Science.gov

Sample records for advanced software tools

  1. Constructing an advanced software tool for planetary atmospheric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Sims, Michael; Podolak, Ester; Mckay, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Scientific model building can be an intensive and painstaking process, often involving the development of large and complex computer programs. Despite the effort involved, scientific models cannot be easily distributed and shared with other scientists. In general, implemented scientific models are complex, idiosyncratic, and difficult for anyone but the original scientist/programmer to understand. We believe that advanced software techniques can facilitate both the model building and model sharing process. In this paper, we describe a prototype for a scientific modeling software tool that serves as an aid to the scientist in developing and using models. This tool includes an interactive intelligent graphical interface, a high level domain specific modeling language, a library of physics equations and experimental datasets, and a suite of data display facilities. Our prototype has been developed in the domain of planetary atmospheric modeling, and is being used to construct models of Titan's atmosphere.

  2. Proposal for constructing an advanced software tool for planetary atmospheric modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Sims, Michael H.; Podolak, Esther; Mckay, Christopher P.; Thompson, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Scientific model building can be a time intensive and painstaking process, often involving the development of large and complex computer programs. Despite the effort involved, scientific models cannot easily be distributed and shared with other scientists. In general, implemented scientific models are complex, idiosyncratic, and difficult for anyone but the original scientist/programmer to understand. We believe that advanced software techniques can facilitate both the model building and model sharing process. We propose to construct a scientific modeling software tool that serves as an aid to the scientist in developing and using models. The proposed tool will include an interactive intelligent graphical interface and a high level, domain specific, modeling language. As a testbed for this research, we propose development of a software prototype in the domain of planetary atmospheric modeling.

  3. Development of tools for safety analysis of control software in advanced reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Guarro, S.; Yau, M.; Motamed, M.

    1996-04-01

    Software based control systems have gained a pervasive presence in a wide variety of applications, including nuclear power plant control and protection systems which are within the oversight and licensing responsibility of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. While the cost effectiveness and flexibility of software based plant process control is widely recognized, it is very difficult to achieve and prove high levels of demonstrated dependability and safety assurance for the functions performed by process control software, due to the very flexibility and potential complexity of the software itself. The development of tools to model, analyze and test software design and implementations in the context of the system that the software is designed to control can greatly assist the task of providing higher levels of assurance than those obtainable by software testing alone. This report presents and discusses the development of the Dynamic Flowgraph Methodology (DFM) and its application in the dependability and assurance analysis of software-based control systems. The features of the methodology and full-scale examples of application to both generic process and nuclear power plant control systems are presented and discussed in detail. The features of a workstation software tool developed to assist users in the application of DFM are also described.

  4. Performance analysis and optimization of an advanced pharmaceutical wastewater treatment plant through a visual basic software tool (PWWT.VB).

    PubMed

    Pal, Parimal; Thakura, Ritwik; Chakrabortty, Sankha

    2016-05-01

    A user-friendly, menu-driven simulation software tool has been developed for the first time to optimize and analyze the system performance of an advanced continuous membrane-integrated pharmaceutical wastewater treatment plant. The software allows pre-analysis and manipulation of input data which helps in optimization and shows the software performance visually on a graphical platform. Moreover, the software helps the user to "visualize" the effects of the operating parameters through its model-predicted output profiles. The software is based on a dynamic mathematical model, developed for a systematically integrated forward osmosis-nanofiltration process for removal of toxic organic compounds from pharmaceutical wastewater. The model-predicted values have been observed to corroborate well with the extensive experimental investigations which were found to be consistent under varying operating conditions like operating pressure, operating flow rate, and draw solute concentration. Low values of the relative error (RE = 0.09) and high values of Willmott-d-index (d will = 0.981) reflected a high degree of accuracy and reliability of the software. This software is likely to be a very efficient tool for system design or simulation of an advanced membrane-integrated treatment plant for hazardous wastewater. PMID:26856870

  5. Performance analysis and optimization of an advanced pharmaceutical wastewater treatment plant through a visual basic software tool (PWWT.VB).

    PubMed

    Pal, Parimal; Thakura, Ritwik; Chakrabortty, Sankha

    2016-05-01

    A user-friendly, menu-driven simulation software tool has been developed for the first time to optimize and analyze the system performance of an advanced continuous membrane-integrated pharmaceutical wastewater treatment plant. The software allows pre-analysis and manipulation of input data which helps in optimization and shows the software performance visually on a graphical platform. Moreover, the software helps the user to "visualize" the effects of the operating parameters through its model-predicted output profiles. The software is based on a dynamic mathematical model, developed for a systematically integrated forward osmosis-nanofiltration process for removal of toxic organic compounds from pharmaceutical wastewater. The model-predicted values have been observed to corroborate well with the extensive experimental investigations which were found to be consistent under varying operating conditions like operating pressure, operating flow rate, and draw solute concentration. Low values of the relative error (RE = 0.09) and high values of Willmott-d-index (d will = 0.981) reflected a high degree of accuracy and reliability of the software. This software is likely to be a very efficient tool for system design or simulation of an advanced membrane-integrated treatment plant for hazardous wastewater.

  6. Software engineering tools.

    PubMed

    Wear, L L; Pinkert, J R

    1994-01-01

    We have looked at general descriptions and illustrations of several software development tools, such as tools for prototyping, developing DFDs, testing, and maintenance. Many others are available, and new ones are being developed. However, you have at least seen some examples of powerful CASE tools for systems development.

  7. Biological Imaging Software Tools

    PubMed Central

    Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Berthold, Michael R.; Goldberg, Ilya G.; Ibáñez, Luis; Manjunath, B.S.; Martone, Maryann E.; Murphy, Robert F.; Peng, Hanchuan; Plant, Anne L.; Roysam, Badrinath; Stuurman, Nico; Swedlow, Jason R.; Tomancak, Pavel; Carpenter, Anne E.

    2013-01-01

    Few technologies are more widespread in modern biological laboratories than imaging. Recent advances in optical technologies and instrumentation are providing hitherto unimagined capabilities. Almost all these advances have required the development of software to enable the acquisition, management, analysis, and visualization of the imaging data. We review each computational step that biologists encounter when dealing with digital images, the challenges in that domain, and the overall status of available software for bioimage informatics, focusing on open source options. PMID:22743775

  8. Machine Tool Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A NASA-developed software package has played a part in technical education of students who major in Mechanical Engineering Technology at William Rainey Harper College. Professor Hack has been using (APT) Automatically Programmed Tool Software since 1969 in his CAD/CAM Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing curriculum. Professor Hack teaches the use of APT programming languages for control of metal cutting machines. Machine tool instructions are geometry definitions written in APT Language to constitute a "part program." The part program is processed by the machine tool. CAD/CAM students go from writing a program to cutting steel in the course of a semester.

  9. Modeling and MBL: Software Tools for Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinker, Robert F.

    Recent technological advances and new software packages put unprecedented power for experimenting and theory-building in the hands of students at all levels. Microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) and model-solving tools illustrate the educational potential of the technology. These tools include modeling software and three MBL packages (which are…

  10. CSAM Metrology Software Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Duc; Sandor, Michael; Agarwal, Shri

    2005-01-01

    CSAM Metrology Software Tool (CMeST) is a computer program for analysis of false-color CSAM images of plastic-encapsulated microcircuits. (CSAM signifies C-mode scanning acoustic microscopy.) The colors in the images indicate areas of delamination within the plastic packages. Heretofore, the images have been interpreted by human examiners. Hence, interpretations have not been entirely consistent and objective. CMeST processes the color information in image-data files to detect areas of delamination without incurring inconsistencies of subjective judgement. CMeST can be used to create a database of baseline images of packages acquired at given times for comparison with images of the same packages acquired at later times. Any area within an image can be selected for analysis, which can include examination of different delamination types by location. CMeST can also be used to perform statistical analyses of image data. Results of analyses are available in a spreadsheet format for further processing. The results can be exported to any data-base-processing software.

  11. Advances in Software Tools for Pre-processing and Post-processing of Overset Grid Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.

    2004-01-01

    Recent developments in three pieces of software for performing pre-processing and post-processing work on numerical computations using overset grids are presented. The first is the OVERGRID graphical interface which provides a unified environment for the visualization, manipulation, generation and diagnostics of geometry and grids. Modules are also available for automatic boundary conditions detection, flow solver input preparation, multiple component dynamics input preparation and dynamics animation, simple solution viewing for moving components, and debris trajectory analysis input preparation. The second is a grid generation script library that enables rapid creation of grid generation scripts. A sample of recent applications will be described. The third is the OVERPLOT graphical interface for displaying and analyzing history files generated by the flow solver. Data displayed include residuals, component forces and moments, number of supersonic and reverse flow points, and various dynamics parameters.

  12. A Visual Basic simulation software tool for performance analysis of a membrane-based advanced water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Pal, P; Kumar, R; Srivastava, N; Chowdhury, J

    2014-02-01

    A Visual Basic simulation software (WATTPPA) has been developed to analyse the performance of an advanced wastewater treatment plant. This user-friendly and menu-driven software is based on the dynamic mathematical model for an industrial wastewater treatment scheme that integrates chemical, biological and membrane-based unit operations. The software-predicted results corroborate very well with the experimental findings as indicated in the overall correlation coefficient of the order of 0.99. The software permits pre-analysis and manipulation of input data, helps in optimization and exhibits performance of an integrated plant visually on a graphical platform. It allows quick performance analysis of the whole system as well as the individual units. The software first of its kind in its domain and in the well-known Microsoft Excel environment is likely to be very useful in successful design, optimization and operation of an advanced hybrid treatment plant for hazardous wastewater.

  13. A Visual Basic simulation software tool for performance analysis of a membrane-based advanced water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Pal, P; Kumar, R; Srivastava, N; Chowdhury, J

    2014-02-01

    A Visual Basic simulation software (WATTPPA) has been developed to analyse the performance of an advanced wastewater treatment plant. This user-friendly and menu-driven software is based on the dynamic mathematical model for an industrial wastewater treatment scheme that integrates chemical, biological and membrane-based unit operations. The software-predicted results corroborate very well with the experimental findings as indicated in the overall correlation coefficient of the order of 0.99. The software permits pre-analysis and manipulation of input data, helps in optimization and exhibits performance of an integrated plant visually on a graphical platform. It allows quick performance analysis of the whole system as well as the individual units. The software first of its kind in its domain and in the well-known Microsoft Excel environment is likely to be very useful in successful design, optimization and operation of an advanced hybrid treatment plant for hazardous wastewater. PMID:23982824

  14. Software engineering methodologies and tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Lawrence M.

    1993-01-01

    Over the years many engineering disciplines have developed, including chemical, electronic, etc. Common to all engineering disciplines is the use of rigor, models, metrics, and predefined methodologies. Recently, a new engineering discipline has appeared on the scene, called software engineering. For over thirty years computer software has been developed and the track record has not been good. Software development projects often miss schedules, are over budget, do not give the user what is wanted, and produce defects. One estimate is there are one to three defects per 1000 lines of deployed code. More and more systems are requiring larger and more complex software for support. As this requirement grows, the software development problems grow exponentially. It is believed that software quality can be improved by applying engineering principles. Another compelling reason to bring the engineering disciplines to software development is productivity. It has been estimated that productivity of producing software has only increased one to two percent a year in the last thirty years. Ironically, the computer and its software have contributed significantly to the industry-wide productivity, but computer professionals have done a poor job of using the computer to do their job. Engineering disciplines and methodologies are now emerging supported by software tools that address the problems of software development. This paper addresses some of the current software engineering methodologies as a backdrop for the general evaluation of computer assisted software engineering (CASE) tools from actual installation of and experimentation with some specific tools.

  15. Software Tools: EPICUR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abreu, Jose Luis; And Others

    EPICUR (Integrated Programing Environment for the Development of Educational Software) is a set of programming modules ranging from low level interfaces to high level algorithms aimed at the development of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) applications. The emphasis is on user-friendly interfaces and on multiplying productivity without loss of…

  16. Modern Tools for Modern Software

    SciTech Connect

    Kumfert, G; Epperly, T

    2001-10-31

    This is a proposal for a new software configure/build tool for building, maintaining, deploying, and installing software. At its completion, this new tool will replace current standard tool suites such as ''autoconf'', ''automake'', ''libtool'', and the de facto standard build tool, ''make''. This ambitious project is born out of the realization that as scientific software has grown in size and complexity over the years, the difficulty of configuring and building software has increased as well. For high performance scientific software, additional complexities often arises from the need for portability to multiple platforms (including many one-of-a-kind platforms), multilanguage implementations, use of third party libraries, and a need to adapt algorithms to the specific features of the hardware. Development of scientific software is being hampered by the quality of configuration and build tools commonly available. Inordinate amounts of time and expertise are required to develop and maintain the configure and build system for a moderately complex project. Better build and configure tools will increase developer productivity. This proposal is a first step in a process of shoring up the foundation upon which DOE software is created and used.

  17. Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST) was developed to allow users to easily estimate the toxicity of chemicals using Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSARs) methodologies. QSARs are mathematical models used to predict measures of toxicity from the physical c...

  18. Software Tools Streamline Project Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Three innovative software inventions from Ames Research Center (NETMARK, Program Management Tool, and Query-Based Document Management) are finding their way into NASA missions as well as industry applications. The first, NETMARK, is a program that enables integrated searching of data stored in a variety of databases and documents, meaning that users no longer have to look in several places for related information. NETMARK allows users to search and query information across all of these sources in one step. This cross-cutting capability in information analysis has exponentially reduced the amount of time needed to mine data from days or weeks to mere seconds. NETMARK has been used widely throughout NASA, enabling this automatic integration of information across many documents and databases. NASA projects that use NETMARK include the internal reporting system and project performance dashboard, Erasmus, NASA s enterprise management tool, which enhances organizational collaboration and information sharing through document routing and review; the Integrated Financial Management Program; International Space Station Knowledge Management; Mishap and Anomaly Information Reporting System; and management of the Mars Exploration Rovers. Approximately $1 billion worth of NASA s projects are currently managed using Program Management Tool (PMT), which is based on NETMARK. PMT is a comprehensive, Web-enabled application tool used to assist program and project managers within NASA enterprises in monitoring, disseminating, and tracking the progress of program and project milestones and other relevant resources. The PMT consists of an integrated knowledge repository built upon advanced enterprise-wide database integration techniques and the latest Web-enabled technologies. The current system is in a pilot operational mode allowing users to automatically manage, track, define, update, and view customizable milestone objectives and goals. The third software invention, Query

  19. Advanced fingerprint verification software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baradarani, A.; Taylor, J. R. B.; Severin, F.; Maev, R. Gr.

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a fingerprint software package that can be used in a wide range of applications from law enforcement to public and private security systems, and to personal devices such as laptops, vehicles, and door- locks. The software and processing units are a unique implementation of new and sophisticated algorithms that compete with the current best systems in the world. Development of the software package has been in line with the third generation of our ultrasonic fingerprinting machine1. Solid and robust performance is achieved in the presence of misplaced and low quality fingerprints.

  20. Fermilab Software Tools Program: Fermitools

    SciTech Connect

    Pordes, R.

    1995-10-01

    The Fermilab Software Tools Program (Fermitools) was established in 1994 as an intiative under which Fermilab provides software it has developed to outside collaborators. During the year and a half since its start ten software products have been packaged and made available on the official Fermilab anonymous ftp site, and backup support and information services have been made available for them. During the past decade, institutions outside the Fermilab physics experiment user community have in general only been able to obtain and use Fermilab developed software on an adhoc or informal basis. With the Fermitools program the Fermilab Computing Division has instituted an umbrella under which software that is regarded by its internal user community as useful and of high quality can be provided to users outside of High Energy Physics experiments. The main thrust of the Fermitools program is stimulating collaborative use and further development of the software. Having established minimal umbrella beaurocracy makes collaborative development and support easier. The published caveat given to people who take the software includes the statement ``Provision of the software implies no commitment of support by Fermilab. The Fermilab Computing Division is open to discussing other levels of support for use of the software with responsible and committed users and collaborator``. There have been no negative comments in response to this and the policy has not given rise to any questions or complaints. In this paper we present the goals and strategy of the program and introduce some of the software made available through it. We discuss our experiences to date and mention the perceived benefits of the Program.

  1. Component Modeling Approach Software Tool

    2010-08-23

    The Component Modeling Approach Software Tool (CMAST) establishes a set of performance libraries of approved components (frames, glass, and spacer) which can be accessed for configuring fenestration products for a project, and btaining a U-factor, Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC), and Visible Transmittance (VT) rating for those products, which can then be reflected in a CMA Label Certificate for code compliance. CMAST is web-based as well as client-based. The completed CMA program and software toolmore » will be useful in several ways for a vast array of stakeholders in the industry: Generating performance ratings for bidding projects Ascertaining credible and accurate performance data Obtaining third party certification of overall product performance for code compliance« less

  2. Integration of case tools for software project management

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, R.; Shinagawa, Y.; Khan, M.F.

    1996-12-31

    Building and maintenance of high quality large software projects is a complex and difficult process. Tools employing software metrics are becoming an effective aid for management of such large projects. In this paper, we briefly trace the evolution of such tools from their beginnings up until the current trends of integrated CASE tools. We present a generic integrated CASE environment incorporating a formal set of software metrics with a suite of advanced analytic techniques. The proposed integrated CASE environment is an enhancement of currently used tools, and can enable more efficient and cost-effective management of large and complex software projects.

  3. Tools for Embedded Computing Systems Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A workshop was held to assess the state of tools for embedded systems software and to determine directions for tool development. A synopsis of the talk and the key figures of each workshop presentation, together with chairmen summaries, are presented. The presentations covered four major areas: (1) tools and the software environment (development and testing); (2) tools and software requirements, design, and specification; (3) tools and language processors; and (4) tools and verification and validation (analysis and testing). The utility and contribution of existing tools and research results for the development and testing of embedded computing systems software are described and assessed.

  4. Technology Transfer Challenges for High-Assurance Software Engineering Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor); Penix, John; Markosian, Lawrence Z.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we describe our experience with the challenges thar we are currently facing in our effort to develop advanced software verification and validation tools. We categorize these challenges into several areas: cost benefits modeling, tool usability, customer application domain, and organizational issues. We provide examples of challenges in each area and identrfj, open research issues in areas which limit our ability to transfer high-assurance software engineering tools into practice.

  5. AUTOSIM: An automated repetitive software testing tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, J. R.; Mcbride, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    AUTOSIM is a software tool which automates the repetitive run testing of software. This tool executes programming tasks previously performed by a programmer with one year of programming experience. Use of the AUTOSIM tool requires a knowledge base containing information about known faults, code fixes, and the fault diagnosis-correction process. AUTOSIM can be considered as an expert system which replaces a low level of programming expertise. Reference information about the design and implementation of the AUTOSIM software test tool provides flowcharts to assist in maintaining the software code and a description of how to use the tool.

  6. The advanced software development workstation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridge, Ernest M., III; Pitman, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Software Development Workstation (ASDW) task is researching and developing the technologies required to support Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) with the emphasis on those advanced methods, tools, and processes that will be of benefit to support all NASA programs. Immediate goals are to provide research and prototype tools that will increase productivity, in the near term, in projects such as the Software Support Environment (SSE), the Space Station Control Center (SSCC), and the Flight Analysis and Design System (FADS) which will be used to support the Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom. Goals also include providing technology for development, evolution, maintenance, and operations. The technologies under research and development in the ASDW project are targeted to provide productivity enhancements during the software life cycle phase of enterprise and information system modeling, requirements generation and analysis, system design and coding, and system use and maintenance. On-line user's guides will assist users in operating the developed information system with knowledge base expert assistance.

  7. NASA Approach to HPCCP Support Software and Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaylock, Bruce; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA HPCC Program, together with other agencies participating in the Federal HPCC Program, intends to advance technologies to enable the execution of grand challenge applications at sustained rates up to TeraFLOPS. During 1995-6 NASA undertook two major systems software efforts to improve the state of high performance support software and tools. The first of these activities was a replanning of support software and tools activities internal to the Agency. In replanning the software activities emphasis was placed on Meeting the needs of Grand Challenge Uses Few projects Near term useful results. The revised NASA plan calls for support software and tools activities in four areas: Application Creation Process Support Application Usage/Operations Support Advanced Support Software and Tools Concepts Metrics Based Monitoring and Management The second major activity undertaken was participation in a multiagency Task Force resulting from the Second Pasadena Workshop on System Software and Tools. The task force developed the Guidelines for Writing System Software and Tools Requirements for Parallel and Clustered Computers.

  8. Software engineering environment tool set integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selfridge, William P.

    1986-01-01

    Space Transportation System Division (STSD) Engineering has a program to promote excellence within the engineering function. This program resulted in a capital funded facility based on a VAX cluster called the Rockwell Operational Engineering System (ROSES). The second phase of a three phase plan to establish an integrated software engineering environment for ROSES is examined. It discusses briefly phase one which establishes the basic capability for a modern software development environment to include a tool set, training and standards. Phase two is a tool set integration. The tool set is primarily off-the-shelf tools acquired through vendors or government agencies (public domain). These tools were placed into categories of software development. These categories are: requirements, design, and construction support; verification and validation support; and software management support. The integration of the tool set is being performed through concept prototyping and development of tools specifically designed to support the life cycle and provide transition from one phase to the next.

  9. Software Construction and Analysis Tools for Future Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Michael R.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA and its international partners will increasingly depend on software-based systems to implement advanced functions for future space missions, such as Martian rovers that autonomously navigate long distances exploring geographic features formed by surface water early in the planet's history. The software-based functions for these missions will need to be robust and highly reliable, raising significant challenges in the context of recent Mars mission failures attributed to software faults. After reviewing these challenges, this paper describes tools that have been developed at NASA Ames that could contribute to meeting these challenges; 1) Program synthesis tools based on automated inference that generate documentation for manual review and annotations for automated certification. 2) Model-checking tools for concurrent object-oriented software that achieve memorability through synergy with program abstraction and static analysis tools.

  10. Parallel software tools at Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moitra, Stuti; Tennille, Geoffrey M.; Lakeotes, Christopher D.; Randall, Donald P.; Arthur, Jarvis J.; Hammond, Dana P.; Mall, Gerald H.

    1993-01-01

    This document gives a brief overview of parallel software tools available on the Intel iPSC/860 parallel computer at Langley Research Center. It is intended to provide a source of information that is somewhat more concise than vendor-supplied material on the purpose and use of various tools. Each of the chapters on tools is organized in a similar manner covering an overview of the functionality, access information, how to effectively use the tool, observations about the tool and how it compares to similar software, known problems or shortfalls with the software, and reference documentation. It is primarily intended for users of the iPSC/860 at Langley Research Center and is appropriate for both the experienced and novice user.

  11. Advancing Software Architecture Modeling for Large Scale Heterogeneous Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan

    2010-11-07

    In this paper we describe how incorporating technology-specific modeling at the architecture level can help reduce risks and produce better designs for large, heterogeneous software applications. We draw an analogy with established modeling approaches in scientific domains, using groundwater modeling as an example, to help illustrate gaps in current software architecture modeling approaches. We then describe the advances in modeling, analysis and tooling that are required to bring sophisticated modeling and development methods within reach of software architects.

  12. Modeling Tool Advances Rotorcraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Continuum Dynamics Inc. (CDI), founded in 1979, specializes in advanced engineering services, including fluid dynamic modeling and analysis for aeronautics research. The company has completed a number of SBIR research projects with NASA, including early rotorcraft work done through Langley Research Center, but more recently, out of Ames Research Center. NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants on helicopter wake modeling resulted in the Comprehensive Hierarchical Aeromechanics Rotorcraft Model (CHARM), a tool for studying helicopter and tiltrotor unsteady free wake modeling, including distributed and integrated loads, and performance prediction. Application of the software code in a blade redesign program for Carson Helicopters, of Perkasie, Pennsylvania, increased the payload and cruise speeds of its S-61 helicopter. Follow-on development resulted in a $24 million revenue increase for Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation, of Stratford, Connecticut, as part of the company's rotor design efforts. Now under continuous development for more than 25 years, CHARM models the complete aerodynamics and dynamics of rotorcraft in general flight conditions. CHARM has been used to model a broad spectrum of rotorcraft attributes, including performance, blade loading, blade-vortex interaction noise, air flow fields, and hub loads. The highly accurate software is currently in use by all major rotorcraft manufacturers, NASA, the U.S. Army, and the U.S. Navy.

  13. Software Framework for Advanced Power Plant Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    John Widmann; Sorin Munteanu; Aseem Jain; Pankaj Gupta; Mark Moales; Erik Ferguson; Lewis Collins; David Sloan; Woodrow Fiveland; Yi-dong Lang; Larry Biegler; Michael Locke; Simon Lingard; Jay Yun

    2010-08-01

    This report summarizes the work accomplished during the Phase II development effort of the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS). The objective of the project is to develop the tools to efficiently combine high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models with process modeling software. During the course of the project, a robust integration controller was developed that can be used in any CAPE-OPEN compliant process modeling environment. The controller mediates the exchange of information between the process modeling software and the CFD software. Several approaches to reducing the time disparity between CFD simulations and process modeling have been investigated and implemented. These include enabling the CFD models to be run on a remote cluster and enabling multiple CFD models to be run simultaneously. Furthermore, computationally fast reduced-order models (ROMs) have been developed that can be 'trained' using the results from CFD simulations and then used directly within flowsheets. Unit operation models (both CFD and ROMs) can be uploaded to a model database and shared between multiple users.

  14. Tool Use Within NASA Software Quality Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shigeta, Denise; Port, Dan; Nikora, Allen P.; Wilf, Joel

    2013-01-01

    As space mission software systems become larger and more complex, it is increasingly important for the software assurance effort to have the ability to effectively assess both the artifacts produced during software system development and the development process itself. Conceptually, assurance is a straightforward idea - it is the result of activities carried out by an organization independent of the software developers to better inform project management of potential technical and programmatic risks, and thus increase management's confidence in the decisions they ultimately make. In practice, effective assurance for large, complex systems often entails assessing large, complex software artifacts (e.g., requirements specifications, architectural descriptions) as well as substantial amounts of unstructured information (e.g., anomaly reports resulting from testing activities during development). In such an environment, assurance engineers can benefit greatly from appropriate tool support. In order to do so, an assurance organization will need accurate and timely information on the tool support available for various types of assurance activities. In this paper, we investigate the current use of tool support for assurance organizations within NASA, and describe on-going work at JPL for providing assurance organizations with the information about tools they need to use them effectively.

  15. Real time software tools and methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christofferson, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    Real time systems are characterized by high speed processing and throughput as well as asynchronous event processing requirements. These requirements give rise to particular implementations of parallel or pipeline multitasking structures, of intertask or interprocess communications mechanisms, and finally of message (buffer) routing or switching mechanisms. These mechanisms or structures, along with the data structue, describe the essential character of the system. These common structural elements and mechanisms are identified, their implementation in the form of routines, tasks or macros - in other words, tools are formalized. The tools developed support or make available the following: reentrant task creation, generalized message routing techniques, generalized task structures/task families, standardized intertask communications mechanisms, and pipeline and parallel processing architectures in a multitasking environment. Tools development raise some interesting prospects in the areas of software instrumentation and software portability. These issues are discussed following the description of the tools themselves.

  16. Software development tools: A bibliography, appendix C.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddle, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    A bibliography containing approximately 200 citations on tools which help software developers perform some development task (such as text manipulation, testing, etc.), and which would not necessarily be found as part of a computing facility is given. The bibliography comes from a relatively random sampling of the literature and is not complete. But it is indicative of the nature and range of tools currently being prepared or currently available.

  17. Software Tools for Empowering Instructional Developers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayeski, Diane M.

    1991-01-01

    Software systems are being created to assist both novice and expert instructional technologists in response to perceived need of organizations to increase their training. Underlying philosophies and goals of instructional developer automation tools and their potential effects upon the organizations who adopt them must be examined so they will help…

  18. SUSTAINABLE REMEDIATION SOFTWARE TOOL EXERCISE AND EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, J.; Nichols, R.; Looney, B.

    2011-05-12

    The goal of this study was to examine two different software tools designed to account for the environmental impacts of remediation projects. Three case studies from the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC were used to exercise SiteWise (SW) and Sustainable Remediation Tool (SRT) by including both traditional and novel remediation techniques, contaminants, and contaminated media. This study combined retrospective analysis of implemented projects with prospective analysis of options that were not implemented. Input data were derived from engineering plans, project reports, and planning documents with a few factors supplied from calculations based on Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). Conclusions drawn from software output were generally consistent within a tool; both tools identified the same remediation options as the 'best' for a given site. Magnitudes of impacts varied between the two tools, and it was not always possible to identify the source of the disagreement. The tools differed in their quantitative approaches: SRT based impacts on specific contaminants, media, and site geometry and modeled contaminant removal. SW based impacts on processes and equipment instead of chemical modeling. While SW was able to handle greater variety in remediation scenarios, it did not include a measure of the effectiveness of the scenario.

  19. New Software Framework to Share Research Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, Kevin; Becker, Thorsten W.; Boschi, Lapo; Sain, Jared; Schorlemmer, Danijel; Waterhouse, Hannah

    2009-03-01

    Solid Earth Teaching and Research Environment (SEATREE) is a modular and user-friendly software to facilitate the use of solid Earth research tools in the classroom and for interdisciplinary research collaboration. The software provides a stand-alone open-source package that allows users to operate in a “black box” mode, which hides implementation details, while also allowing them to dig deeper into the underlying source code. The overlying user interfaces are written in the Python programming language using a modern, object-oriented design, including graphical user interactions. SEATREE, which provides an interface to a range of new and existing lower level programs that can be written in any computer programming language, may in the long run contribute to new ways of sharing scientific research. By sharing both data and modeling tools in a consistent framework, published (numerical) experiments can be made truly reproducible again.

  20. Software Engineering Tools for Scientific Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Marc; Saboo, Pallabi; Sonsini, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Software tools were constructed to address issues the NASA Fortran development community faces, and they were tested on real models currently in use at NASA. These proof-of-concept tools address the High-End Computing Program and the Modeling, Analysis, and Prediction Program. Two examples are the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric model in Cell Fortran on the Cell Broadband Engine, and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) coupled atmosphere- ocean model called ModelE, written in fixed format Fortran.

  1. A software tool for dataflow graph scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert L., III

    1994-01-01

    A graph-theoretic design process and software tool is presented for selecting a multiprocessing scheduling solution for a class of computational problems. The problems of interest are those that can be described using a dataflow graph and are intended to be executed repetitively on multiple processors. The dataflow paradigm is very useful in exposing the parallelism inherent in algorithms. It provides a graphical and mathematical model which describes a partial ordering of algorithm tasks based on data precedence.

  2. Integrated review software advances at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Klosterbuer, S. F.; Michel, K. D.; Betts, S. E.; Determan, J. C.; Longo, J. F.; Parker, R. F.; Pelowitz, D. G.; Rothrock, R. B.; Schneider, C. M.; Nordquist, H. M.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1988, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been developing software for unattended monitoring systems. These systems are composed of three categories of software: acquisition, collection and review. The data acquisition software is contained in modular instrumentation distributed throughout facilities to continuously acquire data from devices ranging from radiation detectors to cameras to binary switches. The data collection software runs on computers connected to the instruments and offloads and stores the acquired data. The review software enables the end user to quickly and easily examine the data collected from these different systems and compare the results to declared operator activities. This paper addresses the review software. The original standalone review software processed only radiation data. This software was expanded to include new programs (tools) to display and correlate video and operator declarations and added an interface to the standard neutron coincidence counter analysis program. This expanded review software containing multiple review tools is referred to collectively as the Integrated Review Software (IRS). The IRS continues to expand and evolve. Two primary IRS developments will be described in this paper. First, the IRS was expanded to include review tools to display and analyze new data types. Position Review was developed to display Global Positioning System (GPS) location data to aid in tracking radiation movements. Isotopic Review is being developed to provide a link to the standard gamma isotopic analysis software. In addition significant enhancements are being added to the existing review tools such as Operator Review, Radiation Review and Digital Video Review. A second IRS development is to produce standardized components with published interfaces enabling other parties to produce custom components that plug into review software. It is anticipated that there will be four primary types of components that could be

  3. ATLAS software configuration and build tool optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybkin, Grigory; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    ATLAS software code base is over 6 million lines organised in about 2000 packages. It makes use of some 100 external software packages, is developed by more than 400 developers and used by more than 2500 physicists from over 200 universities and laboratories in 6 continents. To meet the challenge of configuration and building of this software, the Configuration Management Tool (CMT) is used. CMT expects each package to describe its build targets, build and environment setup parameters, dependencies on other packages in a text file called requirements, and each project (group of packages) to describe its policies and dependencies on other projects in a text project file. Based on the effective set of configuration parameters read from the requirements files of dependent packages and project files, CMT commands build the packages, generate the environment for their use, or query the packages. The main focus was on build time performance that was optimised within several approaches: reduction of the number of reads of requirements files that are now read once per package by a CMT build command that generates cached requirements files for subsequent CMT build commands; introduction of more fine-grained build parallelism at package task level, i.e., dependent applications and libraries are compiled in parallel; code optimisation of CMT commands used for build; introduction of package level build parallelism, i. e., parallelise the build of independent packages. By default, CMT launches NUMBER-OF-PROCESSORS build commands in parallel. The other focus was on CMT commands optimisation in general that made them approximately 2 times faster. CMT can generate a cached requirements file for the environment setup command, which is especially useful for deployment on distributed file systems like AFS or CERN VMFS. The use of parallelism, caching and code optimisation significantly-by several times-reduced software build time, environment setup time, increased the efficiency of

  4. Software Tools to Support Research on Airport Departure Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Francis; Evans, Antony; Feron, Eric; Clarke, John-Paul

    2003-01-01

    A simple, portable and useful collection of software tools has been developed for the analysis of airport surface traffic. The tools are based on a flexible and robust traffic-flow model, and include calibration, validation and simulation functionality for this model. Several different interfaces have been developed to help promote usage of these tools, including a portable Matlab(TM) implementation of the basic algorithms; a web-based interface which provides online access to automated analyses of airport traffic based on a database of real-world operations data which covers over 250 U.S. airports over a 5-year period; and an interactive simulation-based tool currently in use as part of a college-level educational module. More advanced applications for airport departure traffic include taxi-time prediction and evaluation of "windowing" congestion control.

  5. Final Technical Report - Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, Alan

    2014-10-21

    This is a final technical report for the University of Maryland work in the SciDAC Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS). The Maryland work focused on software tools for coupling parallel software components built using the Common Component Architecture (CCA) APIs. Those tools are based on the Maryland InterComm software framework that has been used in multiple computational science applications to build large-scale simulations of complex physical systems that employ multiple separately developed codes.

  6. Final Report for "Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software"

    SciTech Connect

    Svetlana Shasharina

    2010-12-01

    The goal of the Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software is to fundamentally changing the way scientific software is developed and used by bringing component-based software development technologies to high-performance scientific and engineering computing. The role of Tech-X work in TASCS project is to provide an outreach to accelerator physics and fusion applications by introducing TASCS tools into applications, testing tools in the applications and modifying the tools to be more usable.

  7. Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Informatics Software Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    This is a description of the software design for the 2013 edition of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Informatics computer assembly. The Informatics system is an optional part of the space suit assembly. It adds a graphical interface for displaying suit status, timelines, procedures, and caution and warning information. In the future it will display maps with GPS position data, and video and still images captured by the astronaut.

  8. STAYSL PNNL Suite of Software Tools.

    SciTech Connect

    GREENWOOD, LARRY R.

    2013-07-19

    Version: 00 The STAYSL PNNL software suite provides a set of tools for working with neutron activation rates measured in a nuclear fission reactor, an accelerator-based neutron source, or any neutron field to determine the neutron flux spectrum through a generalized least-squares approach. This process is referred to as neutron spectral adjustment since the preferred approach is to use measured data to adjust neutron spectra provided by neutron physics calculations. The input data consist of the reaction rates based on measured activities, an initial estimate of the neutron flux spectrum, neutron activation cross sections and their associated uncertainties (covariances), and relevant correction factors. The output consists of the adjusted neutron flux spectrum and associated covariance matrix, which is useful for neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations.

  9. STAYSL PNNL Suite of Software Tools.

    2013-07-19

    Version: 00 The STAYSL PNNL software suite provides a set of tools for working with neutron activation rates measured in a nuclear fission reactor, an accelerator-based neutron source, or any neutron field to determine the neutron flux spectrum through a generalized least-squares approach. This process is referred to as neutron spectral adjustment since the preferred approach is to use measured data to adjust neutron spectra provided by neutron physics calculations. The input data consist ofmore » the reaction rates based on measured activities, an initial estimate of the neutron flux spectrum, neutron activation cross sections and their associated uncertainties (covariances), and relevant correction factors. The output consists of the adjusted neutron flux spectrum and associated covariance matrix, which is useful for neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations.« less

  10. Northwestern University Schizophrenia Data and Software Tool (NUSDAST)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Kogan, Alex; Cobia, Derin; Alpert, Kathryn; Kolasny, Anthony; Miller, Michael I.; Marcus, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The schizophrenia research community has invested substantial resources on collecting, managing and sharing large neuroimaging datasets. As part of this effort, our group has collected high resolution magnetic resonance (MR) datasets from individuals with schizophrenia, their non-psychotic siblings, healthy controls and their siblings. This effort has resulted in a growing resource, the Northwestern University Schizophrenia Data and Software Tool (NUSDAST), an NIH-funded data sharing project to stimulate new research. This resource resides on XNAT Central, and it contains neuroimaging (MR scans, landmarks and surface maps for deep subcortical structures, and FreeSurfer cortical parcellation and measurement data), cognitive (cognitive domain scores for crystallized intelligence, working memory, episodic memory, and executive function), clinical (demographic, sibling relationship, SAPS and SANS psychopathology), and genetic (20 polymorphisms) data, collected from more than 450 subjects, most with 2-year longitudinal follow-up. A neuroimaging mapping, analysis and visualization software tool, CAWorks, is also part of this resource. Moreover, in making our existing neuroimaging data along with the associated meta-data and computational tools publically accessible, we have established a web-based information retrieval portal that allows the user to efficiently search the collection. This research-ready dataset meaningfully combines neuroimaging data with other relevant information, and it can be used to help facilitate advancing neuroimaging research. It is our hope that this effort will help to overcome some of the commonly recognized technical barriers in advancing neuroimaging research such as lack of local organization and standard descriptions. PMID:24223551

  11. Northwestern University Schizophrenia Data and Software Tool (NUSDAST).

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Kogan, Alex; Cobia, Derin; Alpert, Kathryn; Kolasny, Anthony; Miller, Michael I; Marcus, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The schizophrenia research community has invested substantial resources on collecting, managing and sharing large neuroimaging datasets. As part of this effort, our group has collected high resolution magnetic resonance (MR) datasets from individuals with schizophrenia, their non-psychotic siblings, healthy controls and their siblings. This effort has resulted in a growing resource, the Northwestern University Schizophrenia Data and Software Tool (NUSDAST), an NIH-funded data sharing project to stimulate new research. This resource resides on XNAT Central, and it contains neuroimaging (MR scans, landmarks and surface maps for deep subcortical structures, and FreeSurfer cortical parcellation and measurement data), cognitive (cognitive domain scores for crystallized intelligence, working memory, episodic memory, and executive function), clinical (demographic, sibling relationship, SAPS and SANS psychopathology), and genetic (20 polymorphisms) data, collected from more than 450 subjects, most with 2-year longitudinal follow-up. A neuroimaging mapping, analysis and visualization software tool, CAWorks, is also part of this resource. Moreover, in making our existing neuroimaging data along with the associated meta-data and computational tools publically accessible, we have established a web-based information retrieval portal that allows the user to efficiently search the collection. This research-ready dataset meaningfully combines neuroimaging data with other relevant information, and it can be used to help facilitate advancing neuroimaging research. It is our hope that this effort will help to overcome some of the commonly recognized technical barriers in advancing neuroimaging research such as lack of local organization and standard descriptions. PMID:24223551

  12. Control Software for Advanced Video Guidance Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Book, Michael L.; Bryan, Thomas C.

    2006-01-01

    Embedded software has been developed specifically for controlling an Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS). A Video Guidance Sensor is an optoelectronic system that provides guidance for automated docking of two vehicles. Such a system includes pulsed laser diodes and a video camera, the output of which is digitized. From the positions of digitized target images and known geometric relationships, the relative position and orientation of the vehicles are computed. The present software consists of two subprograms running in two processors that are parts of the AVGS. The subprogram in the first processor receives commands from an external source, checks the commands for correctness, performs commanded non-image-data-processing control functions, and sends image data processing parts of commands to the second processor. The subprogram in the second processor processes image data as commanded. Upon power-up, the software performs basic tests of functionality, then effects a transition to a standby mode. When a command is received, the software goes into one of several operational modes (e.g. acquisition or tracking). The software then returns, to the external source, the data appropriate to the command.

  13. Tool Support for Software Lookup Table Optimization

    DOE PAGES

    Wilcox, Chris; Strout, Michelle Mills; Bieman, James M.

    2011-01-01

    A number of scientific applications are performance-limited by expressions that repeatedly call costly elementary functions. Lookup table (LUT) optimization accelerates the evaluation of such functions by reusing previously computed results. LUT methods can speed up applications that tolerate an approximation of function results, thereby achieving a high level of fuzzy reuse. One problem with LUT optimization is the difficulty of controlling the tradeoff between performance and accuracy. The current practice of manual LUT optimization adds programming effort by requiring extensive experimentation to make this tradeoff, and such hand tuning can obfuscate algorithms. In this paper we describe a methodology andmore » tool implementation to improve the application of software LUT optimization. Our Mesa tool implements source-to-source transformations for C or C++ code to automate the tedious and error-prone aspects of LUT generation such as domain profiling, error analysis, and code generation. We evaluate Mesa with five scientific applications. Our results show a performance improvement of 3.0× and 6.9× for two molecular biology algorithms, 1.4× for a molecular dynamics program, 2.1× to 2.8× for a neural network application, and 4.6× for a hydrology calculation. We find that Mesa enables LUT optimization with more control over accuracy and less effort than manual approaches.« less

  14. Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) compendium of tools, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A set of programs used to aid software product development is listed. Known as software tools, such programs include requirements analyzers, design languages, precompilers, code auditors, code analyzers, and software librarians. Abstracts, resource requirements, documentation, processing summaries, and availability are indicated for most tools.

  15. Sandia software guidelines: Volume 5, Tools, techniques, and methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. This volume describes software tools and methodologies available to Sandia personnel for the development of software, and outlines techniques that have proven useful within the Laboratories and elsewhere. References and evaluations by Sandia personnel are included. 6 figs.

  16. Tools and Behavioral Abstraction: A Direction for Software Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leino, K. Rustan M.

    As in other engineering professions, software engineers rely on tools. Such tools can analyze program texts and design specifications more automatically and in more detail than ever before. While many tools today are applied to find new defects in old code, I predict that more software-engineering tools of the future will be available to software authors at the time of authoring. If such analysis tools can be made to be fast enough and easy enough to use, they can help software engineers better produce and evolve programs.

  17. Tool Support for Parametric Analysis of Large Software Simulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Gundy-Burlet, Karen; Pasareanu, Corina; Menzies, Tim; Barrett, Tony

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of large and complex parameterized software systems, e.g., systems simulation in aerospace, is very complicated and time-consuming due to the large parameter space, and the complex, highly coupled nonlinear nature of the different system components. Thus, such systems are generally validated only in regions local to anticipated operating points rather than through characterization of the entire feasible operational envelope of the system. We have addressed the factors deterring such an analysis with a tool to support envelope assessment: we utilize a combination of advanced Monte Carlo generation with n-factor combinatorial parameter variations to limit the number of cases, but still explore important interactions in the parameter space in a systematic fashion. Additional test-cases, automatically generated from models (e.g., UML, Simulink, Stateflow) improve the coverage. The distributed test runs of the software system produce vast amounts of data, making manual analysis impossible. Our tool automatically analyzes the generated data through a combination of unsupervised Bayesian clustering techniques (AutoBayes) and supervised learning of critical parameter ranges using the treatment learner TAR3. The tool has been developed around the Trick simulation environment, which is widely used within NASA. We will present this tool with a GN&C (Guidance, Navigation and Control) simulation of a small satellite system.

  18. VTGRAPH - GRAPHIC SOFTWARE TOOL FOR VT TERMINALS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C.

    1994-01-01

    VTGRAPH is a graphics software tool for DEC/VT or VT compatible terminals which are widely used by government and industry. It is a FORTRAN or C-language callable library designed to allow the user to deal with many computer environments which use VT terminals for window management and graphic systems. It also provides a PLOT10-like package plus color or shade capability for VT240, VT241, and VT300 terminals. The program is transportable to many different computers which use VT terminals. With this graphics package, the user can easily design more friendly user interface programs and design PLOT10 programs on VT terminals with different computer systems. VTGRAPH was developed using the ReGis Graphics set which provides a full range of graphics capabilities. The basic VTGRAPH capabilities are as follows: window management, PLOT10 compatible drawing, generic program routines for two and three dimensional plotting, and color graphics or shaded graphics capability. The program was developed in VAX FORTRAN in 1988. VTGRAPH requires a ReGis graphics set terminal and a FORTRAN compiler. The program has been run on a DEC MicroVAX 3600 series computer operating under VMS 5.0, and has a virtual memory requirement of 5KB.

  19. A Tool for Managing Software Architecture Knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Babar, Muhammad A.; Gorton, Ian

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes a tool for managing architectural knowledge and rationale. The tool has been developed to support a framework for capturing and using architectural knowledge to improve the architecture process. This paper describes the main architectural components and features of the tool. The paper also provides examples of using the tool for supporting wellknown architecture design and analysis methods.

  20. The Value of Open Source Software Tools in Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Gary

    2011-01-01

    In an era of global networks, researchers using qualitative methods must consider the impact of any software they use on the sharing of data and findings. In this essay, I identify researchers' main areas of concern regarding the use of qualitative software packages for research. I then examine how open source software tools, wherein the publisher…

  1. User Studies: Developing Learning Strategy Tool Software for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Gail E.; Koury, Kevin A.; Peng, Hsinyi

    This paper is a report of user studies for developing learning strategy tool software for children. The prototype software demonstrated is designed for children with learning and behavioral disabilities. The tools consist of easy-to-use templates for creating organizational, memory, and learning approach guides for use in classrooms and at home.…

  2. Caesy: A software tool for computer-aided engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wette, Matt

    1993-01-01

    A new software tool, Caesy, is described. This tool provides a strongly typed programming environment for research in the development of algorithms and software for computer-aided control system design. A description of the user language and its implementation as they currently stand are presented along with a description of work in progress and areas of future work.

  3. ToxPredictor: a Toxicity Estimation Software Tool

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Computational Toxicology Team within the National Risk Management Research Laboratory has developed a software tool that will allow the user to estimate the toxicity for a variety of endpoints (such as acute aquatic toxicity). The software tool is coded in Java and can be ac...

  4. Estimation of toxicity using a Java based software tool

    EPA Science Inventory

    A software tool has been developed that will allow a user to estimate the toxicity for a variety of endpoints (such as acute aquatic toxicity). The software tool is coded in Java and can be accessed using a web browser (or alternatively downloaded and ran as a stand alone applic...

  5. Tools Ensure Reliability of Critical Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    In November 2006, after attempting to make a routine maneuver, NASA's Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) reported unexpected errors. The onboard software switched to backup resources, and a 2-day lapse in communication took place between the spacecraft and Earth. When a signal was finally received, it indicated that MGS had entered safe mode, a state of restricted activity in which the computer awaits instructions from Earth. After more than 9 years of successful operation gathering data and snapping pictures of Mars to characterize the planet's land and weather communication between MGS and Earth suddenly stopped. Months later, a report from NASA's internal review board found the spacecraft's battery failed due to an unfortunate sequence of events. Updates to the spacecraft's software, which had taken place months earlier, were written to the wrong memory address in the spacecraft's computer. In short, the mission ended because of a software defect. Over the last decade, spacecraft have become increasingly reliant on software to carry out mission operations. In fact, the next mission to Mars, the Mars Science Laboratory, will rely on more software than all earlier missions to Mars combined. According to Gerard Holzmann, manager at the Laboratory for Reliable Software (LaRS) at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), even the fault protection systems on a spacecraft are mostly software-based. For reasons like these, well-functioning software is critical for NASA. In the same year as the failure of MGS, Holzmann presented a new approach to critical software development to help reduce risk and provide consistency. He proposed The Power of 10: Rules for Developing Safety-Critical Code, which is a small set of rules that can easily be remembered, clearly relate to risk, and allow compliance to be verified. The reaction at JPL was positive, and developers in the private sector embraced Holzmann's ideas.

  6. EISA 432 Energy Audits Best Practices: Software Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Maryl Fisher

    2014-11-01

    Five whole building analysis software tools that can aid an energy manager with fulfilling energy audit and commissioning/retro-commissioning requirements were selected for review in this best practices study. A description of each software tool is provided as well as a discussion of the user interface and level of expertise required for each tool, a review of how to use the tool for analyzing energy conservation opportunities, the format and content of reports generated by the tool, and a discussion on the applicability of the tool for commissioning.

  7. Interactive Software Fault Analysis Tool for Operational Anomaly Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ken

    2002-01-01

    Resolving software operational anomalies frequently requires a significant amount of resources for software troubleshooting activities. The time required to identify a root cause of the anomaly in the software may lead to significant timeline impacts and in some cases, may extend to compromise of mission and safety objectives. An integrated tool that supports software fault analysis based on the observed operational effects of an anomaly could significantly reduce the time required to resolve operational anomalies; increase confidence for the proposed solution; identify software paths to be re-verified during regression testing; and, as a secondary product of the analysis, identify safety critical software paths.

  8. Applying CASE Tools for On-Board Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brammer, U.; Hönle, A.

    For many space projects the software development is facing great pressure with respect to quality, costs and schedule. One way to cope with these challenges is the application of CASE tools for automatic generation of code and documentation. This paper describes two CASE tools: Rhapsody (I-Logix) featuring UML and ISG (BSSE) that provides modeling of finite state machines. Both tools have been used at Kayser-Threde in different space projects for the development of on-board software. The tools are discussed with regard to the full software development cycle.

  9. Software Users Manual (SUM): Extended Testability Analysis (ETA) Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Fulton, Christopher E.

    2011-01-01

    This software user manual describes the implementation and use the Extended Testability Analysis (ETA) Tool. The ETA Tool is a software program that augments the analysis and reporting capabilities of a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) testability analysis software package called the Testability Engineering And Maintenance System (TEAMS) Designer. An initial diagnostic assessment is performed by the TEAMS Designer software using a qualitative, directed-graph model of the system being analyzed. The ETA Tool utilizes system design information captured within the diagnostic model and testability analysis output from the TEAMS Designer software to create a series of six reports for various system engineering needs. The ETA Tool allows the user to perform additional studies on the testability analysis results by determining the detection sensitivity to the loss of certain sensors or tests. The ETA Tool was developed to support design and development of the NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle. The diagnostic analysis provided by the ETA Tool was proven to be valuable system engineering output that provided consistency in the verification of system engineering requirements. This software user manual provides a description of each output report generated by the ETA Tool. The manual also describes the example diagnostic model and supporting documentation - also provided with the ETA Tool software release package - that were used to generate the reports presented in the manual

  10. Managing Digital Archives Using Open Source Software Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barve, S.; Dongare, S.

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes the use of open source software tools such as MySQL and PHP for creating database-backed websites. Such websites offer many advantages over ones built from static HTML pages. This paper will discuss how OSS tools are used and their benefits, and after the successful implementation of these tools how the library took the initiative in implementing an institutional repository using DSpace open source software.

  11. ADVANCED POWER SYSTEMS ANALYSIS TOOLS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert R. Jensen; Steven A. Benson; Jason D. Laumb

    2001-08-31

    The use of Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) modeling tools and improved analytical methods has provided key information in optimizing advanced power system design and operating conditions for efficiency, producing minimal air pollutant emissions and utilizing a wide range of fossil fuel properties. This project was divided into four tasks: the demonstration of the ash transformation model, upgrading spreadsheet tools, enhancements to analytical capabilities using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and improvements to the slag viscosity model. The ash transformation model, Atran, was used to predict the size and composition of ash particles, which has a major impact on the fate of the combustion system. To optimize Atran key factors such as mineral fragmentation and coalescence, the heterogeneous and homogeneous interaction of the organically associated elements must be considered as they are applied to the operating conditions. The resulting model's ash composition compares favorably to measured results. Enhancements to existing EERC spreadsheet application included upgrading interactive spreadsheets to calculate the thermodynamic properties for fuels, reactants, products, and steam with Newton Raphson algorithms to perform calculations on mass, energy, and elemental balances, isentropic expansion of steam, and gasifier equilibrium conditions. Derivative calculations can be performed to estimate fuel heating values, adiabatic flame temperatures, emission factors, comparative fuel costs, and per-unit carbon taxes from fuel analyses. Using state-of-the-art computer-controlled scanning electron microscopes and associated microanalysis systems, a method to determine viscosity using the incorporation of grey-scale binning acquired by the SEM image was developed. The image analysis capabilities of a backscattered electron image can be subdivided into various grey-scale ranges that can be analyzed separately. Since the grey scale's intensity is

  12. Building Software Development Capacity to Advance the State of Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luterbach, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Educational technologists may advance the state of the field by increasing capacity to develop software tools and instructional applications. Presently, few academic programs in educational technology require even a single computer programming course. Further, the educational technologists who develop software generally work independently or in…

  13. Integrated Software: A Versatile Management Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, L. Edward

    1985-01-01

    Integrated software is available to help with many of the small- to medium-sized school's management tasks requiring data analysis. Typical integrated programs include spreadsheet, database, graphing, and word processing components and cost less than the price of all the components purchased separately. (PGD)

  14. Innovative Software Tools Measure Behavioral Alertness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    To monitor astronaut behavioral alertness in space, Johnson Space Center awarded Philadelphia-based Pulsar Informatics Inc. SBIR funding to develop software to be used onboard the International Space Station. Now used by the government and private companies, the technology has increased revenues for the firm by an average of 75 percent every year.

  15. Software Development Of XML Parser Based On Algebraic Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Bozhidar; Georgieva, Adriana

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, is presented one software development and implementation of an algebraic method for XML data processing, which accelerates XML parsing process. Therefore, the proposed in this article nontraditional approach for fast XML navigation with algebraic tools contributes to advanced efforts in the making of an easier user-friendly API for XML transformations. Here the proposed software for XML documents processing (parser) is easy to use and can manage files with strictly defined data structure. The purpose of the presented algorithm is to offer a new approach for search and restructuring hierarchical XML data. This approach permits fast XML documents processing, using algebraic model developed in details in previous works of the same authors. So proposed parsing mechanism is easy accessible to the web consumer who is able to control XML file processing, to search different elements (tags) in it, to delete and to add a new XML content as well. The presented various tests show higher rapidity and low consumption of resources in comparison with some existing commercial parsers.

  16. Talkoot: software tool to create collaboratories for earth science

    SciTech Connect

    Movva, Sunil; Ramachandran, Rahul; Maskey, Manil; Kulkarni, Ajinkya; Conover, Helen; Nair, U.S.

    2012-01-01

    Open science, where researchers share and publish every element of their research process in addition to the final results, can foster novel ways of collaboration among researchers and has the potential to spontaneously create new virtual research collaborations. Based on scientific interest, these new virtual research collaborations can cut across traditional boundaries such as institutions and organizations. Advances in technology allow for software tools that can be used by different research groups and institutions to build and support virtual collaborations and infuse open science. This paper describes Talkoot, a software toolkit designed and developed by the authors to provide Earth Science researchers a ready-to-use knowledge management environment and an online platform for collaboration. Talkoot allows Earth Science researchers a means to systematically gather, tag and share their data, analysis workflows and research notes. These Talkoot features are designed to foster rapid knowledge sharing within a virtual community. Talkoot can be utilized by small to medium sized groups and research centers, as well as large enterprises such a national laboratories and federal agencies.

  17. The Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (T.E.S.T.)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (T.E.S.T.) has been developed to estimate toxicological values for aquatic and mammalian species considering acute and chronic endpoints for screening purposes within TSCA and REACH programs.

  18. ISWHM: Tools and Techniques for Software and System Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Mengshoel, Ole J.; Darwiche, Adnan

    2010-01-01

    This presentation presents status and results of research on Software Health Management done within the NRA "ISWHM: Tools and Techniques for Software and System Health Management." Topics include: Ingredients of a Guidance, Navigation, and Control System (GN and C); Selected GN and C Testbed example; Health Management of major ingredients; ISWHM testbed architecture; and Conclusions and next Steps.

  19. Developing a Decision Support System: The Software and Hardware Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Phillip M.

