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Sample records for advanced solar dynamic

  1. Advanced solar dynamic technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calogeras, James

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs and discussion on Advanced Solar Dynamic Technology Program are presented. Topics covered include: advanced solar dynamic technology program; advanced concentrators; advanced heat receivers; power conversion systems; dished all metal honeycomb sandwich panels; Stirling cavity heat pipe receiver; Brayton solar receiver; and thermal energy storage technology.

  2. Technology development of fabrication techniques for advanced solar dynamic concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Scott W.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the advanced concentrator program is to develop the technology that will lead to lightweight, highly reflective, accurate, scaleable, and long lived space solar dynamic concentrators. The advanced concentrator program encompasses new and innovative concepts, fabrication techniques, materials selection, and simulated space environmental testing. Fabrication techniques include methods of fabricating the substrates and coating substrate surfaces to produce high-quality optical surfaces, acceptable for further coating with vapor deposited optical films. The selected materials to obtain a high quality optical surface include microsheet glass and Eccocoat EP-3 epoxy, with DC-93-500 selected as a candidate silicone adhesive and levelizing layer. The following procedures are defined: cutting, cleaning, forming, and bonding microsheet glass. Procedures are also defined for surface cleaning, and EP-3 epoxy application. The results and analyses from atomic oxygen and thermal cycling tests are used to determine the effects of orbital conditions in a space environment.

  3. Technology development of fabrication techniques for advanced solar dynamic concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Scott W.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the advanced concentrator program is to develop the technology that will lead to lightweight, highly reflective, accurate, scaleable, and long lived space solar dynamic concentrators. The advanced concentrator program encompasses new and innovative concepts, fabrication techniques, materials selection, and simulated space environmental testing. Fabrication techniques include methods of fabricating the substrates and coating substrate surfaces to produce high quality optical surfaces, acceptable for further coating with vapor deposited optical films. The selected materials to obtain a high quality optical surface include microsheet glass and Eccocoat EP-3 epoxy, with DC-93-500 selected as a candidate silicone adhesive and levelizing layer. The following procedures are defined: cutting, cleaning, forming, and bonding microsheet glass. Procedures are also defined for surface cleaning, and EP-3 epoxy application. The results and analyses from atomic oxygen and thermal cycling tests are used to determine the effects of orbital conditions in a space environment.

  4. Microgravity fluid management requirements of advanced solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Migra, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    The advanced solar dynamic system (ASDS) program is aimed at developing the technology for highly efficient, lightweight space power systems. The approach is to evaluate Stirling, Brayton and liquid metal Rankine power conversion systems (PCS) over the temperature range of 1025 to 1400K, identify the critical technologies and develop these technologies. Microgravity fluid management technology is required in several areas of this program, namely, thermal energy storage (TES), heat pipe applications and liquid metal, two phase flow Rankine systems. Utilization of the heat of fusion of phase change materials offers potential for smaller, lighter TES systems. The candidate TES materials exhibit large volume change with the phase change. The heat pipe is an energy dense heat transfer device. A high temperature application may transfer heat from the solar receiver to the PCS working fluid and/or TES. A low temperature application may transfer waste heat from the PCS to the radiator. The liquid metal Rankine PCS requires management of the boiling/condensing process typical of two phase flow systems.

  5. The dynamic solar chromosphere: recent advances from high resolution telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, Konstantinos; Tsiropoula, Georgia

    This review focuses on the solar chromosphere, a very inhomogeneous and dynamic layer that exhibits phenomena on a large range of spatial and temporal scales. High-resolution observa-tions from existing telescopes (DST, SST, DOT), as well as long-duration observations with Hinode's SOT employing lines such as the Ca II infrared lines, the Ca II HK and above all the Hα line reveal an incredibly rich, dynamic and highly structured environment, both in quiet and active regions. The fine-structure chromosphere, is mainly constituted by fibrilar features that connect various parts of active regions or span across network cell interiors. We discuss this highly dynamical solar chromosphere, especially below the magnetic canopy, which is gov-erned by flows reflecting both the complex geometry and dynamics of the magnetic field and the propagation and dissipation of waves in the different atmospheric layers. A comprehensive view of the fine-structure chromosphere requires deep understanding of the physical processes involved, investigation of the intricate link with structures/processes at lower photospheric lev-els and analysis of its impact on the mass and energy transport to higher atmospheric layers through flows resulting from different physical processes such as magnetic reconnection and waves. Furthermore, we assess the challenges facing theory and numerical modelling which require the inclusion of several physical ingredients, such as non-LTE and three-dimensional numerical simulations.

  6. Compatibility of molten salts with advanced solar dynamic receiver materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Perry, W. D.

    1989-01-01

    Metal-coated graphite fibers are being considered as a thermal conductivity enhancement filler material for molten salts in solar dynamic thermal energy storage systems. The successful metal coating chosen for this application must exhibit acceptable wettability and must be compatible with the molten salt environment. Contact angle values between molten lithium fluoride and several metal, metal fluoride, and metal oxide substrates have been determined at 892 C using a modification of the Wilhelmy plate technique. Reproducible contact angles with repeated exposure to the molten LiF indicated compatibility.

  7. Thermal evaluation of advanced solar dynamic heat receiver performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Roger A.

    1989-01-01

    The thermal performance of a variety of concepts for thermal energy storage as applied to solar dynamic applications is discussed. It is recognized that designs providing large thermal gradients or large temperature swings during orbit are susceptible to early mechanical failure. Concepts incorporating heat pipe technology may encounter operational limitations over sufficiently large ranges. By reviewing the thermal performance of basic designs, the relative merits of the basic concepts are compared. In addition the effect of thermal enhancement and metal utilization as applied to each design provides a partial characterization of the performance improvements to be achieved by developing these technologies.

  8. Recent advances in solar dynamic power for space

    SciTech Connect

    Binz, E.F.; Grosskopf, W.J.; Hallinan, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a hybrid power system for the Space Station is discussed. The hybrid system consists of photovoltaic modules, solar dynamic modules, and power management and distribution subsystems; the design and components of the modules and subsystems are described. The capabilities of closed Brayton cycle (CBC) and organic Rankine cycle (ORC) solar receivers are examined. The behavior of phase-change materials (PCMs) for ORC and CBC is characterized. It is observed that LiOH with a melting point of 471 C is appropriate for an ORC that operates in the 399 C range, and the LiOH which has a heat fusion of 877 kJ/g can be contained with Ni and Ni-Cr alloys. A mixture of CaF2-LiF was selected for CBC which operates at 732 C; the salt mixture has a melting point of 768 C, a heat fusion of 791 kJ/kg, and can be contained with Ni-Cr and Co-base alloys. Large-scale system tests with PCMs in cylindrical canisters were conducted using a parabolic concentrator to evaluate thermodynamic performance in a LEO environment. The data reveal that the PCM can convert the sunlight of LEO to the constant energy stream necessary for dynamic engine operation.

  9. Conceptual definition of a technology development mission for advanced solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Migra, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    An initial conceptual definition of a technology development mission for advanced solar dynamic power systems is provided, utilizing a space station to provide a dedicated test facility. The advanced power systems considered included Brayton, Stirling, and liquid metal Rankine systems operating in the temperature range of 1040 to 1400 K. The critical technologies for advanced systems were identified by reviewing the current state of the art of solar dynamic power systems. The experimental requirements were determined by planning a system test of a 20 kWe solar dynamic power system on the space station test facility. These requirements were documented via the Mission Requirements Working Group (MRWG) and Technology Development Advocacy Group (TDAG) forms. Various concepts or considerations of advanced concepts are discussed. A preliminary evolutionary plan for this technology development mission was prepared.

  10. The development of an advanced generic solar dynamic heat receiver thermal model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Y. C.; Roschke, E. J.; Kohout, L.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced generic solar dynamic heat receiver thermal model under development which can analyze both orbital transient and orbital average conditions is discussed. This model can be used to study advanced receiver concepts, evaluate receiver concepts under development, analyze receiver thermal characteristics under various operational conditions, and evaluate solar dynamic system thermal performances in various orbit conditions. The model and the basic considerations that led to its creation are described, and results based on a set of baseline orbit, configuration, and operational conditions are presented to demonstrate the working of the receiver model.

  11. Advanced solar space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohlin, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    The space missions in solar physics planned for the next decade are similar in that they will have, for the most part, distinct, unifying science objectives in contrast to the more general 'exploratory' nature of the Orbiting Solar Observatory and Skylab/ATM missions of the 1960's and 70's. In particular, the strategy for advanced solar physics space missions will focus on the quantitative understanding of the physical processes that create and control the flow of electromagnetic and particulate energy from the sun and through interplanetary space at all phases of the current sunspot cycle No. 21. Attention is given to the Solar Maximum Mission, the International Solar Polar Mission, solar physics on an early Shuttle mission, principal investigator class experiments for future spacelabs, the Solar Optical Telescope, the Space Science Platform, the Solar Cycle and Dynamics Mission, and an attempt to send a spacecraft to within 4 solar radii of the sun's surface.

  12. Space Station Freedom solar dynamic power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, T.; Friefeld, Jerry M.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Space Station Freedom solar dynamic power generation are presented. Topics covered include: prime contract activity; key solar dynamic power module requirements; solar dynamic heat receiver technology; and solar concentrator advanced development.

  13. Advanced solar dynamic space power systems perspectives, requirements and technology needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dustin, M. O.; Savino, J. M.; Lacy, D. E.; Migra, R. P.; Juhasz, A. J.; Coles, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    Projected NASA, Civil, Commercial, and Military missions will require space power systems of increased versatility and power levels. The Advanced Solar Dynamic (ASD) Power systems offer the potential for efficient, lightweight, survivable, relatively compact, long-lived space power systems applicable to a wide range of power levels (3 to 300 kWe), and a wide variety of orbits. The successful development of these systems could satisfy the power needs for a wide variety of these projected missions. Thus, the NASA Lewis Research Center has embarked upon an aggressive ASD reserach project under the direction of NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (DAST). The project is being implemented through a combination of in-house and contracted efforts. Key elements of this project are missions analysis to determine the power systems requirements, systems analysis to identify the most attractive ASD power systems to meet these requirements, and to guide the technology development efforts, and technology development of key components.

  14. Recent Advances in Heliogyro Solar Sail Structural Dynamics, Stability, and Control Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Warren, Jerry E.; Horta, Lucas G.; Lyle, Karen H.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Gibbs, S. Chad; Dowell, Earl H.; Guerrant, Daniel V.; Lawrence, Dale

    2015-01-01

    Results from recent NASA sponsored research on the structural dynamics, stability, and control characteristics of heliogyro solar sails are summarized. Specific areas under investigation include coupled nonlinear finite element analysis of heliogyro membrane blade with solar radiation pressure effects, system identification of spinning membrane structures, and solarelastic stability analysis of heliogyro solar sails, including stability during blade deployment. Recent results from terrestrial 1-g blade dynamics and control experiments on "rope ladder" membrane blade analogs, and small-scale in vacuo system identification experiments with hanging and spinning high-aspect ratio membranes will also be presented. A low-cost, rideshare payload heliogyro technology demonstration mission concept is used as a mission context for these heliogyro structural dynamics and solarelasticity investigations, and is also described. Blade torsional dynamic response and control are also shown to be significantly improved through the use of edge stiffening structural features or inclusion of modest tip masses to increase centrifugal stiffening of the blade structure. An output-only system identification procedure suitable for on-orbit blade dynamics investigations is also developed and validated using ground tests of spinning sub-scale heliogyro blade models. Overall, analytical and experimental investigations to date indicate no intractable stability or control issues for the heliogyro solar sail concept.

  15. Advanced Solar Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, J. H.; Hobgood, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The Advanced Solar Power System (ASPS) concentrator uses a technically sophisticated design and extensive tooling to produce very efficient (80 to 90%) and versatile energy supply equipment which is inexpensive to manufacture and requires little maintenance. The advanced optical design has two 10th order, generalized aspheric surfaces in a Cassegrainian configuration which gives outstanding performance and is relatively insensitive to temperature changes and wind loading. Manufacturing tolerances also have been achieved. The key to the ASPS is the direct absorption of concentrated sunlight in the working fluid by radiative transfers in a black body cavity. The basic ASPS design concepts, efficiency, optical system, and tracking and focusing controls are described.

  16. Conceptual design of a self-deployable, high performance parabolic concentrator for advanced solar-dynamic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehne, Hans J.

    1991-01-01

    NASA has initiated technology development programs to develop advanced solar dynamic power systems and components for space applications beyond 2000. Conceptual design work that was performed is described. The main efforts were the: (1) conceptual design of self-deploying, high-performance parabolic concentrator; and (2) materials selection for a lightweight, shape-stable concentrator. The deployment concept utilizes rigid gore-shaped reflective panels. The assembled concentrator takes an annular shape with a void in the center. This deployable concentrator concept is applicable to a range of solar dynamic power systems of 25 kW sub e to in excess of 75 kW sub e. The concept allows for a family of power system sizes all using the same packaging and deployment technique. The primary structural material selected for the concentrator is a polyethyl ethylketone/carbon fiber composite also referred to as APC-2 or Vitrex. This composite has a nearly neutral coefficient of thermal expansion which leads to shape stable characteristics under thermal gradient conditions. Substantial efforts were undertaken to produce a highly specular surface on the composite. The overall coefficient of thermal expansion of the composite laminate is near zero, but thermally induced stresses due to micro-movement of the fibers and matrix in relation to each other cause the surface to become nonspecular.

  17. Advanced solar panel designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralph, E. L.; Linder, E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes solar cell panel designs that utilize new hgih efficiency solar cells along with lightweight rigid panel technology. The resulting designs push the W/kg and W/sq m parameters to new high levels. These new designs are well suited to meet the demand for higher performance small satellites. This paper reports on progress made on two SBIR Phase 1 contracts. One panel design involved the use of large area (5.5 cm x 6.5 cm) GaAs/Ge solar cells of 19% efficiency combined with a lightweight rigid graphite fiber epoxy isogrid substrate configuration. A coupon (38 cm x 38 cm) was fabricated and tested which demonstrated an array specific power level of 60 W/kg with a potential of reaching 80 W/kg. The second panel design involved the use of newly developed high efficiency (22%) dual junction GaInP2/GaAs/Ge solar cells combined with an advanced lightweight rigid substrate using aluminum honeycomb core with high strength graphite fiber mesh facesheets. A coupon (38 cm x 38 cm) was fabricated and tested which demonstrated an array specific power of 105 W/kg and 230 W/sq m. This paper will address the construction details of the panels and an a analysis of the component weights. A strawman array design suitable for a typical small-sat mission is described for each of the two panel design technologies being studied. Benefits in respect to weight reduction, area reduction, and system cost reduction are analyzed and compared to conventional arrays.

  18. Advances in Solar Power Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haupt, S. E.; Kosovic, B.; Drobot, S.

    2014-12-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research and partners are building a blended SunCast Solar Power Forecasting system. This system includes several short-range nowcasting models and improves upon longer range numerical weather prediction (NWP) models as part of the "Public-Private-Academic Partnership to Advance Solar Power Forecasting." The nowcasting models being built include statistical learning models that include cloud regime prediction, multiple sky imager-based advection models, satellite image-based advection models, and rapid update NWP models with cloud assimilation. The team has also integrated new modules into the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) to better predict clouds, aerosols, and irradiance. The modules include a new shallow convection scheme; upgraded physics parameterizations of clouds; new radiative transfer modules that specify GHI, DNI, and DIF prediction; better satellite assimilation methods; and new aerosol estimation methods. These new physical models are incorporated into WRF-Solar, which is then integrated with publically available NWP models via the Dynamic Integrated Forecast (DICast) system as well as the Nowcast Blender to provide seamless forecasts at partner utility and balancing authority commercial solar farms. The improvements will be described and results to date discussed.

  19. Solar Concentrator Advanced Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knasel, Don; Ehresman, Derik

    1989-01-01

    The Solar Concentrator Advanced Development Project has successfully designed, fabricated, and tested a full scale prototypical solar dynamic concentrator for space station applications. A Truss Hexagonal Panel reflector was selected as a viable solar concentrator concept to be used for space station applications. This concentrator utilizes a modular design approach and is flexible in attainable flux profiles and assembly techniques. The detailed design of the concentrator, which included structural, thermal and optical analysis, identified the feasibility of the design and specific technologies that were required to fabricate it. The needed surface accuracy of the reflectors surface was found to be very tight, within 5 mrad RMS slope error, and results in very close tolerances for fabrication. To meet the design requirements, a modular structure composed of hexagonal panels was used. The panels, made up of graphite epoxy box beams provided the strength, stiffness and dimensional stability needed. All initial project requirements were met or exceeded by hardware demonstration. Initial testing of structural repeatability of a seven panel portion of the concentrator was followed by assembly and testing of the full nineteen panel structure. The testing, which consisted of theodolite and optical measurements over an assembly-disassembly-reassembly cycle, demonstrated that the concentrator maintained the as-built contour and optical characteristics. The facet development effort within the project, which included developing the vapor deposited reflective facet, produced a viable design with demonstrated optical characteristics that are within the project goals.

  20. Identification of salt-alloy combinations for thermal energy storage applications in advanced solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Misra, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations based on the available data for flouride salt systems reveal that a number of congruently melting compositions and eutectics exist which have the potential to meet the lightweight, high energy storage requirements imposed for advanced solar dynamic systems operating between about 1000 and 1400 K. Compatibility studies to determine suitable containment alloys to be used with NaF-22CaF2-13MgF2, NaF-32CaF2, and NaF-23MgF2 have been conducted at the eutectic temperature + 25 K for each system. For these three NaF-based eutectics, none of the common, commercially available high temperature alloys appear to offer adequate corrosion resistance for a long lifetime; however mild steel, pure nickel and Nb-1Zr could prove useful. These latter materials suggest the possibility that a strong, corrosion resistant, nonrefractory, elevated temperature alloy based on the Ni-Ni3Nb system could be developed.

  1. On the advancement of quantum dot solar cell performance through enhanced charge carrier dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, David R.

    The quantum dot solar cell is one of the few solar technologies which promises to compete with fossil fuels, but work is still needed to increase its performance. Electron transfer kinetics at interfaces and limitations of the redox couple within the cell, are responsible for lowering power conversion efficiency. Several techniques which are able to increase electron transfer within the working electrode and at the counter electrode/electrolyte interface are discussed in this dissertation. Trap sites on the surface of CdSe quantum dots are created when mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) is added to the suspension. The trap sites are emissive creating a loss pathway for photogenerated charges which will manifest as reduced photocurrent. MPA displaces amines on the surface of CdSe creating Se vacancies. Emission properties are controlled by the concentration of MPA. Because trap sites are generated, a more successful method to sensitize TiO2 films is the SILAR technique which directly grows quantum dots on the desired surface. Anodically etched TiO2 nanotubes yield photocurrents 20% greater than TiO2 nanoparticles because of longer electron diffusion lengths. Peak incident photon to charge carrier efficiencies of TiO2 nanotube samples show a doubling of photocurrent in the visible region compared to nanoparticles. The TiO2 substrates are sensitized with CdS by the SILAR process which is found to utilize both the inside and outside surfaces of the TiO2 nanotubes. Etched TiO2 nanotubes are removed from the underlying titanium foil in order to use spectroscopic techniques. Ultrafast transient absorption shows the extremely fast nature of charge injection from SILAR CdS into TiO 2 nanotubes. Surface area analysis of TiO2 nanotube powder gives an area of 77m2/g, a value 1.5 times larger than traditional TiO2 nanoparticles. By isolating the counter electrode with a salt bridge the effect of the polysulfide electrolyte is found to act as an electron scavenger on the working

  2. Advanced controls for stability assessment of solar dynamics space power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momoh, James A.; Anwah, Nnamdi A.

    1995-08-01

    In support of the power requirements for the Space Station Alpha (SSA), a joint program by the U.S. and Russia for a permanently manned space station to be launched into orbit by 1998, a robust control scheme is needed to assure the stability of the rotating machines that will be integrated into the power subsystem. A framework design and systems studies for modeling and analysis is presented. It employs classical d-q axes machine model with voltage/frequency dependent loads. To guarantee that design requirements and necessary trade studies are done, a functional analysis tool CORE is used for the study. This provides us with different control options for stability assessment. Initial studies and recommendations using advanced simulation tools are also presented. The benefits of the stability/control scheme for evaluating future designs and power management are discussed.

  3. Advanced controls for stability assessment of solar dynamics space power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Anwah, Nnamdi A.

    1995-01-01

    In support of the power requirements for the Space Station Alpha (SSA), a joint program by the U.S. and Russia for a permanently manned space station to be launched into orbit by 1998, a robust control scheme is needed to assure the stability of the rotating machines that will be integrated into the power subsystem. A framework design and systems studies for modeling and analysis is presented. It employs classical d-q axes machine model with voltage/frequency dependent loads. To guarantee that design requirements and necessary trade studies are done, a functional analysis tool CORE is used for the study. This provides us with different control options for stability assessment. Initial studies and recommendations using advanced simulation tools are also presented. The benefits of the stability/control scheme for evaluating future designs and power management are discussed.

  4. Solar Concentrator Advanced Development Program, Task 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Solar dynamic power generation has been selected by NASA to provide power for the space station. Solar dynamic concentrator technology has been demonstrated for terrestrial applications but has not been developed for space applications. The object of the Solar Concentrator Advanced Development program is to develop the technology of solar concentrators which would be used on the space station. The first task of this program was to develop conceptual concentrator designs and perform trade-off studies and to develop a materials data base and perform material selection. Three unique concentrator concepts; Truss Hex, Spline Radial Panel and Domed Fresnel, were developed and evaluated against weighted trade criteria. The Truss Hex concept was recommended for the space station. Materials data base development demonstrated that several material systems are capable of withstanding extended periods of atomic oxygen exposure without undesirable performance degradation. Descriptions of the conceptual designs and materials test data are included.

  5. Conceptual design of a self-deployable, high performance parabolic concentrator for advanced solar-dynamic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehne, Hans Joachim; Duffy, Donald R.

    1989-01-01

    A summary is presented of the concentrator conceptual design work performed under a NASA-funded project. The design study centers around two basic efforts: conceptual design of a self-deploying, high-performance parabolic concentrator; and materials selection for a lightweight, shape-stable concentrator. The primary structural material selected for the concentrator is PEEK/carbon fiber composite. The deployment concept utilizes rigid gore-shaped reflective panels. The assembled concentrator takes a circular shape with a void in the center. The deployable solar concentrator concept is applicable to a range of solar dynamic power systems of 25 kWe to more than 75 kWe.

  6. Preface: Advances in solar physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Nakariakov, Valery M.

    2015-12-01

    The idea for this special issue of Advances in Space Research (ASR) was formulated during the 14th European Solar Physics Meeting (ESPM-14) that took place in Dublin, Ireland in September 2014. Since ASR does not publish conference proceedings, it was decided to extend a general call to the international solar-physics community for manuscripts pertinent to the following thematic areas: New and upcoming heliospheric observational and data assimilation facilities.

  7. Alignment and Initial Operation of an Advanced Solar Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Jefferies, Kent S.; Mason, Lee S.

    1996-01-01

    A solar simulator utilizing nine 30-kW xenon arc lamps was built to provide radiant power for testing a solar dynamic space power system in a thermal vacuum environment. The advanced solar simulator achieved the following values specific to the solar dynamic system: (1) a subtense angle of 1 deg; (2) the ability to vary solar simulator intensity up to 1.7 kW/sq m; (3) a beam diameter of 4.8 m; and (4) uniformity of illumination on the order of +/-10%. The flexibility of the solar simulator design allows for other potential uses of the facility.

  8. A Solar Dynamic Power Option for Space Solar Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.

    1999-01-01

    A study was performed to determine the potential performance and related technology requirements of Solar Dynamic power systems for a Space Solar Power satellite. Space Solar Power is a concept where solar energy is collected in orbit and beamed to Earth receiving stations to supplement terrestrial electric power service. Solar Dynamic systems offer the benefits of high solar-to-electric efficiency, long life with minimal performance degradation, and high power scalability. System analyses indicate that with moderate component development, SD systems can exhibit excellent mass and deployed area characteristics. Using the analyses as a guide, a technology roadmap was -enerated which identifies the component advances necessary to make SD power generation a competitive option for the SSP mission.

  9. Solar System Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisdom, Jack

    2002-01-01

    In these 18 years, the research has touched every major dynamical problem in the solar system, including: the effect of chaotic zones on the distribution of asteroids, the delivery of meteorites along chaotic pathways, the chaotic motion of Pluto, the chaotic motion of the outer planets and that of the whole solar system, the delivery of short period comets from the Kuiper belt, the tidal evolution of the Uranian arid Galilean satellites, the chaotic tumbling of Hyperion and other irregular satellites, the large chaotic variations of the obliquity of Mars, the evolution of the Earth-Moon system, and the resonant core- mantle dynamics of Earth and Venus. It has introduced new analytical and numerical tools that are in widespread use. Today, nearly every long-term integration of our solar system, its subsystems, and other solar systems uses algorithms that was invented. This research has all been primarily Supported by this sequence of PGG NASA grants. During this period published major investigations of tidal evolution of the Earth-Moon system and of the passage of the Earth and Venus through non-linear core-mantle resonances were completed. It has published a major innovation in symplectic algorithms: the symplectic corrector. A paper was completed on non-perturbative hydrostatic equilibrium.

  10. The Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, William D.

    2008-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is the first Space Weather Mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. SDO's main goal is to understand, driving towards a predictive capability, those solar variations that influence life on Earth and humanity's technological systems. The past decade has seen an increasing emphasis on understanding the entire Sun, from the nuclear reactions at the core to the development and loss of magnetic loops in the corona. SDO's three science investigations (HMI, AIA, and EVE) will determine how the Sun's magnetic field is generated and structured, how this stored magnetic energy is released into the heliosphere and geospace as the solar wind, energetic particles, and variations in the solar irradiance. SDO will return full-disk Dopplergrams, full-disk vector magnetograms, full-disk images at nine EIUV wavelengths, and EUV spectral irradiances, all taken at a rapid cadence. This means you can 'observe the database' to study events, but we can also move forward in producing quantitative models of what the Sun is doing today. SDO is scheduled to launch in 2008 on an Atlas V rocket from the Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The satellite will fly in a 28 degree inclined geosynchronous orbit about the longitude of New Mexico, where a dedicated Ka-band ground station will receive the 150 Mbps data flow. How SDO data will transform the study of the Sun and its affect on Space Weather studies will be discussed.

  11. Selection of Solar Simulator for Solar Dynamic Ground Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Carol M.

    1994-01-01

    The 2 kWe Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) experiment will be conducted in 1995 at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). This solar dynamic power system test will be conducted in a simulated space environment and will require an artificial sun. To address the solar simulator requirements for the GTD, Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) was hired under contract to review and visit four existing solar simulator facilities. The four facilities included, AEDC's Mark 1 Chamber, NASA-JSC Chamber A, AEDC's 12V Chamber, and NASA-JPL Space Simulator Chamber. Two design concepts were considered following several months of evaluating existing solar simulator facilities throughout the United States. To satisfy system requirements for the SD GTD experiment the solar simulator needs to provide a uniform light flux to the SD concentrator, provide the light within a subtense angle of one degree, and provide an intensity of one solar constant (1.37 kW/sq m) at airmass zero. Most solar simulators are designed for supplying heat loads to spacecraft where a cone angle as large as 3 degrees is acceptable. It was also concluded that a solar simulator, such like these considered in the AEDC study, would require major facility modifications for NASA LeRC and result in significant impacts to the program. The advanced solar simulator concept developed by NASA LeRC will meet the system requirements for the SD GTD experiment Since SD GTD solar simulator requirements could not be addressed by existing simulator, an advanced concept was considered.

  12. Selection of solar simulator for solar dynamic ground test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolbert, Carol M.

    1994-08-01

    The 2 kWe Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) experiment will be conducted in 1995 at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). This solar dynamic power system test will be conducted in a simulated space environment and will require an artificial sun. To address the solar simulator requirements for the GTD, Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) was hired under contract to review and visit four existing solar simulator facilities. The four facilities included, AEDC's Mark 1 Chamber, NASA-JSC Chamber A, AEDC's 12V Chamber, and NASA-JPL Space Simulator Chamber. Two design concepts were considered following several months of evaluating existing solar simulator facilities throughout the United States. To satisfy system requirements for the SD GTD experiment the solar simulator needs to provide a uniform light flux to the SD concentrator, provide the light within a subtense angle of one degree, and provide an intensity of one solar constant (1.37 kW/sq m) at airmass zero. Most solar simulators are designed for supplying heat loads to spacecraft where a cone angle as large as 3 degrees is acceptable. It was also concluded that a solar simulator, such like these considered in the AEDC study, would require major facility modifications for NASA LeRC and result in significant impacts to the program. The advanced solar simulator concept developed by NASA LeRC will meet the system requirements for the SD GTD experiment Since SD GTD solar simulator requirements could not be addressed by existing simulator, an advanced concept was considered.

  13. Advances in Solar Heating and Cooling Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Dan S.

    1976-01-01

    Reports on technological advancements in the fields of solar collectors, thermal storage systems, and solar heating and cooling systems. Diagrams aid in the understanding of the thermodynamics of the systems. (CP)

  14. Advanced Technology Solar Telescope Construction: Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimmele, Thomas R.; McMullin, J.; Keil, S.; Goode, P.; Knoelker, M.; Kuhn, J.; Rosner, R.; ATST Team

    2012-05-01

    The 4m Advance Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) on Haleakala will be the most powerful solar telescope and the world’s leading ground-based resource for studying solar magnetism that controls the solar wind, flares, coronal mass ejections and variability in the Sun’s output. The ATST will provide high resolution and high sensitivity observations of the dynamic solar magnetic fields throughout the solar atmosphere, including the corona at infrared wavelengths. With its 4 m aperture, ATST will resolve magnetic features at their intrinsic scales. A high order adaptive optics system delivers a corrected beam to the initial set of five state-of-the-art, facility class instrumentation located in the coude laboratory facility. Photopheric and chromospheric magnetometry is part of the key mission of four of these instruments. Coronal magnetometry and spectroscopy will be performed by two of these instruments at infrared wavelengths. The ATST project has transitioned from design and development to its construction phase. Site construction is expected to begin in April 2012. The project has awarded design and fabrication contracts for major telescope subsystems. A robust instrument program has been established and all instruments have passed preliminary design reviews or critical design reviews. A brief overview of the science goals and observational requirements of the ATST will be given, followed by a summary of the project status of the telescope and discussion of the approach to integrating instruments into the facility. The National Science Foundation (NSF) through the National Solar Observatory (NSO) funds the ATST Project. The NSO is operated under a cooperative agreement between the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) and NSF.

  15. Advancing Concentrating Solar Power Research (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide scientific, engineering, and analytical expertise to help advance innovation in concentrating solar power (CSP). This fact sheet summarizes how NREL is advancing CSP research.

  16. Solar dynamic space power system heat rejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, A. W.; Gustafson, E.; Mclallin, K. L.

    1986-01-01

    A radiator system concept is described that meets the heat rejection requirements of the NASA Space Station solar dynamic power modules. The heat pipe radiator is a high-reliability, high-performance approach that is capable of erection in space and is maintainable on orbit. Results are present of trade studies that compare the radiator system area and weight estimates for candidate advanced high performance heat pipes. The results indicate the advantages of the dual-slot heat pipe radiator for high temperature applications as well as its weight-reduction potential over the range of temperatures to be encountered in the solar dynamic heat rejection systems.

  17. Recent Advances in Solar Cell Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The advances in solar cell efficiency, radiation tolerance, and cost over the last decade are reviewed. Potential performance of thin-film solar cells in space are discussed, and the cost and the historical trends in production capability of the photovoltaics industry are considered with respect to the requirements of space power systems. Concentrator cells with conversion efficiency over 30%, and nonconcentrating solar cells with efficiency over 25% are now available, and advanced radiation-tolerant cells and lightweight, thin-film arrays are both being developed. Nonsolar applications of solar cells, including thermophotovoltaics, alpha- and betavoltaics, and laser power receivers, are also discussed.

  18. Advances in solar radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    The status of the observations and interpretations of the sun's radio emission covering the entire radio spectrum from millimeter wavelengths to hectometer and kilometer wavelengths is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the progress made in solar radio physics as a result of recent advances in plasma and radiation theory. It is noted that the capability now exists of observing the sun with a spatial resolution of approximately a second of arc and a temporal resolution of about a millisecond at centimeter wavelengths and of obtaining fast multifrequency two-dimensional pictures of the sun at meter and decameter wavelengths. A summary is given of the properties of nonflaring active regions at millimeter, centimeter, and meter-decameter wavelengths. The properties of centimeter wave bursts are discussed in connection with the high spatial resolution observations. The observations of the preflare build-up of an active region are reviewed. High spatial resolution observations (a few seconds of arc to approximately 1 arcsec) are discussed, with particular attention given to the one- and two-dimensional maps of centimeter-wavelength burst sources.

  19. Advanced Rainbow Solar Photovoltaic Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick; Shields, Virgil

    2003-01-01

    Photovoltaic arrays of the rainbow type, equipped with light-concentrator and spectral-beam-splitter optics, have been investigated in a continuing effort to develop lightweight, high-efficiency solar electric power sources. This investigation has contributed to a revival of the concept of the rainbow photovoltaic array, which originated in the 1950s but proved unrealistic at that time because the selection of solar photovoltaic cells was too limited. Advances in the art of photovoltaic cells since that time have rendered the concept more realistic, thereby prompting the present development effort. A rainbow photovoltaic array comprises side-by-side strings of series-connected photovoltaic cells. The cells in each string have the same bandgap, which differs from the bandgaps of the other strings. Hence, each string operates most efficiently in a unique wavelength band determined by its bandgap. To obtain maximum energy-conversion efficiency and to minimize the size and weight of the array for a given sunlight input aperture, the sunlight incident on the aperture is concentrated, then spectrally dispersed onto the photovoltaic array plane, whereon each string of cells is positioned to intercept the light in its wavelength band of most efficient operation. The number of cells in each string is chosen so that the output potentials of all the strings are the same; this makes it possible to connect the strings together in parallel to maximize the output current of the array. According to the original rainbow photovoltaic concept, the concentrated sunlight was to be split into multiple beams by use of an array of dichroic filters designed so that each beam would contain light in one of the desired wavelength bands. The concept has since been modified to provide for dispersion of the spectrum by use of adjacent prisms. A proposal for an advanced version calls for a unitary concentrator/ spectral-beam-splitter optic in the form of a parabolic curved Fresnel-like prism

  20. Solar interior structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Rachel

    2016-07-01

    Helioseismology allows us to probe the interior structure and dynamics of the Sun, and long-term observations allow us to follow their temporal variations. This review describes the important findings of recent years, covering the interior structure, the near-surface changes related to the solar cycle and possible deeper-seated variations, the interior rotation profile, and solar-cycle related changes in the zonal and meridional flows.

  1. Solar array flight dynamic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the Solar Array Flight Dynamic Experiment (SAFDE) is to demonstrate the feasibility of on-orbit measurement and ground processing of large space structures dynamic characteristics. Test definition or verification provides the dynamic characteristic accuracy required for control systems use. An illumination/measurement system was developed to fly on space shuttle flight STS-31D. The system was designed to dynamically evaluate a large solar array called the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE) that had been scheduled for this flight. The SAFDE system consisted of a set of laser diode illuminators, retroreflective targets, an intelligent star tracker receiver and the associated equipment to power, condition, and record the results. In six tests on STS-41D, data was successfully acquired from 18 retroreflector targets and ground processed, post flight, to define the solar array's dynamic characteristic. The flight experiment proved the viability of on-orbit test definition of large space structures dynamic characteristics. Future large space structures controllability should be greatly enhanced by this capability.

  2. Solar array flight dynamic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Solar Array Flight Dynamic Experiment (SAFDE) is to demonstrate the feasibility of on-orbit measurement and ground processing of large space structures' dynamic characteristics. Test definition or verification provides the dynamic characteristic accuracy required for control systems use. An illumination/measurement system was developed to fly on space shuttle flight STS-41D. The system was designed to dynamically evaluate a large solar array called the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE) that had been scheduled for this flight. The SAFDE system consisted of a set of laser diode illuminators, retroreflective targets, an intelligent star tracker receiver and the associated equipment to power, condition, and record the results. In six tests on STS-41D, data was successfully acquired from 18 retroreflector targets and ground processed, post flight, to define the solar array's dynamic characteristic. The flight experiment proved the viability of on-orbit test definition of large space structures dynamic characteristics. Future large space structures controllability should be greatly enhanced by this capability.

  3. Recent Advances on Solar Global Magnetism and Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, A. S.; Browning, M. K.; Dikpati, M.; Hotta, H.; Strugarek, A.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss recent observational, theoretical and numerical progress made in understanding the solar global magnetism and its short and long term variability. We discuss the physical process thought to be at the origin of the solar magnetic field and its 22-yr cycle, namely dynamo action, and the nonlinear interplay between convection, rotation, radiation and magnetic field, yielding modulations of the solar constant or of the large scale flows such as the torsional oscillations. We also discuss the role of the field parity and dynamo families in explaining the complex multipolar structure of the solar global magnetic field. We then present some key MHD processes acting in the deep radiative interior and discuss the probable topology of a primordial field there. Finally we summarize how helioseismology has contributed to these recent advances and how it could contribute to resolving current unsolved problems in solar global dynamics and magnetism.

  4. Advances in Perovskite Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Chuantian; Bolink, Henk J.; Han, Hongwei; Huang, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    Organolead halide perovskite materials possess a combination of remarkable optoelectronic properties, such as steep optical absorption edge and high absorption coefficients, long charge carrier diffusion lengths and lifetimes. Taken together with the ability for low temperature preparation, also from solution, perovskite‐based devices, especially photovoltaic (PV) cells have been studied intensively, with remarkable progress in performance, over the past few years. The combination of high efficiency, low cost and additional (non‐PV) applications provides great potential for commercialization. Performance and applications of perovskite solar cells often correlate with their device structures. Many innovative device structures were developed, aiming at large‐scale fabrication, reducing fabrication cost, enhancing the power conversion efficiency and thus broadening potential future applications. This review summarizes typical structures of perovskite solar cells and comments on novel device structures. The applications of perovskite solar cells are discussed. PMID:27812475

  5. Advanced solar concentrator: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The preliminary design of a point-focusing solar concentrator, consisting of a steerable space frame structure supporting a paraboloidal mirror glass reflector, is described. A mass production, operation, and maintenance cost assessment is presented. A conceptual evaluation of a modified concentrator design is included. The detailed design of one of the lightweight, structurally efficient reflective elements comprising the paraboloidal reflective surface is given.

  6. Solar system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisdom, Jack

    1987-01-01

    The rotational dynamics of irregularly shaped satellites and the origin of Kirkwood Gaps are discussed. The chaotic tumbling of Hyperion and the anomalously low eccentricity of Deimos are examined. The Digital Orrery is used to explore the phase space of the ellipic restricted three body problem near the principal commensurabilities (2/1, 5/2, 3/1, and 3/2). The results for the 3/1 commensurability are in close agreement with those found earlier with the algebraic mapping method. Large chaotic zones are associated with the 3/1, 2/1 and 5/2 resonances, where there are gaps in the distribution of asteroids. The region near the 3/2 resonance, where the Hilda group of asteroids is located, is largely devoid of chaotic behavior. Thus, there is a qualitative agreement between the character of the motion and the distribution of asteroids.

  7. Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO) accommodations requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Results of an accommodations analysis for the Advanced Solar Observatory on Space Station Freedom are reported. Concepts for the High Resolution Telescope Cluster, Pinhole/Occulter Facility, and High Energy Cluster were developed which can be accommodated on Space Station Freedom. It is shown that workable accommodations concepts are possible. Areas of emphasis for the next stage of engineering development are identified.

  8. Advanced reflector materials for solar concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G; Williams, T; Wendelin, T

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes the research and development program at the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in advanced reflector materials for solar concentrators. NREL's research thrust is to develop solar reflector materials that maintain high specular reflectance for extended lifetimes under outdoor service conditions and whose cost is significantly lower than existing products. Much of this work has been in collaboration with private-sector companies that have extensive expertise in vacuum-coating and polymer-film technologies. Significant progress and other promising developments will be discussed. These are expected to lead to additional improvements needed to commercialize solar thermal concentration systems and make them economically attractive to the solar manufacturing industry. To explicitly demonstrate the optical durability of candidate reflector materials in real-world service conditions, a network of instrumented outdoor exposure sites has been activated.

  9. Technology Projections for Solar Dynamic Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.

    1999-01-01

    Solar Dynamic power systems can offer many potential benefits to Earth orbiting satellites including high solar-to-electric efficiency, long life without performance degradation, and high power capability. A recent integrated system test of a 2 kilowatt SD power system in a simulated space environment has successfully demonstrated technology readiness for space flight. Conceptual design studies of SD power systems have addressed several potential mission applications: a 10 kilowatt LEO satellite, a low power Space Based Radar, and a 30 kilowatt GEO communications satellite. The studies show that with moderate component development, SD systems can exhibit excellent mass and deployed area characteristics. Using the conceptual design studies as a basis, a SD technology roadmap was generated which identifies the component advances necessary to assure SD systems a competitive advantage for future NASA, DOD, and commercial missions.

  10. Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnack, D. D.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced computational techniques were used to study solar coronal heating and coronal mass ejections. A three dimensional, time dependent resistive magnetohydrodynamic code was used to study the dynamic response of a model corona to continuous, slow, random magnetic footpoint displacements in the photosphere. Three dimensional numerical simulations of the response of the corona to simple smooth braiding flows in the photosphere were calculated to illustrate and understand the spontaneous formation of current filaments. Two dimensional steady state helmet streamer configurations were obtained by determining the time asymptotic state of the interaction of an initially one dimensinal transponic solar wind with a spherical potential dipole field. The disruption of the steady state helmet streamer configuration was studied as a response to shearing of the magnetic footpoints of the closed field lines under the helmet.

  11. The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesnell, W. Dean; Thompson, B. J.; Chamberlin, P. C.

    2012-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) was launched on 11 February 2010 at 15:23 UT from Kennedy Space Center aboard an Atlas V 401 (AV-021) launch vehicle. A series of apogee-motor firings lifted SDO from an initial geosynchronous transfer orbit into a circular geosynchronous orbit inclined by 28° about the longitude of the SDO-dedicated ground station in New Mexico. SDO began returning science data on 1 May 2010. SDO is the first space-weather mission in NASA’s Living With a Star (LWS) Program. SDO’s main goal is to understand, driving toward a predictive capability, those solar variations that influence life on Earth and humanity’s technological systems. The SDO science investigations will determine how the Sun’s magnetic field is generated and structured, how this stored magnetic energy is released into the heliosphere and geospace as the solar wind, energetic particles, and variations in the solar irradiance. Insights gained from SDO investigations will also lead to an increased understanding of the role that solar variability plays in changes in Earth’s atmospheric chemistry and climate. The SDO mission includes three scientific investigations (the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE), and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI)), a spacecraft bus, and a dedicated ground station to handle the telemetry. The Goddard Space Flight Center built and will operate the spacecraft during its planned five-year mission life; this includes: commanding the spacecraft, receiving the science data, and forwarding that data to the science teams. The science investigations teams at Stanford University, Lockheed Martin Solar Astrophysics Laboratory (LMSAL), and University of Colorado Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) will process, analyze, distribute, and archive the science data. We will describe the building of SDO and the science that it will provide to NASA.

  12. Advanced Solar Cells for Satellite Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, Dennis J.; Weinberg, Irving

    1994-01-01

    The multiple natures of today's space missions with regard to operational lifetime, orbital environment, cost and size of spacecraft, to name just a few, present such a broad range of performance requirements to be met by the solar array that no single design can suffice to meet them all. The result is a demand for development of specialized solar cell types that help to optimize overall satellite performance within a specified cost range for any given space mission. Historically, space solar array performance has been optimized for a given mission by tailoring the features of silicon solar cells to account for the orbital environment and average operating conditions expected during the mission. It has become necessary to turn to entirely new photovoltaic materials and device designs to meet the requirements of future missions, both in the near and far term. This paper will outline some of the mission drivers and resulting performance requirements that must be met by advanced solar cells, and provide an overview of some of the advanced cell technologies under development to meet them. The discussion will include high efficiency, radiation hard single junction cells; monolithic and mechanically stacked multiple bandgap cells; and thin film cells.

  13. Nonlinear Dynamic Model Explains The Solar Dynamic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuman, Maria

    Nonlinear mathematical model in torus representation describes the solar dynamic. Its graphic presentation shows that without perturbing force the orbits of the planets would be circles; only perturbing force could elongate the circular orbits into ellipses. Since the Hubble telescope found that the planetary orbits of other stars in the Milky Way are also ellipses, powerful perturbing force must be present in our galaxy. Such perturbing force is the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy with its heavy Black Hole and leftover stars, which we see orbiting around the center of our galaxy. Since observations of NASA's SDO found that magnetic fields rule the solar activity, we can expect when the planets align and their magnetic moments sum up, the already perturbed stars to reverse their magnetic parity (represented graphically as periodic looping through the hole of the torus). We predict that planets aligned on both sides of the Sun, when their magnetic moments sum-up, would induce more flares in the turbulent equatorial zone, which would bulge. When planets align only on one side of the Sun, the strong magnetic gradient of their asymmetric pull would flip the magnetic poles of the Sun. The Sun would elongate pole-to-pole, emit some energy through the poles, and the solar activity would cease. Similar reshaping and emission was observed in stars called magnetars and experimentally observed in super-liquid fast-spinning Helium nanodroplets. We are certain that NASA's SDO will confirm our predictions.

  14. Comparative values of advanced space solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slifer, L. W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A methodology for deriving a first order dollar value estimate for advanced solar cells which consists of defining scenarios for solar array production and launch to orbit and the associated costs for typical spacecraft, determining that portion affected by cell design and performance and determining the attributable cost differences is presented. Break even values are calculated for a variety of cells; confirming that efficiency and related effects of radiation resistance and temperature coefficient are major factors; array tare mass, packaging and packing factor are important; but cell mass is of lesser significance. Associated dollar values provide a means of comparison.

  15. Solar dynamic power module design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Secunde, Richard R.; Labus, Thomas L.; Lovely, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Studies have shown that use of solar dynamic (SD) power for the growth eras of the Space Station Freedom program will result in life cycle cost savings when compared to power supplied by photovoltaic sources. In the SD power module, a concentrator collects and focuses solar energy into a heat receiver which has integral thermal energy storage. A power conversion unit (PCU) based on the closed Brayton thermodynamic cycle removes thermal energy from the receiver and converts that energy to electrical energy. Since the closed Brayton cycle is a single phase gas cycle, the conversion hardware (heat exchangers, turbine, compressor, etc.) can be designed for operation in low earth orbit, and tested with confidence in test facilities on earth before launch into space. The concentrator subassemblies will be aligned and the receiver/PCU/radiator combination completely assembled and charged with gas and cooling liquid on earth before launch to, and assembly on orbit.

  16. Solar dynamic power module design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Secunde, Richard R.; Labus, Thomas L.; Lovely, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Studies have shown that the use of solar dynamic (SD) power for the growth areas of the Space Station Freedom program will result in life cycle cost savings when compared to power supplied by photovoltaic sources. In the SD power module, a concentrator collects and focuses solar energy into a heat receiver which has integral thermal energy storage. A Power Conversion Unit (PCU) based on the closed Brayton cycle removes thermal energy from the receiver and converts that energy to electrical energy. Since the closed Brayton cycle is a single phase gas cycle, the conversion hardware (heat exchangers, turbine, compressor, etc.) can be designed for operation in low earth orbit, and tested with confidence in test facilities on earth before launch into space. The concentrator subassemblies will be aligned and the receiver/PCU/radiator combination completely assembled and charged with gas and cooling liquid on earth before launch to, and assembly on, orbit.

  17. Mission applications for advanced photovoltaic solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; West, John L.; Chave, Robert G.; Mcgee, David P.; Yen, Albert S.

    1990-01-01

    The suitability of the Advanced Photovoltaic Solar Array (APSA) for future space missions was examined by considering the impact on the spacecraft system in general. The lightweight flexible blanket array system was compared to rigid arrays and a radio-isotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) static power source for a wide range of assumed future earth orbiting and interplanetary mission applications. The study approach was to establish assessment criteria and a rating scheme, identify a reference mission set, perform the power system assessment for each mission, and develop conclusions and recommendations to guide future APSA technology development. The authors discuss the three selected power sources, the assessment criteria and rating definitions, and the reference missions. They present the assessment results in a convenient tabular format. It is concluded that the three power sources examined, APSA, conventional solar arrays, and RTGs, can be considered to complement each other. Each power technology has its own range of preferred applications.

  18. Solar thermoelectricity via advanced latent heat storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, M. L.; Rea, J.; Glatzmaier, G. C.; Hardin, C.; Oshman, C.; Vaughn, J.; Roark, T.; Raade, J. W.; Bradshaw, R. W.; Sharp, J.; Avery, A. D.; Bobela, D.; Bonner, R.; Weigand, R.; Campo, D.; Parilla, P. A.; Siegel, N. P.; Toberer, E. S.; Ginley, D. S.

    2016-05-01

    We report on a new modular, dispatchable, and cost-effective solar electricity-generating technology. Solar ThermoElectricity via Advanced Latent heat Storage (STEALS) integrates several state-of-the-art technologies to provide electricity on demand. In the envisioned STEALS system, concentrated sunlight is converted to heat at a solar absorber. The heat is then delivered to either a thermoelectric (TE) module for direct electricity generation, or to charge a phase change material for thermal energy storage, enabling subsequent generation during off-sun hours, or both for simultaneous electricity production and energy storage. The key to making STEALS a dispatchable technology lies in the development of a "thermal valve," which controls when heat is allowed to flow through the TE module, thus controlling when electricity is generated. The current project addresses each of the three major subcomponents, (i) the TE module, (ii) the thermal energy storage system, and (iii) the thermal valve. The project also includes system-level and techno- economic modeling of the envisioned integrated system and will culminate in the demonstration of a laboratory-scale STEALS prototype capable of generating 3kWe.

  19. Solar dynamic heat receiver technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedgwick, Leigh M.

    1991-01-01

    A full-size, solar dynamic heat receiver was designed to meet the requirements specified for electrical power modules on the U.S. Space Station, Freedom. The heat receiver supplies thermal energy to power a heat engine in a closed Brayton cycle using a mixture of helium-xenon gas as the working fluid. The electrical power output of the engine, 25 kW, requires a 100 kW thermal input throughout a 90 minute orbit, including when the spacecraft is eclipsed for up to 36 minutes from the sun. The heat receiver employs an integral thermal energy storage system utilizing the latent heat available through the phase change of a high-temperature salt mixture. A near eutectic mixture of lithium fluoride and calcium difluoride is used as the phase change material. The salt is contained within a felt metal matrix which enhances heat transfer and controls the salt void distribution during solidification. Fabrication of the receiver is complete and it was delivered to NASA for verification testing in a simulated low-Earth-orbit environment. This document reviews the receiver design and describes its fabrication history. The major elements required to operate the receiver during testing are also described.

  20. Dynamical characterization of the last prolonged solar minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cionco, Rodolfo Gustavo; Compagnucci, Rosa Hilda

    2012-11-01

    The planetary hypothesis of the solar cycle is an old idea in which the gravitational influence of the planets has a non-negligible effect on the causes of the solar magnetic cycle. The advance of this hypothesis is based on phenomenological correlations between dynamical parameters of the Sun's movement around the barycentre of the Solar System and sunspots time series; and more especially, identifying relationships linking solar barycentric dynamics with prolonged minima (especially Grand Minima events). However, at present there is no clear physical mechanism relating these phenomena. The possible celestial influence on solar cycle modulation is of great importance not only in solar physics but also in Earth sciences, because prolonged solar minima have associated important climatic and telluric variations, in particular, during the Maunder and Dalton Minimum. In this work we looked for a possible causal link in relation with solar barycentric dynamics and prolonged minima events. We searched for particular changes in the Sun's acceleration and concentrated on long-term variations of the solar cycle. We show how the orbital angular momentum of the Sun evolves and how the inclination of the solar barycentric orbit varies during the epochs of orbital retrogressions. In particular, at these moments, the radial component of the Sun's acceleration (i.e., in the barycentre-Sun direction) had an exceptional magnitude. These radial impulses occurred at the very beginning of the Maunder Minimum, during the Dalton Minimum and also at the maximum of cycle 22 before the present extended minimum. We also found a strong correlation between the planetary torque and the observed sunspots international number around that maximum. We apply our results in a novel theory of Sun-planets interaction that it is sensitive to Sun barycentric dynamics and found a very important effect on the Sun's capability of storing hypothetical reservoirs of potential energy that could be released by

  1. The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, L.; Barr, J.; Dalrymple, N.; Fraser, M.; Hubbard, R.; Wagner, J.; Warner, M.

    2006-06-01

    Telescope enclosure design is based on an increasingly standard set of criteria. Enclosures must provide failsafe protection in a harsh environment for an irreplaceable piece of equipment; must allow effective air flushing to minimize local seeing while still attenuating wind-induced vibration of the telescope; must reliably operate so that the dome is never the reason for observatory down time; must provide access to utilities, lifting devices and support facilities; and they must be affordable within the overall project budget. The enclosure for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) has to satisfy all these challenging requirements plus one more. To eliminate so-called external dome seeing, the exterior surfaces of the enclosure must be maintained at or just below ambient air temperature while being subjected to the full solar loading of an observing day. Further complicating the design of the ATST enclosure and support facilities are the environmental sensitivities and high construction costs at the selected site - the summit of Haleakala on the island of Maui, Hawaii. Previous development work has determined an appropriate enclosure shape to minimize solar exposure while allowing effective interior flushing, and has demonstrated the feasibility of controlling the exterior skin temperature with an active cooling system. This paper presents the evolution of the design since site selection and how the enclosure and associated thermal systems have been tailored to the particular climatic and terrain conditions of the site. Also discussed are load-reduction strategies that have been identified through thermal modeling, CFD modeling, and other analyses to refine and economize the thermal control systems.

  2. Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) HGAS Induced Jitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Alice; Blaurock, Carl; Liu, Kuo-Chia; Mule, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a comprehensive assessment of High Gain Antenna System induced jitter on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The jitter prediction is created using a coupled model of the structural dynamics, optical response, control systems, and stepper motor actuator electromechanical dynamics. The paper gives an overview of the model components, presents the verification processes used to evaluate the models, describes validation and calibration tests and model-to-measurement comparison results, and presents the jitter analysis methodology and results.

  3. Solar cycle effects on Indian summer monsoon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnam, M. Venkat; Santhi, Y. Durga; Kishore, P.; Rao, S. Vijaya Bhaskara

    2014-12-01

    Solar activity associated with sunspot number influences the atmospheric circulation on various time scales. As Indian summer monsoon (ISM) is the manifestation between warmer Asian continent and the cooler Indian Ocean, changes in the solar cycle are expected to influence the ISM characteristics. Among several elements of ISM, Tropical Easterly Jet (TEJ), Low Level Jet (LLJ), and rainfall are important features. As a part of CAWSES India Phase II theme 1 (solar influence on climate (0-100 km)) programme, we made an attempt to investigate the role of solar cycle variability on these ISM features using long-term data available from NECP/NCAR (1948-2010) and ERA-Interim (1979-2010) re-analysis products. To check the suitability of these data sets, ground based observations available over the Indian region are also considered. ISM characteristics are studied separately for the maximum and minimum as well as increasing and decreasing solar cycle conditions. Amplitudes corresponding to the solar cycle observed in TEJ, LLJ and rainfall are extracted using advanced statistical tool known as intrinsic mode function. Long-term trends in TEJ reveal decreasing trend at the rate of 0.13 m/s/yr (between 1948 and 2000) and no perceptible trend in LLJ. There exists inverse relation between TEJ strength and Central India rainfall. Large difference of 2 m/s (5 m/s) in the zonal winds of TEJ between solar maximum and minimum (increasing and decreasing trend) is noticed. There exists a difference of ~2 m/s in LLJ winds between solar maximum and minimum and increasing and decreasing trend of the solar cycle. However, no consistent relation between the ISM rainfall and solar cycle is noticed over Indian region unlike reported earlier but there exists a delayed effect around 13 years. We attribute the observed features as linear and non-linear relation between dynamics of ISM, rainfall and solar cycle, respectively.

  4. Fast dynamic processes of solar radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tomson, Teolan

    2010-02-15

    This paper studies dynamic processes of fast-alternating solar radiation which are assessed by alternation of clouds. Most attention is devoted to clouds of type Cumulus Humilis, identified through visual recognition and/or a specially constructed automatic sensor. One second sampling period was used. Recorded data series were analyzed with regard to duration of illuminated 'windows' between shadows, their stochastic intervals, fronts and the magnitude of increments of solar irradiance. (author)

  5. Preface: Recent Advances in Fractional Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, H M; Baleanu, Dumitru; Li, Changpin

    2016-08-01

    This Special Focus Issue contains several recent developments and advances on the subject of Fractional Dynamics and its widespread applications in various areas of the mathematical, physical, and engineering sciences. PMID:27586617

  6. Preface: Recent Advances in Fractional Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, H. M.; Baleanu, Dumitru; Li, Changpin

    2016-08-01

    This Special Focus Issue contains several recent developments and advances on the subject of Fractional Dynamics and its widespread applications in various areas of the mathematical, physical, and engineering sciences.

  7. Solar Dynamics Observatory Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera, Rachel; Uhl, Andrew; Secunda, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Mission is to study how solar activity is created and how space weather results from that activity. Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA): High Resolution Images of 10 wavelengths every 10 seconds. Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE): Measure Sun's brightness in EUV. Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI): Measures Doppler shift to study waves of the Sun. Launched February 11, 2010.

  8. Research opportunities to advance solar energy utilization.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nathan S

    2016-01-22

    Major developments, as well as remaining challenges and the associated research opportunities, are evaluated for three technologically distinct approaches to solar energy utilization: solar electricity, solar thermal, and solar fuels technologies. Much progress has been made, but research opportunities are still present for all approaches. Both evolutionary and revolutionary technology development, involving foundational research, applied research, learning by doing, demonstration projects, and deployment at scale will be needed to continue this technology-innovation ecosystem. Most of the approaches still offer the potential to provide much higher efficiencies, much lower costs, improved scalability, and new functionality, relative to the embodiments of solar energy-conversion systems that have been developed to date.

  9. The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope: design and early construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullin, Joseph P.; Rimmele, Thomas R.; Keil, Stephen L.; Warner, Mark; Barden, Samuel; Bulau, Scott; Craig, Simon; Goodrich, Bret; Hansen, Eric; Hegwer, Steve; Hubbard, Robert; McBride, William; Shimko, Steve; Wöger, Friedrich; Ditsler, Jennifer

    2012-09-01

    The National Solar Observatory’s (NSO) Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) is the first large U.S. solar telescope accessible to the worldwide solar physics community to be constructed in more than 30 years. The 4-meter diameter facility will operate over a broad wavelength range (0.35 to 28 μm ), employing adaptive optics systems to achieve diffraction limited imaging and resolve features approximately 20 km on the Sun; the key observational parameters (collecting area, spatial resolution, spectral coverage, polarization accuracy, low scattered light) enable resolution of the theoretically-predicted, fine-scale magnetic features and their dynamics which modulate the radiative output of the sun and drive the release of magnetic energy from the Sun’s atmosphere in the form of flares and coronal mass ejections. In 2010, the ATST received a significant fraction of its funding for construction. In the subsequent two years, the project has hired staff and opened an office on Maui. A number of large industrial contracts have been placed throughout the world to complete the detailed designs and begin constructing the major telescope subsystems. These contracts have included the site development, AandE designs, mirrors, polishing, optic support assemblies, telescope mount and coudé rotator structures, enclosure, thermal and mechanical systems, and high-level software and controls. In addition, design development work on the instrument suite has undergone significant progress; this has included the completion of preliminary design reviews (PDR) for all five facility instruments. Permitting required for physically starting construction on the mountaintop of Haleakalā, Maui has also progressed. This paper will review the ATST goals and specifications, describe each of the major subsystems under construction, and review the contracts and lessons learned during the contracting and early construction phases. Schedules for site construction, key factory testing of

  10. Process Technology and Advanced Concepts: Organic Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Process Technology and Advanced Concepts: Organic Solar Cell that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information.

  11. Solar dynamic power systems for space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, Thomas B.; Nall, Marsha M.; Seidel, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    The Parabolic Offset Linearly Actuated Reflector (POLAR) solar dynamic module was selected as the baseline design for a solar dynamic power system aboard the space station. The POLAR concept was chosen over other candidate designs after extensive trade studies. The primary advantages of the POLAR concept are the low mass moment of inertia of the module about the transverse boom and the compactness of the stowed module which enables packaging of two complete modules in the Shuttle orbiter payload bay. The fine pointing control system required for the solar dynamic module has been studied and initial results indicate that if disturbances from the station are allowed to back drive the rotary alpha joint, pointing errors caused by transient loads on the space station can be minimized. This would allow pointing controls to operate in bandwidths near system structural frequencies. The incorporation of the fine pointing control system into the solar dynamic module is fairly straightforward for the three strut concentrator support structure. However, results of structural analyses indicate that this three strut support is not optimum. Incorporation of a vernier pointing system into the proposed six strut support structure is being studied.

  12. Advances in Solar Radiometry and Metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.; Andreas, A.; Reda, I.; Gotseff, P.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.; Anderberg, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Radiometry and Metrology task at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provides traceable optical radiometric calibrations and measurements to photovoltaic (PV) researchers and the PV industry. Traceability of NREL solar radiometer calibrations to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR) was accomplished during the NREL Pyrheliometer Comparison in October 2003. The task has calibrated 10 spectral and more than 180 broadband radiometers for solar measurements. Other accomplishments include characterization of pyranometer thermal offset errors with laboratory and spectral modeling tools; developing a simple scheme to correct pyranometer data for known responsivity variations; and measuring detailed spectral distributions of the NREL High Intensity Pulsed Solar Simulator (HIPSS) as a function of lamp voltage and time. The optical metrology functions support the NREL Measurement and Characterization Task effort for ISO 17025 accreditation of NREL Solar Reference Cell Calibrations. Optical metrology functions have been integrated into the NREL quality system and audited for ISO17025 compliance.

  13. Advanced solar energy conversion. [solar pumped gas lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    An atomic iodine laser, a candidate for the direct solar pumped lasers, was successfully excited with a 4 kW beam from a xenon arc solar simulator, thus proving the feasibility of the concept. The experimental set up and the laser output as functions of operating conditions are presented. The preliminary results of the iodine laser amplifier pumped with the HCP array to which a Q switch for giant pulse production was coupled are included. Two invention disclosures - a laser driven magnetohydrodynamic generator for conversion of laser energy to electricity and solar pumped gas lasers - are also included.

  14. Dynamic electrical response of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catani, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamic response of a solar generator is of primary importance as much for the design and development of electrical power conditioning hardware as for the analysis of electromagnetic compatibility. A mathematical model of photo-batteries was developed on the basis of impedance measurements performed under differing conditions of temperature, light intensity, before and after irradiation. This model was compared with that derived from PN junction theory and to static measurements. These dynamic measurements enabled the refinement of an integration method capable of determining, under normal laboratory conditions, the dynamic response of a generator to operational lighting conditions.

  15. The solar wind and magnetospheric dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The dynamic processes involved in the interaction between the solar wind and the earth's magnetosphere are reviewed. The evolution of models of the magnetosphere is first surveyed. The existence of the auroral substorm and the cyclical polar magnetic substorm is evidence that the magnetosphere is a dynamic system. The dynamic changes occurring in the magnetosphere, including erosion of the magnetopause, changes in the size of the polar cap, variations in the flaring angle of the tail, neutral point formation, plasma sheet motions, and the inward collapse of the midnight magnetosphere, are discussed. The cyclical variations of geomagnetic activity are explained in terms of the control of the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction by the north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field. Present phenomenological models allow prediction of geomagnetic activity from interplanetary measurements, but modeling of detailed magnetospheric processes is still in its infancy.

  16. Advanced research in solar-energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W.

    1983-01-01

    The Solar Energy Storage Program at the Solar Energy Research Institute is reviewed. The program provides research, systems analyses, and economic assessments of thermal and thermochemical energy storage and transport. Current activities include experimental research into very high temperature (above 800/sup 0/C) thermal energy storage and assessment of novel thermochemical energy storage and transport systems. The applications for such high-temperature storage are thermochemical processes, solar thermal-electric power generation, cogeneration of heat and electricity, industrial process heat, and thermally regenerative electrochemical systems. The research results for five high-temperature thermal energy storage technologies and two thermochemical systems are described.

  17. Dynamics of Solar System Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, Stanley F.

    2002-01-01

    The ongoing aim of the research is to investigate the dynamical and physical evolution of interplanetary dust particles in order to produce a detailed global model of the zodiacal cloud and its constituent components that is capable of predicting thermal fluxes in mid-infrared wave bands to an accuracy of 1% or better; with the additional aim of exploiting this research as a basis for predicting structure in exozodiacal clouds that may be signatures of unseen planets.

  18. Solar System dynamics with the Gaia mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hestroffer, D.; Berthier, J.; Carry, B.; David, P.; Lainey, V.; Rambaux, N.; Thuillot, W.; Arlot, J.-E.; Bancelin, D.; Colas, F.; Desmars, J.; Devillepoix, H.; Fouchard, M.; Ivantsov, A.; Kovalenko, I.; Robert, V.

    2014-12-01

    The Gaia mission is to be launched on December 19th, 2013 by the European Space Agency (ESA). Solar System science is well covered by the mission and has been included since the early stages of its concept and development. We present here some aspects on the astrometry and dynamics of Solar System Objects (SSO) - in particular asteroids, comets and satellites - as well as ground-based support. We also touch upon the future of SSO astrometry that will be achieved indirectly, after mission completion, from the Gaia astrometric catalogue.

  19. Testing relativity with solar system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellings, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    A major breakthrough is described in the accuracy of Solar System dynamical tests of relativistic gravity. The breakthrough was achieved by factoring in ranging data from Viking Landers 1 and 2 from the surface of Mars. Other key data sources included optical transit circle observations, lunar laser ranging, planetary radar, and spacecraft (Mariner 9 to Mars and Mariner 10 to Mercury). The Solar System model which is used to fit the data and the process by which such fits are performed are explained and results are discussed. The results are fully consistent with the predictions of General Relativity.

  20. Predictive Dynamic Security Assessment through Advanced Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenyu; Diao, Ruisheng; Jin, Shuangshuang; Chen, Yousu

    2014-11-30

    Abstract— Traditional dynamic security assessment is limited by several factors and thus falls short in providing real-time information to be predictive for power system operation. These factors include the steady-state assumption of current operating points, static transfer limits, and low computational speed. This addresses these factors and frames predictive dynamic security assessment. The primary objective of predictive dynamic security assessment is to enhance the functionality and computational process of dynamic security assessment through the use of high-speed phasor measurements and the application of advanced computing technologies for faster-than-real-time simulation. This paper presents algorithms, computing platforms, and simulation frameworks that constitute the predictive dynamic security assessment capability. Examples of phasor application and fast computation for dynamic security assessment are included to demonstrate the feasibility and speed enhancement for real-time applications.

  1. The Solar Dynamics Observatory after three years in orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, D.; Ekinci, F. M.; Fink, D.; Pesnell, W. D.

    There are three instruments aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO): EVE, which measures the extreme ultraviolet irradiance of the Sun; AIA, which images the Sun at high cadence in ten wavelengths; and HMI, which measures the solar magnetic field and velocity of the solar surface. These instruments have returned roughly 1.5 Tbytes of solar data per day nearly continuously since the beginning of SDO's science operations in May 2010, which has been facilitated by a continuous downlink from geosynchronous orbit to SDO's dedicated pair of 18-m antennas in White Sands, New Mexico. Science data returned from SDO is continually advancing knowledge of and research in prominence and filament eruptions, late phase flares, and the solar vector magnetic field, amongst other areas. Additionally, observations made during orbit maintenance, collision avoidance, and ground system operations have yielded lessons learned about the need to account for extreme weather in antenna design and the importance of clear, direct communication channels with other satellite operators. These observations and lessons are being used to improve the SDO ground system and operations approach and may prove useful for future mission design.

  2. A heat receiver design for solar dynamic space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Karl W.; Dustin, Miles O.; Crane, Roger

    1990-01-01

    An advanced heat pipe receiver designed for a solar dynamic space power system is described. The power system consists of a solar concentrator, solar heat receiver, Stirling heat engine, linear alternator and waste heat radiator. The solar concentrator focuses the sun's energy into a heat receiver. The engine and alternator convert a portion of this energy to electric power and the remaining heat is rejected by a waste heat radiator. Primary liquid metal heat pipes transport heat energy to the Stirling engine. Thermal energy storage allows this power system to operate during the shade portion of an orbit. Lithium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic is the thermal energy storage material. Thermal energy storage canisters are attached to the midsection of each heat pipe. The primary heat pipes pass through a secondary vapor cavity heat pipe near the engine and receiver interface. The secondary vapor cavity heat pipe serves three important functions. First, it smooths out hot spots in the solar cavity and provides even distribution of heat to the engine. Second, the event of a heat pipe failure, the secondary heat pipe cavity can efficiently transfer heat from other operating primary heat pipes to the engine heat exchanger of the defunct heat pipe. Third, the secondary heat pipe vapor cavity reduces temperature drops caused by heat flow into the engine. This unique design provides a high level of reliability and performance.

  3. Brayton cycle solarized advanced gas turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Described is the development of a Brayton Engine/Generator Set for solar thermal to electrical power conversion, authorized under DOE/NASA Contract DEN3-181. The objective was to design, fabricate, assemble, and test a small, hybrid, 20-kW Brayton-engine-powered generator set. The latter, called a power conversion assembly (PCA), is designed to operate with solar energy obtained from a parobolic dish concentrator, 11 meters in diameter, or with fossil energy supplied by burning fuels in a combustor, or by a combination of both (hybrid model). The CPA consists of the Brayton cycle engine, a solar collector, a belt-driven 20-kW generator, and the necessary control systems for automatic operation in solar-only, fuel-only, and hybrid modes to supply electrical power to a utility grid. The original configuration of the generator set used the GTEC Model GTP36-51 gas turbine engine for the PCA prime mover. However, subsequent development of the GTEC Model AGT101 led to its selection as the powersource for the PCA. Performance characteristics of the latter, thermally coupled to a solar collector for operation in the solar mode, are presented. The PCA was successfully demonstrated in the fuel-only mode at the GTEC Phoenix, Arizona, facilities prior to its shipment to Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico, for installation and testing on a test bed concentractor (parabolic dish). Considerations relative to Brayton-engine development using the all-ceramic AGT101 when it becomes available, which would satisfy the DOE heat engine efficiency goal of 35 to 41 percent, are also discussed in the report.

  4. Electric power - Photovoltaic or solar dynamic?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. L.; Hallinan, G. J.; Hieatt, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The design of the power system for supplying the Space Station with insolation-generated electricity is the main Phase B task at NASA-Lewis Center. The advantages and limitations of two types of power systems, the photovoltaic arrays (PV) and the solar dynamic system (SD), are discussed from the points of view of cost, overall systems integration, and growth. Subsystems of each of these options are described, and a sketch of a projected SD system is shown. The PV technology is well developed and proven, but its low efficiency calls for solar arrays of large areas, which affect station dynamics, control, and drag compensation. The SD systems would be less costly to operate than VP, and are more efficient, needing less deployed area. The major drawback of the SD is its infancy. The conservative and forgiving designs for some of its components must still be created and tested, and the development risks assessed.

  5. Solar Prominence Fine Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We review recent observational and theoretical results on the fine structure and dynamics of solar prominences, beginning with an overview of prominence classifications, the proposal of possible new ``funnel prominence'' classification, and a discussion of the recent ``solar tornado'' findings. We then focus on quiescent prominences to review formation, down-flow dynamics, and the ``prominence bubble'' phenomena. We show new observations of the prominence bubble Rayleigh-Taylor instability triggered by a Kelvin-Helmholtz shear flow instability occurring along the bubble boundary. Finally we review recent studies on plasma composition of bubbles, emphasizing that differential emission measure (DEM) analysis offers a more quantitative analysis than photometric comparisons. In conclusion, we discuss the relation of prominences to coronal magnetic flux ropes, proposing that prominences can be understood as partially ionized condensations of plasma forming the return flow of a general magneto-thermal convection in the corona.

  6. Quasi-steady solar wind dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, V. J.

    1983-01-01

    Progress in understanding the large scale dynamics of quasisteady, corotating solar wind structure was reviewed. The nature of the solar wind at large heliocentric distances preliminary calculations from a 2-D MHD model are used to demonstrate theoretical expectations of corotating structure out to 30 AU. It is found that the forward and reverse shocks from adjacent CIR's begin to interact at about 10 AU, producing new shock pairs flanking secondary CIR's. These sawtooth secondary CIR's interact again at about 20 AU and survive as visible entities to 30 AU. The model predicts the velocity jumps at the leading edge of the secondary CIR's at 30 AU should be very small but there should still be sizable variations in the thermodynamic and magnetic parameters. The driving dynamic mechanism in the distant solar wind is the relaxation of pressure gradients. The second topic is the influence of weak, nonimpulsive time dependence in quasisteady dynamics. It is suggested that modest large scale variations in the coronal flow speed on periods of several hours to a day may be responsible for many of the remaining discrepancies between theory and observation. Effects offer a ready explanation for the apparent rounding of stream fronts between 0.3 and 1.0 AU discovered by Helios.

  7. Solar dynamic power system definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallin, Wayne E.; Friefeld, Jerry M.

    1988-01-01

    The solar dynamic power system design and analysis study compared Brayton, alkali-metal Rankine, and free-piston Stirling cycles with silicon planar and GaAs concentrator photovoltaic power systems for application to missions beyond the Phase 2 Space Station level of technology for all power systems. Conceptual designs for Brayton and Stirling power systems were developed for 35 kWe and 7 kWe power levels. All power systems were designed for 7-year end-of-life conditions in low Earth orbit. LiF was selected for thermal energy storage for the solar dynamic systems. Results indicate that the Stirling cycle systems have the highest performance (lowest weight and area) followed by the Brayton cycle, with photovoltaic systems considerably lower in performance. For example, based on the performance assumptions used, the planar silicon power system weight was 55 to 75 percent higher than for the Stirling system. A technology program was developed to address areas wherein significant performance improvements could be realized relative to the current state-of-the-art as represented by Space Station. In addition, a preliminary evaluation of hardenability potential found that solar dynamic systems can be hardened beyond the hardness inherent in the conceptual designs of this study.

  8. Recent technological advances in thin film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ullal, H.S.; Zwelbel, K.; Surek, T.

    1990-03-01

    High-efficiency, low-cost thin film solar cells are an exciting photovoltaic technology option for generating cost-effective electricity in 1995 and beyond. This paper reviews the substantial advances made by several thin film solar cell technologies, namely, amorphous silicon, copper indium diselenide, cadmium telluride, and polycrystalline silicon. Recent examples of utility demonstration projects of these emerging materials are also discussed. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Progress to Develop an Advanced Solar-Selective Coating

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C. E.

    2008-03-01

    The progress to develop a durable advanced solar-selective coating will be described. Experimental work has focused on modeling high-temperature, solar-selective coatings; depositing the individual layers and modeled coatings; measuring the optical, thermal, morphology, and compositional properties and using the data to validate the modeled and deposited properties; re-optimizing the coating; and testing the coating performance and durability.

  10. Dynamic Simulations of Advanced Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; Jacob J. Jacobson; Gretchen E. Matthern; David E. Shropshire

    2011-03-01

    Years of performing dynamic simulations of advanced nuclear fuel cycle options provide insights into how they could work and how one might transition from the current once-through fuel cycle. This paper summarizes those insights from the context of the 2005 objectives and goals of the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Our intent is not to compare options, assess options versus those objectives and goals, nor recommend changes to those objectives and goals. Rather, we organize what we have learned from dynamic simulations in the context of the AFCI objectives for waste management, proliferation resistance, uranium utilization, and economics. Thus, we do not merely describe “lessons learned” from dynamic simulations but attempt to answer the “so what” question by using this context. The analyses have been performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Dynamics (VISION). We observe that the 2005 objectives and goals do not address many of the inherently dynamic discriminators among advanced fuel cycle options and transitions thereof.

  11. Advanced Solar Cell Testing and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Curtis, Henry; Piszczor, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The topic for this workshop stems from an ongoing effort by the photovoltaic community and U.S. government to address issues and recent problems associated with solar cells and arrays experienced by a number of different space systems. In April 2003, a workshop session was held at the Aerospace Space Power Workshop to discuss an effort by the Air Force to update and standardize solar cell and array qualification test procedures in an effort to ameliorate some of these problems. The organizers of that workshop session thought it was important to continue these discussions and present this information to the entire photovoltaic community. Thus, it was decided to include this topic as a workshop at the following SPRAT conference.

  12. Recent advances in sensitized mesoscopic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Grätzel, Michael

    2009-11-17

    Perhaps the largest challenge for our global society is to find ways to replace the slowly but inevitably vanishing fossil fuel supplies by renewable resources and, at the same time, avoid negative effects from the current energy system on climate, environment, and health. The quality of human life to a large degree depends upon the availability of clean energy sources. The worldwide power consumption is expected to double in the next 3 decades because of the increase in world population and the rising demand of energy in the developing countries. This implies enhanced depletion of fossil fuel reserves, leading to further aggravation of the environmental pollution. As a consequence of dwindling resources, a huge power supply gap of 14 terawatts is expected to open up by year 2050 equaling today's entire consumption, thus threatening to create a planetary emergency of gigantic dimensions. Solar energy is expected to play a crucial role as a future energy source. The sun provides about 120,000 terawatts to the earth's surface, which amounts to 6000 times the present rate of the world's energy consumption. However, capturing solar energy and converting it to electricity or chemical fuels, such as hydrogen, at low cost and using abundantly available raw materials remains a huge challenge. Chemistry is expected to make pivotal contributions to identify environmentally friendly solutions to this energy problem. One area of great promise is that of solar converters generally referred to as "organic photovoltaic cells" (OPV) that employ organic constituents for light harvesting or charge carrier transport. While this field is still in its infancy, it is receiving enormous research attention, with the number of publications growing exponentially over the past decade. The advantage of this new generation of solar cells is that they can be produced at low cost, i.e., potentially less than 1 U.S. $/peak watt. Some but not all OPV embodiments can avoid the expensive and energy

  13. Chemical Dynamics at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, T.; Berrah, N.; Fadley, C.; Moore, C.B.; Neumark, D.M.; Ng, C.Y.; Ruscic, B.; Smith, N.V.; Suits, A.G.; Wodtke, A.M.

    1999-02-02

    A day-long retreat was held January 15, 1999 to chart the future directions for chemical dynamics studies at the Advanced Light Source. This represents an important period for the Chemical Dynamics Beamline, as the hardware is well-developed, most of the initial experimental objectives have been realized and the mission is now to identify the future scientific priorities for the beamline and attract users of the highest caliber. To this end, we have developed a detailed scientific program for the near term; identified and prioritized the long range scientific opportunities, identified essential new hardware, and outlined an aggressive outreach program to involve the chemical physics community.

  14. Recent Advances in Solar Sail Propulsion at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Young, Roy M.; Montgomery, Edward E., IV

    2006-01-01

    Supporting NASA's Science Mission Directorate, the In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is developing solar sail propulsion for use in robotic science and exploration of the solar system. Solar sail propulsion will provide longer on-station operation, increased scientific payload mass fraction, and access to previously inaccessible orbits for multiple potential science missions. Two different 20-meter solar sail systems were produced and successfully completed functional vacuum testing last year in NASA Glenn's Space Power Facility at Plum Brook Station, Ohio. The sails were designed and developed by ATK Space Systems and L'Garde, respectively. These sail systems consist of a central structure with four deployable booms that support the sails. This sail designs are robust enough for deployments in a one atmosphere, one gravity environment, and are scalable to much larger solar sails-perhaps as much as 150 meters on a side. In addition, computation modeling and analytical simulations have been performed to assess the scalability of the technology to the large sizes (>150 meters) required for first generation solar sails missions. Life and space environmental effects testing of sail and component materials are also nearly complete. This paper will summarize recent technology advancements in solar sails and their successful ambient and vacuum testing.

  15. Recent Advances in Solar Sail Propulsion Systems at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les

    2006-01-01

    Supporting NASA's Science Mission Directorate, the In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is developing solar sail propulsion for use in robotic science and exploration of the solar system. Solar sail propulsion has the potential to provide longer on-station operation, increased scientific payload mass fraction, and access to previously inaccessible orbits for multiple potential science missions. Two different 20-meter solar sail systems were produced and successfully completed functional vacuum testing last year in NASA Glenn s Space Power Facility at Plum Brook Station Ohio. The sails were designed and developed by ATK Space Systems and L'Garde, respectively. The sail systems consist of a central structure with four deployable booms that support the sails. The sail designs are robust enough for deployments in a one atmosphere, one gravity environment and are scalable to much larger solar sails - perhaps as large as 150 meters on a side. In addition, computational modeling and analytical simulations have been performed to assess the scalability of the technology to the large sizes (150 meters) required to implement the first generation of missions using solar sails. Life and space environmental effects testing of sail and component materials are also nearly complete. This paper will summarize recent technology advancements in solar sails and their successful ambient and vacuum environment testing.

  16. Chapter 1: Recent Advances in Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, B. N.

    2008-10-01

    For millennia, the Sun (and the universe) has been viewed in the visual light. As the bestower of light and life, the ancients made God out of the Sun. With the Babylonians, or with the multiple origins with the Chinese, Egyptians and Indians, quoting the Rig Veda:"All that exists was born from Sūrya, the God of gods.", we have come a long way to understanding the Sun. In the early seventeenth century, however, Galileo showed that the Sun was not an immaculate object. Thus began our scientific interests in our nearest stellar neighbour, the Sun (cf., Figure 1.1.), with its sunspots and the related solar activity. The observations of the Sun and their interpretations are of universal importance for at least two reasons: First, the Sun is the source of energy for the entire planetary system and all aspects of our life have direct impact on what happens on the Sun; and second, the Sun's proximity makes it unique among the billions of stars in the sky of which we can resolve its surface features and study physical processes at work...

  17. MULTISCALE DYNAMICS OF SOLAR MAGNETIC STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2012-03-20

    Multiscale topological complexity of the solar magnetic field is among the primary factors controlling energy release in the corona, including associated processes in the photospheric and chromospheric boundaries. We present a new approach for analyzing multiscale behavior of the photospheric magnetic flux underlying these dynamics as depicted by a sequence of high-resolution solar magnetograms. The approach involves two basic processing steps: (1) identification of timing and location of magnetic flux origin and demise events (as defined by DeForest et al.) by tracking spatiotemporal evolution of unipolar and bipolar photospheric regions, and (2) analysis of collective behavior of the detected magnetic events using a generalized version of the Grassberger-Procaccia correlation integral algorithm. The scale-free nature of the developed algorithms makes it possible to characterize the dynamics of the photospheric network across a wide range of distances and relaxation times. Three types of photospheric conditions are considered to test the method: a quiet photosphere, a solar active region (NOAA 10365) in a quiescent non-flaring state, and the same active region during a period of M-class flares. The results obtained show (1) the presence of a topologically complex asymmetrically fragmented magnetic network in the quiet photosphere driven by meso- and supergranulation, (2) the formation of non-potential magnetic structures with complex polarity separation lines inside the active region, and (3) statistical signatures of canceling bipolar magnetic structures coinciding with flaring activity in the active region. Each of these effects can represent an unstable magnetic configuration acting as an energy source for coronal dissipation and heating.

  18. Multiscale Dynamics of Solar Magnetic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Multiscale topological complexity of the solar magnetic field is among the primary factors controlling energy release in the corona, including associated processes in the photospheric and chromospheric boundaries.We present a new approach for analyzing multiscale behavior of the photospheric magnetic flux underlying these dynamics as depicted by a sequence of high-resolution solar magnetograms. The approach involves two basic processing steps: (1) identification of timing and location of magnetic flux origin and demise events (as defined by DeForest et al.) by tracking spatiotemporal evolution of unipolar and bipolar photospheric regions, and (2) analysis of collective behavior of the detected magnetic events using a generalized version of the Grassberger-Procaccia correlation integral algorithm. The scale-free nature of the developed algorithms makes it possible to characterize the dynamics of the photospheric network across a wide range of distances and relaxation times. Three types of photospheric conditions are considered to test the method: a quiet photosphere, a solar active region (NOAA 10365) in a quiescent non-flaring state, and the same active region during a period of M-class flares. The results obtained show (1) the presence of a topologically complex asymmetrically fragmented magnetic network in the quiet photosphere driven by meso- and supergranulation, (2) the formation of non-potential magnetic structures with complex polarity separation lines inside the active region, and (3) statistical signatures of canceling bipolar magnetic structures coinciding with flaring activity in the active region. Each of these effects can represent an unstable magnetic configuration acting as an energy source for coronal dissipation and heating.

  19. Dynamic modeling of solar dynamic components and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochstein, John I.; Korakianitis, T.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this grant was to support NASA in modeling efforts to predict the transient dynamic and thermodynamic response of the space station solar dynamic power generation system. In order to meet the initial schedule requirement of providing results in time to support installation of the system as part of the initial phase of space station, early efforts were executed with alacrity and often in parallel. Initially, methods to predict the transient response of a Rankine as well as a Brayton cycle were developed. Review of preliminary design concepts led NASA to select a regenerative gas-turbine cycle using a helium-xenon mixture as the working fluid and, from that point forward, the modeling effort focused exclusively on that system. Although initial project planning called for a three year period of performance, revised NASA schedules moved system installation to later and later phases of station deployment. Eventually, NASA selected to halt development of the solar dynamic power generation system for space station and to reduce support for this project to two-thirds of the original level.

  20. Dynamic Modeling of Solar Dynamic Components and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, John I.; Korakianitis, T.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this grant was to support NASA in modeling efforts to predict the transient dynamic and thermodynamic response of the space station solar dynamic power generation system. In order to meet the initial schedule requirement of providing results in time to support installation of the system as part of the initial phase of space station, early efforts were executed with alacrity and often in parallel. Initially, methods to predict the transient response of a Rankine as well as a Brayton cycle were developed. Review of preliminary design concepts led NASA to select a regenerative gas-turbine cycle using a helium-xenon mixture as the working fluid and, from that point forward, the modeling effort focused exclusively on that system. Although initial project planning called for a three year period of performance, revised NASA schedules moved system installation to later and later phases of station deployment. Eventually, NASA selected to halt development of the solar dynamic power generation system for space station and to reduce support for this project to two-thirds of the original level.

  1. Advanced solar concentrator mass production, operation, and maintenance cost assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemeyer, W. A.; Bedard, R. J.; Bell, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    The object of this assessment was to estimate the costs of the preliminary design at: production rates of 100 to 1,000,000 concentrators per year; concentrators per aperture diameters of 5, 10, 11, and 15 meters; and various receiver/power conversion package weights. The design of the cellular glass substrate Advanced Solar Concentrator is presented. The concentrator is an 11 meter diameter, two axis tracking, parabolic dish solar concentrator. The reflective surface of this design consists of inner and outer groups of mirror glass/cellular glass gores.

  2. Polarization Calibration of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmore, D. F.

    2014-10-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the World's largest solar polarimeter with a number of polarimetric instruments simultaneously sharing the ATST light beam. Polarization calibration requires determination of the polarization properties of the telescope optics that are shared by all instruments and the polarization response of each instrument. Hundreds of parameters are required to fully specify the telescope optics but by grouping successive optical elements separated at the Gregorian focus, the elevation rotation, and the Coudé - azimuth rotation and performing calibrations over the course of a day, it is possible to infer the polarization properties of each of the groups, and the instruments themselves with many fewer parameters.

  3. Solar Power Satellite Development: Advances in Modularity and Mechanical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Dorsey, John T.; Watson, Judith J.

    2010-01-01

    Space solar power satellites require innovative concepts in order to achieve economically and technically feasible designs. The mass and volume constraints of current and planned launch vehicles necessitate highly efficient structural systems be developed. In addition, modularity and in-space deployment will be enabling design attributes. This paper reviews the current challenges of launching and building very large space systems. A building block approach is proposed in order to achieve near-term solar power satellite risk reduction while promoting the necessary long-term technology advances. Promising mechanical systems technologies anticipated in the coming decades including modularity, material systems, structural concepts, and in-space operations are described

  4. solar thermal power systems advanced solar thermal technology project, advanced subsystems development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The preliminary design for a prototype small (20 kWe) solar thermal electric generating unit was completed, consisting of several subsystems. The concentrator and the receiver collect solar energy and a thermal buffer storage with a transport system is used to provide a partially smoothed heat input to the Stirling engine. A fossil-fuel combustor is included in the receiver designs to permit operation with partial or no solar insolation (hybrid). The engine converts the heat input into mechanical action that powers a generator. To obtain electric power on a large scale, multiple solar modules will be required to operate in parallel. The small solar electric power plant used as a baseline design will provide electricity at remote sites and small communities.

  5. Advanced Silicon Solar Cell Device Physics and Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deceglie, Michael Gardner

    A fundamental challenge in the development and deployment of solar photovoltaic technology is a reduction in cost enabling direct competition with fossil-fuel-based energy sources. A key driver in this cost reduction is optimized device efficiency, because increased energy output leverages all photovoltaic system costs, from raw materials and module manufacturing to installation and maintenance. To continue progress toward higher conversion efficiencies, solar cells are being fabricated with increasingly complex designs, including engineered nanostructures, heterojunctions, and novel contacting and passivation schemes. Such advanced designs require a comprehensive and unified understanding of the optical and electrical device physics at the microscopic scale. This thesis focuses on a microscopic understanding of solar cell optoelectronic performance and its impact on cell optimization. We consider this in three solar cell platforms: thin-film crystalline silicon, amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunctions, and thin-film cells with nanophotonic light trapping. The work described in this thesis represents a powerful design paradigm, based on a detailed physical understanding of the mechanisms governing solar cell performance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of understanding not just the individual mechanisms, but also their interactions. Such an approach to device optimization is critical for the efficiency and competitiveness of future generations of solar cells.

  6. Nonlinear Dynamic Models in Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2002-01-01

    To facilitate analysis, ALS systems are often assumed to be linear and time invariant, but they usually have important nonlinear and dynamic aspects. Nonlinear dynamic behavior can be caused by time varying inputs, changes in system parameters, nonlinear system functions, closed loop feedback delays, and limits on buffer storage or processing rates. Dynamic models are usually cataloged according to the number of state variables. The simplest dynamic models are linear, using only integration, multiplication, addition, and subtraction of the state variables. A general linear model with only two state variables can produce all the possible dynamic behavior of linear systems with many state variables, including stability, oscillation, or exponential growth and decay. Linear systems can be described using mathematical analysis. Nonlinear dynamics can be fully explored only by computer simulations of models. Unexpected behavior is produced by simple models having only two or three state variables with simple mathematical relations between them. Closed loop feedback delays are a major source of system instability. Exceeding limits on buffer storage or processing rates forces systems to change operating mode. Different equilibrium points may be reached from different initial conditions. Instead of one stable equilibrium point, the system may have several equilibrium points, oscillate at different frequencies, or even behave chaotically, depending on the system inputs and initial conditions. The frequency spectrum of an output oscillation may contain harmonics and the sums and differences of input frequencies, but it may also contain a stable limit cycle oscillation not related to input frequencies. We must investigate the nonlinear dynamic aspects of advanced life support systems to understand and counter undesirable behavior.

  7. Inner Solar System Dynamical Analogues for Plutinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, M.; Brasser, R.; Stacey, R. G.; Wiegert, P.

    2004-11-01

    Neptune and Pluto share a remarkable 3:2 mean motion resonance. Neptune orbits the Sun three times for each two circuits by Pluto, and Pluto in its eccentric orbit is never at perihelion when Neptune is close. In recent years many plutinos, which share the 3:2 resonance in the outer solar system, have been discovered. We now find Earth, Venus, and Mars, to have resonant asteroids dynamically similar to the plutinos of Neptune. Earth-associated asteroids 67367, 2000 YJ11, and 2002 AV31 share many relative orbital properties, including eccentricity, with Pluto. Associated with Venus, 5381 Sekhmet and 2000 ET70 are in short-lived libration with dissimilar orbits also not similar to that of Pluto. Earth and Venus 3:2 resonant objects interact with the next outer planet, limiting their lifetimes. It is likely that such interactions also provide an injection mechanism into the resonance. In resonance with Mars are 12008 Kandrup, 1999 RO37, 2002 GO6, 2004 CN50, and four others, and these have Pluto-like and apparently primordial orbits at the inner edge of the asteroid belt. This suggests an unexpected influence of Mars on the structure of the inner belt. While plutinos have only been observed for partial orbits, these objects all have been, or soon will be, observed over a full orbital path, permitting exploration of the evolution of the resonance. In some cases we find that close approaches to the associated planet are possible, while this has generally been discounted as being involved in the origin of the Pluto resonance. Even for computational studies, these objects favor further investigations of 3:2 resonant behavior since the time scales are short. Thus, while informing us on asteroid transport in the inner solar system, ``inner plutinos" may shed light also on the outer solar system and the role of the 3:2 resonance there.

  8. Solar sail attitude dynamics and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Marsh, E. L.; Gunter, S. M.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes some results of an attitude dynamics and control study for a solar sailing vehicle. This type of vehicle is currently under study and evaluation at JPL and has very high potential for interplanetary missions in and beyond the 1980s. Crucial to the success of such a vehicle would be the performance of its onboard attitude control system. Because of the vehicle's large size and its flexibility, vehicle deformations may have a potential for causing a degradation in vehicle performance. It may therefore be necessary for the control system to take into account the vehicle deformations as well as its rigid-body motions. Distributed parameter system analysis techniques are used in the paper to study certain fundamental aspects of such a control system for the sail vehicle. The techniques can, however, be more generally applicable to other large flexible vehicles.

  9. The dynamic heliosphere, solar activity, and cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potgieter, Marius S.

    2010-08-01

    This brief review addresses the relation between solar activity, cosmic ray variations and the dynamics of the heliosphere. The global features of the heliosphere influence what happens inside its boundaries on a variety of time-scales. Galactic and anomalous cosmic rays are the messengers that convey vital information on global heliospheric changes in the manner that they respond to these changes. By observing cosmic rays over a large range of energies at Earth, and with various space detectors, a better understanding is gained about space weather and climate. The causes of the cosmic ray variability are reviewed, with emphasis on the 11-year and 22-year cycles, step modulation, charge-sign dependent modulation and particle drifts. Advances in this field are selectively discussed in the context of what still are some of the important uncertainties and outstanding issues.

  10. SEPServer advances overview on Solar Energetic Particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malandraki, O.

    2013-09-01

    SEPServer hosted activities related to the scientific analysis of SEP event observations, including data analysis using both data-driven and simulation-based methods. The scientific conclusions of this effort are drawn with the implementation and release to the SEP community of multiple SEP event catalogs based on different spacecrafts and instruments, covering a broad timescale from 1975 to 2013 as well as a variety of distances from 0.3 to ~5 AU in the heliosphere. SEP events from Helios A & B missions, going back to 1975, at distances 0.3-1 AU, together with their Electromagnetic (EM) counterpart from OSRA data are being released for the first time. A catalog covering solar cycle 23 based upon the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/ Energetic and Relativistic Nuclei and Electron (ERNE) highenergy (~68 MeV) protons at 1 AU with parallel analysis of SOHO/ Electron Proton Helium Instrument (EPHIN) and Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) / Electron, Proton and Alpha Monitor (EPAM) data, including the relevant EM associations has also been delivered. Furthermore, the first complete Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) SEP catalog based on the Low Energy Telescope (LET) protons (610 MeV) and the Solar Electron Proton Telescope (SEPT) electrons (65-105 keV) covering the rising phase of solar cycle 24 has been implemented. Moreover, the Cosmic Ray and Solar Particle Investigation (COSPIN) Kiel Electron Telescope (KET) data of 38-125 MeV has been used to identify a new catalog of SEP events observed in and out of the ecliptic plane over solar cycle 23, with simultaneous analysis of electrons recorded by the Heliosphere Instrument for Spectra, Composition and Anisotropy at Low Energies (HISCALE). For selected cases simulation based analysis has been applied in order to identify the timing of the injection history and to provide a cross reference to the EM emissions, leading to a comprehensive treatment of these events and to the corresponding testing of

  11. Exploring dynamic events in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, Cooper James

    With the advent of modern computational technology it is now becoming the norm to employ detailed 3D computer models as empirical tools that directly account for the inhomogeneous nature of the Sun-Heliosphere environment. The key advantage of this approach lies in the ability to compare model results directly to observational data and to use a successful comparison (or lack thereof) to glean information on the underlying physical processes. Using extreme ultraviolet waves (EUV waves) as the overarching scientific driver, we apply this observation modeling approach to study the complex dynamics of the magnetic and thermodynamic structures that are observed in the low solar corona. Representing a highly non-trivial effort, this work includes three main scientific thrusts: an initial modeling effort and two EUV wave case-studies. First we document the development of the new Low Corona (LC) model, a 3D time-dependent thermodynamic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model implemented within the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF). Observation synthesis methods are integrated within the LC model, which provides the ability to compare model results directly to EUV imaging observations taken by spacecraft. The new model is then used to explore the dynamic interplay between magnetic structures and thermodynamic energy balance in the corona that is caused by coronal heating mechanisms. With the model development complete, we investigate the nature of EUV waves in detail through two case-studies. Starting with the 2008 March 25 event, we conduct a series of numerical simulations that independently vary fundamental parameters thought to govern the physical mechanisms behind EUV waves. Through the subsequent analysis of the 3D data and comparison to observations we find evidence for both wave and non-wave mechanisms contributing to the EUV wave signal. We conclude with a comprehensive observation and modeling analysis of the 2010 June 13 EUV wave event, which was observed by the

  12. Solar dynamic power system development for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The development of a solar dynamic electric power generation system as part of the Space Station Freedom Program is documented. The solar dynamic power system includes a solar concentrator, which collects sunlight; a receiver, which accepts and stores the concentrated solar energy and transfers this energy to a gas; a Brayton turbine, alternator, and compressor unit, which generates electric power; and a radiator, which rejects waste heat. Solar dynamic systems have greater efficiency and lower maintenance costs than photovoltaic systems and are being considered for future growth of Space Station Freedom. Solar dynamic development managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center from 1986 to Feb. 1991 is covered. It summarizes technology and hardware development, describes 'lessons learned', and, through an extensive bibliography, serves as a source list of documents that provide details of the design and analytic results achieved. It was prepared by the staff of the Solar Dynamic Power System Branch at the NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The report includes results from the prime contractor as well as from in-house efforts, university grants, and other contracts. Also included are the writers' opinions on the best way to proceed technically and programmatically with solar dynamic efforts in the future, on the basis of their experiences in this program.

  13. Solar dynamic power for space station freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labus, Thomas L.; Secunde, Richard R.; Lovely, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom Program is presently planned to consist of two phases. At the completion of Phase 1, Freedom's manned base will consist of a transverse boom with attached manned modules and 75 kW of available electric power supplied by photovoltaic (PV) power sources. In Phase 2, electric power available to the manned base will be increased to 125 kW by the addition of two solar dynamic (SD) power modules, one at each end of the transverse boom. Power for manned base growth beyond Phase 2 will be supplied by additional SD modules. Studies show that SD power for the growth eras will result in life cycle cost savings of $3 to $4 billion when compared to PV-supplied power. In the SD power modules for Space Station Freedom, an offset parabolic concentrator collects and focuses solar energy into a heat receiver. To allow full power operation over the entire orbit, the receiver includes integral thermal energy storage by means of the heat of fusion of a salt mixture. Thermal energy is removed from the receiver and converted to electrical energy by a power conversion unit (PCU) which includes a closed brayton cycle (CBC) heat engine and an alternator. The receiver/PCU/radiator combination will be completely assembled and charged with gas and cooling fluid on Earth before launch to orbit. The concentrator subassemblies will be pre-aligned and stowed in the orbiter bay before launch. On orbit, the receiver/PCU/radiator assembly will be installed as a unit. The pre-aligned concentrator panels will then be latched together and the total concentrator attached to the receiver/PCU/radiator by the astronauts. After final electric connections are made and checkout is complete, the SD power module will be ready for operation.

  14. Solar dynamic power for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labus, Thomas L.; Secunde, Richard R.; Lovely, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom Program is presently planned to consist of two phases. At the completion of Phase 1, Freedom's manned base will consist of a transverse boom with attached manned modules and 75 kW of available electric power supplied by photovoltaic (PV) power sources. In Phase 2, electric power available to the manned base will be increased to 125 kW by the addition of two solar dynamic (SD) power modules, one at each end of the transverse boom. Power for manned base growth beyond Phase 2 will be supplied by additional SD modules. Studies show that SD power for the growth eras will result in life cycle cost savings of $3 to $4 billion when compared to PV-supplied power. In the SD power modules for Space Station Freedom, an offset parabolic concentrator collects and focuses solar energy into a heat receiver. To allow full power operation over the entire orbit, the receiver includes integral thermal energy storage by means of the heat of fusion of a salt mixture. Thermal energy is removed from the receiver and converted to electrical energy by a power conversion unit (PCU) which includes a closed brayton cycle (CBC) heat engine and an alternator. The receiver/PCU/radiator combination will be completely assembled and charged with gas and cooling fluid on earth before launch to orbit. The concentrator subassemblies will be pre-aligned and stowed in the orbiter bay before launch. On orbit, the receiver/PCU/radiator assembly will be installed as a unit. The pre-aligned concentrator panels will then be latched together and the total concentrator attached to the receiver/PCU/radiator by the astronauts. After final electric connections are made and checkout is complete, the SD power module will be ready for operation.

  15. Recent Progress in Heliogyro Solar Sail Structural Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, William K.; Warren, Jerry E.; Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Gibbs, Samuel C.; Dowell, E.; Guerrant, Daniel; Lawrence Dale

    2014-01-01

    Results from recent National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) research on the structural dynamics and control characteristics of heliogyro solar sails are summarized. Specific areas under investigation include coupled nonlinear finite element analysis of heliogyro membrane blade with solar radiation pressure effects, system identification of spinning membrane structures, solarelastic stability analysis of heliogyro solar sails, including stability during blade deployment, and results from small-scale in vacuo dynamics experiments with spinning high-aspect ratio membranes. A low-cost, rideshare payload heliogyro technology demonstration mission concept, used as a mission context for these heliogyro structural dynamics and solarelasticity investigations, is also described.

  16. Advanced component research in the solar thermal program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C. T.

    The capabilities, equipment, and programs of the DoE advanced components test facility (ACTF) for developing solar thermal technologies are reviewed. The ACTF has a heliostat field, a rigid structural steel test tower at the geometric center of the heliostat field, an experiment platform on the tower, a heat rejection system, and computerized instrumentation. Tests have been performed on a directly-heated fluidized-bed solar receiver, a high pressure single-pass-to-superheat steam generator, a liquid Na heat pipe receiver, a flash pyrolysis biomass gasifier, and a grid-connected Stirling engine powered electrical generator. Helium served as the 720 C working fluid in the Stirling engine, and 18.8 kWe continuous was produced for the grid. Verified components qualified for further development are subjected to larger scale testing at a 5 MW facility in Albuquerque, NM.

  17. Dynamical Streams in the Solar Neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Famaey, B.; Jorissen, A.; Luri, X.; Mayor, M.; Udry, S.; Dejonghe, H.; Turon, C.

    2005-01-01

    The true nature of the Hyades and Sirius superclusters is still an open question. In this contribution, we confront Eggen's hypothesis that they are cluster remnants with the results of a kinematic analysis of more than 6000 K and M giants in the solar neighbourhood. This analysis includes new radial velocity data from a large survey performed with the CORAVEL spectrometer, complemented by Hipparcos parallaxes and Tycho-2 proper motions (Famaey et al. 2004). A maximum-likelihood method, based on a bayesian approach, has been applied to the data, in order to make full use of all the available data (including less precise parallaxes) and to derive the properties of the different kinematic subgroups. Two such subgroups can be identified with the Hyades and Sirius superclusters. Stars belonging to them span a very wide range of age, which is difficult to account for in Eggen's scenario. These groups are thus most probably dynamical streams related to the dynamical perturbation by spiral waves rather than to cluster remnants. An explanation for the presence of young clusters in the same area of velocity-space is that they have been put there by the same wave. Indeed, the scale of a cluster is small in comparison to the scale of the perturbation of the potential linked with a spiral wave. The response of a cluster to a spiral wave is thus similar to the response of a single star. Thus, in this scenario, the Hyades and Ursa Major clusters just happen to be in the Hyades and Sirius streams, which are purely dynamical features that have nothing to do with the remnants of more massive primordial clusters. This mechanism could be the key to understanding the presence of an old metal-rich population, and of many exoplanetary systems in our neighbourhood. Moreover, a strong spiral pattern seems to be needed in order to yield such prominent streams. Since spiral structure is usually baryonic, this would leave very little room for dark matter. This may be an indication that the

  18. AFDM: An Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bohl, W.R.; Parker, F.R. ); Wilhelm, D. . Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik); Berthier, J. ); Goutagny, L. . Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire); Ninokata,

    1990-09-01

    AFDM, or the Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model, is a computer code that investigates new approaches simulating the multiphase-flow fluid-dynamics aspects of severe accidents in fast reactors. The AFDM formalism starts with differential equations similar to those in the SIMMER-II code. These equations are modified to treat three velocity fields and supplemented with a variety of new models. The AFDM code has 12 topologies describing what material contacts are possible depending on the presence or absence of a given material in a computational cell, on the dominant liquid, and on the continuous phase. Single-phase, bubbly, churn-turbulent, cellular, and dispersed flow regimes are permitted for the pool situations modeled. Virtual mass terms are included for vapor in liquid-continuous flow. Interfacial areas between the continuous and discontinuous phases are convected to allow some tracking of phenomenological histories. Interfacial areas are also modified by models of nucleation, dynamic forces, turbulence, flashing, coalescence, and mass transfer. Heat transfer is generally treated using engineering correlations. Liquid-vapor phase transitions are handled with the nonequilibrium, heat-transfer-limited model, whereas melting and freezing processes are based on equilibrium considerations. Convection is treated using a fractional-step method of time integration, including a semi-implicit pressure iteration. A higher-order differencing option is provided to control numerical diffusion. The Los Alamos SESAME equation-of-state has been implemented using densities and temperatures as the independent variables. AFDM programming has vectorized all computational loops consistent with the objective of producing an exportable code. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Advanced solar concentrator development in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is the lead laboratory for the United States Department of Energy's program to develop, build, and test advanced solar concentrators that are low in cost, have high performance, and demonstrate a long lifetime. The principal focus of DOE's concentrator program is on the development of heliostats for central receiver power plants and point focus parabolic dishes for use with a 25-kWe Stirling engine. The status and future plans of DOE's program in each area are reviewed. 29 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Solar Dynamics Observatory Launch and Commissioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Donnell, James R., Jr.; Kristin, D.; Bourkland, L.; Hsu, Oscar C.; Liu, Kuo-Chia; Mason, Paul A. C.; Morgenstern, Wendy M.; Russo, Angela M.; Starin, Scott R.; Vess, Melissa F.

    2011-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) was launched on February 11, 2010. Over the next three months, the spacecraft was raised from its launch orbit into its final geosynchronous orbit and its systems and instruments were tested and calibrated in preparation for its desired ten year science mission studying the Sun. A great deal of activity during this time involved the spacecraft attitude control system (ACS); testing control modes, calibrating sensors and actuators, and using the ACS to help commission the spacecraft instruments and to control the propulsion system as the spacecraft was maneuvered into its final orbit. This paper will discuss the chronology of the SDO launch and commissioning, showing the ACS analysis work performed to diagnose propellant slosh transient and attitude oscillation anomalies that were seen during commissioning, and to determine how to overcome them. The simulations and tests devised to demonstrate correct operation of all onboard ACS modes and the activities in support of instrument calibration will be discussed and the final maneuver plan performed to bring SDO on station will be shown. In addition to detailing these commissioning and anomaly resolution activities, the unique set of tests performed to characterize SDO's on-orbit jitter performance will be discussed.

  1. Multiple-etalon systems for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Sigwarth, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Multiple etalon systems are discussed that meet the science requirements for a narrow-passband imaging system for the 4-meter National Solar Observatory (NSO)/Advance Technology Solar Telescope (ATST). A multiple etalon system can provide an imaging interferometer that works in four distinct modes: as a spectro-polarimeter, a filter-vector magnetograph, an intermediate-band imager, and broadband high-resolution imager. Specific dual and triple etalon configurations are described that provide a spectrographic passband of 2.0-3.5 micron and reduce parasitic light levels to 10(exp -4) as required for precise polarization measurement, e.g., Zeeman measurements of magnetic sensitive lines. A TESOS-like (Telecentric Etalon SOlar Spectrometer) triple etalon system provides a spectral purity of 10(exp -5). The triple designs have the advantage of reducing the finesse requirement on each etalon; allow the use of more stable blocking filters, and have very high spectral purity. A dual-etalon double-pass (Cavallini-like) system can provide a competing configuration. Such a dual-etalon design can provide high contrast. The selection of the final focal plane instrument will depend on a trade-off between an ideal instrument and practical reality. The trade study will include the number of etalons, their aperture sizes, complexities of the optical train, number of blocking filters, configuration of the electronic control system, computer interfaces, temperature controllers, etalon controllers, and their associated feedback electronics. The heritage of single and multiple etalon systems comes from their use in several observatories, including the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Observatory, Sacramento Peak Observatory (NSO), and Kiepenheuer-Institut fur Sonnenphysik (KIS, Germany), Mees Solar Observatory (University of Hawaii), and Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory (Italy). The design of the ATST multiple etalon system will benefit from the experience gained at these

  2. Multiple Etalon Systems for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Sigwarth, Michael; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Multiple etalons systems are discussed that meet the 4-meter NSO/Advance Technology Solar Telescope (http://www.nso.edu/ATST/index.html) instrument and science requirements for a narrow bandpass imaging system. A multiple etalon system can provide an imaging interferometer working in four distinct modes: as a spectro-polarimeter, a filter-vector magnetograph, and a wide-band and broad-band high-resolution imager. Specific dual and triple etalon configurations will be described that provides spectrographic passband of 2.0-3.5nm and reduces parasitic light levels to 1/10000 as required by precise polarization measurement, e.g., Zeeman measurements of magnetic sensitive lines. A TESOS-like triple etalon system provides for spectral purity of 100 thousandths. The triple designs have the advantage of reducing the finesse requirement on each etalon, allowing much more stable blocking filters, and can have very high spectral purity. A dual-etalon double-pass Cavallini-like configuration can provide a competing configuration. This design can provide high contrast with only a double etalon. The selection of the final focal plan instrument will depend on a trade-off of the ideal instrument versus reality, the number of etalons, the aperture of etalons, the number of blocking filters the electronic control system and computer interfaces, the temperature control and controllers for the etalons and the electronics. The use of existing experience should provide significant cost savings. The heritage of use of etalons and multiple etalon systems in solar physics come from a number of observatories, which includes MSFC Solar Observatory (NASA), Sac Peak Observatory (NSO), and Kiepenheuer Institute for Solar Physics (Germany), Mees Solar Observatory (University of Hawaii), and Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory (Italy). The design of the ATST multiple etalon system will reply on the existing experience from these observatories.

  3. A novel advanced box-type solar cooker

    SciTech Connect

    Grupp, M.; Montagne, P.; Wackernagel, M. )

    1991-01-01

    An advanced version of the box-type solar cooker is presented: a fixed cooking vessel in good thermal contact with a conductive absorber plate is set into the glazing; the results are improved thermal performance, easier access to the cooking vessel and less frequent maintenance due to protection of all absorbing and reflecting surfaces. Outdoor tests show that 5 liters of water per sq m of opening surface can be brought to full boiling in less than one hour. A finite element simulation model of the advanced box cooker is presented. It is shown that the most decisive parameters are absorber-to-pot heat transfer and absorber conductivity. Field tests in Ethiopia and India are under way, local production in India has started.

  4. Early Results from Solar Dynamic Space Power System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Mason, Lee S.

    1996-01-01

    A government/industry team designed, built and tested a 2-kWe solar dynamic space power system in a large thermal vacuum facility with a simulated Sun at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The Lewis facility provides an accurate simulation of temperatures, high vacuum and solar flux as encountered in low-Earth orbit. The solar dynamic system includes a Brayton power conversion unit integrated with a solar receiver which is designed to store energy for continuous power operation during the eclipse phase of the orbit. This paper reviews the goals and status of the Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration project and describes the initial testing, including both operational and performance data. System testing to date has accumulated over 365 hours of power operation (ranging from 400 watts to 2.0-W(sub e)), including 187 simulated orbits, 16 ambient starts and 2 hot restarts. Data are shown for an orbital startup, transient and steady-state orbital operation and shutdown. System testing with varying insolation levels and operating speeds is discussed. The solar dynamic ground test demonstration is providing the experience and confidence toward a successful flight demonstration of the solar dynamic technologies on the Space Station Mir in 1997.

  5. Use of advanced solar cells for commercial communication satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1995-03-01

    The current generation of communications satellites are located primarily in geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Over the next decade, however, a new generation of communications satellites will be built and launched, designed to provide a world-wide interconnection of portable telephones. For this mission, the satellites must be positioned in lower polar and near-polar orbits. To provide complete coverage, large numbers of satellites will be required. Because the required number of satellites decreases as the orbital altitude is increased, fewer satellites would be required if the orbit chosen were raised from low to intermediate orbit. However, in intermediate orbits, satellites encounter significant radiation due to trapped electrons and protons. Radiation tolerant solar cells may be necessary to make such satellites feasible. We analyze the amount of radiation encountered in low and intermediate polar orbits at altitudes of interest to next-generation communication satellites, calculate the expected degradation for silicon, GaAs, and InP solar cells, and show that the lifetimes can be significantly increased by use of advanced solar cells.

  6. Use of advanced solar cells for commerical communication satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.

    1995-01-01

    The current generation of communications satellites are located primarily in geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Over the next decade, however, a new generation of communications satellites will be built and launched, designed to provide a world-wide interconnection of portable telephones. For this mission, the satellites must be positioned in lower polar- and near-polar orbits. To provide complete coverage, large numbers of satellites will be required. Because of the required number of satellites decreases as the orbital altitude is increased, fewer satellites would be required if the orbit chosen were raised from Low to intermediate orbit. However, in intermediate orbits, satellites encounter significant radiation due to trapped electrons and protons. Radiation tolerant solar cells may be necessary to make such satellites feasible. We analyze the amount of radiation encountered in low and intermediate polar orbits at altitudes of interest to next-generation communication satellites, calculate the expected degradation for silicon, GaAs, and InP solar cells, and show that the lifetimes can be significantly increased by use of advanced solar cells.

  7. Interfacial Materials for Organic Solar Cells: Recent Advances and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhigang; Wei, Jiajun

    2016-01-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) have shown great promise as low‐cost photovoltaic devices for solar energy conversion over the past decade. Interfacial engineering provides a powerful strategy to enhance efficiency and stability of OSCs. With the rapid advances of interface layer materials and active layer materials, power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of both single‐junction and tandem OSCs have exceeded a landmark value of 10%. This review summarizes the latest advances in interfacial layers for single‐junction and tandem OSCs. Electron or hole transporting materials, including metal oxides, polymers/small‐molecules, metals and metal salts/complexes, carbon‐based materials, organic‐inorganic hybrids/composites, and other emerging materials, are systemically presented as cathode and anode interface layers for high performance OSCs. Meanwhile, incorporating these electron‐transporting and hole‐transporting layer materials as building blocks, a variety of interconnecting layers for conventional or inverted tandem OSCs are comprehensively discussed, along with their functions to bridge the difference between adjacent subcells. By analyzing the structure–property relationships of various interfacial materials, the important design rules for such materials towards high efficiency and stable OSCs are highlighted. Finally, we present a brief summary as well as some perspectives to help researchers understand the current challenges and opportunities in this emerging area of research. PMID:27812480

  8. Analysis of dynamic effects in solar thermal energy conversion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    The paper examines a study the purpose of which is to assess the performance of solar thermal power systems insofar as it depends on the dynamic character of system components and the solar radiation which drives them. Using a dynamic model, the daily operation of two conceptual solar conversion systems was simulated under varying operating strategies and several different time-dependent radiation intensity functions. These curves ranged from smoothly varying input of several magnitudes to input of constant total energy whose intensity oscillated with periods from 1/4 hour to 6 hours.

  9. Solar Dynamics and G-modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blizard, Jane B.

    1987-01-01

    Various properties of r-modes that would occupy the solar convection zone were computed. Values were calculated for the energy loss from the coefficient of eddy viscosity using the solar convective zone model. Viscous damping is strong and removes one-third or more of the mode energy each oscillation period. A fast Fourier transform (FFT) of daily Zurich sunspot number was made for eight sets of data, taken near peaks of solar cycles 14 to 21. The FFTs were evaluated with the Wolff and Hickey model. The horizontal component of F sub h of the force exerted by a planetary torque was calculated to see is it works on the photospheric layers at a rate comparable to 0.000001 solar luminosity. The time span of torque in the external sector of the Sun was calculated. The duration of the effect of two planets in conjunction on sunspot numbers was examined. The north-south asymmetry of solar activity was investigated.

  10. Solar Dynamics and G-modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blizard, Jane B.

    1987-02-01

    Various properties of r-modes that would occupy the solar convection zone were computed. Values were calculated for the energy loss from the coefficient of eddy viscosity using the solar convective zone model. Viscous damping is strong and removes one-third or more of the mode energy each oscillation period. A fast Fourier transform (FFT) of daily Zurich sunspot number was made for eight sets of data, taken near peaks of solar cycles 14 to 21. The FFTs were evaluated with the Wolff and Hickey model. The horizontal component of Fh of the force exerted by a planetary torque was calculated to see is it works on the photospheric layers at a rate comparable to 0.000001 solar luminosity. The time span of torque in the external sector of the Sun was calculated. The duration of the effect of two planets in conjunction on sunspot numbers was examined. The north-south asymmetry of solar activity was investigated.

  11. Advances in photographic X-ray imaging for solar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, D.; Schueller, R.; Waljeski, K.; Davis, J. M.

    1989-11-01

    The technique of obtaining quantitative data from high resolution soft X-ray photographic images produced by grazing incidence optics was successfully developed to a high degree during the AS&E Solar Research Sounding Rocket Program and the S-054 X-Ray Spectrographic Telescope Experiment Program on Skylab. Continued use of soft X-Ray photographic imaging in sounding rocket flights of the AS&E High Resolution Solar Soft X-Ray Imaging Payload has provided opportunities to further develop these techniques. The developments discussed include: (1) the calibration and use of an inexpensive, commercially available microprocessor controlled drum type film processor for photometric film development, (2) the use of Kodak Technical Pan 2415 film and Kodak SO-253 High Speed Holographic film for improved resolution, and (3) the application of a technique described by Cook, Ewing, and Sutton (1988) for determining the film characteristics curves from density histograms of the flight film. Although the superior sensitivity, noise level, and linearity of microchannel plate and CCD detectors attracts the development efforts of many groups working in soft X-ray imaging, the high spatial resolution and dynamic range as well as the reliability and ease of application of photographic media assures the continued use of these techniques in solar X-ray astronomy observations.

  12. Advances in photographic X-ray imaging for solar astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, J. Daniel; Schueller, R.; Waljeski, K.; Davis, John M.

    1989-08-01

    The technique of obtaining quantitative data from high resolution soft X-ray photographic images produced by grazing incidence optics was successfully developed to a high degree during the Solar Research Sounding Rocket Program and the S-054 X-Ray Spectrographic Telescope Experiment Program on Skylab. Continued use of soft X-ray photographic imaging in sounding rocket flights of the High Resolution Solar Soft X-Ray Imaging Payload has provided opportunities to further develop these techniques. The developments discussed include: (1) The calibration and use of an inexpensive, commercially available microprocessor controlled drum type film processor for photometric film development; (2) The use of Kodak Technical Pan 2415 film and Kodak SO-253 High Speed Holographic film for improved resolution; and (3) The application of a technique described by Cook, Ewing, and Sutton for determining the film characteristics curves from density histograms of the flight film. Although the superior sensitivity, noise level, and linearity of microchannel plate and CCD detectors attracts the development efforts of many groups working in soft X-ray imaging, the high spatial resolution and dynamic range as well as the reliability and ease of application of photographic media assures the continued use of these techniques in solar X-ray astronomy observations.

  13. Modeling and Flight Data Analysis of Spacecraft Dynamics with a Large Solar Array Paddle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwata, Takanori; Maeda, Ken; Hoshino, Hiroki

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) was launched on January 24 2006 and has been operated successfully since then. This satellite has the attitude dynamics characterized by three large flexible structures, four large moving components, and stringent attitude/pointing stability requirements. In particular, it has one of the largest solar array paddles. Presented in this paper are flight data analyses and modeling of spacecraft attitude motion induced by the large solar array paddle. On orbit attitude dynamics was first characterized and summarized. These characteristic motions associated with the solar array paddle were identified and assessed. These motions are thermally induced motion, the pitch excitation by the paddle drive, and the role excitation. The thermally induced motion and the pitch excitation by the paddle drive were modeled and simulated to verify the mechanics of the motions. The control law updates implemented to mitigate the attitude vibrations are also reported.

  14. Recent developments in the dynamics of advanced rotor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1985-01-01

    The problems that were encountered in the dynamics of advanced rotor systems are described. The methods for analyzing these problems are discussed, as are past solutions of the problems. To begin, the basic dynamic problems of rotors are discussed: aeroelastic stability, rotor and airframe loads, and aircraft vibration. Next, advanced topics that are the subject of current research are described: vibration control, dynamic upflow, finite element analyses, and composite materials. Finally, the dynamics of various rotorcraft configurations are considered: hingeless rotors, bearingless rotors, rotors with circulation control, coupled rotor/engine dynamics, articulated rotors, and tilting proprotor aircraft.

