Science.gov

Sample records for advanced solid cancers

  1. Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors or Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-20

    Bladder Cancer; Breast Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Leukemia; Lung Cancer; Melanoma (Skin); Ovarian Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  2. Sunitinib Malate and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Kidney Cancer or Advanced Solid Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-01

    Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  3. Irinotecan and Alisertib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  4. GTI-2040, Oxaliplatin, and Capecitabine in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer or Other Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-26

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  5. Phase 1 Study of Intravenous Oncolytic Poxvirus (vvDD) in Patients With Advanced Solid Cancers.

    PubMed

    Downs-Canner, Stephanie; Guo, Zong Sheng; Ravindranathan, Roshni; Breitbach, Caroline J; O'Malley, Mark E; Jones, Heather L; Moon, Anne; McCart, Judith Andrea; Shuai, Yongli; Zeh, Herbert J; Bartlett, David L

    2016-08-01

    We have conducted a phase 1 study of intravenous vvDD, a Western Reserve strain oncolytic vaccinia virus, on 11 patients with standard treatment-refractory advanced colorectal or other solid cancers. The primary endpoints were maximum tolerated dose and associated toxicity while secondary endpoints were pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, immune responses, and antitumor activity. No dose-limiting toxicities and treatment related severe adverse events were observed. The most common adverse events were grades 1/2 flu-like symptoms. Virus genomes were detectable in the blood 15-30 minutes after virus administration in a dose-dependent manner. There was evidence of a prolonged virus replication in tumor tissues in two patients, but no evidence of virus replication in non-tumor tissues, except a healed injury site and an oral thrush. Over 100-fold of anti-viral antibodies were induced in patients' sera. A strong induction of inflammatory and Th1, but not Th2 cytokines, suggested a potent Th1-mediated immunity against the virus and possibly the cancer. One patient showed a mixed response on PET-CT with resolution of some liver metastases, and another patient with cutaneous melanoma demonstrated clinical regression of some lesions. Given the confirmed safety, further trials evaluating intravenous vvDD in combination with therapeutic transgenes, immune checkpoint blockade or complement inhibitors, are warranted. PMID:27203445

  6. GTI-2040 and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Metastatic, or Unresectable Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  7. Advanced Solid State Nanopores Architectures: From Early Cancer Detection to Nano-electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, Rashid

    2013-03-01

    Solid-state nanopores (ssNPs) are potentially low-cost and highly scalable technologies for rapid and reliable se-quencing of the human diploid genome for under 1,000. The ssNPs detect ionic current changes while molecules translocate through the pore. Several key challenges must be overcome in order for ssNPs to become ubiquitous in the fields of medical diagnostics and personalized healthcare. One major challenge is to reduce the speed at which DNA translocates through the nanopore from microseconds to milliseconds per nucleotide, enabling reliable identification of single nucleotides. The other major challenge is to improve the sensitivity of the approach requiring new sensing modalities and novel device architectures. In this paper, we review our recent efforts to (i) develop ssNPs for early cancer detection, (ii) to embed graphene electrodes in dielectric nanolaminates to form 3 and 4 terminal nanopore devices, and (iii) we demonstrate a nanopore based structure consisting of stacked graphene and Al2O3 dielectric layers to study electrochemical activity at graphene edges. The electrochemical signal corresponding to the atomically thin graphene layer could also provide a pathway to DNA sequencing. Supported by National Institute of Health.

  8. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 and Hydroxychloroquine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, Melanoma, Prostate or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-05

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  9. A Dose Escalation Study in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Advanced Solid Tumors With Alterations of FGFR1, 2 and/or 3;; Squamous Lung Cancer With FGFR1 Amplification;; Bladder Cancer With FGFR3 Mutation or Fusion; Advanced Solid Tumors With FGFR1 Amplication,; Advanced Solid Tumors With FGFR2 Amplication,; Advanced Solid Tumors With FGFR3 Mutation

  10. An implantable and controlled drug-release silk fibroin nanofibrous matrix to advance the treatment of solid tumour cancers.