    1989-01-01

    Describes some of the available software and hardware tools that can be used to develop a decision support system implemented on microcomputers. Activities that should be supported by software are discussed, including data entry, data coding, finding and combining data, and data compatibility. Hardware considerations include speed, storage…

  20. iPhone examination with modern forensic software tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höne, Thomas; Kröger, Knut; Luttenberger, Silas; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to show the usefulness of modern forensic software tools for iPhone examination. In particular, we focus on the new version of Elcomsoft iOS Forensic Toolkit and compare it with Oxygen Forensics Suite 2012 regarding functionality, usability and capabilities. It is shown how these software tools works and how capable they are in examining non-jailbreaked and jailbreaked iPhones.

  1. Software tool for xenon gamma-ray spectrometer control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernysheva, I. V.; Novikov, A. S.; Shustov, A. E.; Dmitrenko, V. V.; Pyae Nyein, Sone; Petrenko, D.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasik, K. F.

    2016-02-01

    Software tool "Acquisition and processing of gamma-ray spectra" for xenon gamma-ray spectrometers control was developed. It supports the multi-windows interface. Software tool has the possibilities for acquisition of gamma-ray spectra from xenon gamma-ray detector via USB or RS-485 interfaces, directly or via TCP-IP protocol, energy calibration of gamma-ray spectra, saving gamma-ray spectra on a disk.

  2. Some Interactive Aspects of a Software Design Schema Acquisition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hing-Yan; Harandi, Mehdi T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a design schema acquisition tool which forms an important component of a hybrid software design system for reuse. The hybrid system incorporates both schema-based approaches in supporting software design reuse activities and is realized by extensions to the IDeA system. The paper also examines some of the interactive aspects that the tool requires with the domain analyst to accomplish its acquisition task.

  3. Generating DEM from LIDAR data - comparison of available software tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzeniowska, K.; Lacka, M.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years many software tools and applications have appeared that offer procedures, scripts and algorithms to process and visualize ALS data. This variety of software tools and of "point cloud" processing methods contributed to the aim of this study: to assess algorithms available in various software tools that are used to classify LIDAR "point cloud" data, through a careful examination of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) generated from LIDAR data on a base of these algorithms. The works focused on the most important available software tools: both commercial and open source ones. Two sites in a mountain area were selected for the study. The area of each site is 0.645 sq km. DEMs generated with analysed software tools ware compared with a reference dataset, generated using manual methods to eliminate non ground points. Surfaces were analysed using raster analysis. Minimum, maximum and mean differences between reference DEM and DEMs generated with analysed software tools were calculated, together with Root Mean Square Error. Differences between DEMs were also examined visually using transects along the grid axes in the test sites.

  4. Lessons learned in deploying software estimation technology and tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panlilio-Yap, Nikki; Ho, Danny

    1994-01-01

    Developing a software product involves estimating various project parameters. This is typically done in the planning stages of the project when there is much uncertainty and very little information. Coming up with accurate estimates of effort, cost, schedule, and reliability is a critical problem faced by all software project managers. The use of estimation models and commercially available tools in conjunction with the best bottom-up estimates of software-development experts enhances the ability of a product development group to derive reasonable estimates of important project parameters. This paper describes the experience of the IBM Software Solutions (SWS) Toronto Laboratory in selecting software estimation models and tools and deploying their use to the laboratory's product development groups. It introduces the SLIM and COSTAR products, the software estimation tools selected for deployment to the product areas, and discusses the rationale for their selection. The paper also describes the mechanisms used for technology injection and tool deployment, and concludes with a discussion of important lessons learned in the technology and tool insertion process.

  5. Development of Advanced Multi-Modality Radiation Treatment Planning Software

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D W; Hartmann Siantar, C

    2002-02-19

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has long been active in development of advanced Monte-Carlo based computational dosimetry and treatment planning methods and software for advanced radiotherapy, with a particular focus on Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) and, to a somewhat lesser extent, Fast-Neutron Therapy. The most recent INEEL software product system of this type is known as SERA, Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications. SERA is at a mature level in its life cycle, it has been licensed for research use worldwide, and it has become well established as a computational tool for research. However, along with its strengths, SERA also has some limitations in its structure and computational methodologies. More specifically, it is optimized only for neutron-based applications. Although photon transport can be computed with SERA, the simplified model that is used is designed primarily for photons produced in the neutron transport process. Thus SERA is not appropriate for applications to, for example, standard external-beam photon radiotherapy, which is by far more commonly used in the clinic than neutron based therapy.

  6. Software for Use with Optoelectronic Measuring Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Kim C.

    2004-01-01

    A computer program has been written to facilitate and accelerate the process of measurement by use of the apparatus described in "Optoelectronic Tool Adds Scale Marks to Photographic Images" (KSC-12201). The tool contains four laser diodes that generate parallel beams of light spaced apart at a known distance. The beams of light are used to project bright spots that serve as scale marks that become incorporated into photographic images (including film and electronic images). The sizes of objects depicted in the images can readily be measured by reference to the scale marks. The computer program is applicable to a scene that contains the laser spots and that has been imaged in a square pixel format that can be imported into a graphical user interface (GUI) generated by the program. It is assumed that the laser spots and the distance(s) to be measured all lie in the same plane and that the plane is perpendicular to the line of sight of the camera used to record the image

  7. A Dynamic MPI Software Correctness Checking Tool

    2005-10-31

    Umpire is prototype tool developed at LLNL by Bronis R. de Supinski, J. M. May, Martin Schulz and Jeffery Vetter as part of the ASDE TRTS project for detecting programming errors at runtime in message passing applications. Umpire monitors the MPI operations of an application by interposing itself between the application and the MPI runtime system using the MPI profiling layer. Umpire then checks the application’s MPI behavior for specific errors. Umpire detects errors thatmore » are local to individual MPI tasks, including resource errors (e.g., leaks of MPI datatypes and other opaque objects) and overwrites of non-blocking send buffers. It also detects distributed errors, including deadlocks involving any MPI-1 constructs and datatype mismatches between matching communication operations.« less

  8. Rapid medical advances challenge the tooling industry.

    PubMed

    Conley, B

    2008-01-01

    The requirement for greater performance in smaller spaces has increased demands for product and process innovation in tubing and other medical products. In turn, these developments have placed greater demands on the producers of the advanced tooling for these products. Tooling manufacturers must now continuously design equipment with much tighter tolerances for more sophisticated coextrusions and for newer generations of multilumen and multilayer tubing.

  9. Advances in knowledge-based software engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walt

    1991-01-01

    The underlying hypothesis of this work is that a rigorous and comprehensive software reuse methodology can bring about a more effective and efficient utilization of constrained resources in the development of large-scale software systems by both government and industry. It is also believed that correct use of this type of software engineering methodology can significantly contribute to the higher levels of reliability that will be required of future operational systems. An overview and discussion of current research in the development and application of two systems that support a rigorous reuse paradigm are presented: the Knowledge-Based Software Engineering Environment (KBSEE) and the Knowledge Acquisition fo the Preservation of Tradeoffs and Underlying Rationales (KAPTUR) systems. Emphasis is on a presentation of operational scenarios which highlight the major functional capabilities of the two systems.

  10. Meta-tools for software development and knowledge acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksson, Henrik; Musen, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of tools that provide support for software development is highly dependent on the match between the tools and their task. Knowledge-acquisition (KA) tools constitute a class of development tools targeted at knowledge-based systems. Generally, KA tools that are custom-tailored for particular application domains are more effective than are general KA tools that cover a large class of domains. The high cost of custom-tailoring KA tools manually has encouraged researchers to develop meta-tools for KA tools. Current research issues in meta-tools for knowledge acquisition are the specification styles, or meta-views, for target KA tools used, and the relationships between the specification entered in the meta-tool and other specifications for the target program under development. We examine different types of meta-views and meta-tools. Our current project is to provide meta-tools that produce KA tools from multiple specification sources--for instance, from a task analysis of the target application.

  11. Advanced software development workstation project: Engineering scripting language. Graphical editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Software development is widely considered to be a bottleneck in the development of complex systems, both in terms of development and in terms of maintenance of deployed systems. Cost of software development and maintenance can also be very high. One approach to reducing costs and relieving this bottleneck is increasing the reuse of software designs and software components. A method for achieving such reuse is a software parts composition system. Such a system consists of a language for modeling software parts and their interfaces, a catalog of existing parts, an editor for combining parts, and a code generator that takes a specification and generates code for that application in the target language. The Advanced Software Development Workstation is intended to be an expert system shell designed to provide the capabilities of a software part composition system.

  12. Software tool for data mining and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Ye, Chenzhou; Chen, Nianyi

    2002-03-01

    A software tool for data mining is introduced, which integrates pattern recognition (PCA, Fisher, clustering, hyperenvelop, regression), artificial intelligence (knowledge representation, decision trees), statistical learning (rough set, support vector machine), computational intelligence (neural network, genetic algorithm, fuzzy systems). It consists of nine function models: pattern recognition, decision trees, association rule, fuzzy rule, neural network, genetic algorithm, Hyper Envelop, support vector machine, visualization. The principle and knowledge representation of some function models of data mining are described. The software tool of data mining is realized by Visual C++ under Windows 2000. Nonmonotony in data mining is dealt with by concept hierarchy and layered mining. The software tool of data mining has satisfactorily applied in the prediction of regularities of the formation of ternary intermetallic compounds in alloy systems, and diagnosis of brain glioma.

  13. Management of Astronomical Software Projects with Open Source Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briegel, F.; Bertram, T.; Berwein, J.; Kittmann, F.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper we will offer an innovative approach to managing the software development process with free open source tools, for building and automated testing, a system to automate the compile/test cycle on a variety of platforms to validate code changes, using virtualization to compile in parallel on various operating system platforms, version control and change management, enhanced wiki and issue tracking system for online documentation and reporting and groupware tools as they are: blog, discussion and calendar. Initially starting with the Linc-Nirvana instrument a new project and configuration management tool for developing astronomical software was looked for. After evaluation of various systems of this kind, we are satisfied with the selection we are using now. Following the lead of Linc-Nirvana most of the other software projects at the MPIA are using it now.

  14. DEVICE CONTROL TOOL FOR CEBAF BEAM DIAGNOSTICS SOFTWARE

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel Chevtsov

    2008-02-11

    Continuously monitoring the beam quality in the CEBAF accelerator, a variety of beam diagnostics software created at Jefferson Lab makes a significant contribution to very high availability of the machine for nuclear physics experiments. The interface between this software and beam instrumentation hardware components is provided by a device control tool, which is optimized for beam diagnostics tasks. As a part of the device/driver development framework at Jefferson Lab, this tool is very easy to support and extend to integrate new beam instrumentation components. All device control functions are based on the configuration (ASCII text) files that completely define the used hardware interface standards (CAMAC, VME, RS-232, GPIB, etc.) and communication protocols. The paper presents the main elements of the device control tool for beam diagnostics software at Jefferson Lab.

  15. Software engineering and data management for automated payload experiment tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddux, Gary A.; Provancha, Anna; Chattam, David

    1994-01-01

    The Microgravity Projects Office identified a need to develop a software package that will lead experiment developers through the development planning process, obtain necessary information, establish an electronic data exchange avenue, and allow easier manipulation/reformatting of the collected information. An MS-DOS compatible software package called the Automated Payload Experiment Tool (APET) has been developed and delivered. The objective of this task is to expand on the results of the APET work previously performed by University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) and provide versions of the software in a Macintosh and Windows compatible format. Appendix 1 science requirements document (SRD) Users Manual is attached.

  16. Software engineering and data management for automated payload experiment tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddux, Gary A.; Provancha, Anna; Chattam, David

    1994-01-01

    The Microgravity Projects Office identified a need to develop a software package that will lead experiment developers through the development planning process, obtain necessary information, establish an electronic data exchange avenue, and allow easier manipulation/reformatting of the collected information. An MS-DOS compatible software package called the Automated Payload Experiment Tool (APET) has been developed and delivered. The objective of this task is to expand on the results of the APET work previously performed by UAH and provide versions of the software in a Macintosh and Windows compatible format.

  17. Knowledge engineering software: A demonstration of a high end tool

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, G.C.; Krall, R.B.; Marinuzzi, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    Many investigators wanting to apply knowledge-based systems (KBS) as consultants for cancer diagnosis have turned to tools running on personal computers. While some of these tools serve well for small tasks, they lack the power available with the high end KBS tools such as KEE (Knowledge Engineering Environment) and ART (Automated Reasoning Tool). These tools were originally developed on Lisp machines and have the full functionality of the Lisp language as well as many additional features. They provide a rich and highly productive environment for the software developer. To illustrate the capability of one of these high end tools we have converted a table showing the classification of benign soft tissue tumors into a KEE knowledge base. We have used the tools available in Kee to identify the tumor type for a hypothetical patient. 10 figs.

  18. Advanced information processing system: Input/output network management software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagle, Gail; Alger, Linda; Kemp, Alexander

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the software requirements and specifications for the Input/Output Network Management Services for the Advanced Information Processing System. This introduction and overview section is provided to briefly outline the overall architecture and software requirements of the AIPS system before discussing the details of the design requirements and specifications of the AIPS I/O Network Management software. A brief overview of the AIPS architecture followed by a more detailed description of the network architecture.

  19. Design and implementation of the mobility assessment tool: software description

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In previous work, we described the development of an 81-item video-animated tool for assessing mobility. In response to criticism levied during a pilot study of this tool, we sought to develop a new version built upon a flexible framework for designing and administering the instrument. Results Rather than constructing a self-contained software application with a hard-coded instrument, we designed an XML schema capable of describing a variety of psychometric instruments. The new version of our video-animated assessment tool was then defined fully within the context of a compliant XML document. Two software applications—one built in Java, the other in Objective-C for the Apple iPad—were then built that could present the instrument described in the XML document and collect participants’ responses. Separating the instrument’s definition from the software application implementing it allowed for rapid iteration and easy, reliable definition of variations. Conclusions Defining instruments in a software-independent XML document simplifies the process of defining instruments and variations and allows a single instrument to be deployed on as many platforms as there are software applications capable of interpreting the instrument, thereby broadening the potential target audience for the instrument. Continued work will be done to further specify and refine this type of instrument specification with a focus on spurring adoption by researchers in gerontology and geriatric medicine. PMID:23879716

  20. Advances in Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography Hardware and Software.

    PubMed

    Piccinelli, Marina; Garcia, Ernest V

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear imaging techniques remain today's most reliable modality for the assessment and quantification of myocardial perfusion. In recent years, the field has experienced tremendous progress both in terms of dedicated cameras for cardiac applications and software techniques for image reconstruction. The most recent advances in single-photon emission computed tomography hardware and software are reviewed, focusing on how these improvements have resulted in an even more powerful diagnostic tool with reduced injected radiation dose and acquisition time.

  1. Byonic: Advanced Peptide and Protein Identification Software

    PubMed Central

    Bern, Marshall; Kil, Yong J.; Becker, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Byonic™ is the name of a software package for peptide and protein identification by tandem mass spectrometry. This software, which has only recently become commercially available, facilitates a much wider range of search possibilities than previous search software such as SEQUEST and Mascot. Byonic allows the user to define an essentially unlimited number of variable modification types. Byonic also allows the user to set a separate limit on the number of occurrences of each modification type, so that a search may consider only one or two chance modifications such as oxidations and deamidations per peptide, yet allow three or four biological modifications such as phosphorylations, which tend to cluster together. Hence Byonic can search for 10s or even 100s of modification types simultaneously without a prohibitively large combinatorial explosion. Byonic’s Wildcard Search™ allows the user to search for unanticipated or even unknown modifications alongside known modifications. Finally, Byonic’s Glycopeptide Search allows the user to identify glycopeptides without prior knowledge of glycan masses or glycosylation sites. PMID:23255153

  2. Understanding Computation of Impulse Response in Microwave Software Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potrebic, Milka M.; Tosic, Dejan V.; Pejovic, Predrag V.

    2010-01-01

    In modern microwave engineering curricula, the introduction of the many new topics in microwave industrial development, or of software tools for design and simulation, sometimes results in students having an inadequate understanding of the fundamental theory. The terminology for and the explanation of algorithms for calculating impulse response in…

  3. Knickpoint finder: A software tool that improves neotectonic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiroz, G. L.; Salamuni, E.; Nascimento, E. R.

    2015-03-01

    This work presents a new software tool for morphometric analysis of drainage networks based on the methods of Hack (1973) and Etchebehere et al. (2004). This tool is applicable to studies of morphotectonics and neotectonics. The software used a digital elevation model (DEM) to identify the relief breakpoints along drainage profiles (knickpoints). The program was coded in Python for use on the ArcGIS platform and is called Knickpoint Finder. A study area was selected to test and evaluate the software's ability to analyze and identify neotectonic morphostructures based on the morphology of the terrain. For an assessment of its validity, we chose an area of the James River basin, which covers most of the Piedmont area of Virginia (USA), which is an area of constant intraplate seismicity and non-orogenic active tectonics and exhibits a relatively homogeneous geodesic surface currently being altered by the seismogenic features of the region. After using the tool in the chosen area, we found that the knickpoint locations are associated with the geologic structures, epicenters of recent earthquakes, and drainages with rectilinear anomalies. The regional analysis demanded the use of a spatial representation of the data after processing using Knickpoint Finder. The results were satisfactory in terms of the correlation of dense areas of knickpoints with active lineaments and the rapidity of the identification of deformed areas. Therefore, this software tool may be considered useful in neotectonic analyses of large areas and may be applied to any area where there is DEM coverage.

  4. Proposing a Mathematical Software Tool in Physics Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltzis, Konstantinos B.

    2009-01-01

    MathCad® is a very popular software tool for mathematical and statistical analysis in science and engineering. Its low cost, ease of use, extensive function library, and worksheet-like user interface distinguish it among other commercial packages. Its features are also well suited to educational process. The use of natural mathematical notation…

  5. GenePRIMP: A software quality control tool

    ScienceCinema

    Amrita Pati

    2016-07-12

    Amrita Pati of the DOE Joint Genome Institute's Genome Biology group describes the software tool GenePRIMP and how it fits into the quality control pipeline for microbial genomics. Further details regarding GenePRIMP appear in a paper published online May 2, 2010 in Nature Methods.

  6. GenePRIMP: A software quality control tool

    SciTech Connect

    Amrita Pati

    2010-05-05

    Amrita Pati of the DOE Joint Genome Institute's Genome Biology group describes the software tool GenePRIMP and how it fits into the quality control pipeline for microbial genomics. Further details regarding GenePRIMP appear in a paper published online May 2, 2010 in Nature Methods.

  7. Using Software Tools to Automate the Assessment of Student Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, David

    1991-01-01

    Argues that advent of computer-aided instruction (CAI) systems for teaching introductory computer programing makes it imperative that software be developed to automate assessment and grading of student programs. Examples of typical student programing problems are given, and application of the Unix tools Lex and Yacc to the automatic assessment of…

  8. Chips: A Tool for Developing Software Interfaces Interactively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Robert E.; And Others

    This report provides a detailed description of Chips, an interactive tool for developing software employing graphical/computer interfaces on Xerox Lisp machines. It is noted that Chips, which is implemented as a collection of customizable classes, provides the programmer with a rich graphical interface for the creation of rich graphical…

  9. New generation of exploration tools: interactive modeling software and microcomputers

    SciTech Connect

    Krajewski, S.A.

    1986-08-01

    Software packages offering interactive modeling techniques are now available for use on microcomputer hardware systems. These packages are reasonably priced for both company and independent explorationists; they do not require users to have high levels of computer literacy; they are capable of rapidly completing complex ranges of sophisticated geologic and geophysical modeling tasks; and they can produce presentation-quality output for comparison with real-world data. For example, interactive packages are available for mapping, log analysis, seismic modeling, reservoir studies, and financial projects as well as for applying a variety of statistical and geostatistical techniques to analysis of exploration data. More importantly, these packages enable explorationists to directly apply their geologic expertise when developing and fine-tuning models for identifying new prospects and for extending producing fields. As a result of these features, microcomputers and interactive modeling software are becoming common tools in many exploration offices. Gravity and magnetics software programs illustrate some of the capabilities of such exploration tools.

  10. A Software Communication Tool for the Tele-ICU

    PubMed Central

    Pimintel, Denise M.; Wei, Shang Heng; Odor, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The Tele Intensive Care Unit (tele-ICU) supports a high volume, high acuity population of patients. There is a high-volume of incoming and outgoing calls, especially during the evening and night hours, through the tele-ICU hubs. The tele-ICU clinicians must be able to communicate effectively to team members in order to support the care of complex and critically ill patients while supporting and maintaining a standard to improve time to intervention. This study describes a software communication tool that will improve the time to intervention, over the paper-driven communication format presently used in the tele-ICU. The software provides a multi-relational database of message instances to mine information for evaluation and quality improvement for all entities that touch the tele-ICU. The software design incorporates years of critical care and software design experience combined with new skills acquired in an applied Health Informatics program. This software tool will function in the tele-ICU environment and perform as a front-end application that gathers, routes, and displays internal communication messages for intervention by priority and provider. PMID:24551398

  11. A software communication tool for the tele-ICU.

    PubMed

    Pimintel, Denise M; Wei, Shang Heng; Odor, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The Tele Intensive Care Unit (tele-ICU) supports a high volume, high acuity population of patients. There is a high-volume of incoming and outgoing calls, especially during the evening and night hours, through the tele-ICU hubs. The tele-ICU clinicians must be able to communicate effectively to team members in order to support the care of complex and critically ill patients while supporting and maintaining a standard to improve time to intervention. This study describes a software communication tool that will improve the time to intervention, over the paper-driven communication format presently used in the tele-ICU. The software provides a multi-relational database of message instances to mine information for evaluation and quality improvement for all entities that touch the tele-ICU. The software design incorporates years of critical care and software design experience combined with new skills acquired in an applied Health Informatics program. This software tool will function in the tele-ICU environment and perform as a front-end application that gathers, routes, and displays internal communication messages for intervention by priority and provider. PMID:24551398

  12. Software Tool Integrating Data Flow Diagrams and Petri Nets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronesbery, Carroll; Tavana, Madjid

    2010-01-01

    Data Flow Diagram - Petri Net (DFPN) is a software tool for analyzing other software to be developed. The full name of this program reflects its design, which combines the benefit of data-flow diagrams (which are typically favored by software analysts) with the power and precision of Petri-net models, without requiring specialized Petri-net training. (A Petri net is a particular type of directed graph, a description of which would exceed the scope of this article.) DFPN assists a software analyst in drawing and specifying a data-flow diagram, then translates the diagram into a Petri net, then enables graphical tracing of execution paths through the Petri net for verification, by the end user, of the properties of the software to be developed. In comparison with prior means of verifying the properties of software to be developed, DFPN makes verification by the end user more nearly certain, thereby making it easier to identify and correct misconceptions earlier in the development process, when correction is less expensive. After the verification by the end user, DFPN generates a printable system specification in the form of descriptions of processes and data.

  13. An expert system based software sizing tool, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedlander, David

    1990-01-01

    A software tool was developed for predicting the size of a future computer program at an early stage in its development. The system is intended to enable a user who is not expert in Software Engineering to estimate software size in lines of source code with an accuracy similar to that of an expert, based on the program's functional specifications. The project was planned as a knowledge based system with a field prototype as the goal of Phase 2 and a commercial system planned for Phase 3. The researchers used techniques from Artificial Intelligence and knowledge from human experts and existing software from NASA's COSMIC database. They devised a classification scheme for the software specifications, and a small set of generic software components that represent complexity and apply to large classes of programs. The specifications are converted to generic components by a set of rules and the generic components are input to a nonlinear sizing function which makes the final prediction. The system developed for this project predicted code sizes from the database with a bias factor of 1.06 and a fluctuation factor of 1.77, an accuracy similar to that of human experts but without their significant optimistic bias.

  14. COSTMODL: An automated software development cost estimation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, George B.

    1991-01-01

    The cost of developing computer software continues to consume an increasing portion of many organizations' total budgets, both in the public and private sector. As this trend develops, the capability to produce reliable estimates of the effort and schedule required to develop a candidate software product takes on increasing importance. The COSTMODL program was developed to provide an in-house capability to perform development cost estimates for NASA software projects. COSTMODL is an automated software development cost estimation tool which incorporates five cost estimation algorithms including the latest models for the Ada language and incrementally developed products. The principal characteristic which sets COSTMODL apart from other software cost estimation programs is its capacity to be completely customized to a particular environment. The estimation equations can be recalibrated to reflect the programmer productivity characteristics demonstrated by the user's organization, and the set of significant factors which effect software development costs can be customized to reflect any unique properties of the user's development environment. Careful use of a capability such as COSTMODL can significantly reduce the risk of cost overruns and failed projects.

  15. Towards early software reliability prediction for computer forensic tools (case study).

    PubMed

    Abu Talib, Manar

    2016-01-01

    Versatility, flexibility and robustness are essential requirements for software forensic tools. Researchers and practitioners need to put more effort into assessing this type of tool. A Markov model is a robust means for analyzing and anticipating the functioning of an advanced component based system. It is used, for instance, to analyze the reliability of the state machines of real time reactive systems. This research extends the architecture-based software reliability prediction model for computer forensic tools, which is based on Markov chains and COSMIC-FFP. Basically, every part of the computer forensic tool is linked to a discrete time Markov chain. If this can be done, then a probabilistic analysis by Markov chains can be performed to analyze the reliability of the components and of the whole tool. The purposes of the proposed reliability assessment method are to evaluate the tool's reliability in the early phases of its development, to improve the reliability assessment process for large computer forensic tools over time, and to compare alternative tool designs. The reliability analysis can assist designers in choosing the most reliable topology for the components, which can maximize the reliability of the tool and meet the expected reliability level specified by the end-user. The approach of assessing component-based tool reliability in the COSMIC-FFP context is illustrated with the Forensic Toolkit Imager case study.

  16. Software Tools to Support the Assessment of System Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.

    2013-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of three software tools that were developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center to support the assessment of system health: the Propulsion Diagnostic Method Evaluation Strategy (ProDIMES), the Systematic Sensor Selection Strategy (S4), and the Extended Testability Analysis (ETA) tool. Originally developed to support specific NASA projects in aeronautics and space, these software tools are currently available to U.S. citizens through the NASA Glenn Software Catalog. The ProDiMES software tool was developed to support a uniform comparison of propulsion gas path diagnostic methods. Methods published in the open literature are typically applied to dissimilar platforms with different levels of complexity. They often address different diagnostic problems and use inconsistent metrics for evaluating performance. As a result, it is difficult to perform a one ]to ]one comparison of the various diagnostic methods. ProDIMES solves this problem by serving as a theme problem to aid in propulsion gas path diagnostic technology development and evaluation. The overall goal is to provide a tool that will serve as an industry standard, and will truly facilitate the development and evaluation of significant Engine Health Management (EHM) capabilities. ProDiMES has been developed under a collaborative project of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP) based on feedback provided by individuals within the aircraft engine health management community. The S4 software tool provides a framework that supports the optimal selection of sensors for health management assessments. S4 is structured to accommodate user ]defined applications, diagnostic systems, search techniques, and system requirements/constraints. One or more sensor suites that maximize this performance while meeting other user ]defined system requirements that are presumed to exist. S4 provides a systematic approach for evaluating combinations of sensors to determine the set or sets of

  17. Using CONFIG for Simulation of Operation of Water Recovery Subsystems for Advanced Control Software Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Flores, Luis; Fleming, Land; Throop, Daiv

    2002-01-01

    A hybrid discrete/continuous simulation tool, CONFIG, has been developed to support evaluation of the operability life support systems. CON FIG simulates operations scenarios in which flows and pressures change continuously while system reconfigurations occur as discrete events. In simulations, intelligent control software can interact dynamically with hardware system models. CONFIG simulations have been used to evaluate control software and intelligent agents for automating life support systems operations. A CON FIG model of an advanced biological water recovery system has been developed to interact with intelligent control software that is being used in a water system test at NASA Johnson Space Center

  18. Proceedings of the Workshop on software tools for distributed intelligent control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Herget, C.J.

    1990-09-01

    The Workshop on Software Tools for Distributed Intelligent Control Systems was organized by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the United States Army Headquarters Training and Doctrine Command and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The goals of the workshop were to the identify the current state of the art in tools which support control systems engineering design and implementation, identify research issues associated with writing software tools which would provide a design environment to assist engineers in multidisciplinary control design and implementation, formulate a potential investment strategy to resolve the research issues and develop public domain code which can form the core of more powerful engineering design tools, and recommend test cases to focus the software development process and test associated performance metrics. Recognizing that the development of software tools for distributed intelligent control systems will require a multidisciplinary effort, experts in systems engineering, control systems engineering, and compute science were invited to participate in the workshop. In particular, experts who could address the following topics were selected: operating systems, engineering data representation and manipulation, emerging standards for manufacturing data, mathematical foundations, coupling of symbolic and numerical computation, user interface, system identification, system representation at different levels of abstraction, system specification, system design, verification and validation, automatic code generation, and integration of modular, reusable code.

  19. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) utility library software description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinedinst, Winston C.; Slominski, Christopher J.; Dickson, Richard W.; Wolverton, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The individual software processes used in the flight computers on-board the Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) aircraft have many common functional elements. A library of commonly used software modules was created for general uses among the processes. The library includes modules for mathematical computations, data formatting, system database interfacing, and condition handling. The modules available in the library and their associated calling requirements are described.

  20. Advanced genetic tools for plant biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, WS; Yuan, JS; Stewart, CN

    2013-10-09

    Basic research has provided a much better understanding of the genetic networks and regulatory hierarchies in plants. To meet the challenges of agriculture, we must be able to rapidly translate this knowledge into generating improved plants. Therefore, in this Review, we discuss advanced tools that are currently available for use in plant biotechnology to produce new products in plants and to generate plants with new functions. These tools include synthetic promoters, 'tunable' transcription factors, genome-editing tools and site-specific recombinases. We also review some tools with the potential to enable crop improvement, such as methods for the assembly and synthesis of large DNA molecules, plant transformation with linked multigenes and plant artificial chromosomes. These genetic technologies should be integrated to realize their potential for applications to pressing agricultural and environmental problems.

  1. The RUMBA software: tools for neuroimaging data analysis.

    PubMed

    Bly, Benjamin Martin; Rebbechi, Donovan; Hanson, Stephen Jose; Grasso, Giorgio

    2004-01-01

    The enormous scale and complexity of data sets in functional neuroimaging makes it crucial to have well-designed and flexible software for image processing, modeling, and statistical analysis. At present, researchers must choose between general purpose scientific computing environments (e.g., Splus and Matlab), and specialized human brain mapping packages that implement particular analysis strategies (e.g., AFNI, SPM, VoxBo, FSL or FIASCO). For the vast majority of users in Human Brain Mapping and Cognitive Neuroscience, general purpose computing environments provide an insufficient framework for a complex data-analysis regime. On the other hand, the operational particulars of more specialized neuroimaging analysis packages are difficult or impossible to modify and provide little transparency or flexibility to the user for approaches other than massively multiple comparisons based on inferential statistics derived from linear models. In order to address these problems, we have developed open-source software that allows a wide array of data analysis procedures. The RUMBA software includes programming tools that simplify the development of novel methods, and accommodates data in several standard image formats. A scripting interface, along with programming libraries, defines a number of useful analytic procedures, and provides an interface to data analysis procedures. The software also supports a graphical functional programming environment for implementing data analysis streams based on modular functional components. With these features, the RUMBA software provides researchers programmability, reusability, modular analysis tools, novel data analysis streams, and an analysis environment in which multiple approaches can be contrasted and compared. The RUMBA software retains the flexibility of general scientific computing environments while adding a framework in which both experts and novices can develop and adapt neuroimaging-specific analyses.

  2. An infrastructure for the creation of high end scientific and engineering software tools and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, L.A.; Marques, O.A.; Wilson, G.V.

    2003-04-01

    This document has been prepared as a response to the High End Computing Revitalization Task Force (HECRTF) call for white papers. Our main goal is to identify mechanism necessary for the design and implementation of an infrastructure to support development of high-end scientific and engineering software tools and applications. This infrastructure will provide a plethora of software services to facilitate the efficient deployment of future HEC technology as well as collaborations among researchers and engineers across disciplines and institutions. In particular, we address here the following points; Key software technologies that must be advanced to strengthen the foundation for developing new generations of HEC systems. A Software Infrastructure for minimizing ''time to solution'' by users of HEC systems.

  3. Software Certification for Temporal Properties With Affordable Tool Qualification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xia, Songtao; DiVito, Benedetto L.

    2005-01-01

    It has been recognized that a framework based on proof-carrying code (also called semantic-based software certification in its community) could be used as a candidate software certification process for the avionics industry. To meet this goal, tools in the "trust base" of a proof-carrying code system must be qualified by regulatory authorities. A family of semantic-based software certification approaches is described, each different in expressive power, level of automation and trust base. Of particular interest is the so-called abstraction-carrying code, which can certify temporal properties. When a pure abstraction-carrying code method is used in the context of industrial software certification, the fact that the trust base includes a model checker would incur a high qualification cost. This position paper proposes a hybrid of abstraction-based and proof-based certification methods so that the model checker used by a client can be significantly simplified, thereby leading to lower cost in tool qualification.

  4. Westinghouse Waste Simulation and Optimization Software Tool - 13493

    SciTech Connect

    Mennicken, Kim; Aign, Joerg

    2013-07-01

    Radioactive waste is produced during NPP operation and NPP D and D. Different kinds of waste with different volumes and properties have to be treated. Finding a technically and commercially optimized waste treatment concept is a difficult and time consuming process. The Westinghouse waste simulation and optimization software tool is an approach to study the total life cycle cost of any waste management facility. The tool enables the user of the simulation and optimization software to plan processes and storage buildings and to identify bottlenecks in the overall waste management design before starting detailed planning activities. Furthermore, application of the software enables the user to optimize the number of treatment systems, to determine the minimum design capacity for onsite storage facilities, to identify bottlenecks in the overall design and to identify the most cost-effective treatment paths by maintaining optimal waste treatment technologies. In combination with proven waste treatment equipment and integrated waste management solutions, the waste simulation and optimization software provides reliable qualitative results that lead to an effective planning and minimization of the total project planning risk of any waste management activity. (authors)

  5. An Open Source Software Tool for Hydrologic Climate Change Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Dong Kwan; Shin, Mun-Ju; Kim, Young-Oh

    2015-04-01

    With the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) publishing Climate Change Assessment Reports containing updated forecasts and scenarios regularly, it is necessary to also periodically perform hydrologic assessments studies on these scenarios. The practical users including scientists and government people need to use handy tools that operate from climate input data of historical observations and climate change scenarios to rainfall-runoff simulation and assessment periodically. We propose HydroCAT (Hydrologic Climate change Assessment Tool), which is a flexible software tool designed to simplify and streamline hydrologic climate change assessment studies with the incorporation of: taking climate input values from general circulation models using the latest climate change scenarios; simulation of downscaled values using statistical downscaling methods; calibration and simulation of well-know multiple lumped conceptual hydrologic models; assessment of results using statistical methods. This package is designed in an open source, R-based, software package that includes an operating framework to support wide data frameworks, variety of hydrologic models, and climate change scenarios. The use of the software is demonstrated in a case study of the Geum River basin in Republic of Korea.

  6. Development of Advanced Multi-Modality Radiation Treatment Planning Software for Neutron Radiotherapy and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D; Wessol, D; Wemple, C; Harkin, G; Hartmann-Siantar, C

    2002-08-20

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has long been active in development of advanced Monte-Carlo based computational dosimetry and treatment planning methods and software for advanced radiotherapy, with a particular focus on Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) and, to a somewhat lesser extent, Fast-Neutron Therapy. The most recent INEEL software system of this type is known as SERA, Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications. As a logical next step in the development of modern radiotherapy planning tools to support the most advanced research, INEEL and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the developers of the PEREGRTNE computational engine for radiotherapy treatment planning applications, have recently launched a new project to collaborate in the development of a ''next-generation'' multi-modality treatment planning software system that will be useful for all modern forms of radiotherapy.

  7. Advanced transport operating system software upgrade: Flight management/flight controls software description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinedinst, Winston C.; Debure, Kelly R.; Dickson, Richard W.; Heaphy, William J.; Parks, Mark A.; Slominski, Christopher J.; Wolverton, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The Flight Management/Flight Controls (FM/FC) software for the Norden 2 (PDP-11/70M) computer installed on the NASA 737 aircraft is described. The software computes the navigation position estimates, guidance commands, those commands to be issued to the control surfaces to direct the aircraft in flight based on the modes selected on the Advanced Guidance Control System (AGSC) mode panel, and the flight path selected via the Navigation Control/Display Unit (NCDU).

  8. fMRI analysis software tools: an evaluation framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedoia, Valentina; Colli, Vittoria; Strocchi, Sabina; Vite, Cristina; Binaghi, Elisabetta; Conte, Leopoldo

    2011-03-01

    Performance comparison of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) software tools is a very difficult task. In this paper, a framework for comparison of fMRI analysis results obtained with different software packages is proposed. An objective evaluation is possible only after pre-processing steps that normalize input data in a standard domain. Segmentation and registration algorithms are implemented in order to classify voxels belonging to brain or not, and to find the non rigid transformation that best aligns the volume under inspection with a standard one. Through the definitions of intersection and union of fuzzy logic an index was defined which quantify information overlap between Statistical Parametrical Maps (SPMs). Direct comparison between fMRI results can only highlight differences. In order to assess the best result, an index that represents the goodness of the activation detection is required. The transformation of the activation map in a standard domain allows the use of a functional Atlas for labeling the active voxels. For each functional area the Activation Weighted Index (AWI) that identifies the mean activation level of whole area was defined. By means of this brief, but comprehensive description, it is easy to find a metric for the objective evaluation of a fMRI analysis tools. Trough the first evaluation method the situations where the SPMs are inconsistent were identified. The result of AWI analysis suggest which tool has higher sensitivity and specificity. The proposed method seems a valid evaluation tool when applied to an adequate number of patients.

  9. Classroom Live: a software-assisted gamification tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas, Adrian A.; de Freitas, Michelle M.

    2013-06-01

    Teachers have come to rely on a variety of approaches in order to elicit and sustain student interest in the classroom. One particular approach, known as gamification, seeks to improve student engagement by transforming the traditional classroom experience into a competitive multiplayer game. Initial attempts at classroom gamification relied on the teacher manually tracking student progress. At the US Air Force Academy, we wanted to experiment with a software gamification tool. Our client/server suite, dubbed Classroom Live, streamlines the gamification process for the teacher by simplifying common tasks. Simultaneously, the tool provides students with an esthetically pleasing user interface that offers in game rewards in exchange for their participation. Classroom Live is still in development, but our initial experience using the tool has been extremely positive and confirms our belief that students respond positively to gamification, even at the undergraduate level.

  10. Anvil Tool in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe, III; Bauman, William, III; Keen, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Meteorologists from the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) and Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have identified anvil forecasting as one of their most challenging tasks when predicting the probability of violations of the lightning Launch Commit Criteria and Space Shuttle Flight Rules. As a result, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) created a graphical overlay tool for the Meteorological Interactive Data Display Systems (MIDDS) to indicate the threat of thunderstorm anvil clouds, using either observed or model forecast winds as input. In order for the Anvil Tool to remain available to the meteorologists, the AMU was tasked to transition the tool to the Advanced Weather interactive Processing System (AWIPS). This report describes the work done by the AMU to develop the Anvil Tool for AWIPS to create a graphical overlay depicting the threat from thunderstorm anvil clouds. The AWIPS Anvil Tool is based on the previously deployed AMU MIDDS Anvil Tool. SMG and 45 WS forecasters have used the MIDDS Anvil Tool during launch and landing operations. SMG's primary weather analysis and display system is now AWIPS and the 45 WS has plans to replace MIDDS with AWIPS. The Anvil Tool creates a graphic that users can overlay on satellite or radar imagery to depict the potential location of thunderstorm anvils one, two, and three hours into the future. The locations are based on an average of the upper-level observed or forecasted winds. The graphic includes 10 and 20 nm standoff circles centered at the location of interest, in addition to one-, two-, and three-hour arcs in the upwind direction. The arcs extend outward across a 30 degree sector width based on a previous AMU study which determined thunderstorm anvils move in a direction plus or minus 15 degrees of the upper-level (300- to 150-mb) wind direction. This report briefly describes the history of the MIDDS Anvil Tool and then explains how the initial development of the AWIPS Anvil Tool was carried out. After testing was

  11. Review of Software Tools for Design and Analysis of Large scale MRM Proteomic Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, Christopher M.; Chung, Lisa; Bruce, Can; Cheung, Kei-Hoi

    2013-01-01

    Selective or Multiple Reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) is a liquid-chromatography (LC)/tandem-mass spectrometry (MS/MS) method that enables the quantitation of specific proteins in a sample by analyzing precursor ions and the fragment ions of their selected tryptic peptides. Instrumentation software has advanced to the point that thousands of transitions (pairs of primary and secondary m/z values) can be measured in a triple quadrupole instrument coupled to an LC, by a well-designed scheduling and selection of m/z windows. The design of a good MRM assay relies on the availability of peptide spectra from previous discovery-phase LC-MS/MS studies. The tedious aspect of manually developing and processing MRM assays involving thousands of transitions has spurred to development of software tools to automate this process. Software packages have been developed for project management, assay development, assay validation, data export, peak integration, quality assessment, and biostatistical analysis. No single tool provides a complete end-to-end solution, thus this article reviews the current state and discusses future directions of these software tools in order to enable researchers to combine these tools for a comprehensive targeted proteomics workflow. PMID:23702368

  12. PQLX: A Software Tool to Evaluate Seismic Station Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. E.; Boaz, R. I.

    2006-12-01

    We present a new tool that will allow users to evaluate seismic station performance and characteristics by providing quick and easy transitions between visualizations of the frequency and time domains. The software is based on the probability density functions (PDF) of power spectral densities (PSD) (McNamara and Buland, 2004). The computed PSDs are stored in a MySQL database, allowing a user to access specific time periods of PSDs (PDF subsets) and time series segments through a GUI-driven interface. The power of the method and software lies in the fact that there is no need to screen the data for system transients, earthquakes or general data artifacts since they map into a background probability level. In fact, examination of artifacts related to station operation and episodic cultural noise allow us to estimate both the overall station quality and a baseline level of earth noise at each site. The output of this analysis tool is useful for both operational and scientific applications. Operationally, it is useful for characterizing the current and past performance of existing broadband stations, for conducting tests on potential new seismic station locations, for detecting problems with the recording system or sensors, and for evaluating the overall quality of data and meta-data. Scientifically, the tool allows for mining of PSDs for investigations on the evolution of seismic noise (see Aster et al., Hutt et al., Leeds et al., and Oneel et al., this meeting). The PDF algorithm and initial software were developed by the USGS as a part of the ANSS/GSN data and network QC system. Further development, supported by the IRIS Data Management Center, integrated the PDF algorithm into the IRIS QUACK system. The newest version, PQLX, combines the PDF system with the PQL time series viewing tool developed with support from IRIS PASSCAL. Currently, PQLX is operational at the USGS ANSS NOC and ASL for station performance monitoring.

  13. COSTMODL - AN AUTOMATED SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT COST ESTIMATION TOOL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, G. B.

    1994-01-01

    The cost of developing computer software consumes an increasing portion of many organizations' budgets. As this trend continues, the capability to estimate the effort and schedule required to develop a candidate software product becomes increasingly important. COSTMODL is an automated software development estimation tool which fulfills this need. Assimilating COSTMODL to any organization's particular environment can yield significant reduction in the risk of cost overruns and failed projects. This user-customization capability is unmatched by any other available estimation tool. COSTMODL accepts a description of a software product to be developed and computes estimates of the effort required to produce it, the calendar schedule required, and the distribution of effort and staffing as a function of the defined set of development life-cycle phases. This is accomplished by the five cost estimation algorithms incorporated into COSTMODL: the NASA-developed KISS model; the Basic, Intermediate, and Ada COCOMO models; and the Incremental Development model. This choice affords the user the ability to handle project complexities ranging from small, relatively simple projects to very large projects. Unique to COSTMODL is the ability to redefine the life-cycle phases of development and the capability to display a graphic representation of the optimum organizational structure required to develop the subject project, along with required staffing levels and skills. The program is menu-driven and mouse sensitive with an extensive context-sensitive help system that makes it possible for a new user to easily install and operate the program and to learn the fundamentals of cost estimation without having prior training or separate documentation. The implementation of these functions, along with the customization feature, into one program makes COSTMODL unique within the industry. COSTMODL was written for IBM PC compatibles, and it requires Turbo Pascal 5.0 or later and Turbo

  14. A NEO population generation and observation simulation software tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Sven; Gelhaus, Johannes; Hahn, Gerhard; Franco, Raffaella

    One of the main targets of ESA's Space Situational Awareness (SSA) program is to build a wide knowledge base about objects that can potentially harm Earth (Near-Earth Objects, NEOs). An important part of this effort is to create the Small Bodies Data Centre (SBDC) which is going to aggregate measurement data from a fully-integrated NEO observation sensor network. Until this network is developed, artificial NEO measurement data is needed in order to validate SBDC algorithms. Moreover, to establish a functioning NEO observation sensor network, it has to be determined where to place sensors, what technical requirements have to be met in order to be able to detect NEOs and which observation strategies work the best. Because of this, a sensor simulation software was needed. This paper presents a software tool which allows users to create and analyse NEO populations and to simulate and analyse population observations. It is a console program written in Fortran and comes with a Graphical User Interface (GUI) written in Java and C. The tool can be distinguished into the components ``Population Generator'' and ``Observation Simulator''. The Population Generator component is responsible for generating and analysing a NEO population. Users can choose between creating fictitious (random) and synthetic populations. The latter are based on one of two models describing the orbital and size distribution of observed NEOs: The existing socalled ``Bottke Model'' (Bottke et al. 2000, 2002) and the new ``Granvik Model'' (Granvik et al. 2014, in preparation) which has been developed in parallel to the tool. Generated populations can be analysed by defining 2D, 3D and scatter plots using various NEO attributes. As a result, the tool creates the appropiate files for the plotting tool ``gnuplot''. The tool's Observation Simulator component yields the Observation Simulation and Observation Analysis functions. Users can define sensor systems using ground- or space-based locations as well as

  15. Advances in Games Technology: Software, Models, and Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prakash, Edmond; Brindle, Geoff; Jones, Kevin; Zhou, Suiping; Chaudhari, Narendra S.; Wong, Kok-Wai

    2009-01-01

    Games technology has undergone tremendous development. In this article, the authors report the rapid advancement that has been observed in the way games software is being developed, as well as in the development of games content using game engines. One area that has gained special attention is modeling the game environment such as terrain and…

  16. Advanced software development workstation. OOPSLA 1992 Conference. Trip report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izygon, Michel E.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the main trends observed at the Object Oriented Programming Systems, Languages, and Applications Conference held in Vancouver, British Columbia. This conference is the main object-oriented event that allows us to assess the dynamism of the technology and to meet the main actors of the field. It is an invaluable source of information for the advanced software development project.

  17. Advanced Spacesuit Informatics Software Design for Power, Avionics and Software Version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Theodore W.

    2016-01-01

    A description of the software design for the 2016 edition of the Informatics computer assembly of the NASAs Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU), also called the Advanced Spacesuit. The Informatics system is an optional part of the spacesuit assembly. It adds a graphical interface for displaying suit status, timelines, procedures, and warning information. It also provides an interface to the suit mounted camera for recording still images, video, and audio field notes.

  18. Musical Composition and Creativity in an Advanced Software Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Nicholas

    2002-01-01

    This paper serves as a brief description of research into the use of professional level music software as a learning tool for creativity and composition by primary school children. The research formed the basis of a Master of Information Technology in Education degree at the University of Melbourne. The paper examines the physical environment, the…

  19. Self-advancing step-tap tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Donald R. (Inventor); Penner, Ronald K. (Inventor); Franklin, Larry D. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Methods and tool for simultaneously forming a bore in a work piece and forming a series of threads in said bore. In an embodiment, the tool has a predetermined axial length, a proximal end, and a distal end, said tool comprising: a shank located at said proximal end; a pilot drill portion located at said distal end; and a mill portion intermediately disposed between said shank and said pilot drill portion. The mill portion is comprised of at least two drill-tap sections of predetermined axial lengths and at least one transition section of predetermined axial length, wherein each of said at least one transition section is sandwiched between a distinct set of two of said at least two drill-tap sections. The at least two drill-tap sections are formed of one or more drill-tap cutting teeth spirally increasing along said at least two drill-tap sections, wherein said tool is self-advanced in said work piece along said formed threads, and wherein said tool simultaneously forms said bore and said series of threads along a substantially similar longitudinal axis.

  20. Process proximity correction using an automated software tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Wilhelm; Dolainsky, Christoph; Thiele, Joerg; Friedrich, Christoph M.; Karakatsanis, Paul

    1998-06-01

    The pattern transfer process from the chip layout data to the structures on the finished wafer consists of many process steps. Although desired, none of these steps is linear in all aspects of the pattern transfer. Approaching the process limits due to the ever-shrinking linewidth, the non- linearities of the pattern transfer clearly show up. This means, that one cannot continue the practice to summarize all process influences into one bias between the data used for mask making and the final chip structure. The correction of process non-linearities is a necessity. This correction is usually called optical proximity correction (OPC), although not all effects intended for correction are of optical origin and/or not all these are effects of the neighborhood. We therefore propose to use the term PPC (process proximity correction). This paper reports our experiences with the application of OPTISSIMO, a software tool developed to perform automatically OPC/PPC for full chip designs. First, we provide a definition of PPC, which in our view has to correct all non- linearities of the pattern transfer process from layout data to the final electrically measured structures. Then, the strategy of the OPC/PPC tool OPTISSIMO, a software package to perform PPC based on process simulation, is discussed. We focus on the data handling strategy and on the process modeling of the tool under evaluation. It is shown, that full chip OPC/PPC is practicable using a well-designed hierarchy management system combined with a pattern library. Finally, it is demonstrated, that a model-based OPC/PPC tool is by definition a process simulation tool, that is able to perform all simulation tasks (like defect printability) at reasonable accuracy.

  1. Pathway Tools version 19.0 update: software for pathway/genome informatics and systems biology.

    PubMed

    Karp, Peter D; Latendresse, Mario; Paley, Suzanne M; Krummenacker, Markus; Ong, Quang D; Billington, Richard; Kothari, Anamika; Weaver, Daniel; Lee, Thomas; Subhraveti, Pallavi; Spaulding, Aaron; Fulcher, Carol; Keseler, Ingrid M; Caspi, Ron

    2016-09-01

    Pathway Tools is a bioinformatics software environment with a broad set of capabilities. The software provides genome-informatics tools such as a genome browser, sequence alignments, a genome-variant analyzer and comparative-genomics operations. It offers metabolic-informatics tools, such as metabolic reconstruction, quantitative metabolic modeling, prediction of reaction atom mappings and metabolic route search. Pathway Tools also provides regulatory-informatics tools, such as the ability to represent and visualize a wide range of regulatory interactions. This article outlines the advances in Pathway Tools in the past 5 years. Major additions include components for metabolic modeling, metabolic route search, computation of atom mappings and estimation of compound Gibbs free energies of formation; addition of editors for signaling pathways, for genome sequences and for cellular architecture; storage of gene essentiality data and phenotype data; display of multiple alignments, and of signaling and electron-transport pathways; and development of Python and web-services application programming interfaces. Scientists around the world have created more than 9800 Pathway/Genome Databases by using Pathway Tools, many of which are curated databases for important model organisms.

  2. Software for the ACP (Advanced Computer Program) multiprocessor system

    SciTech Connect

    Biel, J.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.; Cook, A.; Fischler, M.; Gaines, I.; Kaliher, C.; Hance, R.; Husby, D.; Nash, T.

    1987-02-02

    Software has been developed for use with the Fermilab Advanced Computer Program (ACP) multiprocessor system. The software was designed to make a system of a hundred independent node processors as easy to use as a single, powerful CPU. Subroutines have been developed by which a user's host program can send data to and get results from the program running in each of his ACP node processors. Utility programs make it easy to compile and link host and node programs, to debug a node program on an ACP development system, and to submit a debugged program to an ACP production system.

  3. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) control display unit software description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Parks, Mark A.; Debure, Kelly R.; Heaphy, William J.

    1992-01-01

    The software created for the Control Display Units (CDUs), used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project, on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) is described. Module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, a detailed description, and global references. The global reference section includes subroutines, functions, and common variables referenced by a particular module. The CDUs, one for the pilot and one for the copilot, are used for flight management purposes. Operations performed with the CDU affects the aircraft's guidance, navigation, and display software.

  4. Software Tools for In-Situ Documentation of Built Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smars, P.

    2013-07-01

    The paper presents open source software tools developed by the author to facilitate in-situ documentation of architectural and archæological heritage. The design choices are exposed and related to a general issue in conservation and documentation: taking decisions about a valuable object under threat . The questions of level of objectivity is central to the three steps of this process. It is our belief that in-situ documentation has to be favoured in this demanding context, full of potential discoveries. The very powerful surveying techniques in rapid development nowadays enhance our vision but often tend to bring back a critical part of the documentation process to the office. The software presented facilitate a direct treatment of the data on the site. Emphasis is given to flexibility, interoperability and simplicity. Key features of the software are listed and illustrated with examples (3D model of Gothic vaults, analysis of the shape of a column, deformation of a wall, direct interaction with AutoCAD).

  5. Advanced CAN (Controller Area Network) Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, D.J.

    2000-03-17

    The CAN interface cards that are currently in use are PCMCIA based and use a microprocessor and CAN chip that are no longer in production. The long-term support of the SGT CAN interface is of concern due to this issue along with performance inadequacies and technical support. The CAN bus is at the heart of the SGT trailer. If the CAN bus in the SGT trailer cannot be maintained adequately, then the trailer itself cannot be maintained adequately. These concerns led to the need for a CRADA to help develop a new product that would be called the ''Gryphon'' CAN tool. FM and T provided manufacturing expertise along with design criteria to ensure SGT compatibility and long-term support. FM and T also provided resources for software support. Dearborn provided software and hardware design expertise to implement the necessary requirements. Both partners worked around heavy internal workloads to support completion of the project. This CRADA establishes a US source for an item that is very critical to support the SGT project. The Dearborn Group had the same goal to provide a US alternative to German suppliers. The Dearborn Group was also interested in developing a CAN product that has performance characteristics that place the Gryphon in a class by itself. This enhanced product not only meets and exceeds SGT requirements; it has opened up options that were not even considered before the project began. The cost of the product is also less than the European options.

  6. A Runtime Environment for Supporting Research in Resilient HPC System Software & Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Vallee, Geoffroy R; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Boehm, Swen; Engelmann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The high-performance computing (HPC) community continues to increase the size and complexity of hardware platforms that support advanced scientific workloads. The runtime environment (RTE) is a crucial layer in the software stack for these large-scale systems. The RTE manages the interface between the operating system and the application running in parallel on the machine. The deployment of applications and tools on large-scale HPC computing systems requires the RTE to manage process creation in a scalable manner, support sparse connectivity, and provide fault tolerance. We have developed a new RTE that provides a basis for building distributed execution environments and developing tools for HPC to aid research in system software and resilience. This paper describes the software architecture of the Scalable runTime Component Infrastructure (STCI), which is intended to provide a complete infrastructure for scalable start-up and management of many processes in large-scale HPC systems. We highlight features of the current implementation, which is provided as a system library that allows developers to easily use and integrate STCI in their tools and/or applications. The motivation for this work has been to support ongoing research activities in fault-tolerance for large-scale systems. We discuss the advantages of the modular framework employed and describe two use cases that demonstrate its capabilities: (i) an alternate runtime for a Message Passing Interface (MPI) stack, and (ii) a distributed control and communication substrate for a fault-injection tool.

  7. Software tool for 3D extraction of germinal centers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Germinal Centers (GC) are short-lived micro-anatomical structures, within lymphoid organs, where affinity maturation is initiated. Theoretical modeling of the dynamics of the GC reaction including follicular CD4+ T helper and the recently described follicular regulatory CD4+ T cell populations, predicts that the intensity and life span of such reactions is driven by both types of T cells, yet controlled primarily by follicular regulatory CD4+ T cells. In order to calibrate GC models, it is necessary to properly analyze the kinetics of GC sizes. Presently, the estimation of spleen GC volumes relies upon confocal microscopy images from 20-30 slices spanning a depth of ~ 20 - 50 μm, whose GC areas are analyzed, slice-by-slice, for subsequent 3D reconstruction and quantification. The quantity of data to be analyzed from such images taken for kinetics experiments is usually prohibitively large to extract semi-manually with existing software. As a result, the entire procedure is highly time-consuming, and inaccurate, thereby motivating the need for a new software tool that can automatically identify and calculate the 3D spot volumes from GC multidimensional images. Results We have developed pyBioImage, an open source cross platform image analysis software application, written in python with C extensions that is specifically tailored to the needs of immunologic research involving 4D imaging of GCs. The software provides 1) support for importing many multi-image formats, 2) basic image processing and analysis, and 3) the ExtractGC module, that allows for automatic analysis and visualization of extracted GC volumes from multidimensional confocal microscopy images. We present concrete examples of different microscopy image data sets of GC that have been used in experimental and theoretical studies of mouse model GC dynamics. Conclusions The pyBioImage software framework seeks to be a general purpose image application for immunological research based on 4D imaging

  8. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Damevski, Kostadin

    2009-03-30

    A resounding success of the Scientific Discover through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedened computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) tackles these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative hig-performance scientific computing.

  9. Learning Photogrammetry with Interactive Software Tool PhoX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, T.

    2016-06-01

    Photogrammetry is a complex topic in high-level university teaching, especially in the fields of geodesy, geoinformatics and metrology where high quality results are demanded. In addition, more and more black-box solutions for 3D image processing and point cloud generation are available that generate nice results easily, e.g. by structure-from-motion approaches. Within this context, the classical approach of teaching photogrammetry (e.g. focusing on aerial stereophotogrammetry) has to be reformed in order to educate students and professionals with new topics and provide them with more information behind the scene. Since around 20 years photogrammetry courses at the Jade University of Applied Sciences in Oldenburg, Germany, include the use of digital photogrammetry software that provide individual exercises, deep analysis of calculation results and a wide range of visualization tools for almost all standard tasks in photogrammetry. During the last years the software package PhoX has been developed that is part of a new didactic concept in photogrammetry and related subjects. It also serves as analysis tool in recent research projects. PhoX consists of a project-oriented data structure for images, image data, measured points and features and 3D objects. It allows for almost all basic photogrammetric measurement tools, image processing, calculation methods, graphical analysis functions, simulations and much more. Students use the program in order to conduct predefined exercises where they have the opportunity to analyse results in a high level of detail. This includes the analysis of statistical quality parameters but also the meaning of transformation parameters, rotation matrices, calibration and orientation data. As one specific advantage, PhoX allows for the interactive modification of single parameters and the direct view of the resulting effect in image or object space.

  10. Comparisons of Kinematics and Dynamics Simulation Software Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiue, Yeu-Sheng Paul

    2002-01-01

    Kinematic and dynamic analyses for moving bodies are essential to system engineers and designers in the process of design and validations. 3D visualization and motion simulation plus finite element analysis (FEA) give engineers a better way to present ideas and results. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) system engineering researchers are currently using IGRIP from DELMIA Inc. as a kinematic simulation tool for discrete bodies motion simulations. Although IGRIP is an excellent tool for kinematic simulation with some dynamic analysis capabilities in robotic control, explorations of other alternatives with more powerful dynamic analysis and FEA capabilities are necessary. Kinematics analysis will only examine the displacement, velocity, and acceleration of the mechanism without considering effects from masses of components. With dynamic analysis and FEA, effects such as the forces or torques at the joint due to mass and inertia of components can be identified. With keen market competition, ALGOR Mechanical Event Simulation (MES), MSC visualNastran 4D, Unigraphics Motion+, and Pro/MECHANICA were chosen for explorations. In this study, comparisons between software tools were presented in terms of following categories: graphical user interface (GUI), import capability, tutorial availability, ease of use, kinematic simulation capability, dynamic simulation capability, FEA capability, graphical output, technical support, and cost. Propulsion Test Article (PTA) with Fastrac engine model exported from IGRIP and an office chair mechanism were used as examples for simulations.

  11. User Guide for the STAYSL PNNL Suite of Software Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Johnson, Christian D.

    2013-02-27

    The STAYSL PNNL software suite provides a set of tools for working with neutron activation rates measured in a nuclear fission reactor, an accelerator-based neutron source, or any neutron field to determine the neutron flux spectrum through a generalized least-squares approach. This process is referred to as neutron spectral adjustment since the preferred approach is to use measured data to adjust neutron spectra provided by neutron physics calculations. The input data consist of the reaction rates based on measured activities, an initial estimate of the neutron flux spectrum, neutron activation cross sections and their associated uncertainties (covariances), and relevant correction factors. The output consists of the adjusted neutron flux spectrum and associated covariance matrix, which is useful for neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations.

  12. SOFI Simulation Tool: A Software Package for Simulating and Testing Super-Resolution Optical Fluctuation Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sharipov, Azat; Geissbuehler, Stefan; Leutenegger, Marcel; Vandenberg, Wim; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Lasser, Theo

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) allows one to perform sub-diffraction fluorescence microscopy of living cells. By analyzing the acquired image sequence with an advanced correlation method, i.e. a high-order cross-cumulant analysis, super-resolution in all three spatial dimensions can be achieved. Here we introduce a software tool for a simple qualitative comparison of SOFI images under simulated conditions considering parameters of the microscope setup and essential properties of the biological sample. This tool incorporates SOFI and STORM algorithms, displays and describes the SOFI image processing steps in a tutorial-like fashion. Fast testing of various parameters simplifies the parameter optimization prior to experimental work. The performance of the simulation tool is demonstrated by comparing simulated results with experimentally acquired data. PMID:27583365

  13. SOFI Simulation Tool: A Software Package for Simulating and Testing Super-Resolution Optical Fluctuation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Girsault, Arik; Lukes, Tomas; Sharipov, Azat; Geissbuehler, Stefan; Leutenegger, Marcel; Vandenberg, Wim; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Lasser, Theo

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) allows one to perform sub-diffraction fluorescence microscopy of living cells. By analyzing the acquired image sequence with an advanced correlation method, i.e. a high-order cross-cumulant analysis, super-resolution in all three spatial dimensions can be achieved. Here we introduce a software tool for a simple qualitative comparison of SOFI images under simulated conditions considering parameters of the microscope setup and essential properties of the biological sample. This tool incorporates SOFI and STORM algorithms, displays and describes the SOFI image processing steps in a tutorial-like fashion. Fast testing of various parameters simplifies the parameter optimization prior to experimental work. The performance of the simulation tool is demonstrated by comparing simulated results with experimentally acquired data. PMID:27583365

  14. Software control of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope enclosure PLC hardware using COTS software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrowman, Alastair J.; de Bilbao, Lander; Ariño, Javier; Murga, Gaizka; Goodrich, Bret; Hubbard, John R.; Greer, Alan; Mayer, Chris; Taylor, Philip

    2012-09-01

    As PLCs evolve from simple logic controllers into more capable Programmable Automation Controllers (PACs), observatories are increasingly using such devices to control complex mechanisms1, 2. This paper describes use of COTS software to control such hardware using the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) Common Services Framework (CSF). We present the Enclosure Control System (ECS) under development in Spain and the UK. The paper details selection of the commercial PLC communication library PLCIO. Implemented in C and delivered with source code, the library separates the programmer from communication details through a simple API. Capable of communicating with many types of PLCs (including Allen-Bradley and Siemens) the API remains the same irrespective of PLC in use. The ECS is implemented in Java using the observatory's framework that provides common services for software components. We present a design following a connection-based approach where all components access the PLC through a single connection class. The link between Java and PLCIO C library is provided by a thin Java Native Interface (JNI) layer. Also presented is a software simulator of the PLC based upon the PLCIO Virtual PLC. This creates a simulator operating below the library's API and thus requires no change to ECS software. It also provides enhanced software testing capabilities prior to hardware becoming available. Results are presented in the form of communication timing test data, showing that the use of CSF, JNI and PLCIO provide a control system capable of controlling enclosure tracking mechanisms, that would be equally valid for telescope mount control.

  15. MUST - An integrated system of support tools for research flight software engineering. [Multipurpose User-oriented Software Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straeter, T. A.; Foudriat, E. C.; Will, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of NASA's MUST (Multipurpose User-oriented Software Technology) program at Langley Research Center are to cut the cost of producing software which effectively utilizes digital systems for flight research. These objectives will be accomplished by providing an integrated system of support software tools for use throughout the research flight software development process. A description of the overall MUST program and its progress toward the release of a first MUST system will be presented. This release includes: a special interactive user interface, a library of subroutines, assemblers, a compiler, automatic documentation tools, and a test and simulation system.

  16. Framework Programmable Platform for the Advanced Software Development Workstation (FPP/ASDW). Demonstration framework document. Volume 1: Concepts and activity descriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Richard J.; Blinn, Thomas M.; Dewitte, Paul S.; Crump, John W.; Ackley, Keith A.

    1992-01-01

    The Framework Programmable Software Development Platform (FPP) is a project aimed at effectively combining tool and data integration mechanisms with a model of the software development process to provide an intelligent integrated software development environment. Guided by the model, this system development framework will take advantage of an integrated operating environment to automate effectively the management of the software development process so that costly mistakes during the development phase can be eliminated. The Advanced Software Development Workstation (ASDW) program is conducting research into development of advanced technologies for Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE).

  17. DVS-SOFTWARE: An Effective Tool for Applying Highly Parallelized Hardware To Computational Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, I.; Herrera, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Most geophysical systems are macroscopic physical systems. The behavior prediction of such systems is carried out by means of computational models whose basic models are partial differential equations (PDEs) [1]. Due to the enormous size of the discretized version of such PDEs it is necessary to apply highly parallelized super-computers. For them, at present, the most efficient software is based on non-overlapping domain decomposition methods (DDM). However, a limiting feature of the present state-of-the-art techniques is due to the kind of discretizations used in them. Recently, I. Herrera and co-workers using 'non-overlapping discretizations' have produced the DVS-Software which overcomes this limitation [2]. The DVS-software can be applied to a great variety of geophysical problems and achieves very high parallel efficiencies (90%, or so [3]). It is therefore very suitable for effectively applying the most advanced parallel supercomputers available at present. In a parallel talk, in this AGU Fall Meeting, Graciela Herrera Z. will present how this software is being applied to advance MOD-FLOW. Key Words: Parallel Software for Geophysics, High Performance Computing, HPC, Parallel Computing, Domain Decomposition Methods (DDM)REFERENCES [1]. Herrera Ismael and George F. Pinder, Mathematical Modelling in Science and Engineering: An axiomatic approach", John Wiley, 243p., 2012. [2]. Herrera, I., de la Cruz L.M. and Rosas-Medina A. "Non Overlapping Discretization Methods for Partial, Differential Equations". NUMER METH PART D E, 30: 1427-1454, 2014, DOI 10.1002/num 21852. (Open source) [3]. Herrera, I., & Contreras Iván "An Innovative Tool for Effectively Applying Highly Parallelized Software To Problems of Elasticity". Geofísica Internacional, 2015 (In press)

  18. ELER software - a new tool for urban earthquake loss assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancilar, U.; Tuzun, C.; Yenidogan, C.; Erdik, M.

    2010-12-01

    ATC-55 (Yang, 2005). An urban loss assessment exercise for a scenario earthquake for the city of Istanbul is conducted and physical and social losses are presented. Damage to the urban environment is compared to the results obtained from similar software, i.e. KOERILoss (KOERI, 2002) and DBELA (Crowley et al., 2004). The European rapid loss estimation tool is expected to help enable effective emergency response, on both local and global level, as well as public information.

  19. Sandia Advanced MEMS Design Tools, Version 2.0

    2002-06-13

    Sandia Advanced MEMS Design Tools is a 5-level surface micromachine fabrication technology, which customers internal and external to Sandia can access to fabricate prototype MEMS devices. This CD contains an integrated set of electronic files that: a) Describe the SUMMiT V fabrication process b) Provide enabling educational information (including pictures, videos, technical information) c)Facilitate the process of designing MEMS with the SUMMiT process (prototype file, Design Rule Checker, Standard Parts Library) d) Facilitate the processmore » of having MEMS fabricated at SNL e) Facilitate the process of having post-fabrication services performed While there exist some files on the CD that are used in conjunction with the software AutoCAD, these files are not intended for use independent of the CD. NOTE: THE CUSTOMER MUST PURCHASE HIS/HER OWN COPY OF AutoCAD TO USE WITH THESE FILES.« less

  20. A software tool for rapid flood inundation mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verdin, James; Verdin, Kristine; Mathis, Melissa; Magadzire, Tamuka; Kabuchanga, Eric; Woodbury, Mark; Gadain, Hussein

    2016-06-02

    The GIS Flood Tool (GFT) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey with support from the U.S. Agency for International Development’s Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance to provide a means for production of reconnaissance-level flood inundation mapping for data-sparse and resource-limited areas of the world. The GFT has also attracted interest as a tool for rapid assessment flood inundation mapping for the Flood Inundation Mapping Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. The GFT can fill an important gap for communities that lack flood inundation mapping by providing a first-estimate of inundation zones, pending availability of resources to complete an engineering study. The tool can also help identify priority areas for application of scarce flood inundation mapping resources. The technical basis of the GFT is an application of the Manning equation for steady flow in an open channel, operating on specially processed digital elevation data. The GFT is implemented as a software extension in ArcGIS. Output maps from the GFT were validated at 11 sites with inundation maps produced previously by the Flood Inundation Mapping Program using standard one-dimensional hydraulic modeling techniques. In 80 percent of the cases, the GFT inundation patterns matched 75 percent or more of the one-dimensional hydraulic model inundation patterns. Lower rates of pattern agreement were seen at sites with low relief and subtle surface water divides. Although the GFT is simple to use, it should be applied with the oversight or review of a qualified hydraulic engineer who understands the simplifying assumptions of the approach.

  1. A software tool for rapid flood inundation mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verdin, James; Verdin, Kristine; Mathis, Melissa; Magadzire, Tamuka; Kabuchanga, Eric; Woodbury, Mark; Gadain, Hussein

    2016-01-01

    The GIS Flood Tool (GFT) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey with support from the U.S. Agency for International Development’s Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance to provide a means for production of reconnaissance-level flood inundation mapping for data-sparse and resource-limited areas of the world. The GFT has also attracted interest as a tool for rapid assessment flood inundation mapping for the Flood Inundation Mapping Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. The GFT can fill an important gap for communities that lack flood inundation mapping by providing a first-estimate of inundation zones, pending availability of resources to complete an engineering study. The tool can also help identify priority areas for application of scarce flood inundation mapping resources. The technical basis of the GFT is an application of the Manning equation for steady flow in an open channel, operating on specially processed digital elevation data. The GFT is implemented as a software extension in ArcGIS. Output maps from the GFT were validated at 11 sites with inundation maps produced previously by the Flood Inundation Mapping Program using standard one-dimensional hydraulic modeling techniques. In 80 percent of the cases, the GFT inundation patterns matched 75 percent or more of the one-dimensional hydraulic model inundation patterns. Lower rates of pattern agreement were seen at sites with low relief and subtle surface water divides. Although the GFT is simple to use, it should be applied with the oversight or review of a qualified hydraulic engineer who understands the simplifying assumptions of the approach.

  2. Development and applications of a software tool for diarthrodial joint analysis.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Sandra; Lopomo, Nicola; Greggio, Samuele; Ferretti, Emil; Visani, Andrea

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes a new software environment for advanced analysis of diarthrodial joints. The new tool provides a number of elaboration functions to investigate the joint kinematics, bone anatomy, and ligament and tendon properties. In particular, the shapes and the contact points of the articulating surfaces can be displayed and analysed through 2D user-defined sections and fittings (lines or conics). Ligament behaviour can be evaluated during joint movement, through the computation of elongations, orientations, and fiber strain. Motion trajectories can be also analysed through the calculation of helical axes, instantaneous rotations, and displacements in specific user-chosen coordinate reference frames. The software has an user-friendly graphical interface to display four-dimensional data (time-space data) obtained from medical images, navigation systems, spatial linkages or digitalizers, and can also generate printable reports and multiple graphs as well as ASCII files that can be imported to spreadsheet programs such as Microsoft Excel.

  3. Use of software tools in the development of real time software systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvey, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The transformation of a preexisting software system into a larger and more versatile system with different mission requirements is discussed. The history of this transformation is used to illustrate the use of structured real time programming techniques and tools to produce maintainable and somewhat transportable systems. The predecessor system is a single ground diagnostic system; its purpose is to exercise a computer controlled hardware set prior to its deployment in its functional environment, as well as test the equipment set by supplying certain well known stimulas. The successor system (FTE) is required to perform certain testing and control functions while this hardware set is in its functional environment. Both systems must deal with heavy user input/output loads and a new I/O requirement is included in the design of the FTF system. Human factors are enhanced by adding an improved console interface and special function keyboard handler. The additional features require the inclusion of much new software to the original set from which FTF was developed. As a result, it is necessary to split the system into a duel programming configuration with high rates of interground communications. A generalized information routing mechanism is used to support this configuration.

  4. Advanced program development management software system. Software description and user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to apply emerging techniques and tools from the computer science discipline of paperless management to the activities of the Space Transportation and Exploration Office (PT01) in Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Program Development, thereby enhancing the productivity of the workforce, the quality of the data products, and the collection, dissemination, and storage of information. The approach used to accomplish the objectives emphasized the utilization of finished form (off-the-shelf) software products to the greatest extent possible without impacting the performance of the end product, to pursue developments when necessary in the rapid prototyping environment to provide a mechanism for frequent feedback from the users, and to provide a full range of user support functions during the development process to promote testing of the software.

  5. Development of Advanced Tools for Cryogenic Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugby, D. C.; Marland, B. C.; Stouffer, C. J.; Kroliczek, E. J.

    2004-06-01

    This paper describes four advanced devices (or tools) that were developed to help solve problems in cryogenic integration. The four devices are: (1) an across-gimbal nitrogen cryogenic loop heat pipe (CLHP); (2) a miniaturized neon CLHP; (3) a differential thermal expansion (DTE) cryogenic thermal switch (CTSW); and (4) a dual-volume nitrogen cryogenic thermal storage unit (CTSU). The across-gimbal CLHP provides a low torque, high conductance solution for gimbaled cryogenic systems wishing to position their cryocoolers off-gimbal. The miniaturized CLHP combines thermal transport, flexibility, and thermal switching (at 35 K) into one device that can be directly mounted to both the cooler cold head and the cooled component. The DTE-CTSW, designed and successfully tested in a previous program using a stainless steel tube and beryllium (Be) end-pieces, was redesigned with a polymer rod and high-purity aluminum (Al) end-pieces to improve performance and manufacturability while still providing a miniaturized design. Lastly, the CTSU was designed with a 6063 Al heat exchanger and integrally welded, segmented, high purity Al thermal straps for direct attachment to both a cooler cold head and a Be component whose peak heat load exceeds its average load by 2.5 times. For each device, the paper will describe its development objective, operating principles, heritage, requirements, design, test data and lessons learned.

  6. Decision graphs: a tool for developing real-time software

    SciTech Connect

    Kozubal, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of decision graphs in the preparation of, in particular, real-time software is briefly described. The usefulness of decision graphs in software design, testing, and maintenance is pointed out. 2 figures. (RWR)

  7. Experimental Evaluation of Verification and Validation Tools on Martian Rover Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brat, Guillaume; Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Goldberg, Allen; Havelund, Klaus; Lowry, Mike; Pasareanu, Corina; Venet, Arnaud; Visser, Willem

    2003-01-01

    To achieve its science objectives in deep space exploration, NASA has a need for science platform vehicles to autonomously make control decisions in a time frame that excludes intervention from Earth-based controllers. Round-trip light-time is one significant factor motivating autonomy capability, another factor is the need to reduce ground support operations cost. An unsolved problem potentially impeding the adoption of autonomy capability is the verification and validation of such software systems, which exhibit far more behaviors (and hence distinct execution paths in the software) than is typical in current deepspace platforms. Hence the need for a study to benchmark advanced Verification and Validation (V&V) tools on representative autonomy software. The objective of the study was to access the maturity of different technologies, to provide data indicative of potential synergies between them, and to identify gaps in the technologies with respect to the challenge of autonomy V&V. The study consisted of two parts: first, a set of relatively independent case studies of different tools on the same autonomy code, second a carefully controlled experiment with human participants on a subset of these technologies. This paper describes the second part of the study. Overall, nearly four hundred hours of data on human use of three different advanced V&V tools were accumulated, with a control group that used conventional testing methods. The experiment simulated four independent V&V teams debugging three successive versions of an executive controller for a Martian Rover. Defects were carefully seeded into the three versions based on a profile of defects from CVS logs that occurred in the actual development of the executive controller. The rest of the document is structured a s follows. In section 2 and 3, we respectively describe the tools used in the study and the rover software that was analyzed. In section 4 the methodology for the experiment is described; this

  8. A software tool for the analysis of neuronal morphology data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Anatomy plays a fundamental role in supporting and shaping nervous system activity. The remarkable progress of computer processing power within the last two decades has enabled the generation of electronic databases of complete three-dimensional (3D) dendritic and axonal morphology for neuroanatomical studies. Several laboratories are freely posting their reconstructions online after result publication v.gr. NeuroMorpho.Org (Nat Rev Neurosci7:318–324, 2006). These neuroanatomical archives represent a crucial resource to explore the relationship between structure and function in the brain (Front Neurosci6:49, 2012). However, such 'Cartesian’ descriptions bear little intuitive information for neuroscientists. Here, we developed a simple prototype of a MATLAB-based software tool to quantitatively describe the 3D neuronal structures from public repositories. The program imports neuronal reconstructions and quantifies statistical distributions of basic morphological parameters such as branch length, tortuosity, branch's genealogy and bifurcation angles. Using these morphological distributions, our algorithm can generate a set of virtual neurons readily usable for network simulations. PMID:24529393

  9. Advanced cryogenics for cutting tools. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, L.J.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to determine if cryogenic treatment improved the life and cost effectiveness of perishable cutting tools over other treatments or coatings. Test results showed that in five of seven of the perishable cutting tools tested there was no improvement in tool life. The other two tools showed a small gain in tool life, but not as much as when switching manufacturers of the cutting tool. The following conclusions were drawn from this study: (1) titanium nitride coatings are more effective than cryogenic treatment in increasing the life of perishable cutting tools made from all cutting tool materials, (2) cryogenic treatment may increase tool life if the cutting tool is improperly heat treated during its origination, and (3) cryogenic treatment was only effective on those tools made from less sophisticated high speed tool steels. As a part of a recent detailed investigation, four cutting tool manufacturers and two cutting tool laboratories were queried and none could supply any data to substantiate cryogenic treatment of perishable cutting tools.

  10. SHMTools: a general-purpose software tool for SHM applications

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Dustin; Farrar, Charles; Taylor, Stuart; Park, Gyuhae; Flynn, Eric B; Kpotufe, Samory; Dondi, Denis; Mollov, Todor; Todd, Michael D; Rosin, Tajana S; Figueiredo, Eloi

    2010-11-30

    This paper describes a new software package for various structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. The software is a set of standardized MATLAB routines covering three main stages of SHM: data acquisition, feature extraction, and feature classification for damage identification. A subset of the software in SHMTools is embeddable, which consists of Matlab functions that can be cross-compiled into generic 'C' programs to be run on a target hardware. The software is also designed to accommodate multiple sensing modalities, including piezoelectric active-sensing, which has been widely used in SHM practice. The software package, including standardized datasets, are publicly available for use by the SHM community. The details of this embeddable software will be discussed, along with several example processes that can be used for guidelines for future use of the software.

  11. Tool for Sizing Analysis of the Advanced Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Hue-Hsie Jannivine; Brown, Cheryl B.; Jeng, Frank J.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced Life Support Sizing Analysis Tool (ALSSAT) is a computer model for sizing and analyzing designs of environmental-control and life support systems (ECLSS) for spacecraft and surface habitats involved in the exploration of Mars and Moon. It performs conceptual designs of advanced life support (ALS) subsystems that utilize physicochemical and biological processes to recycle air and water, and process wastes in order to reduce the need of resource resupply. By assuming steady-state operations, ALSSAT is a means of investigating combinations of such subsystems technologies and thereby assisting in determining the most cost-effective technology combination available. In fact, ALSSAT can perform sizing analysis of the ALS subsystems that are operated dynamically or steady in nature. Using the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet software with Visual Basic programming language, ALSSAT has been developed to perform multiple-case trade studies based on the calculated ECLSS mass, volume, power, and Equivalent System Mass, as well as parametric studies by varying the input parameters. ALSSAT s modular format is specifically designed for the ease of future maintenance and upgrades.

  12. Advances of implementing NC machine tools discussed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukuyev, Y. P.; Trukhan, Y. V.

    1984-11-01

    Numerical control machine tools which are one of the principal resources of reequipment, mechanization and automation of small series and series production in machine building were examined. The continually increasing volume of NC machine tools which are produced and introduced is economically significant for introduction of these machine tools to operation and organization of their effective use. Organizational and technical measures were directed at solving these problems. To insure the fastest introduction of NC machine tools into operation and their technical maintenance, a number of setting up organizations was organized. Setting up services are also provided by the plants manufacturing the NC machine tools, and appropriate subdivisions are created for this purpose.

  13. Recent advances in software for beamline design, accelerator operations and personnel training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, George H.; Hill, Barrey W.; Martono, Hendy; Moore, John M.

    2000-03-01

    Accelerators are finding new applications in research, industry, medicine, as well as other fields, and there is a growing need for new tools to improve the productivity of scientists and engineers involved with these emerging accelerator applications. Several advances in computer software have been made that focus on meeting those needs. This paper summarizes recent work in the development of a unique software framework designed specifically to support the accelerator community: the Multi-Platform Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Codes (SPARC MP). SPARC MP includes a sophisticated beamline object model, an extensive library of GUI components, and supports a variety of particle optics codes and add-on tools. This framework has been used to create the Particle Beam Optics Laboratory (PBO Lab TM) family of software applications. PBO Lab has been used for beamline design, as a computer aid for teaching particle optics, and to support accelerator operations. Several popular charged particle optics programs, including MARYLIE, TRANSPORT, TURTLE and TRACE 3-D, have been integrated with a new version of PBO Lab. The modeling and simulation capabilities of these codes allow PBO Lab to support a wide spectrum of accelerator types. New external data interface tools are available to import beamline parameters from other sources, for example, to utilize magnet strengths generated by a control system. An overview of the new version of PBO Lab is presented.

  14. Data-Driven Decision Making as a Tool to Improve Software Development Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Mary Erin

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide software project failure rate, based on a survey of information technology software manager's view of user satisfaction, product quality, and staff productivity, is estimated to be between 24% and 36% and software project success has not kept pace with the advances in hardware. The problem addressed by this study was the limited…

  15. Software for predictive microbiology and risk assessment: a description and comparison of tools presented at the ICPMF8 Software Fair.

    PubMed

    Tenenhaus-Aziza, Fanny; Ellouze, Mariem

    2015-02-01

    The 8th International Conference on Predictive Modelling in Food was held in Paris, France in September 2013. One of the major topics of this conference was the transfer of knowledge and tools between academics and stakeholders of the food sector. During the conference, a "Software Fair" was held to provide information and demonstrations of predictive microbiology and risk assessment software. This article presents an overall description of the 16 software tools demonstrated at the session and provides a comparison based on several criteria such as the modeling approach, the different modules available (e.g. databases, predictors, fitting tools, risk assessment tools), the studied environmental factors (temperature, pH, aw, etc.), the type of media (broth or food) and the number and type of the provided micro-organisms (pathogens and spoilers). The present study is a guide to help users select the software tools which are most suitable to their specific needs, before they test and explore the tool(s) in more depth.

  16. Advances in software development for intelligent interfaces for alarm and emergency management consoles

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, M.R.; Olson, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    Recent advances in technology allow features like voice synthesis, voice and speech recognition, image understanding, and intelligent data base management to be incorporated in computer driven alarm and emergency management information systems. New software development environments make it possible to do rapid prototyping of custom applications. Three examples using these technologies are discussed. (1) Maximum use is made of high-speed graphics and voice synthesis to implement a state-of-the-art alarm processing and display system with features that make the operator-machine interface efficient and accurate. Although very functional, this system is not portable or flexible; the software would have to be substantially rewritten for other applications. (2) An application generator which has the capability of ''building'' a specific alarm processing and display application in a matter of a few hours, using the site definition developed in the security planning phase to produce the custom application. This package is based on a standardized choice of hardware, within which it is capable of building a system to order, automatically constructing graphics, data tables, alarm prioritization rules, and interfaces to peripherals. (3) A software tool, the User Interface Management System (UIMS), is described which permits rapid prototyping of human-machine interfaces for a variety of applications including emergency management, alarm display and process information display. The object-oriented software of the UIMS achieves rapid prototyping of a new interface by standardizing to a class library of software objects instead of hardware objects.

  17. Using Commercial Off-the-Shelf Software Tools for Space Shuttle Scientific Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groleau, Nicolas; Friedland, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In October 1993, the Astronaut Science Advisor (ASA) was on board the STS-58 flight of the space shuttle. ASA is an interactive system providing data acquisition and analysis, experiment step re-scheduling, and various other forms of reasoning. As fielded, the system runs on a single Macintosh PowerBook 170, which hosts the six ASA modules. There is one other piece of hardware, an external (GW Instruments, Sommerville, Massachusetts) analog-to-digital converter connected to the PowerBook's SCSI port. Three main software tools were used: LabVIEW, CLIPS, and HyperCard: First, a module written in LabVIEW (National Instruments, Austin, Texas) controls the A/D conversion and stores the resulting data in appropriate arrays. This module also analyzes the numerical data to produce a small set of characteristic numbers or symbols describing the results of an experiment trial. Second, a forward-chaining inference system written in CLIPS (NASA) uses the symbolic information provided by the first stage with a static rule base to infer decisions about the experiment. This expert system shell is used by the system for diagnosis. The third component of the system is the user interface, written in HyperCard (Claris Inc. and Apple Inc., both in Cupertino, California).

  18. ESSCOTS for Learning: Transforming Commercial Software into Powerful Educational Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, David; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Gives an overview of Educational Support Systems based on commercial off-the-shelf software (ESSCOTS), and discusses the benefits of developing such educational software. Presents results of a study that revealed the learning processes of middle and high school students who used a geographical information system. (JMV)

  19. Measuring the development process: A tool for software design evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moy, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    The design metrics evaluator (DME), a component of an automated software design analysis system, is described. The DME quantitatively evaluates software design attributes. Its use directs attention to areas of a procedure, module, or complete program having a high potential for error.

  20. Assistive Software Tools for Secondary-Level Students with Literacy Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Alissa A.; McPhillips, Martin; Mulhern, Gerry; Wylie, Judith

    2006-01-01

    The present study assessed the compensatory effectiveness of four assistive software tools (speech synthesis, spellchecker, homophone tool, and dictionary) on literacy. Secondary-level students (N = 93) with reading difficulties completed computer-based tests of literacy skills. Training on their respective software followed for those assigned to…

  1. Kid Tools: Self-Management, Problem- Solving, Organizational, and Planning Software for Children and Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Kevin J.; Fitzgerald, Gail E.; Koury, Kevin A.; Mitchem, Herine J.; Hollingsead, Candice

    2007-01-01

    This article provides an overview of KidTools, an electronic performance software system designed for elementary and middle school children to use independently on classroom or home computers. The software system contains 30 computerized research-based strategy tools that can be implemented in a classroom or home environment. Through the…

  2. The mission events graphic generator software: A small tool with big results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lupisella, Mark; Leibee, Jack; Scaffidi, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Utilization of graphics has long been a useful methodology for many aspects of spacecraft operations. A personal computer based software tool that implements straight-forward graphics and greatly enhances spacecraft operations is presented. This unique software tool is the Mission Events Graphic Generator (MEGG) software which is used in support of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Project. MEGG reads the HST mission schedule and generates a graphical timeline.

  3. Advances in software development for intelligent interfaces for alarm and emergency management consoles

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, M.R.; Olson, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    Recent advances in technology allow features like voice synthesis, voice and speech recognition, image understanding, and intelligent data base management to be incorporated in computer driven alarm and emergency management information systems. New software development environments make it possible to do rapid prototyping of custom applications. Three examples using these technologies are discussed. 1) Maximum use is made of high-speed graphics and voice synthesis to implement a state-of-the-art alarm processing and display system with features that make the operator-machine interface efficient and accurate. 2) An application generator which has the capability of ''building'' a specific alarm processing and display application in a matter of a few hours, using the site definition developed in the security planning phase to produce the custom application. 3) A software tool, is described which permits rapid prototyping of human-machine interfaces for a variety of applications including emergency management, alarm display and process information display.

  4. Experimental Evaluation of Verification and Validation Tools on Martian Rover Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brat, Guillaume; Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Goldberg, Allen; Havelund, Klaus; Lowry, Mike; Pasareani, Corina; Venet, Arnaud; Visser, Willem; Washington, Rich

    2003-01-01

    We report on a study to determine the maturity of different verification and validation technologies (V&V) on a representative example of NASA flight software. The study consisted of a controlled experiment where three technologies (static analysis, runtime analysis and model checking) were compared to traditional testing with respect to their ability to find seeded errors in a prototype Mars Rover. What makes this study unique is that it is the first (to the best of our knowledge) to do a controlled experiment to compare formal methods based tools to testing on a realistic industrial-size example where the emphasis was on collecting as much data on the performance of the tools and the participants as possible. The paper includes a description of the Rover code that was analyzed, the tools used as well as a detailed description of the experimental setup and the results. Due to the complexity of setting up the experiment, our results can not be generalized, but we believe it can still serve as a valuable point of reference for future studies of this kind. It did confirm the belief we had that advanced tools can outperform testing when trying to locate concurrency errors. Furthermore the results of the experiment inspired a novel framework for testing the next generation of the Rover.

  5. Acts -- A collection of high performing software tools for scientific computing

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, L.A.; Marques, O.A.

    2002-11-01

    During the past decades there has been a continuous growth in the number of physical and societal problems that have been successfully studied and solved by means of computational modeling and simulation. Further, many new discoveries depend on high performance computer simulations to satisfy their demands for large computational resources and short response time. The Advanced CompuTational Software (ACTS) Collection brings together a number of general-purpose computational tool development projects funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These tools make it easier for scientific code developers to write high performance applications for parallel computers. They tackle a number of computational issues that are common to a large number of scientific applications, mainly implementation of numerical algorithms, and support for code development, execution and optimization. The ACTS collection promotes code portability, reusability, reduction of duplicate efforts, and tool maturity. This paper presents a brief introduction to the functionality available in ACTS. It also highlight the tools that are in demand by Climate and Weather modelers.

  6. An Approach to Building a Traceability Tool for Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Nelly; Watson, Tom

    1997-01-01

    It is difficult in a large, complex computer program to ensure that it meets the specified requirements. As the program evolves over time, a11 program constraints originally elicited during the requirements phase must be maintained. In addition, during the life cycle of the program, requirements typically change and the program must consistently reflect those changes. Imagine the following scenario. Company X wants to develop a system to automate its assembly line. With such a large system, there are many different stakeholders, e.g., managers, experts such as industrial and mechanical engineers, and end-users. Requirements would be elicited from all of the stake holders involved in the system with each stakeholder contributing their point of view to the requirements. For example, some of the requirements provided by an industrial engineer may concern the movement of parts through the assembly line. A point of view provided by the electrical engineer may be reflected in constraints concerning maximum power usage. End-users may be concerned with comfort and safety issues, whereas managers are concerned with the efficiency of the operation. With so many points of view affecting the requirements, it is difficult to manage them, communicate information to relevant stakeholders. and it is likely that conflicts in the requirements will arise. In the coding process, the implementors will make additional assumptions and interpretations on the design and the requirements of the system. During any stage of development, stakeholders may request that a requirement be added or changed. In such a dynamic environment, it is difficult to guarantee that the system will preserve the current set of requirements. Tracing, the mapping between objects in the artifacts of the system being developed, addresses this issue. Artifacts encompass documents such as the system definition, interview transcripts, memoranda, the software requirements specification, user's manuals, the functional

  7. Sandia Advanced MEMS Design Tools, Version 2.2.5

    SciTech Connect

    Yarberry, Victor; Allen, James; Lantz, Jeffery; Priddy, Brian; & Westling, Belinda

    2010-01-19

    The Sandia National Laboratories Advanced MEMS Design Tools, Version 2.2.5, is a collection of menus, prototype drawings, and executables that provide significant productivity enhancements when using AutoCAD to design MEMS components. This release is designed for AutoCAD 2000i, 2002, or 2004 and is supported under Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000, or XP. SUMMiT V (Sandia Ultra planar Multi level MEMS Technology) is a 5 level surface micromachine fabrication technology, which customers internal and external to Sandia can access to fabricate prototype MEMS devices. This CD contains an integrated set of electronic files that: a) Describe the SUMMiT V fabrication process b) Facilitate the process of designing MEMS with the SUMMiT process (prototype file, Design Rule Checker, Standard Parts Library) New features in this version: AutoCAD 2004 support has been added. SafeExplode ? a new feature that explodes blocks without affecting polylines (avoids exploding polylines into objects that are ignored by the DRC and Visualization tools). Layer control menu ? a pull-down menu for selecting layers to isolate, freeze, or thaw. Updated tools: A check has been added to catch invalid block names. DRC features: Added username/password validation, added a method to update the user?s password. SNL_DRC_WIDTH ? a value to control the width of the DRC error lines. SNL_BIAS_VALUE ? a value use to offset selected geometry SNL_PROCESS_NAME ? a value to specify the process name Documentation changes: The documentation has been updated to include the new features. While there exist some files on the CD that are used in conjunction with software package AutoCAD, these files are not intended for use independent of the CD. Note that the customer must purchase his/her own copy of AutoCAD to use with these files.

  8. Sandia Advanced MEMS Design Tools, Version 2.2.5

    2010-01-19

    The Sandia National Laboratories Advanced MEMS Design Tools, Version 2.2.5, is a collection of menus, prototype drawings, and executables that provide significant productivity enhancements when using AutoCAD to design MEMS components. This release is designed for AutoCAD 2000i, 2002, or 2004 and is supported under Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000, or XP. SUMMiT V (Sandia Ultra planar Multi level MEMS Technology) is a 5 level surface micromachine fabrication technology, which customers internal and external tomore » Sandia can access to fabricate prototype MEMS devices. This CD contains an integrated set of electronic files that: a) Describe the SUMMiT V fabrication process b) Facilitate the process of designing MEMS with the SUMMiT process (prototype file, Design Rule Checker, Standard Parts Library) New features in this version: AutoCAD 2004 support has been added. SafeExplode ? a new feature that explodes blocks without affecting polylines (avoids exploding polylines into objects that are ignored by the DRC and Visualization tools). Layer control menu ? a pull-down menu for selecting layers to isolate, freeze, or thaw. Updated tools: A check has been added to catch invalid block names. DRC features: Added username/password validation, added a method to update the user?s password. SNL_DRC_WIDTH ? a value to control the width of the DRC error lines. SNL_BIAS_VALUE ? a value use to offset selected geometry SNL_PROCESS_NAME ? a value to specify the process name Documentation changes: The documentation has been updated to include the new features. While there exist some files on the CD that are used in conjunction with software package AutoCAD, these files are not intended for use independent of the CD. Note that the customer must purchase his/her own copy of AutoCAD to use with these files.« less

  9. SAGES: a suite of freely-available software tools for electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Sheri L; Feighner, Brian H; Loschen, Wayne A; Wojcik, Richard A; Skora, Joseph F; Coberly, Jacqueline S; Blazes, David L

    2011-05-10

    Public health surveillance is undergoing a revolution driven by advances in the field of information technology. Many countries have experienced vast improvements in the collection, ingestion, analysis, visualization, and dissemination of public health data. Resource-limited countries have lagged behind due to challenges in information technology infrastructure, public health resources, and the costs of proprietary software. The Suite for Automated Global Electronic bioSurveillance (SAGES) is a collection of modular, flexible, freely-available software tools for electronic disease surveillance in resource-limited settings. One or more SAGES tools may be used in concert with existing surveillance applications or the SAGES tools may be used en masse for an end-to-end biosurveillance capability. This flexibility allows for the development of an inexpensive, customized, and sustainable disease surveillance system. The ability to rapidly assess anomalous disease activity may lead to more efficient use of limited resources and better compliance with World Health Organization International Health Regulations.

  10. OpenROCS: a software tool to control robotic observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomé, Josep; Sanz, Josep; Vilardell, Francesc; Ribas, Ignasi; Gil, Pere

    2012-09-01

    We present the Open Robotic Observatory Control System (OpenROCS), an open source software platform developed for the robotic control of telescopes. It acts as a software infrastructure that executes all the necessary processes to implement responses to the system events that appear in the routine and non-routine operations associated to data-flow and housekeeping control. The OpenROCS software design and implementation provides a high flexibility to be adapted to different observatory configurations and event-action specifications. It is based on an abstract model that is independent of the specific hardware or software and is highly configurable. Interfaces to the system components are defined in a simple manner to achieve this goal. We give a detailed description of the version 2.0 of this software, based on a modular architecture developed in PHP and XML configuration files, and using standard communication protocols to interface with applications for hardware monitoring and control, environment monitoring, scheduling of tasks, image processing and data quality control. We provide two examples of how it is used as the core element of the control system in two robotic observatories: the Joan Oró Telescope at the Montsec Astronomical Observatory (Catalonia, Spain) and the SuperWASP Qatar Telescope at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (Canary Islands, Spain).

  11. NASA's Advanced Multimission Operations System: A Case Study in Formalizing Software Architecture Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    All software systems of significant size and longevity eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by evolving requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the cause, software architecture evolution is commonplace in real world software projects. Recently, software architecture researchers have begun to study this phenomenon in depth. However, this work has suffered from problems of validation; research in this area has tended to make heavy use of toy examples and hypothetical scenarios and has not been well supported by real world examples. To help address this problem, I describe an ongoing effort at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to re-architect the Advanced Multimission Operations System (AMMOS), which is used to operate NASA's deep-space and astrophysics missions. Based on examination of project documents and interviews with project personnel, I describe the goals and approach of this evolution effort and then present models that capture some of the key architectural changes. Finally, I demonstrate how approaches and formal methods from my previous research in architecture evolution may be applied to this evolution, while using languages and tools already in place at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  12. Advanced Data Format (ADF) Software Library and Users Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Matthew; Smith, Charles A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The "CFD General Notation System" (CGNS) consists of a collection of conventions, and conforming software, for the storage and retrieval of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) data. It facilitates the exchange of data between sites and applications, and helps stabilize the archiving of aerodynamic data. This effort was initiated in order to streamline the procedures in exchanging data and software between NASA and its customers, but the goal is to develop CGNS into a National Standard for the exchange of aerodynamic data. The CGNS development team is comprised of members from Boeing Commercial. Airplane Group, NASA-Ames, NASA-Langley, NASA-Lewis, McDonnell-Douglas Corporation (now Boeing-St. Louis), Air Force-Wright Lab., and ICEM-CFD Engineering. The elements of CGNS address all activities associated with the storage of data on external media and its movement to and from application programs. These elements include: 1) The Advanced Data Format (ADF) Database manager, consisting of both a file format specification and its 1/0 software, which handles the actual reading and writing of data from and to external storage media; 2) The Standard Interface Data Structures (SIDS), which specify the intellectual content of CFD data and the conventions governing naming and terminology; 3) The SIDS-to-ADF File Mapping conventions, which specify the exact location where the CFD data defined by the SIDS is to be stored within the ADF file(s); and 4) The CGNS Mid-level Library, which provides CFD-knowledgeable routines suitable for direct installation into application codes. The ADF is a generic database manager with minimal intrinsic capability. It was written for the purpose of storing large numerical datasets in an efficient, platform independent manner. To be effective, it must be used in conjunction with external agreements on how the data will be organized within the ADF database such defined by the SIDS. There are currently 34 user callable functions that comprise the ADF

  13. MSP-Tool: a VBA-based software tool for the analysis of multispecimen paleointensity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monster, Marilyn; de Groot, Lennart; Dekkers, Mark

    2015-12-01

    The multispecimen protocol (MSP) is a method to estimate the Earth's magnetic field's past strength from volcanic rocks or archeological materials. By reducing the amount of heating steps and aligning the specimens parallel to the applied field, thermochemical alteration and multi-domain effects are minimized. We present a new software tool, written for Microsoft Excel 2010 in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), that evaluates paleointensity data acquired using this protocol. In addition to the three ratios (standard, fraction-corrected and domain-state-corrected) calculated following Dekkers and Böhnel (2006) and Fabian and Leonhardt (2010) and a number of other parameters proposed by Fabian and Leonhardt (2010), it also provides several reliability criteria. These include an alteration criterion, whether or not the linear regression intersects the y axis within the theoretically prescribed range, and two directional checks. Overprints and misalignment are detected by isolating the remaining natural remanent magnetization (NRM) and the partial thermoremanent magnetization (pTRM) gained and comparing their declinations and inclinations. The NRM remaining and pTRM gained are then used to calculate alignment-corrected multispecimen plots. Data are analyzed using bootstrap statistics. The program was tested on lava samples that were given a full TRM and that acquired their pTRMs at angles of 0, 15, 30 and 90° with respect to their NRMs. MSP-Tool adequately detected and largely corrected these artificial alignment errors.

  14. Klonos: A Similarity Analysis Based Tool for Software Porting

    2014-07-30

    The Klonos is a compiler-based tool that can help users for scientific application porting. The tool is based on the similarity analysis with the help of the OpenUH compiler (a branch of Open64 compiler). This tool combines syntactic and cost-model-provided metrics clusters, which aggregate similar subroutines that can be ported similarity. The generated porting plan, which allows programmers and compilers to reuse porting experience as much as possible during the porting process.

  15. Development of the FITS tools package for multiple software environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pence, W. D.; Blackburn, J. K.

    1992-01-01

    The HEASARC is developing a package of general purpose software for analyzing data files in FITS format. This paper describes the design philosophy which makes the software both machine-independent (it runs on VAXs, Suns, and DEC-stations) and software environment-independent. Currently the software can be compiled and linked to produce IRAF tasks, or alternatively, the same source code can be used to generate stand-alone tasks using one of two implementations of a user-parameter interface library. The machine independence of the software is achieved by writing the source code in ANSI standard Fortran or C, using the machine-independent FITSIO subroutine interface for all data file I/O, and using a standard user-parameter subroutine interface for all user I/O. The latter interface is based on the Fortran IRAF Parameter File interface developed at STScI. The IRAF tasks are built by linking to the IRAF implementation of this parameter interface library. Two other implementations of this parameter interface library, which have no IRAF dependencies, are now available which can be used to generate stand-alone executable tasks. These stand-alone tasks can simply be executed from the machine operating system prompt either by supplying all the task parameters on the command line or by entering the task name after which the user will be prompted for any required parameters. A first release of this FTOOLS package is now publicly available. The currently available tasks are described, along with instructions on how to obtain a copy of the software.

  16. Software engineering capability for Ada (GRASP/Ada Tool)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, James H., II

    1995-01-01

    The GRASP/Ada project (Graphical Representations of Algorithms, Structures, and Processes for Ada) has successfully created and prototyped a new algorithmic level graphical representation for Ada software, the Control Structure Diagram (CSD). The primary impetus for creation of the CSD was to improve the comprehension efficiency of Ada software and, as a result, improve reliability and reduce costs. The emphasis has been on the automatic generation of the CSD from Ada PDL or source code to support reverse engineering and maintenance. The CSD has the potential to replace traditional prettyprinted Ada Source code. A new Motif compliant graphical user interface has been developed for the GRASP/Ada prototype.

  17. Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Tools (AFAVT), AFDC (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-01-01

    The Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Web site offers a collection of calculators, interactive maps, and informational tools to assist fleets, fuel providers, and others looking to reduce petroleum consumption in the transportation sector.

  18. Experiments in Chemistry: A Model Science Software Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Diana; Tinker, Robert

    1984-01-01

    Describes "Experiments in Chemistry," in which experiments are performed using software and hardware interfaced to the Apple microcomputer's game paddle port. Experiments include temperature, pH electrode, and EMF (cell potential determinations, oxidation-reduction titrations, and precipitation titrations) investigations. (JN)

  19. A Study of Collaborative Software Development Using Groupware Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defranco-Tommarello, Joanna; Deek, Fadi P.

    2005-01-01

    The experimental results of a collaborative problem solving and program development model that takes into consideration the cognitive and social activities that occur during software development is presented in this paper. This collaborative model is based on the Dual Common Model that focuses on individual cognitive aspects of problem solving and…

  20. Calico: An Early-Phase Software Design Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangano, Nicolas Francisco

    2013-01-01

    When developers are faced with a design challenge, they often turn to the whiteboard. This is typical during the conceptual stages of software design, when no code is in existence yet. It may also happen when a significant code base has already been developed, for instance, to plan new functionality or discuss optimizing a key component. While…

  1. Innovative Tools Advance Revolutionary Weld Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    The iconic, orange external tank of the space shuttle launch system not only contains the fuel used by the shuttle s main engines during liftoff but also comprises the shuttle s backbone, supporting the space shuttle orbiter and solid rocket boosters. Given the tank s structural importance and the extreme forces (7.8 million pounds of thrust load) and temperatures it encounters during launch, the welds used to construct the tank must be highly reliable. Variable polarity plasma arc welding, developed for manufacturing the external tank and later employed for building the International Space Station, was until 1994 the best process for joining the aluminum alloys used during construction. That year, Marshall Space Flight Center engineers began experimenting with a relatively new welding technique called friction stir welding (FSW), developed in 1991 by The Welding Institute, of Cambridge, England. FSW differs from traditional fusion welding in that it is a solid-state welding technique, using frictional heat and motion to join structural components without actually melting any of the material. The weld is created by a shouldered pin tool that is plunged into the seam of the materials to be joined. The tool traverses the line while rotating at high speeds, generating friction that heats and softens but does not melt the metal. (The heat produced approaches about 80 percent of the metal s melting temperature.) The pin tool s rotation crushes and stirs the plasticized metal, extruding it along the seam as the tool moves forward. The material cools and consolidates, resulting in a weld with superior mechanical properties as compared to those weld properties of fusion welds. The innovative FSW technology promises a number of attractive benefits. Because the welded materials are not melted, many of the undesirables associated with fusion welding porosity, cracking, shrinkage, and distortion of the weld are minimized or avoided. The process is more energy efficient, safe

  2. Use of software tools for calculating flow accelerated corrosion of nuclear power plant equipment and pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naftal', M. M.; Baranenko, V. I.; Gulina, O. M.

    2014-06-01

    The results obtained from calculations of flow accelerated corrosion of equipment and pipelines operating at nuclear power plants constructed on the basis of PWR, VVER, and RBMK reactors carried out using the EKI-02 and EKI-03 software tools are presented. It is shown that the calculation error does not exceed its value indicated in the qualification certificates for these software tools. It is pointed out that calculations aimed at predicting the service life of pipelines and efficient surveillance of flow accelerated corrosion wear are hardly possible without using the above-mentioned software tools.

  3. Annotation of glycomics MS and MS/MS spectra using the GlycoWorkbench software tool.

    PubMed

    Damerell, David; Ceroni, Alessio; Maass, Kai; Ranzinger, René; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M

    2015-01-01

    The GlycoWorkbench software tool allows users to semiautomatically annotate glycomics MS and MS/MS spectra and MS glycoproteomics spectra. The GlycanBuilder software tool is embedded within GlycoWorkbench allowing users to draw glycan structures and export images of the drawn structures. This chapter demonstrates to users how to draw glycan structures within GlycoWorkbench using the GlycanBuilder software tool. This chapter also demonstrates how to use GlycoWorkbench to import MS and MS/MS glycomics spectra and use the cascading annotation feature to annotate both the MS and MS/MS spectra with a single command.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan : ASC software quality engineering practices Version 3.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Pilch, Martin M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) Quality Criteria, Revision 10 (QC-1) as 'conformance to customer requirements and expectations'. This quality plan defines the SNL ASC Program software quality engineering (SQE) practices and provides a mapping of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirement (CPR) 001.3.6; 'Corporate Software Engineering Excellence'. This plan also identifies ASC management's and the software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals. This SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitments to improving software products by applying cost-effective SQE practices. This plan enumerates the SQE practices that comprise the development of SNL ASC's software products and explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices.

  5. XML-Based Integration of the SMIILE Tool Prototype and Software Metrics Repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakić, Gordana; Gerlec, Črt; Novak, Jernej; Budimac, Zoran

    2011-09-01

    An adequate system for collecting and analyzing software metric results is crucial for the successful interpretation of software characteristics during the software development process. Furthermore, the right interpretation can also identify poor quality in complex modules within software systems. However, there is a gap between raw metrics data and the right interpretation of them. In this paper, the integration of a language independent metric tool (SMIILE prototype [9]) for metrics data extraction and the software metrics repository for storing and analyzing extracted data will be described. With this integration we hope to overcome some of the difficulties that application of sofware metrics experienced in practice.

  6. Training, Quality Assurance Factors, and Tools Investigation: a Work Report and Suggestions on Software Quality Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Pen-Nan

    1991-01-01

    Previously, several research tasks have been conducted, some observations were obtained, and several possible suggestions have been contemplated involving software quality assurance engineering at NASA Johnson. These research tasks are briefly described. Also, a brief discussion is given on the role of software quality assurance in software engineering along with some observations and suggestions. A brief discussion on a training program for software quality assurance engineers is provided. A list of assurance factors as well as quality factors are also included. Finally, a process model which can be used for searching and collecting software quality assurance tools is presented.

  7. New Instrumental Tools for Advanced Astrochemical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steber, Amanda; Zinn, Sabrina; Schnell, Melanie; Rijs, Anouk

    2015-06-01

    Astrochemistry has been a growing field over the past several years. As the data from the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) becomes publicly available, new and fast techniques for the analysis of the data will need to be developed, as well as fast, sensitive laboratory techniques. This lab is in the process of building up instrumentation that will be dedicated to the measurement of astrochemically relevant species, both in the microwave and the millimeter wave regimes. Discharge experiments, laser ablation experiments, as well as time of flight measurements will be possible with this instrumentation. Coupled with instrumentation capabilities will be new software aimed at a speeding up the analysis. The laboratory data will be used to search for new molecular signatures in the interstellar medium (ISM), and help to elucidate molecular reaction pathways occurring in the ISM.

  8. Methods, Software and Tools for Three Numerical Applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    E. R. Jessup

    2000-03-01

    This is a report of the results of the authors work supported by DOE contract DE-FG03-97ER25325. They proposed to study three numerical problems. They are: (1) the extension of the PMESC parallel programming library; (2) the development of algorithms and software for certain generalized eigenvalue and singular value (SVD) problems, and (3) the application of techniques of linear algebra to an information retrieval technique known as latent semantic indexing (LSI).

  9. Software development tools for the CDF MX scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Stuermer, W.; Turner, K.; Littleton-Sestini, S.

    1991-11-01

    This paper discuses the design of the high level assembler and diagnostic control program developed for the MX, a high speed, custom designed computer used in the CDF data acquisition system at Fermilab. These programs provide a friendly productive environment for the development of software on the MX. Details of their implementation and special features, and some of the lessons learned during their development are included.

  10. Terahertz Tools Advance Imaging for Security, Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Picometrix, a wholly owned subsidiary of Advanced Photonix Inc. (API), of Ann Arbor, Michigan, invented the world s first commercial terahertz system. The company improved the portability and capabilities of their systems through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) agreements with Langley Research Center to provide terahertz imaging capabilities for inspecting the space shuttle external tanks and orbiters. Now API s systems make use of the unique imaging capacity of terahertz radiation on manufacturing floors, for thickness measurements of coatings, pharmaceutical tablet production, and even art conservation.

  11. Toolkit of Available EPA Green Infrastructure Modeling Software: Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool (WMOST) is a software application designed tofacilitate integrated water resources management across wet and dry climate regions. It allows waterresources managers and planners to screen a wide range of practices across their watersh...

  12. 76 FR 5832 - International Business Machines (IBM), Software Group Business Unit, Optim Data Studio Tools QA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... November 17, 2010 (75 FR 70296). The negative determination of the TAA petition filed on behalf of workers at International Business Machines (IBM), Software Group Business Unit, Optim Data Studio Tools QA... Employment and Training Administration International Business Machines (IBM), Software Group Business...

  13. Slower Algebra Students Meet Faster Tools: Solving Algebra Word Problems with Graphing Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerushalmy, Michal

    2006-01-01

    The article discusses the ways that less successful mathematics students used graphing software with capabilities similar to a basic graphing calculator to solve algebra problems in context. The study is based on interviewing students who learned algebra for 3 years in an environment where software tools were always present. We found differences…

  14. An Overview of Public Access Computer Software Management Tools for Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wayne, Richard

    2004-01-01

    An IT decision maker gives an overview of public access PC software that's useful in controlling session length and scheduling, Internet access, print output, security, and the latest headaches: spyware and adware. In this article, the author describes a representative sample of software tools in several important categories such as setup…

  15. Designing and Using Software Tools for Educational Purposes: FLAT, a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro-Schez, J. J.; del Castillo, E.; Hortolano, J.; Rodriguez, A.

    2009-01-01

    Educational software tools are considered to enrich teaching strategies, providing a more compelling means of exploration and feedback than traditional blackboard methods. Moreover, software simulators provide a more motivating link between theory and practice than pencil-paper methods, encouraging active and discovery learning in the students.…

  16. Software tools for the analysis of video meteors emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madiedo, J. M.; Toscano, F. M.; Trigo-Rodriguez, J. M.

    2011-10-01

    One of the goals of the SPanish Meteor Network (SPMN) is related to the study of the chemical composition of meteoroids by analyzing the emission spectra resulting from the ablation of these particles of interplanetary matter in the atmosphere. With this aim, some of the CCD video devices we employ to observe the nigh sky are endowed with holographic diffraction gratings, and a continuous monitoring of meteor activity is performed. We have recently developed a new software to analyze these spectra. A description of this computer program is given, and some of the results obtained so far are presented here.

  17. Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment (AGWA) 3.0 Software Tool

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment (AGWA) tool has been developed under an interagency research agreement between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. AGWA i...

  18. Advances in nanocrystallography as a proteomic tool.

    PubMed

    Pechkova, Eugenia; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Nicolini, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    In order to overcome the difficulties and hurdles too much often encountered in crystallizing a protein with the conventional techniques, our group has introduced the innovative Langmuir-Blodgett (LB)-based crystallization, as a major advance in the field of both structural and functional proteomics, thus pioneering the emerging field of the so-called nanocrystallography or nanobiocrystallography. This approach uniquely combines protein crystallography and nanotechnologies within an integrated, coherent framework that allows one to obtain highly stable protein crystals and to fully characterize them at a nano- and subnanoscale. A variety of experimental techniques and theoretical/semi-theoretical approaches, ranging from atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism, Raman spectroscopy and other spectroscopic methods, microbeam grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering to in silico simulations, bioinformatics, and molecular dynamics, has been exploited in order to study the LB-films and to investigate the kinetics and the main features of LB-grown crystals. When compared to classical hanging-drop crystallization, LB technique appears strikingly superior and yields results comparable with crystallization in microgravity environments. Therefore, the achievement of LB-based crystallography can have a tremendous impact in the field of industrial and clinical/therapeutic applications, opening new perspectives for personalized medicine. These implications are envisaged and discussed in the present contribution.

  19. Development of a Software Tool to Automate ADCO Flight Controller Console Planning Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark G.

    2011-01-01

    This independent study project covers the development of the International Space Station (ISS) Attitude Determination and Control Officer (ADCO) Planning Exchange APEX Tool. The primary goal of the tool is to streamline existing manual and time-intensive planning tools into a more automated, user-friendly application that interfaces with existing products and allows the ADCO to produce accurate products and timelines more effectively. This paper will survey the current ISS attitude planning process and its associated requirements, goals, documentation and software tools and how a software tool could simplify and automate many of the planning actions which occur at the ADCO console. The project will be covered from inception through the initial prototype delivery in November 2011 and will include development of design requirements and software as well as design verification and testing.

  20. Advanced tool kits for EPR security.

    PubMed

    Blobel, B

    2000-11-01

    Responding to the challenge for efficient and high quality health care, the shared care paradigm must be established in health. In that context, information systems such as electronic patient records (EPR) have to meet this paradigm supporting communication and interoperation between the health care establishments (HCE) and health professionals (HP) involved. Due to the sensitivity of personal medical information, this co-operation must be provided in a trustworthy way. To enable different views of HCE and HP ranging from management, doctors, nurses up to systems administrators and IT professionals, a set of models for analysis, design and implementation of secure distributed EPR has been developed and introduced. The approach is based on the popular UML methodology and the component paradigm for open, interoperable systems. Easy to use tool kits deal with both application security services and communication security services but also with the security infrastructure needed. Regarding the requirements for distributed multi-user EPRs, modelling and implementation of policy agreements, authorisation and access control are especially considered. Current developments for a security infrastructure in health care based on cryptographic algorithms as health professional cards (HPC), security services employing digital signatures, and health-related TTP services are discussed. CEN and ISO initiatives for health informatics standards in the context of secure and communicable EPR are especially mentioned. PMID:11154968

  1. Framework programmable platform for the advanced software development workstation. Integration mechanism design document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Richard J.; Blinn, Thomas M.; Mayer, Paula S. D.; Reddy, Uday; Ackley, Keith; Futrell, Mike

    1991-01-01

    The Framework Programmable Software Development Platform (FPP) is a project aimed at combining effective tool and data integration mechanisms with a model of the software development process in an intelligent integrated software development environment. Guided by this model, this system development framework will take advantage of an integrated operating environment to automate effectively the management of the software development process so that costly mistakes during the development phase can be eliminated.

  2. The Web Interface Template System (WITS), a software developer`s tool

    SciTech Connect

    Lauer, L.J.; Lynam, M.; Muniz, T.

    1995-11-01

    The Web Interface Template System (WITS) is a tool for software developers. WITS is a three-tiered, object-oriented system operating in a Client/Server environment. This tool can be used to create software applications that have a Web browser as the user interface and access a Sybase database. Development, modification, and implementation are greatly simplified because the developer can change and test definitions immediately, without writing or compiling any code. This document explains WITS functionality, the system structure and components of WITS, and how to obtain, install, and use the software system.

  3. JULIDE: a software tool for 3D reconstruction and statistical analysis of autoradiographic mouse brain sections.

    PubMed

    Ribes, Delphine; Parafita, Julia; Charrier, Rémi; Magara, Fulvio; Magistretti, Pierre J; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2010-11-23

    In this article we introduce JULIDE, a software toolkit developed to perform the 3D reconstruction, intensity normalization, volume standardization by 3D image registration and voxel-wise statistical analysis of autoradiographs of mouse brain sections. This software tool has been developed in the open-source ITK software framework and is freely available under a GPL license. The article presents the complete image processing chain from raw data acquisition to 3D statistical group analysis. Results of the group comparison in the context of a study on spatial learning are shown as an illustration of the data that can be obtained with this tool.

  4. Software tool for the prosthetic foot modeling and stiffness optimization.

    PubMed

    Strbac, Matija; Popović, Dejan B

    2012-01-01

    We present the procedure for the optimization of the stiffness of the prosthetic foot. The procedure allows the selection of the elements of the foot and the materials used for the design. The procedure is based on the optimization where the cost function is the minimization of the difference between the knee joint torques of healthy walking and the walking with the transfemural prosthesis. We present a simulation environment that allows the user to interactively vary the foot geometry and track the changes in the knee torque that arise from these adjustments. The software allows the estimation of the optimal prosthetic foot elasticity and geometry. We show that altering model attributes such as the length of the elastic foot segment or its elasticity leads to significant changes in the estimated knee torque required for a given trajectory.

  5. Software Tool for the Prosthetic Foot Modeling and Stiffness Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Štrbac, Matija; Popović, Dejan B.

    2012-01-01

    We present the procedure for the optimization of the stiffness of the prosthetic foot. The procedure allows the selection of the elements of the foot and the materials used for the design. The procedure is based on the optimization where the cost function is the minimization of the difference between the knee joint torques of healthy walking and the walking with the transfemural prosthesis. We present a simulation environment that allows the user to interactively vary the foot geometry and track the changes in the knee torque that arise from these adjustments. The software allows the estimation of the optimal prosthetic foot elasticity and geometry. We show that altering model attributes such as the length of the elastic foot segment or its elasticity leads to significant changes in the estimated knee torque required for a given trajectory. PMID:22536296

  6. Arc Flash Boundary Calculations Using Computer Software Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, M.D.

    2005-01-07

    Arc Flash Protection boundary calculations have become easier to perform with the availability of personal computer software. These programs incorporate arc flash protection boundary formulas for different voltage and current levels, calculate the bolted fault current at each bus, and use built in time-current coordination curves to determine the clearing time of protective devices in the system. Results of the arc flash protection boundary calculations can be presented in several different forms--as an annotation to the one-line diagram, as a table of arc flash protection boundary distances, and as printed placards to be attached to the appropriate equipment. Basic arc flash protection boundary principles are presented in this paper along with several helpful suggestions for performing arc flash protection boundary calculations.

  7. RadicalLocator: A software tool for identifying the radicals in Chinese characters.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lili; Reichle, Erik D; Jones, Mathew; Liversedge, Simon P

    2015-09-01

    This article describes a new software tool called RadicalLocator that can be used to automatically identify (e.g., for visual inspection) individual target radicals (i.e., groups of strokes) in written Chinese characters. We first briefly clarify why this software is useful for research purposes and discuss the factors that make this pattern recognition task so difficult. We then describe how the software can be downloaded and installed, and used to identify the radicals in characters for the purposes of, for example, selecting materials for psycholinguistic experiments. Finally, we discuss several known limitations of the software and heuristics for addressing them.

  8. Collaborative Software Development in Support of Fast Adaptive AeroSpace Tools (FAAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Park, Michael A.; Wood, William A.

    2003-01-01

    A collaborative software development approach is described. The software product is an adaptation of proven computational capabilities combined with new capabilities to form the Agency's next generation aerothermodynamic and aerodynamic analysis and design tools. To efficiently produce a cohesive, robust, and extensible software suite, the approach uses agile software development techniques; specifically, project retrospectives, the Scrum status meeting format, and a subset of Extreme Programming's coding practices are employed. Examples are provided which demonstrate the substantial benefits derived from employing these practices. Also included is a discussion of issues encountered when porting legacy Fortran 77 code to Fortran 95 and a Fortran 95 coding standard.

  9. Data Visualization: An Exploratory Study into the Software Tools Used by Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Michael; Mattia, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Data visualization is a key component to business and data analytics, allowing analysts in businesses to create tools such as dashboards for business executives. Various software packages allow businesses to create these tools in order to manipulate data for making informed business decisions. The focus is to examine what skills employers are…

  10. Award-Winning CARES/Life Ceramics Durability Evaluation Software Is Making Advanced Technology Accessible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Products made from advanced ceramics show great promise for revolutionizing aerospace and terrestrial propulsion and power generation. However, ceramic components are difficult to design because brittle materials in general have widely varying strength values. The CARES/Life software developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center eases this by providing a tool that uses probabilistic reliability analysis techniques to optimize the design and manufacture of brittle material components. CARES/Life is an integrated package that predicts the probability of a monolithic ceramic component's failure as a function of its time in service. It couples commercial finite element programs--which resolve a component's temperature and stress distribution - with reliability evaluation and fracture mechanics routines for modeling strength - limiting defects. These routines are based on calculations of the probabilistic nature of the brittle material's strength.

  11. Development of a software tool for an internal dosimetry using MIRD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaichana, A.; Tocharoenchai, C.

    2016-03-01

    Currently, many software packages for the internal radiation dosimetry have been developed. Many of them do not provide sufficient tools to perform all of the necessary steps from nuclear medicine image analysis for dose calculation. For this reason, we developed a CALRADDOSE software that can be performed internal dosimetry using MIRD method within a single environment. MATLAB software version 2015a was used as development tool. The calculation process of this software proceeds from collecting time-activity data from image data followed by residence time calculation and absorbed dose calculation using MIRD method. To evaluate the accuracy of this software, we calculate residence times and absorbed doses of 5 Ga- 67 studies and 5 I-131 MIBG studies and then compared the results with those obtained from OLINDA/EXM software. The results showed that the residence times and absorbed doses obtained from both software packages were not statistically significant differences. The CALRADDOSE software is a user-friendly, graphic user interface-based software for internal dosimetry. It provides fast and accurate results, which may be useful for a routine work.

  12. A diagnostic tool for malaria based on computer software.

    PubMed

    Kotepui, Manas; Uthaisar, Kwuntida; Phunphuech, Bhukdee; Phiwklam, Nuoil

    2015-11-12

    Nowadays, the gold standard method for malaria diagnosis is a staining of thick and thin blood film examined by expert laboratorists. It requires well-trained laboratorists, which is a time consuming task, and is un-automated protocol. For this study, Maladiag Software was developed to predict malaria infection in suspected malaria patients. The demographic data of patients, examination for malaria parasites, and complete blood count (CBC) profiles were analyzed. Binary logistic regression was used to create the equation for the malaria diagnosis. The diagnostic parameters of the equation were tested on 4,985 samples (703 infected and 4,282 control samples). The equation indicated 81.2% sensitivity and 80.3% specificity for predicting infection of malaria. The positive likelihood and negative likelihood ratio were 4.12 (95% CI = 4.01-4.23) and 0.23 (95% CI = 0.22-0.25), respectively. This parameter also had odds ratios (P value < 0.0001, OR = 17.6, 95% CI = 16.0-19.3). The equation can predict malaria infection after adjust for age, gender, nationality, monocyte (%), platelet count, neutrophil (%), lymphocyte (%), and the RBC count of patients. The diagnostic accuracy was 0.877 (Area under curve, AUC) (95% CI = 0.871-0.883). The system, when used in combination with other clinical and microscopy methods, might improve malaria diagnoses and enhance prompt treatment.

  13. A software tool for tomographic axial superresolution in STED microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koho, S; Deguchi, T; Hänninen, P E

    2015-11-01

    A method for generating three-dimensional tomograms from multiple three-dimensional axial projections in STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) superresolution microscopy is introduced. Our STED< method, based on the use of a micromirror placed on top of a standard microscopic sample, is used to record a three-dimensional projection at an oblique angle in relation to the main optical axis. Combining the STED< projection with the regular STED image into a single view by tomographic reconstruction, is shown to result in a tomogram with three-to-four-fold improved apparent axial resolution. Registration of the different projections is based on the use of a mutual-information histogram similarity metric. Fusion of the projections into a single view is based on Richardson-Lucy iterative deconvolution algorithm, modified to work with multiple projections. Our tomographic reconstruction method is demonstrated to work with real biological STED superresolution images, including a data set with a limited signal-to-noise ratio (SNR); the reconstruction software (SuperTomo) and its source code will be released under BSD open-source license.

  14. A diagnostic tool for malaria based on computer software.

    PubMed

    Kotepui, Manas; Uthaisar, Kwuntida; Phunphuech, Bhukdee; Phiwklam, Nuoil

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, the gold standard method for malaria diagnosis is a staining of thick and thin blood film examined by expert laboratorists. It requires well-trained laboratorists, which is a time consuming task, and is un-automated protocol. For this study, Maladiag Software was developed to predict malaria infection in suspected malaria patients. The demographic data of patients, examination for malaria parasites, and complete blood count (CBC) profiles were analyzed. Binary logistic regression was used to create the equation for the malaria diagnosis. The diagnostic parameters of the equation were tested on 4,985 samples (703 infected and 4,282 control samples). The equation indicated 81.2% sensitivity and 80.3% specificity for predicting infection of malaria. The positive likelihood and negative likelihood ratio were 4.12 (95% CI = 4.01-4.23) and 0.23 (95% CI = 0.22-0.25), respectively. This parameter also had odds ratios (P value < 0.0001, OR = 17.6, 95% CI = 16.0-19.3). The equation can predict malaria infection after adjust for age, gender, nationality, monocyte (%), platelet count, neutrophil (%), lymphocyte (%), and the RBC count of patients. The diagnostic accuracy was 0.877 (Area under curve, AUC) (95% CI = 0.871-0.883). The system, when used in combination with other clinical and microscopy methods, might improve malaria diagnoses and enhance prompt treatment. PMID:26559606

  15. Lessons learned applying CASE methods/tools to Ada software development projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumberg, Maurice H.; Randall, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the lessons learned from introducing CASE methods/tools into organizations and applying them to actual Ada software development projects. This paper will be useful to any organization planning to introduce a software engineering environment (SEE) or evolving an existing one. It contains management level lessons learned, as well as lessons learned in using specific SEE tools/methods. The experiences presented are from Alpha Test projects established under the STARS (Software Technology for Adaptable and Reliable Systems) project. They reflect the front end efforts by those projects to understand the tools/methods, initial experiences in their introduction and use, and later experiences in the use of specific tools/methods and the introduction of new ones.

  16. Software tools and frameworks in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, R.

    2011-01-01

    In many fields of science and industry the computing environment has grown at an exponential speed in the past 30 years. From ad hoc solutions for each problem, the field has evolved gradually to use or reuse systems developed across the years for the same environment or coming from other fields with the same requirements. Several frameworks have emerged to solve common problems. In High Energy Physics (HEP) and Nuclear Physics, we have witnessed the emergence of common tools, packages and libraries that have become gradually the corner stone of the computing in these fields. The emergence of these systems has been complex because the computing field is evolving rapidly, the problems to be solved more and more complex and the size of the experiments now involving several thousand physicists from all over the world. This paper describes the emergence of these frameworks and their evolution from libraries including independent subroutines to task-oriented packages and to general experiments frameworks.

  17. Users' manual for the Hydroecological Integrity Assessment Process software (including the New Jersey Assessment Tools)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henriksen, James A.; Heasley, John; Kennen, Jonathan G.; Nieswand, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Applying the Hydroecological Integrity Assessment Process involves four steps: (1) a hydrologic classification of relatively unmodified streams in a geographic area using long-term gage records and 171 ecologically relevant indices; (2) the identification of statistically significant, nonredundant, hydroecologically relevant indices associated with the five major flow components for each stream class; and (3) the development of a stream-classification tool and a hydrologic assessment tool. Four computer software tools have been developed.

  18. Automated software development tools in the MIS (Management Information Systems) environment

    SciTech Connect

    Arrowood, L.F.; Emrich, M.L.

    1987-09-11

    Quantitative and qualitative benefits can be obtained through the use of automated software development tools. Such tools are best utilized when they complement existing procedures and standards. They can assist systems analysts and programmers with project specification, design, implementation, testing, and documentation. Commercial products have been evaluated to determine their efficacy. User comments have been included to illustrate actual benefits derived from introducing these tools into MIS organizations.

  19. Software tools for developing parallel applications. Part 1: Code development and debugging

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.; Geist, A.; Pancake, C.; Rover, D.

    1997-04-01

    Developing an application for parallel computers can be a lengthy and frustrating process making it a perfect candidate for software tool support. Yet application programmers are often the last to hear about new tools emerging from R and D efforts. This paper provides an overview of two focuses of tool support: code development and debugging. Each is discussed in terms of the programmer needs addressed, the extent to which representative current tools meet those needs, and what new levels of tool support are important if parallel computing is to become more widespread.

  20. Methods and software tools for design evaluation in population pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Joakim; Bazzoli, Caroline; Ogungbenro, Kay; Aliev, Alexander; Leonov, Sergei; Duffull, Stephen; Hooker, Andrew C; Mentré, France

    2015-01-01

    Population pharmacokinetic (PK)-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) models are increasingly used in drug development and in academic research; hence, designing efficient studies is an important task. Following the first theoretical work on optimal design for nonlinear mixed-effects models, this research theme has grown rapidly. There are now several different software tools that implement an evaluation of the Fisher information matrix for population PKPD. We compared and evaluated the following five software tools: PFIM, PkStaMp, PopDes, PopED and POPT. The comparisons were performed using two models, a simple-one compartment warfarin PK model and a more complex PKPD model for pegylated interferon, with data on both concentration and response of viral load of hepatitis C virus. The results of the software were compared in terms of the standard error (SE) values of the parameters predicted from the software and the empirical SE values obtained via replicated clinical trial simulation and estimation. For the warfarin PK model and the pegylated interferon PKPD model, all software gave similar results. Interestingly, it was seen, for all software, that the simpler approximation to the Fisher information matrix, using the block diagonal matrix, provided predicted SE values that were closer to the empirical SE values than when the more complicated approximation was used (the full matrix). For most PKPD models, using any of the available software tools will provide meaningful results, avoiding cumbersome simulation and allowing design optimization.

  1. Teaching structure: student use of software tools for understanding macromolecular structure in an undergraduate biochemistry course.

    PubMed

    Jaswal, Sheila S; O'Hara, Patricia B; Williamson, Patrick L; Springer, Amy L

    2013-01-01

    Because understanding the structure of biological macromolecules is critical to understanding their function, students of biochemistry should become familiar not only with viewing, but also with generating and manipulating structural representations. We report a strategy from a one-semester undergraduate biochemistry course to integrate use of structural representation tools into both laboratory and homework activities. First, early in the course we introduce the use of readily available open-source software for visualizing protein structure, coincident with modules on amino acid and peptide bond properties. Second, we use these same software tools in lectures and incorporate images and other structure representations in homework tasks. Third, we require a capstone project in which teams of students examine a protein-nucleic acid complex and then use the software tools to illustrate for their classmates the salient features of the structure, relating how the structure helps explain biological function. To ensure engagement with a range of software and database features, we generated a detailed template file that can be used to explore any structure, and that guides students through specific applications of many of the software tools. In presentations, students demonstrate that they are successfully interpreting structural information, and using representations to illustrate particular points relevant to function. Thus, over the semester students integrate information about structural features of biological macromolecules into the larger discussion of the chemical basis of function. Together these assignments provide an accessible introduction to structural representation tools, allowing students to add these methods to their biochemical toolboxes early in their scientific development.

  2. GraphCrunch 2: Software tool for network modeling, alignment and clustering

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent advancements in experimental biotechnology have produced large amounts of protein-protein interaction (PPI) data. The topology of PPI networks is believed to have a strong link to their function. Hence, the abundance of PPI data for many organisms stimulates the development of computational techniques for the modeling, comparison, alignment, and clustering of networks. In addition, finding representative models for PPI networks will improve our understanding of the cell just as a model of gravity has helped us understand planetary motion. To decide if a model is representative, we need quantitative comparisons of model networks to real ones. However, exact network comparison is computationally intractable and therefore several heuristics have been used instead. Some of these heuristics are easily computable "network properties," such as the degree distribution, or the clustering coefficient. An important special case of network comparison is the network alignment problem. Analogous to sequence alignment, this problem asks to find the "best" mapping between regions in two networks. It is expected that network alignment might have as strong an impact on our understanding of biology as sequence alignment has had. Topology-based clustering of nodes in PPI networks is another example of an important network analysis problem that can uncover relationships between interaction patterns and phenotype. Results We introduce the GraphCrunch 2 software tool, which addresses these problems. It is a significant extension of GraphCrunch which implements the most popular random network models and compares them with the data networks with respect to many network properties. Also, GraphCrunch 2 implements the GRAph ALigner algorithm ("GRAAL") for purely topological network alignment. GRAAL can align any pair of networks and exposes large, dense, contiguous regions of topological and functional similarities far larger than any other existing tool. Finally, Graph

  3. STRING 3: An Advanced Groundwater Flow Visualization Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Simon; Michel, Isabel; Biedert, Tim; Gräfe, Marius; Seidel, Torsten; König, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The visualization of 3D groundwater flow is a challenging task. Previous versions of our software STRING [1] solely focused on intuitive visualization of complex flow scenarios for non-professional audiences. STRING, developed by Fraunhofer ITWM (Kaiserslautern, Germany) and delta h Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH (Witten, Germany), provides the necessary means for visualization of both 2D and 3D data on planar and curved surfaces. In this contribution we discuss how to extend this approach to a full 3D tool and its challenges in continuation of Michel et al. [2]. This elevates STRING from a post-production to an exploration tool for experts. In STRING moving pathlets provide an intuition of velocity and direction of both steady-state and transient flows. The visualization concept is based on the Lagrangian view of the flow. To capture every detail of the flow an advanced method for intelligent, time-dependent seeding is used building on the Finite Pointset Method (FPM) developed by Fraunhofer ITWM. Lifting our visualization approach from 2D into 3D provides many new challenges. With the implementation of a seeding strategy for 3D one of the major problems has already been solved (see Schröder et al. [3]). As pathlets only provide an overview of the velocity field other means are required for the visualization of additional flow properties. We suggest the use of Direct Volume Rendering and isosurfaces for scalar features. In this regard we were able to develop an efficient approach for combining the rendering through raytracing of the volume and regular OpenGL geometries. This is achieved through the use of Depth Peeling or A-Buffers for the rendering of transparent geometries. Animation of pathlets requires a strict boundary of the simulation domain. Hence, STRING needs to extract the boundary, even from unstructured data, if it is not provided. In 3D we additionally need a good visualization of the boundary itself. For this the silhouette based on the angle of

  4. Software tools for assisting the multisource imagery analyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privett, Grant J.; Harvey, Peter R. W.; Booth, David M.; Kent, Philip J.; Redding, Nick J.; Evans, Dean; Jones, K. L.

    2003-11-01

    Increasingly demanding military requirements and rapid technological advances are producing reconnaissance sensors with greater spatial, spectral and temporal resolution. This, with the benefits to be gained from deploying multiple sensors co-operatively, is resulting in a so-called data deluge, where recording systems, data-links, and exploitation systems struggle to cope with the required imagery throughput. This paper focuses on the exploitation stage and, in particular, the provision of cueing aids for Imagery Analysts (IAs), who need to integrate a variety of sources in order to gain situational awareness. These sources may include multi-source imagery and intelligence feeds, various types of mapping and collateral data, as well the need for the IAs to add their own expertise in military doctrine etc. This integration task is becoming increasingly difficult as the volume and diversity of the input increases. The first stage in many exploitation tasks is that of image registration. It facilitates change detection and many avenues of multi-source exploitation. Progress is reported on the automating this task, on its current performance characteristics, its integration into a potentially operational system, and hence on its expected utility. We also report on the development of an evolutionary architecture, 'ICARUS' in which feature detectors (or cuers) are constructed incrementally using a genetic algorithm that evolves simple sub-structures before combining, and further evolving them, to form more comprehensive and robust detectors. This approach is shown to help overcome the complexity limit that prevents many machine-learning algorithms from scaling up to the real world.

  5. Recent progress and advances in iterative software (including parallel aspects)

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, G.; Young, D.M.; Kincaid, D.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of the workshop is to provide a forum for discussion of the current state of iterative software packages. Of particular interest is software for large scale engineering and scientific applications, especially for distributed parallel systems. However, the authors will also review the state of software development for conventional architectures. This workshop will complement the other proposed workshops on iterative BLAS kernels and applications. The format for the workshop is as follows: To provide some structure, there will be brief presentations, each of less than five minutes duration and dealing with specific facets of the subject. These will be designed to focus the discussion and to stimulate an exchange with the participants. Issues to be covered include: The evolution of iterative packages, current state of the art, the parallel computing challenge, applications viewpoint, standards, and future directions and open problems.

  6. Advanced Computing Tools and Models for Accelerator Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, Robert; Ryne, Robert D.

    2008-06-11

    This paper is based on a transcript of my EPAC'08 presentation on advanced computing tools for accelerator physics. Following an introduction I present several examples, provide a history of the development of beam dynamics capabilities, and conclude with thoughts on the future of large scale computing in accelerator physics.

  7. PAW, a general-purpose portable software tool for data analysis and presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, René; Couet, Olivier; Vandoni, Carlo E.; Zanarini, Pietro

    1989-12-01

    During the last twenty years, CERN has played a leading role as the focus for development of packages and software libraries to solve problems related to high energy physics (HEP). The results of the integration of resources from many different laboratories can be expressed in several million lines of code written at CERN during this period of time, used at CERN and distributed to collaborating laboratories. Nowadays, this role of software developer is considered very important by the entire HEP community. In this paper a large software package, where man-machine interaction and graphics play a key role (PAW - Physics Analysis Workstation), is described. PAW is essentially an interactive system which includes many different software tools, strongly oriented towards data analysis and data presentation. Some of these tools have been available in different forms and with different human interfaces for several years.

  8. Software Partitioning Schemes for Advanced Simulation Computer Systems. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clymer, S. J.

    Conducted to design software partitioning techniques for use by the Air Force to partition a large flight simulator program for optimal execution on alternative configurations, this study resulted in a mathematical model which defines characteristics for an optimal partition, and a manually demonstrated partitioning algorithm design which…

  9. Leveraging Existing Mission Tools in a Re-Usable, Component-Based Software Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Kevin; Grenander, Sven; Kurien, James; z,s (fshir. z[orttr); z,scer; O'Reilly, Taifun

    2006-01-01

    Emerging methods in component-based software development offer significant advantages but may seem incompatible with existing mission operations applications. In this paper we relate our positive experiences integrating existing mission applications into component-based tools we are delivering to three missions. In most operations environments, a number of software applications have been integrated together to form the mission operations software. In contrast, with component-based software development chunks of related functionality and data structures, referred to as components, can be individually delivered, integrated and re-used. With the advent of powerful tools for managing component-based development, complex software systems can potentially see significant benefits in ease of integration, testability and reusability from these techniques. These benefits motivate us to ask how component-based development techniques can be relevant in a mission operations environment, where there is significant investment in software tools that are not component-based and may not be written in languages for which component-based tools even exist. Trusted and complex software tools for sequencing, validation, navigation, and other vital functions cannot simply be re-written or abandoned in order to gain the advantages offered by emerging component-based software techniques. Thus some middle ground must be found. We have faced exactly this issue, and have found several solutions. Ensemble is an open platform for development, integration, and deployment of mission operations software that we are developing. Ensemble itself is an extension of an open source, component-based software development platform called Eclipse. Due to the advantages of component-based development, we have been able to vary rapidly develop mission operations tools for three surface missions by mixing and matching from a common set of mission operation components. We have also had to determine how to

  10. Software Tools for Developing and Simulating the NASA LaRC CMF Motion Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Richard B., Jr.; Carrelli, David J.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Cockpit Motion Facility (CMF) motion base has provided many design and analysis challenges. In the process of addressing these challenges, a comprehensive suite of software tools was developed. The software tools development began with a detailed MATLAB/Simulink model of the motion base which was used primarily for safety loads prediction, design of the closed loop compensator and development of the motion base safety systems1. A Simulink model of the digital control law, from which a portion of the embedded code is directly generated, was later added to this model to form a closed loop system model. Concurrently, software that runs on a PC was created to display and record motion base parameters. It includes a user interface for controlling time history displays, strip chart displays, data storage, and initializing of function generators used during motion base testing. Finally, a software tool was developed for kinematic analysis and prediction of mechanical clearances for the motion system. These tools work together in an integrated package to support normal operations of the motion base, simulate the end to end operation of the motion base system providing facilities for software-in-the-loop testing, mechanical geometry and sensor data visualizations, and function generator setup and evaluation.

  11. "Blogs" and "wikis" are valuable software tools for communication within research groups.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Igor M; Bialek, Dominik; Efimova, Ekaterina; Schwartlander, Ruth; Pless, Gesine; Neuhaus, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Appropriate software tools may improve communication and ease access to knowledge for research groups. A weblog is a website which contains periodic, chronologically ordered posts on a common webpage, whereas a wiki is hypertext-based collaborative software that enables documents to be authored collectively using a web browser. Although not primarily intended for use as an intranet-based collaborative knowledge warehouse, both blogs and wikis have the potential to offer all the features of complex and expensive IT solutions. These tools enable the team members to share knowledge simply and quickly-the collective knowledge base of the group can be efficiently managed and navigated.

  12. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Componet Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Govindaraju, Madhusudhan

    2010-10-31

    Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science FY 2010Report Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software: Distributed CCA State University of New York, Binghamton, NY, 13902 Summary The overall objective of Binghamton's involvement is to work on enhancements of the CCA environment, motivated by the applications and research initiatives discussed in the proposal. This year we are working on re-focusing our design and development efforts to develop proof-of-concept implementations that have the potential to significantly impact scientific components. We worked on developing parallel implementations for non-hydrostatic code and worked on a model coupling interface for biogeochemical computations coded in MATLAB. We also worked on the design and implementation modules that will be required for the emerging MapReduce model to be effective for scientific applications. Finally, we focused on optimizing the processing of scientific datasets on multi-core processors. Research Details We worked on the following research projects that we are working on applying to CCA-based scientific applications. 1. Non-Hydrostatic Hydrodynamics: Non-static hydrodynamics are significantly more accurate at modeling internal waves that may be important in lake ecosystems. Non-hydrostatic codes, however, are significantly more computationally expensive, often prohibitively so. We have worked with Chin Wu at the University of Wisconsin to parallelize non-hydrostatic code. We have obtained a speed up of about 26 times maximum. Although this is significant progress, we hope to improve the performance further, such that it becomes a practical alternative to hydrostatic codes. 2. Model-coupling for water-based ecosystems: To answer pressing questions about water resources requires that physical models (hydrodynamics) be coupled with biological and chemical models. Most hydrodynamics codes are written in Fortran, however, while most ecologists work in MATLAB. This

  13. Knowledge-engineering software. A demonstration of a high-end tool.

    PubMed

    Salzman, G C; Krall, R B; Marinuzzi, J G

    1988-06-01

    Many investigators wanting to apply knowledge-based systems (KBSs) as consultants for cancer diagnosis have turned to tools running on personal computers. While some of these tools serve well for small tasks, they lack the power available with such high-end KBS tools as KEE (Knowledge Engineering Environment) and ART (Automated Reasoning Tool). These tools were originally developed on Lisp machines and have the full functionality of the Lisp language as well as many additional features. They provide a rich and highly productive environment for the software developer. This paper illustrates the capability of one of these high-end tools. First, a table showing the classification of benign soft tissue tumors was converted into a KEE knowledge base. The tools available in KEE were then used to identify the tumor type for a hypothetical patient. PMID:3408548

  14. Recent advances in the CRANK software suite for experimental phasing

    SciTech Connect

    Pannu, Navraj S. Waterreus, Willem-Jan; Skubák, Pavol; Sikharulidze, Irakli; Abrahams, Jan Pieter; Graaff, Rudolf A. G. de

    2011-04-01

    Recent developments in the CRANK software suite for experimental phasing have led to many more structures being built automatically. For its first release in 2004, CRANK was shown to effectively detect and phase anomalous scatterers from single-wavelength anomalous diffraction data. Since then, CRANK has been significantly improved and many more structures can be built automatically with single- or multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction or single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering data. Here, the new algorithms that have been developed that have led to these substantial improvements are discussed and CRANK’s performance on over 100 real data sets is shown. The latest version of CRANK is freely available for download at http://www.bfsc.leidenuniv.nl/software/crank/ and from CCP4 (http://www.ccp4.ac.uk/)

  15. GenomeTools: a comprehensive software library for efficient processing of structured genome annotations.

    PubMed

    Gremme, Gordon; Steinbiss, Sascha; Kurtz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Genome annotations are often published as plain text files describing genomic features and their subcomponents by an implicit annotation graph. In this paper, we present the GenomeTools, a convenient and efficient software library and associated software tools for developing bioinformatics software intended to create, process or convert annotation graphs. The GenomeTools strictly follow the annotation graph approach, offering a unified graph-based representation. This gives the developer intuitive and immediate access to genomic features and tools for their manipulation. To process large annotation sets with low memory overhead, we have designed and implemented an efficient pull-based approach for sequential processing of annotations. This allows to handle even the largest annotation sets, such as a complete catalogue of human variations. Our object-oriented C-based software library enables a developer to conveniently implement their own functionality on annotation graphs and to integrate it into larger workflows, simultaneously accessing compressed sequence data if required. The careful C implementation of the GenomeTools does not only ensure a light-weight memory footprint while allowing full sequential as well as random access to the annotation graph, but also facilitates the creation of bindings to a variety of script programming languages (like Python and Ruby) sharing the same interface. PMID:24091398

  16. Advanced Numerical Methods and Software Approaches for Semiconductor Device Simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Carey, Graham F.; Pardhanani, A. L.; Bova, S. W.

    2000-01-01

    In this article we concisely present several modern strategies that are applicable to driftdominated carrier transport in higher-order deterministic models such as the driftdiffusion, hydrodynamic, and quantum hydrodynamic systems. The approaches include extensions of “upwind” and artificial dissipation schemes, generalization of the traditional Scharfetter – Gummel approach, Petrov – Galerkin and streamline-upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG), “entropy” variables, transformations, least-squares mixed methods and other stabilized Galerkin schemes such as Galerkin least squares and discontinuous Galerkin schemes. The treatment is representative rather than an exhaustive review and several schemes are mentioned only briefly with appropriate reference to the literature. Some of themore » methods have been applied to the semiconductor device problem while others are still in the early stages of development for this class of applications. We have included numerical examples from our recent research tests with some of the methods. A second aspect of the work deals with algorithms that employ unstructured grids in conjunction with adaptive refinement strategies. The full benefits of such approaches have not yet been developed in this application area and we emphasize the need for further work on analysis, data structures and software to support adaptivity. Finally, we briefly consider some aspects of software frameworks. These include dial-an-operator approaches such as that used in the industrial simulator PROPHET, and object-oriented software support such as those in the SANDIA National Laboratory framework SIERRA.« less

  17. Advanced numerical methods and software approaches for semiconductor device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    CAREY,GRAHAM F.; PARDHANANI,A.L.; BOVA,STEVEN W.

    2000-03-23

    In this article the authors concisely present several modern strategies that are applicable to drift-dominated carrier transport in higher-order deterministic models such as the drift-diffusion, hydrodynamic, and quantum hydrodynamic systems. The approaches include extensions of upwind and artificial dissipation schemes, generalization of the traditional Scharfetter-Gummel approach, Petrov-Galerkin and streamline-upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG), entropy variables, transformations, least-squares mixed methods and other stabilized Galerkin schemes such as Galerkin least squares and discontinuous Galerkin schemes. The treatment is representative rather than an exhaustive review and several schemes are mentioned only briefly with appropriate reference to the literature. Some of the methods have been applied to the semiconductor device problem while others are still in the early stages of development for this class of applications. They have included numerical examples from the recent research tests with some of the methods. A second aspect of the work deals with algorithms that employ unstructured grids in conjunction with adaptive refinement strategies. The full benefits of such approaches have not yet been developed in this application area and they emphasize the need for further work on analysis, data structures and software to support adaptivity. Finally, they briefly consider some aspects of software frameworks. These include dial-an-operator approaches such as that used in the industrial simulator PROPHET, and object-oriented software support such as those in the SANDIA National Laboratory framework SIERRA.

  18. Review of free software tools for image analysis of fluorescence cell micrographs.

    PubMed

    Wiesmann, V; Franz, D; Held, C; Münzenmayer, C; Palmisano, R; Wittenberg, T

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of free software tools have been made available for the evaluation of fluorescence cell micrographs. The main users are biologists and related life scientists with no or little knowledge of image processing. In this review, we give an overview of available tools and guidelines about which tools the users should use to segment fluorescence micrographs. We selected 15 free tools and divided them into stand-alone, Matlab-based, ImageJ-based, free demo versions of commercial tools and data sharing tools. The review consists of two parts: First, we developed a criteria catalogue and rated the tools regarding structural requirements, functionality (flexibility, segmentation and image processing filters) and usability (documentation, data management, usability and visualization). Second, we performed an image processing case study with four representative fluorescence micrograph segmentation tasks with figure-ground and cell separation. The tools display a wide range of functionality and usability. In the image processing case study, we were able to perform figure-ground separation in all micrographs using mainly thresholding. Cell separation was not possible with most of the tools, because cell separation methods are provided only by a subset of the tools and are difficult to parametrize and to use. Most important is that the usability matches the functionality of a tool. To be usable, specialized tools with less functionality need to fulfill less usability criteria, whereas multipurpose tools need a well-structured menu and intuitive graphical user interface.

  19. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1: ASC software quality engineering practices, Version 2.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan. Part 2, Mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices. Version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Molly A.; Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, 'ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines'. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan part 2 mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices, version 2.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR001.3.2 and CPR001.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ''ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines''. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  2. Review of Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Tools for Verifying Command and Control Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, Michael L.; Bonanne, Kevin H.; Favretto, Jeffrey A.; Jackson, Maddalena M.; Jones, Stephanie L.; Mackey, Ryan M.; Sarrel, Marc A.; Simpson, Kimberly A.

    2014-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Standing Review Board (SRB) requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) conduct an independent review of the plan developed by Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) for identifying models and emulators to create a tool(s) to verify their command and control software. The NESC was requested to identify any issues or weaknesses in the GSDO plan. This document contains the outcome of the NESC review.

  3. Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box (TTB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Monica; ONeil, Daniel A.; Christensen, Carissa B.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) is a decision support tool designed to aid program managers and strategic planners in determining how to invest technology research and development dollars. It is an Excel-based modeling package that allows a user to build complex space architectures and evaluate the impact of various technology choices. ATLAS contains system models, cost and operations models, a campaign timeline and a centralized technology database. Technology data for all system models is drawn from a common database, the ATLAS Technology Tool Box (TTB). The TTB provides a comprehensive, architecture-independent technology database that is keyed to current and future timeframes.

  4. Framework Programmable Platform for the advanced software development workstation: Framework processor design document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Richard J.; Blinn, Thomas M.; Mayer, Paula S. D.; Ackley, Keith A.; Crump, Wes; Sanders, Les

    1991-01-01

    The design of the Framework Processor (FP) component of the Framework Programmable Software Development Platform (FFP) is described. The FFP is a project aimed at combining effective tool and data integration mechanisms with a model of the software development process in an intelligent integrated software development environment. Guided by the model, this Framework Processor will take advantage of an integrated operating environment to provide automated support for the management and control of the software development process so that costly mistakes during the development phase can be eliminated.

  5. A Guide to the Use of Tool Software for the Apple Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collett, Charles R.; Goldberg, Fred S.

    Designed to give teachers and supervisors a working knowledge of various approaches to enhancing pupil learning through software application programs, this guide is presented in a hands-on fashion. It supports a dual purpose, i.e., it can serve as an individual tutorial or as a turnkey staff development tool. All program files referred to may be…

  6. Microsoft Producer: A Software Tool for Creating Multimedia PowerPoint[R] Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leffingwell, Thad R.; Thomas, David G.; Elliott, William H.

    2007-01-01

    Microsoft[R] Producer[R] is a powerful yet user-friendly PowerPoint companion tool for creating on-demand multimedia presentations. Instructors can easily distribute these presentations via compact disc or streaming media over the Internet. We describe the features of the software, system requirements, and other required hardware. We also describe…

  7. Wiki as a Corporate Learning Tool: Case Study for Software Development Company

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milovanovic, Milos; Minovic, Miroslav; Stavljanin, Velimir; Savkovic, Marko; Starcevic, Dusan

    2012-01-01

    In our study, we attempted to further investigate how Web 2.0 technologies influence workplace learning. Our particular interest was on using Wiki as a tool for corporate exchange of knowledge with the focus on informal learning. In this study, we collaborated with a multinational software development company that uses Wiki as a corporate tool…

  8. Using a Self-Administered Visual Basic Software Tool To Teach Psychological Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strang, Harold R.; Sullivan, Amie K.; Schoeny, Zahrl G.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces LearningLinks, a Visual Basic software tool that allows teachers to create individualized learning modules that use constructivist and behavioral learning principles. Describes field testing of undergraduates at the University of Virginia that tested a module designed to improve understanding of the psychological concepts of…

  9. A software application that answers the need for an enterprise budgeting tool.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, L; Chevalier, C S; Conner, B

    2000-01-01

    A prototype software application developed for the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine answered our need for an enterprise budgeting tool--one that has application across the entire organization. This application, built on Microsoft Access, provides a flexible user interface without requiring sophisticated technical support.

  10. SDMdata: A Web-Based Software Tool for Collecting Species Occurrence Records.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiaoquan; Huang, Minyi; Duan, Renyan

    2015-01-01

    It is important to easily and efficiently obtain high quality species distribution data for predicting the potential distribution of species using species distribution models (SDMs). There is a need for a powerful software tool to automatically or semi-automatically assist in identifying and correcting errors. Here, we use Python to develop a web-based software tool (SDMdata) to easily collect occurrence data from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) and check species names and the accuracy of coordinates (latitude and longitude). It is an open source software (GNU Affero General Public License/AGPL licensed) allowing anyone to access and manipulate the source code. SDMdata is available online free of charge from .

  11. Software Construction and Composition Tools for Petascale Computing SCW0837 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, T W; Hochstein, L

    2011-09-12

    The majority of scientific software is distributed as source code. As the number of library dependencies and supported platforms increases, so does the complexity of describing the rules for configuring and building software. In this project, we have performed an empirical study of the magnitude of the build problem by examining the development history of two DOE-funded scientific software projects. We have developed MixDown, a meta-build tool, to simplify the task of building applications that depend on multiple third-party libraries. The results of this research indicate that the effort that scientific programmers spend takes a significant fraction of the total development effort and that the use of MixDown can significantly simplify the task of building software with multiple dependencies.

  12. Assess/Mitigate Risk through the Use of Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE) Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to perform an independent assessment of the mitigation of the Constellation Program (CxP) Risk 4421 through the use of computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tools. With the cancellation of the CxP, the assessment goals were modified to capture lessons learned and best practices in the use of CASE tools. The assessment goal was to prepare the next program for the use of these CASE tools. The outcome of the assessment is contained in this document.

  13. Advanced computational tools for 3-D seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barhen, J.; Glover, C.W.; Protopopescu, V.A.

    1996-06-01

    The global objective of this effort is to develop advanced computational tools for 3-D seismic analysis, and test the products using a model dataset developed under the joint aegis of the United States` Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) and the European Association of Exploration Geophysicists (EAEG). The goal is to enhance the value to the oil industry of the SEG/EAEG modeling project, carried out with US Department of Energy (DOE) funding in FY` 93-95. The primary objective of the ORNL Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) is to spearhead the computational innovations techniques that would enable a revolutionary advance in 3-D seismic analysis. The CESAR effort is carried out in collaboration with world-class domain experts from leading universities, and in close coordination with other national laboratories and oil industry partners.

  14. Evaluation of reliability modeling tools for advanced fault tolerant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Robert; Scheper, Charlotte

    1986-01-01

    The Computer Aided Reliability Estimation (CARE III) and Automated Reliability Interactice Estimation System (ARIES 82) reliability tools for application to advanced fault tolerance aerospace systems were evaluated. To determine reliability modeling requirements, the evaluation focused on the Draper Laboratories' Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) architecture as an example architecture for fault tolerance aerospace systems. Advantages and limitations were identified for each reliability evaluation tool. The CARE III program was designed primarily for analyzing ultrareliable flight control systems. The ARIES 82 program's primary use was to support university research and teaching. Both CARE III and ARIES 82 were not suited for determining the reliability of complex nodal networks of the type used to interconnect processing sites in the AIPS architecture. It was concluded that ARIES was not suitable for modeling advanced fault tolerant systems. It was further concluded that subject to some limitations (the difficulty in modeling systems with unpowered spare modules, systems where equipment maintenance must be considered, systems where failure depends on the sequence in which faults occurred, and systems where multiple faults greater than a double near coincident faults must be considered), CARE III is best suited for evaluating the reliability of advanced tolerant systems for air transport.

  15. Anvil Forecast Tool in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Hood, Doris

    2009-01-01

    Meteorologists from the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) and National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have identified anvil forecasting as one of their most challenging tasks when predicting the probability of violations of the Lightning Launch Commit Criteria and Space Shuttle Flight Rules. As a result, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) was tasked to create a graphical overlay tool for the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS) that indicates the threat of thunderstorm anvil clouds, using either observed or model forecast winds as input. The tool creates a graphic depicting the potential location of thunderstorm anvils one, two, and three hours into the future. The locations are based on the average of the upper level observed or forecasted winds. The graphic includes 10 and 20 n mi standoff circles centered at the location of interest, as well as one-, two-, and three-hour arcs in the upwind direction. The arcs extend outward across a 30 sector width based on a previous AMU study that determined thunderstorm anvils move in a direction plus or minus 15 of the upper-level wind direction. The AMU was then tasked to transition the tool to the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS). SMG later requested the tool be updated to provide more flexibility and quicker access to model data. This presentation describes the work performed by the AMU to transition the tool into AWIPS, as well as the subsequent improvements made to the tool.

  16. New software tools for enhanced precision in robot-assisted laser phonomicrosurgery.

    PubMed

    Dagnino, Giulio; Mattos, Leonardo S; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a new software package created to enhance precision during robot-assisted laser phonomicrosurgery procedures. The new software is composed of three tools for camera calibration, automatic tumor segmentation, and laser tracking. These were designed and developed to improve the outcome of this demanding microsurgical technique, and were tested herein to produce quantitative performance data. The experimental setup was based on the motorized laser micromanipulator created by Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia and the experimental protocols followed are fully described in this paper. The results show the new tools are robust and effective: The camera calibration tool reduced residual errors (RMSE) to 0.009 ± 0.002 mm under 40× microscope magnification; the automatic tumor segmentation tool resulted in deep lesion segmentations comparable to manual segmentations (RMSE= 0.160 ± 0.028 mm under 40× magnification); and the laser tracker tool proved to be reliable even during cutting procedures (RMSE= 0.073 ± 0.023 mm under 40× magnification). These results demonstrate the new software package can provide excellent improvements to the previous microsurgical system, leading to important enhancements in surgical outcome.

  17. IPAT: a freely accessible software tool for analyzing multiple patent documents with inbuilt landscape visualizer.

    PubMed

    Ajay, Dara; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2015-01-01

    Intelligent Patent Analysis Tool (IPAT) is an online data retrieval tool, operated based on text mining algorithm to extract specific patent information in a predetermined pattern into an Excel sheet. The software is designed and developed to retrieve and analyze technology information from multiple patent documents and generate various patent landscape graphs and charts. The software is C# coded in visual studio 2010, which extracts the publicly available patent information from the web pages like Google Patent and simultaneously study the various technology trends based on user-defined parameters. In other words, IPAT combined with the manual categorization will act as an excellent technology assessment tool in competitive intelligence and due diligence for predicting the future R&D forecast.

  18. IPAT: a freely accessible software tool for analyzing multiple patent documents with inbuilt landscape visualizer.

    PubMed

    Ajay, Dara; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2015-01-01

    Intelligent Patent Analysis Tool (IPAT) is an online data retrieval tool, operated based on text mining algorithm to extract specific patent information in a predetermined pattern into an Excel sheet. The software is designed and developed to retrieve and analyze technology information from multiple patent documents and generate various patent landscape graphs and charts. The software is C# coded in visual studio 2010, which extracts the publicly available patent information from the web pages like Google Patent and simultaneously study the various technology trends based on user-defined parameters. In other words, IPAT combined with the manual categorization will act as an excellent technology assessment tool in competitive intelligence and due diligence for predicting the future R&D forecast. PMID:26452016

  19. SU-E-T-27: A Tool for Routine Quality Assurance of Radiotherapy Dose Calculation Software

    SciTech Connect

    Popple, R; Cardan, R; Duan, J; Wu, X; Shen, S; Brezovich, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dose calculation software is thoroughly evaluated when it is commissioned; however, evaluation of periodic software updates is typically limited in scope due to staffing constraints and the need to quickly return the treatment planning system to clinical service. We developed a tool for quickly and comprehensively testing and documenting dose calculation software against measured data. Methods: A tool was developed using MatLab (The MathWorks, Natick, MA) for evaluation of dose calculation algorithms against measured data. Inputs to the tool are measured data, reference DICOM RT PLAN files describing the measurements, and dose calculations in DICOM format. The tool consists of a collection of extensible modules that can perform analysis of point dose, depth dose curves, and profiles using dose difference, distance-to-agreement, and the gamma-index. Each module generates a report subsection that is incorporated into a master template, which is converted to final form in portable document format (PDF). Results: After each change to the treatment planning system, a report can be generated in approximately 90 minutes. The tool has been in use for more than 5 years, spanning 5 versions of the eMC and 4 versions of the AAA. We have detected changes to the algorithms that affected clinical practice once during this period. Conclusion: Our tool provides an efficient method for quality assurance of dose calculation software, providing a complete set of tests for an update. Future work includes the addition of plan level tests, allowing incorporation of, for example, the TG-119 test suite for IMRT, and integration with the treatment planning system via an application programming interface. Integration with the planning system will permit fully-automated testing and reporting at scheduled intervals.

  20. A proposal for reverse engineering CASE tools to support new software development

    SciTech Connect

    Maxted, A.

    1993-06-01

    Current CASE technology provides sophisticated diagramming tools to generate a software design. The design, stored internal to the CASE tool, is bridged to the code via code generators. There are several limitations to this technique: (1) the portability of the design is limited to the portability of the CASE tools, and (2) the code generators offer a clumsy link between design and code. The CASE tool though valuable during design, becomes a hindrance during implementation. Frustration frequently causes the CASE tool to be abandoned during implementation, permanently severing the link between design and code. Current CASE stores the design in a CASE internal structure, from which code is generated. The technique presented herein suggests that CASE tools store the system knowledge directly in code. The CASE support then switches from an emphasis on code generators to employing state-of-the-art reverse engineering techniques for document generation. Graphical and textual descriptions of each software component (e.g., Ada Package) may be generated via reverse engineering techniques from the code. These reverse engineered descriptions can be merged with system over-view diagrams to form a top-level design document. The resulting document can readily reflect changes to the software components by automatically generating new component descriptions for the changed components. The proposed auto documentation technique facilitates the document upgrade task at later stages of development, (e.g., design, implementation and delivery) by using the component code as the source of the component descriptions. The CASE technique presented herein is a unique application of reverse engineering techniques to new software systems. This technique contrasts with more traditional CASE auto code generation techniques.

  1. A Review of Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging Computational Methods and Software Tools

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Khader M.; Walimuni, Indika S.; Abid, Humaira; Hahn, Klaus R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we provide an up-to-date short review of computational magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and software tools that are widely used to process and analyze diffusion-weighted MRI data. A review of different methods used to acquire, model and analyze diffusion-weighted imaging data (DWI) is first provided with focus on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The major preprocessing, processing and post-processing procedures applied to DTI data are discussed. A list of freely available software packages to analyze diffusion MRI data is also provided. PMID:21087766

  2. Cerec Smile Design--a software tool for the enhancement of restorations in the esthetic zone.

    PubMed

    Kurbad, Andreas; Kurbad, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Restorations in the esthetic zone can now be enhanced using software tools. In addition to the design of the restoration itself, a part or all of the patient's face can be displayed on the monitor to increase the predictability of treatment results. Using the Smile Design components of the Cerec and inLab software, a digital photograph of the patient can be projected onto a three-dimensional dummy head. In addition to its use for the enhancement of the CAD process, this technology can also be utilized for marketing purposes. PMID:24364196

  3. Cerec Smile Design--a software tool for the enhancement of restorations in the esthetic zone.

    PubMed

    Kurbad, Andreas; Kurbad, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Restorations in the esthetic zone can now be enhanced using software tools. In addition to the design of the restoration itself, a part or all of the patient's face can be displayed on the monitor to increase the predictability of treatment results. Using the Smile Design components of the Cerec and inLab software, a digital photograph of the patient can be projected onto a three-dimensional dummy head. In addition to its use for the enhancement of the CAD process, this technology can also be utilized for marketing purposes.

  4. Mars, accessing the third dimension: a software tool to exploit Mars ground penetrating radars data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantini, Federico; Ivanov, Anton B.

    2016-04-01

    The Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding (MARSIS), on board the ESA's Mars Express and the SHAllow RADar (SHARAD), on board the NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter are two ground penetrating radars (GPRs) aimed to probe the crust of Mars to explore the subsurface structure of the planet. By now they are collecting data since about 10 years covering a large fraction of the Mars surface. On the Earth GPRs collect data by sending electromagnetic (EM) pulses toward the surface and listening to the return echoes occurring at the dielectric discontinuities on the planet's surface and subsurface. The wavelengths used allow MARSIS EM pulses to penetrate the crust for several kilometers. The data products (Radargrams) are matrices where the x-axis spans different sampling points on the planet surface and the y-axis is the power of the echoes over time in the listening window. No standard way to manage this kind of data is established in the planetary science community and data analysis and interpretation require very often some knowledge of radar signal processing. Our software tool is aimed to ease the access to this data in particular to scientists without a specific background in signal processing. MARSIS and SHARAD geometrical data such as probing point latitude and longitude and spacecraft altitude, are stored, together with relevant acquisition metadata, in a geo-enabled relational database implemented using PostgreSQL and PostGIS. Data are extracted from official ESA and NASA released data using self-developed python classes and scripts and inserted in the database using OGR utilities. This software is also aimed to be the core of a collection of classes and script to implement more complex GPR data analysis. Geometrical data and metadata are exposed as WFS layers using a QGIS server, which can be further integrated with other data, such as imaging, spectroscopy and topography. Radar geometry data will be available as a part of the iMars Web

  5. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Mathew Sottile

    2010-06-30

    The UO portion of the larger TASCS project was focused on the usability subproject identified in the original project proposal. The key usability issue that we tacked was that of supporting legacy code developers in migrating to a component-oriented design pattern and development model with minimal manual labor. It was observed during the lifetime of the TASCS (and previous CCA efforts) that more often than not, users would arrive with existing code that was developed previous to their exposure to component design methods. As such, they were faced with the task of both learning the CCA toolchain and at the same time, manually deconstructing and reassembling their existing code to fit the design constraints imposed by components. This was a common complaint (and occasional reason for a user to abandon components altogether), so our task was to remove this manual labor as much as possible to lessen the burden placed on the end-user when adopting components for existing codes. To accomplish this, we created a source-based static analysis tool that used code annotations to drive code generation and transformation operations. The use of code annotations is due to one of the key technical challenges facing this work | programming languages are limited in the degree to which application-specific semantics can be represented in code. For example, data types are often ambiguous. The C pointer is the most common example cited in practice. Given a pointer to a location in memory, should it be interpreted as a singleton or an array. If it is to be interpreted as an array, how many dimensions does the array have? What are their extents? The annotation language that we designed and implemented addresses this ambiguity issue by allowing users to decorate their code in places where ambiguity exists in order to guide tools to interpret what the programmer really intends.

  6. Software tools for simultaneous data visualization and T cell epitopes and disorder prediction in proteins.

    PubMed

    Jandrlić, Davorka R; Lazić, Goran M; Mitić, Nenad S; Pavlović, Mirjana D

    2016-04-01

    We have developed EpDis and MassPred, extendable open source software tools that support bioinformatic research and enable parallel use of different methods for the prediction of T cell epitopes, disorder and disordered binding regions and hydropathy calculation. These tools offer a semi-automated installation of chosen sets of external predictors and an interface allowing for easy application of the prediction methods, which can be applied either to individual proteins or to datasets of a large number of proteins. In addition to access to prediction methods, the tools also provide visualization of the obtained results, calculation of consensus from results of different methods, as well as import of experimental data and their comparison with results obtained with different predictors. The tools also offer a graphical user interface and the possibility to store data and the results obtained using all of the integrated methods in the relational database or flat file for further analysis. The MassPred part enables a massive parallel application of all integrated predictors to the set of proteins. Both tools can be downloaded from http://bioinfo.matf.bg.ac.rs/home/downloads.wafl?cat=Software. Appendix A includes the technical description of the created tools and a list of supported predictors. PMID:26851400

  7. IVUSAngio tool: a publicly available software for fast and accurate 3D reconstruction of coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Doulaverakis, Charalampos; Tsampoulatidis, Ioannis; Antoniadis, Antonios P; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S; Giannopoulos, Andreas; Kompatsiaris, Ioannis; Giannoglou, George D

    2013-11-01

    There is an ongoing research and clinical interest in the development of reliable and easily accessible software for the 3D reconstruction of coronary arteries. In this work, we present the architecture and validation of IVUSAngio Tool, an application which performs fast and accurate 3D reconstruction of the coronary arteries by using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and biplane angiography data. The 3D reconstruction is based on the fusion of the detected arterial boundaries in IVUS images with the 3D IVUS catheter path derived from the biplane angiography. The IVUSAngio Tool suite integrates all the intermediate processing and computational steps and provides a user-friendly interface. It also offers additional functionality, such as automatic selection of the end-diastolic IVUS images, semi-automatic and automatic IVUS segmentation, vascular morphometric measurements, graphical visualization of the 3D model and export in a format compatible with other computer-aided design applications. Our software was applied and validated in 31 human coronary arteries yielding quite promising results. Collectively, the use of IVUSAngio Tool significantly reduces the total processing time for 3D coronary reconstruction. IVUSAngio Tool is distributed as free software, publicly available to download and use.

  8. Distortion Analysis Toolkit—A Software Tool for Easy Analysis of Nonlinear Audio Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakarinen, Jyri

    2010-12-01

    Several audio effects devices deliberately add nonlinear distortion to the processed signal in order to create a desired sound. When creating virtual analog models of nonlinearly distorting devices, it would be very useful to carefully analyze the type of distortion, so that the model could be made as realistic as possible. While traditional system analysis tools such as the frequency response give detailed information on the operation of linear and time-invariant systems, they are less useful for analyzing nonlinear devices. Furthermore, although there do exist separate algorithms for nonlinear distortion analysis, there is currently no unified, easy-to-use tool for rapid analysis of distorting audio systems. This paper offers a remedy by introducing a new software tool for easy analysis of distorting effects. A comparison between a well-known guitar tube amplifier and two commercial software simulations is presented as a case study. This freely available software is written in Matlab language, but the analysis tool can also run as a standalone program, so the user does not need to have Matlab installed in order to perform the analysis.

  9. Pathway Tools version 13.0: integrated software for pathway/genome informatics and systems biology

    PubMed Central

    Paley, Suzanne M.; Krummenacker, Markus; Latendresse, Mario; Dale, Joseph M.; Lee, Thomas J.; Kaipa, Pallavi; Gilham, Fred; Spaulding, Aaron; Popescu, Liviu; Altman, Tomer; Paulsen, Ian; Keseler, Ingrid M.; Caspi, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Pathway Tools is a production-quality software environment for creating a type of model-organism database called a Pathway/Genome Database (PGDB). A PGDB such as EcoCyc integrates the evolving understanding of the genes, proteins, metabolic network and regulatory network of an organism. This article provides an overview of Pathway Tools capabilities. The software performs multiple computational inferences including prediction of metabolic pathways, prediction of metabolic pathway hole fillers and prediction of operons. It enables interactive editing of PGDBs by DB curators. It supports web publishing of PGDBs, and provides a large number of query and visualization tools. The software also supports comparative analyses of PGDBs, and provides several systems biology analyses of PGDBs including reachability analysis of metabolic networks, and interactive tracing of metabolites through a metabolic network. More than 800 PGDBs have been created using Pathway Tools by scientists around the world, many of which are curated DBs for important model organisms. Those PGDBs can be exchanged using a peer-to-peer DB sharing system called the PGDB Registry. PMID:19955237

  10. Development, Implementation and Application of Micromechanical Analysis Tools for Advanced High Temperature Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This document contains the final report to the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) for the research project entitled Development, Implementation, and Application of Micromechanical Analysis Tools for Advanced High-Temperature Composites. The research supporting this initiative has been conducted by Dr. Brett A. Bednarcyk, a Senior Scientist at OM in Brookpark, Ohio from the period of August 1998 to March 2005. Most of the work summarized herein involved development, implementation, and application of enhancements and new capabilities for NASA GRC's Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) software package. When the project began, this software was at a low TRL (3-4) and at release version 2.0. Due to this project, the TRL of MAC/GMC has been raised to 7 and two new versions (3.0 and 4.0) have been released. The most important accomplishments with respect to MAC/GMC are: (1) A multi-scale framework has been built around the software, enabling coupled design and analysis from the global structure scale down to the micro fiber-matrix scale; (2) The software has been expanded to analyze smart materials; (3) State-of-the-art micromechanics theories have been implemented and validated within the code; (4) The damage, failure, and lifing capabilities of the code have been expanded from a very limited state to a vast degree of functionality and utility; and (5) The user flexibility of the code has been significantly enhanced. MAC/GMC is now the premier code for design and analysis of advanced composite and smart materials. It is a candidate for the 2005 NASA Software of the Year Award. The work completed over the course of the project is summarized below on a year by year basis. All publications resulting from the project are listed at the end of this report.

  11. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - Site Status Update

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, T W

    2008-12-03

    This report summarizes LLNL's progress for the period April through September of 2008 for the Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) SciDAC. The TASCS project is organized into four major thrust areas: CCA Environment (72%), Component Technology Initiatives (16%), CCA Toolkit (8%), and User and Application Outreach & Support (4%). The percentage of LLNL's effort allocation is shown in parenthesis for each thrust area. Major thrust areas are further broken down into activity areas, LLNL's effort directed to each activity is shown in Figure 1. Enhancements, Core Tools, and Usability are all part of CCA Environment, and Software Quality is part of Component Technology Initiatives. The balance of this report will cover our accomplishments in each of these activity areas.

  12. Framework Programmable Platform for the Advanced Software Development Workstation: Preliminary system design document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Richard J.; Blinn, Thomas M.; Mayer, Paula S. D.; Ackley, Keith A.; Crump, John W., IV; Henderson, Richard; Futrell, Michael T.

    1991-01-01

    The Framework Programmable Software Development Platform (FPP) is a project aimed at combining effective tool and data integration mechanisms with a model of the software development process in an intelligent integrated software environment. Guided by the model, this system development framework will take advantage of an integrated operating environment to automate effectively the management of the software development process so that costly mistakes during the development phase can be eliminated. The focus here is on the design of components that make up the FPP. These components serve as supporting systems for the Integration Mechanism and the Framework Processor and provide the 'glue' that ties the FPP together. Also discussed are the components that allow the platform to operate in a distributed, heterogeneous environment and to manage the development and evolution of software system artifacts.

  13. Advanced Electric Submersible Pump Design Tool for Geothermal Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Xuele Qi; Norman Turnquist; Farshad Ghasripoor

    2012-05-31

    Electrical Submersible Pumps (ESPs) present higher efficiency, larger production rate, and can be operated in deeper wells than the other geothermal artificial lifting systems. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) applications recommend lifting 300 C geothermal water at 80kg/s flow rate in a maximum 10-5/8-inch diameter wellbore to improve the cost-effectiveness. In this paper, an advanced ESP design tool comprising a 1D theoretical model and a 3D CFD analysis has been developed to design ESPs for geothermal applications. Design of Experiments was also performed to optimize the geometry and performance. The designed mixed-flow type centrifugal impeller and diffuser exhibit high efficiency and head rise under simulated EGS conditions. The design tool has been validated by comparing the prediction to experimental data of an existing ESP product.

  14. Advances in Mass Spectrometric Tools for Probing Neuropeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchberger, Amanda; Yu, Qing; Li, Lingjun

    2015-07-01

    Neuropeptides are important mediators in the functionality of the brain and other neurological organs. Because neuropeptides exist in a wide range of concentrations, appropriate characterization methods are needed to provide dynamic, chemical, and spatial information. Mass spectrometry and compatible tools have been a popular choice in analyzing neuropeptides. There have been several advances and challenges, both of which are the focus of this review. Discussions range from sample collection to bioinformatic tools, although avenues such as quantitation and imaging are included. Further development of the presented methods for neuropeptidomic mass spectrometric analysis is inevitable, which will lead to a further understanding of the complex interplay of neuropeptides and other signaling molecules in the nervous system.

  15. PC Software graphics tool for conceptual design of space/planetary electrical power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Long V.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the Decision Support System (DSS), a personal computer software graphics tool for designing conceptual space and/or planetary electrical power systems. By using the DSS, users can obtain desirable system design and operating parameters, such as system weight, electrical distribution efficiency, and bus power. With this tool, a large-scale specific power system was designed in a matter of days. It is an excellent tool to help designers make tradeoffs between system components, hardware architectures, and operation parameters in the early stages of the design cycle. The DSS is a user-friendly, menu-driven tool with online help and a custom graphical user interface. An example design and results are illustrated for a typical space power system with multiple types of power sources, frequencies, energy storage systems, and loads.

  16. A Symphony of Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currents, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Offers a descriptive table of databases that help higher education institutions orchestrate advancement operations. Information includes vendor, contact, software, price, database engine/server platform, recommended reporting tools, record capacity, and client type. (EV)

  17. Oxygen octahedra picker: A software tool to extract quantitative information from STEM images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Salzberger, Ute; Sigle, Wilfried; Eren Suyolcu, Y; van Aken, Peter A

    2016-09-01

    In perovskite oxide based materials and hetero-structures there are often strong correlations between oxygen octahedral distortions and functionality. Thus, atomistic understanding of the octahedral distortion, which requires accurate measurements of atomic column positions, will greatly help to engineer their properties. Here, we report the development of a software tool to extract quantitative information of the lattice and of BO6 octahedral distortions from STEM images. Center-of-mass and 2D Gaussian fitting methods are implemented to locate positions of individual atom columns. The precision of atomic column distance measurements is evaluated on both simulated and experimental images. The application of the software tool is demonstrated using practical examples. PMID:27344044

  18. RAVEN as a tool for dynamic probabilistic risk assessment: Software overview

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonsi, A.; Rabiti, C.; Mandelli, D.; Cogliati, J. J.; Kinoshita, R. A.

    2013-07-01

    RAVEN is a software tool under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that acts as the control logic driver and post-processing tool for the newly developed Thermal-Hydraulic code RELAP-7. The scope of this paper is to show the software structure of RAVEN and its utilization in connection with RELAP-7. A short overview of the mathematical framework behind the code is presented along with its main capabilities such as on-line controlling/ monitoring and Monte-Carlo sampling. A demo of a Station Black Out PRA analysis of a simplified Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) model is shown in order to demonstrate the Monte-Carlo and clustering capabilities. (authors)

  19. RAVEN AS A TOOL FOR DYNAMIC PROBABILISTIC RISK ASSESSMENT: SOFTWARE OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonsi Andrea; Mandelli Diego; Rabiti Cristian; Joshua Cogliati; Robert Kinoshita

    2013-05-01

    RAVEN is a software tool under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that acts as the control logic driver and post-processing tool for the newly developed Thermo-Hydraylic code RELAP- 7. The scope of this paper is to show the software structure of RAVEN and its utilization in connection with RELAP-7. A short overview of the mathematical framework behind the code is presented along with its main capabilities such as on-line controlling/monitoring and Monte-Carlo sampling. A demo of a Station Black Out PRA analysis of a simplified Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) model is shown in order to demonstrate the Monte-Carlo and clustering capabilities.

  20. Analyst Tools and Quality Control Software for the ARM Data System

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, S.T.

    2004-12-14

    ATK Mission Research develops analyst tools and automated quality control software in order to assist the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data Quality Office with their data inspection tasks. We have developed a web-based data analysis and visualization tool, called NCVweb, that allows for easy viewing of ARM NetCDF files. NCVweb, along with our library of sharable Interactive Data Language procedures and functions, allows even novice ARM researchers to be productive with ARM data with only minimal effort. We also contribute to the ARM Data Quality Office by analyzing ARM data streams, developing new quality control metrics, new diagnostic plots, and integrating this information into DQ HandS - the Data Quality Health and Status web-based explorer. We have developed several ways to detect outliers in ARM data streams and have written software to run in an automated fashion to flag these outliers.

  1. Review on advanced composite materials boring mechanism and tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Runping; Wang, Chengyong

    2010-12-01

    With the rapid development of aviation and aerospace manufacturing technology, advanced composite materials represented by carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) and super hybrid composites (fibre/metal plates) are more and more widely applied. The fibres are mainly carbon fibre, boron fibre, Aramid fiber and Sic fibre. The matrixes are resin matrix, metal matrix and ceramic matrix. Advanced composite materials have higher specific strength and higher specific modulus than glass fibre reinforced resin composites of the 1st generation. They are widely used in aviation and aerospace industry due to their high specific strength, high specific modulus, excellent ductility, anticorrosion, heat-insulation, sound-insulation, shock absorption and high&low temperature resistance. They are used for radomes, inlets, airfoils(fuel tank included), flap, aileron, vertical tail, horizontal tail, air brake, skin, baseboards and tails, etc. Its hardness is up to 62~65HRC. The holes are greatly affected by the fibre laminates direction of carbon fibre reinforced composite material due to its anisotropy when drilling in unidirectional laminates. There are burrs, splits at the exit because of stress concentration. Besides there is delamination and the hole is prone to be smaller. Burrs are caused by poor sharpness of cutting edge, delamination, tearing, splitting are caused by the great stress caused by high thrust force. Poorer sharpness of cutting edge leads to lower cutting performance and higher drilling force at the same time. The present research focuses on the interrelation between rotation speed, feed, drill's geometry, drill life, cutting mode, tools material etc. and thrust force. At the same time, holes quantity and holes making difficulty of composites have also increased. It requires high performance drills which won't bring out defects and have long tool life. It has become a trend to develop super hard material tools and tools with special geometry for drilling

  2. Review on advanced composite materials boring mechanism and tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Runping; Wang, Chengyong

    2011-05-01

    With the rapid development of aviation and aerospace manufacturing technology, advanced composite materials represented by carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) and super hybrid composites (fibre/metal plates) are more and more widely applied. The fibres are mainly carbon fibre, boron fibre, Aramid fiber and Sic fibre. The matrixes are resin matrix, metal matrix and ceramic matrix. Advanced composite materials have higher specific strength and higher specific modulus than glass fibre reinforced resin composites of the 1st generation. They are widely used in aviation and aerospace industry due to their high specific strength, high specific modulus, excellent ductility, anticorrosion, heat-insulation, sound-insulation, shock absorption and high&low temperature resistance. They are used for radomes, inlets, airfoils(fuel tank included), flap, aileron, vertical tail, horizontal tail, air brake, skin, baseboards and tails, etc. Its hardness is up to 62~65HRC. The holes are greatly affected by the fibre laminates direction of carbon fibre reinforced composite material due to its anisotropy when drilling in unidirectional laminates. There are burrs, splits at the exit because of stress concentration. Besides there is delamination and the hole is prone to be smaller. Burrs are caused by poor sharpness of cutting edge, delamination, tearing, splitting are caused by the great stress caused by high thrust force. Poorer sharpness of cutting edge leads to lower cutting performance and higher drilling force at the same time. The present research focuses on the interrelation between rotation speed, feed, drill's geometry, drill life, cutting mode, tools material etc. and thrust force. At the same time, holes quantity and holes making difficulty of composites have also increased. It requires high performance drills which won't bring out defects and have long tool life. It has become a trend to develop super hard material tools and tools with special geometry for drilling

  3. A SOFTWARE TOOL TO COMPARE MEASURED AND SIMULATED BUILDING ENERGY PERFORMANCE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Maile, Tobias; Bazjanac, Vladimir; O'Donnell, James; Garr, Matthew

    2011-11-01

    Building energy performance is often inadequate when compared to design goals. To link design goals to actual operation one can compare measured with simulated energy performance data. Our previously developed comparison approach is the Energy Performance Comparison Methodology (EPCM), which enables the identification of performance problems based on a comparison of measured and simulated performance data. In context of this method, we developed a software tool that provides graphing and data processing capabilities of the two performance data sets. The software tool called SEE IT (Stanford Energy Efficiency Information Tool) eliminates the need for manual generation of data plots and data reformatting. SEE IT makes the generation of time series, scatter and carpet plots independent of the source of data (measured or simulated) and provides a valuable tool for comparing measurements with simulation results. SEE IT also allows assigning data points on a predefined building object hierarchy and supports different versions of simulated performance data. This paper briefly introduces the EPCM, describes the SEE IT tool and illustrates its use in the context of a building case study.

  4. Tools to aid the specification and design of flight software, appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, G.

    1980-01-01

    The tasks that are normally performed during the specification and architecture design stages of software development are identified. Ways that tools could perform, or aid the performance, of such tasks are also identified. Much of the verification and analysis that is suggested is currently rarely performed during these early stages, but it is believed that this analysis should be done as early as possible so as to detect errors as early as possible.

  5. A new software tool for computing Earth's atmospheric transmission of near- and far-infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Steven D.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a new software tool, ATRAN, which computes the transmittance of Earth's atmosphere at near- and far-infrared wavelengths. We compare the capabilities of this program with others currently available and demonstrate its utility for observational data calibration and reduction. The program employs current water-vapor and ozone models to produce fast and accurate transmittance spectra for wavelengths ranging from 0.8 microns to 10 mm.

  6. Techniques and tools for measuring energy efficiency of scientific software applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurachmanov, David; Elmer, Peter; Eulisse, Giulio; Knight, Robert; Niemi, Tapio; Nurminen, Jukka K.; Nyback, Filip; Pestana, Gonçalo; Ou, Zhonghong; Khan, Kashif

    2015-05-01

    The scale of scientific High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Throughput Computing (HTC) has increased significantly in recent years, and is becoming sensitive to total energy use and cost. Energy-efficiency has thus become an important concern in scientific fields such as High Energy Physics (HEP). There has been a growing interest in utilizing alternate architectures, such as low power ARM processors, to replace traditional Intel x86 architectures. Nevertheless, even though such solutions have been successfully used in mobile applications with low I/O and memory demands, it is unclear if they are suitable and more energy-efficient in the scientific computing environment. Furthermore, there is a lack of tools and experience to derive and compare power consumption between the architectures for various workloads, and eventually to support software optimizations for energy efficiency. To that end, we have performed several physical and software-based measurements of workloads from HEP applications running on ARM and Intel architectures, and compare their power consumption and performance. We leverage several profiling tools (both in hardware and software) to extract different characteristics of the power use. We report the results of these measurements and the experience gained in developing a set of measurement techniques and profiling tools to accurately assess the power consumption for scientific workloads.

  7. User Driven Development of Software Tools for Open Data Discovery and Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlobinski, Sascha; Keppel, Frank; Dihe, Pascal; Boot, Gerben; Falkenroth, Esa

    2016-04-01

    The use of open data in research faces challenges not restricted to inherent properties such as data quality, resolution of open data sets. Often Open data is catalogued insufficiently or fragmented. Software tools that support the effective discovery including the assessment of the data's appropriateness for research have shortcomings such as the lack of essential functionalities like support for data provenance. We believe that one of the reasons is the neglect of real end users requirements in the development process of aforementioned software tools. In the context of the FP7 Switch-On project we have pro-actively engaged the relevant user user community to collaboratively develop a means to publish, find and bind open data relevant for hydrologic research. Implementing key concepts of data discovery and exploration we have used state of the art web technologies to provide an interactive software tool that is easy to use yet powerful enough to satisfy the data discovery and access requirements of the hydrological research community.

  8. gLAB-A Fully Software Tool to Generate, Process and Analyze GNSS Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionisio, Cesare; Citterico, Dario; Pirazzi, Gabriele; De Quattro, Nicola; Marracci, Riccardo; Cucchi, Luca; Valdambrini, Nicola; Formaioni, Irene

    2010-08-01

    In this paper the concept of Software Defined Radio (SDR) and its use in modern GNSS receiver is highlighted demonstrating how software receivers are important in many situations especially for verification and validation. After a brief introduction of gLab, a fully software high modular tool to generate, process and analyze current and future GNSS signals, the different software modules will be described. Demonstrating the wide range of uses concerning gLab, different practical example will be briefly overviewed: from the analysis of real data over the experimental GIOVE-B satellite, to the antenna group delay determination or the CN0 estimation under wide dynamic range etc.. gLab is the result of different projects leaded by Intecs in GNSS SW Radio: the signal generator is the result of the SWAN (Sistemi softWare per Applicazioni di Navigazione) project under Italian Space Agency (ASI) contract, the analyzer and the processing module have been developed for ESA to V&V the IOV (In Orbit Validation) Galileo Phase. In this case the GNSS SW RX works in parallel with Test User Receivers (TUR) in order to validate the Signal In Space (SiS). Is remarkable that gLab is the result of over three years of development and approximately one year of test and validation under ESA (European Space Agency) supervision.

  9. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M.; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields.

  10. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science.

    PubMed

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-09-15

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields.

  11. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science

    PubMed Central

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M.; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields. PMID:26370627

  12. GOAL: A software tool for assessing biological significance of genes groups

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Modern high throughput experimental techniques such as DNA microarrays often result in large lists of genes. Computational biology tools such as clustering are then used to group together genes based on their similarity in expression profiles. Genes in each group are probably functionally related. The functional relevance among the genes in each group is usually characterized by utilizing available biological knowledge in public databases such as Gene Ontology (GO), KEGG pathways, association between a transcription factor (TF) and its target genes, and/or gene networks. Results We developed GOAL: Gene Ontology AnaLyzer, a software tool specifically designed for the functional evaluation of gene groups. GOAL implements and supports efficient and statistically rigorous functional interpretations of gene groups through its integration with available GO, TF-gene association data, and association with KEGG pathways. In order to facilitate more specific functional characterization of a gene group, we implement three GO-tree search strategies rather than one as in most existing GO analysis tools. Furthermore, GOAL offers flexibility in deployment. It can be used as a standalone tool, a plug-in to other computational biology tools, or a web server application. Conclusion We developed a functional evaluation software tool, GOAL, to perform functional characterization of a gene group. GOAL offers three GO-tree search strategies and combines its strength in function integration, portability and visualization, and its flexibility in deployment. Furthermore, GOAL can be used to evaluate and compare gene groups as the output from computational biology tools such as clustering algorithms. PMID:20459620

  13. The anatomy of E-Learning tools: Does software usability influence learning outcomes?

    PubMed

    Van Nuland, Sonya E; Rogers, Kem A

    2016-07-01

    Reductions in laboratory hours have increased the popularity of commercial anatomy e-learning tools. It is critical to understand how the functionality of such tools can influence the mental effort required during the learning process, also known as cognitive load. Using dual-task methodology, two anatomical e-learning tools were examined to determine the effect of their design on cognitive load during two joint learning exercises. A.D.A.M. Interactive Anatomy is a simplistic, two-dimensional tool that presents like a textbook, whereas Netter's 3D Interactive Anatomy has a more complex three-dimensional usability that allows structures to be rotated. It was hypothesized that longer reaction times on an observation task would be associated with the more complex anatomical software (Netter's 3D Interactive Anatomy), indicating a higher cognitive load imposed by the anatomy software, which would result in lower post-test scores. Undergraduate anatomy students from Western University, Canada (n = 70) were assessed using a baseline knowledge test, Stroop observation task response times (a measure of cognitive load), mental rotation test scores, and an anatomy post-test. Results showed that reaction times and post-test outcomes were similar for both tools, whereas mental rotation test scores were positively correlated with post-test values when students used Netter's 3D Interactive Anatomy (P = 0.007), but not when they used A.D.A.M. Interactive Anatomy. This suggests that a simple e-learning tool, such as A.D.A.M. Interactive Anatomy, is as effective as more complicated tools, such as Netter's 3D Interactive Anatomy, and does not academically disadvantage those with poor spatial ability. Anat Sci Educ 9: 378-390. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  14. The anatomy of E-Learning tools: Does software usability influence learning outcomes?

    PubMed

    Van Nuland, Sonya E; Rogers, Kem A

    2016-07-01

    Reductions in laboratory hours have increased the popularity of commercial anatomy e-learning tools. It is critical to understand how the functionality of such tools can influence the mental effort required during the learning process, also known as cognitive load. Using dual-task methodology, two anatomical e-learning tools were examined to determine the effect of their design on cognitive load during two joint learning exercises. A.D.A.M. Interactive Anatomy is a simplistic, two-dimensional tool that presents like a textbook, whereas Netter's 3D Interactive Anatomy has a more complex three-dimensional usability that allows structures to be rotated. It was hypothesized that longer reaction times on an observation task would be associated with the more complex anatomical software (Netter's 3D Interactive Anatomy), indicating a higher cognitive load imposed by the anatomy software, which would result in lower post-test scores. Undergraduate anatomy students from Western University, Canada (n = 70) were assessed using a baseline knowledge test, Stroop observation task response times (a measure of cognitive load), mental rotation test scores, and an anatomy post-test. Results showed that reaction times and post-test outcomes were similar for both tools, whereas mental rotation test scores were positively correlated with post-test values when students used Netter's 3D Interactive Anatomy (P = 0.007), but not when they used A.D.A.M. Interactive Anatomy. This suggests that a simple e-learning tool, such as A.D.A.M. Interactive Anatomy, is as effective as more complicated tools, such as Netter's 3D Interactive Anatomy, and does not academically disadvantage those with poor spatial ability. Anat Sci Educ 9: 378-390. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. PMID:26671838

  15. Advanced Reach Tool (ART): development of the mechanistic model.

    PubMed

    Fransman, Wouter; Van Tongeren, Martie; Cherrie, John W; Tischer, Martin; Schneider, Thomas; Schinkel, Jody; Kromhout, Hans; Warren, Nick; Goede, Henk; Tielemans, Erik

    2011-11-01

    This paper describes the development of the mechanistic model within a collaborative project, referred to as the Advanced REACH Tool (ART) project, to develop a tool to model inhalation exposure for workers sharing similar operational conditions across different industries and locations in Europe. The ART mechanistic model is based on a conceptual framework that adopts a source receptor approach, which describes the transport of a contaminant from the source to the receptor and defines seven independent principal modifying factors: substance emission potential, activity emission potential, localized controls, segregation, personal enclosure, surface contamination, and dispersion. ART currently differentiates between three different exposure types: vapours, mists, and dust (fumes, fibres, and gases are presently excluded). Various sources were used to assign numerical values to the multipliers to each modifying factor. The evidence used to underpin this assessment procedure was based on chemical and physical laws. In addition, empirical data obtained from literature were used. Where this was not possible, expert elicitation was applied for the assessment procedure. Multipliers for all modifying factors were peer reviewed by leading experts from industry, research institutes, and public authorities across the globe. In addition, several workshops with experts were organized to discuss the proposed exposure multipliers. The mechanistic model is a central part of the ART tool and with advancing knowledge on exposure, determinants will require updates and refinements on a continuous basis, such as the effect of worker behaviour on personal exposure, 'best practice' values that describe the maximum achievable effectiveness of control measures, the intrinsic emission potential of various solid objects (e.g. metal, glass, plastics, etc.), and extending the applicability domain to certain types of exposures (e.g. gas, fume, and fibre exposure).

  16. Development of a User Interface for a Regression Analysis Software Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Norbert Manfred; Volden, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    An easy-to -use user interface was implemented in a highly automated regression analysis tool. The user interface was developed from the start to run on computers that use the Windows, Macintosh, Linux, or UNIX operating system. Many user interface features were specifically designed such that a novice or inexperienced user can apply the regression analysis tool with confidence. Therefore, the user interface s design minimizes interactive input from the user. In addition, reasonable default combinations are assigned to those analysis settings that influence the outcome of the regression analysis. These default combinations will lead to a successful regression analysis result for most experimental data sets. The user interface comes in two versions. The text user interface version is used for the ongoing development of the regression analysis tool. The official release of the regression analysis tool, on the other hand, has a graphical user interface that is more efficient to use. This graphical user interface displays all input file names, output file names, and analysis settings for a specific software application mode on a single screen which makes it easier to generate reliable analysis results and to perform input parameter studies. An object-oriented approach was used for the development of the graphical user interface. This choice keeps future software maintenance costs to a reasonable limit. Examples of both the text user interface and graphical user interface are discussed in order to illustrate the user interface s overall design approach.

  17. BYMUR software: a free and open source tool for quantifying and visualizing multi-risk analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonini, Roberto; Selva, Jacopo

    2013-04-01

    The BYMUR software aims to provide an easy-to-use open source tool for both computing multi-risk and managing/visualizing/comparing all the inputs (e.g. hazard, fragilities and exposure) as well as the corresponding results (e.g. risk curves, risk indexes). For all inputs, a complete management of inter-model epistemic uncertainty is considered. The BYMUR software will be one of the final products provided by the homonymous ByMuR project (http://bymur.bo.ingv.it/) funded by Italian Ministry of Education, Universities and Research (MIUR), focused to (i) provide a quantitative and objective general method for a comprehensive long-term multi-risk analysis in a given area, accounting for inter-model epistemic uncertainty through Bayesian methodologies, and (ii) apply the methodology to seismic, volcanic and tsunami risks in Naples (Italy). More specifically, the BYMUR software will be able to separately account for the probabilistic hazard assessment of different kind of hazardous phenomena, the relative (time-dependent/independent) vulnerabilities and exposure data, and their possible (predefined) interactions: the software will analyze these inputs and will use them to estimate both single- and multi- risk associated to a specific target area. In addition, it will be possible to connect the software to further tools (e.g., a full hazard analysis), allowing a dynamic I/O of results. The use of Python programming language guarantees that the final software will be open source and platform independent. Moreover, thanks to the integration of some most popular and rich-featured Python scientific modules (Numpy, Matplotlib, Scipy) with the wxPython graphical user toolkit, the final tool will be equipped with a comprehensive Graphical User Interface (GUI) able to control and visualize (in the form of tables, maps and/or plots) any stage of the multi-risk analysis. The additional features of importing/exporting data in MySQL databases and/or standard XML formats (for

  18. Software tools of the Computis European project to process mass spectrometry images.

    PubMed

    Robbe, Marie-France; Both, Jean-Pierre; Prideaux, Brendan; Klinkert, Ivo; Picaud, Vincent; Schramm, Thorsten; Hester, Atfons; Guevara, Victor; Stoeckli, Markus; Roempp, Andreas; Heeren, Ron M A; Spengler, Bernhard; Gala, Olivier; Haan, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Among the needs usually expressed by teams using mass spectrometry imaging, one that often arises is that for user-friendly software able to manage huge data volumes quickly and to provide efficient assistance for the interpretation of data. To answer this need, the Computis European project developed several complementary software tools to process mass spectrometry imaging data. Data Cube Explorer provides a simple spatial and spectral exploration for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight (MALDI-ToF) and time of flight-secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) data. SpectViewer offers visualisation functions, assistance to the interpretation of data, classification functionalities, peak list extraction to interrogate biological database and image overlay, and it can process data issued from MALDI-ToF, ToF-SIMS and desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) equipment. EasyReg2D is able to register two images, in American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) format, issued from different technologies. The collaboration between the teams was hampered by the multiplicity of equipment and data formats, so the project also developed a common data format (imzML) to facilitate the exchange of experimental data and their interpretation by the different software tools. The BioMap platform for visualisation and exploration of MALDI-ToF and DESI images was adapted to parse imzML files, enabling its access to all project partners and, more globally, to a larger community of users. Considering the huge advantages brought by the imzML standard format, a specific editor (vBrowser) for imzML files and converters from proprietary formats to imzML were developed to enable the use of the imzML format by a broad scientific community. This initiative paves the way toward the development of a large panel of software tools able to process mass spectrometry imaging datasets in the future.

  19. Robust optimal design of experiments for model discrimination using an interactive software tool.

    PubMed

    Stegmaier, Johannes; Skanda, Dominik; Lebiedz, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of biochemical processes significantly contributes to a better understanding of biological functionality and underlying dynamic mechanisms. To support time consuming and costly lab experiments, kinetic reaction equations can be formulated as a set of ordinary differential equations, which in turn allows to simulate and compare hypothetical models in silico. To identify new experimental designs that are able to discriminate between investigated models, the approach used in this work solves a semi-infinite constrained nonlinear optimization problem using derivative based numerical algorithms. The method takes into account parameter variabilities such that new experimental designs are robust against parameter changes while maintaining the optimal potential to discriminate between hypothetical models. In this contribution we present a newly developed software tool that offers a convenient graphical user interface for model discrimination. We demonstrate the beneficial operation of the discrimination approach and the usefulness of the software tool by analyzing a realistic benchmark experiment from literature. New robust optimal designs that allow to discriminate between the investigated model hypotheses of the benchmark experiment are successfully calculated and yield promising results. The involved robustification approach provides maximally discriminating experiments for the worst parameter configurations, which can be used to estimate the meaningfulness of upcoming experiments. A major benefit of the graphical user interface is the ability to interactively investigate the model behavior and the clear arrangement of numerous variables. In addition to a brief theoretical overview of the discrimination method and the functionality of the software tool, the importance of robustness of experimental designs against parameter variability is demonstrated on a biochemical benchmark problem. The software is licensed under the GNU General Public License

  20. Utilization of Software Tools for Uncertainty Calculation in Measurement Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangl, Hubert; Zine-Zine, Mariam; Hoermaier, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Despite its importance, uncertainty is often neglected by practitioners in the design of system even in safety critical applications. Thus, problems arising from uncertainty may only be identified late in the design process and thus lead to additional costs. Although there exists numerous tools to support uncertainty calculation, reasons for limited usage in early design phases may be low awareness of the existence of the tools and insufficient training in the practical application. We present a teaching philosophy that addresses uncertainty from the very beginning of teaching measurement science, in particular with respect to the utilization of software tools. The developed teaching material is based on the GUM method and makes use of uncertainty toolboxes in the simulation environment. Based on examples in measurement science education we discuss advantages and disadvantages of the proposed teaching philosophy and include feedback from students.

  1. Data and software tools for gamma radiation spectral threat detection and nuclide identification algorithm development and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnoy, David; Fisher, Brian; Phifer, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    The detection of radiological and nuclear threats is extremely important to national security. The federal government is spending significant resources developing new detection systems and attempting to increase the performance of existing ones. The detection of illicit radionuclides that may pose a radiological or nuclear threat is a challenging problem complicated by benign radiation sources (e.g., cat litter and medical treatments), shielding, and large variations in background radiation. Although there is a growing acceptance within the community that concentrating efforts on algorithm development (independent of the specifics of fully assembled systems) has the potential for significant overall system performance gains, there are two major hindrances to advancements in gamma spectral analysis algorithms under the current paradigm: access to data and common performance metrics along with baseline performance measures. Because many of the signatures collected during performance measurement campaigns are classified, dissemination to algorithm developers is extremely limited. This leaves developers no choice but to collect their own data if they are lucky enough to have access to material and sensors. This is often combined with their own definition of metrics for measuring performance. These two conditions make it all but impossible for developers and external reviewers to make meaningful comparisons between algorithms. Without meaningful comparisons, performance advancements become very hard to achieve and (more importantly) recognize. The objective of this work is to overcome these obstacles by developing and freely distributing real and synthetically generated gamma-spectra data sets as well as software tools for performance evaluation with associated performance baselines to national labs, academic institutions, government agencies, and industry. At present, datasets for two tracks, or application domains, have been developed: one that includes temporal

  2. Advanced gradient-index lens design tools to maximize system performance and reduce SWaP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Sawyer D.; Nagar, Jogender; Brocker, Donovan E.; Easum, John A.; Turpin, Jeremiah P.; Werner, Douglas H.

    2016-05-01

    GRadient-INdex (GRIN) lenses have long been of interest due to their potential for providing levels of performance unachievable with traditional homogeneous lenses. While historically limited by a lack of suitable materials, rapid advancements in manufacturing techniques, including 3D printing, have recently kindled a renewed interest in GRIN optics. Further increasing the desire for GRIN devices has been the advent of Transformation Optics (TO), which provides the mathematical framework for representing the behavior of electromagnetic radiation in a given geometry by "transforming" it to an alternative, usually more desirable, geometry through an appropriate mapping of the constituent material parameters. Using TO, aspherical lenses can be transformed to simpler spherical and flat geometries or even rotationally-asymmetric shapes which result in true 3D GRIN profiles. Meanwhile, there is a critical lack of suitable design tools which can effectively evaluate the optical wave propagation through 3D GRIN profiles produced by TO. Current modeling software packages for optical lens systems also lack advanced multi-objective global optimization capability which allows the user to explicitly view the trade-offs between all design objectives such as focus quality, FOV, ▵nand focal drift due to chromatic aberrations. When coupled with advanced design methodologies such as TO, wavefront matching (WFM), and analytical achromatic GRIN theory, these tools provide a powerful framework for maximizing SWaP (Size, Weight and Power) reduction in GRIN-enabled optical systems. We provide an overview of our advanced GRIN design tools and examples which minimize the presence of mono- and polychromatic aberrations in the context of reducing SWaP.

  3. TESPI (Tool for Environmental Sound Product Innovation): a simplified software tool to support environmentally conscious design in SMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misceo, Monica; Buonamici, Roberto; Buttol, Patrizia; Naldesi, Luciano; Grimaldi, Filomena; Rinaldi, Caterina

    2004-12-01

    TESPI (Tool for Environmental Sound Product Innovation) is the prototype of a software tool developed within the framework of the "eLCA" project. The project, (www.elca.enea.it)financed by the European Commission, is realising "On line green tools and services for Small and Medium sized Enterprises (SMEs)". The implementation by SMEs of environmental product innovation (as fostered by the European Integrated Product Policy, IPP) needs specific adaptation to their economic model, their knowledge of production and management processes and their relationships with innovation and the environment. In particular, quality and costs are the main driving forces of innovation in European SMEs, and well known barriers exist to the adoption of an environmental approach in the product design. Starting from these considerations, the TESPI tool has been developed to support the first steps of product design taking into account both the quality and the environment. Two main issues have been considered: (i) classic Quality Function Deployment (QFD) can hardly be proposed to SMEs; (ii) the environmental aspects of the product life cycle need to be integrated with the quality approach. TESPI is a user friendly web-based tool, has a training approach and applies to modular products. Users are guided through the investigation of the quality aspects of their product (customer"s needs and requirements fulfilment) and the identification of the key environmental aspects in the product"s life cycle. A simplified check list allows analyzing the environmental performance of the product. Help is available for a better understanding of the analysis criteria. As a result, the significant aspects for the redesign of the product are identified.

  4. Emerging role of bioinformatics tools and software in evolution of clinical research.

    PubMed

    Gill, Supreet Kaur; Christopher, Ajay Francis; Gupta, Vikas; Bansal, Parveen

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research is making toiling efforts for promotion and wellbeing of the health status of the people. There is a rapid increase in number and severity of diseases like cancer, hepatitis, HIV etc, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Clinical research involves drug discovery and development whereas clinical trials are performed to establish safety and efficacy of drugs. Drug discovery is a long process starting with the target identification, validation and lead optimization. This is followed by the preclinical trials, intensive clinical trials and eventually post marketing vigilance for drug safety. Softwares and the bioinformatics tools play a great role not only in the drug discovery but also in drug development. It involves the use of informatics in the development of new knowledge pertaining to health and disease, data management during clinical trials and to use clinical data for secondary research. In addition, new technology likes molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, proteomics and quantitative structure activity relationship in clinical research results in faster and easier drug discovery process. During the preclinical trials, the software is used for randomization to remove bias and to plan study design. In clinical trials software like electronic data capture, Remote data capture and electronic case report form (eCRF) is used to store the data. eClinical, Oracle clinical are software used for clinical data management and for statistical analysis of the data. After the drug is marketed the safety of a drug could be monitored by drug safety software like Oracle Argus or ARISg. Therefore, softwares are used from the very early stages of drug designing, to drug development, clinical trials and during pharmacovigilance. This review describes different aspects related to application of computers and bioinformatics in drug designing, discovery and development, formulation designing and clinical research. PMID:27453827

  5. Emerging role of bioinformatics tools and software in evolution of clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Supreet Kaur; Christopher, Ajay Francis; Gupta, Vikas; Bansal, Parveen

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research is making toiling efforts for promotion and wellbeing of the health status of the people. There is a rapid increase in number and severity of diseases like cancer, hepatitis, HIV etc, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Clinical research involves drug discovery and development whereas clinical trials are performed to establish safety and efficacy of drugs. Drug discovery is a long process starting with the target identification, validation and lead optimization. This is followed by the preclinical trials, intensive clinical trials and eventually post marketing vigilance for drug safety. Softwares and the bioinformatics tools play a great role not only in the drug discovery but also in drug development. It involves the use of informatics in the development of new knowledge pertaining to health and disease, data management during clinical trials and to use clinical data for secondary research. In addition, new technology likes molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, proteomics and quantitative structure activity relationship in clinical research results in faster and easier drug discovery process. During the preclinical trials, the software is used for randomization to remove bias and to plan study design. In clinical trials software like electronic data capture, Remote data capture and electronic case report form (eCRF) is used to store the data. eClinical, Oracle clinical are software used for clinical data management and for statistical analysis of the data. After the drug is marketed the safety of a drug could be monitored by drug safety software like Oracle Argus or ARISg. Therefore, softwares are used from the very early stages of drug designing, to drug development, clinical trials and during pharmacovigilance. This review describes different aspects related to application of computers and bioinformatics in drug designing, discovery and development, formulation designing and clinical research. PMID:27453827

  6. A user friendly software tool for the simulation and optimization of high power fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Liang; Mao, Qinghe

    2008-12-01

    Double-clad rare-earth-doped fiber laser is a new generation of high power solid-state lasers. The numerical simulation is an important approach in the configuration design and parameter optimization for the high power fiber lasers (HPFLs). In this paper, we report our user-friendly high-power fiber laser simulation software system, which integrates the design, analysis and optimization functions together. The numerical simulations of the software are with the HPFL model based on the rate-equation theory. By using the theoretical model, for specific laser cavity configuration, doped fiber parameters and pump conditions, the distributions of the population inversion, forward and backward pump, and circulating lasing intensity along the doped fiber can be calculated, and thus, the main output characteristics, such as cavity gain, output power and laser efficiency, can be achieved accordingly. On the basis of the simulation results, the software supplies the functions developed for designs and optimizations of the pump configuration, doped fiber length and the reflectivity of output mirror. By combining the calculated mode-field distribution in doped fibers with the mechanism of curvature loss to suppress the higher-order modes, the software also supplies the function for optimizing the beam quality. With graphical user interface (GUI), all the functions of the software are provided function tools in menu options, especially for those which may be used frequently, toolbar buttons, shortcut keys and pop-up menus are also provided. The software is with single-document interface (SDI) and coded in C++ in the integrated development environment of Visual C++ 6.0. We believe it would be very helpful for the investigation and development of HPFLs.

  7. Creating a strategic plan for configuration management using computer aided software engineering (CASE) tools

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.R.; Sarfaty, R.

    1993-05-01

    This paper provides guidance in the definition, documentation, measurement, enhancement of processes, and validation of a strategic plan for configuration management (CM). The approach and methodology used in establishing a strategic plan is the same for any enterprise, including the Department of Energy (DOE), commercial nuclear plants, the Department of Defense (DOD), or large industrial complexes. The principles and techniques presented are used world wide by some of the largest corporations. The authors used industry knowledge and the areas of their current employment to illustrate and provide examples. Developing a strategic configuration and information management plan for DOE Idaho Field Office (DOE-ID) facilities is discussed in this paper. A good knowledge of CM principles is the key to successful strategic planning. This paper will describe and define CM elements, and discuss how CM integrates the facility`s physical configuration, design basis, and documentation. The strategic plan does not need the support of a computer aided software engineering (CASE) tool. However, the use of the CASE tool provides a methodology for consistency in approach, graphics, and database capability combined to form an encyclopedia and a method of presentation that is easily understood and aids the process of reengineering. CASE tools have much more capability than those stated above. Some examples are supporting a joint application development group (JAD) to prepare a software functional specification document and, if necessary, provide the capability to automatically generate software application code. This paper briefly discusses characteristics and capabilities of two CASE tools that use different methodologies to generate similar deliverables.

  8. A software tool of digital tomosynthesis application for patient positioning in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Dai, Jian-Rong

    2016-03-08

    Digital Tomosynthesis (DTS) is an image modality in reconstructing tomographic images from two-dimensional kV projections covering a narrow scan angles. Comparing with conventional cone-beam CT (CBCT), it requires less time and radiation dose in data acquisition. It is feasible to apply this technique in patient positioning in radiotherapy. To facilitate its clinical application, a software tool was developed and the reconstruction processes were accelerated by graphic process-ing unit (GPU). Two reconstruction and two registration processes are required for DTS application which is different from conventional CBCT application which requires one image reconstruction process and one image registration process. The reconstruction stage consists of productions of two types of DTS. One type of DTS is reconstructed from cone-beam (CB) projections covering a narrow scan angle and is named onboard DTS (ODTS), which represents the real patient position in treatment room. Another type of DTS is reconstructed from digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) and is named reference DTS (RDTS), which represents the ideal patient position in treatment room. Prior to the reconstruction of RDTS, The DRRs are reconstructed from planning CT using the same acquisition setting of CB projections. The registration stage consists of two matching processes between ODTS and RDTS. The target shift in lateral and longitudinal axes are obtained from the matching between ODTS and RDTS in coronal view, while the target shift in longitudinal and vertical axes are obtained from the matching between ODTS and RDTS in sagittal view. In this software, both DRR and DTS reconstruction algorithms were implemented on GPU environments for acceleration purpose. The comprehensive evaluation of this software tool was performed including geometric accuracy, image quality, registration accuracy, and reconstruction efficiency. The average correlation coefficient between DRR/DTS generated by GPU-based algorithm

  9. A software tool of digital tomosynthesis application for patient positioning in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Dai, Jian-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Digital Tomosynthesis (DTS) is an image modality in reconstructing tomographic images from two-dimensional kV projections covering a narrow scan angles. Comparing with conventional cone-beam CT (CBCT), it requires less time and radiation dose in data acquisition. It is feasible to apply this technique in patient positioning in radiotherapy. To facilitate its clinical application, a software tool was developed and the reconstruction processes were accelerated by graphic process-ing unit (GPU). Two reconstruction and two registration processes are required for DTS application which is different from conventional CBCT application which requires one image reconstruction process and one image registration process. The reconstruction stage consists of productions of two types of DTS. One type of DTS is reconstructed from cone-beam (CB) projections covering a narrow scan angle and is named onboard DTS (ODTS), which represents the real patient position in treatment room. Another type of DTS is reconstructed from digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) and is named reference DTS (RDTS), which represents the ideal patient position in treatment room. Prior to the reconstruction of RDTS, The DRRs are reconstructed from planning CT using the same acquisition setting of CB projections. The registration stage consists of two matching processes between ODTS and RDTS. The target shift in lateral and longitudinal axes are obtained from the matching between ODTS and RDTS in coronal view, while the target shift in longitudinal and vertical axes are obtained from the matching between ODTS and RDTS in sagittal view. In this software, both DRR and DTS reconstruction algorithms were implemented on GPU environments for acceleration purpose. The comprehensive evaluation of this software tool was performed including geometric accuracy, image quality, registration accuracy, and reconstruction efficiency. The average correlation coefficient between DRR/DTS generated by GPU-based algorithm

  10. An Advanced Decision Support Tool for Electricity Infrastructure Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yousu; Huang, Zhenyu; Wong, Pak C.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Allwardt, Craig H.; Ma, Jian; Greitzer, Frank L.

    2010-01-31

    Electricity infrastructure, as one of the most critical infrastructures in the U.S., plays an important role in modern societies. Its failure would lead to significant disruption of people’s lives, industry and commercial activities, and result in massive economic losses. Reliable operation of electricity infrastructure is an extremely challenging task because human operators need to consider thousands of possible configurations in near real-time to choose the best option and operate the network effectively. In today’s practice, electricity infrastructure operation is largely based on operators’ experience with very limited real-time decision support, resulting in inadequate management of complex predictions and the inability to anticipate, recognize, and respond to situations caused by human errors, natural disasters, or cyber attacks. Therefore, a systematic approach is needed to manage the complex operational paradigms and choose the best option in a near-real-time manner. This paper proposes an advanced decision support tool for electricity infrastructure operations. The tool has the functions of turning large amount of data into actionable information to help operators monitor power grid status in real time; performing trend analysis to indentify system trend at the regional level or system level to help the operator to foresee and discern emergencies, studying clustering analysis to assist operators to identify the relationships between system configurations and affected assets, and interactively evaluating the alternative remedial actions to aid operators to make effective and timely decisions. This tool can provide significant decision support on electricity infrastructure operations and lead to better reliability in power grids. This paper presents examples with actual electricity infrastructure data to demonstrate the capability of this tool.

  11. STRAP PTM: Software Tool for Rapid Annotation and Differential Comparison of Protein Post-Translational Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Jean L.; Bhatia, Vivek N.; Whelan, Stephen A.; Costello, Catherine E.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) is an increasingly important component of proteomics and biomarker discovery, but very few tools exist for performing fast and easy characterization of global PTM changes and differential comparison of PTMs across groups of data obtained from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry experiments. STRAP PTM (Software Tool for Rapid Annotation of Proteins: Post-Translational Modification edition) is a program that was developed to facilitate the characterization of PTMs using spectral counting and a novel scoring algorithm to accelerate the identification of differential PTMs from complex data sets. The software facilitates multi-sample comparison by collating, scoring, and ranking PTMs and by summarizing data visually. The freely available software (beta release) installs on a PC and processes data in protXML format obtained from files parsed through the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline. The easy-to-use interface allows examination of results at protein, peptide, and PTM levels, and the overall design offers tremendous flexibility that provides proteomics insight beyond simple assignment and counting. PMID:25422678

  12. CmapTools: A Software Environment for Knowledge Modeling and Sharing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canas, Alberto J.

    2004-01-01

    In an ongoing collaborative effort between a group of NASA Ames scientists and researchers at the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC) of the University of West Florida, a new version of CmapTools has been developed that enable scientists to construct knowledge models of their domain of expertise, share them with other scientists, make them available to anybody on the Internet with access to a Web browser, and peer-review other scientists models. These software tools have been successfully used at NASA to build a large-scale multimedia on Mars and in knowledge model on Habitability Assessment. The new version of the software places emphasis on greater usability for experts constructing their own knowledge models, and support for the creation of large knowledge models with large number of supporting resources in the forms of images, videos, web pages, and other media. Additionally, the software currently allows scientists to cooperate with each other in the construction, sharing and criticizing of knowledge models. Scientists collaborating from remote distances, for example researchers at the Astrobiology Institute, can concurrently manipulate the knowledge models they are viewing without having to do this at a special videoconferencing facility.

  13. A software tool to measure the geometric distortion in x-ray image systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Gabriel; Guibelalde, Eduardo; Chevalier, Margarita

    2010-04-01

    A software tool is presented to measure the geometric distortion in images obtained with X-ray systems that provides a more objective method than the usual measurements over the image of a phantom with usual rulers. In a first step, this software has been applied to mammography images and makes use of the grid included into the CDMAM phantom (University Hospital Nijmegen). For digital images, this software tool automatically locates the grid crossing points and obtains a set of corners (up to 237) that are used by the program to determine 6 different squares, at top, bottom, left, right and central positions. The sixth square is the largest that can be fitted in the grid (widest possible square). The distortion is calculated as ((length of left diagonal - length of right diagonal)/ length of left diagonal) (%) for the six positions. The algorithm error is of the order of 0.3%. The method might be applied to other radiological systems without any major changes to adjust the program code to other phantoms. In this work a set of measurements for 54 CDMAM images, acquired in 11 different mammography systems from 6 manufacturers are presented. We can conclude that the distortion of all equipments is smaller than the recommendations for maximum distortions in primary displays (2%)

  14. Bioinformatics Methods and Tools to Advance Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Lecroq, T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives To summarize excellent current research in the field of Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics with application in the health domain and clinical care. Method We provide a synopsis of the articles selected for the IMIA Yearbook 2015, from which we attempt to derive a synthetic overview of current and future activities in the field. As last year, a first step of selection was performed by querying MEDLINE with a list of MeSH descriptors completed by a list of terms adapted to the section. Each section editor has evaluated separately the set of 1,594 articles and the evaluation results were merged for retaining 15 articles for peer-review. Results The selection and evaluation process of this Yearbook’s section on Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics yielded four excellent articles regarding data management and genome medicine that are mainly tool-based papers. In the first article, the authors present PPISURV a tool for uncovering the role of specific genes in cancer survival outcome. The second article describes the classifier PredictSNP which combines six performing tools for predicting disease-related mutations. In the third article, by presenting a high-coverage map of the human proteome using high resolution mass spectrometry, the authors highlight the need for using mass spectrometry to complement genome annotation. The fourth article is also related to patient survival and decision support. The authors present datamining methods of large-scale datasets of past transplants. The objective is to identify chances of survival. Conclusions The current research activities still attest the continuous convergence of Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics, with a focus this year on dedicated tools and methods to advance clinical care. Indeed, there is a need for powerful tools for managing and interpreting complex, large-scale genomic and biological datasets, but also a need for user-friendly tools developed for the clinicians in their

  15. Clinical holistic health: advanced tools for holistic medicine.

    PubMed

    Ventegodt, Søren; Clausen, Birgitte; Nielsen, May Lyck; Merrick, Joav

    2006-02-24

    According to holistic medical theory, the patient will heal when old painful moments, the traumatic events of life that are often called "gestalts", are integrated in the present "now". The advanced holistic physician's expanded toolbox has many different tools to induce this healing, some that are more dangerous and potentially traumatic than others. The more intense the therapeutic technique, the more emotional energy will be released and contained in the session, but the higher also is the risk for the therapist to lose control of the session and lose the patient to his or her own dark side. To avoid harming the patient must be the highest priority in holistic existential therapy, making sufficient education and training an issue of highest importance. The concept of "stepping up" the therapy by using more and more "dramatic" methods to get access to repressed emotions and events has led us to a "therapeutic staircase" with ten steps: (1) establishing the relationship; (2) establishing intimacy, trust, and confidentiality; (3) giving support and holding; (4) taking the patient into the process of physical, emotional, and mental healing; (5) social healing of being in the family; (6) spiritual healing--returning to the abstract wholeness of the soul; (7) healing the informational layer of the body; (8) healing the three fundamental dimensions of existence: love, power, and sexuality in a direct way using, among other techniques, "controlled violence" and "acupressure through the vagina"; (9) mind-expanding and consciousness-transformative techniques like psychotropic drugs; and (10) techniques transgressing the patient's borders and, therefore, often traumatizing (for instance, the use of force against the will of the patient). We believe that the systematic use of the staircase will greatly improve the power and efficiency of holistic medicine for the patient and we invite a broad cooperation in scientifically testing the efficiency of the advanced holistic

  16. Advanced Tools and Techniques for Formal Techniques in Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, John C.

    2005-01-01

    This is the final technical report for grant number NAG-1-02101. The title of this grant was "Advanced Tools and Techniques for Formal Techniques In Aerospace Systems". The principal investigator on this grant was Dr. John C. Knight of the Computer Science Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904-4740. This report summarizes activities under the grant during the period 7/01/2002 to 9/30/2004. This report is organized as follows. In section 2, the technical background of the grant is summarized. Section 3 lists accomplishments and section 4 lists students funded under the grant. In section 5, we present a list of presentations given at various academic and research institutions about the research conducted. Finally, a list of publications generated under this grant is included in section 6.

  17. Teaching Advanced Data Analysis Tools to High School Astronomy Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, David V.; Herring, Julie; Hintz, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    A major barrier to becoming an astronomer is learning how to analyze astronomical data, such as using photometry to compare the brightness of stars. Most fledgling astronomers learn observation, data reduction, and analysis skills through an upper division college class. If the same skills could be taught in an introductory high school astronomy class, then more students would have an opportunity to do authentic science earlier, with implications for how many choose to become astronomers. Several software tools have been developed that can analyze astronomical data ranging from fairly straightforward (AstroImageJ and DS9) to very complex (IRAF and DAOphot). During the summer of 2014, a study was undertaken at Brigham Young University through a Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program to evaluate the effectiveness and ease-of-use of these four software packages. Standard tasks tested included creating a false-color IR image using WISE data in DS9, Adobe Photoshop, and The Gimp; a multi-aperture analyses of variable stars over time using AstroImageJ; creating Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of stars using photometry at multiple wavelengths in AstroImageJ and DS9; and color-magnitude and hydrogen alpha index diagrams for open star clusters using IRAF and DAOphot. Tutorials were then written and combined with screen captures to teach high school astronomy students at Walden School of Liberal Arts in Provo, UT how to perform these same tasks. They analyzed image data using the four software packages, imported it into Microsoft Excel, and created charts using images from BYU's 36-inch telescope at their West Mountain Observatory. The students' attempts to complete these tasks were observed, mentoring was provided, and the students then reported on their experience through a self-reflection essay and concept test. Results indicate that high school astronomy students can successfully complete professional-level astronomy data analyses when given detailed

  18. Web-based software tool for constraint-based design specification of synthetic biological systems.

    PubMed

    Oberortner, Ernst; Densmore, Douglas

    2015-06-19

    miniEugene provides computational support for solving combinatorial design problems, enabling users to specify and enumerate designs for novel biological systems based on sets of biological constraints. This technical note presents a brief tutorial for biologists and software engineers in the field of synthetic biology on how to use miniEugene. After reading this technical note, users should know which biological constraints are available in miniEugene, understand the syntax and semantics of these constraints, and be able to follow a step-by-step guide to specify the design of a classical synthetic biological system-the genetic toggle switch.1 We also provide links and references to more information on the miniEugene web application and the integration of the miniEugene software library into sophisticated Computer-Aided Design (CAD) tools for synthetic biology ( www.eugenecad.org ).

  19. Web-based software tool for constraint-based design specification of synthetic biological systems.

    PubMed

    Oberortner, Ernst; Densmore, Douglas

    2015-06-19

    miniEugene provides computational support for solving combinatorial design problems, enabling users to specify and enumerate designs for novel biological systems based on sets of biological constraints. This technical note presents a brief tutorial for biologists and software engineers in the field of synthetic biology on how to use miniEugene. After reading this technical note, users should know which biological constraints are available in miniEugene, understand the syntax and semantics of these constraints, and be able to follow a step-by-step guide to specify the design of a classical synthetic biological system-the genetic toggle switch.1 We also provide links and references to more information on the miniEugene web application and the integration of the miniEugene software library into sophisticated Computer-Aided Design (CAD) tools for synthetic biology ( www.eugenecad.org ). PMID:25426642

  20. Data Assimilation Tools for CO2 Reservoir Model Development – A Review of Key Data Types, Analyses, and Selected Software

    SciTech Connect

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Sullivan, E. C.; Murray, Christopher J.; Last, George V.; Black, Gary D.

    2009-09-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has embarked on an initiative to develop world-class capabilities for performing experimental and computational analyses associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. The ultimate goal of this initiative is to provide science-based solutions for helping to mitigate the adverse effects of greenhouse gas emissions. This Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative currently has two primary focus areas—advanced experimental methods and computational analysis. The experimental methods focus area involves the development of new experimental capabilities, supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL) housed at PNNL, for quantifying mineral reaction kinetics with CO2 under high temperature and pressure (supercritical) conditions. The computational analysis focus area involves numerical simulation of coupled, multi-scale processes associated with CO2 sequestration in geologic media, and the development of software to facilitate building and parameterizing conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reservoirs that represent geologic repositories for injected CO2. This report describes work in support of the computational analysis focus area. The computational analysis focus area currently consists of several collaborative research projects. These are all geared towards the development and application of conceptual and numerical models for geologic sequestration of CO2. The software being developed for this focus area is referred to as the Geologic Sequestration Software Suite or GS3. A wiki-based software framework is being developed to support GS3. This report summarizes work performed in FY09 on one of the LDRD projects in the computational analysis focus area. The title of this project is Data Assimilation Tools for CO2 Reservoir Model Development. Some key objectives of this project in FY09 were to assess the current state

  1. Analyst Tools and Quality Control Software for the ARM Data System

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Sean; Hughes, Gary

    2008-07-31

    Mission Research develops analyst tools and automated quality control software in order to assist the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data Quality Office with their data inspection tasks. We have developed web-based data analysis and visualization tools such as the interactive plotting program NCVweb, various diagnostic plot browsers, and a datastream processing status application. These tools allow even novice ARM researchers to be productive with ARM data with only minimal effort. We also contribute to the ARM Data Quality Office by analyzing ARM data streams, developing new quality control metrics, new diagnostic plots, and integrating this information into DQ HandS - the Data Quality Health and Status web-based explorer. We have developed several ways to detect outliers in ARM data streams and have written software to run in an automated fashion to flag these outliers. We have also embarked on a system to comprehensively generate long time-series plots, frequency distributions, and other relevant statistics for scientific and engineering data in most high-level, publicly available ARM data streams. Furthermore, frequency distributions categorized by month or by season are made available to help define valid data ranges specific to those time domains. These statistics can be used to set limits that when checked, will improve upon the reporting of suspicious data and the early detection of instrument malfunction. The statistics and proposed limits are stored in a database for easy reporting, refining, and for use by other processes. Web-based applications to view the results are also available.

  2. Global search tool for the Advanced Photon Source Integrated Relational Model of Installed Systems (IRMIS) database.

    SciTech Connect

    Quock, D. E. R.; Cianciarulo, M. B.; APS Engineering Support Division; Purdue Univ.

    2007-01-01

    The Integrated Relational Model of Installed Systems (IRMIS) is a relational database tool that has been implemented at the Advanced Photon Source to maintain an updated account of approximately 600 control system software applications, 400,000 process variables, and 30,000 control system hardware components. To effectively display this large amount of control system information to operators and engineers, IRMIS was initially built with nine Web-based viewers: Applications Organizing Index, IOC, PLC, Component Type, Installed Components, Network, Controls Spares, Process Variables, and Cables. However, since each viewer is designed to provide details from only one major category of the control system, the necessity for a one-stop global search tool for the entire database became apparent. The user requirements for extremely fast database search time and ease of navigation through search results led to the choice of Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX) technology in the implementation of the IRMIS global search tool. Unique features of the global search tool include a two-tier level of displayed search results, and a database data integrity validation and reporting mechanism.

  3. CUSTOMER RESPONSE TO BESTPRACTICES TRAINING AND SOFTWARE TOOLS PROVIDED BY DOE'S INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, Martin; Martin, Michaela A; Schmoyer, Richard L

    2008-03-01

    The BestPractices program area, which has evolved into the Save Energy Now (SEN) Initiative, is a component of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) that provides technical assistance and disseminates information on energy-efficient technologies and practices to U.S. industrial firms. The BestPractices approach to information dissemination includes conducting training sessions which address energy-intensive systems (compressed air, steam, process heat, pumps, motors, and fans) and distributing DOE software tools on those same topics. The current report documents a recent Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) study undertaken to determine the implementation rate, attribution rate, and reduction factor for industrial end-users who received BestPractices training and registered software in FY 2006. The implementation rate is the proportion of service recipients taking energy-saving actions as a result of the service received. The attribution rate applies to those individuals taking energy-saving actions as a result of the services received and represents the portion of the savings achieved through those actions that is due to the service. The reduction factor is the saving that is realized from program-induced measures as a proportion of the potential savings that could be achieved if all service recipients took action. In addition to examining those factors, the ORNL study collected information on selected characteristics of service recipients, the perceived value of the services provided, and the potential energy savings that can be achieved through implementation of measures identified from the training or software. Because the provision of training is distinctly different from the provision of software tools, the two efforts were examined independently and the findings for each are reported separately.

  4. DSC: software tool for simulation-based design of control strategies applied to wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Ruano, M V; Ribes, J; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a computer tool called DSC (Simulation based Controllers Design) that enables an easy design of control systems and strategies applied to wastewater treatment plants. Although the control systems are developed and evaluated by simulation, this tool aims to facilitate the direct implementation of the designed control system to the PC of the full-scale WWTP (wastewater treatment plants). The designed control system can be programmed in a dedicated control application and can be connected to either the simulation software or the SCADA of the plant. To this end, the developed DSC incorporates an OPC server (OLE for process control) which facilitates an open-standard communication protocol for different industrial process applications. The potential capabilities of the DSC tool are illustrated through the example of a full-scale application. An aeration control system applied to a nutrient removing WWTP was designed, tuned and evaluated with the DSC tool before its implementation in the full scale plant. The control parameters obtained by simulation were suitable for the full scale plant with only few modifications to improve the control performance. With the DSC tool, the control systems performance can be easily evaluated by simulation. Once developed and tuned by simulation, the control systems can be directly applied to the full-scale WWTP. PMID:21330730

  5. DSC: software tool for simulation-based design of control strategies applied to wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Ruano, M V; Ribes, J; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a computer tool called DSC (Simulation based Controllers Design) that enables an easy design of control systems and strategies applied to wastewater treatment plants. Although the control systems are developed and evaluated by simulation, this tool aims to facilitate the direct implementation of the designed control system to the PC of the full-scale WWTP (wastewater treatment plants). The designed control system can be programmed in a dedicated control application and can be connected to either the simulation software or the SCADA of the plant. To this end, the developed DSC incorporates an OPC server (OLE for process control) which facilitates an open-standard communication protocol for different industrial process applications. The potential capabilities of the DSC tool are illustrated through the example of a full-scale application. An aeration control system applied to a nutrient removing WWTP was designed, tuned and evaluated with the DSC tool before its implementation in the full scale plant. The control parameters obtained by simulation were suitable for the full scale plant with only few modifications to improve the control performance. With the DSC tool, the control systems performance can be easily evaluated by simulation. Once developed and tuned by simulation, the control systems can be directly applied to the full-scale WWTP.

  6. adwTools Developed: New Bulk Alloy and Surface Analysis Software for the Alloy Design Workbench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Morse, Jeffrey A.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2004-01-01

    A suite of atomistic modeling software, called the Alloy Design Workbench, has been developed by the Computational Materials Group at the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI). The main goal of this software is to guide and augment experimental materials research and development efforts by creating powerful, yet intuitive, software that combines a graphical user interface with an operating code suitable for real-time atomistic simulations of multicomponent alloy systems. Targeted for experimentalists, the interface is straightforward and requires minimum knowledge of the underlying theory, allowing researchers to focus on the scientific aspects of the work. The centerpiece of the Alloy Design Workbench suite is the adwTools module, which concentrates on the atomistic analysis of surfaces and bulk alloys containing an arbitrary number of elements. An additional module, adwParams, handles ab initio input for the parameterization used in adwTools. Future modules planned for the suite include adwSeg, which will provide numerical predictions for segregation profiles to alloy surfaces and interfaces, and adwReport, which will serve as a window into the database, providing public access to the parameterization data and a repository where users can submit their own findings from the rest of the suite. The entire suite is designed to run on desktop-scale computers. The adwTools module incorporates a custom OAI/Glenn-developed Fortran code based on the BFS (Bozzolo- Ferrante-Smith) method for alloys, ref. 1). The heart of the suite, this code is used to calculate the energetics of different compositions and configurations of atoms.

  7. Tools for the advancement of undergraduate statistics education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffner, Andrew Alan

    To keep pace with advances in applied statistics and to maintain literate consumers of quantitative analyses, statistics educators stress the need for change in the classroom (Cobb, 1992; Garfield, 1993, 1995; Moore, 1991a; Snee, 1993; Steinhorst and Keeler, 1995). These authors stress a more concept oriented undergraduate introductory statistics course which emphasizes true understanding over mechanical skills. Drawing on recent educational research, this dissertation attempts to realize this vision by developing tools and pedagogy to assist statistics instructors. This dissertation describes statistical facets, pieces of statistical understanding that are building blocks of knowledge, and discusses DIANA, a World-Wide Web tool for diagnosing facets. Further, I show how facets may be incorporated into course design through the development of benchmark lessons based on the principles of collaborative learning (diSessa and Minstrell, 1995; Cohen, 1994; Reynolds et al., 1995; Bruer, 1993; von Glasersfeld, 1991) and activity based courses (Jones, 1991; Yackel, Cobb and Wood, 1991). To support benchmark lessons and collaborative learning in large classes I describe Virtual Benchmark Instruction, benchmark lessons which take place on a structured hypertext bulletin board using the technology of the World-Wide Web. Finally, I present randomized experiments which suggest that these educational developments are effective in a university introductory statistics course.

  8. Advanced REACH Tool: a Bayesian model for occupational exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    McNally, Kevin; Warren, Nicholas; Fransman, Wouter; Entink, Rinke Klein; Schinkel, Jody; van Tongeren, Martie; Cherrie, John W; Kromhout, Hans; Schneider, Thomas; Tielemans, Erik

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes a Bayesian model for the assessment of inhalation exposures in an occupational setting; the methodology underpins a freely available web-based application for exposure assessment, the Advanced REACH Tool (ART). The ART is a higher tier exposure tool that combines disparate sources of information within a Bayesian statistical framework. The information is obtained from expert knowledge expressed in a calibrated mechanistic model of exposure assessment, data on inter- and intra-individual variability in exposures from the literature, and context-specific exposure measurements. The ART provides central estimates and credible intervals for different percentiles of the exposure distribution, for full-shift and long-term average exposures. The ART can produce exposure estimates in the absence of measurements, but the precision of the estimates improves as more data become available. The methodology presented in this paper is able to utilize partially analogous data, a novel approach designed to make efficient use of a sparsely populated measurement database although some additional research is still required before practical implementation. The methodology is demonstrated using two worked examples: an exposure to copper pyrithione in the spraying of antifouling paints and an exposure to ethyl acetate in shoe repair. PMID:24665110

  9. A software tool for STED-AFM correlative super-resolution microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koho, Sami; Deguchi, Takahiro; Löhmus, Madis; Näreoja, Tuomas; Hänninen, Pekka E.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-modal correlative microscopy allows combining the strengths of several imaging techniques to provide unique contrast. However it is not always straightforward to setup instruments for such customized experiments, as most microscope manufacturers use their own proprietary software, with limited or no capability to interface with other instruments - this makes correlation of the multi-modal data extremely challenging. We introduce a new software tool for simultaneous use of a STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscope with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). In our experiments, a Leica TCS STED commercial super-resolution microscope, together with an Agilent 5500ilm AFM microscope was used. With our software, it is possible to synchronize the data acquisition between the STED and AFM instruments, as well as to perform automatic registration of the AFM images with the super-resolution STED images. The software was realized in LabVIEW; the registration part was also implemented as an ImageJ script. The synchronization was realized by controlling simple trigger signals, also available in the commercial STED microscope, with a low-cost National Instruments USB-6501 digital I/O card. The registration was based on detecting the positions of the AFM tip inside the STED fieldof-view, which were then used as registration landmarks. The registration should work on any STED and tip-scanning AFM microscope combination, at nanometer-scale precision. Our STED-AFM correlation method has been tested with a variety of nanoparticle and fixed cell samples. The software will be released under BSD open-source license.

  10. JCoast – A biologist-centric software tool for data mining and comparison of prokaryotic (meta)genomes

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Michael; Lombardot, Thierry; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Kottmann, Renzo; Duhaime, Melissa Beth; Peplies, Jörg; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Background Current sequencing technologies give access to sequence information for genomes and metagenomes at a tremendous speed. Subsequent data processing is mainly performed by automatic pipelines provided by the sequencing centers. Although, standardised workflows are desirable and useful in many respects, rational data mining, comparative genomics, and especially the interpretation of the sequence information in the biological context, demands for intuitive, flexible, and extendable solutions. Results The JCoast software tool was primarily designed to analyse and compare (meta)genome sequences of prokaryotes. Based on a pre-computed GenDB database project, JCoast offers a flexible graphical user interface (GUI), as well as an application programming interface (API) that facilitates back-end data access. JCoast offers individual, cross genome-, and metagenome analysis, and assists the biologist in exploration of large and complex datasets. Conclusion JCoast combines all functions required for the mining, annotation, and interpretation of (meta)genomic data. The lightweight software solution allows the user to easily take advantage of advanced back-end database structures by providing a programming and graphical user interface to answer biological questions. JCoast is available at the project homepage. PMID:18380896

  11. System Software and Tools for High Performance Computing Environments: A report on the findings of the Pasadena Workshop, April 14--16, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, T.; Messina, P.; Chen, M.

    1993-04-01

    The Pasadena Workshop on System Software and Tools for High Performance Computing Environments was held at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory from April 14 through April 16, 1992. The workshop was sponsored by a number of Federal agencies committed to the advancement of high performance computing (HPC) both as a means to advance their respective missions and as a national resource to enhance American productivity and competitiveness. Over a hundred experts in related fields from industry, academia, and government were invited to participate in this effort to assess the current status of software technology in support of HPC systems. The overall objectives of the workshop were to understand the requirements and current limitations of HPC software technology and to contribute to a basis for establishing new directions in research and development for software technology in HPC environments. This report includes reports written by the participants of the workshop`s seven working groups. Materials presented at the workshop are reproduced in appendices. Additional chapters summarize the findings and analyze their implications for future directions in HPC software technology development.

  12. NEuronMOrphological analysis tool: open-source software for quantitative morphometrics

    PubMed Central

    Billeci, Lucia; Magliaro, Chiara; Pioggia, Giovanni; Ahluwalia, Arti

    2013-01-01

    Morphometric analysis of neurons and brain tissue is relevant to the study of neuron circuitry development during the first phases of brain growth or for probing the link between microstructural morphology and degenerative diseases. As neural imaging techniques become ever more sophisticated, so does the amount and complexity of data generated. The NEuronMOrphological analysis tool NEMO was purposely developed to handle and process large numbers of optical microscopy image files of neurons in culture or slices in order to automatically run batch routines, store data and apply multivariate classification and feature extraction using 3-way principal component analysis (PCA). Here we describe the software's main features, underlining the differences between NEMO and other commercial and non-commercial image processing tools, and show an example of how NEMO can be used to classify neurons from wild-type mice and from animal models of autism. PMID:23420185

  13. Virtual Power Electronics: Novel Software Tools for Design, Modeling and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamar, Janos; Nagy, István; Funato, Hirohito; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Dranga, Octavian; Nishida, Yasuyuki

    The current paper is dedicated to present browser-based multimedia-rich software tools and e-learning curriculum to support the design and modeling process of power electronics circuits and to explain sometimes rather sophisticated phenomena. Two projects will be discussed. The so-called Inetele project is financed by the Leonardo da Vinci program of the European Union (EU). It is a collaborative project between numerous EU universities and institutes to develop state-of-the art curriculum in Electrical Engineering. Another cooperative project with participation of Japanese, European and Australian institutes focuses especially on developing e-learning curriculum, interactive design and modeling tools, furthermore on development of a virtual laboratory. Snapshots from these two projects will be presented.

  14. Cost benefits of advanced software: A review of methodology used at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joglekar, Prafulla N.

    1993-01-01

    To assist rational investments in advanced software, a formal, explicit, and multi-perspective cost-benefit analysis methodology is proposed. The methodology can be implemented through a six-stage process which is described and explained. The current practice of cost-benefit analysis at KSC is reviewed in the light of this methodology. The review finds that there is a vicious circle operating. Unsound methods lead to unreliable cost-benefit estimates. Unreliable estimates convince management that cost-benefit studies should not be taken seriously. Then, given external demands for cost-benefit estimates, management encourages software enginees to somehow come up with the numbers for their projects. Lacking the expertise needed to do a proper study, courageous software engineers with vested interests use ad hoc and unsound methods to generate some estimates. In turn, these estimates are unreliable, and the cycle continues. The proposed methodology should help KSC to break out of this cycle.

  15. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) Flight Management/Flight Controls (FM/FC) software description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, David A.; Dickson, Richard W.; Clinedinst, Winston C.; Slominski, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    The flight software developed for the Flight Management/Flight Controls (FM/FC) MicroVAX computer used on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle for Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) research is described. The FM/FC software computes navigation position estimates, guidance commands, and those commands issued to the control surfaces to direct the aircraft in flight. Various modes of flight are provided for, ranging from computer assisted manual modes to fully automatic modes including automatic landing. A high-level system overview as well as a description of each software module comprising the system is provided. Digital systems diagrams are included for each major flight control component and selected flight management functions.

  16. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) Consolidated Progress Report July 2006 - March 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Bernholdt, D E; McInnes, L C; Govindaraju, M; Bramley, R; Epperly, T; Kohl, J A; Nieplocha, J; Armstrong, R; Shasharina, S; Sussman, A L; Sottile, M; Damevski, K

    2009-04-14

    A resounding success of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedented computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) tackles these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative high-performance scientific computing.

  17. Center for Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kostadin, Damevski

    2015-01-25

    A resounding success of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedented computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)1 tackles these these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative high-performance scientific computing.

  18. TNA4OptFlux – a software tool for the analysis of strain optimization strategies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rational approaches for Metabolic Engineering (ME) deal with the identification of modifications that improve the microbes’ production capabilities of target compounds. One of the major challenges created by strain optimization algorithms used in these ME problems is the interpretation of the changes that lead to a given overproduction. Often, a single gene knockout induces changes in the fluxes of several reactions, as compared with the wild-type, and it is therefore difficult to evaluate the physiological differences of the in silico mutant. This is aggravated by the fact that genome-scale models per se are difficult to visualize, given the high number of reactions and metabolites involved. Findings We introduce a software tool, the Topological Network Analysis for OptFlux (TNA4OptFlux), a plug-in which adds to the open-source ME platform OptFlux the capability of creating and performing topological analysis over metabolic networks. One of the tool’s major advantages is the possibility of using these tools in the analysis and comparison of simulated phenotypes, namely those coming from the results of strain optimization algorithms. We illustrate the capabilities of the tool by using it to aid the interpretation of two E. coli strains designed in OptFlux for the overproduction of succinate and glycine. Conclusions Besides adding new functionalities to the OptFlux software tool regarding topological analysis, TNA4OptFlux methods greatly facilitate the interpretation of non-intuitive ME strategies by automating the comparison between perturbed and non-perturbed metabolic networks. The plug-in is available on the web site http://www.optflux.org, together with extensive documentation. PMID:23641878

  19. A software tool for material data analysis and property prediction: CASAC-ANA

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J.; Xie, Q.; Feng, J.; Li, S.; Xu, Z.; Chen, L.; Gui, Z.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, a user-friendly software, CASAC-ANA, for material data analysis and property prediction is presented. In CASAC-ANA, there are seven methods: Nonlinear Mapping (NLM), Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Stepwise Discriminant Analysis (SDA), Discriminant Analysis with Constellation Graph (DACG), Hierarchical Clustering Analysis (HCA), Stepwise Multiple Linear Regression (SMLR), and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). The software has some noteworthy features: (1) only one input file is needed and multipath output is produced; (2) both quantitative and qualitative data of dependent variables are accepted; and (3) it is easy to link with materials property databases. As a generalized modeling tool, CASAC-ANA can be used to treat material data concerning composition, technological processes, properties, and to predict properties of materials. The validity of the CASAC-ANA software has been tested successfully with three typical case studies concerning structural alloy steels, nickel-base superalloys, and continuously cast copper alloys. These CASAC-ANA methods have been compared and discussed.

  20. Software tools for quantification of X-ray microtomography at the UGCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlassenbroeck, J.; Dierick, M.; Masschaele, B.; Cnudde, V.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Jacobs, P.

    2007-09-01

    The technique of X-ray microtomography using X-ray tube radiation offers an interesting tool for the non-destructive investigation of a wide range of materials. A major challenge lies in the analysis and quantification of the resulting data, allowing for a full characterization of the sample under investigation. In this paper, we discuss the software tools for reconstruction and analysis of tomographic data that are being developed at the UGCT. The tomographic reconstruction is performed using Octopus, a high-performance and user-friendly software package. The reconstruction process transforms the raw acquisition data into a stack of 2D cross-sections through the sample, resulting in a 3D data set. A number of artifact and noise reduction algorithms are integrated to reduce ring artifacts, beam hardening artifacts, COR misalignment, detector or stage tilt, pixel non-linearities, etc. These corrections are very important to facilitate the analysis of the 3D data. The analysis of the 3D data focuses primarily on the characterization of pore structures, but will be extended to other applications. A first package for the analysis of pore structures in three dimensions was developed under Matlab ®. A new package, called Morpho+, is being developed in a C++ environment, with optimizations and extensions of the previously used algorithms. The current status of this project will be discussed. Examples of pore analysis can be found in pharmaceuticals, material science, geology and numerous other fields.

  1. DSSR: an integrated software tool for dissecting the spatial structure of RNA

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiang-Jun; Bussemaker, Harmen J.; Olson, Wilma K.

    2015-01-01

    Insight into the three-dimensional architecture of RNA is essential for understanding its cellular functions. However, even the classic transfer RNA structure contains features that are overlooked by existing bioinformatics tools. Here we present DSSR (Dissecting the Spatial Structure of RNA), an integrated and automated tool for analyzing and annotating RNA tertiary structures. The software identifies canonical and noncanonical base pairs, including those with modified nucleotides, in any tautomeric or protonation state. DSSR detects higher-order coplanar base associations, termed multiplets. It finds arrays of stacked pairs, classifies them by base-pair identity and backbone connectivity, and distinguishes a stem of covalently connected canonical pairs from a helix of stacked pairs of arbitrary type/linkage. DSSR identifies coaxial stacking of multiple stems within a single helix and lists isolated canonical pairs that lie outside of a stem. The program characterizes ‘closed’ loops of various types (hairpin, bulge, internal, and junction loops) and pseudoknots of arbitrary complexity. Notably, DSSR employs isolated pairs and the ends of stems, whether pseudoknotted or not, to define junction loops. This new, inclusive definition provides a novel perspective on the spatial organization of RNA. Tests on all nucleic acid structures in the Protein Data Bank confirm the efficiency and robustness of the software, and applications to representative RNA molecules illustrate its unique features. DSSR and related materials are freely available at http://x3dna.org/. PMID:26184874

  2. APT - NASA ENHANCED VERSION OF AUTOMATICALLY PROGRAMMED TOOL SOFTWARE - STAND-ALONE VERSION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premo, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    The APT code is one of the most widely used software tools for complex numerically controlled (N/C) machining. APT is an acronym for Automatically Programmed Tools and is used to denote both a language and the computer software that processes that language. Development of the APT language and software system was begun over twenty years ago as a U. S. government sponsored industry and university research effort. APT is a "problem oriented" language that was developed for the explicit purpose of aiding the N/C machine tools. Machine-tool instructions and geometry definitions are written in the APT language to constitute a "part program." The APT part program is processed by the APT software to produce a cutter location (CL) file. This CL file may then be processed by user supplied post processors to convert the CL data into a form suitable for a particular N/C machine tool. This June, 1989 offering of the APT system represents an adaptation, with enhancements, of the public domain version of APT IV/SSX8 to the DEC VAX-11/780 for use by the Engineering Services Division of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Enhancements include the super pocket feature which allows concave and convex polygon shapes of up to 40 points including shapes that overlap, that leave islands of material within the pocket, and that have one or more arcs as part of the pocket boundary. Recent modifications to APT include a rework of the POCKET subroutine and correction of an error that prevented the use within a macro of a macro variable cutter move statement combined with macro variable double check surfaces. Former modifications included the expansion of array and buffer sizes to accommodate larger part programs, and the insertion of a few user friendly error messages. The APT system software on the DEC VAX-11/780 is organized into two separate programs: the load complex and the APT processor. The load complex handles the table initiation phase and is usually only run when changes to the

  3. Querator: an advanced multi-archive data mining tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierfederici, Francesco

    2001-11-01

    In recent years, the operation of large telescopes with wide field detectors - such as the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Wide Field Imager (WFI) on the 2.2 meters telescope at La Silla, Chile - have dramatically increased the amount of astronomical data produced each year. The next survey telescopes, such as the ESO VST, will continue on this trend, producing extremely large datasets. Astronomy, therefore, has become an incredibly data rich field requiring new tools and new strategies to efficiently handle huge archives and fully exploit their scientific content. At the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility we are working on a new project, code named Querator (http://archive.eso.org/querator/). Querator is an advanced multi-archive search engine built to address the needs of astronomers looking for multicolor imaging data across different astronomical data-centers. Querator returns sets of images of a given astronomical object or search region. A set contains exposures in a number of different wave bands. The user constraints the number of desired wave bands by selecting from a set of instruments, filters or by specifying actual physical units. As far as present-day data-centers are concerned, Querator points out the need for: - an uniform and standard description of archival data and - an uniform and standard description of how the data was acquired (i.e. instrument and observation characteristics). Clearly, these pieces of information will constitute an intermediate layer between the data itself and the data mining tools operating on it. This layered structure is a prerequisite to real data-center inter-operability and, hence, to Virtual Observatories. A detailed description of Querator's design, of the required data structures, of the problems encountered so far and of the proposed solutions will be given in the following pages. Throughout this paper we'll favor the term data-center over archive to stress the need to look at raw-pixels' archives

  4. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1 : ASC software quality engineering practices version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Minana, Molly A.; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in DOE/AL Quality Criteria (QC-1) as conformance to customer requirements and expectations. This quality plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirements (CPR 1.3.2 and CPR 1.3.6) and the Department of Energy (DOE) document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines (GP&G). This quality plan identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities for cost-effective software engineering quality practices. The SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitment to improving software products by applying cost-effective software engineering quality practices. This document explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices; enumerates the practices that compose the development of SNL ASC's software products; and includes a sample assessment checklist that was developed based upon the practices in this document.

  5. DSA hole defectivity analysis using advanced optical inspection tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harukawa, Ryota; Aoki, Masami; Cross, Andrew; Nagaswami, Venkat; Tomita, Tadatoshi; Nagahara, Seiji; Muramatsu, Makoto; Kawakami, Shinichiro; Kosugi, Hitoshi; Rathsack, Benjamen; Kitano, Takahiro; Sweis, Jason; Mokhberi, Ali

    2013-04-01

    This paper discusses the defect density detection and analysis methodology using advanced optical wafer inspection capability to enable accelerated development of a DSA process/process tools and the required inspection capability to monitor such a process. The defectivity inspection methodologies are optimized for grapho epitaxy directed self-assembly (DSA) contact holes with 25 nm sizes. A defect test reticle with programmed defects on guide patterns is designed for improved optimization of defectivity monitoring. Using this reticle, resist guide holes with a variety of sizes and shapes are patterned using an ArF immersion scanner. The negative tone development (NTD) type thermally stable resist guide is used for DSA of a polystyrene-b-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) block copolymer (BCP). Using a variety of defects intentionally made by changing guide pattern sizes, the detection rates of each specific defectivity type has been analyzed. It is found in this work that to maximize sensitivity, a two pass scan with bright field (BF) and dark field (DF) modes provides the best overall defect type coverage and sensitivity. The performance of the two pass scan with BF and DF modes is also revealed by defect analysis for baseline defectivity on a wafer processed with nominal process conditions.

  6. Astonishing advances in mouse genetic tools for biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Lech; Jackson, Walker S

    2015-01-01

    The humble house mouse has long been a workhorse model system in biomedical research. The technology for introducing site-specific genome modifications led to Nobel Prizes for its pioneers and opened a new era of mouse genetics. However, this technology was very time-consuming and technically demanding. As a result, many investigators continued to employ easier genome manipulation methods, though resulting models can suffer from overlooked or underestimated consequences. Another breakthrough, invaluable for the molecular dissection of disease mechanisms, was the invention of high-throughput methods to measure the expression of a plethora of genes in parallel. However, the use of samples containing material from multiple cell types could obfuscate data, and thus interpretations. In this review we highlight some important issues in experimental approaches using mouse models for biomedical research. We then discuss recent technological advances in mouse genetics that are revolutionising human disease research. Mouse genomes are now easily manipulated at precise locations thanks to guided endonucleases, such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) or the CRISPR/Cas9 system, both also having the potential to turn the dream of human gene therapy into reality. Newly developed methods of cell type-specific isolation of transcriptomes from crude tissue homogenates, followed by detection with next generation sequencing (NGS), are vastly improving gene regulation studies. Taken together, these amazing tools simplify the creation of much more accurate mouse models of human disease, and enable the extraction of hitherto unobtainable data. PMID:26513700

  7. European regulatory tools for advanced therapy medicinal products.

    PubMed

    Flory, Egbert; Reinhardt, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Increasing scientific knowledge and technical innovations in the areas of cell biology, biotechnology and medicine resulted in the development of promising therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment of human diseases. Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) reflect a complex and innovative class of biopharmaceuticals as these products are highly research-driven, characterised by innovative manufacturing processes and heterogeneous with regard to their origin, type and complexity. This class of ATMP integrates gene therapy medicinal products, somatic cell therapy medicinal products and tissue engineering products and are often individualized and patient-specific products. Multiple challenges arise from the nature of ATMPs, which are often developed by micro, small and medium sized enterprises, university and academia, for whom regulatory experiences are limited and regulatory requirements are challenging. Regulatory guidance such as the reflection paper on classification of ATMPs and guidelines highlighting product-specific issues support academic research groups and pharmaceutical companies to foster the development of safe and effective ATMPs. This review provides an overview on the European regulatory aspects of ATMPs and highlights specific regulatory tools such as the ATMP classification procedure, a discussion on the hospital exemption for selected ATMPs as well as borderline issues towards transplants/transfusion products.

  8. Astonishing advances in mouse genetic tools for biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Lech; Jackson, Walker S

    2015-01-01

    The humble house mouse has long been a workhorse model system in biomedical research. The technology for introducing site-specific genome modifications led to Nobel Prizes for its pioneers and opened a new era of mouse genetics. However, this technology was very time-consuming and technically demanding. As a result, many investigators continued to employ easier genome manipulation methods, though resulting models can suffer from overlooked or underestimated consequences. Another breakthrough, invaluable for the molecular dissection of disease mechanisms, was the invention of high-throughput methods to measure the expression of a plethora of genes in parallel. However, the use of samples containing material from multiple cell types could obfuscate data, and thus interpretations. In this review we highlight some important issues in experimental approaches using mouse models for biomedical research. We then discuss recent technological advances in mouse genetics that are revolutionising human disease research. Mouse genomes are now easily manipulated at precise locations thanks to guided endonucleases, such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) or the CRISPR/Cas9 system, both also having the potential to turn the dream of human gene therapy into reality. Newly developed methods of cell type-specific isolation of transcriptomes from crude tissue homogenates, followed by detection with next generation sequencing (NGS), are vastly improving gene regulation studies. Taken together, these amazing tools simplify the creation of much more accurate mouse models of human disease, and enable the extraction of hitherto unobtainable data.

  9. Using Numerical Models in the Development of Software Tools for Risk Management of Accidents with Oil and Inert Spills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, R.; Leitão, P. C.; Braunschweig, F.; Lourenço, F.; Galvão, P.; Neves, R.

    2012-04-01

    substances, helping in the management of the crisis, in the distribution of response resources, or prioritizing specific areas. They can also be used for detection of pollution sources. However, the resources involved, and the scientific and technological levels needed in the manipulation of numerical models, had both limited the interoperability between operational models, monitoring tools and decision-support software tools. The increasing predictive capacity of metocean conditions and fate and behaviour of pollutants spilt at sea or costal zones, and the presence of monitoring tools like vessel traffic control systems, can both provide a safer support for decision-making in emergency or planning issues associated to pollution risk management, especially if used in an integrated way. Following this approach, and taking advantage of an integrated framework developed in ARCOPOL (www.arcopol.eu) and EASYCO (www.project-easy.info) projects, three innovative model-supported software tools were developed and applied in the Atlantic Area, and / or the Portuguese Coast. Two of these tools are used for spill model simulations - a web-based interface (EASYCO web bidirectional tool) and an advanced desktop application (MOHID Desktop Spill Simulator) - both of them allowing end user to have control over the model simulations. Parameters such as date and time of the event, location and oil spill volume are provided the users; these interactive tools also integrate best available metocean forecasts (waves, meteorological, hydrodynamics) from different institutions in the Atlantic Area. Metocean data are continuously gathered from remote THREDDS data servers (using OPENDAP) or ftp sites, and then automatically interpolated and pre-processed to be available for the simulators. These simulation tools developed can also import initial data and export results from/to remote servers, using OGC WFS services. Simulations are provided to end user in a matter of seconds, and thus, can be very

  10. System For Retrieving Reusable Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Warren, Lloyd; Beckman, Brian C.

    1993-01-01

    Encyclopedia of Software Components (ESC) is information-retrieval system of computer hardware and software providing access to generic reusable software tools and parts. Core of ESC is central tool base, which is repository of reusable software. It receives queries and submissions from user through local browser subsystem and receives authorized updates from maintenance subsystem. Sends retrievals to local browser subsystem and user's submissions to maintenance subsystem. Future versions will provide for advanced media, including voice and video, and will link system to database-management system. Programmers will not only retrieve software, but also modify, execute, and cross-link with other software.

  11. Proofreading Using an Assistive Software Homophone Tool: Compensatory and Remedial Effects on the Literacy Skills of Students with Reading Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Alissa A.; Mulhern, Gerry; Wylie, Judith

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of using an assistive software homophone tool on the assisted proofreading performance and unassisted basic skills of secondary-level students with reading difficulties. Students aged 13 to 15 years proofread passages for homophonic errors under three conditions: with the homophone tool, with homophones…

  12. Establishing a Web-based DICOM teaching file authoring tool using open-source public software.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Jeng; Yang, Chung-Yi; Liu, Kao-Lang; Liu, Hon-Man; Ching, Yu-Tai; Chen, Shyh-Jye

    2005-09-01

    Online teaching files are an important source of educational and referential materials in the radiology community. The commonly used Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) file format of the radiology community is not natively supported by common Web browsers. The ability of the Web server to convert and parse DICOM is important when the DICOM-converting tools are not available. In this paper, we describe our approach to develop a Web-based teaching file authoring tool. Our server is built using Apache Web server running on FreeBSD operating system. The dynamic page content is produced by Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP). Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine images are converted by ImageMagick into Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format. Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine attributes are parsed by dicom3tools and stored in PostgreSQL database. Using free software available from the Internet, we build a Web service that allows radiologists to create their own online teaching file cases with a common Web browser.

  13. Ranking of Business Process Simulation Software Tools with DEX/QQ Hierarchical Decision Model.

    PubMed

    Damij, Nadja; Boškoski, Pavle; Bohanec, Marko; Mileva Boshkoska, Biljana

    2016-01-01

    The omnipresent need for optimisation requires constant improvements of companies' business processes (BPs). Minimising the risk of inappropriate BP being implemented is usually performed by simulating the newly developed BP under various initial conditions and "what-if" scenarios. An effectual business process simulations software (BPSS) is a prerequisite for accurate analysis of an BP. Characterisation of an BPSS tool is a challenging task due to the complex selection criteria that includes quality of visual aspects, simulation capabilities, statistical facilities, quality reporting etc. Under such circumstances, making an optimal decision is challenging. Therefore, various decision support models are employed aiding the BPSS tool selection. The currently established decision support models are either proprietary or comprise only a limited subset of criteria, which affects their accuracy. Addressing this issue, this paper proposes a new hierarchical decision support model for ranking of BPSS based on their technical characteristics by employing DEX and qualitative to quantitative (QQ) methodology. Consequently, the decision expert feeds the required information in a systematic and user friendly manner. There are three significant contributions of the proposed approach. Firstly, the proposed hierarchical model is easily extendible for adding new criteria in the hierarchical structure. Secondly, a fully operational decision support system (DSS) tool that implements the proposed hierarchical model is presented. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed hierarchical model is assessed by comparing the resulting rankings of BPSS with respect to currently available results. PMID:26871694

  14. Ranking of Business Process Simulation Software Tools with DEX/QQ Hierarchical Decision Model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The omnipresent need for optimisation requires constant improvements of companies’ business processes (BPs). Minimising the risk of inappropriate BP being implemented is usually performed by simulating the newly developed BP under various initial conditions and “what-if” scenarios. An effectual business process simulations software (BPSS) is a prerequisite for accurate analysis of an BP. Characterisation of an BPSS tool is a challenging task due to the complex selection criteria that includes quality of visual aspects, simulation capabilities, statistical facilities, quality reporting etc. Under such circumstances, making an optimal decision is challenging. Therefore, various decision support models are employed aiding the BPSS tool selection. The currently established decision support models are either proprietary or comprise only a limited subset of criteria, which affects their accuracy. Addressing this issue, this paper proposes a new hierarchical decision support model for ranking of BPSS based on their technical characteristics by employing DEX and qualitative to quantitative (QQ) methodology. Consequently, the decision expert feeds the required information in a systematic and user friendly manner. There are three significant contributions of the proposed approach. Firstly, the proposed hierarchical model is easily extendible for adding new criteria in the hierarchical structure. Secondly, a fully operational decision support system (DSS) tool that implements the proposed hierarchical model is presented. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed hierarchical model is assessed by comparing the resulting rankings of BPSS with respect to currently available results. PMID:26871694

  15. Ranking of Business Process Simulation Software Tools with DEX/QQ Hierarchical Decision Model.

    PubMed

    Damij, Nadja; Boškoski, Pavle; Bohanec, Marko; Mileva Boshkoska, Biljana

    2016-01-01

    The omnipresent need for optimisation requires constant improvements of companies' business processes (BPs). Minimising the risk of inappropriate BP being implemented is usually performed by simulating the newly developed BP under various initial conditions and "what-if" scenarios. An effectual business process simulations software (BPSS) is a prerequisite for accurate analysis of an BP. Characterisation of an BPSS tool is a challenging task due to the complex selection criteria that includes quality of visual aspects, simulation capabilities, statistical facilities, quality reporting etc. Under such circumstances, making an optimal decision is challenging. Therefore, various decision support models are employed aiding the BPSS tool selection. The currently established decision support models are either proprietary or comprise only a limited subset of criteria, which affects their accuracy. Addressing this issue, this paper proposes a new hierarchical decision support model for ranking of BPSS based on their technical characteristics by employing DEX and qualitative to quantitative (QQ) methodology. Consequently, the decision expert feeds the required information in a systematic and user friendly manner. There are three significant contributions of the proposed approach. Firstly, the proposed hierarchical model is easily extendible for adding new criteria in the hierarchical structure. Secondly, a fully operational decision support system (DSS) tool that implements the proposed hierarchical model is presented. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed hierarchical model is assessed by comparing the resulting rankings of BPSS with respect to currently available results.

  16. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Tools, Algorithms, and Methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    David E. Shropshire

    2009-05-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Systems Analysis supports engineering economic analyses and trade-studies, and requires a requisite reference cost basis to support adequate analysis rigor. In this regard, the AFCI program has created a reference set of economic documentation. The documentation consists of the “Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC) Cost Basis” report (Shropshire, et al. 2007), “AFCI Economic Analysis” report, and the “AFCI Economic Tools, Algorithms, and Methodologies Report.” Together, these documents provide the reference cost basis, cost modeling basis, and methodologies needed to support AFCI economic analysis. The application of the reference cost data in the cost and econometric systems analysis models will be supported by this report. These methodologies include: the energy/environment/economic evaluation of nuclear technology penetration in the energy market—domestic and internationally—and impacts on AFCI facility deployment, uranium resource modeling to inform the front-end fuel cycle costs, facility first-of-a-kind to nth-of-a-kind learning with application to deployment of AFCI facilities, cost tradeoffs to meet nuclear non-proliferation requirements, and international nuclear facility supply/demand analysis. The economic analysis will be performed using two cost models. VISION.ECON will be used to evaluate and compare costs under dynamic conditions, consistent with the cases and analysis performed by the AFCI Systems Analysis team. Generation IV Excel Calculations of Nuclear Systems (G4-ECONS) will provide static (snapshot-in-time) cost analysis and will provide a check on the dynamic results. In future analysis, additional AFCI measures may be developed to show the value of AFCI in closing the fuel cycle. Comparisons can show AFCI in terms of reduced global proliferation (e.g., reduction in enrichment), greater sustainability through preservation of a natural resource (e.g., reduction in uranium ore depletion), value from

  17. Development of 3D multimedia with advanced computer animation tools for outreach activities related to Meteor Science and Meteoritics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madiedo, J. M.

    2012-09-01

    Documentaries related to Astronomy and Planetary Sciences are a common and very attractive way to promote the interest of the public in these areas. These educational tools can get benefit from new advanced computer animation software and 3D technologies, as these allow making these documentaries even more attractive. However, special care must be taken in order to guarantee that the information contained in them is serious and objective. In this sense, an additional value is given when the footage is produced by the own researchers. With this aim, a new documentary produced and directed by Prof. Madiedo has been developed. The documentary, which has been entirely developed by means of advanced computer animation tools, is dedicated to several aspects of Meteor Science and Meteoritics. The main features of this outreach and education initiative are exposed here.

  18. A Software Tool for Processing the Displacement Time Series Extracted from Raw Radar Data

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, Francesco; Paolo Ricci, Pier; Gentile, Carmelo

    2010-05-28

    The application of high-resolution radar waveform and interferometric principles recently led to the development of a microwave interferometer, suitable to simultaneously measuring the (static or dynamic) deflection of several points on a large structure. From the technical standpoint, the sensor is a Stepped Frequency Continuous Wave (SF-CW), coherent radar, operating in the K{sub u} frequency band.In the paper, the main procedures adopted to extract the deflection time series from raw radar data and to assess the quality of data are addressed, and the MATLAB toolbox developed is described. Subsequently, other functions implemented in the software tool (e.g. evaluation of the spectral matrix of the deflection time-histories, identification of natural frequencies and operational mode shapes evaluation) are described and the application to data recorded on full-scale bridges is exemplified.

  19. A browsing tool for the Internet Logical Library of the HPCC Software Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biro, Ross

    1993-01-01

    As the quantity of information available on the Internet grows, locating a particular piece of information becomes more difficult. One possible solution is for a database of pointers to all available information to be maintained at a central site. Subject classifications for all the information could also be maintained in order to make searching possible. This paper describes one possible method of searching such an index. In particular a prototype browsing tool has been created using TCL/TK to demonstrate several possible features: rapidly scanning at any rank of the index, narrowing the index to any scope, regular-expression searching, and creation of a list of pointers answering to any set of index terms. The prototype browser is an easy-to-use independent X application designed for use in the Catalog of Repositories of the HPCC (High Performance Computing and Communications) Software Exchange.

  20. BioBrick assembly standards and techniques and associated software tools.

    PubMed

    Røkke, Gunvor; Korvald, Eirin; Pahr, Jarle; Oyås, Ove; Lale, Rahmi

    2014-01-01

    The BioBrick idea was developed to introduce the engineering principles of abstraction and standardization into synthetic biology. BioBricks are DNA sequences that serve a defined biological function and can be readily assembled with any other BioBrick parts to create new BioBricks with novel properties. In order to achieve this, several assembly standards can be used. Which assembly standards a BioBrick is compatible with, depends on the prefix and suffix sequences surrounding the part. In this chapter, five of the most common assembly standards will be described, as well as some of the most used assembly techniques, cloning procedures, and a presentation of the available software tools that can be used for deciding on the best method for assembling of different BioBricks, and searching for BioBrick parts in the Registry of Standard Biological Parts database. PMID:24395353

  1. A software tool to evaluate crystal types and morphological developments of accessory zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, Robert

    2014-08-01

    Computer programs for an appropriate visualization of crystal types and morphological developments of accessory zircon are not available hitherto. Usually, typological computations are conducted by using simple calculation tools or spread-sheet programs. In practice, however, high numbers of data sets including information of numerous zircon populations have to be processed and stored. The paper describes the software ZIRCTYP, which is a macro-driven program within the Microsoft Access database management system. It allows the computation of zircon morphologies occurring in specific rock samples and their presentation in typology diagrams. In addition, morphological developments within a given zircon population are presented (1) statistically and (2) graphically as crystal sequences showing initial, intermediate, and final growth stages.

  2. A Software Tool for Processing the Displacement Time Series Extracted from Raw Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, Francesco; Gentile, Carmelo; Paolo Ricci, Pier

    2010-05-01

    The application of high-resolution radar waveform and interferometric principles recently led to the development of a microwave interferometer, suitable to simultaneously measuring the (static or dynamic) deflection of several points on a large structure. From the technical standpoint, the sensor is a Stepped Frequency Continuous Wave (SF-CW), coherent radar, operating in the Ku frequency band. In the paper, the main procedures adopted to extract the deflection time series from raw radar data and to assess the quality of data are addressed, and the MATLAB toolbox developed is described. Subsequently, other functions implemented in the software tool (e.g. evaluation of the spectral matrix of the deflection time-histories, identification of natural frequencies and operational mode shapes evaluation) are described and the application to data recorded on full-scale bridges is exemplified.

  3. Development and validation of evolutionary algorithm software as an optimization tool for biological and environmental applications.

    PubMed

    Sys, K; Boon, N; Verstraete, W

    2004-06-01

    A flexible, extendable tool for the optimization of (micro)biological processes and protocols using evolutionary algorithms was developed. It has been tested using three different theoretical optimization problems: 2 two-dimensional problems, one with three maxima and one with five maxima and a river autopurification optimization problem with boundary conditions. For each problem, different evolutionary parameter settings were used for the optimization. For each combination of evolutionary parameters, 15 generations were run 20 times. It has been shown that in all cases, the evolutionary algorithm gave rise to valuable results. Generally, the algorithms were able to detect the more stable sub-maximum even if there existed less stable maxima. The latter is, from a practical point of view, generally more desired. The most important factors influencing the convergence process were the parameter value randomization rate and distribution. The developed software, described in this work, is available for free.

  4. BioBrick assembly standards and techniques and associated software tools.

    PubMed

    Røkke, Gunvor; Korvald, Eirin; Pahr, Jarle; Oyås, Ove; Lale, Rahmi

    2014-01-01

    The BioBrick idea was developed to introduce the engineering principles of abstraction and standardization into synthetic biology. BioBricks are DNA sequences that serve a defined biological function and can be readily assembled with any other BioBrick parts to create new BioBricks with novel properties. In order to achieve this, several assembly standards can be used. Which assembly standards a BioBrick is compatible with, depends on the prefix and suffix sequences surrounding the part. In this chapter, five of the most common assembly standards will be described, as well as some of the most used assembly techniques, cloning procedures, and a presentation of the available software tools that can be used for deciding on the best method for assembling of different BioBricks, and searching for BioBrick parts in the Registry of Standard Biological Parts database.

  5. A protocol building software tool for medical device quality control tests.

    PubMed

    Theodorakos, Y; Gueorguieva, K; Bliznakov, J; Kolitsi, Z; Pallikarakis, N

    1999-01-01

    Q-Pro is an application for Quality Control and Inspection of Medical Devices. General system requirements include friendly and comprehensive graphical environment and proper, quick, easy and intuitive user interface. Functions such as, a tool library for protocol design widely used multimedia, as well as, a support of a local database for protocol and inventory data archiving are provided by the system. In order to serve the different categories of users, involved in Quality Control procedures, the system has been split into three modules of different functionality and complexity, each of which can work as a stand-alone application. The implementation of protocols and use of the software functions, as well as, the user interface itself have been proved by the evaluators to be clear and intuitive. The software seems to adapt easily to different kinds of Quality Control procedures and objectives. Q-Pro effectively supports and enhances the processes to attain a highly tuned, professional, responsive and effective quality control and preventive maintenance procedures for biomedical equipment management. PMID:10724996

  6. RadNotes: a novel software development tool for radiology education.

    PubMed

    Baxter, A B; Klein, J S; Oesterle, E V

    1997-01-01

    RadNotes is a novel software development tool that enables physicians to develop teaching materials incorporating text and images in an intelligent, highly usable format. Projects undertaken in the RadNotes environment require neither programming expertise nor the assistance of a software engineer. The first of these projects, Thoracic Imaging, integrates image teaching files, concise disease and topic summaries, references, and flash card quizzes into a single program designed to provide an overview of chest radiology. RadNotes is intended to support the academic goals of teaching radiologists by enabling authors to create, edit, and electronically distribute image-oriented presentations. RadNotes also supports the educational goals of physicians who wish to quickly review selected imaging topics, as well as to develop a visual vocabulary of corresponding radiologic anatomy and pathologic conditions. Although Thoracic Imaging was developed with the aim of introducing chest radiology to residents, RadNotes can be used to develop tutorials and image-based tests for all levels; create corresponding World Wide Web sites; and organize notes, images, and references for individual use.

  7. Open Source Software Openfoam as a New Aerodynamical Simulation Tool for Rocket-Borne Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszak, T.; Brede, M.; Strelnikov, B.

    2015-09-01

    The only way to do in-situ measurements, which are very important experimental studies for atmospheric science, in the mesoshere/lower thermosphere (MLT) is to use sounding rockets. The drawback of using rockets is the shock wave appearing because of the very high speed of the rocket motion (typically about 1000 mIs). This shock wave disturbs the density, the temperature and the velocity fields in the vicinity of the rocket, compared to undisturbed values of the atmosphere. This effect, however, can be quantified and the measured data has to be corrected not just to make it more precise but simply usable. The commonly accepted and widely used tool for this calculations is the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique developed by GA. Bird which is available as stand-alone program limited to use a single processor. Apart from complications with simulations of flows around bodies related to different flow regimes in the altitude range of MLT, that rise due to exponential density change by several orders of magnitude, a particular hardware configuration introduces significant difficulty for aerodynamical calculations due to choice of the grid sizes mainly depending on the demands on adequate DSMCs and good resolution of geometries with scale differences of factor of iO~. This makes either the calculation time unreasonably long or even prevents the calculation algorithm from converging. In this paper we apply the free open source software OpenFOAM (licensed under GNU GPL) for a three-dimensional CFD-Simulation of a flow around a sounding rocket instrumentation. An advantage of this software package, among other things, is that it can run on high performance clusters, which are easily scalable. We present the first results and discuss the potential of the new tool in applications for sounding rockets.

  8. Earth Observing System (EOS)/ Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A): Special Test Equipment. Software Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwantje, Robert

    1995-01-01

    This document defines the functional, performance, and interface requirements for the Earth Observing System/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (EOS/AMSU-A) Special Test Equipment (STE) software used in the test and integration of the instruments.

  9. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) color displays software description microprocessor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Plyler, Valerie E.; Dickson, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the software created for the Sperry Microprocessor Color Display System used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV). The software delivery known as the 'baseline display system', is the one described in this document. Throughout this publication, module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, detailed description, and global references. The global reference section includes procedures and common variables referenced by a particular module. The system described supports the Research Flight Deck (RFD) of the TSRV. The RFD contains eight cathode ray tubes (CRTs) which depict a Primary Flight Display, Navigation Display, System Warning Display, Takeoff Performance Monitoring System Display, and Engine Display.

  10. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) color displays software description: MicroVAX system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Plyler, Valerie E.; Dickson, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the software created for the Display MicroVAX computer used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV). The software delivery of February 27, 1991, known as the 'baseline display system', is the one described in this document. Throughout this publication, module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, detailed description, and global references. The global references section includes subroutines, functions, and common variables referenced by a particular module. The system described supports the Research Flight Deck (RFD) of the TSRV. The RFD contains eight Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) which depict a Primary Flight Display, Navigation Display, System Warning Display, Takeoff Performance Monitoring System Display, and Engine Display.

  11. The Perfect Neuroimaging-Genetics-Computation Storm: Collision of Petabytes of Data, Millions of Hardware Devices and Thousands of Software Tools

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Petrosyan, Petros; Liu, Zhizhong; Eggert, Paul; Zamanyan, Alen; Torri, Federica; Macciardi, Fabio; Hobel, Sam; Moon, Seok Woo; Sung, Young Hee; Jiang, Zhiguo; Labus, Jennifer; Kurth, Florian; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Mayer, Emeran; Vespa, Paul M.; Van Horn, John D.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2013-01-01

    The volume, diversity and velocity of biomedical data are exponentially increasing providing petabytes of new neuroimaging and genetics data every year. At the same time, tens-of-thousands of computational algorithms are developed and reported in the literature along with thousands of software tools and services. Users demand intuitive, quick and platform-agnostic access to data, software tools, and infrastructure from millions of hardware devices. This explosion of information, scientific techniques, computational models, and technological advances leads to enormous challenges in data analysis, evidence-based biomedical inference and reproducibility of findings. The Pipeline workflow environment provides a crowd-based distributed solution for consistent management of these heterogeneous resources. The Pipeline allows multiple (local) clients and (remote) servers to connect, exchange protocols, control the execution, monitor the states of different tools or hardware, and share complete protocols as portable XML workflows. In this paper, we demonstrate several advanced computational neuroimaging and genetics case-studies, and end-to-end pipeline solutions. These are implemented as graphical workflow protocols in the context of analyzing imaging (sMRI, fMRI, DTI), phenotypic (demographic, clinical), and genetic (SNP) data. PMID:23975276

  12. The perfect neuroimaging-genetics-computation storm: collision of petabytes of data, millions of hardware devices and thousands of software tools.

    PubMed

    Dinov, Ivo D; Petrosyan, Petros; Liu, Zhizhong; Eggert, Paul; Zamanyan, Alen; Torri, Federica; Macciardi, Fabio; Hobel, Sam; Moon, Seok Woo; Sung, Young Hee; Jiang, Zhiguo; Labus, Jennifer; Kurth, Florian; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Mayer, Emeran; Vespa, Paul M; Van Horn, John D; Toga, Arthur W

    2014-06-01

    The volume, diversity and velocity of biomedical data are exponentially increasing providing petabytes of new neuroimaging and genetics data every year. At the same time, tens-of-thousands of computational algorithms are developed and reported in the literature along with thousands of software tools and services. Users demand intuitive, quick and platform-agnostic access to data, software tools, and infrastructure from millions of hardware devices. This explosion of information, scientific techniques, computational models, and technological advances leads to enormous challenges in data analysis, evidence-based biomedical inference and reproducibility of findings. The Pipeline workflow environment provides a crowd-based distributed solution for consistent management of these heterogeneous resources. The Pipeline allows multiple (local) clients and (remote) servers to connect, exchange protocols, control the execution, monitor the states of different tools or hardware, and share complete protocols as portable XML workflows. In this paper, we demonstrate several advanced computational neuroimaging and genetics case-studies, and end-to-end pipeline solutions. These are implemented as graphical workflow protocols in the context of analyzing imaging (sMRI, fMRI, DTI), phenotypic (demographic, clinical), and genetic (SNP) data.

  13. Using Numerical Models in the Development of Software Tools for Risk Management of Accidents with Oil and Inert Spills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, R.; Leitão, P. C.; Braunschweig, F.; Lourenço, F.; Galvão, P.; Neves, R.

    2012-04-01

    substances, helping in the management of the crisis, in the distribution of response resources, or prioritizing specific areas. They can also be used for detection of pollution sources. However, the resources involved, and the scientific and technological levels needed in the manipulation of numerical models, had both limited the interoperability between operational models, monitoring tools and decision-support software tools. The increasing predictive capacity of metocean conditions and fate and behaviour of pollutants spilt at sea or costal zones, and the presence of monitoring tools like vessel traffic control systems, can both provide a safer support for decision-making in emergency or planning issues associated to pollution risk management, especially if used in an integrated way. Following this approach, and taking advantage of an integrated framework developed in ARCOPOL (www.arcopol.eu) and EASYCO (www.project-easy.info) projects, three innovative model-supported software tools were developed and applied in the Atlantic Area, and / or the Portuguese Coast. Two of these tools are used for spill model simulations - a web-based interface (EASYCO web bidirectional tool) and an advanced desktop application (MOHID Desktop Spill Simulator) - both of them allowing end user to have control over the model simulations. Parameters such as date and time of the event, location and oil spill volume are provided the users; these interactive tools also integrate best available metocean forecasts (waves, meteorological, hydrodynamics) from different institutions in the Atlantic Area. Metocean data are continuously gathered from remote THREDDS data servers (using OPENDAP) or ftp sites, and then automatically interpolated and pre-processed to be available for the simulators. These simulation tools developed can also import initial data and export results from/to remote servers, using OGC WFS services. Simulations are provided to end user in a matter of seconds, and thus, can be very

  14. Techniques and software tools for estimating ultrasonic signal-to-noise ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Chien-Ping; Margetan, Frank J.; McKillip, Matthew; Engle, Brady J.; Roberts, Ronald A.

    2016-02-01

    At Iowa State University's Center for Nondestructive Evaluation (ISU CNDE), the use of models to simulate ultrasonic inspections has played a key role in R&D efforts for over 30 years. To this end a series of wave propagation models, flaw response models, and microstructural backscatter models have been developed to address inspection problems of interest. One use of the combined models is the estimation of signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) in circumstances where backscatter from the microstructure (grain noise) acts to mask sonic echoes from internal defects. Such S/N models have been used in the past to address questions of inspection optimization and reliability. Under the sponsorship of the National Science Foundation's Industry/University Cooperative Research Center at ISU, an effort was recently initiated to improve existing research-grade software by adding graphical user interface (GUI) to become user friendly tools for the rapid estimation of S/N for ultrasonic inspections of metals. The software combines: (1) a Python-based GUI for specifying an inspection scenario and displaying results; and (2) a Fortran-based engine for computing defect signal and backscattered grain noise characteristics. The latter makes use of several models including: the Multi-Gaussian Beam Model for computing sonic fields radiated by commercial transducers; the Thompson-Gray Model for the response from an internal defect; the Independent Scatterer Model for backscattered grain noise; and the Stanke-Kino Unified Model for attenuation. The initial emphasis was on reformulating the research-grade code into a suitable modular form, adding the graphical user interface and performing computations rapidly and robustly. Thus the initial inspection problem being addressed is relatively simple. A normal-incidence pulse/echo immersion inspection is simulated for a curved metal component having a non-uniform microstructure, specifically an equiaxed, untextured microstructure in which the average

  15. Comparing Simple and Advanced Video Tools as Supports for Complex Collaborative Design Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahn, Carmen; Pea, Roy; Hesse, Friedrich W.; Rosen, Joe

    2010-01-01

    Working with digital video technologies, particularly advanced video tools with editing capabilities, offers new prospects for meaningful learning through design. However, it is also possible that the additional complexity of such tools does "not" advance learning. We compared in an experiment the design processes and learning outcomes of 24…

  16. ACTS (Advanced Communications Technology Satellite) Propagation Experiment: Preprocessing Software User's Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Robert K.; Wang, Xuhe; Westenhaver, David

    1996-01-01

    The preprocessing software manual describes the Actspp program originally developed to observe and diagnose Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) propagation terminal/receiver problems. However, it has been quite useful for automating the preprocessing functions needed to convert the terminal output to useful attenuation estimates. Prior to having data acceptable for archival functions, the individual receiver system must be calibrated and the power level shifts caused by ranging tone modulation must be received. Actspp provides three output files: the daylog, the diurnal coefficient file, and the file that contains calibration information.

  17. MATISSE: Multi-purpose Advanced Tool for Instruments for the Solar System Exploration .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinzi, A.; Capria, M. T.; Antonelli, L. A.

    In planetary sciences, design, assemble and launch onboard instruments are only preliminary steps toward the final aim of converting data into scientific knowledge, as the real challenge is the data analysis and interpretation. Up to now data have been generally stored in "old style" archives, i.e. common ftp servers where the user can manually search for data browsing directories organized in a time order manner. However, as datasets to be stored and searched become particularly large, this latter task absorbs a great part of the time, subtracting time to the real scientific work. In order to reduce the time spent to search and analyze data MATISSE (Multi-purpose Advanced Tool for Instruments for the Solar System Exploration), a new set of software tools developed together with the scientific teams of the instruments involved, is under development at ASDC (ASI Science Data Center), whose experience in space missions data management is well known (e.g., \\citealt{verrecchia07,pittori09,giommi09,massaro11}) and its features and aims will be presented here.

  18. Effectiveness of Crown Preparation Assessment Software As an Educational Tool in Simulation Clinic: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Tiu, Janine; Cheng, Enxin; Hung, Tzu-Chiao; Yu, Chuan-Chia; Lin, Tony; Schwass, Don; Al-Amleh, Basil

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility of a new tooth preparation assessment software, Preppr, as an educational tool for dental students in achieving optimal parameters for a crown preparation. In February 2015, 30 dental students in their fourth year in a five-year undergraduate dental curriculum in New Zealand were randomly selected from a pool of volunteers (N=40) out of the total class of 85. The participants were placed into one of three groups of ten students each: Group A, the control group, received only written and pictorial instructions; Group B received tutor evaluation and feedback; and Group C performed self-directed learning with the aid of Preppr. Each student was asked to prepare an all-ceramic crown on the lower first molar typodont within three hours and to repeat the exercise three times over the next four weeks. The exercise stipulated a 1 mm finish line dimension and total convergence angles (TOC) between 10 and 20 degrees. Fulfillment of these parameters was taken as an acceptable preparation. The results showed that Group C had the highest percentage of students who achieved minimum finish line dimensions and acceptable TOC angles. Those students also achieved the stipulated requirements earlier than the other groups. This study's findings provide promising data on the feasibility of using Preppr as a self-directed educational tool for students training to prepare dental crowns. PMID:27480712

  19. SHAPA: An interactive software tool for protocol analysis applied to aircrew communications and workload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Jeffrey M.; Sanderson, Penelope M.; Seidler, Karen S.

    1990-01-01

    As modern transport environments become increasingly complex, issues such as crew communication, interaction with automation, and workload management have become crucial. Much research is being focused on holistic aspects of social and cognitive behavior, such as the strategies used to handle workload, the flow of information, the scheduling of tasks, the verbal and non-verbal interactions between crew members. Traditional laboratory performance measures no longer sufficiently meet the needs of researchers addressing these issues. However observational techniques are better equipped to capture the type of data needed and to build models of the requisite level of sophistication. Presented here is SHAPA, an interactive software tool for performing both verbal and non-verbal protocol analysis. It has been developed with the idea of affording the researchers the closest possible degree of engagement with protocol data. The researcher can configure SHAPA to encode protocols using any theoretical framework or encoding vocabulary that is desired. SHAPA allows protocol analysis to be performed at any level of analysis, and it supplies a wide variety of tools for data aggregation, manipulation. The output generated by SHAPA can be used alone or in combination with other performance variables to get a rich picture of the influences on sequences of verbal or nonverbal behavior.

  20. TIDE TOOL: Open-Source Sea-Level Monitoring Software for Tsunami Warning Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, S. A.; Kong, L. S.; Becker, N. C.; Wang, D.

    2012-12-01

    A tsunami warning center (TWC) typically decides to issue a tsunami warning bulletin when initial estimates of earthquake source parameters suggest it may be capable of generating a tsunami. A TWC, however, relies on sea-level data to provide prima facie evidence for the existence or non-existence of destructive tsunami waves and to constrain tsunami wave height forecast models. In the aftermath of the 2004 Sumatra disaster, the International Tsunami Information Center asked the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) to develop a platform-independent, easy-to-use software package to give nascent TWCs the ability to process WMO Global Telecommunications System (GTS) sea-level messages and to analyze the resulting sea-level curves (marigrams). In response PTWC developed TIDE TOOL that has since steadily grown in sophistication to become PTWC's operational sea-level processing system. TIDE TOOL has two main parts: a decoder that reads GTS sea-level message logs, and a graphical user interface (GUI) written in the open-source platform-independent graphical toolkit scripting language Tcl/Tk. This GUI consists of dynamic map-based clients that allow the user to select and analyze a single station or groups of stations by displaying their marigams in strip-chart or screen-tiled forms. TIDE TOOL also includes detail maps of each station to show each station's geographical context and reverse tsunami travel time contours to each station. TIDE TOOL can also be coupled to the GEOWARE™ TTT program to plot tsunami travel times and to indicate the expected tsunami arrival time on the marigrams. Because sea-level messages are structured in a rich variety of formats TIDE TOOL includes a metadata file, COMP_META, that contains all of the information needed by TIDE TOOL to decode sea-level data as well as basic information such as the geographical coordinates of each station. TIDE TOOL can therefore continuously decode theses sea-level messages in real-time and display the time

  1. Should We Have Blind Faith in Bioinformatics Software? Illustrations from the SNAP Web-Based Tool

    PubMed Central

    Robiou-du-Pont, Sébastien; Li, Aihua; Christie, Shanice; Sohani, Zahra N.; Meyre, David

    2015-01-01

    Bioinformatics tools have gained popularity in biology but little is known about their validity. We aimed to assess the early contribution of 415 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with eight cardio-metabolic traits at the genome-wide significance level in adults in the Family Atherosclerosis Monitoring In earLY Life (FAMILY) birth cohort. We used the popular web-based tool SNAP to assess the availability of the 415 SNPs in the Illumina Cardio-Metabochip genotyped in the FAMILY study participants. We then compared the SNAP output with the Cardio-Metabochip file provided by Illumina using chromosome and chromosomal positions of SNPs from NCBI Human Genome Browser (Genome Reference Consortium Human Build 37). With the HapMap 3 release 2 reference, 201 out of 415 SNPs were reported as missing in the Cardio-Metabochip by the SNAP output. However, the Cardio-Metabochip file revealed that 152 of these 201 SNPs were in fact present in the Cardio-Metabochip array (false negative rate of 36.6%). With the more recent 1000 Genomes Project release, we found a false-negative rate of 17.6% by comparing the outputs of SNAP and the Illumina product file. We did not find any ‘false positive’ SNPs (SNPs specified as available in the Cardio-Metabochip by SNAP, but not by the Cardio-Metabochip Illumina file). The Cohen’s Kappa coefficient, which calculates the percentage of agreement between both methods, indicated that the validity of SNAP was fair to moderate depending on the reference used (the HapMap 3 or 1000 Genomes). In conclusion, we demonstrate that the SNAP outputs for the Cardio-Metabochip are invalid. This study illustrates the importance of systematically assessing the validity of bioinformatics tools in an independent manner. We propose a series of guidelines to improve practices in the fast-moving field of bioinformatics software implementation. PMID:25742008

  2. Should we have blind faith in bioinformatics software? Illustrations from the SNAP web-based tool.

    PubMed

    Robiou-du-Pont, Sébastien; Li, Aihua; Christie, Shanice; Sohani, Zahra N; Meyre, David

    2015-01-01

    Bioinformatics tools have gained popularity in biology but little is known about their validity. We aimed to assess the early contribution of 415 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with eight cardio-metabolic traits at the genome-wide significance level in adults in the Family Atherosclerosis Monitoring In earLY Life (FAMILY) birth cohort. We used the popular web-based tool SNAP to assess the availability of the 415 SNPs in the Illumina Cardio-Metabochip genotyped in the FAMILY study participants. We then compared the SNAP output with the Cardio-Metabochip file provided by Illumina using chromosome and chromosomal positions of SNPs from NCBI Human Genome Browser (Genome Reference Consortium Human Build 37). With the HapMap 3 release 2 reference, 201 out of 415 SNPs were reported as missing in the Cardio-Metabochip by the SNAP output. However, the Cardio-Metabochip file revealed that 152 of these 201 SNPs were in fact present in the Cardio-Metabochip array (false negative rate of 36.6%). With the more recent 1000 Genomes Project release, we found a false-negative rate of 17.6% by comparing the outputs of SNAP and the Illumina product file. We did not find any 'false positive' SNPs (SNPs specified as available in the Cardio-Metabochip by SNAP, but not by the Cardio-Metabochip Illumina file). The Cohen's Kappa coefficient, which calculates the percentage of agreement between both methods, indicated that the validity of SNAP was fair to moderate depending on the reference used (the HapMap 3 or 1000 Genomes). In conclusion, we demonstrate that the SNAP outputs for the Cardio-Metabochip are invalid. This study illustrates the importance of systematically assessing the validity of bioinformatics tools in an independent manner. We propose a series of guidelines to improve practices in the fast-moving field of bioinformatics software implementation.

  3. New advanced radio diagnostics tools for Space Weather Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krankowski, A.; Rothkaehl, H.; Atamaniuk, B.; Morawski, M.; Zakharenkova, I.; Cherniak, I.; Otmianowska-Mazur, K.

    2013-12-01

    To give a more detailed and complete understanding of physical plasma processes that govern the solar-terrestrial space, and to develop qualitative and quantitative models of the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupling, it is necessary to design and build the next generation of instruments for space diagnostics and monitoring. Novel ground- based wide-area sensor networks, such as the LOFAR (Low Frequency Array) radar facility, comprising wide band, and vector-sensing radio receivers and multi-spacecraft plasma diagnostics should help solve outstanding problems of space physics and describe long-term environmental changes. The LOw Frequency ARray - LOFAR - is a new fully digital radio telescope designed for frequencies between 30 MHz and 240 MHz located in Europe. The three new LOFAR stations will be installed until summer 2015 in Poland. The LOFAR facilities in Poland will be distributed among three sites: Lazy (East of Krakow), Borowiec near Poznan and Baldy near Olsztyn. All they will be connected via PIONIER dedicated links to Poznan. Each site will host one LOFAR station (96 high-band+96 low-band antennas). They will most time work as a part of European network, however, when less charged, they can operate as a national network The new digital radio frequency analyzer (RFA) on board the low-orbiting RELEC satellite was designed to monitor and investigate the ionospheric plasma properties. This two-point ground-based and topside ionosphere-located space plasma diagnostic can be a useful new tool for monitoring and diagnosing turbulent plasma properties. The RFA on board the RELEC satellite is the first in a series of experiments which is planned to be launched into the near-Earth environment. In order to improve and validate the large scales and small scales ionospheric structures we will used the GPS observations collected at IGS/EPN network employed to reconstruct diurnal variations of TEC using all satellite passes over individual GPS stations and the

  4. A practical overview and comparison of certain commercial forensic software tools for processing large-scale digital investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to show the usefulness of modern forensic software tools for processing large-scale digital investigations. In particular, we focus on the new version of Nuix 4.2 and compare it with AccessData FTK 4.2, X-Ways Forensics 16.9 and Guidance Encase Forensic 7 regarding its performance, functionality, usability and capability. We will show how these software tools work with large forensic images and how capable they are in examining complex and big data scenarios.

  5. Diva software, a tool for European regional seas and Ocean climatologies production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouberdous, M.; Troupin, C.; Barth, A.; Alvera-Azcàrate, A.; Beckers, J.-M.

    2012-04-01

    Diva (Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis) is a software based on a method designed to perform data-gridding (or analysis) tasks, with the assets of taking into account the intrinsic nature of oceanographic data, i.e., the uncertainty on the in situ measurements and the anisotropy due to advection and irregular coastlines and topography. The Variational Inverse Method (VIM, Brasseur et al., 1996) implemented in Diva consists in minimizing a variational principle which accounts for the differences between the observations and the reconstructed field, the influence of the gradients and variability of the reconstructed field. The resolution of the numerical problem is based on finite-element method, which allows a great numerical efficiency and the consideration of complicated contours. Along with the analysis, Diva provides also error fields (Brankart and Brasseur, 1998; Rixen et al., 2000) based on the data coverage and noise. Diva is used for the production of climatologies in the pan-European network SeaDataNet. SeaDataNet is connecting the existing marine data centres of more than 30 countries and set up a data management infrastructure consisting of a standardized distributed system. The consortium has elaborated integrated products, using common procedures and methods. Among these, it uses the Diva software as reference tool for climatologies computation for various European regional seas, the Atlantic and the global ocean. During the first phase of the SeaDataNet project, a number of additional tools were developed to make easier the climatologies production for the users. Among these tools: the advection constraint during the field reconstruction through the specification of a velocity field on a regular grid, forcing the analysis to align with the velocity vectors; the Generalized Cross Validation for the determination of analysis parameters (signal-to-noise ratio); the creation of contours at selected depths; the detection of possible outliers; the

  6. An assessment of a software simulation tool for lidar atmosphere and ocean measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, K. A.; Vaughan, M.; Burton, S. P.; Hair, J. W.; Hostetler, C. A.; Kowch, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    A high-fidelity lidar simulation tool is used to generate synthetic lidar backscatter data that closely matches the expected performance of various lidars, including the noise characteristics inherent to analog detection and uncertainties related to the measurement environment. This tool supports performance trade studies and scientific investigations for both the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), which flies aboard Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), and the NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). CALIOP measures profiles of attenuated backscatter coefficients (532 and 1064 nm) and volume depolarization ratios at 532 nm. HSRL measures the same profiles plus volume depolarization at 1064 nm and a molecular-only profile which allows for the direct retrieval of aerosol extinction and backscatter profiles at 532 nm. The simulation tool models both the fundamental physics of the lidar instruments and the signals generated from aerosols, clouds, and the ocean surface and subsurface. This work presents the results of a study conducted to verify the accuracy of the simulated data using data from both HSRL and CALIOP. The tool was tuned to CALIOP instrument settings and the model atmosphere was defined using profiles of attenuated backscatter and depolarization obtained by HSRL during underflights of CALIPSO. The validated HSRL data provide highly accurate measurements of the particulate intensive and extensive optical properties and thus were considered as the truth atmosphere. The resulting simulated data were processed through the CALIPSO data analysis system. Comparisons showed good agreement between the simulated and CALIOP data. This verifies the accuracy of the tool to support studies involving the characterization of instrument components and advanced data analysis techniques. The capability of the tool to simulate ocean surface scattering and subsurface

  7. Proofreading using an assistive software homophone tool: compensatory and remedial effects on the literacy skills of students with reading difficulties.

    PubMed

    Lange, Alissa A; Mulhern, Gerry; Wylie, Judith

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of using an assistive software homophone tool on the assisted proofreading performance and unassisted basic skills of secondary-level students with reading difficulties. Students aged 13 to 15 years proofread passages for homophonic errors under three conditions: with the homophone tool, with homophones highlighted only, or with no help. The group using the homophone tool significantly outperformed the other two groups on assisted proofreading and outperformed the others on unassisted spelling, although not significantly. Remedial (unassisted) improvements in automaticity of word recognition, homophone proofreading, and basic reading were found over all groups. Results elucidate the differential contributions of each function of the homophone tool and suggest that with the proper training, assistive software can help not only students with diagnosed disabilities but also those with generally weak reading skills.

  8. The Use of Software Tools for ChE Education: Students' Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbas, Abderrahim; Al-Bastaki, Nader

    2002-01-01

    Describes three computer software programs implemented in the chemical engineering curriculum at the University of Bahrain and explains students' evaluations of the usefulness and effectiveness of the software packages. Programs include Control Station (CS), HYSYS, and MATHCAD. (YDS)

  9. PlanetPack3: a software tool for exoplanets characterization from radial velocity and transit data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2015-08-01

    We describe the forthcoming third major release of the PlanetPack software tool for exoplanets detection and characterization from Doppler and/or transit data. Among other things, this major update will bring routines for the joint fitting of radial velocities and transits, optionally taking into account various subtle effects: the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, the light arrival time delay between the radial velocity and transit curves, new experimental models of the Doppler or photometry noise, including non-stationary models with variable noise magnitude (due to e.g. the stellar activity variations).This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project No. 14-02-92615 KO_a), the UK Royal Society International Exchange grant IE140055, by the President of Russia grant for young scientists (No. MK-733.2014.2), by the programme of the Presidium of Russian Academy of Sciences P21, and by the Saint Petersburg State University research grant 6.37.341.2015.

  10. STEAM: a software tool based on empirical analysis for micro electro mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devasia, Archana; Pasupuleti, Ajay; Sahin, Ferat

    2006-03-01

    In this research a generalized software framework that enables accurate computer aided design of MEMS devices is developed. The proposed simulation engine utilizes a novel material property estimation technique that generates effective material properties at the microscopic level. The material property models were developed based on empirical analysis and the behavior extraction of standard test structures. A literature review is provided on the physical phenomena that govern the mechanical behavior of thin films materials. This survey indicates that the present day models operate under a wide range of assumptions that may not be applicable to the micro-world. Thus, this methodology is foreseen to be an essential tool for MEMS designers as it would develop empirical models that relate the loading parameters, material properties, and the geometry of the microstructures with its performance characteristics. This process involves learning the relationship between the above parameters using non-parametric learning algorithms such as radial basis function networks and genetic algorithms. The proposed simulation engine has a graphical user interface (GUI) which is very adaptable, flexible, and transparent. The GUI is able to encompass all parameters associated with the determination of the desired material property so as to create models that provide an accurate estimation of the desired property. This technique was verified by fabricating and simulating bilayer cantilevers consisting of aluminum and glass (TEOS oxide) in our previous work. The results obtained were found to be very encouraging.

  11. CancellationTools: All-in-one software for administration and analysis of cancellation tasks.

    PubMed

    Dalmaijer, Edwin S; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; Nijboer, Tanja C W; Cornelissen, Tim H W; Husain, Masud

    2015-12-01

    In a cancellation task, a participant is required to search for and cross out ("cancel") targets, which are usually embedded among distractor stimuli. The number of cancelled targets and their location can be used to diagnose the neglect syndrome after stroke. In addition, the organization of search provides a potentially useful way to measure executive control over multitarget search. Although many useful cancellation measures have been introduced, most fail to make their way into research studies and clinical practice due to the practical difficulty of acquiring such parameters from traditional pen-and-paper measures. Here we present new, open-source software that is freely available to all. It allows researchers and clinicians to flexibly administer computerized cancellation tasks using stimuli of their choice, and to directly analyze the data in a convenient manner. The automated analysis suite provides output that includes almost all of the currently existing measures, as well as several new ones introduced here. All tasks can be performed using either a computer mouse or a touchscreen as an input device, and an online version of the task runtime is available for tablet devices. A summary of the results is produced in a single A4-sized PDF document, including high quality data visualizations. For research purposes, batch analysis of large datasets is possible. In sum, CancellationTools allows users to employ a flexible, computerized cancellation task, which provides extensive benefits and ease of use.

  12. TRANSIT--A Software Tool for Himar1 TnSeq Analysis.

    PubMed

    DeJesus, Michael A; Ambadipudi, Chaitra; Baker, Richard; Sassetti, Christopher; Ioerger, Thomas R

    2015-10-01

    TnSeq has become a popular technique for determining the essentiality of genomic regions in bacterial organisms. Several methods have been developed to analyze the wealth of data that has been obtained through TnSeq experiments. We developed a tool for analyzing Himar1 TnSeq data called TRANSIT. TRANSIT provides a graphical interface to three different statistical methods for analyzing TnSeq data. These methods cover a variety of approaches capable of identifying essential genes in individual datasets as well as comparative analysis between conditions. We demonstrate the utility of this software by analyzing TnSeq datasets of M. tuberculosis grown on glycerol and cholesterol. We show that TRANSIT can be used to discover genes which have been previously implicated for growth on these carbon sources. TRANSIT is written in Python, and thus can be run on Windows, OSX and Linux platforms. The source code is distributed under the GNU GPL v3 license and can be obtained from the following GitHub repository: https://github.com/mad-lab/transit. PMID:26447887

  13. CubeSat mission design software tool for risk estimating relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, Katharine Brumbaugh; Lightsey, E. Glenn

    2014-09-01

    In an effort to make the CubeSat risk estimation and management process more scientific, a software tool has been created that enables mission designers to estimate mission risks. CubeSat mission designers are able to input mission characteristics, such as form factor, mass, development cycle, and launch information, in order to determine the mission risk root causes which historically present the highest risk for their mission. Historical data was collected from the CubeSat community and analyzed to provide a statistical background to characterize these Risk Estimating Relationships (RERs). This paper develops and validates the mathematical model based on the same cost estimating relationship methodology used by the Unmanned Spacecraft Cost Model (USCM) and the Small Satellite Cost Model (SSCM). The RER development uses general error regression models to determine the best fit relationship between root cause consequence and likelihood values and the input factors of interest. These root causes are combined into seven overall CubeSat mission risks which are then graphed on the industry-standard 5×5 Likelihood-Consequence (L-C) chart to help mission designers quickly identify areas of concern within their mission. This paper is the first to document not only the creation of a historical database of CubeSat mission risks, but, more importantly, the scientific representation of Risk Estimating Relationships.

  14. TRANSIT - A Software Tool for Himar1 TnSeq Analysis

    PubMed Central

    DeJesus, Michael A.; Ambadipudi, Chaitra; Baker, Richard; Sassetti, Christopher; Ioerger, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    TnSeq has become a popular technique for determining the essentiality of genomic regions in bacterial organisms. Several methods have been developed to analyze the wealth of data that has been obtained through TnSeq experiments. We developed a tool for analyzing Himar1 TnSeq data called TRANSIT. TRANSIT provides a graphical interface to three different statistical methods for analyzing TnSeq data. These methods cover a variety of approaches capable of identifying essential genes in individual datasets as well as comparative analysis between conditions. We demonstrate the utility of this software by analyzing TnSeq datasets of M. tuberculosis grown on glycerol and cholesterol. We show that TRANSIT can be used to discover genes which have been previously implicated for growth on these carbon sources. TRANSIT is written in Python, and thus can be run on Windows, OSX and Linux platforms. The source code is distributed under the GNU GPL v3 license and can be obtained from the following GitHub repository: https://github.com/mad-lab/transit PMID:26447887

  15. A software tool for quality assurance of computed/digital radiography (CR/DR) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Nikunj; Valentino, Daniel J.

    2011-03-01

    The recommended methods to test the performance of computed radiography (CR) systems have been established by The American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Report No. 93, "Acceptance Testing and Quality Control of Photostimulable Storage Phosphor Imaging Systems". The quality assurance tests are categorized by how frequently they need to be performed. Quality assurance of CR systems is the responsibility of the facility that performs the exam and is governed by the state in which the facility is located. For Example, the New York State Department of Health has established a guide which lists the tests that a CR facility must perform for quality assurance. This study aims at educating the reader about the new quality assurance requirements defined by the state. It further demonstrates an easy to use software tool, henceforth referred to as the Digital Physicist, developed to aid a radiologic facility in conforming with state guidelines and monitoring quality assurance of CR/DR imaging systems. The Digital Physicist provides a vendor independent procedure for quality assurance of CR/DR systems. Further it, generates a PDF report with a brief description of these tests and the obtained results.

  16. Prognostic 2.0: software tool for heart rate variability analysis and QT interval dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Alfonso; Rueda, Oscar L.; Bautista, Lola X.; Martinez, Víctor E.; Lopez, Eddie R.; Gomez, Mario F.; Alvarez, Alexander

    2007-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, in particular Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) are the first cause of death in industrialized countries. Measurements of indicators of the behavior of the autonomic nervous system, such as the Heart Rate Variability (HRV) and the QT Interval Dispersion (QTD) in the acute phase of the AMI (first 48 hours after the event) give a good estimation of the subsequent cardiac events that could present a person who had suffered an AMI. This paper describes the implementation of the second version of Prognostic-AMI, a software tool that automate the calculation of such indicators. It uses the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) to de-noise the signals an to detect the QRS complex and the T-wave from a conventional electrocardiogram of 12 leads. Indicators are measured in both time and frequency domain. A pilot trial performed on a sample population of 76 patients shows that people who had had cardiac complications in the acute phase of the AMI have low values in the indicators of HRV and QTD.

  17. TRANSIT--A Software Tool for Himar1 TnSeq Analysis.

    PubMed

    DeJesus, Michael A; Ambadipudi, Chaitra; Baker, Richard; Sassetti, Christopher; Ioerger, Thomas R

    2015-10-01

    TnSeq has become a popular technique for determining the essentiality of genomic regions in bacterial organisms. Several methods have been developed to analyze the wealth of data that has been obtained through TnSeq experiments. We developed a tool for analyzing Himar1 TnSeq data called TRANSIT. TRANSIT provides a graphical interface to three different statistical methods for analyzing TnSeq data. These methods cover a variety of approaches capable of identifying essential genes in individual datasets as well as comparative analysis between conditions. We demonstrate the utility of this software by analyzing TnSeq datasets of M. tuberculosis grown on glycerol and cholesterol. We show that TRANSIT can be used to discover genes which have been previously implicated for growth on these carbon sources. TRANSIT is written in Python, and thus can be run on Windows, OSX and Linux platforms. The source code is distributed under the GNU GPL v3 license and can be obtained from the following GitHub repository: https://github.com/mad-lab/transit.

  18. GTest: a software tool for graphical assessment of empirical distributions' Gaussianity.

    PubMed

    Barca, E; Bruno, E; Bruno, D E; Passarella, G

    2016-03-01

    their request for an effective tool for addressing such difficulties motivated us in adopting the inference-by-eye paradigm and implementing an easy-to-use, quick and reliable statistical tool. GTest visualizes its outcomes as a modified version of the Q-Q plot. The application has been developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) within MS Excel 2010, which demonstrated to have all the characteristics of robustness and reliability needed. GTest provides true graphical normality tests which are as reliable as any statistical quantitative approach but much easier to understand. The Q-Q plots have been integrated with the outlining of an acceptance region around the representation of the theoretical distribution, defined in accordance with the alpha level of significance and the data sample size. The test decision rule is the following: if the empirical scatterplot falls completely within the acceptance region, then it can be concluded that the empirical distribution fits the theoretical one at the given alpha level. A comprehensive case study has been carried out with simulated and real-world data in order to check the robustness and reliability of the software.

  19. GTest: a software tool for graphical assessment of empirical distributions' Gaussianity.

    PubMed

    Barca, E; Bruno, E; Bruno, D E; Passarella, G

    2016-03-01

    their request for an effective tool for addressing such difficulties motivated us in adopting the inference-by-eye paradigm and implementing an easy-to-use, quick and reliable statistical tool. GTest visualizes its outcomes as a modified version of the Q-Q plot. The application has been developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) within MS Excel 2010, which demonstrated to have all the characteristics of robustness and reliability needed. GTest provides true graphical normality tests which are as reliable as any statistical quantitative approach but much easier to understand. The Q-Q plots have been integrated with the outlining of an acceptance region around the representation of the theoretical distribution, defined in accordance with the alpha level of significance and the data sample size. The test decision rule is the following: if the empirical scatterplot falls completely within the acceptance region, then it can be concluded that the empirical distribution fits the theoretical one at the given alpha level. A comprehensive case study has been carried out with simulated and real-world data in order to check the robustness and reliability of the software. PMID:26846288

  20. Advanced Engineering Tools for Structural Analysis of Advanced Power Plants Application to the GE ESBWR Design

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, R.E.; Fanning, A.; Diaz Llanos, M.; Moreno, A.; Carrasco, A.

    2002-07-01

    Experience in the design of nuclear reactors for power generation shows that the plant structures and buildings involved are one of the major contributors to plant capital investment. Consequently, the design of theses elements must be optimised if cost reductions in future reactors are to be achieved. The benefits of using the 'Best Estimate Approach' are well known in the area of core and systems design. This consists in developing accurate models of a plant's phenomenology and behaviour, minimising the margins. Different safety margins have been applied in the past when performing structural analyses. Three of these margins can be identified: - increasing the value of the load by a factor that depends on the load frequency; - decreasing the resistance of the structure's resistance, and - safety margins introduced through two step analysis. The first two type of margins are established in the applicable codes in order to provide design safety margins. The third one derives from limitations in tools which, in the past, did not allow obtaining an accurate model in which both the dynamic and static loads could be evaluated simultaneously. Nowadays, improvements in hardware and software have eliminated the need for two-step calculations in structural analysis (dynamic plus static), allowing the creation one-through finite element models in which all loads, both dynamic and static, are combined without the determination of the equivalent static loads from the dynamic loads. This paper summarizes how these models and methods have been applied to optimize the Reactor Building structural design of the General Electric (GE) ESBWR Passive Plant. The work has focused on three areas: - the design of the Gravity Driven Cooling System (GDCS) Pools as pressure boundary between the Drywell and the Wet-well; - the evaluation of the thickness of the Reactor Building foundation slab, and - the global structural evaluation of the Reactor Building.

  1. Students' Learning Experiences When Using a Dynamic Geometry Software Tool in a Geometry Lesson at Secondary School in Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denbel, Dejene Girma

    2015-01-01

    Students learning experiences were investigated in geometry lesson when using Dynamic Geometry Software (DGS) tool in geometry learning in 25 Ethiopian secondary students. The research data were drawn from the used worksheets, classroom observations, results of pre- and post-test, a questionnaire and interview responses. I used GeoGebra as a DGS…

  2. Productivity, part 2: cloud storage, remote meeting tools, screencasting, speech recognition software, password managers, and online data backup.

    PubMed

    Lackey, Amanda E; Pandey, Tarun; Moshiri, Mariam; Lalwani, Neeraj; Lall, Chandana; Bhargava, Puneet

    2014-06-01

    It is an opportune time for radiologists to focus on personal productivity. The ever increasing reliance on computers and the Internet has significantly changed the way we work. Myriad software applications are available to help us improve our personal efficiency. In this article, the authors discuss some tools that help improve collaboration and personal productivity, maximize e-learning, and protect valuable digital data.

  3. State transition storyboards: A tool for designing the Goldstone solar system radar data acquisition system user interface software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, S. D.

    1987-01-01

    Effective user interface design in software systems is a complex task that takes place without adequate modeling tools. By combining state transition diagrams and the storyboard technique of filmmakers, State Transition Storyboards were developed to provide a detailed modeling technique for the Goldstone Solar System Radar Data Acquisition System human-machine interface. Illustrations are included with a description of the modeling technique.

  4. EPA's science blog: "It All Starts with Science"; Article title: "EPA's Solvent Substitution Software Tool, PARIS III"

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's solvent substitution software tool, PARIS III is provided by the EPA for free, and can be effective and efficiently used to help environmentally-conscious individuals find better and greener solvent mixtures for many different common industrial processes. People can downlo...

  5. The Design and Development of a Computerized Tool Support for Conducting Senior Projects in Software Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chung-Yang; Teng, Kao-Chiuan

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a computerized tool support, the Meetings-Flow Project Collaboration System (MFS), for designing, directing and sustaining the collaborative teamwork required in senior projects in software engineering (SE) education. Among many schools' SE curricula, senior projects serve as a capstone course that provides comprehensive…

  6. A Quantitative Study of a Software Tool that Supports a Part-Complete Solution Method on Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings from a quantitative research study into the use of a software tool that was built to support a part-complete solution method (PCSM) for the learning of computer programming. The use of part-complete solutions to programming problems is one of the methods that can be used to reduce the cognitive load that students…

  7. Plagiarism Detection: A Comparison of Teaching Assistants and a Software Tool in Identifying Cheating in a Psychology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seifried, Eva; Lenhard, Wolfgang; Spinath, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Essays that are assigned as homework in large classes are prone to cheating via unauthorized collaboration. In this study, we compared the ability of a software tool based on Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) and student teaching assistants to detect plagiarism in a large group of students. To do so, we took two approaches: the first approach was…

  8. Quality assurance of solar spectral UV-measurements: methods and use of the SHICrivm software tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. E.; den Outer, P. N.; Slaper, H.

    2003-04-01

    Ground-based UV-irradiance measurements are crucial for determining the long-term changes and trends in biologically and/or photo-chemically relevant solar UV-radiation reaching the Earth's surface. Such changes in UV-radiation levels have probably occurred and/or are expected due to ozone depletion and climate change. In order to analyse UV-irradiation levels in relation to atmospheric parameters and to facilitate an assessment of the European UV-climate a European database (EUVDatabase) has been set up within the EDUCE-project (EC-contract EVK2-CT-1999-00028). High quality UV-data-sets from across the continent are assessable from the EUVDatabase (http://uv.fmi.fi/uvdb/). An accurate analysis of the UV-climate and long term changes therein requires quality assurance of the spectral data. The SHICrivm software tool (http://www.rivm.nl/shicrivm) is developed to analyse several quality aspects of measured UV-spectra. The SHICrivm tool is applied to over one million spectra from the EUVDatabase and detects for each measured spectrum: the accuracy of the wavelength calibration from 290 up to 500 nm, the lowest detectable irradiance level, the occurrence of non-natural spikes in spectra, deviations in spectral shape, and identifies possible irradiance scale errors in the UV-range. In addition the SHIC-package can be used to correct wavelength scale errors and non-natural spectral spikes. A deconvolution and convolution algorithm is included to improve the comparibility of spectra obtained with different instruments, and to allow a fully comparable analysis of biologically weighted UV-dose for instruments with various spectral characteristics. Within the context of the EDUCE-project data from over 20 UV-monitoring stations are retrieved from the database and a quality assessment is performed using the SHIC-tool. The quality parameters are presented by means of a simple scheme of coloured quality flags. Spectra that meet the WMO-criteria for spectral measurements are

  9. GelClust: a software tool for gel electrophoresis images analysis and dendrogram generation.

    PubMed

    Khakabimamaghani, Sahand; Najafi, Ali; Ranjbar, Reza; Raam, Monireh

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents GelClust, a new software that is designed for processing gel electrophoresis images and generating the corresponding phylogenetic trees. Unlike the most of commercial and non-commercial related softwares, we found that GelClust is very user-friendly and guides the user from image toward dendrogram through seven simple steps. Furthermore, the software, which is implemented in C# programming language under Windows operating system, is more accurate than similar software regarding image processing and is the only software able to detect and correct gel 'smile' effects completely automatically. These claims are supported with experiments.

  10. GelClust: a software tool for gel electrophoresis images analysis and dendrogram generation.

    PubMed

    Khakabimamaghani, Sahand; Najafi, Ali; Ranjbar, Reza; Raam, Monireh

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents GelClust, a new software that is designed for processing gel electrophoresis images and generating the corresponding phylogenetic trees. Unlike the most of commercial and non-commercial related softwares, we found that GelClust is very user-friendly and guides the user from image toward dendrogram through seven simple steps. Furthermore, the software, which is implemented in C# programming language under Windows operating system, is more accurate than similar software regarding image processing and is the only software able to detect and correct gel 'smile' effects completely automatically. These claims are supported with experiments. PMID:23727299

  11. Open Software Tools Applied to Jordan's National Multi-Agent Water Management Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Stephen; Meier, Philipp; Harou, Julien; Yoon, Jim; Selby, Philip; Lachaut, Thibaut; Klassert, Christian; Avisse, Nicolas; Khadem, Majed; Tilmant, Amaury; Gorelick, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Jordan is the fourth most water scarce country in the world, where demand exceeds supply in a politically and demographically unstable context. The Jordan Water Project (JWP) aims to perform policy evaluation by modelling the hydrology, economics, and governance of Jordan's water resource system. The multidisciplinary nature of the project requires a modelling software system capable of integrating submodels from multiple disciplines into a single decision making process and communicating results to stakeholders. This requires a tool for building an integrated model and a system where diverse data sets can be managed and visualised. The integrated Jordan model is built using Pynsim, an open-source multi-agent simulation framework implemented in Python. Pynsim operates on network structures of nodes and links and supports institutional hierarchies, where an institution represents a grouping of nodes, links or other institutions. At each time step, code within each node, link and institution can executed independently, allowing for their fully autonomous behaviour. Additionally, engines (sub-models) perform actions over the entire network or on a subset of the network, such as taking a decision on a set of nodes. Pynsim is modular in design, allowing distinct modules to be modified easily without affecting others. Data management and visualisation is performed using Hydra (www.hydraplatform.org), an open software platform allowing users to manage network structure and data. The Hydra data manager connects to Pynsim, providing necessary input parameters for the integrated model. By providing a high-level portal to the model, Hydra removes a barrier between the users of the model (researchers, stakeholders, planners etc) and the model itself, allowing them to manage data, run the model and visualise results all through a single user interface. Pynsim's ability to represent institutional hierarchies, inter-network communication and the separation of node, link and

  12. Improvement of a free software tool for the assessment of sediment connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crema, Stefano; Lanni, Cristiano; Goldin, Beatrice; Marchi, Lorenzo; Cavalli, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Sediment connectivity expresses the degree of linkage that controls sediment fluxes throughout landscape, in particular between sediment sources and downstream areas. The assessment of sediment connectivity becomes a key issue when dealing with risk mitigation and priorities of intervention in the territory. In this work, the authors report the improvements made to an open source and stand-alone application (SedInConnect, http://www.sedalp.eu/download/tools.shtml), along with extensive applications to alpine catchments. SedInConnect calculates a sediment connectivity index as expressed in Cavalli et al. (2013); the software improvements consisted primarily in the introduction of the sink feature, i.e. areas that act as traps for sediment produced upstream (e.g., lakes, sediment traps). Based on user-defined sinks, the software decouples those parts of the catchment that do not deliver sediment to a selected target of interest (e.g., fan apex, main drainage network). In this way the assessment of sediment connectivity is achieved by taking in consideration effective sediment contributing areas. Sediment connectivity analysis has been carried out on several catchments in the South Tyrol alpine area (Northern Italy) with the goal of achieving a fast and objective characterization of the topographic control on sediment transfer. In addition to depicting the variability of sediment connectivity inside each basin, the index of connectivity has proved to be a valuable indicator of the dominant process characterizing the basin sediment dynamics (debris flow, bedload, mixed behavior). The characterization of the dominant process is of great importance for the hazard and risk assessment in mountain areas, and for choice and design of structural and non-structural intervention measures. The recognition of the dominant sediment transport process by the index of connectivity is in agreement with evidences arising from post-event field surveys and with the application of

  13. Recent advances in i-Gene tools and analysis: microarrays, next generation sequencing and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moorhouse, Michael J; Sharma, Hari S

    2011-08-01

    Recent advances in technology and associated methodology have made the current period one of the most exciting in molecular biology and medicine. Underlying these is an appreciation that modern research is driven by increasing large amounts of data being interpreted by interdisciplinary collaborative teams which are often geographically dispersed. The availability of cheap computing power, high speed informatics networks and high quality analysis software has been essential to this as has the application of modern quality assurance methodologies. In this review, we discuss the application of modern 'High-Throughput' molecular biological technologies such as 'Microarrays' and 'Next Generation Sequencing' to scientific and biomedical research as we have observed. Furthermore in this review, we also offer some guidance that enables the reader as to understand certain features of these as well as new strategies and help them to apply these i-Gene tools in their endeavours successfully. Collectively, we term this 'i-Gene Analysis'. We also offer predictions as to the developments that are anticipated in the near and more distant future.

  14. Advanced Software for Analysis of High-Speed Rolling-Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poplawski, J. V.; Rumbarger, J. H.; Peters, S. M.; Galatis, H.; Flower, R.

    2003-01-01

    COBRA-AHS is a package of advanced software for analysis of rigid or flexible shaft systems supported by rolling-element bearings operating at high speeds under complex mechanical and thermal loads. These loads can include centrifugal and thermal loads generated by motions of bearing components. COBRA-AHS offers several improvements over prior commercial bearing-analysis programs: It includes innovative probabilistic fatigue-life-estimating software that provides for computation of three-dimensional stress fields and incorporates stress-based (in contradistinction to prior load-based) mathematical models of fatigue life. It interacts automatically with the ANSYS finite-element code to generate finite-element models for estimating distributions of temperature and temperature-induced changes in dimensions in iterative thermal/dimensional analyses: thus, for example, it can be used to predict changes in clearances and thermal lockup. COBRA-AHS provides an improved graphical user interface that facilitates the iterative cycle of analysis and design by providing analysis results quickly in graphical form, enabling the user to control interactive runs without leaving the program environment, and facilitating transfer of plots and printed results for inclusion in design reports. Additional features include roller-edge stress prediction and influence of shaft and housing distortion on bearing performance.

  15. Advanced Vibration Analysis Tool Developed for Robust Engine Rotor Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this research program is to develop vibration analysis tools, design tools, and design strategies to significantly improve the safety and robustness of turbine engine rotors. Bladed disks in turbine engines always feature small, random blade-to-blade differences, or mistuning. Mistuning can lead to a dramatic increase in blade forced-response amplitudes and stresses. Ultimately, this results in high-cycle fatigue, which is a major safety and cost concern. In this research program, the necessary steps will be taken to transform a state-of-the-art vibration analysis tool, the Turbo- Reduce forced-response prediction code, into an effective design tool by enhancing and extending the underlying modeling and analysis methods. Furthermore, novel techniques will be developed to assess the safety of a given design. In particular, a procedure will be established for using natural-frequency curve veerings to identify ranges of operating conditions (rotational speeds and engine orders) in which there is a great risk that the rotor blades will suffer high stresses. This work also will aid statistical studies of the forced response by reducing the necessary number of simulations. Finally, new strategies for improving the design of rotors will be pursued.

  16. Human Factors Evaluation of Advanced Electric Power Grid Visualization Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Dauenhauer, Peter M.; Wierks, Tamara G.; Podmore, Robin

    2009-04-01

    This report describes initial human factors evaluation of four visualization tools (Graphical Contingency Analysis, Force Directed Graphs, Phasor State Estimator and Mode Meter/ Mode Shapes) developed by PNNL, and proposed test plans that may be implemented to evaluate their utility in scenario-based experiments.

  17. Sustaining an Online, Shared Community Resource for Models, Robust Open source Software Tools and Data for Volcanology - the Vhub Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, A. K.; Valentine, G. A.; Bursik, M. I.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Jones, M.; Simakov, N.; Aghakhani, H.; Jones-Ivey, R.; Kosar, T.; Zhang, B.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last 5 years we have created a community collaboratory Vhub.org [Palma et al, J. App. Volc. 3:2 doi:10.1186/2191-5040-3-2] as a place to find volcanology-related resources, and a venue for users to disseminate tools, teaching resources, data, and an online platform to support collaborative efforts. As the community (current active users > 6000 from an estimated community of comparable size) embeds the tools in the collaboratory into educational and research workflows it became imperative to: a) redesign tools into robust, open source reusable software for online and offline usage/enhancement; b) share large datasets with remote collaborators and other users seamlessly with security; c) support complex workflows for uncertainty analysis, validation and verification and data assimilation with large data. The focus on tool development/redevelopment has been twofold - firstly to use best practices in software engineering and new hardware like multi-core and graphic processing units. Secondly we wish to enhance capabilities to support inverse modeling, uncertainty quantification using large ensembles and design of experiments, calibration, validation. Among software engineering practices we practice are open source facilitating community contributions, modularity and reusability. Our initial targets are four popular tools on Vhub - TITAN2D, TEPHRA2, PUFF and LAVA. Use of tools like these requires many observation driven data sets e.g. digital elevation models of topography, satellite imagery, field observations on deposits etc. These data are often maintained in private repositories that are privately shared by "sneaker-net". As a partial solution to this we tested mechanisms using irods software for online sharing of private data with public metadata and access limits. Finally, we adapted use of workflow engines (e.g. Pegasus) to support the complex data and computing workflows needed for usage like uncertainty quantification for hazard analysis using physical

  18. Advanced communications technology satellite high burst rate link evaluation terminal communication protocol software user's guide, version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    The Communication Protocol Software was developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center to support the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite High Burst Rate Link Evaluation Terminal (ACTS HBR-LET). The HBR-LET is an experimenters terminal to communicate with the ACTS for various experiments by government, university, and industry agencies. The Communication Protocol Software is one segment of the Control and Performance Monitor (C&PM) Software system of the HBR-LET. The Communication Protocol Software allows users to control and configure the Intermediate Frequency Switch Matrix (IFSM) on board the ACTS to yield a desired path through the spacecraft payload. Besides IFSM control, the C&PM Software System is also responsible for instrument control during HBR-LET experiments, uplink power control of the HBR-LET to demonstrate power augmentation during signal fade events, and data display. The Communication Protocol Software User's Guide, Version 1.0 (NASA CR-189162) outlines the commands and procedures to install and operate the Communication Protocol Software. Configuration files used to control the IFSM, operator commands, and error recovery procedures are discussed. The Communication Protocol Software Maintenance Manual, Version 1.0 (NASA CR-189163, to be published) is a programmer's guide to the Communication Protocol Software. This manual details the current implementation of the software from a technical perspective. Included is an overview of the Communication Protocol Software, computer algorithms, format representations, and computer hardware configuration. The Communication Protocol Software Test Plan (NASA CR-189164, to be published) provides a step-by-step procedure to verify the operation of the software. Included in the Test Plan is command transmission, telemetry reception, error detection, and error recovery procedures.

  19. Development of a Kinect Software Tool to Classify Movements during Active Video Gaming.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Michael; Thornton, Ashleigh L; Lay, Brendan S; Ward, Brodie; Nathan, David; Hunt, Daniel; Braham, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    While it has been established that using full body motion to play active video games results in increased levels of energy expenditure, there is little information on the classification of human movement during active video game play in relationship to fundamental movement skills. The aim of this study was to validate software utilising Kinect sensor motion capture technology to recognise fundamental movement skills (FMS), during active video game play. Two human assessors rated jumping and side-stepping and these assessments were compared to the Kinect Action Recognition Tool (KART), to establish a level of agreement and determine the number of movements completed during five minutes of active video game play, for 43 children (m = 12 years 7 months ± 1 year 6 months). During five minutes of active video game play, inter-rater reliability, when examining the two human raters, was found to be higher for the jump (r = 0.94, p < .01) than the sidestep (r = 0.87, p < .01), although both were excellent. Excellent reliability was also found between human raters and the KART system for the jump (r = 0.84, p, .01) and moderate reliability for sidestep (r = 0.6983, p < .01) during game play, demonstrating that both humans and KART had higher agreement for jumps than sidesteps in the game play condition. The results of the study provide confidence that the Kinect sensor can be used to count the number of jumps and sidestep during five minutes of active video game play with a similar level of accuracy as human raters. However, in contrast to humans, the KART system required a fraction of the time to analyse and tabulate the results. PMID:27442437

  20. A flexible, interactive software tool for fitting the parameters of neuronal models

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Péter; Vella, Michael; Gulyás, Attila I.; Freund, Tamás F.; Káli, Szabolcs

    2014-01-01

    The construction of biologically relevant neuronal models as well as model-based analysis of experimental data often requires the simultaneous fitting of multiple model parameters, so that the behavior of the model in a certain paradigm matches (as closely as possible) the corresponding output of a real neuron according to some predefined criterion. Although the task of model optimization is often computationally hard, and the quality of the results depends heavily on technical issues such as the appropriate choice (and implementation) of cost functions and optimization algorithms, no existing program provides access to the best available methods while also guiding the user through the process effectively. Our software, called Optimizer, implements a modular and extensible framework for the optimization of neuronal models, and also features a graphical interface which makes it easy for even non-expert users to handle many commonly occurring scenarios. Meanwhile, educated users can extend the capabilities of the program and customize it according to their needs with relatively little effort. Optimizer has been developed in Python, takes advantage of open-source Python modules for nonlinear optimization, and interfaces directly with the NEURON simulator to run the models. Other simulators are supported through an external interface. We have tested the program on several different types of problems of varying complexity, using different model classes. As targets, we used simulated traces from the same or a more complex model class, as well as experimental data. We successfully used Optimizer to determine passive parameters and conductance densities in compartmental models, and to fit simple (adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire) neuronal models to complex biological data. Our detailed comparisons show that Optimizer can handle a wider range of problems, and delivers equally good or better performance than any other existing neuronal model fitting tool. PMID

  1. Development of a Kinect Software Tool to Classify Movements during Active Video Gaming.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Michael; Thornton, Ashleigh L; Lay, Brendan S; Ward, Brodie; Nathan, David; Hunt, Daniel; Braham, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    While it has been established that using full body motion to play active video games results in increased levels of energy expenditure, there is little information on the classification of human movement during active video game play in relationship to fundamental movement skills. The aim of this study was to validate software utilising Kinect sensor motion capture technology to recognise fundamental movement skills (FMS), during active video game play. Two human assessors rated jumping and side-stepping and these assessments were compared to the Kinect Action Recognition Tool (KART), to establish a level of agreement and determine the number of movements completed during five minutes of active video game play, for 43 children (m = 12 years 7 months ± 1 year 6 months). During five minutes of active video game play, inter-rater reliability, when examining the two human raters, was found to be higher for the jump (r = 0.94, p < .01) than the sidestep (r = 0.87, p < .01), although both were excellent. Excellent reliability was also found between human raters and the KART system for the jump (r = 0.84, p, .01) and moderate reliability for sidestep (r = 0.6983, p < .01) during game play, demonstrating that both humans and KART had higher agreement for jumps than sidesteps in the game play condition. The results of the study provide confidence that the Kinect sensor can be used to count the number of jumps and sidestep during five minutes of active video game play with a similar level of accuracy as human raters. However, in contrast to humans, the KART system required a fraction of the time to analyse and tabulate the results.

  2. Reviewing the impact of problem structure on planning: a software tool for analyzing tower tasks.

    PubMed

    Kaller, Christoph P; Rahm, Benjamin; Köstering, Lena; Unterrainer, Josef M

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive, clinical, and neuroimaging studies on planning abilities most frequently implement the Tower of London task or one of its variants. Yet, cumulating evidence from a series of experiments suggests that the commonly used approximation of problem difficulty in terms of the minimum number of moves for goal attainment is too coarse a measure for the underlying cognitive operations, and in some cases may be even misleading. Rather, problem difficulty can be more specifically characterized by a set of structural task parameters such as the number and nature of optimal and suboptimal solution paths, the required search depths, the patterns of intermediate and goal moves, goal hierarchies and the associated degree of ambiguity in the sequential ordering of goal moves. First applications in developmental and patient studies have proven fruitful in targeting fundamental alterations of planning abilities in healthy and clinical conditions. In addition, recent evidence from neuroimaging shows that manipulations of problem structure relate to separate cognitive and neural processes and are accompanied by dissociable brain activation patterns. Here, we briefly review these structural problem parameters and the concepts behind. As controlling for task parameters and selecting a balanced problem set is a complex and error-prone endeavor, we further present TowerTool, a software solution that allows easy access to in-depth analysis of the problem structure of widely used planning tasks like the Tower of London, the Tower of Hanoi, and their variants. Thereby, we hope to encourage and facilitate the implementation of structurally balanced task sets in future studies on planning and to promote transfer between the cognitive, developmental, and clinical neurosciences. PMID:20723568

  3. Biomedical Mutation Analysis (BMA): A software tool for analyzing mutations associated with antiviral resistance

    PubMed Central

    Salvatierra, Karina; Florez, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is considered a major public health problem, with 200 million people infected worldwide. The treatment for HCV chronic infection with pegylated interferon alpha plus ribavirin inhibitors is unspecific; consequently, the treatment is effective in only 50% of patients infected. This has prompted the development of direct-acting antivirals (DAA) that target virus proteins. These DAA have demonstrated a potent effect in vitro and in vivo; however, virus mutations associated with the development of resistance have been described. Objective: To design and develop an online information system for detecting mutations in amino acids known to be implicated in resistance to DAA. Materials and methods:    We have used computer applications, technological tools, standard languages, infrastructure systems and algorithms, to analyze positions associated with resistance to DAA for the NS3, NS5A, and NS5B genes of HCV. Results: We have designed and developed an online information system named Biomedical Mutation Analysis (BMA), which allows users to calculate changes in nucleotide and amino acid sequences for each selected sequence from conventional Sanger and cloning sequencing using a graphical interface. Conclusion: BMA quickly, easily and effectively analyzes mutations, including complete documentation and examples. Furthermore, the development of different visualization techniques allows proper interpretation and understanding of the results. The data obtained using BMA will be useful for the assessment and surveillance of HCV resistance to new antivirals, and for the treatment regimens by selecting those DAA to which the virus is not resistant, avoiding unnecessary treatment failures. The software is available at: http://bma.itiud.org. PMID:27547378

  4. Development of a Kinect Software Tool to Classify Movements during Active Video Gaming

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Michael; Lay, Brendan S.; Ward, Brodie; Nathan, David; Hunt, Daniel; Braham, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    While it has been established that using full body motion to play active video games results in increased levels of energy expenditure, there is little information on the classification of human movement during active video game play in relationship to fundamental movement skills. The aim of this study was to validate software utilising Kinect sensor motion capture technology to recognise fundamental movement skills (FMS), during active video game play. Two human assessors rated jumping and side-stepping and these assessments were compared to the Kinect Action Recognition Tool (KART), to establish a level of agreement and determine the number of movements completed during five minutes of active video game play, for 43 children (m = 12 years 7 months ± 1 year 6 months). During five minutes of active video game play, inter-rater reliability, when examining the two human raters, was found to be higher for the jump (r = 0.94, p < .01) than the sidestep (r = 0.87, p < .01), although both were excellent. Excellent reliability was also found between human raters and the KART system for the jump (r = 0.84, p, .01) and moderate reliability for sidestep (r = 0.6983, p < .01) during game play, demonstrating that both humans and KART had higher agreement for jumps than sidesteps in the game play condition. The results of the study provide confidence that the Kinect sensor can be used to count the number of jumps and sidestep during five minutes of active video game play with a similar level of accuracy as human raters. However, in contrast to humans, the KART system required a fraction of the time to analyse and tabulate the results. PMID:27442437

  5. A flexible, interactive software tool for fitting the parameters of neuronal models.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Péter; Vella, Michael; Gulyás, Attila I; Freund, Tamás F; Káli, Szabolcs

    2014-01-01

    The construction of biologically relevant neuronal models as well as model-based analysis of experimental data often requires the simultaneous fitting of multiple model parameters, so that the behavior of the model in a certain paradigm matches (as closely as possible) the corresponding output of a real neuron according to some predefined criterion. Although the task of model optimization is often computationally hard, and the quality of the results depends heavily on technical issues such as the appropriate choice (and implementation) of cost functions and optimization algorithms, no existing program provides access to the best available methods while also guiding the user through the process effectively. Our software, called Optimizer, implements a modular and extensible framework for the optimization of neuronal models, and also features a graphical interface which makes it easy for even non-expert users to handle many commonly occurring scenarios. Meanwhile, educated users can extend the capabilities of the program and customize it according to their needs with relatively little effort. Optimizer has been developed in Python, takes advantage of open-source Python modules for nonlinear optimization, and interfaces directly with the NEURON simulator to run the models. Other simulators are supported through an external interface. We have tested the program on several different types of problems of varying complexity, using different model classes. As targets, we used simulated traces from the same or a more complex model class, as well as experimental data. We successfully used Optimizer to determine passive parameters and conductance densities in compartmental models, and to fit simple (adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire) neuronal models to complex biological data. Our detailed comparisons show that Optimizer can handle a wider range of problems, and delivers equally good or better performance than any other existing neuronal model fitting tool. PMID

  6. Tools to Support the Reuse of Software Assets for the NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattmann, Chris A.; Downs, Robert R.; Marshall, James J.; Most, Neal F.; Samadi, Shahin

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Earth Science Data Systems (ESDS) Software Reuse Working Group (SRWG) is chartered with the investigation, production, and dissemination of information related to the reuse of NASA Earth science software assets. One major current objective is to engage the NASA decadal missions in areas relevant to software reuse. In this paper we report on the current status of these activities. First, we provide some background on the SRWG in general and then discuss the group s flagship recommendation, the NASA Reuse Readiness Levels (RRLs). We continue by describing areas in which mission software may be reused in the context of NASA decadal missions. We conclude the paper with pointers to future directions.

  7. The DSET Tool Library: A software approach to enable data exchange between climate system models

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, J.

    1994-12-01

    Climate modeling is a computationally intensive process. Until recently computers were not powerful enough to perform the complex calculations required to simulate the earth`s climate. As a result standalone programs were created that represent components of the earth`s climate (e.g., Atmospheric Circulation Model). However, recent advances in computing, including massively parallel computing, make it possible to couple the components forming a complete earth climate simulation. The ability to couple different climate model components will significantly improve our ability to predict climate accurately and reliably. Historically each major component of the coupled earth simulation is a standalone program designed independently with different coordinate systems and data representations. In order for two component models to be coupled, the data of one model must be mapped to the coordinate system of the second model. The focus of this project is to provide a general tool to facilitate the mapping of data between simulation components, with an emphasis on using object-oriented programming techniques to provide polynomial interpolation, line and area weighting, and aggregation services.

  8. An Advanced Educational Program for Software Design Engineering at Graduate School of Information Science and Technology of Osaka University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuzawa, Toshimitsu; Inoue, Katsuro; Murakami, Koso; Fujiwara, Toru; Nishio, Shojiro

    This paper gives an overview of an advanced educational program for software design engineering that is currently conducted at Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Osaka University under the grant “ Initiatives for Attractive Education in Graduate Schools” from MEXT. Software design engineering is highly expected to play a critical role in winning success in designing the next-generation software systems. The aim of the program is to bring up young researchers with the latest design methodologies and practical design experience, who can pioneer the frontier of software design engineering. The program is conducted with the collaboration of industries that have rich practical experience and are facing the engineering problems to be solved in developing the next-generation software.

  9. Advanced functionality for radio analysis in the Offline software framework of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Denkiewicz, A.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Gesterling, K.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hague, J. D.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Parrisius, J.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; PeĶala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Phan, N.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Riviére, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tamashiro, A.; Tapia, A.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tiwari, D. K.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winders, L.; Winnick, M. G.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2011-04-01

    The advent of the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) necessitates the development of a powerful framework for the analysis of radio measurements of cosmic ray air showers. As AERA performs “radio-hybrid” measurements of air shower radio emission in coincidence with the surface particle detectors and fluorescence telescopes of the Pierre Auger Observatory, the radio analysis functionality had to be incorporated in the existing hybrid analysis solutions for fluorescence and surface detector data. This goal has been achieved in a natural way by extending the existing Auger Offline software framework with radio functionality. In this article, we lay out the design, highlights and features of the radio extension implemented in the Auger Offline framework. Its functionality has achieved a high degree of sophistication and offers advanced features such as vectorial reconstruction of the electric field, advanced signal processing algorithms, a transparent and efficient handling of FFTs, a very detailed simulation of detector effects, and the read-in of multiple data formats including data from various radio simulation codes. The source code of this radio functionality can be made available to interested parties on request.

  10. Advanced functionality for radio analysis in the Offline software framework of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; /INFN, Naples /Copenhagen Astron. Observ. /Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-01-01

    The advent of the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) necessitates the development of a powerful framework for the analysis of radio measurements of cosmic ray air showers. As AERA performs 'radio-hybrid' measurements of air shower radio emission in coincidence with the surface particle detectors and fluorescence telescopes of the Pierre Auger Observatory, the radio analysis functionality had to be incorporated in the existing hybrid analysis solutions for fluorescence and surface detector data. This goal has been achieved in a natural way by extending the existing Auger Offline software framework with radio functionality. In this article, we lay out the design, highlights and features of the radio extension implemented in the Auger Offline framework. Its functionality has achieved a high degree of sophistication and offers advanced features such as vectorial reconstruction of the electric field, advanced signal processing algorithms, a transparent and efficient handling of FFTs, a very detailed simulation of detector effects, and the read-in of multiple data formats including data from various radio simulation codes. The source code of this radio functionality can be made available to interested parties on request.

  11. Sandia Advanced MEMS Design Tools, V2.1

    2002-02-04

    SUMMiT V (Sandia Ultra planar Multi level MEMS Technology) is a 5 level surface micromachine fabrication technology, which customers intornal and external to Sandia can access to fabricate prototype MEMS devices. This CD contains an integrated set of electronic files that: a) Describe the SUMMiT V fabrication process b) Provide enabling educational information (including pictures, videos, technical information) c) Facilitate the process of designing MEMS with the SUMMiT process (prototype file, Design Rule Checker, Standardmore » Parts Library) d) Facilitate the process of having MEMS fabricated at Sandia National Laboratories e) Facilitate the process of having post-fabrication services performed. While there exist some files on the CD that are used in conjunction with software package AutoCAD, these files are not intended for use independent of the CD. Nole that the customer must purchase his/her own copy of Aut0CAD to use with these files.« less

  12. [The software QSR Nvivo 2.0 in qualitative data analysis: a tool for health and human sciences researches].

    PubMed

    Guizzo, Bianca Salazar; Krziminski, Clarissa de Oliveira; de Oliveira, Dora Lúcia Leidens Correa

    2003-04-01

    The QSR Nvivo 2.0 is one of the latest versions of qualitative data analysis software package. Taking on board our experience as QSR Nvivo 2.0 users we describe here the software's most important tools. The QSR Nvivo 2.0 was used to facilitate the qualitative analysis of data gathered in a Health and Education research. Considering the shortage of published materials about the issue, which suggests a lack of knowledge about the program in our context, our aim is to show how the QSR Nvivo 2.0 can assist qualitative data analysis.

  13. Development of the software tool for generation and visualization of the finite element head model with bone conduction sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, Dalibor; Milošević, Žarko; Saveljić, Igor; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    Vibration of the skull causes a hearing sensation. We call it Bone Conduction (BC) sound. There are several investigations about transmission properties of bone conducted sound. The aim of this study was to develop a software tool for easy generation of the finite element (FE) model of the human head with different materials based on human head anatomy and to calculate sound conduction through the head. Developed software tool generates a model in a few steps. The first step is to do segmentation of CT medical images (DICOM) and to generate a surface mesh files (STL). Each STL file presents a different layer of human head with different material properties (brain, CSF, different layers of the skull bone, skin, etc.). The next steps are to make tetrahedral mesh from obtained STL files, to define FE model boundary conditions and to solve FE equations. This tool uses PAK solver, which is the open source software implemented in SIFEM FP7 project, for calculations of the head vibration. Purpose of this tool is to show impact of the bone conduction sound of the head on the hearing system and to estimate matching of obtained results with experimental measurements.

  14. An Advanced Flaw-Response Modelling Approach for Inspection Qualification Using a Multi-Agent System Software Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, James P.; McLean, Neil; Gachagan, Anthony; McArthur, Stephen D. J.; Hayward, Gordon

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the application of a Multi-Agent System used in the design and qualification of ultrasonic NDT inspections using theoretical ultrasonic flaw-response modelling. When a large number of models are available the selection of the most appropriate one for a given inspection scenario becomes time-consuming; the disparate nature of the software models prevents easy integration with other NDT software tools to automate this process. A prototype Inspection Qualification Multi-Agent System has been developed which incorporates a rule-based software system to perform the flaw-response model selection procedure.

  15. Advancing lighting and daylighting simulation: The transition from analysis to design aid tools

    SciTech Connect

    Hitchcock, R.J.

    1995-05-01

    This paper explores three significant software development requirements for making the transition from stand-alone lighting simulation/analysis tools to simulation-based design aid tools. These requirements include specialized lighting simulation engines, facilitated methods for creating detailed simulatable building descriptions, an automated techniques for providing lighting design guidance. Initial computer implementations meant to address each of these requirements are discussed to further elaborate these requirements and to illustrate work-in-progress.

  16. Water quality management of aquifer recharge using advanced tools.

    PubMed

    Lazarova, Valentina; Emsellem, Yves; Paille, Julie; Glucina, Karl; Gislette, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) with recycled water or other alternative resources is one of the most rapidly growing techniques that is viewed as a necessity in water-short areas. In order to better control health and environmental effects of MAR, this paper presents two case studies demonstrating how to improve water quality, enable reliable tracing of injected water and better control and manage MAR operation in the case of indirect and direct aquifer recharge. Two water quality management strategies are illustrated on two full-scale case studies, including the results of the combination of non conventional and advanced technologies for water quality improvement, comprehensive sampling and monitoring programs including emerging pollutants, tracer studies using boron isotopes and integrative aquifer 3D GIS hydraulic and hydrodispersive modelling.

  17. Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride Light Emitting Diode Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Patibandla, Nag; Agrawal, Vivek

    2012-12-01

    Over the course of this program, Applied Materials, Inc., with generous support from the United States Department of Energy, developed a world-class three chamber III-Nitride epi cluster tool for low-cost, high volume GaN growth for the solid state lighting industry. One of the major achievements of the program was to design, build, and demonstrate the world’s largest wafer capacity HVPE chamber suitable for repeatable high volume III-Nitride template and device manufacturing. Applied Materials’ experience in developing deposition chambers for the silicon chip industry over many decades resulted in many orders of magnitude reductions in the price of transistors. That experience and understanding was used in developing this GaN epi deposition tool. The multi-chamber approach, which continues to be unique in the ability of the each chamber to deposit a section of the full device structure, unlike other cluster tools, allows for extreme flexibility in the manufacturing process. This robust architecture is suitable for not just the LED industry, but GaN power devices as well, both horizontal and vertical designs. The new HVPE technology developed allows GaN to be grown at a rate unheard of with MOCVD, up to 20x the typical MOCVD rates of 3{micro}m per hour, with bulk crystal quality better than the highest-quality commercial GaN films grown by MOCVD at a much cheaper overall cost. This is a unique development as the HVPE process has been known for decades, but never successfully commercially developed for high volume manufacturing. This research shows the potential of the first commercial-grade HVPE chamber, an elusive goal for III-V researchers and those wanting to capitalize on the promise of HVPE. Additionally, in the course of this program, Applied Materials built two MOCVD chambers, in addition to the HVPE chamber, and a robot that moves wafers between them. The MOCVD chambers demonstrated industry-leading wavelength yield for GaN based LED wafers and industry

  18. Using McIDAS-V data analysis and visualization software as an educational tool for understanding the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtor, T. H.; Rink, T.

    2010-12-01

    The University of Wisconsin’s Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC) has been at the forefront in developing data analysis and visualization tools for environmental satellites and other geophysical data. The fifth generation of the Man-computer Interactive Data Access System (McIDAS-V) is Java-based, open-source, freely available software that operates on Linux, Macintosh and Windows systems. The software tools provide powerful new data manipulation and visualization capabilities that work with geophysical data in research, operational and educational environments. McIDAS-V provides unique capabilities to support innovative techniques for evaluating research results, teaching and training. McIDAS-V is based on three powerful software elements. VisAD is a Java library for building interactive, collaborative, 4 dimensional visualization and analysis tools. The Integrated Data Viewer (IDV) is a reference application based on the VisAD system and developed by the Unidata program that demonstrates the flexibility that is needed in this evolving environment, using a modern, object-oriented software design approach. The third tool, HYDRA, allows users to build, display and interrogate multi and hyperspectral environmental satellite data in powerful ways. The McIDAS-V software is being used for training and education in several settings. The McIDAS User Group provides training workshops at its annual meeting. Numerous online tutorials with training data sets have been developed to aid users in learning simple and more complex operations in McIDAS-V, all are available online. In a University of Wisconsin-Madison undergraduate course in Radar and Satellite Meteorology, McIDAS-V is used to create and deliver laboratory exercises using case study and real time data. At the high school level, McIDAS-V is used in several exercises in our annual Summer Workshop in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences to provide young scientists the opportunity to examine data with friendly and

  19. WaveAR: A software tool for calculating parameters for water waves with incident and reflected components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Blake J.; Hancock, Matthew J.; Mei, Chiang C.; García, Marcelo H.

    2012-09-01

    The ability to determine wave heights and phases along a spatial domain is vital to understanding a wide range of littoral processes. The software tool presented here employs established Stokes wave theory and sampling methods to calculate parameters for the incident and reflected components of a field of weakly nonlinear waves, monochromatic at first order in wave slope and propagating in one horizontal dimension. The software calculates wave parameters over an entire wave tank and accounts for reflection, weak nonlinearity, and a free second harmonic. Currently, no publicly available program has such functionality. The included MATLAB®-based open source code has also been compiled for Windows®, Mac® and Linux® operating systems. An additional companion program, VirtualWave, is included to generate virtual wave fields for WaveAR. Together, the programs serve as ideal analysis and teaching tools for laboratory water wave systems.

  20. The Seismic Tool-Kit (STK): an open source software for seismology and signal processing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reymond, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    We present an open source software project (GNU public license), named STK: Seismic ToolKit, that is dedicated mainly for seismology and signal processing. The STK project that started in 2007, is hosted by SourceForge.net, and count more than 19 500 downloads at the date of writing. The STK project is composed of two main branches: First, a graphical interface dedicated to signal processing (in the SAC format (SAC_ASCII and SAC_BIN): where the signal can be plotted, zoomed, filtered, integrated, derivated, ... etc. (a large variety of IFR and FIR filter is proposed). The estimation of spectral density of the signal are performed via the Fourier transform, with visualization of the Power Spectral Density (PSD) in linear or log scale, and also the evolutive time-frequency representation (or sonagram). The 3-components signals can be also processed for estimating their polarization properties, either for a given window, or either for evolutive windows along the time. This polarization analysis is useful for extracting the polarized noises, differentiating P waves, Rayleigh waves, Love waves, ... etc. Secondly, a panel of Utilities-Program are proposed for working in a terminal mode, with basic programs for computing azimuth and distance in spherical geometry, inter/auto-correlation, spectral density, time-frequency for an entire directory of signals, focal planes, and main components axis, radiation pattern of P waves, Polarization analysis of different waves (including noize), under/over-sampling the signals, cubic-spline smoothing, and linear/non linear regression analysis of data set. A MINimum library of Linear AlGebra (MIN-LINAG) is also provided for computing the main matrix process like: QR/QL decomposition, Cholesky solve of linear system, finding eigen value/eigen vectors, QR-solve/Eigen-solve of linear equations systems ... etc. STK is developed in C/C++, mainly under Linux OS, and it has been also partially implemented under MS-Windows. Usefull links: http

  1. AN ADVANCED TOOL FOR APPLIED INTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Potts, T. Todd; Hylko, James M.; Douglas, Terence A.

    2003-02-27

    WESKEM, LLC's Environmental, Safety and Health (ES&H) Department had previously assessed that a lack of consistency, poor communication and using antiquated communication tools could result in varying operating practices, as well as a failure to capture and disseminate appropriate Integrated Safety Management (ISM) information. To address these issues, the ES&H Department established an Activity Hazard Review (AHR)/Activity Hazard Analysis (AHA) process for systematically identifying, assessing, and controlling hazards associated with project work activities during work planning and execution. Depending on the scope of a project, information from field walkdowns and table-top meetings are collected on an AHR form. The AHA then documents the potential failure and consequence scenarios for a particular hazard. Also, the AHA recommends whether the type of mitigation appears appropriate or whether additional controls should be implemented. Since the application is web based, the information is captured into a single system and organized according to the >200 work activities already recorded in the database. Using the streamlined AHA method improved cycle time from over four hours to an average of one hour, allowing more time to analyze unique hazards and develop appropriate controls. Also, the enhanced configuration control created a readily available AHA library to research and utilize along with standardizing hazard analysis and control selection across four separate work sites located in Kentucky and Tennessee. The AHR/AHA system provides an applied example of how the ISM concept evolved into a standardized field-deployed tool yielding considerable efficiency gains in project planning and resource utilization. Employee safety is preserved through detailed planning that now requires only a portion of the time previously necessary. The available resources can then be applied to implementing appropriate engineering, administrative and personal protective equipment

  2. New EPA 'PLUS' software: A useful tool for local emergency planners

    SciTech Connect

    Anastas, P.T.; Tobin, P.S.

    1993-09-01

    EPA's Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics has produced a new bibliographic database designed for local emergency planners. The PLUS'' (Planner's Library in User-friendly Software) system is a resource database containing abstracts of hundreds of references useful in planning for hazardous substances emergencies. The software's structure allows planners to construct customized search strategies for generating lists of emergency planning-related references on subjects ranging from chemical profiles to personal protective gear.

  3. Hybrid Modeling for Scenario-Based Evaluation of Failure Effects in Advanced Hardware-Software Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Fleming, Land; Throop, David

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an incremental scenario-based simulation approach to evaluation of intelligent software for control and management of hardware systems. A hybrid continuous/discrete event simulation of the hardware dynamically interacts with the intelligent software in operations scenarios. Embedded anomalous conditions and failures in simulated hardware can lead to emergent software behavior and identification of missing or faulty software or hardware requirements. An approach is described for extending simulation-based automated incremental failure modes and effects analysis, to support concurrent evaluation of intelligent software and the hardware controlled by the software

  4. Advances in hardware, software, and automation for 193nm aerial image measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibold, Axel M.; Schmid, R.; Seyfarth, A.; Waechter, M.; Harnisch, W.; Doornmalen, H. v.

    2005-05-01

    A new, second generation AIMS fab 193 system has been developed which is capable of emulating lithographic imaging of any type of reticles such as binary and phase shift masks (PSM) including resolution enhancement technologies (RET) such as optical proximity correction (OPC) or scatter bars. The system emulates the imaging process by adjustment of the lithography equivalent illumination and imaging conditions of 193nm wafer steppers including circular, annular, dipole and quadrupole type illumination modes. The AIMS fab 193 allows a rapid prediction of wafer printability of critical mask features, including dense patterns and contacts, defects or repairs by acquiring through-focus image stacks by means of a CCD camera followed by quantitative image analysis. Moreover the technology can be readily applied to directly determine the process window of a given mask under stepper imaging conditions. Since data acquisition is performed electronically, AIMS in many applications replaces the need for costly and time consuming wafer prints using a wafer stepper/ scanner followed by CD SEM resist or wafer analysis. The AIMS fab 193 second generation system is designed for 193nm lithography mask printing predictability down to the 65nm node. In addition to hardware improvements a new modular AIMS software is introduced allowing for a fully automated operation mode. Multiple pre-defined points can be visited and through-focus AIMS measurements can be executed automatically in a recipe based mode. To increase the effectiveness of the automated operation mode, the throughput of the system to locate the area of interest, and to acquire the through-focus images is increased by almost a factor of two in comparison with the first generation AIMS systems. In addition a new software plug-in concept is realised for the tools. One new feature has been successfully introduced as "Global CD Map", enabling automated investigation of global mask quality based on the local determination of

  5. GUM2DFT—a software tool for uncertainty evaluation of transient signals in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichstädt, S.; Wilkens, V.

    2016-05-01

    The Fourier transform and its counterpart for discrete time signals, the discrete Fourier transform (DFT), are common tools in measurement science and application. Although almost every scientific software package offers ready-to-use implementations of the DFT, the propagation of uncertainties in line with the guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM) is typically neglected. This is of particular importance in dynamic metrology, when input estimation is carried out by deconvolution in the frequency domain. To this end, we present the new open-source software tool GUM2DFT, which utilizes closed formulas for the efficient propagation of uncertainties for the application of the DFT, inverse DFT and input estimation in the frequency domain. It handles different frequency domain representations, accounts for autocorrelation and takes advantage of the symmetry inherent in the DFT result for real-valued time domain signals. All tools are presented in terms of examples which form part of the software package. GUM2DFT will foster GUM-compliant evaluation of uncertainty in a DFT-based analysis and enable metrologists to include uncertainty evaluations in their routine work.

  6. Towards a publicly available, map-based regional software tool to estimate unregulated daily streamflow at ungauged rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archfield, Stacey A.; Steeves, Peter A.; Guthrie, John D.; Ries, Kernell G.

    2013-01-01

    Streamflow information is critical for addressing any number of hydrologic problems. Often, streamflow information is needed at locations that are ungauged and, therefore, have no observations on which to base water management decisions. Furthermore, there has been increasing need for daily streamflow time series to manage rivers for both human and ecological functions. To facilitate negotiation between human and ecological demands for water, this paper presents the first publicly available, map-based, regional software tool to estimate historical, unregulated, daily streamflow time series (streamflow not affected by human alteration such as dams or water withdrawals) at any user-selected ungauged river location. The map interface allows users to locate and click on a river location, which then links to a spreadsheet-based program that computes estimates of daily streamflow for the river location selected. For a demonstration region in the northeast United States, daily streamflow was, in general, shown to be reliably estimated by the software tool. Estimating the highest and lowest streamflows that occurred in the demonstration region over the period from 1960 through 2004 also was accomplished but with more difficulty and limitations. The software tool provides a general framework that can be applied to other regions for which daily streamflow estimates are needed.

  7. Scanning magnetoresistive microscopy: An advanced characterization tool for magnetic nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitin, D.; Grobis, M.; Albrecht, M.

    2016-02-01

    An advanced scanning magnetoresistive microscopy (SMRM) — a robust magnetic imaging and probing technique — will be presented, which utilizes state-of-the-art recording heads of a hard disk drive as sensors. The spatial resolution of modern tunneling magnetoresistive sensors is nowadays comparable to the more commonly used magnetic force microscopes. Important advantages of SMRM are the ability to detect pure magnetic signals directly proportional to the out-of-plane magnetic stray field, negligible sensor stray fields, and the ability to apply local bipolar magnetic field pulses up to 10 kOe with bandwidths from DC up to 1 GHz. Moreover, the SMRM can be further equipped with a heating stage and external magnetic field units. The performance of this method and corresponding best practices are demonstrated by presenting various examples, including a temperature dependent recording study on hard magnetic L10 FeCuPt thin films, imaging of magnetic vortex states in an in-plane magnetic field, and their controlled manipulation by applying local field pulses.

  8. Scanning magnetoresistive microscopy: An advanced characterization tool for magnetic nanosystems.

    PubMed

    Mitin, D; Grobis, M; Albrecht, M

    2016-02-01

    An advanced scanning magnetoresistive microscopy (SMRM) - a robust magnetic imaging and probing technique - will be presented, which utilizes state-of-the-art recording heads of a hard disk drive as sensors. The spatial resolution of modern tunneling magnetoresistive sensors is nowadays comparable to the more commonly used magnetic force microscopes. Important advantages of SMRM are the ability to detect pure magnetic signals directly proportional to the out-of-plane magnetic stray field, negligible sensor stray fields, and the ability to apply local bipolar magnetic field pulses up to 10 kOe with bandwidths from DC up to 1 GHz. Moreover, the SMRM can be further equipped with a heating stage and external magnetic field units. The performance of this method and corresponding best practices are demonstrated by presenting various examples, including a temperature dependent recording study on hard magnetic L1(0) FeCuPt thin films, imaging of magnetic vortex states in an in-plane magnetic field, and their controlled manipulation by applying local field pulses. PMID:26931856

  9. Advanced Flow Control as a Management Tool in the National Airspace System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wugalter, S.

    1974-01-01

    Advanced Flow Control is closely related to Air Traffic Control. Air Traffic Control is the business of the Federal Aviation Administration. To formulate an understanding of advanced flow control and its use as a management tool in the National Airspace System, it becomes necessary to speak somewhat of air traffic control, the role of FAA, and their relationship to advanced flow control. Also, this should dispell forever, any notion that advanced flow control is the inspirational master valve scheme to be used on the Alaskan Oil Pipeline.

  10. Advanced tools for astronomical time series and image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    The algorithms described here, which I have developed for applications in X-ray and γ-ray astronomy, will hopefully be of use in other ways, perhaps aiding in the exploration of modern astronomy's data cornucopia. The goal is to describe principled approaches to some ubiquitous problems, such as detection and characterization of periodic and aperiodic signals, estimation of time delays between multiple time series, and source detection in noisy images with noisy backgrounds. The latter problem is related to detection of clusters in data spaces of various dimensions. A goal of this work is to achieve a unifying view of several related topics: signal detection and characterization, cluster identification, classification, density estimation, and multivariate regression. In addition to being useful for analysis of data from space-based and ground-based missions, these algorithms may be a basis for a future automatic science discovery facility, and in turn provide analysis tools for the Virtual Observatory. This chapter has ties to those by Larry Bretthorst, Tom Loredo, Alanna Connors, Fionn Murtagh, Jim Berger, David van Dyk, Vicent Martinez & Enn Saar.

  11. Lilith: A software framework for the rapid development of scalable tools for distributed computing

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, A.C.; Evensky, D.A.; Armstrong, R.C.

    1998-03-01

    Lilith is a general purpose framework, written in Java, that provides a highly scalable distribution of user code across a heterogeneous computing platform. By creation of suitable user code, the Lilith framework can be used for tool development. The scalable performance provided by Lilith is crucial to the development of effective tools for large distributed systems. Furthermore, since Lilith handles the details of code distribution and communication, the user code need focus primarily on the tool functionality, thus, greatly decreasing the time required for tool development. In this paper, the authors concentrate on the use of the Lilith framework to develop scalable tools. The authors review the functionality of Lilith and introduce a typical tool capitalizing on the features of the framework. They present new Objects directly involved with tool creation. They explain details of development and illustrate with an example. They present timing results demonstrating scalability.

  12. TU-C-17A-03: An Integrated Contour Evaluation Software Tool Using Supervised Pattern Recognition for Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Tan, J; Kavanaugh, J; Dolly, S; Gay, H; Thorstad, W; Anastasio, M; Altman, M; Mutic, S; Li, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) contours delineated either manually or semiautomatically require verification before clinical usage. Manual evaluation is very time consuming. A new integrated software tool using supervised pattern contour recognition was thus developed to facilitate this process. Methods: The contouring tool was developed using an object-oriented programming language C# and application programming interfaces, e.g. visualization toolkit (VTK). The C# language served as the tool design basis. The Accord.Net scientific computing libraries were utilized for the required statistical data processing and pattern recognition, while the VTK was used to build and render 3-D mesh models from critical RT structures in real-time and 360° visualization. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used for system self-updating geometry variations of normal structures based on physician-approved RT contours as a training dataset. The inhouse design of supervised PCA-based contour recognition method was used for automatically evaluating contour normality/abnormality. The function for reporting the contour evaluation results was implemented by using C# and Windows Form Designer. Results: The software input was RT simulation images and RT structures from commercial clinical treatment planning systems. Several abilities were demonstrated: automatic assessment of RT contours, file loading/saving of various modality medical images and RT contours, and generation/visualization of 3-D images and anatomical models. Moreover, it supported the 360° rendering of the RT structures in a multi-slice view, which allows physicians to visually check and edit abnormally contoured structures. Conclusion: This new software integrates the supervised learning framework with image processing and graphical visualization modules for RT contour verification. This tool has great potential for facilitating treatment planning with the assistance of an automatic contour evaluation module in avoiding

  13. Advancing alternate tools: why science education needs CRP and CRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodo Seriki, Vanessa

    2016-09-01

    Ridgeway and Yerrick's paper, Whose banner are we waving?: exploring STEM partnerships for marginalized urban youth, unearthed the tensions that existed between a local community "expert" and a group of students and their facilitator in an afterschool program. Those of us who work with youth who are traditionally marginalized, understand the importance of teaching in culturally relevant ways, but far too often—as Ridgeway and Yerrick shared—community partners have beliefs, motives, and ideologies that are incompatible to the program's mission and goals. Nevertheless, we often enter partnerships assuming that the other party understands the needs of the students or community; understands how in U.S. society White is normative while all others are deficient; and understands how to engage with students in culturally relevant ways. This forum addresses the underlying assumption, described in the Ridgeway and Yerrick article, that educators—despite their background and experiences—are able to teach in culturally relevant ways. Additionally, I assert based on the finding in the article that just as Ladson-Billings and Tate (Teach Coll Rec 97(1):47-68, 1995) asserted, race in the U.S. society, as a scholarly pursuit, was under theorized. The same is true of science education; race in science education is under theorized and the use of culturally relevant pedagogy and critical race theory as a pedagogical model and analytical tool, respectively, in science education is minimal. The increased use of both would impact our understanding of who does science, and how to broaden participation among people of color.

  14. Tools for quantitative form description; an evaluation of different software packages for semi-landmark analysis

    PubMed Central

    Houssaye, Alexandra; Herrel, Anthony; Fabre, Anne-Claire; Cornette, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    The challenging complexity of biological structures has led to the development of several methods for quantitative analyses of form. Bones are shaped by the interaction of historical (phylogenetic), structural, and functional constrains. Consequently, bone shape has been investigated intensively in an evolutionary context. Geometric morphometric approaches allow the description of the shape of an object in all of its biological complexity. However, when biological objects present only few anatomical landmarks, sliding semi-landmarks may provide good descriptors of shape. The sliding procedure, mandatory for sliding semi-landmarks, requires several steps that may be time-consuming. We here compare the time required by two different software packages (‘Edgewarp’ and ‘Morpho’) for the same sliding task, and investigate potential differences in the results and biological interpretation. ‘Morpho’ is much faster than ‘Edgewarp,’ notably as a result of the greater computational power of the ‘Morpho’ software routines and the complexity of the ‘Edgewarp’ workflow. Morphospaces obtained using both software packages are similar and provide a consistent description of the biological variability. The principal differences between the two software packages are observed in areas characterized by abrupt changes in the bone topography. In summary, both software packages perform equally well in terms of the description of biological structures, yet differ in the simplicity of the workflow and time needed to perform the analyses. PMID:26618086

  15. Lilith: A software framework for the rapid development of scalable tools for distributed computing

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, A.C.; Evensky, D.A.; Armstrong, R.C.

    1997-12-31

    Lilith is a general purpose tool that provides a highly scalable, easy distribution of user code across a heterogeneous computing platform. By handling the details of code distribution and communication, such a framework allows for the rapid development of tools for the use and management of large distributed systems. This speed-up in development not only enables the easy creation of tools as needed but also facilitates the ultimate development of more refined, hard-coded tools as well. Lilith is written in Java, providing platform independence and further facilitating rapid tool development through Object reuse and ease of development. The authors present the user-involved objects in the Lilith Distributed Object System and the Lilith User API. They present an example of tool development, illustrating the user calls, and present results demonstrating Lilith`s scalability.

  16. Comparison of a Web-Based Dietary Assessment Tool with Software for the Evaluation of Dietary Records

    PubMed Central

    BENEDIK, Evgen; KOROUŠIĆ SELJAK, Barbara; HRIBAR, Maša; ROGELJ, Irena; BRATANIČ, Borut; OREL, Rok; FIDLER MIS, Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Background Dietary assessment in clinical practice is performed by means of computer support, either in the form of a web-based tool or software. The aim of the paper is to present the results of the comparison of a Slovenian web-based tool with German software for the evaluation of four-day weighted paper-and-pencil-based dietary records (paper-DRs) in pregnant women. Methods A volunteer group of pregnant women (n=63) completed paper-DRs. These records were entered by an experienced research dietitian into a web-based application (Open Platform for Clinical Nutrition, OPEN, http://opkp.si/en, Ljubljana, Slovenia) and software application (Prodi 5.7 Expert plus, Nutri-Science, Stuttgart, Germany, 2011). The results for calculated energy intake, as well as 45 macro- and micronutrient intakes, were statistically compared by using the non-parametric Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. The cut-off for Spearman’s rho was set at >0.600. Results 12 nutritional parameters (energy, carbohydrates, fat, protein, water, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, dietary fiber, vitamin C, folic acid, and stearic acid) were in high correlation (>0.800), 18 in moderate (0.600–0.799), 11 in weak correlation (0.400–0.599), while 5 (arachidonic acid, niacin, alpha-linolenic acid, fluoride, total sugars) did not show any statistical correlation. Conclusion Comparison of the results of the evaluation of dietary records using a web-based dietary assessment tool with those using software shows that there is a high correlation for energy and macronutrient content.

  17. Development of a case tool to support decision based software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wild, Christian J.

    1993-01-01

    A summary of the accomplishments of the research over the past year are presented. Achievements include: made demonstrations with DHC, a prototype supporting decision based software development (DBSD) methodology, for Paramax personnel at ODU; met with Paramax personnel to discuss DBSD issues, the process of integrating DBSD and Refinery and the porting process model; completed and submitted a paper describing DBSD paradigm to IFIP '92; completed and presented a paper describing the approach for software reuse at the Software Reuse Workshop in April 1993; continued to extend DHC with a project agenda, facility necessary for a better project management; completed a primary draft of the re-engineering process model for porting; created a logging form to trace all the activities involved in the process of solving the reengineering problem, and developed a primary chart with the problems involved by the reengineering process.

  18. The NetVISA automatic association tool. Next generation software testing and performance under realistic conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bras, Ronan; Arora, Nimar; Kushida, Noriyuki; Tomuta, Elena; Kebede, Fekadu; Feitio, Paulino

    2016-04-01

    The CTBTO's International Data Centre is in the process of developing the next generation software to perform the automatic association step. The NetVISA software uses a Bayesian approach with a forward physical model using probabilistic representations of the propagation, station capabilities, background seismicity, noise detection statistics, and coda phase statistics. The software has been in development for a few years and is now reaching the stage where it is being tested in a realistic operational context. An interactive module has been developed where the NetVISA automatic events that are in addition to the Global Association (GA) results are presented to the analysts. We report on a series of tests where the results are examined and evaluated by seasoned analysts. Consistent with the statistics previously reported (Arora et al., 2013), the first test shows that the software is able to enhance analysis work by providing additional event hypothesis for consideration by analysts. A test on a three-day data set was performed and showed that the system found 42 additional real events out of 116 examined, including 6 that pass the criterion for the Reviewed Event Bulletin of the IDC. The software was functional in a realistic, real-time mode, during the occurrence of the fourth nuclear test claimed by the Democratic People's Republic of Korea on January 6th, 2016. Confirming a previous statistical observation, the software found more associated stations (51, including 35 primary stations) than GA (36, including 26 primary stations) for this event. Nimar S. Arora, Stuart Russell, Erik Sudderth. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (BSSA) April 2013, vol. 103 no. 2A pp709-729.

  19. ARCHER, a New Monte Carlo Software Tool for Emerging Heterogeneous Computing Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. George; Liu, Tianyu; Su, Lin; Du, Xining; Riblett, Matthew; Ji, Wei; Gu, Deyang; Carothers, Christopher D.; Shephard, Mark S.; Brown, Forrest B.; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Liu, Bob

    2014-06-01

    The Monte Carlo radiation transport community faces a number of challenges associated with peta- and exa-scale computing systems that rely increasingly on heterogeneous architectures involving hardware accelerators such as GPUs. Existing Monte Carlo codes and methods must be strategically upgraded to meet emerging hardware and software needs. In this paper, we describe the development of a software, called ARCHER (Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous EnviRonments), which is designed as a versatile testbed for future Monte Carlo codes. Preliminary results from five projects in nuclear engineering and medical physics are presented.

  20. A Component Approach to Collaborative Scientific Software Development: Tools and Techniques Utilized by the Quantum Chemistry Science Application Partnership

    DOE PAGES

    Kenny, Joseph P.; Janssen, Curtis L.; Gordon, Mark S.; Sosonkina, Masha; Windus, Theresa L.

    2008-01-01

    Cutting-edge scientific computing software is complex, increasingly involving the coupling of multiple packages to combine advanced algorithms or simulations at multiple physical scales. Component-based software engineering (CBSE) has been advanced as a technique for managing this complexity, and complex component applications have been created in the quantum chemistry domain, as well as several other simulation areas, using the component model advocated by the Common Component Architecture (CCA) Forum. While programming models do indeed enable sound software engineering practices, the selection of programming model is just one building block in a comprehensive approach to large-scale collaborative development which must also addressmore » interface and data standardization, and language and package interoperability. We provide an overview of the development approach utilized within the Quantum Chemistry Science Application Partnership, identifying design challenges, describing the techniques which we have adopted to address these challenges and highlighting the advantages which the CCA approach offers for collaborative development.« less

  1. Advances in Coupling of Kinetics and Molecular Scale Tools to Shed Light on Soil Biogeochemical Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, Donald

    2014-09-02

    Biogeochemical processes in soils such as sorption, precipitation, and redox play critical roles in the cycling and fate of nutrients, metal(loid)s and organic chemicals in soil and water environments. Advanced analytical tools enable soil scientists to track these processes in real-time and at the molecular scale. Our review focuses on recent research that has employed state-of-the-art molecular scale spectroscopy, coupled with kinetics, to elucidate the mechanisms of nutrient and metal(loid) reactivity and speciation in soils. We found that by coupling kinetics with advanced molecular and nano-scale tools major advances have been made in elucidating important soil chemical processes including sorption, precipitation, dissolution, and redox of metal(loids) and nutrients. Such advances will aid in better predicting the fate and mobility of nutrients and contaminants in soils and water and enhance environmental and agricultural sustainability.

  2. Software tool for the analysis and visualization of whole genome alignments

    2011-08-01

    GenomeVISTA is a tool which performs and displays pairwise and multiple whole genome DNA alignments. The tools provides a graphical user interface by which users can navigate alignments and multiple levels of resolution and get imformation about individual aligned regions. Users can load their own sequences into GenomeVISTA or view pre-computed alignments for genomes in the VISTA database.

  3. Development of a software tool and criteria evaluation for efficient design of small interfering RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, Aparna; Srivastava, Sonam; Garg, Sanjeev

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} The developed tool predicted siRNA constructs with better thermodynamic stability and total score based on positional and other criteria. {yields} Off-target silencing below score 30 were observed for the best siRNA constructs for different genes. {yields} Immunostimulation and cytotoxicity motifs considered and penalized in the developed tool. {yields} Both positional and compositional criteria were observed to be important. -- Abstract: RNA interference can be used as a tool for gene silencing mediated by small interfering RNAs (siRNA). The critical step in effective and specific RNAi processing is the selection of suitable constructs. Major design criteria, i.e., Reynolds's design rules, thermodynamic stability, internal repeats, immunostimulatory motifs were emphasized and implemented in the siRNA design tool. The tool provides thermodynamic stability score, GC content and a total score based on other design criteria in the output. The viability of the tool was established with different datasets. In general, the siRNA constructs produced by the tool had better thermodynamic score and positional properties. Comparable thermodynamic scores and better total scores were observed with the existing tools. Moreover, the results generated had comparable off-target silencing effect. Criteria evaluations with additional criteria were achieved in WEKA.

  4. The Comprehensive Evaluation of Electronic Learning Tools and Educational Software (CEELTES)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karolcík, Štefan; Cipková, Elena; Hrušecký, Roman; Veselský, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that digital technologies are more and more used in the learning and education process, there is still lack of professional evaluation tools capable of assessing the quality of used digital teaching aids in a comprehensive and objective manner. Construction of the Comprehensive Evaluation of Electronic Learning Tools and…

  5. APASVO: A free software tool for automatic P-phase picking and event detection in seismic traces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, José Emilio; Titos, Manuel; Bueno, Ángel; Álvarez, Isaac; García, Luz; Torre, Ángel de la; Benítez, M.a. Carmen

    2016-05-01

    The accurate estimation of the arrival time of seismic waves or picking is a problem of major interest in seismic research given its relevance in many seismological applications, such as earthquake source location and active seismic tomography. In the last decades, several automatic picking methods have been proposed with the ultimate goal of implementing picking algorithms whose results are comparable to those obtained by manual picking. In order to facilitate the use of these automated methods in the analysis of seismic traces, this paper presents a new free, open source, software graphical tool, named APASVO, which allows picking tasks in an easy and user-friendly way. The tool also provides event detection functionality, where a relatively imprecise estimation of the onset time is sufficient. The application implements the STA-LTA detection algorithm and the AMPA picking algorithm. An autoregressive AIC-based picking method can also be applied. Besides, this graphical tool is complemented with two additional command line tools, an event picking tool and a synthetic earthquake generator. APASVO is a multiplatform tool that works on Windows, Linux and OS X. The application can process data in a large variety of file formats. It is implemented in Python and relies on well-known scientific computing packages such as ObsPy, NumPy, SciPy and Matplotlib.

  6. OutbreakTools: A new platform for disease outbreak analysis using the R software

    PubMed Central

    Jombart, Thibaut; Aanensen, David M.; Baguelin, Marc; Birrell, Paul; Cauchemez, Simon; Camacho, Anton; Colijn, Caroline; Collins, Caitlin; Cori, Anne; Didelot, Xavier; Fraser, Christophe; Frost, Simon; Hens, Niel; Hugues, Joseph; Höhle, Michael; Opatowski, Lulla; Rambaut, Andrew; Ratmann, Oliver; Soubeyrand, Samuel; Suchard, Marc A.; Wallinga, Jacco; Ypma, Rolf; Ferguson, Neil

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of infectious disease outbreaks relies on the analysis of increasingly complex and diverse data, which offer new prospects for gaining insights into disease transmission processes and informing public health policies. However, the potential of such data can only be harnessed using a number of different, complementary approaches and tools, and a unified platform for the analysis of disease outbreaks is still lacking. In this paper, we present the new R package OutbreakTools, which aims to provide a basis for outbreak data management and analysis in R. OutbreakTools is developed by a community of epidemiologists, statisticians, modellers and bioinformaticians, and implements classes and methods for storing, handling and visualizing outbreak data. It includes real and simulated outbreak datasets. Together with a number of tools for infectious disease epidemiology recently made available in R, OutbreakTools contributes to the emergence of a new, free and open-source platform for the analysis of disease outbreaks. PMID:24928667

  7. In-depth evaluation of software tools for data-independent acquisition based label-free quantification.

    PubMed

    Kuharev, Jörg; Navarro, Pedro; Distler, Ute; Jahn, Olaf; Tenzer, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Label-free quantification (LFQ) based on data-independent acquisition workflows currently experiences increasing popularity. Several software tools have been recently published or are commercially available. The present study focuses on the evaluation of three different software packages (Progenesis, synapter, and ISOQuant) supporting ion mobility enhanced data-independent acquisition data. In order to benchmark the LFQ performance of the different tools, we generated two hybrid proteome samples of defined quantitative composition containing tryptically digested proteomes of three different species (mouse, yeast, Escherichia coli). This model dataset simulates complex biological samples containing large numbers of both unregulated (background) proteins as well as up- and downregulated proteins with exactly known ratios between samples. We determined the number and dynamic range of quantifiable proteins and analyzed the influence of applied algorithms (retention time alignment, clustering, normalization, etc.) on quantification results. Analysis of technical reproducibility revealed median coefficients of variation of reported protein abundances below 5% for MS(E) data for Progenesis and ISOQuant. Regarding accuracy of LFQ, evaluation with synapter and ISOQuant yielded superior results compared to Progenesis. In addition, we discuss reporting formats and user friendliness of the software packages. The data generated in this study have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with identifier PXD001240 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001240).

  8. Apache Open Climate Workbench: Building Open Source Climate Science Tools and Community at the Apache Software Foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, M.; Ramirez, P.; Boustani, M.; Mattmann, C. A.; Khudikyan, S.; McGibbney, L. J.; Whitehall, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    Apache Open Climate Workbench (OCW; https://climate.apache.org/) is a Top-Level Project at the Apache Software Foundation that aims to provide a suite of tools for performing climate science evaluations using model outputs from a multitude of different sources (ESGF, CORDEX, U.S. NCA, NARCCAP) with remote sensing data from NASA, NOAA, and other agencies. Apache OCW is the second NASA project to become a Top-Level Project at the Apache Software Foundation. It grew out of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Regional Climate Model Evaluation System (RCMES) project, a collaboration between JPL and the University of California, Los Angeles' Joint Institute for Regional Earth System Science and Engineering (JIFRESSE). Apache OCW provides scientists and developers with tools for data manipulation, metrics for dataset comparisons, and a visualization suite. In addition to a powerful low-level API, Apache OCW also supports a web application for quick, browser-controlled evaluations, a command line application for local evaluations, and a virtual machine for isolated experimentation with minimal setup. This talk will look at the difficulties and successes of moving a closed community research project out into the wild world of open source. We'll explore the growing pains Apache OCW went through to become a Top-Level Project at the Apache Software Foundation as well as the benefits gained by opening up development to the broader climate and computer science communities.

  9. Novel development tool for software pipeline optimization for VLIW-DSPs used in real-time image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuertler, Johannes; Mayer, Konrad J.; Krattenthaler, Werner; Bajla, Ivan

    2003-04-01

    Although the hardware platform is often seen as the most important element of real-time imaging systems, software optimization can also provide remarkable reduction of overall computational costs. The recommended code development flow for digital signal processors based on the TMS320C6000(TM) architecture usually involves three phases: development of C code, refinement of C code, and programming linear assembly code. Each step requires a different level of knowledge of processor internals. The developer is not directly involved in the automatic scheduling process. In some cases, however, this may result in unacceptable code performance. A better solution can be achieved by scheduling the assembly code by hand. Unfortunately, scheduling of software pipelines by hand not only requires expert skills but is also time consuming, and moreover, prone to errors. To overcome these drawbacks we have designed an innovative development tool - the Software Pipeline Optimization Tool (SPOT(TM)). The SPOT is based on visualization of the scheduled assembly code by a two-dimensional interactive schedule editor, which is equipped with feedback mechanisms deduced from analysis of data dependencies and resource allocation conflicts. The paper addresses optimization techniques available by the application of the SPOT. Furthermore, the benefit of the SPOT is documented by more than 20 optimized image processing algorithms.

  10. SABRE--A Novel Software Tool for Bibliographic Post-Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burge, Cecil D.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the software architecture and application of SABRE (Semi-Automated Bibliographic Environment), which is one of the first products to provide a semi-automatic environment for relevancy ranking of citations obtained from searches of bibliographic databases. Features designed to meet the review, categorization, culling, and reporting needs…

  11. Designing, Developing and Implementing a Software Tool for Scenario Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Geoff; Taylor, Mathew; Stewart, Terry; Blackburn, Greg; Jinks, Audrey; Razdar, Bahareh; Holmes, Paul; Marastoni, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    The pedagogical value of problem-based and inquiry-based learning activities has led to increased use of this approach in many courses. While scenarios or case studies were initially presented to learners as text-based material, the development of modern software technology provides the opportunity to deliver scenarios as e-learning modules,…

  12. Software tools for data modelling and processing of human body temperature circadian dynamics.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Elena S; Afanasova, Anastasia I

    2015-01-01

    This paper is presenting a software development for simulating and processing thermometry data. The motivation of this research is the miniaturization of actuators attached to human body which allow frequent temperature measurements and improve the medical diagnosis procedures related to circadian dynamics.

  13. Teaching Locus with a Conserved Property by Integrating Mathematical Tools and Dynamic Geometric Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stupel, Moshe; Segal, Ruti; Oxman, Victor

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we present investigative tasks that concern loci, which integrate the use of dynamic geometry software (DGS) with mathematics for proving the obtained figures. Additional conditions were added to the loci: ellipse, parabola and circle, which result in the emergence of new loci, similar in form to the original loci. The…

  14. MS DOS Tool Software Including Public Domain, Grades 6-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist teachers and supervisors in introducing middle and high school students to the MS DOS computer and its functional application software in word processing, database management, and spreadsheet analysis. The guide begins by introducing students to computers: when and how they are used, hardware and…

  15. TeraTools: Multiparameter data acquisition software for the Windows 95/NT OS

    SciTech Connect

    Piercey, R.B.

    1997-12-31

    TeraTools, a general purpose, multiparameter, data acquisition application for Windows 95NT is described. It is based on the Kmax architecture which has been used since 1986 on the Macintosh computer at numerous industrial, education, and research sites world-wide. TeraTools includes high-level support for industry-standard modular instrumentation; a built-in scripting language; drivers for commercially available interfaces; hooks for external code extensions; event file sorting and replay; and a full set of histogramming and display tools. The environment is scalable and may be applied to problems involving a few parameters or many parameters.

  16. Basis of Estimate Software Tool (BEST) - a practical solution to part of the cost and schedule integration puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, L.; Bain, P.

    1997-02-01

    The Basis of Estimate Software Tool (BEST) was developed at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) to bridge the gap that exists in conventional project control systems between scheduled activities, their allocated or assigned resources, and the set of assumptions (basis of estimate) that correlate resources and activities. Having a documented and auditable basis of estimate (BOE) is necessary for budget validation, work scope analysis, change control, and a number of related management control functions. The uniqueness of BEST is demonstrated by the manner in which it responds to the diverse needs of the heavily regulated environmental workplace - containing many features not found in conventional off-the-shelf software products. However, even companies dealing in relatively unregulated work places will find many attractive features in BEST. This product will be of particular interest to current Government contractors and contractors preparing proposals that may require subsequent validation. 2 figs.

  17. A new software tool is developed to evaluate the measured/simulated transmission characteristics of optical multiplexers/demultiplexers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyringer, D.; Schmid, P.

    2011-10-01

    A new software tool, called AWG-Analyzer, is developed to evaluate the simulated/measured transmission characteristics of optical multiplexers/demultiplexers based on arrayed waveguide gratings (AWG). The output of the calculation is a set of the transmission parameters like: non-uniformity, adjacent channel crosstalk, non-adjacent channel crosstalk, background crosstalk, insertion loss, polarisation dependent loss (PDL), etc. calculated for each output channel first and then for the whole AWG - the worst case value of each parameter over all the output channels. This set of the parameters is then taken as the AWG specification. The parameters are calculated for a particular channel bandwidth (also known as the channel passband or ITU passband), that is also an input parameter for the calculations. Additionally, the developed software tool, having a user friendly interface, offers the help where all calculated transmission parameters are explained and exactly defined. The tool also includes a brief overview about AWG functionality with a small animation and the information about various AWG types (CWDM and DWDM AWGs, Colourless AWGs).

  18. Creating Interoperable Meshing and Discretization Software: The Terascale Simulation Tools and Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.; Freitag, L.; Glimm, J.

    2002-03-28

    We present an overview of the technical objectives of the Terascale Simulation Tools and Technologies center. The primary goal of this multi-institution collaboration is to develop technologies that enable application scientists to easily use multiple mesh and discretization strategies within a single simulation on terascale computers. The discussion focuses on our efforts to create interoperable mesh generation tools, high-order discretization techniques, and adaptive meshing strategies.

  19. Space Flight Software Development Software for Intelligent System Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis C.; Crumbley, Tim

    2004-01-01

    The slide presentation examines the Marshall Space Flight Center Flight Software Branch, including software development projects, mission critical space flight software development, software technical insight, advanced software development technologies, and continuous improvement in the software development processes and methods.

  20. Providing a Connection between a Bayesian Inverse Modeling Tool and a Coupled Hydrogeological Processes Modeling Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frystacky, H.; Osorio-Murillo, C. A.; Over, M. W.; Kalbacher, T.; Gunnell, D.; Kolditz, O.; Ames, D.; Rubin, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The Method of Anchored Distributions (MAD) is a Bayesian technique for characterizing the uncertainty in geostatistical model parameters. Open-source software has been developed in a modular framework such that this technique can be applied to any forward model software via a driver. This presentation is about the driver that has been developed for OpenGeoSys (OGS), open-source software that can simulate many hydrogeological processes, including couple processes. MAD allows the use of multiple data types for conditioning the spatially random fields and assessing model parameter likelihood. For example, if simulating flow and mass transport, the inversion target variable could be hydraulic conductivity and the inversion data types could be head, concentration, or both. The driver detects from the OGS files which processes and variables are being used in a given project and allows MAD to prompt the user to choose those that are to be modeled or to be treated deterministically. In this way, any combination of processes allowed by OGS can have MAD applied. As for the software, there are two versions, each with its own OGS driver. A Windows desktop version is available as a graphical user interface and is ideal for the learning and teaching environment. High-throughput computing can even be achieved with this version via HTCondor if large projects want to be pursued in a computer lab. In addition to this desktop application, a Linux version is available equipped with MPI such that it can be run in parallel on a computer cluster. All releases can be downloaded from the MAD Codeplex site given below.