  15. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R.; Shtein, Max

    2015-09-01

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within +/-1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices.

  16. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking

    PubMed Central

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R.; Shtein, Max

    2015-01-01

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within ±1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices. PMID:26348820

  17. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking.

    PubMed

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R; Shtein, Max

    2015-01-01

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within ±1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices. PMID:26348820

  18. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking.

    PubMed

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R; Shtein, Max

    2015-09-08

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within ±1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices.

  19. Solar array flight experiment/dynamic augmentation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Leighton E.; Pack, Homer C., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This report presents the objectives, design, testing, and data analyses of the Solar Array Flight Experiment/Dynamic Augmentation Experiment (SAFE/DAE) that was tested aboard Shuttle in September 1984. The SAFE was a lightweight, flat-fold array that employed a thin polyimide film (Kapton) as a substrate for the solar cells. Extension/retraction, dynamics, electrical and thermal tests, were performed. Of particular interest is the dynamic behavior of such a large lightweight structure in space. Three techniques for measuring and analyzing this behavior were employed. The methodology for performing these tests, gathering data, and data analyses are presented. The report shows that the SAFE solar array technology is ready for application and that new methods are available to assess the dynamics of large structures in space.

  20. Recent Advances in Understanding Particle Acceleration Processes in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, V. V.; Arzner, K.; Benz, A. O.; Browning, P.; Dauphin, C.; Emslie, A. G.; Fletcher, L.; Kontar, E. P.; Mann, G.; Onofri, M.; Petrosian, V.; Turkmani, R.; Vilmer, N.; Vlahos, L.

    2011-09-01

    We review basic theoretical concepts in particle acceleration, with particular emphasis on processes likely to occur in regions of magnetic reconnection. Several new developments are discussed, including detailed studies of reconnection in three-dimensional magnetic field configurations (e.g., current sheets, collapsing traps, separatrix regions) and stochastic acceleration in a turbulent environment. Fluid, test-particle, and particle-in-cell approaches are used and results compared. While these studies show considerable promise in accounting for the various observational manifestations of solar flares, they are limited by a number of factors, mostly relating to available computational power. Not the least of these issues is the need to explicitly incorporate the electrodynamic feedback of the accelerated particles themselves on the environment in which they are accelerated. A brief prognosis for future advancement is offered.

  1. Facility level thermal systems for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, LeEllen; Murga, Gaizka; Fraser, Mark; Climent, Tània

    2012-09-01

    The management and control of the local aero-thermal environment is critical for success of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST). In addition to minimizing disturbances to local seeing, the facility thermal systems must meet stringent energy efficiency requirements to minimize impact on the surrounding environment and meet federal requirements along with operational budgetary constraints. This paper describes the major facility thermal equipment and systems to be implemented along with associated energy management features. The systems presented include the central plant, the climate control systems for the computer room and coudé laboratory, the carousel cooling system which actively controls the surface temperature of the rotating telescope enclosure, and the systems used for active and passive ventilation of the telescope chamber.

  2. A Model for Infusing Energy Concepts into Vocational Education Programs. Advanced Solar Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delta Vocational Technical School, Marked Tree, AR.

    This instructional unit consists of materials designed to help students understand terms associated with solar energy; identify components of advanced solar systems; and identify applications of solar energy in business, industry, agriculture, and photovoltaics. Included in the unit are the following materials: suggested activities, instructional…

  3. Projected techno-economic improvements for advanced solar thermal power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T.; Manvi, R.; Roschke, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    The projected characteristics of solar thermal power plants (with outputs up to 10 MWe) employing promising advanced technology subsystems/components are compared to current (or pre-1985) steam-Rankine systems. Improvements accruing to advanced technology development options are delineated. The improvements derived from advanced systems result primarily from achieving high efficiencies via solar collector systems which (1) capture a large portion of the available insolation and (2) concentrate this captured solar flux to attain high temperatures required for high heat engine/energy conversion performance. The most efficient solar collector systems employ two-axis tracking. Attractive systems include the central receiver/heliostat and the parabolic dish.

  4. The Implementation of Advanced Solar Array Technology in Future NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael F.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Hoffman, David J.; White, Steve; Douglas, Mark; Spence, Brian; Jones, P. Alan

    2003-01-01

    Advanced solar array technology is expected to be critical in achieving the mission goals on many future NASA space flight programs. Current PV cell development programs offer significant potential and performance improvements. However, in order to achieve the performance improvements promised by these devices, new solar array structures must be designed and developed to accommodate these new PV cell technologies. This paper will address the use of advanced solar array technology in future NASA space missions and specifically look at how newer solar cell technologies impact solar array designs and overall power system performance.

  5. Functional safety for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulau, Scott; Williams, Timothy R.

    2012-09-01

    Since inception, the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) has planned to implement a facility-wide functional safety system to protect personnel from harm and prevent damage to the facility or environment. The ATST will deploy an integrated safety-related control system (SRCS) to achieve functional safety throughout the facility rather than relying on individual facility subsystems to provide safety functions on an ad hoc basis. The Global Interlock System (GIS) is an independent, distributed, facility-wide, safety-related control system, comprised of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) programmable controllers that monitor, evaluate, and control hazardous energy and conditions throughout the facility that arise during operation and maintenance. The GIS has been designed to utilize recent advances in technology for functional safety plus revised national and international standards that allow for a distributed architecture using programmable controllers over a local area network instead of traditional hard-wired safety functions, while providing an equivalent or even greater level of safety. Programmable controllers provide an ideal platform for controlling the often complex interrelationships between subsystems in a modern astronomical facility, such as the ATST. A large, complex hard-wired relay control system is no longer needed. This type of system also offers greater flexibility during development and integration in addition to providing for expanded capability into the future. The GIS features fault detection, self-diagnostics, and redundant communications that will lead to decreased maintenance time and increased availability of the facility.

  6. Advanced Nanomaterials for High-Efficiency Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Junhong

    2013-11-29

    Energy supply has arguably become one of the most important problems facing humankind. The exponential demand for energy is evidenced by dwindling fossil fuel supplies and record-high oil and gas prices due to global population growth and economic development. This energy shortage has significant implications to the future of our society, in addition to the greenhouse gas emission burden due to consumption of fossil fuels. Solar energy seems to be the most viable choice to meet our clean energy demand given its large scale and clean/renewable nature. However, existing methods to convert sun light into electricity are not efficient enough to become a practical alternative to fossil fuels. This DOE project aims to develop advanced hybrid nanomaterials consisting of semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots or QDs) supported on graphene for cost-effective solar cells with improved conversion efficiency for harvesting abundant, renewable, clean solar energy to relieve our global energy challenge. Expected outcomes of the project include new methods for low-cost manufacturing of hybrid nanostructures, systematic understanding of their properties that can be tailored for desired applications, and novel photovoltaic cells. Through this project, we have successfully synthesized a number of novel nanomaterials, including vertically-oriented graphene (VG) sheets, three-dimensional (3D) carbon nanostructures comprising few-layer graphene (FLG) sheets inherently connected with CNTs through sp{sup 2} carbons, crumpled graphene (CG)-nanocrystal hybrids, CdSe nanoparticles (NPs), CdS NPs, nanohybrids of metal nitride decorated on nitrogen-doped graphene (NG), QD-carbon nanotube (CNT) and QD-VG-CNT structures, TiO{sub 2}-CdS NPs, and reduced graphene oxide (RGO)-SnO{sub 2} NPs. We further assembled CdSe NPs onto graphene sheets and investigated physical and electronic interactions between CdSe NPs and the graphene. Finally we have demonstrated various applications of these

  7. Active Control of Solar Array Dynamics During Spacecraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Brant A.; Woo, Nelson; Kraft, Thomas G.; Blandino, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent NASA mission plans require spacecraft to undergo potentially significant maneuvers (or dynamic loading events) with large solar arrays deployed. Therefore there is an increased need to understand and possibly control the nonlinear dynamics in the spacecraft system during such maneuvers. The development of a nonlinear controller is described. The utility of using a nonlinear controller to reduce forces and motion in a solar array wing during a loading event is demonstrated. The result is dramatic reductions in system forces and motion during a 10 second loading event. A motion curve derived from the simulation with the closed loop controller is used to obtain similar benefits with a simpler motion control approach.

  8. Solar extreme ultraviolet sensor and advanced langmuir probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronka, N. R.; Block, B. P.; Carignan, G. R.

    1992-01-01

    For more than two decades, the staff of the Space Physics Research Laboratory (SPRL) has collaborated with the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in the design and implementation of Langmuir probes (LP). This program of probe development under the direction of Larry Brace of GSFC has evolved methodically with innovations to: improve measurement precision, increase the speed of measurement, and reduce the weight, size, power consumption and data rate of the instrument. Under contract NAG5-419 these improvements were implemented and are what characterize the Advanced Langmuir Probe (ALP). Using data from the Langmuir Probe on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter, Brace and Walter Hoegy of GSFC demonstrated a novel method of monitoring the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) flux. This led to the idea of developing a sensor similar to a Langmuir probe specifically designed to measure solar EUV (SEUV) that uses a similar electronics package. Under this contract, a combined instrument package of the ALP and SEUV sensor was to be designed, constructed, and laboratory tested. Finally the instrument was to be flight tested as part of sounding rocket experiment to acquire the necessary data to validate this method for possible use in future earth and planetary aeronomy missions. The primary purpose of this contract was to develop the electronics hardware and software for this instrument, since the actual sensors were suppied by GSFC. Due to budget constraints, only a flight model was constructed. These electronics were tested and calibrated in the laboratory, and then the instrument was integrated into the rocket payload at Wallops Flight Facility where it underwent environmental testing. After instrument recalibration at SPRL, the payload was reintegrated and launched from the Poker Flat Research Range near Fairbanks Alaska. The payload was successfully recovered and after refurbishment underwent further testing and developing to improve its performance for future use.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations: advances and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Goñi, Josep Ramon; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep L

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have evolved into a mature technique that can be used effectively to understand macromolecular structure-to-function relationships. Present simulation times are close to biologically relevant ones. Information gathered about the dynamic properties of macromolecules is rich enough to shift the usual paradigm of structural bioinformatics from studying single structures to analyze conformational ensembles. Here, we describe the foundations of molecular dynamics and the improvements made in the direction of getting such ensemble. Specific application of the technique to three main issues (allosteric regulation, docking, and structure refinement) is discussed. PMID:26604800

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations: advances and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Goñi, Josep Ramon; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep L

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have evolved into a mature technique that can be used effectively to understand macromolecular structure-to-function relationships. Present simulation times are close to biologically relevant ones. Information gathered about the dynamic properties of macromolecules is rich enough to shift the usual paradigm of structural bioinformatics from studying single structures to analyze conformational ensembles. Here, we describe the foundations of molecular dynamics and the improvements made in the direction of getting such ensemble. Specific application of the technique to three main issues (allosteric regulation, docking, and structure refinement) is discussed.

  11. Analysis of advanced vapor source for cadmium telluride solar cell manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khetani, Tejas Harshadkumar

    A thin film CdS/CdTe solar cell manufacturing line has been developed in the Materials Engineering Laboratory at Colorado State University. The original design incorporated infrared lamps for heating the vapor source. This system has been redesigned to improve the energy efficiency of the system, allow co-sublimation and allow longer run time before the sources have to be replenished. The advanced vapor source incorporates conduction heating with heating elements embedded in graphite. The advanced vapor source was modeled by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). From these models, the required maximum operating temperature of the element was determined to be 720 C for the processing of CdS/CdTe solar cells. Nichrome and Kanthal A1 were primarily selected for this application at temperature of 720 °C in vacuum with oxygen partial pressure. Research on oxidation effects and life due to oxidation as well as creep deformation was done, and Nichrome was found more suitable for this application. A study of the life of the Nichrome heating elements in this application was conducted and the estimate of life is approximately 1900 years for repeated on-off application. This is many orders of magnitude higher than the life of infrared heat lamps. Ceramic cement based on aluminum oxide (Resbond 920) is used for bonding the elements to the graphite. Thermodynamic calculations showed that this cement is inert to the heating element. An earlier design of the advanced source encountered failure of the element. The failed element was studies by scanning electron microscopy and the failure was attributed to loss of adhesion between the graphite and the ceramic element. The design has been modified and the advanced vapor source is currently in operation.

  12. Advanced Electric Propulsion for Space Solar Power Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steve

    1999-01-01

    The sun tower concept of collecting solar energy in space and beaming it down for commercial use will require very affordable in-space as well as earth-to-orbit transportation. Advanced electric propulsion using a 200 kW power and propulsion system added to the sun tower nodes can provide a factor of two reduction in the required number of launch vehicles when compared to in-space cryogenic chemical systems. In addition, the total time required to launch and deliver the complete sun tower system is of the same order of magnitude using high power electric propulsion or cryogenic chemical propulsion: around one year. Advanced electric propulsion can also be used to minimize the stationkeeping propulsion system mass for this unique space platform. 50 to 100 kW class Hall, ion, magnetoplasmadynamic, and pulsed inductive thrusters are compared. High power Hall thruster technology provides the best mix of launches saved and shortest ground to Geosynchronous Earth Orbital Environment (GEO) delivery time of all the systems, including chemical. More detailed studies comparing launch vehicle costs, transfer operations costs, and propulsion system costs and complexities must be made to down-select a technology. The concept of adding electric propulsion to the sun tower nodes was compared to a concept using re-useable electric propulsion tugs for Low Earth Orbital Environment (LEO) to GEO transfer. While the tug concept would reduce the total number of required propulsion systems, more launchers and notably longer LEO to GEO and complete sun tower ground to GEO times would be required. The tugs would also need more complex, longer life propulsion systems and the ability to dock with sun tower nodes.

  13. Advanced Inverter Functions to Support High Levels of Distributed Solar: Policy and Regulatory Considerations (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    This paper explains how advanced inverter functions (sometimes called 'smart inverters') contribute to the integration of high levels of solar PV generation onto the electrical grid and covers the contributions of advanced functions to maintaining grid stability. Policy and regulatory considerations associated with the deployment of advanced inverter functions are also introduced.

  14. Recent advances in symmetric and network dynamics.

    PubMed

    Golubitsky, Martin; Stewart, Ian

    2015-09-01

    We summarize some of the main results discovered over the past three decades concerning symmetric dynamical systems and networks of dynamical systems, with a focus on pattern formation. In both of these contexts, extra constraints on the dynamical system are imposed, and the generic phenomena can change. The main areas discussed are time-periodic states, mode interactions, and non-compact symmetry groups such as the Euclidean group. We consider both dynamics and bifurcations. We summarize applications of these ideas to pattern formation in a variety of physical and biological systems, and explain how the methods were motivated by transferring to new contexts René Thom's general viewpoint, one version of which became known as "catastrophe theory." We emphasize the role of symmetry-breaking in the creation of patterns. Topics include equivariant Hopf bifurcation, which gives conditions for a periodic state to bifurcate from an equilibrium, and the H/K theorem, which classifies the pairs of setwise and pointwise symmetries of periodic states in equivariant dynamics. We discuss mode interactions, which organize multiple bifurcations into a single degenerate bifurcation, and systems with non-compact symmetry groups, where new technical issues arise. We transfer many of the ideas to the context of networks of coupled dynamical systems, and interpret synchrony and phase relations in network dynamics as a type of pattern, in which space is discretized into finitely many nodes, while time remains continuous. We also describe a variety of applications including animal locomotion, Couette-Taylor flow, flames, the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction, binocular rivalry, and a nonlinear filter based on anomalous growth rates for the amplitude of periodic oscillations in a feed-forward network. PMID:26428565

  15. Recent advances in symmetric and network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubitsky, Martin; Stewart, Ian

    2015-09-01

    We summarize some of the main results discovered over the past three decades concerning symmetric dynamical systems and networks of dynamical systems, with a focus on pattern formation. In both of these contexts, extra constraints on the dynamical system are imposed, and the generic phenomena can change. The main areas discussed are time-periodic states, mode interactions, and non-compact symmetry groups such as the Euclidean group. We consider both dynamics and bifurcations. We summarize applications of these ideas to pattern formation in a variety of physical and biological systems, and explain how the methods were motivated by transferring to new contexts René Thom's general viewpoint, one version of which became known as "catastrophe theory." We emphasize the role of symmetry-breaking in the creation of patterns. Topics include equivariant Hopf bifurcation, which gives conditions for a periodic state to bifurcate from an equilibrium, and the H/K theorem, which classifies the pairs of setwise and pointwise symmetries of periodic states in equivariant dynamics. We discuss mode interactions, which organize multiple bifurcations into a single degenerate bifurcation, and systems with non-compact symmetry groups, where new technical issues arise. We transfer many of the ideas to the context of networks of coupled dynamical systems, and interpret synchrony and phase relations in network dynamics as a type of pattern, in which space is discretized into finitely many nodes, while time remains continuous. We also describe a variety of applications including animal locomotion, Couette-Taylor flow, flames, the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction, binocular rivalry, and a nonlinear filter based on anomalous growth rates for the amplitude of periodic oscillations in a feed-forward network.

  16. Optical control of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope.

    PubMed

    Upton, Robert

    2006-08-10

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) is an off-axis Gregorian astronomical telescope design. The ATST is expected to be subject to thermal and gravitational effects that result in misalignments of its mirrors and warping of its primary mirror. These effects require active, closed-loop correction to maintain its as-designed diffraction-limited optical performance. The simulation and modeling of the ATST with a closed-loop correction strategy are presented. The correction strategy is derived from the linear mathematical properties of two Jacobian, or influence, matrices that map the ATST rigid-body (RB) misalignments and primary mirror figure errors to wavefront sensor (WFS) measurements. The two Jacobian matrices also quantify the sensitivities of the ATST to RB and primary mirror figure perturbations. The modeled active correction strategy results in a decrease of the rms wavefront error averaged over the field of view (FOV) from 500 to 19 nm, subject to 10 nm rms WFS noise. This result is obtained utilizing nine WFSs distributed in the FOV with a 300 nm rms astigmatism figure error on the primary mirror. Correction of the ATST RB perturbations is demonstrated for an optimum subset of three WFSs with corrections improving the ATST rms wavefront error from 340 to 17.8 nm. In addition to the active correction of the ATST, an analytically robust sensitivity analysis that can be generally extended to a wider class of optical systems is presented. PMID:16926876

  17. Optical control of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope.

    PubMed

    Upton, Robert

    2006-08-10

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) is an off-axis Gregorian astronomical telescope design. The ATST is expected to be subject to thermal and gravitational effects that result in misalignments of its mirrors and warping of its primary mirror. These effects require active, closed-loop correction to maintain its as-designed diffraction-limited optical performance. The simulation and modeling of the ATST with a closed-loop correction strategy are presented. The correction strategy is derived from the linear mathematical properties of two Jacobian, or influence, matrices that map the ATST rigid-body (RB) misalignments and primary mirror figure errors to wavefront sensor (WFS) measurements. The two Jacobian matrices also quantify the sensitivities of the ATST to RB and primary mirror figure perturbations. The modeled active correction strategy results in a decrease of the rms wavefront error averaged over the field of view (FOV) from 500 to 19 nm, subject to 10 nm rms WFS noise. This result is obtained utilizing nine WFSs distributed in the FOV with a 300 nm rms astigmatism figure error on the primary mirror. Correction of the ATST RB perturbations is demonstrated for an optimum subset of three WFSs with corrections improving the ATST rms wavefront error from 340 to 17.8 nm. In addition to the active correction of the ATST, an analytically robust sensitivity analysis that can be generally extended to a wider class of optical systems is presented.

  18. Dynamic properties of helium ions in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurbuchen, Th.; Bochsler, P.; von Steiger, R.

    1995-01-01

    We characterize the dynamic properties of He ions of the solar wind. Because of the non-negligible abundance and the significant fraction of momentum flux inherent in helium ions, this species has an influence on the state of turbulence. Especially, we analyze the helium dynamic properties of different solar wind types. After a discussion of the influence of measurement errors on the statistical analysis of He bulk velocities, we investigate the structure function dependency on the solar wind state. We find a self-similar sealing in the range of minutes to days with characteristic structure function slopes deviating from the canonical Kolmogorov values. For comparison with previous studies, we also analyze H structure functions of the same time periods and discuss differences of coinciding He and H structure functions in the framework of the concept of intermittency.

  19. The Solar Dynamics Observatory, Our New Eye on the Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The solar photon output, which was once thought to be constant, varies over all time scales from seconds during solar flares to years due to the solar cycle. These solar variations cause significant deviations in the Earth and space environments on similar time scales, such as affecting the atmospheric densities and composition of particular atoms, molecules, and ions in the atmospheres of the Earth and other planets. Presented and discussed will be examples of current data from satellites that have preceded SDO such as TRACE, SOHO and TIMED that show how we can trace the origins of solar activity from inside the Sun, though its atmosphere, then all the way to the Sun's influence on the Earth and other objects in the solar system. The presentation will continuously emphasize how the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the first satellite in NASA's Living with a Star program, is going to improve upon these current observations and provide further insights into the variable Sun and its Heliospheric influence.

  20. Dynamics of the Solar Plasma Events and Their Interplanetary Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Subhash Chandra

    2016-07-01

    In the present study we have analyzed the interplanetary plasma / field parameter, which have initiated the complex nature intense and highly geo-effective events in the magnetosphere. It is believed that Solar wind velocity V. interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B and Bz are the crucial drivers of these activities. However, sometimes strong geomagnetic disturbance is associated with the interaction between slow and fast solar wind originating from coronal holes leads to create co-rotating plasma interaction region (CIR). Thus the dynamics of the magnetospheric plasma configuration is the reflection of measured solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. While the magnetospheric plasma anomalies are generally represented by geomagnetic storms and sudden ionosphere disturbance (SIDs). The study considers geomagnetic storms associated with disturbance storm time (Dst) decreases of more than -50 nT to -300 nT, observed during solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of solar cycle 24. These have been analyzed and studied statistically. The spacecraft data those provided by SOHO, ACE and geomagnetic stations like WDC-Kyoto are utilized in the study. It is observed that the yearly occurrences of geomagnetic storm are strongly correlated with 11-year sunspot cycle, but no significant correlation between the maximum and minimum phase of solar cycle have been found. It is also found that solar cycle-23 is remarkable for occurrence of intense geomagnetic storms during its declining phase. The detailed results are discussed in this paper.

  1. Advances in fluorescence labeling strategies for dynamic cellular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Kevin M; Palmer, Amy E

    2014-01-01

    Synergistic advances in optical physics, probe design, molecular biology, labeling techniques and computational analysis have propelled fluorescence imaging into new realms of spatiotemporal resolution and sensitivity. This review aims to discuss advances in fluorescent probes and live-cell labeling strategies, two areas that remain pivotal for future advances in imaging technology. Fluorescent protein– and bio-orthogonal–based methods for protein and RNA imaging are discussed as well as emerging bioengineering techniques that enable their expression at specific genomic loci (for example, CRISPR and TALENs). Important attributes that contribute to the success of each technique are emphasized, providing a guideline for future advances in dynamic live-cell imaging. PMID:24937069

  2. Advances in Quantum Trajectory Approaches to Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askar, Attila

    2001-03-01

    The quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) formulation is based on the separation of the amplitude and phase of the complex wave function in Schrodinger's equation. The approach leads to conservation laws for an equivalent "gas continuum". The Lagrangian [1] representation corresponds to following the particles of the fluid continuum, i. e. calculating "quantum trajectories". The Eulerian [2] representation on the other hand, amounts to observing the dynamics of the gas continuum at the points of a fixed coordinate frame. The combination of several factors leads to a most encouraging computational efficiency. QFD enables the numerical analysis to deal with near monotonic amplitude and phase functions. The Lagrangian description concentrates the computation effort to regions of highest probability as an optimal adaptive grid. The Eulerian representation allows the study of multi-coordinate problems as a set of one-dimensional problems within an alternating direction methodology. An explicit time integrator limits the increase in computational effort with the number of discrete points to linear. Discretization of the space via local finite elements [1,2] and global radial functions [3] will be discussed. Applications include wave packets in four-dimensional quadratic potentials and two coordinate photo-dissociation problems for NOCl and NO2. [1] "Quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) in the Lagrangian representation with applications to photo-dissociation problems", F. Sales, A. Askar and H. A. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. 11, 2423 (1999) [2] "Multidimensional wave-packet dynamics within the fluid dynamical formulation of the Schrodinger equation", B. Dey, A. Askar and H. A. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. 109, 8770 (1998) [3] "Solution of the quantum fluid dynamics equations with radial basis function interpolation", Xu-Guang Hu, Tak-San Ho, H. A. Rabitz and A. Askar, Phys. Rev. E. 61, 5967 (2000)

  3. Development of an advanced solar augmented water heater. Final report Feb 80-May 82

    SciTech Connect

    Grunes, H.; Morrison, D.; de Winter, F.

    1982-06-01

    A program was undertaken to design, construct and test two advanced prototype solar augmented gas water heaters. Computer analyses and experimental work were used to optimize components and characterize performance. The resulting design includes a solar preheat tank, a gas-fired backup tank, the collector loop pump and all operating controls contained in a single cylindrical package. The backup tank is positioned above the solar preheat tank. The connection between the solar and backup tanks is effectively a thermal diode which restricts heat transfer from the backup to the solar tank but allows the backup tank to become an integral part of solar storage whenever the solar tank temperature surpasses the backup tank set point temperature. Solar heat is supplied through a jacketed tank drainback system. Gas heat is supplied through a two phase thermosyphon heat exchanger. Testing showed the system to operate efficiently and reliably.

  4. Development of an advanced solar augmented water heater (for single family home applications)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunes, H.; Morrison, D.; Dewinter, F.

    1982-06-01

    A program was undertaken to design, construct and test two advanced prototype solar augmented gas water heaters. Computer analyses and experimental work were used to optimize components and characterize performance. The resulting design includes a solar preheat tank, a gas-fired backup tank, the collector loop pump and all operating controls contained in a single cylindrical package. The backup tank is positioned above the solar preheat tank. The connection between the solar and backup tanks is effectively a thermal diode which restricts heat transfer from the backup to the solar tank but allows the backup tank to become an integral part of solar storage whenever the solar tank temperature surpasses the backup tank set point temperature. Solar heat is supplied through a jacketed tank drainback system.

  5. Coronal Dynamics at Recent Total Solar Eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Lu, M.; Davis, A. B.; Demianski, M.; Rusin, V.; Saniga, M.; Seaton, D. B.; Lucas, R.; Babcock, B. A.; Dantowitz, R.; Gaintatzis, P.; Seeger, C. H.; Malamut, C.; Steele, A.

    2014-12-01

    Our composite images of the solar corona based on extensive imaging at the total solar eclipses of 2010 (Easter Island), 2012 (Australia), and 2013 (Gabon) reveal several coronal mass ejections and other changes in coronal streamers and in polar plumes. Our resultant spatial resolution is finer than that available in imaging from spacecraft, including that from SOHO/LASCO or STEREO. We trace the eruptions back to their footpoints on the sun using imaging from SDO and SWAP, and follow them upwards through the corona, measuring velocities. The high-resolution computer compositing by Miloslav Druckmüller and Hana Druckmüllerová (2010 and 2013) and Pavlos Gaintatzis (2012) allows comparison of our images with those taken at intervals of minutes or hours along the totality path. Williams College's 2013 eclipse expedition was supported in part by grant 9327-13 from National Geographic Society/Committee for Research and Exploration. Our work on the 2012 eclipse is supported in part by grant AGS-1047726 from Solar Terrestrial Research/NSF AGS. V.R. and M.S. were partially supported by the VEGA grant agency project 2/0098/10 and 2/0003/13 (Slovak Academy of Sciences) and Grant 0139-12 from NG/CRE, and Hana Druckmüllerová by grant 205/09/1469 of the Czech Science Foundation. M.L. was supported by Sigma Xi. C.M. was a Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium Summer Fellow, supported at Williams College by REU/NSF grant AST-1005024. Partial support was provided by U.S. Department of Defense's ASSURE program. J.M.P. thanks Caltech's Planetary Sciences Department for hospitality. Support for D.B.S. and SWAP came from PRODEX grant C90345 managed by ESA in collaboration with the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO) in support of the PROBA2/SWAP mission, and from the EC's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant 218816 (SOTERIA project, www.soteria-space.eu). SWAP is a project of the Centre Spatial de Liège and the Royal Observatory of Belgium funded by

  6. Attitude Dynamics and Control of Solar Sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperber, Evan

    Solar sails are space vehicles that rely on solar radiation pressure in order to generate forces for thrust and attitude control torques. They exhibit characteristics such as large moments of inertia, fragility of various system components, and long mission durations that make attitude control a particularly difficult engineering problem. Thrust vector control (TVC) is a family of sailcraft attitude control techniques that is on a short list of strategies thought to be suitable for the primary attitude control of solar sails. Every sailcraft TVC device functions by manipulating the relative locations of the composite mass center (cm) of the sailcraft and the center of pressure (cp) of at least one of its reflectors. Relative displacement of these two points results in body torques that can be used to steer the sailcraft. This dissertation presents a strategy for the large-angle reorientation of a sailcraft using TVC. Two forms of TVC, namely the panel and ballast mass translation methods are well represented in the literature, while rigorous studies regarding a third form, gimballed mass rotation, are conspicuously absent. The gimballed mass method is physically realized by placing a ballast mass, commonly the sailcraft's scientific payload, at the tip of a gimballed boom that has its base fixed at some point on the sailcraft. A TVC algorithm will then strategically manipulate the payload boom's gimbal angles, thereby changing the projection of the sailcraft cm in the plane of the sail. This research demonstrates effective three-axis attitude control of a model sailcraft using numerical simulation of its nonlinear equations of motion. The particular TVC algorithm developed herein involves two phases---the first phase selects appropriate gimbal rates with the objective that the sailcraft be placed in the neighborhood of its target orientation. It was discovered, however that concomitantly minimizing attitude error as well as residual body rate was not possible using

  7. Recent advances in the ITO/InP solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gessert, T. A.; Li, X.; Wanlass, M. W.; Coutts, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    It was demonstrated that Indium Tin Oxide (ITO)/InP solar cells can now be made on as-received p(-) bulk substrates which are of nearly equal quality to those which could previously only be made on epitaxially grown p(-) InP base layers. Although this advancement is due in part to both increases in substrate quality and a better understanding of back contact formation, it appears that the passivation/compensation effects resulting from having H2 in the sputtering gas tends to reduce significantly the performance differences previously observed between these two substrates. It is shown that since high efficiency ITO/InP cells can be made from as-received substrates, and since the type conversion process is not highly spatially dependent, large area ITO/InP cells (4 sq cm) with efficiencies approaching 17 percent (Global) can be made. Furthermore, the measured open circuit voltages (V sub OC) and quantum efficiencies (QEs) from these large cells suggest that, when they are processed using optimum grid designs, the efficiencies will be nearly equal to that of the smaller cells thus far produced. It has been shown, through comparative experiments involving ITO/InP and IO/InP cells, that Sn may not be the major cause of type conversion of the InP surface and thus further implies that the ITO may not be an essential element in this type of device. Specifically, very efficient photovoltaic solar cells were made by sputtering (Sn free) In2O3 showing that type conversion and subsequent junction formation will occur even in the absence of the sputtered SN species. The result suggests that sputter damage may indeed be the important mechanism(s) of type conversion. Finally, an initial study of the stability of the ITO/InP cell done over the course of about one year has indicated that the J(sub SC) (short circuit current) and the fill factor (FF) are measurably stable within experimental certainty.

  8. Control/structure interactions of Freedom's solar dynamic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, R. D.; Yunis, I.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address potential control/structures interaction (CSI) problems of large flexible multibody structures in the presence of pointing and tracking requirements. A control approach is introduced for the simultaneous tracking and vibration control of multibody space structures. The application that is discussed is Space Station Freedom configured with solar dynamic (SD) modules. The SD fine-pointing and tracking requirements may necessitate controller frequencies above the structural natural frequencies of Freedom and the SD modules. It is well known that this can give rise to CSI problems if the controller is designed without due consideration given to the structural dynamics of the system. In this paper, possible CSI problems of Freedom's solar dynamic power systems are demonstrated using a simple lumped mass model. A NASTRAN model of Freedom developed at NASA Lewis is used to demonstrate potential CSI problems and the proposed tracking and vibration control approach.

  9. Phase change energy storage for solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, F. P.; Taylor, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a transient computer simulation that was developed to study phase change energy storage techniques for Space Station Freedom (SSF) solar dynamic (SD) power systems. Such SD systems may be used in future growth SSF configurations. Two solar dynamic options are considered in this paper: Brayton and Rankine. Model elements consist of a single node receiver and concentrator, and takes into account overall heat engine efficiency and power distribution characteristics. The simulation not only computes the energy stored in the receiver phase change material (PCM), but also the amount of the PCM required for various combinations of load demands and power system mission constraints. For a solar dynamic power system in low earth orbit, the amount of stored PCM energy is calculated by balancing the solar energy input and the energy consumed by the loads corrected by an overall system efficiency. The model assumes an average 75 kW SD power system load profile which is connected to user loads via dedicated power distribution channels. The model then calculates the stored energy in the receiver and subsequently estimates the quantity of PCM necessary to meet peaking and contingency requirements. The model can also be used to conduct trade studies on the performance of SD power systems using different storage materials.

  10. The Solar Dynamics Observatory: Your Eye on the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, William Dean

    2010-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) was launched on February 11,2010 into partly cloudy skies over Cape Canaveral, Florida. SDO moved into a 28 degree inclined geosynchronous orbit over the longitude of the ground station in New Mexico. SDO is the first Space Weather Mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. SDO's main goal is to understand and predict those solar variations that influence life on Earth and our technological systems. The SDO science investigations will determine how the Sun's magnetic field is generated and structured, how this stored magnetic energy is released into the heliosphere as the solar wind, energetic particles, and variations in the solar irradiance. The SDO mission consists of three scientific investigations (AIA, EVE, and HMI), a spacecraft bus, and a dedicated Ka-band ground station to handle the 150 Mbps data flow. SDO continues a long tradition of NASA missions providing calibrated solar spectral irradiance data, in this case using multiple measurements of the irradiance and rocket underflights of the spacecraft. The other instruments on SDO will be used to explain and develop predictive models of the solar spectral irradiance in the extreme ultraviolet. Science teams at LMSAL, LASP, and Stanford are responsible for processing, analyzing, distributing, and archiving the science data. We will talk about the building of SDO, its launch, and the data and science it will provide to NASA.

  11. Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    The problem of chromospheric dynamics and heating consists of two problems: one, concerning the magnetic network on the boundary of supergranulation cells (CB), where the oscillation period is seven minutes, and the other, concerning the cell interior (CI), where the oscillation period is three minutes. The observational data on the oscillations and the emission of radiation can be used to determine the structure and dynamics of the atmosphere provided answers are known to three critical questions, concerning: the nature of the waves powering the bright points, the origin of the observed oscillation periods and the mechanism of chromospheric heating. The recent modeling of the dynamics of the CI, which combines a sophisticated treatment of gas dynamics and radiative transfer in a one-dimensional model with empirical velocity input from the observations, answered the first of these questions: the waves powering K(sub 2upsilon), bright points are propagating acoustic waves. This firm conclusion declares invalid the model of Leibacher & Stein, which explains the observed period with standing acoustic waves in a chromospheric cavity. On the third question, the heating of the chromosphere in the CI, their model predicts that the temperature in the chromosphere is declining in the outward direction up to a height of at least I Mm most of the time, so even the time-average temperature is dropping monotonically in the outward direction, implying that lines formed in the chromosphere up to a height of at least 1 Mm appear in absorption most of the time and everywhere in the CI. The problem of the CI can be resolved with a two-component model, which combines a model for K(sub 2upsilon), bright points with a model for the background. The bright point model has the same aims as the CS94 model, except that the empirical driving from the LRK93 observations is replaced by impulsive excitation, as suggested by the properties of the Klein-Gordon equation.

  12. Laboratory study supporting the interpretation of Solar Dynamics Observatory data

    DOE PAGES

    Trabert, E.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2015-01-29

    High-resolution extreme ultraviolet spectra of ions in an electron beam ion trap are investigated as a laboratory complement of the moderate-resolution observation bands of the AIA experiment on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) spacecraft. Here, the latter observations depend on dominant iron lines of various charge states which in combination yield temperature information on the solar plasma. Our measurements suggest additions to the spectral models that are used in the SDO data interpretation. In the process, we also note a fair number of inconsistencies among the wavelength reference data bases.

  13. Advanced Solar-propelled Cargo Spacecraft for Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auziasdeturenne, Jacqueline; Beall, Mark; Burianek, Joseph; Cinniger, Anna; Dunmire, Barbrina; Haberman, Eric; Iwamoto, James; Johnson, Stephen; Mccracken, Shawn; Miller, Melanie

    1989-01-01

    Three concepts for an unmanned, solar powered, cargo spacecraft for Mars support missions were investigated. These spacecraft are designed to carry a 50,000 kg payload from a low Earth orbit to a low Mars orbit. Each design uses a distinctly different propulsion system: A Solar Radiation Absorption (SRA) system, a Solar-Pumped Laser (SPL) system and a solar powered magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) arc system. The SRA directly converts solar energy to thermal energy in the propellant through a novel process. In the SPL system, a pair of solar-pumped, multi-megawatt, CO2 lasers in sunsynchronous Earth orbit converts solar energy to laser energy. The MPD system used indium phosphide solar cells to convert sunlight to electricity, which powers the propulsion system. Various orbital transfer options are examined for these concepts. In the SRA system, the mother ship transfers the payload into a very high Earth orbit and a small auxiliary propulsion system boosts the payload into a Hohmann transfer to Mars. The SPL spacecraft and the SPL powered spacecraft return to Earth for subsequent missions. The MPD propelled spacecraft, however, remains at Mars as an orbiting space station. A patched conic approximation was used to determine a heliocentric interplanetary transfer orbit for the MPD propelled spacecraft. All three solar-powered spacecraft use an aerobrake procedure to place the payload into a low Mars parking orbit. The payload delivery times range from 160 days to 873 days (2.39 years).

  14. Final Technical Report Advanced Solar Resource Modeling and Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Clifford

    2015-12-01

    The SunShot Initiative coordinates research, development, demonstration, and deployment activities aimed at dramatically reducing the total installed cost of solar power. The SunShot Initiative focuses on removing critical technical and non-technical barriers to installing and integrating solar energy into the electricity grid. Uncertainty in projected power and energy production from solar power systems contributes to these barriers by increasing financial risks to photovoltaic (PV) deployment and by exacerbating the technical challenges to integration of solar power on the electricity grid.

  15. GLOBAL DYNAMICS OF SUBSURFACE SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jouve, L.; Brun, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    We present three-dimensional numerical simulations of a magnetic loop evolving in either a convectively stable or unstable rotating shell. The magnetic loop is introduced into the shell in such a way that it is buoyant only in a certain portion in longitude, thus creating an {Omega}-loop. Due to the action of magnetic buoyancy, the loop rises and develops asymmetries between its leading and following legs, creating emerging bipolar regions whose characteristics are similar to those of observed spots at the solar surface. In particular, we self-consistently reproduce the creation of tongues around the spot polarities, which can be strongly affected by convection. We further emphasize the presence of ring-shaped magnetic structures around our simulated emerging regions, which we call 'magnetic necklace' and which were seen in a number of observations without being reported as of today. We show that those necklaces are markers of vorticity generation at the periphery and below the rising magnetic loop. We also find that the asymmetry between the two legs of the loop is crucially dependent on the initial magnetic field strength. The tilt angle of the emerging regions is also studied in the stable and unstable cases and seems to be affected both by the convective motions and the presence of a differential rotation in the convective cases.

  16. A measurement of the shape of the solar disk: The solar quadrupole moment, the solar octopole moment, and the advance of perihelion of the planet mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Lydon, T.J.; Sofia, S.

    1996-01-01

    The Solar Disk Sextant experiment has measured the solar angular diameter for a variety of solar latitudes. Combined with solar surface angular rotation data, the solar quadrupole moment {ital J}{sub 2} and the solar octopole moment {ital J}{sub 4} have been derived first by assuming constant internal angular rotation on cylinders and then by assuming constant internal angular rotation on cones. We have derived values of 1.8{times}10{sup {minus}7} for {ital J}{sub 2} and 9.8{times}10{sup {minus}7} for {ital J}{sub 4}. We conclude with a discussion of errors and address the prediction of general relativity for the rate of advance of perihelion of the planet Mercury. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  17. [Advances in microbial solar cells--A review].

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoyun; Yu, Changping; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-08-01

    The energy crisis has become one of the major problems hindering the development of the world. The emergence of microbial fuel cells provides a new solution to the energy crisis. Microbial solar cells, integrating photosynthetic organisms such as plants and microalgae into microbial fuel cells, can convert solar energy into electrical energy. Microbial solar cell has steady electric energy, and broad application prospects in wastewater treatment, biodiesel processing and intermediate metabolites production. Here we reviewed recent progress of microbial solar cells from the perspective of the role of photosynthetic organisms in microbial fuel cells, based on a vast amount of literature, and discussed their advantages and deficiency. At last, brief analysis of the facing problems and research needs of microbial fuel cells are undertaken. This work was expected to be beneficial for the application of the microbial solar cells technology.

  18. Radiator selection for Space Station Solar Dynamic Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Mike; Hoehn, Frank

    A study was conducted to define the best radiator for heat rejection of the Space Station Solar Dynamic Power System. Included in the study were radiators for both the Organic Rankine Cycle and Closed Brayton Cycle heat engines. A number of potential approaches were considered for the Organic Rankine Cycle and a constructable radiator was chosen. Detailed optimizations of this concept were conducted resulting in a baseline for inclusion into the ORC Preliminary Design. A number of approaches were also considered for the CBC radiator. For this application a deployed pumped liquid radiator was selected which was also refined resulting in a baseline for the CBC preliminary design. This paper reports the results and methodology of these studies and describes the preliminary designs of the Space Station Solar Dynamic Power System radiators for both of the candidate heat engine cycles.

  19. Dynamic conversion of solar generated heat to electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. C.; Fourakis, E.; Hammer, J. M.; Smith, G. A.; Grosskreutz, J. C.; Mcbride, E.

    1974-01-01

    The effort undertaken during this program led to the selection of the water-superheated steam (850 psig/900 F) crescent central receiver as the preferred concept from among 11 candidate systems across the technological spectrum of the dynamic conversion of solar generated heat to electricity. The solar power plant designs were investigated in the range of plant capacities from 100 to 1000 Mw(e). The investigations considered the impacts of plant size, collector design, feed-water temperature ratio, heat rejection equipment, ground cover, and location on solar power technical and economic feasibility. For the distributed receiver systems, the optimization studies showed that plant capacities less than 100 Mw(e) may be best. Although the size of central receiver concepts was not parametrically investigated, all indications are that the optimal plant capacity for central receiver systems will be in the range from 50 to 200 Mw(e). Solar thermal power plant site selection criteria and methodology were also established and used to evaluate potentially suitable sites. The result of this effort was to identify a site south of Inyokern, California, as typically suitable for a solar thermal power plant. The criteria used in the selection process included insolation and climatological characteristics, topography, and seismic history as well as water availability.

  20. Long-Term Dynamics of Small Bodies in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, Steve (Technical Monitor); Holman, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    As part of the NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics program Prof. Norm Murray (CITA) and I have been conducting investigations of the long-term dynamics of small bodies in the outer solar system. This grant, and its predecessor NAG5-7761, supported travel for collaboration by the Investigators and also supports Murray during an annual one month visit to the CfA for further collaboration. In the course of this grant we made a number of advances in solar system dynamics. For example, we developed an analytic model for the origin and consequence of chaos associated with three-body resonances in the asteroid belt. This has been shown to be important for the delivery of near Earth objects. We later extended this model to three-body resonances among planets. We were able to show that the numerically identified chaos among the outer planets results from a three-body resonance involving Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus. The resulting paper was awarded the 1999 Newcomb Cleveland award from the AAAS. This award singles out one paper published in Science each year for distinction. This grant has also supported, in part, my participate in other solar system dynamics projects. The results from those collaborations are also listed.

  1. No Photon Left Behind: Advanced Optics at ARPA-E for Buildings and Solar Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branz, Howard M.

    2015-04-01

    Key technology challenges in building efficiency and solar energy utilization require transformational optics, plasmonics and photonics technologies. We describe advanced optical technologies funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy. Buildings technologies include a passive daytime photonic cooler, infra-red computer vision mapping for energy audit, and dual-band electrochromic windows based on plasmonic absorption. Solar technologies include novel hybrid energy converters that combine high-efficiency photovoltaics with concentrating solar thermal collection and storage. Because the marginal cost of thermal energy storage is low, these systems enable generation of inexpensive and dispatchable solar energy that can be deployed when the sun doesn't shine. The solar technologies under development include nanoparticle plasmonic spectrum splitting, Rugate filter interference structures and photovoltaic cells that can operate efficiently at over 400° C.

  2. Generic solar photovoltaic system dynamic simulation model specification.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Abraham; Behnke, Michael Robert; Elliott, Ryan Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This document is intended to serve as a specification for generic solar photovoltaic (PV) system positive-sequence dynamic models to be implemented by software developers and approved by the WECC MVWG for use in bulk system dynamic simulations in accordance with NERC MOD standards. Two specific dynamic models are included in the scope of this document. The first, a Central Station PV System model, is intended to capture the most important dynamic characteristics of large scale (> 10 MW) PV systems with a central Point of Interconnection (POI) at the transmission level. The second, a Distributed PV System model, is intended to represent an aggregation of smaller, distribution-connected systems that comprise a portion of a composite load that might be modeled at a transmission load bus.

  3. Testing quasilinear modified Newtonian dynamics in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galianni, Pasquale; Feix, Martin; Zhao, Hongsheng; Horne, Keith

    2012-08-01

    A unique signature of the modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) paradigm is its peculiar behavior in the vicinity of the points where the total Newtonian acceleration exactly cancels. In the Solar System, these are the saddle points of the gravitational potential near the planets. Typically, such points are embedded into low-acceleration bubbles where modified gravity theories à la MOND predict significant deviations from Newton’s laws. As it has been pointed out recently, the Earth-Sun bubble may be visited by the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft in the near future, providing a unique occasion to put these theories to a direct test. In this work, we present a high-precision model of the Solar System’s gravitational potential to determine accurate positions and motions of these saddle points and study the predicted dynamical anomalies within the framework of quasilinear MOND. Considering the expected sensitivity of the LISA Pathfinder probe, we argue that interpolation functions which exhibit a “faster” transition between the two dynamical regimes have a good chance of surviving a null result. An example of such a function is the QMOND analog of the so-called simple interpolating function which agrees well with much of the extragalactic phenomenology. We have also discovered that several of Saturn’s outermost satellites periodically intersect the Saturn-Sun bubble, providing the first example of Solar System objects that regularly undergo the MOND regime.

  4. Applicability of advanced automotive heat engines to solar thermal power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beremand, D. G.; Evans, D. G.; Alger, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The requirements of a solar thermal power system are reviewed and compared with the predicted characteristics of automobile engines under development. A good match is found in terms of power level and efficiency when the automobile engines, designed for maximum powers of 65-100 kW (87 to 133 hp) are operated to the nominal 20-40 kW electric output requirement of the solar thermal application. At these reduced power levels it appears that the automotive gas turbine and Stirling engines have the potential to deliver the 40+ percent efficiency goal of the solar thermal program.

  5. Lessons Learned From Dynamic Simulations of Advanced Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; Jacob J. Jacobson; Gretchen E. Matthern; David E. Shropshire

    2009-04-01

    Years of performing dynamic simulations of advanced nuclear fuel cycle options provide insights into how they could work and how one might transition from the current once-through fuel cycle. This paper summarizes those insights from the context of the 2005 objectives and goals of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Our intent is not to compare options, assess options versus those objectives and goals, nor recommend changes to those objectives and goals. Rather, we organize what we have learned from dynamic simulations in the context of the AFCI objectives for waste management, proliferation resistance, uranium utilization, and economics. Thus, we do not merely describe “lessons learned” from dynamic simulations but attempt to answer the “so what” question by using this context. The analyses have been performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Dynamics (VISION). We observe that the 2005 objectives and goals do not address many of the inherently dynamic discriminators among advanced fuel cycle options and transitions thereof.

  6. Advanced and In Situ Analytical Methods for Solar Fuel Materials.

    PubMed

    Chan, Candace K; Tüysüz, Harun; Braun, Artur; Ranjan, Chinmoy; La Mantia, Fabio; Miller, Benjamin K; Zhang, Liuxian; Crozier, Peter A; Haber, Joel A; Gregoire, John M; Park, Hyun S; Batchellor, Adam S; Trotochaud, Lena; Boettcher, Shannon W

    2016-01-01

    In situ and operando techniques can play important roles in the development of better performing photoelectrodes, photocatalysts, and electrocatalysts by helping to elucidate crucial intermediates and mechanistic steps. The development of high throughput screening methods has also accelerated the evaluation of relevant photoelectrochemical and electrochemical properties for new solar fuel materials. In this chapter, several in situ and high throughput characterization tools are discussed in detail along with their impact on our understanding of solar fuel materials.

  7. Explosive Vessel for Dynamic Experiments at Advanced Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Charles; Sorensen, Christian; Armstrong, Christopher; Sanchez, Nathaniel; Jensen, Brian

    2015-06-01

    There has been significant effort in coupling dynamic loading platforms to advanced light sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) to take advantage of X-ray diagnostics for examining material physics at extremes. Although the focus of these efforts has been on using gun systems for dynamic compression experiments, there are many experiments that require explosive loading capabilities including studies related to detonator dynamics, small angle X-ray scattering on explosives, and ejecta formation, for example. To this end, an explosive vessel and positioning stage was designed specifically for use at a synchrotron with requirements to confine up to 15 grams of explosives, couple the vessel to the X-ray beam line, and reliably position samples in the X-ray beam remotely with micrometer spatial accuracy. In this work, a description of the system will be provided along with explosive testing results for the robust, reusable positioning system.

  8. Solar chromospheric fine scale structures: dynamics and energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, K.

    2012-01-01

    The solar chromosphere is a very inhomogeneous and dynamic layer of the solar atmosphere that exhibits several phenomena on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. High-resolution and long-duration observations, employing mostly lines, such as Halpha, the Ca II infrared lines and the Ca II H and K lines, obtained both from ground-based telescope facilities (e.g. DST, VTT, THEMIS, SST, DOT), as well as state-of-the-art satellites (e.g. SOHO, TRACE, HINODE) reveal an incredibly rich, dynamic and highly structured chromospheric environment. What is known in literature as the chromospheric fine-scale structure mainly consists of small fibrilar-like features that connect various parts of quiet/active regions or span across the chromospheric network cell interiors, showing a large diversity of both physical and dynamic characteristics. The highly dynamic, fine-scale chromospheric structures are mostly governed by flows which reflect the complex geometry and dynamics of the local magnetic field and play an important role in the propagation and dissipation of waves. A comprehensive study of these structures requires deep understanding of the physical processes involved and investigation of their intricate link with structures/processes at lower photospheric levels. Furthermore, due to their large number present on the solar surface, it is essential to investigate their impact on the mass and energy transport to higher atmospheric layers through processes such as magnetic reconnection and propagation of waves. The in-depth study of all aforementioned characteristics and processes, with the further addition of non-LTE physics, as well as the use of three-dimensional numerical simulations poses a fascinating challenge for both theory and numerical modeling of chromospheric fine-scale structures.

  9. Advanced solar-propelled cargo spacecraft for Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auziasdeturenne, J.; Beall, M.; Burianek, J.; Cinniger, A.; Dunmire, B.; Haberman, E.; Iwamoto, J.; Johnson, S.; Mccracken, S.; Miller, M.

    1989-01-01

    At the University of Washington, three concepts for an unmanned, solar powered, cargo spacecraft for Mars-support missions have been investigated. These spacecraft are designed to carry a 50,000 kg payload from a low Earth orbit to a low Mars orbit. Each design uses a distinctly different propulsion system: a solar radiation absorption (SRA) system, a solar-pumped laser (SPL) system, and a solar powered mangetoplasmadynamic (MPD) arc system. The SRA directly converts solar energy to thermal energy in the propellant through a novel process developed at the University of Washington. A solar concentrator focuses sunlight into an absorption chamber. A mixture of hydrogen and potassium vapor absorbs the incident radiation and is heated to approximately 3700 K. The hot propellant gas exhausts through a nozzle to produce thrust. The SRA has an I(sub sp) of approximately 1000 sec and produces a thrust of 2940 N using two thrust chambers. In the SPL system, a pair of solar-pumped, multi-megawatt, CO2 lasers in sun-synchronous Earth orbit converts solar energy to laser energy. The laser beams are transmitted to the spacecraft via laser relay satellites. The laser energy heats the hydrogen propellant through a plasma breakdown process in the center of an absorption chamber. Propellant flowing through the chamber, heated by the plasma core, expands through a nozzle to produce thrust. The SPL has an I(sub sp) of 1285 sec and produces a thrust of 1200 N using two thrust chambers. The MPD system uses indium phosphide solar cells to convert sunlight to electricity, which powers the propulsion system. In this system, the argon propellant is ionized and electromagnetically accelerated by a magnetoplasmadynamic arc to produce thrust. The MPD spacecraft has an I(sub sp) of 2490 sec and produces a thrust of 100 N. Various orbital transfer options are examined for these concepts. In the SRA system, the mother ship transfers the payload into a very high Earth orbit and a small auxiliary

  10. Solar Dynamic Power System Stability Analysis and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Wang, Yanchun

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to conduct dynamic analysis, control design, and control performance test of solar power system. Solar power system consists of generation system and distribution network system. A bench mark system is used in this research, which includes a generator with excitation system and governor, an ac/dc converter, six DDCU's and forty-eight loads. A detailed model is used for modeling generator. Excitation system is represented by a third order model. DDCU is represented by a seventh order system. The load is modeled by the combination of constant power and constant impedance. Eigen-analysis and eigen-sensitivity analysis are used for system dynamic analysis. The effects of excitation system, governor, ac/dc converter control, and the type of load on system stability are discussed. In order to improve system transient stability, nonlinear ac/dc converter control is introduced. The direct linearization method is used for control design. The dynamic analysis results show that these controls affect system stability in different ways. The parameter coordination of controllers are recommended based on the dynamic analysis. It is concluded from the present studies that system stability is improved by the coordination of control parameters and the nonlinear ac/dc converter control stabilize system oscillation caused by the load change and system fault efficiently.

  11. Solar activity and its evolution across the corona: recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccarello, Francesca; Balmaceda, Laura; Cessateur, Gael; Cremades, Hebe; Guglielmino, Salvatore L.; Lilensten, Jean; Dudok de Wit, Thierry; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Lopez, Fernando M.; Mierla, Marilena; Parenti, Susanna; Pomoell, Jens; Romano, Paolo; Rodriguez, Luciano; Srivastava, Nandita; Vainio, Rami; West, Matt; Zuccarello, Francesco P.

    2013-04-01

    Solar magnetism is responsible for the several active phenomena that occur in the solar atmosphere. The consequences of these phenomena on the solar-terrestrial environment and on Space Weather are nowadays clearly recognized, even if not yet fully understood. In order to shed light on the mechanisms that are at the basis of the Space Weather, it is necessary to investigate the sequence of phenomena starting in the solar atmosphere and developing across the outer layers of the Sun and along the path from the Sun to the Earth. This goal can be reached by a combined multi-disciplinary, multi-instrument, multi-wavelength study of these phenomena, starting with the very first manifestation of solar active region formation and evolution, followed by explosive phenomena (i.e., flares, erupting prominences, coronal mass ejections), and ending with the interaction of plasma magnetized clouds expelled from the Sun with the interplanetary magnetic field and medium. This wide field of research constitutes one of the main aims of COST Action ES0803: Developing Space Weather products and services in Europe. In particular, one of the tasks of this COST Action was to investigate the Progress in Scientific Understanding of Space Weather. In this paper we review the state of the art of our comprehension of some phenomena that, in the scenario outlined above, might have a role on Space Weather, focusing on the researches, thematic reviews, and main results obtained during the COST Action ES0803.

  12. The Solar Dynamics Observatory: Your eye on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesnell, William

    The Sun hiccups and satellites die. That is what NASA's Living With a Star Program is all about. The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is the first Space Weather Mission in LWS. SDO's main goal is to understand, driving towards a predictive capability, those solar variations that influence life on Earth and humanity's technological systems. The past decade has seen an increasing emphasis on understanding the entire Sun, from the nuclear reactions at the core to the development and loss of magnetic loops in the corona. SDO's three science investigations (HMI, AIA, and EVE) will determine how the Sun's magnetic field is generated and structured, how this stored magnetic energy is released into the heliosphere and geospace as the solar wind, energetic particles, and variations in the solar irradiance. SDO will return fulldisk Dopplergrams, full-disk vector magnetograms, full-disk images at seven EUV wavelengths, and EUV spectral irradiances, all taken at a rapid cadence. This means you can "observe the database" to study events, but we can also move forward in producing quantitative models of what the Sun is doing today. SDO is scheduled to launch in 2008 on an Atlas V rocket from the Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The satellite will fly in a 28 degree inclined geosynchronous orbit about the longitude of New Mexico, where a dedicated Ka-band ground station will receive the 150 Mbps data flow. How SDO data will transform the study of the Sun and its affect on Space Weather studies will be discussed.

  13. Solar wind dynamic pressure control of the dayside magnetopause location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simunek, Jiri; Nemecek, Zdenek; Safrankova, Jana; Prech, Lubomir; Shue, Jih-Hong

    2016-07-01

    The solar wind dynamic pressure is the principal factor controlling the magnetopause location. Their mutual relation is usually written in a power-law form and suggested indices vary from -1/4.8 to -1/6.6 according to a particular magnetopause model. The paper analyzes about six thousands of THEMIS dayside magnetopause crossings observed in a broad range of upstream pressures (0.2-20 nPa). We found that (1) the power-law form provides the best description of variations of the magnetopause stand-off distance with upstream pressures; (2) the most appropriate value of the power index resulting from the present study is -1/4.4 if only solar wind dynamic pressure is considered; (3) the value of the power index varies slightly with other investigated parameters like the orientation of interplanetary magnetic field or solar wind speed; and (4) the value of the power index increases to or above -1/6 if the orbital limitations are not handled properly.

  14. NASA advanced aeronautics design solar powered remotely piloted vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elario, David S.; Guillmette, Neal H.; Lind, Gregory S.; Webster, Jonathan D.; Ferreira, Michael J.; Konstantakis, George C.; Marshall, David L.; Windt, Cari L.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental problems such as the depletion of the ozone layer and air pollution demand a change in traditional means of propulsion that is sensitive to the ecology. Solar powered propulsion is a favorable alternative that is both ecologically harmless as well as cost effective. Integration of solar energy into designs ranging from futuristic vehicles to heating is beneficial to society. The design and construction of a Multi-Purpose Remotely Piloted Vehicle (MPRPV) seeks to verify the feasibility of utilizing solar propulsion as a primary fuel source. This task has been a year long effort by a group of ten students, divided into five teams, each dealing with different aspects of the design. The aircraft was designed to take-off, climb to the design altitude, fly in a sustained figure-eight flight path, and cruise for approximately one hour. This mission requires flight at Reynolds numbers between 150,000 and 200,000 and demands special considerations in the aerodynamic design in order to achieve flight in this regime. Optimal performance requires a light weight configuration with both structural integrity and maximum power availability. The structure design and choice of solar cells for the propulsion was governed by the weight, efficiency, and cost considerations. The final design is a MPRPV weighting 35 N which cruises 7 m/s at the design altitude of 50 m. The configuration includes a wing composed of balsa and foam NACA 6409 airfoil sections and carbon fiber spars, a tail of similar construction, and a truss structure fuselage. The propulsion system consists of 98 10 percent efficient solar cells donated by Mobil Solar, a NiCad battery for energy storage, and a folding propeller regulated by a lightweight and efficient control system. The airfoils and propeller chosen for the design were research and tested during the design process.

  15. Dynamics of magnetic bright points in the lower solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarzadeh, Shahin

    2013-08-01

    In this thesis we have investigated the structure and dynamics of small-scale magnetic bright points (MBPs) in quiet, internetwork regions of the lower solar atmosphere. Such MBPs are associated with small-scale, intense (generally kG) magnetic elements. The internetwork (IN) areas cover the largest fraction of the solar surface and it has been argued that the IN may contain most of the existing unsigned magnetic flux on the surface at any given time. However, the distribution of the magnetic field's properties in the IN regions is still being debated. Thus, only recently has the presence of kG fields in the IN been confirmed of which the studied MBPs are thought to be manifestations. In addition, interaction between intense magnetic features and convective flows on the solar surface (in particular in IN areas) have been proposed to excite waves which can carry energy to the upper solar atmosphere. The properties of these waves and their contribution to the heating of the upper solar atmosphere is still unclear. Moreover, the migration of the small magnetic elements owing to the convective flows/turbulence is not known (due to, e.g., lack of high spatial and temporal resolution observations not affected by seeing). We used high spatial and temporal resolution observations, obtained by the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory, to address the above issues. We concentrate on the study of the smallest MBPs visible in the data; whose apparent lack of internal fine-structure facilitates their precise location and tracking in time-series of images. The analyses were performed using an algorithm we developed to identify, locate and track the MBPs as well as to determine their physical properties at any given time. These findings have implications for, e.g., our understanding of the heating mechanisms in the higher layers of the solar atmosphere, estimates of the solar magnetic flux as well as the structure of the convection flows (within a supergranule) advecting small

  16. The solar wind - Advances in our knowledge through two solar cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, Joan

    1989-01-01

    As the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft have moved outward they have gradually unfolded a view of distant regions of the heliosphere. Information on the solar wind velocity, density and temperature as a function of distance out to more than 40 AU has been gathered. Meanwhile the description of the solar wind has evolved. Long-standing questions on the sources of the wind causing geomagnetic activity were clarified by the discovery of coronal holes and coronal mass ejections. The propagation of the resultant solar wind disturbances through the heliosphere has been studied using both observations and models. Plasma physical processes have been studied. This review focuses on the development of the concepts that have been used to describe the solar wind in the three dimensional heliosphere over the last two solar cycles. Collisionless shocks, transient disturbances in space, disturbance propagation and the distant solar wind are discussed.

  17. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    2000-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the third year of the NASA Space Physics Theory contract "The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona," between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period June 16, 1998 to August 15, 1999. This is also the final report for this contract. Under this contract SAIC, the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model. During the three-year duration of this contract we have published 49 articles in the scientific literature. These publications are listed in Section 3 of this report. In the Appendix we have attached reprints of selected articles. We summarize our progress during the third year of the contract. Full descriptions of our work can be found in the cited publications, a few of which are attached to this report.

  18. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in nanostructures for solar fuels.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Jason B; Richter, Christiaan; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    Sunlight can be used to drive chemical reactions to produce fuels that store energy in chemical bonds. These fuels, such as hydrogen from splitting water, have much larger energy density than do electrical storage devices. The efficient conversion of clean, sustainable solar energy using photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic systems requires precise control over the thermodynamics, kinetics, and structural aspects of materials and molecules. Generation, thermalization, trapping, interfacial transfer, and recombination of photoexcited charge carriers often occur on femtosecond to picosecond timescales. These short timescales limit the transport of photoexcited carriers to nanometer-scale distances, but nanostructures with high surface-to-volume ratios can enable both significant light absorption and high quantum efficiency. This review highlights the importance of understanding ultrafast carrier dynamics for the generation of solar fuels, including case studies on colloidal nanostructures, nanostructured photoelectrodes, and photoelectrodes sensitized with molecular chromophores and catalysts. PMID:24423371

  19. Thermal energy storage for a space solar dynamic power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faget, N. M.; Fraser, W. M., Jr.; Simon, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    In the past, NASA has employed solar photovoltaic devices for long-duration missions. Thus, the Skylab system has operated with a silicon photovoltaic array and a nickel-cadmium electrochemical system energy storage system. Difficulties regarding the employment of such a system for the larger power requirements of the Space Station are related to a low orbit system efficiency and the large weight of the battery. For this reason the employment of a solar dynamic power system (SDPS) has been considered. The primary components of an SDPS include a concentrating mirror, a heat receiver, a thermal energy storage (TES) system, a thermodynamic heat engine, an alternator, and a heat rejection system. The heat-engine types under consideration are a Brayton cycle engine, an organic Rankine cycle engine, and a free-piston/linear-alternator Stirling cycle engine. Attention is given to a system description, TES integration concepts, and a TES technology assessment.

  20. Modified Newtonian dynamics habitats within the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Bekenstein, Jacob; Magueijo, Joao

    2006-05-15

    MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) is an interesting alternative to the presence of dark matter in galaxies. We here examine the possibility that mild or even strong MOND behavior may become evident well inside the solar system, in particular, near saddle points of the total gravitational potential. Whereas in Newtonian theory tidal stresses are finite at saddle points, they are expected to diverge in MOND, and to remain distinctly large inside a sizable oblate ellipsoid around the saddle point. We work out the MOND effects using the nonrelativistic limit of the TeVeS theory, both in the perturbative nearly Newtonian regime and in the deep MOND regime. While strong MOND behavior would be a spectacular 'backyard' vindication of the theory, pinpointing the MOND bubbles in the setting of the realistic solar system may be difficult. Space missions, such as the LISA Pathfinder, equipped with sensitive accelerometers, may be able to explore the larger perturbative region.

  1. Flux concentrations on solar dynamic components due to mispointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rylicki, Daniel S.

    1992-01-01

    Mispointing of the solar dynamic (SD) concentrator designed for use on Space Station Freedom (SSF) causes the optical axis of the concentrator to be nonparallel to the incoming rays from the Sun. This causes solar flux not to be focused into the aperture hole of the receiver and may position the flux on other SSF components. A Rocketdyne analysis has determined the thermal impact of off-axis radiation due to mispointing on elements of the SD module and photovoltaic (PV) arrays. The conclusion was that flux distributions on some of the radiator components, the two-axis gimbal rings, the truss, and the PV arrays could present problems. The OFFSET computer code was used at Lewis Research Center to further investigate these flux distributions incident on components. The Lewis study included distributions for a greater range of mispoint angles than the Rocketdyne study.

  2. Long-Term Dynamics of Small Bodies in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Grant, John (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As part of the NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics program, Prof. Norm Murray (CITA (Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics)) and I have been conducting investigations of the long-term dynamics of small bodies in the outer solar system. This grant, and its successor NAG5-10365, supports travel for collaboration by the Investigators and also supports Murray during an annual one month visit to the CfA (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) for further collaboration. In the course of this grant we made a number of advances in solar system dynamics. For example, we developed an analytic model for the origin and consequence of chaos associated with three-body resonances in the asteroid belt. This has been shown to be important for the delivery of near Earth objects (NEO). We later extended this model to three-body resonances among planets. We were able to show that the numerically identified chaos among the outer planets results from a three-body resonance involving Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus. The resulting paper was awarded the 1999 Newcomb Cleveland award from the AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science). This award singles out one paper published in Science each year for distinction. A list of grant-related publications is presented, with abstracts included.

  3. Charge dynamics in new architectures for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinson, Alex Brandon Fletcher

    The promise of a clean, renewable, and abundant energy supply make the efficient conversion of solar energy to electricity a compelling scientific and societal goal. In the following chapters, I will describe my efforts to advance one class of photovoltaic technology, dye-sensitized solar cells, by demonstration and characterization of unexplored device architectures. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the origin of solar energy conversion and the fundamentals of dye-sensitized solar cells. An understanding of device operation through charge dynamics facilitates a survey of the state of the art in addition to predictions for promising future directions. Chapter 2 elucidates the electron transport and interception dynamics in ZnO nanorod array based dye-sensitized solar cells. The data presented suggest that the study of alternative photoanode architectures is a viable means of improving device performance and understanding. Chapter 3 introduces a new photoanode design in which anodic aluminum oxide and atomic layer deposition are utilized to fabricate oriented arrays of electrically interconnected semiconductor nanotubes. The viability of these structures as dye-sensitized electrodes is demonstrated by characterization of their morphology, light harvesting efficiency, and photovoltaic performance. Chapter 4 builds upon the successful implementation of nanotube based dye-sensitized solar cells by quantifying charge dynamics through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Fitting the impedance data to an appropriate equivalent circuit establishes ZnO nanotubes as the most effective architecture for rapid electron collection to date. Chapter 5 expands the synthetic palette of atomic layer deposition to include transparent conducting oxides that may be grown on high aspect ratio templates. Understanding and optimizing the growth mechanism of two versatile systems enables the structures to be presented in the final chapter. Chapter 6 concludes with a presentation of

  4. Advanced Thin Film Solar Arrays for Space: The Terrestrial Legacy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Hepp, Aloysius; Raffaelle, Ryne; Flood, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    As in the case for single crystal solar cells, the first serious thin film solar cells were developed for space applications with the promise of better power to weight ratios and lower cost. Future science, military, and commercial space missions are incredibly diverse. Military and commercial missions encompass both hundreds of kilowatt arrays to tens of watt arrays in various earth orbits. While science missions also have small to very large power needs there are additional unique requirements to provide power for near sun missions and planetary exploration including orbiters, landers, and rovers both to the inner planets and the outer planets with a major emphasis in the near term on Mars. High power missions are particularly attractive for thin film utilization. These missions are generally those involving solar electric propulsion, surface power systems to sustain an outpost or a permanent colony on the surface of the Moon or Mars, space based lasers or radar, or large Earth orbiting power stations which can serve as central utilities for other orbiting spacecraft, or potentially beaming power to the Earth itself. This paper will discuss the current state of the art of thin film solar cells and the synergy with terrestrial thin film photovoltaic evolution. It will also address some of the technology development issues required to make thin film photovoltaics a viable choice for future space power systems.

  5. Newman Unit 1 advanced solar repowering. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1982-04-01

    The five appendices give the selection process and system specification of the Newman Unit 1 solar repowering system, including the conceptual design drawings and diagrams; input data for the simulation program; and a review of the most important characteristics of the existing plant. (LEW)

  6. On the Dynamics of Small-Scale Solar Magnetic Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, T. E.; Title, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    We report on the dynamics of the small-scale solar magnetic field, based on analysis of very high resolution images of the solar photosphere obtained at the Swedish Vacuum Solar Telescope. The data sets are movies from 1 to 4 hr in length, taken in several wavelength bands with a typical time between frames of 20 s. The primary method of tracking small-scale magnetic elements is with very high contrast images of photospheric bright points, taken through a 12 A bandpass filter centered at 4305 A in the Fraunhofer 'G band.' Previous studies have established that such bright points are unambiguously associated with sites of small-scale magnetic flux in the photosphere, although the details of the mechanism responsible for the brightening of the flux elements remain uncertain. The G band bright points move in the intergranular lanes at speeds from 0.5 to 5 km/s. The motions appear to be constrained to the intergranular lanes and are primarily driven by the evolution of the local granular convection flow field. Continual fragmentation and merging of flux is the fundamental evolutionary mode of small-scale magnetic structures in the solar photosphere. Rotation and folding of chains or groups of bright points are also observed. The timescale for magnetic flux evolution in active region plage is on the order of the correlation time of granulation (typically 6-8 minutes), but significant morphological changes can occur on timescales as short as 100 S. Smaller fragments are occasionally seen to fade beyond observable contrast. The concept of a stable, isolated subarcsecond magnetic 'flux tube' in the solar photosphere is inconsistent with the observations presented here.

  7. The AFDM (advanced fluid dynamics model) program: Scope and significance

    SciTech Connect

    Bohl, W.R.; Parker, F.R. ); Wilhelm, D. . Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik); Berthier, J. )

    1990-01-01

    The origins and goals of the advanced fluid dynamics model (AFDM) program are described, and the models, algorithm, and coding used in the resulting AFDM computer program are summarized. A sample fuel-steel boiling pool calculation is presented and compared with a similar SIMMER-II calculation. A subjective assessment of the AFDM developments is given, and areas where future work is possible are detailed. 10 refs.

  8. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO): A Systems Approach to a Complex Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruffa, John A.; Ward, David K.; Bartusek, Lisa M.; Bay, Michael; Gonzales, Peter J.; Pesnell, William D.

    2012-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) includes three advanced instruments, massive science data volume, stringent science data completeness requirements, and a custom ground station to meet mission demands. The strict instrument science requirements imposed a number of challenging drivers on the overall mission system design, leading the SDO team to adopt an integrated systems engineering presence across all aspects of the mission to ensure that mission science requirements would be met. Key strategies were devised to address these system level drivers and mitigate identified threats to mission success. The global systems engineering team approach ensured that key drivers and risk areas were rigorously addressed through all phases of the mission, leading to the successful SDO launch and on-orbit operation. Since launch, SDO s on-orbit performance has met all mission science requirements and enabled groundbreaking science observations, expanding our understanding of the Sun and its dynamic processes.

  9. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO): A Systems Approach to a Complex Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruffa, John A.; Ward, David K.; Bartusek, LIsa M.; Bay, Michael; Gonzales, Peter J.; Pesnell, William D.

    2012-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) includes three advanced instruments, massive science data volume, stringent science data completeness requirements, and a custom ground station to meet mission demands. The strict instrument science requirements imposed a number of challenging drivers on the overall mission system design, leading the SDO team to adopt an integrated systems engineering presence across all aspects of the mission to ensure that mission science requirements would be met. Key strategies were devised to address these system level drivers and mitigate identified threats to mission success. The global systems engineering team approach ensured that key drivers and risk areas were rigorously addressed through all phases of the mission, leading to the successful SDO launch and on-orbit operation. Since launch, SDO's on-orbit performance has met all mission science requirements and enabled groundbreaking science observations, expanding our understanding of the Sun and its dynamic processes.

  10. Investigations of Solar Prominence Dynamics Using Laboratory Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Paul M Bellan

    2008-05-28

    Laboratory experiments simulating many of the dynamical features of solar coronal loops have been carried out. These experiments manifest collimation, kinking, jet flows, and S-shapes. Diagnostics include high-speed photography and x-ray detectors. Two loops having opposite or the same magnetic helicity polarities have been merged and it is found that counter-helicity merging provides much greater x-ray emission. A non-MHD particle orbit instability has been discovered whereby ions going in the opposite direction of the current flow direction can be ejected from a magnetic flux tube.

  11. Flexible Dynamics and Attitude Control of a Square Solar Sail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Mirue

    This thesis presents a comprehensive analysis of attitude and structural dynamics of a square solar sail. In particular, this research examines the use of corner-attached reflective vanes to control the attitude of the spacecraft. An introduction to known solar sail designs is given, then the mathematics involved in calculating solar radiation pressure forces are presented. A detailed derivation and implementation of the unconstrained nonlinear flexible structural dynamics with Finite Element Method (FEM) models are explored, with several sample simulations of published large deflection experiments used as verification measures. To simulate the inability of a thin membrane to resist compression, the sail membrane elements are augmented with a method that approximates the wrinkling and the slacking dynamics, which is followed by a simulation of another well-known experiment as a verification measure. Once the structural dynamics are established, the usage of the tip vanes is explored. Specifically, a control allocation problem formed by having two degrees of freedom for each tip vane is defined and an efficient solution to this problem is presented, allowing desired control torques to be converted to appropriate vane angles. A randomized testing mechanism is implemented to show the efficacy of this algorithm. The sail shadowing problem is explored as well, where a component of the spacecraft casts shadow upon the sail and prevents solar radiation pressure force from being produced. A method to calculate the region of shadow is presented, and two different shadowing examples are examined --- due to the spacecraft bus, and due to the sail itself. Combining all of the above, an attitude control simulation of the sail model is presented. A simple PD controller combined with the control allocation scheme is used to provide the control torque for the sail, with which the spacecraft must orient towards a number of pre-specified attitude targets. Several attitude

  12. Solar dynamic heat receiver thermal characteristics in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Y. C.; Roschke, E. J.; Birur, G. C.

    1988-01-01

    A simplified system model is under development for evaluating the thermal characteristics and thermal performance of a solar dynamic spacecraft energy system's heat receiver. Results based on baseline orbit, power system configuration, and operational conditions, are generated for three basic receiver concepts and three concentrator surface slope errors. Receiver thermal characteristics and thermal behavior in LEO conditions are presented. The configuration in which heat is directly transferred to the working fluid is noted to generate the best system and thermal characteristics. as well as the lowest performance degradation with increasing slope error.

  13. Overview of the solar dynamic ground test demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Boyle, Robert V.

    1993-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) program demonstrates the availability of SD technologies in a simulated space environment at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) vacuum facility. An aerospace industry/ government team is working together to design, fabricate, build, and test a complete SD system. This paper reviews the goals and status of the SD GTD program. A description of the SD system includes key design features of the system, subsystems, and components as reported at the Critical Design Review (CDR).

  14. Advanced glazing and associated materials for solar and building applications: International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Program Task 18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, Michael G.

    1992-11-01

    Following a program definition phase of 2 years, Task 18 of the International Energy Agency Solar Heating & Cooling program commenced a 5 year research phase in April 1992. Task 18 investigates a wide range of advanced glazing materials and glazing systems which include monolithic and granular aerogels, transparent insulation materials, chromogenic materials, evacuated glazings, low-emittance coatings, solar collector covers, angular selective transmittance thin films, holographic and light guide materials, and frame and edge seal technology. In addition to materials-centered research, Task 18 concentrates on measurement of key glazing properties such as total energy transmittance, U-value, and spectral directional optical properties, and through the use of building energy analysis software tools the identification of appropriate applications, control strategies, and energy and environmental benefits to be derived from advanced glazing products. Fifteen OECD countries are participating in Task 18 which is led by the United Kingdom.

  15. Advances in simulation study on organic small molecular solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Guo, Wenge; Li, Ming; Ma, Wentao; Meng, Sen

    2015-02-01

    Recently, more focuses have been put on organic semiconductors because of its advantages, such as its flexibility, ease of fabrication and potential low cost, etc. The reasons we pay highlight on small molecular photovoltaic material are its ease of purification, easy to adjust and determine structure, easy to assemble range units and get high carrier mobility, etc. Simulation study on organic small molecular solar cells before the experiment can help the researchers find relationship between the efficiency and structure parameters, properties of material, estimate the performance of the device, bring the optimization of guidance. Also, the applicability of the model used in simulation can be discussed by comparison with experimental data. This paper summaries principle, structure, progress of numerical simulation on organic small molecular solar cells.

  16. Advanced Antireflection Coatings for High-Performance Solar Energy Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Noren

    2015-01-01

    Phase II objectives: Develop and refine antireflection coatings incorporating lanthanum titanate as an intermediate refractive index material; Investigate wet/dry thermal oxidation of aluminum containing semiconductor compounds as a means of forming a more transparent window layer with equal or better optical properties than its unoxidized form; Develop a fabrication process that allows integration of the oxidized window layer and maintains the necessary electrical properties for contacting the solar cell; Conduct an experimental demonstration of the best candidates for improved antireflection coatings.

  17. The Performance of Advanced III-V Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert L.; Gaddy, Edward; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Test results show triple junction solar cells with efficiencies as high as 27% at 28C and 136.7 mw/sq cm. Triple junction cells also achieve up to 27.5% at -120 C and 5 mw/sq cm, conditions applicable to missions to Jupiter. Some triple junction cells show practically no degradation as a result of Low Intensity Low Temperature (LILT) effects, while others show some; this degradation can be overcome with minor changes to the cell design.

  18. From first generation biofuels to advanced solar biofuels.

    PubMed

    Aro, Eva-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Roadmaps towards sustainable bioeconomy, including the production of biofuels, in many EU countries mostly rely on biomass use. However, although biomass is renewable, the efficiency of biomass production is too low to be able to fully replace the fossil fuels. The use of land for fuel production also introduces ethical problems in increasing the food price. Harvesting solar energy by the photosynthetic machinery of plants and autotrophic microorganisms is the basis for all biomass production. This paper describes current challenges and possibilities to sustainably increase the biomass production and highlights future technologies to further enhance biofuel production directly from sunlight. The biggest scientific breakthroughs are expected to rely on a new technology called "synthetic biology", which makes engineering of biological systems possible. It will enable direct conversion of solar energy to a fuel from inexhaustible raw materials: sun light, water and CO2. In the future, such solar biofuels are expected to be produced in engineered photosynthetic microorganisms or in completely synthetic living factories.

  19. Development of advanced silicon solar cells for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillington, David R.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the development of large area high efficiency wrapthrough solar cells for Space Station Freedom. The goal of this contract was the development and fabrication of 8 x 8 cm coplanar back contact solar cells with a minimum output of 1.039 watts/cell. The first task in this program was a modeling study to determine the optimum configuration of the cell and to study the effects of surface passivation, substrate resistivity, and back surface field on the BOL and EOL performance. In addition, the optical stack, including the cell cover, AR coatings, and Kapton blanket, was modeled to optimize 'on orbit' operation. The second phase was a manufacturing development phase to develop high volume manufacturing processes for the reliable production of low recombination velocity boron back surface fields, techniques to produce smooth, low leakage wrapthrough holes, passivation, photoresist application methods, and metallization schemes. The final portion of this program was a pilot production phase. Seven hundred solar cells were delivered in this phase. At the end of the program, cells with average efficiencies over 13 percent were being produced with power output in excess of 1.139 watts/cell, thus substantially exceeding the program goal.

  20. From first generation biofuels to advanced solar biofuels.

    PubMed

    Aro, Eva-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Roadmaps towards sustainable bioeconomy, including the production of biofuels, in many EU countries mostly rely on biomass use. However, although biomass is renewable, the efficiency of biomass production is too low to be able to fully replace the fossil fuels. The use of land for fuel production also introduces ethical problems in increasing the food price. Harvesting solar energy by the photosynthetic machinery of plants and autotrophic microorganisms is the basis for all biomass production. This paper describes current challenges and possibilities to sustainably increase the biomass production and highlights future technologies to further enhance biofuel production directly from sunlight. The biggest scientific breakthroughs are expected to rely on a new technology called "synthetic biology", which makes engineering of biological systems possible. It will enable direct conversion of solar energy to a fuel from inexhaustible raw materials: sun light, water and CO2. In the future, such solar biofuels are expected to be produced in engineered photosynthetic microorganisms or in completely synthetic living factories. PMID:26667057

  1. Ray tracing optical analysis of offset solar collector for Space Station solar dynamic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, Kent S.

    1988-01-01

    OFFSET, a detailed ray tracing computer code, was developed at NASA Lewis Research Center to model the offset solar collector for the Space Station solar dynamic electric power system. This model traces rays from 50 points on the face of the sun to 10 points on each of the 456 collector facets. The triangular facets are modeled with spherical, parabolic, or toroidal reflective surface contour and surface slope errors. The rays are then traced through the receiver aperture to the walls of the receiver. Images of the collector and of the sun within the receiver produced by this code provide insight into the collector receiver interface. Flux distribution on the receiver walls, plotted by this code, is improved by a combination of changes to aperture location and receiver tilt angle. Power loss by spillage at the receiver aperture is computed and is considerably reduced by using toroidal facets.

  2. Ray tracing optical analysis of offset solar collector for space station solar dynamic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, Kent S.

    1988-01-01

    OFFSET, a detailed ray tracing computer code, was developed at NASA Lewis Research Center to model the offset solar collector for the Space Station solar dynamic electric power system. This model traces rays from 50 points on the face of the Sun to 10 points on each of the 456 collector facets. The triangular facets are modeled with spherical, parabolic, or toroidal reflective surface contour and surface slope errors. The rays are then traced through the receiver aperture to the walls of the receiver. Images of the collector and of the Sun within the receiver produced by this code provide insight into the collector receiver interface. Flux distribution on the receiver walls, plotted by this code, is improved by a combination of changes to aperture location and receiver tilt angle. Power loss by spillage at the receiver aperture is computed and is considerably reduced by using toroidal facets.

  3. The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Title, A. M.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Schrijver, C. J.; Aia Team

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly AIA on SDO will provide revolutionary coverage of the entire visible solar hemisphere observed from photospheric to coronal temperatures at 1-arcsecond resolution with a characteristic cadence of 10 seconds for each channel The AIA comprises four dual normal-incidence telescopes that enable it to cycle through a set of EUV channels centered on strong emission lines of iron ranging from Fe IX through XXIII and helium 304A plus two UV channels near 1600A and a broad band visible channel Combined with the vector- magnetic imagery from SDO HMI the AIA observations will significantly further our understanding of the dynamics of the magnetic field in the solar atmosphere and heliosphere both in quiescent and eruptive stages The comprehensive thermal coverage of the corona will open new avenues of study for coronal energetics and seismology which will benefit from the excellent calibration against the SDO EVE spectral irradiance measurements The AIA data will be easily accessible on the web with a time delay that is expected to be of the order of 15 minutes to 1 hour Users will be able to browse the data through summary web pages that are complemented by a comprehensive metadata catalog Data analysis will be supported through the freely available SolarSoft libraries and through modules in a flexible evolving pipeline data-analysis system to be operated at the AIA-HMI Joint Science Operations Center We plan to incorporate feature recognition software automated movie making coronal field modeling

  4. Spin-down Dynamics of Magnetized Solar-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oglethorpe, R. L. F.; Garaud, P.

    2013-12-01

    It has long been known that solar-type stars undergo significant spin-down, via magnetic braking, during their main-sequence lifetimes. However, magnetic braking only operates on the surface layers; it is not yet completely understood how angular momentum is transported within the star and how rapidly the spin-down information is communicated to the deep interior. In this work, we use insight from recent progress in understanding internal solar dynamics to model the interior of other solar-type stars. We assume, following Gough & McIntyre, that the bulk of the radiation zone of these stars is held in uniform rotation by the presence of an embedded large-scale primordial field, confined below a stably stratified, magnetic-free tachocline by large-scale meridional flows downwelling from the convection zone. We derive simple equations to describe the response of this model interior to spin-down of the surface layers, which are identical to the two-zone model of MacGregor & Brenner, with a coupling timescale proportional to the local Eddington-Sweet timescale across the tachocline. This timescale depends both on the rotation rate of the star and on the thickness of the tachocline, and it can vary from a few hundred thousand years to a few Gyr, depending on stellar properties. Qualitative predictions of the model appear to be consistent with observations, although they depend sensitively on the assumed functional dependence of the tachocline thickness on the stellar rotation rate.

  5. Spin-down dynamics of magnetized solar-type stars

    SciTech Connect

    Oglethorpe, R. L. F.; Garaud, P.

    2013-12-01

    It has long been known that solar-type stars undergo significant spin-down, via magnetic braking, during their main-sequence lifetimes. However, magnetic braking only operates on the surface layers; it is not yet completely understood how angular momentum is transported within the star and how rapidly the spin-down information is communicated to the deep interior. In this work, we use insight from recent progress in understanding internal solar dynamics to model the interior of other solar-type stars. We assume, following Gough and McIntyre, that the bulk of the radiation zone of these stars is held in uniform rotation by the presence of an embedded large-scale primordial field, confined below a stably stratified, magnetic-free tachocline by large-scale meridional flows downwelling from the convection zone. We derive simple equations to describe the response of this model interior to spin-down of the surface layers, which are identical to the two-zone model of MacGregor and Brenner, with a coupling timescale proportional to the local Eddington-Sweet timescale across the tachocline. This timescale depends both on the rotation rate of the star and on the thickness of the tachocline, and it can vary from a few hundred thousand years to a few Gyr, depending on stellar properties. Qualitative predictions of the model appear to be consistent with observations, although they depend sensitively on the assumed functional dependence of the tachocline thickness on the stellar rotation rate.

  6. Structure and Dynamics of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang; Wagner, William (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    For the meeting of the AAS/SPD in Albuquerque, NM, I organized a Topical Session of the AAS on Structure and Dynamics of Chromospheres. The grant support was used to bring to the US two of the speakers from abroad. I had invited them for presentations at the Session: Dr. Klaus Wilhelm, the former PI of the SUMER instrument on SOHO, from the Max-Planck Institut in Lindau, Germany, and Dr. Sirajul Hasan, from the Indian Institute of Astrophysics in Bangalore, India. Both speakers preceded their trip to the AAS meeting with a stay at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, where they interacted with members of the Solar and Stellar Physics division. The highlights of the visits were the talks at the AAS/SPD meeting, in which six invited speakers told the audience of astronomers about current problems in solar physics and their relation to stellar problems. An important result of the visits is a paper by Dr. Wilhelm and me on 'Observations of the upper solar chromosphere with SUMER on SOHO', which has been submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics for publication.

  7. Dynamical structure of solar radio burst type III as evidence of energy of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Zety Sharizat Binti

    2013-11-01

    Observations of low frequency solar type III radio bursts associated with the ejection of plasma oscillations localized disturbance is due to excitation atoms in the plasma frequency incoherent radiations play a dominant role at the meter and decimeter wavelengths. Here, we report the results of the dynamical structure of solar flare type III that occurred on 9th March 2012 at National Space Centre, Sg Lang, Selangor, Malaysia by using the CALLISTO system. These bursts are associated with solar flare type M6 which suddenly ejected in the active region AR 1429 starting at 03:32 UT and ending at 05:00 UT with the peak at 04:12 UT. The observation showed an initial strong burst occurred due to strong signal at the beginning of the phase. We also found that both solar burst and flares tend to be a numerous on the same day and probability of chance coincidence is high. It is clearly seen that an impulsive lace burst was detected at 4:24 UT and it is more plausible that the energies are confined to the top of the loop when we compared with X-ray results. Associated with this event was type II with velocities 1285 km/s and type IV radio sweeps along with a full halo Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) first seen in SOHO/LASCO C2 imagery at 09/0426 Z. We concluded that the significance of study solar burst type III lies in the fact that the emission at decimetric wavelength comes from the role of magnetic field in active region that may provide the key to the energy release mechanism in a flare.

  8. The Solar Dynamics Observatory: Your Eye On The Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, William Dean

    2008-01-01

    The Sun hiccups and satellites die. That is what NASA's Living With a Star Program is all about. The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is the first Space Weather Mission in LWS. SDO's main goal is to understand, driving towards a predictive capability, those solar variations that influence life on Earth and humanity's technological systems. The past decade has seen an increasing emphasis on understanding the entire Sun, from the nuclear reactions at the core to the development and loss of magnetic loops in the corona. SDO's three science investigations (HMI, AIA, and EVE) will determine how the Sun's magnetic field is generated and structured, how this stored magnetic energy is released into the heliosphere and geospace as the solar wind, energetic particles, and variations in the solar irradiance. SDO will return full-disk Dopplergrams, full-disk vector magnetograms, full-disk images at nine E/UV wavelengths, and EUV spectral irradiances, all taken at a rapid cadence. This means you can "observe the database" to study events, but we can also move forward in producing quantitative models of what the Sun is doing today. SDO is scheduled to launch in 2008 on an Atlas V rocket from the Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The satellite will fly in a 28 degree inclined geosynchronous orbit about the longitude of New Mexico, where a dedicated Ka-band ground station will receive the 150 Mbps data flow. How SDO data will transform the study of the Sun and its affect on Space Weather studies will be discussed.

  9. Advances in Radiation-Tolerant Solar Arrays for SEP Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Mark J.; Eskenazi, Michael I.; Ferguson, Dale C.

    2007-01-01

    As the power levels of commercial communications satellites reach the 20 kWe and higher, new options begin to emerge for transferring the satellite from LEO to GEO. In the past electric propulsion has been demonstrated successfully for this mission - albeit under unfortunate circumstances when the kick motor failed. The unexpected use of propellant for the electric propulsion (EP) system compromised the life of that vehicle, but did demonstrate the viability of such an approach. Replacing the kick motor on a satellite and replacing that mass by additional propellant for the EP system as well as mass for additional revenue-producing transponders should lead to major benefits for the provider. Of course this approach requires that the loss in solar array power during transit of the Van Allen radiation belts is not excessive and still enables the 15 to 20 year mission life. In addition, SEP missions to Jupiter, with its exceptional radiation belts, would mandate a radiation-resistant solar array to compete with a radioisotope alternative. Several critical issues emerge as potential barriers to this approach: reducing solar array radiation damage, operating the array at high voltage (>300 V) for extended times for Hall or ion thrusters, designing an array that will be resistant to micrometeoroid impacts and the differing environmental conditions as the vehicle travels from LEO to GEO (or at Jupiter), producing an array that is light weight to preserve payload mass fraction - and to do this at a cost that is lower than today's arrays. This paper will describe progress made to date on achieving an array that meets all these requirements and is also useful for deep space electric propulsion missions.

  10. Advances in Concentrating Solar Power Collectors: Mirrors and Solar Selective Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kenendy, C. E.

    2007-10-10

    The intention is to explore the feasibility of depositing the coating by lower-cost methods and to perform a rigorous cost analysis after a viable high-temperature solar-selective coating is demonstrated by e-beam.

  11. Propellant Slosh Analysis for the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Paul A. C.; Starin, Scott R.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission, part of the Living With a Star program, is a geosynchronous satellite with tight pointing requirements. Due to a large amount of liquid propellant, a detailed slosh analysis is required to ensure the tight pointing budget can be satisfied. Much of the high fidelity slosh analysis and simulation has been performed via computational fluid dynamics. Even though this method of simulation is very accurate, it requires significant computational effort and specialized knowledge, limiting the ability of the SDO project to access fluid dynamics simulations at will. Furthermore, it is very difficult to incorporate most of these models into simulations of the overall spacecraft and its environment. Ultimately, the effects of the propellant slosh on the attitude stability and pointing performance of the entire spacecraft are of great interest to attitude control engineers. Equivalent mechanical models, such as models that approximate the fluid slosh effects by analogy to the movements of a point-mass pendulum, are important tools in simulating propellant slosh dynamics as part of the entire attitude determination and control system. This paper describes some of the current methods used to analyze and model slosh. It focuses on equivalent mechanical models and their incorporation into control-based analysis tools such as Simulink. The SDO mission is used as the case study for this work.

  12. Advanced sensible heat solar receiver for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Timothy J.; Lacy, Dovie E.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis, through in-house efforts, has begun a study to generate a conceptual design of a sensible heat solar receiver and to determine the feasibility of such a system for space power applications. The sensible heat solar receiver generated in this study uses pure lithium as the thermal storage medium and was designed for a 7 kWe Brayton (PCS) operating at 1100 K. The receiver consists of two stages interconnected via temperature sensing variable conductance sodium heat pipes. The lithium is contained within a niobium vessel and the outer shell of the receiver is constructed of third generation rigid, fibrous ceramic insulation material. Reradiation losses are controlled with niobium and aluminum shields. By nature of design, the sensible heat receiver generated in this study is comparable in both size and mass to a latent heat system of similar thermal capacitance. The heat receiver design and thermal analysis was conducted through the combined use of PATRAN, SINDA, TRASYS, and NASTRAN software packages.

  13. Advanced sensible heat solar receiver for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Timothy J.; Lacy, Dovie E.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis, through in-house efforts, has begun a study to generate a conceptual design of a sensible heat solar receiver and to determine the feasibility of such a system for space power applications. The sensible heat solar receiver generated in this study uses pure lithium as the thermal storage medium and was designed for a 7 kWe Brayton (PCS) operating at 1100 K. The receiver consists of two stages interconnected via temperature sensing variable conductance sodium heat pipes. The lithium is contained within a niobium vessel and the outer shell of the receiver is constructed of third generation rigid, fibrous ceramic insulation material. Reradiation losses are controlled with niobium and aluminum shields. By nature of design, the sensible heat receiver generated in this study is comparable in both size and mass to a latent heat system of similar thermal capacitance. The heat receiver design and thermal analysis were conducted through the combined use of PATRAN, SINDA, TRASYS, and NASTRAN software packages.

  14. Deployment dynamics and control of large-scale flexible solar array system with deployable mast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-Quan; Liu, Xiao-Feng; Guo, Shao-Jing; Cai, Guo-Ping

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, deployment dynamics and control of large-scale flexible solar array system with deployable mast are investigated. The adopted solar array system is introduced firstly, including system configuration, deployable mast and solar arrays with several mechanisms. Then dynamic equation of the solar array system is established by the Jourdain velocity variation principle and a method for dynamics with topology changes is introduced. In addition, a PD controller with disturbance estimation is designed to eliminate the drift of spacecraft mainbody. Finally the validity of the dynamic model is verified through a comparison with ADAMS software and the deployment process and dynamic behavior of the system are studied in detail. Simulation results indicate that the proposed model is effective to describe the deployment dynamics of the large-scale flexible solar arrays and the proposed controller is practical to eliminate the drift of spacecraft mainbody.

  15. Advances in Remote Sensing for Vegetation Dynamics and Agricultural Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Compton; Puma, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Spaceborne remote sensing has led to great advances in the global monitoring of vegetation. For example, the NASA Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) group has developed widely used datasets from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensors as well as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) map imagery and normalized difference vegetation index datasets. These data are valuable for analyzing vegetation trends and variability at the regional and global levels. Numerous studies have investigated such trends and variability for both natural vegetation (e.g., re-greening of the Sahel, shifts in the Eurasian boreal forest, Amazonian drought sensitivity) and crops (e.g., impacts of extremes on agricultural production). Here, a critical overview is presented on recent developments and opportunities in the use of remote sensing for monitoring vegetation and crop dynamics.

  16. Exploring biomolecular dynamics and interactions using advanced sampling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luitz, Manuel; Bomblies, Rainer; Ostermeir, Katja; Zacharias, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have emerged as a valuable tool to investigate statistical mechanics and kinetics of biomolecules and synthetic soft matter materials. However, major limitations for routine applications are due to the accuracy of the molecular mechanics force field and due to the maximum simulation time that can be achieved in current simulations studies. For improving the sampling a number of advanced sampling approaches have been designed in recent years. In particular, variants of the parallel tempering replica-exchange methodology are widely used in many simulation studies. Recent methodological advancements and a discussion of specific aims and advantages are given. This includes improved free energy simulation approaches and conformational search applications.

  17. Recent advancements in low cost solar cell processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralph, E. L.

    1975-01-01

    A proof-of-concept solar cell process has been developed that is adaptable to automation. This involved the development of a new contact system, a new antireflection coating system, a drift field cell design and a new contoured surface treatment. All these processes are performed without the use of vacuum chambers and expensive masking techniques, thus providing the possibility of reduced costs by automation using conventional semiconductor processing machinery. The contacts were printed on the cells by conventional silk screen machinery. The P(+) back field was formed by diffusing in aluminum from a printed aluminum back contact. The antireflection coating was formed by spinning on and baking a TiO2-SiO2 glass film. Air-mass-zero efficiencies of over 10% were achieved using this completely vacuum-free process.

  18. Demonstration of an advanced solar garden with a water ceiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, R.; Riseng, C.; Thomas, G.; Mandeville, M.

    1980-09-01

    Experimental procedures for evaluating the water ceiling as an integral part of an ongoing garden agricultural experiment are discussed and the results presented. The water ceiling proved useful in providing extra thermal capacity to the solar garden. It provides heat at night after the water was warmed during the day, and retards overheating in the daytime by absorbing infrared energy into the water. In growing nonflowering plants such as lettuce and Chinese cabbage, the water ceiling showed no noticeable degradation in yield or maturation rate. In flowering plants such as tomatoes, the reduced light levels delayed yields by a couple of weeks but the total yield was only slightly diminished. In geographic areas where there is less cloud cover than in Michigan, the water ceiling could be more effective.

  19. Advanced Solar Cell and Array Technology for NASA Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael; Benson, Scott; Scheiman, David; Finacannon, Homer; Oleson, Steve; Landis, Geoffrey

    2008-01-01

    A recent study by the NASA Glenn Research Center assessed the feasibility of using photovoltaics (PV) to power spacecraft for outer planetary, deep space missions. While the majority of spacecraft have relied on photovoltaics for primary power, the drastic reduction in solar intensity as the spacecraft moves farther from the sun has either limited the power available (severely curtailing scientific operations) or necessitated the use of nuclear systems. A desire by NASA and the scientific community to explore various bodies in the outer solar system and conduct "long-term" operations using using smaller, "lower-cost" spacecraft has renewed interest in exploring the feasibility of using photovoltaics for to Jupiter, Saturn and beyond. With recent advances in solar cell performance and continuing development in lightweight, high power solar array technology, the study determined that photovoltaics is indeed a viable option for many of these missions.

  20. Comparisons of peak ionosphere pressures at Mars and Venus with incident solar wind dynamic pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Radio occultation measurements of electron density profiles from Mariner 6 and 7, the Mariner 9 extended mission, and the U.S. Viking orbiters, together with model ion and electron temperature profiles, are used to derive thermal pressure profiles in the Mars ionosphere. The comparison of the Mars peak ionosphere pressure with the incident solar and dynamic pressure suggests that at solar maximum the Mars ionosphere, like that of Venus, should generally be sufficient to balance the incident solar wind pressure. At solar minimum, when the ionosphere is weakest and the solar wind dynamic pressure is highest, only the peak pressures at high solar zenith angles (SZAs) at Mars appear to be strong enough to balance the incident solar wind pressure. This is similar to the situation at Venus at solar minimum.

  1. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Investigation for the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Philip Hanby; Schou, Jesper; Bush, R. I.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Bogart, R. S.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Liu, Y.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Zhao, J.; Title, A. M.; Schrijver, C. J.; Tarbell, T. D.; Tomczyk, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument and investigation as a part of the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is designed to study convection-zone dynamics and the solar dynamo, the origin and evolution of sunspots, active regions, and complexes of activity, the sources and drivers of solar magnetic activity and disturbances, links between the internal processes and dynamics of the corona and heliosphere, and precursors of solar disturbances for space-weather forecasts. A brief overview of the instrument, investigation objectives, and standard data products is presented.

  2. SciDAC Advances and Applications in Computational Beam Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.; Abell, D.; Adelmann, A.; Amundson, J.; Bohn, C.; Cary, J.; Colella, P.; Dechow, D.; Decyk, V.; Dragt, A.; Gerber, R.; Habib, S.; Higdon, D.; Katsouleas, T.; Ma, K.-L.; McCorquodale, P.; Mihalcea, D.; Mitchell, C.; Mori, W.; Mottershead, C.T.; Neri, F.; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Samulyak, R.; Serafini, D.; Shalf, J.; Siegerist, C.; Spentzouris, P.; Stoltz, P.; Terzic, B.; Venturini, M.; Walstrom, P.

    2005-06-26

    SciDAC has had a major impact on computational beam dynamics and the design of particle accelerators. Particle accelerators--which account for half of the facilities in the DOE Office of Science Facilities for the Future of Science 20 Year Outlook--are crucial for US scientific, industrial, and economic competitiveness. Thanks to SciDAC, accelerator design calculations that were once thought impossible are now carried routinely, and new challenging and important calculations are within reach. SciDAC accelerator modeling codes are being used to get the most science out of existing facilities, to produce optimal designs for future facilities, and to explore advanced accelerator concepts that may hold the key to qualitatively new ways of accelerating charged particle beams. In this poster we present highlights from the SciDAC Accelerator Science and Technology (AST) project Beam Dynamics focus area in regard to algorithm development, software development, and applications.

  3. A dynamical model of plasma turbulence in the solar wind

    PubMed Central

    Howes, G. G.

    2015-01-01

    A dynamical approach, rather than the usual statistical approach, is taken to explore the physical mechanisms underlying the nonlinear transfer of energy, the damping of the turbulent fluctuations, and the development of coherent structures in kinetic plasma turbulence. It is argued that the linear and nonlinear dynamics of Alfvén waves are responsible, at a very fundamental level, for some of the key qualitative features of plasma turbulence that distinguish it from hydrodynamic turbulence, including the anisotropic cascade of energy and the development of current sheets at small scales. The first dynamical model of kinetic turbulence in the weakly collisional solar wind plasma that combines self-consistently the physics of Alfvén waves with the development of small-scale current sheets is presented and its physical implications are discussed. This model leads to a simplified perspective on the nature of turbulence in a weakly collisional plasma: the nonlinear interactions responsible for the turbulent cascade of energy and the formation of current sheets are essentially fluid in nature, while the collisionless damping of the turbulent fluctuations and the energy injection by kinetic instabilities are essentially kinetic in nature. PMID:25848075

  4. DYNAMICS OF MAGNETIZED VORTEX TUBES IN THE SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A.

    2012-05-20

    We use three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations to investigate the formation and dynamics of small-scale (less than 0.5 Mm in diameter) vortex tubes spontaneously generated by turbulent convection in quiet-Sun regions with an initially weak (10 G) mean magnetic field. The results show that the vortex tubes penetrate into the chromosphere and substantially affect the structure and dynamics of the solar atmosphere. The vortex tubes are mostly concentrated in intergranular lanes and are characterized by strong (near sonic) downflows and swirling motions that capture and twist magnetic field lines, forming magnetic flux tubes that expand with height and attain magnetic field strengths ranging from 200 G in the chromosphere to more than 1 kG in the photosphere. We investigate in detail the physical properties of these vortex tubes, including thermodynamic properties, flow dynamics, and kinetic and current helicities, and conclude that magnetized vortex tubes provide an important path for energy and momentum transfer from the convection zone into the chromosphere.

  5. A dynamical model of plasma turbulence in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Howes, G G

    2015-05-13

    A dynamical approach, rather than the usual statistical approach, is taken to explore the physical mechanisms underlying the nonlinear transfer of energy, the damping of the turbulent fluctuations, and the development of coherent structures in kinetic plasma turbulence. It is argued that the linear and nonlinear dynamics of Alfvén waves are responsible, at a very fundamental level, for some of the key qualitative features of plasma turbulence that distinguish it from hydrodynamic turbulence, including the anisotropic cascade of energy and the development of current sheets at small scales. The first dynamical model of kinetic turbulence in the weakly collisional solar wind plasma that combines self-consistently the physics of Alfvén waves with the development of small-scale current sheets is presented and its physical implications are discussed. This model leads to a simplified perspective on the nature of turbulence in a weakly collisional plasma: the nonlinear interactions responsible for the turbulent cascade of energy and the formation of current sheets are essentially fluid in nature, while the collisionless damping of the turbulent fluctuations and the energy injection by kinetic instabilities are essentially kinetic in nature.

  6. A dynamical model of plasma turbulence in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Howes, G G

    2015-05-13

    A dynamical approach, rather than the usual statistical approach, is taken to explore the physical mechanisms underlying the nonlinear transfer of energy, the damping of the turbulent fluctuations, and the development of coherent structures in kinetic plasma turbulence. It is argued that the linear and nonlinear dynamics of Alfvén waves are responsible, at a very fundamental level, for some of the key qualitative features of plasma turbulence that distinguish it from hydrodynamic turbulence, including the anisotropic cascade of energy and the development of current sheets at small scales. The first dynamical model of kinetic turbulence in the weakly collisional solar wind plasma that combines self-consistently the physics of Alfvén waves with the development of small-scale current sheets is presented and its physical implications are discussed. This model leads to a simplified perspective on the nature of turbulence in a weakly collisional plasma: the nonlinear interactions responsible for the turbulent cascade of energy and the formation of current sheets are essentially fluid in nature, while the collisionless damping of the turbulent fluctuations and the energy injection by kinetic instabilities are essentially kinetic in nature. PMID:25848075

  7. Advanced techniques for constrained internal coordinate molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jeffrey R; Balaraman, Gouthaman S; Niesen, Michiel J M; Larsen, Adrien B; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-04-30

    Internal coordinate molecular dynamics (ICMD) methods provide a more natural description of a protein by using bond, angle, and torsional coordinates instead of a Cartesian coordinate representation. Freezing high-frequency bonds and angles in the ICMD model gives rise to constrained ICMD (CICMD) models. There are several theoretical aspects that need to be developed to make the CICMD method robust and widely usable. In this article, we have designed a new framework for (1) initializing velocities for nonindependent CICMD coordinates, (2) efficient computation of center of mass velocity during CICMD simulations, (3) using advanced integrators such as Runge-Kutta, Lobatto, and adaptive CVODE for CICMD simulations, and (4) cancelling out the "flying ice cube effect" that sometimes arises in Nosé-Hoover dynamics. The Generalized Newton-Euler Inverse Mass Operator (GNEIMO) method is an implementation of a CICMD method that we have developed to study protein dynamics. GNEIMO allows for a hierarchy of coarse-grained simulation models based on the ability to rigidly constrain any group of atoms. In this article, we perform tests on the Lobatto and Runge-Kutta integrators to determine optimal simulation parameters. We also implement an adaptive coarse-graining tool using the GNEIMO Python interface. This tool enables the secondary structure-guided "freezing and thawing" of degrees of freedom in the molecule on the fly during molecular dynamics simulations and is shown to fold four proteins to their native topologies. With these advancements, we envision the use of the GNEIMO method in protein structure prediction, structure refinement, and in studying domain motion.

  8. Research studies on magnetohydrodynamic systems and modeling solar dynamical behavior. Final report July 1981-June 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-11-01

    Research involving magnetohydrodynamic systems and solar dynamical behavior is presented. The reported research is divided into seven major sections: Section I. Laser Beam Matter Interactions, Section II. Ion Beam Matter Interactions, Section III. Energy Loss of Fast Particles to an Electron Plasma, Section IV. Solar Magnetic Flux Transport, Section V. Solar Magnetic Flux Emergence, Section VI. Coronal Bullets and Section VII. Solar Flares and Preflare Studies.

  9. The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Title, Alan M.; AIA Team

    2006-06-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on SDO will provide revolutionary coverage of the entire visible solar hemisphere, observed from photospheric to coronal temperatures, at 1-arcsecond resolution, with a characteristic cadence of 10 seconds for each channel. The AIA comprises four dual normal-incidence telescopes that enable it to cycle through a set of EUV channels centered on strong emission lines of iron (ranging from Fe IX through XXIII) and helium (304A), plus two UV channels near 1600A and a broad band visible channel. Combined with the (vector-)magnetic imagery from SDO/HMI, the AIA observations will significantly further our understanding of the dynamics of the magnetic field in the solar atmosphere and heliosphere, both in quiescent and eruptive stages. The comprehensive thermal coverage of the corona will open new avenues of study for coronal energetics and seismology, which will benefit from the excellent calibration against the SDO/EVE spectral irradiance measurements. The AIA data will be easily accessible on the web, with a time delay that is expected to be of the order of 15 minutes to 1 hour. Users will be able to browse the data through summary web pages that are complemented by a comprehensive metadata catalog. Data analysis will be supported through the freely available SolarSoft libraries and through modules in a flexible, evolving pipeline data analysis system to be operated at the AIA-HMI Joint Science Operations Center. We plan to incorporate feature recognition software, automated movie making, coronal field modeling, and other supporting analysis software. We invite the broad ILWS community to contact us with ideas to collaborate on any aspect of the AIA Investigation. Details on the AIA instrument, the Science Investigation, and related news can be found at http://aia.lmsal.com.

  10. The Solar Dynamics Observatory, Studying the Sun and Its Influence on Other Bodies in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, P. C.

    2011-01-01

    The solar photon output, which was once thought to be constant, varies over all time scales from seconds during solar flares to years due to the solar cycle. These solar variations cause significant deviations in the Earth and space environments on similar time scales, such as affecting the atmospheric densities and composition of particular atoms, molecules, and ions in the atmospheres of the Earth and other planets. Presented and discussed will be examples of unprecedented observations from NASA's new solar observatory, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Using three specialized instruments, SDO measures the origins of solar activity from inside the Sun, though its atmosphere, then accurately measuring the Sun's radiative output in X-ray and EUV wavelengths (0.1-121 nm). Along with the visually appealing observations will be discussions of what these measurements can tell us about how the plasma motions in all layers of the Sun modifies and strengthens the weak solar dipole magnetic field to drive large energy releases in solar eruptions. Also presented will be examples of how the release of the Sun's energy, in the form of photons and high energy particles, physically influence other bodies in the solar system such as Earth, Mars, and the Moon, and how these changes drive changes in the technology that we are becoming dependent upon. The presentation will continuously emphasize how SDO, the first satellite in NASA's Living with a Star program, improving our understanding of the variable Sun and its Heliospheric influence.

  11. Modulating Exciton Dynamics in Composite Nanocrystals for Excitonic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Concina, Isabella; Manzoni, Cristian; Grancini, Giulia; Celikin, Mert; Soudi, Afsoon; Rosei, Federico; Zavelani-Rossi, Margherita; Cerullo, Giulio; Vomiero, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) represent one of the most promising materials for third-generation solar cells due to their potential to boost the photoconversion efficiency beyond the Shockley-Queisser limit. Composite nanocrystals can challenge the current scenario by combining broad spectral response and tailored energy levels to favor charge extraction and reduce energy and charge recombination. We synthesized PbS/CdS QDs with different compositions at the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles assembled in a mesoporous film. The ultrafast photoinduced dynamics and the charge injection processes were investigated by pump-probe spectroscopy. We demonstrated good injection of photogenerated electrons from QDs to TiO2 in the PbS/CdS blend and used the QDs to fabricate solar cells. The fine-tuning of chemical composition and size of lead and cadmium chalcogenide QDs led to highly efficient PV devices (3% maximum photoconversion efficiency). This combined study paves the way to the full exploitation of QDs in next-generation photovoltaic (PV) devices.

  12. SECONDARY FLARE RIBBONS OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Yang, Shuhong E-mail: liting@nao.cas.cn

    2014-02-20

    Using the observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we statistically investigate the flare ribbons (FRs) of 19 X-class flares of the 24th solar cycle from 2010 June to 2013 August. Of these 19 flares, the source regions of 16 can be observed by AIA and the FRs of each flare are well detected, and 11 of the 16 display multiple ribbons. Based on the ribbon brightness and the relationship between the ribbons and post-flare loops, we divide the multiple ribbons into two types: normal FRs, which are connected by post-flare loops and have been extensively investigated, and secondary flare ribbons (SFRs), which are weaker than the FRs, not connected by post-flare loops, and always have a short lifetime. Of the 11 SFRs, 10 appear simultaneously with the FRs, and none of them have post-flare loops. The last one, on the other hand, appears 80 minutes later than the FR, lasts almost two hours, and also has no post-flare loops detected. We suggest that the magnetic reconnection associated with this SFR is triggered by the blast wave that results from the main flare. These observations imply that in some flare processes, more than two sets of magnetic loops or more than twice the number of magnetic reconnections are involved.

  13. Bus Vent Design Evolution for the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    As a spacecraft undergoes ascent in a launch vehicle, its pressure environment transitions from one atmosphere to high vacuum in a matter of minutes. Venting of internal cavities is necessary to prevent the buildup of pressure differentials across cavity walls. Opposing the need to vent these volumes freely into space are thermal, optical, and electrostatic requirements for limiting or prohibiting the intrusion of unwanted energy into the same cavities. Bus vent design evolution is discussed for the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Design changes were influenced by a number of factors and concerns, such as contamination control, electrostatic discharge, changes in bus material, and driving fairing ascent pressure for a launch vehicle that was just entering service as this satellite project had gotten underway.

  14. The cavity heat pipe Stirling receiver for space solar dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesseli, James B.; Lacy, Dovie E.

    1989-01-01

    The receiver/storage unit for the low-earth-orbiting Stirling system is discussed. The design, referred to as the cavity heat pipe (CHP), has been optimized for minimum specific mass and volume width. A specific version of this design at the 7-kWe level has been compared to the space station Brayton solar dynamic design. The space station design utilizes a eutectic mixture of LiF and CaF2. Using the same phase change material, the CHP has been shown to have a specific mass of 40 percent and a volume of 5 percent of that of the space station Brayton at the same power level. Additionally, it complements the free-piston Stirling engine in that it also maintains a relatively flat specific mass down to at least 1 kWe. The technical requirements, tradeoff studies, critical issues, and critical technology experiments are discussed.

  15. Solar dynamic heat rejection technology. Task 1: System concept development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafson, Eric; Carlson, Albert W.

    1987-01-01

    The results are presented of a concept development study of heat rejection systems for Space Station solar dynamic power systems. The heat rejection concepts are based on recent developments in high thermal transport capacity heat pipe radiators. The thermal performance and weights of each of the heat rejection subsystems is addressed in detail, and critical technologies which require development tests and evaluation for successful demonstration are assessed and identified. Baseline and several alternate heat rejection system configurations and optimum designs are developed for both Brayton and Rankine cycles. The thermal performance, mass properties, assembly requirements, reliability, maintenance requirements and life cycle cost are determined for each configuration. A specific design was then selected for each configuration which represents an optimum design for that configuration. The final recommendations of heat rejection system configuration for either the Brayton or Rankine cycles depend on the priorities established for the evaluation criteria.

  16. Carrier injection dynamics in heterojunction solar cells with bipolar molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yosuke; Yonezawa, Kouhei; Yasuda, Takeshi E-mail: moritomo.yutaka.gf@u.tsukuba.ac.jp; Moritomo, Yutaka E-mail: moritomo.yutaka.gf@u.tsukuba.ac.jp

    2015-03-23

    A boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc) is a bipolar molecule and is used in hetero-junction organic solar cells. Here, we investigated the carrier injection dynamics from the donor α-sexithiophene (6T) or acceptor C{sub 60} layers to the bipolar SubPc layer by means of the femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy. We observed gradual increase of the SubPc{sup –} (SubPc{sup +}) species within ≈300 ps. The increases are interpreted in terms of the exciton diffusion within the 6T (C{sub 60}) layer and subsequent electron (hole) injection at the interface. In 6T/SubPc heterojunction, the electron injection is observed even at 80 K. The robust electron injection is ascribed to the efficient charge separation within the 6T layer under photo exciation at 400 nm.

  17. Complex Dynamic Flows in Solar Flare Sheet Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, David E.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Savage, Sabrina

    2012-01-01

    Observations of high-energy emission from solar flares often reveal the presence of large sheet-like structures, sometimes extending over a space comparable to the Sun's radius. Given that these structures are found between a departing coronal mass ejection and the post-eruption flare arcade, it is natural to associate the structure with a current sheet; though the relationship is unclear. Moreover, recent high-resolution observations have begun to reveal that the motions in this region are highly complex, including reconnection outflows, oscillations, and apparent wakes and eddies. We present a detailed first look at the complicated dynamics within this supra-arcade plasma, and consider implications for the interrelationship between the plasma and its embedded magnetic field.

  18. The solar dynamic radiator with a historical perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclallin, K. L.; Fleming, M. L.; Hoehn, F. W.; Howerton, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    A historical perspective on pumped-fluid loop space radiators provides a basis for the design of the Space Station Solar Dynamic (SD) power module radiator. SD power modules, capable of generating 25 kW (electrical) each, are planned for growth in Station power requirements. The Brayton cycle SD module configuration incorporates a pumped-fluid loop radiator that must reject up to 99 kW (thermal). The thermal/hydraulic design conditions in combination with required radiator orientation and packaging envelope form a unique set of constraints as compared to previous pumped-fluid loop radiator systems. Nevertheless, past program successes have demonstrated a technology base that can be applied to the SD radiator development program to ensure a low risk, low cost system.

  19. The Solar Dynamic radiator with a historical perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclallin, K. L.; Fleming, M. L.; Hoehn, F. W.; Howerton, R.

    1988-01-01

    A historical perspective on pumped loop space radiators provides a basis for the design of the Space Station Solar Dynamic (SD) power module radiator. SD power modules, capable of generating 25 kWe each, are planned for growth Station power requirements. The Brayton (cycle) SD module configuration incorporates a pumped loop radiator that must reject up to 99 kW. The thermal/hydraulic design conditions in combination with required radiator orientation and packaging envelope form a unique set of constraints as compared to previous pumped loop radiator systems. Nevertheless, past program successes have demonstrated a technology base which can be applied to the SD radiator development program to ensure a low risk, low cost system.

  20. Solar Dynamics Observatory Data Search using Metadata in the KDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, E.; Choi, S.; Baek, J.-H.; Park, J.; Lee, J.; Cho, K.

    2015-09-01

    We have constructed the Korean Data Center (KDC) for the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) in the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI). The SDO comprises three instruments; the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), and the Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE). We archive AIA and HMI FITS data. The size of data is about 1 TB of a day. The goal of KDC for SDO is to provide easy and fast access service to the data for researchers in Asia. In order to improve the data search rate, we designed the system to search data without going through a process of database query. The fields of instrument, wavelength, data path, date, and time are saved as a text file. This metadata file and SDO FITS data can be simply accessed via HTTP and are open to the public. We present a process of creating metadata and a way to access SDO FITS data in detail.

  1. Dynamics of a toroidal magnetic cloud in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romashets, E. P.; Vandas, M.

    2001-06-01

    Knowledge about the behavior of compact toroidal magnetic force-free objects in ambient magnetic field may help to better understand dynamical processes in association with coronal mass ejections and their interplanetary counterparts. The problem to find the diamagnetic force acting on a toroidal object in an inhomogeneous magnetic field is solved analytically. At first the drapery of the inhomogeneous magnetic field caused by an insertion of a toroid was found, and then the force acting on the toroid by this disturbed magnetic field was obtained. The problem is considered in purely toroidal coordinates. The obtained solution can be used for calculations of the repulsing diamagnetic force acting on isolated objects in the solar corona such as magnetic clouds of a toroidal shape and for the determination of their velocity profiles. Deformations of toroidal transients due to this melon seed force are not investigated here. Only the force acting on the toroid as a whole is taken in consideration.

  2. The Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase for the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlburt, Neal E.; Cheung, M.; Schrijver, K.; HEK development Team

    2009-05-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory will generated over 2 petabytes of imagery in its 5 year mission. In order to improve scientific productivity and to reduce system requirements , we have developed a system for data markup to identify "interesting” datasets and direct scientists to them through an event-based querying system. The SDO Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK) will enable caching of commonly accessed datasets within the Joint Science Operations Center (JSOC) and reduces the (human) time spent searching for and downloading relevant data. We present an overview of our HEK including the ingestion of images, automated and manual tools for identifying and annotation features within the images, and interfaces and web tools for querying and accessing events and their associated data.

  3. Structural evaluation of concepts for a solar energy concentrator for Space Station advanced development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenner, Winfred S.; Rhodes, Marvin D.