    PubMed

    Xie, Maobin; Fan, Dejun; Chen, Yufeng; Zhao, Zheng; He, Xiaowen; Li, Gang; Chen, Aizheng; Wu, Xiaojian; Li, Jiashen; Li, Zhi; Hunt, John A; Li, Yi; Lan, Ping

    2016-10-01

    The development of more effective cancer therapeutic strategies are still critically required. The maximization of the therapeutic effect in combination with avoiding the severe side effects on normal tissues when using chemotherapy drugs is still an urgent problem that requires improvements urgently. Here we provide implantable and controllable drug-release that utilises silk fibroin (SF) as a nanofibrous drug delivery system (DDS) for cancer treatment. A nanofibrous structure with controllable fibre diameter (<100 nm) was produced. The drug release rate of the SF DDS was controlled by applying a post-treatment process. In vitro anti-cancer (HCT116) results indicated that curcumin (CM)-SF nanofibrous matrix had a superior anti-cancer potential when the concentration was >5 μg/mL. The mechanism could be explained by the cell cycle being held in the S phase. The toxic effect on normal cells (NCM460) was minimized by using a treatment concentration range (5-20 μg/mL). Implantation of this DDS into the tumour site inhibited the growth of solid tumour; this offers an alternative approach for novel cancer therapy. PMID:27376557

  11. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) that is being developed to replace, in 1997, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor which currently boosts the Space Shuttle. The ASRM will contain features to improve motor safety (fewer potential leak paths, improved seal materials, stronger case material, and fewer nozzle and case joints), an improved ignition system using through-bulkhead initiators, and highly reproducible manufacturing and inspection techniques with a large number of automated procedures. The ASRM will be able to deliver 12,000 lbs greater payloads to any given orbit of the Shuttle. There are also environmental improvements, realized by waste propellant recovery.

  12. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-08-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor will utilize improved design features and automated manufacturing methods to produce an inherently safer propulsive system for the Space Shuttle and future launch systems. This second-generation motor will also provide an additional 12,000 pounds of payload to orbit, enhancing the utility and efficiency of the Shuttle system. The new plant will feature strip-wound, asbestos-free insulation; propellant continuous mixing and casting; and extensive robotic systems. Following a series of static tests at the Stennis Space Center, MS flights are targeted to begin in early 1997.

  13. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor will utilize improved design features and automated manufacturing methods to produce an inherently safer propulsive system for the Space Shuttle and future launch systems. This second-generation motor will also provide an additional 12,000 pounds of payload to orbit, enhancing the utility and efficiency of the Shuttle system. The new plant will feature strip-wound, asbestos-free insulation; propellant continuous mixing and casting; and extensive robotic systems. Following a series of static tests at the Stennis Space Center, MS flights are targeted to begin in early 1997.

  14. NASA's Advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) will not only bring increased safety, reliability and performance for the Space Shuttle Booster, it will enhance overall Shuttle safety by effectively eliminating 174 failure points in the Space Shuttle Main Engine throttling system and by reducing the exposure time to aborts due to main engine loss or shutdown. In some missions, the vulnerability time to Return-to-Launch Site aborts is halved. The ASRM uses case joints which will close or remain static under the effects of motor ignition and pressurization. The case itself is constructed of the weldable steel alloy HP 9-4-0.30, having very high strength and with superior fracture toughness and stress corrosion resistance. The internal insulation is strip-wound and is free of asbestos. The nozzle employs light weight ablative parts and is some 5,000 pounds lighter than the Shuttle motor used to date. The payload performance of the ASRM-powered Shuttle is 12,000 pounds higher than that provided by the present motor. This is of particular benefit for payloads delivered to higher inclinations and/or altitudes. The ASRM facility uses state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, including continuous propellant mixing and direct casting.

  15. NASA's Advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) will not only bring increased safety, reliability and performance for the Space Shuttle Booster, it will enhance overall Shuttle safety by effectively eliminating 174 failure points in the Space Shuttle Main Engine throttling system and by reducing the exposure time to aborts due to main engine loss or shutdown. In some missions, the vulnerability time to Return-to-Launch Site aborts is halved. The ASRM uses case joints which will close or remain static under the effects of motor ignition and pressurization. The case itself is constructed of the weldable steel alloy HP 9-4-0.30, having very high strength and with superior fracture toughness and stress corrosion resistance. The internal insulation is strip-wound and is free of asbestos. The nozzle employs light weight ablative parts and is some 5,000 pounds lighter than the Shuttle motor used to date. The payload performance of the ASRM-powered Shuttle is 12,000 pounds higher than that provided by the present motor. This is of particular benefit for payloads delivered to higher inclinations and/or altitudes. The ASRM facility uses state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, including continuous propellant mixing and direct casting.

  16. Phase Ib, Dose Escalation Study of Oral LDE225 in Combination With BKM120 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-18

    Dose Escalation; Safety; Preliminary Efficacy; Advanced Solid Tumors; Metastatic Breast Cancer; Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Colorectal Cancer; Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme; Gastric Cancer; Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer; Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Hormone Receptor Positive (ER+/PR+, and Her2-) Metastatic Breast Cancer

  17. SU2C Phase Ib Study of Paclitaxel and MK-2206 in Advanced Solid Tumors and Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Krop, Ian; Akcakanat, Argun; Chen, Huiqin; Liu, Shuying; Li, Yisheng; Culotta, Kirk S.; Tarco, Emily; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Moulder-Thompson, Stacy; Velez-Bravo, Vivianne; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Doyle, Laurence A.; Do, Kim-Anh; Winer, Eric P.; Mills, Gordon B.; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is preclinical synergism between taxanes and MK-2206. We aim to determine the maximum tolerated dose, safety, and activity of combining MK-2206 and paclitaxel in metastatic cancer. Methods: Patients received weekly doses of paclitaxel at 80mg/m2 on day 1, followed by MK-2206 orally on day 2 escalated at 90mg, 135mg, and 200mg. Treatment continued until progression, excessive toxicity, or patient request. Blood and tissue were collected for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics markers. A cycle consisted of three weeks of therapy. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as unacceptable toxicity during the first cycle. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Twenty-two patients were treated, nine in dose escalation and 13 in dose expansion. Median age was 55 years. Median number of cycles was four. Dose escalation was completed with no DLT. CTCAE Grade 3 or higher adverse events were fatigue (n = 2), rash (n = 2), hyperglycemia (n = 1), and neutropenia (n = 7). Four patients in the expansion phase required MK-2206 dose reduction. Phase II recommended dose was established as paclitaxel 80mg/m2 weekly on day 1, and MK-2206 135mg weekly on day 2. Paclitaxel systemic exposure was similar in the presence or absence of MK-2206. Plasma MK-2206 concentrations were similar to data from previous phase I monotherapy. There was a statistically significant decrease in expression of pAKT S473 (P = .01) and pAKT T308 (P = .002) after therapy. PI3K/AKT/mTOR downregulation in tumor tissues and circulating markers did not correlate with tumor response or clinical benefit. There were five objective responses, and nine patients had stable disease. Conclusion: MK-2206 was well tolerated with paclitaxel. Preliminary antitumor activity was documented. PMID:25688104

  18. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-06

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Melanoma; Stage III Melanoma; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  19. Entinostat, Nivolumab, and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  20. Advanced solid propellant motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. L.; Russ, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    An advanced lightweight insulation system suitable for use in long duration, low pressure planetary orbiter-type motor applications was developed. Experiments included the screening of various filler and binder materials with optimization studies combining the best of each. Small scale test motor data were used to judge the degree of success.

  1. Coping with Advanced Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Currents Blog Research Findings Drug Approvals Precision Medicine Leadership Views All Press Releases 2016 2015 2014 2013 ... NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Previous NCI Directors NCI Organization Advisory ...

  2. Advances in cancer immunology and cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Voena, Claudia; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    After decades of setbacks, cancer immunology is living its Golden Age. Recent advances in cancer immunology have provided new therapeutic approaches to treat cancer. The objective clinical response observed in patients treated with antibodies that block the immune checkpoints, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell-death protein 1 (PD-1)/programmed cell-death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathways, has led to their FDA approval for the treatment of melanoma in 2011 and in 2014, respectively. The anti-PD-1 antibody nivolumab has received the FDA-approval in March 2015 for squamous lung cancer treatment. In addition, antibodies targeting PD-1 or PD-L1 have demonstrated their efficacy and safety in additional tumors, including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), renal cell carcinoma (RCC), bladder cancer, and Hodgkin's lymphoma. Almost at the same time, the field of adoptive cell transfer has exploded. The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T technology has provided strong evidence of efficacy in the treatment of B cell malignancies, and different T cell based treatments are currently under investigation for different types of tumors. In this review we will discuss the latest advances in cancer immunology and immunotherapy as well as new treatments now under development in the clinic and potential strategies that have shown promising results in preclinical models. PMID:27011048

  3. Advanced Solid Rocket Motor case design status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, G. L.; Cash, S. F.; Beck, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) case design aimed at achieving a safer and more reliable solid rocket motor for the Space Shuttle system is considered. The ASRM case has a 150.0 inch diameter, three equal length segment, and 9Ni-4CO-0.3C steel alloy. The major design features include bolted casebolted case joints which close during pressurization, plasma arc welded factory joints, integral stiffener for splash down and recovery, and integral External Tank attachment rings. Each mechanical joint has redundant and verifiable o-ring seals.

  4. Advanced Solid Rocket Motor case design status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, G. L.; Cash, S. F.; Beck, J. P.

    1993-06-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) case design aimed at achieving a safer and more reliable solid rocket motor for the Space Shuttle system is considered. The ASRM case has a 150.0 inch diameter, three equal length segment, and 9Ni-4CO-0.3C steel alloy. The major design features include bolted casebolted case joints which close during pressurization, plasma arc welded factory joints, integral stiffener for splash down and recovery, and integral External Tank attachment rings. Each mechanical joint has redundant and verifiable o-ring seals.

  5. Advanced Solid Rocket Launcher and Its Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Yasuhiro; Imoto, Takayuki; Habu, Hiroto; Ohtsuka, Hirohito; Hori, Keiichi; Koreki, Takemasa; Fukuchi, Apollo; Uekusa, Yasuyuki; Akiba, Ryojiro

    The research on next generation solid propellant rockets is actively underway in various spectra. JAXA is developing the Advanced Solid Rocket (ASR) as a successor to the M-V launch vehicle, which was utilized over past ten years for space science programs including planetary missions. ASR is a result of the development of the next generation technology including a highly intelligent autonomous check-out system, which is connected to not only the solid rocket but also future transportation systems. It is expected to improve the efficiency of the launch system and double the cost performance. Far beyond this effort, the passion of the volunteers among the industry-government-academia cooperation has been united to establish the society of the freewheeling thinking “Next generation Solid Rocket Society (NSRS)”. It aims at a larger revolution than what the ASR provides so that the order of the cost performance is further improved. A study of the Low melting temperature Thermoplastic Propellant (LTP) is now at the experimental stage, which is expected to reform the manufacturing process of the solid rocket propellant and lead to a significant increase in cost performance. This paper indicates the direction of the big flow towards the next generation solid-propellant rockets: the concept of the intelligent ASR under development; and the innovation behind LTP.

  6. Phase I trial of vandetanib in combination with gemcitabine and capecitabine in patients with advanced solid tumors with an expanded cohort in pancreatic and biliary cancers.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Elizabeth R; Eckhardt, S Gail; Pitts, Todd M; Bradshaw-Pierce, Erica L; O'byrant, Cindy L; Messersmith, Wells A; Nallapreddy, Sujatha; Weekes, