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Sample records for advanced silicon nitride

  1. Improved silicon nitride for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Hun C.; Fang, Ho T.

    1987-01-01

    The technology base required to fabricate silicon nitride components with the strength, reliability, and reproducibility necessary for actual heat engine applications is presented. Task 2 was set up to develop test bars with high Weibull slope and greater high temperature strength, and to conduct an initial net shape component fabrication evaluation. Screening experiments were performed in Task 7 on advanced materials and processing for input to Task 2. The technical efforts performed in the second year of a 5-yr program are covered. The first iteration of Task 2 was completed as planned. Two half-replicated, fractional factorial (2 sup 5), statistically designed matrix experiments were conducted. These experiments have identified Denka 9FW Si3N4 as an alternate raw material to GTE SN502 Si3N4 for subsequent process evaluation. A detailed statistical analysis was conducted to correlate processing conditions with as-processed test bar properties. One processing condition produced a material with a 97 ksi average room temperature MOR (100 percent of goal) with 13.2 Weibull slope (83 percent of goal); another condition produced 86 ksi (6 percent over baseline) room temperature strength with a Weibull slope of 20 (125 percent of goal).

  2. Improved silicon nitride for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Wimmer, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Silicon nitride is a high temperature material currently under consideration for heat engine and other applications. The objective is to improve the net shape fabrication technology of Si3N4 by injection molding. This is to be accomplished by optimizing the process through a series of statistically designed matrix experiments. To provide input to the matrix experiments, a wide range of alternate materials and processing parameters was investigated throughout the whole program. The improvement in the processing is to be demonstrated by a 20 percent increase in strength and a 100 percent increase in the Weibull modulus over that of the baseline material. A full characterization of the baseline process was completed. Material properties were found to be highly dependent on each step of the process. Several important parameters identified thus far are the starting raw materials, sinter/hot isostatic pressing cycle, powder bed, mixing methods, and sintering aid levels.

  3. Improved silicon nitride for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Harry C.; Fang, Ho T.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a four year program to improve the strength and reliability of injection-molded silicon nitride are summarized. Statistically designed processing experiments were performed to identify and optimize critical processing parameters and compositions. Process improvements were monitored by strength testing at room and elevated temperatures, and microstructural characterization by optical, scanning electron microscopes, and scanning transmission electron microscope. Processing modifications resulted in a 20 percent strength and 72 percent Weibull slope improvement of the baseline material. Additional sintering aids screening and optimization experiments succeeded in developing a new composition (GN-10) capable of 581.2 MPa at 1399 C. A SiC whisker toughened composite using this material as a matrix achieved a room temperature toughness of 6.9 MPa m(exp .5) by the Chevron notched bar technique. Exploratory experiments were conducted on injection molding of turbocharger rotors.

  4. Improved silicon nitride for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Wimmer, J. M.; Huang, H. H.; Rorabaugh, M. E.; Schienle, J.; Styhr, K. H.

    1985-01-01

    The AiResearch Casting Company baseline silicon nitride (92 percent GTE SN-502 Si sub 3 N sub 4 plus 6 percent Y sub 2 O sub 3 plus 2 percent Al sub 2 O sub 3) was characterized with methods that included chemical analysis, oxygen content determination, electrophoresis, particle size distribution analysis, surface area determination, and analysis of the degree of agglomeration and maximum particle size of elutriated powder. Test bars were injection molded and processed through sintering at 0.68 MPa (100 psi) of nitrogen. The as-sintered test bars were evaluated by X-ray phase analysis, room and elevated temperature modulus of rupture strength, Weibull modulus, stress rupture, strength after oxidation, fracture origins, microstructure, and density from quantities of samples sufficiently large to generate statistically valid results. A series of small test matrices were conducted to study the effects and interactions of processing parameters which included raw materials, binder systems, binder removal cycles, injection molding temperatures, particle size distribution, sintering additives, and sintering cycle parameters.

  5. Analytical and experimental evaluation of joining silicon carbide to silicon carbide and silicon nitride to silicon nitride for advanced heat engine applications Phase 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, G.J.; Vartabedian, A.M.; Wade, J.A.; White, C.S.

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of joining, Phase 2 was to develop joining technologies for HIP`ed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with 4wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (NCX-5101) and for a siliconized SiC (NT230) for various geometries including: butt joins, curved joins and shaft to disk joins. In addition, more extensive mechanical characterization of silicon nitride joins to enhance the predictive capabilities of the analytical/numerical models for structural components in advanced heat engines was provided. Mechanical evaluation were performed by: flexure strength at 22 C and 1,370 C, stress rupture at 1,370 C, high temperature creep, 22 C tensile testing and spin tests. While the silicon nitride joins were produced with sufficient integrity for many applications, the lower join strength would limit its use in the more severe structural applications. Thus, the silicon carbide join quality was deemed unsatisfactory to advance to more complex, curved geometries. The silicon carbide joining methods covered within this contract, although not entirely successful, have emphasized the need to focus future efforts upon ways to obtain a homogeneous, well sintered parent/join interface prior to siliconization. In conclusion, the improved definition of the silicon carbide joining problem obtained by efforts during this contract have provided avenues for future work that could successfully obtain heat engine quality joins.

  6. Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Joining Silicon Carbide to Silicon Carbide and Silicon Nitride to Silicon Nitride for Advanced Heat Engine Applications Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    Techniques were developed to produce reliable silicon nitride to silicon nitride (NCX-5101) curved joins which were used to manufacture spin test specimens as a proof of concept to simulate parts such as a simple rotor. Specimens were machined from the curved joins to measure the following properties of the join interlayer: tensile strength, shear strength, 22 C flexure strength and 1370 C flexure strength. In parallel, extensive silicon nitride tensile creep evaluation of planar butt joins provided a sufficient data base to develop models with accurate predictive capability for different geometries. Analytical models applied satisfactorily to the silicon nitride joins were Norton's Law for creep strain, a modified Norton's Law internal variable model and the Monkman-Grant relationship for failure modeling. The Theta Projection method was less successful. Attempts were also made to develop planar butt joins of siliconized silicon carbide (NT230).

  7. Advanced optical modelling of dynamically deposited silicon nitride layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borojevic, N.; Hameiri, Z.; Winderbaum, S.

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic deposition of silicon nitrides using in-line plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition systems results in non-uniform structure of the dielectric layer. Appropriate analysis of such layers requires the optical characterization to be performed as a function of the layer's depth. This work presents a method to characterize dynamically deposited silicon nitride layers. The method is based on the fitting of experimental spectroscopic ellipsometry data via grading of Tauc-Lorentz optical parameters through the depth of the layer. When compared with the standard Tauc-Lorentz fitting procedure, used in previous studies, the improved method is demonstrating better quality fits to the experimental data and revealing more accurate optical properties of the dielectric layers. The most significant advantage of the method is the ability to extract the depth profile of the optical properties along the direction of the layer normal. This is enabling a better understanding of layers deposited using dynamic plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition systems frequently used in the photovoltaic industry.

  8. Small, short and long fatigue crack growth in an advanced silicon nitride ceramic material

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.H.; Edwards, L.

    1996-05-15

    In metallic materials, a number of workers have reported that the growth rates of small fatigue cracks cannot be correlated with the stress intensity factor range, {Delta}K. Small cracks normally exhibit faster growth rates than long cracks and often show growth rate minima. This anomalous behavior has been attributed to the failure of the linear elastic fracture mechanics parameter {Delta}K to characterize small, or short fatigue crack growth. Ceramic materials combine a lack of dislocation deformation and a very small grain size and thus the reasons for any observed anomalous small or short crack growth effect are less clear. Previous work on small or short fatigue crack growth in ceramics is limited, and work on silicon nitride which is one of the most promising structural ceramics is particularly sparse. As the majority of the fatigue lifetime of any silicon nitride component will be controlled by the propagation of a preexisting small flaw to a critical size, the presence of any short or small crack effect in this material is of engineering importance. Thus, the objective of the work presented here is to investigate the small, short and long crack growth in an advanced silicon nitride material.

  9. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-06-11

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  10. Analytical and experimental evaluation of joining silicon nitride to metal and silicon carbide to metal for advanced heat engine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.; Selverian, J.H.; Kim, H.; O'Niel, D.; Kim, K. )

    1990-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of Phase I of Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Joining Silicon Nitride to Metal and Silicon Carbide to Metal and Silicon Carbide to Metal for Advanced Heat Engine Applications. A general methodology was developed to optimize the joint geometry and material systems for 650 and 950{degree}C applications. Failure criteria were derived to predict the fracture of the braze and ceramic. Extensive finite element analyses (FEA), using ABAQUS code, were performed to examine various joint geometries and to evaluate the affect of different interlayers on the residual stress state. Also, material systems composed of coating materials, interlayers, and braze alloys were developed for the program based on the chemical stability and strength of the joints during processing and service. Finally, the FEA results were compared with experiments using an idealized strength relationship. The results showed that the measured strength of the joint reached 30--90% of the strength by predicted by FEA. Overall results demonstrated that FEA is an effective tool for designing the geometries of ceramic-metal joints and that joining by brazing is a relevant method for advanced heat engine applications. 33 refs., 54 figs., 36 tabs.

  11. Dissolution of bulk specimens of silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. F.; Merkle, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    An accurate chemical characterization of silicon nitride has become important in connection with current efforts to incorporate components of this material into advanced heat engines. However, there are problems concerning a chemical analysis of bulk silicon nitride. Current analytical methods require the pulverization of bulk specimens. A pulverization procedure making use of grinding media, on the other hand, will introduce contaminants. A description is given of a dissolution procedure which overcomes these difficulties. It has been found that up to at least 0.6 g solid pieces of various samples of hot pressed and reaction bonded silicon nitride can be decomposed in a mixture of 3 mL hydrofluoric acid and 1 mL nitric acid overnight at 150 C in a Parr bomb. High-purity silicon nitride is completely soluble in nitric acid after treatment in the bomb. Following decomposition, silicon and hydrofluoric acid are volatilized and insoluble fluorides are converted to a soluble form.

  12. Cordierite silicon nitride filters

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, J.; Buchan, B. ); Duiven, R.; Berger, M. ); Cleveland, J.; Ferri, J. )

    1992-02-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a silicon nitride based crossflow filter. This report summarizes the findings and results of the project. The project was phased with Phase I consisting of filter material development and crossflow filter design. Phase II involved filter manufacturing, filter testing under simulated conditions and reporting the results. In Phase I, Cordierite Silicon Nitride (CSN) was developed and tested for permeability and strength. Target values for each of these parameters were established early in the program. The values were met by the material development effort in Phase I. The crossflow filter design effort proceeded by developing a macroscopic design based on required surface area and estimated stresses. Then the thermal and pressure stresses were estimated using finite element analysis. In Phase II of this program, the filter manufacturing technique was developed, and the manufactured filters were tested. The technique developed involved press-bonding extruded tiles to form a filter, producing a monolithic filter after sintering. Filters manufactured using this technique were tested at Acurex and at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center. The filters did not delaminate during testing and operated and high collection efficiency and good cleanability. Further development in areas of sintering and filter design is recommended.

  13. Producing Silicon Carbide/Silicon Nitride Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Manufacturing process makes CxSiyNz fibers. Precursor fibers spun from extruding machine charged with polycarbosilazane resin. When pyrolyzed, resin converted to cross-linked mixture of silicon carbide and silicon nitride, still in fiber form. CxSiyNz fibers promising substitutes for carbon fibers in high-strength, low-weight composites where high electrical conductivity unwanted.

  14. Silicon Nitride Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Pazhayannur; Brown, Robert

    2015-06-01

    This report presents the development a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4) . Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonalβ-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products and then combined with the single component solid models to study the global phase diagram. Sponsored by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Living With a Star program office.

  15. Method for producing silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-07-23

    Silicon carbide/silicon nitride composites are prepared by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and optionally crsytalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen.

  16. Synthesis of cubic silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerr, Andreas; Miehe, Gerhard; Serghiou, George; Schwarz, Marcus; Kroke, Edwin; Riedel, Ralf; Fueß, Hartmut; Kroll, Peter; Boehler, Reinhard

    1999-07-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) is used in a variety of important technological applications. The high fracture toughness, hardness and wear resistance of Si3N4-based ceramics are exploited in cutting tools and anti-friction bearings; in electronic applications, Si3N4 is used as an insulating, masking and passivating material. Two polymorphs of silicon nitride are known, both of hexagonal structure: α- and β-Si3N4. Here we report the synthesis of a third polymorph of silicon nitride, which has a cubic spinel structure. This new phase, c-Si3N4, is formed at pressures above 15GPa and temperatures exceeding 2,000K, yet persists metastably in air at ambient pressure to at least 700K. First-principles calculations of the properties of this phase suggest that the hardness of c-Si3N4 should be comparable to that of the hardest known oxide (stishovite, a high-pressure phase of SiO2), and significantly greater than the hardness of the two hexagonal polymorphs.

  17. Analytical and experimental evaluation of joining silicon nitride to metal and silicon carbide to metal for advanced heat engine applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.; Selverian, J.H.; O`Neil, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, K.

    1993-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of Phase 2 of Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Joining Silicon Nitride to Metal and Silicon Carbide to Metal for Advanced Heat Engine Applications. A general methodology was developed to optimize the joint geometry and material systems for 650{degrees}C applications. Failure criteria were derived to predict the fracture of the braze and ceramic. Extensive finite element analyses (FEA) were performed to examine various joint geometries and to evaluate the affect of different interlayers on the residual stress state. Also, material systems composed of coating materials, interlayers, and braze alloys were developed for the program based on the chemical stability and strength of the joints during processing, and service. The FEA results were compared with experiments using two methods: (1) an idealized strength relationship of the ceramic, and (2) a probabilistic analysis of the ceramic strength (NASA CARES). The results showed that the measured strength of the joint reached 30--80% of the strength predicted by FEA. Also, potential high-temperature braze alloys were developed and evaluated for the high-temperature application of ceramic-metal joints. 38 tabs, 29 figs, 20 refs.

  18. Studies of silicon carbide and silicon carbide nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Zhila

    Silicon carbide semiconductor technology is continuing to advance rapidly. The excellent physical and electronic properties of silicon carbide recently take itself to be the main focused power device material for high temperature, high power, and high frequency electronic devices because of its large band gap, high thermal conductivity, and high electron saturation drift velocity. SiC is more stable than Si because of its high melting point and mechanical strength. Also the understanding of the structure and properties of semiconducting thin film alloys is one of the fundamental steps toward their successful application in technologies requiring materials with tunable energy gaps, such as solar cells, flat panel displays, optical memories and anti-reflecting coatings. Silicon carbide and silicon nitrides are promising materials for novel semiconductor applications because of their band gaps. In addition, they are "hard" materials in the sense of having high elastic constants and large cohesive energies and are generally resistant to harsh environment, including radiation. In this research, thin films of silicon carbide and silicon carbide nitride were deposited in a r.f magnetron sputtering system using a SiC target. A detailed analysis of the surface chemistry of the deposited films was performed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy whereas structure and morphology was studied atomic force microscopy (AFM), and nonoindentation.

  19. Manufacture of sintered silicon nitrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwai, T.

    1985-01-01

    Sintered silicon nitrides are manufactured by sintering Si3N powder containing 2 to 15% in wt of a powder mixture composed of nitride powder of lanthanide or Y 100 parts and AIN powder less than 100 parts at 1500 to 1900 deg. temperature under a pressure of less than 200 Kg/sq. cm. The sintered Si3N has high mechanical strength in high temperature. Thus, Si3N4 93.0, Y 5.0 and AlN 2.0% in weight were wet mixed in acetone in N atom, molded and sintered at 1750 deg. and 1000 Kg/sq. cm. to give a sintered body having high hardness.

  20. Colloidal characterization of ultrafine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of various powder treatment strategies on the colloid chemistry of aqueous dispersions of silicon carbide and silicon nitride are examined using a surface titration methodology. Pretreatments are used to differentiate between the true surface chemistry of the powders and artifacts resulting from exposure history. Silicon nitride powders require more extensive pretreatment to reveal consistent surface chemistry than do silicon carbide powders. As measured by titration, the degree of proton adsorption from the suspending fluid by pretreated silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can both be made similar to that of silica.

  1. Silicon Nitride Membranes for Filtration and Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, Paul; Zavadil, Kevin; Shul, Randy; Willison, Christi Gober; Miller, Sam

    1999-07-19

    Semi-Permeable silicon nitride membranes have been developed using a Bosch etch process followed by a reactive ion etch (NE) process. These membranes were observed to allow air but not water to pass through them into surface micromachined, silicon nitride microfluidic channels. Membranes with this property have potential use in microfluidic systems as gas bubble traps and vents, filters to remove particles and gas partitioning membranes. Membrane permeation was measured as 1.6 x 10{sup {minus}8} mol/m{sup 2}Pa s of helium for inline membranes at the entrance and exit of the silicon nitride microfluidic channels.

  2. Joining of silicon nitrides using oxynitride glasses

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, M.H.

    1993-03-01

    This report presents a study on commercial silicon nitrides that were successfully joined using oxynitride glasses. Sintered silicon nitride was joined by either closed or glass-filled joints. Glass-filled joints were successfully used on hot-pressed silicon nitrides and were comparable in fast fracture strength to unjoined silicon nitrides up to approximately 1000C. Above that temperature, strengths decreased rapidly and glass flow failure began. The study observed that time-dependent failure currently limits the service temperatures of glass-filled joints. Creep failure occurred in excess of 1000C. Between 900 and 1000C, slow crack growth failure was observed. Cavitation (or viscous deformation) was the rate-controlling mechanism of slow crack growth.

  3. Silicon nitride reinforced with molybdenum disilicide

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    Compositions of matter comprised of silicon nitride and molybdenum disilicide and methods of making the compositions, where the molybdenum disilicide is present in amounts ranging from about 5 to about 50 vol. %.

  4. Silicon nitride ceramic having high fatigue life and high toughness

    DOEpatents

    Yeckley, Russell L.

    1996-01-01

    A sintered silicon nitride ceramic comprising between about 0.6 mol % and about 3.2 mol % rare earth as rare earth oxide, and between about 85 w/o and about 95 w/o beta silicon nitride grains, wherein at least about 20% of the beta silicon nitride grains have a thickness of greater than about 1 micron.

  5. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite densified materials prepared using composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1997-07-01

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  6. Infrared bolometers with silicon nitride micromesh absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, J. J.; Turner, A. D.; DelCastillo, H. M.; Beeman, J. W.; Lange, A. E.; Mauskopf, P. D.

    1996-01-01

    Sensitive far infrared and millimeter wave bolometers fabricated from a freestanding membrane of low stress silicon nitride are reported. The absorber, consisting of a metallized silicon nitride micromesh thermally isolated by radial legs of silicon nitride, is placed in an integrating cavity to efficiently couple to single mode or multiple mode infrared radiation. This structure provides low heat capacity, low thermal conduction and minimal cross section to energetic particles. A neutron transmutation doped Ge thermister is bump bonded to the center of the device and read out with evaporated Cr-Au leads. The limiting performance of the micromesh absorber is discussed and the recent results obtained from a 300 mK cold stage are summarized.

  7. Evaluation of silicon-nitride ceramic valves.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J. G.; Zhang, J. M.; Andrews, M. J.; Tretheway, J. S.; Phillips, N. S .L.; Jensen, J. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Univ. of Texas; Caterpillar, Inc.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon-nitride ceramic valves can improve the performance of both light- and heavy-duty automotive engines because of the superior material properties of silicon nitrides over current metal alloys. However, ceramics are brittle materials that may introduce uncertainties in the reliability and durability of ceramic valves. As a result, the lifetime of ceramic valves are difficult to predict theoretically due to wide variations in the type and distribution of microstructural flaws in the material. Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods are therefore required to assess the quality and reliability of these valves. Because ceramic materials are optically translucent and the strength-limiting flaws are normally located near the valve surface, a laser-scatter method can be used for NDE evaluation of ceramic valves. This paper reviews the progress in the development of this NDE method and its application to inspect silicon-nitride ceramic valves at various stages of manufacturing and bench and engine tests.

  8. Silicon-nitride and metal composite

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.; Huffsmith, Sarah A.

    1981-01-01

    A composite and a method for bonding the composite. The composite includes a ceramic portion of silicon nitride, a refractory metal portion and a layer of MoSi.sub.2 indirectly bonding the composite together. The method includes contacting the layer of MoSi.sub.2 with a surface of the silicon nitride and with a surface of the metal; heating the layer to a temperature below 1400.degree. C.; and, simultaneously with the heating, compressing the layer such that the contacting is with a pressure of at least 30 MPa. This composite overcomes useful life problems in the fabrication of parts for a helical expander for use in power generation.

  9. Silicon-nitride and metal composite

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.; Huffsmith, S.A.

    A composite and a method for bonding the composite are described. The composite includes a ceramic portion of silicon nitride, a refractory metal portion and a layer of MoSi/sub 2/ indirectly bonding the composite together. The method includes contacting the layer of MoSi/sub 2/ with a surface of the silicon nitride and with a surface of the metal; heating the layer to a temperature below 1400/sup 0/C; and, simultaneously, compressing the layer such that the contacting is with a pressure of at least 30 MPa. This composite overcomes useful life problems in the fabrication of parts for a helical expander for use in power generation.

  10. Abrasion resistant silicon nitride based articles

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, V.K.; Buijan, S.T.; Penty, R.A.

    1984-02-28

    A composite article and cutting tool are prepared by densification to form a body consisting essentially of particles of hard refractory material uniformly distributed in a matrix consisting essentially of a first phase and a second phase, said first phase consisting essentially of crystalline silicon nitride and said second phase being an intergranular refractory phase comprising silicon nitride and a suitable densification aid selected from the group consisting of yttrium oxide, zirconium oxide, hafnium oxide and the lanthanade rare earth oxides and mixture thereof.

  11. Wetting and infiltration of nitride bonded silicon nitride by liquid silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, V.; Reimann, C.; Friedrich, J.

    2016-04-01

    Nitride bonded silicon nitride (NBSN) is a promising crucible material for the repeated use in the directional solidification of multicrystalline (mc) silicon ingots for photovoltaic applications. Due to wetting and infiltration, however, silicon nitride in its initial state does not offer the desired reusability. In this work the sessile drop method is used to systematically study the wetting and infiltration behavior of NBSN after applying different oxidation procedures. It is found that the wetting of the NBSN crucible by liquid silicon can be prevented by the oxidation of the geometrical surface. The infiltration of liquid silicon into the porous crucible can be suppressed by oxygen enrichment within the volume of the NBSN, i.e. at the pore walls of the crucibles. The realized reusability of the NBSN is demonstrated by reusing a NBSN crucible six times for the directional solidification of undoped multicrystalline silicon ingots.

  12. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Baik, Sunggi

    1984-12-11

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  13. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1984-12-11

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  14. Slip casting and nitridation of silicon powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiko, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Powdered Silicon was slip-cast with a CaSO4 x 0.5H2O mold and nitrided in a N atm. containing 0 or 5 vol. % H at 1000 to 1420 deg. To remove the castings, the modeling faces were coated successively with an aq. salt soap and powdered cellulose containing Na alginate, and thus prevented the sticking problem.

  15. Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Pujari, Vimal K.; Tracey, Dennis M.; Foley, Michael R.; Paille, Norman I.; Pelletier, Paul J.; Sales, Lenny C.; Willkens, Craig A.; Yeckley, Russell L.

    1996-01-01

    A silicon nitride ceramic comprising: a) inclusions no greater than 25 microns in length, b) agglomerates no greater than 20 microns in diameter, and c) a surface finish of less than about 8 microinches, said ceramic having a four-point flexural strength of at least about 900 MPa.

  16. Silicon nitride having a high tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Pujari, V.K.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.; Paille, N.I.; Pelletier, P.J.; Sales, L.C.; Willkens, C.A.; Yeckley, R.L.

    1996-11-05

    A silicon nitride ceramic is disclosed comprising: (a) inclusions no greater than 25 microns in length, (b) agglomerates no greater than 20 microns in diameter, and (c) a surface finish of less than about 8 microinches, said ceramic having a four-point flexural strength of at least about 900 MPa. 4 figs.

  17. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  18. Investigations of silicon nitride films for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Elmiger, J.R.; Kunst, M.

    1996-12-31

    Silicon nitride films on crystalline silicon were deposited in a low-temperature (<400 C) Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition process. The deposition process is monitored with in situ Time Resolved Microwave Conductivity measurements leading to an on-line quality control of the deposited films. It is shown that at the start of the deposition there is a strong decrease of the lifetime of the measured transient signal due to plasma induced damage at the silicon surface. Afterwards an increase of the lifetime is observed due to passivation of the interface. For thin films (<30 nm), the lifetime and the film composition depend on the film thickness. Furthermore, the film composition has a strong impact on the passivation of thick (100 nm) silicon nitride films. The best passivation is obtained for almost stoichiometric films characterized by a refractive index of 1.95.

  19. Integrated silicon and silicon nitride photonic circuits on flexible substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Li, Mo

    2014-06-15

    Flexible integrated photonic devices based on crystalline materials on plastic substrates have a promising potential in many unconventional applications. In this Letter, we demonstrate a fully integrated photonic system including ring resonators and grating couplers, based on both crystalline silicon and silicon nitride, on flexible plastic substrate by using the stamping-transfer method. A high yield has been achieved by a simple, yet reliable transfer method without significant performance degradation.

  20. Molybdenum enhanced low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Lowden, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for chemical vapor deposition of crystalline silicon nitride which comprises the steps of: introducing a mixture of a silicon source, a molybdenum source, a nitrogen source, and a hydrogen source into a vessel containing a suitable substrate; and thermally decomposing the mixture to deposit onto the substrate a coating comprising crystalline silicon nitride containing a dispersion of molybdenum silicide.

  1. Quantum electromechanics on silicon nitride nanomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, J. M.; Kalaee, M.; Pitanti, A.; Norte, R.; Heinzle, L.; Davanço, M.; Srinivasan, K.; Painter, O.

    2016-08-01

    Radiation pressure has recently been used to effectively couple the quantum motion of mechanical elements to the fields of optical or microwave light. Integration of all three degrees of freedom--mechanical, optical and microwave--would enable a quantum interconnect between microwave and optical quantum systems. We present a platform based on silicon nitride nanomembranes for integrating superconducting microwave circuits with planar acoustic and optical devices such as phononic and photonic crystals. Using planar capacitors with vacuum gaps of 60 nm and spiral inductor coils of micron pitch we realize microwave resonant circuits with large electromechanical coupling to planar acoustic structures of nanoscale dimensions and femtoFarad motional capacitance. Using this enhanced coupling, we demonstrate microwave backaction cooling of the 4.48 MHz mechanical resonance of a nanobeam to an occupancy as low as 0.32. These results indicate the viability of silicon nitride nanomembranes as an all-in-one substrate for quantum electro-opto-mechanical experiments.

  2. Cyclic fatigue in silicon nitride ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, G.; Kawabe, Y. . Tsukuba Lab.); Horibe, S. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    Static and cyclic fatigue behavior was investigated for two kinds of silicon nitride with different microstructures. These materials hardly show rising R-curve behavior. Nevertheless the considerable cyclic loading effect is obviously recognized in them. There has been observed an insignificant difference in the pure cyclic loading effect between coarse grained silicon nitride (SSN-1) and fine grained one (SSN-2). In addition, crack growth rate shows a transient acceleration or retardation when variable-amplitude cyclic loading is applied to SSN-1. Such a result implies the existence of a process zone near a crack tip which has a similar function to plastic zone in metals. Since the above cyclic crack behavior is inexplicable by the grain bridging degradation mechanisms, possible cyclic fatigue mechanisms are, thus, discussed.

  3. Silicon Nitride Antireflection Coatings for Photovoltaic Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C.; Wydeven, T.; Donohoe, K.

    1984-01-01

    Chemical-vapor deposition adapted to yield graded index of refraction. Silicon nitride deposited in layers, refractive index of which decreases with distance away from cell/coating interface. Changing index of refraction allows adjustment of spectral transmittance for wavelengths which cell is most effective at converting light to electric current. Average conversion efficiency of solar cells increased from 8.84 percent to 12.63 percent.

  4. Mirowave annealing of silicon nitride materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kiggans, J.O. Jr.; Montgomery, F.C.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1997-08-01

    Dense silicon nitride-based ceramics were microwave annealed to determine if microwave heating offers advantages over conventional heating for the enhancement of the high temperature creep resistance. Gas pressure sintered silicon nitride (GPS-SN) and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN) were heated in microwave or graphite element furnaces at 1150{degrees}C and 1600{degrees}C. Annealed materials were characterized for the room and high temperature flexural strengths, room temperature fracture toughness values, and high temperature creep properties. In addition, SEM analyses were performed to study grain growth and other microstructural changes. The results of this study showed that both types of furnace anneals at 1150{degrees}C lowered the room temperature strength and toughness values of both SRBSN and GPS-SN materials; however, the anneal treatments at 1600{degrees}C had little effect on the room temperature properties. Both the SRBSN and GPS-SN control and annealed samples had reduced high temperature fast fracture strengths, when compared to the room temperature strengths. Creep tests at 1200{degrees}C indicated that both the SRBSN and the GPS-SN materials that were annealed by microwave heating at I 150{degrees}C for 20 h showed enhanced creep resistance, when compared to unheated controls and conventionally heated materials. No qualitative differences were seen in the microstructures of the SRBSN and the GPS-SN materials which could account for the differences in the creep properties of the annealed materials. Additional experimental work is in progress to further understand the mechanisms for the enhanced creep properties of silicon nitride materials annealed by microwave heating.

  5. Silicon Nitride Balls For Cryogenic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butner, Myles F.; Ng, Lillian W.

    1990-01-01

    Resistance to wear greater than that of 440C steel. Experiments show lives of ball bearings immersed in liquid nitrogen or liquid oxygen increased significantly when 440C steel balls (running on 440C steel races) replaced by balls of silicon nitride. Developed for use at high temperatures, where lubrication poor or nonexistent. Best wear life of any bearing tested to date and ball material spalls without fracturing. Plans for future tests call for use of liquid oxygen as working fluid.

  6. Apparatus for silicon nitride precursor solids recovery

    DOEpatents

    Crosbie, Gary M.; Predmesky, Ronald L.; Nicholson, John M.

    1995-04-04

    Method and apparatus are provided for collecting reaction product solids entrained in a gaseous outflow from a reaction situs, wherein the gaseous outflow includes a condensable vapor. A condensate is formed of the condensable vapor on static mixer surfaces within a static mixer heat exchanger. The entrained reaction product solids are captured in the condensate which can be collected for further processing, such as return to the reaction situs. In production of silicon imide, optionally integrated into a production process for making silicon nitride caramic, wherein reactant feed gas comprising silicon halide and substantially inert carrier gas is reacted with liquid ammonia in a reaction vessel, silicon imide reaction product solids entrained in a gaseous outflow comprising residual carrier gas and vaporized ammonia can be captured by forming a condensate of the ammonia vapor on static mixer surfaces of a static mixer heat exchanger.

  7. Method for silicon nitride precursor solids recovery

    DOEpatents

    Crosbie, Gary M.; Predmesky, Ronald L.; Nicholson, John M.

    1992-12-15

    Method and apparatus are provided for collecting reaction product solids entrained in a gaseous outflow from a reaction situs, wherein the gaseous outflow includes a condensable vapor. A condensate is formed of the condensable vapor on static mixer surfaces within a static mixer heat exchanger. The entrained reaction product solids are captured in the condensate which can be collected for further processing, such as return to the reaction situs. In production of silicon imide, optionally integrated into a production process for making silicon nitride caramic, wherein reactant feed gas comprising silicon halide and substantially inert carrier gas is reacted with liquid ammonia in a reaction vessel, silicon imide reaction product solids entrained in a gaseous outflow comprising residual carrier gas and vaporized ammonia can be captured by forming a condensate of the ammonia vapor on static mixer surfaces of a static mixer heat exchanger.

  8. Vertical integration of high-Q silicon nitride microresonators into silicon-on-insulator platform.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Eftekhar, Ali A; Sodagar, Majid; Xia, Zhixuan; Atabaki, Amir H; Adibi, Ali

    2013-07-29

    We demonstrate a vertical integration of high-Q silicon nitride microresonators into the silicon-on-insulator platform for applications at the telecommunication wavelengths. Low-loss silicon nitride films with a thickness of 400 nm are successfully grown, enabling compact silicon nitride microresonators with ultra-high intrinsic Qs (~ 6 × 10(6) for 60 μm radius and ~ 2 × 10(7) for 240 μm radius). The coupling between the silicon nitride microresonator and the underneath silicon waveguide is based on evanescent coupling with silicon dioxide as buffer. Selective coupling to a desired radial mode of the silicon nitride microresonator is also achievable using a pulley coupling scheme. In this work, a 60-μm-radius silicon nitride microresonator has been successfully integrated into the silicon-on-insulator platform, showing a single-mode operation with an intrinsic Q of 2 × 10(6).

  9. Process for manufacture of semipermeable silicon nitride membranes

    DOEpatents

    Galambos, Paul Charles; Shul, Randy J.; Willison, Christi Gober

    2003-12-09

    A new class of semipermeable membranes, and techniques for their fabrication, have been developed. These membranes, formed by appropriate etching of a deposited silicon nitride layer, are robust, easily manufacturable, and compatible with a wide range of silicon micromachining techniques.

  10. The Effect of Polymer Char on Nitridation Kinetics of Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Rickmond C.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1994-01-01

    Effects of polymer char on nitridation kinetics of attrition milled silicon powder have been investigated from 1200 to 1350 C. Results indicate that at and above 1250 C, the silicon compacts containing 3.5 wt percent polymer char were fully converted to Si3N4 after 24 hr exposure in nitrogen. In contrast, the silicon compacts without polymer char could not be fully converted to Si3N4 at 1350 C under similar exposure conditions. At 1250 and 1350 C, the silicon compacts with polymer char showed faster nitridation kinetics than those without the polymer char. As the polymer char content is increased, the amount of SiC in the nitrided material is also increased. By adding small amounts (approx. 2.5 wt percent) of NiO, the silicon compacts containing polymer char can be completely nitrided at 1200 C. The probable mechanism for the accelerated nitridation of silicon containing polymer char is discussed.

  11. High temperature mechanical performance of a hot isostatically pressed silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, A.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Jenkins, M.G.; Lin, C.K.J.

    1996-01-01

    Silicon nitride ceramics are an attractive material of choice for designers and manufacturers of advanced gas turbine engine components for many reasons. These materials typically have potentially high temperatures of usefulness (up to 1400{degrees}C), are chemically inert, have a relatively low specific gravity (important for inertial effects), and are good thermal conductors (i.e., resistant to thermal shock). In order for manufacturers to take advantage of these inherent properties of silicon nitride, the high-temperature mechanical performance of the material must first be characterized. The mechanical response of silicon nitride to static, dynamic, and cyclic conditions at elevated temperatures, along with reliable and representative data, is critical information that gas turbine engine designers and manufacturers require for the confident insertion of silicon nitride components into gas turbine engines. This final report describes the high-temperature mechanical characterization and analyses that were conducted on a candidate structural silicon nitride ceramic. The high-temperature strength, static fatigue (creep rupture), and dynamic and cyclic fatigue performance were characterized. The efforts put forth were part of Work Breakdown Structure Subelement 3.2.1, {open_quotes}Rotor Data Base Generation.{close_quotes} PY6 is comparable to other hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) silicon nitrides currently being considered for advanced gas turbine engine applications.

  12. Process for producing amorphous and crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Peter E. D.; Pugar, Eloise A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for producing amorphous or crystalline silicon nitride is disclosed which comprises reacting silicon disulfide ammonia gas at elevated temperature. In a preferred embodiment silicon disulfide in the form of "whiskers" or needles is heated at temperature ranging from about 900.degree. C. to about 1200.degree. C. to produce silicon nitride which retains the whisker or needle morphological characteristics of the silicon disulfide. Silicon carbide, e.g. in the form of whiskers, also can be prepared by reacting substituted ammonia, e.g. methylamine, or a hydrocarbon containing active hydrogen-containing groups, such as ethylene, with silicon disulfide, at elevated temperature, e.g. 900.degree. C.

  13. Process for producing amorphous and crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, P.E.D.; Pugar, E.A.

    1985-11-12

    A process for producing amorphous or crystalline silicon nitride is disclosed which comprises reacting silicon disulfide ammonia gas at elevated temperature. In a preferred embodiment silicon disulfide in the form of whiskers'' or needles is heated at temperature ranging from about 900 C to about 1,200 C to produce silicon nitride which retains the whisker or needle morphological characteristics of the silicon disulfide. Silicon carbide, e.g. in the form of whiskers, also can be prepared by reacting substituted ammonia, e.g. methylamine, or a hydrocarbon containing active hydrogen-containing groups, such as ethylene, with silicon disulfide, at elevated temperature, e.g. 900 C. 6 figs.

  14. Resistance of Silicon Nitride Turbine Components to Erosion and Hot Corrosion/oxidation Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangmen, Thomas E.; Fox, Dennis S.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon nitride turbine components are under intensive development by AlliedSignal to enable a new generation of higher power density auxiliary power systems. In order to be viable in the intended applications, silicon nitride turbine airfoils must be designed for survival in aggressive oxidizing combustion gas environments. Erosive and corrosive damage to ceramic airfoils from ingested sand and sea salt must be avoided. Recent engine test experience demonstrated that NT154 silicon nitride turbine vanes have exceptional resistance to sand erosion, relative to superalloys used in production engines. Similarly, NT154 silicon nitride has excellent resistance to oxidation in the temperature range of interest - up to 1400 C. Hot corrosion attack of superalloy gas turbine components is well documented. While hot corrosion from ingested sea salt will attack silicon nitride substantially less than the superalloys being replaced in initial engine applications, this degradation has the potential to limit component lives in advanced engine applications. Hot corrosion adversely affects the strength of silicon nitride in the 850 to 1300 C range. Since unacceptable reductions in strength must be rapidly identified and avoided, AlliedSignal and the NASA Lewis Research Center have pioneered the development of an environmental life prediction model for silicon nitride turbine components. Strength retention in flexure specimens following 1 to 3300 hour exposures to high temperature oxidation and hot corrosion has been measured and used to calibrate the life prediction model. Predicted component life is dependent upon engine design (stress, temperature, pressure, fuel/air ratio, gas velocity, and inlet air filtration), mission usage (fuel sulfur content, location (salt in air), and times at duty cycle power points), and material parameters. Preliminary analyses indicate that the hot corrosion resistance of NT154 silicon nitride is adequate for AlliedSignal's initial engine

  15. Sputtered silicon nitride coatings for wear protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1982-01-01

    Silicon nitride films were deposited by RF sputtering on 304 stainless steel substrates in a planar RF sputtering apparatus. The sputtering was performed from a Si3N4 target in a sputtering atmosphere of argon and nitrogen. The rate of deposition, the composition of the coatings, the surface microhardness and the adhesion of the coatings to the substrates were investigated as a function of the process parameters, such as: substrate target distance, fraction nitrogen in the sputtering atmosphere and sputtering pressure. Silicon rich coating was obtained for fraction nitrogen below 0.2. The rate of deposition decreases continuously with increasing fraction nitrogen and decreasing sputtering pressure. It was found that the adherence of the coatings improves with decreasing sputtering pressure, almost independently of their composition.

  16. Nanoporous silicon nitride membranes fabricated from porous nanocrystalline silicon templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desormeaux, J. P. S.; Winans, J. D.; Wayson, S. E.; Gaborski, T. R.; Khire, T. S.; Striemer, C. C.; McGrath, J. L.

    2014-08-01

    The extraordinary permeability and manufacturability of ultrathin silicon-based membranes are enabling devices with improved performance and smaller sizes in such important areas as molecular filtration and sensing, cell culture, electroosmotic pumping, and hemodialysis. Because of the robust chemical and mechanical properties of silicon nitride (SiN), several laboratories have developed techniques for patterning nanopores in SiN using reactive ion etching (RIE) through a template structure. These methods however, have failed to produce pores small enough for ultrafiltration (<100 nm) in SiN and involve templates that are prone to microporous defects. Here we present a facile, wafer-scale method to produce nanoporous silicon nitride (NPN) membranes using porous nanocrystalline silicon (pnc-Si) as a self-assembling, defect free, RIE masking layer. By modifying the mask layer morphology and the RIE etch conditions, the pore sizes of NPN can be adjusted between 40 nm and 80 nm with porosities reaching 40%. The resulting NPN membranes exhibit higher burst pressures than pnc-Si membranes while having 5× greater permeability. NPN membranes also demonstrate the capacity for high resolution separations (<10 nm) seen previously with pnc-Si membranes. We further demonstrate that human endothelial cells can be grown on NPN membranes, verifying the biocompatibility of NPN and demonstrating the potential of this material for cell culture applications.

  17. Molybdenum enhanced low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride

    DOEpatents

    Lowden, R.A.

    1994-04-05

    A process for chemical vapor deposition of crystalline silicon nitride is described which comprises the steps of: introducing a mixture of a silicon source, a molybdenum source, a nitrogen source, and a hydrogen source into a vessel containing a suitable substrate; and thermally decomposing the mixture to deposit onto the substrate a coating comprising crystalline silicon nitride containing a dispersion of molybdenum silicide. 5 figures.

  18. Quantum electromechanics on silicon nitride nanomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Fink, J. M.; Kalaee, M.; Pitanti, A.; Norte, R.; Heinzle, L.; Davanço, M.; Srinivasan, K.; Painter, O.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation pressure has recently been used to effectively couple the quantum motion of mechanical elements to the fields of optical or microwave light. Integration of all three degrees of freedom—mechanical, optical and microwave—would enable a quantum interconnect between microwave and optical quantum systems. We present a platform based on silicon nitride nanomembranes for integrating superconducting microwave circuits with planar acoustic and optical devices such as phononic and photonic crystals. Using planar capacitors with vacuum gaps of 60 nm and spiral inductor coils of micron pitch we realize microwave resonant circuits with large electromechanical coupling to planar acoustic structures of nanoscale dimensions and femtoFarad motional capacitance. Using this enhanced coupling, we demonstrate microwave backaction cooling of the 4.48 MHz mechanical resonance of a nanobeam to an occupancy as low as 0.32. These results indicate the viability of silicon nitride nanomembranes as an all-in-one substrate for quantum electro-opto-mechanical experiments. PMID:27484751

  19. Cordierite silicon nitride filters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, J.; Buchan, B.; Duiven, R.; Berger, M.; Cleveland, J.; Ferri, J.

    1992-02-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a silicon nitride based crossflow filter. This report summarizes the findings and results of the project. The project was phased with Phase I consisting of filter material development and crossflow filter design. Phase II involved filter manufacturing, filter testing under simulated conditions and reporting the results. In Phase I, Cordierite Silicon Nitride (CSN) was developed and tested for permeability and strength. Target values for each of these parameters were established early in the program. The values were met by the material development effort in Phase I. The crossflow filter design effort proceeded by developing a macroscopic design based on required surface area and estimated stresses. Then the thermal and pressure stresses were estimated using finite element analysis. In Phase II of this program, the filter manufacturing technique was developed, and the manufactured filters were tested. The technique developed involved press-bonding extruded tiles to form a filter, producing a monolithic filter after sintering. Filters manufactured using this technique were tested at Acurex and at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center. The filters did not delaminate during testing and operated and high collection efficiency and good cleanability. Further development in areas of sintering and filter design is recommended.

  20. Quantum electromechanics on silicon nitride nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Fink, J M; Kalaee, M; Pitanti, A; Norte, R; Heinzle, L; Davanço, M; Srinivasan, K; Painter, O

    2016-01-01

    Radiation pressure has recently been used to effectively couple the quantum motion of mechanical elements to the fields of optical or microwave light. Integration of all three degrees of freedom-mechanical, optical and microwave-would enable a quantum interconnect between microwave and optical quantum systems. We present a platform based on silicon nitride nanomembranes for integrating superconducting microwave circuits with planar acoustic and optical devices such as phononic and photonic crystals. Using planar capacitors with vacuum gaps of 60 nm and spiral inductor coils of micron pitch we realize microwave resonant circuits with large electromechanical coupling to planar acoustic structures of nanoscale dimensions and femtoFarad motional capacitance. Using this enhanced coupling, we demonstrate microwave backaction cooling of the 4.48 MHz mechanical resonance of a nanobeam to an occupancy as low as 0.32. These results indicate the viability of silicon nitride nanomembranes as an all-in-one substrate for quantum electro-opto-mechanical experiments. PMID:27484751

  1. Development of silicon nitride of improved toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    The application of reaction sintered Si2N4 energy absorbing surface layers to hot-pressed Si3N4 was investigated. The surface layer was formed by in-place nitridation of silicon powder. It was found that reaction sintered Si3N4 layers of 1 mm thickness, fabricated from either -100, +200, -200, or -325 mesh Si powder and nitrided in 96% N2/4% H2 so that approximately 20-25 vol % unnitrided Si remained in the layer, resulted in a sevenfold increase in ballistic impact resistance of a 0.64 cm thick hot-pressed SI3N4 substrate from RT 1370 C. Both NC-132 SI3N4, with MgO additive, and NCX-34 Si3N4, with Y2O3 additive, were evaluated as substrate material. The finer grain size -200 and -325 mesh nitrided Si layers were for their smoothness and relatively high density. It was found that nitriding in N2/H2 mixtures, rather than pure N2, resulted in a microstructure that did not substantially degrade the strength of the hot-pressed Si3N4 substrate. Thermal cycling tests on the RSSN/HPSN combinations from 200 C to 1370 C for 75 cycles in air did not degrade the impact resistance nor the interfacial bonding, although a large amount of internal silica formation occurred within the RSSN layer. Mach 0.8, 5 hr, hot gas erosion tests showed no surface recession of RSSN layers at 1200 C and slight surface recession at 1370 C.

  2. PECVD silicon-rich nitride and low stress nitride films mechanical characterization using membrane point load deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagolini, Alvise; Picciotto, Antonino; Crivellari, Michele; Conci, Paolo; Bellutti, Pierluigi

    2016-02-01

    An analysis of the mechanical properties of plasma enhanced chemical vapor (PECVD) silicon nitrides is presented, using micro fabricated silicon nitride membranes under point load deflection. The membranes are made of PECVD silicon-rich nitride and low stress nitride films. The mechanical performance of the bended membranes is examined both with analytical models and finite element simulation in order to extract the elastic modulus and residual stress values. The elastic modulus of low stress silicon nitride is calculated using stress free analytical models, while for silicon-rich silicon nitride and annealed low stress silicon nitride it is estimated with a pre-stressed model of point-load deflection. The effect of annealing both in nitrogen and hydrogen atmosphere is evaluated in terms of residual stress, refractive index and thickness variation. It is demonstrated that a hydrogen rich annealing atmosphere induces very little change in low stress silicon nitride. Nitrogen annealing effects are measured and shown to be much higher in silicon-rich nitride than in low stress silicon nitride. An estimate of PECVD silicon-rich nitride elastic modulus is obtained in the range between 240-320 GPa for deposited samples and 390 GPa for samples annealed in nitrogen atmosphere. PECVD low stress silicon nitride elastic modulus is estimated to be 88 GPa as deposited and 320 GPa after nitrogen annealing.

  3. Silicon nitride protective coatings for silvered glass mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.

    1984-07-20

    A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer or coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate prior to metal deposition thereon to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors.

  4. Silicon nitride protective coatings for silvered glass mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.

    1988-01-01

    A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer or coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate before metal deposition to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors.

  5. Scale-up of microwave nitridation of sintered reaction bonded silicon nitride parts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Kiggans, J.O.; Garvey, G.A.

    1997-10-01

    Scale-up were performed in which microwave heating was used to fabricate reaction-bonded silicon nitride and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN). Tests were performed in both a 2.45 GHz, 500 liter and a 2.45 GHz, 4000 liter multimode cavities. The silicon preforms processed in the studies were clevis pins for diesel engines. Up to 230 samples were processed in a single microwave furnace run. Data were collected which included weight gains for nitridation and sintering studies were performed using a conventional resistance-heated furnace.

  6. Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot; Luthra, Krishan Lal

    2002-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced silicon-silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon-silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

  7. Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot; Luthra, Krishan Lal

    1999-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced silicon--silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon--silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

  8. Reliability of two sintered silicon nitride materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mieskowski, D. M.; Sanders, W. A.; Pierce, L. A.

    1985-01-01

    Two types of sintered silicon nitride were evaluated in terms of reliability: an experimental high pressure nitrogen sintered material and a commercial material. The results show wide variations in strength for both materials. The Weibull moduli were 5.5, 8.9, and 11 for the experimental material at room temperature, 1200, and 1370 C, respectively. The commercial material showed Weibull moduli of 9.0, 8.6, and 8.9 at these respective temperatures. No correlation between strength and flaw size was noted for the experimental material. The applicability of the Weibull and Griffith theories to processing defects on the order of 100 microns or less in size are discussed.

  9. Effect of processing parameters on reaction bonding of silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richman, M. H.; Gregory, O. J.; Magida, M. B.

    1980-01-01

    Reaction bonded silicon nitride was developed. The relationship between the various processing parameters and the resulting microstructures was to design and synthesize reaction bonded materials with improved room temperature mechanical properties.

  10. Infrared Dielectric Properties of Low-stress Silicon Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Beall, James A.; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; McAndrew, Brendan; Niemack, Michael D.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon nitride thin films play an important role in the realization of sensors, filters, and high-performance circuits. Estimates of the dielectric function in the far- and mid-IR regime are derived from the observed transmittance spectra for a commonly employed low-stress silicon nitride formulation. The experimental, modeling, and numerical methods used to extract the dielectric parameters with an accuracy of approximately 4% are presented.

  11. Fabrication of turbine components and properties of sintered silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neil, J. T.; French, K. W.; Quackenbush, C. L.; Smith, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents a status report on the injection molding of sinterable silicon nitride at GTE Laboratories. The effort involves fabrication of single axial turbine blades and monolithic radial turbine rotors. The injection molding process is reviewed and the fabrication of the turbine components discussed. Oxidation resistance and strength results of current injection molded sintered silicon nitride as well as dimensional checks on sintered turbine blades demonstrate that this material is a viable candidate for high temperature structural applications.

  12. Prediction of plasma-induced damage distribution during silicon nitride etching using advanced three-dimensional voxel model

    SciTech Connect

    Kuboi, Nobuyuki Tatsumi, Tetsuya; Kinoshita, Takashi; Shigetoshi, Takushi; Fukasawa, Masanaga; Komachi, Jun; Ansai, Hisahiro

    2015-11-15

    The authors modeled SiN film etching with hydrofluorocarbon (CH{sub x}F{sub y}/Ar/O{sub 2}) plasma considering physical (ion bombardment) and chemical reactions in detail, including the reactivity of radicals (C, F, O, N, and H), the area ratio of Si dangling bonds, the outflux of N and H, the dependence of the H/N ratio on the polymer layer, and generation of by-products (HCN, C{sub 2}N{sub 2}, NH, HF, OH, and CH, in addition to CO, CF{sub 2}, SiF{sub 2}, and SiF{sub 4}) as ion assistance process parameters for the first time. The model was consistent with the measured C-F polymer layer thickness, etch rate, and selectivity dependence on process variation for SiN, SiO{sub 2}, and Si film etching. To analyze the three-dimensional (3D) damage distribution affected by the etched profile, the authors developed an advanced 3D voxel model that can predict the time-evolution of the etched profile and damage distribution. The model includes some new concepts for gas transportation in the pattern using a fluid model and the property of voxels called “smart voxels,” which contain details of the history of the etching situation. Using this 3D model, the authors demonstrated metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor SiN side-wall etching that consisted of the main-etch step with CF{sub 4}/Ar/O{sub 2} plasma and an over-etch step with CH{sub 3}F/Ar/O{sub 2} plasma under the assumption of a realistic process and pattern size. A large amount of Si damage induced by irradiated hydrogen occurred in the source/drain region, a Si recess depth of 5 nm was generated, and the dislocated Si was distributed in a 10 nm deeper region than the Si recess, which was consistent with experimental data for a capacitively coupled plasma. An especially large amount of Si damage was also found at the bottom edge region of the metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistors. Furthermore, our simulation results for bulk fin-type field-effect transistor side-wall etching

  13. Radiation tolerant silicon nitride insulated gate field effect transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.

    1969-01-01

    Metal-Insulated-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor /MISFET/ device uses a silicon nitride passivation layer over a thin silicon oxide layer to enhance the radiation tolerance. It is useful in electronic systems exposed to space radiation environment or the effects of nuclear weapons.

  14. Synthesis of silicon nitride films by ion beam enhanced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xianghuai, Liu; Bin, Xue; Zhihong, Zheng; Zuyao, Zhou; Shichang, Zou

    1989-03-01

    Silicon nitride films with stoichiometric ratio of Si 3N 4 have been synthesized by concurrent electron beam evaporation of silicon and bombardment with nitrogen ions. The results show that the component ratio of nitrogen to silicon in IBED silicon nitride films can be controlled and predicted by the atomic arrival rate ratio of nitrogen to silicon. IR measurement shows that the characteristic absorption peak of IBED Si 3N 4 is located at a wavenumber of 840 cm -1. The refractive index ranges from 2.2 to 2.6. RBS, AES, TEM, SEM, ED and spreading resistance measurement were used for investigation of the depth profiles of composition and structure of silicon nitride films synthesized by IBED. An intermixed layer is formed at the interface by the knock on effect, and a silicon enriched layer is observed at the surface region of the film. Normally the films were found to be amorphous, but electron diffraction patterns taken from deposited layer showed a certain crystallinity. The silicon nitride films prepared by IBED have dramatically less oxygen content than that formed by non-ion-assisted deposition.

  15. Comparison of the surface charge behavior of commercial silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1988-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of protons from aqueous solution onto the surfaces of a variety of commercial silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders has been examined using a surface titration methodology. This method provides information on some colloidal characteristics, such as the point of zero charge (pzc) and the variation of proton adsorption with dispersion pH, useful for the prediction of optimal ceramic-processing conditions. Qualitatively, the magnitude of the proton adsorption from solution reveals small differences among all of the materials studied. However, the results show that the pzc for the various silicon nitride powders is affected by the powder synthesis route. Complementary investigations have shown that milling can also act to shift the pzc exhibited by silicon nitride powder. Also, studies of the role of the electrolyte in the development of surface charge have indicated no evidence of specific adsorption of ammonium ion on either silicon nitride or silicon carbide powders.

  16. Forming of silicon nitride by gelcasting

    SciTech Connect

    Omatete, O.O.; Strehlow, R.A. ); Armstrong, B.L. . Garrett Ceramic Components Div.)

    1990-01-01

    Gelcasting is a near-net-shape forming technique that is applicable to various types of powders. It is accomplished by casting a concentrated suspension of a commercial ceramic powder in a solution of a polymerizable monomer and then polymerizing. The monomer used in the process is acrylamide which undergoes a vinyl polymerization. A filled gel is formed, which is dried and processed further. Gelcasting of alumina, sialon and silicon nitride has been carried out as the principal part of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) program. Two rotors have been gelcast as part of a cooperative research agreement between Allied-Signal Aerospace Company and ORNL. Emphasis is placed on the unit-operations of the process. Because a requirement of the process is a castable suspension of more than 50 vol % solids loading, good dispersion is crucial. Drying, another key process, has been studied extensively. Data on the relationship of physical properties of products to some of the more significant processing variables is discussed. Environmental, safety and hygiene issues are summarized. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Covalent biofunctionalization of silicon nitride surfaces.

    PubMed

    Arafat, Ahmed; Giesbers, Marcel; Rosso, Michel; Sudhölter, Ernst J R; Schroën, Karin; White, Richard G; Yang, Li; Linford, Matthew R; Zuilhof, Han

    2007-05-22

    Covalently attached organic monolayers on etched silicon nitride (SixN4; x >/= 3) surfaces were prepared by reaction of SixN4-coated wafers with neat or solutions of 1-alkenes and 1-alkynes in refluxing mesitylene. The surface modification was monitored by measurement of the static water contact angle, XPS, IRRAS, AFM, and ToF-SIMS, and evidence for the formation of Si-C bonds is presented. The etching can be achieved by dilute HF solutions and yields both Si-H and N-H moieties. The resulting etched SixN4 surfaces are functionalized by terminal carboxylic acid groups in either of two ways: (a) via attachment of a 10-undecenoic acid 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl ester (trifluoro ethanol ester) and subsequent thermal acid hydrolysis; (b) through attachment of a photocleavable ester, and subsequent photochemical cleavage, as this would allow photopatterned functionalized SixN4. The carboxylic acids are successfully used for the attachment of oligopeptides (aspartame) and complete proteins using EDC/NHS chemistry. Finally, an amino-terminated organic monolayer can be formed by reaction of HF-treated SixN4 surfaces with a N-(omega-undecylenyl)phthalimide, which yields an amino-terminated surface upon deprotection with hydrazine.

  18. Comparative investigation of the biocompatibility of various silicon nitride ceramic qualities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Neumann, A; Reske, T; Held, M; Jahnke, K; Ragoss, C; Maier, H R

    2004-10-01

    There is a controversy about the biocompatibility of silicon nitride ceramics contained in the literature, which appears to be related to a factor of the individual chemical composition of different qualities of silicon nitride ceramics and of the different surface properties. This study attempts to investigate the cytotoxicity of different qualities of industrial silicon nitride ceramics applying an L929-cell culture model in a direct contact assay combined with a cell viability assessment. Five different qualities of industrial standard silicon nitride ceramics were chosen for in vitro testing. The chemical composition was determined by EDS analysis. Different biomedically approved aluminium oxide qualities, a titanium alloy, glass and polyvinylchloride (PVC) served as control materials. L929 mice fibroblasts were incubated directly on the materials for 24 h, stained with bisbenzimide and propidium iodine for double fluorochromasia viability testing, and evaluated by inversion-fluorescence microscopy to control cell morphology, viability and cell counts compared to empty well values. Scanning electron microscopy was applied to additionally investigate cell morphology. There was no observation of cytotoxic effects on the silicon nitride ceramic samples; moreover cell morphology remained the same as on aluminium oxide and titanium. Viability testing revealed the presence of avital cells exclusively on PVC, which served as a negative control. Cell counts on all polished surfaces showed significantly higher numbers, whereas some rough surface samples showed significantly lower numbers. We conclude that silicon nitride ceramics show no cytotoxic effects and should be considered for biomedical application owing to its favourable physiochemical properties, especially its superior resistance to mechanical stress, which would be useful for compression loaded conditions. Polished surfaces would appear to promote advanced biocompatibility. PMID:15516875

  19. Measurement and analysis of forces in grinding of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Jahanmir, S.; Hwang, T.; Whitenton, E.P.; Job, L.S.; Evans, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    Using an instrumented surface grinder, the two components of grinding forces (normal and tangential) were measured for different types of silicon nitride ceramics. The influences of grinding parameters, such as down feed and table speed, and grinding fluids on forces were determined. In addition to these measurements, the specific grinding energy defined as the energy per unit volume of removed material was calculated. This parameter and the measured forces were then analyzed to determine possible correlations with mechanical properties of the silicon nitrides. It was found that, in general, the grinding forces and the specific grinding energy increase with the hardness. Both the grinding forces and the specific grinding energy were influenced by the grinding fluid and the grinding parameters. The implication of these results on the mechanisms of material removal in grinding of silicon nitride and the possible tribological effects are discussed.

  20. Dynamic fracture toughnesses of reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, A. S.; Emery, A. F.; Liaw, B. M.

    1983-01-01

    The room-temperature dynamic fracture response of reaction-bonded silicon nitride is investigated using a hybrid experimental-numerical procedure. In this procedure, experimentally determined crack velocities are utilized to drive a dynamic finite-element code or dynamic finite-difference code in its generation mode in order to extract numerically the dynamic stress intensity factor of the fracturing specimen. Results show that the dynamic fracture toughness vs crack velocity relations of the two reaction-bonded silicon nitrides do not follow the general trend in those relations of brittle polymers and steel. A definite slow crack velocity during the initial phase of dynamic crack propagation is observed in reaction-bonded silicon nitride, which results in a nonunique dynamic fracture toughness vs crack velocity relation. In addition, it is found that a propagating crack will continue to propagate under a static stress intensity factor substantially lower than K(IC).

  1. Catalytic Effects of Cr on Nitridation of Silicon and Formation of One-dimensional Silicon Nitride Nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Feng; Lu, Lilin; Tian, Liang; Li, Faliang; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Shaowei

    2016-08-01

    The catalytic effects of chromium (Cr) on the direct nitridation of silicon (Si) and morphology of nitridation product were investigated. Cr dramatically improved the conversation of Si to silicon nitride (Si3N4). The complete conversion was achieved at 1350 °C upon addition of 1.25 wt% Cr. This temperature was much lower than that required in the case without using a catalyst. Meanwhile, Cr played an important role in the in-situ growth of one-dimensional (1-D) α-Si3N4 nanostructures. α-Si3N4 nanowires and nanobelts became the primary product phases when 5 wt% Cr was used as the catalyst. The growth processes of the 1-D α-Si3N4 nanostructures were governed by the vapor-solid mechanism. First-principle calculations suggest that electrons can be transferred from Cr atoms to N atoms, facilitating the Si nitridation.

  2. Fabrication of sinterable silicon nitride by injection molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quackenbush, C. L.; French, K.; Neil, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    Transformation of structural ceramics from the laboratory to production requires development of near net shape fabrication techniques which minimize finish grinding. One potential technique for producing large quantities of complex-shaped parts at a low cost, and microstructure of sintered silicon nitride fabricated by injection molding is discussed and compared to data generated from isostatically dry-pressed material. Binder selection methodology, compounding of ceramic and binder components, injection molding techniques, and problems in binder removal are discussed. Strength, oxidation resistance, and microstructure of sintered silicon nitride fabricated by injection molding is discussed and compared to data generated from isostatically dry-pressed material.

  3. Plasma deposited silicon nitride for indium phosphide encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valco, G. J.; Kapoor, V. J.; Biedenbender, M. D.; Williams, W. D.

    1989-01-01

    The composition and the annealing characteristics of plasma-deposited silicon-nitride encapsulating films on the ion-implanted InP substrates were investigated, using two different substrate-cleaning procedures (organic solvents and HF or HIO3 solutions) prior to encapsulation. The effect of plasma deposition of silicon nitride on the InP substrates was assessed through the current-voltage characteristics of Schottky diodes. Results of XPS analyses showed that the cleaning procedure that employed HF solution left less oxygen on the InP surface than the procedure involving HIO3. No chemical interaction between the film and the substrate was observed before or after annealing.

  4. Low temperature silicon nitride waveguides for multilayer platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez Bucio, T.; Tarazona, A.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Mashanovich, G. Z.; Gardes, F. Y.

    2016-05-01

    Several 3D multilayer silicon photonics platforms have been proposed to provide densely integrated structures for complex integrated circuits. Amongst these platforms, great interest has been given to the inclusion of silicon nitride layers to achieve low propagation losses due to their capacity of providing tight optical confinement with low scattering losses in a wide spectral range. However, none of the proposed platforms have demonstrated the integration of active devices. The problem is that typically low loss silicon nitride layers have been fabricated with LPCVD which involves high processing temperatures (<1000 ºC) that affect metallisation and doping processes that are sensitive to temperatures above 400ºC. As a result, we have investigated ammonia-free PECVD and HWCVD processes to obtain high quality silicon nitride films with reduced hydrogen content at low temperatures. Several deposition recipes were defined through a design of experiments methodology in which different combinations of deposition parameters were tested to optimise the quality and the losses of the deposited layers. The physical, chemical and optical properties of the deposited materials were characterised using different techniques including ellipsometry, SEM, FTIR, AFM and the waveguide loss cut-back method. Silicon nitride layers with hydrogen content between 10-20%, losses below 10dB/cm and high material quality were obtained with the ammonia-free recipe. Similarly, it was demonstrated that HWCVD has the potential to fabricate waveguides with low losses due to its capacity of yielding hydrogen contents <10% and roughness <1.5nm.

  5. Method for one-to-one polishing of silicon nitride and silicon oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babu, Suryadevara V. (Inventor); Natarajan, Anita (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of removing silicon nitride at about the same removal rate as silicon dioxide by CMP. The method utilizes a polishing slurry that includes colloidal silica abrasive particles dispersed in water and additives that modulate the silicon dioxide and silicon nitride removal rates such that they are about the same. In one embodiment of the invention, the additive is lysine or lysine mono hydrochloride in combination with picolinic acid, which is effective at a pH of about 8. In another embodiment of the invention, the additive is arginine in combination with picolinic acid, which is effective at a pH of about 10.

  6. Deposition of reactively ion beam sputtered silicon nitride coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.

    1982-01-01

    An ion beam source was used to deposit silicon nitride films by reactively sputtering a silicon target with beams of Ar + N2 mixtures. The nitrogen fraction in the sputtering gas was 0.05 to 0.80 at a total pressure of 6 to 2 millionth torr. The ion beam current was 50 mA at 500 V. The composition of the deposited films was investigated by auger electron spectroscopy and the rate of deposition was determined by interferometry. A relatively low rate of deposition of about 2 nm. one-tenth min. was found. AES spectra of films obtained with nitrogen fractions higher than 0.50 were consistent with a silicon to nitrogen ratio corresponding to Si3N4. However the AES spectra also indicated that the sputtered silicon nitride films were contaminated with oxygen and carbon and contained significant amounts of iron, nickel, and chromium, most probably sputtered from the holder of the substrate and target.

  7. Stability and rheology of dispersions of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between the surface and colloid chemistry of commercial ultra-fine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders was examined by a variety of standard characterization techniques and by methodologies especially developed for ceramic dispersions. These include electrokinetic measurement, surface titration, and surface spectroscopies. The effects of powder pretreatment and modification strategies, which can be utilized to augment control of processing characteristics, were monitored with these technologies. Both silicon carbide and nitride were found to exhibit silica-like surface chemistries, but silicon nitride powders possess an additional amine surface functionality. Colloidal characteristics of the various nitride powders in aqueous suspension is believed to be highly dependent on the relative amounts of the two types of surface groups, which in turn is determined by the powder synthesis route. The differences in the apparent colloidal characteristics for silicon nitride powders cannot be attributed to the specific absorption of ammonium ions. Development of a model for the prediction of double-layer characteristics of materials with a hybrid site interface facilitated understanding and prediction of the behavior of both surface charge and surface potential for these materials. The utility of the model in application to silicon nitride powders was demonstrated.

  8. Silicon nitride coated silicon thin film on three dimensions current collector for lithium ion battery anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-Yu; Chang, Chun-Chi; Duh, Jenq-Gong

    2016-09-01

    Silicon nitride coated silicon (N-Si) has been synthesized by two-step DC sputtering on Cu Micro-cone arrays (CMAs) at ambient temperature. The electrochemical properties of N-Si anodes with various thickness of nitride layer are investigated. From the potential window of 1.2 V-0.05 V, high rate charge-discharge and long cycle test have been executed to investigate the electrochemical performances of various N-Si coated Si-based lithium ion batteries anode materials. Higher specific capacity can be obtained after 200 cycles. The cycling stability is enhanced via thinner nitride layer coating as silicon nitride films are converted to Li3N with covered Si thin films. These N-Si anodes can be cycled under high rates up to 10 C due to low charge transfer resistance resulted from silicon nitride films. This indicates that the combination of silicon nitride and silicon can effectively endure high current and thus enhance the cycling stability. It is expected that N-Si is a potential candidate for batteries that can work effectively under high power.

  9. Silicon Nitride for Direct Water-Splitting and Corrosion Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Head, J.; Turner, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Todays fossil fuels are becoming harder to obtain, creating pollution problems, and posing hazards to people’s health. One alternative to fossil fuels is hydrogen, capable of serving as a clean and efficient energy carrier. Certain semiconductors are able to harness the energy of photons and direct it into water electrolysis in a process known as photoelectrochemical water splitting. Triple junction devices integrate three semiconductors of different band gaps resulting in a monolithic material that absorbs over a broader spectrum. Amorphous silicon (a-Si) is one such material that, when stacked in tandem, possesses water-splitting capabilities. Even though a-Si is capable of splitting water, it is an unstable material in solution and therefore requires a coating to protect the surface from corrosion. A stable, transparent material that has the potential for corrosion protection is silicon nitride. In this study, silicon nitride thin films were grown using DC magnetron sputtering with varying amounts of argon and nitrogen added to the system. X-ray diffraction indicated amorphous silicon nitride films. Current as a function of potential was determined from cyclic voltammetry measurements. Mott-Schottky analysis showed n-type behavior with absorption and transmission measurements indicated variation in flatband potentials. Variation in band gap values ranging from 1.90 to 4.0 eV. Corrosion measurements reveal that the silicon nitride samples exhibit both p-type and n-type behavior. Photocurrent over a range of potentials was greater in samples that were submerged in acidic electrolyte. Silicon nitride shows good stability in acidic, neutral, and basic solutions, indicative of a good material for corrosion mitigation.

  10. Substitution of ceramics for high temperature alloys. [advantages of using silicon carbides and silicon nitrides in gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, H. B.

    1978-01-01

    The high temperature capability of ceramics such as silicon nitride and silicon carbide can result in turbine engines of improved efficiency. Other advantages when compared to the nickel and cobalt alloys in current use are raw material availability, lower weight, erosion/corrosion resistance, and potentially lower cost. The use of ceramics in three different sizes of gas turbine is considered; these are the large utility turbines, advanced aircraft turbines, and small automotive turbines. Special consideration, unique to each of these applications, arise when one considers substituting ceramics for high temperature alloys. The effects of material substitutions are reviewed in terms of engine performance, operating economy, and secondary effects.

  11. Nitridation of silicon under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, J. )

    1987-07-01

    The microstructure of reaction-bonded Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} was changed by nitriding Si powder compacts at 0, 1, and 50 MPa. The microstructural parameters were analyzed using light and scanning electron microscopy, XRD, and mercury pressure porosimetry. The influence of the nitriding gas pressure on the ratio of the crystallographic Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} phases {alpha} and {beta}, the pore size distribution, and the resulting mechanical properties has been investigated. High nitrogen pressure promotes the formation of {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and leads to a fine-grained homogeneous microstructure, with improved fracture strength and fracture toughness.

  12. Formation and characterization of DNA microarrays at silicon nitride substrates.

    PubMed

    Manning, Mary; Redmond, Gareth

    2005-01-01

    A versatile method for direct, covalent attachment of DNA microarrays at silicon nitride layers, previously deposited by chemical vapor deposition at silicon wafer substrates, is reported. Each microarray fabrication process step, from silicon nitride substrate deposition, surface cleaning, amino-silanation, and attachment of a homobifunctional cross-linking molecule to covalent immobilization of probe oligonucleotides, is defined, characterized, and optimized to yield consistent probe microarray quality, homogeneity, and probe-target hybridization performance. The developed microarray fabrication methodology provides excellent (high signal-to-background ratio) and reproducible responsivity to target oligonucleotide hybridization with a rugged chemical stability that permits exposure of arrays to stringent pre- and posthybridization wash conditions through many sustained cycles of reuse. Overall, the achieved performance features compare very favorably with those of more mature glass based microarrays. It is proposed that this DNA microarray fabrication strategy has the potential to provide a viable route toward the successful realization of future integrated DNA biochips.

  13. Optical stability of silicon nitride MIS inversion layer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, K.; Hezel, R.

    1985-09-01

    For MIS inversion layer solar cells with silicon nitride as an AR coating, accelerated optical stress tests were performed. Degradation of the cell characteristics occurred which was found to be caused by photons with energies equal to or greater than 3.7 eV (wavelength of 335 nm or less). Generation of interface states at the silicon-insulator interface by UV light is shown to be the mechanism responsible. The original cell data could be completely restored by heat treatment (activation energy 0.5 eV) and partially by illumination with short-wavelength light. As the most striking result, however, it is demonstrated that the UV light-induced instability can be drastically improved by incorporation of cesium ions into the silicon nitride layer. An interpretation is given for this effect.

  14. Development of a continuous spinning process for producing silicon carbide - silicon nitride precursor fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus was designed for the continuous production of silicon carbide - silicon nitride precursor fibers. The precursor polymer can be fiberized, crosslined and pyrolyzed. The product is a metallic black fiber with the composition of the type C sub x Si sub y n sub z. Little, other than the tensile strength and modulus of elasticity, is known of the physical properties.

  15. Hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient of silicon nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, George T.; Yen, S. K.

    2002-12-01

    Hydrogen ion diffusion in silicon nitride thin film is of significant interest because of its importance in barrier, sensor and catalytic coating applications. In this study, a novel method based on potential-pH response measurement was used to determine hydrogen ion diffusion in silicon nitride thin films. Hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient in silicon nitride films obtained from this method was 1×10 -19 cm 2/s. A potential-pH response drift was observed and is believed to be due to the presence of a hydrated layer affecting the hydrogen ion diffusion onto the nitride film of the Si 3N 4-gate hydrogen ion-sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs). The unique feature of the potential-pH response method is its relatively simple experimental procedure, which eliminates complications arising from surface-related effects and/or presence of hydrogen traps in membrane, such as those found in the conventional permeation method. The method also offers a considerable test time reduction, with the experiment being completed in 10 h as compared to the conventional electrochemical permeation method which takes as long as 5 days.

  16. Polyorganosilazane preceramic binder development for reaction bonded silicon nitride composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, D.L.; Starr, T.L. )

    1992-11-01

    This study has examined the use of two commercially available polyorganosilazanes for application as preceramic binders in a composite composed of silicon carbide fibers in a reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) matrix. Ceramic monolithic and composite samples were produced. Density of monolithic and whisker reinforced RBSN samples containing the polysilazane binder was increased. Mercury intrusion porosimetry revealed a significant decrease in the pore sizes of samples containing a polyorganosilazane binder. Electron micrographs of samples containing the preceramic binder looked similar to control samples containing no precursor. Overall, incorporation of the polysilazane into monolithic and whisker reinforced samples resulted in significantly increased density and decreased porosity. Nitriding of the RBSN was slightly retarded by addition of the polysilazane binder. Samples with the preceramic binders contained increased contents of [alpha] versus [beta]-silicon nitride which may be due to interaction of hydrogen evolved from polysilazane pyrolysis with the nitriding process. Initial efforts to produce continuous fiber reinforced composites via this method have not realized the same improvements in density and porosity which have been observed for monolithic and whisker reinforced samples. Further, the addition of perceramic binder resulted in a more brittle fracture morphology as compared to similar composites made without the binder.

  17. Polyorganosilazane preceramic binder development for reaction bonded silicon nitride composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, D.L.; Starr, T.L.

    1992-11-01

    This study has examined the use of two commercially available polyorganosilazanes for application as preceramic binders in a composite composed of silicon carbide fibers in a reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) matrix. Ceramic monolithic and composite samples were produced. Density of monolithic and whisker reinforced RBSN samples containing the polysilazane binder was increased. Mercury intrusion porosimetry revealed a significant decrease in the pore sizes of samples containing a polyorganosilazane binder. Electron micrographs of samples containing the preceramic binder looked similar to control samples containing no precursor. Overall, incorporation of the polysilazane into monolithic and whisker reinforced samples resulted in significantly increased density and decreased porosity. Nitriding of the RBSN was slightly retarded by addition of the polysilazane binder. Samples with the preceramic binders contained increased contents of {alpha} versus {beta}-silicon nitride which may be due to interaction of hydrogen evolved from polysilazane pyrolysis with the nitriding process. Initial efforts to produce continuous fiber reinforced composites via this method have not realized the same improvements in density and porosity which have been observed for monolithic and whisker reinforced samples. Further, the addition of perceramic binder resulted in a more brittle fracture morphology as compared to similar composites made without the binder.

  18. Novel phosphate-functionalized silica-based dispersions for selectively polishing silicon nitride over silicon dioxide and polysilicon films.

    PubMed

    Veera Dandu, P R; Penta, Naresh K; Peethala, B C; Babu, S V

    2010-08-01

    We prepared and characterized novel phosphate-functionalized silica particles, and showed that, by using them during chemical mechanical polishing, both silicon dioxide and polysilicon removal rates can be suppressed while simultaneously enhancing silicon nitride removal rates. We achieved a silicon nitride:silicon dioxide:polysilicon removal rate selectivity of (>20):1:1. The measured removal rates of silicon dioxide, silicon nitride, and polysilicon are related to the electrostatic interactions and chemical reactivity between these films and the modified-silica abrasives.

  19. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Baik, Sunggi

    1985-11-12

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  20. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1985-11-12

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  1. Silicon Nitride: A Synthetic Mineral for Vertebrate Biology.

    PubMed

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; McEntire, Bryan J; Bock, Ryan; Boffelli, Marco; Zhu, Wenliang; Vitale, Eleonora; Puppulin, Leonardo; Adachi, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Kanamura, Narisato; Bal, B Sonny

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable stoichiometric flexibility of hydroxyapatite (HAp) enables the formation of a variety of charged structural sites at the material's surface which facilitates bone remodeling due to binding of biomolecule moieties in zwitterionic fashion. In this paper, we report for the first time that an optimized biomedical grade silicon nitride (Si3N4) demonstrated cell adhesion and improved osteoconductivity comparable to highly defective, non-stoichiometric natural hydroxyapatite. Si3N4's zwitterionic-like behavior is a function of the dualism between positive and negative charged off-stoichiometric sites (i.e., N-vacancies versus silanols groups, respectively). Lattice defects at the biomaterial's surface greatly promote interaction with positively- and negatively-charged functional groups in biomolecules, and result in the biologically effective characteristics of silicon nitride. These findings are anticipated to be a starting point for further discoveries of therapeutic bone-graft substitute materials. PMID:27539146

  2. Silicon Nitride: A Synthetic Mineral for Vertebrate Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; McEntire, Bryan J.; Bock, Ryan; Boffelli, Marco; Zhu, Wenliang; Vitale, Eleonora; Puppulin, Leonardo; Adachi, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Kanamura, Narisato; Bal, B. Sonny

    2016-08-01

    The remarkable stoichiometric flexibility of hydroxyapatite (HAp) enables the formation of a variety of charged structural sites at the material’s surface which facilitates bone remodeling due to binding of biomolecule moieties in zwitterionic fashion. In this paper, we report for the first time that an optimized biomedical grade silicon nitride (Si3N4) demonstrated cell adhesion and improved osteoconductivity comparable to highly defective, non-stoichiometric natural hydroxyapatite. Si3N4’s zwitterionic-like behavior is a function of the dualism between positive and negative charged off-stoichiometric sites (i.e., N-vacancies versus silanols groups, respectively). Lattice defects at the biomaterial’s surface greatly promote interaction with positively- and negatively-charged functional groups in biomolecules, and result in the biologically effective characteristics of silicon nitride. These findings are anticipated to be a starting point for further discoveries of therapeutic bone-graft substitute materials.

  3. Optical bistability in a silicon nitride waveguide grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bej, Subhajit; Laukkanen, Janne; Tervo, Jani; Svirko, Yuri P.; Turunen, Jari

    2016-04-01

    Using the Fourier Modal Method for gratings with Kerr media [J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 31, 2371 (2014)] we demonstrate that low energy Optical Bistability for normally incident light field can be observed by strong nonlinear light-matter interactions in a Silicon Nitride waveguide-grating with 2-D periodicity. Finite divergence of the incident light beam has been taken into account in our numerical study and the gratings are designed to observe bistable behavior in direct transmitted light inside the optical telecommunication C-band (1520 nm-1570 nm). The waveguide grating structures are fabricated from PECVD synthesized Silicon Nitride thin film on top of quartz with standard electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching techniques. We aim to demonstrate this phenomenon experimentally using a tunable narrow line-width pulsed laser. Our resonant nanostructures may find applications in free space all-optical information processing and all-optical switching.

  4. Silicon Nitride: A Synthetic Mineral for Vertebrate Biology

    PubMed Central

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; McEntire, Bryan J.; Bock, Ryan; Boffelli, Marco; Zhu, Wenliang; Vitale, Eleonora; Puppulin, Leonardo; Adachi, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Kanamura, Narisato; Bal, B. Sonny

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable stoichiometric flexibility of hydroxyapatite (HAp) enables the formation of a variety of charged structural sites at the material’s surface which facilitates bone remodeling due to binding of biomolecule moieties in zwitterionic fashion. In this paper, we report for the first time that an optimized biomedical grade silicon nitride (Si3N4) demonstrated cell adhesion and improved osteoconductivity comparable to highly defective, non-stoichiometric natural hydroxyapatite. Si3N4’s zwitterionic-like behavior is a function of the dualism between positive and negative charged off-stoichiometric sites (i.e., N-vacancies versus silanols groups, respectively). Lattice defects at the biomaterial’s surface greatly promote interaction with positively- and negatively-charged functional groups in biomolecules, and result in the biologically effective characteristics of silicon nitride. These findings are anticipated to be a starting point for further discoveries of therapeutic bone-graft substitute materials. PMID:27539146

  5. Interfacial Structure in Silicon Nitride Sintered with Lanthanide Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, C.; Ziegler, A.; Shibata, Naoya; Winkelman, G. B.; Satet, R. L.; Hoffmann, M. J.; Cinibulk, M. K.; Becher, Paul F; Painter, Gayle S; Browning, N. D.; Cockayne, D.J.H.; Ritchie, R O; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    Three independent research groups present a comparison of their structural analyses of prismatic interfaces in silicon nitride densified with the aid of lanthanide oxide Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}. All three groups obtained scanning transmission electron microscope images which clearly reveal the presence of well-defined Ln segregation sites at the interfaces, and, moreover, reveal that these segregation sites are element-specific. While some results differ across the three research groups, the vast majority exhibits good reproducibility.

  6. Glow-discharge synthesis of silicon nitride precursor powders

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, P.; Buss, R.J.; Loehman, R.E. )

    1989-07-01

    A radio-frequency glow discharge is used for the synthesis of submicron, amorphous, silicon nitride precursor powders from silane and ammonia. Powders are produced with a range of Si/N ratios, including stoichiometric, Si-rich, and N-rich, and contain substantial amounts of hydrogen. The powders appear to be similar to silicon diimide and are easily converted to oxide by water vapor. The powders lose weight and crystallize to a mixture of {alpha} and {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} after prolonged heating at 1600{degree}C. Studies of spectrally and spatially resolved optical emission from the plasma are reported.

  7. Corrosion of silicon nitride in high temperature alkaline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Liyan; Guzonas, Dave A.; Qian, Jing

    2016-08-01

    The corrosion of silicon nitride (Si3N4) in alkaline solutions was studied at temperatures from 60 to 300 °C. Si3N4 experienced significant corrosion above 100 °C. The release rates of silicon and nitrogen follow zero order reaction kinetics and increase with increasing temperature. The molar ratio of dissolved silicon and nitrogen species in the high temperature solutions is the same as that in the solid phase (congruent dissolution). The activation energy for silicon and nitrogen release rates is 75 kJ/mol which agrees well with that of silica dissolution. At 300 °C, the release of aluminum is observed and follows first order reaction kinetics while other minor constituents including Ti and Y are highly enriched on the corrosion films due to the low solubility of their oxides.

  8. Catalytic Effects of Cr on Nitridation of Silicon and Formation of One-dimensional Silicon Nitride Nanostructure

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Feng; Lu, Lilin; Tian, Liang; Li, Faliang; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Shaowei

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic effects of chromium (Cr) on the direct nitridation of silicon (Si) and morphology of nitridation product were investigated. Cr dramatically improved the conversation of Si to silicon nitride (Si3N4). The complete conversion was achieved at 1350 °C upon addition of 1.25 wt% Cr. This temperature was much lower than that required in the case without using a catalyst. Meanwhile, Cr played an important role in the in-situ growth of one-dimensional (1-D) α-Si3N4 nanostructures. α-Si3N4 nanowires and nanobelts became the primary product phases when 5 wt% Cr was used as the catalyst. The growth processes of the 1-D α-Si3N4 nanostructures were governed by the vapor-solid mechanism. First-principle calculations suggest that electrons can be transferred from Cr atoms to N atoms, facilitating the Si nitridation. PMID:27527681

  9. Catalytic Effects of Cr on Nitridation of Silicon and Formation of One-dimensional Silicon Nitride Nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Liang, Feng; Lu, Lilin; Tian, Liang; Li, Faliang; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Shaowei

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic effects of chromium (Cr) on the direct nitridation of silicon (Si) and morphology of nitridation product were investigated. Cr dramatically improved the conversation of Si to silicon nitride (Si3N4). The complete conversion was achieved at 1350 °C upon addition of 1.25 wt% Cr. This temperature was much lower than that required in the case without using a catalyst. Meanwhile, Cr played an important role in the in-situ growth of one-dimensional (1-D) α-Si3N4 nanostructures. α-Si3N4 nanowires and nanobelts became the primary product phases when 5 wt% Cr was used as the catalyst. The growth processes of the 1-D α-Si3N4 nanostructures were governed by the vapor-solid mechanism. First-principle calculations suggest that electrons can be transferred from Cr atoms to N atoms, facilitating the Si nitridation. PMID:27527681

  10. Development of a Lightweight Thrust Chamber Assembly Utilizing In-Situ Reinforced Silicon Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvander, J.; Wherley, B.; Claflin, S.

    1999-06-01

    The paper describes the status of the Light Weight Thrust Chamber Assembly (LWTCA) program currently underway at Boeing Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power, under contract with the US Air Force Research Laboratory. The goal of the program is to demonstrate technology which will lead to a 40% reduction in weight (including the nozzle), a 50% reduction in cost, a 75% reduction in part count and a 3% increase in specific impulse on a full scale, 400 klbf thrust LOX/hydrogen booster engine. The demonstration will be performed through the use of manufacturing technology demonstrator hardware and 60 klbf thrust hot-fire tests. The primary means to achieving these goals is by using in-situ reinforced silicon nitride for structural components. Silicon nitride is an advanced ceramic material that has high specific strength and fracture toughness, and can be cast to near- net part shape. Tests to validate the material properties of in-situ reinforced silicon nitride are discussed, along with the resulting changes to traditional thrust chamber design as a result of the improved properties. The progress towards manufacturing and hot-fire testing a thrust chamber assembly from the material is also described.

  11. Deep-UV nitride-on-silicon microdisk lasers

    PubMed Central

    Sellés, J.; Brimont, C.; Cassabois, G.; Valvin, P.; Guillet, T.; Roland, I.; Zeng, Y.; Checoury, X.; Boucaud, P.; Mexis, M.; Semond, F.; Gayral, B.

    2016-01-01

    Deep ultra-violet semiconductor lasers have numerous applications for optical storage and biochemistry. Many strategies based on nitride heterostructures and adapted substrates have been investigated to develop efficient active layers in this spectral range, starting with AlGaN quantum wells on AlN substrates and more recently sapphire and SiC substrates. Here we report an efficient and simple solution relying on binary GaN/AlN quantum wells grown on a thin AlN buffer layer on a silicon substrate. This active region is embedded in microdisk photonic resonators of high quality factors and allows the demonstration of a deep ultra-violet microlaser operating at 275 nm at room temperature under optical pumping, with a spontaneous emission coupling factor β = (4 ± 2) 10−4. The ability of the active layer to be released from the silicon substrate and to be grown on silicon-on-insulator substrates opens the way to future developments of nitride nanophotonic platforms on silicon. PMID:26887701

  12. Critical flaw size in silicon nitride ball bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, George Arthur

    Aircraft engine and bearing manufacturers have been aggressively pursuing advanced materials technology systems solutions to meet main shaft-bearing needs of advanced military aircraft engines. Ceramic silicon nitride hybrid bearings are being developed for such high performance applications. Though silicon nitride exhibits many favorable properties such as high compressive strength, high hardness, a third of the density of steel, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and high corrosion and temperature resistance, they also have low fracture toughness and are susceptible to failure from fatigue spalls emanating from pre-existing surface flaws that can grow under rolling contact fatigue (RCF). Rolling elements and raceways are among the most demanding components in aircraft engines due to a combination of high cyclic contact stresses, long expected component lifetimes, corrosive environment, and the high consequence of fatigue failure. The cost of these rolling elements increases exponentially with the decrease in allowable flaw size for service applications. Hence the range of 3D non-planar surface flaw geometries subject to RCF is simulated to determine the critical flaw size (CFS) or the largest allowable flaw that does not grow under service conditions. This dissertation is a numerical and experimental investigation of surface flaws in ceramic balls subjected to RCF and has resulted in the following analyses: Crack Shape Determination: the nucleation of surface flaws from ball impact that occurs during the manufacturing process is simulated. By examining the subsurface Hertzian stresses between contacting spheres, their applicability to predicting and characterizing crack size and shape is established. It is demonstrated that a wide range of cone and partial cone cracks, observed in practice, can be generated using the proposed approaches. RCF Simulation: the procedure and concerns in modeling nonplanar 3D cracks subject to RCF using FEA for stress intensity

  13. Hydrogen diffusion in silicon from plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride film at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheoran, Manav; Kim, Dong Seop; Rohatgi, Ajeet; Dekkers, H. F. W.; Beaucarne, G.; Young, Matthew; Asher, Sally

    2008-04-01

    The stable hydrogen isotope deuterium (D), which is released during the annealing of deuterated silicon nitride films, diffuses through the crystalline silicon and is captured by a thin, amorphous layer of silicon sputtered on the rear surface. We report on the measurement of the concentration of "penetrated" D by secondary ion mass spectrometry to monitor the flux of D diffusing through single-crystalline silicon wafers. The penetrated D content in the trapping layer increases with the annealing time. However, the flux of D injected into the silicon from the silicon nitride layer decreases as annealing time increases.

  14. DNA and protein microarray printing on silicon nitride waveguide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Hogrebe, Paul; Grainger, David W

    2006-01-15

    Sputtered silicon nitride optical waveguide surfaces were silanized and modified with a hetero-bifunctional crosslinker to facilitate thiol-reactive immobilization of contact-printed DNA probe oligonucleotides, streptavidin and murine anti-human interleukin-1 beta capture agents in microarray formats. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize each reaction sequence on the native silicon oxynitride surface. Thiol-terminated DNA probe oligonucleotides exhibited substantially higher surface printing immobilization and target hybridization efficiencies than non-thiolated DNA probe oligonucleotides: strong fluorescence signals from target DNA hybridization supported successful DNA oligonucleotide probe microarray fabrication and specific capture bioactivity. Analogously printed arrays of thiolated streptavidin and non-thiolated streptavidin did not exhibit noticeable differences in either surface immobilization or analyte capture assay signals. Non-thiolated anti-human interleukin-1 beta printed on modified silicon nitride surfaces reactive to thiol chemistry exhibited comparable performance for capturing human interleukin-1 beta analyte to commercial amine-reactive microarraying polymer surfaces in sandwich immunoassays, indicating substantial non-specific antibody-surface capture responsible for analyte capture signal.

  15. RF sputtered silicon and hafnium nitrides: Properties and adhesion to 440C stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1982-01-01

    Silicon nitride and hafnium nitride coatings were deposited by reactive RF sputtering on oxidized and unoxidized 440C stainless steel substrates. Sputtering was done in mixtures of argon and nitrogen gases from pressed powder silicon nitride and from hafnium metal targets. Depositions were at two background pressures, 8 and 20 mtorr, and at two different fractions (f) of nitrogen in argon, 0.25 and 0.60, for hafnium nitride and at f = 0.25 for silicon nitride. The coatings and the interface between the coating and substrates were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Auger electron spectroscopy. A Knoop microhardness of 1650 + or - 100 kg/sq mm was measured for hafnium nitride and 3900 + or - 500 kg/sq mm for silicon nitride. The friction coefficients between a 440C rider and the coatings were measured under lubricated conditions. Scratch test results demonstrate that the adhesion of hafnium nitride to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C is superior to that of silicon nitride. Oxidized 440C is found to have increased adhesion, to both nitrides, over that of unoxidized 440C.

  16. RF-sputtered silicon and hafnium nitrides - Properties and adhesion to 440C stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon nitride and hafnium nitride coatings were deposited by reactive RF sputtering on oxidized and unoxidized 440C stainless steel substrates. Sputtering was done in mixtures of argon and nitrogen gases from pressed powder silicon nitride and from hafnium metal targets. Depositions were at two background pressures, 8 and 20 mtorr, and at two different fractions (f) of nitrogen in argon, 0.25 and 0.60, for hafnium nitride and at f = 0.25 for silicon nitride. The coatings and the interface between the coating and substrates were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Auger electron spectroscopy. A Knoop microhardness of 1650 + or 100 kg/sq mm was measured for hafnium nitride and 3900 + or 500 kg/sq mm for silicon nitride. The friction coefficients between a 440C rider and the coatings were measured under lubricated conditions. Scratch test results demonstrate that the adhesion of hafnium nitride to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C is superior to that of silicon nitride. Oxidized 440C is found to have increased adhesion, to both nitrides, over that of unoxidized 440C.

  17. Grinding force and microcrack density in abrasive machining of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H.H.K.; Wei, L.; Jahanmir, S.

    1995-12-01

    The relationship between grinding forces and the material`s resistance to microfracture is investigated in abrasive machining of silicon nitride ceramics. Surface grinding is performed on two forms of silicon nitride with different microstructures, and the grinding forces are measured. In addition, single-point scratching is performed on polished surfaces to amplify the damage associated with the action of an individual abrasive particle in grinding. A thermal wave measurement technique in then used on the cross sections to characterize the density of subsurface microcracks associated with scratching. Compared to a fine-grain silicon nitride, the density of microcracks in a coarse-grain silicon nitride is significantly larger, while the grinding force is smaller. The smaller grinding force for the coarse-grain silicon nitride is attributed to the ease of local intergranular microfracture and grain dislodgement during grinding. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital Materials} {ital Research} {ital Society}.

  18. Surface Area, and Oxidation Effects on Nitridation Kinetics of Silicon Powder Compacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Palczer, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Commercially available silicon powders were wet-attrition-milled from 2 to 48 hr to achieve surface areas (SA's) ranging from 1.3 to 70 sq m/g. The surface area effects on the nitridation kinetics of silicon powder compacts were determined at 1250 or 1350 C for 4 hr. In addition, the influence of nitridation environment, and preoxidation on nitridation kinetics of a silicon powder of high surface area (approximately equals 63 sq m/g) was investigated. As the surface area increased, so did the percentage nitridation after 4 hr in N2 at 1250 or 1350 C. Silicon powders of high surface area (greater than 40 sq m/g) can be nitrided to greater than 70% at 1250 C in 4 hr. The nitridation kinetics of the high-surface-area powder compacts were significantly delayed by preoxidation treatment. Conversely, the nitridation environment had no significant influence on the nitridation kinetics of the same powder. Impurities present in the starting powder, and those accumulated during attrition milling, appeared to react with the silica layer on the surface of silicon particles to form a molten silicate layer, which provided a path for rapid diffusion of nitrogen and enhanced the nitridation kinetics of high surface area silicon powder.

  19. Nanostructured silicon nitride from wheat and rice husks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qadri, S. B.; Rath, B. B.; Gorzkowski, E. P.; Wollmershauser, J. A.; Feng, C. R.

    2016-04-01

    Nanoparticles, submicron-diameter tubes, and rods of Si3N4 were synthesized from the thermal treatment of wheat and rice husks at temperatures at and above 1300 °C in a nitrogen atmosphere. The whole pattern Rietveld analysis of the observed diffraction data from treatments at 1300 °C showed the formation of only hexagonal α-phase of Si3N4 with an R-factor of 1%, whereas samples treated at 1400 °C and above showed both α- and β-phases with an R-factor of 2%. Transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of tubes, rods, and nanoparticles of Si3N4. In a two-step process, where pure SiC was produced first from rice or wheat husk in an argon atmosphere and subsequently treated in a nitrogen atmosphere at 1450 °C, a nanostructured composite material having α- and β-phases of Si3N4 combined with cubic phase of SiC was formed. The thermodynamics of the formation of silicon nitride is discussed in terms of the solid state reaction between organic matter (silica content), which is inherently present in the wheat and rice husks, with the nitrogen from the furnace atmosphere. Nanostructures of silicon nitride formed by a single direct reaction or their composites with SiC formed in a two-step process of agricultural byproducts provide an uncomplicated sustainable synthesis route for silicon nitride used in mechanical, biotechnology, and electro-optic nanotechnology applications.

  20. Processing and testing of high toughness silicon nitride ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tikare, Veena; Sanders, William A.; Choi, Sung R.

    1993-01-01

    High toughness silicon nitride ceramics were processed with the addition of small quantities of beta-Si3N4 whiskers in a commercially available alpha-Si3N4 powder. These whiskers grew preferentially during sintering resulting in large, elongated beta-grains, which acted to toughen the matrix by crack deflection and grain pullout. The fracture toughness of these samples seeded with beta-Si3N4 whiskers ranged from 8.7 to 9.5 MPa m(exp 0.5) depending on the sintering additives.

  1. Method of forming tiny silicon nitride spacer for flash EPROM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. H.; Wu, K. C.; Hwang, Yuan-Ko; Chen, Shih-Shiung

    2001-04-01

    The silicon nitride spacer technology is widely used in split gate non-volatile memory device sand flash EPROM. A tiny spacer structure is formed on tunnel oxide layer adjacent to the sidewall of floating gate electrode to prevent write disturbance that caused by reverse tunneling. But the processing is very critical for such flash EPROM devices since the dimension the SN spacer are so small. It was influenced not only by SN spacer dry etching but also later photo-resistance strip process of implantation for threshold voltage adjustment. A new method of forming tiny SN spacer by using anisotropic dry etching and isotropic wet etching was presented in this paper.

  2. Oxidation Protection of Porous Reaction-Bonded Silicon Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Oxidation kinetics of both as-fabricated and coated reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) were studied at 900 and 1000 C with thermogravimetry. Uncoated RBSN exhibited internal oxidation and parabolic kinetics. An amorphous Si-C-O coating provided the greatest degree of protection to oxygen, with a small linear weight loss observed. Linear weight gains were measured on samples with an amorphous Si-N-C coating. Chemically vapor deposited (CVD) Si3N4 coated RBSN exhibited parabolic kinetics, and the coating cracked severely. A continuous-SiC-fiber-reinforced RBSN composite was also coated with the Si-C-O material, but no substantial oxidation protection was observed.

  3. Investigation of silicon surface passivation by silicon nitride film deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Sin sub x grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVO) for passivating silicon surfaces was studied. The application of PECVO SiN sub x films for passivations of silicon N+/P or P+/N solar cells is of particular interest. This program has involved the following areas of investigation: (1) Establishment of PECVO system and development of procedures for growth of SiN sub x; (2) Optical characterization of SiN sub x films; (3) Characterization of the SiN sub x/Si interface; (4) Surface recombination velocity deduced from photoresponse; (5) Current-Voltage analyses of silicon N+/P cells; and (6) Gated diode device studies.

  4. Feasibility of Actively Cooled Silicon Nitride Airfoil for Turbine Applications Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2001-01-01

    Nickel-base superalloys currently limit gas turbine engine performance. Active cooling has extended the temperature range of service of nickel-base superalloys in current gas turbine engines, but the margin for further improvement appears modest. Therefore, significant advancements in materials technology are needed to raise turbine inlet temperatures above 2400 F to increase engine specific thrust and operating efficiency. Because of their low density and high-temperature strength and thermal conductivity, in situ toughened silicon nitride ceramics have received a great deal of attention for cooled structures. However, the high processing costs and low impact resistance of silicon nitride ceramics have proven to be major obstacles for widespread applications. Advanced rapid prototyping technology in combination with conventional gel casting and sintering can reduce high processing costs and may offer an affordable manufacturing approach. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center, in cooperation with a local university and an aerospace company, are developing actively cooled and functionally graded ceramic structures. The objective of this program is to develop cost-effective manufacturing technology and experimental and analytical capabilities for environmentally stable, aerodynamically efficient, foreign-object-damage-resistant, in situ toughened silicon nitride turbine nozzle vanes, and to test these vanes under simulated engine conditions. Starting with computer aided design (CAD) files of an airfoil and a flat plate with internal cooling passages, the permanent and removable mold components for gel casting ceramic slips were made by stereolithography and Sanders machines, respectively. The gel-cast part was dried and sintered to final shape. Several in situ toughened silicon nitride generic airfoils with internal cooling passages have been fabricated. The uncoated and thermal barrier coated airfoils and flat plates were burner rig tested for 30 min without

  5. Silicon Nitride Windows for Electron Microscopy of Whole Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ring, E. A.; Peckys, D. B.; Dukes, M. J.; Baudoin, J. P.; de Jonge, N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Silicon microchips with thin electron transparent silicon nitride windows provide a sample support that accommodates both light-, and electron microscopy of whole eukaryotic cells in vacuum or liquid, with minimum sample preparation steps. The windows are robust enough that cellular samples can be cultured directly onto them, with no addition of a supporting film, and no need to embed or section the sample, as is typically required in electron microscopy. By combining two microchips, a microfluidic chamber can be constructed for the imaging of samples in liquid in the electron microscope. We provide microchip design specifications, a fabrication outline, instructions on how to prepare them for biological samples, and examples of images obtained using different light-, and electron microscopy modalities. The use of these microchips is particularly advantageous for correlative light-, and electron microscopy. PMID:21770941

  6. Mechanical properties measurement of silicon nitride thin films using the bulge test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hun Kee; Ko, Seong Hyun; Han, Jun Soo; Park, HyunChul

    2007-12-01

    The mechanical properties of silicon nitride films are investigated. Freestanding films of silicon nitride are fabricated using the MEMS technique. The films were deposited onto (100) silicon wafers by LPCVD (Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition). Square and rectangular membranes are made by anisotropic etching of the silicon substrates. Then the bulge test for silicon nitride film was carried out. The thickness of specimens was 0.5, 0.75 and 1μm respectively. By testing both square and rectangular membranes, the reliability and valiant-ness of bulge test with regard to the shape of specimens was investigated. Also considering residual stress in the films, one can evaluate the Young's modulus from experimental load-deflection curves. Young's modulus of the silicon nitride films was about 232GPa. The residual stress is below 100MPa.

  7. Reciprocating sliding wear of in-situ reinforced silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Yust, C.S.

    1995-10-01

    The reciprocating sliding wear response of two in-situ reinforced-silicon nitride compositions provided by AlliedSignal have been evaluated. The materials were prepared by AlliedSignal-Ceramic Components Division and were tested at conditions of interest to the Bendix Engine Controls Division (South Bend, IN) and AlliedSignal Research and Technology (Des Plaines, IL). The materials are being considered for a variety of new applications, and the current tests provide critical friction and wear values under anticipated operating conditions. Both pin and disk specimens of GS-44 and GN-10 in-situ reinforced silicon nitride of specified dimensions for wear testing were provided by the AlliedSignal participants. An initial series of tests examined the unlubricated behavior of these materials at elevated temperature (up to 900 C) in an inert atmosphere. The results revealed excessive levels of both friction and wear in the unlubricated condition. The test conditions were modified to include the use of jet fuel as a lubricant because of an intended application in that medium. The introduction of the lubricant resulted in very limited wear of both the pin and disk specimens.

  8. Silicon nitride ceramic-based two-dimensional microcombustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shuji; Yamada, Takashi; Sugimoto, Shinya; Li, Jing-Feng; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2003-05-01

    In this paper we describe silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramic-based microdiffusion combustors with a two-dimensional structure, which is potentially batch-producible by microelectromechanical systems machining technology such as deep reactive ion etching. Si3N4 ceramic structures were fabricated by the nitridation of a spark-plasma-sintered silicon green compact after mechanical micromilling. Five types of combustor with a combustion chamber volume of 181 mul and depths of 1, 2 and 3 mm were tested. The combustors with combustion chamber depths of 2 or 3 mm achieved stable combustion at equivalence ratios from 0.28 to 1.3 and total flow rates from 4.0 to 11.3 SLM. They formed a flame at the center of the combustion chamber as designed, when the equivalence ratio was low. However, the combustor with a combustion chamber depth of 1 mm could not maintain a flame in the combustion chamber. This may be because combustion was not completed due to the shallow combustion chamber with a depth equivalent to the quenching distance of hydrogen.

  9. Mid-infrared optical properties of thin films of aluminum oxide, titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide, aluminum nitride, and silicon nitride.

    PubMed

    Kischkat, Jan; Peters, Sven; Gruska, Bernd; Semtsiv, Mykhaylo; Chashnikova, Mikaela; Klinkmüller, Matthias; Fedosenko, Oliana; Machulik, Stephan; Aleksandrova, Anna; Monastyrskyi, Gregorii; Flores, Yuri; Masselink, W Ted

    2012-10-01

    The complex refractive index components, n and k, have been studied for thin films of several common dielectric materials with a low to medium refractive index as functions of wavelength and stoichiometry for mid-infrared (MIR) wavelengths within the range 1.54-14.29 μm (700-6500 cm(-1)). The materials silicon oxide, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, and titanium oxide are prepared using room temperature reactive sputter deposition and are characterized using MIR variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry. The investigation shows how sensitive the refractive index functions are to the O2 and N2 flow rates, and for which growth conditions the materials deposit homogeneously. It also allows conclusions to be drawn on the degree of amorphousness and roughness. To facilitate comparison of the materials deposited in this work with others, the index of refraction was also determined and provided for the near-IR and visible ranges of the spectrum. The results presented here should serve as a useful information base for designing optical coatings for the MIR part of the electromagnetic spectrum. The results are parameterized to allow them to be easily used for coating design.

  10. Friction and wear behavior of in-situ reinforced silicon nitride. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yust, C.S.

    1995-10-01

    Specimens of in-situ-reinforced silicon nitride (ISRSH) have been wear tested in lubricated, reciprocating, sliding motion against a silicon nitride counterface. Only mild wear of the ISRSN was observed at contact pressures up to 4.8 GPa at an average sliding velocity of 0.3 m/s. At 0.6 m/s, a wear mode transition was observed in ISRSN at 4.2 - 4.4 GPa. In comparison, the wear mode transition in silicon carbide whisker reinforced silicon nitride at both velocities was evident at about 2.2 - 2.4 GPa. Scanning electron microscopy of the ISRSN wear surfaces revealed the presence of a 40 pm thick debris layer on the mild wear tracks. The ISRSN wear mode transition response indicated a potential for an improved wear resistance in this material as compared to whisker reinforced silicon nitride.

  11. Crystallization of the glassy grain boundary phase in silicon nitride ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Charles H., III

    1991-01-01

    The role was studied of the intergranular glassy phase in silicon nitride as-processed with yttria as a sintering aid. The microstructure, crystallization, and viscosity of the glassy phase were areas studied. Crystallization of the intergranular glassy phase to more refractory crystalline phases should improve the high temperature mechanical properties of the silicon nitride. The addition of a nucleating agent will increase the rate of crystallization. The measurement of the viscosity of the glassy phase will permit the estimation of the high temperature deformation of the silicon nitride.

  12. Thermal and Kerr nonlinear properties of plasma-deposited silicon nitride/ silicon dioxide waveguides.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Saperstein, Robert E; Alic, Nikola; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2008-08-18

    We introduce and present experimental evaluations of loss and nonlinear optical response in a waveguide and an optical resonator, both implemented with a silicon nitride/ silicon dioxide material platform prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with dual frequency reactors that significantly reduce the stress and the consequent loss of the devices. We measure a relatively small loss of approximately 4dB/cm in the waveguides. The fabricated ring resonators in add-drop and all-pass arrangements demonstrate quality factors of Q=12,900 and 35,600. The resonators are used to measure both the thermal and ultrafast Kerr nonlinearities. The measured thermal nonlinearity is larger than expected, which is attributed to slower heat dissipation in the plasma-deposited silicon dioxide film. The n2 for silicon nitride that is unknown in the literature is measured, for the first time, as 2.4 x 10(-15)cm(2)/W, which is 10 times larger than that for silicon dioxide.

  13. The development of a porous silicon nitride crossflow filter; Final report, September 1988--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    1992-09-01

    This report summarizes the work performed in developing a permeable form of silicon nitride for application to ceramic crossflow filters for use in advanced coal-fired electric power plants. The program was sponsored by the Department of Energy Morgantown Energy Technology Center and consisted of a design analysis and material development phase and a filter manufacture and demonstration phase. The crossflow filter design and operating requirements were defined. A filter design meeting the requirements was developed and thermal and stress analyses were performed. Material development efforts focused initially on reaction-bonded silicon nitride material. This approach was not successful, and the materials effort was refocused on the development of a permeable form of sintered silicon nitride (SSN). This effort was successful. The SSN material was used for the second phase of the program, filter manufacture and evaluation. Four half-scale SAN filter modules were fabricated. Three of the modules were qualified for filter performance tests. Tests were performed on two of the three qualified modules in the High-Temperature, High-Pressure facility at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center. The first module failed on test when it expanded into the clamping device, causing dust leakage through the filter. The second module performed well for a cumulative 150-hr test. It displayed excellent filtration capability during the test. The blowback pulse cleaning was highly effective, and the module apparently withstood the stresses induced by the periodic pulse cleaning. Testing of the module resumed, and when the flow of combustion gas through the filter was doubled, cracks developed and the test was concluded.

  14. Scale-up of the nitridation and sintering of silicon preforms using microwave heating

    SciTech Connect

    Kiggans, J.O. Jr.; Tiegs, T.N.; Davisson, C.C.; Morrow, M.S.; Garvey, G.J.

    1996-05-01

    Scale-up studies were performed in which microwave heating was used to fabricate reaction-bonded silicon nitride and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN). Tests were performed in both a 2.45 GHz, 500 liter and a 2.45 GHz, 4,000 liter multimode cavities. A variety of sizes, shapes, and compositions of silicon preforms were processed in the studies, including bucket tappets and clevis pins for diesel engines. Up to 230 samples were processed in a single microwave furnace run. Data were collected which included weight gains for nitridation experiments, and final densities for nitridation and sintering experiments. For comparison, nitridation and sintering studies were performed using a conventional resistance-heated furnace.

  15. Optical properties of V-groove silicon nitride trench waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Huang, Yuewang; Boyraz, Ozdal

    2016-09-01

    We numerically investigate the mode properties of the V-groove silicon nitride trench waveguides based on the experimental results. The trench waveguides are suitable for nonlinear applications. By manipulating the waveguide thicknesses, the waveguides can achieve zero dispersion or a maximized nonlinear parameter of 0.219  W-1·m-1 at 1550 nm. Broadband four-wave mixing with a gain of 5.545  m-1 is presented as an example. The waveguides can also be applied in sensing applications with an optimized evanescent intensity ratio. By etching away the top flat slabs, wider trapezoidal trench waveguides can be utilized for plasmonic sensing thanks to their TE fundamental modes. PMID:27607510

  16. Single-layer graphene on silicon nitride micromembrane resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Silvan; Guillermo Villanueva, Luis; Amato, Bartolo; Boisen, Anja; Bagci, Tolga; Zeuthen, Emil; Sørensen, Anders S.; Usami, Koji; Polzik, Eugene S.; Taylor, Jacob M.; Marcus, Charles M.; Cheol Shin, Yong; Kong, Jing

    2014-02-07

    Due to their low mass, high quality factor, and good optical properties, silicon nitride (SiN) micromembrane resonators are widely used in force and mass sensing applications, particularly in optomechanics. The metallization of such membranes would enable an electronic integration with the prospect for exciting new devices, such as optoelectromechanical transducers. Here, we add a single-layer graphene on SiN micromembranes and compare electromechanical coupling and mechanical properties to bare dielectric membranes and to membranes metallized with an aluminium layer. The electrostatic coupling of graphene covered membranes is found to be equal to a perfectly conductive membrane, without significantly adding mass, decreasing the superior mechanical quality factor or affecting the optical properties of pure SiN micromembranes. The concept of graphene-SiN resonators allows a broad range of new experiments both in applied physics and fundamental basic research, e.g., for the mechanical, electrical, or optical characterization of graphene.

  17. Design and evaluation of silicon nitride turbocharger rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Takama, K.; Sasaki, S.; Shimizu, T.; Kamiya, N. )

    1993-01-01

    Two types of silicon nitride ceramic rotor have been introduced into the Japanese market by Toyota Motor Corporation, named CT26 and CT12A, to improve engine acceleration response by the reduction in moment of inertia. In order to design a suitable blade shape for a ceramic rotor, the critical stress of the blade was determined by the results obtained experimentally from correlating the fracture origin over spin-tested rotors with centrifugal stress at fracture. A suitable blade shape has been determined for the CT26 turbocharger rotor type, which is identical to the metal rotor except for the disk diameter of hub back face and the blade thickness. The CT12A type is of similar design to the CT26 type; all dimensions could be reduced except for the inlet blade thickness, which is determined by foreign object damage (FOD) resistance.

  18. Evaluation of Silicon Nitride for Brayton Turbine Wheel Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Marc R.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) is being evaluated as a risk-reduction alternative for a Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter Brayton turbine wheel in the event that the Prometheus program design requirements exceed the creep strength of the baseline metallic superalloys. Five Si3N4 ceramics, each processed by a different method, were screened based on the Weibull distribution of bend strength at 1700 F (927 C). Three of the Si3N4 ceramics, Honeywell AS800, Kyocera SN282, and Saint-Gobain NT154, had bend strengths in excess of 87 ksi (600 MPa) at 1700 F (927 C). These were chosen for further assessment and consideration for future subcomponent and component fabrication and testing.

  19. Improved performance of silicon nitride-based high temperature ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashbrook, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Recent progress in the production of Si3N4 based ceramics is reviewed: (1) high temperature strength and toughness of hot pressed Si3N4 were improved by using high purity powder and a stabilized ZrO2 additive, (2) impact resistance of hot pressed Si3N4 was increased by the use of a crushable energy absorbing layer, (3) the oxidation resistance and strength of reaction sintered Si3N4 were increased by impregnating reaction sintered silicon nitride with solutions that oxidize to Al2O3 or ZrO2, (4) beta prime SiA1ON compositions and sintering aids were developed for improved oxidation resistance or improved high temperature strength.

  20. Strength of hot isostatically pressed and sintered reaction bonded silicon nitrides containing Y2O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, William A.; Mieskowski, Diane M.

    1989-01-01

    The hot isostatic pressing of reaction bonded Si3N4 containing Y2O3 produced specimens with greater room temperature strengths than those by high pressure nitrogen sintering of the same material. Average room temperature bend strengths for hot isostatically pressed reaction bonded silicon nitride and high pressure nitrogen sintered reaction bonded silicon nitride were 767 and 670 MPa, respectively. Values of 472 and 495 MPa were observed at 1370 C. For specimens of similar but lower Y2O3 content produced from Si3N4 powder using the same high pressure nitrogen sintering conditions, the room temperature strength was 664 MPa and the 1370 C strength was 402 MPa. The greater strengths of the reaction bonded silicon nitride materials in comparison to the sintered silicon nitride powder material are attributed to the combined effect of processing method and higher Y2O3 content.

  1. Conductivity of materials made of aluminum nitride and silicon nitride mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorbatov, A. G.; Kamyshov, V. M.

    1978-01-01

    To establish the possible mechanism for conductivity in aluminum nitride a study was made of the electric conductivity of pure AlN and its mixtures with silicon nitride at different temperatures and partial pressures of nitrogen in the gas phase. The thermoelectromotive force was also measured. The experiments used polycrystalline samples of cylindrical shape 18 mm in diameter made of powders by hot pressing in graphite press molds at a temperature of 1973-2273 K and pressure 1,470,000 n/sqm. The items obtained by this method had porosity not over 5%. After pressing, the samples were machined to remove carbon from the surface, and were annealed in a stream of dry ammonia for 10 h at a temperature of 1273-1373 K. Electric conductivity was measured according to the bridge scheme on an alternating current of frequency 10 kHz. In order to guarantee close contact of the platinum electrodes with the surface of the samples, a thin layer of platinum was sprayed on them. Experiments were conducted in the temperature interval 1273-1573 K with a half hour delay at each assigned temperature with heating and cooling.

  2. Properties of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of NASA Lewis developed SiC/RBSN composites and their thermal and environmental stability havd been studied. The composites consist of nearly 30 vol pct of aligned 142 micron diameter chemically vapor-deposited SiC fibers in a relatively porous silicon nitride matrix. In the as-fabricated condition, the unidirectional and 2-D composites exhibited metal-like stress-strain behavior, graceful failure, and showed improved properties when compared with unreinforced matrix of comparable density. Furthermore, the measured room temperature tensile properties were relativley independent of tested volume and were unaffected by artifical notches normal to the loading direction or by thermal shocking from temperatures up to 800 C. The four-point bend strength data measured as a function of temperature to 1400 C in air showed that as-fabricated strength was maintained to 1200 C. At 1400 C, however, nearly 15 pct loss in strength was observed. Measurement of room temperature tensile strength after 100 hr exposure at temperatures to 1400 C in a nitrogen environment indicated no loss from the as-fabricated composite strength. On the other hand, after 100 hr exposure in flowing oxygen at 1200 and 1400 C, the composites showed approximately 40 pct loss from their as-fabricated ultimate tensile strength. Those exposed between 400 to 1200 C showed nearly 60 pct strength loss. Oxidation of the fiber/matrix interface as well as internal oxidation of the porous Si3N4 matrix are likely mechanisms for strength degradation. The excellent strength reproducibility, notch insensitivity, and high temperature strength of the composite makes it an ideal candidate for advanced heat engine applications provided coating or densification methods are developed to avoid internal oxidation attack.

  3. Use of additives to improve microstructures and fracture resistance of silicon nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Becher, Paul F.; Lin, Hua-Tay

    2011-06-28

    A high-strength, fracture-resistant silicon nitride ceramic material that includes about 5 to about 75 wt-% of elongated reinforcing grains of beta-silicon nitride, about 20 to about 95 wt-% of fine grains of beta-silicon nitride, wherein the fine grains have a major axis of less than about 1 micron; and about 1 to about 15 wt-% of an amorphous intergranular phase comprising Si, N, O, a rare earth element and a secondary densification element. The elongated reinforcing grains have an aspect ratio of 2:1 or greater and a major axis measuring about 1 micron or greater. The elongated reinforcing grains are essentially isotropically oriented within the ceramic microstructure. The silicon nitride ceramic exhibits a room temperature flexure strength of 1,000 MPa or greater and a fracture toughness of 9 MPa-m.sup.(1/2) or greater. The silicon nitride ceramic exhibits a peak strength of 800 MPa or greater at 1200 degrees C. Also included are methods of making silicon nitride ceramic materials which exhibit the described high flexure strength and fracture-resistant values.

  4. Silica coating of zirconia by silicon nitride hydrolysis on adhesion promotion of resin to zirconia.

    PubMed

    Lung, Christie Ying Kei; Liu, Dan; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of silica coating on zirconia by silicon nitride hydrolysis in resin zirconia bonding was investigated. The silica coated zirconia samples were prepared in silicon nitride dispersion at 90 °C under different immersion times followed by a thermal treatment at 1400 °C. Four test groups were prepared: 1) zirconia samples treated by sandblasting, 2) zirconia samples treated by immersion in silicon nitride dispersion for 6 h, 3) zirconia samples treated by immersion in silicon nitride dispersion for 24 h and 4) zirconia samples treated by immersion in silicon nitride dispersion for 48 h. The coatings were characterized by SEM, EDX, XRD and Raman. The resin zirconia bond strengths of the four test groups were evaluated under three storage conditions: dry storage, water storage in deionized water at 37 °C for 30 days and thermo-cycling for 6000 cycles between 5.0 and 55.0 °C. Surface morphology and composition of zirconia were changed after surface treatments. Phase transformation was observed for zirconia surface by sandblasting treatment but was not observed for zirconia surface treated with silicon nitride hydrolysis. Significant differences in bond strengths were found under different surface treatments (p<0.001) and under three storage conditions (p<0.005). The highest bond strength values were obtained by sandblasting treatment.

  5. Fabrication of porous silicon nitride ceramics using binder jetting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinskiy, L.; Ripetsky, A.; Sitnikov, S.; Solyaev, Y.; Kahramanov, R.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the results of the binder jetting technology application for the processing of the Si3N4-based ceramics. The difference of the developed technology from analogues used for additive manufacturing of silicon nitride ceramics is a method of the separate deposition of the mineral powder and binder without direct injection of suspensions/slurries. It is assumed that such approach allows reducing the technology complexity and simplifying the process of the feedstock preparation, including the simplification of the composite materials production. The binders based on methyl ester of acrylic acid with polyurethane and modified starch were studied. At this stage of the investigations, the technology of green body's fabrication is implemented using a standard HP cartridge mounted on the robotic arm. For the coordinated operation of the cartridge and robot the specially developed software was used. Obtained green bodies of silicon powder were used to produce the ceramic samples via reaction sintering. The results of study of ceramics samples microstructure and composition are presented. Sintered ceramics are characterized by fibrous α-Si3N4 structure and porosity up to 70%.

  6. Thermal Residual Stress in Environmental Barrier Coated Silicon Nitride - Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Abdul-Aziz; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2009-01-01

    When exposed to combustion environments containing moisture both un-reinforced and fiber reinforced silicon based ceramic materials tend to undergo surface recession. To avoid surface recession environmental barrier coating systems are required. However, due to differences in the elastic and thermal properties of the substrate and the environmental barrier coating, thermal residual stresses can be generated in the coated substrate. Depending on their magnitude and nature thermal residual stresses can have significant influence on the strength and fracture behavior of coated substrates. To determine the maximum residual stresses developed during deposition of the coatings, a finite element model (FEM) was developed. Using this model, the thermal residual stresses were predicted in silicon nitride substrates coated with three environmental coating systems namely barium strontium aluminum silicate (BSAS), rare earth mono silicate (REMS) and earth mono di-silicate (REDS). A parametric study was also conducted to determine the influence of coating layer thickness and material parameters on thermal residual stress. Results indicate that z-direction stresses in all three systems are small and negligible, but maximum in-plane stresses can be significant depending on the composition of the constituent layer and the distance from the substrate. The BSAS and REDS systems show much lower thermal residual stresses than REMS system. Parametric analysis indicates that in each system, the thermal residual stresses can be decreased with decreasing the modulus and thickness of the coating.

  7. Light-induced enhancement of the minority carrier lifetime in boron-doped Czochralski silicon passivated by doped silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongzhe; Chen, Chao; Pan, Miao; Sun, Yiling; Yang, Xi

    2015-12-01

    This study reports a doubling of the effective minority carrier lifetime under light soaking conditions, observed in a boron-doped p-type Czochralski grown silicon wafer passivated by a phosphorus-doped silicon nitride thin film. The analysis of capacitance-voltage curves revealed that the fixed charge in this phosphorus-doped silicon nitride film was negative, which was unlike the well-known positive fixed charges observed in traditional undoped silicon nitride. The analysis results revealed that the enhancement phenomenon of minority carrier lifetime was caused by the abrupt increase in the density of negative fixed charge (from 7.2 × 1011 to 1.2 × 1012 cm-2) after light soaking.

  8. Synthesis of fine-grained .alpha.-silicon nitride by a combustion process

    DOEpatents

    Holt, J. Birch; Kingman, Donald D.; Bianchini, Gregory M.

    1990-01-01

    A combustion synthesis process for the preparation of .alpha.-silicon nitride and composites thereof is disclosed. Preparation of the .alpha.-silicon nitride comprises the steps of dry mixing silicon powder with an alkali metal azide, such as sodium azide, cold-pressing the mixture into any desired shape, or loading the mixture into a fused, quartz crucible, loading the crucible into a combustion chamber, pressurizing the chamber with nitrogen and igniting the mixture using an igniter pellet. The method for the preparation of the composites comprises dry mixing silicon powder (Si) or SiO.sub.2, with a metal or metal oxide, adding a small amount of an alkali metal azide such as sodium azide, introducing the mixture into a suitable combustion chamber, pressurizing the combustion chamber with nitrogen, igniting the mixture within the combustion chamber, and isolating the .alpha.-silicon nitride formed as a reaction product.

  9. Synthesis of Silicon Nitride and Silicon Carbide Nanocomposites through High Energy Milling of Waste Silica Fume for Structural Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suri, Jyothi

    Nanocomposites have been widely used in a multitude of applications in electronics and structural components because of their improved mechanical, electrical, and magnetic properties. Silicon nitride/Silicon carbide (Si 3N4/SiC) nanocomposites have been studied intensively for low and high temperature structural applications, such as turbine and automobile engine components, ball bearings, turbochargers, as well as energy applications due to their superior wear resistance, high temperature strength, high oxidation resistance and good creep resistance. Silica fume is the waste material produced during the manufacture of silicon and ferro-silicon alloys, and contains 94 to 97 wt.% SiO2. In the present dissertation, the feasibility of using waste silica fume as the raw material was investigated to synthesize (I) advanced nanocomposites of Si3N4/SiC, and (2) porous silicon carbide (SiC) for membrane applications. The processing approach used to convert the waste material to advanced ceramic materials was based on a novel process called, integrated mechanical and thermal activation process (IMTA) process. In the first part of the dissertation, the effect of parameters such as carbothermic nitridation and reduction temperature and the graphite concentration in the starting silica fume plus graphite mixture, were explored to synthesize nanocomposite powders with tailored amounts of Si3N4 and SiC phases. An effective way to synthesize carbon-free Si3N 4/SiC composite powders was studied to provide a clear pathway and fundamental understanding of the reaction mechanisms. Si3N4/SiC nanocomposite powders were then sintered using two different approaches, based on liquid phase sintering and spark plasma sintering processes, with Al 2O3 and Y2O3 as the sintering aids. The nanocomposites were investigated for their densification behavior, microstructure, and mechanical properties. Si3N4/SiC nanocomposites thus obtained were found to possess superior mechanical properties at much

  10. Graphene metallization of high-stress silicon nitride resonators for electrical integration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunwoo; Adiga, Vivekananda P; Barton, Robert A; van der Zande, Arend M; Lee, Gwan-Hyoung; Ilic, B Rob; Gondarenko, Alexander; Parpia, Jeevak M; Craighead, Harold G; Hone, James

    2013-09-11

    High stress stoichiometric silicon nitride resonators, whose quality factors exceed one million, have shown promise for applications in sensing, signal processing, and optomechanics. Yet, electrical integration of the insulating silicon nitride resonators has been challenging, as depositing even a thin layer of metal degrades the quality factor significantly. In this work, we show that graphene used as a conductive coating for Si3N4 membranes reduces the quality factor by less than 30% on average, which is minimal when compared to the effect of conventional metallization layers such as chromium or aluminum. The electrical integration of Si3N4-Graphene (SiNG) heterostructure resonators is demonstrated with electrical readout and electrostatic tuning of the frequency by up to 0.3% per volt. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of hybrid graphene/nitride mechanical resonators in which the electrical properties of graphene are combined with the superior mechanical performance of silicon nitride.

  11. Bend strengths of reaction bonded silicon nitride prepared from dry attrition milled silicon powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, T. P.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    Dry attrition milled silicon powder was compacted, sintered in helium, and reaction bonded in nitrogen-4 volume percent hydrogen. Bend strengths of bars with as-nitrided surfaces averaged as high as 210 MPa at room temperature and 220 MPa at 1400 C. Bars prepared from the milled powder were stronger than those prepared from as-received powder at both room temperature and at 1400 C. Room temperature strength decreased with increased milling time and 1400 C strength increased with increased milling time.

  12. Improved multicrystalline silicon ingot quality using single layer silicon beads coated with silicon nitride as seed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    babu, G. Anandha; Takahashi, Isao; Matsushima, Satoru; Usami, Noritaka

    2016-05-01

    We propose to utilize single layer silicon beads (SLSB) coated with silicon nitride as cost-effective seed layer to grow high-quality multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) ingot. The texture structure of silicon nitride provides a large number of nucleation sites for the fine grain formation at the bottom of the crucible. No special care is needed to prevent seed melting, which would lead to decrease of red zone owing to decrease of feedstock melting time. As we expected, mc-Si ingot seeded with SLSB was found to consist of small, different grain orientations, more uniform grain distribution, high percentage of random grain boundaries, less twin boundaries, and low density of dislocation clusters compared with conventional mc-Si ingot grown under identical growth conditions. These results show that the SLSB seeded mc-Si ingot has enhanced ingot quality. The correlation between grain boundary structure and defect structure as well as the reason responsible for dislocation clusters reduction in SLSB seeded mc-Si wafer are also discussed.

  13. High gas velocity burner tests on silicon carbide and silicon nitride at 1200 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. A.; Probst, H. B.

    1973-01-01

    Specimens of silicon carbide and silicon nitride were exposed to a Mach one gas velocity burner simulating a turbine engine environment. Cyclic tests up to 100 hour duration were conducted at specimen temperatures of 1200 C. A specimen geometry was used that develops thermal stresses during thermal cycling in a manner similar to blades and vanes of a gas turbine engine. Materials were compared on a basis of weight change, dimensional reductions, metallography, fluorescent penetrant inspection, X-ray diffraction analyses, failure mode, and general appearance. One hot pressed SiC, one reaction sintered SiC, and three hot pressed Si3N4 specimens survived the program goal of 100 one-hour cycle exposures. Of the materials that failed to meet the program goal, thermal fatigue was identified as the exclusive failure mode.

  14. Multisite silicon neural probes with integrated silicon nitride waveguides and gratings for optogenetic applications

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Euijae; Chen, Yu; Masmanidis, Sotiris; Li, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Optimal optogenetic perturbation of brain circuit activity often requires light delivery in a precise spatial pattern that cannot be achieved with conventional optical fibers. We demonstrate an implantable silicon-based probe with a compact light delivery system, consisting of silicon nitride waveguides and grating couplers for out-of-plane light emission with high spatial resolution. 473 nm light is coupled into and guided in cm-long waveguide and emitted at the output grating coupler. Using the direct cut-back and out-scattering measurement techniques, the propagation optical loss of the waveguide is measured to be below 3 dB/cm. The grating couplers provide collimated light emission with sufficient irradiance for neural stimulation. Finally, a probe with multisite light delivery with three output grating emitters from a single laser input is demonstrated. PMID:26941111

  15. Preparation of silicon carbide-silicon nitride fibers by the pyrolysis of polycarbosilazane precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, B. G.; Daniels, J. G.; Ledbetter, F. E., III; Clemons, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The development of silicon carbide-silicon nitride fibers (SiC-Si3N4) by the pyrolysis of polycarbosilazane precursors is reviewed. Precursor resin, which was prepared by heating tris(N-methylamino)methylsilane or tris(N-methylamino)phenylsilane to about 520 C, was drawn into fibers from the melt and then made unmeltable by humidity conditioning at 100 C and 95 percent relative humidity. The humidity treated precursor fibers were pyrolyzed to ceramic fibers with good mechanical properties and electrical resistivity. For example, SiC-Si3N4 fibers derived from tris(N-methylamino)methylsilane had a tensile rupture modulus of 29 million psi and electrical resistivity of 6.9 x ten to the 8th power omega-cm, which is ten to the twelfth power times greater than that obtained for graphite fibers.

  16. BORON NITRIDE CAPACITORS FOR ADVANCED POWER ELECTRONIC DEVICES

    SciTech Connect

    N. Badi; D. Starikov; C. Boney; A. Bensaoula; D. Johnstone

    2010-11-01

    This project fabricates long-life boron nitride/boron oxynitride thin film -based capacitors for advanced SiC power electronics with a broad operating temperature range using a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique. The use of vapor deposition provides for precise control and quality material formation.

  17. Fabrication of a full-size EUV pellicle based on silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, Dario L.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the fabrication and initial characterization of an unsupported membrane composed of a single ultrathin silicon nitride (SiNx) layer with potential application as a EUV pellicle is described in detail. A full size free-standing pellicle with inner film area equal to 113x145mm and champion EUV transparency equal to 89.5% (single pass) is demonstrated utilizing the methodology presented in this study. The exemplary EUV transparency of the reported pellicle was achieved by limiting the membrane thickness to 16nm, while the intrinsic mechanical stability for the silicon nitride film was realized by adjusting the Si:N ratio to provide a non-stoichiometric layer featuring low tensile stress. The pellicle thickness, elemental composition and mass density were used to calculate the expected EUV transparency, which was found to be in good agreement with experimental EUV transmission measurements. Additionally, careful consideration was given to process-induced mechanical instabilities exerted on the ultrathin pellicle during the wet etch, rinsing and drying fabrication steps, and a unique yet simple set of ancillary hardware, materials and processing techniques was introduced to minimize such disturbances and yield large-area pellicles that are free of visible defects and wrinkles. In the absence of commercially available actinic inspection tools, a distinctive advantage of the SiNx membrane versus a Silicon-based EUV pellicle solution is the demonstrated ArF transmission, making it attractive for through-pellicle mask defect inspection and advanced metrology work utilizing available 193nm excimer laser and detection systems. A preliminary heat load test indicates that the SiNx-based EUV pellicle would be marginally compatible with an equivalent 80W EUV source.

  18. RF sputtered silicon and hafnium nitrides as applied to 440C steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon nitride and hafnium nitride coatings were deposited on oxidized and unoxidized 440C stainless steel substrates. Sputtering was done in mixtures of argon and nitrogen gases from pressed powder silicon nitride and from hafnium metal targets. The coatings and the interface between the coating and substrate were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Auger electron spectroscopy. Oxide was found at all interfaces with an interface width of at least 600 A for the oxidized substrates and at least 300 A for the unoxidized substrates. Scratch test results demonstrate that the adhesion of hafnium nitride to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C is superior to that of silicon nitride. Oxidized 440C is found to have increased adhesion, to both nitrides, over that of unoxidized 440C. Coatings of both nitrides deposited at 8 mtorr were found to have increased adhesion to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C over those deposited at 20 mtorr.

  19. Influence of grinding direction on fracture strength of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Strakna, T.J.; Jahanmir, S.; Allor, R.L.; Kumar, K.V.

    1995-12-31

    It is generally found that grinding transverse to the tensile stress direction in flexure bars subjected to four-point bending results in a lower strength compared to grinding in the longitudinal direction. In the present study, standard flexure specimens made from a reaction-bonded and a sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN and SRBSN) were surface ground under three different conditions in both longitudinal and transverse directions to assess the effect of grinding direction on strength. Four-point flexure tests were performed on the specimens and Weibull parameters were calculated. The results showed that while the strength was not affected by the grinding condition when grinding was performed in the longitudinal direction, the strength of the samples ground in the transverse direction was reduced as the material removal rate was increased by a factor of 30. This result was confirmed by fractography, which showed that almost all the fracture initiation sites in the longitudinally ground samples were associated with near-surface microstructural features, whereas in the transverse ground samples fracture initiated from damage introduced by grinding. The strength reduction by grinding in the transverse direction was found to be material dependent, and was larger for SRBSN than for RBSN.

  20. Ag doped silicon nitride nanocomposites for embedded plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayle, M.; Bonafos, C.; Benzo, P.; Benassayag, G.; Pécassou, B.; Khomenkova, L.; Gourbilleau, F.; Carles, R.

    2015-09-01

    The localized surface plasmon-polariton resonance (LSPR) of noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) is widely exploited for enhanced optical spectroscopies of molecules, nonlinear optics, photothermal therapy, photovoltaics, or more recently in plasmoelectronics and photocatalysis. The LSPR frequency depends not only of the noble metal NP material, shape, and size but also of its environment, i.e., of the embedding matrix. In this paper, Ag-NPs have been fabricated by low energy ion beam synthesis in silicon nitride (SiNx) matrices. By coupling the high refractive index of SiNx to the relevant choice of dielectric thickness in a SiNx/Si bilayer for an optimum antireflective effect, a very sharp plasmonic optical interference is obtained in mid-range of the visible spectrum (2.6 eV). The diffusion barrier property of the host SiNx matrix allows for the introduction of a high amount of Ag and the formation of a high density of Ag-NPs that nucleate during the implantation process. Under specific implantation conditions, in-plane self-organization effects are obtained in this matrix that could be the result of a metastable coarsening regime.

  1. Optimization of the gelcasting of a silicon nitride formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Omatete, O.O.; Pollinger, J.P.; O`Young, K.

    1995-06-01

    An optimum gelcasting condition for a silicon nitride formulation was determined using the Taguchi statistical method. An L{sub 8}(4{sup 1} {times} 2{sup 4}) design, in which the effects of one factor at four levels and four factors at two levels were evaluated in only eight experiments, was used. The factors at two levels were: the total monomer concentration, the monomer/crosslinker ratio, the initiator concentration, and the initiator/catalyst ratio; the factor at four levels was the initiator concentration per mass of the slip. The primary criterion used to determine optimum design was the green strength of the dried part, although three other parameters were measured: initial slip viscosity, time for the slip viscosity to reach 300 mPa.s. at 25 C, and time for the slip to gel at 50 C. The optimum gelcasting conditions from the designed experiments predicted 80% increase in green strength (4.3 MPa versus 2.4 MPa, the initial value). The confirmation runs showed only a 60% increase (3.8 MPa).

  2. Gas pressure sintering of silicon nitride to optimize fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Nunn, S.D.; Beavers, T.M.; Menchhofer, P.A.; Barker, D.L.; Coffey, D.W.

    1995-06-01

    Gas-pressure sintering (GPS) can be used to densify silicon nitride containing a wide variety of sintering additives. Parameters affecting the sintering behavior include densification temperature, densification time, grain growth temperature, grain growth time and heating rates. The Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-6% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-2% A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples sintered to high densities at all conditions used in the present study, whereas the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Sr{sub 2}La{sub 4}Yb{sub 4}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} samples required the highest temperatures and longest times to achieve densities {ge}98 % T. D. The main effect on the fracture toughness for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-6% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-2% A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples was the use of a lower densification temperature, which was 1900C in the present study. For the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Sr{sub 2}La{sub 4}Yb{sub 4}SiO4{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} composition, fracture toughness was sensitive to and improved by a slower heating rate (10c/min), a lower densification temperature (1900`), a higher grain growth temperature (2000C), and a longer grain growth time (2 h).

  3. Surface modifications of silicon nitride for cellular biosensor applications.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Johan; Altankov, George; Errachid, Abdelhamid; Samitier, Josep; Planell, Josep A; Engel, Elisabeth

    2008-04-01

    Thin films of silicon nitride (Si3N4) can be used in several kinds of micro-sized biosensors as a material to monitor fine environmental changes related to the process of bone formation in vitro. We found however that Si3N4 does not provide optimal conditions for osseointegration as osteoblast-like MG-63 cells tend to detach from the surface when cultured over confluence. Therefore Si3N4 was modified with self-assembled monolayers bearing functional end groups of primary amine (NH2) and carboxyl (COOH) respectively. Both these modifications enhanced the interaction with confluent cell layers and thus improve osseointegration over Si3N4. Furthermore it was observed that the NH2 functionality increased the adsorption of fibronectin (FN), promoted cell proliferation, but delayed the differentiation. We also studied the fate of pre-adsorbed and secreted FN from cells to learn more about the impact of above functionalities for the development of provisional extracellular matrix on materials interface. Taken together our data supports that Si3N4 has low tissue integration but good cellular biocompatibility and thus is appropriate in cellular biosensor applications such as the ion-sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET). COOH and NH2 chemistries generally improve the interfacial tissue interaction with the sensor and they are therefore suitable substrates for monitoring cellular growth or matrix deposition using electrical impedance spectroscopy.

  4. Silicon nitride waveguide router enabling directional power transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Vivek Raj; Lee, Hak-Soon; Lee, Yong-Geon; Lee, Sang-Shin

    2014-11-01

    A passive guided-wave router featuring directional power transmission among three different input/output ports has been proposed and demonstrated, taking advantage of appropriately disposed straight and bent waveguides in silicon nitride. The proposed router consists of a straight waveguide and a curved waveguide of the same width, which are brought together with a small offset between them and are interconnected together to another curved waveguide of an enlarged width. Due to the passively directional steering of excited guided modes induced by the device configuration, a three-port guided wave router is demonstrated where a signal input from Port I passes to Port II, but a signal fed from Port II is directed to Port III instead of Port I, providing a good contrast level of 14 dB at λ=1546 nm for forward and backward transmissions. Insertion losses of 4.6 dB and 1.2 dB were respectively obtained for the routes from Port I to Port II and from Port II to Port III. Due to the absence of active control and the use of conventional linear materials, the proposed passive router featuring a compact configuration will play a pivotal role in creating fully functional on-chip photonic circuits.

  5. Silicon Nitride Creep Under Various Specimen-Loading Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Holland, Frederic A.

    2000-01-01

    Extensive creep testing of a hot-pressed silicon nitride (NC 132) was performed at 1300 C in air using five different specimen-loading configurations: (1) pure tension, (2) pure compression, (3) four-point uniaxial flexure, (4) ball-on-ring biaxial flexure, and (5) ring-on-ring biaxial flexure. This paper reports experimental results as well as test techniques developed in this work. Nominal creep strain and its rate for a given nominal applied stress were greatest in tension, least in compression, and intermediate in uniaxial and biaxial flexure. Except for the case of compression loading, nominal creep strain generally decreased with time, resulting in a less-defined steady-state condition. Of the four creep formulations-power-law, hyperbolic sine, step, and redistribution--the conventional power-law formulation still provides the most convenient and reasonable estimation of the creep parameters of the NC 132 material. The data base to be obtained will be used to validate the NASA Glenn-developed design code CARES/Creep (ceramics analysis and reliability evaluation of structures and creep).

  6. Ag doped silicon nitride nanocomposites for embedded plasmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Bayle, M.; Bonafos, C. Benzo, P.; Benassayag, G.; Pécassou, B.; Carles, R.; Khomenkova, L.; Gourbilleau, F.

    2015-09-07

    The localized surface plasmon-polariton resonance (LSPR) of noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) is widely exploited for enhanced optical spectroscopies of molecules, nonlinear optics, photothermal therapy, photovoltaics, or more recently in plasmoelectronics and photocatalysis. The LSPR frequency depends not only of the noble metal NP material, shape, and size but also of its environment, i.e., of the embedding matrix. In this paper, Ag-NPs have been fabricated by low energy ion beam synthesis in silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) matrices. By coupling the high refractive index of SiN{sub x} to the relevant choice of dielectric thickness in a SiN{sub x}/Si bilayer for an optimum antireflective effect, a very sharp plasmonic optical interference is obtained in mid-range of the visible spectrum (2.6 eV). The diffusion barrier property of the host SiN{sub x} matrix allows for the introduction of a high amount of Ag and the formation of a high density of Ag-NPs that nucleate during the implantation process. Under specific implantation conditions, in-plane self-organization effects are obtained in this matrix that could be the result of a metastable coarsening regime.

  7. Occurence and implications of silicon nitride in enstatic chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Swan, P.; Prombo, C. A.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon nitride Si3N4, has previously been observed to be a common constituent of acid residues of Qingzhen (EH3) and Indarch (EH4). Ion probe analysis of the Si, N and C isotopic compositions of individual Si3N4 grains from Qingzhen and Indarch acid residues suggest most, if not all, grains are Solar System in origin. A few grains have isotopically anomalous C but this is probably due to small presolar SiC grains adhering to them. In situ observations of the Si3N4 in Qingzhen show that it is only present within, and probably exsolved from, host phases which contain elemental Si in solid solution. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the Si3N4 probably formed during metamorphism and not in the nebula. Thermodynamic calculations also show that sinoite (Si2N2O) and not Si3N4 should be the stable phase during metamorphism. It appears that kinetic factors must have inhibited the formation if sinoite in Qimgzhen and Indarch.

  8. Photoluminescence and electronic transitions in cubic silicon nitride

    PubMed Central

    Museur, Luc; Zerr, Andreas; Kanaev, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    A spectroscopic study of cubic silicon nitride (γ-Si3N4) at cryogenic temperatures of 8 K in the near IR - VUV range of spectra with synchrotron radiation excitation provided the first experimental evidence of direct electronic transitions in this material. The observed photoluminescence (PL) bands were assigned to excitons and excited and centers formed after the electron capture by neutral structural defects. The excitons are weakly quenched on neutral and strongly on charged defects. The fundamental band-gap energy of 5.05 ± 0.05 eV and strong free exciton binding energy ~0.65 eV were determined. The latter value suggests a high efficiency of the electric power transformation in light in defect-free crystals. Combined with a very high hardness and exceptional thermal stability in air, our results indicate that γ-Si3N4 has a potential for fabrication of robust and efficient photonic emitters. PMID:26725937

  9. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Ceramics with Pore Gradient Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Lianmeng; Chen Fei; Shen Qiang; Yan Faqiang

    2008-02-15

    In the present study, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics with pore gradient structure were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. Silicon nitride ceramics with different controlled porosities were prepared by using ZrP{sub 2}O{sub 7} as a binder material and heat treated at 1100 deg. C in a pressureless nitrogen atmosphere. Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics with controlled porosity of 34-47% were obtained. The distribution of porous structure was homogenous. Fully dense Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics could be sintered at 1400{approx}1600 deg. C by using MgO and alumina Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the sintering aids. Pore gradient structure was formed by laminating the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} porous ceramics and powder mixture was used to obtain fully dense ceramics, and then sintering at 1400-1600 deg. C. Microstructure of sintered samples was observed by scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and the change of phase compositions was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that these samples exhibited a good porous graded structure with a highly porous layer and a dense surface layer. The major phase of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics was still {alpha} phase.

  10. Hydrogenation of defects in edge-defined film-fed grown aluminum-enhanced plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride multicrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Ji-Weon; Rosenblum, Mark D.; Kalejs, Juris P.; Rohatgi, Ajeet

    2000-05-01

    Gettering of impurities and hydrogen passivation of defects in edge-defined film-fed grown (EFG) multicrystalline silicon were studied by low-cost manufacturable technologies such as emitter diffusion by a spin-on phosphorus dopant source, back surface field formation by screen-printed aluminum, and a post-deposition anneal of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride antireflection coating. These processes were carried out in a high-throughput lamp-heated conveyor belt furnace. PECVD silicon nitride-induced hydrogenation of defects in EFG silicon was studied in conjunction with screen-printed aluminum back surface field formation to investigate the synergistic effect of aluminum gettering and silicon nitride hydrogenation of bulk defects. It was found that post-deposition anneal of PECVD silicon nitride at temperatures ranging from 450 to 850 °C, without the coformation of aluminum back surface field on the back, does not provide appreciable passivation or hydrogenation of bulk defects in EFG material. However, simultaneous anneal of PECVD silicon nitride and formation of aluminum back surface field at 850 °C significantly enhanced the hydrogenation ability of the PECVD silicon nitride film. PECVD silicon nitride deposition and a subsequent anneal, after the aluminum back surface field formation, was found to be less effective in passivating bulk defects. It is proposed that aluminum-enhanced hydrogenation from a PECVD silicon nitride film is the result of vacancy generation at the aluminum-silicon interface due to the alloying process. The affinity of hydrogen to react with vacancies provides a chemical potential gradient that increases the flux of atomic hydrogen from the silicon nitride film into the bulk silicon. In addition, vacancies can dissociate hydrogen molecules, increasing the atomic hydrogen content of the bulk silicon. This enhances defect passivation and improves the minority carrier lifetime.

  11. Gas source molecular beam epitaxy of scandium nitride on silicon carbide and gallium nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2014-11-01

    Scandium nitride (ScN) is a group IIIB transition metal nitride semiconductor with numerous potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices due to close lattice matching with gallium nitride (GaN). However, prior investigations of ScN have focused primarily on heteroepitaxial growth on substrates with a high lattice mismatch of 7%–20%. In this study, the authors have investigated ammonia (NH{sub 3}) gas source molecular beam epitaxy (NH{sub 3}-GSMBE) of ScN on more closely lattice matched silicon carbide (SiC) and GaN surfaces (<3% mismatch). Based on a thermodynamic analysis of the ScN phase stability window, NH{sub 3}-GSMBE conditions of 10{sup −5}–10{sup −4} Torr NH{sub 3} and 800–1050 °C where selected for initial investigation. In-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ex-situ Rutherford backscattering measurements showed all ScN films grown using these conditions were stoichiometric. For ScN growth on 3C-SiC (111)-(√3 × √3)R30° carbon rich surfaces, the observed attenuation of the XPS Si 2p and C 1s substrate core levels with increasing ScN thickness indicated growth initiated in a layer-by-layer fashion. This was consistent with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of 100–200 nm thick films that revealed featureless surfaces. In contrast, ScN films grown on 3C-SiC (111)-(3 × 3) and 3C-SiC (100)-(3 × 2) silicon rich surfaces were found to exhibit extremely rough surfaces in SEM. ScN films grown on both 3C-SiC (111)-(√3 × √3)R30° and 2H-GaN (0001)-(1 × 1) epilayer surfaces exhibited hexagonal (1 × 1) low energy electron diffraction patterns indicative of (111) oriented ScN. X-ray diffraction ω-2θ rocking curve scans for these same films showed a large full width half maximum of 0.29° (1047 arc sec) consistent with transmission electron microscopy images that revealed the films to be poly-crystalline with columnar grains oriented at ≈15° to the [0001] direction of the

  12. Passivation of c-Si surfaces by sub-nm amorphous silicon capped with silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Yimao; Yan, Di; Bullock, James; Zhang, Xinyu; Cuevas, Andres

    2015-12-01

    A sub-nm hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film capped with silicon nitride (SiNx) is shown to provide a high level passivation to crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces. When passivated by a 0.8 nm a-Si:H/75 nm SiNx stack, recombination current density J0 values of 9, 11, 47, and 87 fA/cm2 are obtained on 10 Ω.cm n-type, 0.8 Ω.cm p-type, 160 Ω/sq phosphorus-diffused, and 120 Ω/sq boron-diffused silicon surfaces, respectively. The J0 on n-type 10 Ω.cm wafers is further reduced to 2.5 ± 0.5 fA/cm2 when the a-Si:H film thickness exceeds 2.5 nm. The passivation by the sub-nm a-Si:H/SiNx stack is thermally stable at 400 °C in N2 for 60 min on all four c-Si surfaces. Capacitance-voltage measurements reveal a reduction in interface defect density and film charge density with an increase in a-Si:H thickness. The nearly transparent sub-nm a-Si:H/SiNx stack is thus demonstrated to be a promising surface passivation and antireflection coating suitable for all types of surfaces encountered in high efficiency c-Si solar cells.

  13. Elasticity and inelasticity of silicon nitride/boron nitride fibrous monoliths.

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, B. I.; Burenkov, Yu. A.; Kardashev, B. K.; Singh, D.; Goretta, K. C.; de Arellano-Lopez, A. R.; Energy Technology; Russian Academy of Sciences; Univer. de Sevilla

    2001-01-01

    A study is reported on the effect of temperature and elastic vibration amplitude on Young's modulus E and internal friction in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and BN ceramic samples and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/BN monoliths obtained by hot pressing of BN-coated Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} fibers. The fibers were arranged along, across, or both along and across the specimen axis. The E measurements were carried out under thermal cycling within the 20-600 C range. It was found that high-modulus silicon-nitride specimens possess a high thermal stability; the E(T) dependences obtained under heating and cooling coincide well with one another. The low-modulus BN ceramic exhibits a considerable hysteresis, thus indicating evolution of the defect structure under the action of thermoelastic (internal) stresses. Monoliths demonstrate a qualitatively similar behavior (with hysteresis). This behavior of the elastic modulus is possible under microplastic deformation initiated by internal stresses. The presence of microplastic shear in all the materials studied is supported by the character of the amplitude dependences of internal friction and the Young's modulus. The experimental data obtained are discussed in terms of a model in which the temperature dependences of the elastic modulus and their features are accounted for by both microplastic deformation and nonlinear lattice-atom vibrations, which depend on internal stresses.

  14. Process for producing silicon nitride based articles of high fracture toughness and strength

    DOEpatents

    Huckabee, M.; Buljan, S.T.; Neil, J.T.

    1991-09-10

    A process for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength is disclosed. The process involves densifying to at least 98% of theoretical density a mixture including (a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 [mu]m and a surface area of about 8-12 m[sup 2]/g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 [mu]m and a surface area of about 2-4 m[sup 2]/g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified article an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. Optionally, the mixture may be blended with a binder and injection molded to form a green body, which then may be densified by, for example, hot isostatic pressing.

  15. Process for producing silicon nitride based articles of high fracture toughness and strength

    DOEpatents

    Huckabee, Marvin; Buljan, Sergej-Tomislav; Neil, Jeffrey T.

    1991-01-01

    A process for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength. The process involves densifying to at least 98% of theoretical density a mixture including (a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 .mu.m and a surface area of about 8-12 m.sup.2 /g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 .mu.m and a surface area of about 2-4 m.sup.2 /g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified article an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. Optionally, the mixture may be blended with a binder and injection molded to form a green body, which then may be densified by, for example, hot isostatic pressing.

  16. Fatigue life of high-speed ball bearings with silicon nitride balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1974-01-01

    Hot-pressed silicon nitride was evaluated as a rolling-element bearing material. The five-ball fatigue tester was used to test 12.7-mm- diameter silicon nitride balls at maximum Hertz stresses ranging from 4.27 x 10 to the 9th power n/sq m to 6.21 x 10 to the 9th power n/sq m at a race temperature of 328K. The fatigue life of NC-132 hot-pressed silicon nitride was found to be equal to typical bearing steels and much greater than other ceramic or cermet materials at the same stress levels. A digital computer program was used to predict the fatigue life of 120-mm- bore angular-contact ball bearings containing either steel or silicon nitride balls. The analysis indicates that there is no improvement in the lives of bearings of the same geometry operating at DN values from 2 to 4 million where silicon nitride balls are used in place of steel balls.

  17. Reaction injection molding of silicon nitride ceramics having crystallized grain boundary phases

    SciTech Connect

    Lukacs, A. III; Matsumoto, R.L.K.

    1993-08-31

    A reaction injection molding process is described for preparing a sintered, silicon nitride-containing ceramic article comprising; (1) injecting into a heated mold a fluid, nondilatant mixture comprising (a) at least 40% by volume of a powder mixture of (i) from about 20 wt.% to about 98 wt.% silicon nitride, (ii) from about 0.5 wt.% to about 20 wt.% of a silicate glass-forming sintering aid, and (iii) from about 0.001 wt.% to about 80 wt.% of a high metal content transition metal silicide or a transition metal or metal compound that forms a high metal content silicide with silicon nitride under the conditions defined in steps (2) or (3), and (b) a curable silicon nitride precursor binder that is a liquid below its curing temperature, to cure the binder and produce a hardened molded article, (2) heating the hardened mol suitable atmosphere to a temperature sufficient to convert the cured binder to a silicon nitride-containing ceramic, and (3) sintering the article by (i) heating at a temperature of 1,300 to 1,800 C until a silicate glass forms, and (ii) further heating at a temperature of 1,300 to 1,800 C under a vacuum until oxygen is removed from the silicate glass and the glass crystallizes.

  18. Hafnium nitride buffer layers for growth of GaN on silicon

    DOEpatents

    Armitage, Robert D.; Weber, Eicke R.

    2005-08-16

    Gallium nitride is grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on (111) and (001) silicon substrates using hafnium nitride buffer layers. Wurtzite GaN epitaxial layers are obtained on both the (111) and (001) HfN/Si surfaces, with crack-free thickness up to 1.2 {character pullout}m. However, growth on the (001) surface results in nearly stress-free films, suggesting that much thicker crack-free layers could be obtained.

  19. Tensile test of pressureless-sintered silicon nitride at elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsusue, K.; Fujisawa, Y.; Takahara, K.

    1985-01-01

    Uniaxial tensile strength tests of pressureless sintered silicon nitride were carried out in air at temperatures ranging from room temperature up to 1600 C. Silicon nitrides containing Y2O3, Al2O3, Al2O3-MgO, or MgO-CeO2 additives were tested. The results show that the composition of the additive used influences the strength characteristics of the silicon nitride. The tensile strength rapidly decreased at temperatures above 1000 C for the materials containing MgO as the additive and above 1000 C for the material with Y2O3. When the temperature increased to as high as 1300 C, the strength decreased to about 10 percent of the room temperature strength in each case. Observations of the fracture origin and of the crack propagation on the fracture surfaces are discussed.

  20. Ab initio design of nanostructures for solar energy conversion: a case study on silicon nitride nanowire

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Design of novel materials for efficient solar energy conversion is critical to the development of green energy technology. In this work, we present a first-principles study on the design of nanostructures for solar energy harvesting on the basis of the density functional theory. We show that the indirect band structure of bulk silicon nitride is transferred to direct bandgap in nanowire. We find that intermediate bands can be created by doping, leading to enhancement of sunlight absorption. We further show that codoping not only reduces the bandgap and introduces intermediate bands but also enhances the solubility of dopants in silicon nitride nanowires due to reduced formation energy of substitution. Importantly, the codoped nanowire is ferromagnetic, leading to the improvement of carrier mobility. The silicon nitride nanowires with direct bandgap, intermediate bands, and ferromagnetism may be applicable to solar energy harvesting. PMID:25294975

  1. Influence of slurry flocculation on the character and compaction of spray-dried silicon nitride granules

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hideo; Shinohara, Nobuhiro; Okumiya, Masataro; Uematsu, Keizo; JunIchiro, Tsubaki; Iwamoto, Yuji; Kamiya, Hidehiro

    1995-04-01

    The effect of slurry flocculation on the characteristics of silicon nitride granules prepared by the spray drying process is investigated. The flocculation state of an aqueous silicon nitride slurry is controlled by adding nitric acid and evaluated as a function of pH. Dense and hard silicon nitride granules result from a well-dispersed slurry having a high pH (e.g., 10.8). These hard granules retain their shape in green compacts and form detrimental defects. Lowering the pH of the slurry to a certain value (e.g., pH 7.9) results in slurry flocculation. Granules prepared from this flocculated slurry have low density and low diametral compression strength and contribute to the elimination large pores in green compacts.

  2. Ab initio design of nanostructures for solar energy conversion: a case study on silicon nitride nanowire.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Design of novel materials for efficient solar energy conversion is critical to the development of green energy technology. In this work, we present a first-principles study on the design of nanostructures for solar energy harvesting on the basis of the density functional theory. We show that the indirect band structure of bulk silicon nitride is transferred to direct bandgap in nanowire. We find that intermediate bands can be created by doping, leading to enhancement of sunlight absorption. We further show that codoping not only reduces the bandgap and introduces intermediate bands but also enhances the solubility of dopants in silicon nitride nanowires due to reduced formation energy of substitution. Importantly, the codoped nanowire is ferromagnetic, leading to the improvement of carrier mobility. The silicon nitride nanowires with direct bandgap, intermediate bands, and ferromagnetism may be applicable to solar energy harvesting.

  3. Si Passivation and Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Nitride: Final Technical Report, March 18, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Atwater, H. A.

    2007-11-01

    This report investigated chemical and physical methods for Si surface passivation for application in crystalline Si and thin Si film photovoltaic devices. Overall, our efforts during the project were focused in three areas: i) synthesis of silicon nitride thin films with high hydrogen content by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition; ii) investigation of the role of hydrogen passivation of defects in crystalline Si and Si solar cells by out diffusion from hydrogenated silicon nitride films; iii) investigation of the growth kinetics and passivation of hydrogenated polycrystalline. Silicon nitride films were grown by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition and film properties have been characterized as a function of SiH4/NH3 flow ratio. It was demonstrated that hot-wire chemical vapor deposition leads to growth of SiNx films with controllable stoichiometry and hydrogen.

  4. Foreign Object Damage in Flexure Bars of Two Gas-Turbine Grade Silicon Nitrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Pereira, J. Michael; Janosik, Lesley A.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2004-01-01

    Foreign object damage (FOD) behavior of two commercial gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides, AS800 and SN282, was determined at ambient temperature through strength testing of flexure test specimens impacted by steel ball projectiles with a diameter of 1.59 mm in a velocity range from 220 to 440 m/s. AS800 silicon nitride exhibited a greater FOD resistance than SN282, primarily due to its greater value of fracture toughness (K(sub lc)). The use of an additional equiaxed, fine-grained silicon nitride (NC132) showed that fracture toughness was a key material parameter affecting FOD resistance. The observed damages generated by projectile impact were typically in the forms of well- or ill-developed ring and cone cracks with little presence of radial cracks.

  5. Transient and steady-state erosion of in-situ reinforced silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Karasek, K.R.; Whalen, P.J.; Rateick, R.G. Jr.; Hamilton, A.C.; Routbort, J.L.

    1994-10-01

    Relative to most other materials silicon nitride is very erosion resistant. However, the resulting surface flaws degrade strength - a serious concern for component designers. AlliedSignal Ceramic Components GS-44 in-situ reinforced silicon nitride was eroded in a slinger apparatus. Both transient (extremely low level) and steady-state erosion regimes were investigated. Alumina particles with effective average diameters of 140 Jim and 63 {mu}m were used at velocities of 50 m/s, 100 m/s, and 138 m/s. Biaxial tensile strength was measured. Strength decreased by about 15% after a very small erodent dosage and then remained virtually constant with further erosion. In-situ reinforcement produces R-curve behavior in which the fracture toughness increases with crack size. The effect of this is quite dramatic with strength loss being significantly less than expected for a normal silicon nitride with constant fracture toughness.

  6. Thermogravimetric analysis of silicon carbide-silicon nitride polycarbosilazane precursor during pyrolysis from ambient to 1000 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledbetter, F. E., III; Daniels, J. G.; Clemons, J. M.; Hundley, N. H.; Penn, B. G.

    1984-01-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis data are presented on the unmeltable polycarbosilazane precursor of silicon carbide-silicon nitride fibers, over the room temperature-1000 C range in a nitrogen atmosphere, in order to establish the weight loss at various temperatures during the precursor's pyrolysis to the fiber material. The fibers obtained by this method are excellent candidates for use in applications where the oxidation of carbon fibers (above 400 C) renders them unsuitable.

  7. Si quantum dots in silicon nitride: Quantum confinement and defects

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharova, L. V. Karner, V. L.; D'Ortenzio, R.; Chaudhary, S.; Mokry, C. R.; Simpson, P. J.; Nguyen, P. H.

    2015-12-14

    Luminescence of amorphous Si quantum dots (Si QDs) in a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}:H) matrix was examined over a broad range of stoichiometries from Si{sub 3}N{sub 2.08} to Si{sub 3}N{sub 4.14}, to optimize light emission. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition was used to deposit hydrogenated SiN{sub x} films with excess Si on Si (001) substrates, with stoichiometry controlled by variation of the gas flow rates of SiH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} gases. The compositional and optical properties were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection, spectroscopic ellipsometry, photoluminescence (PL), time-resolved PL, and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy. Ultraviolet-laser-excited PL spectra show multiple emission bands from 400 nm (3.1 eV) to 850 nm (1.45 eV) for different Si{sub 3}N{sub x} compositions. There is a red-shift of the measured peaks from ∼2.3 eV to ∼1.45 eV as Si content increases, which provides evidence for quantum confinement. Higher N content samples show additional peaks in their PL spectra at higher energies, which we attribute to defects. We observed three different ranges of composition where Tauc band gaps, PL, and PL lifetimes change systematically. There is an interesting interplay of defect luminescence and, possibly, small Si QD luminescence observed in the intermediate range of compositions (∼Si{sub 3}N{sub 3.15}) in which the maximum of light emission is observed.

  8. Behavior of cyclic fatigue cracks in monolithic silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, C.J.; Ritchie, R.O.; Dauskardt, R.H.

    1995-09-01

    Cyclic fatigue-crack propagation behavior in monolithic silicon nitride is characterized in light of current fatigue-crack growth models for ceramics toughened by grain-bridging mechanisms, with specific emphasis on the role of load ratio. Such models are based on diminished crack-tip shielding in the crack wave under cyclic loads due to frictional-wear degradation of the grain-bridging zone. The notion of cyclic crack growth promoted by diminished shielding is seen to be consistent with measured (long-crack) growth rates, fractography, in situ crack-profile analyses, and measurements of back-face strain compliance. Growth rates are found to display a much larger dependence on the maximum applied stress intensity, K{sub max}, than on the applied stress-intensity range, {Delta}K, with behavior described by the relationship da/dN {proportional_to} K{sub max}{sup 29} {Delta}K. Fatigue thresholds similarly exhibit a marked dependence on the load ratio, R = K{sub min}/K{sub max}; such effects are shown to be inconsistent with traditional models of fatigue-crack closure. In particular, when characterized in terms of K{sub max}, growth rates below {approximately} 10{sup {minus}9} m/cycle exhibit an inverse dependence on load ratio, an observation which is consistent with the grain-bridging phenomenon; specifically, with increasing R, the sliding distance between the grain bridges is decreased, leading to less frictional wear, and hence less degradation in shielding, per loading cycle. The microstructural origins of such behavior are discussed.

  9. Si quantum dots in silicon nitride: Quantum confinement and defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharova, L. V.; Nguyen, P. H.; Karner, V. L.; D'Ortenzio, R.; Chaudhary, S.; Mokry, C. R.; Simpson, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Luminescence of amorphous Si quantum dots (Si QDs) in a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiNx:H) matrix was examined over a broad range of stoichiometries from Si3N2.08 to Si3N4.14, to optimize light emission. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition was used to deposit hydrogenated SiNx films with excess Si on Si (001) substrates, with stoichiometry controlled by variation of the gas flow rates of SiH4 and NH3 gases. The compositional and optical properties were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection, spectroscopic ellipsometry, photoluminescence (PL), time-resolved PL, and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy. Ultraviolet-laser-excited PL spectra show multiple emission bands from 400 nm (3.1 eV) to 850 nm (1.45 eV) for different Si3Nx compositions. There is a red-shift of the measured peaks from ˜2.3 eV to ˜1.45 eV as Si content increases, which provides evidence for quantum confinement. Higher N content samples show additional peaks in their PL spectra at higher energies, which we attribute to defects. We observed three different ranges of composition where Tauc band gaps, PL, and PL lifetimes change systematically. There is an interesting interplay of defect luminescence and, possibly, small Si QD luminescence observed in the intermediate range of compositions (˜Si3N3.15) in which the maximum of light emission is observed.

  10. Antifuse with a single silicon-rich silicon nitride insulating layer

    DOEpatents

    Habermehl, Scott D.; Apodaca, Roger T.

    2013-01-22

    An antifuse is disclosed which has an electrically-insulating region sandwiched between two electrodes. The electrically-insulating region has a single layer of a non-hydrogenated silicon-rich (i.e. non-stoichiometric) silicon nitride SiN.sub.X with a nitrogen content X which is generally in the range of 0silicon. Arrays of antifuses can also be formed.

  11. Characteristics and Charge Storage of Silicon Quantum Dots Embedded in Silicon Nitride Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wugang; Zeng, Xiangbin; Wen, Xixing; Zheng, Wenjun; Wen, Yangyang; Yao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Silicon-rich silicon nitride (SRSN) films were prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Silicon quantum dots (Si QDs) were obtained after high temperature annealing. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, Raman and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra were used to describe the structure behaviors of the as-deposited and annealed samples. The hydrogen-related bonds disappeared when the annealing temperature was above 650°C for 30 min. Crystalline and amorphous Si QDs co-existed in the SRSN film annealed at 1100°C. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the SRSN under Xe lamp were studied. The red-shift and blue-shift of PL peaks were ascribed to the size and phase evolution of Si QDs, and the PL intensity strongly depended on the passivation condition of Si QDs. The charge storage effect was investigated on Al/the SRSN annealed at 1100°C/ n-Si/Al structure by capacitance-voltage ( C- V) measurements. The C- V hysteresis width increased to 1.8 V at the sweeping voltage of ±10 V.

  12. Effects of surface grinding conditions on the reciprocating friction and wear behavior of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.; Martin, R.L.; Zanoria, E.S.

    1997-12-31

    The relationship between two significantly different surface grinding conditions and the reciprocating ball-on-flat friction and wear behavior of a high-quality, structural silicon nitride material (GS-44) was investigated. The slider materials were silicon nitride NBD 200 and 440C stainless steel. Two machining conditions were selected based on extensive machining and flexural strength test data obtained under the auspices of an international, interlaboratory grinding study. The condition categorized as {open_quotes}low strength{close_quote} grinding used a coarse 80 grit wheel and produced low flexure strength due to machining-induced flaws in the surface. The other condition, regarded as {open_quotes}high strength grinding,{close_quotes} utilized a 320 grit wheel and produced a flexural strength nearly 70% greater. Grinding wheel surface speeds were 35 and 47 m/s. Reciprocating sliding tests were conducted following the procedure described in a newly-published ASTM standard (G- 133) for linearly-reciprocating wear. Tests were performed in directions both parallel and perpendicular to the grinding marks (lay) using a 25 N load, 5 Hz reciprocating frequency, 10 mm stroke length, and 100 m of sliding at room temperature. The effects of sliding direction relative to the lay were more pronounced for stainless steel than for silicon nitride sliders. The wear of stainless steel was less than the wear of the silicon nitride slider materials because of the formation of transfer particles which covered the sharp edges of the silicon nitride grinding grooves and reduced abrasive contact. The wear of the GS-44 material was much greater for the silicon nitride sliders than for the stainless steel sliders. The causes for the effects of surface-grinding severity and sliding direction on friction and wear of GS-44 and its counterface materials are explained.

  13. Process for producing high purity silicon nitride by the direct reaction between elemental silicon and nitrogen-hydrogen liquid reactants

    DOEpatents

    Pugar, Eloise A.; Morgan, Peter E. D.

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for producing, at a low temperature, a high purity reaction product consisting essentially of silicon, nitrogen, and hydrogen which can then be heated to produce a high purity alpha silicon nitride. The process comprises: reacting together a particulate elemental high purity silicon with a high purity nitrogen-hydrogen reactant in its liquid state (such as ammonia or hydrazine) having the formula: N.sub.n H.sub.(n+m) wherein: n=1-4 and m=2 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is straight chain, and 0 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is cyclic. High purity silicon nitride can be formed from this intermediate product by heating the intermediate product at a temperature of from about 1200.degree.-1700.degree. C. for a period from about 15 minutes up to about 2 hours to form a high purity alpha silicon nitride product. The discovery of the existence of a soluble Si-N-H intermediate enables chemical pathways to be explored previously unavailable in conventional solid state approaches to silicon-nitrogen ceramics.

  14. Process for producing high purity silicon nitride by the direct reaction between elemental silicon and nitrogen-hydrogen liquid reactants

    DOEpatents

    Pugar, E.A.; Morgan, P.E.D.

    1987-09-15

    A process is disclosed for producing, at a low temperature, a high purity reaction product consisting essentially of silicon, nitrogen, and hydrogen which can then be heated to produce a high purity alpha silicon nitride. The process comprises: reacting together a particulate elemental high purity silicon with a high purity nitrogen-hydrogen reactant in its liquid state (such as ammonia or hydrazine) having the formula: N/sub n/H/sub (n+m)/ wherein: n = 1--4 and m = 2 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is straight chain, and 0 when the nitrogen-hydrogen reactant is cyclic. High purity silicon nitride can be formed from this intermediate product by heating the intermediate product at a temperature of from about 1200--1700/degree/C for a period from about 15 minutes up to about 2 hours to form a high purity alpha silicon nitride product. The discovery of the existence of a soluble Si/endash/N/endash/H intermediate enables chemical pathways to be explored previously unavailable in conventional solid-state approaches to silicon-nitrogen ceramics

  15. Inelastic electron scattering in amorphous silicon nitride and aluminum oxide with multiple-scattering corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livins, Peteris; Aton, T.; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1988-09-01

    Electron-energy-loss measurements for an amorphous chemical-vapor-deposited silicon nitride film and evaporated sapphire in the broad energy range 1-200 eV are investigated. A method, not requiring the zero-loss peak, to remove the multiple scattering is discussed, applied, and the optical constants obtained. An Elliot-type model used with aluminum oxide gives a valence-exciton binding energy of 1.36+/-0.2 eV with a band gap of 9.8+/-0.2 eV. The unexpected strength of the nitrogen 2s transition is noted in silicon nitride.

  16. Octave-spanning supercontinuum generation in a silicon-rich nitride waveguide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Pu, Minhao; Zhou, Binbin; Krückel, Clemens J; Fülöp, Attila; Torres-Company, Victor; Bache, Morten

    2016-06-15

    We experimentally show octave-spanning supercontinuum generation in a nonstoichiometric silicon-rich nitride waveguide when pumped by femtosecond pulses from an erbium fiber laser. The pulse energy and bandwidth are comparable to results achieved in stoichiometric silicon nitride waveguides, but our material platform is simpler to manufacture. We also observe wave-breaking supercontinuum generation by using orthogonal pumping in the same waveguide. Additional analysis reveals that the waveguide height is a powerful tuning parameter for generating mid-infrared dispersive waves while keeping the pump in the telecom band. PMID:27304272

  17. Hot isostatic pressing of silicon nitride Sisub3n4 containing zircon, or zirconia and silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somiya, S.; Yoshimura, M.; Suzuki, T.; Nishimura, H.

    1980-01-01

    A hydrothermal synthesis apparatus with a 10 KB cylinder was used to obtain a sintered body of silicon nitride. The sintering auxiliary agents used were zircon (ZrSiO4) and a mixture of zirconia (ZrO2) and silica (SiO2). Experiments were conducted with the amounts of ZrSi04 or ArO2 and SiO2 varying over a wide range and the results compared to discover the quantity of additive which produced sintering in silicon nitride by the hot pressing method.

  18. Rare-earth adsorption at intergranular interfaces in silicon nitride ceramics: Subnanometer observations and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, N.; Painter, G.S.; Becher, P.F.; Satet, R.L.; Hoffmann, M.J.; Pennycook, S.J.

    2005-10-01

    It is shown that the rare earths (REs) have different tendencies to segregate to the grain surfaces in silicon nitride ceramics, and this alters the filling of adsorption sites on the prismatic plane surfaces. Here, the adsorption and binding strengths of RE segregants at prismatic grain surfaces are determined by first-principles calculations. The adsorption of three rare earths (La, Gd, and Lu) is expected to be distinctly different at the predicted adsorption sites, and this is confirmed by atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images. This combination of theory and experiment provides a basis for understanding the adsorption behavior of RE elements in silicon nitride ceramics.

  19. Octave-spanning supercontinuum generation in a silicon-rich nitride waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xing; Pu, Minhao; Zhou, Binbin; Krückel, Clemens J.; Fülöp, Attila; Torres-Company, Victor; Bache, Morten

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally show octave-spanning supercontinuum generation in a non-stoichiometric silicon-rich nitride waveguide when pumped by femtosecond pulses from an erbium fiber laser. The pulse energy and bandwidth are comparable to results achieved in stoichiometric silicon nitride waveguides, but our material platform is simpler to manufacture. We also observe wave-breaking supercontinuum generation by using orthogonal pumping in the same waveguide. Additional analysis reveals that the waveguide height is a powerful tuning parameter for generating mid-infrared dispersive waves while keeping the pump in the telecom band.

  20. Processing study of injection molding of silicon nitride for engine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rorabaugh, M. E.; Yeh, H. C.

    1985-01-01

    The high hardness of silicon nitride, which is currently under consideration as a structural material for such hot engine components as turbine blades, renders machining of the material prohibitively costly; the near net shape forming technique of injection molding is accordingly favored as a means for component fabrication. Attention is presently given to the relationships between injection molding processing parameters and the resulting microstructural and mechanical properties of the resulting engine parts. An experimental program has been conducted under NASA sponsorship which tests the quality of injection molded bars of silicon nitride at various stages of processing.

  1. Alternative Liquid Fuel Effects on Cooled Silicon Nitride Marine Gas Turbine Airfoils

    SciTech Connect

    Holowczak, J.

    2002-03-01

    With prior support from the Office of Naval Research, DARPA, and U.S. Department of Energy, United Technologies is developing and engine environment testing what we believe to be the first internally cooled silicon nitride ceramic turbine vane in the United States. The vanes are being developed for the FT8, an aeroderivative stationary/marine gas turbine. The current effort resulted in further manufacturing and development and prototyping by two U.S. based gas turbine grade silicon nitride component manufacturers, preliminary development of both alumina, and YTRIA based environmental barrier coatings (EBC's) and testing or ceramic vanes with an EBC coating.

  2. Processing of complex sintered reaction bonded silicon nitride parts by microwave heating

    SciTech Connect

    Kiggans, J.O.; Tiegs, T.N.; Kimrey, H.D. ); Holcombe, C.E. )

    1993-01-01

    Several studies have been conducted over the last several years assessing the use of microwave heating for processing reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN). Although SRBSN test specimens up to 500g have been processed by using microwave heating, samples have been limited to simple shapes such as tiles. In this study, microwave packaging techniques were developed to process complex SRBSN parts and multiple samples within a single cycle. Physical and mechanical properties of test samples were measured. Comparison studies were performed using conventional furnace processing to establish baseline values and expected statistical variation.

  3. Processing of complex sintered reaction bonded silicon nitride parts by microwave heating

    SciTech Connect

    Kiggans, J.O.; Tiegs, T.N.; Kimrey, H.D.; Holcombe, C.E.

    1993-06-01

    Several studies have been conducted over the last several years assessing the use of microwave heating for processing reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN). Although SRBSN test specimens up to 500g have been processed by using microwave heating, samples have been limited to simple shapes such as tiles. In this study, microwave packaging techniques were developed to process complex SRBSN parts and multiple samples within a single cycle. Physical and mechanical properties of test samples were measured. Comparison studies were performed using conventional furnace processing to establish baseline values and expected statistical variation.

  4. Alternative substrates for gallium nitride epitaxy and devices: Laterally overgrown gallium nitride and silicon(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Hugues

    Gallium nitride films grown on sapphire or silicon carbide using the conventional 'two-step' technique typically exhibit threading dislocations on the order of ˜109 cm-2, which are detrimental to device performance. In addition, sapphire and silicon carbide substrates are expensive and available only in limited size (2-3 inch diameter). This work addresses both issues by evaluating the properties of GaN films synthesized by lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO) and conventional growth on sapphire and Si(111) substrates. LEO consists of partially masking a previously-grown seed layer and performing a subsequent regrowth such that the regrown features extend over the masked areas. Under favorable conditions the threading dislocations originating from the seed material are blocked by the mask material or redirected by the growing facets. In this work dislocation densities as low as ˜106 cm-2 were observed in the laterally-overgrown areas. The overgrown features exhibited well-defined facets ((0001), {11¯01}, {112¯0}, {112¯1}, {112¯2}), the persistence of which depended on the orientation of the mask as well as on the growth conditions. The relationship between the morphology of the LEO stripes and the growth conditions (temperature, pressure, ammonia and trimethylgallium partial pressures) was characterized for LEO on GaN/sapphire substrates. A qualitative model of the growth mechanisms was presented based on the microscopic structure of the growing surfaces. Microstructural characterization revealed a crystallographic tilt between the seed and the LEO region, which resulted in the formation of dislocations above the mask edge and at the junction plane of adjacent stripes. GaN stripes laterally overgrown on AlN/Si(111) exhibited similar properties. However, chemical interactions between the substrate and the precursors caused morphological degradation, which could be avoided by using a thick (≥180 nm) AlN buffer layer. In addition, thermal expansion mismatch

  5. Dynamic fatigue property of silicon carbide whisker-reinforced silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic fatigue behavior of 30 vol pct SiC whisker-reinforced silicon nitride was determined in flexure as a function of temperature from 1100 to 1300 C in an air environment. The fatigue susceptibility parameter n decreased from 88.1 to 20.1 with increasing temperature from 1100 to 1300 C. A transition in the dynamic fatigue curve occurred at a lowest stressing rate of 2 MPa/min at a temperature of 1300 C, resulting in a considerably lower value of n = 5.8. This transition was primarily due to creep that was enhanced by a combination of high temperature and very slow deformation rate. The fatigue resistance of natural flaws at 1100 C was found to be greater than that of artificial flaws produced by indentation.

  6. First-principles investigation of band offsets and dielectric properties of Silicon-Silicon Nitride interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Li, Tianshu; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia

    2011-03-01

    Silicon Nitride (Si3N4) is a possible candidate material to replace or be alloyed with SiO2 to form high-K dielectric films on Si substrates, so as to help prevent leakage currents in modern CMOS transistors. Building on our previous work on dielectric properties of crystalline and amorphous Si3N4 slabs, we present an analysis of the band offsets and dielectric properties of crystalline-Si/amorphous Si3N4 interfaces based on first principles calculations. We discuss shortcomings of the conventional bulk-plus line up approach in band offset calculations for systems with an amorphous component, and we present the results of band offsets obtained from calculations of local density of states. Finally, we describe the role of bonding configurations in determining band edges and dielectric constants at the interface. We acknowledge financial support from Intel Corporation.

  7. Dynamic fatigue property of silicon carbide whisker-reinforced silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, S.R.; Salem, J.A.; Gyekenyesi, J.P.

    1991-08-01

    The dynamic fatigue behavior of 30 vol pct SiC whisker-reinforced silicon nitride was determined in flexure as a function of temperature from 1100 to 1300 C in an air environment. The fatigue susceptibility parameter n decreased from 88.1 to 20.1 with increasing temperature from 1100 to 1300 C. A transition in the dynamic fatigue curve occurred at a lowest stressing rate of 2 MPa/min at a temperature of 1300 C, resulting in a considerably lower value of n = 5.8. This transition was primarily due to creep that was enhanced by a combination of high temperature and very slow deformation rate. The fatigue resistance of natural flaws at 1100 C was found to be greater than that of artificial flaws produced by indentation. 27 refs.

  8. Advances and directions of ion nitriding/carburizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1989-01-01

    Ion nitriding and carburizing are plasma activated thermodynamic processes for the production of case hardened surface layers not only for ferrous materials, but also for an increasing number of nonferrous metals. When the treatment variables are properly controlled, the use of nitrogenous or carbonaceous glow discharge medium offers great flexibility in tailoring surface/near-surface properties independently of the bulk properties. The ion nitriding process has reached a high level of maturity and has gained wide industrial acceptance, while the more recently introduced ion carburizing process is rapidly gaining industrial acceptance. The current status of plasma mass transfer mechanisms into the surface regarding the formation of compound and diffusion layers in ion nitriding and carbon build-up ion carburizing is reviewed. In addition, the recent developments in design and construction of advanced equipment for obtaining optimized and controlled case/core properties is summarized. Also, new developments and trends such as duplex plasma treatments and alternatives to dc diode nitriding are highlighted.

  9. Advanced silicon on insulator technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godbey, D.; Hughes, H.; Kub, F.

    1991-01-01

    Undoped, thin-layer silicon-on-insulator was fabricated using wafer bonding and selective etching techniques employing a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown Si0.7Ge0.3 layer as an etch stop. Defect free, undoped 200-350 nm silicon layers over silicon dioxide are routinely fabricated using this procedure. A new selective silicon-germanium etch was developed that significantly improves the ease of fabrication of the bond and etch back silicon insulator (BESOI) material.

  10. Process for the production of metal nitride sintered bodies and resultant silicon nitride and aluminum nitride sintered bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yajima, S.; Omori, M.; Hayashi, J.; Kayano, H.; Hamano, M.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the manufacture of metal nitride sintered bodies, in particular, a process in which a mixture of metal nitrite powders is shaped and heated together with a binding agent is described. Of the metal nitrides Si3N4 and AIN were used especially frequently because of their excellent properties at high temperatures. The goal is to produce a process for metal nitride sintered bodies with high strength, high corrosion resistance, thermal shock resistance, thermal shock resistance, and avoidance of previously known faults.

  11. Passivation of c-Si surfaces by sub-nm amorphous silicon capped with silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Yimao Yan, Di; Bullock, James; Zhang, Xinyu; Cuevas, Andres

    2015-12-07

    A sub-nm hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film capped with silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) is shown to provide a high level passivation to crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces. When passivated by a 0.8 nm a-Si:H/75 nm SiN{sub x} stack, recombination current density J{sub 0} values of 9, 11, 47, and 87 fA/cm{sup 2} are obtained on 10 Ω·cm n-type, 0.8 Ω·cm p-type, 160 Ω/sq phosphorus-diffused, and 120 Ω/sq boron-diffused silicon surfaces, respectively. The J{sub 0} on n-type 10 Ω·cm wafers is further reduced to 2.5 ± 0.5 fA/cm{sup 2} when the a-Si:H film thickness exceeds 2.5 nm. The passivation by the sub-nm a-Si:H/SiN{sub x} stack is thermally stable at 400 °C in N{sub 2} for 60 min on all four c-Si surfaces. Capacitance–voltage measurements reveal a reduction in interface defect density and film charge density with an increase in a-Si:H thickness. The nearly transparent sub-nm a-Si:H/SiN{sub x} stack is thus demonstrated to be a promising surface passivation and antireflection coating suitable for all types of surfaces encountered in high efficiency c-Si solar cells.

  12. Strong, Tough Ceramics Containing Microscopic Reinforcements: Tailoring In-Situ Reinforced Silicon Nitride Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, P.F.

    1999-06-27

    Ceramics with their hardness, chemical stability, and refractoriness could be used to design more efficient energy generation and conversion systems as well as numerous other applications. However, we have needed to develop a fundamental understanding of how to tailor ceramics to improve their performance, especially to overcome their brittle nature. One of the advances in this respect was the incorporation of very strong microscopic rod-like reinforcements in the form of whiskers that serve to hold the ceramic together making it tougher and resistant to fracture. This microscopic reinforcement approach has a number of features that are similar to continuous fiber-reinforced ceramics; however, some of the details are modified. For instance, the strengths of the microscopic reinforcements must be higher as they typically have much stronger interfaces. For instance, single crystal silicon carbide whiskers can have tensile strengths in excess of {ge}7 GPa or >2 times that of continuous fibers. Furthermore, reinforcement pullout is limited to lengths of a few microns in the case of microscopic reinforcement due as much to the higher interfacial shear resistance as to the limit of the reinforcement lengths. On the other hand, the microscopic reinforcement approach can be generated in-situ during the processing of ceramics. A remarkable example of this is found in silicon nitride ceramics where elongated rod-like shape grains can be formed when the ceramic is fired at elevated temperatures to form a dense component.

  13. Thermal conductivity and photoluminescence of light-emitting silicon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconnet, Amy; Panzer, Matt; Yerci, Selçuk; Minissale, Salvatore; Wang, X.; Zhang, X.; Dal Negro, Luca; Goodson, K. E.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon-rich and rare-earth-doped nitride materials are promising candidates for silicon-compatible photonic sources. This work investigates the thermal conductivity and photoluminescence (PL) of light emitting samples fabricated with a range of excess silicon concentrations and annealing temperatures using time-domain picosecond thermoreflectance and time-resolved photoluminescence. A direct correlation between the thermal conductivity and photoluminescence dynamics is demonstrated, as well as a significant reduction of thermal conductivity upon incorporation of erbium ions. These findings highlight the role of annealing and stoichiometry control in the optimization of light emitting microstructures suitable for the demonstration of efficient Si-compatible light sources based on the silicon nitride platform.

  14. Effect of composition on the processing and properties of sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Kiggans, J.O.; Montgomery, F.C.; Lin, H.T.; Barker, D.L.; Snodgrass, J.D.; Sabolsky, E.M.; Coffey, D.W.

    1996-04-01

    The type of silicon powder and sintering additive were found to influence the processing and final mechanical properties of sintered reaction bonded silicon nitride. High purity silicon powders produced low {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} content during nitridation. The Si powder type had no apparent effect on densification. More complete nitridation and higher room temperature mechanical properties were observed for the Si powders with higher Fe contents. However, the higher Fe contents resulted in greater high temperature strength degradation and so there was better high temperature strength retention with the higher purity Si. High {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} contents were found after nitridation with {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} seeded materials and with MgO-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the sintering additive. Densification was inhibited by refractory additives, such as Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}. The highest room temperature strength and fracture toughness values correlated to high nitrided {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} contents. The high temperature strength behavior was similar for all additive types.

  15. High Temperature Corrosion of Silicon Carbide and Silicon Nitride in Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, E. J.; Robinson, Raymond C.; Cuy, Michael D.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) are proposed for applications in high temperature combustion environments containing water vapor. Both SiC and Si3N4 react with water vapor to form a silica (SiO2) scale. It is therefore important to understand the durability of SiC, Si3N4 and SiO2 in water vapor. Thermogravimetric analyses, furnace exposures and burner rig results were obtained for these materials in water vapor at temperatures between 1100 and 1450 C and water vapor partial pressures ranging from 0.1 to 3.1 atm. First, the oxidation of SiC and Si3N4 in water vapor is considered. The parabolic kinetic rate law, rate dependence on water vapor partial pressure, and oxidation mechanism are discussed. Second, the volatilization of silica to form Si(OH)4(g) is examined. Mass spectrometric results, the linear kinetic rate law and a volatilization model based on diffusion through a gas boundary layer are discussed. Finally, the combined oxidation and volatilization reactions, which occur when SiC or Si3N4 are exposed in a water vapor-containing environment, are presented. Both experimental evidence and a model for the paralinear kinetic rate law are shown for these simultaneous oxidation and volatilization reactions.

  16. Surface modification of silicon dioxide, silicon nitride and titanium oxynitride for lactate dehydrogenase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Saengdee, Pawasuth; Chaisriratanakul, Woraphan; Bunjongpru, Win; Sripumkhai, Witsaroot; Srisuwan, Awirut; Jeamsaksiri, Wutthinan; Hruanun, Charndet; Poyai, Amporn; Promptmas, Chamras

    2015-05-15

    Three different types of surface, silicon dioxide (SiO2), silicon nitride (Si3N4), and titanium oxynitride (TiON) were modified for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) immobilization using (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) to obtain an amino layer on each surface. The APTES modified surfaces can directly react with LDH via physical attachment. LDH can be chemically immobilized on those surfaces after incorporation with glutaraldehyde (GA) to obtain aldehyde layers of APTES-GA modified surfaces. The wetting properties, chemical bonding composition, and morphology of the modified surface were determined by contact angle (CA) measurement, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. In this experiment, the immobilized protein content and LDH activity on each modified surface was used as an indicator of surface modification achievement. The results revealed that both the APTES and APTES-GA treatments successfully link the LDH molecule to those surfaces while retaining its activity. All types of tested surfaces modified with APTES-GA gave better LDH immobilizing efficiency than APTES, especially the SiO2 surface. In addition, the SiO2 surface offered the highest LDH immobilization among tested surfaces, with both APTES and APTES-GA modification. However, TiON and Si3N4 surfaces could be used as alternative candidate materials in the preparation of ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET) based biosensors, including lactate sensors using immobilized LDH on the ISFET surface.

  17. Cavity Optomechanics with High-Stress Silicon Nitride Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Dalziel Joseph

    There has been a barrage of interest in recent years to marry the fields of nanomechanics and quantum optics. Mechanical systems provide sensitive and scalable architectures for sensing applications ranging from atomic force microscopy to gravity wave interferometry. Optical resonators driven by low noise lasers provide a quiet and well-understood means to read-out and manipulate mechanical motion, by way of the radiation pressure force. Taken to an extreme, a device consisting of a high-Q nanomechanical oscillator coupled to a high-finesse optical cavity may enable ground-state preparation of the mechanical element, thus paving the way for a new class of quantum technology based on chip-scale phononic devices coupled to optical photons. By way of mutual coupling to the optical field, this architecture may enable coupling of single phonons to real or artificial atoms, an enticing prospect because of the vast "quantum optics toolbox" already developed for cavity quantum electrodynamics. The first step towards these goals --- ground-state cooling of the mechanical element in a "cavity optomechanical" system --- has very recently been realized in a cryogenic setup. The work presented in this thesis describes an effort to extend this capability to a room temperature apparatus, so that the usual panoply of table-top optical/atomic physics tools can be brought to bear. This requires a mechanical oscillator with exceptionally low dissipation, as well as careful attention to extraneous sources of noise in both the optical and mechanical componentry. Our particular system is based on a high- Q, high-stress silicon nitride membrane coupled to a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity. The purpose of this thesis is to record in detail the procedure for characterizing/modeling the physical properties of the membrane resonator, the optical cavity, and their mutual interaction, as well as extraneous sources of noise related to multimode thermal motion of the oscillator, thermal motion

  18. Study of phenomena related to the sintering process of silicon nitride at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertani, A.

    1982-01-01

    A procedure was perfected for the production of components used in engineering applications of silicon nitride. Particles of complex geometry that combine remarkable mechanical properties with a high density are obtained. The process developed, in contrast to the "hot pressing" method, does not use external pressures, and in contrast to the reaction bonding method, final densities close to the theoretical value are obtained.

  19. Effect of attrition milling on the reaction sintering of silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, T. P.; Glasgow, T. K.; Yeh, H. C.

    1978-01-01

    Silicon powder was ground in a steel attrition mill under nitrogen. Air exposed powder was compacted, prefired in helium, and reaction sintered in nitrogen-4 v/o hydrogen. For longer grinding times, oxygen content, surface area and compactability of the powder increased; and both alpha/beta ratio and degreee of nitridation during sintering increased. Iron content remained constant.

  20. Reactive low-voltage ion plating of hard silicon nitride optical thin films and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramm, Juergen; Hora, Ralf; Bovard, Bertrand G.

    1990-08-01

    Silicon nitride films were synthesized in a Balzers BAP 800 coating plant by an plasma enhanced evaporation process. Transparent, stoichiometric films free of hydrogen, oxygen, argon, and heavy metals were obtained. The optical properties, the chemical composition, the microhardness, the structure, and the morphology of the films were investigated.

  1. Evaluation and silicon nitride internal combustion engine components. Final report, Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Voldrich, W.

    1992-04-01

    The feasibility of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) use in internal combustion engines was studied by testing three different components for wear resistance and lower reciprocating mass. The information obtained from these preliminary spin rig and engine tests indicates several design changes are necessary to survive high-stress engine applications. The three silicon nitride components tested were valve spring retainers, tappet rollers, and fuel pump push rod ends. Garrett Ceramic Components` gas-pressure sinterable Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (GS-44) was used to fabricate the above components. Components were final machined from densified blanks that had been green formed by isostatic pressing of GS-44 granules. Spin rig testing of the valve spring retainers indicated that these Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} components could survive at high RPM levels (9,500) when teamed with silicon nitride valves and lower spring tension than standard titanium components. Silicon nitride tappet rollers showed no wear on roller O.D. or I.D. surfaces, steel axles and lifters; however, due to the uncrowned design of these particular rollers the cam lobes indicated wear after spin rig testing. Fuel pump push rod ends were successful at reducing wear on the cam lobe and rod end when tested on spin rigs and in real-world race applications.

  2. Improved reaction sintered silicon nitride. [protective coatings to improve oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgartner, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Processing treatments were applied to as-nitrided reaction sintered silicon nitride (RSSN) with the purposes of improving strength after processing to above 350 MN/m2 and improving strength after oxidation exposure. The experimental approaches are divided into three broad classifications: sintering of surface-applied powders; impregnation of solution followed by further thermal processing; and infiltration of molten silicon and subsequent carburization or nitridation of the silicon. The impregnation of RSSN with solutions of aluminum nitrate and zirconyl chloride, followed by heating at 1400-1500 C in a nitrogen atmosphere containing silicon monoxide, improved RSSN strength and oxidation resistance. The room temperature bend strength of RSSN was increased nearly fifty percent above the untreated strength with mean absolute strengths up to 420 MN/m2. Strengths of treated samples that were measured after a 12 hour oxidation exposure in air were up to 90 percent of the original as-nitrided strength, as compared to retained strengths in the range of 35 to 60 percent for untreated RSSN after the same oxidation exposure.

  3. Surface Strength of Silicon Nitride in Relation to Rolling Contact Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Hadfield, M.; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2009-01-01

    Silicon nitride material has been traditionally used as bearing material due to its superior performance against bearing steel. Its successful application as a bearing element has led to the development of rolling contact applications in turbomachinery and automotive industries. In the case of latter, this is especially true for the engine manufacturing industry where its excellent rolling contact performance can make significant savings on warranty cost for engine manufactures. In spite of these advantages, the remaining limitation for their broader application is the high component machining cost. Further understanding of rolling contact performance of silicon nitride in relation to its surface integrity will enable engine manufacturers to produce components that meet the design requirements while at the same time reduce the machining cost. In the present study, the relationship between the C-sphere strength of a silicon nitride and its rolling contact fatigue life is investigated. The C-sphere test is used here to compare the strengths of three batches of sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN) specimens with different subsurface quality induced by variation of machining parameters. In parallel, the rolling contact fatigue (RCF) performance of those machining conditions is studied on a modified four-ball tester. The results show that the most aggressively machined specimens have the weakest C-sphere strength and the shortest RCF life. This positive relationship can give component manufacturers a valuable reference when they make selections of candidate material and finishing standards.

  4. Processing development for ceramic structural components: the influence of a presintering of silicon on the final properties of reaction bonded silicon nitride. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    The influence of a presintering of silicon on the final properties of reaction bonded silicon nitride has been studied using scanning electron and optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, 4 pt. bend test, and mecury intrusion porosimetry. It has been shown that presintering at 1050/sup 0/C will not affect the final nitrided properties. At 1200/sup 0/C, the oxide layer is removed, promoting the formation of B-phase silicon nitride. Presintering at 1200/sup 0/C also results in compact weight loss due to the volatilization of silicon, and the formation of large pores which severely reduce nitrided strength. The development of the structure of sintered silicon compacts appears to involve a temperature gradient, with greater sintering observed near the surface.

  5. Processing development for ceramic structural components: the influence of a presentering of silicon on the final properties of reaction bonded silicon nitride. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    The influence of a presintering of silicon on the final properties of reaction bonded silicon nitride has been studied using scanning electron and optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, 4 pt. bend test, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. It has been shown that presintering at 1050/sup 0/C will not affect the final nitrided properties. At 1200/sup 0/C, the oxide layer is removed, promoting the formation of B-phase silicon nitride. Presintering at 1200/sup 0/C also results in compact weight loss due to the volatilization of silicon, and the formation of large pores which severely reduce nitrided strength. The development of the structure of sintered silicon compacts appears to involve a temperature gradient, with greater sintering observed near the surface.

  6. Tantalum oxide/silicon nitride: A negatively charged surface passivation stack for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Yimao Bullock, James; Cuevas, Andres

    2015-05-18

    This letter reports effective passivation of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces by thermal atomic layer deposited tantalum oxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) underneath plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}). Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy imaging shows an approximately 2 nm thick interfacial layer between Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and c-Si. Surface recombination velocities as low as 5.0 cm/s and 3.2 cm/s are attained on p-type 0.8 Ω·cm and n-type 1.0 Ω·cm c-Si wafers, respectively. Recombination current densities of 25 fA/cm{sup 2} and 68 fA/cm{sup 2} are measured on 150 Ω/sq boron-diffused p{sup +} and 120 Ω/sq phosphorus-diffused n{sup +} c-Si, respectively. Capacitance–voltage measurements reveal a negative fixed insulator charge density of −1.8 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} for the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} film and −1.0 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} for the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiN{sub x} stack. The Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiN{sub x} stack is demonstrated to be an excellent candidate for surface passivation of high efficiency silicon solar cells.

  7. Analysis of the luminescent centers in silicon rich silicon nitride light-emitting capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabañas-Tay, S. A.; Palacios-Huerta, L.; Luna-López, J. A.; Aceves-Mijares, M.; Alcántara-Iniesta, S.; Pérez-García, S. A.; Morales-Sánchez, A.

    2015-06-01

    An analysis of the luminescent center and its effect on the optical, electrical and electro-optical properties of silicon rich silicon nitride (SRN) films deposited by low pressure chemical vapor deposition is reported. As-deposited SRN films emit a broad photoluminescence (PL) spectrum in the visible range where the maximum peak shifts from ∼490 to ∼590 nm as the silicon excess increases. After thermal annealing, a PL blue-shift is observed and it is ascribed to a compositional-dependent change in the concentration of defect states within the films. A correlation between the PL peak energy with the optical band-gap indicates that the luminescence is related to the band tail carrier recombination in the SRN films. Light emitting capacitors (LECs) based on fluor-doped tin oxide SnO2:F (FTO)/SRN active layer/n-Si substrate emit a broad electroluminescent spectra where the maximum emission peak blue-shifts when the polarity is changed from reverse to forward bias. In the reverse bias, the electroluminescence (EL) is related to the states of valence band tail and Si dangling bonds (K0 centers), while in the forward bias the EL is originated from electronic transitions from the conduction band minimum to K0 centers. A model based on the trap assisted tunneling carrier transport is correlated with the proposed EL radiative recombination process in the FTO/SRN/n-Si structures. A discussion of the differences between the PL and EL spectra is reported. The results open new alternatives toward the development of Si-based light emitters where two different EL spectra can be obtained changing the polarity.

  8. Comparison of properties of sintered and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride fabricated by microwave and conventional heating

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Kiggans, J.O. Jr.; Lin, H.T.

    1995-10-01

    A comparison of microwave and conventional processing of silicon nitride-based ceramics was performed to identify any differences between the two, such as improved fabrication parameters or increased mechanical properties. Two areas of thermal processing were examined: sintered silicon nitride (SSN) and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN). The SSN powder compacts showed improved densification and enhanced grain growth. SRBSN materials were fabricated in the microwave with a one-step process using cost-effective raw materials. The SRBSN materials had properties appropriate for structural applications. Observed increases in fracture toughness for the microwave processed SRBSN materials were attributable to enhanced elongated grain growth.

  9. Comparison of properties of sintered and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride fabricated by microwave and conventional heating

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Kiggans, J.O. Jr.; Lin, H.T.; Willkens, C.A.

    1994-10-01

    A comparison of microwave and conventional processing of silicon nitride-based ceramics was performed to identify any differences between the two, such as improved fabrication parameters or increased mechanical properties. Two areas of thermal processing were examined: (1) sintered silicon nitride (SSN) and (2) sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN). The SSN powder compacts showed improved densification and enhanced grain growth. SRBSN materials were fabricated in the microwave with a one-step process using cost-effective raw materials. The SRBSN materials had properties appropriate for structural applications. Observed increases in fracture toughness for the microwave processed SRBSN materials were attributable to enhanced elongated grain growth.

  10. Assessments of Mechanical and Life Limiting Properties of Two Candidate Silicon Nitrides for Stirling Convertor Heater Head Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Krause, David L.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced technology for Stirling convertors with a target of significantly improving the specific power and efficiency of the convertor and overall generator for Mars rovers and deep space missions. One specific approach to the target has been recognized as the use of appropriate high-temperature materials. As a series of ceramic material approaches in Advanced Stirling Convertor Development Program in fiscal year 2005, two commercial, structural silicon nitrides AS800 (Honeywell, Torrence, California) and SN282 (Kyocera, Vancouver, Washington) were selected and their mechanical and life limiting properties were characterized at 1050 C in air. AS800 exhibited both strength and Weibull modulus greater than SN282. A life limiting phenomenon was apparent in AS800 with a low slow crack growth parameter n = 15; whereas, a much increased resistance to slow crack growth was found in SN282 with n greater than 100. Difference in elastic modulus and thermal conductivity was negligible up to 1200 C between the two silicon nitrides. The same was true for the coefficient of thermal expansion up to 1400 C.

  11. Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride Using a Novel Silylamine Precursor.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Min; Jang, Se Jin; Yusup, Luchana L; Lee, Won-Jun; Lee, Sang-Ick

    2016-08-17

    We report the plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of silicon nitride thin film using a silylamine compound as the silicon precursor. A series of silylamine compounds were designed by replacing SiH3 groups in trisilylamine by dimethylaminomethylsilyl or trimethylsilyl groups to obtain sufficient thermal stability. The silylamine compounds were synthesized through redistribution, amino-substitution, lithiation, and silylation reactions. Among them, bis(dimethylaminomethylsilyl)trimethylsilyl amine (C9H29N3Si3, DTDN2-H2) was selected as the silicon precursor because of the lowest bond dissociation energy and sufficient vapor pressures. The energies for adsorption and reaction of DTDN2-H2 with the silicon nitride surface were also calculated by density functional theory. PEALD silicon nitride thin films were prepared using DTDN2-H2 and N2 plasma. The PEALD process window was between 250 and 400 °C with a growth rate of 0.36 Å/cycle. The best film quality was obtained at 400 °C with a RF power of 100 W. The PEALD film prepared showed good bottom and sidewall coverages of ∼80% and ∼73%, respectively, on a trench-patterned wafer with an aspect ratio of 5.5. PMID:27447839

  12. Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride Using a Novel Silylamine Precursor.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Min; Jang, Se Jin; Yusup, Luchana L; Lee, Won-Jun; Lee, Sang-Ick

    2016-08-17

    We report the plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of silicon nitride thin film using a silylamine compound as the silicon precursor. A series of silylamine compounds were designed by replacing SiH3 groups in trisilylamine by dimethylaminomethylsilyl or trimethylsilyl groups to obtain sufficient thermal stability. The silylamine compounds were synthesized through redistribution, amino-substitution, lithiation, and silylation reactions. Among them, bis(dimethylaminomethylsilyl)trimethylsilyl amine (C9H29N3Si3, DTDN2-H2) was selected as the silicon precursor because of the lowest bond dissociation energy and sufficient vapor pressures. The energies for adsorption and reaction of DTDN2-H2 with the silicon nitride surface were also calculated by density functional theory. PEALD silicon nitride thin films were prepared using DTDN2-H2 and N2 plasma. The PEALD process window was between 250 and 400 °C with a growth rate of 0.36 Å/cycle. The best film quality was obtained at 400 °C with a RF power of 100 W. The PEALD film prepared showed good bottom and sidewall coverages of ∼80% and ∼73%, respectively, on a trench-patterned wafer with an aspect ratio of 5.5.

  13. Aluminum nitride-silicon carbide whisker composites: Processing, properties, and microstructural stability

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    Aluminum nitride -- silicon carbide whisker composites with up to 20 vol % whiskers were fabricated by pressureless sintering (1750{degree}--1800{degree}C) and by hot-pressing (1700{degree}--1800{degree}C). Silicon carbide whiskers were found to degrade depending on the type of protective powder bed used during sintering. Whiskers were found to degraded in high oxygen containing samples by reaction with sintering additives. Whisker degradation was also due to the formation of silicon carbide -- aluminum nitride solid solution. No whisker degradation was observed in hot-pressed samples. For these samples Young's modulus and fracture toughness were measured. A 33% increase in the fracture toughness was measured by the indentation technique for a 20 vol % whisker composite. Operative toughening mechanisms were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Crack deflection and whisker bridging were the dominant mechanisms. It was also shown that load transfer from matrix to whiskers can be a contributing factor to toughening. 88 refs., 34 figs., 11 tabs.

  14. Geometrical Deviation and Residual Strain in Novel Silicon-on-Aluminium-Nitride Bonded Wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Chuan-Ling; Xu, Zheng; Wu, Yan-Jun; An, Zheng-Hua; Xie, Xin-Yun; Lin, Cheng-Lu

    2002-11-01

    Aluminium nitride (AlN), with much higher thermal conductivity, is considered to be an excellent alternative to the SiO2 layer in traditional silicon-on-insulator (SOI) materials. The silicon-on-aluminium-nitride (SOAN) structure was fabricated by the smart-cut process to alleviate the self-heating effects for traditional SOI. The convergent beam Kikuchi line diffraction pattern results show that some rotational misalignment exists when two wafers are bonded, which is about 3°. The high-resolution x-ray diffraction result indicates that, before annealing at high temperature, the residual lattice strain in the top silicon layer is tensile. After annealing at 1100°C for an hour, the strain in the top Si decreases greatly and reverses from tensile to slightly compressive as a result of viscous flow of AlN.

  15. Role of silicon excess in Er-doped silicon-rich nitride light emitting devices at 1.54 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Ramírez, J. M. Berencén, Y.; Garrido, B.; Cueff, S.; Labbé, C.

    2014-08-28

    Erbium-doped silicon-rich nitride electroluminescent thin-films emitting at 1.54 μm have been fabricated and integrated within a metal-oxide-semiconductor structure. By gradually varying the stoichiometry of the silicon nitride, we uncover the role of silicon excess on the optoelectronic properties of devices. While the electrical transport is mainly enabled in all cases by Poole-Frenkel conduction, power efficiency and conductivity are strongly altered by the silicon excess content. Specifically, the increase in silicon excess remarkably enhances the conductivity and decreases the charge trapping; however, it also reduces the power efficiency. The main excitation mechanism of Er{sup 3+} ions embedded in silicon-rich nitrides is discussed. The optimum Si excess that balances power efficiency, conductivity, and charge trapping density is found to be close to 16%.

  16. Resonant second harmonic generation in a gallium nitride two-dimensional photonic crystal on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y.; Roland, I.; Checoury, X.; Han, Z.; El Kurdi, M.; Sauvage, S.; Gayral, B.; Brimont, C.; Guillet, T.; Mexis, M.; Semond, F.; Boucaud, P.

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate second harmonic generation in a gallium nitride photonic crystal cavity embedded in a two-dimensional free-standing photonic crystal platform on silicon. The photonic crystal nanocavity is optically pumped with a continuous-wave laser at telecom wavelengths in the transparency window of the nitride material. The harmonic generation is evidenced by the spectral range of the emitted signal, the quadratic power dependence vs. input power, and the spectral dependence of second harmonic signal. The harmonic emission pattern is correlated to the harmonic polarization generated by the second-order nonlinear susceptibilities χzxx (2 ), χzyy (2 ) and the electric fields of the fundamental cavity mode.

  17. Near-infrared gallium nitride two-dimensional photonic crystal platform on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Roland, I.; Zeng, Y.; Han, Z.; Checoury, X.; Blin, C.; El Kurdi, M.; Ghrib, A.; Sauvage, S.; Boucaud, P.; Gayral, B.; Brimont, C.; Guillet, T.; Semond, F.

    2014-07-07

    We demonstrate a two-dimensional free-standing gallium nitride photonic crystal platform operating around 1550 nm and fabricated on a silicon substrate. Width-modulated waveguide cavities are integrated and exhibit loaded quality factors up to 34 000 at 1575 nm. We show the resonance tunability by varying the ratio of air hole radius to periodicity, and cavity hole displacement. We deduce a ∼7.9 dB/cm linear absorption loss for the suspended nitride structure from the power dependence of the cavity in-plane transmission.

  18. Near-infrared gallium nitride two-dimensional photonic crystal platform on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, I.; Zeng, Y.; Han, Z.; Checoury, X.; Blin, C.; El Kurdi, M.; Ghrib, A.; Sauvage, S.; Gayral, B.; Brimont, C.; Guillet, T.; Semond, F.; Boucaud, P.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate a two-dimensional free-standing gallium nitride photonic crystal platform operating around 1550 nm and fabricated on a silicon substrate. Width-modulated waveguide cavities are integrated and exhibit loaded quality factors up to 34 000 at 1575 nm. We show the resonance tunability by varying the ratio of air hole radius to periodicity, and cavity hole displacement. We deduce a ˜7.9 dB/cm linear absorption loss for the suspended nitride structure from the power dependence of the cavity in-plane transmission.

  19. Rolling-element fatigue life of silicon nitride balls. [as compared to that of steel, ceramic, and cermet materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1974-01-01

    The five-ball fatigue tester was used to evaluate silicon nitride as a rolling-element bearing material. Results indicate that hot-pressed silicon nitride running against steel may be expected to yield fatigue lives comparable to or greater than those of bearing quality steel running against steel at stress levels typical rolling-element bearing application. The fatigue life of hot-pressed silicon nitride is considerably greater than that of any ceramic or cermet tested. Computer analysis indicates that there is no improvement in the lives of 120-mm-bore angular--contact ball bearings of the same geometry operating at DN values from 2 to 4 million where hot-pressed silicon nitride balls are used in place of steel balls.

  20. Foreign Object Damage Behavior of Two Gas-turbine Grade Silicon Nitrides by Steel Ball Projectiles at Ambient Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Pereira, J. Michael; Janosik, Lesley A.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2002-01-01

    Foreign object damage (FOD) behavior of two commercial gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides, AS800 and SN282, was determined at ambient temperature through strength testing of flexure test specimens impacted by steel-ball projectiles with a diameter of 1.59 mm in a velocity range from 220 to 440 m/s. AS800 silicon nitride exhibited a greater FOD resistance than SN282, primarily due to its greater value of fracture toughness (K(sub IC)). Additionally, the FOD response of an equiaxed, fine-grained silicon nitride (NC132) was also investigated to provide further insight. The NC132 silicon nitride exhibited the lowest fracture toughness of the three materials tested, providing further evidence that K(sub IC) is a key material parameter affecting FOD resistance. The observed damage generated by projectile impact was typically in the forms of well- or ill-developed ring or cone cracks with little presence of radial cracks.

  1. Chemical bulk properties of multicrystalline silicon ingots for solar cells cast in silicon nitride crucibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modanese, C.; Di Sabatino, M.; Syvertsen, M.; Arnberg, L.

    2012-09-01

    Silicon nitride is an alternative material to the widely used silica crucibles for directional solidification of mc-Si ingots, its main advantages being the reusability in successive castings and elimination for a source for oxygen contamination of the ingot. In this work, several ingots were cast in these crucibles and compared to reference ingots cast in silica crucibles. The thermal properties of the Si3N4 crucible differ from those of the SiO2 crucible and lead to a different thermal history during melting and casting. The oxygen contamination of the ingot was observed to depend mainly on the melting and holding temperature, rather than on the crucible material. The lowest oxygen concentration was observed in the ingots with the lowest melting temperature. However, the thermal properties of the Si3N4 crucible influence the oxygen profile along ingot height, with a faster decrease in the concentration with increasing ingot height. This is believed to be due to a different mechanism for oxygen transport compared to that of the silica crucibles. The concentration of dopants in the ingots showed that contamination from the Si3N4 crucible occurred, probably due to diffusion of B- and P-oxides into the Si melt.

  2. Effect of total pressure on the formation and size evolution of silicon quantum dots in silicon nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Rezgui, B.; Sibai, A.; Nychyporuk, T.; Lemiti, M.; Bremond, G.; Maestre, D.; Palais, O.

    2010-05-03

    The size of silicon quantum dots (Si QDs) embedded in silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) has been controlled by varying the total pressure in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) reactor. This is evidenced by transmission electron microscopy and results in a shift in the light emission peak of the quantum dots. We show that the luminescence in our structures is attributed to the quantum confinement effect. These findings give a strong indication that the quality (density and size distribution) of Si QDs can be improved by optimizing the deposition parameters which opens a route to the fabrication of an all-Si tandem solar cell.

  3. Preparation and evaluation of silicon nitride matrices for silicon nitride-SiC fiber composites. M.S. Thesis Final Technical Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelson, Scott R.

    1988-01-01

    Continuous silicon carbide (SiC) fiber was added to three types of silicon nitride (Si3N4) matrices. Efforts were aimed at producing a dense Si3N4 matrix from reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) by hot-isostatic-pressing (HIP) and pressureless sintering, and from Si3N4 powder by hot-pressing. The sintering additives utilized were chosen to allow for densification, while not causing severe degradation of the fiber. The ceramic microstructures were evaluated using scanning optical microscopy. Vickers indentation was used to determine the microhardness and fracture toughness values of the matrices. The RBSN matrices in this study did not reach more than 80 percent of theoretical density after sintering at various temperatures, pressures, and additive levels. Hot-pressing Si3N4 powder produced the highest density matrices; hardness and toughness values were within an order of magnitude of the best literature values. The best sintering aid composition chosen included Y2O3, SiO2, and Al2O3 or AlN. Photomicrographs demonstrate a significant reduction of fiber attack by this additive composition.

  4. A study of vapor-phase deposition of silicon nitride layers by ammonolysis of dichlorosilane at lowered pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Manzha, N. M.

    2010-12-15

    Deposition kinetics of silicon nitride layers at lowered reactor pressures of 10-130 Pa and temperatures in the range 973-1073 K has been studied. The equilibrium constant of the bimolecular reaction of dichlorosilane with ammonia has been calculated. The apparent activation energies calculated taking into account the experimental growth rate nearly coincide with the experimental data. Recommendations for improving the quality of silicon nitride layers are made.

  5. Subtask 6.6 - SiAION Coatings for Alkali-Resistant Silicon Nitride. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-25

    The efficiency of a gas turbine can be improved by increasing operating temperature. Construction materials should both meet high strength requirements and exhibit hot alkali corrosion resistance. Structural ceramics based on silicon nitride are promising candidates for high temperature engineering applications because of their high strength and good resistance to corrosion. Their performance varies significantly with the mechanical properties of boundary phases which, in turn, depend on their chemical composition, thickness of the amorphous phase, and the deformation process. To make silicon nitride ceramics tough, SiAlON ceramics were developed with controlled crystallization of the amorphous grain boundary phase. Crystallization of the grain boundary glass improves the high temperature mechanical properties of silicon nitride ceramics. Thus, the knowledge of silicon oxynitride ceramics corrosion behavior in Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} becomes important for engineers in designing appropriate part for turbines working at high temperatures. So far there has been no report concerning alkali attack on SiAlON ceramics in the presence of SO{sub 2} and chlorine in flue gas. The goal of this project was to investigate alkali corrosion of SiAlON-Y structural ceramics under combustion conditions in the presence of sodium derived components.

  6. Electron trap level of hydrogen incorporated nitrogen vacancies in silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Sonoda, Ken'ichiro Tsukuda, Eiji; Tanizawa, Motoaki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-03-14

    Hydrogen incorporation into nitrogen vacancies in silicon nitride and its effects on electron trap level are analyzed using simulation based on density functional theory with temperature- and pressure-dependent hydrogen chemical potential. If the silicon dangling bonds around a nitrogen vacancy are well separated each other, hydrogen incorporation is energetically stable up to 900 °C, which is in agreement with the experimentally observed desorption temperature. On the other hand, if the dangling bonds strongly interact, the incorporation is energetically unfavorable even at room temperature because of steric hindrance. An electron trap level caused by a nitrogen vacancy becomes shallow by the hydrogen incorporation. An electron is trapped in a deep level created by a silicon dangling bond before hydrogen incorporation, whereas it is trapped in a shallow level created by an anti-bonding state of a silicon-silicon bond after hydrogen incorporation. The simulation results qualitatively explain the experiment, in which reduced hydrogen content in silicon nitride shows superior charge retention characteristics.

  7. Surface state analysis of wet ground silicon nitride powders by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kameshima, Yoshikazu; Yasumori, Atsuo; Okada, Kiyoshi

    1995-09-01

    Three kinds of silicon nitride powders, i.e. as-prepared direct-nitridation powder, HF-treated direct-nitridation powder, and as-prepared imide decomposition powder, were wet ground by ball milling in water and the surface state change due to the grinding was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray Auger electron spectroscopy (XAES). The thickness of the oxidized surface layer of the powder was calculated from the peak area ratio and the chemical composition was evaluated from the Auger parameter (AP). Surface oxidized phase amount gradually increased with longer milling time and the thickness increased almost three times after 7 days milling, compared to as those of the unground samples. Chemical composition of the oxidized phase formed by the grinding was pure silica irrespective to the samples, although those of the oxidized phase in the unground samples differed among the samples.

  8. Development of an aluminum nitride-silicon carbide material set for high-temperature sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Benjamin A.; Habermehl, Scott D.; Clews, Peggy J.

    2014-06-01

    A number of important energy and defense-related applications would benefit from sensors capable of withstanding extreme temperatures (>300°C). Examples include sensors for automobile engines, gas turbines, nuclear and coal power plants, and petroleum and geothermal well drilling. Military applications, such as hypersonic flight research, would also benefit from sensors capable of 1000°C. Silicon carbide (SiC) has long been recognized as a promising material for harsh environment sensors and electronics because it has the highest mechanical strength of semiconductors with the exception of diamond and its upper temperature limit exceeds 2500°C, where it sublimates rather than melts. Yet today, many advanced SiC MEMS are limited to lower temperatures because they are made from SiC films deposited on silicon wafers. Other limitations arise from sensor transduction by measuring changes in capacitance or resistance, which require biasing or modulation schemes that can with- stand elevated temperatures. We are circumventing these issues by developing sensing structures directly on SiC wafers using SiC and piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films. SiC and AlN are a promising material combination due to their high thermal, electrical, and mechanical strength and closely matched coefficients of thermal expansion. AlN is also a non-ferroelectric piezoelectric material, enabling piezoelectric transduction at temperatures exceeding 1000°C. In this paper, the challenges of incorporating these two materials into a compatible MEMS fabrication process are presented. The current progress and initial measurements of the fabrication process are shown. The future direction and the need for further investigation of the material set are addressed.

  9. Differences in creep performance of a HIPed silicon nitride in ambient air and inert environments

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, A.A.; Kirkland, T.P.; Ferber, M.K.

    1995-04-01

    High temperature tensile creep studies of a commercially available hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) silicon nitride were conducted in ambient air and argon environments. The creep performance of this HIPed silicon nitride was found to be different in these environments. The material crept faster (and had a consequential shorter lifetime) in argon than in ambient air at 1370{degrees}C at tensile stresses between 110-140 MPa. The stress dependence of the minimum creep rate was found to be {approx} 6 in argon and {approx} 3.5 in air, while the minimum creep rates were almost an order of magnitude faster in argon than in air at equivalent tensile stresses. Differences in the creep performance are explained with reference to the presence or absence of oxygen in the two environments.

  10. Nondestructive evaluation of silicon-nitride ceramic valves from engine duration test.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J. G.; Trethewey, J. S.; Vanderspiegle, N. N.; Jensen, J. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Caterpillar, Inc.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we investigated impact and wear damage in silicon-nitride ceramic valves that were subjected to an engine duration test in a natural-gas engine. A high-speed automated laser-scattering system was developed for the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of 10 SN235P silicon-nitride valves. The NDE system scans the entire valve surface and generates a two-dimensional scattering image that is used to identify location, size and relative severity of subsurface damage in the valves. NED imaging data were obtained at before and at 100 and 500 hours of the engine duration test. The NDE data were analyzed and compared with surface photomicrographs. Wear damage was found in the impact surface of all valves, expecially for exhaust valves. However, the NDE examination did not detect subsurface damage such as cracks or spalls in these engine-tested valves.

  11. Corrosion behavior of silicon nitride, magnesium oxide, and several metals in molten calcium chloride with chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, D. . Research and Development Center); Sesions, C.E.; Marra, J.E. )

    1992-08-01

    In this paper corrosion studies are described in a molten calcium chloride environment sparged with chlorine gas at 850{degrees}C, both in the melt and in the gas phase above the salt, in support of efforts at Westinghouse Savannah River Company to develop more resistant materials of construction for molten salt processing of plutonium. Corrosion rates and electron microscope analyses are reported for Inconel alloys 601 and 617, tantalum, tungsten, magnesium oxide, and silicon nitride. Silicon nitride exhibited the greatest resistance, showing {lt}0.1 mg/cm{sup 2} {center dot} h loss in both melt and vapor None of the metallic coupons withstood the chlorine vapor environment, although Inconel indicated resistance immersed in the melt if protected from chlorine gas.

  12. Microstructural and physical properties of magnesium oxide-doped silicon nitride ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirota, V.; Lukianova, O.; Krasilnikov, V.; Selemenev, V.; Dokalov, V.

    Silicon nitride based ceramics with aluminum, yttrium and magnesium oxides were produced by cold isostatic pressing and free sintering. The phase composition of the starting MgO powder obtained by the novel technology has been studied. The effect of magnesium oxide content on the structure of the produced materials has been investigated. It was found, that obtained materials with 1 and 2 wt.% of magnesium oxide and without it have a typical β-silicon nitride structure with elongated grains. Ceramics with 5 wt.% magnesia has a duplex α/β-structure with elongated and equiaxed grains. Ceramics with 2 wt.% magnesium oxide has a maximum density of 2.91 g/cm3. The increases in magnesium oxide content upto 5% led to decrease in the shrinkage (from 16% to 12%) and density (from 2.88 to 2.37 g/cm3).

  13. Spin transport, magnetoresistance, and electrically detected magnetic resonance in amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutch, Michael J.; Lenahan, Patrick M.; King, Sean W.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a study of spin transport via electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) and near-zero field magnetoresistance (MR) in silicon nitride films. Silicon nitrides have long been important materials in solid state electronics. Although electronic transport in these materials is not well understood, electron paramagnetic resonance studies have identified a single dominating paramagnetic defect and have also provided physical and chemical descriptions of the defects, called K centers. Our EDMR and MR measurements clearly link the near-zero field MR response to the K centers and also indicate that K center energy levels are approximately 3.1 eV above the a-SiN:H valence band edge. In addition, our results suggest an approach for the study of defect mediated spin-transport in inorganic amorphous insulators via variable electric field and variable frequency EDMR and MR which may be widely applicable.

  14. Crack healing behavior of hot pressed silicon nitride due to oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. R.; Tikare, V.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that limited oxidation of an MgO-containing, hot-pressed silicon nitride ceramic at 800 deg C and above results in increased strength due to crack healing. Slight oxidation of the surface produces enstatite and cristobalite which fills in cracks. More extensive oxidation leads to strength degradation due to the formation of new flaws by the evolution of N2 gas at the surface. The apparent fracture toughness also increased at 800 deg C and above due to oxidation. Bonds formed between the two surfaces of the crack during oxidation leads to a reduction in stress intensity at the crack tip, suggesting that valid high-temperature toughness values cannot be obtained in an air environment. The increase in strength due to crack healing by oxidation can be achieved without compromising the fatigue properties of the silicon nitride ceramic.

  15. Advance Complex Liquid Nitriding of Stainless Steel AISI 321 Surface at 430 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuanhua; Wang, Jun; Zeng, Dezhi; Huang, Runbo; Fan, Hongyuan

    2013-09-01

    Liquid nitriding of type 321 austenite stainless steel was conducted at low temperature at 430 °C, using a type of a complex chemical heat-treatment; and the properties of the nitrided surface were evaluated. Experimental results revealed that a modified layer was formed on the surface with the thickness ranging from 2 to 30 μm varying with changing treatment time. When the stainless steel subjected to the advanced liquid nitriding less than 8 h at 430 °C, the main phase of the nitrided coating layer was the S phase generally. When the treatment time prolonged up to 16 h, S phase formed and partially transformed to CrN subsequently; and then the fine secondary CrN phase precipitated. All treatments performed in the current study can effectively improve the surface hardness. The nitrided layer thickness changed intensively with the increasing nitrided time. The growth of the nitride layer took place mainly by nitrogen diffusion according to the expected parabolic rate law. The highest hardness value obtained in this experiment was about 1400 Hv0.25. Low-temperature nitriding can improve the corrosion resistance of the 321 stainless steel against diluted vitriolic acid. The immerse test results revealed that the sample nitrided for 16 h had the best corrosion resistance than the others. SEM examinations indicated that after nitriding, the corrosion mechanisms of the steel had changed from serious general corrosion of untreated sample to selectivity corrosion of nitrided samples in the diluted vitriolic acid.

  16. Nitridation of silicon. M.S. Thesis Case Western Reserve Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, N. J.

    1981-01-01

    Silicon powders with three levels of impurities, principally Fe, were sintered in He or H2. Non-densifying mechanisms of material transport were dominant in all cases. High purity Si showed coarsening in He while particle growth was suppressed in H2. Lower purity powder coarsened in both He and H2. The same three Si powders and Si /111/ single crystal wafers were nitrided in both N2 and N2/H2 atmospheres. Hydrogen increased the degree of nitridation of all three powders and the alpha/beta ratio of the lower purity powder. Some Si3N4 whiskers and open channels through the surface nitride layer were observed in the presence of Fe, correlating with the nitridation-enhancing effects of Fe. Thermodynamic calculations showed that when SiO2 is present on the Si, addition of H2 to the nitriding atmosphere decreases the amount of SiO2 and increases the partial pressure of Si-containing vapor species, that is, Si and SiO. Large amounts of NH3 and SiH4 were also predicted to form.

  17. Formation of porous surface layers in reaction bonded silicon nitride during processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, N. J.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    An effort was undertaken to determine if the formation of the generally observed layer of large porosity adjacent to the as-nitride surfaces of reaction bonded silicon nitrides could be prevented during processing. Isostatically pressed test bars were prepared from wet vibratory milled Si powder. Sintering and nitriding were each done under three different conditions:(1) bars directly exposed to the furnance atmosphere; (2) bars packed in Si powder; (3) bars packed in Si3N4 powder. Packing the bars in either Si of Si3N4 powder during sintering retarded formation of the layer of large porosity. Only packing the bars in Si prevented formation of the layer during nitridation. The strongest bars (316 MPa) were those sintered in Si and nitrided in Si3N4 despite their having a layer of large surface porosity; failure initiated at very large pores and inclusions. The alpha/beta ratio was found to be directly proportional to the oxygen content; a possible explanation for this relationship is discussed.

  18. Experimental study of thermodynamic surface characteristics and pH sensitivity of silicon dioxide and silicon nitride.

    PubMed

    Barhoumi, H; Maaref, A; Jaffrezic-Renault, N

    2010-05-18

    In this report, we have introduced a revision of the chemical treatment influence on the surface thermodynamic properties of silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) and silicon nitride (Si(3)N(4)) solid thin layers. Some characterization techniques might be used to quantify the thermodynamic properties of solid surface and predict its ability in the adhesion phenomenon. In this work, we have used static and dynamic contact angle (CA) measurements to characterize both dioxide solid surfaces being treated by using the two procedures of cleaning and chemical activation. Qualitative and quantitative concepts of analysis, using the Van Oss approach, are based on the determination of dioxide surface hydrophilic and hydrophobic features and the thermodynamic parameters such as free energy, acid, base, and Lewis acid-base surface tension components. Electrochemical capacitance-potential measurements were carried out to study the reactivity of both silicon dioxide and silicon nitride surfaces for pH variation. Furthermore, the surface roughness of these insulators was examined by using the contact angle hysteresis (CAH) measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was concluded that CA technique can be used as a suitable and base method for the understanding of surface wettability and for the control of surface wetting behavior.

  19. Mechanical behaviour and failure phenomenon of an in situ toughened silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, J. A.; Choi, S. R.; Freedman, M. R.; Jenkins, M. G.

    1992-01-01

    The Weibull modulus, fracture toughness and crack growth resistance of an in-situ toughened, silicon nitride material used to manufacture a turbine combustor were determined from room temperature to 1371 C. The material exhibited an elongated grain structure that resulted in improved fracture toughness, nonlinear crack growth resistance, and good elevated temperature strength. However, low temperature strength was limited by grains of excessive length (30 to 100 microns). These excessively long grains were surrounded by regions rich in sintering additives.

  20. An evaluation of indentation and finishing properties of bearing grade silicon nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, J.F.; Gardos, M.N.; Hardisty, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the results of studies of the machining performance and the indentation hardness and fracture toughness of different silicon nitride materials as part of an effort to better define the optimum machining conditions for bearing components. This work builds on prior efforts by two of the authors, Gardos and Hardisty (1993) who formulated a simple relationship between diamond grinding performance of silicon nitride bearing balls and a wear equation first detailed by Evans and Wilshaw (1976). The goal of this present work was to determine the general applicability of such a relationship, i.e., could simple indentation studies be used to define finishing conditions for different silicon nitride materials? The availability of such a simple test would reduce the time required for developing an acceptable process when a supplier changes his formulation, or when a new material becomes available. Quicker development of optimum finishing conditions would eventually result in a lower-cost product for users. The initial study by Gardos and Hardisty (1993) was based on limited data taken at a fixed set of conditions. This study expanded the range of conditions evaluated and the number of ceramic materials studied in an effort to define the universality of the relationship between grinding wear, hardness, and toughness. This study has shown that no simple relationship like that first envisioned by the authors exists. The results showed that the grinding wear of the individual silicon nitride materials increased at different rates as a function of load. Because of the differences found in the load dependence of grinding rates, no simple relationship between hardness, fracture toughness, and grinding rate could be found that fit the data over the range of conditions studied.

  1. Silicon nitride: A ceramic material with outstanding resistance to thermal shock and corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, K. H.; Saure, F.

    1983-01-01

    The known physical, mechanical and chemical properties of reaction-sintered silicon nitride are summarized. This material deserves interest especially because of its unusually good resistance to thermal shock and corrosion at high temperatures. Two types are distinguished: reaction-sintered (porous) and hot-pressed (dense) Si3N4. Only the reaction-sintered material which is being produced today in large scale as crucibles, pipes, nozzles and tiles is considered.

  2. Strength evaluation test of pressureless-sintered silicon nitride at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsusue, K.; Takahara, K.; Hashimoto, R.

    1984-01-01

    In order to study strength characteristics at room temperature and the strength evaluating method of ceramic materials, the following tests were conducted on pressureless sintered silicon nitride specimens: bending tests, the three tensile tests of rectangular plates, holed plates, and notched plates, and spin tests of centrally holed disks. The relationship between the mean strength of specimens and the effective volume of specimens are examined using Weibull's theory. The effect of surface grinding on the strength of specimens is discussed.

  3. Crystallization of the glassy phase of grain boundaries in silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferson, D. A.; Thomas, J. M.; Wen, S.

    1984-01-01

    Three types of hot-pressed silicon nitride specimens (containing 5wt% Y2O3 and 2wt% Al2O3 additives) which were subjected to different temperature heat treatments were studied by X-ray diffraction, X-ray microanalysis and high resolution electron microscopy. The results indicated that there were phase changes in the grain boundaries after heat treatment and the glassy phase at the grain boundaries was crystallized by heat treatment.

  4. Dispersion engineering of thick high-Q silicon nitride ring-resonators via atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Riemensberger, Johann; Hartinger, Klaus; Herr, Tobias; Brasch, Victor; Holzwarth, Ronald; Kippenberg, Tobias J

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate dispersion engineering of integrated silicon nitride based ring resonators through conformal coating with hafnium dioxide deposited on top of the structures via atomic layer deposition. Both, magnitude and bandwidth of anomalous dispersion can be significantly increased. The results are confirmed by high resolution frequency-comb-assisted-diode-laser spectroscopy and are in very good agreement with the simulated modification of the mode spectrum.

  5. Mechanical behavior and failure phenomenon of an in situ-toughened silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Choi, Sung R.; Freedman, Marc R.; Jenkins, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    The Weibull modulus, fracture toughness and crack growth resistance of an in-situ toughened, silicon nitride material used to manufacture a turbine combustor were determined from room temperature to 1371 C. The material exhibited an elongated grain structure that resulted in improved fracture toughness, nonlinear crack growth resistance, and good elevated temperature strength. However, low temperature strength was limited by grains of excessive length (30 to 100 microns). These excessively long grains were surrounded by regions rich in sintering additives.

  6. The Effects of Thermal Cycling on Gallium Nitride and Silicon Carbide Semiconductor Devices for Aerospace Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Electronics designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work efficiently and reliably under harsh environment conditions. These Include radiation, extreme temperatures, thermal cycling, to name a few. Preliminary data obtained on new Gallium Nitride and Silicon Carbide power devices under exposure to radiation followed by long term thermal cycling are presented. This work was done in collaboration with GSFC and JPL in support of the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program

  7. Thermal shock behavior of silicon nitride flexure beam specimens with indentation cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, S.R.; Salem, J.A. . Lewis Research Center)

    1994-03-01

    The experimental results of thermal shock testing of silicon nitride flexure beam specimens containing indentation cracks are presented. The thermal stress induced by water quenching is much greater in the transverse direction than in the longitudinal direction, resulting in an insensitivity of residual bend strength to temperature differences up to 580 C. This result indicates that a flexure beam configuration is not an appropriate geometry for thermal shock testing when thermal shock behavior is to be evaluated from residual bend strength data.

  8. Elevated Temperature Slow Crack Growth of Silicon Nitride Under Dynamic, Static and Cyclic Flexural Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Nemeth, Noel; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1994-01-01

    The slow crack growth parameters of a hot-pressed silicon nitride were determined at 1200 and 1300 C in air by statically, dynamically and cyclicly loading bend specimens. The fatigue parameters were estimated using the recently developed CARES/Life computer code. Good agreement exists between the flexural results. However, fatigue susceptibility under static uniaxial tensile loading, reported elsewhere, was greater than in flexure. Cyclic flexural loading resulted in the lowest apparent flexural fatigue susceptibility.

  9. SiAlON COATINGS OF SILICON NITRIDE AND SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Jan W. Nowok; John P. Hurley; John P. Kay

    2000-06-01

    The need for new engineering materials in aerospace applications and in stationary power turbine blades for high-efficiency energy-generating equipment has led to a rapid development of ceramic coatings. They can be tailored to have superior physical (high specific strength and stiffness, enhanced high-temperature performance) and chemical (high-temperature corrosion resistance in more aggressive fuel environments) properties than those of monolithic ceramic materials. Among the major chemical properties of SiAlON-Y ceramics are their good corrosion resistance against aggressive media combined with good thermal shock behavior. The good corrosion resistance results from the yttria-alumina-garnet (YAG), Al{sub 5}Y{sub 3}O{sub 12}, formed during the corrosion process of SiAlON-Y ceramics in combustion gases at 1300 C. The interfacial chemical precipitation of the YAG phase is beneficial. This phase may crystallize in cubic and/or tetragonal modifications and if formed in SiAlON-Y ceramic may simultaneously generate residual stress. Also, this phase can contain a large number of point defects, which is a consequence of the large unit cell and complexity of the YAG structure because it has no close-packed oxygen planes. Therefore, the need exists to elucidate the corrosion mechanism of a multilayered barrier with respect to using SiAlON-YAG as a corrosion-protective coating. Stress corrosion cracking in the grain boundary of a silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic enriched in a glassy phase such as SiAlON can significantly affect its mechanical properties. It has been suggested that the increased resistance of the oxynitride glass to stress corrosion is related to the increased surface potential of the fracture surface created in the more durable and highly cross-linked oxynitride glass network structure. We expect that either increased or decreased surface potential of the intergranular glassy phase is brought about by changes in the residual stress of the Si

  10. Comment on Growth and characterization of epitaxial cubic boron nitride films on silicon''

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, K.F.; Mills, M.J.; Medlin, D.L.; Friedmann, T.A. )

    1994-09-15

    We review the x-ray-diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) data that Doll [ital et] [ital al]. [Phys. Rev. B 43, 6816 (1991)] used as evidence for the epitaxial growth of cubic boron nitride (cBN) on silicon (001) surfaces. The three reported x-ray-diffraction peaks do not provide unambiguous evidence for cBN due to potential interference from the graphitelike phase of BN and from artifacts of the silicon substrate. We provide an interpretation of their HRTEM image. Our interpretation does not provide support for an epitaxial cBN/Si relationship or the presence of cBN.

  11. Rf-plasma synthesis of nanosize silicon carbide and nitride. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, R.J.

    1997-02-01

    A pulsed rf plasma technique is capable of generating ceramic particles of 10 manometer dimension. Experiments using silane/ammonia and trimethylchlorosilane/hydrogen gas mixtures show that both silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can be synthesized with control of the average particle diameter from 7 to 200 nm. Large size dispersion and much agglomeration appear characteristic of the method, in contrast to results reported by another research group. The as produced powders have a high hydrogen content and are air and moisture sensitive. Post-plasma treatment in a controlled atmosphere at elevated temperature (800{degrees}C) eliminates the hydrogen and stabilizes the powder with respect to oxidation or hydrolysis.

  12. Quantitative mapping of pore fraction variations in silicon nitride using an ultrasonic contact scan technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Kiser, James D.; Swickard, Suzanne M.; Szatmary, Steven A.; Kerwin, David P.

    1993-01-01

    An ultrasonic scan procedure using the pulse-echo contact configuration was employed to obtain maps of pore fraction variations in sintered silicon nitride samples in terms of ultrasonic material properties. Ultrasonic velocity, attenuation coefficient, and reflection coefficient images were obtained simultaneously over a broad band of frequencies (e.g., 30 to 110 MHz) by using spectroscopic analysis. Liquid and membrane (dry) coupling techniques and longitudinal and shear-wave energies were used. The major results include the following: Ultrasonic velocity (longitudinal and shear wave) images revealed and correlated with the extent of average through-thickness pore fraction variations in the silicon nitride disks. Attenuation coefficient images revealed pore fraction nonuniformity due to the scattering that occurred at boundaries between regions of high and low pore fraction. Velocity and attenuation coefficient images were each nearly identical for machined and polished disks, making the method readily applicable to machined materials. Velocity images were similar for wet and membrane coupling. Maps of apparent Poisson's ratio constructed from longitudinal and shear-wave velocities quantified Poisson's ratio variations across a silicon nitride disk. Thermal wave images of a disk indicated transient thermal behavior variations that correlated with observed variations in pore fraction and velocity and attenuation coefficients.

  13. Synthesis and Optical Properties of Si-Rich Nitride Containing Silicon Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wugang; Zeng, Xiangbin; Wen, Xixing; Zheng, Wenjun; Yao, Wei

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogenated silicon-rich nitride films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using NH3 and SiH4. As-deposited samples were thermally annealed under different conditions in argon ambient. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was carried out to investigate the bonding configurations, and Raman scattering spectroscopy was used to study the microstructures and confirm the presence of Si quantum dots (QDs). We found that a near-stoichiometric silicon nitride matrix was formed after high-temperature processing. When the annealing temperature reached 1100°C, the degree of crystallinity ( X c) increased to 51.6% for the 60-min sample compared with 46.1% for the 30-min sample. Red-light and yellow-light emission were obtained from the samples annealed at 1100°C for 30 min and 60 min, respectively. The emission mechanism is dominated by excitons confined within the Si QDs. The ultra-nanocrystals play an important role in the luminescence blue-shift. We measured the bandgap values from optical absorption studies. The increase of the optical bandgap from 1.80 eV to 1.90 eV with increase of the annealing temperature from 950°C to 1100°C is ascribed to the silicon clusters and nitride matrix.

  14. Foreign Object Damage of Two Gas-Turbine Grade Silicon Nitrides in a Thin Disk Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Pereira, J. Michael; Janosik, Lesley A.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2003-01-01

    Foreign object damage (FOD) behavior of two commercial gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides, AS800 and SN282, was determined at ambient temperature through post-impact strength testing for thin disks impacted by steel-ball projectiles with a diameter of 1.59 mm in a velocity range from 115 to 440 m/s. AS800 silicon nitride exhibited a greater FOD resistance than SN282, primarily due to its greater value of fracture toughness (K(sub IC)). The critical impact velocity in which the corresponding post-impact strength yielded the lowest value was V(sub c) approx. 440 and 300 m/s for AS800 and SN282, respectively. A unique lower-strength regime was typified for both silicon nitrides depending on impact velocity, attributed to significant radial cracking. The damages generated by projectile impact were typically in the forms of ring, radial, and cone cracks with their severity and combination being dependent on impact velocity. Unlike thick (3 mm) flexure bar specimens used in the previous studies, thin (2 mm) disk target specimens exhibited a unique backside radial cracking occurring on the reverse side just beneath the impact sites at and above impact velocity of 160 and 220 m/s for SN282 and AS800, respectively.

  15. Preparation of Silicon Nitride Multilayer Ceramic Radome Material and Optimal Design of the Wall Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Fei; Shen Qiang; Zhang Lianmeng

    2008-02-15

    A study of silicon nitride ceramic radomes, which includes preparation of the material and optimal design of the radome wall structure, is presented in this paper. Multilayer radome wall structure with high dielectric constant skins and a low dielectric constant core layer is used for broadband application. As a candidate material for both the skins and core layer, silicon nitride ceramics of controlled dielectric constant in the range 3.0{approx}7.5 were prepared by adding different content of sintering aids such as magnesia, alumina, silica and zirconium phosphate binder and choosing suitable sintering methods. A computer aided design (CAD) for the wall structure of silicon nitride multilayer ceramic radome based on microwave equivalent network method is carried out according to design requirements. By optimizing the thickness of skins and core layer, the power transmission efficiency of such a multilayer Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic radome is calculated. The calculated results suggest that when the dielectric constant of skins lies in the range 6{approx}7.5 and core layer in the range 3.5{approx}4, the power transmission efficiency is above 85% with frequency of 2{approx}18 GHz while the thickness of skins is less than 0.03{lambda} and the thickness ratio of skins to core layer is less than 1:15.

  16. Influence of interlayer trapping and detrapping mechanisms on the electrical characterization of hafnium oxide/silicon nitride stacks on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, H.; Duenas, S.; Castan, H.; Gomez, A.; Bailon, L.; Toledano-Luque, M.; Prado, A. del; Martil, I.; Gonzalez-Diaz, G.

    2008-11-01

    Al/HfO{sub 2}/SiN{sub x}:H/n-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors have been studied by electrical characterization. Films of silicon nitride were directly grown on n-type silicon substrates by electron cyclotron resonance assisted chemical vapor deposition. Silicon nitride thickness was varied from 3 to 6.6 nm. Afterwards, 12 nm thick hafnium oxide films were deposited by the high-pressure sputtering approach. Interface quality was determined by using current-voltage, capacitance-voltage, deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), conductance transients, and flatband voltage transient techniques. Leakage currents followed the Poole-Frenkel emission model in all cases. According to the simultaneous measurement of the high and low frequency capacitance voltage curves, the interface trap density obtained for all the samples is in the 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1} range. However, a significant increase in this density of about two orders of magnitude was obtained by DLTS for the thinnest silicon nitride interfacial layers. In this work we probe that this increase is an artifact that must be attributed to traps existing at the HfO{sub 2}/SiN{sub x}:H intralayer interface. These traps are more easily charged or discharged as this interface comes near to the substrate, that is, as thinner the SiN{sub x}:H interface layer is. The trapping/detrapping mechanism increases the capacitance transient and, in consequence, the DLTS measurements have contributions not only from the insulator/substrate interface but also from the HfO{sub 2}/SiN{sub x}:H intralayer interface.

  17. Atomic oxygen effects on boron nitride and silicon nitride: A comparison of ground based and space flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. B.; Lan, E. H.; Smith, C. A.; Whatley, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of atomic oxygen on boron nitride (BN) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) were evaluated in a low Earth orbit (LEO) flight experiment and in a ground based simulation facility. In both the inflight and ground based experiments, these materials were coated on thin (approx. 250A) silver films, and the electrical resistance of the silver was measured in situ to detect any penetration of atomic oxygen through the BN and Si3N4 materials. In the presence of atomic oxygen, silver oxidizes to form silver oxide, which has a much higher electrical resistance than pure silver. Permeation of atomic oxygen through BN, as indicated by an increase in the electrical resistance of the silver underneath, was observed in both the inflight and ground based experiments. In contrast, no permeation of atomic oxygen through Si3N4 was observed in either the inflight or ground based experiments. The ground based results show good qualitative correlation with the LEO flight results, indicating that ground based facilities such as the one at Los Alamos National Lab can reproduce space flight data from LEO.

  18. A comparison of ground-based and space flight data: Atomic oxygen reactions with boron nitride and silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. B.; Lan, E. H.; Smith, C. A.; Whatley, W. J.; Koontz, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of atomic oxygen on boron nitride (BN) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) have been studied in low Earth orbit (LEO) flight experiments and in a ground-based simulation facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Both the in-flight and ground-based experiments employed the materials coated over thin (approx 250 Angstrom) silver films whose electrical resistance was measured in situ to detect penetration of atomic oxygen through the BN and Si3N4 materials. In the presence of atomic oxygen, silver oxidizes to form silver oxide, which has a much higher electrical resistance than pure silver. Permeation of atomic oxygen through BN, as indicated by an increase in the electrical resistance of the silver underneath, was observed in both the in-flight and ground-based experiments. In contrast, no permeation of atomic oxygen through Si3N4 was observed in either the in-flight or ground-based experiments. The ground-based results show good qualitative correlation with the LEO flight results, thus validating the simulation fidelity of the ground-based facility in terms of reproducing LEO flight results.

  19. Synthesis of gallium nitride nanostructures by nitridation of electrochemically deposited gallium oxide on silicon substrate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanostructures were successfully synthesized by the nitridation of the electrochemically deposited gallium oxide (Ga2O3) through the utilization of a so-called ammoniating process. Ga2O3 nanostructures were firstly deposited on Si substrate by a simple two-terminal electrochemical technique at a constant current density of 0.15 A/cm2 using a mixture of Ga2O3, HCl, NH4OH and H2O for 2 h. Then, the deposited Ga2O3 sample was ammoniated in a horizontal quartz tube single zone furnace at various ammoniating times and temperatures. The complete nitridation of Ga2O3 nanostructures at temperatures of 850°C and below was not observed even the ammoniating time was kept up to 45 min. After the ammoniating process at temperature of 900°C for 15 min, several prominent diffraction peaks correspond to hexagonal GaN (h-GaN) planes were detected, while no diffraction peak of Ga2O3 structure was detected, suggesting a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN. Thus, temperature seems to be a key parameter in a nitridation process where the deoxidization rate of Ga2O3 to generate gaseous Ga2O increase with temperature. The growth mechanism for the transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN was proposed and discussed. It was found that a complete transformation can not be realized without a complete deoxidization of Ga2O3. A significant change of morphological structures takes place after a complete transformation of Ga2O3 to GaN where the original nanorod structures of Ga2O3 diminish, and a new nanowire-like GaN structures appear. These results show that the presented method seems to be promising in producing high-quality h-GaN nanostructures on Si. PMID:25593562

  20. Behavior of incorporated nitrogen in plasma-nitrided silicon oxide formed by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, Nao; Itokawa, Hiroshi; Fujitsuka, Ryota; Sekine, Katsuyuki; Onoue, Seiji; Tonotani, Junichi

    2016-04-01

    The behavior of nitrogen (N) atoms in plasma-nitrided silicon oxide (SiO2) formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was characterized by physical analysis and from electrical properties. The changes in the chemical bonding and distribution of N in plasma-nitrided SiO2 were investigated for different subsequent processes. N-Si3, N-Si2O, and N2 are formed in a SiO2 film by plasma nitridation. N2 molecules diffuse out during annealing at temperatures higher than 900 °C. NH species are generated from N2 molecules and H in the SiO2 film with subsequent oxide deposition using O3 as an oxidant. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors are obtained. The negative shift of the C-V curve is caused by the increase in the density of positive fix charge traps in CVD-SiO2 induced by plasma nitridation. The C-V curve of plasma-nitrided SiO2 subjected to annealing shifts to the positive direction and that subjected to the subsequent oxide deposition shifts markedly to the negative direction. It is clarified that the density of positive charge fixed traps in plasma-nitrided SiO2 films decrease because the amount of N2 molecules is decreased by annealing, and that the density of traps increases because NH species are generated and move to the interface between SiO2 and the Si substrate with the subsequent oxide deposition.

  1. Effect of additive gases and injection methods on chemical dry etching of silicon nitride, silicon oxynitride, and silicon oxide layers in F{sub 2} remote plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Y. B.; Park, S. M.; Kim, D. J.; Lee, N.-E.; Kim, K. S.; Bae, G. H.

    2007-07-15

    The authors investigated the effects of various additive gases and different injection methods on the chemical dry etching of silicon nitride, silicon oxynitride, and silicon oxide layers in F{sub 2} remote plasmas. N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}+O{sub 2} gases in the F{sub 2}/Ar/N{sub 2} and F{sub 2}/Ar/N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} remote plasmas effectively increased the etch rate of the layers. The addition of direct-injected NO gas increased the etch rates most significantly. NO radicals generated by the addition of N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}+O{sub 2} or direct-injected NO molecules contributed to the effective removal of nitrogen and oxygen in the silicon nitride and oxide layers, by forming N{sub 2}O and NO{sub 2} by-products, respectively, and thereby enhancing SiF{sub 4} formation. As a result of the effective removal of the oxygen, nitrogen, and silicon atoms in the layers, the chemical dry etch rates were enhanced significantly. The process regime for the etch rate enhancement of the layers was extended at elevated temperature.

  2. Power mixture and green body for producing silicon nitride base articles of high fracture toughness and strength

    DOEpatents

    Huckabee, M.L.; Buljan, S.T.; Neil, J.T.

    1991-09-17

    A powder mixture and a green body for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength are disclosed. The powder mixture includes (a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 [mu]m and a surface area of about 8-12m[sup 2]g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 [mu]m and a surface area of about 2-4 m[sup 2]/g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified article an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. The green body is formed from the powder mixture, an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid, and an effective amount of a suitable organic binder. No Drawings

  3. Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride Light Emitting Diode Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Patibandla, Nag; Agrawal, Vivek

    2012-12-01

    Over the course of this program, Applied Materials, Inc., with generous support from the United States Department of Energy, developed a world-class three chamber III-Nitride epi cluster tool for low-cost, high volume GaN growth for the solid state lighting industry. One of the major achievements of the program was to design, build, and demonstrate the world’s largest wafer capacity HVPE chamber suitable for repeatable high volume III-Nitride template and device manufacturing. Applied Materials’ experience in developing deposition chambers for the silicon chip industry over many decades resulted in many orders of magnitude reductions in the price of transistors. That experience and understanding was used in developing this GaN epi deposition tool. The multi-chamber approach, which continues to be unique in the ability of the each chamber to deposit a section of the full device structure, unlike other cluster tools, allows for extreme flexibility in the manufacturing process. This robust architecture is suitable for not just the LED industry, but GaN power devices as well, both horizontal and vertical designs. The new HVPE technology developed allows GaN to be grown at a rate unheard of with MOCVD, up to 20x the typical MOCVD rates of 3{micro}m per hour, with bulk crystal quality better than the highest-quality commercial GaN films grown by MOCVD at a much cheaper overall cost. This is a unique development as the HVPE process has been known for decades, but never successfully commercially developed for high volume manufacturing. This research shows the potential of the first commercial-grade HVPE chamber, an elusive goal for III-V researchers and those wanting to capitalize on the promise of HVPE. Additionally, in the course of this program, Applied Materials built two MOCVD chambers, in addition to the HVPE chamber, and a robot that moves wafers between them. The MOCVD chambers demonstrated industry-leading wavelength yield for GaN based LED wafers and industry

  4. Impact of interstitial oxygen trapped in silicon during plasma growth of silicon oxy-nitride films for silicon solar cell passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saseendran, Sandeep S.; Saravanan, S.; Raval, Mehul C.; Kottantharayil, Anil

    2016-03-01

    Low temperature oxidation of silicon in plasma ambient is a potential candidate for replacing thermally grown SiO2 films for surface passivation of crystalline silicon solar cells. In this work, we report the growth of silicon oxy-nitride (SiOxNy) film in N2O plasma ambient at 380 °C. However, this process results in trapping of interstitial oxygen within silicon. The impact of this trapped interstitial oxygen on the surface passivation quality is investigated. The interstitial oxygen trapped in silicon was seen to decrease for larger SiOxNy film thickness. Effective minority carrier lifetime (τeff) measurements on n-type float zone silicon wafers passivated by SiOxNy/silicon nitride (SiNv:H) stack showed a decrease in τeff from 347 μs to 68 μs, for larger SiOxNy film thickness due to degradation in interface properties. From high frequency capacitance-voltage measurements, it was concluded that the surface passivation quality was governed by the interface parameters (fixed charge density and interface state density). High temperature firing of the SiOxNy/SiNv:H stack resulted in a severe degradation in τeff due to migration of oxygen across the interface into silicon. However, on using the SiOxNy/SiNv:H stack for emitter surface passivation in screen printed p-type Si solar cells, an improvement in short wavelength response was observed in comparison to the passivation by SiNv:H alone, indicating an improvement in emitter surface passivation quality.

  5. Origin of rectification in boron nitride heterojunctions to silicon.

    PubMed

    Teii, Kungen; Hori, Takuro; Mizusako, Yusei; Matsumoto, Seiichiro

    2013-04-10

    Cubic and hexagonal boron nitride (cBN and hBN) heterojunctions to n-type Si are fabricated under low-energy ion bombardment by inductively coupled plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using the chemistry of fluorine. The sp2-bonded BN/Si heterojunction shows no rectification, while the cBN/sp2BN/Si heterojunction has rectification properties analogue to typical p-n junction diodes despite a large thickness (∼130 nm) of the sp2BN interlayer. The current-voltage characteristics at temperatures up to 573 K are governed by thermal excitation of carriers, and mostly described with the ideal diode equation and the Frenkel-Poole emission model at low and high bias voltages, respectively. The rectification in the cBN/sp2BN/Si heterojunction is caused by a bias-dependent change in the barrier height for holes arising from stronger p-type conduction in the cBN layer and enhanced with the thick sp2BN interlayer for impeding the reverse current flow at defect levels mainly associated with grain boundaries.

  6. Sublimation behavior of silicon nitride /Si3N4/ coated silicon germanium /SiGe/ unicouples. [for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapfer, G.; Truscello, V. C.

    1975-01-01

    For the Multi-Hundred Watt (MHW) Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG), the silicon germanium unicouples are coated with silicon nitride to minimize degradation mechanisms which are directly attributable to material sublimation effects. A program is under way to determine the effective vapor suppression of this coating as a function of temperature and gas environment. The results of weight loss experiments, using Si3N4 coated hot shoes (SiMo), operating over a temperature range from 900 C to 1200 C, are analyzed and discussed. These experiments were conducted both in high vacuum and at different pressures of carbon monoxide (CO) to determine its effect on the coating. Although the results show a favorable vapor suppression at all operating temperatures, the pressure of the CO and the thickness of the coating have a decided effect on the useful lifetime of the coating.

  7. Formation of porous surface layers in reaction bonded silicon nitride during processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, N. J.; Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    Microstructural examination of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) has shown that there is often a region adjacent to the as-nitrided surfaces that is even more porous than the interior of this already quite porous material. Because this layer of large porosity is considered detrimental to both the strength and oxidation resistance of RBSN, a study was undertaken to determine if its formation could be prevented during processing. All test bars studied were made from a single batch of Si powder which was milled for 4 hours in heptane in a vibratory mill using high density alumina cylinders as the grinding media. After air drying the powder, bars were compacted in a single acting die and hydropressed.

  8. Resonant second harmonic generation in a gallium nitride two-dimensional photonic crystal on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Y.; Roland, I.; Checoury, X.; Han, Z.; El Kurdi, M.; Sauvage, S.; Boucaud, P.; Gayral, B.; Brimont, C.; Guillet, T.; Mexis, M.; Semond, F.

    2015-02-23

    We demonstrate second harmonic generation in a gallium nitride photonic crystal cavity embedded in a two-dimensional free-standing photonic crystal platform on silicon. The photonic crystal nanocavity is optically pumped with a continuous-wave laser at telecom wavelengths in the transparency window of the nitride material. The harmonic generation is evidenced by the spectral range of the emitted signal, the quadratic power dependence vs. input power, and the spectral dependence of second harmonic signal. The harmonic emission pattern is correlated to the harmonic polarization generated by the second-order nonlinear susceptibilities χ{sub zxx}{sup (2)}, χ{sub zyy}{sup (2)} and the electric fields of the fundamental cavity mode.

  9. Adhesion, friction, and wear of plasma-deposited thin silicon nitride films at temperatures to 700 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Pouch, J. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Pantic, D. M.; Johnson, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    The adhesion, friction, and wear behavior of silicon nitride films deposited by low- and high-frequency plasmas (30 kHz and 13.56 MHz) at various temperatures to 700 C in vacuum were examined. The results of the investigation indicated that the Si/N ratios were much greater for the films deposited at 13.56 MHz than for those deposited at 30 kHz. Amorphous silicon was present in both low- and high-frequency plasma-deposited silicon nitride films. However, more amorphous silicon occurred in the films deposited at 13.56 MHz than in those deposited at 30 kHz. Temperature significantly influenced adhesion, friction, and wear of the silicon nitride films. Wear occurred in the contact area at high temperature. The wear correlated with the increase in adhesion and friction for the low- and high-frequency plasma-deposited films above 600 and 500 C, respectively. The low- and high-frequency plasma-deposited thin silicon nitride films exhibited a capability for lubrication (low adhesion and friction) in vacuum at temperatures to 500 and 400 C, respectively.

  10. Adhesion, friction, and wear of plasma-deposited thin silicon nitride films at temperatures to 700 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Pouch, J. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Pantic, D. M.; Johnson, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    The adhesion, friction, and wear behavior of silicon nitride films deposited by low- and high-frequency plasmas (30 kHz and 13.56 MHz) at various temperatures to 700 C in vacuum were examined. The results of the investigation indicated that the Si/N ratios were much greater for the films deposited at 13.56 MHz than for those deposited at 30 kHz. Amorphous silicon was present in both low- and high-frequency plasma-deposited silicon nitride films. However, more amorphous silicon occurred in the films deposited at 13.56 MHz than in those deposited at 30 kHz. Temperature significantly influenced adhesion, friction, and wear of the silicon nitride films. Wear occurred in the contact area at high temperature. The wear correlated with the increase in adhesion and friction for the low- and high-frequency plasma-deposited films above 600 and 500 C, respectively. The low- and high-frequency plasma-deposited thin silicon nitride films exhibited a capability for lubrication (low adhesion and friction) in vacuum at temperatures to 500 and 400 C, respectively.

  11. Hard carbon nitride and method for preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Haller, Eugene E.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Hansen, William L.

    1992-01-01

    Novel crystalline .alpha. (silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride and .beta. (silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride are formed by sputtering carbon in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere onto a single crystal germanium or silicon, respectively, substrate.

  12. Silicon nitride films for the protective functional coating: blood compatibility and biomechanical property study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhifeng; Wang, Yingjun; Du, Chang; Huang, Nan; Wang, Lin; Ning, Chengyun

    2012-12-01

    Behaviors of silicon nitride films and their relation to blood compatibility and biomechanical have been interesting subjects to researchers. A systematic blood compatibility and biomechanical property investigation on the deposition of silicon-nitride films under varying N₂ and CF₄ flows was carried out by direct current unbalanced magnetron sputtering techniques. Significant role of surface property, chemical bonding state of silicon nitride film and blood compatibility, mechanical properties for the films were observed. The chemical bonding configurations, surface topography, contact angle and mechanical properties were characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nano-indentation technique and CSEM pin-on-disk tribometer. Blood compatibility of the films was evaluated by platelet adhesion investigation. The results of the platelet adhesion tests shown that the effect of fluorine and nitrogen-doped revealed an intimate relationship between the ratio of polar component and dispersion component of the surface energy and its hemocompatibility. Si-N-O coating can be a great candidate for developing antithrombogenic surfaces in blood contacting materials. The chemical bonding state made an adjustment in microstructured surfaces, once in the totally wettable configuration, may improve the initial contact between platelet and biomedical materials, due to the appropriate ratio of dispersion component and polar component. To resist wear, biomedical components require coatings that are tough and hard, have low friction, and are bio-inert. The study suggests that by Si-N coating the metal surfaces could be a choice to prolong the life of the sliding pair Co-Cr-Mo alloy/UHMWPE implants.

  13. Estimation of crack closure stresses for in situ toughened silicon nitride with 8 wt pct scandia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    An 8-wt pct-scandia silicon nitride with an elongated grain structure was fabricated. The material exhibited high fracture toughness and a rising R-curve as measured by the indentation strength technique. The 'toughening' exponent m was found to be m about 0.1. The high fracture toughness and R-curve behavior was attributed mainly to bridging of the crack faces by the elongated grains. The crack closure (bridging) stress distribution in the wake region of the crack tip was estimated as a function of crack size from the R-curve data, with an arbitrarily assumed distribution function.

  14. Fractal and spherulitic morphology of silicon nitride crystallized from amorphous films

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, A.D.; Grabowski, K.S.; Donovan, E.P.; Carosella, C.A.; Hubler, G.K.

    1988-01-01

    Thin films of substoichiometric silicon nitride were grown by the use of ion beam assisted deposition. The amorphous films were annealed at high temperatures (1017-1200C) to produce crystalline alpha-Si3N4. Both highly symmetric spherulitic crystal morphologies and irregular fractal aggregates were seen. In the latter case, a fractal dimension of 1.2 was measured. These two macroscopically different forms possessed correspondingly different microstructures. The morphologies were found to be determined by the temperature of the anneal.

  15. Processing and mechanical properties of silicon nitride formed by robocasting aqueous slurries

    SciTech Connect

    HE,GUOPING; HIRSCHFELD,DEIDRE A.; CESARANO III,JOSEPH

    2000-01-26

    Robocasting is a new freeform fabrication technique for dense ceramics. It uses robotics to control deposition of ceramic slurries through an orifice. The optimization of concentrated aqueous Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} slurry properties to achieve high green density robocast bodies and subsequent high sintered densities was investigated. The effects of pH, electrolyte, additives and solids loading on the dispersion and rheological properties of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} slurries were determined. The mechanical behavior of sintered robocast bars was determined and compared to conventionally produced silicon nitride ceramics.

  16. Strength and fatigue of NT551 silicon nitride and NT551 diesel exhaust valves

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, M.J.; Werezczak, A.A.; Kirkland, T.P.; Breder, K.

    2000-02-01

    The content of this report is excerpted from Mark Andrew's Ph.D. Thesis (Andrews, 1999), which was funded by a DOE/OTT High Temperature Materials Laboratory Graduate Fellowship. It involves the characterization of NT551 and valves fabricated with it. The motivations behind using silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) as an exhaust valve for a diesel engine are presented in this section. There are several economic factors that have encouraged the design and implementation of ceramic components for internal combustion (IC) engines. The reasons for selecting the diesel engine valve for this are also presented.

  17. Soft-x-ray emission spectroscopy study of the electronic structure of nonstoichiometric silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nithianandam, V. Jeyasingh; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1987-07-01

    Soft-x-ray emission spectroscopy was used to investigate the electronic structure of nonstoichiometric silicon nitride samples of different compositions. The Si L23 x-ray emission spectra from these samples are presented and interpreted using a two-phase linear superposition model for the valence-band region. We assumed a model for the valence-band edge and for the emission in the gap region due to trap states and the Si 2p core exciton. The results obtained from these fits are compared with relevant models and other experiments.

  18. Ammonia formation caused by the presence of water in the wet grinding of silicon nitride powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanno, Y.; Suzuki, K.; Kuwahara, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Si3 N4 powder (amorphous, alpha-, and beta-Si3 N4) was mixed with MeOH containing 8.87 mol. % H2O and ground. The NH3 generation rapidly increased after a grinding time of 100 hours. Silicon nitride sintered material was chosen as one of the high temperature, high strength structural materials and studies of the control of the raw material powder, preparation of the sintered body (finding the right assistant, hot press, high pressure sintering, fracture toughness and oxidation at high temperature were performed.

  19. Dual-pumped degenerate Kerr oscillator in a silicon nitride microresonator.

    PubMed

    Okawachi, Yoshitomo; Yu, Mengjie; Luke, Kevin; Carvalho, Daniel O; Ramelow, Sven; Farsi, Alessandro; Lipson, Michal; Gaeta, Alexander L

    2015-11-15

    We demonstrate a degenerate parametric oscillator in a silicon nitride microresonator. We use two frequency-detuned pump waves to perform parametric four-wave mixing and operate in the normal group-velocity dispersion regime to produce signal and idler fields that are frequency degenerate. Our theoretical modeling shows that this regime enables generation of bimodal phase states, analogous to the χ(2)-based degenerate OPO. Our system offers potential for realization of CMOS-chip-based coherent optical computing and an all-optical quantum random number generator. PMID:26565851

  20. Laser scattering detection and characterization of defects and machining damage in silicon nitride components.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J. G.

    1998-11-25

    It is known that surface and subsurface damage in machined silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic components can significantly affect component strength and lifetime. Because Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} may transmit some light into its subsurface, they have developed an elastic optical scattering technique to provide two-dimensional image data for detecting surface or subsurface defects and machining damage. This technique has been used to analyze diamond-ground Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} specimens subjected to various machining conditions. The results were compared with photomicroscopy data for detect characterization and were correlated with machining conditions.

  1. Silicon-nitride photonic circuits interfaced with monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Guohua; Stanev, Teodor K.; Czaplewski, David A.; Jung, Il Woong; Stern, Nathaniel P.

    2015-08-31

    We report on the integration of monolayer molybdenum disulphide with silicon nitride microresonators assembled by visco-elastic layer transfer techniques. Evanescent coupling from the resonator mode to the monolayer is confirmed through measurements of cavity transmission. The absorption of the monolayer semiconductor flakes in this geometry is determined to be 850 dB/cm, which is larger than that of graphene and black phosphorus with the same thickness. This technique can be applied to diverse monolayer semiconductors for assembling hybrid optoelectronic devices such as photodetectors and modulators operating over a wide spectral range.

  2. Observation of transparency of Erbium-doped silicon nitride in photonic crystal nanobeam cavities.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yiyang; Makarova, Maria; Yerci, Selcuk; Li, Rui; Stevens, Martin J; Baek, Burm; Nam, Sae Woo; Dal Negro, Luca; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2010-06-21

    One dimensional nanobeam photonic crystal cavities are fabricated in an Er-doped amorphous silicon nitride layer. Photoluminescence from the cavities around 1.54 microm is studied at cryogenic and room temperatures at different optical pump powers. The resonators demonstrate Purcell enhanced absorption and emission rates, also confirmed by time resolved measurements. Resonances exhibit linewidth narrowing with pump power, signifying absorption bleaching and the onset of stimulated emission in the material at both 5.5 K and room temperature. We estimate from the cavity linewidths that Er has been pumped to transparency at the cavity resonance wavelength.

  3. Characterization of hydrogen-plasma interactions with photoresist, silicon, and silicon nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Thedjoisworo, Bayu A.; Cheung, David; Zamani, Davoud

    2012-05-15

    For the 45 nm technology node and beyond, a major challenge is to achieve reasonably high photoresist ash rates while minimizing the loss of the silicon (Si) substrate and its nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). Accordingly, an objective of this work is to characterize the photoresist strip rate under varying conditions of H{sub 2} plasma and the effects of these conditions on Si and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} etch rates. In addition, we discuss in detail the fundamental mechanisms of the reactions between H atoms and the above substrates and successfully reconcile the process trends obtained with the reaction mechanisms. In this work, photoresist, Si, and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} films were exposed to downstream pure-H{sub 2} discharges and their removal rates were characterized by ellipsometry as a function of the following parameters: substrate temperature, reactor pressure, H{sub 2} flow rate, and source power. The authors found that the H{sub 2}-based dry ash and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} etch are both thermally activated reactions, evidenced by the steady increase in etch rate as a function of temperature, with activation energies of {approx}5.0 and {approx}2.7 kcal/mol, respectively. The Si substrate exhibits a rather unique behavior where the etch rate increases initially to a maximum, which occurs at {approx}40 deg. C, and then decreases upon a further increase in temperature. The decrease in the Si etch rate at higher temperatures is attributed to the activation of competing side reactions that consume the chemisorbed H atoms on the Si surface, which then suppresses the Si-etch step. The photoresist and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} removal rates increase initially with increasing pressure, reaching maxima at {approx}800 and 2000 mTorr, respectively, beyond which the removal rates drop with increasing pressure. The initial increase in removal rate at the low-pressure regime is attributed to the increased atomic-hydrogen density, whereas the decrease in ash rate at the high-pressure regime could be

  4. The effect of preparation conditions on the structure and mechanical properties of reaction-sintered silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinrich, J.

    1980-01-01

    The microstructure of reaction sintered silicon nitride (RSSN) was changed over a wide range by varying the grain density, grain size of the silicon starting powder, nitriding conditions, and by introducing artificial pores. The influence of single microstructural parameters on mechanical properties like room temperature strength, creep behavior, and resistance to thermal shock was investigated. The essential factors influencing these properties were found to be total porosity, pore size distribution, and the fractions of alpha and beta Si3N4. In view of high temperature engineering applications of RSSN, potentials for optimizing the material's properties by controlled processing are discussed.

  5. Power mixture and green body for producing silicon nitride base & articles of high fracture toughness and strength

    DOEpatents

    Huckabee, Marvin L.; Buljan, Sergej-Tomislav; Neil, Jeffrey T.

    1991-01-01

    A powder mixture and a green body for producing a silicon nitride-based article of improved fracture toughness and strength. The powder mixture includes 9a) a bimodal silicon nitride powder blend consisting essentially of about 10-30% by weight of a first silicon mitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.2 .mu.m and a surface area of about 8-12m.sup.2 g, and about 70-90% by weight of a second silicon nitride powder of an average particle size of about 0.4-0.6 .mu.m and a surface area of about 2-4 m.sup.2 /g, (b) about 10-50 percent by volume, based on the volume of the densified article, of refractory whiskers or fibers having an aspect ratio of about 3-150 and having an equivalent diameter selected to produce in the densified articel an equivalent diameter ratio of the whiskers or fibers to grains of silicon nitride of greater than 1.0, and (c) an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid. The green body is formed from the powder mixture, an effective amount of a suitable oxide densification aid, and an effective amount of a suitable organic binder.

  6. Design, analysis, and characterization of stress-engineered 3D microstructures comprised of PECVD silicon oxide and nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Chia-Hsing; Turner, Kevin T.

    2016-06-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are typically 2D or quasi-3D structures fabricated using surface and bulk micromachining processes. In this work, an approach for 3D structure fabrication based on stress engineering is demonstrated. Specifically, sub-mm 3D spherical cage-like structures are realized through the deformation of bilayers of residually-stressed silicon oxide and silicon nitride with micrometer-scale thicknesses. Analytical and finite models to predict the shape of stress-engineered structures based on geometry and residual stress are described and used for structure design. A systematic experimental study was performed to quantify residual stresses in silicon nitride films made by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The measurements show that the residual stress of PECVD silicon nitride can be tuned over a wide range of tensile stresses through the control of deposition parameters, such as flow rate and power. Stress engineered 3D cage-like structures comprised of PECVD silicon nitride and oxide films were fabricated. 3D structures with a range of curvatures were demonstrated. The measured geometry of the fabricated structures are in good agreement with predictions from analytical and finite element models.

  7. Alumina and silicon oxide/nitride sidewall passivation for P- and N-type sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christophersen, M.; Fadeyev, V.; Phlips, B. F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Parker, C.; Ely, S.; Wright, J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Silicon detectors normally have an inactive region along the perimeter of the sensor. In this paper we describe a "scribe, cleave, and passivate" (SCP) technique for the fabrication of slim edges in a post processing with finished detectors. The scribing was done by laser-scribing and etching. After scribing and cleaving steps, the sidewalls are passivated with a dielectric. We present results for n- and p-type sensors with different sidewall passivations. The leakage current depends strongly on the type of sidewall passivation. An alumina passivation leads to very low leakage currents for p-type sensors because of a negative interface charge. For n-type sensors, a hydrogenated silicon nitride shows the lowest leakage currents. Furthermore, we applied the technique to large area n-type single-sided strip detectors (cleaving length up to 3.5 cm).

  8. Effects of ambient conditions on the adhesion of cubic boron nitride films on silicon substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinale, G.F.; Howitt, D.G.; Mirkarimi, P.B.; McCarty, K.F.; Klaus, E.J.; Medlin, D.L.

    1994-08-01

    Effect of environmental conditions on cubic boron nitride (cBN) film adhesion to silicon substrates was studied. cBN films were deposited onto (100)-oriented silicon substrates by ion-assisted pulsed laser deposition. Irradiating ions were mixtures of nitrogen with argon, krypton, and xenon. Under room-ambient conditions, the films delaminated in the following time order: N/Xe, N/Kr, and N/Ar. cBN films deposited using N/Xe ion-assisted deposition were exposed to four environmental conditions for several weeks: a 1-mTorr vacuum, high humidity, dry oxygen, and dry nitrogen. Films exposed to the humid environment delaminated whereas those stored under vacuum or in dry gases did not. Films stored in dry nitrogen were removed after nearly two weeks and placed in the high-humidity chamber; these films subsequently delaminated within 14 hours.

  9. Silicon-on-nitride structures for mid-infrared gap-plasmon waveguiding

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Jianwei E-mail: soref@rcn.com; Kimerling, Lionel C.; Michel, Jurgen; Soref, Richard E-mail: soref@rcn.com

    2014-01-20

    Silicon-on-nitride (SON) is a convenient, low-loss platform for mid-infrared group IV plasmonics and photonics. We have designed 5-layer SON channel-waveguides and slab-waveguides for the 2.0 to 5.4 μm wavelength range and have simulated the resulting three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) SON gap-plasmon modes. Our simulations show propagation lengths of ∼60 μm for 3D gap-strip modes having a 0.003 λ{sup 2} cross-section. Because the ∼50-nm SON (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) mode region is also a gate insulator between silver (Ag) and n-doped Silicon (Si), metal-oxide-semiconductor accumulation gating is available for electro-optical loss modulation of the gap-confined mode.

  10. Effect of the hexagonal phase interlayer on rectification properties of boron nitride heterojunctions to silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teii, K.; Ito, H.; Katayama, N.; Matsumoto, S.

    2015-02-01

    Rectification properties of boron nitride/silicon p-n heterojunction diodes fabricated under low-energy ion impact by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition are studied in terms of the resistive sp2-bonded boron nitride (sp2BN) interlayer. A two-step biasing technique is developed to control the fraction of cubic boron nitride (cBN) phase and, hence, the thickness of the sp2BN interlayer in the films. The rectification ratio at room temperature is increased up to the order of 104 at ±10 V of biasing with increasing the sp2BN thickness up to around 130 nm due to suppression of the reverse leakage current. The variation of the ideality factor in the low bias region is related to the interface disorders and defects, not to the sp2BN thickness. The forward current follows the Frenkel-Poole emission model in the sp2BN interlayer at relatively high fields when the anomalous effect is assumed. The transport of the minority carriers for reverse current is strongly limited by the high bulk resistance of the thick sp2BN interlayer, while that of the major carriers for forward current is much less affected.

  11. Effect of the hexagonal phase interlayer on rectification properties of boron nitride heterojunctions to silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Teii, K. Ito, H.; Katayama, N.; Matsumoto, S.

    2015-02-07

    Rectification properties of boron nitride/silicon p-n heterojunction diodes fabricated under low-energy ion impact by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition are studied in terms of the resistive sp{sup 2}-bonded boron nitride (sp{sup 2}BN) interlayer. A two-step biasing technique is developed to control the fraction of cubic boron nitride (cBN) phase and, hence, the thickness of the sp{sup 2}BN interlayer in the films. The rectification ratio at room temperature is increased up to the order of 10{sup 4} at ±10 V of biasing with increasing the sp{sup 2}BN thickness up to around 130 nm due to suppression of the reverse leakage current. The variation of the ideality factor in the low bias region is related to the interface disorders and defects, not to the sp{sup 2}BN thickness. The forward current follows the Frenkel-Poole emission model in the sp{sup 2}BN interlayer at relatively high fields when the anomalous effect is assumed. The transport of the minority carriers for reverse current is strongly limited by the high bulk resistance of the thick sp{sup 2}BN interlayer, while that of the major carriers for forward current is much less affected.

  12. Surface recombination velocity of phosphorus-diffused silicon solar cell emitters passivated with plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride and thermal silicon oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, M. J.; Schmidt, J.; Cuevas, A.; Bultman, J. H.

    2001-04-01

    The emitter saturation current density (JOe) and surface recombination velocity (Sp) of various high quality passivation schemes on phosphorus-diffused solar cell emitters have been determined and compared. The passivation schemes investigated were (i) stoichiometric plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride (SiN), (ii) forming gas annealed thermally grown silicon oxide, and (iii) aluminum annealed (alnealed) thermal silicon oxide. Emitters with sheet resistances ranging from 30 to 430 and 50 to 380 Ω/□ were investigated for planar and random-pyramid textured silicon surfaces, which covers both industrial and laboratory emitters. The electronic surface passivation quality provided by PECVD SiN films was found to be good, with Sp values ranging from 1400 to 25 000 cm/s for planar emitters. Thin thermal silicon oxides were found to provide superior passivation to PECVD SiN, with the best passivation provided by an alnealed thin oxide (Sp values between 250 and 21 000 cm/s). The optimized PECVD SiN films are, nevertheless, sufficiently good for most silicon solar cell applications.

  13. Effects of post-deposition argon implantation on the memory properties of plasma-deposited silicon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Q. A.; Brown, W. D.

    1989-10-01

    Post-deposition ion implantation has been used to introduce argon into plasma-enhanced chemically vapor deposited silicon nitride films in an attempt to influence the transfer, trapping, and emission of charge during write/erase exercising of the metal-silicon nitride-silicon oxide-silicon structure. Argon was implanted into the SiH4 -NH3 -N2 deposited films at energies ranging from 25 to 75 keV, current densities ranging from 0.1 to 75 μA/cm2 and fluences ranging from 1×1012 to 1×1016 ions/cm2. Physical properties of the films were studied by ellipsometry and infrared spectroscopy, while high frequency capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves were used to obtain programming, retention, and endurance characteristics.

  14. Effect of Projectile Materials on Foreign Object Damage of a Gas-Turbine Grade Silicon Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Racz, Zsolt; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Brewer, David N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2005-01-01

    Foreign object damage (FOD) behavior of AS800 silicon nitride was determined using four different projectile materials at ambient temperature. The target test specimens rigidly supported were impacted at their centers by spherical projectiles with a diameter of 1.59 mm. Four different types of projectiles were used including hardened steel balls, annealed steel balls, silicon nitride balls, and brass balls. Post-impact strength of each target specimen impacted was determined as a function of impact velocity to better understand the severity of local impact damage. The critical impact velocity where target specimens fail upon impact was highest with brass balls, lowest with ceramic ball, and intermediate with annealed and hardened steel balls. Degree of strength degradation upon impact followed the same order as in the critical impact velocity with respect to projectile materials. For steel balls, hardened projectiles yielded more significant impact damage than annealed counterparts. The most important material parameter affecting FOD was identified as hardness of projectiles and was correlated in terms of critical impact velocity, impact deformation, and impact load.

  15. Thickness limitations in carbon nanotube reinforced silicon nitride coatings synthesized by vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Eres, Gyula

    2012-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration is a convenient method for synthesizing carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced ceramic coatings. The thickness over which infiltration is relatively uniform is limited by gas phase diffusion in the pore structure. These effects were investigated in two types of silicon nitride matrix composites. With CNTs that were distributed uniformly on the substrate surface dense coatings were limited to thicknesses of several microns. With dual structured CNT arrays produced by photolithography coatings up to 400 gm thick were obtained with minimal residual porosity. Gas transport into these dual structured materials was facilitated by creating micron sized channels between "CNT pillars" (i.e. each pillar consisted of a large number of individual CNTs). The experimental results are consistent with basic comparisons between the rates of gas diffusion and silicon nitride growth in porous structures. This analysis also provides a general insight into optimizing infiltration conditions during the fabrication of thick CNT-reinforced composite coatings. (C) 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of W and WC on the oxidation resistance of yttria-doped silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuon, S.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of tungsten and tungsten carbide contamination on the oxidation and cracking in air of yttria-doped silicon nitride ceramics is investigated. Silicon nitride powder containing 8 wt % Y2O3 was doped with 2 wt % W, 4 wt % W, 2 wt % WC or left undoped, and sintered in order to simulate contamination during milling, and specimens were exposed in air to 500, 750 and 1350 C for various lengths of time. Scanning electron and optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction of the specimens in the as-sintered state reveals that the addition of W or WC does not affect the phase relationships in the system, composed of alpha and beta Si3N4, melilite and an amorphous phase. Catastrophic oxidation is observed at 750 C in specimens containing 2 and 4 wt % W, accompanied by the disappearance of alpha Si3N4 and melilite from the structure. At 1350 C, the formation of a protective glassy oxide layer was observed on all specimens without catastrophic oxidation, and it is found that pre-oxidation at 1350 C also improved the oxidation resistance at 750 C of bars doped with 4 wt % W. It is suggested that tungsten contamination from WC grinding balls may be the major cause of the intermediate-temperature cracking and instability frequently observed in Si3N4-8Y2O3.

  17. Comparative study of elastic constantd of α-, β- and Cubic- silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Hongzhi; Ouyang, Lizhi; Ching, Wai-Yim

    2003-03-01

    Silicon nitride is an important structural ceramic and dielectric insulator. Recently, the new high pressure cubic phase of silicon nitride in spinel structure has attracted a lot of attention.^[1] We have carried out a detailed ab-initio calculation of all independent elastic constants for all three phases of Si_3N4 by using the Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP) in both LDA and GGA approxmations. The results for β-Si_3N4 are in reasonable agreement with a experimental measurement on single crystal samples.^[2] For cubic-Si_3N4 , The three independent elastic constants are predicted to be C_11 = 504.16 GPa, C_12 = 176.66 GPa, C_44 = 326.65 GPa and a bulk modulus B = 286 GPa. This value is very close to the experimental value of 300 GPa.^[1] All these results will be compared with those obtained by using the OLCAO method based on localized orbital approach.^[3] [1]. Wai-Yim Ching, Yong-Nian Xu, Jukian D. Gale, and Manfred Ruhle, J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 81, 3189 (1998) [2]. R. Vogelgesang, M. Grimsditch, and J. S. Wallace, Appl. Phys. Lett. 76, 8 (2000) [3]. W.Y.Ching, Lizhi Ouyang, and Julian D. Gale, Phys. Rev. B61, 13, (2000)

  18. Formation of boron nitride coatings on silicon carbide fibers using trimethylborate vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Mengjiao; Zhou, Tong; He, Jing; Chen, Lifu

    2016-09-01

    High quality boron nitride (BN) coatings have been grown on silicon carbide (SiC) fibers by carbothermal nitridation and at atmospheric pressure. SiC fibers were first treated in chlorine gas to form CDC (carbide-derived carbon) film on the fiber surface. The CDC-coated SiC fibers were then reacted with trimethylborate vapor and ammonia vapor at high temperature, forming BN coatings by carbothermal reduction. The FT-IR, XPS, XRD, SEM, TEM and AES were used to investigate the formation of the obtained coatings. It has been found that the obtained coatings are composed of phase mixture of h-BN and amorphous carbon, very uniform in thickness, have smooth surface and adhere well with the SiC fiber substrates. The BN-coated SiC fibers retain ∼80% strength of the as-received SiC fibers and show an obvious interfacial debonding and fiber pullout in the SiCf/SiOC composites. This method may be useful for the large scale production of high quality BN coating on silicon carbide fiber.

  19. Friction and wear of plasma-deposited amorphous hydrogenated films on silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the friction and wear behavior of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films in sliding contact with silicon nitride pins in both dry nitrogen and humid air environments. Amorphous hydrogenated carbon films approximately 0.06 micron thick were deposited on silicon nitride flat substrates by using the 30 kHz ac glow discharge of a planar plasma reactor. The results indicate that an increase in plasma deposition power gives an increase in film density and hardness. The high-density a-C:H films deposited behaved tribologically much like bulk diamond. In the dry nitrogen environment, a tribochemical reaction produced a substance, probably a hydrocarbon-rich layer, that decreased the coefficient of friction. In the humid air environment, tribochemical interactions drastically reduced the wear life of a-C:H films and water vapor greatly increased the friction. Even in humid air, effective lubrication is possible with vacuum-annealed a-C:H films. The vacuum-annealed high-density a-C:H film formed an outermost superficial graphitic layer, which behaved like graphite, on the bulk a-C:H film. Like graphite, the annealed a-C:H film with the superficial graphitic layer showed low friction when adsorbed water vapor was present.

  20. Effect of Silicon Nitride Balls and Rollers on Rolling Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Vlcek, Brian L.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Three decades have passed since the introduction of silicon nitride rollers and balls into conventional rolling-element bearings. For a given applied load, the contact (Hertz) stress in a hybrid bearing will be higher than an all-steel rolling-element bearing. The silicon nitride rolling-element life as well as the lives of the steel races were used to determine the resultant bearing life of both hybrid and all-steel bearings. Life factors were determined and reported for hybrid bearings. Under nominal operating speeds, the resultant calculated lives of the deep-groove, angular-contact, and cylindrical roller hybrid bearings with races made of post-1960 bearing steel increased by factors of 3.7, 3.2, and 5.5, respectively, from those calculated using the Lundberg-Palmgren equations. An all-steel bearing under the same load will have a longer life than the equivalent hybrid bearing under the same conditions. Under these conditions, hybrid bearings are predicted to have a lower fatigue life than all-steel bearings by 58 percent for deep-groove bearings, 41 percent for angular-contact bearings, and 28 percent for cylindrical roller bearings.

  1. Electron transport and dielectric breakdown in silicon nitride using a charge transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Sean P.; Lu, Toh-Ming; Plawsky, Joel L.

    2016-10-01

    Silicon nitride is an important material used in the electronics industry. As such, the electronic transport and reliability of these materials are important to study and understand. We report on a charge transport model to predict leakage current and failure trends based on previously published data for a stoichiometric silicon nitride dielectric. Failure occurs when the defect density increases to a critical value of approximately 6 × 1025 traps/m3. The model's parameters are determined using voltage ramp data only, and yet, the model is also able to predict constant voltage stress failure over a time scale ranging from minutes to months. The successful fit of the model to the experimental data validates our assumption that the dominant defect in the dielectric is the Si dangling bond, located approximately 2.2 eV below the conduction band. A comparison with previous SiCOH simulations shows SiN and SiCOH have similar defect-related material properties. It is also speculated that, based on the estimated parameter values of 2.75 eV for the defect formation activation energy, the materials' TDDB wear-out are caused by broken Si-H bonds, resulting in Si dangling bond defects.

  2. A mathematical model and simulation results of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konakov, S. A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride thin films from SiH4-NH3-N2-Ar mixture, an important application in modern materials science. Our multiphysics model describes gas dynamics, chemical physics, plasma physics and electrodynamics. The PECVD technology is inherently multiscale, from macroscale processes in the chemical reactor to atomic-scale surface chemistry. Our macroscale model is based on Navier-Stokes equations for a transient laminar flow of a compressible chemically reacting gas mixture, together with the mass transfer and energy balance equations, Poisson equation for electric potential, electrons and ions balance equations. The chemical kinetics model includes 24 species and 58 reactions: 37 in the gas phase and 21 on the surface. A deposition model consists of three stages: adsorption to the surface, diffusion along the surface and embedding of products into the substrate. A new model has been validated on experimental results obtained with the "Plasmalab System 100" reactor. We present the mathematical model and simulation results investigating the influence of flow rate and source gas proportion on silicon nitride film growth rate and chemical composition.

  3. Review of corrosion behavior of ceramic heat exchanger materals: Corrosion characteristics of silicon carbide and silicon nitride. Final report, September 11, 1992--March 11, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, R.G.; Dapkunas, S.J.

    1993-09-01

    The present work is a review of the substantial effort that has been made to measure and understand the effects of corrosion with respect to the properties, performance, and durability of various forms of silicon carbide and silicon nitride. The review encompasses corrosion in diverse environments, usually at temperatures of 1000C or higher. The environments include dry and moist oxygen, mixtures of hot gaseous vapors, molten salts, molten metals, and complex environments pertaining to coal ashes and slags.

  4. Recombination and thin film properties of silicon nitride and amorphous silicon passivated c-Si following ammonia plasma exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Yimao; Thomson, Andrew F.; Cuevas, Andres; McIntosh, Keith R.

    2015-01-26

    Recombination at silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) and amorphous silicon (a-Si) passivated crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces is shown to increase significantly following an ammonia (NH{sub 3}) plasma exposure at room temperature. The effect of plasma exposure on chemical structure, refractive index, permittivity, and electronic properties of the thin films is also investigated. It is found that the NH{sub 3} plasma exposure causes (i) an increase in the density of Si≡N{sub 3} groups in both SiN{sub x} and a-Si films, (ii) a reduction in refractive index and permittivity, (iii) an increase in the density of defects at the SiN{sub x}/c-Si interface, and (iv) a reduction in the density of positive charge in SiN{sub x}. The changes in recombination and thin film properties are likely due to an insertion of N–H radicals into the bulk of SiN{sub x} or a-Si. It is therefore important for device performance to minimize NH{sub 3} plasma exposure of SiN{sub x} or a-Si passivating films during subsequent fabrication steps.

  5. Alternative process for thin layer etching: Application to nitride spacer etching stopping on silicon germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Posseme, N. Pollet, O.; Barnola, S.

    2014-08-04

    Silicon nitride spacer etching realization is considered today as one of the most challenging of the etch process for the new devices realization. For this step, the atomic etch precision to stop on silicon or silicon germanium with a perfect anisotropy (no foot formation) is required. The situation is that none of the current plasma technologies can meet all these requirements. To overcome these issues and meet the highly complex requirements imposed by device fabrication processes, we recently proposed an alternative etching process to the current plasma etch chemistries. This process is based on thin film modification by light ions implantation followed by a selective removal of the modified layer with respect to the non-modified material. In this Letter, we demonstrate the benefit of this alternative etch method in term of film damage control (silicon germanium recess obtained is less than 6 A), anisotropy (no foot formation), and its compatibility with other integration steps like epitaxial. The etch mechanisms of this approach are also addressed.

  6. Formation of Mach angle profiles during wet etching of silica and silicon nitride materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghulinyan, M.; Bernard, M.; Bartali, R.; Pucker, G.

    2015-12-01

    In integrated circuit technology peeling of masking photoresist films is a major drawback during the long-timed wet etching of materials. It causes an undesired film underetching, which is often accompanied by a formation of complex etch profiles. Here we report on a detailed study of wedge-shaped profile formation in a series of silicon oxide, silicon oxynitride and silicon nitride materials during wet etching in a buffered hydrofluoric acid (BHF) solution. The shape of etched profiles reflects the time-dependent adhesion properties of the photoresist to a particular material and can be perfectly circular, purely linear or a combination of both, separated by a knee feature. Starting from a formal analogy between the sonic boom propagation and the wet underetching process, we model the wedge formation mechanism analytically. This model predicts the final form of the profile as a function of time and fits the experimental data perfectly. We discuss how this knowledge can be extended to the design and the realization of optical components such as highly efficient etch-less vertical tapers for passive silicon photonics.

  7. Simultaneous direct determination of aluminum, calcium and iron in silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders by slurry-sampling graphite furnace AAS.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hirotsugu; Yada, Masako; Yoshida, Tomomi; Zhang, Qiangbin; Inoue, Sadanobu; Atsuya, Ikuo

    2004-03-01

    A fast and accurate analytical method was established for the simultaneous direct determination of aluminum, calcium and iron in silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using a slurry sampling technique and a Hitachi Model Z-9000 atomic absorption spectrometer. The slurry samples were prepared by the ultrasonication of silicon carbide or silicon nitride powders with 0.1 M nitric acid. Calibration curves were prepared by using a mixed standard solution containing aluminum, calcium, iron and 0.1 M nitric acid. The analytical results of the proposed method for aluminum, calcium and iron in silicon carbide and silicon nitride reference materials were in good agreement with the reference values. The detection limits for aluminum, calcium and iron were 0.6 microg/g, 0.15 microg/g and 2.5 microg/g, respectively, in solid samples, when 200 mg of powdered samples were suspended in 20 ml of 0.1 M nitric acid and a 10 microl portion of the slurry sample was then measured. The relative standard deviation of the determination of aluminum, calcium and iron was 5 - 33%.

  8. Evaluation of Silicon Nitride as a Substrate for Culture of PC12 Cells: An Interfacial Model for Functional Studies in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Medina Benavente, Johan Jaime; Mogami, Hideo; Sakurai, Takashi; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nitride is a biocompatible material that is currently used as an interfacial surface between cells and large-scale integration devices incorporating ion-sensitive field-effect transistor technology. Here, we investigated whether a poly-L-lysine coated silicon nitride surface is suitable for the culture of PC12 cells, which are widely used as a model for neural differentiation, and we characterized their interaction based on cell behavior when seeded on the tested material. The coated surface was first examined in terms of wettability and topography using contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy and then, conditioned silicon nitride surface was used as the substrate for the study of PC12 cell culture properties. We found that coating silicon nitride with poly-L-lysine increased surface hydrophilicity and that exposing this coated surface to an extracellular aqueous environment gradually decreased its roughness. When PC12 cells were cultured on a coated silicon nitride surface, adhesion and spreading were facilitated, and the cells showed enhanced morphological differentiation compared to those cultured on a plastic culture dish. A bromodeoxyuridine assay demonstrated that, on the coated silicon nitride surface, higher proportions of cells left the cell cycle, remained in a quiescent state and had longer survival times. Therefore, our study of the interaction of the silicon nitride surface with PC12 cells provides important information for the production of devices that need to have optimal cell culture-supporting properties in order to be used in the study of neuronal functions. PMID:24587271

  9. Modeling the growth of PECVD silicon nitride films for crystalline silicon solar cells using factorial design and response surface methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Nybergh, K.; Marjamaeki, T.; Skarp, E.

    1997-12-31

    Silicon nitride was grown on polished Si wafers by a parallel plate PECVD reactor. Reaction gases were NH{sub 3} and 3% SiH{sub 4} in Ar and the rf frequency was 13.56 MHz. The film thickness and refractive index were measured by an ellipsometer. The results were analyzed using response surface methodology. The results indicate that the silane-to-ammonia flow rate ratio is the dominating parameter when determining the refractive index and that the total gas flow rate and the chamber pressure dominate the growth rate, whereas rf power has a less strong impact on growth rate and no impact on refractive index. The previous results will be used when growing passivating antireflection coatings on three grain Si solar cells.

  10. Bulk-wave and guided-wave photoacoustic evaluation of the mechanical properties of aluminum/silicon nitride double-layer thin films.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feifei; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar; Lilley, Carmen M

    2006-12-01

    The development of devices made of micro- and nano-structured thin film materials has resulted in the need for advanced measurement techniques to characterize their mechanical properties. Photoacoustic techniques, which use pulsed laser irradiation to nondestructively induce very high frequency ultrasound in a test object via rapid thermal expansion, are suitable for nondestructive and non-contact evaluation of thin films. In this paper, we compare two photoacoustic techniques to characterize the mechanical parameters of edge-supported aluminum and silicon nitride double-layer thin films. The elastic properties and residual stresses in such films affect their mechanical performance. In a first set of experiments, a femtosecond transient pump-probe technique is used to investigate the Young's moduli of the aluminum and silicon nitride layers by launching ultra-high frequency bulk acoustic waves in the films. The measured transient signals are compared with simulated transient thermoelastic signals in multi-layer structures, and the elastic moduli are determined. Independent pump-probe tests on silicon substrate-supported region and unsupported region are in good agreement. In a second set of experiments, dispersion curves of the A(0) mode of the Lamb waves that propagate along the unsupported films are measured using a broadband photoacoustic guided-wave method. The residual stresses and flexural rigidities for the same set of double-layer membranes are determined from these dispersion curves. Comparisons of the results obtained by the two photoacoustic techniques are made and discussed.

  11. Surface etching, chemical modification and characterization of silicon nitride and silicon oxide—selective functionalization of Si3N4 and SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li-Hong; Michalak, David J.; Chopra, Tatiana P.; Pujari, Sidharam P.; Cabrera, Wilfredo; Dick, Don; Veyan, Jean-François; Hourani, Rami; Halls, Mathew D.; Zuilhof, Han; Chabal, Yves J.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to selectively chemically functionalize silicon nitride (Si3N4) or silicon dioxide (SiO2) surfaces after cleaning would open interesting technological applications. In order to achieve this goal, the chemical composition of surfaces needs to be carefully characterized so that target chemical reactions can proceed on only one surface at a time. While wet-chemically cleaned silicon dioxide surfaces have been shown to be terminated with surficial Si-OH sites, chemical composition of the HF-etched silicon nitride surfaces is more controversial. In this work, we removed the native oxide under various aqueous HF-etching conditions and studied the chemical nature of the resulting Si3N4 surfaces using infrared absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low energy ion scattering (LEIS), and contact angle measurements. We find that HF-etched silicon nitride surfaces are terminated by surficial Si-F and Si-OH bonds, with slightly subsurface Si-OH, Si-O-Si, and Si-NH2 groups. The concentration of surficial Si-F sites is not dependent on HF concentration, but the distribution of oxygen and Si-NH2 displays a weak dependence. The Si-OH groups of the etched nitride surface are shown to react in a similar manner to the Si-OH sites on SiO2, and therefore no selectivity was found. Chemical selectivity was, however, demonstrated by first reacting the -NH2 groups on the etched nitride surface with aldehyde molecules, which do not react with the Si-OH sites on a SiO2 surface, and then using trichloro-organosilanes for selective reaction only on the SiO2 surface (no reactivity on the aldehyde-terminated Si3N4 surface).

  12. More Efficient Power Conversion for EVs: Gallium-Nitride Advanced Power Semiconductor and Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Delphi is developing power converters that are smaller and more energy efficient, reliable, and cost-effective than current power converters. Power converters rely on power transistors which act like a very precisely controlled on-off switch, controlling the electrical energy flowing through an electrical circuit. Most power transistors today use silicon (Si) semiconductors. However, Delphi is using semiconductors made with a thin layer of gallium-nitride (GaN) applied on top of the more conventional Si material. The GaN layer increases the energy efficiency of the power transistor and also enables the transistor to operate at much higher temperatures, voltages, and power-density levels compared to its Si counterpart. Delphi is packaging these high-performance GaN semiconductors with advanced electrical connections and a cooling system that extracts waste heat from both sides of the device to further increase the device’s efficiency and allow more electrical current to flow through it. When combined with other electronic components on a circuit board, Delphi’s GaN power transistor package will help improve the overall performance and cost-effectiveness of HEVs and EVs.

  13. The electroluminescence mechanism of Er³⁺ in different silicon oxide and silicon nitride environments

    SciTech Connect

    Rebohle, L. Wutzler, R.; Braun, M.; Helm, M.; Skorupa, W.; Berencén, Y.; Ramírez, J. M.; Garrido, B.; Hiller, D.

    2014-09-28

    Rare earth doped metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures are of great interest for Si-based light emission. However, several physical limitations make it difficult to achieve the performance of light emitters based on compound semiconductors. To address this point, in this work the electroluminescence (EL) excitation and quenching mechanism of Er-implanted MOS structures with different designs of the dielectric stack are investigated. The devices usually consist of an injection layer made of SiO₂ and an Er-implanted layer made of SiO₂, Si-rich SiO₂, silicon nitride, or Si-rich silicon nitride. All structures implanted with Er show intense EL around 1540 nm with EL power efficiencies in the order of 2 × 10⁻³ (for SiO₂:Er) or 2 × 10⁻⁴(all other matrices) for lower current densities. The EL is excited by the impact of hot electrons with an excitation cross section in the range of 0.5–1.5 × 10⁻¹⁵cm⁻². Whereas the fraction of potentially excitable Er ions in SiO₂ can reach values up to 50%, five times lower values were observed for other matrices. The decrease of the EL decay time for devices with Si-rich SiO₂ or Si nitride compared to SiO₂ as host matrix implies an increase of the number of defects adding additional non-radiative de-excitation paths for Er³⁺. For all investigated devices, EL quenching cross sections in the 10⁻²⁰ cm² range and charge-to-breakdown values in the range of 1–10 C cm⁻² were measured. For the present design with a SiO₂ acceleration layer, thickness reduction and the use of different host matrices did not improve the EL power efficiency or the operation lifetime, but strongly lowered the operation voltage needed to achieve intense EL.

  14. Investigation of Oxygen and Hydrogen Associated Charge Trapping and Electrical Characteristics of Silicon Nitride Films for Mnos Devices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dan

    Silicon nitride (Si_3N _4) and silicon oxynitride (SiO _{rm x}N_ {rm y}) films in the form of metal -nitride-oxide-silicon (MNOS) structures were investigated to determine the correlation between their electrical characteristics and the nature of the chemical bonding so as to provide guidelines for the next generation of nonvolatile memory devices. The photoionization cross section of electron traps in the oxynitride films of MNOS devices were also measured as a function photon energy and oxygen concentration of the silicon oxynitride films. An effective photoionization cross section associated with electron traps was determined to be between 4.9 times 10 ^{-19} cm^2 to 10.8 times 10^ {-19} cm^2 over the photon energy of 2.06 eV to 3.1 eV for silicon oxynitride films containing 7 atomic % to 17 atomic % of oxygen. The interface state density of metal-nitride-oxide -silicon (MNOS) devices was investigated as a function of processing conditions. The interface state density around the midgap of the oxide-silicon interface of the MNOS structures for deposition temperature between 650^ circC to 850^circC increased from 1.1 to 8.2 times 10 ^{11} cm^ {-2}eV^{-1}, for as-deposited silicon nitride films; but decreased from 5.0 to 3.5 times 10^ {11} cm^{-2} eV^{-1}, for films annealed in nitrogen at 900^circC for 60 minutes; and further decreased and remained constant at 1.5 times 10^{11 } cm^{-2}eV ^{-1}, for films which were further annealed in hydrogen at 900^ circC for an additional 60 minutes. The interface state density increase was due to an increase in the loss of hydrogen at the interfacial region and also due to an increase in the thermal stress caused by differences in thermal expansion coefficients of silicon nitride and silicon dioxide films at higher deposition temperatures. The interface state density was subject to two opposing influences; an increase by thermal stress, and a reduction by hydrogen compensation of these states. The photocurrent-voltage (photo

  15. Role of Surface Termination in Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride.

    PubMed

    Ande, Chaitanya Krishna; Knoops, Harm C M; de Peuter, Koen; van Drunen, Maarten; Elliott, Simon D; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M

    2015-09-17

    There is an urgent need to deposit uniform, high-quality, conformal SiN(x) thin films at a low-temperature. Conforming to these constraints, we recently developed a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) process with bis(tertiary-butyl-amino)silane (BTBAS) as the silicon precursor. However, deposition of high quality SiNx thin films at reasonable growth rates occurs only when N2 plasma is used as the coreactant; strongly reduced growth rates are observed when other coreactants like NH3 plasma, or N2-H2 plasma are used. Experiments reported in this Letter reveal that NH(x)- or H- containing plasmas suppress film deposition by terminating reactive surface sites with H and NH(x) groups and inhibiting precursor adsorption. To understand the role of these surface groups on precursor adsorption, we carried out first-principles calculations of precursor adsorption on the β-Si3N4(0001) surface with different surface terminations. They show that adsorption of the precursor is strong on surfaces with undercoordinated surface sites. In contrast, on surfaces with H, NH2 groups, or both, steric hindrance leads to weak precursor adsorption. Experimental and first-principles results together show that using an N2 plasma to generate reactive undercoordinated surface sites allows strong adsorption of the silicon precursor and, hence, is key to successful deposition of silicon nitride by ALD. PMID:26722730

  16. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    This is the third annual technical report for the program entitled, Improved Silicon Carbide for Advanced Heat Engines, for the period February 16, 1987 to February 15, 1988. The objective of the original program was the development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines. Injection molding is the forming method selected for the program because it is capable of forming complex parts adaptable for mass production on an economically sound basis. The goals of the revised program are to reach a Weibull characteristic strength of 550 MPa (80 ksi) and a Weibull modulus of 16 for bars tested in 4-point loading. Two tasks are discussed: Task 1 which involves materials and process improvements, and Task 2 which is a MOR bar matrix to improve strength and reliability. Many statistically designed experiments were completed under task 1 which improved the composition of the batches, the mixing of the powders, the sinter and anneal cycles. The best results were obtained by an attritor mixing process which yielded strengths in excess of 550 MPa (80 ksi) and an individual Weibull modulus of 16.8 for a 9-sample group. Strengths measured at 1200 and 1400 C were equal to the room temperature strength. Annealing of machined test bars significantly improved the strength. Molding yields were measured and flaw distributions were observed to follow a Poisson process. The second iteration of the Task 2 matrix experiment is described.

  17. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    This is the second annual technical report entitled, Improved Silicon Carbide for Advanced Heat Engines, and includes work performed during the period February 16, 1986 to February 15, 1987. The program is conducted for NASA under contract NAS3-24384. The objective is the development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines. The fabrication methods used are to be adaptable for mass production of such parts on an economically sound basis. Injection molding is the forming method selected. This objective is to be accomplished in a two-phase program: (1) to achieve a 20 percent improvement in strength and a 100 percent increase in Weibull modulus of the baseline material; and (2) to produce a complex shaped part, a gas turbine rotor, for example, with the improved mechanical properties attained in the first phase. Eight tasks are included in the first phase covering the characterization of the properties of a baseline material, the improvement of those properties and the fabrication of complex shaped parts. Activities during the first contract year concentrated on two of these areas: fabrication and characterization of the baseline material (Task 1) and improvement of material and processes (Task 7). Activities during the second contract year included an MOR bar matrix study to improve mechanical properties (Task 2), materials and process improvements (Task 7), and a Ford-funded task to mold a turbocharger rotor with an improved material (Task 8).

  18. Effects of PECVD hardware configuration on mechanical stress and stoichiometry of silicon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorger, S. C.; Schönherr, H.; Fathulla, A.; Speidel, E.

    2004-12-01

    Silicon nitrides are important materials in passivation technology currently employed for manufacturing microelectronic power devices. For deposition of these silane-based films various hardware types are used which can lead to different film properties, although the deposition conditions may be the same. The main difference between process kits of the commercially available chamber types for plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is the heating source, which can either be a resistive heater or a lamp module. This paper presents the influence of the different heating sources on the film properties at a constant process temperature. We evaluated the ratio of the concentration of the Si-H and N-H bonds, the hydrogen content and the mechanical stress. Additionally we investigated the influence of annealing at 420°C in dilute hydrogen ambient on the mechanical stress. It was found out that reduction of mechanical stress during thermal anneal depends also on PECVD hardware configuration.

  19. Single Photon Counting UV Solar-Blind Detectors Using Silicon and III-Nitride Materials.

    PubMed

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Jewell, April D; Hennessy, John J; Carver, Alexander G; Jones, Todd J; Goodsall, Timothy M; Hamden, Erika T; Suvarna, Puneet; Bulmer, J; Shahedipour-Sandvik, F; Charbon, Edoardo; Padmanabhan, Preethi; Hancock, Bruce; Bell, L Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) studies in astronomy, cosmology, planetary studies, biological and medical applications often require precision detection of faint objects and in many cases require photon-counting detection. We present an overview of two approaches for achieving photon counting in the UV. The first approach involves UV enhancement of photon-counting silicon detectors, including electron multiplying charge-coupled devices and avalanche photodiodes. The approach used here employs molecular beam epitaxy for delta doping and superlattice doping for surface passivation and high UV quantum efficiency. Additional UV enhancements include antireflection (AR) and solar-blind UV bandpass coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition. Quantum efficiency (QE) measurements show QE > 50% in the 100-300 nm range for detectors with simple AR coatings, and QE ≅ 80% at ~206 nm has been shown when more complex AR coatings are used. The second approach is based on avalanche photodiodes in III-nitride materials with high QE and intrinsic solar blindness. PMID:27338399

  20. Self-referenced silicon nitride array microring biosensor for toxin detection using glycans at visible wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Farshid; Eftekhar, Ali A.; Gottfried, David S.; Song, Xuezheng; Cummings, Richard D.; Adibi, Ali

    2013-02-01

    We report on application of on-chip referencing to improve the limit-of-detection (LOD) in compact silicon nitride (SiN) microring arrays. Microring resonators, fabricated by e-beam lithography and fluorine-based etching, are designed for visible wavelengths (656nm) and have a footprint of 20 x 20 μm. GM1 ganglioside is used as the specific ligand for recognition of Cholera Toxin Subunit B (CTB), with Ricinus Communis Agglutinin I (RCA I) as a negative control. Using micro-cantilever based printing less than 10 pL of glycan solution is consumed per microring. Real-time data on analyte binding is extracted from the shifts in resonance wavelengths of the microrings.

  1. Single standing carbon nanotube array in gate holes using a silicon nitride cap layer

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Sung Hoon; Yoon, Hyun Sik; Moon, Jong Hyun; Park, Kyu Chang; Jang, Jin

    2005-12-12

    We studied the growth of a single standing carbon nanotube (CNT) which was grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition in the gate hole formed by conventional photolithography in the silicon nitride. The number of CNT per hole increases with increasing the gate hole diameter and a single CNT could be grown in a 3 {mu}m hole. A single standing CNT in a gate hole exhibited the turn-on field of 1.6 V/{mu}m and the current density of 16 {mu}A at 3.3 V/{mu}m. The emission currents follow the Fowler-Nordheim equation with a field enhancement factor of 1.14x10{sup 7}.

  2. Fano resonances in a multimode waveguide coupled to a high-Q silicon nitride ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dapeng; de Dood, Michiel J A; Bauters, Jared F; Heck, Martijn J R; Bowers, John E; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2014-03-24

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) optical ring resonators provide exceptional opportunities for low-loss integrated optics. Here we study the transmission through a multimode waveguide coupled to a Si3N4 ring resonator. By coupling single-mode fibers to both input and output ports of the waveguide we selectively excite and probe combinations of modes in the waveguide. Strong asymmetric Fano resonances are observed and the degree of asymmetry can be tuned through the positions of the input and output fibers. The Fano resonance results from the interference between modes of the waveguide and light that couples resonantly to the ring resonator. We develop a theoretical model based on the coupled mode theory to describe the experimental results. The large extension of the optical modes out of the Si3N4 core makes this system promising for sensing applications.

  3. Observation of ultraslow stress release in silicon nitride films on CaF{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Tianyi; Deen, M. Jamal; Xu, Changqing; Fang, Qiyin; Selvaganapathy, P. Ravi; Zhang, Haiying

    2015-07-15

    Silicon nitride thin films are deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on (100) and (111) CaF{sub 2} crystalline substrates. Delaminated wavy buckles formed during the release of internal compressive stress in the films and the stress releasing processes are observed macroscopically and microscopically. The stress release patterns start from the substrate edges and propagate to the center along defined directions aligned with the crystallographic orientations of the substrate. The stress releasing velocity of SiN{sub x} film on (111) CaF{sub 2} is larger than that of SiN{sub x} film with the same thickness on (100) CaF{sub 2}. The velocities of SiN{sub x} film on both (100) and (111) CaF{sub 2} increase with the film thickness. The stress releasing process is initiated when the films are exposed to atmosphere, but it is not a chemical change from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  4. Single Photon Counting UV Solar-Blind Detectors Using Silicon and III-Nitride Materials

    PubMed Central

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Jewell, April D.; Hennessy, John J.; Carver, Alexander G.; Jones, Todd J.; Goodsall, Timothy M.; Hamden, Erika T.; Suvarna, Puneet; Bulmer, J.; Shahedipour-Sandvik, F.; Charbon, Edoardo; Padmanabhan, Preethi; Hancock, Bruce; Bell, L. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) studies in astronomy, cosmology, planetary studies, biological and medical applications often require precision detection of faint objects and in many cases require photon-counting detection. We present an overview of two approaches for achieving photon counting in the UV. The first approach involves UV enhancement of photon-counting silicon detectors, including electron multiplying charge-coupled devices and avalanche photodiodes. The approach used here employs molecular beam epitaxy for delta doping and superlattice doping for surface passivation and high UV quantum efficiency. Additional UV enhancements include antireflection (AR) and solar-blind UV bandpass coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition. Quantum efficiency (QE) measurements show QE > 50% in the 100–300 nm range for detectors with simple AR coatings, and QE ≅ 80% at ~206 nm has been shown when more complex AR coatings are used. The second approach is based on avalanche photodiodes in III-nitride materials with high QE and intrinsic solar blindness. PMID:27338399

  5. Structural Evolution of Silicon Oxynitride Fiber Reinforced Boron Nitride Matrix Composite at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chunrong; Li, Bin; Zhang, Changrui; Wang, Siqing; Xie, Zhengfang; Shao, Changwei

    2016-02-01

    The structural evolution of a silicon oxynitride fiber reinforced boron nitride matrix (Si-N-Of/BN) wave-transparent composite at high temperatures was investigated. When heat treated at 1600 °C, the composite retained a favorable bending strength of 55.3 MPa while partially crystallizing to Si2N2O and h-BN from the as-received amorphous structure. The Si-N-O fibers still performed as effective reinforcements despite the presence of small pores due to fiber decomposition. Upon heat treatment at 1800 °C, the Si-N-O fibers already lost their reinforcing function and rough hollow microstructure formed within the fibers because of the accelerated decomposition. Further heating to 2000 °C led to the complete decomposition of the reinforcing fibers and only h-BN particles survived. The crystallization and decomposition behaviors of the composite at high temperatures are discussed.

  6. Microstructure and Phase Composition of Cold Isostatically Pressed and Pressureless Sintered Silicon Nitride.

    PubMed

    Lukianova, O A; Krasilnikov, V V; Parkhomenko, A A; Sirota, V V

    2016-12-01

    The microstructure and physical properties of new Y2O3 and Al2O3 oxide-doped silicon nitride ceramics fabricated by cold isostatic pressing and free sintering were investigated. The phase composition of produced material was also studied by X-ray diffraction at room and elevated temperature. The fabricated ceramics featured a microstructure of Si5AlON7 grains with a fine-grained α-Si3N4 with a small amount of Y2SiAlON5. Described ceramics is attractive for many high-temperature structural applications due to beneficial combination of fine-grained structure with improved mechanical properties and small weight loss.

  7. Effect of loading rate on dynamic fracture of reaction bonded silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, B. M.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Emery, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    Wedge-loaded, modified tapered double cantilever beam (WL-MTDCB) specimens under impact loading were used to determine the room temperature dynamic fracture response of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN). The crack extension history, with the exception of the terminal phase, was similar to that obtained under static loading. Like its static counterpart, a distinct crack acceleration phase, which was not observed in dynamic fracture of steel and brittle polymers, was noted. Unlike its static counterpart, the crack continued to propagate at nearly its terminal velocity under a low dynamic stress intensity factor during the terminal phase of crack propagation. These and previously obtained results for glass and RBSN show that dynamic crack arrest under a positive dynamic stress intensity factor is unlikely in static and impact loaded structural ceramics.

  8. Single Photon Counting UV Solar-Blind Detectors Using Silicon and III-Nitride Materials.

    PubMed

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Jewell, April D; Hennessy, John J; Carver, Alexander G; Jones, Todd J; Goodsall, Timothy M; Hamden, Erika T; Suvarna, Puneet; Bulmer, J; Shahedipour-Sandvik, F; Charbon, Edoardo; Padmanabhan, Preethi; Hancock, Bruce; Bell, L Douglas

    2016-06-21

    Ultraviolet (UV) studies in astronomy, cosmology, planetary studies, biological and medical applications often require precision detection of faint objects and in many cases require photon-counting detection. We present an overview of two approaches for achieving photon counting in the UV. The first approach involves UV enhancement of photon-counting silicon detectors, including electron multiplying charge-coupled devices and avalanche photodiodes. The approach used here employs molecular beam epitaxy for delta doping and superlattice doping for surface passivation and high UV quantum efficiency. Additional UV enhancements include antireflection (AR) and solar-blind UV bandpass coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition. Quantum efficiency (QE) measurements show QE > 50% in the 100-300 nm range for detectors with simple AR coatings, and QE ≅ 80% at ~206 nm has been shown when more complex AR coatings are used. The second approach is based on avalanche photodiodes in III-nitride materials with high QE and intrinsic solar blindness.

  9. Microstructure and Phase Composition of Cold Isostatically Pressed and Pressureless Sintered Silicon Nitride.

    PubMed

    Lukianova, O A; Krasilnikov, V V; Parkhomenko, A A; Sirota, V V

    2016-12-01

    The microstructure and physical properties of new Y2O3 and Al2O3 oxide-doped silicon nitride ceramics fabricated by cold isostatic pressing and free sintering were investigated. The phase composition of produced material was also studied by X-ray diffraction at room and elevated temperature. The fabricated ceramics featured a microstructure of Si5AlON7 grains with a fine-grained α-Si3N4 with a small amount of Y2SiAlON5. Described ceramics is attractive for many high-temperature structural applications due to beneficial combination of fine-grained structure with improved mechanical properties and small weight loss. PMID:26979726

  10. Steel bonded dense silicon nitride compositions and method for their fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.; Shell, T.E.

    1985-05-20

    A two-stage bonding technique for bonding high density silicon nitride and other ceramic materials to stainless steel and other hard metals, and multilayered ceramic-metal composites prepared by the technique are disclosed. The technique involves initially slurry coating a surface of the ceramic material at about 1500/sup 0/C in a vacuum with a refractory material and the stainless steel is then pressure bonded to the metallic coated surface by brazing it with nickel-copper-silver or nickel-copper-manganese alloys at a temperature in the range of about 850/sup 0/ to 950/sup 0/C in a vacuum. The two-stage bonding technique minimizes the temperature-expansion mismatch between the dissimilar materials.

  11. Paralinear Oxidation of Silicon Nitride in a Water Vapor/Oxygen Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Nguyen, QuynhGiao; Humphrey, Donald L.; Lewton, Susan M.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Three silicon nitride materials were exposed to dry oxygen flowing at 0.44 cm/s at temperatures between 1200 and 1400 C. Reaction kinetics were measured with a continuously recording microbalance. Parabolic kinetics were observed. When the same materials were exposed to a 50% H2O - 50% O2 gas mixture flowing at 4.4 cm/s, all three types exhibited paralinear kinetics. The material is oxidized by water vapor to form solid silica. The protective silica is in turn volatilized by water vapor to form primarily gaseous Si(OH)4. Nonlinear least squares analysis and a paralinear kinetic model were used to determine both parabolic and linear rate constants from the kinetic data. Volatilization of the protective silica scale can result in accelerated consumption of Si3N4. Recession rates under conditions more representative of actual combustors are compared to the furnace data.

  12. The utilization of microwave heating for the fabrication of sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Kiggans, J.O.; Tiegs, T.N.; Lin, H.T.; Holcombe, C.E.

    1995-12-31

    The results of studies in which microwave heating was used to fabricate sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN) are reviewed. These results are compared to parallel studies where conventional heating was used for the fabrication of these materials. Microwave fabrication of SRBSN involves a single heating cycle, whereas conventional processing requires two separate furnace runs and sample packaging steps. SRBSN containing high levels of sintering aids which were fabricated by microwave heating showed improved strength and toughness, as compared to those materials fabricated using a conventional resistance-heated furnace. An analysis of the microstructures of the microwave fabricated materials showed enhanced acicular grain growth as compared to conventionally heated material. Results are presented on studies involving the scale-up of the microwave fabrication process.

  13. Steel bonded dense silicon nitride compositions and method for their fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.; Shell, Thomas E.

    1987-01-01

    A two-stage bonding technique for bonding high density silicon nitride and other ceramic materials to stainless steel and other hard metals, and multilayered ceramic-metal composites prepared by the technique are disclosed. The technique involves initially slurry coating a surface of the ceramic material at about 1500.degree. C. in a vacuum with a refractory material and the stainless steel is then pressure bonded to the metallic coated surface by brazing it with nickel-copper-silver or nickel-copper-manganese alloys at a temperature in the range of about 850.degree. to 950.degree. C. in a vacuum. The two-stage bonding technique minimizes the temperature-expansion mismatch between the dissimilar materials.

  14. Identification of light elements in silicon nitride by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Idrobo, Juan C; Walkosz, Weronika; Klie, Robert F; Oğüt, Serdar

    2012-12-01

    In silicon nitride structural ceramics, the overall mechanical and thermal properties are controlled by the atomic and electronic structures at the interface between the ceramic grains and the amorphous intergranular films (IGFs) formed by various sintering additives. In the last ten years the atomic arrangements of heavy elements (rare-earths) at the Si(3)N(4)/IGF interfaces have been resolved. However, the atomic position of light elements, without which it is not possible to obtain a complete description of the interfaces, has been lacking. This review article details the authors' efforts to identify the atomic arrangement of light elements such as nitrogen and oxygen at the Si(3)N(4)/SiO(2) interface and in bulk Si(3)N(4) using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

  15. Diamond and diamondlike carbon as wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings for silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1995-01-01

    Recent work on the friction and wear properties of as-deposited fine-grain diamond, polished coarse-grain diamond, and as-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) films in humid air at a relative humidity of approximately 40 percent and in dry nitrogen is reviewed. Two types of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes are used to deposit diamond films on silicon nitride (Si3N4) substrates: microwave-plasma and hot-filament. Ion beams are used to deposit DLC films of Si3N4 substrates. The diamond and DLC films in sliding contact with hemispherical bare Si3N4 pins have low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.2) and low wear rates (less than 10(exp -7) mm(exp 2)/N-m), and thus, can be used effectively as wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings for Si3N4 in the aforementioned two environments.

  16. Octave-spanning coherent supercontinuum generation in a silicon nitride waveguide.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Adrea R; Mayer, Aline S; Klenner, Alexander; Luke, Kevin; Lamb, Erin S; Lamont, Michael R E; Joshi, Chaitanya; Okawachi, Yoshitomo; Wise, Frank W; Lipson, Michal; Keller, Ursula; Gaeta, Alexander L

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the generation of a supercontinuum spanning more than 1.4 octaves in a silicon nitride waveguide using sub-100-fs pulses at 1 μm generated by either a 53-MHz, diode-pumped ytterbium (Yb) fiber laser or a 1-GHz, Yb:CaAlGdO(4) (Yb:CALGO) laser. Our numerical simulations show that the broadband supercontinuum is fully coherent, and a spectral interference measurement is used to verify that the supercontinuum generated with the Yb:CALGO laser possesses a high degree of coherence over the majority of its spectral bandwidth. This coherent spectrum may be utilized for optical coherence tomography, spectroscopy, and frequency metrology. PMID:26512533

  17. Design Evaluation Using Finite Element Analysis of Cooled Silicon Nitride Plates for a Turbine Blade Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Baaklini, George Y.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2001-01-01

    Two- and three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed on uncoated and thermal barrier coated (TBC) silicon nitride plates with and without internal cooling by air. Steady-state heat-transfer analyses were done to optimize the size and the geometry of the cooling channels to reduce thermal stresses, and to evaluate the thermal environment experienced by the plate during burner rig testing. The limited experimental data available were used to model the thermal profile exerted by the flame on the plate. Thermal stress analyses were performed to assess the stress response due to thermal loading. Contours for the temperature and the representative stresses for the plates were generated and presented for different cooling hole sizes and shapes. Analysis indicates that the TBC experienced higher stresses, and the temperature gradient was much reduced when the plate was internally cooled by air. The advantages and disadvantages of several cooling channel layouts were evaluated.

  18. Impact of oxygen bonding on the atomic structure and photoluminescence properties of Si-rich silicon nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, P. D.; Sunding, M. F.; Vestland, L. O.; Finstad, T. G.; Olsen, A.; Kepaptsoglou, D. M.; Ramasse, Q. M.

    2012-10-01

    The atomic structure and optical properties of Si-rich silicon nitride thin films have been for decades the subject of intense research, both theoretically and experimentally. It has been established in particular that modifying the chemical composition of this material (e.g., the Si excess concentration) can lead to dramatic differences in its physical, optical, and electrical properties. The present paper reports on how the incorporation of oxygen into silicon nitride networks influences their chemical bonding and photoluminescence properties. Here, by using a combination of analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy it is demonstrated that the structure of Si-rich silicon nitride with low O content can be described by the co-existence of Si nanocrystals in a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix, with occasional localized nano-regions of a Si{sub 2}ON{sub 2} phase, depending on the amount of excess Si. Furthermore, it is shown that the structure of silicon nitride with high O content can be adequately described by a so-called random bonding model, according to which the material consists in bonded networks of randomly distributed tetrahedral SiO{sub x}N{sub 4-x} (where x = 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4). Photoluminescence measurements indicate that the effect of O is to introduce a gap state in the band gap of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix. When a large amount of O is introduced, on the other hand, the photoluminescence measurements are in agreement with a shifted conduction band minimum in the dielectric. For both cases (high and low O content), Si dangling bonds were found to give rise to the deep level in the band gap of the nitride matrix, causing the dominant emission band in the photoluminescence of the films.

  19. Silicon Nitride Plates for Turbine Blade Application: FEA and NDE Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Baaklini, George Y.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2001-01-01

    Engine manufacturers are continually attempting to improve the performance and the overall efficiency of internal combustion engines. The thermal efficiency is typically improved by raising the operating temperature of essential engine components in the combustion area. This reduces the heat loss to a cooling system and allows a greater portion of the heat to be used for propulsion. Further improvements can be achieved by diverting part of the air from the compressor, which would have been used in the combustor for combustion purposes, into the turbine components. Such a process is called active cooling. Increasing the operating temperature, decreasing the cooling air, or both can improve the efficiency of the engine. Furthermore, lightweight, strong, tough hightemperature materials are required to complement efficiency improvement for nextgeneration gas turbine engines that can operate with minimum cooling. Because of their low-density, high-temperature strength, and thermal conductivity, ceramics are being investigated as potential materials for replacing ordinary metals that are currently used for engine hot section components. Ceramic structures can withstand higher operating temperatures and other harsh environmental factors. In addition, their low densities relative to metals helps condense component mass (ref. 1). The objectives of this program at the NASA Glenn Research Center are to develop manufacturing technology, a thermal barrier coating/environmental barrier coating (TBC/EBC), and an analytical modeling capability to predict thermomechanical stresses, and to do minimal burner rig tests of silicon nitride (Si3N4) and SiC/SiC turbine nozzle vanes under simulated engine conditions. Furthermore, and in support of the latter objectives, an optimization exercise using finite element analysis and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) was carried out to characterize and evaluate silicon nitride plates with cooling channels.

  20. Luminescence mechanism for Er3+ ions in a silicon-rich nitride host under electrical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berencén, Y.; Illera, S.; Rebohle, L.; Ramírez, J. M.; Wutzler, R.; Cirera, A.; Hiller, D.; Rodríguez, J. A.; Skorupa, W.; Garrido, B.

    2016-03-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study on the electroluminescent excitation mechanism for trivalent erbium (Er3+) ions in a silicon-rich nitride (SiN x ) host is presented. Direct impact by hot electrons is demonstrated to be the fundamental excitation mechanism. The Er3+ excitation by energy transfer from silicon nanostructures and/or defects is shown to be marginal under electrical pumping. A bilayer structure made of a SiO2 electron-accelerating layer and an Er-implanted SiN x layer has been sandwiched between a metal-insulator-semiconductor structure with a highly doped N-type silicon substrate and an indium-tin-oxide window functioning as a transparent electrode. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are used to model hot electron transport in the proposed device structure. Acoustic, polar and non-polar optical electron-phonon scattering mechanisms are considered as well as a new scattering process related to the trapping/detrapping on energetically shallow traps in the band gap of silicon nitride. For SiO2 layers around 20 nm-thick and beyond, the number and kinetic energy of hot electrons before entering the SiN x layer are maximal. A significant enhancement of the 1.54 μm electroluminescence power efficiency of two orders of magnitude is observed in devices composed of a 20 nm-thick SiO2 layer compared to those composed of 10 nm-thick SiO2. We demonstrate by MC simulations that such a difference, in terms of power efficiency, is ascribed to the high-energy tail of the hot electron energy distribution, which becomes more pronounced as the SiO2 electron-accelerating layer thickness increases. It is also unveiled that direct excitation of the 1.54 μm Er3+ main radiative transition requiring an excitation energy of only 0.8 eV is inefficient, and that the major part of the Er3+ ions are excited via higher level energy states. The obtained results are sufficiently consistent to be extended to other trivalent rare-earth ions inside similar insulating material

  1. Effect of nitridation surface treatment on silicon (1 1 1) substrate for the growth of high quality single-crystalline GaN hetero-epitaxy layer by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mohd Nazri Abd.; Yusuf, Yusnizam; Mansor, Mazwan; Shuhaimi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    A single-crystalline with high quality of gallium nitride epilayers was grown on silicon (1 1 1) substrate by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The process of nitridation surface treatment was accomplished on silicon (1 1 1) substrate by flowing the ammonia gaseous. Then, it was followed by a thin aluminum nitride nucleation layer, aluminum nitride/gallium nitride multi-layer and a thick gallium nitride epilayer. The influence of in situ nitridation surface treatment on the crystallinity quality of gallium nitride epilayers was studied by varying the nitridation times at 40, 220 and 400 s, respectively. It was shown that the nitridation times greatly affect the structural properties of the grown top gallium nitride epilayer on silicon (1 1 1) substrate. In the (0 0 0 2) and (1 0 1 bar 2) X-ray rocking curve analysis, a narrower value of full width at half-maximum has been obtained as the nitridation time increased. This is signifying the reduction of dislocation density in the gallium nitride epilayer. This result was supported by the value of bowing and root mean square roughness measured by surface profilometer and atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, a crack-free gallium nitride surface with an abrupt cross-sectional structure that observed using field effect scanning electron microscopy was also been obtained. The phi-scan curve of asymmetric gallium nitride proved the top gallium nitride epilayer exhibited a single-crystalline structure.

  2. Area Reports. Advanced materials and devices research area. Silicon materials research task, and advanced silicon sheet task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the Silicon Materials Task and the Advanced Silicon Sheet Task are to identify the critical technical barriers to low-cost silicon purification and sheet growth that must be overcome to produce a PV cell substrate material at a price consistent with Flat-plate Solar Array (FSA) Project objectives and to overcome these barriers by performing and supporting appropriate R&D. Progress reports are given on silicon refinement using silane, a chemical vapor transport process for purifying metallurgical grade silicon, silicon particle growth research, and modeling of silane pyrolysis in fluidized-bed reactors.

  3. Displacement linear detection down to thermal fluctuations of a silicon nitride membrane with self-mixing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldacci, Lorenzo; Pitanti, Alessandro; Masini, Luca; Arcangeli, Andrea; Navarro Urrios, Daniel; Tredicucci, Alessandro; SouLMan research Group Team

    Active optomechanical systems exploit the interaction between photons and mechanical vibrations inside a laser cavity. A compound cavity made of a laser diode and an external vibrating reflector is a suitable platform, due to its ease of construction and coupling modulation. Here we use it as a linear displacement detector, by studying the motion of a silicon nitride suspended membrane as the external mirror of a near infrared laser diode. The membrane vibrations cause fluctuations in the laser optical power, which are collected by a photodiode and measured with a spectrum analyzer. The dynamics of the membrane driven by a piezo actuator was investigated in a homodyne configuration. The high Q-factor (~ 105 at low pressure) of the fundamental mechanical mode at 74 kHz enabled direct measurement of thermal motion at room temperature, which holds an average displacement of 20 pm. Therefore, compound cavity systems can be employed as table-top, cost-effective displacement linear detectors. Furthermore, nonlinear optomechanical interactions could be observed, with new possibilities in the study of non-Markovian quantum properties at the mesoscale. Work supported by European Research Council, advanced Grant No. 321122 SouLMan.

  4. Thermal stability of boron nitride/silicon p-n heterojunction diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Teii, Kungen Mizusako, Yusei; Hori, Takuro; Matsumoto, Seiichiro

    2015-10-21

    Heterojunctions of p-type cubic boron nitride (cBN) and n-type silicon with sp{sup 2}-bonded BN (sp{sup 2}BN) interlayers are fabricated under low-energy ion impact by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and their rectification properties are studied at temperatures up to 573 K. The rectification ratio is increased up to the order of 10{sup 5} at room temperature by optimizing the thickness of the sp{sup 2}BN interlayer and the cBN fraction for suppressing the reverse leakage current. A highly rectifying p-type cBN/thick sp{sup 2}BN/n-type silicon junction diode shows irreversible rectification properties mainly characterized by a marked decrease in reverse current by an order of magnitude in an initial temperature ramp/down cycle. This irreversible behavior is much more reduced by conducting the cycle twice or more. The temperature-dependent properties confirm an overall increase in effective barrier heights for carrier injection and conduction by biasing at high temperatures, which consequently increases the thermal stability of the diode performance.

  5. Synthesis and corrosion properties of silicon nitride films by ion beam assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, K.; Hatada, R.; Emmerich, R.; Enders, B.; Wolf, G. K.

    1995-12-01

    Silicon nitride films SiN x were deposited on 316L austenitic stainless steel substrates by silicon evaporation and simultaneous nitrogen ion irradiation with an acceleration voltage of 2 kV. In order to study the influence of the nitrogen content on changes in stoichiometry, structure, morphology, thermal oxidation behaviour and corrosion behaviour, the atom to ion transport ratio was systematically varied. The changes of binding states and the stoichiometry were evaluated with XPS and AES analysis. A maximum nitrogen content was reached with a {Si}/{N} transport ratio lower than 2. The films are chemically inert when exposed to laboratory atmosphere up to a temperature of more than 1000°C. XRD and SEM measurements show amorphous and featureless films for transport ratios {Si}/{N} from 1 up to 10. The variation of the corrosion behaviour of coated stainless steel substrates in sulphuric acid and hydrochloric acid shows a minimum at medium transport ratios. This goes parallel with changes in porosity and adhesion. Additional investigations showed that titanium implantation as an intermediate step improves the corrosion resistance considerably.

  6. Thermal stability of boron nitride/silicon p-n heterojunction diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teii, Kungen; Mizusako, Yusei; Hori, Takuro; Matsumoto, Seiichiro

    2015-10-01

    Heterojunctions of p-type cubic boron nitride (cBN) and n-type silicon with sp2-bonded BN (sp2BN) interlayers are fabricated under low-energy ion impact by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and their rectification properties are studied at temperatures up to 573 K. The rectification ratio is increased up to the order of 105 at room temperature by optimizing the thickness of the sp2BN interlayer and the cBN fraction for suppressing the reverse leakage current. A highly rectifying p-type cBN/thick sp2BN/n-type silicon junction diode shows irreversible rectification properties mainly characterized by a marked decrease in reverse current by an order of magnitude in an initial temperature ramp/down cycle. This irreversible behavior is much more reduced by conducting the cycle twice or more. The temperature-dependent properties confirm an overall increase in effective barrier heights for carrier injection and conduction by biasing at high temperatures, which consequently increases the thermal stability of the diode performance.

  7. Low-temperature silicon nitride for thin-film electronics on polyimide foil substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleskova, H.; Wagner, S.; Gašparík, V.; Kováč, P.

    2001-05-01

    We optimized silicon nitride (SiN x) layers, deposited by 13.56 MHz plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at 150°C, to provide a high quality gate dielectric layer for the amorphous silicon thin film technology on polyimide foils. The layers were deposited from mixtures of silane, ammonia, and hydrogen. We varied the H 2 flow rate from 55 to 220 sccm and the rf power from 5 to 50 W, while the pressure was kept at 500 mTorr and the ratio of ammonia to silane flow at 10:1. The best film was obtained from the gas composition of SiH 4:NH 3:H 2=1:10:44 and the rf power of ˜20 W. This film grows at the rate of 1.5 Å/s, has a refractive index n=1.80, a dielectric constant ɛ=7.46, a dielectric breakdown field >3.4 MV/cm, a Si/N ratio of ˜0.67, and a hydrogen content of ˜2×10 22 cm -3, and etches in 10:1 buffered HF at a rate of 61 Å/s.

  8. Far IR Transmission Characteristics of Silicon Nitride Films using Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrusca, D.; Castillo-Domínguez, E.; Velázquez, M.; Hughes, D.; Serrano, A.; Torres-Jácome, A.

    2009-12-01

    We are fabricating amorphous Silicon (a-Si) bolometers doped with boron with a measured NEP˜1.5×10-16 W/Hz1/2 suitable for use in millimeter and sub-millimeter astronomy. In this paper we present the preliminary results of the absorber optimization for the a-Si bolometers. A film of Silicon Nitride (SiN), deposited by LPCVD (Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition) process at INAOE, with or without metallic coating is used as a weak thermal link to the heat sink as well as an absorber. We have measured the transmission spectrum of thin films of SiN in the range of 200 to 1000 GHz using Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (FTS) and a bolometric system with a NEP˜1.26×10-13. The transmission of thin films of SiN with a thickness of 0.4 μn has been measured at temperatures of 290 K and 4 K. The uncoated SiN films have a transmission of 80% and we expect a 50% transmission for the metallic (e.g. Titanium) coated films.

  9. Foreign Object Damage in Disks of Two Gas-turbine-grade Silicon Nitrides by Steel Ball Projectiles at Ambient Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Pereira, J. Michael; Janosik, Lesley A.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2003-01-01

    Foreign object damage (FOD) behavior of two commercial gas-turbine-grade silicon nitrides, AS800 and SN282, was determined at ambient temperature through postimpact strength testing of disks impacted by steel ball projectiles with a diameter of 1.59 mm in a velocity range from 115 to 440 m/s. AS800 silicon nitride exhibited a greater FOD resistance than SN282, primarily due to its greater value of fracture toughness (k(sub Ic)). The critical impact velocity V(sub c) for which the corresponding postimpact strength was the lowest was V(sub c) approximately equal to 440 and 300 m/s AS800 and SN282, respectively. A unique lower strength regime was typified for both silicon nitrides depending on impact velocity and was attributed to significant radial cracking. The damage generated by projectile impact was typically in the form of ring, radial, and cone cracks with their severity and combination being dependent on impact velocity. Unlike the thick (4 millimeters) flexure bar specimens used in our previous studies, the thin (2 millimeter) disk target specimen exhibited a unique back-side radial cracking on the reverse side just beneath the impact sites at and above impact velocities of 160 meters per second for SN282 and 220 meters per second AS800.

  10. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    The development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines is studied. Injection molding was the forming method selected for the program because it is capable of forming complex parts adaptable for mass production on an economically sound basis. The goals were to reach a Weibull characteristic strength of 550 MPa (80 ksi) and a Weibull modulus of 16 for bars tested in four-point loading. Statistically designed experiments were performed throughout the program and a fluid mixing process employing an attritor mixer was developed. Compositional improvements in the amounts and sources of boron and carbon used and a pressureless sintering cycle were developed which provided samples of about 99 percent of theoretical density. Strengths were found to improve significantly by annealing in air. Strengths in excess of 550 MPa (80 ksi) with Weibull modulus of about 9 were obtained. Further improvements in Weibull modulus to about 16 were realized by proof testing. This is an increase of 86 percent in strength and 100 percent in Weibull modulus over the baseline data generated at the beginning of the program. Molding yields were improved and flaw distributions were observed to follow a Poisson process. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were found to be useful in characterizing the SiC powder and the sintered samples. Turbocharger rotors were molded and examined as an indication of the moldability of the mixes which were developed in this program.

  11. Performance of GaN-on-Si-based vertical light-emitting diodes using silicon nitride electrodes with conducting filaments: correlation between filament density and device reliability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong Heon; Kim, Su Jin; Lee, Tae Ho; Lee, Byeong Ryong; Kim, Tae Geun

    2016-08-01

    Transparent conductive electrodes with good conductivity and optical transmittance are an essential element for highly efficient light-emitting diodes. However, conventional indium tin oxide and its alternative transparent conductive electrodes have some trouble with a trade-off between electrical conductivity and optical transmittance, thus limiting their practical applications. Here, we present silicon nitride transparent conductive electrodes with conducting filaments embedded using the electrical breakdown process and investigate the dependence of the conducting filament density formed in the transparent conductive electrode on the device performance of gallium nitride-based vertical light-emitting diodes. Three gallium nitride-on-silicon-based vertical light-emitting diodes using silicon nitride transparent conductive electrodes with high, medium, and low conducting filament densities were prepared with a reference vertical light-emitting diode using metal electrodes. This was carried to determine the optimal density of the conducting filaments in the proposed silicon nitride transparent conductive electrodes. In comparison, the vertical light-emitting diodes with a medium conducting filament density exhibited the lowest optical loss, direct ohmic behavior, and the best current injection and distribution over the entire n-type gallium nitride surface, leading to highly reliable light-emitting diode performance.

  12. Performance of GaN-on-Si-based vertical light-emitting diodes using silicon nitride electrodes with conducting filaments: correlation between filament density and device reliability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong Heon; Kim, Su Jin; Lee, Tae Ho; Lee, Byeong Ryong; Kim, Tae Geun

    2016-08-01

    Transparent conductive electrodes with good conductivity and optical transmittance are an essential element for highly efficient light-emitting diodes. However, conventional indium tin oxide and its alternative transparent conductive electrodes have some trouble with a trade-off between electrical conductivity and optical transmittance, thus limiting their practical applications. Here, we present silicon nitride transparent conductive electrodes with conducting filaments embedded using the electrical breakdown process and investigate the dependence of the conducting filament density formed in the transparent conductive electrode on the device performance of gallium nitride-based vertical light-emitting diodes. Three gallium nitride-on-silicon-based vertical light-emitting diodes using silicon nitride transparent conductive electrodes with high, medium, and low conducting filament densities were prepared with a reference vertical light-emitting diode using metal electrodes. This was carried to determine the optimal density of the conducting filaments in the proposed silicon nitride transparent conductive electrodes. In comparison, the vertical light-emitting diodes with a medium conducting filament density exhibited the lowest optical loss, direct ohmic behavior, and the best current injection and distribution over the entire n-type gallium nitride surface, leading to highly reliable light-emitting diode performance. PMID:27505739

  13. Frequency comb offset detection using supercontinuum generation in silicon nitride waveguides.

    PubMed

    Mayer, A S; Klenner, A; Johnson, A R; Luke, K; Lamont, M R E; Okawachi, Y; Lipson, M; Gaeta, A L; Keller, U

    2015-06-15

    We present the first direct carrier-envelope-offset (CEO) frequency detection of a modelocked laser based on supercontinuum generation (SCG) in a CMOS-compatible silicon nitride (Si(3)N(4)) waveguide. With a coherent supercontinuum spanning more than 1.5 octaves from visible to beyond telecommunication wavelengths, we achieve self-referencing of SESAM modelocked diode-pumped Yb:CALGO lasers using standard f-to-2f interferometry. We directly obtain without amplification strong CEO beat signals for both a 100-MHz and 1-GHz pulse repetition rate laser. High signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of > 25 dB and even > 30 dB have been generated with only 30 pJ and 36 pJ of coupled pulse energy from the megahertz and gigahertz laser respectively. We compare these results to self-referencing using a commercial photonic crystal fiber and find that the required peak power for CEO beat detection with a comparable SNR is lowered by more than an order of magnitude when using a Si(3)N(4) waveguide. PMID:26193524

  14. Gelcasting of sub-micron alumina, sialon, and silicon nitride powders

    SciTech Connect

    Omatete, O.O.; Strehlow, R.A.; Walls, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Gelcasting is a near-net-shape forming technique that is applicable to various types of powders. It is accomplished by casting a concentrated suspension of a commercial ceramic powder in a solution of a polymerizable monomer and then polymerizing. A filled gel is formed, which is dried and processed further. Alumina, sialon, and silicon nitride parts of various geometries have been made and are described. Emphasis is placed on the unit-operations of the process. Because a requirement of the process is a castable suspension of more than 50 vol % solids loading, good dispersion is crucial. Drying, another key process, has been studied extensively. Shrinkage from the cast size occurs during drying and further shrinkage occurs during sintering. Data on the relationship of physical properties of products to some of the more significant processing variables is discussed. Emphasis is also placed on the machinability of the dried gelled body. Because the body at this stage is quite durable, green part machining is feasible. The monomer used in the process is acrylamide, which undergoes a vinyl polymerization. Environmental, safety and hygiene issues are summarized. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Fabrication and characterization of silicon nitride directional coupler interferometer for sensing aptamer hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, K.; Uchiyamada, K.; Yokokawa, M.; Asakawa, K.; Suzuki, H.

    2016-03-01

    We used silicon nitride (Si3N4) directional coupler (DC) interferometers to fabricate evanescent field biosensors for detection of aptamer hybridization. The DC detects temporal changes in refractive index (RI) as changes in the relative intensities of near-fields. Numerical simulation provided information for sensitivity of the DC as well as preferable dimensions of single mode waveguides. The result suggests that lengthening the DC improves its sensitivity. Another approach to realize high sensitivity was to make the coupling region of the DC longer for a given complete coupling length Lc. A folded DC is also presented based on calculations using Si waveguides. Here a meander-line with an array of segmented DCs and asymmetric 180°-curved waveguides was accommodated in a (100 μm)2 square area. Phases of propagating lights within two curved waveguides could be coincided. This cascade-connection of the segments of the DCs facilitated highly sensitive detection of biomolecules and a flexible sensor design. Signal dependences on device length and bulk RI change were evaluated by end-fire coupling measurements. The optical intensities agreed well with the corresponding fitting curve and the curve calculated based on the coupled mode theory.

  16. Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride from Bis(tert-butylamino)silane and N2 Plasma.

    PubMed

    Knoops, Harm C M; Braeken, Eline M J; de Peuter, Koen; Potts, Stephen E; Haukka, Suvi; Pore, Viljami; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M

    2015-09-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride (SiNx) is deemed essential for a variety of applications in nanoelectronics, such as gate spacer layers in transistors. In this work an ALD process using bis(tert-butylamino)silane (BTBAS) and N2 plasma was developed and studied. The process exhibited a wide temperature window starting from room temperature up to 500 °C. The material properties and wet-etch rates were investigated as a function of plasma exposure time, plasma pressure, and substrate table temperature. Table temperatures of 300-500 °C yielded a high material quality and a composition close to Si3N4 was obtained at 500 °C (N/Si=1.4±0.1, mass density=2.9±0.1 g/cm3, refractive index=1.96±0.03). Low wet-etch rates of ∼1 nm/min were obtained for films deposited at table temperatures of 400 °C and higher, similar to that achieved in the literature using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of SiNx at >700 °C. For novel applications requiring significantly lower temperatures, the temperature window from room temperature to 200 °C can be a solution, where relatively high material quality was obtained when operating at low plasma pressures or long plasma exposure times.

  17. Silicon nitride formation from a silane-nitrogen ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, J.C.; Stein, H.J. ); Popov, O.A.; Yoder, M. ); Outten, C.A. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    Good quality, low temperature silicon nitride and oxynitride films were deposited downstream from an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source using SiH{sub 4} and N{sub 2} gas mixtures. The Si/N ratio and H content in the deposited films were determined using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS)and elastic recoil detection (ERD). The H concentration was minimum for films with compositions closest to that of stoichiometric Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The optimum conditions for producing a stoichiometric Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}were: a SiH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} flow ratio between 0.1 and 0.2, and an electrically isolated sample far from the ECR source. Infrared absorption spectra showed that as the film composition changed from N rich to Si rich the dominant bonds associated with H changed from N-H to Si-H. The addition of O{sub 2} to the background gas formed an oxynitride with a low H content similar to the stoichiometric Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wananuruksawong, R.; Jinawath, S.; Padipatvuthikul, P.; Wasanapiarnpong, T.

    2011-10-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si3N4 ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si3N4 was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 °C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si3N4 ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si3N4 specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder (<150 micrometer, Pyrex) with 5 wt% of zirconia powder (3 wt% Y2O3 - partial stabilized zirconia) and 30 wt% of polyvinyl alcohol (5 wt% solution). After coating the veneer on the Si3N4 specimens, the firing was performed in electric tube furnace between 1000-1200°C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100°C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98×10-6 °C-1, rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  19. Modification of silicon nitride surfaces with GOPES and APTES for antibody immobilization: computational and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dien To, Thien; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Nhat Thanh Phan, Khoa; Thu Thi Truong, An; Doan, Tin Chanh Duc; Mau Dang, Chien

    2015-12-01

    Chemical modification of silicon nitride (SiN) surfaces by silanization has been widely studied especially with 3-(aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and 3-(glycidyloxypropyl) dimethylethoxysilane (GOPES). However few reports performed the experimental and computational studies together. In this study, surface modification of SiN surfaces with GOPES and APTES covalently bound with glutaraldehyde (GTA) was investigated for antibody immobilization. The monoclonal anti-cytokeratin-FITC (MACF) antibody was immobilized on the modified SiN surfaces. The modified surfaces were characterized by water contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. The FITC-fluorescent label indicated the existence of MACF antibody on the SiN surfaces and the efficiency of the silanization reaction. Absorption of APTES and GOPES on the oxidized SiN surfaces was computationally modeled and calculated by Materials Studio software. The computational and experimental results showed that modification of the SiN surfaces with APTES and GTA was more effective than the modification with GOPES.

  20. Surface toughness of silicon nitride bioceramics: II, Comparison with commercial oxide materials.

    PubMed

    McEntire, Bryan J; Enomoto, Yuto; Zhu, Wenliang; Boffelli, Marco; Marin, Elia; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Raman microprobe-assisted indentation, a micromechanics method validated in a companion paper, was used to compare the surface toughening behaviors of silicon nitride (Si3N4) and alumina-based bioceramics employed in joint arthroplasty (i.e., monolithic alumina, Al2O3, and yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2)-toughened alumina, ZTA). Quantitative assessments of microscopic stress fields both ahead and behind the tip of Vickers indentation cracks propagated under increasing indentation loads were systematically made using a Raman microprobe with spatial resolution on the order of a single micrometer. Concurrently, crack opening displacement (COD) profiles were monitored on the same microcracks screened by Raman spectroscopy. The Raman eye clearly visualized different mechanisms operative in toughening Si3N4 and ZTA bioceramics (i.e., crack-face bridging and ZrO2 polymorphic transformation, respectively) as compared to the brittle behavior of monolithic Al2O3. Moreover, emphasis was placed on assessing not only the effectiveness but also the durability of such toughening effects when the biomaterials were aged in a hydrothermal environment. A significant degree of embrittlement at the biomaterial surface was recorded in the transformation-toughened ZTA, with the surface toughness reduced by exposure to the hydrothermal environment. Conversely, the Si3N4 biomaterial experienced a surface toughness value independent of hydrothermal attack. Crack-face bridging thus appears to be a durable surface toughening mechanism for biomaterials in joint arthroplasty. PMID:26437609

  1. Two color DNA barcode detection in photoluminescence suppressed silicon nitride nanopores.

    PubMed

    Assad, Ossama N; Di Fiori, Nicolas; Squires, Allison H; Meller, Amit

    2015-01-14

    Optical sensing of solid-state nanopores is a relatively new approach that can enable high-throughput, multicolor readout from a collection of nanopores. It is therefore highly attractive for applications such as nanopore-based DNA sequencing and genotyping using DNA barcodes. However, to date optical readout has been plagued by the need to achieve sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for single fluorophore sensing, while still maintaining millisecond resolution. One of the main factors degrading the optical SNR in solid-state nanopores is the high photoluminescence (PL) background emanating from the silicon nitride (SiNx) membrane in which pores are commonly fabricated. Focusing on the optical properties of SiNx nanopores we show that the local membrane PL intensity is substantially reduced, and its spectrum is shifted toward shorter wavelengths with increasing e-beam dose. This phenomenon, which is correlated with a marked photocurrent enhancement in these nanopores, is utilized to perform for the first time single molecule fluorescence detection using both green and red laser excitations. Specifically, the reduction in PL and the concurrent measurement of the nanopore photocurrent enhancement allow us to maximize the background suppression and to detect a dual color, five-unit DNA barcode with high SNR levels. PMID:25522780

  2. Fuzzy sets predict flexural strength and density of silicon nitride ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cios, Krzysztof J.; Sztandera, Leszek M.; Baaklini, George Y.; Vary, Alex

    1993-01-01

    In this work, we utilize fuzzy sets theory to evaluate and make predictions of flexural strength and density of NASA 6Y silicon nitride ceramic. Processing variables of milling time, sintering time, and sintering nitrogen pressure are used as an input to the fuzzy system. Flexural strength and density are the output parameters of the system. Data from 273 Si3N4 modulus of rupture bars tested at room temperature and 135 bars tested at 1370 C are used in this study. Generalized mean operator and Hamming distance are utilized to build the fuzzy predictive model. The maximum test error for density does not exceed 3.3 percent, and for flexural strength 7.1 percent, as compared with the errors of 1.72 percent and 11.34 percent obtained by using neural networks, respectively. These results demonstrate that fuzzy sets theory can be incorporated into the process of designing materials, such as ceramics, especially for assessing more complex relationships between the processing variables and parameters, like strength, which are governed by randomness of manufacturing processes.

  3. Stress control of silicon nitride films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong-ling; Feng, Xiao-fei; Wen, Zhi-yu; Shang, Zheng-guo; She, Yin

    2016-07-01

    Stress controllable silicon nitride (SiNx) films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are reported. Low stress SiNx films were deposited in both high frequency (HF) mode and dual frequency (HF/LF) mode. By optimizing process parameters, stress free (-0.27 MPa) SiNx films were obtained with the deposition rate of 45.5 nm/min and the refractive index of 2.06. Furthermore, at HF/LF mode, the stress is significantly influenced by LF ratio and LF power, and can be controlled to be 10 MPa with the LF ratio of 17% and LF power of 150 W. However, LF power has a little effect on the deposition rate due to the interaction between HF power and LF power. The deposited SiNx films have good mechanical and optical properties, low deposition temperature and controllable stress, and can be widely used in integrated circuit (IC), micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and bio-MEMS.

  4. The stopping power and energy straggling of heavy ions in silicon nitride and polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikšová, R.; Hnatowicz, V.; Macková, A.; Malinský, P.; Slepička, P.

    2015-07-01

    The stopping power and energy straggling of 12C3+ and 16O3+ ions with energies between 4.5 and 7.8 MeV in a 0.166-μm-thin silicon nitride and in 4-μm-thin polypropylene foils were measured by means of an indirect transmission method using a half-covered PIPS detector. Ions scattered from a thin gold layer under a scattering angle of 150° were used. The energy spectra of back-scattered and decelerated ions were registered and evaluated simultaneously. The measured stopping powers were compared with the theoretical predictions simulated by SRIM-2008 and MSTAR codes. SRIM prediction of energy stopping is reasonably close to the experimentally obtained values comparing to MSTAR values. Better agreement between experimental and predicted data was observed for C3+ ion energy losses comparing to O3+ ions. The experimental data from Paul's database and our previous experimental data were also discussed. The obtained experimental energy-straggling data were compared to those calculated by using Bohr's, Yang's models etc. The predictions by Yang are in good agreement with our experiment within a frame of uncertainty of 25%.

  5. Processing of Silicon Nitride Ceramics from Concentrated Aqueous Suspensions by Robocasting

    SciTech Connect

    HE,GUOPING; HIRSCHFELD,DEIDRE A.; CESARANO III,JOSEPH; STUECKER,JOHN N.

    2000-08-14

    The optimization of concentrated AlliedSignal GS-44 silicon nitride aqueous slurries for robocasting was investigated. The dispersion mechanisms of GS-44 Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} aqueous suspensions with and without polyacrylate were analyzed. The zero point of charge (ZPC) was at about pH 6. Well-dispersed GS-44 suspensions were obtained in the pH range from 7 to 11 by the addition of Darvan 821A. The influence of pH, amount of Darvan 821A and solids loading on the theological behavior of GS-44 aqueous suspensions was determined. A coagulant, aluminum nitrate, was used to control the yield stress and shear thinning behavior of highly loaded Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} slurries. Homogeneous and stable suspensions of 52 vol% GS-44 Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were robocast successfully at pH 7.8 to pH 8.5. The sintering process, mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of robocast GS-44 bars were determined.

  6. Vertical coupling of laser glass microspheres to buried silicon nitride ellipses and waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro-Urrios, D.; Ramírez, J. M.; Berencén, Y.; Garrido, B.; Capuj, N. E.; Tredicucci, A.

    2015-09-07

    We demonstrate the integration of Nd{sup 3+} doped barium-titanium-silicate microsphere lasers with a silicon nitride photonic platform. Devices with two different geometrical configurations for extracting the laser light to buried waveguides have been fabricated and characterized. The first configuration relies on a standard coupling scheme, where the microspheres are placed over strip waveguides. The second is based on a buried elliptical geometry whose working principle is that of an elliptical mirror. In the latter case, the input of a strip waveguide is placed on one focus of the ellipse, while a lasing microsphere is placed on top of the other focus. The fabricated elliptical geometry (ellipticity = 0.9) presents a light collecting capacity that is 50% greater than that of the standard waveguide coupling configuration and could be further improved by increasing the ellipticity. Moreover, since the dimensions of the spheres are much smaller than those of the ellipses, surface planarization is not required. On the contrary, we show that the absence of a planarization step strongly damages the microsphere lasing performance in the standard configuration.

  7. Creep of a Silicon Nitride Under Various Specimen/Loading Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Powers, Lynn M.; Holland, Frederic A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Holland, F. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Extensive creep testing of a hot-pressed silicon nitride (NC132) was performed at 1300 C in air using five different specimen/loading configurations, including pure tension, pure compression, four-point uniaxial flexure, ball-on-ring biaxial flexure, and ring-on-ring biaxial flexure. Nominal creep strain and its rate for a given nominal applied stress were greatest in tension, least in compression, and intermediate in uniaxial and biaxial flexure. Except for the case of compressive loading, nominal creep strain generally decreased with time, resulting in less-defined steady-state condition. Of the four different creep formulations - power-law, hyperbolic sine, step, redistribution models - the conventional power-law model still provides the most convenient and reasonable means to estimate simple, quantitative creep parameters of the material. Predictions of creep deformation for the case of multiaxial stress state (biaxial flexure) were made based on pure tension and compression creep data by using the design code CARES/Creep.

  8. Detection of antibody-antigen reaction by silicon nitride slot-ring biosensors using protein G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tomoya; Hirowatari, Anna; Ikeda, Takeshi; Fukuyama, Masataka; Amemiya, Yoshiteru; Kuroda, Akio; Yokoyama, Shin

    2016-04-01

    Biosensors using ring resonators with silicon nitride (SiN) slot waveguides have been fabricated. The temperature coefficient of the resonance wavelength of the SiN resonator is 0.006 nm/°C, which is one order of magnitude smaller than that of Si. The sensitivity of the biosensor has been improved by using slot waveguide together with Si-binding protein (designated as Si-tag), which bonds to SiN or SiO2 surface, as an anchoring molecule to immobilize bioreceptors on the SiN rings in an oriented manner. Furthermore, the protein G, which strongly bonds to many kinds of mammalian antibodies only by mixing the antibody solution, is used to efficiently immobilize the antigen on the sensor surface. By means of these devises the sensitivity of the biosensor has been improved by factor of 10-100 compared with that of normal Si ring resonator sensors without slot. Then the detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) with the sensitivity of ~1×10-8 g/ml, which is the concentration of strongly suspicious for the prostate cancer, has been achieved.

  9. Si-Si bond as a deep trap for electrons and holes in silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpushin, A. A.; Sorokin, A. N.; Gritsenko, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    A two-stage model of the capture of electrons and holes in traps in amorphous silicon nitride Si3N4 has been proposed. The electronic structure of a "Si-Si bond" intrinsic defect in Si3N4 has been calculated in the tight-binding approximation without fitting parameters. The properties of the Si-Si bond such as a giant cross section for capture of electrons and holes and a giant lifetime of trapped carriers have been explained. It has been shown that the Si-Si bond in the neutral state gives shallow levels near the bottom of the conduction band and the top of the valence band, which have a large cross section for capture. The capture of an electron or a hole on this bond is accompanied by the shift of shallow levels by 1.4-1.5 eV to the band gap owing to the polaron effect and a change in the localization region of valence electrons of atoms of the Si-Si bond. The calculations have been proposed with a new method for parameterizing the matrix elements of the tightbinding Hamiltonian taking into account a change in the localization region of valence electrons of an isolated atom incorporated into a solid.

  10. Wideband nonlinear spectral broadening in ultra-short ultra - silicon rich nitride waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ju Won; Chen, George F. R.; Ng, D. K. T.; Ooi, Kelvin J. A.; Tan, Dawn T. H.

    2016-01-01

    CMOS-compatible nonlinear optics platforms with high Kerr nonlinearity facilitate the generation of broadband spectra based on self-phase modulation. Our ultra – silicon rich nitride (USRN) platform is designed to have a large nonlinear refractive index and low nonlinear losses at 1.55 μm for the facilitation of wideband spectral broadening. We investigate the ultrafast spectral characteristics of USRN waveguides with 1-mm-length, which have high nonlinear parameters (γ ∼ 550 W−1/m) and anomalous dispersion at 1.55 μm wavelength of input light. USRN add-drop ring resonators broaden output spectra by a factor of 2 compared with the bandwidth of input fs laser with the highest quality factors of 11000 and 15000. Two – fold self phase modulation induced spectral broadening is observed using waveguides only 430 μm in length, whereas a quadrupling of the output bandwidth is observed with USRN waveguides with a 1-mm-length. A broadening factor of around 3 per 1 mm length is achieved in the USRN waveguides, a value which is comparatively larger than many other CMOS-compatible platforms. PMID:27272558

  11. High-Responsivity Graphene-Boron Nitride Photodetector and Autocorrelator in a Silicon Photonic Integrated Circuit.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ren-Jye; Gao, Yuanda; Wang, Yifei; Peng, Cheng; Robertson, Alexander D; Efetov, Dmitri K; Assefa, Solomon; Koppens, Frank H L; Hone, James; Englund, Dirk

    2015-11-11

    Graphene and other two-dimensional (2D) materials have emerged as promising materials for broadband and ultrafast photodetection and optical modulation. These optoelectronic capabilities can augment complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices for high-speed and low-power optical interconnects. Here, we demonstrate an on-chip ultrafast photodetector based on a two-dimensional heterostructure consisting of high-quality graphene encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride. Coupled to the optical mode of a silicon waveguide, this 2D heterostructure-based photodetector exhibits a maximum responsivity of 0.36 A/W and high-speed operation with a 3 dB cutoff at 42 GHz. From photocurrent measurements as a function of the top-gate and source-drain voltages, we conclude that the photoresponse is consistent with hot electron mediated effects. At moderate peak powers above 50 mW, we observe a saturating photocurrent consistent with the mechanisms of electron-phonon supercollision cooling. This nonlinear photoresponse enables optical on-chip autocorrelation measurements with picosecond-scale timing resolution and exceptionally low peak powers.

  12. Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride from Bis(tert-butylamino)silane and N2 Plasma.

    PubMed

    Knoops, Harm C M; Braeken, Eline M J; de Peuter, Koen; Potts, Stephen E; Haukka, Suvi; Pore, Viljami; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M

    2015-09-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride (SiNx) is deemed essential for a variety of applications in nanoelectronics, such as gate spacer layers in transistors. In this work an ALD process using bis(tert-butylamino)silane (BTBAS) and N2 plasma was developed and studied. The process exhibited a wide temperature window starting from room temperature up to 500 °C. The material properties and wet-etch rates were investigated as a function of plasma exposure time, plasma pressure, and substrate table temperature. Table temperatures of 300-500 °C yielded a high material quality and a composition close to Si3N4 was obtained at 500 °C (N/Si=1.4±0.1, mass density=2.9±0.1 g/cm3, refractive index=1.96±0.03). Low wet-etch rates of ∼1 nm/min were obtained for films deposited at table temperatures of 400 °C and higher, similar to that achieved in the literature using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of SiNx at >700 °C. For novel applications requiring significantly lower temperatures, the temperature window from room temperature to 200 °C can be a solution, where relatively high material quality was obtained when operating at low plasma pressures or long plasma exposure times. PMID:26305370

  13. Atomic-Resolution Observations of Semi-Crystalline IntegranularThin Films in Silicon Nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Alexander; Idrobo, Juan C.; Cinibulk, Michael K.; Kisielowski, Christian; Browning, Nigel D.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2005-08-01

    The thin intergranular phase in a silicon nitride (Si3N4)ceramic, which has been regarded for decades as having an entirely amorphous morphology, is shown to have a semi-crystalline structure. Using two different but complementary high-resolution electron microscopy methods, the intergranular atomic structure was directly imaged at the atomic level. These high-resolution images show that the atomic arrangement of the dopand element cerium takes very periodic positions not only along the interface between the intergranular phase and the Si3N4 matrix grains, but it arranges in a semi-crystalline structure that spans the entire width of the intergranular phase between two adjacent matrix grains, in principle connecting the two separate matrix grains. The result will have implications on the approach of understanding the materials properties of ceramics, most significantly on the mechanical properties and the associated computational modeling of the atomic structure of the thin intergranular phase in Si3N4 ceramics.

  14. Ultra-thin superconducting film coated silicon nitride nanowire resonators for low-temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Abhilash; Zhelev, Nikolay; de Alba, Roberto; Parpia, Jeevak

    We demonstrate fabrication of high stress silicon nitride nanowire resonators with a thickness and width of less than 50 nm intended to be used as probes for the study of superfluid 3He. The resonators are fabricated as doubly-clamped wires/beams using a combination of electron-beam lithography and wet/dry etching techniques. We demonstrate the ability to suspend (over a trench of depth ~8 µm) wires with a cross section as small as 30 nm, covered with a 20 nm superconducting film, and having lengths up to 50 µm. Room temperature resonance measurements were carried out by driving the devices using a piezo stage and detecting the motion using an optical interferometer. The results show that metalizing nano-mechanical resonators not only affects their resonant frequencies but significantly reduce their quality factor (Q). The devices are parametrically pumped by modulating the system at twice its fundamental resonant frequency, which results in observed amplification of the signal. The wires show self-oscillation with increasing modulation strength. The fabricated nanowire resonators are intended to be immersed in the superfluid 3He. By tracking the resonant frequency and the Q of the various modes of the wire versus temperature, we aim to probe the superfluid gap structure.

  15. Gigahertz frequency comb offset stabilization based on supercontinuum generation in silicon nitride waveguides.

    PubMed

    Klenner, Alexander; Mayer, Aline S; Johnson, Adrea R; Luke, Kevin; Lamont, Michael R E; Okawachi, Yoshitomo; Lipson, Michal; Gaeta, Alexander L; Keller, Ursula

    2016-05-16

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) waveguides represent a novel photonic platform that is ideally suited for energy efficient and ultrabroadband nonlinear interactions from the visible to the mid-infrared. Chip-based supercontinuum generation in Si3N4 offers a path towards a fully-integrated and highly compact comb source for sensing and time-and-frequency metrology applications. We demonstrate the first successful frequency comb offset stabilization that utilizes a Si3N4 waveguide for octave-spanning supercontinuum generation and achieve the lowest integrated residual phase noise of any diode-pumped gigahertz laser comb to date. In addition, we perform a direct comparison to a standard silica photonic crystal fiber (PCF) using the same ultrafast solid-state laser oscillator operating at 1 µm. We identify the minimal role of Raman scattering in Si3N4 as a key benefit that allows to overcome the fundamental limitations of silica fibers set by Raman-induced self-frequency shift. PMID:27409927

  16. Joining and Integration of Silicon Nitride Ceramics for Aerospace and Energy Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Asthana, R.

    2009-01-01

    Light-weight, creep-resistant silicon nitride ceramics possess excellent high-temperature strength and are projected to significantly raise engine efficiency and performance when used as turbine components in the next-generation turbo-shaft engines without the extensive cooling that is needed for metallic parts. One key aspect of Si3N4 utilization in such applications is its joining response to diverse materials. In an ongoing research program, the joining and integration of Si3N4 ceramics with metallic, ceramic, and composite materials using braze interlayers with the liquidus temperature in the range 750-1240C is being explored. In this paper, the self-joining behavior of Kyocera Si3N4 and St. Gobain Si3N4 using a ductile Cu-based active braze (Cu-ABA) containing Ti will be presented. Joint microstructure, composition, hardness, and strength as revealed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), Knoop microhardness test, and offset compression shear test will be presented. Additionally, microstructure, composition, and joint strength of Si3N4/Inconel 625 joints made using Cu-ABA, will be presented. The results will be discussed with reference to the role of chemical reactions, wetting behavior, and residual stresses in joints.

  17. Effect of cyclic loading on the creep performance of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, A.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Kirkland, T.P.; Lin, C.K.J.

    1995-04-01

    Tension-tension cyclic fatigue tests (triangular waveform, {sigma}{sub max} = 100 MPa, R = 0.1) were conducted on hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) silicon nitride at frequencies spanning several orders of magnitude (5.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 0.1 Hz or 10{sup {minus}3} MPa/s to 18 MPa/s) at 1,370 C in air. The amount of cyclic creep strain was found to be a function of the frequency or stressing rate with greater strains to failure observed as the frequency or stressing rate decreased. The total strain was viewed as the sum of elastic, anelastic (or transient recoverable), and plastic (viscous or non-recoverable) strain contributions, after the empirical Pao and Marin model. The plastic strain was found to be the dominant component of the total creep and was unsatisfactorily represented by the Pao and Marin model. To circumvent this, a time exponent was introduced in the plastic strain term in the Pao and Marin model. This modification resulted in good correlation between model and experiment at the slower frequencies examined but over-predicted the cyclic creep strain at the faster frequencies. The utility of using the modified Pao and Marin model to predict cyclic creep response from static creep and strain relaxation tests is described.

  18. In situ formation of tin nanocrystals embedded in silicon nitride matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shujuan; So, Yong Heng; Conibeer, Gavin; Green, Martin A.

    2009-06-15

    Tin (Sn) nanocrystals (NCs) embedded in a silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) matrix have been fabricated in a cosputtering process employing low temperature (100 deg. C) substrate heating. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the formation of uniformly sized Sn NCs of 5.2+-0.9 nm evenly distributed in the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix. Both TEM and x-ray diffraction measurements showed that the Sn NCs adopted the semimetallic tetragonal beta-Sn structure rather than the cubic semiconducting alpha-Sn structure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the semimetallic state (Sn{sup 0}) is the major component of Sn in the sample films. Our investigation demonstrates a pronounced effect of the substrate temperature on the formation of Sn NCs. The mechanism of in situ formation of Sn NCs is discussed. We suggest that the formation of uniformly sized Sn NCs is correlated with lowering the surface mobility of the nuclei due to the presence of the cosputtered Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}.

  19. Crystallization of grain boundary phases in silicon nitride with low additive contents by microwave annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Ploetz, K.L.; Kiggans, J.O.; Yeckley, R.L.

    1993-06-01

    Microwave annealing of dense Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-4% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} materials showed improvements over conventional heating. Increases in fracture toughness were observed for annealing between 1200--1650C. The high temperature strength was related to the residual {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} content which is indicative of a finer average grain size in the specimens. The high temperature dynamic fatigue showed increased stress to failure for specimens microwave annealed between 1400--1550C for periods >5 h. Silicon nitrides with different sintering additives would require different conditions for optimum crystallization. While there were some observed property improvements, they were not so dramatic to justify abandoning conventional over microwave heating. The Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-4% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} materials used in the study were developed for elevated temperature use and already posses excellent good high temperature strength, fatigue resistance and creep properties. This is due to the very refractory nature of the grain boundary phases and the small quantity of secondary phase present. However, microwave annealing of these materials may be necessary in applications where the maximum in fracture toughness and fatigue resistance are required and thus justifies its use.

  20. Evaluation of the elevated-temperature mechanical reliability of a HIPed silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Ferber, M.K.; Jenkins, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    The long-term mechanical reliability of a commercially-available hot isostatically pressed silicon nitride was evaluated by measuring the tensile creep and fatigue behavior at 1150, 1260, and 1370{degrees}C. The stress and temperature sensitivities of the secondary (or minimum) creep rates were used to estimate the stress exponent and activation energy associated with the dominant creep mechanism. The fatigue behavior was examined by allowing individual creep tests to continue until the specimen failed. The applicability of the four-point load geometry to the study of creep behavior was also evaluated by conducting a limited number of flexural creep tests. The tensile fatigue data revealed two distinct failure mechanisms. At 1150{degrees}C, failure was controlled by a slow crack growth mechanism. At 1260 and 1370{degrees}C, the accumulation of creep damage in the form of grain boundary cavities and cracks dominated the fatigue behavior. In this temperature regime, the fatigue life was controlled by the secondary (or minimum) creep in accordance with the Monkman-Grant relation. 36 refs.

  1. Evaluation of the strength and creep-fatigue behavior of hot isostatically pressed silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Ferber, M.K.; Jenkins, M.G. )

    1992-09-01

    This paper reports that the strength of a commerically available hot isostatically pressed silicon nitride was measured as a function of temperature. To evaluate long-term mechanical reliability of this material, the tensile creep and fatigue behavior was measured at 1150[degrees], 1260[degrees], and 1370[degrees]C. The stress and temperature sensitivities of the secondary (or minimum) creep strain rate were used to estimate the stress exponent and activation energy associated with the dominant creep mechanism. The fatigue characteristics were evaluated by allowing individual creep tests to continue until specimen failure. The applicability of the four-point load geometry to the study of strength and creep behavior was also determined by conducting a limited number of flexural creep tests. The tensile fatigue data revealed two distinct failure mechanisms. At 1150[degrees]C, failure was controlled by a slow crack growth mechanism. At 1260[degrees] and 1370[degrees]C, the accumulation of creep damage in the form of grain boundary cavities and cracks dominated the fatigue behavior. In this temperature regime, the fatigue life was controlled by the secondary (or minimum) creep strain rate in accordance with the Monkman-Grant relation.

  2. Cross-polarization confocal imaging of subsurface flaws in silicon nitride.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.; Sun, J. G.; Pei, Z.

    2011-03-01

    A cross-polarization confocal microscopy (CPCM) method was developed to image subsurface flaws in optically translucent silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramics. Unlike conventional confocal microscopy, which measures reflected light so is applicable only to transparent and semi-transparent materials, CPCM detects scattered light from subsurface while filtering out the reflected light from ceramic surface. For subsurface imaging, the refractive-index mismatch between imaging (air) and imaged (ceramic) medium may cause image distortion and reduce resolution in the depth direction. This effect, characterized by an axial scaling factor (ASF), was analyzed and experimentally determined for glass and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials. The experimental CPCM system was used to image Hertzian C-cracks generated by various indentation loads in the subsurface of a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} specimen. It was demonstrated that CPCM may provide detailed information of subsurface cracks, such as crack angle and path, and subsurface microstructural variations.

  3. Formation and characteristics of silicon nitride-lithium aluminum silicate ceramics: I. Sintering and microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.J.; Greil, P.; Petzow, G. )

    1987-10-01

    Silicon nitride ceramics with the grain-boundary phase {beta}-eucryptite, LiAlSiO{sub 4}, or {beta}-spodumene, LiAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}, were produced by pressureless sintering {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, SiO{sub 2}, and LiAlO{sub 2} powder mixtures at 1,300{degree} to 1,900{degree}C. The phase relations in the system Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-LiAlO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} were investigated at 1,500{degree}C, showing the presence of an Si-Li-O rich liquid phase. During annealing at 900{degree} to 1,300{degree}C, {beta}-eucryptite precipitated when the sintering temperature was <1,700{degree}C, whereas {beta}-spodumene crystallized when it was >1,700{degree}C. Because of the low thermal expansion of {beta}-LiAlSiO{sub 4} and {beta}-LiAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} ({minus}6.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}7}{degree}C{sup {minus}1} and 8.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}7}{degree}C{sup {minus}1}, RT = 1,000{degree}C), thermal-induced misfit stresses will be developed. Because of these stresses, toughening effects can be expected in the composite microstructures.

  4. Hexagonal Ag nanoarrays induced enhancement of blue light emission from amorphous oxidized silicon nitride via localized surface plasmon coupling.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhongyuan; Ni, Xiaodong; Zhang, Wenping; Jiang, Xiaofan; Yang, Huafeng; Yu, Jie; Wang, Wen; Xu, Ling; Xu, Jun; Chen, Kunji; Feng, Duan

    2014-11-17

    A significant enhancement of blue light emission from amorphous oxidized silicon nitride (a-SiNx:O) films is achieved by introduction of ordered and size-controllable arrays of Ag nanoparticles between the silicon substrate and a-SiNx:O films. Using hexagonal arrays of Ag nanoparticles fabricated by nanosphere lithography, the localized surface plasmons (LSPs) resonance can effectively increase the internal quantum efficiency from 3.9% to 13.3%. Theoretical calculation confirms that the electromagnetic field-intensity enhancement is through the dipole surface plasma coupling with the excitons of a-SiNx:O films, which demonstrates a-SiNx:O films with enhanced blue emission are promising for silicon-based light-emitting applications by patterned Ag arrays.

  5. Effects of Interface Coating and Nitride Enhancing Additive on Properties of Hi-Nicalon SiC Fiber Reinforced Reaction-Bonded Silicon Nitride Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishana T.; Hull, David R.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Babuder, Raymond

    2000-01-01

    Strong and tough Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites (SiC/ RBSN) have been fabricated by the fiber lay-up approach. Commercially available uncoated and PBN, PBN/Si-rich PBN, and BN/SiC coated SiC Hi-Nicalon fiber tows were used as reinforcement. The composites contained approximately 24 vol % of aligned 14 micron diameter SiC fibers in a porous RBSN matrix. Both one- and two-dimensional composites were characterized. The effects of interface coating composition, and the nitridation enhancing additive, NiO, on the room temperature physical, tensile, and interfacial shear strength properties of SiC/RBSN matrix composites were evaluated. Results indicate that for all three coated fibers, the thickness of the coatings decreased from the outer periphery to the interior of the tows, and that from 10 to 30 percent of the fibers were not covered with the interface coating. In the uncoated regions, chemical reaction between the NiO additive and the SiC fiber occurs causing degradation of tensile properties of the composites. Among the three interface coating combinations investigated, the BN/SiC coated Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced RBSN matrix composite showed the least amount of uncoated regions and reasonably uniform interface coating thickness. The matrix cracking stress in SiC/RBSN composites was predicted using a fracture mechanics based crack bridging model.

  6. Unusual strategies for using indium gallium nitride grown on silicon (111) for solid-state lighting

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hoon-sik; Brueckner, Eric; Song, Jizhou; Li, Yuhang; Kim, Seok; Lu, Chaofeng; Sulkin, Joshua; Choquette, Kent; Huang, Yonggang; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Rogers, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Properties that can now be achieved with advanced, blue indium gallium nitride light emitting diodes (LEDs) lead to their potential as replacements for existing infrastructure in general illumination, with important implications for efficient use of energy. Further advances in this technology will benefit from reexamination of the modes for incorporating this materials technology into lighting modules that manage light conversion, extraction, and distribution, in ways that minimize adverse thermal effects associated with operation, with packages that exploit the unique aspects of these light sources. We present here ideas in anisotropic etching, microscale device assembly/integration, and module configuration that address these challenges in unconventional ways. Various device demonstrations provide examples of the capabilities, including thin, flexible lighting “tapes” based on patterned phosphors and large collections of small light emitters on plastic substrates. Quantitative modeling and experimental evaluation of heat flow in such structures illustrates one particular, important aspect of their operation: small, distributed LEDs can be passively cooled simply by direct thermal transport through thin-film metallization used for electrical interconnect, providing an enhanced and scalable means to integrate these devices in modules for white light generation. PMID:21666096

  7. Unusual strategies for using indium gallium nitride grown on silicon (111) for solid-state lighting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoon-sik; Brueckner, Eric; Song, Jizhou; Li, Yuhang; Kim, Seok; Lu, Chaofeng; Sulkin, Joshua; Choquette, Kent; Huang, Yonggang; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Rogers, John A

    2011-06-21

    Properties that can now be achieved with advanced, blue indium gallium nitride light emitting diodes (LEDs) lead to their potential as replacements for existing infrastructure in general illumination, with important implications for efficient use of energy. Further advances in this technology will benefit from reexamination of the modes for incorporating this materials technology into lighting modules that manage light conversion, extraction, and distribution, in ways that minimize adverse thermal effects associated with operation, with packages that exploit the unique aspects of these light sources. We present here ideas in anisotropic etching, microscale device assembly/integration, and module configuration that address these challenges in unconventional ways. Various device demonstrations provide examples of the capabilities, including thin, flexible lighting "tapes" based on patterned phosphors and large collections of small light emitters on plastic substrates. Quantitative modeling and experimental evaluation of heat flow in such structures illustrates one particular, important aspect of their operation: small, distributed LEDs can be passively cooled simply by direct thermal transport through thin-film metallization used for electrical interconnect, providing an enhanced and scalable means to integrate these devices in modules for white light generation.

  8. Galvanic corrosion of structural non-stoichiometric silicon nitride thin films and its implications on reliability of microelectromechanical devices

    SciTech Connect

    Broas, M. Mattila, T. T.; Paulasto-Kröckel, M.; Liu, X.; Ge, Y.

    2015-06-28

    This paper describes a reliability assessment and failure analysis of a poly-Si/non-stoichiometric silicon nitride thin film composite structure. A set of poly-Si/SiN{sub x} thin film structures were exposed to a mixed flowing gas (MFG) environment, which simulates outdoor environments, for 90 days, and an elevated temperature and humidity (85 °C/95% R.H.) test for 140 days. The mechanical integrity of the thin films was observed to degrade during exposure to the chemically reactive atmospheres. The degree of degradation was analyzed with nanoindentation tests. Statistical analysis of the forces required to initiate a fracture in the thin films indicated degradation due to the exposure to the MFG environment in the SiN{sub x} part of the films. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a porous-like reaction layer on top of SiN{sub x}. The morphology of the reaction layer resembled that of galvanically corroded poly-Si. Transmission electron microscopy further clarified the microstructure of the reaction layer which had a complex multi-phase structure extending to depths of ∼100 nm. Furthermore, the layer was oxidized two times deeper in a 90 days MFG-tested sample compared to an untested reference. The formation of the layer is proposed to be caused by galvanic corrosion of elemental silicon in non-stoichiometric silicon nitride during hydrofluoric acid etching. The degradation is proposed to be due uncontrolled oxidation of the films during the stress tests.

  9. Galvanic corrosion of structural non-stoichiometric silicon nitride thin films and its implications on reliability of microelectromechanical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broas, M.; Liu, X.; Ge, Y.; Mattila, T. T.; Paulasto-Kröckel, M.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a reliability assessment and failure analysis of a poly-Si/non-stoichiometric silicon nitride thin film composite structure. A set of poly-Si/SiNx thin film structures were exposed to a mixed flowing gas (MFG) environment, which simulates outdoor environments, for 90 days, and an elevated temperature and humidity (85 °C/95% R.H.) test for 140 days. The mechanical integrity of the thin films was observed to degrade during exposure to the chemically reactive atmospheres. The degree of degradation was analyzed with nanoindentation tests. Statistical analysis of the forces required to initiate a fracture in the thin films indicated degradation due to the exposure to the MFG environment in the SiNx part of the films. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a porous-like reaction layer on top of SiNx. The morphology of the reaction layer resembled that of galvanically corroded poly-Si. Transmission electron microscopy further clarified the microstructure of the reaction layer which had a complex multi-phase structure extending to depths of ˜100 nm. Furthermore, the layer was oxidized two times deeper in a 90 days MFG-tested sample compared to an untested reference. The formation of the layer is proposed to be caused by galvanic corrosion of elemental silicon in non-stoichiometric silicon nitride during hydrofluoric acid etching. The degradation is proposed to be due uncontrolled oxidation of the films during the stress tests.

  10. Design of a polymer-filled silicon nitride strip/slot asymmetric hybrid waveguide for realizing both flat dispersion and athermal operation.

    PubMed

    Bian, Dandan; Chen, Shaowu; Lei, Xun; Qin, Guanshi; Chen, Zhanguo

    2016-06-20

    An asymmetric strip/slot hybrid silicon nitride waveguide is designed to simultaneously realize athermal operation and flat dispersion. The slot filling and upper cladding materials are negative thermal-optical coefficient (TOC), low refractive index polyurethane acrylate, while the left and right cladding layers are positive TOC, high refractive index silicon nitride. With suitable waveguide parameter selection, an optimum strip/slot hybrid silicon nitride waveguide exhibits an effective TOC of 1.263×10-7/K at 1550 nm, flattened dispersion in the wavelength range from 1200 to 1800 nm with the maximum dispersion of 30.51 ps/(nm·km), and a minimum of 10.89 ps/(nm·km). The proposed hybrid waveguide has great potential in building up broadband athermal microresonator optical frequency combs.

  11. Stress-controlled silicon nitride film with high optical transmittance prepared by an ultrahigh-vacuum electron cyclotron resonance plasma chemical-vapor deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jinho; Suzuki, Katsumi

    1994-06-01

    An ultrahigh-vaccuum electron cyclotron resonance plasma chemical-vapor deposition system with a substrate heating component has been applied to deposit silicon nitride film. Low background pressure (˜5×10-9 Torr) and efficient plasma excitation at a low deposition pressure (<10-3 Torr) result in a low oxygen impurity content in the silicon nitride film. Process flexibility of this system, i.e., control of the SiH4 to NH3 flow ratio, deposition pressure, and substrate temperature, allows the deposition of near-stoichiometry silicon nitride film with a high optical transmittance as well as a suppressed amount of hydrogen impurity and a low film stress.

  12. Performance improvement of silicon nitride ball bearings by ion implantation. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.M.; Miner, J.

    1998-03-01

    The present report summarizes technical results of CRADA No. ORNL 92-128 with the Pratt and Whitney Division of United Technologies Corporation. The stated purpose of the program was to assess the 3effect of ion implantation on the rolling contact performance of engineering silicon nitride bearings, to determine by post-test analyses of the bearings the reasons for improved or reduced performance and the mechanisms of failure, if applicable, and to relate the overall results to basic property changes including but not limited to swelling, hardness, modulus, micromechanical properties, and surface morphology. Forty-two control samples were tested to an intended runout period of 60 h. It was possible to supply only six balls for ion implantation, but an extended test period goal of 150 h was used. The balls were implanted with C-ions at 150 keV to a fluence of 1.1 {times} 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}. The collection of samples had pre-existing defects called C-cracks in the surfaces. As a result, seven of the control samples had severe spalls before reaching the goal of 60 h for an unacceptable failure rate of 0.003/sample-h. None of the ion-implanted samples experienced engineering failure in 150 h of testing. Analytical techniques have been used to characterize ion implantation results, to characterize wear tracks, and to characterize microstructure and impurity content. In possible relation to C-cracks. It is encouraging that ion implantation can mitigate the C-crack failure mode. However, the practical implications are compromised by the fact that bearings with C-cracks would, in no case, be acceptable in engineering practice, as this type of defect was not anticipated when the program was designed. The most important reason for the use of ceramic bearings is energy efficiency.

  13. Design, microstructure, and high-temperature behavior of silicon nitride sintered with rate-earth oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ciniculk, M.K. . Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering)

    1991-08-01

    The processing-microstructure-property relations of silicon nitride ceramics sintered with rare-earth oxide additives have been investigated with the aim of improving their high-temperature behavior. The additions of the oxides of Y, Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, or Yb were compositionally controlled to tailor the intergranular phase. The resulting microstructure consisted of {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} grains and a crystalline secondary phase of RE{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}, with a thin residual amorphous phase present at grain boundaries. The lanthanide oxides were found to be as effective as Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} in densifying Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, resulting in identical microstructures. The crystallization behavior of all six disilicates was similar, characterized by a limited nucleation and rapid growth mechanism resulting in large single crystals. Complete crystallization of the intergranular phase was obtained with the exception of a residual amorphous, observed at interfaces and believed to be rich in impurities, the cause of incomplete devitrification. The low resistance to oxidation of these materials was attributed to the minimization of amorphous phases via devitrification to disilicates, compatible with SiO{sub 2}, the oxidation product of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The strength retention of these materials at 1300{degrees}C was found to be between 80% and 91% of room-temperature strength, due to crystallization of the secondary phase and a residual but refractory amorphous grain-boundary phase. The creep behavior was found to be strongly dependent on residual amorphous phase viscosity as well as on the oxidation behavior, as evidenced by the nonsteady-state creep rates of all materials. 122 refs., 51 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Strength testing of Ti-vapor-coated silicon nitride braze joints

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    Sintered silicon nitride was vacuum brazed to itself at 1130{degree}C with a Au-25Ni-25Pd wt % filler metal. Wetting was obtained by coating the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} surfaces with titanium prior to brazing by electron beam evaporation. The brazed joints were virtually free of porosity. Metallographic analysis showed that Ti reacted with the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, to form a TiN reaction layer during brazing. Small amounts of Si and Ti dissolved in the filler metal layers but they did not appear to influence the mechanical properties of the braze layer. Flexure bars were made from the brazed coupons and tested at room temperature, 600C, 700C, and 800C in air. At 700C and below, fracture of the test bars occurred in the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, either near the brazed surfaces or at some distance into the monolithic material. The measured strength of joint specimens decreased slightly with increasing test temperature, and generally exceeded the intrinsic braze filler metal strength in this temperature range. It was also found that lapping the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, prior to Ti coating reduced the number of near-surface flaws and produced joints with higher average strength and lower scatter than those left in a ground condition. Specimens tested at 800C had very low strengths, and this behavior was related to the microstructure at the brazed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} surfaces.

  15. The effect of dielectric properties of sintering additives on microwave sintered silicon nitride ceramics.

    PubMed

    Chockalingam, Sreekumar; George, Jacob; Earl, David; Amarakoon, Vasantha R W

    2008-01-01

    Silicon nitride requires the use of susceptive additives for microwave liquid phase sintering due to the material's low dielectric loss. In this article, we report the effect of complex dielectric properties of two compositions of sintering aids on 2.45 GHz microwave sintered Si3N4 with respect to power absorption, temperature distribution and densification behavior. The temperature dependent dielectric properties were measured from 25 degrees C to 1400 degrees C using a conventional cavity perturbation technique. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) electromagnetic simulations coupled with a thermal solver was used to predict the microwave power absorption and the corresponding temperature evolution inside the samples. The additive with higher dielectric loss (4 wt% MgO, 6 wt% Y2O3 and 2.5 wt% ZrO2) produces a greater sintered density than the lower loss additive (4 wt% MgO and 6 wt% Y2O3) or pure Si3N4. Although microwave loss at temperatures below 600 degrees C is insignificant with or without the additives, the loss begins to increase at higher temperatures when the additives are present and has a strong upward trend above 1000 degrees C. Above 1200 degrees C the sample containing ZrO2 exhibited the greatest loss. Numerical simulations at the peak sintering temperature show greater microwave power absorption and higher temperature in the sample with the highest loss additive. The simulation results correlate to the difference in densification behavior observed. The simulation was also useful because the material temperature was not accurately provided by optical pyrometer measurements of the crucible sample holder.

  16. Thermal Response of Cooled Silicon Nitride Plate Due to Thermal Conductivity Effects Analyzed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Bhatt, Ramakrishna

    2003-01-01

    Lightweight, strong, tough high-temperature materials are required to complement efficiency improvements for next-generation gas turbine engines that can operate with minimum cooling. Because of their low density, high-temperature strength, and high thermal conductivity, ceramics are being investigated as materials to replace the nickelbase superalloys that are currently used for engine hot-section components. Ceramic structures can withstand higher operating temperatures and a harsh combustion environment. In addition, their low densities relative to metals help reduce component mass (ref. 1). To complement the effectiveness of the ceramics and their applicability for turbine engine applications, a parametric study using the finite element method is being carried out. The NASA Glenn Research Center remains very active in conducting and supporting a variety of research activities related to ceramic matrix composites through both experimental and analytical efforts (ref. 1). The objectives of this work are to develop manufacturing technology, develop a thermal and environmental barrier coating (TBC/EBC), develop an analytical modeling capability to predict thermomechanical stresses, and perform a minimal burner rig test on silicon nitride (Si3N4) and SiC/SiC turbine nozzle vanes under simulated engine conditions. Moreover, we intend to generate a detailed database of the material s property characteristics and their effects on structural response. We expect to offer a wide range of data since the modeling will account for other variables, such as cooling channel geometry and spacing. Comprehensive analyses have begun on a plate specimen with Si3N4 cooling holes.

  17. Laminate behavior for SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Phillips, Ronald E.

    1990-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composite laminates (SiC/RBSN) have been measured. The laminates contained approx 30 volume fraction of aligned 142-micron diameter SiC fiber in a porous RBSN matrix. Three types of laminate studied were unidirectional: (1) (0) sub 8, (2) (10) sub 8, and (3) (45) sub 8, and (90) sub 8; cross plied laminates (0 sub 2/90 sub 2); and angle plied laminates: (+45 sub 2/-45 sub 2). Each laminate contained eight fiber plies. Results of the unidirectionally reinforced composites tested at various angles to the reinforcement direction indicate large anisotropy in in-plane properties. In addition, strength properties of these composites along the fiber direction were independent of specimen gage length and were unaffected by notches normal to the fiber direction. Splitting parallel to the fiber at the notch tip appears to be the dominant crack blunting mechanism responsible for notch insensitive behavior of these composites. In-plane properties of the composites can be improved by 2-D laminate construction. Mechanical property results for (0 sub 2/90 sub 2) sub s and (+45/-45 sub 2) sub s laminates showed that their matrix failure strains were similar to that for (0) sub 8 laminates, but their primary elastic moduli, matrix cracking strengths, and ultimate composite strengths were lower. The elastic properties of unidirectional, cross-ply, and angle-ply composites can be predicted from modified constitutive equations and laminate theory. Further improvements in laminate properties may be achieved by reducing the matrix porosity and by optimizing the bond strength between the SiC fiber and RBSN matrix.

  18. Laminate behavior for SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatt, R. T.; Phillips, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composite laminates (SiC/RBSN) have been measured. The laminates contained approx 30 volume fraction of aligned 142-micron diameter SiC fiber in a porous RBSN matrix. Three types of laminate studied were unidirectional: (1) (0) sub 8, (2) (10) sub 8, and (3) (45) sub 8, and (90) sub 8; cross plied laminates (0 sub 2/90 sub 2); and angle plied laminates: (+45 sub 2/-45 sub 2). Each laminate contained eight fiber plies. Results of the unidirectionally reinforced composites tested at various angles to the reinforcement direction indicate large anisotropy in in-plane properties. In addition, strength properties of these composites along the fiber direction were independent of specimen gage length and were unaffected by notches normal to the fiber direction. Splitting parallel to the fiber at the notch tip appears to be the dominant crack blunting mechanism responsible for notch insensitive behavior of these composites. In-plane properties of the composites can be improved by 2-D laminate construction. Mechanical property results for (0 sub 2/90 sub 2)sub s and (+45/-45 sub 2) sub s laminates showed that their matrix failure strains were similar to that for (0) sub 8 laminates, but their primary elastic moduli, matrix cracking strengths, and ultimate composite strengths were lower. The elastic properties of unidirectional, cross-ply, and angle-ply composites can be predicted from modified constitutive equations and laminate theory. Further improvements in laminate properties may be achieved by reducing the matrix porosity and by optimizing the bond strength between the SiC fiber and RBSN matrix.

  19. The effect of dielectric properties of sintering additives on microwave sintered silicon nitride ceramics.

    PubMed

    Chockalingam, Sreekumar; George, Jacob; Earl, David; Amarakoon, Vasantha R W

    2008-01-01

    Silicon nitride requires the use of susceptive additives for microwave liquid phase sintering due to the material's low dielectric loss. In this article, we report the effect of complex dielectric properties of two compositions of sintering aids on 2.45 GHz microwave sintered Si3N4 with respect to power absorption, temperature distribution and densification behavior. The temperature dependent dielectric properties were measured from 25 degrees C to 1400 degrees C using a conventional cavity perturbation technique. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) electromagnetic simulations coupled with a thermal solver was used to predict the microwave power absorption and the corresponding temperature evolution inside the samples. The additive with higher dielectric loss (4 wt% MgO, 6 wt% Y2O3 and 2.5 wt% ZrO2) produces a greater sintered density than the lower loss additive (4 wt% MgO and 6 wt% Y2O3) or pure Si3N4. Although microwave loss at temperatures below 600 degrees C is insignificant with or without the additives, the loss begins to increase at higher temperatures when the additives are present and has a strong upward trend above 1000 degrees C. Above 1200 degrees C the sample containing ZrO2 exhibited the greatest loss. Numerical simulations at the peak sintering temperature show greater microwave power absorption and higher temperature in the sample with the highest loss additive. The simulation results correlate to the difference in densification behavior observed. The simulation was also useful because the material temperature was not accurately provided by optical pyrometer measurements of the crucible sample holder. PMID:19227072

  20. Stable protein-repellent zwitterionic polymer brushes grafted from silicon nitride.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ai T; Baggerman, Jacob; Paulusse, Jos M J; van Rijn, Cees J M; Zuilhof, Han

    2011-03-15

    Zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine acrylamide) (SBMAA) brushes were grafted from silicon-rich silicon nitride (SixN4, x > 3) surfaces by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and studied in protein adsorption experiments. To this aim ATRP initiators were immobilized onto SixN4 through stable Si-C linkages via three consecutive reactions. A UV-induced reaction of 1,2-epoxy-9-decene with hydrogen-terminated SixN4 surfaces was followed by conversion of the epoxide with 1,2-ethylenediamine resulting in primary and secondary amine-terminated surfaces. A reaction with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide led to ATRP initiator-covered surfaces. Zwitterionic polymer brushes of SBMAA were grown from these initiator-coated surfaces (thickness ∼30 nm), and the polymer-coated surfaces were characterized in detail by static water contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and an atomic force microscope (AFM). The adsorption of proteins onto zwitterionic polymer coated surfaces was evaluated by in situ reflectometry, using a fibrinogen (FIB) solution of 0.1 g·L(-1), and compared to hexadecyl-coated SixN4 surfaces (C16-SixN4), uncoated air-based plasma oxidized SixN4 surfaces (SiOy-SixN4), and hexa(ethylene oxide)-coated SixN4 surfaces (EO6-SixN4). Excellent protein repellence (>99%) was observed for these zwitterionic polymer-coated SixN4 surfaces during exposure to FIB solution as compared to C16-SixN4 surfaces. Furthermore, the stability of these zwitterionic polymer-coated SixN4 surfaces was surveyed by exposing the surfaces for 1 week to phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution at room temperature. The zwitterionic polymer-coated SixN4 surfaces before and after exposure to PBS solution were characterized by XPS, AFM, and water contact angle measurements, and their protein-repelling properties were evaluated by reflectometry. After exposure to PBS solution, the zwitterionic polymer coating remained intact, and its thickness was unchanged within experimental

  1. Scanning capacitance microscopy and spectroscopy applied to local charge modifications and characterization of nitride-oxide-silicon heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, M.; Wiesendanger, R.

    1995-10-01

    We have combined a home-built capacitance sensor with a commercial scanning force microscope to obtain a Scanning Capacitance Microscope (SCM). The SCM has been used to study Nitride-Oxide-Silicon (NOS) heterostructures which offer potential applications in charge storage technology. Charge writing and reading on a submicrometer scale is demonstrated with our SCM setup. In addition, SCM appears to be very useful for the characterization of subsurface defects in semiconductor devices which are inaccessible by most of the other scanning probe microscopies. Finally, we introduce a novel spectroscopic mode of SCM operation which offers combined voltage-dependent and spatially resolved information about inhomogeneous charge distributions in semiconductor devices.

  2. Mechanistic studies of the CVD of silicon nitride from SiF[sub 4] and NH[sub 3

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, R J; Ho, P

    1992-01-01

    An industrial process for the CVD of silicon nitride from SiF[sub 4] and NH[sub 3] was studied with a wide variety of techniques, ranging from numerical models of the coupled chemistry and fluid mechanics to experimental studies of chemical reactions. The latter includes a set of molecular beam experiments that probed the temperature and flux dependencies of the reaction of SiF[sub 4] and NH[sub 3] at the surface. These experiments showed that the CVD reactor chemistry was dominated by surface kinetics rather than gas-phase decomposition.

  3. A Monolithically Integrated Gallium Nitride Nanowire/Silicon Solar Cell Photocathode for Selective Carbon Dioxide Reduction to Methane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yichen; Fan, Shizhao; AlOtaibi, Bandar; Wang, Yongjie; Li, Lu; Mi, Zetian

    2016-06-20

    A gallium nitride nanowire/silicon solar cell photocathode for the photoreduction of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) is demonstrated. Such a monolithically integrated nanowire/solar cell photocathode offers several unique advantages, including the absorption of a large part of the solar spectrum and highly efficient carrier extraction. With the incorporation of copper as the co-catalyst, the devices exhibit a Faradaic efficiency of about 19 % for the 8e(-) photoreduction to CH4 at -1.4 V vs Ag/AgCl, a value that is more than thirty times higher than that for the 2e(-) reduced CO (ca. 0.6 %). PMID:27128407

  4. A Monolithically Integrated Gallium Nitride Nanowire/Silicon Solar Cell Photocathode for Selective Carbon Dioxide Reduction to Methane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yichen; Fan, Shizhao; AlOtaibi, Bandar; Wang, Yongjie; Li, Lu; Mi, Zetian

    2016-06-20

    A gallium nitride nanowire/silicon solar cell photocathode for the photoreduction of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) is demonstrated. Such a monolithically integrated nanowire/solar cell photocathode offers several unique advantages, including the absorption of a large part of the solar spectrum and highly efficient carrier extraction. With the incorporation of copper as the co-catalyst, the devices exhibit a Faradaic efficiency of about 19 % for the 8e(-) photoreduction to CH4 at -1.4 V vs Ag/AgCl, a value that is more than thirty times higher than that for the 2e(-) reduced CO (ca. 0.6 %).

  5. Influence of hydrogen effusion from hydrogenated silicon nitride layers on the regeneration of boron-oxygen related defects in crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wilking, S. Ebert, S.; Herguth, A.; Hahn, G.

    2013-11-21

    The degradation effect boron doped and oxygen-rich crystalline silicon materials suffer from under illumination can be neutralized in hydrogenated silicon by the application of a regeneration process consisting of a combination of slightly elevated temperature and carrier injection. In this paper, the influence of variations in short high temperature steps on the kinetics of the regeneration process is investigated. It is found that hotter and longer firing steps allowing an effective hydrogenation from a hydrogen-rich silicon nitride passivation layer result in an acceleration of the regeneration process. Additionally, a fast cool down from high temperature to around 550 °C seems to be crucial for a fast regeneration process. It is suggested that high cooling rates suppress hydrogen effusion from the silicon bulk in a temperature range where the hydrogenated passivation layer cannot release hydrogen in considerable amounts. Thus, the hydrogen content of the silicon bulk after the complete high temperature step can be increased resulting in a faster regeneration process. Hence, the data presented here back up the theory that the regeneration process might be a hydrogen passivation of boron-oxygen related defects.

  6. Integration of bulk-quality thin film magneto-optical cerium-doped yttrium iron garnet on silicon nitride photonic substrates.

    PubMed

    Onbasli, Mehmet C; Goto, Taichi; Sun, Xueyin; Huynh, Nathalie; Ross, C A

    2014-10-20

    Cerium substituted yttrium iron garnet (Ce:YIG) films were grown on yttrium iron garnet (YIG) seed layers on silicon nitride films using pulsed laser deposition. Optimal process conditions for forming garnet films on silicon nitride are presented. Bulk or near-bulk magnetic and magneto-optical properties were observed for 160 nm thick Ce:YIG films grown at 640 °C on rapid thermal annealed 40 nm thick YIG grown at 640 °C and 2 Hz pulse rate. The effect of growth temperature and deposition rate on structural, magnetic and magneto-optical properties has been investigated.

  7. Porous silicon advances in drug delivery and immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Savage, D; Liu, X; Curley, S; Ferrari, M; Serda, RE

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical applications of porous silicon include drug delivery, imaging, diagnostics and immunotherapy. This review summarizes new silicon particle fabrication techniques, dynamics of cellular transport, advances in the multistage vector approach to drug delivery, and the use of porous silicon as immune adjuvants. Recent findings support superior therapeutic efficacy of the multistage vector approach over single particle drug delivery systems in mouse models of ovarian and breast cancer. With respect to vaccine development, multivalent presentation of pathogen-associated molecular patterns on the particle surface creates powerful platforms for immunotherapy, with the porous matrix able to carry both antigens and immune modulators. PMID:23845260

  8. Coupled fiber taper extraction of 1.53 microm photoluminescence from erbium doped silicon nitride photonic crystal cavities.

    PubMed

    Shambat, Gary; Gong, Yiyang; Lu, Jesse; Yerci, Selçuk; Li, Rui; Dal Negro, Luca; Vucković, Jelena

    2010-03-15

    Optical fiber tapers are used to collect photoluminescence emission at approximately 1.5 microm from photonic crystal cavities fabricated in erbium doped silicon nitride on silicon. In the experiment, photoluminescence collection via one arm of the fiber taper is enhanced 2.5 times relative to free space collection, corresponding to a net collection efficiency of 4%. Theoretically, the collection efficiency into one arm of the fiber-taper with this material system and cavity design can be as high as 12.5%, but the degradation of the experimental coupling efficiency relative to this value mainly comes from scattering loss within the short taper transition regions. By varying the fiber taper offset from the cavity, a broad tuning range of coupling strength and collection efficiency is obtained. This material system combined with fiber taper collection is promising for building on-chip optical amplifiers.

  9. Chemical nature of silicon nitride-indium phosphide interface and rapid thermal annealing for InP MISFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedenbender, M. D.; Kapoor, V. J.

    1990-01-01

    A rapid thermal annealing (RTA) process in pure N2 or pure H2 was developed for ion-implanted and encapsulated indium phosphide compound semiconductors, and the chemical nature at the silicon nitride-InP interface before and after RTA was examined using XPS. Results obtained from SIMS on the atomic concentration profiles of the implanted silicon in InP before and after RTA are presented, together with electrical characteristics of the annealed implants. Using the RTA process developed, InP metal-insulator semiconductor FETs (MISFETS) were fabricated. The MISFETS prepared had threshold voltages of +1 V, transconductance of 27 mS/mm, peak channel mobility of 1200 sq cm/V per sec, and drain current drift of only 7 percent.

  10. C- and L-band erbium-doped waveguide lasers with wafer-scale silicon nitride cavities.

    PubMed

    Purnawirman; Sun, J; Adam, T N; Leake, G; Coolbaugh, D; Bradley, J D B; Shah Hosseini, E; Watts, M R

    2013-06-01

    We report on integrated erbium-doped waveguide lasers designed for silicon photonic systems. The distributed Bragg reflector laser cavities consist of silicon nitride waveguide and grating features defined by wafer-scale immersion lithography and a top erbium-doped aluminum oxide layer deposited as the final step in the fabrication process. The resulting inverted ridge waveguide yields high optical intensity overlap with the active medium for both the 0.98 μm pump (89%) and 1.5 μm laser (87%) wavelengths with a pump-laser intensity overlap of >93%. We obtain output powers of up to 5 mW and show lasing at widely spaced wavelengths within both the C and L bands of the erbium gain spectrum (1536, 1561, and 1596 nm).

  11. Densification of Reaction Bonded Silicon Nitride with the Addition of Fine Si Powder Effects on the Sinterability and Mechanical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sea-Hoon; Cho, Chun-Rae; Park, Young-Jo; Ko, Jae-Woong; Kim, Hai-Doo; Lin, Hua-Tay; Becher, Paul F

    2013-01-01

    The densification behavior and strength of sintered reaction bonded silicon nitrides (SRBSN) that contain Lu2O3-SiO2 additives were improved by the addition of fine Si powder. Dense specimens (relative density: 99.5%) were obtained by gas-pressure sintering (GPS) at 1850oC through the addition of fine Si. In contrast, the densification of conventional specimens did not complete at 1950oC. The fine Si decreased the onset temperature of shrinkage and increased the shrinkage rate because the additive helped the compaction of green bodies and induced the formation of fine Si3N4 particles after nitridation and sintering at and above 1600oC. The amount of residual SiO2 within the specimens was not strongly affected by adding fine Si powder because most of the SiO2 layer that had formed on the fine Si particles decomposed during nitridation. The maximum strength and fracture toughness of the specimens were 991 MPa and 8.0 MPa m1/2, respectively.

  12. PIP processing, microstructure and properties of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} fiber and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} fiber reinforced silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, S.T.; Page, R.A.; Davidson, D.L.; Graef, R.C.

    1995-10-01

    Polymer infiltration/pyrolysis (PIP) processing has the potential to become an affordable means of manufacturing continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix components. The PIP method is very similar to the well-known polymer-matrix and carbon-carbon composite manufacturing techniques, the major difference being the use of a preceramic polymer in place of the organic polymer or carbon precursor. To date, the majority of research in the field of preceramic polymers has centered on precursors to silicon carbide (SiC). The Southwest Research institute (SwRI) has focused on the development of polymeric precursors to silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) because its high-temperature strength, resistance to oxidation, and other properties make it an attractive candidate for many advanced high-temperature structural applications. PIP Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites with NICALON SiC fiber reinforcement have exhibited good fracture toughness (K{sub IC} {approximately} 16 MPa {center_dot} m{sup 1/2}). The authors report here processing, microstructure and preliminary mechanical properties of two new PIP Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites. One is reinforced with Tonen Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} fiber (plain weave) while the other is reinforced with ALMAX Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} fiber (8 Harness satin weave).

  13. Comparison of dynamic fatigue behavior between SiC whisker-reinforced composite and monolithic silicon nitrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic fatigue behavior of 30 vol percent silicon nitride whisker-reinforced composite and monolithic silicon nitrides were determined as a function of temperature from 1100 to 1300 C in ambient air. The fatigue susceptibility parameter, n, decreased from 88.1 to 20.1 for the composite material, and from 50.8 to 40.4 for the monolithic, with increasing temperature from 1100 to 1300 C. A transition in the dynamic fatigue curve occurred for the composite material at a low stressing rate of 2 MPa/min at 1300 C, resulting in a very low value of n equals 5.8. Fractographic analysis showed that glassy phases in the slow crack growth region were more pronounced in the composite compared to the monolithic material, implying that SiC whisker addition promotes the formation of glass rich phases at the grain boundaries, thereby enhancing fatigue. These results indicate that SiC whisker addition to Si3 N4 matrix substantially deteriorates fatigue resistance inherent to the matrix base material for this selected material system.

  14. Fabrication of a Carbon Nanotube-Embedded Silicon Nitride Membrane for Studies of Nanometer-Scale Mass Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, J K; Noy, A; Huser, T; Eaglesham, D; Bakajin, O

    2004-08-25

    A membrane consisting of multiwall carbon nanotubes embedded in a silicon nitride matrix was fabricated for fluid mechanics studies on the nanometer scale. Characterization by tracer diffusion and scanning electron microscopy suggests that the membrane is free of large voids. An upper limit to the diffusive flux of D{sub 2}O of 2.4x10-{sup 8} mole/m{sup 2}-s was determined, indicating extremely slow transport. By contrast, hydrodynamic calculations of water flow across a nanotube membrane of similar specifications predict a much higher molar flux of 1.91 mole/m{sup 2}-s, suggesting that the nanotubes produced possess a 'bamboo' morphology. The carbon nanotube membranes were used to make nanoporous silicon nitride membranes, fabricated by sacrificial removal of the carbon. Nitrogen flow measurements on these structures give a membrane permeance of 4.7x10{sup -4} mole/m{sup 2}-s-Pa at a pore density of 4x10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}. Using a Knudsen diffusion model, the average pore size of this membrane is estimated to be 66 nm, which agrees well with TEM observations of the multiwall carbon nanotube outer diameter. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications inseparations and chemical sensing.

  15. Foreign Object Damage in a Gas-Turbine Grade Silicon Nitride by Spherical Projectiles of Various Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Racz, Zsolt; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Brewer, David N.

    2006-01-01

    Assessments of foreign object damage (FOD) of a commercial, gas-turbine grade, in situ toughened silicon nitride ceramic (AS800, Honeywell Ceramics Components) were made using four different projectile materials at ambient temperature. AS800 flexure target specimens rigidly supported were impacted at their centers in a velocity range from 50 to 450 m/s by spherical projectiles with a diameter of 1.59 mm. Four different projectile materials were used including hardened steel, annealed steel, silicon nitride ceramic, and brass. Post-impact strength of each target specimen impacted was determined as a function of impact velocity to appraise the severity of local impact damage. For a given impact velocity, the degree of strength degradation was greatest for ceramic balls, least for brass balls, and intermediate for annealed and hardened steel balls. For steel balls, hardened projectiles yielded more significant impact damage than annealed counterparts. The most important material parameter affecting FOD was identified as hardness of projectiles. Impact load as a function of impact velocity was quasi-statically estimated based on both impact and static indentation associated data.

  16. Role of GaAs surface clearing in plasma deposition of silicon nitride films for encapsulated annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Valco, G.J.; Kapoor, V.J.

    1985-06-01

    The role of GaAs surface cleaning and plasma reactor cleaning prior to deposition of silicon nitride films for encapsulated annealing has been investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was employed to determine the surface characteristics of GaAs treated with HCl, HF, and NH4OH solutions preceded by a degreasing procedure. The HCl clean left the least amount of oxygen on the surface. Fluorine contamination resulting from the CF4 plasma used to clean the reactor was found to be located at the film-substrate interface by Auger electron spectroscopy with argon-ion sputtering. A modified deposition procedure was developed to eliminate the fluorine contamination. Plasma deposition of silicon nitride encapsulating films was found to modify the I-V characteristics of Schottky diodes subsequently formed on GaAs surface. The reverse current of the diodes was slightly reduced. Substrates implanted with Si at 100 keV and a dose of 5 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm showed a peak electron concentration of 1.7 x 10 to the 17th/cu cm at a depth of 0.1-micron with 60 percent activation after encapsulation and annealing at 800 C for 7 min. 9 references.

  17. Structure, phonons and related properties in zinc-IV-nitride (IV = silicon, germanium, tin), scandium nitride, and rare-earth nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Tula R.

    This thesis presents a study of the phonons and related properties in two sets of nitride compounds, whose properties are until now relatively poorly known. The Zn-IV-N2 group of compounds with the group IV elements Si, Ge and Sn, form a series analogous to the well known III-N nitride series with group III element Al, Ga, In. Structurally, they can be derived by doubling the period of III-V compounds in the plane in two directions and replacing the group-III elements with Zn and a group-IV element in a particular ordered pattern. Even though they are similar to the well-known III-V nitride compounds, the study of the properties of these materials is in its early stages. The phonons in these materials and their relation to the phonons in the corresponding group-III nitrides are of fundamental interest. They are also of practical interest because the phonon related spectra such as infrared absorption and Raman spectroscopy are sensitive to the structural quality of the material and can thus be used to quantify the degree of crystalline perfection of real samples. First-principles calculations of the phonons and related ground state properties of these compounds were carried out using Density Functional Perturbation Theory (DFPT) with the Local Density Approximation (LDA) for exchange and correlation and using a pseudopotential plane wave implementation which was developed by several authors over the last decades. The main focus of our study is on the phonons at the center of the Brillouin zone because the latter are most directly related to commonly used spectroscopies to probe the vibrations in a solid: infrared reflectivity and Raman spectroscopy. For a semiconducting or insulating compound, a splitting occurs between transverse and longitudinal phonons at the Gamma-point because of the long-range nature of electrostatic forces. The concepts required to handle this problem are reviewed. Our discussion emphasizes how the various quantities required are related to

  18. Boron Nitride Nanotubes: Recent Advances in Their Synthesis, Functionalization, and Applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chee Huei; Bhandari, Shiva; Tiwari, Bishnu; Yapici, Nazmiye; Zhang, Dongyan; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of current research progress on boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) is presented in this article. Particularly, recent advancements in controlled synthesis and large-scale production of BNNTs will first be summarized. While recent success in mass production of BNNTs has opened up new opportunities to implement the appealing properties in various applications, concerns about product purity and quality still remain. Secondly, we will summarize the progress in functionalization of BNNTs, which is the necessary step for their applications. Additionally, selected potential applications in structural composites and biomedicine will be highlighted. PMID:27428947

  19. Bioconjugation of protein-repellent zwitterionic polymer brushes grafted from silicon nitride.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ai T; Baggerman, Jacob; Paulusse, Jos M J; Zuilhof, Han; van Rijn, Cees J M

    2012-01-10

    A new method for attaching antibodies to protein-repellent zwitterionic polymer brushes aimed at recognizing microorganisms while preventing the nonspecific adsorption of proteins is presented. The poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (SBMA) brushes were grafted from α-bromo isobutyryl initiator-functionalized silicon nitride (Si(x)N(4), x ≥ 3) surfaces via controlled atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). A trifunctional tris(2-aminoethyl)amine linker was reacted with the terminal alkylbromide of polySBMA chains. N-Hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) functionalization was achieved by reacting the resultant amine-terminated polySBMA brush with bifunctional suberic acid bis(N-hydroxysuccinimide ester). Anti-Salmonella antibodies were subsequently immobilized onto polySBMA-grafted Si(x)N(4) surfaces through these NHS linkers. The protein-repellent properties of the polySBMA-grafted surface after antibody attachment were evaluated by exposing the surfaces to Alexa Fluor 488-labeled fibrinogen (FIB) solution (0.1 g·L(-1)) for 1 h at room temperature. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) images revealed the minimal adsorption of FIB onto the antibody-coated polySBMA in comparison with that of antibody-coated epoxide monolayers and also bare Si(x)N(4) surfaces. Subsequently, the interaction of antibodies immobilized onto polySBMA with SYTO9-stained Salmonella solution without using blocking solution was examined by CLSM. The fluorescent images showed that antibody-coated polySBMA efficiently captured Salmonella with only low background noise as compared to antibody-coated monolayers lacking the polymer brush. Finally, the antibody-coated polySBMA surfaces were exposed to a mixture of Alexa Fluor 647-labeled FIB and Salmonella without the prior use of a blocking solution to evaluate the ability of the surfaces to capture bacteria while simultaneously repelling proteins. The fluorescent images showed the capture of Salmonella with no adsorption of FIB as compared to

  20. Dual mechanical behaviour of hydrogen in stressed silicon nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Volpi, F. Braccini, M.; Pasturel, A.; Devos, A.; Raymond, G.; Morin, P.

    2014-07-28

    In the present article, we report a study on the mechanical behaviour displayed by hydrogen atoms and pores in silicon nitride (SiN) films. A simple three-phase model is proposed to relate the physical properties (stiffness, film stress, mass density, etc.) of hydrogenated nanoporous SiN thin films to the volume fractions of hydrogen and pores. This model is then applied to experimental data extracted from films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition, where hydrogen content, stress, and mass densities range widely from 11% to 30%, −2.8 to 1.5 GPa, and 2.0 to 2.8 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively. Starting from the conventional plotting of film's Young's modulus against film porosity, we first propose to correct the conventional calculation of porosity volume fraction with the hydrogen content, thus taking into account both hydrogen mass and concentration. The weight of this hydrogen-correction is found to evolve linearly with hydrogen concentration in tensile films (in accordance with a simple “mass correction” of the film density calculation), but a clear discontinuity is observed toward compressive stresses. Then, the effective volume occupied by hydrogen atoms is calculated taking account of the bond type (N-H or Si-H bonds), thus allowing a precise extraction of the hydrogen volume fraction. These calculations applied to tensile films show that both volume fractions of hydrogen and porosity are similar in magnitude and randomly distributed against Young's modulus. However, the expected linear dependence of the Young's modulus is clearly observed when both volume fractions are added. Finally, we show that the stiffer behaviour of compressive films cannot be only explained on the basis of this (hydrogen + porosity) volume fraction. Indeed this stiffness difference relies on a dual mechanical behaviour displayed by hydrogen atoms against the film stress state: while they participate to the stiffness in compressive films, hydrogen atoms

  1. Silicon nitride based plasmonic components for CMOS back-end-of-line integration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shiyang; Lo, G Q; Kwong, D L

    2013-10-01

    Silicon nitride waveguides provide low propagation loss but weak mode confinement due to the relatively small refractive index contrast between the Si₃N₄ core and the SiO2 cladding. On the other hand, metal-insulator-metal (MIM) plasmonic waveguides offer strong mode confinement but large propagation loss. In this work, MIM-like plasmonic waveguides and passive devices based on horizontal Cu-Si₃N₄-Cu or Cu-SiO₂-Si₃N₄-SiO₂-Cu structures are integrated in the conventional Si₃N₄ waveguide circuits using standard CMOS backend processes, and are characterized around 1550-nm telecom wavelengths using the conventional fiber-waveguide-fiber method. The Cu-Si₃N₄(~100 nm)-Cu devices exhibit ~0.78-dB/μm propagation loss for straight waveguides, ~38% coupling efficiency with the conventional 1-μm-wide Si₃N₄ waveguide through a 2-μm-long taper coupler, ~0.2-dB bending loss for sharp 90° bends, and ~0.1-dB excess loss for ultracompact 1 × 2 and 1 × 4 power splitters. Inserting a ~10-nm SiO₂ layer between the Si3N4 core and the Cu cover (i.e., the Cu-SiO2(~10 nm)-Si₃N₄(~100 nm)-SiO2(~10 nm)-Cu devices), the propagation loss and the coupling efficiency are improved to ~0.37 dB/μm and ~52% while the bending loss and the excess loss are degraded to ~3.2 dB and ~2.1 dB, respectively. These experimental results are roughly consistent with the numerical simulation results after taking the influence of possible imperfect fabrication into account. Ultracompact plasmonic ring resonators with 1-μm radius are demonstrated with an extinction ratio of ~18 dB and a quality factor of ~84, close to the theoretical prediction.

  2. Influence of Cooling Channel Geometry on the Thermal Response in Silicon Nitride Plates Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2002-01-01

    Engine manufacturers are continually attempting to improve the performance and efficiency of internal combustion engines. Usually they raise the operating temperature or reduce the cooling air requirement for the hot section turbine components. However, the success of these attempts depends on finding materials that are lightweight, are strong, and can withstand high temperatures. Ceramics are among the top candidate materials considered for such harsh applications. They hold low-density, high-temperature strength, and thermal conductivity, and they are undergoing investigation as potential materials for replacing nickel-base alloys and superalloys that are currently used for engine hot-section components. Ceramic structures can withstand higher operating temperatures and a harsh combustion environment. In addition, their low densities relative to metals help reduce component mass. The long-term objectives of the High Temperature Propulsion Components (HOTPC) Project are to develop manufacturing technology, thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TBC/EBC), and the analytical modeling capability to predict thermomechanical stresses in minimally cooled silicon nitride turbine nozzle vanes under simulated engine conditions. Two- and three-dimensional finite element analyses with TBC were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Nondestructive evaluation was used to determine processing defects. The study included conducting preliminary parametric analytical runs of heat transfer and stress analyses under steady-state conditions to demonstrate the feasibility of using cooled Si3N4 parts for turbine applications. The influence of cooling-channel shapes (such as circular, square, and ascending-order cooling channels) on cooling efficiency and thermal stresses was investigated. Temperature distributions were generated for all cases considered under both cooling and no-cooling conditions, with air being the cooling medium. The table shows the magnitude of the

  3. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, T. J.; Winterbottom, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Work performed to develop silicon carbide materials of high strength and to form components of complex shape and high reliability is described. A beta-SiC powder and binder system was adapted to the injection molding process and procedures and process parameters developed capable of providing a sintered silicon carbide material with improved properties. The initial effort has been to characterize the baseline precursor materials (beta silicon carbide powder and boron and carbon sintering aids), develop mixing and injection molding procedures for fabricating test bars, and characterize the properties of the sintered materials. Parallel studies of various mixing, dewaxing, and sintering procedures have been carried out in order to distinguish process routes for improving material properties. A total of 276 MOR bars of the baseline material have been molded, and 122 bars have been fully processed to a sinter density of approximately 95 percent. The material has a mean MOR room temperature strength of 43.31 ksi (299 MPa), a Weibull characteristic strength of 45.8 ksi (315 MPa), and a Weibull modulus of 8.0. Mean values of the MOR strengths at 1000, 1200, and 14000 C are 41.4, 43.2, and 47.2 ksi, respectively. Strength controlling flaws in this material were found to consist of regions of high porosity and were attributed to agglomerates originating in the initial mixing procedures. The mean stress rupture lift at 1400 C of five samples tested at 172 MPa (25 ksi) stress was 62 hours and at 207 MPa (30 ksi) stress was 14 hours. New fluid mixing techniques have been developed which significantly reduce flaw size and improve the strength of the material. Initial MOR tests indicate the strength of the fluid-mixed material exceeds the baseline property by more than 33 percent.

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Silicon Nitride Thin Films and Their Application as Hermetic Coatings on Optical Fibers for Protection against Hydrogen Penetration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chi-Hsien

    1995-01-01

    Silicon nitride has been proposed to be a hermetic coating on optical fibers against the penetration of hydrogen which can induce optical losses in silica-based fibers in the region 1.08 to 1.24 μm and a broad absorption edge above 1.5 mum. Silicon nitride coatings have been deposited on flat substrates and optical fibers by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and rf reactive magnetron sputtering. Properties of the coatings have been studied using several techniques: profilometry, ellipsometry, XRD, XPS, AES, OM, SEM, TEM, EPR, FTIR, and SIMS. Properties were related to the deposition parameters such as reactant gas ratio, gas flow rate, and substrate position (in MOCVD); sputtering gas composition, pressure, and rf power (in rf sputtering). Diffusion of hydrogen in rf sputtered silicon nitride has been studied for the first time by annealing the deuterium-implanted silicon nitride films at elevated temperatures (700-1000^circC) for various periods of time. The broadening of the SIMS deuterium depth profile has been simulated by a modified plane source diffusion equation to calculate diffusion coefficients. The hydrogen concentrations in the as-deposited stoichiometric Si_3rm N_4 and Si-rich Si_3rm N_3 film has been determined to be 1.28 times 10^{20} and 7.22 times10^{19} atoms/cm ^3, which are less than the conventional LPCVD and PECVD prepared silicon nitride films (10 ^{21}-10^{22 } atoms/cm^3) Activation energies of deuterium diffusion in Si_3 rm N_4 and Si_3rm N_3 are 3.33 and 2.33 eV. Si_3 rm N_4 was found to contain more N -H traps which limit the diffusion of hydrogen. The effectiveness of the silicon nitride coating against hydrogen penetration has been studied by testing the uncoated and coated optical fibers in a hydrogen atmosphere. Electron paramagnetic resonance and a fiber optic hydrogen gas sensor composed of a WO_3 or Pd/WO _3 coated borosilicate fiber were used to monitor the diffusion of hydrogen into the fibers. Both results have

  5. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.; Mangels, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The development of silicon carbide materials of high strength was initiated and components of complex shape and high reliability were formed. The approach was to adapt a beta-SiC powder and binder system to the injection molding process and to develop procedures and process parameters capable of providing a sintered silicon carbide material with improved properties. The initial effort was to characterize the baseline precursor materials, develop mixing and injection molding procedures for fabricating test bars, and characterize the properties of the sintered materials. Parallel studies of various mixing, dewaxing, and sintering procedures were performed in order to distinguish process routes for improving material properties. A total of 276 modulus-of-rupture (MOR) bars of the baseline material was molded, and 122 bars were fully processed to a sinter density of approximately 95 percent. Fluid mixing techniques were developed which significantly reduced flaw size and improved the strength of the material. Initial MOR tests indicated that strength of the fluid-mixed material exceeds the baseline property by more than 33 percent. the baseline property by more than 33 percent.

  6. The role of aluminum surface alloying in improving the corrosion resistance of silicon nitride under the influence of sodium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Yong Suk

    Corrosion of silicon nitride (Sisb3Nsb4) and associated degradation processes can severely limit the performance and reliability of advanced engine and structural systems employing it as a key component. The corrosion resistance of Sisb3Nsb4 is adversely affected by sodium, a reactive species commonly present in many service environments. Despite a number of studies on the sodium-accelerated corrosion, few attempts have been made to reduce the adverse effects of sodium on the corrosion resistance of Sisb3Nsb4. This work aimed to investigate the detailed role of aluminum surface alloying in minimizing the detrimental effect of sodium on the corrosion behavior of Sisb3Nsb4. Ion implantation was used as an alloying tool and pure hot-isostatically-pressed Sisb3Nsb4 as a base material. Surface regions (˜200nm) of highly polished Sisb3Nsb4 platelets were implanted with aluminum at multi-energies and multi-doses to achieve a uniform concentration distribution of 1, 5, and 10 at.%. Unimplanted and implanted Sisb3Nsb4 samples were exposed in atmospheric pressure oxygen enriched with 100 and 220 ppm sodium nitrate vapor at 900sp°-1100sp°C for 0.5 to 8 hours. Kinetics of corrosion were evaluated using profilometry in conjunction with etch patterning. The morphological, structural, and chemical characteristics of the corrosion layers were studied using various analytical techniques which include x-ray diffraction, secondary electron microscopy, atomic absorption analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. This investigation has shown that, under the influence of sodium, corrosion of unimplanted Sisb3Nsb4 follows a rapid and linear kinetic law. The corrosion layers are non-protective and rough. They also exhibit a high degree of morphological and phase instability, which can be attributed to increased thermodynamic and kinetic tendency towards the formation of low eutectic products, phase separation, and devitrification in the corrosion layer. Aluminum

  7. Modeling of the refractive index and composition of luminescent nanometric chlorinated-silicon nitride films with embedded Si-quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Gómez, A.; Escobar-Alarcón, L.; Serna, R.; Cabello, F.; Haro-Poniatowski, E.; García-Valenzuela, A.; Alonso, J. C.

    2016-10-01

    The refractive index of nanometric (<100 nm) chlorinated-silicon nitride films with embedded silicon quantum dots, prepared by remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition was investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The complex refractive indexes and thicknesses of the films were obtained from the ellipsometric measurements using the Cauchy model. The chemical composition of the bulk of the films, including the hydrogen, chlorine, and oxygen content, was measured by elastic forward analysis (EFA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The EFA and XPS results indicate that the films are composed of nearly stoichiometric silicon nitride (Si3N4) with different amounts of hydrogen, chlorine, and oxygen, and that their top surface is oxidized. Based on the composition results the refractive index of the films was fitted using the effective medium approximation considering the system: Si substrate + Si3N4 + Si + voids + top ultrathin oxidized surface layer.

  8. Approaching Defect-free Amorphous Silicon Nitride by Plasma-assisted Atomic Beam Deposition for High Performance Gate Dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shu-Ju; Wang, Chiang-Lun; Lee, Hung-Chun; Lin, Chun-Yeh; Chen, Jhih-Wei; Shiu, Hong-Wei; Chang, Lo-Yueh; Hsueh, Han-Ting; Chen, Hung-Ying; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tu, Li-Wei; Teng, Hsisheng; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chia-Hao; Wu, Chung-Lin

    2016-06-01

    In the past few decades, gate insulators with a high dielectric constant (high-k dielectric) enabling a physically thick but dielectrically thin insulating layer, have been used to replace traditional SiOx insulator and to ensure continuous downscaling of Si-based transistor technology. However, due to the non-silicon derivative natures of the high-k metal oxides, transport properties in these dielectrics are still limited by various structural defects on the hetero-interfaces and inside the dielectrics. Here, we show that another insulating silicon compound, amorphous silicon nitride (a-Si3N4), is a promising candidate of effective electrical insulator for use as a high-k dielectric. We have examined a-Si3N4 deposited using the plasma-assisted atomic beam deposition (PA-ABD) technique in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment and demonstrated the absence of defect-related luminescence; it was also found that the electronic structure across the a-Si3N4/Si heterojunction approaches the intrinsic limit, which exhibits large band gap energy and valence band offset. We demonstrate that charge transport properties in the metal/a-Si3N4/Si (MNS) structures approach defect-free limits with a large breakdown field and a low leakage current. Using PA-ABD, our results suggest a general strategy to markedly improve the performance of gate dielectric using a nearly defect-free insulator.

  9. Approaching Defect-free Amorphous Silicon Nitride by Plasma-assisted Atomic Beam Deposition for High Performance Gate Dielectric

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shu-Ju; Wang, Chiang-Lun; Lee, Hung-Chun; Lin, Chun-Yeh; Chen, Jhih-Wei; Shiu, Hong-Wei; Chang, Lo-Yueh; Hsueh, Han-Ting; Chen, Hung-Ying; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tu, Li-Wei; Teng, Hsisheng; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chia-Hao; Wu, Chung-Lin

    2016-01-01

    In the past few decades, gate insulators with a high dielectric constant (high-k dielectric) enabling a physically thick but dielectrically thin insulating layer, have been used to replace traditional SiOx insulator and to ensure continuous downscaling of Si-based transistor technology. However, due to the non-silicon derivative natures of the high-k metal oxides, transport properties in these dielectrics are still limited by various structural defects on the hetero-interfaces and inside the dielectrics. Here, we show that another insulating silicon compound, amorphous silicon nitride (a-Si3N4), is a promising candidate of effective electrical insulator for use as a high-k dielectric. We have examined a-Si3N4 deposited using the plasma-assisted atomic beam deposition (PA-ABD) technique in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment and demonstrated the absence of defect-related luminescence; it was also found that the electronic structure across the a-Si3N4/Si heterojunction approaches the intrinsic limit, which exhibits large band gap energy and valence band offset. We demonstrate that charge transport properties in the metal/a-Si3N4/Si (MNS) structures approach defect-free limits with a large breakdown field and a low leakage current. Using PA-ABD, our results suggest a general strategy to markedly improve the performance of gate dielectric using a nearly defect-free insulator. PMID:27325155

  10. Approaching Defect-free Amorphous Silicon Nitride by Plasma-assisted Atomic Beam Deposition for High Performance Gate Dielectric.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shu-Ju; Wang, Chiang-Lun; Lee, Hung-Chun; Lin, Chun-Yeh; Chen, Jhih-Wei; Shiu, Hong-Wei; Chang, Lo-Yueh; Hsueh, Han-Ting; Chen, Hung-Ying; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tu, Li-Wei; Teng, Hsisheng; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chia-Hao; Wu, Chung-Lin

    2016-01-01

    In the past few decades, gate insulators with a high dielectric constant (high-k dielectric) enabling a physically thick but dielectrically thin insulating layer, have been used to replace traditional SiOx insulator and to ensure continuous downscaling of Si-based transistor technology. However, due to the non-silicon derivative natures of the high-k metal oxides, transport properties in these dielectrics are still limited by various structural defects on the hetero-interfaces and inside the dielectrics. Here, we show that another insulating silicon compound, amorphous silicon nitride (a-Si3N4), is a promising candidate of effective electrical insulator for use as a high-k dielectric. We have examined a-Si3N4 deposited using the plasma-assisted atomic beam deposition (PA-ABD) technique in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment and demonstrated the absence of defect-related luminescence; it was also found that the electronic structure across the a-Si3N4/Si heterojunction approaches the intrinsic limit, which exhibits large band gap energy and valence band offset. We demonstrate that charge transport properties in the metal/a-Si3N4/Si (MNS) structures approach defect-free limits with a large breakdown field and a low leakage current. Using PA-ABD, our results suggest a general strategy to markedly improve the performance of gate dielectric using a nearly defect-free insulator. PMID:27325155

  11. Low-loss, silicon integrated, aluminum nitride photonic circuits and their use for electro-optic signal processing.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Chi; Pernice, Wolfram H P; Tang, Hong X

    2012-07-11

    Photonic miniaturization requires seamless integration of linear and nonlinear optical components to achieve passive and active functions simultaneously. Among the available material systems, silicon photonics holds immense promise for optical signal processing and on-chip optical networks. However, silicon is limited to wavelengths above 1.1 μm and does not provide the desired lowest order optical nonlinearity for active signal processing. Here we report the integration of aluminum nitride (AlN) films on silicon substrates to bring active functionalities to chip-scale photonics. Using CMOS-compatible sputtered thin films we fabricate AlN-on-insulator waveguides that exhibit low propagation loss (0.6 dB/cm). Exploiting AlN's inherent Pockels effect we demonstrate electro-optic modulation up to 4.5 Gb/s with very low energy consumption (down to 10 fJ/bit). The ultrawide transparency window of AlN devices also enables high speed modulation at visible wavelengths. Our low cost, wideband, carrier-free photonic circuits hold promise for ultralow power and high-speed signal processing at the microprocessor chip level.

  12. Role of interfacial carbon layer in the thermal diffusivity/conductivity of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Hemanshu; Donaldson, Kimberly Y.; Hasselman, D. P. H.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on samples of reaction-bonded silicon nitride uniaxially reinforced by SiC monofilaments with and without a 3-micron-thick carbon-rich coating. It is found that a combination of a carbon coatings on the fibers and an interfacial gap due to the thermal expansion mismatch in the composite can significantly (by a factor of 2) lower the effective thermal diffusivity in the direction transverse to the fiber. At atmospheric pressure, gaseous conduction across the interfacial gap makes a significant contribution to the heat transfer across the interface, indicated by significantly lower values of the effective thermal diffusivity under vacuum than in nitrogen or helium at atmospheric pressure.

  13. Characterization of a high-quality and UV-transparent PECVD silicon nitride film for nonvolatile memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chin K.; Ying, T. L.; Wei, C. S.; Liu, L. M.; Cheng, Huang-Chung; Lin, M. S.

    1994-09-01

    A high quality and UV-transparent plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride film is well developed to form a passivation layer for non-volatile memory devices. The dependence of the film properties on process parameters has been studied by factorial designed experiments. The deposition rate, uniformity, stress, refractive index, wet etching rate, density, step coverage, and UV-transmittance are the items used to evaluate the film properties. Rutherfold backside scattering (RBS) and hydrogen forward scattering (HFS) are used to measure the film composition and total hydrogen composition, respectively. Compared to the traditional PECVD nitride (PE-SiN) film known to have tensile stress and opacity to ultra-violet light (UV light), the developed PE-SiN film with very low compressive stress (< 1E9 dynes/cm*2) and excellent UV-transmittance (> 70% for 1.6 micrometers - thick film) can be achieved. The developed film has higher density, lower hydrogen content, and high N/Si inside film. Based on RBS/HFS, UV-transmittance and Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FTIR) results, the material and optical properties of the developed PE-SiN film are well investigated. This developed PE-SiN film is successfully applied to EPROM devices, and very good electrical and reliability performances have been demonstrated.

  14. Electrical Properties of Silicon Nitride Films Prepared by Photo-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition under Controlled Decomposition of Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Masahiro; Ohtsuki, Tetsuya; Takubo, Kenji; Komoda, Michio; Matsunami, Hiroyuki

    1993-12-01

    Silicon nitride (SiNx) films have been deposited at lower substrate temperatures (≤500°C) by direct (without Hg-sensitization) photo-chemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD) with a low-pressure Hg lamp using SiH4 and NH3. The resistivity was as high as 5× 1016 Ωcm. The minimum value of interface-trap density in Al/SiNx/Si metal-nitride-semiconductor (MNS) diodes was estimated to be 9× 1010 cm-2 eV-1 by a quasi-static capacitance-voltage measurement. In contrast to conventional plasma CVD of SiNx, the formation of intermediate species is controlled by the decomposition of NH3 which is decomposed to a lesser extent in a plasma process, based on analyses of film structures and transient mass spectroscopy. This effect causes the properties of SiNx to not change in a wide range of NH3/SiH4 gas composition.

  15. Improved interfacial and electrical properties of vanadyl-phthalocyanine metal-insulator-semiconductor devices with silicon nitride as gate insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lijuan Song, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Long; Li, Yiping; Yan, Donghang

    2013-12-09

    We have investigated the interfacial and electrical properties of vanadyl-phthalocyanine (VOPc) metal-insulator-semiconductor devices by the measurement of capacitance and conductance. The devices have been fabricated on ordered para-sexiphenyl (p-6P) layer with silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) as gate insulator. The VOPc/p-6P/SiN{sub x} devices have shown a negligible hysteresis, low series resistance, and high operated frequency. Bulk traps have been distinguished from interface traps by two loss peaks in conductance measurement. Trap densities and distribution of trap energy level have been obtained. The improved properties indicate that VOPc/ p-6P devices with SiN{sub x} insulator hold a great promise of application in flexible displays.

  16. Influences of process parameters of low frequency PECVD technology on intrinsic stress of silicon nitride thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weizhi; Kang, Zhe; Ye, Yun; Jiang, Yadong

    2010-10-01

    Silicon nitride (SiNx) thin films were deposited by low frequency (LF) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technology. By systematic variation of the process parameters, e.g. reactive gas flow rate, LF power, chamber gas pressure and substrate temperature. Influences of above parameters on the intrinsic stress of SiNx films were studied and analyzed by combining with the measured refractive index (RI), density, infrared spectra results of deposited SiNx films. The results showed that intrinsic stress of SiNx film was roughly proportional to film density, which was inversely proportional to hydrogen content in the SiNx film. Substrate temperature during deposition was the most important factor affecting hydrogen content in deposited film and, accordingly, the density and intrinsic stress of SiNx film.

  17. Optical trapping of microparticles using silicon nitride waveguide junctions and tapered-waveguide junctions on an optofluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hong; Poon, Andrew W

    2012-10-01

    We study optical trapping of microparticles on an optofluidic chip using silicon nitride waveguide junctions and tapered-waveguide junctions. We demonstrate the trapping of single 1 μm-sized polystyrene particles using the evanescent field of waveguide junctions connecting a submicrometer-sized input-waveguide and a micrometer-sized output-waveguide. Particle trapping is localized in the vicinity of the junction. We also demonstrate trapping of one and two 1μm-sized polystyrene particles using tapered-waveguide junctions connecting a submicrometer-sized singlemode input-waveguide and a micrometer-sized multimode output-waveguide. Particle trapping occurs near the taper output end, the taper center and the taper input end, depending on the taper aspect ratio.

  18. Valence-band electronic structure of silicon nitride studied with the use of soft-x-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, R. D.; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1986-02-01

    We have studied the valence-band electronic structure of α-phase, β-phase, and amorphous silicon nitride samples, using Si L-x-ray emission. Our results are compared with a recent band-structure calculation and show that Si 3d states are necessary to properly describe the upper-valence-band and lower-conduction-band density of states. A prominent feature is seen above the valence band which is attributed to conduction-band states that are populated by the incident electron beam. By reducing the energy of the electron beam it is possible to enhance the surface emission relative to bulk emission, and such spectra are also presented and discussed.

  19. Influence of Cooling Hole Geometry and Material Conductivity on the Thermal Response of Cooled Silicon Nitride Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Girgis, Morris

    2002-01-01

    To complement the effectiveness of ceramic materials and the applicability to turbine engine applications, a parametric study using the finite element method was carried out. This study conducted thorough analyses of a thermal-barrier-coated silicon nitride (Si3N4) plate specimen with cooling channels, where its thermal conductivity was verified in an attempt to minimize the thermal stresses and reach an optimal rate of stress. The thermal stress profile was generated for specimens with circular and square cooling channels. Lower stresses were reported for a higher magnitude of thermal conductivity and in particular for the circular cooling channel arrangement. Contour plots for the stresses and the temperature are presented and discussed.

  20. Impact of ALD grown passivation layers on silicon nitride based integrated optic devices for very-near-infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Amit; Subramanian, Ananth Z; Häyrinen, Markus; Selvaraja, Shankar; Verheyen, Peter; Van Thourhout, Dries; Honkanen, Seppo; Lipsanen, Harri; Baets, Roel

    2014-03-10

    A CMOS compatible post-processing method to reduce optical losses in silicon nitride (Si(3)N(4)) integrated optical waveguides is demonstrated. Using thin layer atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide (Al(2)O(3)) we demonstrate that surface roughness can be reduced. A 40 nm thick Al(2)O(3) layer is deposited by ALD over Si(3)N(4) based strip waveguides and its influence on the surface roughness and the waveguide loss is studied. As a result, an improvement in the waveguide loss, from very high loss (60 dB/cm) to low-loss regime (~5 dB/cm) is reported for a 220 nm x 500 nm Si(3)N(4) wire at 900 nm wavelength. This opens prospects to implement very low loss waveguides.

  1. Mechanical behavior and environmental durability of in-situ reinforced silicon nitride in a simulated rocket engine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshbin, Simin Rachel

    The mechanical properties and environmental durability for a gelcast in-situ reinforced silicon nitride in a simulated rocket engine environment was investigated. The results summarized in this dissertation include tensile, flexural strength, compressive strength, interrupted stress rupture, thermal cycle, fracture toughness, low cycle fatigue, elastic modulus, and Poisson's ratio determinations. In addition, the results for a series of investigations determining the effect of simulated engine environment on AS800 are included. Specimens were exposed to hydrogen, water, and oxygen at approximate temperature and pressures of engine operation. After exposure the retained flexural strength of the specimen was measured and compared to the strength of as-received material. Environmental effects for as-sintered specimens and machined specimen surfaces were measured. The investigation temperatures included cryogenic (-320°F), ambient and elevated (2000°F). The environmental exposure data showed that there are minimal effects on the retained properties of AS800 from exposure to oxygen and water combinations.

  2. Modulating the fixed charge density in silicon nitride films while monitoring the surface recombination velocity by photoluminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilchuk, Molly; Haug, Halvard; Marstein, Erik Stensrud

    2015-04-01

    Several important semiconductor devices such as solar cells and photodetectors may be fabricated based on surface inversion layer junctions induced by fixed charge in a dielectric layer. Inversion layer junctions can easily be fabricated by depositing layers with a high density of fixed charge on a semiconducting substrate. Increasing the fixed charge improves such devices; for instance, the efficiency of a solar cell can be substantially increased by reducing the surface recombination velocity, which is a function of the fixed charge density. Methods for increasing the charge density are therefore of interest. In this work, the fixed charge density in silicon nitride layers deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is increased to very high values above 1 × 1013 cm-2 after the application of an external voltage to a gate electrode. The effect of the fixed charge density on the surface recombination velocity was experimentally observed using the combination of capacitance-voltage characterization and photoluminescence imaging, showing a significant reduction in the surface recombination velocity for increasing charge density. The surface recombination velocity vs. charge density data was analyzed using a numerical device model, which indicated the presence of a sub-surface damage region formed during deposition of the layers. Finally, we have demonstrated that the aluminum electrodes used for charge injection may be chemically removed in phosphoric acid without loss of the underlying charge. The injected charge was shown to be stable for a prolonged time period, leading us to propose charge injection in silicon nitride films by application of soaking voltage as a viable method for fabricating inversion layer devices.

  3. Hard carbon nitride and method for preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Haller, E.E.; Cohen, M.L.; Hansen, W.L.

    1992-05-05

    Novel crystalline [alpha](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride and [beta](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride are formed by sputtering carbon in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere onto a single crystal germanium or silicon, respectively, substrate. 1 figure.

  4. Exploring High Refractive Index Silicon-Rich Nitride Films by Low-Temperature Inductively Coupled Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition and Applications for Integrated Waveguides.

    PubMed

    Ng, Doris K T; Wang, Qian; Wang, Ting; Ng, Siu-Kit; Toh, Yeow-Teck; Lim, Kim-Peng; Yang, Yi; Tan, Dawn T H

    2015-10-01

    Silicon-rich nitride films are developed and explored using an inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition system at low temperature of 250 °C with an ammonia-free gas chemistry. The refractive index of the developed silicon-rich nitride films can increase from 2.2 to 3.08 at 1550 nm wavelength while retaining a near-zero extinction coefficient when the amount of silane increases. Energy dispersive spectrum analysis gives the silicon to nitrogen ratio in the films. Atomic force microscopy shows a very smooth surface, with a surface roughness root-mean-square of 0.27 nm over a 3 μm × 3 μm area of the 300 nm thick film with a refractive index of 3.08. As an application example, the 300 nm thick silicon-rich nitride film is then patterned by electron beam lithography and etched using inductively coupled plasma system to form thin-film micro/nano waveguides, and the waveguide loss is characterized.

  5. High temperature and low pressure chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride on AlGaN: Band offsets and passivation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Pramod; Washiyama, Shun; Kaess, Felix; Hayden Breckenridge, M.; Hernandez-Balderrama, Luis H.; Haidet, Brian B.; Alden, Dorian; Franke, Alexander; Sarkar, Biplab; Kohn, Erhard; Collazo, Ramon; Sitar, Zlatko

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we employed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the band offsets and interface Fermi level at the heterojunction formed by stoichiometric silicon nitride deposited on AlxGa1-xN (of varying Al composition "x") via low pressure chemical vapor deposition. Silicon nitride is found to form a type II staggered band alignment with AlGaN for all Al compositions (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) and present an electron barrier into AlGaN even at higher Al compositions, where Eg(AlGaN) > Eg(Si3N4). Further, no band bending is observed in AlGaN for x ≤ 0.6 and a reduced band bending (by ˜1 eV in comparison to that at free surface) is observed for x > 0.6. The Fermi level in silicon nitride is found to be at 3 eV with respect to its valence band, which is likely due to silicon (≡Si0/-1) dangling bonds. The presence of band bending for x > 0.6 is seen as a likely consequence of Fermi level alignment at Si3N4/AlGaN hetero-interface and not due to interface states. Photoelectron spectroscopy results are corroborated by current-voltage-temperature and capacitance-voltage measurements. A shift in the interface Fermi level (before band bending at equilibrium) from the conduction band in Si3N4/n-GaN to the valence band in Si3N4/p-GaN is observed, which strongly indicates a reduction in mid-gap interface states. Hence, stoichiometric silicon nitride is found to be a feasible passivation and dielectric insulation material for AlGaN at any composition.

  6. Development of an Advanced Computational Model for OMCVD of Indium Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Carlos A.; Moore, Craig E.; Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Zhou, Ning; Lowry, Sam; Krishnan, Anantha; Frazier, Donald O.; Bachmann, Klaus J.

    1999-01-01

    An advanced computational model is being developed to predict the formation of indium nitride (InN) film from the reaction of trimethylindium (In(CH3)3) with ammonia (NH3). The components are introduced into the reactor in the gas phase within a background of molecular nitrogen (N2). Organometallic chemical vapor deposition occurs on a heated sapphire surface. The model simulates heat and mass transport with gas and surface chemistry under steady state and pulsed conditions. The development and validation of an accurate model for the interactions between the diffusion of gas phase species and surface kinetics is essential to enable the regulation of the process in order to produce a low defect material. The validation of the model will be performed in concert with a NASA-North Carolina State University project.

  7. Role of the interfacial thermal barrier in the effective thermal diffusivity/conductivity of SiC-fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Hemanshu; Donaldson, Kimberly Y.; Hasselman, D. P. H.; Bhatt, R. T.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental thermal diffusivity data transverse to the fiber direction for composites composed of a reaction bonded silicon nitride matrix reinforced with uniaxially aligned carbon-coated silicon carbide fibers indicate the existence of a significant thermal barrier at the matrix-fiber interface. Calculations of the interfacial thermal conductances indicate that at 300 C and 1-atm N2, more than 90 percent of the heat conduction across the interface occurs by gaseous conduction. Good agreement is obtained between thermal conductance values for the oxidized composite at 1 atm calculated from the thermal conductivity of the N2 gas and those inferred from the data for the effective composite thermal conductivity.

  8. Matrix density effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber-reinforced silicon nitride matrix properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Kiser, Lames D.

    1990-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties were measured for SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride composites (SiC/RBSN) of different densities. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers (Textron SCS-6) in a reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix. The composite density was varied by changing the consolidation pressure during RBSN processing and by hot isostatically pressing the SiC/RBSN composites. Results indicate that as the consolidation pressure was increased from 27 to 138 MPa, the average pore size of the nitrided composites decreased from 0.04 to 0.02 microns and the composite density increased from 2.07 to 2.45 gm/cc. Nonetheless, these improvements resulted in only small increases in the first matrix cracking stress, primary elastic modulus, and ultimate tensile strength values of the composites. In contrast, HIP consolidation of SiC/RBSN resulted in a fully dense material whose first matrix cracking stress and elastic modulus were approx. 15 and 50 percent higher, respectively, and ultimate tensile strength values were approx. 40 percent lower than those for unHIPed SiC/RBSN composites. The modulus behavior for all specimens can be explained by simple rule-of-mixture theory. Also, the loss in ultimate strength for the HIPed composites appears to be related to a degradation in fiber strength at the HIP temperature. However, the density effect on matrix fracture strength was much less than would be expected based on typical monolithic Si3N4 behavior, suggesting that composite theory is indeed operating. Possible practical implications of these observations are discussed.

  9. Comparison between transient and frequency modulated excitation: application to silicon nitride and aluminum oxide coatings of silicon.

    PubMed

    Klein, D; Ohm, W; Fengler, S; Kunst, M

    2014-06-01

    Contactless measurements of the lifetime of charge carriers are presented with varying ways of photo excitation: with and without bias light and pulsed and frequency modulated. These methods are applied to the study of the surface passivation of single crystalline silicon by a-SiN(x):H and Al2O3 coatings. The properties of these coatings are investigated under consideration of the merits of the different methods.

  10. Damage Mechanisms and Controlled Crack Propagation in a Hot Pressed Silicon Nitride Ceramic. Ph.D. Thesis - Northwestern Univ., 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony Martin

    1994-01-01

    The subcritical growth of cracks from pre-existing flaws in ceramics can severely affect the structural reliability of a material. The ability to directly observe subcritical crack growth and rigorously analyze its influence on fracture behavior is important for an accurate assessment of material performance. A Mode I fracture specimen and loading method has been developed which permits the observation of stable, subcritical crack extension in monolithic and toughened ceramics. The test specimen and procedure has demonstrated its ability to generate and stably propagate sharp, through-thickness cracks in brittle high modulus materials. Crack growth for an aluminum oxide ceramic was observed to be continuously stable throughout testing. Conversely, the fracture behavior of a silicon nitride ceramic exhibited crack growth as a series of subcritical extensions which are interrupted by dynamic propagation. Dynamic initiation and arrest fracture resistance measurements for the silicon nitride averaged 67 and 48 J/sq m, respectively. The dynamic initiation event was observed to be sudden and explosive. Increments of subcritical crack growth contributed to a 40 percent increase in fracture resistance before dynamic initiation. Subcritical crack growth visibly marked the fracture surface with an increase in surface roughness. Increments of subcritical crack growth loosen ceramic material near the fracture surface and the fracture debris is easily removed by a replication technique. Fracture debris is viewed as evidence that both crack bridging and subsurface microcracking may be some of the mechanisms contributing to the increase in fracture resistance. A Statistical Fracture Mechanics model specifically developed to address subcritical crack growth and fracture reliability is used together with a damaged zone of material at the crack tip to model experimental results. A Monte Carlo simulation of the actual experiments was used to establish a set of modeling input

  11. Durable ultrathin silicon nitride/carbon bilayer overcoats for magnetic heads: The role of enhanced interfacial bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Reuben J.; Dwivedi, Neeraj; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Zheng; Tripathy, S.; Lim, Christina Y. H.

    2015-01-28

    Pole tip recession (PTR) is one of the major issues faced in magnetic tape storage technology, which causes an increase in the magnetic spacing and hence signal loss during data readback. Despite efforts to reduce the magnetic spacing, PTR, and surface wear on the heads by using protective overcoats, most of them either employ complex fabrication processes and approaches do not provide adequate protection to the head or are too thick (∼10–20 nm), especially for future high density tape storage. In this work, we discuss an approach to reduce the PTR and surface wear at the head by developing an ultrathin ∼7 nm bilayer overcoat of silicon/silicon nitride (Si/SiN{sub x}) and carbon (C), which is totally fabricated by a cost-effective and industrial-friendly magnetron sputtering process. When compared with a monolithic C overcoat of similar thickness, the electrically insulating Si/SiN{sub x}/C bilayer overcoat was found to provide better wear protection for commercial tape heads, as demonstrated by Auger electron spectroscopic analyses after wear tests with commercial tape media. Although the microstructures of carbon in the monolithic and bilayer overcoats were similar, the improved wear durability of the bilayer overcoat was attributed to the creation of extensive interfacial bonding of Si and N with the C overcoat and the alumina-titanium carbide composite head substrate, as predicted by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and confirmed by in-depth X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. This study highlights the pivotal role of enhanced interfaces and interfacial bonding in developing ultrathin yet wear-durable overcoats for tape heads.

  12. DNA Physical Mapping via the Controlled Translocation of Single Molecules through a 5-10nm Silicon Nitride Nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Derek; Reisner, Walter; Jiang, Zhijun; Hagerty, Nick; Wood, Charles; Chan, Jason

    2009-03-01

    The ability to map the binding position of sequence-specific markers, including transcription-factors, protein-nucleic acids (PNAs) or deactivated restriction enzymes, along a single DNA molecule in a nanofluidic device would be of key importance for the life-sciences. Such markers could give an indication of the active genes at particular stage in a cell's transcriptional cycle, pinpoint the location of mutations or even provide a DNA barcode that could aid in genomics applications. We have developed a setup consisting of a 5-10 nm nanopore in a 20nm thick silicon nitride film coupled to an optical tweezer setup. The translocation of DNA across the nanopore can be detected via blockades in the electrical current through the pore. By anchoring one end of the translocating DNA to an optically trapped microsphere, we hope to stretch out the molecule in the nanopore and control the translocation speed, enabling us to slowly scan across the genome and detect changes in the baseline current due to the presence of bound markers.

  13. Dry etching of Al-rich AlGaAs with silicon nitride masks for photonic crystal fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuyu; Togano, Yuji; Hashimura, Kentaro; Morifuji, Masato; Kondow, Masahiko

    2015-04-01

    We investigate inductively coupled plasma (ICP) deep dry etching of Al0.8Ga0.2As for photonic crystal (PC) fabrication using a Cl2/BCl3/CH4 gas mixture. On the basis of our previous report [Y. Kitabayashi et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 52, 04CG07 (2013)], we obtained a PC structure having air holes deeper than 1.5 µm and a diameter of 120 nm by adjusting the gas flow rate and increasing the process pressure. In this study, silicon nitride (SiNx) and SiO2 were both used as the mask layer. Furthermore, samples with SiNx and SiO2 masks for ICP deep dry etching were also fabricated and compared. The vertical profile of the PC structure with the SiNx mask layer displayed a rounded shape that was caused by the charge up in the mask layer. Then, a thinner mask layer was used to ease the effects of mask retardation and charge up. As a result, a PC structure with a SiNx mask layer having air holes deeper than 1.7 µm and a diameter of 190 nm was successfully fabricated.

  14. Chemical modification of silicon nitride microsieves for capture of MCF-7 circulating tumor cells of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dien To, Thien; Thoai Le, Huyen; Thi Dinh, Mai Ngoc; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Doan, Tin Chanh Duc; Mau Dang, Chien

    2015-01-01

    Chemical modification of silicon nitride (SiN) microsieves with glutaraldehyde and 3-glycidoxypropyldimethylethoxysilane (GOPS) for bio-coupling with an antibody to capture MCF-7 circulating tumor cells of breast cancer is reported. In this research, the antibody monoclonal anti-cytokerantin-FITC with fluorescein isothiocyanate label was used due to its good selectivity to MCF-7 circulating tumor cells of breast cancer. Modification efficiency was determined by the variation of contact angle. The increase in contact angle of the microsieves treated with glutaraldehyde and GOPS indicated that the microsieve surface changed from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. These results confirmed the successful immobilization of glutaraldehyde and GOPS onto SiN microsieves. Antibody binding effect was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescent images exhibited that GOPS was more effective than the glutaraldehyde treatment. The GOPS-treated microsieves were then used for capture of MCF-7 cells in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The fluorescent images proved that the surface modification of SiN microsieves with GOPS helped to increase the efficiency of MCF-7 capture.

  15. Oxidation effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1989-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded silicon nitride composites were measured after 100 hrs exposure at temperatures to 1400 C in nitrogen and oxygen environments. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers in a reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix. The results indicate that composites heat treated in a nitrogen environment at temperatures to 1400 C showed deformation and fracture behavior equivalent to that of the as-fabricated composites. Also, the composites heat treated in an oxidizing environment beyond 400 C yielded significantly lower tensile strength values. Specifically in the temperature range from 600 to 1000 C, composites retained approx. 40 percent of their as-fabricated strength, and those heat treated in the temperatures from 1200 to 1400 C retained 70 percent. Nonetheless, for all oxygen heat treatment conditions, composite specimens displayed strain capability beyond the matrix fracture stress; a typical behavior of a tough composite.

  16. Optical bistability in a silicon nitride microring resonator with azo dye-doped liquid crystal as cladding material.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Ta; Tseng, Chih-Wei; Yu, Jui-Hao; Li, Yuan-Cheng; Lee, Chun-Hong; Jau, Hung-Chang; Lee, Ming-Chang; Chen, Yung-Jui; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2013-05-01

    This investigation reports observations of optical bistability in a silicon nitride (SiN) micro-ring resonator with azo dye-doped liquid crystal cladding. The refractive index of the cladding can be changed by switching the liquid crystal between nematic (NLC) and photo-induced isotropic (PHI) states by. Both the NLC and the PHI states can be maintained for many hours, and can be rapidly switched from one state to the other by photo-induced isomerization using 532 nm and 408 nm addressing light, respectively. The proposed device exhibits optical bistable switching of the resonance wavelength without sustained use of a power source. It has a 1.9 nm maximum spectral shift with a Q-factor of over 10000. The hybrid SiN- LC micro-ring resonator possesses easy switching, long memory, and low power consumption. It therefore has the potential to be used in signal processing elements and switching elements in optically integrated circuits. PMID:23669955

  17. Tensile creep and creep rupture behavior of monolithic and SiC-whisker-reinforced silicon nitride ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ohji, Tatsuki; Yamauchi, Yukihiko )

    1993-12-01

    The tensile creep and creep rupture behavior of silicon nitride was investigated at 1,200 to 1,350 C using hot-pressed materials with and without SiC whiskers. Stable steady-state creep was observed under low applied stresses at 1,200 C. Accelerated creep regimes, which were absent below 1,300 C, were identified above that temperature. The appearance of accelerated creep at the higher temperatures attributable to formation of microcracks throughout a specimen. The whisker-reinforced material exhibited better creep resistance than the monolith at 1,200 C. Considerably high values 3 to 5, were obtained for the creep exponent in the overall temperature range. The exponent tended to decrease with decreasing applied stress at 1,200 C. The primary creep mechanism was considered cavitation-enhanced creep. Specimen lifetimes followed the Monkman-Grant relationship except for fractures with large accelerated creep regimes. The creep rupture behavior is discussed in association with cavity formation and crack adolescence.

  18. Correlation of film density and wet etch rate in hydrofluoric acid of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provine, J.; Schindler, Peter; Kim, Yongmin; Walch, Steve P.; Kim, Hyo Jin; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2016-06-01

    The continued scaling in transistors and memory elements has necessitated the development of atomic layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride (SiNx), particularly for use a low k dielectric spacer. One of the key material properties needed for SiNx films is a low wet etch rate (WER) in hydrofluoric (HF) acid. In this work, we report on the evaluation of multiple precursors for plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of SiNx and evaluate the film's WER in 100:1 dilutions of HF in H2O. The remote plasma capability available in PEALD, enabled controlling the density of the SiNx film. Namely, prolonged plasma exposure made films denser which corresponded to lower WER in a systematic fashion. We determined that there is a strong correlation between WER and the density of the film that extends across multiple precursors, PEALD reactors, and a variety of process conditions. Limiting all steps in the deposition to a maximum temperature of 350 °C, it was shown to be possible to achieve a WER in PEALD SiNx of 6.1 Å/min, which is similar to WER of SiNx from LPCVD reactions at 850 °C.

  19. Intermediate-temperature environmental effects on boron nitride-coated silicon carbide-fiber-reinforced glass-ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, E.Y.; Lin, H.T.; Brennan, J.J.

    1997-03-01

    The environmental effects on the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composites at intermediate temperatures were investigated by conducting flexural static-fatigue experiments in air at 600 and 950 C. The material that was studied was a silicon carbide/boron nitride (SiC/BN) dual-coated Nicalon-fiber-reinforced barium magnesium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic. Comparable time-dependent failure responses were found at 600 and 950 C when the maximum tensile stress applied in the bend bar was >60% of the room-temperature ultimate flexural strength of as-received materials. At both temperatures, the materials survived 500 h fatigue tests at lower stress levels. Among the samples that survived the 500 h fatigue tests, a 20% degradation in the room temperature flexural strength was measured in samples that were fatigued at 600 C. The growth rate of the Si-C-O fiber oxidation product at 600 C was not sufficient to seal the stress-induced cracks, so that the interior of the material was oxidized and resulted in a strength degradation and less fibrous fracture. In contrast, the interior of the material remained intact at 950 C because of crack sealing by rapid silicate formation, and strength/toughness of the composite was maintained. Also, at 600 C, BN oxidized via volatilization, because no borosilicate was formed.

  20. Controlled translocation of DNA through nanopores in carbon nano-, silicon-nitride- and lipid-coated membranes.

    PubMed

    Sischka, Andy; Galla, Lukas; Meyer, Andreas J; Spiering, Andre; Knust, Sebastian; Mayer, Michael; Hall, Adam R; Beyer, André; Reimann, Peter; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Anselmetti, Dario

    2015-07-21

    We investigated experimentally and theoretically the translocation forces when a charged polymer is threaded through a solid-state nanopore and found distinct dependencies on the nanopore diameter as well as on the nano membrane material chemistry. For this purpose we utilized dedicated optical tweezers force mechanics capable of probing the insertion of negatively charged double-stranded DNA inside a helium-ion drilled nanopore. We found that both the diameter of the nanopore and the membrane material itself have significant influences on the electroosmotic flow through the nanopore and thus on the threading force. Compared to a bare silicon-nitride membrane, the threading of DNA through only 3 nm thin carbon nano membranes as well as lipid bilayer-coated nanopores increased the threading force by 15% or 85%, respectively. This finding was quantitatively described by our recently developed theoretical model that also incorporates hydrodynamic slip effects on the translocating DNA molecule and the force dependence on the membrane thickness. The additional measurements presented in this paper further support our model.

  1. Effects of Fe2O3 addition on the nitridation of silicon powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasegawa, Y.; Inomata, Y.; Kijima, K.; Matsuyama, T.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction of silicon powder and nitrogen was studied in the range of 1300-1400 C. When an addition of Fe2O3 was more than 0.8wt%, the reaction was linear and compared to samples with no Fe2O3, the reaction velocity increased 5 to 10 times. The reactions were mediated by the process of peeling and cracking in a thin layer of Si2N4 formed on the silicon particles or on the surface of the Fe-Si melts. As the addition of Fe2O3 increased, the reaction activation energy for highly pure samples decreased. Fe2O3 which exceeded the Si3N4 solubility limits was finally converted to d-Fe.

  2. High-density, uniform gallium nitride nanorods grown on Au-coated silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chuanbao; Xiang, Xu; Zhu, Hesun

    2005-01-01

    High-density GaN nanorods with uniform diameters and lengths were successfully grown on Au-coated silicon substrate. The diameters were in the range of 50-80 nm, and the lengths ranged from 1 to 2 μm. A significant feature is that each nanorod was attached with nanoparticle at its very end, which is consistent with the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism. It was also found that the as-grown final product is strongly dependent on the thickness of the Au thin film coated on the silicon substrate. According to the experimental results, we proposed that the catalytic activity of gold is determined by the size of Au particles, and just very small Au clusters exhibit effective reactivity in the growth of GaN one-dimensional nanostructures.

  3. Sublimation Growth of Aluminum Ntride on Silicon Carbide Substrate with Aluminum Nitride-Silicon Carbide Transition Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Gu,Z.; Edgar, J.; Raghothamachar, B.; Dudley, M.; Zhuang, D.; Sitar, Z.; Coffey, D.

    2007-01-01

    The advantages of depositing AlN-SiC alloy transition layers on SiC substrates before the seeded growth of bulk AlN crystals were examined. The presence of AlN-SiC alloy layers helped to suppress the SiC decomposition by providing vapor sources of silicon and carbon. In addition, cracks in the final AlN crystals decreased from {approx}5 x 106/mm2 for those grown directly on SiC substrates to less than 1 x 106/mm2 for those grown on AlN-SiC alloy layers because of the intermediate lattice constants and thermal expansion coefficient of AlN-SiC. X-ray diffraction confirmed the formation of pure single-crystalline AlN upon both AlN-SiC alloys and SiC substrates. X-ray topography (XRT) demonstrated that strains present in the AlN crystals decreased as the AlN grew thicker. However, the XRT for AlN crystals grown directly on SiC substrates was significantly distorted with a high overall defect density compared to those grown on AlN-SiC alloys.

  4. Single crystal wurtzitic aluminum nitride growth on silicon using supersonic gas jets

    SciTech Connect

    Ustin, S.A.; Lauhon, L.; Brown, K.A.; Hu, D.Q.; Ho, W.

    1996-11-01

    Highly oriented aluminum nitride (0001) films have been grown on Si(001) and Si(111) substrates at temperatures between 550 C and 775 C with dual supersonic molecular beam sources. Triethylaluminum (TEA;[(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 3}Al]) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) were used as precursors. Hydrogen, helium, and nitrogen were used as seeding gases for the precursors. Providing a wide range of possible kinetic energies for the supersonic beams due to the disparate masses of the seed gases. Growth rates of AlN were found to depend strongly on the substrate orientation and the kinetic energy of the incident precursor; a significant increase in growth rate is seen when seeding in hydrogen or helium as opposed to nitrogen. Growth rates were 2--3 times greater on Si(001) than on Si(111). Structural characterization of the films was done by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). X-ray rocking curve (XRC) full-width half-maxima (FWHM) were seen as small as 2.5{degree}. Rutherford back scattering (RBS) was used to determine the thickness of the films and their chemical composition. Films were shown to be nitrogen rich, deviating from perfect stoichiometry by 10--20%. Surface analysis was performed by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES).

  5. Slow gold adatom diffusion on graphene: effect of silicon dioxide and hexagonal boron nitride substrates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Chen, Zheyuan; Wang, Lei; Polyakova Stolyarova, Elena; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Hone, James; Flynn, George W; Brus, Louis E

    2013-04-25

    We examine the nucleation kinetics of Au clusters on graphene and explore the relationship with layer number and underlying supporting substrate of graphene. Using the mean field theory of diffusion-limited aggregation, morphology patterns are semiquantitatively analyzed to obtain Au adatom effective diffusion constants and activation energies. Under specified assumptions, the Au adatom diffusion constant for single-layer graphene supported on SiO2 is ∼50 times smaller than that for hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN)-supported graphene and on the order of 800 times smaller than that for multilayer graphite. Bilayer graphene on SiO2 shows a Au adatom diffusion constant similar to single-layer graphene on h-BN. Scanning probe data show that single-layer graphene is far flatter on h-BN than on SiO2. Two factors are proposed as contributing to the observed lower diffusion constants on single-layer graphene: local surface roughness and homogeneous loss of dispersion/van der Waals electronic stability in multilayers. Graphene Raman spectroscopy shows little charge transfer between Au nanoparticles and graphene. PMID:23121443

  6. Selective layer disordering in intersubband Al0.028Ga0.972 N/AlN superlattices with silicon nitride capping layer

    DOE PAGES

    Wierer, Jonathan J.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Skogen, Erik J.; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Vawter, Gregory A.; Montaño, Ines

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate the selective layer disordering in intersubband Al0.028Ga0.972 N/AlN superlattices using a silicon nitride (SiNx) capping layer. The (SiNx) capped superlattice exhibits suppressed layer disordering under high-temperature annealing. In addition, the rate of layer disordering is reduced with increased SiNx thickness. The layer disordering is caused by Si diffusion, and the SiNx layer inhibits vacancy formation at the crystal surface and ultimately, the movement of Al and Ga atoms across the heterointerfaces. In conclusion, patterning of the SiNx layer results in selective layer disordering, an attractive method to integrate active and passive III–nitride-based intersubband devices.

  7. Selective layer disordering in intersubband Al0.028Ga0.972N/AlN superlattices with silicon nitride capping layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierer, Jonathan J., Jr.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Skogen, Erik J.; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Vawter, Gregory A.; Montaño, Ines

    2015-06-01

    Selective layer disordering in an intersubband Al0.028Ga0.972N/AlN superlattice using a silicon nitride (SiNx) capping layer is demonstrated. The SiNx capped superlattice exhibits suppressed layer disordering under high-temperature annealing. Additionally, the rate of layer disordering is reduced with increased SiNx thickness. The layer disordering is caused by Si diffusion, and the SiNx layer inhibits vacancy formation at the crystal surface and ultimately, the movement of Al and Ga atoms across the heterointerfaces. Patterning of the SiNx layer results in selective layer disordering, an attractive method to integrate active and passive III-nitride-based intersubband devices.

  8. Fracture toughness of hydroxyapatite/mica composite, packed hydroxyapatite, alumina ceramics, silicon nitride and -carbide.

    PubMed

    Nordström, E G; Yokobori, A T; Yokobori, T; Aizawa, Y

    1998-01-01

    By using the fracture toughness estimation method based on two-dimensional map, it was found that the ductility of the high porosity hydroxyapatite/mice composite was comparable with silicon carbide. It was measured to be higher than that of packed hydroxyapatite. Alumina ceramics with more than 96% aluminium oxide showed a higher fracture toughness than the composite material. When bending strength was compared, the strength of the composite was two or three times lower than that of packed hydroxyapatite and much lower than the other studied materials. The composite material showed high porosity, which in turn gives it a lower bending strength. However, the high porosity is more favourable for biocompatibility.

  9. Advanced Silicon Solar Cell Device Physics and Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deceglie, Michael Gardner

    A fundamental challenge in the development and deployment of solar photovoltaic technology is a reduction in cost enabling direct competition with fossil-fuel-based energy sources. A key driver in this cost reduction is optimized device efficiency, because increased energy output leverages all photovoltaic system costs, from raw materials and module manufacturing to installation and maintenance. To continue progress toward higher conversion efficiencies, solar cells are being fabricated with increasingly complex designs, including engineered nanostructures, heterojunctions, and novel contacting and passivation schemes. Such advanced designs require a comprehensive and unified understanding of the optical and electrical device physics at the microscopic scale. This thesis focuses on a microscopic understanding of solar cell optoelectronic performance and its impact on cell optimization. We consider this in three solar cell platforms: thin-film crystalline silicon, amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunctions, and thin-film cells with nanophotonic light trapping. The work described in this thesis represents a powerful design paradigm, based on a detailed physical understanding of the mechanisms governing solar cell performance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of understanding not just the individual mechanisms, but also their interactions. Such an approach to device optimization is critical for the efficiency and competitiveness of future generations of solar cells.

  10. Advanced Measurements of Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Farhad Farzbod; Stephen J. Reese; Zilong Hua; Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2012-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered as a fuel cladding material for accident tolerant fuel under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Division of the Department of Energy. Silicon carbide has many potential advantages over traditional zirconium based cladding systems. These include high melting point, low susceptibility to corrosion, and low degradation of mechanical properties under neutron irradiation. In addition, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) made from SiC have high mechanical toughness enabling these materials to withstand thermal and mechanical shock loading. However, many of the fundamental mechanical and thermal properties of SiC CMCs depend strongly on the fabrication process. As a result, extrapolating current materials science databases for these materials to nuclear applications is not possible. The “Advanced Measurements” work package under the LWRS fuels pathway is tasked with the development of measurement techniques that can characterize fundamental thermal and mechanical properties of SiC CMCs. An emphasis is being placed on development of characterization tools that can used for examination of fresh as well as irradiated samples. The work discuss in this report can be divided into two broad categories. The first involves the development of laser ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic and yield properties and the second involves the development of laser-based techniques to measurement thermal transport properties. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of SiC CMCs in regards to thermal and mechanical properties. The material properties characterized within this work package will be used as validation of advanced materials physics models of SiC CMCs developed under the LWRS fuels pathway. In addition, it is envisioned that similar measurement techniques can be used to provide process control and quality assurance as well as measurement of

  11. Redeposition in plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition: Silicon nitride film quality ruled by the gas residence time

    SciTech Connect

    Knoops, Harm C. M. E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl; Peuter, K. de; Kessels, W. M. M. E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl

    2015-07-06

    The requirements on the material properties and growth control of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) spacer films in transistors are becoming ever more stringent as scaling of transistor structures continues. One method to deposit high-quality films with excellent control is atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, depositing SiN{sub x} by ALD has turned out to be very challenging. In this work, it is shown that the plasma gas residence time τ is a key parameter for the deposition of SiN{sub x} by plasma-assisted ALD and that this parameter can be linked to a so-called “redeposition effect”. This previously ignored effect, which takes place during the plasma step, is the dissociation of reaction products in the plasma and the subsequent redeposition of reaction-product fragments on the surface. For SiN{sub x} ALD using SiH{sub 2}(NH{sup t}Bu){sub 2} as precursor and N{sub 2} plasma as reactant, the gas residence time τ was found to determine both SiN{sub x} film quality and the resulting growth per cycle. It is shown that redeposition can be minimized by using a short residence time resulting in high-quality films with a high wet-etch resistance (i.e., a wet-etch rate of 0.5 nm/min in buffered HF solution). Due to the fundamental nature of the redeposition effect, it is expected to play a role in many more plasma-assisted ALD processes.

  12. Specific Neuron Placement on Gold and Silicon Nitride-Patterned Substrates through a Two-Step Functionalization Method.

    PubMed

    Mescola, Andrea; Canale, Claudio; Prato, Mirko; Diaspro, Alberto; Berdondini, Luca; Maccione, Alessandro; Dante, Silvia

    2016-06-28

    The control of neuron-substrate adhesion has been always a challenge for fabricating neuron-based cell chips and in particular for multielectrode array (MEA) devices, which warrants the investigation of the electrophysiological activity of neuronal networks. The recent introduction of high-density chips based on the complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, integrating thousands of electrodes, improved the possibility to sense large networks and raised the challenge to develop newly adapted functionalization techniques to further increase neuron electrode localization to avoid the positioning of cells out of the recording area. Here, we present a simple and straightforward chemical functionalization method that leads to the precise and exclusive positioning of the neural cell bodies onto modified electrodes and inhibits, at the same time, cellular adhesion in the surrounding insulator areas. Different from other approaches, this technique does not require any adhesion molecule as well as complex patterning technique such as μ-contact printing. The functionalization was first optimized on gold (Au) and silicon nitride (Si3N4)-patterned surfaces. The procedure consisted of the introduction of a passivating layer of hydrophobic silane molecules (propyltriethoxysilane [PTES]) followed by a treatment of the Au surface using 11-amino-1-undecanethiol hydrochloride (AT). On model substrates, well-ordered neural networks and an optimal coupling between a single neuron and single micrometric functionalized Au surface were achieved. In addition, we presented the preliminary results of this functionalization method directly applied on a CMOS-MEA: the electrical spontaneous spiking and bursting activities of the network recorded for up to 4 weeks demonstrate an excellent and stable neural adhesion and functional behavior comparable with what expected using a standard adhesion factor, such as polylysine or laminin, thus demonstrating that this procedure can be

  13. The role of N-Si-O bonding configurations in tunable photoluminescence of oxygenated amorphous silicon nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengzhan; Chen, Kunji Lin, Zewen; Li, Wei; Xu, Jun; Huang, Xinfan; Dong, Hengping

    2015-06-08

    Last year, we have reported that the internal quantum efficiency of photoluminescence (PL) from amorphous silicon oxynitride (a-SiN{sub x}O{sub y}) films has been achieved as high as 60%. The present work intensively investigated the mechanisms for tunable PL in the 2.05–2.95 eV range from our a-SiN{sub x}:O films, by using a combination of optical characterizations, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements. The results of XPS, EPR, and photoluminescence excited measurements indicated that the incorporation of oxygen atoms into silicon nitride (a-SiN{sub x}) networks not only reduced the band tail structure disorder (Urbach tail width E{sub U}) but also created N-Si-O (N{sub x}) defect states in the band gap. We have discovered the distinctive PL characteristics from a-SiN{sub x}:O films with various NH{sub 3/}SiH{sub 4} ratios. The PL peak energy (E{sub PL}) is independent of the excitation energy (E{sub exc}) and the PL intensity (I{sub PL}) is regardless of the optical band gap (E{sub opt}) but is proportional to the N{sub x} defects concentration, both of which are completely different from the PL characteristics by band tail states recombination mechanism, in which the E{sub PL} is proportional to E{sub exc} (when E{sub exc} ≤ E{sub opt}) and the I{sub PL} is dependent on the relative position of E{sub exc} and E{sub opt}. Based on the N-Si-O bonding configurations and the distinctive PL characteristics, the radiative recombination mechanism through the N-Si-O defect states has been proposed, by which the performance of stimulated emission may be realized in this kind of a-SiN{sub x}:O films.

  14. Selection of polymer binders and fabrication of SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, John S.; Lightfoot, A.; Sigalovsky, J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: effects of solvent and polymer exposures on nitriding kinetics of high purity Si powders and on resulting phase distributions; effects of solvent and polymer exposures on Si Surface Chemistry; effects of solvent and polymeric exposures on nitriding kinetics; and fabrication of flexural test samples.

  15. Advanced methods for light trapping in optically thin silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, James Richard

    2011-12-01

    The field of light trapping is the study of how best to absorb light in a thin film of material when most light either reflects away at the surface or transmits straight through to the other side. This has tremendous application to the field of photovoltaics where thin silicon films can be manufactured cheaply, but also fail to capture all of the available photons in the solar spectrum. Advancements in light trapping therefore bring us closer to the day when photovoltaic devices may reach grid parity with traditional fossil fuels on the electrical energy market. This dissertation advances our understanding of light trapping by first modeling the effects of loss in planar dielectric waveguides. The mathematical framework developed here can be used to model any arbitrary three-layer structure with mixed gain or loss and then extract the total field solution for the guided modes. It is found that lossy waveguides possess a greater number of eigenmodes than their lossless counterparts, and that these "loss guided" modes attenuate much more rapidly than conventional modes. Another contribution from this dissertation is the exploration of light trapping through the use of dielectric nanospheres embedded directly within the active layer of a thin silicon film. The primary benefit to this approach is that the device can utilize a surface nitride layer serving as an antireflective coating while still retaining the benefits of light trapping within the film. The end result is that light trapping and light injection are effectively decoupled from each other and may be independently optimized within a single photovoltaic device. The final contribution from this work is a direct numerical comparison between multiple light trapping schemes. This allows us to quantify the relative performances of various design techniques against one another and objectively determine which ideas tend to capture the most light. Using numerical simulation, this work directly compares the absorption

  16. Extreme strain rate and temperature dependence of the mechanical properties of nano silicon nitride thin layers in a basal plane under tension: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuefeng; Wang, Hongjie; Wei, Yin; Wen, Jiangbo; Niu, Min; Jia, Shuhai

    2014-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to clarify the extreme strain rate and temperature dependence of the mechanical behaviors of nano silicon nitride thin layers in a basal plane under tension. It is found that fracture stresses show almost no change with increasing strain rate. However, fracture strains decrease gradually due to the appearance of additional N(2c)-Si bond breaking defects in the deformation process. With increasing loading temperature, there is a noticeable drop in fracture stress and fracture strain. In the low temperature range, roughness phases can be observed owing to a combination of factors such as configuration evolution and energy change.

  17. Hot-pressed silicon nitride with various lanthanide oxides as sintering additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, K.; Toibana, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of addition of various lanthanide oxides and their mixture with Y2O3 on the sintering of Si3N4 were investigated. The addition of simple and mixed lanthanide oxides promoted the densification of Si3N4 in hot-pressing at 1800 C under 300-400kg/ centimeters squared for 60 min. The crystallization of yttrium and lanthanide-silicon oxynitrides which was observed inn the sintered body containing yttrium-lanthanide mixed oxides as additives led to the formation of a highly refractory Si3N4 ceramic having a bending strength of 82 and 84 kg/millimeters squared at room temperature and 1300 C respectively. In a Y2O3+La2O3 system, a higher molar ratio of La2O3 to Y2O3 gave a higher hardness and strength at high temperatures. It was found that 90 min was an optimum sintering time for the highest strength.

  18. Thermoelectric properties of silicon carbide nanowires with nitride dopants and vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhuo; Zheng, Qing-Rong; Su, Gang

    2011-12-01

    The thermoelectric properties of cubic zinc-blend silicon carbide nanowires (SiCNWs) with nitrogen impurities and vacancies along [111] direction are theoretically studied by means of atomistic simulations. It is found that the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of SiCNWs can be significantly enhanced by doping N impurities together with making Si vacancies. Aiming at obtaining a large ZT, we study possible energetically stable configurations, and disclose that, when N dopants are located at the center, a small number of Si vacancies at corners are most favored for n-type nanowires, while a large number of Si vacancies spreading into the flat edge sites are most favored for p-type nanowires. For the SiCNW with a diameter of 1.1 nm and a length of 4.6 nm, the ZT value for the n-type is shown capable of reaching 1.78 at 900 K. The conditions to get higher ZT values for longer SiCNWs are also addressed.

  19. Tailoring the optical constants in single-crystal silicon with embedded silver nanostructures for advanced silicon photonics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Akhter, Perveen; Huang, Mengbing Spratt, William; Kadakia, Nirag; Amir, Faisal

    2015-03-28

    Plasmonic effects associated with metal nanostructures are expected to hold the key to tailoring light emission/propagation and harvesting solar energy in materials including single crystal silicon which remains the backbone in the microelectronics and photovoltaics industries but unfortunately, lacks many functionalities needed for construction of advanced photonic and optoelectronics devices. Currently, silicon plasmonic structures are practically possible only in the configuration with metal nanoparticles or thin film arrays on a silicon surface. This does not enable one to exploit the full potential of plasmonics for optical engineering in silicon, because the plasmonic effects are dominant over a length of ∼50 nm, and the active device region typically lies below the surface much beyond this range. Here, we report on a novel method for the formation of silver nanoparticles embedded within a silicon crystal through metal gettering from a silver thin film deposited at the surface to nanocavities within the Si created by hydrogen ion implantation. The refractive index of the Ag-nanostructured layer is found to be 3–10% lower or higher than that of silicon for wavelengths below or beyond ∼815–900 nm, respectively. Around this wavelength range, the optical extinction values increase by a factor of 10–100 as opposed to the pure silicon case. Increasing the amount of gettered silver leads to an increased extinction as well as a redshift in wavelength position for the resonance. This resonance is attributed to the surface plasmon excitation of the resultant silver nanoparticles in silicon. Additionally, we show that the profiles for optical constants in silicon can be tailored by varying the position and number of nanocavity layers. Such silicon crystals with embedded metal nanostructures would offer novel functional base structures for applications in silicon photonics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and plasmonics.

  20. C4F8O/O2/N-based Additive Gases for Silicon Nitride Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Chamber Cleaning with Low Global Warming Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Hwang; Bae, Jeong Woon; Oh, Chang Hyun; Kim, Ki Joon; Lee, Nae Eung; Yeom, Geun Young

    2002-11-01

    In this study, N2O and NO were added as additive gases to C4F8O/O2 for plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride chamber cleaning and their effects on the emission properties of perfluorocarbon compounds (PFCs) were investigated. The cleaning rate, destruction and removal efficiencies (DREs), and million metric tons of carbon equivalent (MMTCE) were studied as a function of flow rates of PFCs and additive gases. The use of C4F8O/O2 alone showed the highest cleaning rate and the lowest emission properties at the cleaning condition of 20%C4F8O/80%O2, working pressure of 500 mTorr, and 13.56 MHz rf power of 350 W. By the addition of about 20% NO or 20% N2O to the optimized C4F8O/O2, the additional reduction of MMTCE higher than 50% could be obtained. The addition of NO resulted in lower MMTCE compared to that in the case of the addition of N2O mostly due to the higher silicon nitride cleaning rate in the latter case.