    1994-01-01

    Solar dynamic power systems have a higher thermodynamic efficiency than conventional photovoltaic systems; therefore they are attractive for long-term space missions with high electrical power demands. In an investigation conducted in support of a preliminary concept for Space Station Freedom, an approach for a solar dynamic power system was developed and a number of the components for the solar concentrator were fabricated for experimental evaluation. The concentrator consists of hexagonal panels comprised of triangular reflective facets which are supported by a truss. Structural analyses of the solar concentrator and the support truss were conducted using finite-element models. A number of potential component failure scenarios were postulated and the resulting structural performance was assessed. The solar concentrator and support truss were found to be adequate to meet a 1.0-Hz structural dynamics design requirement in pristine condition. However, for some of the simulated component failure conditions, the fundamental frequency dropped below the 1.0-Hz design requirement. As a result, two alternative concepts were developed and assessed. One concept incorporated a tetrahedral ring truss support for the hexagonal panels: the second incorporated a full tetrahedral truss support for the panels. The results indicate that significant improvements in stiffness can be obtained by attaching the panels to a tetrahedral truss, and that this concentrator and support truss will meet the 1.0-Hz design requirement with any of the simulated failure conditions.

  4. Observations and Modeling of Solar Flare Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Solar flares are one of the most energetic events in solar atmosphere, which last minutes to tens of minutes. The eruption of a solar flare involves energy release, plasma heating, particle acceleration, mass flows, waves, etc. A solar flare releases a large amount of energy, and its emission spans a wide wavelength range. Solar flares are usually accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs); therefore they could significantly affect the space environments between the Earth and the Sun. At present, we do not fully understand the whole flare process. There are still many important questions to be resolved, such as when and where is the energy released? How long does the energy release last? What are the main ways of energy release? And how does the solar atmosphere respond to the energy release? To address these questions, we study in detail the flare heating and dynamic evolution. We first give a brief review of previous flare studies (Chapter 1), and introduce the observing instruments (Chapter 2) and the modeling method (Chapter 3) related to this thesis work. Then we use spectral data to investigate the chromospheric evaporation (Chapter 4). Based on the results, we further explore the flare heating problem. With observationally inferred heating functions, we model two flare loops, and compare the results with observations (Chapter 5). A consistency is achieved between modeling and observations. In addition, we model two different sets of flare loop systems with quite different heating profiles and dynamic evolutions (Chapter 6). The details are described as below. Firstly, we investigate the chromospheric evaporation in the flare on 2007 January 16 using line profiles observed by the Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode. Three points with different magnetic polarities at flare ribbons are analyzed in detail. We find that the three points show different patterns of upflows and downflows in the impulsive phase of the flare. The

  5. Soft X-ray irradiance measured by the Solar Aspect Monitor on the Solar Dynamic Observatory Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. Y.; Bailey, S. M.; Jones, A.; Woodraska, D.; Caspi, A.; Woods, T. N.; Eparvier, F. G.; Wieman, S. R.; Didkovsky, L. V.

    2016-04-01

    The Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM) is a pinhole camera on the Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. SAM projects the solar disk onto the CCD through a metallic filter designed to allow only solar photons shortward of 7 nm to pass. Contamination from energetic particles and out-of-band irradiance is, however, significant in the SAM observations. We present a technique for isolating the 0.01-7 nm integrated irradiance from the SAM signal to produce the first results of broadband irradiance for the time period from May 2010 to May 2014. The results of this analysis agree with a similar data product from EVE's EUV SpectroPhotometer to within 25%. We compare our results with measurements from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer Solar X-ray Photometer and the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics Solar EUV Experiment at similar levels of solar activity. We show that the full-disk SAM broadband results compared well to the other measurements of the 0.01-7 nm irradiance. We also explore SAM's capability toward resolving spatial contribution from regions of solar disk in irradiance and demonstrate this feature with a case study of several strong flares that erupted from active regions on 11 March 2011.

  6. Computer Vision for the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, P. C. H.; Attrill, G. D. R.; Davey, A. R.; Engell, A.; Farid, S.; Grigis, P. C.; Kasper, J.; Korreck, K.; Saar, S. H.; Savcheva, A.; Su, Y.; Testa, P.; Wills-Davey, M.; Bernasconi, P. N.; Raouafi, N.-E.; Delouille, V. A.; Hochedez, J. F.; Cirtain, J. W.; Deforest, C. E.; Angryk, R. A.; de Moortel, I.; Wiegelmann, T.; Georgoulis, M. K.; McAteer, R. T. J.; Timmons, R. P.

    2012-01-01

    In Fall 2008 NASA selected a large international consortium to produce a comprehensive automated feature-recognition system for the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The SDO data that we consider are all of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) images plus surface magnetic-field images from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). We produce robust, very efficient, professionally coded software modules that can keep up with the SDO data stream and detect, trace, and analyze numerous phenomena, including flares, sigmoids, filaments, coronal dimmings, polarity inversion lines, sunspots, X-ray bright points, active regions, coronal holes, EIT waves, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), coronal oscillations, and jets. We also track the emergence and evolution of magnetic elements down to the smallest detectable features and will provide at least four full-disk, nonlinear, force-free magnetic field extrapolations per day. The detection of CMEs and filaments is accomplished with Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/ Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) and ground-based Hα data, respectively. A completely new software element is a trainable feature-detection module based on a generalized image-classification algorithm. Such a trainable module can be used to find features that have not yet been discovered (as, for example, sigmoids were in the pre- Yohkoh era). Our codes will produce entries in the Heliophysics Events Knowledgebase (HEK) as well as produce complete catalogs for results that are too numerous for inclusion in the HEK, such as the X-ray bright-point metadata. This will permit users to locate data on individual events as well as carry out statistical studies on large numbers of events, using the interface provided by the Virtual Solar Observatory. The operations concept for our computer vision system is that the data will be analyzed in near real time as soon as they arrive at the SDO Joint Science Operations Center and have undergone basic

  7. Data Distribution System (DDS) and Solar Dynamic Observatory Ground Station (SDOGS) Integration Manager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, Kim; Bialas, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The DDS SDOGS Integration Manager (DSIM) provides translation between native control and status formats for systems within DDS and SDOGS, and the ASIST (Advanced Spacecraft Integration and System Test) control environment in the SDO MOC (Solar Dynamics Observatory Mission Operations Center). This system was created in response for a need to centralize remote monitor and control of SDO Ground Station equipments using ASIST control environment in SDO MOC, and to have configurable table definition for equipment. It provides translation of status and monitoring information from the native systems into ASIST-readable format to display on pages in the MOC. The manager is lightweight, user friendly, and efficient. It allows data trending, correlation, and storing. It allows using ASIST as common interface for remote monitor and control of heterogeneous equipments. It also provides failover capability to back up machines.

  8. Advanced materials for multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet solar astronomy.

    PubMed

    Bogachev, S A; Chkhalo, N I; Kuzin, S V; Pariev, D E; Polkovnikov, V N; Salashchenko, N N; Shestov, S V; Zuev, S Y

    2016-03-20

    We provide an analysis of contemporary multilayer optics for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) solar astronomy in the wavelength ranges: λ=12.9-13.3  nm, λ=17-21  nm, λ=28-33  nm, and λ=58.4  nm. We found new material pairs, which will make new spaceborne experiments possible due to the high reflection efficiencies, spectral resolution, and long-term stabilities of the proposed multilayer coatings. In the spectral range λ=13  nm, Mo/Be multilayer mirrors were shown to demonstrate a better ratio of reflection efficiency and spectral resolution compared with the commonly used Mo/Si. In the spectral range λ=17-21  nm, a new multilayer structure Al/Si was proposed, which had higher spectral resolution along with comparable reflection efficiency compared with the commonly used Al/Zr multilayer structures. In the spectral range λ=30  nm, the Si/B4C/Mg/Cr multilayer structure turned out to best obey reflection efficiency and long-term stability. The B4C and Cr layers prevented mutual diffusion of the Si and Mg layers. For the spectral range λ=58  nm, a new multilayer Mo/Mg-based structure was developed; its reflection efficiency and long-term stability have been analyzed. We also investigated intrinsic stresses inherent for most of the multilayer structures and proposed possibilities for stress elimination.

  9. Advanced materials for multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet solar astronomy.

    PubMed

    Bogachev, S A; Chkhalo, N I; Kuzin, S V; Pariev, D E; Polkovnikov, V N; Salashchenko, N N; Shestov, S V; Zuev, S Y

    2016-03-20

    We provide an analysis of contemporary multilayer optics for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) solar astronomy in the wavelength ranges: λ=12.9-13.3  nm, λ=17-21  nm, λ=28-33  nm, and λ=58.4  nm. We found new material pairs, which will make new spaceborne experiments possible due to the high reflection efficiencies, spectral resolution, and long-term stabilities of the proposed multilayer coatings. In the spectral range λ=13  nm, Mo/Be multilayer mirrors were shown to demonstrate a better ratio of reflection efficiency and spectral resolution compared with the commonly used Mo/Si. In the spectral range λ=17-21  nm, a new multilayer structure Al/Si was proposed, which had higher spectral resolution along with comparable reflection efficiency compared with the commonly used Al/Zr multilayer structures. In the spectral range λ=30  nm, the Si/B4C/Mg/Cr multilayer structure turned out to best obey reflection efficiency and long-term stability. The B4C and Cr layers prevented mutual diffusion of the Si and Mg layers. For the spectral range λ=58  nm, a new multilayer Mo/Mg-based structure was developed; its reflection efficiency and long-term stability have been analyzed. We also investigated intrinsic stresses inherent for most of the multilayer structures and proposed possibilities for stress elimination. PMID:27140543

  10. Development of processing procedures for advanced silicon solar cells. [antireflection coatings and short circuit currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.; Stella, P. M.; Avery, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Ten ohm-cm silicon solar cells, 0.2 mm thick, were produced with short circuit current efficiencies up to thirteen percent and using a combination of recent technical advances. The cells were fabricated in conventional and wraparound contact configurations. Improvement in cell collection efficiency from both the short and long wavelengths region of the solar spectrum was obtained by coupling a shallow junction and an optically transparent antireflection coating with back surface field technology. Both boron diffusion and aluminum alloying techniques were evaluated for forming back surface field cells. The latter method is less complicated and is compatible with wraparound cell processing.

  11. Advances in graphene-based semiconductor photocatalysts for solar energy conversion: fundamentals and materials engineering.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiuqiang; Kretschmer, Katja; Wang, Guoxiu

    2015-08-28

    Graphene-based semiconductor photocatalysis has been regarded as a promising technology for solar energy storage and conversion. In this review, we summarized recent developments of graphene-based photocatalysts, including preparation of graphene-based photocatalysts, typical key advances in the understanding of graphene functions for photocatalytic activity enhancement and methodologies to regulate the electron transfer efficiency in graphene-based composite photocatalysts, by which we hope to offer enriched information to harvest the utmost fascinating properties of graphene as a platform to construct efficient graphene-based composite photocatalysts for solar-to-energy conversion.

  12. Advances in thin-film solar cells for lightweight space photovoltaic power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1989-01-01

    The present stature and current research directions of photovoltaic arrays as primary power systems for space are reviewed. There have recently been great advances in the technology of thin-film solar cells for terrestrial applications. In a thin-film solar cell the thickness of the active element is only a few microns; transfer of this technology to space arrays could result in ultralow-weight solar arrays with potentially large gains in specific power. Recent advances in thin-film solar cells are reviewed, including polycrystalline copper-indium selenide (CuInSe2) and related I-III-VI2 compounds, polycrystalline cadmium telluride and related II-VI compounds, and amorphous silicon:hydrogen and alloys. The best experimental efficiency on thin-film solar cells to date is 12 percent AMO for CuIn Se2. This efficiency is likely to be increased in the next few years. The radiation tolerance of thin-film materials is far greater than that of single-crystal materials. CuIn Se2 shows no degradation when exposed to 1 MeV electrons. Experimental evidence also suggests that most of all of the radiation damage on thin-films can be removed by a low temperature anneal. The possibility of thin-film multibandgap cascade solar cells is discussed, including the tradeoffs between monolithic and mechanically stacked cells. The best current efficiency for a cascade is 12.5 percent AMO for an amorphous silicon on CuInSe2 multibandgap combination. Higher efficiencies are expected in the future. For several missions, including solar-electric propulsion, a manned Mars mission, and lunar exploration and manufacturing, thin-film photovolatic arrays may be a mission-enabling technology.

  13. Newman Unit 1 advanced solar repowering advanced conceptual design. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1982-04-01

    The Newman Unit 1 solar repowering design is a water/steam central receiver concept supplying superheated steam. The work reported is to develop a refined baseline conceptual design that has potential for construction and operation by 1986, makes use of existing solar thermal technology, and provides the best economics for this application. Trade studies performed in the design effort are described, both for the conceptual design of the overall system and for the subsystem conceptual design. System-level functional requirements, design, operation, performance, cost, safety, environmental, institutional, and regulatory considerations are described. Subsystems described include the collector, receiver, fossil energy, electrical power generating, and master control subsystems, site and site facilities. The conceptual design, cost, and performance of each subsystem is discussed at length. A detailed economic analysis of the repowered unit is made to realistically assess the economics of the first repowered unit using present cost data for a limited production level for solar hardware. Finally, a development plan is given, including the design, procurement, construction, checkout, startup, performance validation, and commercial operation. (LEW)

  14. Performance of High-Efficiency Advanced Triple-Junction Solar Panels for the LILT Mission Dawn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatemi, Navid S.; Sharma, Surya; Buitrago, Oscar; Sharps, Paul R.; Blok, Ron; Kroon, Martin; Jalink, Cees; Harris, Robin; Stella, Paul; Distefano, Sal

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Discovery Mission Dawn is designed to (LILT) conditions. operate within the solar system's Asteroid belt, where the large distance from the sun creates a low-intensity, low-temperature (LILT) condition. To meet the mission power requirements under LlLT conditions, very high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells were selected to power the spacecraft to be built by Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC) under contract with JPL. Emcore's InGaP/InGaAs/Ge advanced triple-junction (ATJ) solar cells, exhibiting an average air mass zero (AMO) efficiency of greater than 27.6% (one-sun, 28 C), were used to populate the solar panels [1]. The two solar array wings, to be built by Dutch Space, with 5 large- area panels each (total area of 36.4 sq. meters) are projected to produce between 10.3 kWe and 1.3 kWe of end-of life (EOL) power in the 1.0 to 3.0 AU range, respectively. The details of the solar panel design, testing and power analysis are presented.

  15. Internal Dynamics of a Twin-layer Solar Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2016-07-01

    Modern observations revealed rich dynamics within solar prominences. The globally stable quiescent prominences, characterized by the presence of thin vertical threads and falling knobs, are frequently invaded by small rising dark plumes. These dynamic phenomena are related to magnetic Rayleigh–Taylor instability, since prominence matter, 100 times denser than surrounding coronal plasma, is lifted against gravity by weak magnetic field. To get a deeper understanding of the physics behind these phenomena, we use three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations to investigate the nonlinear magnetoconvective motions in a twin-layer prominence in a macroscopic model from chromospheric layers up to 30 Mm height. The properties of simulated falling “fingers” and uprising bubbles are consistent with those in observed vertical threads and rising plumes in quiescent prominences. Both sheets of the twin-layer prominence show a strongly coherent evolution due to their magnetic connectivity, and demonstrate collective kink deformation. Our model suggests that the vertical threads of the prominence as seen in an edge-on view, and the apparent horizontal threads of the filament when seen top-down are different appearances of the same structures. Synthetic images of the modeled twin-layer prominence reflect the strong degree of mixing established over the entire prominence structure, in agreement with the observations.

  16. Internal Dynamics of a Twin-layer Solar Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2016-07-01

    Modern observations revealed rich dynamics within solar prominences. The globally stable quiescent prominences, characterized by the presence of thin vertical threads and falling knobs, are frequently invaded by small rising dark plumes. These dynamic phenomena are related to magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability, since prominence matter, 100 times denser than surrounding coronal plasma, is lifted against gravity by weak magnetic field. To get a deeper understanding of the physics behind these phenomena, we use three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations to investigate the nonlinear magnetoconvective motions in a twin-layer prominence in a macroscopic model from chromospheric layers up to 30 Mm height. The properties of simulated falling “fingers” and uprising bubbles are consistent with those in observed vertical threads and rising plumes in quiescent prominences. Both sheets of the twin-layer prominence show a strongly coherent evolution due to their magnetic connectivity, and demonstrate collective kink deformation. Our model suggests that the vertical threads of the prominence as seen in an edge-on view, and the apparent horizontal threads of the filament when seen top-down are different appearances of the same structures. Synthetic images of the modeled twin-layer prominence reflect the strong degree of mixing established over the entire prominence structure, in agreement with the observations.

  17. Dynamic Event Tree advancements and control logic improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Mandelli, Diego; Sen, Ramazan Sonat; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph

    2015-09-01

    The RAVEN code has been under development at the Idaho National Laboratory since 2012. Its main goal is to create a multi-purpose platform for the deploying of all the capabilities needed for Probabilistic Risk Assessment, uncertainty quantification, data mining analysis and optimization studies. RAVEN is currently equipped with three different sampling categories: Forward samplers (Monte Carlo, Latin Hyper Cube, Stratified, Grid Sampler, Factorials, etc.), Adaptive Samplers (Limit Surface search, Adaptive Polynomial Chaos, etc.) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) samplers (Deterministic and Adaptive Dynamic Event Trees). The main subject of this document is to report the activities that have been done in order to: start the migration of the RAVEN/RELAP-7 control logic system into MOOSE, and develop advanced dynamic sampling capabilities based on the Dynamic Event Tree approach. In order to provide to all MOOSE-based applications a control logic capability, in this Fiscal Year an initial migration activity has been initiated, moving the control logic system, designed for RELAP-7 by the RAVEN team, into the MOOSE framework. In this document, a brief explanation of what has been done is going to be reported. The second and most important subject of this report is about the development of a Dynamic Event Tree (DET) sampler named “Hybrid Dynamic Event Tree” (HDET) and its Adaptive variant “Adaptive Hybrid Dynamic Event Tree” (AHDET). As other authors have already reported, among the different types of uncertainties, it is possible to discern two principle types: aleatory and epistemic uncertainties. The classical Dynamic Event Tree is in charge of treating the first class (aleatory) uncertainties; the dependence of the probabilistic risk assessment and analysis on the epistemic uncertainties are treated by an initial Monte Carlo sampling (MCDET). From each Monte Carlo sample, a DET analysis is run (in total, N trees). The Monte Carlo employs a pre-sampling of the

  18. Prediction of gear wear for the estimation of solar array drive dynamic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatikhin, V. Ye.; Semenov, L. P.; Khoroshilov, V. S.; Popel', V. M.; Kostenko, G. A.

    We describe the dynamic behavior of the solar array gears installed on the long-life spacecraft. Impact of the time-dependant deterioration of gearing accuracy caused by the operational wear on the driver's dynamic performance is analysed. The necessity of taking into account the time-dependant deterioration of the gearing accuracy for the estimation of the solar array drive dynamic performance is justified.

  19. AUTOMATIC DETECTION ALGORITHM OF DYNAMIC PRESSURE PULSES IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Pingbing; Feng, Xueshang; Wang, Yi; Xie, Yanqiong; Li, Huijun; Xu, Xiaojun E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2015-04-20

    Dynamic pressure pulses (DPPs) in the solar wind are a significant phenomenon closely related to the solar-terrestrial connection and physical processes of solar wind dynamics. In order to automatically identify DPPs from solar wind measurements, we develop a procedure with a three-step detection algorithm that is able to rapidly select DPPs from the plasma data stream and simultaneously define the transition region where large dynamic pressure variations occur and demarcate the upstream and downstream region by selecting the relatively quiet status before and after the abrupt change in dynamic pressure. To demonstrate the usefulness, efficiency, and accuracy of this procedure, we have applied it to the Wind observations from 1996 to 2008 by successfully obtaining the DPPs. The procedure can also be applied to other solar wind spacecraft observation data sets with different time resolutions.

  20. THE DYNAMICS OF DUST GRAINS IN THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R. E-mail: rrr@astro.princeton.ed

    2010-11-10

    We study the dynamics of large dust grains {approx}>1 {mu}m with orbits outside of the heliosphere (beyond 250 AU). Motion of the solar system through the interstellar medium (ISM) at a velocity of 26 km s{sup -1} subjects these particles to gas and Coulomb drag (grains are expected to be photoelectrically charged) as well as the Lorentz force and the electric force caused by the induction electric field. We show that to zeroth order the combined effect of these forces can be well described in the framework of the classical Stark problem: particle motion in a Keplerian potential subject to an additional constant force. Based on this analogy, we elucidate the circumstances in which the motion becomes unbound, and show that under local ISM conditions dust grains smaller than {approx}100 {mu}m originating in the Oort Cloud (e.g., in collisions of comets) beyond 10{sup 4} AU are ejected from the solar system under the action of the electric force. Orbital motion of larger, bound grains is described analytically using the orbit-averaged Hamiltonian approach and consists of orbital plane precession at a fixed semimajor axis, accompanied by the periodic variations of the inclination and eccentricity (the latter may approach unity in some cases). A more detailed analysis of the combined effect of gas and Coulomb drag shows it is possible to reduce particle semimajor axes, but that the degree of orbital decay is limited (a factor of several at best) by passages through atomic and molecular clouds, which easily eject small particles.

  1. Solar Dynamics Observatory High Gain Antenna Handover Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashmall, Joseph A.; Mann, Laurie

    2007-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is planned to launch in early 2009 as a mission to study the solar variability and its impact on Earth. To best satisfy its science goal, SDO will fly in a geosynchronous orbit with an inclination of approximately 29 deg. The spacecraft attitude is designed so that the science instruments point directly at the Sun with high accuracy. One of SDO s principal requirements is to obtain long periods of uninterrupted observations. The observations have an extremely high data volume so SDO must be in continuous contact with the ground during the observation periods. To maintain this contact, SDO is equipped with a pair of high gain antennas (HGAs) transmitting to a pair of ground antennas at the SDO ground station (SDOGS) located in White Sands, New Mexico. Either HGA can transmit to either SDOGS antenna. Neither HGA can be powered down. During a portion of each year, each of the HGA beams will intersect with the SDO body for a portion of the orbit. The original SDO antenna contact plan used each HGA for the half of each year during which its beam would not intersect the spacecraft. No data would be lost except, possibly, when switching from one antenna to another. After this plan was adopted, further analysis showed that daily handovers would be necessary for significant periods of the year. This unexpected need for extensive handovers necessitated that a handover design be developed to minimize the impact on the mission. This antenna handover design was developed and successfully tested with simulated data using the slew rate limits from preliminary jitter analysis. Subsequent analysis provided significant revision of allowed rates requiring modification of the handover plans.

  2. Solar Dynamics Observatory High Gain Antenna Handover Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashmall, Joseph A.; Mann, Laurie

    2007-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is planned to launch in early 2009 as a mission to study the solar variability and its impact on Earth. To best satisfy its science goal, SDO will fly in a geosynchronous orbit with an inclination of approximately 29 deg. The spacecraft attitude is designed so that the science instruments point directly at the Sun with high accuracy. One of SDO's principal requirements is to obtain long periods of uninterrupted observations. The observations have an extremely high data volume so SDO must be in continuous contact with the ground during the observation periods. To maintain this contact, SDO is equipped with a pair of high gain antennas (HGAs) transmitting to a pair of ground antennas at the SDO ground station (SDOGS) located in White Sands, New Mexico. Either HGA can transmit to either SDOGS antenna. Neither HGA can be powered down. During a portion of each year, each of the HGA beams will intersect with the SDO body for a portion of the orbit. The original SDO antenna contact plan used each HGA for the half of each year during which its beam would not intersect the spacecraft. No data would be lost except, possibly, when switching from one antenna to another. After this plan was adopted, further analysis showed that daily handovers would be necessary for significant periods of the year. This unexpected need for extensive handovers necessitated that a handover design be developed to minimize the impact on the mission. This antenna handover design was developed and successfully tested with simulated data using the slew rate limits from preliminary jitter analysis. Subsequent analysis provided significant revision of allowed rates requiring modification of the handover plans.

  3. Recent advances in dynamic m6A RNA modification.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guangchao; Li, Hua-Bing; Yin, Zhinan; Flavell, Richard A

    2016-04-01

    The identification of m(6)A demethylases and high-throughput sequencing analysis of methylated transcriptome corroborated m(6)A RNA epigenetic modification as a dynamic regulation process, and reignited its investigation in the past few years. Many basic concepts of cytogenetics have been revolutionized by the growing understanding of the fundamental role of m(6)A in RNA splicing, degradation and translation. In this review, we summarize typical features of methylated transcriptome in mammals, and highlight the 'writers', 'erasers' and 'readers' of m(6)A RNA modification. Moreover, we emphasize recent advances of biological functions of m(6)A and conceive the possible roles of m(6)A in the regulation of immune response and related diseases. PMID:27249342

  4. Recent advances in dynamic m6A RNA modification

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Guangchao; Yin, Zhinan

    2016-01-01

    The identification of m6A demethylases and high-throughput sequencing analysis of methylated transcriptome corroborated m6A RNA epigenetic modification as a dynamic regulation process, and reignited its investigation in the past few years. Many basic concepts of cytogenetics have been revolutionized by the growing understanding of the fundamental role of m6A in RNA splicing, degradation and translation. In this review, we summarize typical features of methylated transcriptome in mammals, and highlight the ‘writers’, ‘erasers’ and ‘readers’ of m6A RNA modification. Moreover, we emphasize recent advances of biological functions of m6A and conceive the possible roles of m6A in the regulation of immune response and related diseases. PMID:27249342

  5. Advances in solar cooking: Proceedings of the first world conference on solar cooking

    SciTech Connect

    Pejack, E.

    1992-12-31

    Population growth and resource depletion have led to a need for new sources of cooking fuel in developing countries. Many poor villagers spend half of their time, or half of their income obtaining cooking fuel. Solar cooking can meet the needs of many of these people. People from eighteen countries met at this world conference to share experiences with design and performance of cookers, food, nutrition and health issues, and information dissemination strategies. A total of 27 individual papers were indexed separately for the data base.

  6. Advances in solar energy: An annual review of research and development. Volume 7

    SciTech Connect

    Boeer, K.W.

    1992-01-01

    In Volume 7 of the Advances in Solar Energy we have targeted the research and development under the leadership of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). This Laboratory is in an excellent position to judge the present state of the art and to review the advances made in variety of solar energy fields over the last two decades. Based on the NREL experience, the Laboratory also has been periodically involved in developing a more realistic forecast, and we felt, in deviation from our previous policy of reporting strictly reviews, that we should encourage NREL to update its latest forecast and to include it in the appropriate chapters. This forecast will be of great value to assess the presently visualized potential of solar energy conversion, and to place it more fairly in competition with other energy options. We must now review solar energy conversion in a global picture. The development of the field has progressed in rather distinct steps: the first major effort began in the mid fifties, when it became clear that current resources in fossil fuels are limited. About twenty years later, the next step was initiated by political motivation, to counteract the Middle-East-induced oil crisis. Again twenty years later, a new a even stronger motivation now requires further acceleration of research, development, demonstration, and commercialization of a mix of promising solar energy conversion means. This new driving force relates to the rapid growth of the world's ppopulation, its demand to live at a higher standard, hence requiring more energy, and the limited volume available on the planet Earth to dump the opulation's waste products. Most critical, and related to energy, is the CO[sub 2]-induced global warming and the disposal of nuclear waste. This requires an all-out effort and a delicate maneuvering to avoid political, economic, and ecological catastrophies.

  7. Structure and Dynamics of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang; Wagner, William J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The grant supported research on the structure of the quiet, nonmagnetic chromosphere and on wave excitation and propagation in both the nonmagnetic chromosphere and the magnetic network. The work on the structure of the chromosphere culminated in the recognition that between two competing views of the solar chromosphere, older models by Avrett and collaborators (referred to as VAL) and the newer, dynamical model by Carlsson & Stein (referred to as CS), the clear decision is in favor of the older models, and this in spite of the evident lack of physics, which does not include wave motion and oscillations. The contrast between the static VAL models and the dynamical CS model can be stated most succinctly by comparing the temperature variation implied by the VAL models and the temperature fluctuations of the CS model, which are, respectively, of the order of 10% for the VAL model (at heights where hydrogen is 50% ionized) and a factor of 10 (at the upper boundary of their chromospheric model). The huge fluctuations of the CS model have never been observed, whereas the smaller temperature variations of the VAL models are consistent with ground-based and space-based observations. While it should be obvious which model describes the Sun and which one fails, the case is far from settled in the minds of solar physicists. Thus, much educational work remains to be done and, of course, more research to develop arguments that make the case more convincing. The research on waves and oscillations has been based on a unified theory of excitation of acoustic waves in the field-free atmosphere and of transverse and longitudinal waves in magnetic flux tubes located in the magnetic network by noting, first, that impulsive excitation of all these waves in gravitationally stratified media leads to oscillations at the respective cutoff frequencies and, second, that the observed oscillation frequencies in the nonmagnetic and magnetic parts of the chromosphere match corresponding cutoff

  8. Solar Dynamics Observatory Guidance, Navigation, and Control System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgenstern, Wendy M.; Bourkland, Kristin L.; Hsu, Oscar C.; Liu, Kuo-Chia; Mason, Paul A. C.; O'Donnell, James R., Jr.; Russo, Angela M.; Starin, Scott R.; Vess, Melissa F.

    2011-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) was designed and built at the Goddard Space Flight Center, launched from Cape Canaveral on February 11, 2010, and reached its final geosynchronous science orbit on March 16, 2010. The purpose of SDO is to observe the Sun and continuously relay data to a dedicated ground station. SDO remains Sun-pointing throughout most of its mission for the instruments to take measurements of the Sun. The SDO attitude control system (ACS) is a single-fault tolerant design. Its fully redundant attitude sensor complement includes sixteen coarse Sun sensors (CSSs), a digital Sun sensor (DSS), three two-axis inertial reference units (IRUs), and two star trackers (STs). The ACS also makes use of the four guide telescopes included as a part of one of the science instruments. Attitude actuation is performed using four reaction wheels assemblies (RWAs) and eight thrusters, with a single main engine used to provide velocity-change thrust for orbit raising. The attitude control software has five nominal control modes, three wheel-based modes and two thruster-based modes. A wheel-based Safehold running in the attitude control electronics box improves the robustness of the system as a whole. All six modes are designed on the same basic proportional-integral-derivative attitude error structure, with more robust modes setting their integral gains to zero. This paper details the final overall design of the SDO guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) system and how it was used in practice during SDO launch, commissioning, and nominal operations. This overview will include the ACS control modes, attitude determination and sensor calibration, the high gain antenna (HGA) calibration, and jitter mitigation operation. The Solar Dynamics Observatory mission is part of the NASA Living With a Star program, which seeks to understand the changing Sun and its effects on the Solar System, life, and society. To this end, the SDO spacecraft carries three Sun

  9. Dynamical evolution of small bodies in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.

    2012-05-01

    This thesis explores the dynamical evolution of small bodies in the Solar System. It focuses on the asteroid population but parts of the theory can be applied to other systems such as comets or Kuiper Belt objects. Small is a relative term that refers to bodies whose dynamics can be significantly perturbed by non-gravitational forces and tidal torques on timescales less than their lifetimes (for instance the collisional timescale in the Main Belt asteroid population or the sun impact timescale for the near-Earth asteroid population). Non-gravitational torques such as the YORP effect can result in the active endogenous evolution of asteroid systems; something that was not considered more than twenty years ago. This thesis is divided into three independent studies. The first explores the dynamics of a binary systems immediately after formation from rotational fission. The rotational fission hypothesis states that a rotationally torqued asteroid will fission when the centrifugal accelerations across the body exceed gravitational attraction. Asteroids must have very little or no tensile strength for this to occur, and are often referred to as "rubble piles.'' A more complete description of the hypothesis and the ensuing dynamics is provided there. From that study a framework of asteroid evolution is assembled. It is determined that mass ratio is the most important factor for determining the outcome of a rotational fission event. Each observed binary morphology is tied to this evolutionary schema and the relevant timescales are assessed. In the second study, the role of non-gravitational and tidal torques in binary asteroid systems is explored. Understanding the competition between tides and the YORP effect provides insight into the relative abundances of the different binary morphologies and the effect of planetary flybys. The interplay between tides and the BYORP effect creates dramatic evolutionary pathways that lead to interesting end states including stranded

  10. Contrast enhancing and adjusting advanced very high resolution radiometer scenes for solar illumination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zokaites, David M.

    1993-01-01

    The AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) satellite sensors provide daily coverage of the entire Earth. As a result, individual scenes cover broad geographic areas (roughly 3000 km by 5000 km) and can contain varying levels of solar illumination. Mosaics of AVHRR scenes can be created for large (continental and global) study areas. As the north-south extent of such mosaics increases, the lightness variability within the mosaic increases. AVHRR channels one and two of multiple daytime scenes were histogrammed to find a relationship between solar zenith and scene lightness as described by brightness value distribution. This relationship was used to determine look-up tables (luts) which removed effects of varying solar illumination. These luts were combined with a contrast enhancing lut and stored online. For individual scenes, one precomputed composite lut was applied to the entire scene based on the solar zenith at scene center. For mosaicked scenes, each pixel was adjusted based on the solar zenith at that pixel location. These procedures reduce lightness variability within and between scenes and enhance scene contrast to provide visually pleasing imagery.

  11. Badhwar-O'Neil 2007 Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) Model Using Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) Measurements for Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONeill, P. M.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite measurements of the galactic cosmic ray flux and correlation with the Climax Neutron Monitor count over Solar Cycle 23 are used to update the Badhwar O'Neill Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) model.

  12. The effect of the low Earth orbit environment on space solar cells: Results of the Advanced Photovoltaic Experiment (S0014)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinker, David J.; Hickey, John R.; Scheiman, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The results of post-flight performance testing of the solar cells flown on the Advanced Photovoltaic Experiment are reported. Comparison of post-flight current-voltage characteristics with similar pre-flight data revealed little or no change in solar cell conversion efficiency, confirming the reliability and endurance of space photovoltaic cells. This finding is in agreement with the lack of significant physical changes in the solar cells despite nearly six years in the low Earth orbit environment.

  13. Numerical model of solar dynamic radiator for parametric analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer L.

    1989-01-01

    Growth power requirements for Space Station Freedom will be met through addition of 25 kW solar dynamic (SD) power modules. The SD module rejects waste heat from the power conversion cycle to space through a pumped-loop, multi-panel, deployable radiator. The baseline radiator configuration was defined during the Space Station conceptual design phase and is a function of the state point and heat rejection requirements of the power conversion unit. Requirements determined by the overall station design such as mass, system redundancy, micrometeoroid and space debris impact survivability, launch packaging, costs, and thermal and structural interaction with other station components have also been design drivers for the radiator configuration. Extensive thermal and power cycle modeling capabilities have been developed which are powerful tools in Station design and analysis, but which prove cumbersome and costly for simple component preliminary design studies. In order to aid in refining the SD radiator to the mature design stage, a simple and flexible numerical model was developed. The model simulates heat transfer and fluid flow performance of the radiator and calculates area mass and impact survivability for many combinations of flow tube and panel configurations, fluid and material properties, and environmental and cycle variations. A brief description and discussion of the numerical model, it's capabilities and limitations, and results of the parametric studies performed is presented.

  14. SUPERGRANULES AS PROBES OF SOLAR CONVECTION ZONE DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Hathaway, David H.

    2012-04-10

    Supergranules are convection cells seen at the Sun's surface as a space filling pattern of horizontal flows. While typical supergranules have diameters of about 35 Mm, they exhibit a broad spectrum of sizes from {approx}10 Mm to {approx}100 Mm. Here we show that supergranules of different sizes can be used to probe the rotation rate in the Sun's outer convection zone. We find that the equatorial rotation rate as a function of depth as measured by global helioseismology matches the equatorial rotation as a function of wavelength for the supergranules. This suggests that supergranules are advected by flows at depths equal to their wavelengths and thus can be used to probe flows at those depths. The supergranule rotation profiles show that the surface shear layer, through which the rotation rate increases inward, extends to depths of {approx}50 Mm and to latitudes of at least 70 Degree-Sign . Typical supergranules are well observed at high latitudes and have a range of sizes that extend to greater depths than those typically available for measuring subsurface flows with local helioseismology. These characteristics indicate that probing the solar convection zone dynamics with supergranules can complement the results of helioseismology.

  15. Attitude Control System Design for the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starin, Scott R.; Bourkland, Kristin L.; Kuo-Chia, Liu; Mason, Paul A. C.; Vess, Melissa F.; Andrews, Stephen F.; Morgenstern, Wendy M.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, part of the Living With a Star program, will place a geosynchronous satellite in orbit to observe the Sun and relay data to a dedicated ground station at all times. SDO remains Sun- pointing throughout most of its mission for the instruments to take measurements of the Sun. The SDO attitude control system is a single-fault tolerant design. Its fully redundant attitude sensor complement includes 16 coarse Sun sensors, a digital Sun sensor, 3 two-axis inertial reference units, 2 star trackers, and 4 guide telescopes. Attitude actuation is performed using 4 reaction wheels and 8 thrusters, and a single main engine nominally provides velocity-change thrust. The attitude control software has five nominal control modes-3 wheel-based modes and 2 thruster-based modes. A wheel-based Safehold running in the attitude control electronics box improves the robustness of the system as a whole. All six modes are designed on the same basic proportional-integral-derivative attitude error structure, with more robust modes setting their integral gains to zero. The paper details the mode designs and their uses.

  16. OFFSET - RAY TRACING OPTICAL ANALYSIS OF OFFSET SOLAR COLLECTOR FOR SPACE STATION SOLAR DYNAMIC POWER SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, K.

    1994-01-01

    OFFSET is a ray tracing computer code for optical analysis of a solar collector. The code models the flux distributions within the receiver cavity produced by reflections from the solar collector. It was developed to model the offset solar collector of the solar dynamic electric power system being developed for Space Station Freedom. OFFSET has been used to improve the understanding of the collector-receiver interface and to guide the efforts of NASA contractors also researching the optical components of the power system. The collector for Space Station Freedom consists of 19 hexagonal panels each containing 24 triangular, reflective facets. Current research is geared toward optimizing flux distribution inside the receiver via changes in collector design and receiver orientation. OFFSET offers many options for experimenting with the design of the system. The offset parabolic collector model configuration is determined by an input file of facet corner coordinates. The user may choose other configurations by changing this file, but to simulate collectors that have other than 19 groups of 24 triangular facets would require modification of the FORTRAN code. Each of the roughly 500 facets in the assembled collector may be independently aimed to smooth out, or tailor, the flux distribution on the receiver's wall. OFFSET simulates the effects of design changes such as in receiver aperture location, tilt angle, and collector facet contour. Unique features of OFFSET include: 1) equations developed to pseudo-randomly select ray originating sources on the Sun which appear evenly distributed and include solar limb darkening; 2) Cone-optics technique used to add surface specular error to the ray originating sources to determine the apparent ray sources of the reflected sun; 3) choice of facet reflective surface contour -- spherical, ideal parabolic, or toroidal; 4) Gaussian distributions of radial and tangential components of surface slope error added to the surface normals at

  17. Solar wind dynamic pressure and electric field as the main factors controlling Saturn's aurorae.

    PubMed

    Crary, F J; Clarke, J T; Dougherty, M K; Hanlon, P G; Hansen, K C; Steinberg, J T; Barraclough, B L; Coates, A J; Gérard, J-C; Grodent, D; Kurth, W S; Mitchell, D G; Rymer, A M; Young, D T

    2005-02-17

    The interaction of the solar wind with Earth's magnetosphere gives rise to the bright polar aurorae and to geomagnetic storms, but the relation between the solar wind and the dynamics of the outer planets' magnetospheres is poorly understood. Jupiter's magnetospheric dynamics and aurorae are dominated by processes internal to the jovian system, whereas Saturn's magnetosphere has generally been considered to have both internal and solar-wind-driven processes. This hypothesis, however, is tentative because of limited simultaneous solar wind and magnetospheric measurements. Here we report solar wind measurements, immediately upstream of Saturn, over a one-month period. When combined with simultaneous ultraviolet imaging we find that, unlike Jupiter, Saturn's aurorae respond strongly to solar wind conditions. But in contrast to Earth, the main controlling factor appears to be solar wind dynamic pressure and electric field, with the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field playing a much more limited role. Saturn's magnetosphere is, therefore, strongly driven by the solar wind, but the solar wind conditions that drive it differ from those that drive the Earth's magnetosphere. PMID:15716946

  18. Solar wind dynamic pressure and electric field as the main factors controlling Saturn's aurorae.

    PubMed

    Crary, F J; Clarke, J T; Dougherty, M K; Hanlon, P G; Hansen, K C; Steinberg, J T; Barraclough, B L; Coates, A J; Gérard, J-C; Grodent, D; Kurth, W S; Mitchell, D G; Rymer, A M; Young, D T

    2005-02-17

    The interaction of the solar wind with Earth's magnetosphere gives rise to the bright polar aurorae and to geomagnetic storms, but the relation between the solar wind and the dynamics of the outer planets' magnetospheres is poorly understood. Jupiter's magnetospheric dynamics and aurorae are dominated by processes internal to the jovian system, whereas Saturn's magnetosphere has generally been considered to have both internal and solar-wind-driven processes. This hypothesis, however, is tentative because of limited simultaneous solar wind and magnetospheric measurements. Here we report solar wind measurements, immediately upstream of Saturn, over a one-month period. When combined with simultaneous ultraviolet imaging we find that, unlike Jupiter, Saturn's aurorae respond strongly to solar wind conditions. But in contrast to Earth, the main controlling factor appears to be solar wind dynamic pressure and electric field, with the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field playing a much more limited role. Saturn's magnetosphere is, therefore, strongly driven by the solar wind, but the solar wind conditions that drive it differ from those that drive the Earth's magnetosphere.

  19. 2 kWe Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration Project. Volume 3; Fabrication and Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Dennis

    1997-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration (SDGTD) project has successfully designed and fabricated a complete solar-powered closed Brayton electrical power generation system and tested it in a relevant thermal vacuum facility at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). In addition to completing technical objectives, the project was completed 3-l/2 months early, and under budget.

  20. Advanced data assimilation in strongly nonlinear dynamical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert N.; Ghil, Michael; Gauthiez, Francois

    1994-01-01

    Advanced data assimilation methods are applied to simple but highly nonlinear problems. The dynamical systems studied here are the stochastically forced double well and the Lorenz model. In both systems, linear approximation of the dynamics about the critical points near which regime transitions occur is not always sufficient to track their occurrence or nonoccurrence. Straightforward application of the extended Kalman filter yields mixed results. The ability of the extended Kalman filter to track transitions of the double-well system from one stable critical point to the other depends on the frequency and accuracy of the observations relative to the mean-square amplitude of the stochastic forcing. The ability of the filter to track the chaotic trajectories of the Lorenz model is limited to short times, as is the ability of strong-constraint variational methods. Examples are given to illustrate the difficulties involved, and qualitative explanations for these difficulties are provided. Three generalizations of the extended Kalman filter are described. The first is based on inspection of the innovation sequence, that is, the successive differences between observations and forecasts; it works very well for the double-well problem. The second, an extension to fourth-order moments, yields excellent results for the Lorenz model but will be unwieldy when applied to models with high-dimensional state spaces. A third, more practical method--based on an empirical statistical model derived from a Monte Carlo simulation--is formulated, and shown to work very well. Weak-constraint methods can be made to perform satisfactorily in the context of these simple models, but such methods do not seem to generalize easily to practical models of the atmosphere and ocean. In particular, it is shown that the equations derived in the weak variational formulation are difficult to solve conveniently for large systems.

  1. Ground System for Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tann, Hun K.; Silva, Christopher J.; Pages, Raymond J.

    2005-01-01

    NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has recently completed its Critical Design Review (CDR) of a new dual Ka and S-band ground system for the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Mission. SDO, the flagship mission under the new Living with a Star Program Office, is one of GSFC s most recent large-scale in-house missions. The observatory is scheduled for launch in August 2008 from the Kennedy Space Center aboard an Atlas-5 expendable launch vehicle. Unique to this mission is an extremely challenging science data capture requirement. The mission is required to capture 99.99% of available science over 95% of all observation opportunities. Due to the continuous, high volume (150 Mbps) science data rate, no on-board storage of science data will be implemented on this mission. With the observatory placed in a geo-synchronous orbit at 36,000 kilometers within view of dedicated ground stations, the ground system will in effect implement a "real-time" science data pipeline with appropriate data accounting, data storage, data distribution, data recovery, and automated system failure detection and correction to keep the science data flowing continuously to three separate Science Operations Centers (SOCs). Data storage rates of approx. 45 Tera-bytes per month are expected. The Mission Operations Center (MOC) will be based at GSFC and is designed to be highly automated. Three SOCs will share in the observatory operations, each operating their own instrument. Remote operations of a multi-antenna ground station in White Sands, New Mexico from the MOC is part of the design baseline.

  2. INSIGHTS INTO FILAMENT ERUPTION ONSET FROM SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Freeland, Samuel L. E-mail: ron.moore@nasa.gov

    2011-04-10

    We examine the buildup to and onset of an active region filament confined eruption of 2010 May 12, using EUV imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Array and line-of-sight magnetic data from the SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. Over the hour preceding eruption the filament undergoes a slow rise averaging {approx}3 km s{sup -1}, with a step-like trajectory. Accompanying a final rise step {approx}20 minutes prior to eruption is a transient preflare brightening, occurring on loops rooted near the site where magnetic field had canceled over the previous 20 hr. Flow-type motions of the filament are relatively smooth with speeds {approx}50 km s{sup -1} prior to the preflare brightening and appear more helical, with speeds {approx}50-100 km s{sup -1}, after that brightening. After a final plateau in the filament's rise, its rapid eruption begins, and concurrently an outer shell 'cocoon' of the filament material increases in emission in hot EUV lines, consistent with heating in a newly formed magnetic flux rope. The main flare brightenings start {approx}5 minutes after eruption onset. The main flare arcade begins between the legs of an envelope-arcade loop that is nearly orthogonal to the filament, suggesting that the flare results from reconnection among the legs of that loop. This progress of events is broadly consistent with flux cancellation leading to formation of a helical flux rope that subsequently erupts due to onset of a magnetic instability and/or runaway tether cutting.

  3. Overview of Solar Seismology: Oscillations as Probes of Internal Structure and Dynamics in the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomre, J.

    1984-01-01

    The physical nature of solar oscillations is reviewed. The nomenclature of the subject and the techniques used to interpret the oscillations are discussed. Many of the acoustic and gravity waves that can be observed in the atmosphere of the Sun are actually resonant or standing modes of the interior; precise measurements of the frequencies of such modes allow deductions of the internal structure and dynamics of this star. The scientific objectives of such studies of solar seismic disturbances, or of solar seismology, are outlined. The reasons why it would be very beneficial to carry out further observations of solar oscillations both from ground based networks and from space will be discussed.

  4. Advanced Research Deposition System (ARDS) for processing CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barricklow, Keegan Corey

    CdTe solar cells have been commercialized at the Gigawatt/year level. The development of volume manufacturing processes for next generation CdTe photovoltaics (PV) with higher efficiencies requires research systems with flexibility, scalability, repeatability and automation. The Advanced Research Deposition Systems (ARDS) developed by the Materials Engineering Laboratory (MEL) provides such a platform for the investigation of materials and manufacturing processes necessary to produce the next generation of CdTe PV. Limited by previous research systems, the ARDS was developed to provide process and hardware flexibility, accommodating advanced processing techniques, and capable of producing device quality films. The ARDS is a unique, in-line process tool with nine processing stations. The system was designed, built and assembled at the Materials Engineering Laboratory. Final assembly, startup, characterization and process development are the focus of this research. Many technical challenges encountered during the startup of the ARDS were addressed in this research. In this study, several hardware modifications needed for the reliable operation of the ARDS were designed, constructed and successfully incorporated into the ARDS. The effect of process condition on film properties for each process step was quantified. Process development to achieve 12% efficient baseline solar cell required investigation of discrete processing steps, troubleshooting process variation, and developing performance correlations. Subsequent to this research, many advances have been demonstrated with the ARDS. The ARDS consistently produces devices of 12% +/-.5% by the process of record (POR). The champion cell produced to date utilizing the ARDS has an efficiency of 16.2% on low cost commercial sodalime glass and utilizes advanced films. The ARDS has enabled investigation of advanced concepts for processing CdTe devices including, Plasma Cleaning, Plasma Enhanced Closed Space Sublimation

  5. Initial results from the Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) project at NASA Lewis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Boyle, Robert V.

    1995-01-01

    A government/industry team designed, built, and tested a 2 kWe solar dynamic space power system in a large thermal/vacuum facility with a simulated sun at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The Lewis facility provides an accurate simulation of temperatures, high vacuum, and solar flux as encountered in low earth orbit. This paper reviews the goals and status of the Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) program and describes the initial testing, including both operational and performance data. This SD technology has the potential as a future power source for the International Space Station Alpha.

  6. Advancements of the Lightweight Integrated Solar Array and Transceiver (LISA-T) Small Spacecraft System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Tiffany; Martinez, Armando; Boyd, Darren; SanSoucie, Michael; Farmer, Brandon; Schneider, Todd; Fabisinski, Leo; Johnson, Les; Carr, John A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes recent advancements of the Lightweight Integrated Solar Array and Transceiver (LISA-T) currently being developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The LISA-T array comprises a launch stowed, orbit deployed structure on which thin-film photovoltaic (PV) and antenna devices are embedded. The system provides significant electrical power generation at low weights, high stowage efficiency, and without the need for solar tracking. Leveraging high-volume terrestrial-market PVs also gives the potential for lower array costs. LISA-T is addressing the power starvation epidemic currently seen by many small-scale satellites while also enabling the application of deployable antenna arrays. Herein, an overview of the system and its applications are presented alongside sub-system development progress and environmental testing plans/initial results.

  7. Advancements of the Lightweight Integrated Solar Array and Transceiver (LISA-T) Small Spacecraft System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockett, Tiffany Russell; Martinez, Armando; Boyd, Darren; SanSouice, Michael; Farmer, Brandon; Schneider, Todd; Laue, Greg; Fabisinski, Leo; Johnson, Les; Carr, John A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes recent advancements of the Lightweight Integrated Solar Array and Transceiver (LISA-T) currently being developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The LISA-T array comprises a launch stowed, orbit deployed structure on which thin-film photovoltaic (PV) and antenna devices are embedded. The system provides significant electrical power generation at low weights, high stowage efficiency, and without the need for solar tracking. Leveraging high-volume terrestrial-market PVs also gives the potential for lower array costs. LISA-T is addressing the power starvation epidemic currently seen by many small-scale satellites while also enabling the application of deployable antenna arrays. Herein, an overview of the system and its applications are presented alongside sub-system development progress and environmental testing plans.

  8. Photocatalytic Removal of Microcystin-LR by Advanced WO3-Based Nanoparticles under Simulated Solar Light

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chao; Li, Dawei; Feng, Chuanping; Zhang, Zhenya; Sugiura, Norio; Yang, Yingnan

    2015-01-01

    A series of advanced WO3-based photocatalysts including CuO/WO3, Pd/WO3, and Pt/WO3 were synthesized for the photocatalytic removal of microcystin-LR (MC-LR) under simulated solar light. In the present study, Pt/WO3 exhibited the best performance for the photocatalytic degradation of MC-LR. The MC-LR degradation can be described by pseudo-first-order kinetic model. Chloride ion (Cl−) with proper concentration could enhance the MC-LR degradation. The presence of metal cations (Cu2+ and Fe3+) improved the photocatalytic degradation of MC-LR. This study suggests that Pt/WO3 photocatalytic oxidation under solar light is a promising option for the purification of water containing MC-LR. PMID:25884038

  9. The dynamic character of the polar solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B. V.; Yu, H.-S.; Buffington, A.; Hick, P. P. E-mail: hsyu@ucsd.edu E-mail: pphick@ucsd.edu

    2014-09-20

    The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph C2 and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) COR2A coronagraph images, when analyzed using correlation tracking techniques, show a surprising result in places ordinarily thought of as 'quiet' solar wind above the poles in coronal hole regions. Instead of the static well-ordered flow and gradual acceleration normally expected, coronagraph images show outflow in polar coronal holes consisting of a mixture of intermittent slow and fast patches of material. We compare measurements of this highly variable solar wind from C2 and COR2A images and show that both coronagraphs measure essentially the same structures. Measurements of the mean velocity as a function of height of these structures are compared with mass flux determinations of the solar wind outflow in the large polar coronal hole regions and give similar results.

  10. Advances and recent trends in heterogeneous photo(electro)-catalysis for solar fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Highfield, James

    2015-04-15

    In the context of a future renewable energy system based on hydrogen storage as energy-dense liquid alcohols co-synthesized from recycled CO2, this article reviews advances in photocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis that exploit solar (photonic) primary energy in relevant endergonic processes, viz., H2 generation by water splitting, bio-oxygenate photoreforming, and artificial photosynthesis (CO2 reduction). Attainment of the efficiency (>10%) mandated for viable techno-economics (USD 2.00-4.00 per kg H2) and implementation on a global scale hinges on the development of photo(electro)catalysts and co-catalysts composed of earth-abundant elements offering visible-light-driven charge separation and surface redox chemistry in high quantum yield, while retaining the chemical and photo-stability typical of titanium dioxide, a ubiquitous oxide semiconductor and performance "benchmark". The dye-sensitized TiO2 solar cell and multi-junction Si are key "voltage-biasing" components in hybrid photovoltaic/photoelectrochemical (PV/PEC) devices that currently lead the field in performance. Prospects and limitations of visible-absorbing particulates, e.g., nanotextured crystalline α-Fe2O3, g-C3N4, and TiO2 sensitized by C/N-based dopants, multilayer composites, and plasmonic metals, are also considered. An interesting trend in water splitting is towards hydrogen peroxide as a solar fuel and value-added green reagent. Fundamental and technical hurdles impeding the advance towards pre-commercial solar fuels demonstration units are considered.

  11. Advances and recent trends in heterogeneous photo(electro)-catalysis for solar fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Highfield, James

    2015-01-01

    In the context of a future renewable energy system based on hydrogen storage as energy-dense liquid alcohols co-synthesized from recycled CO2, this article reviews advances in photocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis that exploit solar (photonic) primary energy in relevant endergonic processes, viz., H2 generation by water splitting, bio-oxygenate photoreforming, and artificial photosynthesis (CO2 reduction). Attainment of the efficiency (>10%) mandated for viable techno-economics (USD 2.00-4.00 per kg H2) and implementation on a global scale hinges on the development of photo(electro)catalysts and co-catalysts composed of earth-abundant elements offering visible-light-driven charge separation and surface redox chemistry in high quantum yield, while retaining the chemical and photo-stability typical of titanium dioxide, a ubiquitous oxide semiconductor and performance "benchmark". The dye-sensitized TiO2 solar cell and multi-junction Si are key "voltage-biasing" components in hybrid photovoltaic/photoelectrochemical (PV/PEC) devices that currently lead the field in performance. Prospects and limitations of visible-absorbing particulates, e.g., nanotextured crystalline α-Fe2O3, g-C3N4, and TiO2 sensitized by C/N-based dopants, multilayer composites, and plasmonic metals, are also considered. An interesting trend in water splitting is towards hydrogen peroxide as a solar fuel and value-added green reagent. Fundamental and technical hurdles impeding the advance towards pre-commercial solar fuels demonstration units are considered. PMID:25884553

  12. Dynamical behaviour of interstellar dust particles in the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Klačka, Jozef

    2004-11-01

    Motion and possible capture of interstellar dust particles (ISDPs) in the Solar System are investigated. Gravitational force of the Sun, solar electromagnetic and corpuscular radiation and interplanetary magnetic field are considered. The effect of solar electromagnetic radiation plays an important role in the sense that nonspherical ISDPs can be captured (and survive) much more effectively than spherical particles. It turns out that particles of effective radii ≈ 0.4 μm, moving initially near the solar equatorial plane and with impact parameter 400 RS ≲ b ≲ 500 RS (solar radii) exhibit a high probability of capture and survival in the Solar System. Only a very small number of spherical particles can be captured. Survived nonspherical ISDPs orbiting around the Sun are characterized by a quantity analogous to the Kepler's third law: /T2, where T is orbital period and is time average of cubed solar distance over the period T. The value of the quantity /T2 is 0.673 ± 0.002 [AU3 /year2 ].

  13. Utilization of Solar Dynamics Observatory space weather digital image data for comparative analysis with application to Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekoyan, V.; Dehipawala, S.; Liu, Ernest; Tulsee, Vivek; Armendariz, R.; Tremberger, G.; Holden, T.; Marchese, P.; Cheung, T.

    2012-10-01

    Digital solar image data is available to users with access to standard, mass-market software. Many scientific projects utilize the Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) format, which requires specialized software typically used in astrophysical research. Data in the FITS format includes photometric and spatial calibration information, which may not be useful to researchers working with self-calibrated, comparative approaches. This project examines the advantages of using mass-market software with readily downloadable image data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory for comparative analysis over with the use of specialized software capable of reading data in the FITS format. Comparative analyses of brightness statistics that describe the solar disk in the study of magnetic energy using algorithms included in mass-market software have been shown to give results similar to analyses using FITS data. The entanglement of magnetic energy associated with solar eruptions, as well as the development of such eruptions, has been characterized successfully using mass-market software. The proposed algorithm would help to establish a publicly accessible, computing network that could assist in exploratory studies of all FITS data. The advances in computer, cell phone and tablet technology could incorporate such an approach readily for the enhancement of high school and first-year college space weather education on a global scale. Application to ground based data such as that contained in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey is discussed.

  14. Electron Transfer Dynamics in Efficient Molecular Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ke; Ward, William; Farnum, Byron H.; Taheri, Atefeh; Johansson, Patrik; Meyer, Gerald John

    2014-10-01

    This research provided new mechanistic insights into surface mediated photochemical processes relevant to solar energy conversion. In this past three years our research has focused on oxidation photo-redox chemistry and on the role surface electric fields play on basic spectroscopic properties of molecular-semiconductor interfaces. Although this research as purely fundamental science, the results and their interpretation have relevance to applications in dye sensitized and photogalvanic solar cells as well as in the storage of solar energy in the form of chemical bonds.

  15. Dynamic Power Spectral Analysis of Solar Measurements from Photospheric, Chromospheric, and Coronal Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouwer, S. D.; Pap, J.; Donnelly, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    An important aspect in the power spectral analysis of solar variability is the quasistationary and quasiperiodic nature of solar periodicities. In other words, the frequency, phase, and amplitude of solar periodicities vary on time scales ranging from active region lifetimes to solar cycle time scales. Here, researchers employ a dynamic, or running, power spectral density analysis to determine many periodicities and their time-varying nature in the projected area of active sunspot groups (S sub act). The Solar Maximum Mission/Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (SMM/ACRIM) total solar irradiance (S), the Nimbus-7 MgII center-to-wing ratio (R (MgII sub c/w)), the Ottawa 10.7 cm flux (F sub 10.7), and the GOES background x ray flux (X sub b) for the maximum, descending, and minimum portions of solar cycle 21 (i.e., 1980 to 1986) are used. The technique dramatically illustrates several previously unrecognized periodicities. For example, a relatively stable period at about 51 days has been found in those indices which are related to emerging magnetic fields. The majority of solar periodicities, particularly around 27, 150 and 300 days, are quasiperiodic because they vary in amplitude and frequency throughout the solar cycle. Finally, it is shown that there are clear differences between the power spectral densities of solar measurements from photospheric, chromospheric, and coronal sources.

  16. Preface: Solar Dynamo Frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark S.

    2016-10-01

    The last six years have seen substantial progress in our understanding of the solar dynamo, fueled by continuing advances in observations and modeling. With the launch of NASAs Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) in 2010 came an unprecedented window on the evolving magnetic topology of the Sun, highlighting its intricate 3D structure and global connectivity. The Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument on SDO in particular has provided potentially transformative yet enigmatic insights into the internal dynamics of the solar convection zone that underlie the dynamo. One of these enigmas is the amplitude and structure of deep solar convection.

  17. Relationship between solar wind dynamic pressure and amplitude of geomagnetic sudden commencement (SC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Tohru; Shinbori, Atsuki

    2016-05-01

    The local time variation of geomagnetic sudden commencements (SCs) has not been taken into account in the Siscoe's linear relationship which connects the SC amplitude with the corresponding dynamic pressure variation of the solar wind. By considering the physical background of SC, we studied which local time is best to extract the information of the solar wind dynamic pressure and concluded that the SC amplitude at 4-5 h local time of middle- and low-latitude stations most directly reflects the dynamic pressure effect. This result is used to re-check the order of magnitude of the largest 3 SCs observed since 1868.

  18. Comet-solar wind interaction - Dynamical length scales and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendis, D. A.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Slavin, J. A.; Jones, D. E.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1986-03-01

    ICE magnetometer measurements at Comet Giacobini-Zinner and model simulations of comet-solar wind interactions are analyzed. The magnetometer data reveal the existence of intense hydromagnetic turbulence, a draping of the magnetic field lines to form a magnetotail, a weak shock, and a magnetic barrier region in the magnetosphere. The global models of the comet-solar wind interaction are described. The observed data and models are compared and good correlation is displayed.

  19. Analysis of shadowing effects on MIR photovoltaic and solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fincannon, James

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is currently working with RSC-Energia, the Russian Space Agency, and Allied Signal in developing a flight demonstration solar dynamic power system. This type of power system is dependent upon solar flux that is reflected and concentrated into a thermal storage system to provide the thermal energy input to a closed-cycle Brayton heat engine. The solar dynamic unit will be flown on the Russian Mir space station in anticipation of use on the International Space Station Alpha. By the time the power system is launched, the Mir will be a spatially complex configuration which will have, in addition to the three-gimbaled solar dynamic unit, eleven solar array wings that are either fixed or track the Sun along one axis and a variety or repositionable habitation and experiment modules. The proximity of arrays to modules creates a situation which makes it highly probable that there will be varying solar flux due to shadowing on the solar dynamic unit and some of the arrays throughout the orbit. Shadowing causes fluctuations in the power output from the arrays and the solar dynamic power system, thus reducing the energy capabilities of the spacecraft. An assessment of the capabilities of the power system under these conditions is an important part in influencing the design and operations of the spacecraft and predicting its energy performance. This paper describes the results obtained from using the Orbiting Spacecraft Shadowing Analysis Station program that was integrated into the Station Power Analysis for Capability Evaluation (SPACE) electrical power system computer program. OSSA allows one to consider the numerous complex factors for analyzing the shadowing effects on the electrical power system including the variety of spacecraft hardware geometric configurations, yearly and daily orbital variations in the vehicle attitude and orbital maneuvers (for communications coverage, payload pointing requirements and rendezvous/docking with other

  20. Alternate space station freedom configuration considerations to accommodate solar dynamic power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deryder, L. J.; Cruz, J. N.; Heck, M. L.; Robertson, B. P.; Troutman, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a technical audit of the Space Station Freedom Program conducted by the Program Director was announced in early 1989 and included a proposal to use solar dynamic power generation systems to provide primary electrical energy for orbital flight operations rather than photovoltaic solar array systems. To generate the current program baseline power of 75 kW, two or more solar concentrators approximately 50 feet in diameter would be required to replace four pairs of solar arrays whose rectangular blanket size is approximately 200 feet by 30 feet. The photovoltaic power system concept uses solar arrays to generate electricity that is stored in nickel-hydrogen batteries. The proposed concept uses the solar concentrator dishes to reflect and focus the Sun's energy to heat helium-xenon gas to drive electricity generating turbines. The purpose here is to consider the station configuration issues for incorporation of solar dynamic power system components. Key flight dynamic configuration geometry issues are addressed and an assembly sequence scenario is developed.

  1. A practical six-degree of freedom solar sail dynamics model for optimizing solar sail trajectories with torque constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisano, Michael E.

    2004-01-01

    Controlled flight of a solar sail-propelled spacecraft ('sailcraft') is a six-degree-of-freedom dynamics problem. Current state-of-the-art tools that simulate and optimize the trajectories flown by sailcraft do not treat the full kinetic (i.e. force and torque-constrained) motion, instead treating a discrete history of commanded sail attitudes, and either neglecting the sail attitude motion over an integration timestep, or treating the attitude evolution kinematically with a spline or similar treatment. The present paper discusses an aspect of developing a next generation sailcraf trajectory designing optimization tool JPL, for NASA's Solar Sail Spaceflight Simulation Software (SS). The aspect discussed in an experimental approach to modeling full six-degree-of-freedom kinetic motion of a solar sail in a trajectory propagator. Early results from implementing this approach in a new trajectory propagation tool are given.

  2. Overview of NASA's Space Solar Power Technology Advanced Research and Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Joe; Mankins, John C.; Davis, N. Jan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Large solar power satellite (SPS) systems that might provide base load power into terrestrial markets were examined extensively in the 1970s by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Following a hiatus of about 15 years, the subject of space solar power (SSP) was reexamined by NASA from 1995-1997 in the 'fresh look' study, and during 1998 in an SSP 'concept definition study', and during 1999-2000 in the SSP Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT) program. As a result of these efforts, during 2001, NASA has initiated the SSP Technology Advanced Research and Development (STAR-Dev) program based on informed decisions. The goal of the STAR-Dev program is to conduct preliminary strategic technology research and development to enable large, multi-megawatt to gigawatt-class space solar power (SSP) systems and wireless power transmission (WPT) for government missions and commercial markets (in-space and terrestrial). Specific objectives include: (1) Release a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) for SSP Projects; (2) Conduct systems studies; (3) Develop Component Technologies; (4) Develop Ground and Flight demonstration systems; and (5) Assess and/or Initiate Partnerships. Accomplishing these objectives will allow informed future decisions regarding further SSP and related research and development investments by both NASA management and prospective external partners. In particular, accomplishing these objectives will also guide further definition of SSP and related technology roadmaps including performance objectives, resources and schedules; including 'multi-purpose' applications (commercial, science, and other government).

  3. Progress making the top end optical assembly (TEOA) for the 4-meter Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canzian, Blaise; Barentine, J.; Arendt, J.; Bader, S.; Danyo, G.; Heller, C.

    2012-09-01

    L-3 Integrated Optical Systems (IOS) Division has been selected by the National Solar Observatory (NSO) to design and produce the Top End Optical Assembly (TEOA) for the 4-meter Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) to operate at Haleakal', Maui. ATST will perform to a very high optical performance level in a difficult thermal environment. The TEOA, containing the 0.65-meter silicon carbide secondary mirror and support, mirror thermal management system, mirror positioning and fast tip-tilt system, field stop with thermally managed heat dump, thermally managed Lyot stop, safety interlock and control system, and support frame, operates in the "hot spot" at the prime focus of the ATST and so presents special challenges. In this paper, we describe progress in the L-3 technical approach to meeting these challenges, including silicon carbide off-axis mirror design, fabrication, and high accuracy figuring and polishing all within L-3; mirror support design; the design for stray light control; subsystems for opto-mechanical positioning and high accuracy absolute mirror orientation sensing; Lyot stop design; and thermal management of all design elements to remain close to ambient temperature despite the imposed solar irradiance load.

  4. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie

    2014-01-01

    Testing was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by Space Systems Loral, LLC (SSL). The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration of flight-type design that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge (ESD) testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four string currents (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 micro-seconds to 2.75 milli-seconds. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-ESD functional testing showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. These test results point to a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission.

  5. Strong Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Pulses during Solar Cycle 23 and Their Impacts on Geosynchronous Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, P.

    2015-12-01

    Solar wind dynamic pressure pulse (DPP) structures, across which the dynamic pressure abruptly changes over timescales from a few seconds to several minutes, are often observed in the near-Earth space environment. In this investigation, we first present a statistical study on the properties of strong dynamic pressure pulses in the solar wind during solar cycle 23. It is found that overwhelming majority of DPPs are associated with the solar wind disturbances including the CME-related flows, the corotating interaction regions, as well as the complex ejecta. The annual variations of the averaged occurrence rate of DPPs are roughly in phase with the solar activities. Although the variabilities of geosynchronous magnetic fields (GMFs) due to the impact of positive DPPs have been well established, there appears no systematic investigations on the response of GMFs to negative DPPs. Here we also study the decompression/compression effects of very strong negative/positive DPPs on GMFs under northward IMFs. In response to the decompression of strong negative DPPs, GMFs on dayside, near the dawn and dusk on nightside are generally depressed. But near the midnight region, the responses of GMF are very diverse, being either positive or negative. For part of events when GOES is located at the midnight sector, GMF is found to abnormally increase as the result of magnetospheric decompression caused by negative DPPs. It is known that on certain conditions magnetic depression of nightside GMFs can be caused by the impact of positive DPPs. Here we found that, a stronger pressure enhancement may have a higher probability of producing the exceptional depression of GMF at midnight region. Statistically, both the decompression effect of strong negative DPPs and the compression effect of strong positive DPPs depend on the magnetic local time, being stronger at the noon sector.

  6. The solar activity dependence of wave dynamical vertical coupling of atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, F. I.; Duggirala, P. R.; Lakshmi, T. V.; Reddy, M. A.; Veenadhari, B.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2014-12-01

    Analysis of oxygen dayglow emissions at OI 557.7, OI 630.0, and OI 777.4 nm showed that the wave dynamical vertical coupling of atmospheres is solar activity dependent. These emission intensities are obtained during January-March in the years 2011 and 2012 from Hyderabad (17.5oN, 78.5oE), India, using a high-spectral resolution multi-wavelength imaging echelle spectrograph (MISE). Spectral analysis of the variations revealed that oscillation periods near the atmospheric free-normal modes of 5, 10, 16, and 25 days (that are produced mainly in the troposphere) are found to register their presence in the upper atmospheric emission intensities. In an earlier study during high solar activity period (2001), the sunspot numbers (SSN) and the daily averaged OI 630.0 nm dayglow intensities were seen to be co-varying. In contrast, the variability in the dayglow emission intensities during relatively low solar activity period (2011) shows no or weaker correlation with that of the SSN but a greater similarity with that of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) strength. Whereas, oscillations of both lower atmospheric normal modes and those related to sunspot are found during moderate solar activity (2012). These results suggest that the upper atmosphere responds mainly to lower atmospheric forcing during low solar activity, to solar forcing during high solar activity, and to both lower atmosphere and solar forcings during moderate solar activity level. A statistical study of the shorter period variations in the gravity wave regime showed they are present in greater numbers in the thermosphere during higher solar activity, which is ascribed to be due to decreasing wave dissipation with increasing solar activity. These results will be presented in the context of short- and long-period wave dynamics in the whole atmosphere.

  7. Insights into real cotton-textile dyeing wastewater treatment using solar advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Soares, Petrick A; Silva, Tânia F C V; Manenti, Diego R; Souza, Selene M A G U; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2014-01-01

    Different advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) were applied to the treatment of a real cotton-textile dyeing wastewater as a pre-oxidation step to enhance the biodegradability of the recalcitrant compounds, which can be further oxidized using a biological process. Tests were conducted on a lab-scale prototype using artificial solar radiation and at pilot scale with compound parabolic collectors using natural solar radiation. The cotton-textile dyeing wastewater presents a lilac color, with a maximum absorbance peak at 641 nm, alkaline pH (pH = 8.2), moderate organic content (DOC = 152 mg C L(-1), COD = 684 mg O2 L(-1)) and low-moderate biodegradability (40 % after 28 days in Zahn-Wellens test). All the tested processes contributed to an effective decolorization and mineralization, but the most efficient process was the solar-photo-Fenton with an optimum catalyst concentration of 60 mg Fe(2+) L(-1), leading to 98.5% decolorization and 85.5% mineralization after less than 0.1 and 5.8 kJUV L(-1), respectively. In order to achieve a final wastewater with a COD below 250 mg O2 L(-1) (discharge limit into water bodies imposed by the Portuguese Legislation-Portaria no. 423/97 of 25 June 1997), considering the combination of a solar-photo-Fenton reaction with a biological process, the phototreatment energy required is 0.5 kJUV L(-1), consuming 7.5 mM hydrogen peroxide, resulting in 58.4% of mineralization [Formula: see text].

  8. Insights into real cotton-textile dyeing wastewater treatment using solar advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Soares, Petrick A; Silva, Tânia F C V; Manenti, Diego R; Souza, Selene M A G U; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2014-01-01

    Different advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) were applied to the treatment of a real cotton-textile dyeing wastewater as a pre-oxidation step to enhance the biodegradability of the recalcitrant compounds, which can be further oxidized using a biological process. Tests were conducted on a lab-scale prototype using artificial solar radiation and at pilot scale with compound parabolic collectors using natural solar radiation. The cotton-textile dyeing wastewater presents a lilac color, with a maximum absorbance peak at 641 nm, alkaline pH (pH = 8.2), moderate organic content (DOC = 152 mg C L(-1), COD = 684 mg O2 L(-1)) and low-moderate biodegradability (40 % after 28 days in Zahn-Wellens test). All the tested processes contributed to an effective decolorization and mineralization, but the most efficient process was the solar-photo-Fenton with an optimum catalyst concentration of 60 mg Fe(2+) L(-1), leading to 98.5% decolorization and 85.5% mineralization after less than 0.1 and 5.8 kJUV L(-1), respectively. In order to achieve a final wastewater with a COD below 250 mg O2 L(-1) (discharge limit into water bodies imposed by the Portuguese Legislation-Portaria no. 423/97 of 25 June 1997), considering the combination of a solar-photo-Fenton reaction with a biological process, the phototreatment energy required is 0.5 kJUV L(-1), consuming 7.5 mM hydrogen peroxide, resulting in 58.4% of mineralization [Formula: see text]. PMID:23832802

  9. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie

    2015-01-01

    A test was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by SSL. The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The coupon has many attributes of the flight design; e.g., substrate structure with graphite face sheets, integrated by-pass diodes, cell interconnects, RTV grout, wire routing, etc. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four array current (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 micros to 2.9 ms. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-test Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS), Dark I-V, and By-Pass Diode tests showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. In addition, the post-test insulation resistance measured was > 50 G-ohms between cells and substrate. These test results indicate a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission application.

  10. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie

    2014-01-01

    Testing was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by Space Systems/Loral, LLC (SSL). The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The coupon has many attributes of the flight design; e.g., substrate structure with graphite face sheets, integrated by-pass diodes, cell interconnects, RTV grout, wire routing, etc. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge (ESD) testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four array currents (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 micro-seconds to 2.75 milli-seconds. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-test Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS), Dark I-V, and By-Pass Diode tests showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. In addition, the post-test insulation resistance measured was > 50 G-ohms between cells and substrate. These test results indicate a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission.

  11. High Current ESD Test of Advanced Triple Junction Solar Array Coupon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. H.; Schneider, T. A.; Vaughn, J. A.; Hoang, B.; Wong, F.

    2014-01-01

    A test was conducted on an Advanced Triple Junction (ATJ) coupon that was part of a risk reduction effort in the development of a high-powered solar array design by SSL. The ATJ coupon was a small, 4-cell, two-string configuration that has served as the basic test coupon design used in previous SSL environmental aging campaigns. The coupon has many attributes of the flight design; e.g., substrate structure with graphite face sheets, integrated by-pass diodes, cell interconnects, RTV grout, wire routing, etc. The objective of the present test was to evaluate the performance of the coupon after being subjected to induced electrostatic discharge testing at two string voltages (100 V, 150 V) and four array current (1.65 A, 2.0 A, 2.475 A, and 3.3 A). An ESD test circuit, unique to SSL solar array design, was built that simulates the effect of missing cells and strings in a full solar panel with special primary arc flashover circuitry. A total of 73 primary arcs were obtained that included 7 temporary sustained arcs (TSA) events. The durations of the TSAs ranged from 50 µs to 2.9 ms. All TSAs occurred at a string voltage of 150 V. Post-test Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS), Dark I-V, and By-Pass Diode tests showed that no degradation occurred due to the TSA events. In addition, the post-test insulation resistance measured was > 50 G-ohms between cells and substrate. These test results indicate a robust design for application to a high-current, high-power mission application.

  12. Evaluation of thermal control coatings for use on solar dynamic radiators in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Rodriguez, Elvin; Slemp, Wayne S.; Stoyack, Joseph E.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal control coatings with high thermal emittance and low solar absorptance are needed for Space Station Freedom (SSF) solar dynamic power module radiator (SDR) surfaces for efficient heat rejection. Additionally, these coatings must be durable to low earth orbital (LEO) environmental effects of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation and deep thermal cycles which occur as a result of start-up and shut-down of the solar dynamic power system. Eleven candidate coatings were characterized for their solar absorptance and emittance before and after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation (200 to 400 nm), vacuum UV (VUV) radiation (100 to 200 nm) and atomic oxygen. Results indicated that the most durable and best performing coatings were white paint thermal control coatings Z-93, zinc oxide pigment in potassium silicate binder, and YB-71, zinc orthotitanate pigment in potassium silicate binder. Optical micrographs of these materials exposed to the individual environmental effects of atomic oxygen and vacuum thermal cycling showed that no surface cracking occurred.

  13. Evaluation of thermal control coatings for use on solar dynamic radiators in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Rodriguez, Elvin; Slemp, Wayne S.; Stoyack, Joseph E.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal control coatings with high thermal emittance and low solar absorptance are needed for Space Station Freedom (SSF) solar dynamic power module radiator (SDR) surfaces for efficient heat rejection. Additionally, these coatings must be durable to low earth orbital (LEO) environmental effects of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation and deep thermal cycles which occur as a result of start-up and shut-down of the solar dynamic power system. Eleven candidate coatings were characterized for their solar absorptance and emittance before and after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation (200 to 400 nm), vacuum UV (VUV) radiation (100 to 200 nm) and atomic oxygen. Results indicated that the most durable and best performing coatings were white paint thermal control coatings Z-93, zinc oxide pigment in potassium silicate binder, and YB-71, zinc orthotitanate pigment in potassium silicate binder. Optical micrographs of these materials exposed to the individual environmental effects of atomic oxygen and vacuum thermal cycling showed that no surface cracking occurred.

  14. Multifractal features of magnetospheric dynamics and their dependence on solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Sumesh

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, novel wavelet leaders (WL) based multifractal analysis has been used to get a better knowledge of the self-organization phenomena inherent in complex magnetospheric dynamics during disturbance and quiescent periods, focusing mainly on the intermittent features of auroral electrojet (AE) index. The results derived from the analysis certainly exhibit the phase transition property of magnetosphere system with respect to variabilities in the driving conditions. By using the novel WL method, solar activity dependence/independence of intermittency of magnetospheric proxies such as AE, SYM-H and Dst indices have been compared. The results indicate that the multifractality of AE index does not follow the solar activity cycle while intermittent features of SYM-H and Dst indices show high degree of solar activity dependence. This shows that along with the external solar wind perturbations, certain complex phenomena of internal origin also significantly modulate the dynamics of geomagnetic fluctuations in the auroral region.

  15. Free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity in active and quiet solar regions and their role in solar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, Konstantinos; Archontis, Vasilis; Tsiropoula, Georgia; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Moraitis, Kostas; Kontogiannis, Ioannis

    We present a novel non-linear force-free method for the calculation of the instantaneous free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity budgets of a solar region from a single photospheric/chromospheric vector magnetogram. Our objective is to study the role of these quantities both in solar eruptions and in quiet-Sun dynamics. The validity of the method is tested using both observations and synthetic magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) models. The method is applied for the derivation of the energy-helicity (EH) diagram of solar active regions (ARs) from a sample of 162 vector magnetograms corresponding to 42 different ARs, suggesting the existence of 4×10(31) erg and 2×10(42) Mx(2) thresholds in free energy and relative helicity, respectively, for ARs to enter eruptive territory. Furthermore, the dynamical evolution of both quantities in eruptive NOAA AR 11158, using a high-cadence 5-day time series of vector magnetograms, suggests the formation of increasingly helical pre-eruption structures and a causal relation between flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). The method is also used to derive helicity and energy budgets in quiet Sun regions and construct the respective EH diagram. Our results highlight the importance of both energy and helicity in AR evolution and quiet-Sun dynamics and instigate further research on the underlying physics with three-dimensional MHD models. This work is supported by EU's Seventh Framework Programme via a Marie Curie Fellowship.

  16. Organic and inorganic nitrogen dynamics in soil - advanced Ntrace approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, Louise C.; Björsne, Anna-Karin; Bodé, Samuel; Klemedtsson, Leif; Boeckx, Pascal; Rütting, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    Depolymerization of soil organic nitrogen (SON) into monomers (e.g. amino acids) is currently thought to be the rate limiting step for the terrestrial nitrogen (N) cycle. The production of free amino acids (AA) is followed by AA mineralization to ammonium, which is an important fraction of the total N mineralization. Accurate assessment of depolymerization and AA mineralization rate is important for a better understanding of the rate limiting steps. Recent developments in the 15N pool dilution techniques, based on 15N labelling of AA's, allow quantifying gross rates of SON depolymerization and AA mineralization (Wanek et al., 2010; Andersen et al., 2015) in addition to gross N mineralization. However, it is well known that the 15N pool dilution approach has limitations; in particular that gross rates of consumption processes (e.g. AA mineralization) are overestimated. This has consequences for evaluating the rate limiting step of the N cycle, as well as for estimating the nitrogen use efficiency (NUE). Here we present a novel 15N tracing approach, which combines 15N-AA labelling with an advanced version of the 15N tracing model Ntrace (Müller et al., 2007) explicitly accounting for AA turnover in soil. This approach (1) provides a more robust quantification of gross depolymerization and AA mineralization and (2) suggests a more realistic estimate for the microbial NUE of amino acids. Advantages of the new 15N tracing approach will be discussed and further improvements will be identified. References: Andresen, L.C., Bodé, S., Tietema, A., Boeckx, P., and Rütting, T.: Amino acid and N mineralization dynamics in heathland soil after long-term warming and repetitive drought, SOIL, 1, 341-349, 2015. Müller, C., Rütting, T., Kattge, J., Laughlin, R. J., and Stevens, R. J.: Estimation of parameters in complex 15N tracing models via Monte Carlo sampling, Soil Biology & Biochemistry, 39, 715-726, 2007. Wanek, W., Mooshammer, M., Blöchl, A., Hanreich, A., and Richter

  17. The applications of Complexity Theory and Tsallis Non-extensive Statistics at Solar Plasma Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlos, George

    2015-04-01

    As the solar plasma lives far from equilibrium it is an excellent laboratory for testing complexity theory and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. In this study, we present the highlights of complexity theory and Tsallis non extensive statistical mechanics as concerns their applications at solar plasma dynamics, especially at sunspot, solar flare and solar wind phenomena. Generally, when a physical system is driven far from equilibrium states some novel characteristics can be observed related to the nonlinear character of dynamics. Generally, the nonlinearity in space plasma dynamics can generate intermittent turbulence with the typical characteristics of the anomalous diffusion process and strange topologies of stochastic space plasma fields (velocity and magnetic fields) caused by the strange dynamics and strange kinetics (Zaslavsky, 2002). In addition, according to Zelenyi and Milovanov (2004) the complex character of the space plasma system includes the existence of non-equilibrium (quasi)-stationary states (NESS) having the topology of a percolating fractal set. The stabilization of a system near the NESS is perceived as a transition into a turbulent state determined by self-organization processes. The long-range correlation effects manifest themselves as a strange non-Gaussian behavior of kinetic processes near the NESS plasma state. The complex character of space plasma can also be described by the non-extensive statistical thermodynamics pioneered by Tsallis, which offers a consistent and effective theoretical framework, based on a generalization of Boltzmann - Gibbs (BG) entropy, to describe far from equilibrium nonlinear complex dynamics (Tsallis, 2009). In a series of recent papers, the hypothesis of Tsallis non-extensive statistics in magnetosphere, sunspot dynamics, solar flares, solar wind and space plasma in general, was tested and verified (Karakatsanis et al., 2013; Pavlos et al., 2014; 2015). Our study includes the analysis of solar plasma time

  18. Effect of piezoelectric field on carrier dynamics in InGaN-based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seunga; Honda, Yoshio; Amano, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    To understand the effect of piezoelectric fields on carrier dynamics, we numerically investigated a simple p-GaN/i-\\text{I}{{\\text{n}}x}\\text{G}{{\\text{a}}1-x}\\text{N} /n-GaN solar cell structure. A reliable simulation model was obtained by comparing the experimental and simulated results in advance. The same p-i-n InGaN structures were re-simulated with and without the piezoelectric field effect, as spontaneous polarization remained unchanged. The sample with the piezoelectric field effect showed higher short current density ({{J}\\text{sc}} ), a staircase-like feature in its I-V curve, and higher open circuit voltage ({{V}\\text{oc}} ) with a lower fill factor (F.F.) and reduced conversion efficiency (C.E.) than the sample with no piezoelectric fields. In addition, with increasing In fraction (x), the {{V}\\text{oc}} value gradually increased while the {{J}\\text{sc}} value significantly decreased, correspondingly leading to a reduction in C.E. and F.F. values of the structure with the piezoelectric field effect. To solve the current loss problem, we applied various piezoelectric field elimination techniques to the simulated structures.

  19. Magneto-acoustic Waves And Their Role In The Energetics And Dynamics Of The Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferies, Stuart; De Pontieu, B.; McIntosh, S.; Hansteen, V. H.

    2007-05-01

    We analyze a diverse set of observations obtained with SOHO and TRACE, as well as with MOTH and the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope to show that sound waves play an important role in shaping the structure and energetics of the magnetized chromosphere. Travel time analysis of TRACE, MOTH and SST observations and comparisons with numerical simulations show that normally evanescent 5 minute p-mode oscillations leak into the chromosphere along flux tubes that are inclined with the vertical. Comparisons of SST data of fibril-like jets above active region plage and quiet Sun mottles with advanced radiative MHD simulations show how these oscillations develop into slow mode magnetoacoustic shocks that drive spicule-like chromospheric jets up to coronal heights. The leaking waves not only drive much of the dynamics of the magnetized chromosphere: Doppler measurements from the MOTH instrument at several heights in the atmosphere show that the total energy flux carried by these leaking waves may play a significant role in the energy balance of the magnetized chromosphere. We describe first approaches to determine more precisely how and where the wave energy is deposited in the low atmosphere.

  20. Metallic phase-change materials for solar dynamic energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; Hamby, C. Jr.

    1990-12-01

    Solar (thermal) dynamic power systems for satellites require a heat storage system that is capable of operating the engine during eclipse. The conventional approach to this thermal storage problem is to use the latent heat of fluoride salts, which would melt during insolation and freeze during eclipse. Although candidate fluorides have large heats of fusion per unit mass, their poor thermal conductivity limits the rate at which energy can be transferred to and from the storage device. System performance is further limited by the high parasitic mass of the superalloy canisters needed to contain the salt. This report describes a new thermal storage system in which the phase-change material (PCM) is a metal (typically germanium) contained in modular graphite canisters. These modules exhibit good thermal conductivity and low parasitic mass, and they are physically and chemically stable. Prototype modules have survived over 600 melt/freeze cycles without degradation. Advanced concepts to further improve performance are described. These concepts include the selection of ternary eutectic alloys to provide a wider range of useful melting temperatures and the use of infiltration to control the location of liquid alloy and to compensate for differences in thermal expansion. 13 refs., 18 figs.

  1. An evaluation model of solar power satellites using world dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagiwa, Yoshiki; Nagatomo, Makoto

    A world dynamics simulation model is proposed for evaluating the effect of solar powered satellites (SPS) on the earth's environment. The model includes solar power satellites and is based on Forrester's WORLD-2 model and on energy cost analysis referring to chemical and traffic industries on earth. The sections of the model are connected by energy exchange between SPS and the earth. Results indicate that a relatively small energy investment in SPS would lead to future improvement in the earth's environment.

  2. The 2-8 GHz solar dynamic spectra and polarization measurement feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddock, F. T.

    1971-01-01

    The preliminary system design of a Solar Microwave Spectrograph (SMS) is presented. This design resulted from a study to determine the feasibility of measuring solar polarization and dynamic spectra over the range of two to eight GHz, using broadband radio frequency instrumentation and rapid recording equipment in conjunction with radio telescopes. The scientific value of the proposed SMS instrument is discussed, with remarks concerning data reduction and analysis and a presentation of the engineering plan to implement the SMS system.

  3. SEISMIC AND DYNAMICAL SOLAR MODELS. I. THE IMPACT OF THE SOLAR ROTATION HISTORY ON NEUTRINOS AND SEISMIC INDICATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Turck-Chieze, S.; Palacios, A.; Nghiem, P. A. P.

    2010-06-01

    Solar activity and helioseismology show the limitation of the standard solar model and call for the inclusion of dynamical processes in both convective and radiative zones. In this paper, we concentrate on the radiative zone. We first recall the sensitivity of boron neutrinos to the microscopic physics included in solar standard and seismic models. We confront the neutrino predictions of the seismic model with all the detected neutrino fluxes. Then, we compute new models of the Sun including a detailed transport of angular momentum and chemicals due to internal rotation that includes meridional circulation and shear-induced turbulence. We use two stellar evolution codes: CESAM and STAREVOL to estimate the different terms. We follow three temporal evolutions of the internal rotation which differ by their initial conditions: very slow, moderate, and fast rotation, with magnetic braking at the arrival on the main sequence for the last two. We find that the meridional velocities in the present solar radiative zone are extremely small in comparison with those of the convective zone (smaller than 10{sup -6} cm s{sup -1} instead of m s{sup -1}). All models lead to a radial differential rotation profile in the radiative zone but with a significantly different contrast. We compare these profiles to the presumed solar internal rotation and show that if meridional circulation and shear turbulence were the only mechanisms transporting angular momentum within the Sun, a rather slow rotation in the young Sun is favored. We confirm the small influence of the transport by rotation on the sound speed profile but its potential impact on the chemicals in the transition region between radiation and convective zones. These models are physically more representative of the real Sun than the standard or seismic solar models but a high initial rotation, as has been considered previously, increases the disagreement with neutrinos and the sound speed in the radiative zone. This present work

  4. Advanced nanostructured materials and their application for improvement of sun-light harvesting and efficiency of solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimova-Malinovska, D.

    2016-02-01

    This review describes the application of different nanostructured materials in solar cells technology for improvement of sun-light harvesting and their efficiency. Several approaches have recently been proposed to increase the efficiency of solar cells above the theoretical limit which are based on a “photon management” concept that employs such phenomena as: (i) down-conversion, and (ii) surface plasmon resonance effect (iii) decreasing of the loss due to the reflection of the radiation, (iv) increasing of the reflection from the back contact, v) increasing of the effective solar cells surface, etc. The results demonstrate the possibility for to increasing of light harvesting, short circuit current and efficiency by application of nanomaterials in thin film and hetero-junction (HJ) solar cells. The first promising results allow an expectation for application of advanced nanomaterials in the 3d generation solar cells.

  5. Ion Measurements During Pioneer Venus Reentry: Implications for Solar Cycle Variation of Ion Composition and Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Hartle, R. E.; Kar, J.; Cloutier, P. A.; Taylor, H. A., Jr.; Brace, L. H.

    1993-01-01

    During the final, low solar activity phase of the Pioneer Venus mission, the Orbiter Ion Mass Spectrometer measurements found all ion species, in the midnight-dusk sector, reduced in concentration relative to that observed at solar maximum. Molecular ion species comprised a greater part of the total ion concentration as O(+) and H(+) had the greatest depletions. The nightside ionospheric states were strikingly similar to the isolated solar maximum "disappearing" ionospheres. Both are very dynamic states characterized by a rapidly drifting plasma and 30-100 eV superthermal O(+) ions.

  6. Ion measurements during Pioneer Venus reentry: Implications for solar cycle variation of ion composition and dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Hartle, R. E.; Kar, J.; Cloutier, P. A.; Taylor, H. A., Jr.; Brace, L. H.

    1993-01-01

    During the final, low solar activity phase of the Pioneer Venus (PV) mission, the Orbiter Ion Mass Spectrometer (OIMS) measurements found all ion species, in the midnight-dusk sector, reduced in concentration relative to that observed at solar maximum. Molecular ion species comprised a greater part of the total ion concentration as O(+) and H(+) had the greatest depletions. The nightside ionospheric states were strikingly similar to the isolated solar maximum 'disappearing' ionospheres. Both are very dynamic states characterized by a rapidly drifting plasma and 30-100 eV superthermal O(+) ions.

  7. Realistic Modeling of Multi-Scale MHD Dynamics of the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitiashvili, Irina; Mansour, Nagi N.; Wray, Alan; Couvidat, Sebastian; Yoon, Seokkwan; Kosovichev, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Realistic 3D radiative MHD simulations open new perspectives for understanding the turbulent dynamics of the solar surface, its coupling to the atmosphere, and the physical mechanisms of generation and transport of non-thermal energy. Traditionally, plasma eruptions and wave phenomena in the solar atmosphere are modeled by prescribing artificial driving mechanisms using magnetic or gas pressure forces that might arise from magnetic field emergence or reconnection instabilities. In contrast, our 'ab initio' simulations provide a realistic description of solar dynamics naturally driven by solar energy flow. By simulating the upper convection zone and the solar atmosphere, we can investigate in detail the physical processes of turbulent magnetoconvection, generation and amplification of magnetic fields, excitation of MHD waves, and plasma eruptions. We present recent simulation results of the multi-scale dynamics of quiet-Sun regions, and energetic effects in the atmosphere and compare with observations. For the comparisons we calculate synthetic spectro-polarimetric data to model observational data of SDO, Hinode, and New Solar Telescope.

  8. Modeling the Multi-Body System Dynamics of a Flexible Solar Sail Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Young; Stough, Robert; Whorton, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Solar sail propulsion systems enable a wide range of space missions that are not feasible with current propulsion technology. Hardware concepts and analytical methods have matured through ground development to the point that a flight validation mission is now realizable. Much attention has been given to modeling the structural dynamics of the constituent elements, but to date an integrated system level dynamics analysis has been lacking. Using a multi-body dynamics and control analysis tool called TREETOPS, the coupled dynamics of the sailcraft bus, sail membranes, flexible booms, and control system sensors and actuators of a representative solar sail spacecraft are investigated to assess system level dynamics and control issues. With this tool, scaling issues and parametric trade studies can be performed to study achievable performance, control authority requirements, and control/structure interaction assessments.

  9. Structural configuration options for the Space Station Freedom solar dynamic radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tylim, Adrian

    1989-01-01

    In order to meet the growing power demands of the Space Station, the electrical power system design includes an option to provide additional power capability in increments of 50 kWe of power. Each increment consists of a pair of two solar dynamic power modules (SDPMs), each of which containing a closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) thermodynamic engine. A solar dynamic radiator (SDR) enables the CBC to reject the waste heat to the surrounding space environment. This paper analyzes three alternatives to the baseline configuration of the Space Station Freedom solar dynamic radiator and discusses their merits based on Space Shuttle cargo capabilities, location with respect to the SDPM supporting structure, thermal performance, drag, concentrator shading, mass, and other issues of concenrn. Results indicating the advantages and disadvantages of each option are presented along with diagrams of the alternative configurations.

  10. 2 kWe Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration Project. Volume 1; Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Dennis

    1997-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration (SDGTD) successfully demonstrated a solar-powered closed Brayton cycle system in a relevant space thermal environment. In addition to meeting technical requirements the project was completed 4 months ahead of schedule and under budget. The following conclusions can be supported: 1. The component technology for solar dynamic closed Brayton cycle technology has clearly been demonstrated. 2. The thermal, optical, control, and electrical integration aspects of systems integration have also been successfully demonstrated. Physical integration aspects were not attempted as these tend to be driven primarily by mission-specific requirements. 3. System efficiency of greater than 15 percent (all losses fully accounted for) was demonstrated using equipment and designs which were not optimized. Some preexisting hardware was used to minimize cost and schedule. 4. Power generation of 2 kWe. 5. A NASA/industry team was developed that successfully worked together to accomplish project goals. The material presented in this report will show that the technology necessary to design and fabricate solar dynamic electrical power systems for space has been successfully developed and demonstrated. The data will further show that achieved results compare well with pretest predictions. The next step in the development of solar dynamic space power will be a flight test.

  11. Solar concentrators for advanced solar-dynamic power systems in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rockwell, Richard

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a study performed by Hughes Danbury Optical Systems, HDOS, (formerly Perkin-Elmer) to design, fabricate, and test a lightweight (2 kg/sq M), self supporting, and highly reflective sub-scale concentrating mirror panel suitable for use in space. The HDOS panel design utilizes Corning's 'micro sheet' glass as the top layer of a composite honeycomb sandwich. This approach, whose manufacturability was previously demonstrated under an earlier NASA contract, provides a smooth (specular) reflective surface without the weight of a conventional glass panel. The primary result of this study is a point design and it's performance assessment.

  12. Mesospheric Dynamical Changes Induced by the Solar Proton Events in October-November 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Roble, Raymond G.; Fleming, Eric L.

    2007-01-01

    The very large solar storms in October-November 2003 caused solar proton events (SPEs) at the Earth that impacted the upper atmospheric polar cap regions. The Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamic General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) was used to study the atmospheric dynamical influence of the solar protons that occurred in Oct-Nov 2003, the fourth largest period of SPEs measured in the past 40 years. The highly energetic solar protons caused ionization, as well as dissociation processes, and ultimately produced odd hydrogen (HOx) and odd nitrogen (NOy). Significant short-lived ozone decreases (10-70%) followed these enhancements of HOx and NOy and led to a cooling of most of the lower mesosphere. This cooling caused an atmospheric circulation change that led to adiabatic heating of the upper mesosphere. Temperature changes up to plus or minus 2.6 K were computed as well as wind (zonal, meridional, vertical) perturbations up to 20-25% of the background winds as a result of 22 the solar protons. The solar proton-induced mesospheric temperature and wind perturbations diminished over a period of 4-6 weeks after the SPEs. The Joule heating in the mesosphere, induced by the solar protons, was computed to be relatively insignificant for these solar storms with most of the temperature and circulation perturbations caused by ozone depletion in the sunlit hemisphere.

  13. The applications of Complexity Theory and Tsallis Non-extensive Statistics at Solar Plasma Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlos, George

    2015-04-01

    As the solar plasma lives far from equilibrium it is an excellent laboratory for testing complexity theory and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. In this study, we present the highlights of complexity theory and Tsallis non extensive statistical mechanics as concerns their applications at solar plasma dynamics, especially at sunspot, solar flare and solar wind phenomena. Generally, when a physical system is driven far from equilibrium states some novel characteristics can be observed related to the nonlinear character of dynamics. Generally, the nonlinearity in space plasma dynamics can generate intermittent turbulence with the typical characteristics of the anomalous diffusion process and strange topologies of stochastic space plasma fields (velocity and magnetic fields) caused by the strange dynamics and strange kinetics (Zaslavsky, 2002). In addition, according to Zelenyi and Milovanov (2004) the complex character of the space plasma system includes the existence of non-equilibrium (quasi)-stationary states (NESS) having the topology of a percolating fractal set. The stabilization of a system near the NESS is perceived as a transition into a turbulent state determined by self-organization processes. The long-range correlation effects manifest themselves as a strange non-Gaussian behavior of kinetic processes near the NESS plasma state. The complex character of space plasma can also be described by the non-extensive statistical thermodynamics pioneered by Tsallis, which offers a consistent and effective theoretical framework, based on a generalization of Boltzmann - Gibbs (BG) entropy, to describe far from equilibrium nonlinear complex dynamics (Tsallis, 2009). In a series of recent papers, the hypothesis of Tsallis non-extensive statistics in magnetosphere, sunspot dynamics, solar flares, solar wind and space plasma in general, was tested and verified (Karakatsanis et al., 2013; Pavlos et al., 2014; 2015). Our study includes the analysis of solar plasma time

  14. Dynamic Simulation over Long Time Periods with 100% Solar Generation.

    SciTech Connect

    Concepcion, Ricky James; Elliott, Ryan Thomas

    2015-12-01

    This project aimed to identify the path forward for dynamic simulation tools to accommodate these needs by characterizing the properties of power systems (with high PV penetration), analyzing how these properties affect dynamic simulation software, and offering solutions for potential problems.

  15. Attitude Dynamics and Control of Solar Sails with Articulated Vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, Edward; Acikmese, A. Behcet; Ploen, Scott R.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we develop a robust nonlinear algorithm for the attitude control of a solar sailcraft with M single degree-of-freedom articulated control vanes. A general attitude controller that tracks an admissible trajectory while rejecting disturbances such as torques due to center-of-mass to center-of-pressure offsets is applied to this problem. We then describe a methodology based on nonlinear programming to allocate the required control torques among the control vanes. A simplified allocation strategy is then applied to a solar sail with four articulated control vanes, and simulation results are given. The performance of the control algorithm and possible limitations of vane-only control are then discussed.

  16. Efficient nanorod-based amorphous silicon solar cells with advanced light trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, Y.; Lare, M. C. van; Polman, A.; Veldhuizen, L. W.; Schropp, R. E. I.; Rath, J. K.

    2015-11-14

    We present a simple, low-cost, and scalable approach for the fabrication of efficient nanorod-based solar cells. Templates with arrays of self-assembled ZnO nanorods with tunable morphology are synthesized by chemical bath deposition using a low process temperature at 80 °C. The nanorod templates are conformally coated with hydrogenated amorphous silicon light absorber layers of 100 nm and 200 nm thickness. An initial efficiency of up to 9.0% is achieved for the optimized design. External quantum efficiency measurements on the nanorod cells show a substantial photocurrent enhancement both in the red and the blue parts of the solar spectrum. Key insights in the light trapping mechanisms in these arrays are obtained via a combination of three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations, optical absorption, and external quantum efficiency measurements. Front surface patterns enhance the light incoupling in the blue, while rear side patterns lead to enhanced light trapping in the red. The red response in the nanorod cells is limited by absorption in the patterned Ag back contact. With these findings, we develop and experimentally realize a further advanced design with patterned front and back sides while keeping the Ag reflector flat, showing significantly enhanced scattering from the back reflector with reduced parasitic absorption in the Ag and thus higher photocurrent generation. Many of the findings in this work can serve to provide insights for further optimization of nanostructures for thin-film solar cells in a broad range of materials.

  17. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1998-01-01

    Under this contract SAIC, the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model. During the period covered by this report we have published 17 articles in the scientific literature. These publications are listed in Section 4 of this report. In the Appendix we have attached reprints of selected articles.

  18. Advanced light-trapping effect of thin-film solar cell with dual photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Anjun; Guo, Zhongyi; Tao, Yifei; Wang, Wei; Mao, Xiaoqin; Fan, Guanghua; Zhou, Keya; Qu, Shiliang

    2015-01-01

    A thin-film solar cell with dual photonic crystals has been proposed, which shows an advanced light-trapping effect and superior performance in ultimate conversion efficiency (UCE). The shapes of nanocones have been optimized and discussed in detail by self-definition. The optimized shape of nanocone arrays (NCs) is a parabolic shape with a nearly linearly graded refractive index (GRI) profile from the air to Si, and the corresponding UCE is 30.3% for the NCs with a period of 300 nm and a thickness of only 2 μm. The top NCs and bottom NCs of the thin film have been simulated respectively to investigate their optimized shapes, and their separate contributions to the light harvest have also been discussed fully. The height of the top NCs and bottom NCs will also influence the performances of the thin-film solar cell greatly, and the result indicates that the unconformal NCs have better light-trapping ability with an optimal UCE of 32.3% than the conformal NCs with an optimal UCE of 30.3%. PMID:26034413

  19. Preliminary design of an advanced Stirling system for terrestrial solar energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, M. A.; Noble, J. E.; Emigh, S. G.; Ross, B. A.; Lehmann, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary design was generated for an advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS) that will be capable of delivering about 25 kW of electric power to an electric utility grid. Stirling engines are being evaluated for terrestrial solar applications. A two-year task to complete detailed design, fabrication, assembly and testing of an ASCS prototype began in April, 1990. The ASCS is designed to deliver maximum power per year over a range of solar inputs with a design life of 30 years (60,000 h). The ACSC has a long-term cost goal of about $450 per kilowatt, exclusive of the 11-m parabolic dish concentrator. The proposed system includes a Stirling engine with high-pressure hydraulic output, coupled with a bent axis variable displacement hydraulic motor and a rotary induction generator. The major thrusts of the preliminary design are described, including material selection for the hot-end components, heat transport system (reflux pool boiler) design, system thermal response, improved manufacturability, FMECA/FTA analysis, updated manufacturing cost estimate, and predicted system performance.

  20. Solar-Enhanced Advanced Oxidation Processes for Water Treatment: Simultaneous Removal of Pathogens and Chemical Pollutants.

    PubMed

    Tsydenova, Oyuna; Batoev, Valeriy; Batoeva, Agniya

    2015-08-14

    The review explores the feasibility of simultaneous removal of pathogens and chemical pollutants by solar-enhanced advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The AOPs are based on in-situ generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), most notably hydroxyl radicals •OH, that are capable of destroying both pollutant molecules and pathogen cells. The review presents evidence of simultaneous removal of pathogens and chemical pollutants by photocatalytic processes, namely TiO2 photocatalysis and photo-Fenton. Complex water matrices with high loads of pathogens and chemical pollutants negatively affect the efficiency of disinfection and pollutant removal. This is due to competition between chemical substances and pathogens for generated ROS. Other possible negative effects include light screening, competitive photon absorption, adsorption on the catalyst surface (thereby inhibiting its photocatalytic activity), etc. Besides, some matrix components may serve as nutrients for pathogens, thus hindering the disinfection process. Each type of water/wastewater would require a tailor-made approach and the variables that were shown to influence the processes-catalyst/oxidant concentrations, incident radiation flux, and pH-need to be adjusted in order to achieve the required degree of pollutant and pathogen removal. Overall, the solar-enhanced AOPs hold promise as an environmentally-friendly way to substitute or supplement conventional water/wastewater treatment, particularly in areas without access to centralized drinking water or sewage/wastewater treatment facilities.

  1. Solar-Enhanced Advanced Oxidation Processes for Water Treatment: Simultaneous Removal of Pathogens and Chemical Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Tsydenova, Oyuna; Batoev, Valeriy; Batoeva, Agniya

    2015-01-01

    The review explores the feasibility of simultaneous removal of pathogens and chemical pollutants by solar-enhanced advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The AOPs are based on in-situ generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), most notably hydroxyl radicals •OH, that are capable of destroying both pollutant molecules and pathogen cells. The review presents evidence of simultaneous removal of pathogens and chemical pollutants by photocatalytic processes, namely TiO2 photocatalysis and photo-Fenton. Complex water matrices with high loads of pathogens and chemical pollutants negatively affect the efficiency of disinfection and pollutant removal. This is due to competition between chemical substances and pathogens for generated ROS. Other possible negative effects include light screening, competitive photon absorption, adsorption on the catalyst surface (thereby inhibiting its photocatalytic activity), etc. Besides, some matrix components may serve as nutrients for pathogens, thus hindering the disinfection process. Each type of water/wastewater would require a tailor-made approach and the variables that were shown to influence the processes—catalyst/oxidant concentrations, incident radiation flux, and pH—need to be adjusted in order to achieve the required degree of pollutant and pathogen removal. Overall, the solar-enhanced AOPs hold promise as an environmentally-friendly way to substitute or supplement conventional water/wastewater treatment, particularly in areas without access to centralized drinking water or sewage/wastewater treatment facilities. PMID:26287222

  2. Concentrating solar power (CSP) power cycle improvements through application of advanced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siefert, John A.; Libby, Cara; Shingledecker, John

    2016-05-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) systems with thermal energy storage (TES) capability offer unique advantages to other renewable energy technologies in that solar radiation can be captured and stored for utilization when the sun is not shining. This makes the technology attractive as a dispatchable resource, and as such the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been engaged in research and development activities to understand and track the technology, identify key technical challenges, and enable improvements to meet future cost and performance targets to enable greater adoption of this carbon-free energy resource. EPRI is also involved with technically leading a consortium of manufacturers, government labs, and research organizations to enable the next generation of fossil fired power plants with advanced ultrasupercritical (A-USC) steam temperatures up to 760°C (1400°F). Materials are a key enabling technology for both of these seemingly opposed systems. This paper discusses how major strides in structural materials for A-USC fossil fired power plants may be translated into improved CSP systems which meet target requirements.

  3. Advanced passivation techniques for Si solar cells with high-κ dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Huijuan; Hwang, Huey-Liang; Kyznetsov, Fedor A.; Smirnova, Tamara P.; Saraev, Andrey A.; Kaichev, Vasily V.

    2014-09-22

    Electronic recombination losses at the wafer surface significantly reduce the efficiency of Si solar cells. Surface passivation using a suitable thin dielectric layer can minimize the recombination losses. Herein, advanced passivation using simple materials (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, HfO{sub 2}) and their compounds H{sub (Hf)}A{sub (Al)}O deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) was investigated. The chemical composition of Hf and Al oxide films were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS depth profiles exhibit continuous uniform dense layers. The ALD-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film has been found to provide negative fixed charge (−6.4 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}), whereas HfO{sub 2} film provides positive fixed charge (3.2 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2}). The effective lifetimes can be improved after oxygen gas annealing for 1 min. I-V characteristics of Si solar cells with high-κ dielectric materials as passivation layers indicate that the performance is significantly improved, and ALD-HfO{sub 2} film would provide better passivation properties than that of the ALD-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film in this research work.

  4. Use of solar advanced oxidation processes for wastewater treatment: Follow-up on degradation products, acute toxicity, genotoxicity and estrogenicity.

    PubMed

    Brienza, M; Mahdi Ahmed, M; Escande, A; Plantard, G; Scrano, L; Chiron, S; Bufo, S A; Goetz, V

    2016-04-01

    Wastewater tertiary treatment by advanced oxidation processes is thought to produce a treated effluent with lower toxicity than the initial influent. Here we performed tertiary treatment of a secondary effluent collected from a Waste Water Treatment Plant via homogeneous (solar/HSO5(-)/Fe(2+)) and heterogeneous (solar/TiO2) solar advanced oxidation aiming at the assessment of their effectiveness in terms of contaminants' and toxicity abatement in a plain solar reactor. A total of 53 organic contaminants were qualitatively identified by liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry after solid phase extraction. Solar advanced oxidation totally or partially removed the major part of contaminants detected within 4.5 h. Standard toxicity tests were performed using Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Brachionus calyciflorus organisms to evaluate acute and chronic toxicity in the secondary or tertiary effluents, and the EC50% was calculated. Estrogenic and genotoxic tests were carried out in an attempt to obtain an even sharper evaluation of potential hazardous effects due to micropollutants or their degradation by-products in wastewater. Genotoxic effects were not detected in effluent before or after treatment. However, we observed relevant estrogenic activity due to the high sensitivity of the HELN ERα cell line.

  5. DYANA - An advanced programming system for large classes of dynamic and equivalent systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Cormick, W. J.

    1967-01-01

    DYANA /dynamic analyzer/ is an advanced programming system which performs automatically the computing of a problem, as well as a major portion of the programming and analysis. The system is divided into time response and frequency response of dynamic and equivalent systems.

  6. Dynamics of Complexity and Accuracy: A Longitudinal Case Study of Advanced Untutored Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polat, Brittany; Kim, Youjin

    2014-01-01

    This longitudinal case study follows a dynamic systems approach to investigate an under-studied research area in second language acquisition, the development of complexity and accuracy for an advanced untutored learner of English. Using the analytical tools of dynamic systems theory (Verspoor et al. 2011) within the framework of complexity,…

  7. Dynamics and Thermodynamics of the Corona Observed During the Total Solar Eclipse of 20 March 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habbal, S. R.; Ding, A.; Druckmuller, M.; Johnson, J.; Morgan, H.; Arndt, M. B.; Alzate, N.; Hutton, J.

    2015-12-01

    Total solar eclipse observations are snapshots of the instantaneous dynamic state of the corona, and each observation never fails to yield surprises. Occurring at the declining phase of solar cycle 24, the 20 March 2015 total solar eclipse was no exception. Images taken through narrow bandpass filters centered on the Fe XIV 530.3 nm and Fe XI 789.2 nm coronal emission lines, showed a corona dominated by strong Fe XIV emission, with a peak ionization temperature of 1.8 MK, and with weak Fe XI emission at 1.1 MK, present mostly over the two poles. Simultaneous imaging spectroscopy through a dual channel high-resolution spectrometer, centered on these two wavelengths, revealed Doppler red shifts exceeding 1000 km/s in the extended corona, covering a distance range of up to 1.5 solar radii above the solar surface. These redshifts together with the observed Doppler broadening could be assigned to specific coronal structures, which were observed simultaneously in high resolution white light images. By comparing these observations with contemporaneous observations from SDO, SWAP/Proba2 and LASCO/C2 and C3, the dynamics of the coronal plasma, as well as its thermodynamics, could be mapped in a region of space, untenable to present-day observatories. These latest eclipse observations underscore the unique scientific opportunities accessible with similar instrumentation during the all-american 21 August 2017 total solar eclipse.

  8. Dynamics and control of flexible spinning solar sails under reflectivity modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Junshan; Gong, Shengping; Ma, Pengbin; Li, Junfeng

    2015-10-01

    Electrochromic devices have been used for the attitude control of a spinning solar sail in a deep space mission by modulating the reflectivity of the sail membrane. As a flexible spinning solar sail has no rigid structure to support its membrane, the distributed load due to solar radiation will lead to the deformation of the sail membrane, and the control torque generated by reflectivity modulation can introduce oscillatory motion to the membrane. By contrast, the deformation and oscillatory motion of the sail membrane have an impact on the performance of the reflectivity control. This paper investigates the dynamics and control of flexible spinning solar sails under reflectivity modulation. The static deformation of a spinning sail membrane subjected to solar radiation pressure in an equilibrium state is analyzed. The von Karman theory is used to obtain the displacements and the stress distribution in the equilibrium states. A simplified analytical first-order mode is chosen to model the membrane oscillation. The coupled membrane oscillation-attitude-orbit dynamics are considered for a GeoSail formation flying mission. The relative attitude and orbit control of flexible spinning solar sails under reflectivity modulation are numerically tested. The simulations indicate that the membrane deformation and oscillation have a lower impact on the control of the reflectivity modulated sails than the increase of the spinning rate.

  9. Report from solar physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, A. B. C.; Acton, L.; Brueckner, G.; Chupp, E. L.; Hudson, H. S.; Roberts, W.

    1989-01-01

    A discussion of the nature of solar physics is followed by a brief review of recent advances in the field. These advances include: the first direct experimental confirmation of the central role played by thermonuclear processes in stars; the discovery that the 5-minute oscillations of the Sun are a global seismic phenomenon that can be used as a probe of the structure and dynamical behavior of the solar interior; the discovery that the solar magnetic field is subdivided into individual flux tubes with field strength exceeding 1000 gauss. Also covered was a science strategy for pure solar physics. Brief discussions are given of solar-terrestrial physics, solar/stellar relationships, and suggested space missions.

  10. The effects of regional insolation differences upon advanced solar thermal electric power plant performance and energy costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latta, A. F.; Bowyer, J. M.; Fujita, T.; Richter, P. H.

    1979-01-01

    The performance and cost of the 10 MWe advanced solar thermal electric power plants sited in various regions of the continental United States were determined. The regional insolation data base is discussed. A range for the forecast cost of conventional electricity by region and nationally over the next several cades are presented.

  11. Advanced Undergraduate and Early Graduate Physics Students' Misconception about Solar Wind Flow: Evidence of Students' Difficulties in Distinguishing Paradigms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Nicholas A.; Lopez, Ramon E.

    2009-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence has suggested that advanced undergraduate students confuse the spiral structure of the interplanetary magnetic field with the flow of the solar wind. Though it is a small study, this paper documents this misconception and begins to investigate the underlying issues behind it. We present evidence that the traditional presentation…

  12. Collisional dynamics of perturbed particle disks in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, William W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical and computational studies were carried out on galactic and planetary disks. With the goal of addressing important open questions centered on galactic structure, the cloudy interstellar medium, giant molecular clouds, and star formation in galactic disks and the collisional dynamics of perturbed particulate matter in planetary disks, focus was largely on the self-gravitational effects, dissipative effects, and collisional dynamics of cloud-particle disks. N-body, 'cloud-particle' computational algorithms were developed for the purpose of isolating the role of gaseous self gravity from the roles of other dominant physical mechanisms and dynamical processes, e.g. the collisional dynamics and dissipative processes. The efforts focused largely on galactic disks show that observational constraints provide stringent tests of the numerical simulation techniques developed. Self gravitational effects of the galactic interstellar medium's gas clouds are included by means of Fourier Transform technique.

  13. Hydrothermal fabrication of selectively doped organic assisted advanced ZnO nanomaterial for solar driven photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Namratha, K; Byrappa, K; Byrappa, S; Venkateswarlu, P; Rajasekhar, D; Deepthi, B K

    2015-08-01

    Hydrothermal fabrication of selectively doped (Ag(+)+Pd(3+)) advanced ZnO nanomaterial has been carried out under mild pressure temperature conditions (autogeneous; 150°C). Gluconic acid has been used as a surface modifier to effectively control the particle size and morphology of these ZnO nanoparticles. The experimental parameters were tuned to achieve optimum conditions for the synthesis of selectively doped ZnO nanomaterials with an experimental duration of 4 hr. These selectively doped ZnO nanoparticles were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-Vis spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The solar driven photocatalytic studies have been carried out for organic dyes, i.e., Procion MX-5B dye, Cibacron Brilliant Yellow dye, Indigo Carmine dye, separately and all three mixed, by using gluconic acid modified selectively doped advanced ZnO nanomaterial. The influence of catalyst, its concentration and initial dye concentration resulted in the photocatalytic efficiency of 89% under daylight.

  14. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    2002-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the second quarter of the first year of NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program (SECTP) contract 'The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere,' NAS5-99188, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation. and covers the period November 16, 1999 to February 15, 2000. Under this contract SAIC and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) model. The topics studied include: the effect of emerging flux on the stability of helmet streamers, coronal loops and streamers, the solar magnetic field, the solar wind, and open magnetic field lines.

  15. Comparative Solar Wind Properties at 9AU between the maximum and late declining phases of the Solar Cycle and possible implications for the magnetospheric dynamics of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Went, D. R.; Jackman, C. M.; Forsyth, R. J.; Dougherty, M. K.; Crary, F. J.

    2009-04-01

    We compare and contrast the general plasma and magnetic field properties of the solar wind upstream of Saturn (8.5-9.5 AU) at solar maximum (Pioneer-11 encounter) and the late-declining (Cassini approach) phase of the solar cycle. In both cases we find a highly structured solar wind dominated by co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs), merged interaction regions (MIRs) and Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) that temporarily disrupt an otherwise clear two sector interplanetary magnetic field structure. Solar rotations generally contain two CIR compressions with embedded crossings of the heliospheric current sheet. There is no conclusive evidence for (persistent) departures from the Parker Spiral IMF model in this region of the heliosphere at either phase of the solar cycle, consistent with previous analyses (Thomas and Smith 1980, Jackman et al. 2008). However it is clear that average plasma properties vary significantly between the maximum and late declining phases of the cycle and there are a number of small but notable deviations. In particular, the average dynamic pressure of the solar wind varies by a factor of roughly two between solar maximum and solar minimum with potentially important consequences for the dynamics of Saturn's magnetosphere. These consequences should become apparent as Cassini enters its extended Equinox Mission which should encompass the rising phase and eventually maximum of Solar Cycle 24. They will be discussed and predictions will be made for future Cassini observations.

  16. NASA solar dynamic ground test demonstration (GTD) program and its application to space nuclear power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, William B.; Shaltens, Richard K.

    1993-01-01

    Closed Brayton cycle power conversion systems are readily adaptable to any heat source contemplated for space application. The inert gas working fluid can be used directly in gas-cooled reactors and coupled to a variety of heat sources (reactor, isotope or solar) by a heat exchanger. This point is demonstrated by the incorporation in the NASA 2 kWe Solar Dynamic (SD) Space Power Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) Program of the turboalternator-compressor and recuperator from the Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) program. This paper will review the goals and status of the SD GTD Program, initiated in April 1992. The performance of the BIPS isotope-heated system will be compared to the solar-heated GTD system incorporating the BIPS components and the applicability of the GTD test bed to dynamics space nuclear power R&D will be discussed.

  17. Industry Perspectives on Advanced Inverters for U.S. Solar Photovoltaic Systems. Grid Benefits, Deployment Challenges, and Emerging Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, Emerson; Ardani, Kristen; Margolis, Robert; Edge, Ryan

    2015-09-01

    To clarify current utility strategies and other considerations related to advanced inverter deployment, we interviewed 20 representatives from 11 leading organizations closely involved with advanced inverter pilot testing, protocols, and implementation. Included were representatives from seven utilities, a regional transmission operator, an inverter manufacturer, a leading solar developer, and a consortium for grid codes and standards. Interview data represent geographically the advanced inverter activities identified in SEPA's prior survey results--most interviewed utilities serve California, Arizona, and Hawaii, though we also interviewed others from the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, and Southeast.

  18. Urey Prize Lecture - Chaotic dynamics in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisdom, Jack

    1987-01-01

    Attention is given to solar system cases in which chaotic solutions of Newton's equations are important, as in chaotic rotation and orbital evolution. Hyperion is noted to be tumbling chaotically; chaotic orbital evolution is suggested to be of fundamental importance to an accounting for the Kirkwood gaps in asteroid distribution and for the phase space boundary of the chaotic zone at the 3/1 mean-motion commensurability with Jupiter. In addition, chaotic trajectories in the 2/1 chaotic zone reach very high eccentricities by a route that carries them to high inclinations temporarily.

  19. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1998-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the first year of the NASA Space Physics Theory contract between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation. Under this contract SAIC, the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model. During the period covered by this report we have published 26 articles in the scientific literature. These publications are listed in Section 4 of this report. In the Appendix we have attached reprints of selected articles.

  20. Viking radio science data analysis and synthesis. [rotation of Mars, solar system dynamics, and gravitational laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. I.

    1984-01-01

    The rotational motion of Mars and its geophysical ramifications were investigated. Solar system dynamics and the laws of gravitation were also studied. The planetary ephemeris program, which was the central element in data analysis for this project, is described in brief. Viking Lander data were used in the investigation.

  1. Evaluation of alternative phase change materials for energy storage in solar dynamic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, R. A.; Dustin, M. O.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of fluoride salt and metallic thermal energy storage materials are compared in terms of basic performance as applied to solar dynamic power generation. Specific performance considerations include uniformity of cycle inlet temperature, peak cavity temperature, TES utilization, and system weights. Also investigated were means of enhancing the thermal conductivity of the salts and its effect on the system performance.

  2. The effect of the low Earth orbit environment on space solar cells: Results of the advanced photovoltaic experiment (S0014)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinker, David J.; Hickey, John R.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Photovoltaic Experiment (APEX), containing over 150 solar cells and sensors, was designed to generate laboratory reference standards as well as to explore the durability of a wide variety of space solar cells. Located on the leading edge of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), APEX received the maximum possible dosage of atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation, as well as enormous numbers of impacts from micrometeoroids and debris. The effect of the low earth orbital (LEO) environment on the solar cells and materials of APEX will be discussed in this paper. The on-orbit performance of the solar cells, as well as a comparison of pre- and postflight laboratory performance measurements, will be presented.

  3. Advancements in dynamic kill calculations for blowout wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kouba, G.E. . Production Fluids Div.); MacDougall, G.R. ); Schumacher, B.W. . Information Technology Dept.)

    1993-09-01

    This paper addresses the development, interpretation, and use of dynamic kill equations. To this end, three simple calculation techniques are developed for determining the minimum dynamic kill rate. Two techniques contain only single-phase calculations and are independent of reservoir inflow performance. Despite these limitations, these two methods are useful for bracketing the minimum flow rates necessary to kill a blowing well. For the third technique, a simplified mechanistic multiphase-flow model is used to determine a most-probable minimum kill rate.

  4. Advanced radial inflow turbine rotor program: Design and dynamic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, C.

    1976-01-01

    The advancement of small, cooled, radial inflow turbine technology in the area of operation at higher turbine inlet temperature is discussed. The first step was accomplished by designing, fabricating, and subjecting to limited mechanical testing an advanced gas generator rotating assembly comprising a radial inflow turbine and two-stage centrifugal compressor. The radial inflow turbine and second-stage compressor were designed as an integrally machined monorotor with turbine cooling taking place basically by conduction to the compressor. Design turbine inlet rotor gas temperature, rotational speed, and overall gas generator compressor pressure ratio were 1422 K (2560 R), 71,222 rpm, and 10/1 respectively. Mechanical testing on a fabricated rotating assembly and bearing system covered 1,000 cold start/stop cycles and three spins to 120 percent design speed (85,466 rpm).

  5. Coupled orbit-attitude dynamics and relative state estimation of spacecraft near small Solar System bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Gaurav; Izadi, Maziar; Sanyal, Amit; Scheeres, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The effects of dynamical coupling between the rotational (attitude) and translational (orbital) motion of spacecraft near small Solar System bodies is investigated. This coupling arises due to the weak gravity of these bodies, as well as solar radiation pressure. The traditional approach assumes a point-mass spacecraft model to describe the translational motion of the spacecraft, while the attitude motion is considered to be completely decoupled from the translational motion. The model used here to describe the rigid-body spacecraft dynamics includes the non-uniform rotating gravity field of the small body up to second degree and order along with the attitude dependent terms, solar tide, and solar radiation pressure. This model shows that the second degree and order gravity terms due to the small body affect the dynamics of the spacecraft to the same extent as the orbit-attitude coupling due to the primary gravity (zeroth order) term. Variational integrators are used to simulate the dynamics of both the rigid spacecraft and the point mass. The small bodies considered here are modeled after Near-Earth Objects (NEO) 101955 Bennu, and 25143 Itokawa, and are assumed to be triaxial ellipsoids with uniform density. Differences in the numerically obtained trajectories of a rigid spacecraft and a point mass are then compared, to illustrate the impact of the orbit-attitude coupling on spacecraft dynamics in proximity of small bodies. Possible implications on the performance of model-based spacecraft control and on the station-keeping budget, if the orbit-attitude coupling is not accounted for in the model of the dynamics, are also discussed. An almost globally asymptotically stable motion estimation scheme based solely on visual/optical feedback that estimates the relative motion of the asteroid with respect to the spacecraft is also obtained. This estimation scheme does not require a model of the dynamics of the asteroid, which makes it perfectly suited for asteroids whose

  6. Sensible heat receiver for solar dynamic space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Gaier, James R.; Petrefski, Chris

    1991-01-01

    A sensible heat receiver is considered which uses a vapor grown carbon fiber-carbon (VGCF/C) composite as the thermal storage medium and which was designed for a 7-kW Brayton engine. This heat receiver stores the required energy to power the system during eclipse in the VGCF/C composite. The heat receiver thermal analysis was conducted through the Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer and Fluid Integrator (SINDA) software package. The sensible heat receiver compares well with other latent and advanced sensible heat receivers analyzed in other studies, while avoiding the problems associated with latent heat storage salts and liquid metal heat pipes. The concept also satisfies the design requirements for a 7-kW Brayton engine system. The weight and size of the system can be optimized by changes in geometry and technology advances for this new material.

  7. Sensible heat receiver for solar dynamic space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Gaier, James R.; Petrefski, Chris

    1991-01-01

    A sensible heat receiver considered in this study uses a vapor grown carbon fiber-carbon (VGCF/C) composite as the thermal storage media and was designed for a 7 kW Brayton engine. The proposed heat receiver stores the required energy to power the system during eclipse in the VGCF/C composite. The heat receiver thermal analysis was conducted through the Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer and Fluid Integrator (SINDA) software package. The sensible heat receiver compares well with other latent and advanced sensible heat receivers analyzed in other studies while avoiding the problems associated with latent heat storage salts and liquid metal heat pipes. The concept also satisfies the design requirements for a 7 kW Brayton engine system. The weight and size of the system can be optimized by changes in geometry and technology advances for this new material.

  8. Dynamical Changes Induced by the Very Large Solar Proton Events in October-November 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Roble, Raymond G.

    2006-01-01

    The very large solar storms in October-November 2003 caused solar proton events (SPEs) at the Earth and impacted the upper atmospheric polar cap regions. The Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamic General Circulation Mode (TIME-GCM) was used to study the atmospheric dynamical influence of the solar protons that occurred in Oct-Nov 2003, the fourth largest period of SPEs measured in the past 40 years. The highly energetic solar protons caused ionization and changes in the electric field, which led to Joule heating of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. This heating led to temperature increases up to 4K in the upper mesosphere. The solar proton-induced ionization, as well as dissociation processes, led to the production of odd hydrogen (HO(x)) and odd nitrogen (NO(y)). Substantial (>40%) short-lived ozone decreases followed these enhancements of HO(x) and NO(y) and led to a cooling of the mesosphere and upper stratosphere. This cooling led to temperature decreases up to 2.5K. The solar proton-caused temperature changes led to maximum meridional and zonal wind variations of +/- 2 m/s on background winds up to +/- 30 m/s. The solar proton-induced wind perturbations were computed to taper off over a period of several days past the SPEs. Solar cycle 23 was accompanied by ten very large SPEs between 1998 and 2005, along with numerous smaller events. These solar proton-driven atmospheric variations need to be carefully considered when examining other polar changes.

  9. Heating and Large Scale Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnack, Dalton D.

    2000-01-01

    The effort was concentrated in the areas: coronal heating mechanism, unstructured adaptive grid algorithms, numerical modeling of magnetic reconnection in the MRX experiment: effect of toroidal magnetic field and finite pressure, effect of OHMIC heating and vertical magnetic field, effect of dynamic MESH adaption.

  10. Analysis of solar receiver flux distributions for US/Russian solar dynamic system demonstration on the MIR Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Fincannon, James

    1995-01-01

    The United States and Russia have agreed to jointly develop a solar dynamic (SD) system for flight demonstration on the Russian MIR space station starting in late 1997. Two important components of this SD system are the solar concentrator and heat receiver provided by Russia and the U.S., respectively. This paper describes optical analysis of the concentrator and solar flux predictions on target receiver surfaces. The optical analysis is performed using the code CIRCE2. These analyses account for finite sun size with limb darkening, concentrator surface slope and position errors, concentrator petal thermal deformation, gaps between petals, and the shading effect of the receiver support struts. The receiver spatial flux distributions are then combined with concentrator shadowing predictions. Geometric shadowing patterns are traced from the concentrator to the target receiver surfaces. These patterns vary with time depending on the chosen MIR flight attitude and orbital mechanics of the MIR spacecraft. The resulting predictions provide spatial and temporal receiver flux distributions for any specified mission profile. The impact these flux distributions have on receiver design and control of the Brayton engine are discussed.

  11. Dynamical fate of wide binaries in the solar neighborhood

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, M.D.; Shapiro, S.L.; Wasserman, I.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical model is presented for the evolution of wide binaries in the Galaxy. The study is pertinent to the postulated solar companion, Nemesis, which may disturb the Oort cloud and cause catastrophic comet showers to strike the earth every 26 Myr. Distant gravitational encounters are modeled by Fokker-Planck coefficients for advection and diffusion of the orbital binding energy. It is shown that encounters with passing stars cause a diffusive evolution of the binding energy and semimajor axis. Encounters with subclumps in giant molecular clouds disrupt orbits to a degree dependent on the cumulative number of stellar encounters. The time scales of the vents and the limitations of scaling laws used are discussed. Results are provided from calculations of galactic distribution of wide binaries and the evolution of wide binary orbits. 38 references.

  12. Open issues in connecting magnetospheric dynamics to their solar drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourlidas, A.

    2015-12-01

    The inner heliospheric evolution of CMEs, the main drivers of Space Weather, is no longer a mystery, thanks to the STEREO observations. The initiation of these events can now be observed with cadence of tens of seconds with arc second resolution, thanks to SDO. The flow of energy required to power solar eruptions is beginning to be understood, thanks to Hinode and IRIS. Yet, there is relatively little progress in predicting the geoeffectiveness of a particular CME. Why is that? What are the issues that holding back progress in medium-term forecasting of Space Weather? I discuss some of the issues (e.g., Bz, drag) and possible mitigation strategies in this talk.

  13. Deployment dynamics of a simplified spinning IKAROS solar sail via absolute coordinate based method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiang; Tian, Qiang; Hu, Hai-Yan

    2013-02-01

    The spinning solar sail of large scale has been well developed in recent years. Such a solar sail can be considered as a rigid-flexible multibody system mainly composed of a spinning central rigid hub, a number of flexible thin tethers, sail membranes, and tip masses. A simplified interplanetary kite-craft accelerated by radiation of the Sun (IKAROS) model is established in this study by using the absolute-coordinate-based (ACB) method that combines the natural coordinate formulation (NCF) describing the central rigid hub and the absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF) describing flexible parts. The initial configuration of the system in the second-stage deployment is determined through both dynamic and static analyses. The huge set of stiff equations of system dynamics is solved by using the generalized-alpha method, and thus the deployment dynamics of the system can be well understood.

  14. Dynamic modeling and sensitivity analysis of solar thermal energy conversion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    Since the energy input to solar thermal conversion systems is both time variant and probabilistic, it is unlikely that simple steady-state methods for estimating lifetime performance will provide satisfactory results. The work described here uses dynamic modeling to begin identifying what must be known about input radiation and system dynamic characteristics to estimate performance reliably. Daily operation of two conceptual solar energy systems was simulated under varying operating strategies with time-dependent radiation intensity ranging from smooth input of several magnitudes to input of constant total energy whose intensity oscillated with periods from 1/4 hour to 6 hours. Integrated daily system output and efficiency were functions of both level and dynamic characteristics of insolation. Sensitivity of output to changes in total input was greater than one.

  15. Variations of energetic electrons associated with solar wind dynamic pressure enhancement in the outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Lee, E.; Kim, K. H.; Lee, D. H.; Lee, J.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's outer radiation belt varies dynamically under the variations of the solar wind. In this study, we investigated the variations of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt caused by an enhancement of the solar wind dynamic pressure associated with an interplanetary shock using the measurements from the Van Allen Probes (VAP) satellites. The enhanced dynamic pressure lasted for about 24 hours, but magnetic storm was not occurred. The impact of the interplanetary shock on 13 April 2013 produced dipolarization of the magnetic field for a few minutes, which was simultaneously observed by VAP A and B moving in the nightside region. The enhancement of the electron fluxes with E < ~600 keV coincidentally occurred during the dipolarization. Later, drift echoes with energy dispersion and ULF-like modulations were observed. By comparing the measurements from VAP A and B we will discuss spatial and temporal characteristics of the enhancement of the energetic electron fluxes.

  16. Global Magnetic Topology and Large-Scale Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Viacheslav; Linker, Jon; Mikic, Zoran; Riley, Pete; Lionello, Roberto; Downs, Cooper; Torok, Tibor

    We consider the global topology of the coronal magnetic field in relation to the large-scale dynamics of the solar corona. Our consideration includes recent results on the structural analysis of this field determined in two different approximations, namely, potential field source surface model and solar magnetohydrodynamic model. We identify similarities and differences between structural features of the magnetic field obtained in these two models and discuss their implications for understanding various large-scale phenomena in the solar corona. The underlying magnetic topology manifests itself in a variety of observed morphological features such as streamers, pseudo-streamers or unipolar streamers, EUV dimmings, flare ribbons, coronal holes, and jets. For each of them, the related magnetic configuration has specific structural features, whose presence has to be not only identified but also verified on its independence from the used field model in order to reliably predict the impact of such features on physical processes in the corona. Among them are magnetic null points and minima, bald patches, separatrix surfaces and quasi-separatrix layers, and open and closed separator field lines. These features form a structural skeleton of the coronal magnetic field and are directly involved through the ubiquitous process of magnetic reconnection in many solar dynamic phenomena such as coronal mass ejections, solar wind, acceleration and transport of energetic particles. We will pinpoint and elucidate in our overview some of such involvements that have recently received a considerable attention in our ongoing projects at Predictive Science.

  17. A STATISTICAL SURVEY OF DYNAMIC PRESSURE PULSES IN THE SOLAR WIND BASED ON WIND OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Pingbing; Feng, Xueshang; Wang, Yi; Xie, Yanqiong; Xu, Xiaojun E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2015-07-20

    Solar wind dynamic pressure pulse (DPP) structures, across which the dynamic pressure changes abruptly over timescales from a few seconds to several minutes, are often observed in the near-Earth space environment. The space weather effects of DPPs on the magnetosphere–ionosphere coupling system have been widely investigated in the last two decades. In this study, we perform a statistical survey on the properties of DPPs near 1 AU based on nearly 20 years of observations from the WIND spacecraft. It is found that only a tiny fraction of DPPs (around 4.2%) can be regarded as interplanetary shocks. For most DPPs, the total pressure (the sum of the thermal pressure and magnetic pressure) remains in equilibrium, but there also exists a small fraction of DPPs that are not pressure-balanced. The overwhelming majority of DPPs are associated with solar wind disturbances, including coronal mass ejection-related flows, corotating interaction regions, as well as complex ejecta. The annual variations of the averaged occurrence rate of DPPs are roughly in phase with the solar activity during solar cycle 23, and during the rising phase of solar cycle 24.

  18. Recent advances in structural dynamics of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Larry D.

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in the area of structural dynamics of large space structures is reviewed. Topics include system identification, large angle slewing of flexible structures, definition of scaling limitations in structural models, and recent results on a tension-stabilized antenna concept known as the hoop-column. Increasingly complex laboratory experiments guide most of the activities leading to realistic technological developments. Theoretical progress in system identification based on system realization theory resulting in unification of several methods is reviewed. Experimental results from implementation of a theoretical large-angle slewing control approach are shown. Status and results of the development of a research computer program for analysis of the transient dynamics of large angle motion of flexible structures are presented. Correlation of results from analysis and vibration tests of the hoop-column antenna concept are summarized.

  19. Recent advances in structural dynamics of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Larry D.

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in the area of structural dynamics of large space structures is reviewed. Topics include system identification, large angle slewing of flexible structures, definition of scaling limitations in structural models, and recent results on a tension-stabilized antenna concept known as the hoop-column. Increasingly complex laboratory experiments guide most of the activities leading to realistic technological developments. Theoretical progress in system identification based on system realization theory resulting in unification of several methods is reviewed. Experimental results from implementation of a theoretical large-angle slewing control approach are shown. Status and results of the development of a research computer program for analysis of the transient dynamics of large angle motion of flexible structures are presented. Correlation of results from analysis and vibration tests of the hoop-column antenna concepts are summarized.

  20. Decontamination of soil washing wastewater using solar driven advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Bandala, Erick R; Velasco, Yuridia; Torres, Luis G

    2008-12-30

    Decontamination of soil washing wastewater was performed using two different solar driven advanced oxidation processes (AOPs): the photo-Fenton reaction and the cobalt/peroxymonosulfate/ultraviolet (Co/PMS/UV) process. Complete sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), the surfactant agent used to enhance soil washing process, degradation was achieved when the Co/PMS/UV process was used. In the case of photo-Fenton reaction, almost complete SDS degradation was achieved after the use of almost four times the actual energy amount required by the Co/PMS/UV process. Initial reaction rate in the first 15min (IR15) was determined for each process in order to compare them. Highest IR15 value was determined for the Co/PMS/UV process (0.011mmol/min) followed by the photo-Fenton reaction (0.0072mmol/min) and the dark Co/PMS and Fenton processes (IR15=0.002mmol/min in both cases). Organic matter depletion in the wastewater, as the sum of surfactant and total petroleum hydrocarbons present (measured as chemical oxygen demand, COD), was also determined for both solar driven processes. It was found that, for the case of COD, the highest removal (69%) was achieved when photo-Fenton reaction was used whereas Co/PMS/UV process yielded a slightly lower removal (51%). In both cases, organic matter removal achieved was over 50%, which can be consider proper for the coupling of the tested AOPs with conventional wastewater treatment processes such as biodegradation.

  1. Decontamination of soil washing wastewater using solar driven advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Bandala, Erick R; Velasco, Yuridia; Torres, Luis G

    2008-12-30

    Decontamination of soil washing wastewater was performed using two different solar driven advanced oxidation processes (AOPs): the photo-Fenton reaction and the cobalt/peroxymonosulfate/ultraviolet (Co/PMS/UV) process. Complete sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), the surfactant agent used to enhance soil washing process, degradation was achieved when the Co/PMS/UV process was used. In the case of photo-Fenton reaction, almost complete SDS degradation was achieved after the use of almost four times the actual energy amount required by the Co/PMS/UV process. Initial reaction rate in the first 15min (IR15) was determined for each process in order to compare them. Highest IR15 value was determined for the Co/PMS/UV process (0.011mmol/min) followed by the photo-Fenton reaction (0.0072mmol/min) and the dark Co/PMS and Fenton processes (IR15=0.002mmol/min in both cases). Organic matter depletion in the wastewater, as the sum of surfactant and total petroleum hydrocarbons present (measured as chemical oxygen demand, COD), was also determined for both solar driven processes. It was found that, for the case of COD, the highest removal (69%) was achieved when photo-Fenton reaction was used whereas Co/PMS/UV process yielded a slightly lower removal (51%). In both cases, organic matter removal achieved was over 50%, which can be consider proper for the coupling of the tested AOPs with conventional wastewater treatment processes such as biodegradation. PMID:18423856

  2. Advanced optical modelling of dynamically deposited silicon nitride layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borojevic, N.; Hameiri, Z.; Winderbaum, S.

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic deposition of silicon nitrides using in-line plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition systems results in non-uniform structure of the dielectric layer. Appropriate analysis of such layers requires the optical characterization to be performed as a function of the layer's depth. This work presents a method to characterize dynamically deposited silicon nitride layers. The method is based on the fitting of experimental spectroscopic ellipsometry data via grading of Tauc-Lorentz optical parameters through the depth of the layer. When compared with the standard Tauc-Lorentz fitting procedure, used in previous studies, the improved method is demonstrating better quality fits to the experimental data and revealing more accurate optical properties of the dielectric layers. The most significant advantage of the method is the ability to extract the depth profile of the optical properties along the direction of the layer normal. This is enabling a better understanding of layers deposited using dynamic plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition systems frequently used in the photovoltaic industry.

  3. Considerations of solar wind dynamics in mapping of Jupiter's auroral features to magnetospheric sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyalay, S.; Vogt, M.; Withers, P.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have mapped locations from the magnetic equator to the ionosphere in order to understand how auroral features relate to magnetospheric sources. Vogt et al. (2011) in particular mapped equatorial regions to the ionosphere by using a method of flux equivalence—requiring that the magnetic flux in a specified region at the equator is equal to the magnetic flux in the region to which it maps in the ionosphere. This is preferred to methods relying on tracing field lines from global Jovian magnetic field models, which are inaccurate beyond 30 Jupiter radii from the planet. That previous study produced a two-dimensional model—accounting for changes with radial distance and local time—of the normal component of the magnetic field in the equatorial region. However, this two-dimensional fit—which aggregated all equatorial data from Pioneer 10, Pioneer 11, Voyager 1, Voyager 2, Ulysses, and Galileo—did not account for temporal variability resulting from changing solar wind conditions. Building off of that project, this study aims to map the Jovian aurora to the magnetosphere for two separate cases: with a nominal magnetosphere, and with a magnetosphere compressed by high solar wind dynamic pressure. Using the Michigan Solar Wind Model (mSWiM) to predict the solar wind conditions upstream of Jupiter, intervals of high solar wind dynamic pressure were separated from intervals of low solar wind dynamic pressure—thus creating two datasets of magnetometer measurements to be used for two separate 2D fits, and two separate mappings.

  4. High Degree of Freedom Dynamics, Weak Chaos, and the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, William I.; Sharp, P.; Grazier, K. R.

    2008-05-01

    Sussman and Wisdom [1992] found that the outer Solar System is chaotic with a Lyapunov time of seven to twenty million years. The shortness of this Lyapunov time stimulated research on the long-term behaviour of the outer Solar System. Three important results have emerged from this research. First, for long-term simulations using symplectic methods, the timestep must be noticeably smaller than previously thought to ensure qualitative information such as the existence of chaos is correct. For example, Grazier et al. (1999) using more accurate integration approach observed that chaotic behavior disappeared when a sufficiently small time step was employed. Second, changes in the initial conditions of the order of the uncertainty in the DE405 ephemeris can create or remove chaos. Third, our models of the outer Solar System may be insufficiently robust to provide reliable information about the long-term behavior. Another aspect of the modelling that must be considered is that any realistic model of the Solar System will be a high dimensional dynamical system. This high dimensionality means the standard definitions and techniques used in chaos theory are not immediately applicable. This complication has been observed in other well-known dynamical systems, such as the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam problem (Berman and Izrailev, 2005). We show that these insights may be relevant to the simple outer solar system that is often employed, but leaves open the question of the behavior of our solar system complicated by other influences ranging from the presence of small bodies to other dynamical effects. G.P. Berman and F.M. Izrailev (2005) Chaos 15, 015104-1-18 K.R. Grazier, W.I. Newman, W.M. Kaula, and J.M. Hyman (1999). Icarus 140, 341-352. G.J. Sussman and J. Wisdom (1992). Science 257, 56-62.

  5. Structural Dynamics Testing of Advanced Stirling Convertor Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oriti, Sal; Williams, Zach

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has been supporting the development of Stirling energy conversion for use in space. Lockheed Martin has been contracted by the Department of Energy to design and fabricate flight-unit Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators, which utilize Sunpower, Inc., free-piston Advanced Stirling Convertors. The engineering unit generator has demonstrated conversion efficiency in excess of 20 percent, offering a significant improvement over existing radioisotope-fueled power systems. NASA Glenn has been supporting the development of this generator by developing the convertors through a technology development contract with Sunpower, and conducting research and experiments in a multitude of areas, such as high-temperature material properties, organics testing, and convertor-level extended operation. Since the generator must undergo launch, several launch simulation tests have also been performed at the convertor level. The standard test sequence for launch vibration exposure has consisted of workmanship and flight acceptance levels. Together, these exposures simulate what a flight convertor will experience. Recently, two supplementary tests were added to the launch vibration simulation activity. First was a vibration durability test of the convertor, intended to quantify the effect of vibration levels up to qualification level in both the lateral and axial directions. Second was qualification-level vibration of several heater heads with small oxide inclusions in the material. The goal of this test was to ascertain the effect of the inclusions on launch survivability to determine if the heater heads were suitable for flight.

  6. The onset of large-scale dynamical instability in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Holman, Matthew J.; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    Over the last two decades, evidence has mounted that the centuries-old question concerning the dynamical stability of the solar system has a straight-forward, definitive answer: with a probability of ~1%, the inner solar system may gravitationally unravel on a timescale comparable to the remaining main-sequence lifetime of the Sun. Concurrently, as the orbital distribution of extrasolar planets began to surface, it had become clear that dynamical instability is a generic process that plays a central role in shaping the architecture of planetary systems. Despite its inherent significance, an unembellished qualitative description of the onset of orbital disorder is largely missing. In this work, we will describe a purely analytical theory for the chaotic disintegration of planetary systems. Specifically, with an emphasis on the Solar System, we will delineate a perturbative model that broadly captures the onset of large-scale instability and use it to elucidate the source of Mercury's chaotic behavior, as well as estimate the corresponding Lyapunov and diffusion coefficients. Subsequently, we will present a framework for calculating the characteristic dynamical lifetime of the inner Solar System. The obtained results constitute an important step towards developing an intuitive view of the long-term evolution of planetary systems.

  7. Single File Dynamics Advances with a Focus on Biophysical Relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flomenbom, Ophir

    2014-08-01

    In this review (appearing in the Special Issue on single file dynamics in biophysics and related extensions), three recently treated variants in file dynamics are presented: files with density that is not fixed, files with heterogeneous particles, and files with slow particles. The results in these files include: • In files with a density law that is not fixed, but decays as a power law with an exponent a the distance from the origin, the particle in the origin mean square displacement (MSD) scales like MSD t[1+a]/2, with a Gaussian probability density function (PDF). This extends the scaling, MSD t1/2, seen in a constant density file. • When, in addition, the particles' diffusion coefficients are distributed like a power law with an exponent γ (around the origin), the MSD follows MSD t[1-γ]/[2/(1+a) - γ], with a Gaussian PDF. • In anomalous files that are renewal, namely, when all particles attempt a jump together, yet, with jump times taken from a PDF that decays as a power law with an exponent -1 - ɛ, ψ(t) t-1-ɛ, the MSD scales like the MSD of the corresponding normal file, in the power ɛ. • In anomalous files of independent particles, the MSD is very slow and scales like MSD log2(t). Even more exciting, the particles form clusters, defining a dynamical phase transition: depending on the anomaly power ɛ, the percentage of particles in clusters ξ follows ξ = √ {1-ǎrepsilon3}, yet when ɛ > 1, fluidity rather than clusters is seen. We talk about utilizing these results while focusing on biophysical processes and applications: dynamics in channels, membranes, biosensors, etc. Special Issue Comments: In this article, results about recently suggested variants in single file dynamics appear: heterogeneous files and slow files, yet also, the relevance with biophysical processes. It is related to the Special Issue articles about expansions in files,61 files with force,62 and the zig zag occurrences in files.63

  8. The Solar Dynamic Buffer Zone (SDBZ) curtain wall: Validation and design of a solar air collector curtain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Russell Corey

    Given the increases in both the environmental and economic costs of energy, there is a need to design and building more sustainable and low-energy building systems now. Curtain wall assemblies show great promise---the spandrel panels within them can be natural solar collectors. By using a Solar Dynamic Buffer Zone (SDBZ) in the spandrel cavity, solar energy can be efficiently gathered using the movement of air. There is a need for a numerical model capable of predicting performance of an SDBZ Curtain Wall system. This research designed, constructed and quantified a prototype SDBZ curtain wall system through by experimental testing in a laboratory environment. The laboratory experiments focussed on three main variables: air flow through the system, incoming radiation and collector surface type. Results from the experimental testing were used to validate a one-dimensional numerical model of the prototype. Results from this research show a SDBZ curtain wall system as an effective means of reducing building heating energy consumption through the preheating of incoming exterior ventilation air during the heating season in cold climates. The numerical model showed good correlation with experimental results at higher operating flows and at lower flows when using an apparent velocity at the heat transfer boundary layer. A seasonal simulation for Toronto, ON predicted energy savings of 205 kWh/m2 with an average seasonal efficiency of 28%. This is considered in the upper range when compared to other solar air collectors. Given the lack of published literature for similar systems, this research acts to introduce a simple, innovative approach to collect solar energy that would otherwise be lost to the exterior using already existing components within a curtain wall. Specifically, the research has provided: results from experiments and simulation, a first generation numerical model, aspects of design and construction of the SDBZ curtain wall and specific directions for further

  9. The Solar Dynamics Observatory: Your On-Orbit Eye on the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, W. Dean

    2011-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) was launched on February 11, 2010 into the partly cloudy skies above Cape Canaveral, Florida. Over the next month SDO moved into a 28 degree inclined geosynchronous orbit at the longitude of the ground station in New Mexico. SDO is the first Space Weather Mission in NASA's Living With a Star Program. SDO's main goal is to understand and predict those solar variations that influence life on Earth and our technological systems. The SDO science investigations will determine how the Sun's magnetic field is generated and structured, how this stored magnetic energy is released into the heliosphere as the solar wind, energetic particles, and variations in the solar irradiance. The SDO mission consists of three scientific investigations (AIA, EVE, and HMI), a spacecraft bus, and a dedicated Ka-band ground station to handle the 150 Mbps data flow. SDO continues a long tradition of NASA missions providing calibrated solar spectral irradiance data, in this case using multiple measurements of the irradiance and rocket underflights of the spacecraft. The other instruments on SDO will be used to explain and develop predictive models of the solar spectral irradiance in the extreme ultraviolet. Science teams at LMSAL, LASP, and Stanford are responsible for processing, analyzing, distributing, and archiving the science data. We will talk about the launch of SDO and describe the data and science it is providing to NASA.

  10. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran; Grebowsky, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the fourth quarter of the second year of NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program (SECTP) contract "The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere," NAS5-99188, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), and covers the period May 16, 2001 to August 15, 2001. Under this contract SAIC and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) model.

  11. SYSTEMATIC DE-SATURATION OF IMAGES FROM THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY IN THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R. A.; Torre, G.; Piana, M. E-mail: torre@dima.unige.it

    2014-10-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of solar flares provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) are often affected by saturation effects in their core, physically most interesting, region. We introduce an image reconstruction procedure that allows recovering information in the primary saturation domain using the secondary images produced by the diffraction fringes as input data. Such a procedure is based on standard image-processing tools like correlation, convolution, and back-projection. Its effectiveness is tested in the case of AIA/SDO observations of the 2013 July 8 flaring event.

  12. The Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase for the Solar Dynamics Observatory - A User's Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Gregory L.; Cheung, M.; Hurlburt, N.; Schrijver, C.; Somani, A.; Freeland, S. L.; Timmons, R.; Kobashi, A.; Serafin, J.; Schiff, D.; Seguin, R.

    2010-05-01

    The recently launched Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) will generated over 2 petabytes of imagery in its 5 year mission. The Heliophysics Events Knowledgebase (HEK) system has been developed to continuously build a database of solar features and events contributed by a combination of machine recognition algorithms run on every single image, and human interactive data exploration. Access to this growing database is provided through a set of currently existing tools as well as an open source API. We present an overview of the user interface tools including illustrative examples of their use.

  13. The Key Role of Solar Dynamics in the Chromospheric Hanle Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlin, E. S.; Bianda, M.

    2016-11-01

    The quantum theory of polarized light allows one to model scattering in the solar atmosphere for inferring its properties. This powerful approach has revealed two key long-standing problems in solar physics: the puzzling dilemmas between theory and observations in several anomalously polarized spectral lines and the need for inferring the ubiquitous weak chromospheric magnetic fields, which requires discriminating the Hanle effect in dynamic optically thick plasmas. However, the ever-present dynamics, i.e., the temporal evolution of heatings and macroscopic motions, has been widely disregarded when modeling and interpreting the scattering polarization. This has hindered a consistent theoretical solution to the puzzle while falsifying the Hanle diagnosis. Here, we show that the dynamical evolution is a keystone for solving both problems because its systematic impact allows an explanation of the observations from “anomalous” instantaneous polarization signals. Evolution accounted for, we reproduce amplitudes and (spectral and spatial) shapes of the Ca i 4227 Å polarization at solar disk center, identifying a restrictive arrangement of magnetic fields, kinematics, heatings, and spatio-temporal resolution. We find that the joint action of dynamics, Hanle effect, and low temporal resolutions mimics Zeeman linear polarization profiles, the true weak-field Zeeman signals being negligible. Our results allow reinterpretation of many polarization signals of the solar spectra and support time-dependent scattering polarization as a powerful tool for deciphering the spatio-temporal distribution of chromospheric heatings and fields. This approach may be a key aid in developing the Hanle diagnosis for the solar atmosphere.

  14. Recent advances in satellite observations of solar variability and global atmospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    The launch of Nimbus 4 in April 1974 has made possible simultaneous measurements of the ultraviolet solar irradiance and the global distribution of atmospheric ozone by the monitor of ultraviolet solar energy (MUSE) and backscatter ultraviolet (BUV) experiments respectively. Two long lived ultraviolet active solar regions which are about 180 deg apart in solar longitude were observed to be associated with central meridian passages of solar magnetic sector boundaries. The boundaries may be significant in the evaluation of correlations between solar magnetic sector structure and atmospheric circulation.

  15. Carrier dynamics and design optimization of electrolyte-induced inversion layer carbon nanotube-silicon Schottky junction solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenchao; Seol, Gyungseon; Rinzler, Andrew G.; Guo, Jing

    2012-03-01

    Carrier dynamics of the electrolyte-induced inversion layer carbon nanotube-silicon Schottky junction solar cells is explored by numerical simulations. Operation mechanisms of the solar cells with and without the electrolyte-induced inversion layer are presented and compared, which clarifies the current flow mechanisms in a solar cell with an induced inversion layer. A heavily doped back contact layer can behave as a hole block layer. In addition to lowering contact resistance and surface recombination, it is particularly useful for improving carrier separation in an electrolyte-induced inversion layer solar cell or a metal-insulator-semiconductor grating solar cell.

  16. Designing and Testing Contols to Mitigate Dynamic Loads in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.D.; Stol, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is designing, implementing, and testing advanced controls to maximize energy extraction and reduce structural dynamic loads of wind turbines. These control designs are based on a linear model of the turbine that is generated by specialized modeling software. In this paper, we show the design and simulation testing of a control algorithm to mitigate blade, tower, and drivetrain loads using advanced state-space control design methods.

  17. Dynamics of Satellites Around Asteroids in Presence of Solar Radiation Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Xiaosheng; Scheeres, Daniel J.; Hou, Xiyun; Liu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Due to the close distance to the Sun, solar radiation pressure (SRP) plays an important role in the dynamics of satellites around near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). In this paper, we focus on the equilibrium points of a satellite orbiting around an asteroid in presence of SRP in the asteroid rotating frame. The asteroid is modelled as a uniformly rotating triaxial ellipsoid. When SRP comes into play, the equilibrium points transformed into periodic orbits termed as``dynamical substitutes". We obtain the analytical approximate solutions of the dynamical substitutes from the linearised equations of motion. The analytical solutions are then used as initial guesses and are numerically corrected to compute the accurate orbits of the dynamical substitutes. The stability of the dynamical substitutes is analysed and the stability maps are obtained by varying parameters of the ellipsoid model as well as the magnitude of SRP.

  18. Dynamic properties of small-scale solar wind plasma fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Riazantseva, M O; Budaev, V P; Zelenyi, L M; Zastenker, G N; Pavlos, G P; Safrankova, J; Nemecek, Z; Prech, L; Nemec, F

    2015-05-13

    The paper presents the latest results of the studies of small-scale fluctuations in a turbulent flow of solar wind (SW) using measurements with extremely high temporal resolution (up to 0.03 s) of the bright monitor of SW (BMSW) plasma spectrometer operating on astrophysical SPECTR-R spacecraft at distances up to 350,000 km from the Earth. The spectra of SW ion flux fluctuations in the range of scales between 0.03 and 100 s are systematically analysed. The difference of slopes in low- and high-frequency parts of spectra and the frequency of the break point between these two characteristic slopes was analysed for different conditions in the SW. The statistical properties of the SW ion flux fluctuations were thoroughly analysed on scales less than 10 s. A high level of intermittency is demonstrated. The extended self-similarity of SW ion flux turbulent flow is constantly observed. The approximation of non-Gaussian probability distribution function of ion flux fluctuations by the Tsallis statistics shows the non-extensive character of SW fluctuations. Statistical characteristics of ion flux fluctuations are compared with the predictions of a log-Poisson model. The log-Poisson parametrization of the structure function scaling has shown that well-defined filament-like plasma structures are, as a rule, observed in the turbulent SW flows. PMID:25848078

  19. Dynamic properties of small-scale solar wind plasma fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Riazantseva, M O; Budaev, V P; Zelenyi, L M; Zastenker, G N; Pavlos, G P; Safrankova, J; Nemecek, Z; Prech, L; Nemec, F

    2015-05-13

    The paper presents the latest results of the studies of small-scale fluctuations in a turbulent flow of solar wind (SW) using measurements with extremely high temporal resolution (up to 0.03 s) of the bright monitor of SW (BMSW) plasma spectrometer operating on astrophysical SPECTR-R spacecraft at distances up to 350,000 km from the Earth. The spectra of SW ion flux fluctuations in the range of scales between 0.03 and 100 s are systematically analysed. The difference of slopes in low- and high-frequency parts of spectra and the frequency of the break point between these two characteristic slopes was analysed for different conditions in the SW. The statistical properties of the SW ion flux fluctuations were thoroughly analysed on scales less than 10 s. A high level of intermittency is demonstrated. The extended self-similarity of SW ion flux turbulent flow is constantly observed. The approximation of non-Gaussian probability distribution function of ion flux fluctuations by the Tsallis statistics shows the non-extensive character of SW fluctuations. Statistical characteristics of ion flux fluctuations are compared with the predictions of a log-Poisson model. The log-Poisson parametrization of the structure function scaling has shown that well-defined filament-like plasma structures are, as a rule, observed in the turbulent SW flows.

  20. Dynamic properties of small-scale solar wind plasma fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Riazantseva, M. O.; Budaev, V. P.; Zelenyi, L. M.; Zastenker, G. N.; Pavlos, G. P.; Safrankova, J.; Nemecek, Z.; Prech, L.; Nemec, F.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the latest results of the studies of small-scale fluctuations in a turbulent flow of solar wind (SW) using measurements with extremely high temporal resolution (up to 0.03 s) of the bright monitor of SW (BMSW) plasma spectrometer operating on astrophysical SPECTR-R spacecraft at distances up to 350 000 km from the Earth. The spectra of SW ion flux fluctuations in the range of scales between 0.03 and 100 s are systematically analysed. The difference of slopes in low- and high-frequency parts of spectra and the frequency of the break point between these two characteristic slopes was analysed for different conditions in the SW. The statistical properties of the SW ion flux fluctuations were thoroughly analysed on scales less than 10 s. A high level of intermittency is demonstrated. The extended self-similarity of SW ion flux turbulent flow is constantly observed. The approximation of non-Gaussian probability distribution function of ion flux fluctuations by the Tsallis statistics shows the non-extensive character of SW fluctuations. Statistical characteristics of ion flux fluctuations are compared with the predictions of a log-Poisson model. The log-Poisson parametrization of the structure function scaling has shown that well-defined filament-like plasma structures are, as a rule, observed in the turbulent SW flows. PMID:25848078

  1. Dynamic modelling and verification of a flat-plate solar collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ron, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    In the modelling of flat-plate solar collectors the dynamic effects have often been neglected. But because the solar collector is inherently exposed to variable weather conditions, its dynamics may be important to the design and control. It is demonstrated that it is not necessary to ignore the dependence of the various temperatures on the location in the direction of flow (which is often done to avoid complications) provided the model is developed in the frequency domain. The linearised model has been verified in the frequency domain by means of a least squares estimator. The verification was performed with a part of a full-size collector, as has been applied in some solar houses, and an artificial sun. It is concluded from the results of the verification that the developed model describes the collector dynamics quite satisfactorily. The differences between the theoretical and estimated heat resistances was about 10 per cent. The verification and estimation procedure proved to be a useful tool for comparing various collectors because the collector has to be fitted with only two temperature sensors. It is shown that the simple models discussed in the literature give responses which are not representative of the collector's dynamics. For well-designed collectors a simplified model is derived. Finally, some desirable sampling rates are given.

  2. Energetics and dynamics of simple impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, R.; Heindl, W. A.; Crannell, C. J.; Thomas, R. J.; Batchelor, D. A.; Magun, A.

    1987-01-01

    Flare energetics and dynamics were studied using observations of simple impulsive spike bursts. A large, homogeneous set of events was selected to enable the most definite tests possible of competing flare models, in the absence of spatially resolved observations. The emission mechanisms and specific flare models that were considered in this investigation are described, and the derivations of the parameters that were tested are presented. Results of the correlation analysis between soft and hard X-ray energetics are also presented. The ion conduction front model and tests of that model with the well-observed spike bursts are described. Finally, conclusions drawn from this investigation and suggestions for future studies are discussed.

  3. High-temperature thermal storage systems for advanced solar receivers materials selections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. F.; Devan, J. H.; Howell, M.

    1990-01-01

    Advanced space power systems that use solar energy and Brayton or Stirling heat engines require thermal energy storage (TES) systems to operate continuously through periods of shade. The receiver storage units, key elements in both Brayton and Stirling systems, are designed to use the latent heat of fusion of phase-change materials (PCMs). The power systems under current consideration for near-future National Aeronautics and Space Administration space missions require working fluid temperatures in the 1100 to 1400 K range. The PCMs under current investigation that gave liquid temperatures within this range are the fluoride family of salts. However, these salts have low thermal conductivity, which causes large temperature gradients in the storage systems. Improvements can be obtained, however, with the use of thermal conductivity enhancements or metallic PCMs. In fact, if suitable containment materials can be found, the use of metallic PCMs would virtually eliminate the orbit associated temperature variations in TES systems. The high thermal conductivity and generally low volume change on melting of germanium and alloys based on silicon make them attractive for storage of thermal energy in space power systems. An approach to solving the containment problem, involving both chemical and physical compatibility, preparation of NiSi/NiSi2, and initial results for containment of germanium and NiSi/NiSi2, are presented.

  4. MATISSE: Multi-purpose Advanced Tool for Instruments for the Solar System Exploration .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinzi, A.; Capria, M. T.; Antonelli, L. A.

    In planetary sciences, design, assemble and launch onboard instruments are only preliminary steps toward the final aim of converting data into scientific knowledge, as the real challenge is the data analysis and interpretation. Up to now data have been generally stored in "old style" archives, i.e. common ftp servers where the user can manually search for data browsing directories organized in a time order manner. However, as datasets to be stored and searched become particularly large, this latter task absorbs a great part of the time, subtracting time to the real scientific work. In order to reduce the time spent to search and analyze data MATISSE (Multi-purpose Advanced Tool for Instruments for the Solar System Exploration), a new set of software tools developed together with the scientific teams of the instruments involved, is under development at ASDC (ASI Science Data Center), whose experience in space missions data management is well known (e.g., \\citealt{verrecchia07,pittori09,giommi09,massaro11}) and its features and aims will be presented here.

  5. Advanced Precursor Reaction Processing for Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shafarman, William N.

    2015-10-12

    This project “Advanced Precursor Reaction Processing for Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 Solar Cells”, completed by the Institute of Energy Conversion (IEC) at the University of Delaware in collaboration with the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Florida, developed the fundamental understanding and technology to increase module efficiency and improve the manufacturability of Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 films using the precursor reaction approach currently being developed by a number of companies. Key results included: (1) development of a three-step H2Se/Ar/H2S reaction process to control Ga distribution through the film and minimizes back contact MoSe2 formation; (2) Ag-alloying to improve precursor homogeneity by avoiding In phase agglomeration, faster reaction and improved adhesion to allow wider reaction process window; (3) addition of Sb, Bi, and Te interlayers at the Mo/precursor junction to produce more uniform precursor morphology and improve adhesion with reduced void formation in reacted films; (4) a precursor structure containing Se and a reaction process to reduce processing time to 5 minutes and eliminate H2Se usage, thereby increasing throughput and reducing costs. All these results were supported by detailed characterization of the film growth, reaction pathways, thermodynamic assessment and device behavior.

  6. Software control of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope enclosure PLC hardware using COTS software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrowman, Alastair J.; de Bilbao, Lander; Ariño, Javier; Murga, Gaizka; Goodrich, Bret; Hubbard, John R.; Greer, Alan; Mayer, Chris; Taylor, Philip

    2012-09-01

    As PLCs evolve from simple logic controllers into more capable Programmable Automation Controllers (PACs), observatories are increasingly using such devices to control complex mechanisms1, 2. This paper describes use of COTS software to control such hardware using the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) Common Services Framework (CSF). We present the Enclosure Control System (ECS) under development in Spain and the UK. The paper details selection of the commercial PLC communication library PLCIO. Implemented in C and delivered with source code, the library separates the programmer from communication details through a simple API. Capable of communicating with many types of PLCs (including Allen-Bradley and Siemens) the API remains the same irrespective of PLC in use. The ECS is implemented in Java using the observatory's framework that provides common services for software components. We present a design following a connection-based approach where all components access the PLC through a single connection class. The link between Java and PLCIO C library is provided by a thin Java Native Interface (JNI) layer. Also presented is a software simulator of the PLC based upon the PLCIO Virtual PLC. This creates a simulator operating below the library's API and thus requires no change to ECS software. It also provides enhanced software testing capabilities prior to hardware becoming available. Results are presented in the form of communication timing test data, showing that the use of CSF, JNI and PLCIO provide a control system capable of controlling enclosure tracking mechanisms, that would be equally valid for telescope mount control.

  7. Nonlinear Synergies and Multiscale Structural Dynamics in Complex Systems: Theoretical Advances and Applications to Hydroclimate Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdigão, R. A. P.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamical evolution of complex coevolving systems is assessed in a novel nonlinear statistical-dynamical framework formally linking nonlinear statistical measures of codependence and emergence with fundamental dynamical interaction laws. The methodological developments are then used to shed light onto fundamental interactions underlying complex behaviour in hydroclimate dynamics. For that purpose, a dynamical model is presented predicting evolving hydroclimatic quantities and their distributions under nonlinearly coevolving geophysical processes. The functional model is based on first principles regulating the dynamics of each system constituent and their synergies, therefore its applicability is general and data-independent, not requiring local calibrations. Moreover, it enables the dynamical estimation of hydroclimatic variations in space and time from the given knowledge at different spatiotemporal conditions. This paves the way for a robust physically based prediction of hydroclimatic changes in unmonitored areas. Validation is achieved by producing, with the dynamical model, a comprehensive spatiotemporal legacy consistent with the observed distributions along with their dynamical and statistical properties and relations. The similarity between simulated and observed distributions is further assessed with robust information-theoretic diagnostics. This study ultimately brings to light emerging signatures of structural change in hydroclimate dynamics arising from nonlinear synergies across spatiotemporal scales, and contributes to a better dynamical understanding and prediction of spatiotemporal regimes, transitions and extremes. The study further sheds light onto a diversity of emerging properties from harmonic to hyper-chaotic dynamics in hydroclimatic systems.

  8. Dynamics of the solar granulation. IX. A global approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesis, A.; Hammer, R.; Roth, M.; Schleicher, H.

    2006-06-01

    Based on a series of spectrograms taken with the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) at the Observatorio del Teide (Tenerife), we study the temporal evolution of granular dynamics and energy transport in the photospheric layers. We consider the ensemble of the granules cut by the spectrograph slit, modulated by wave motion, as a complex system. We describe this ensemble by the rms of the fluctuations of the observables along the slit: continuum intensity I, gas velocity v measured from line center Doppler shifts with respect to the mean profile, and line width w. The history of the rms of the observables v and w reflects the dynamical change of the system over the 20 min observation time. We find a burst-like change for both observables. However, the cross-correlation between I and v remains virtually constant, with the exception of two gaps. Using six lines of different strength we measure the rms of v in the deep photospheric layers. On the basis of this v variation we derive an upper limit of the kinetic energy flux as a function of height in the photosphere for different times during the observation. The shape of the variation with height is constant over time. A limit for the convective enthalpy flux is calculated using the temperature variations of our earlier models. Its shape remains the same over time. Taken together, these results quantify the different roles that the lower and higher photospheric layers play in the energetics of convective overshoot.

  9. AMC EN-1038: Reduced scale solar simulator supplementary test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biering, Robert C.

    1994-01-01

    The reduced scale solar simulator program conducted by the Advanced Manufacturing Center at Cleveland State University in 1992 provided sufficient data to support the selection of the uniform magnification solar simulator module for the Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstrator Program (SDGTD) at NASA LeRC. In 1993, additional testing of the reduced scale solar simulator was conducted to provide information to refine and improve the design of the full scale solar simulator. This report presents the results of these additional tests.

  10. Advanced beam-dynamics simulation tools for RIA.

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, R. W.; Wangler, T. P.; Billen, J. H.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.; Crandall, K. R.; Ostroumov, P.; York, R.; Zhao, Q.; Physics; LANL; LBNL; Tech Source; Michigan State Univ.

    2005-01-01

    We are developing multi-particle beam-dynamics simulation codes for RIA driver-linac simulations extending from the low-energy beam transport (LEBT) line to the end of the linac. These codes run on the NERSC parallel supercomputing platforms at LBNL, which allow us to run simulations with large numbers of macroparticles. The codes have the physics capabilities needed for RIA, including transport and acceleration of multiple-charge-state beams, beam-line elements such as high-voltage platforms within the linac, interdigital accelerating structures, charge-stripper foils, and capabilities for handling the effects of machine errors and other off-normal conditions. This year will mark the end of our project. In this paper we present the status of the work, describe some recent additions to the codes, and show some preliminary simulation results.

  11. Fast infrared spectroscopy of protein dynamics: advancing sensitivity and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Koziol, Klemens L; Johnson, Philip J M; Stucki-Buchli, Brigitte; Waldauer, Steven A; Hamm, Peter

    2015-10-01

    2D-IR spectroscopy has matured to a powerful technique to study the structure and dynamics of peptides, but its extension to larger proteins is still in its infancy, the major limitations being sensitivity and selectivity. Site-selective information requires measuring single vibrational probes at sub-millimolar concentrations where most proteins are still stable, which is a severe challenge for conventional (FT)IR spectroscopy. Besides its ultrafast time-resolution, a so far largely underappreciated potential of 2D-IR spectroscopy lies in its sensitivity gain. The present paper sets the goals and outlines strategies how to use that sensitivity gain together with properly designed vibrational labels to make IR spectroscopy a versatile tool to study a wide class of proteins.

  12. Solar cycle dynamics of solar, magnetospheric, and heliospheric particles, and long-term atmospheric coupling: SAMPLEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M. (Principal Investigator); Hamilton, D. C.; Blake, J. B.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Baker, D. N.; VonRosenvinge, T. T.; Callis, L. B.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Scholer, M.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes science analysis activities by the SAMPEX mission science team during the period during the period July 1, 1995 through July 1, 1996. Bibliographic entries for 1995 and 1996 to date (July 1996) are included. The SAMPEX science team was extremely active, with 20 articles published or submitted to refereed journals, 18 papers published in their entirety in Conference Proceedings, and 53 contributed papers, seminars, and miscellaneous presentations. The bibliography at the end of this report constitutes the primary description of the research activity. Science highlights are given under the major activity headings of anomalous cosmic rays, solar energetic particles, magnetospheric precipitating electrons, trapped H and He isotopes, and data analysis activities.

  13. Lower thermosphere (80-100 km) dynamics response to solar and geomagnetic activity: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazimirovsky, E. S.

    1989-01-01

    The variations of solar and geomagnetic activity may affect the thermosphere circulation via plasma heating and electric fields, especially at high latitudes. The possibility exists that the energy involved in auroral and magnetic storms can produce significant changes of mesosphere and lower thermosphere wind systems. A study of global radar measurements of winds at 80 to 100 km region revealed the short term effects (correlation between wind field and geomagnetic storms) and long term variations over a solar cycle. It seems likely that the correlation results from a modification of planetary waves and tides propagated from below, thus altering the dynamical regime of the thermosphere. Sometimes the long term behavior points rather to a climatic variation with the internal atmospheric cause than to a direct solar control.

  14. Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO): Overview of Science Objectives, Instrument Design, Data Products, and Model Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, T. N.; Eparvier, F. G.; Hock, R.; Jones, A. R.; Woodraska, D.; Judge, D.; Didkovsky, L.; Lean, J.; Mariska, J.; Warren, H.; McMullin, D.; Chamberlin, P.; Berthiaume, G.; Bailey, S.; Fuller-Rowell, T.; Sojka, J.; Tobiska, W. K.; Viereck, R.

    2010-01-01

    The highly variable solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation is the major energy input to the Earth's upper atmosphere, strongly impacting the geospace environment, affecting satellite operations, communications, and navigation. The Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) will measure the solar EUV irradiance from 0.1 to 105 nm with unprecedented spectral resolution (0.1 nm), temporal cadence (ten seconds), and accuracy (20%). EVE includes several irradiance instruments: The Multiple EUV Grating Spectrographs (MEGS)-A is a grazingincidence spectrograph that measures the solar EUV irradiance in the 5 to 37 nm range with 0.1-nm resolution, and the MEGS-B is a normal-incidence, dual-pass spectrograph that measures the solar EUV irradiance in the 35 to 105 nm range with 0.1-nm resolution. To provide MEGS in-flight calibration, the EUV SpectroPhotometer (ESP) measures the solar EUV irradiance in broadbands between 0.1 and 39 nm, and a MEGS-Photometer measures the Sun s bright hydrogen emission at 121.6 nm. The EVE data products include a near real-time space-weather product (Level 0C), which provides the solar EUV irradiance in specific bands and also spectra in 0.1-nm intervals with a cadence of one minute and with a time delay of less than 15 minutes. The EVE higher-level products are Level 2 with the solar EUV irradiance at higher time cadence (0.25 seconds for photometers and ten seconds for spectrographs) and Level 3 with averages of the solar irradiance over a day and over each one-hour period. The EVE team also plans to advance existing models of solar EUV irradiance and to operationally use the EVE measurements in models of Earth s ionosphere and thermosphere. Improved understanding of the evolution of solar flares and extending the various models to incorporate solar flare events are high priorities for the EVE team.

  15. Universal Features of Electron Dynamics in Solar Cells with TiO2 Contact: From Dye Solar Cells to Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Todinova, Anna; Idígoras, Jesús; Salado, Manuel; Kazim, Samrana; Anta, Juan A

    2015-10-01

    The electron dynamics of solar cells with mesoporous TiO2 contact is studied by electrochemical small-perturbation techniques. The study involved dye solar cells (DSC), solid-state perovskite solar cells (SSPSC), and devices where the perovskite acts as sensitizer in a liquid-junction device. Using a transport-recombination continuity equation we found that mid-frequency time constants are proper lifetimes that determine the current-voltage curve. This is not the case for the SSPSC, where a lifetime of ∼1 μs, 1 order of magnitude longer, is required to reproduce the current-voltage curve. This mismatch is attributed to the dielectric response on the mid-frequency component. Correcting for this effect, lifetimes lie on a common exponential trend with respect to open-circuit voltage. Electron transport times share a common trend line too. This universal behavior of lifetimes and transport times suggests that the main difference between the cells is the power to populate the mesoporous TiO2 contact with electrons. PMID:26704621

  16. Universal Features of Electron Dynamics in Solar Cells with TiO2 Contact: From Dye Solar Cells to Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Todinova, Anna; Idígoras, Jesús; Salado, Manuel; Kazim, Samrana; Anta, Juan A

    2015-10-01

    The electron dynamics of solar cells with mesoporous TiO2 contact is studied by electrochemical small-perturbation techniques. The study involved dye solar cells (DSC), solid-state perovskite solar cells (SSPSC), and devices where the perovskite acts as sensitizer in a liquid-junction device. Using a transport-recombination continuity equation we found that mid-frequency time constants are proper lifetimes that determine the current-voltage curve. This is not the case for the SSPSC, where a lifetime of ∼1 μs, 1 order of magnitude longer, is required to reproduce the current-voltage curve. This mismatch is attributed to the dielectric response on the mid-frequency component. Correcting for this effect, lifetimes lie on a common exponential trend with respect to open-circuit voltage. Electron transport times share a common trend line too. This universal behavior of lifetimes and transport times suggests that the main difference between the cells is the power to populate the mesoporous TiO2 contact with electrons.

  17. NONLINEAR DYNAMICS OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC ROSSBY WAVES AND THE CYCLIC NATURE OF SOLAR MAGNETIC ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Raphaldini, Breno; Raupp, Carlos F. M. E-mail: carlos.raupp@iag.usp.br

    2015-01-20

    The solar dynamo is known to be associated with several periodicities, with the nearly 11/22 yr cycle being the most pronounced one. Even though these quasiperiodic variations of solar activity have been attributed to the underlying dynamo action in the Sun's interior, a fundamental theoretical description of these cycles is still elusive. Here, we present a new possible direction in understanding the Sun's cycles based on resonant nonlinear interactions among magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Rossby waves. The WKB theory for dispersive waves is applied to magnetohydrodynamic shallow-water equations describing the dynamics of the solar tachocline, and the reduced dynamics of a resonant triad composed of MHD Rossby waves embedded in constant toroidal magnetic field is analyzed. In the conservative case, the wave amplitudes evolve periodically in time, with periods on the order of the dominant solar activity timescale (∼11 yr). In addition, the presence of linear forcings representative of either convection or instabilities of meridionally varying background states appears to be crucial in balancing dissipation and thus sustaining the periodic oscillations of wave amplitudes associated with resonant triad interactions. Examination of the linear theory of MHD Rossby waves embedded in a latitudinally varying mean flow demonstrates that MHD Rossby waves propagate toward the equator in a waveguide from –35° to 35° in latitude, showing a remarkable resemblance to the structure of the butterfly diagram of the solar activity. Therefore, we argue that resonant nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic Rossby wave interactions might significantly contribute to the observed cycles of magnetic solar activity.

  18. The effects of regional insolation differences upon advanced solar thermal electric power plant performance and energy costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latta, A. F.; Bowyer, J. M.; Fujita, T.; Richter, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    The performance and cost of four 10 MWe advanced solar thermal electric power plants sited in various regions of the continental United States was studied. Each region has different insolation characteristics which result in varying collector field areas, plant performance, capital costs and energy costs. The regional variation in solar plant performance was assessed in relation to the expected rise in the future cost of residential and commercial electricity supplied by conventional utility power systems in the same regions. A discussion of the regional insolation data base is presented along with a description of the solar systems performance and costs. A range for the forecast cost of conventional electricity by region and nationally over the next several decades is given.

  19. Dynamical Stability and Habitability of Extra-Solar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat-Lohinger, Elke

    2012-04-01

    Observations of about 60 binary star systems hosting exoplanets indicate the necessity of stability studies of planetary motion in such multi-stellar systems. For wide binary systems with separations between hundreds and thousands of AU, the results from single-star systems may be applicable but, in tight double stars systems, we have to take the stellar interactions into account which influences the planetary motion significantly. This review discusses the different types of planetary motion in double stars and the stability of the planets for different binary configurations. An application to the most famous tight binary system (γ Cephei) is also shown. Finally, we analyze the habitability from the dynamical point of view in such systems, where we discuss the motion of terrestrial-like planets in the so-called habitable zone.

  20. Advances in understanding the genesis and evolution solar energetic particle events over the last two solar cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainio, Rami

    2016-04-01

    I will review the observational and modeling efforts related to solar energetic particle (SEP) events over the 23rd and 24th solar cycles. I will concentrate on large SEP events related to coronal mass ejections (CMEs), but discuss observations related to the possible role of flares in the acceleration of particles in those events, as well. The possible roles of various acceleration and transport processes in understanding the characteristics of the events will be discussed. This work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA).

  1. 800 Hours of Operational Experience from a 2 kW(sub e) Solar Dynamic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Mason, Lee S.

    1999-01-01

    From December 1994 to September 1998, testing with a 2 kW(sub e) Solar Dynamic power system resulted in 33 individual tests, 886 hours of solar heating, and 783 hours of power generation. Power generation ranged from 400 watts to over 2 kW(sub e), and SD system efficiencies have been measured up to 17 per cent, during simulated low-Earth orbit operation. Further, the turbo-alternator-compressors successfully completed 100 start/stops on foil bearings. Operation was conducted in a large thermal/vacuum facility with a simulated Sun at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The Solar Dynamic system featured a closed Brayton conversion unit integrated with a solar heat receiver, which included thermal energy storage for continuous power output through a typical low-Earth orbit. Two power conversion units and three alternator configurations were used during testing. This paper will review the test program, provide operational and performance data, and review a number of technology issues.

  2. Charge Generation Dynamics in Efficient All-Polymer Solar Cells: Influence of Polymer Packing and Morphology.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Bhoj R; Lee, Changyeon; Younts, Robert; Lee, Wonho; Danilov, Evgeny; Kim, Bumjoon J; Gundogdu, Kenan

    2015-12-23

    All-polymer solar cells exhibit rapid progress in power conversion efficiency (PCE) from 2 to 7.7% over the past few years. While this improvement is primarily attributed to efficient charge transport and balanced mobility between the carriers, not much is known about the charge generation dynamics in these systems. Here we measured exciton relaxation and charge separation dynamics using ultrafast spectroscopy in polymer/polymer blends with different molecular packing and morphology. These measurements indicate that preferential face-on configuration with intermixed nanomorphology increases the charge generation efficiency. In fact, there is a direct quantitative correlation between the free charge population in the ultrafast time scales and the external quantum efficiency, suggesting not only the transport but also charge generation is key for the design of high performance all polymer solar cells. PMID:26630116

  3. Temperature control in a solar collector field using Filtered Dynamic Matrix Control.

    PubMed

    Lima, Daniel Martins; Normey-Rico, Julio Elias; Santos, Tito Luís Maia

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the output temperature control of a solar collector field of a desalinization plant using the Filtered Dynamic Matrix Control (FDMC). The FDMC is a modified controller based on the Dynamic Matrix Control (DMC), a predictive control strategy widely used in industry. In the FDMC, a filter is used in the prediction error, which allows the modification of the robustness and disturbance rejection characteristics of the original algorithm. The implementation and tuning of the FDMC are simple and maintain the advantages of DMC. Several simulation results using a validated model of the solar plant are presented considering different scenarios. The results are also compared to nonlinear control techniques, showing that FDMC, if properly tuned, can yield similar results to more complex control algorithms.

  4. Dynamics and control of Stirling engines in a 15 kWe solar electric generation concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, R. L.; Bahrami, K. A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of kinematic and free piston Stirling engines in a 15 kWe dish-electric approach for solar thermal electric generation. Initially, the principle of operation of Stirling engines in solar thermal electric generation is discussed. Then, under certain simplifying assumptions, mathematical models describing the dynamic operation of the kinematic and free piston Stirling engines are developed. It is found that the engine dynamics may be approximated by second order models. Control mechanisms for both types of Stirling engines are discussed. An approach based on the modulation of the working fluid mean pressure is presented. It is concluded that this approach offers a fast and effective means of control. The free piston Stirling engine, being a thermally driven mechanical oscillator, presents unique control requirements. These are discussed in this paper.

  5. Application of similitude principle to the numerical simulation of solar atmospheric dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Wang, S.; Wang, A. H.; Dryer, M.

    1988-01-01

    Numerical simulation has become an essential part of solar physics because the complex nonlinear characteristics of solar phenomena makes analytical solutions difficult to obtain. Realistic simulation of the birth and decay of an active region still is not possible because of the wide range of spatial and time scales that must be considered. Therefore, proper scaling rules must be recognized for the development of appropriate models. In this paper, the similitude principle is applied to develop scaling rules. It is found that these rules are highly dependent on the physical nature of the specific problem under consideration. A set of 'similitude critiques' is presented for some specific physical conditions. Numerical examples of coronal dynamic response and active region dynamics are used to demonstrate these ideas.

  6. Magnetospheric vortices and their global effect after a solar wind dynamic pressure decrease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H. Y.; Shen, X. C.; Tang, B. B.; Tian, A. M.; Shi, Q. Q.; Weygand, J. M.; Yao, Z. H.; Zong, Q.-G.; Fu, S. Y.; Yao, S. T.; Xiao, T.; Pu, Z. Y.

    2016-02-01

    Using multipoint data from three Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) satellites, we report a magnetospheric flow vortex driven by a negative solar wind dynamic pressure pulse. The observed vortex rotated in a direction opposite to that associated with positive solar wind dynamic pressure pulses. The vortex was moving tailward, as confirmed by a global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation. In addition, the equivalent ionospheric currents (EICs) deduced from ground magnetometer station data reveal that a current vortex in the ionosphere near the foot point of the satellites has a rotation sense consistent with that observed in the magnetosphere. The field-aligned current (FAC) density estimated from three THEMIS satellites is about 0.15 nA/m2, and the total FAC of the vortex is about 1.5-3 × 105 A, on the order of the total FAC in a pseudobreakup, but less than the total FAC in most moderate substorms, 106 A.

  7. Charge Generation Dynamics in Efficient All-Polymer Solar Cells: Influence of Polymer Packing and Morphology.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Bhoj R; Lee, Changyeon; Younts, Robert; Lee, Wonho; Danilov, Evgeny; Kim, Bumjoon J; Gundogdu, Kenan

    2015-12-23

    All-polymer solar cells exhibit rapid progress in power conversion efficiency (PCE) from 2 to 7.7% over the past few years. While this improvement is primarily attributed to efficient charge transport and balanced mobility between the carriers, not much is known about the charge generation dynamics in these systems. Here we measured exciton relaxation and charge separation dynamics using ultrafast spectroscopy in polymer/polymer blends with different molecular packing and morphology. These measurements indicate that preferential face-on configuration with intermixed nanomorphology increases the charge generation efficiency. In fact, there is a direct quantitative correlation between the free charge population in the ultrafast time scales and the external quantum efficiency, suggesting not only the transport but also charge generation is key for the design of high performance all polymer solar cells.

  8. Temperature control in a solar collector field using Filtered Dynamic Matrix Control.

    PubMed

    Lima, Daniel Martins; Normey-Rico, Julio Elias; Santos, Tito Luís Maia

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the output temperature control of a solar collector field of a desalinization plant using the Filtered Dynamic Matrix Control (FDMC). The FDMC is a modified controller based on the Dynamic Matrix Control (DMC), a predictive control strategy widely used in industry. In the FDMC, a filter is used in the prediction error, which allows the modification of the robustness and disturbance rejection characteristics of the original algorithm. The implementation and tuning of the FDMC are simple and maintain the advantages of DMC. Several simulation results using a validated model of the solar plant are presented considering different scenarios. The results are also compared to nonlinear control techniques, showing that FDMC, if properly tuned, can yield similar results to more complex control algorithms. PMID:26472112

  9. Switch programming of reflectivity control devices for the coupled dynamics of a solar sail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tianjian; Gong, Shengping; Mu, Junshan; Li, Junfeng; Wang, Tianshu; Qian, Weiping

    2016-03-01

    As demonstrated in the Interplanetary Kite-craft Accelerated by Radiation Of the Sun (IKAROS), reflectivity control devices (RCDs) are switched on or off independently with each other, which has nevertheless been ignored by many previous researches. This paper emphasizes the discrete property of RCDs, and aims to obtain an appropriate switch law of RCDs for a rigid spinning solar sail. First, the coupled attitude-orbit dynamics is derived from the basic solar force and torque model into an underdetermined linear system with a binary set constraint. Subsequently, the coupled dynamics is reformulated into a constrained quadratic programming and a basic gradient projection method is designed to search for the optimal solution. Finally, a circular sail flying in the Venus rendezvous mission demonstrates the model and method numerically, which illustrates approximately 103 km terminal position error and 0.5 m/s terminal velocity error as 80 independent RCDs are switched on or off appropriately.

  10. Overview of advanced Stirling and gas turbine engine development programs and implications for solar thermal electrical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alger, D.

    1984-03-01

    The DOE automotive advanced engine development projects managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center were described. These included one Stirling cycle engine development and two air Brayton cycle development. Other engine research activities included: (1) an air Brayton engine development sponsored by the Gas Research Institute, and (2) plans for development of a Stirling cycle engine for space use. Current and potential use of these various engines with solar parabolic dishes were discussed.

  11. A survey of geosensor networks: advances in dynamic environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Nittel, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    In the recent decade, several technology trends have influenced the field of geosciences in significant ways. The first trend is the more readily available technology of ubiquitous wireless communication networks and progress in the development of low-power, short-range radio-based communication networks, the miniaturization of computing and storage platforms as well as the development of novel microsensors and sensor materials. All three trends have changed the type of dynamic environmental phenomena that can be detected, monitored and reacted to. Another important aspect is the real-time data delivery of novel platforms today. In this paper, I will survey the field of geosensor networks, and mainly focus on the technology of small-scale geosensor networks, example applications and their feasibility and lessons learnt as well as the current research questions posed by using this technology today. Furthermore, my objective is to investigate how this technology can be embedded in the current landscape of intelligent sensor platforms in the geosciences and identify its place and purpose. PMID:22346721

  12. Advances to Dynamic Mechanical Analysis: High Frequencies and Environmental Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, Jonathon

    2002-03-01

    In dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) the sample is deformed and released sinusoidally providing information about the modulus and damping behaviors with respect to temperature, time, oscillation frequency and amplitude of motion. It offers exceptional sensitivity to glass transitions and secondary relaxations. Recent developments have increased the frequency range up to 1000 Hz, which allow properties measurements under actual end-use conditions. Furthermore high frequencies enhance the ability to determine the kinetics of viscoelastic relaxations. Another recent development allows DMA measurements while samples are immersed in fluids or enveloped in gases. Most significant is the ability to alter the furnace control parameters to account for the thermal properties of the environment used. This configuration allows temperature-controlled measurements (both heating and isothermal profiles) on a wide range of sample shapes and sizes. Environmental DMA is easier to interpret than standard DMA (in air or inert gas) on preconditioned samples because such samples often lose the conditioning solvent or gas during the measurement. Examples will show real-time property changes from the interaction of unconditioned materials with conditioning environments and experiments on pre-conditioned materials that are heated while immersed in conditioning environments. -------------------------------------------------------------

  13. Solar and interplanetary dynamics; Proceedings of the Symposium, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., August 27-31, 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, M. (Editor); Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1980-01-01

    The symposium focuses on solar phenomena as the source of transient events propagating through the solar system, and theoretical and observational assessments of the dynamic processes involved in these events. The topics discussed include the life history of coronal structures and fields, coronal and interplanetary responses to long time scale phenomena, solar transient phenomena affecting the corona and interplanetary medium, coronal and interplanetary responses to short time scale phenomena, and future directions.

  14. Observation of Space Charge Dynamics Inside an All Oxide Based Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Shrabani; Calmeiro, Tomás; Martins, Rodrigo; Nunes, Daniela; Fortunato, Elvira

    2016-06-28

    The charge transfer dynamics at interfaces are fundamental to know the mechanism of photovoltaic processes. The internal potential in solar cell devices depends on the basic processes of photovoltaic effect such as charge carrier generation, separation, transport, recombination, etc. Here we report the direct observation of the surface potential depth profile over the cross-section of the ZnO nanorods/Cu2O based solar cell for two different layer thicknesses at different wavelengths of light using Kelvin probe force microscopy. The topography and phase images across the cross-section of the solar cell are also observed, where the interfaces are well-defined on the nanoscale. The potential profiling results demonstrate that under white light illumination, the photoinduced electrons in Cu2O inject into ZnO due to the interfacial electric field, which results in the large difference in surface potential between two active layers. However, under a single wavelength illumination, the charge carrier generation, separation, and transport processes between two active layers are limited, which affect the surface potential images and corresponding potential depth profile. Because of changes in the active layer thicknesses, small variations have been observed in the charge carrier transport mechanism inside the device. These results provide the clear idea about the charge carrier distribution inside the solar cell in different conditions and show the perfect illumination condition for large carrier transport in a high performance solar cell.

  15. Observation of Space Charge Dynamics Inside an All Oxide Based Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Shrabani; Calmeiro, Tomás; Martins, Rodrigo; Nunes, Daniela; Fortunato, Elvira

    2016-06-28

    The charge transfer dynamics at interfaces are fundamental to know the mechanism of photovoltaic processes. The internal potential in solar cell devices depends on the basic processes of photovoltaic effect such as charge carrier generation, separation, transport, recombination, etc. Here we report the direct observation of the surface potential depth profile over the cross-section of the ZnO nanorods/Cu2O based solar cell for two different layer thicknesses at different wavelengths of light using Kelvin probe force microscopy. The topography and phase images across the cross-section of the solar cell are also observed, where the interfaces are well-defined on the nanoscale. The potential profiling results demonstrate that under white light illumination, the photoinduced electrons in Cu2O inject into ZnO due to the interfacial electric field, which results in the large difference in surface potential between two active layers. However, under a single wavelength illumination, the charge carrier generation, separation, and transport processes between two active layers are limited, which affect the surface potential images and corresponding potential depth profile. Because of changes in the active layer thicknesses, small variations have been observed in the charge carrier transport mechanism inside the device. These results provide the clear idea about the charge carrier distribution inside the solar cell in different conditions and show the perfect illumination condition for large carrier transport in a high performance solar cell. PMID:27244449

  16. Pick-up ion pressure gradients modulating the solar wind dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahr, Hans J.; Fichtner, Horst

    1995-01-01

    Neutral interstellar atoms penetrate deeply into the inner heliosphere before they become ionized by various processes. As ions they are picked-up by the frozen-in magnetic fields and are convected outwards with the solar wind plasma. Thereby the primary plasma flow is mass, momentum, and energy-loaded. The dynamics of the distant multi-constituent solar wind is, however, not solely determined by these loading processes, but is also affected by the wave-mediated pick-up ion pressure gradients derivable from the pick-up ion distribution function. The action of the radial components of these pressures essentially counter balances the decelerating effect of the solar wind momentum loading, diminishing strongly the deceleration of the distant solar wind. Furthermore the latitudinal components of the pick-up ion pressures induce latitudinal forces acting on the multiconstituent solar plasma outflow and inducing nonradial bulk flow components. The enforced nonradial outflow geometry on the upwind hemisphere may partly be responsible for the magnetic flux deficit which was claimed since several years in the PIONEER-10 magnetic flux data.

  17. Is the Stratospheric QBO affected by Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure via an Annual Cycle Modulation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H.; Jarvis, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    This study explores possible solar wind dynamic pressure effects on equatorial temperature and wind with an emphasis on the stratospheric Quasi-biennial Oscillation (QBO). The QBO phase occurrence and transition are closely linked to an annual cycle of tropical lower stratospheric temperature. The statistical response of the tropical temperature to solar wind dynamic pressure is characterized by ~1.25 K warming near the tropopause during the Boreal winter and spring and ~ 0.5 K cooling in the troposphere during the Austral winter and spring. The combined effect of this is a reduction of the amplitude of the annual cycle in temperature in the tropical tropopause region. The weakening of the annual cycle causes systematic and significant change in the tropical upwelling and therefore the strength and phase distribution of the QBO in the lower stratosphere. In the lower stratosphere, significantly stronger and more frequency easterly anomalies are found to be associated with high solar wind dynamic pressure during August to October. In addition to the seasonal response, there is a small but seasonally invariant response that is characterized by a vertical three-cell anomaly pattern with westerly anomalies in the troposphere and at 3-10 hPa and easterly anomalies in the lower stratosphere. We propose that significantly stronger easterly anomalies in the tropical lower stratosphere under high solar wind dynamic pressure during the Austral winter and spring are a consequence both of the initializing effect of this three-cell structure and of an amplification effect due to the seasonal modulation of the annual cycle.

  18. Ultrafast interfacial charge transfer dynamics in dye-sensitized and quantum dot solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Hirendra N.

    2013-02-01

    Dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) appeared to be one of the good discovery for the solution of energy problem. We have been involved in studying ultrafast interfacial electron transfer dynamics in DSSC using femtosecond laser spectroscopy. However it has been realized that it is very difficult to design and develop higher efficient one, due to thermodynamic limitation. Again in DSSC most of the absorbed photon energy is lost as heat within the cell, which apart from decreasing the efficiency also destabilizes the device. It has been realized that quantum dot solar cell (QDSC) are the best bet where the sensitizer dye molecules can be replaced by suitable quantum dot (QD) materials in solar cell. The quantum-confinement effect in semiconductors modifies their electronic structure, which is a very important aspect of these materials. For photovoltaic applications, a long-lived charge separation remains one of the most essential criteria. One of the problems in using QDs for photovoltaic applications is their fast charge recombination caused by nonradiative Auger processes, which occur predominantly at lower particle sizes due to an increase in the Coulomb interaction between electrons and holes. Various approaches, such as the use of metal-semiconductor composites, semiconductor-polymer composite, and semiconductor core-shell heterostructures, have been attempted to minimize the fast recombination between electrons and holes. To make higher efficient solar devices it has been realised that it is very important to understand charge carrier and electron transfer dynamics in QD and QD sensitized semiconductor nanostructured materials. In the present talk, we are going to discuss on recent works on ultrafast electron transfer dynamics in dye-sensitized TiO2 nanoparticles/film [1-12] and charge (electron/hole) transfer dynamics in quantum dot core-shell nano-structured materials [13-17].

  19. Dynamic modeling and experimental simulation of active solar energy systems for the evaluation of control strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, S. R.; Warren, M. L.; Wahlig, M.

    1980-07-01

    Dynamic modeling and experimental simulation are used to evaluate control strategies for active solar energy systems. Performance of proportional and on/off collector loop controllers are evaluated and compared using a theoretical dynamic collector model. The effect of controls and control strategies on hydronic space heating system performance is discussed. Both the computer model and the test facility allow evaluation of control strategies using various flow rates, controller set points, insolation patterns, ambient temperature conditions, and collector types. The test facility also allows comparison of collector and load loop flow stragegies based on various system configurations and building load demands.

  20. Interglacial climate dynamics and advanced time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudelsee, Manfred; Bermejo, Miguel; Köhler, Peter; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2013-04-01

    Studying the climate dynamics of past interglacials (IGs) helps to better assess the anthropogenically influenced dynamics of the current IG, the Holocene. We select the IG portions from the EPICA Dome C ice core archive, which covers the past 800 ka, to apply methods of statistical time series analysis (Mudelsee 2010). The analysed variables are deuterium/H (indicating temperature) (Jouzel et al. 2007), greenhouse gases (Siegenthaler et al. 2005, Loulergue et al. 2008, L¨ü thi et al. 2008) and a model-co-derived climate radiative forcing (Köhler et al. 2010). We select additionally high-resolution sea-surface-temperature records from the marine sedimentary archive. The first statistical method, persistence time estimation (Mudelsee 2002) lets us infer the 'climate memory' property of IGs. Second, linear regression informs about long-term climate trends during IGs. Third, ramp function regression (Mudelsee 2000) is adapted to look on abrupt climate changes during IGs. We compare the Holocene with previous IGs in terms of these mathematical approaches, interprete results in a climate context, assess uncertainties and the requirements to data from old IGs for yielding results of 'acceptable' accuracy. This work receives financial support from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Project ClimSens within the DFG Research Priority Program INTERDYNAMIK) and the European Commission (Marie Curie Initial Training Network LINC, No. 289447, within the 7th Framework Programme). References Jouzel J, Masson-Delmotte V, Cattani O, Dreyfus G, Falourd S, Hoffmann G, Minster B, Nouet J, Barnola JM, Chappellaz J, Fischer H, Gallet JC, Johnsen S, Leuenberger M, Loulergue L, Luethi D, Oerter H, Parrenin F, Raisbeck G, Raynaud D, Schilt A, Schwander J, Selmo E, Souchez R, Spahni R, Stauffer B, Steffensen JP, Stenni B, Stocker TF, Tison JL, Werner M, Wolff EW (2007) Orbital and millennial Antarctic climate variability over the past 800,000 years. Science 317:793. Köhler P, Bintanja R

  1. Characterization of solar cells for space applications. Volume 6: Electrical characteristics of Spectrolab BSF, BSR, textured, 10 ohm-cm, 50 micron advanced OAST solar cells as a function of intensity, temperature, and irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Downing, R. G.; Miyahira, T. F.; Weiss, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    Electrical parametric data are presented on BSF, BSR, textured 10 ohm cm, 50 micron advanced OAST cells in graphical and tabular form as functions of solar illumination intensity, temperature, and 1 MeV electron fluence.

  2. Magnetospheric ULF waves with an increasing amplitude induced by solar wind dynamic pressure changes: THEMIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X.; Zong, Q.; Shi, Q.; Tian, A.; Sun, W.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, X.; Fu, S.; Angelopoulos, V.; Pu, Z.; Hartinger, M.

    2014-12-01

    We report the in situ observation of the magnetospheric ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves with an increasing amplitude induced by solar wind dynamic pressure changes. We examine the magnetospheric responses to solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements from April 1, 2007 to December 31, 2012, and find six ULF wave events with slow but clear wave amplitude increase. The amplitudes of ion velocities and magnetic field of these waves continuously increase by 2.1 ˜ 4.4 times during three to six wave cycles. We choose two typical cases to further investigate the cause of this wave amplitude increase. We find that the wave amplitude growth is mainly contributed by the toroidal mode wave. Interestingly, toroidal mode waves are standing, while compressional and poloidal mode waves are not. Thus, we suspect that the wave amplitude increase may be caused by the superposition of two wave sources. One wave source is the standing wave excited by the solar wind dynamic impulse. Additionally, fast mode compressional wave continuously shakes the magnetic field lines. The azimuthal component of this magnetic perturbation is the second wave source. Furthermore, the simple model calculation of superposing two waves match the observations pretty well.

  3. Using Solar Science to Inspire: The Education and Public Outreach Projects of the HMI Instrument on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrer, D. K.

    2005-05-01

    Solar exploration inspires students and the public to gain a better understanding of the Sun's role in the Earth's environment. New solar discoveries also inspire innovative educational efforts to communicate the results of these explorations. We will describe the E/PO plans associated with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument planned for NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, to be launched in 2008. Our program addresses aspects of formal education, informal education, and public outreach. Projects include a student Science Fellow program being developed in collaboration with Stanford's Haas Center for Public Service, a high-school-appropriate ionospheric disturbance monitor that tracks solar-induced changes in the Earth's ionosphere, development of a new solar program for portable planetaria -- including almost-full-dome projection, and a planned StarDate radio series.

  4. Application of a solar UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process to oil sands process-affected water remediation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Zengquan; Li, Chao; Belosevic, Miodrag; Bolton, James R; El-Din, Mohamed Gamal

    2014-08-19

    The solar UV/chlorine process has emerged as a novel advanced oxidation process for industrial and municipal wastewaters. Currently, its practical application to oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) remediation has been studied to treat fresh OSPW retained in large tailings ponds, which can cause significant adverse environmental impacts on ground and surface waters in Northern Alberta, Canada. Degradation of naphthenic acids (NAs) and fluorophore organic compounds in OSPW was investigated. In a laboratory-scale UV/chlorine treatment, the NAs degradation was clearly structure-dependent and hydroxyl radical-based. In terms of the NAs degradation rate, the raw OSPW (pH ∼ 8.3) rates were higher than those at an alkaline condition (pH = 10). Under actual sunlight, direct solar photolysis partially degraded fluorophore organic compounds, as indicated by the qualitative synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS) of the OSPW, but did not impact NAs degradation. The solar/chlorine process effectively removed NAs (75-84% removal) and fluorophore organic compounds in OSPW in the presence of 200 or 300 mg L(-1) OCl(-). The acute toxicity of OSPW toward Vibrio fischeri was reduced after the solar/chlorine treatment. However, the OSPW toxicity toward goldfish primary kidney macrophages after solar/chlorine treatment showed no obvious toxicity reduction versus that of untreated OSPW, which warrants further study for process optimization.

  5. Advanced methods for light trapping in optically thin silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, James Richard

    2011-12-01

    The field of light trapping is the study of how best to absorb light in a thin film of material when most light either reflects away at the surface or transmits straight through to the other side. This has tremendous application to the field of photovoltaics where thin silicon films can be manufactured cheaply, but also fail to capture all of the available photons in the solar spectrum. Advancements in light trapping therefore bring us closer to the day when photovoltaic devices may reach grid parity with traditional fossil fuels on the electrical energy market. This dissertation advances our understanding of light trapping by first modeling the effects of loss in planar dielectric waveguides. The mathematical framework developed here can be used to model any arbitrary three-layer structure with mixed gain or loss and then extract the total field solution for the guided modes. It is found that lossy waveguides possess a greater number of eigenmodes than their lossless counterparts, and that these "loss guided" modes attenuate much more rapidly than conventional modes. Another contribution from this dissertation is the exploration of light trapping through the use of dielectric nanospheres embedded directly within the active layer of a thin silicon film. The primary benefit to this approach is that the device can utilize a surface nitride layer serving as an antireflective coating while still retaining the benefits of light trapping within the film. The end result is that light trapping and light injection are effectively decoupled from each other and may be independently optimized within a single photovoltaic device. The final contribution from this work is a direct numerical comparison between multiple light trapping schemes. This allows us to quantify the relative performances of various design techniques against one another and objectively determine which ideas tend to capture the most light. Using numerical simulation, this work directly compares the absorption

  6. Study of Extra-Solar Planets with the Advanced Fiber Optic Echelle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noyes, Robert W.; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This is the final report of NASA Grant NAG5-7505, for 'Study of Extra-solar Planets with the Advanced Fiber Optic Echelle'. This program was funded in response to our proposal submitted under NASA NRA 97-OSS-06, with a total period of performance from June 1, 1998 through Feb 28 2002. Principal Investigator is Robert W. Noyes; co-Investigators are Sylvain G. Korzennik (SAO), Peter Niserison (SAO), and Timothy M. Brown (High Altitude Observatory). Since the start of this program we have carried out more than 30 observing runs, typically of 5 to 7 days duration. We obtained a total of around 2000 usable observations of about 150 stars, where a typical observation consists of 3 exposures of 10 minutes each. Using this data base we detected thc two additional planetary companions to the star Upsilon Andromedae. This detection was made independently of, and essentially simultaneously with, a similar detection by the Berkeley group (Marcy et al): the fact that two data sets were completely independent and gave essentially the same orbital parameters for this three-planet system gave a strong confirmation of this important result. We also extended our previous detection of the planet orbiting Rho Coronae Borealis to get a better determination of its orbital eccentricity: e=0.13 +/- 0.05. We detected a new planet in orbit around the star HD 89744, with orbital period 256 days, semi-major axis 0.88 AU, eccentricity 0.70, and minimum mass m sini = 7.2 m(sub Jup). This discovery is significant because of the very high orbital eccentricity, arid also because HD 89744 has both high metallicity [Fe/H] and at the same time a low [C/Fe] abundance ratio.

  7. Opening the Solar System: An Advanced Nuclear Spacecraft for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werka, R. O.; Percy, T. K.

    2014-01-01

    Human exploration of the solar system is limited by our technology, not our imagination. We dream of a time when we can freely travel among the planets and truly become a spacefaring people. However, the current state of our technology limits our options for architecting missions to other planets. Instead of sailing the seas of space in the way that we cruise the seas of Earth, our limited propulsion technology requires us to depart Earth on a giant cluster of gas tanks and return in a lifeboat. This inefficient approach to exploration is evident in many of today's leading mission plans for human flights to Mars, asteroids, and other destinations. The cost and complexity of this approach to mission architecting makes it extremely difficult to realize our dreams of exploration beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO). This does not need to be the case. Researchers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have been investigating the feasibility of a new take on nuclear propulsion with the performance to enable a paradigm shift in human space exploration. During the fall of 2013, engineers at MSFC's Advanced Concepts Office developed a spacecraft concept (pictured below) around this new propulsion technology and redefined the human Mars mission to show its full potential. This spacecraft, which can be launched with a fleet of soon-to-be available SLS launch vehicles, is fueled primarily with hydrogen, and is fully reusable with no staging required. The reusable nature of this design enables a host of alternative mission architectures that more closely resemble an ocean voyage than our current piecemeal approach to exploration.

  8. My chaotic trajectory: A brief (personalized) history of solar-system dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Joseph A.

    2014-05-01

    I will use this opportunity to recall my professional career. Like many, I was drawn into the space program during the mid-60s and early 70s when the solar system’s true nature was being revealed. Previously, dynamical astronomy discussed the short-term, predictable motions of point masses; simultaneously, small objects (e.g., satellites, asteroids, dust) were thought boring rather than dynamically rich. Many of today’s most active research subjects were unknown: TNOs, planetary rings, exoplanets and debris disks. The continuing stream of startling findings by spacecraft, ground-based surveys and numerical simulations forced a renaissance in celestial mechanics, incorporating new dynamical paradigms and additional physics (e.g., energy loss, catastrophic events, radiation forces). My interests evolved as the space program expanded outward: dust, asteroids, natural satellites, rings; rotations, orbital evolution, origins. Fortunately for me, in the early days, elementary models with simple solutions were often adequate to gain a first-order explanation of many puzzles. One could be a generalist, always learning new things.My choice of research subjects was influenced greatly by: i) Cornell colleagues involved in space missions who shared results: the surprising diversity of planetary satellites, the unanticipated orbital and rotational dynamics of asteroids, the chaotic histories of solar system bodies, the non-intuitive behavior of dust and planetary rings, irregular satellites. ii) Teaching introductory courses in applied math, dynamics and planetary science encouraged understandable models. iii) The stimulation of new ideas owing to service at Icarus and on space policy forums. iv) Most importantly, excellent students and colleagues who pushed me into new research directions, and who then stimulated and educated me about those topics.If time allows, I will describe some of today’s puzzles for me and point out similarities between the past development in our

  9. Salicylic acid degradation by advanced oxidation processes. Coupling of solar photoelectro-Fenton and solar heterogeneous photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Garza-Campos, Benjamin; Brillas, Enric; Hernández-Ramírez, Aracely; El-Ghenymy, Abdellatif; Guzmán-Mar, Jorge Luis; Ruiz-Ruiz, Edgar J

    2016-12-01

    A 3.0 L solar flow plant with a Pt/air-diffusion (anode/cathode) cell, a solar photoreactor and a photocatalytic photoreactor filled with TiO2-coated glass spheres has been utilized to couple solar photoelectro-Fenton (SPEF) and solar heterogeneous photocatalysis (SPC) for treating a 165mgL(-1) salicylic acid solution of pH 3.0. Organics were destroyed by OH radicals formed on the TiO2 photocatalyst and at the Pt anode during water oxidation and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between added Fe(2+) and cathodically generated H2O2, along with the photolytic action of sunlight. Poor salicylic acid removal and mineralization were attained using SPC, anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (AO-H2O2) and coupled AO-H2O2-SPC. The electro-Fenton process accelerated the substrate decay, but with low mineralization by the formation of byproducts that are hardly destroyed by OH. The mineralization was strongly increased by SPEF due to the photolysis of products by sunlight, being enhanced by coupled SPEF-SPC due to the additional oxidation by OH at the TiO2 surface. The effect of current density on the performance of both processes was examined. The most potent SPEF-SPC process at 150mAcm(-2) yielded 87% mineralization and 13% current efficiency after consuming 6.0AhL(-1). Maleic, fumaric and oxalic acids detected as final carboxylic acids were completely removed by SPEF and SPEF-SPC. PMID:26947802

  10. Salicylic acid degradation by advanced oxidation processes. Coupling of solar photoelectro-Fenton and solar heterogeneous photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Garza-Campos, Benjamin; Brillas, Enric; Hernández-Ramírez, Aracely; El-Ghenymy, Abdellatif; Guzmán-Mar, Jorge Luis; Ruiz-Ruiz, Edgar J

    2016-12-01

    A 3.0 L solar flow plant with a Pt/air-diffusion (anode/cathode) cell, a solar photoreactor and a photocatalytic photoreactor filled with TiO2-coated glass spheres has been utilized to couple solar photoelectro-Fenton (SPEF) and solar heterogeneous photocatalysis (SPC) for treating a 165mgL(-1) salicylic acid solution of pH 3.0. Organics were destroyed by OH radicals formed on the TiO2 photocatalyst and at the Pt anode during water oxidation and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between added Fe(2+) and cathodically generated H2O2, along with the photolytic action of sunlight. Poor salicylic acid removal and mineralization were attained using SPC, anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (AO-H2O2) and coupled AO-H2O2-SPC. The electro-Fenton process accelerated the substrate decay, but with low mineralization by the formation of byproducts that are hardly destroyed by OH. The mineralization was strongly increased by SPEF due to the photolysis of products by sunlight, being enhanced by coupled SPEF-SPC due to the additional oxidation by OH at the TiO2 surface. The effect of current density on the performance of both processes was examined. The most potent SPEF-SPC process at 150mAcm(-2) yielded 87% mineralization and 13% current efficiency after consuming 6.0AhL(-1). Maleic, fumaric and oxalic acids detected as final carboxylic acids were completely removed by SPEF and SPEF-SPC.

  11. Development and fabrication of advanced cover glass for a GaAs solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, P.G.; Kaminar, N.R.; Grounner, M.

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes work on improving solar cell conversion efficiencies by modifying the cell cover glass. Two approaches were investigated during the course of this work: grooved cover glasses to reduce the effect of top contact obscuration and secondary concentrators to improve concentrator solar cell performances in tracking modules. The grooved cover glass work used an array of metallized V shaped grooves in a thin cover glass (plastic) window to deflect incident light rays away from solar cell front surface regions covered by the solar cell electrical contact metallization onto unobstructed, optically active regions of the solar cell. Secondary concentrators are being considered for use on concentrator solar cells to improve overall system conversion efficiency and reduce receiver module cost. Secondary concentrators designed and fabricated during this project consist of small glass cones to attach directly to the top of the receiver solar cell. When appropriately designed, these secondary concentrator glass cones increase sunlight concentration on the solar cell, improve solar flux uniformity on the cell, improve system tolerance to tracking error, and allow for concentration ratios greater than can be ordinarily achieved with acrylic Fresnel lenses.

  12. Advanced solar-propelled cargo spacecraft for Mars missions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Auziasdeturenne, J.; Beall, M.; Burianek, J.; Cinniger, A.; Dunmire, B.; Haberman, E.; Iwamoto, J.; Johnson, S.; Mccracken, S.; Miller, M.

    1989-06-01

    Three concepts for an unmanned, solar powered, cargo spacecraft for Mars support missions were investigated. These spacecraft are designed to carry a 50,000 kg payload from a low Earth orbit to a low Mars orbit. Each design uses a distinctly different propulsion system: A Solar Radiation Absorption (SRA) system, a Solar-Pumped Laser (SPL) system and a solar powered magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) arc system. The SRA directly converts solar energy to thermal energy in the propellant through a novel process. In the SPL system, a pair of solar-pumped, multi-megawatt, CO2 lasers in sunsynchronous Earth orbit converts solar energy to laser energy. The MPD system used indium phosphide solar cells to convert sunlight to electricity, which powers the propulsion system. Various orbital transfer options are examined for these concepts. In the SRA system, the mother ship transfers the payload into a very high Earth orbit and a small auxiliary propulsion system boosts the payload into a Hohmann transfer to Mars. The SPL spacecraft and the SPL powered spacecraft return to Earth for subsequent missions. The MPD propelled spacecraft, however, remains at Mars as an orbiting space station. A patched conic approximation was used to determine a heliocentric interplanetary transfer orbit for the MPD propelled spacecraft. All three solar-powered spacecraft use an aerobrake procedure to place the payload into a low Mars parking orbit. The payload delivery times range from 160 days to 873 days (2.39 years).

  13. Far Ultraviolet Refractive Index of Optical Materials for Solar Blind Channel (SBC) Filters for HST Advanced Camera for Surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Madison, Timothy J.; Petrone, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Refractive index measurements using the minimum deviation method have been carried out for prisms of a variety of far ultraviolet optical materials used in the manufacture of Solar Blind Channel (SBC) filters for the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). Some of the materials measured are gaining popularity in a variety of high technology applications including high power excimer lasers and advanced microlithography optics operating in a wavelength region where high quality knowledge of optical material properties is sparse. Our measurements are of unusually high accuracy and precision for this wavelength region owing to advanced instrumentation in the large vacuum chamber of the Diffraction Grating Evaluation Facility (DGEF) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Index values for CaF2, BaF2, LiF, and far ultraviolet grades of synthetic sapphire and synthetic fused silica are reported and compared with values from the literature.

  14. Recent Advances in Interface Engineering for Planar Heterojunction Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wei; Pan, Lijia; Yang, Tingbin; Liang, Yongye

    2016-06-25

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells are considered as one of the most promising next-generation solar cells due to their advantages of low-cost precursors, high power conversion efficiency (PCE) and easy of processing. In the past few years, the PCEs have climbed from a few to over 20% for perovskite solar cells. Recent developments demonstrate that perovskite exhibits ambipolar semiconducting characteristics, which allows for the construction of planar heterojunction (PHJ) perovskite solar cells. PHJ perovskite solar cells can avoid the use of high-temperature sintered mesoporous metal oxides, enabling simple processing and the fabrication of flexible and tandem perovskite solar cells. In planar heterojunction materials, hole/electron transport layers are introduced between a perovskite film and the anode/cathode. The hole and electron transporting layers are expected to enhance exciton separation, charge transportation and collection. Further, the supporting layer for the perovskite film not only plays an important role in energy-level alignment, but also affects perovskite film morphology, which have a great effect on device performance. In addition, interfacial layers also affect device stability. In this review, recent progress in interfacial engineering for PHJ perovskite solar cells will be reviewed, especially with the molecular interfacial materials. The supporting interfacial layers for the optimization of perovskite films will be systematically reviewed. Finally, the challenges remaining in perovskite solar cells research will be discussed.

  15. Measurement of high-voltage and radiation-damage limitations to advanced solar array performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidice, D. A.; Severance, P. S.; Keinhardt, K. C.

    1991-01-01

    A description is given of the reconfigured Photovoltaic Array Space Power (PASP) Plus experiment: its objectives, solar-array complement, and diagnostic sensors. Results from a successful spaceflight will lead to a better understanding of high-voltage and radiation-damage limitations in the operation of new-technology solar arrays.

  16. Dynamics of Double Layers, Ion Acceleration, and Heat Flux Suppression during Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T. C.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2014-09-01

    Observations of flare-heated electrons in the corona typically suggest confinement of electrons. The confinement mechanism, however, remains unclear. The transport of coronal hot electrons into ambient plasma was recently investigated by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Electron transport was significantly suppressed by the formation of a highly localized, nonlinear electrostatic potential in the form of a double layer (DL). In this work large-scale PIC simulations are performed to explore the dynamics of DLs in larger systems where, instead of a single DL, multiple DLs are generated. The primary DL accelerates return current electrons, resulting in high velocity electron beams that interact with ambient ions. This forms a Buneman unstable system that spawns more DLs. Trapping of heated return current electrons between multiple DLs strongly suppresses electron transport. DLs also accelerate ambient ions and produce strong ion flows over an extended region. This clarifies the mechanism by which hot electrons in the corona couple to and accelerate ions to form the solar wind. These new dynamics in larger systems reveal a more likely picture of DL development and their impact on the ambient plasma in the solar corona. They are applicable to the preparation for in situ coronal space missions like the Solar Probe Plus.

  17. Dynamics of double layers, ion acceleration, and heat flux suppression during solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. C.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2014-09-20

    Observations of flare-heated electrons in the corona typically suggest confinement of electrons. The confinement mechanism, however, remains unclear. The transport of coronal hot electrons into ambient plasma was recently investigated by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Electron transport was significantly suppressed by the formation of a highly localized, nonlinear electrostatic potential in the form of a double layer (DL). In this work large-scale PIC simulations are performed to explore the dynamics of DLs in larger systems where, instead of a single DL, multiple DLs are generated. The primary DL accelerates return current electrons, resulting in high velocity electron beams that interact with ambient ions. This forms a Buneman unstable system that spawns more DLs. Trapping of heated return current electrons between multiple DLs strongly suppresses electron transport. DLs also accelerate ambient ions and produce strong ion flows over an extended region. This clarifies the mechanism by which hot electrons in the corona couple to and accelerate ions to form the solar wind. These new dynamics in larger systems reveal a more likely picture of DL development and their impact on the ambient plasma in the solar corona. They are applicable to the preparation for in situ coronal space missions like the Solar Probe Plus.

  18. Production of the 4.26 m ZERODUR mirror blank for the Advanced Technology Solar telescope (ATST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Werner, Thomas; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST, formerly the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope, ATST) will be the most powerful solar telescope in the world. It is currently being built by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) in a height of 3000 m above sea level on the mountain Haleakala of Maui, Hawaii. The primary mirror blank of diameter 4.26 m is made of the extremely low thermal expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR® of SCHOTT AG Advanced Optics. The DKIST primary mirror design is extremely challenging. With a mirror thickness of only 78 to 85 mm it is the smallest thickness ever machined on a mirror of 4.26 m in diameter. Additionally the glassy ZERODUR® casting is one of the largest in size ever produced for a 4 m class ZERODUR® mirror blank. The off axis aspherical mirror surface required sophisticated grinding procedures to achieve the specified geometrical tolerance. The small thickness of about 80 mm required special measures during processing, lifting and transport. Additionally acid etch treatment was applied to the convex back-surface and the conical shaped outer diameter surface to improve the strength of the blank. This paper reports on the challenging tasks and the achievements on the material property and dimensional specification parameter during the production of the 4.26 m ZERODUR® primary mirror blank for AURA.

  19. Techno-economic projections for advanced small solar thermal electric power plants to years 1990-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T.; Manvi, R.; Roschke, E. J.; El-Gabalawi, N.; Herrera, G.; Kuo, T. J.; Chen, K. H.

    1979-01-01

    Advanced technologies applicable to solar thermal electric power systems in the 1990-200 time-frame are delineated for power applications that fulfill a wide spectrum of small power needs with primary emphasis on power ratings less than 10MWe. Projections of power system characteristics (energy and capital costs as a function of capacity factor) are made based on development of identified promising technologies and are used as the basis for comparing technology development options and combinations of these options to determine developmental directions offering potential for significant improvements. Stirling engines, Brayton/Rankine combined cycles and storage/transport concepts encompassing liquid metals, and reversible-reaction chemical systems are considered for two-axis tracking systems such as the central receiver or power tower concept and distributed parabolic dish receivers which can provide efficient low-cost solar energy collection while achieving high temperatures for efficient energy conversion. Pursuit of advanced technology across a broad front can result in post-1985 solar thermal systems having the potential of approaching the goal of competitiveness with conventional power systems.

  20. Pathways toward high-performance perovskite solar cells: review of recent advances in organo-metal halide perovskites for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhaoning; Watthage, Suneth C.; Phillips, Adam B.; Heben, Michael J.

    2016-04-01

    Organo-metal halide perovskite-based solar cells have been the focus of intense research over the past five years, and power conversion efficiencies have rapidly been improved from 3.8 to >21%. This article reviews major advances in perovskite solar cells that have contributed to the recent efficiency enhancements, including the evolution of device architecture, the development of material deposition processes, and the advanced device engineering techniques aiming to improve control over morphology, crystallinity, composition, and the interface properties of the perovskite thin films. The challenges and future directions for perovskite solar cell research and development are also discussed.

  1. Development of advanced algorithms to detect, characterize and forecast solar activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yuan

    Study of the solar activity is an important part of space weather research. It is facing serious challenges because of large data volume, which requires application of state-of-the-art machine learning and computer vision techniques. This dissertation targets at two essential aspects in space weather research: automatic feature detection and forecasting of eruptive events. Feature detection includes solar filament detection and solar fibril tracing. A solar filament consists of a mass of gas suspended over the chromosphere by magnetic fields and seen as a dark, ribbon-shaped feature on the bright solar disk in Halpha (Hydrogen-alpha) full-disk solar images. In this dissertation, an automatic solar filament detection and characterization method is presented. The investigation illustrates that the statistical distribution of the Laplacian filter responses of a solar disk contains a special signature which can be used to identify the best threshold value for solar filament segmentation. Experimental results show that this property holds across different solar images obtained by different solar observatories. Evaluation of the proposed method shows that the accuracy rate for filament detection is more than 95% as measured by filament number and more than 99% as measured by filament area, which indicates that only a small fraction of tiny filaments are missing from the detection results. Comparisons indicate that the proposed method outperforms a previous method. Based on the proposed filament segmentation and characterization method, a filament tracking method is put forward, which is capable of tracking filaments throughout their disk passage. With filament tracking, the variation of filaments can be easily recorded. Solar fibrils are tiny dark threads of masses in Halpha images. It is generally believed that fibrils are magnetic field-aligned, primarily due to the reason that the high electrical conductivity of the solar atmosphere freezes the ionized mass in

  2. Naval Research Laboratory's programs in advanced indium phosphide solar cell development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Geoffrey P.

    1995-10-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory has been involved in developing InP solar cell technology since 1988. The purpose of these programs was to produce advanced cells for use in very high radiation environments, either as a result of operating satellites in the Van Allen belts or for very long duration missions in other orbits. Richard Statler was technical representative on the first program, with Spire Corporation as the contractor, which eventually produced several hundred, high efficiency 2 x 2 sq cm single crystal InP cells. The shallow homojunction technology which was developed in this program enabled cells to be made with AMO, one sun efficiencies greater than 19%. Many of these cells have been flown on space experiments, including PASP Plus, which have confirmed the high radiation resistance of InP cells. NRL has also published widely on the radiation response of these cells and also on radiation-induced defect levels detected by DLTS, especially the work of Rob Walters and Scott Messenger. In 1990 NRL began another Navy-sponsored program with Tim Coutts and Mark Wanlass at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), to develop a one sun, two terminal space version of the InP-InGaAs tandem junction cell being investigated at NREL for terrestrial applications. These cells were grown on InP substrates. Several cells with AM0, one sun efficiencies greater than 22% were produced. Two 2 x 2 sq cm cells were incorporated on the STRV lA/B solar cell experiment. These were the only two junction, tandem cells on the STRV experiment. The high cost and relative brittleness of InP wafers meant that if InP cell technology were to become a viable space power source, the superior radiation resistance of InP would have to be combined with a cheaper and more robust substrate. The main technical challenge was to overcome the effect of the dislocations produced by the lattice mismatch at the interface of the two materials. Over the last few years, NRL and Steve Wojtczuk at

  3. Naval Research Laboratory's programs in advanced indium phosphide solar cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Geoffrey P.

    1995-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory has been involved in developing InP solar cell technology since 1988. The purpose of these programs was to produce advanced cells for use in very high radiation environments, either as a result of operating satellites in the Van Allen belts or for very long duration missions in other orbits. Richard Statler was technical representative on the first program, with Spire Corporation as the contractor, which eventually produced several hundred, high efficiency 2 x 2 sq cm single crystal InP cells. The shallow homojunction technology which was developed in this program enabled cells to be made with AMO, one sun efficiencies greater than 19%. Many of these cells have been flown on space experiments, including PASP Plus, which have confirmed the high radiation resistance of InP cells. NRL has also published widely on the radiation response of these cells and also on radiation-induced defect levels detected by DLTS, especially the work of Rob Walters and Scott Messenger. In 1990 NRL began another Navy-sponsored program with Tim Coutts and Mark Wanlass at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), to develop a one sun, two terminal space version of the InP-InGaAs tandem junction cell being investigated at NREL for terrestrial applications. These cells were grown on InP substrates. Several cells with AM0, one sun efficiencies greater than 22% were produced. Two 2 x 2 sq cm cells were incorporated on the STRV lA/B solar cell experiment. These were the only two junction, tandem cells on the STRV experiment. The high cost and relative brittleness of InP wafers meant that if InP cell technology were to become a viable space power source, the superior radiation resistance of InP would have to be combined with a cheaper and more robust substrate. The main technical challenge was to overcome the effect of the dislocations produced by the lattice mismatch at the interface of the two materials. Over the last few years, NRL and Steve Wojtczuk at

  4. Attitude Dynamics of Spinning Solar Sail “IKAROS” Considering Thruster Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Osamu; Shirasawa, Yoji; Sawada, Hirotaka; Tsuda, Yuichi; Funase, Ryu; Saiki, Takanao; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Motooka, Norizumi; Jifuku, Ryo

    In this paper, the attitude dynamics of IKAROS, which is spinning solar sail, are presented. The first mode model of out-of-plane sail deformation (FMM) and multi-particle model (MPM) are introduced to analyze the oscillatory motion of the spinning solar sail. Three oscillation modes are derived from the FMM. They are caused by the nutation motion of the main body, as well as the nutation motion and the out-of-plane oscillation of the sail. The precise attitude motion after sail deployment and reorientation using thrusters is calculated using the MPM considering thruster plume. The IKAROS flight data of the nutation angular velocities of the main body after sail deployment or reorientation using thrusters are nearly equal to the analytical data found using the FMM and MPM.

  5. Dynamical response of the tropical Pacific Ocean to solar forcing during the early Holocene.

    PubMed

    Marchitto, Thomas M; Muscheler, Raimund; Ortiz, Joseph D; Carriquiry, Jose D; van Geen, Alexander

    2010-12-01

    We present a high-resolution magnesium/calcium proxy record of Holocene sea surface temperature (SST) from off the west coast of Baja California Sur, Mexico, a region where interannual SST variability is dominated today by the influence of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Temperatures were lowest during the early to middle Holocene, consistent with documented eastern equatorial Pacific cooling and numerical model simulations of orbital forcing into a La Niña-like state at that time. The early Holocene SSTs were also characterized by millennial-scale fluctuations that correlate with cosmogenic nuclide proxies of solar variability, with inferred solar minima corresponding to El Niño-like (warm) conditions, in apparent agreement with the theoretical "ocean dynamical thermostat" response of ENSO to exogenous radiative forcing. PMID:21127251

  6. Dynamical Response of the Tropical Pacific Ocean to Solar Forcing During the Early Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchitto, Thomas M.; Muscheler, Raimund; Ortiz, Joseph D.; Carriquiry, Jose D.; van Geen, Alexander

    2010-12-01

    We present a high-resolution magnesium/calcium proxy record of Holocene sea surface temperature (SST) from off the west coast of Baja California Sur, Mexico, a region where interannual SST variability is dominated today by the influence of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Temperatures were lowest during the early to middle Holocene, consistent with documented eastern equatorial Pacific cooling and numerical model simulations of orbital forcing into a La Niña-like state at that time. The early Holocene SSTs were also characterized by millennial-scale fluctuations that correlate with cosmogenic nuclide proxies of solar variability, with inferred solar minima corresponding to El Niño-like (warm) conditions, in apparent agreement with the theoretical “ocean dynamical thermostat” response of ENSO to exogenous radiative forcing.

  7. Nano-photonic organic solar cell architecture for advanced light management utilizing dual photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peer, Akshit; Biswas, Rana

    2015-09-01

    Organic solar cells have rapidly increasing efficiencies, but typically absorb less than half of the incident solar spectrum. To increase broadband light absorption, we rigorously design experimentally realizable solar cell architectures based on dual photonic crystals. Our optimized architecture consists of a polymer microlens at the air-glass interface, coupled with a photonic-plasmonic crystal at the metal cathode. The microlens focuses light on the periodic nanostructure that generates strong light diffraction. Waveguiding modes and surface plasmon modes together enhance long wavelength absorption in P3HT-PCBM. The architecture has a period of 500 nm, with absorption and photocurrent enhancement of 49% and 58%, respectively.

  8. Personal solar UV exposure measurements employing modified polysulphone with an extended dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Alfio V; Kimlin, Michael G

    2004-05-01

    Polysulphone dosimeters using a simple to use filter have been developed and tested to provide an extended dynamic measurement range of personal solar UV exposures over an extended period (3 to 6 days). At a Southern Hemisphere subtropical site (27.6 degrees S, 151.9 degrees E), the dynamic range of the filtered polysulphone allowed measurements of erythemal exposures to approximately 100 minimum erythemal dose (MED) for a change in optical absorbance at 330 nm (deltaA330) of 0.35. In comparison, unfiltered polysulphone dosimeters were exposed to approximately 8 MED for the same deltaA330. The error associated with the use of the filtered polysulphone dosimeters is of the order of +/-15%, compared with +/-10% of the unfiltered variety. The developed filtered polysulphone dosimeter system allowed the measurement of erythemal UV exposures over 3 to 6 days at a subtropical site without the need to replace the dosimeters because of saturation. The results show that longer-term measurement programs of personal solar UV have been made more feasible with the use of these polysulphone dosimeters with an extended dynamic range compared with unfiltered polysulphone dosimeters. PMID:15191049

  9. Effects of Chemical Abundances on the Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demarque, Pierre; Basu, S.; Robinson, F.; Hunter, C.; Kallinger, T.

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents a comparison between two three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamical (3D RHD) simulations of the solar outer layers using the Grevesse & Sauval (1998; GS98) and the Asplund, Grevesse & Sauval (2005; AGS05) mixtures, respectively. The AGS05 mixture is a revision of the solar abundance mixture using a model atmosphere based on the stratification and dynamics of a solar 3D RHD simulation performed with the GS98 mixture, using the code of Stein & Nordlund (1989, 1998). Our simulations use the same code, and physically realistic treatment of radiative opacities and equation of state as Robinson et al. (2003). A comparison between our GS98 and AGS05 3D simulations shows differences both in the mean vertical temperature gradient and in the turbulent velocity field in the line forming region of the solar atmosphere. The whole superadiabatic layer (SAL) in the AGS05 simulation, including its peak, is shifted outward with respect to the GS98 SAL. Turbulent velocities, critical for absorption line profile calculations, are larger in the AGS05 simulation by about 10%. Since opacities for the AGS05 mixture are lower than those for the GS98 mixture, the T-τ relations derived from the two simulations are different. At 5000K, τ obtained from the GS98 simulation is about 30% larger than that obtained from the AGS05 simulation. These results show the importance of preserving self consistency in the chemical abundances between the model atmosphere and the 3D HRD simulation. When deriving the solar abundances, one must iterate the chemical composition in the model atmosphere, and hence in the 3D simulation on which the atmosphere is based. This research was supported in part by NASA/ATP grant NAG5-13299 (PD and FR) and NSF grant ATM 0348837 to SB.

  10. Evidence for Coexistence of SOC, Intermittent Turbulence and Low-Dimensional Chaos Processes in Solar Flare Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Karakatsanis, L. P.; Pavlos, G. P.; Iliopoulos, A. C.; Tsoutsouras, V. G.; Pavlos, E. G.

    2011-01-04

    In this study, we present evidence for the co-existence of a SOC-like mechanism, of intermittent turbulence and a hidden low dimensional chaotic process underlying the solar activity. In particular, the original signal reveals a high dimensional stochastic character and a critical state according to a SOC process, since there in no clear discrimination between the original signal and its surrogate data concerning geometrical and dynamical characteristics of the solar time series. Furthermore, using the flat coefficient F we found evidence for intermittent turbulence behaviour. This result was based on the non-Gaussian character and the presence of long-range correlated plasma vorticity. This is in agreement with the low dimensional chaotic self-organization that was revealed after the application of a high pass filter to the original solar flares signal and provides further evidence for self organization in solar activity dynamics. Finally, the above results indicate the existence of a phase transition-like process in the solar corona dynamics, from high dimensional stochastic states to strong intermittent turbulence and low dimensional chaotic states, according to a general theory of critical dynamics applied to the driven and distributed solar corona system.

  11. Overview of the Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration Program at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.

    1995-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) program demonstrates the availability of SD technologies in a simulated space environment at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LERC) vacuum facility. Data from the SD GTD program will be provided to the joint U.S. and Russian team which is currently designing a 2 kW SD flight demonstration power system. This SD technology has the potential as a future power source for the International Space Station. This paper reviews the goals and status of the SD GTD program. A description of the SD GTD system includes key design features of the system, subsystems and components.

  12. Heavy Solar Wind Ion Dynamics at and Downstream from the Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, Virginia M.

    1997-01-01

    This is a contract under the NASA Supporting Research and Technology Program for the analysis and interpretation of the scientific data from the Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun Earth Explorer 1 (ISEE-1) spacecraft and the Fast Plasma Experiment on the ISEE-1 and -2 spacecraft. These combined data sets will be used in a comprehensive study of the heavy solar wind ion dynamics at and downstream from the Earth's bow shock. The report summarizes activities during the above period and outlines expected activities during the forthcoming quarter.

  13. Image Quality of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wachter, R.; Schou, Jesper; Rabello-Soares, M. C.; Miles, J. W.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Bush, R. I.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the imaging quality of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) as measured during the ground calibration of the instrument. We describe the calibration techniques and report our results for the final configuration of HMI. We present the distortion, modulation transfer function, stray light,image shifts introduced by moving parts of the instrument, best focus, field curvature, and the relative alignment of the two cameras. We investigate the gain and linearity of the cameras, and present the measured flat field.

  14. Update of the 2 Kw Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Boyle, Robert V.

    1994-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) program demonstrates the operation of a complete 2 kW, SD system in a simulated space environment at a NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) thermal-vacuum facility. This paper reviews the goals and status of the SD GTD program. A brief description of the SD system identifying key design features of the system, subsystems, and components is included. An aerospace industry/government team is working together to design, fabricate, assemble, and test a complete SD system.

  15. Latent energy storage with salt and metal mixtures for solar dynamic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, R. A.; Konstantinou, K. S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper examines three design alternatives for the development of a solar dynamic heat receiver as applied to power systems operating in low earth orbit. These include a base line design used for comparison in ongoing NASA studies, a system incorporating a salt energy storage system with the salt dispersed within a metal mesh and a hybrid system incorporating both a molten salt and molten metal for energy storage. Based on a typical low earth orbit condition, designs are developed and compared to determine the effect of resultant conductivity, heat capacity and heat of fusion on system size, weight, temperature gradients, cycle turbine inlet temperature and material utilization.

  16. Earth's Magnetic Field Dynamics: Space Weather and Solar Cycle Effect Exhibiting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukharev, A. L.; Sobitnyak, L. I.; Ryabov, M. I.; Orlyuk, M. I.; Orliuk, I. M.; Romenets, A. A.

    According to the 'Odessa' and 'Kiev' observatories total vector magnetic field variations data for 2008-2010 period, dynamics of the space weather manifestations were considered. Wavelet analysis application made the determination of structure changing in circadian period possible. The features of displaying 12, 8 and 6 hour periods are shown. The nature of their correlation and modulation in solar and geomagnetic activity changing is seen. Two stations changes differences that can result from the latitudinal dependence are examined. The existence of 'Odessa' magnetic anomaly located on land and at sea is reviewed.

  17. Thermal energy storage for organic Rankine cycle solar dynamic space power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidenreich, G. R.; Parekh, M. B.

    An organic Rankine cycle-solar dynamic power system (ORC-SDPS) comprises a concentrator, a radiator, a power conversion unit, and a receiver with a thermal energy storage (TES) subsystem which charges and discharges energy to meet power demands during orbital insolation and eclipse periods. Attention is presently given to the criteria used in designing and evaluating an ORC-SDPS TES, as well as the automated test facility employed. It is found that a substantial data base exists for the design of an ORC-SDPS TES subsystem.

  18. Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase for the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlburt, N.; Cheung, M.; Schrijver, C.; Chang, L.; Freeland, S.; Green, S.; Heck, C.; Jaffey, A.; Kobashi, A.; Schiff, D.; Serafin, J.; Seguin, R.; Slater, G.; Somani, A.; Timmons, R.

    2012-01-01

    The immense volume of data generated by the suite of instruments on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) requires new tools for efficient identifying and accessing data that is most relevant for research. We have developed the Heliophysics Events Knowledgebase (HEK) to fill this need. The HEK system combines automated data mining using feature-detection methods and high-performance visualization systems for data markup. In addition, web services and clients are provided for searching the resulting metadata, reviewing results, and efficiently accessing the data. We review these components and present examples of their use with SDO data.

  19. Optimizing zonal advection of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) dynamics for Intel MIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielikainen, Jarno; Huang, Bormin; Huang, Allen H.

    2014-10-01

    The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is the most widely used community weather forecast and research model in the world. There are two distinct varieties of WRF. The Advanced Research WRF (ARW) is an experimental, advanced research version featuring very high resolution. The WRF Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model (WRF-NMM) has been designed for forecasting operations. WRF consists of dynamics code and several physics modules. The WRF-ARW core is based on an Eulerian solver for the fully compressible nonhydrostatic equations. In the paper, we will use Intel Intel Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture to substantially increase the performance of a zonal advection subroutine for optimization. It is of the most time consuming routines in the ARW dynamics core. Advection advances the explicit perturbation horizontal momentum equations by adding in the large-timestep tendency along with the small timestep pressure gradient tendency. We will describe the challenges we met during the development of a high-speed dynamics code subroutine for MIC architecture. Furthermore, lessons learned from the code optimization process will be discussed. The results show that the optimizations improved performance of the original code on Xeon Phi 5110P by a factor of 2.4x.

  20. Optimizing meridional advection of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) dynamics for Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielikainen, Jarno; Huang, Bormin; Huang, Allen H.-L.

    2015-05-01

    The most widely used community weather forecast and research model in the world is the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model. Two distinct varieties of WRF exist. The one we are interested is the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) is an experimental, advanced research version featuring very high resolution. The WRF Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model (WRF-NMM) has been designed for forecasting operations. WRF consists of dynamics code and several physics modules. The WRF-ARW core is based on an Eulerian solver for the fully compressible nonhydrostatic equations. In the paper, we optimize a meridional (north-south direction) advection subroutine for Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor. Advection is of the most time consuming routines in the ARW dynamics core. It advances the explicit perturbation horizontal momentum equations by adding in the large-timestep tendency along with the small timestep pressure gradient tendency. We will describe the challenges we met during the development of a high-speed dynamics code subroutine for MIC architecture. Furthermore, lessons learned from the code optimization process will be discussed. The results show that the optimizations improved performance of the original code on Xeon Phi 7120P by a factor of 1.2x.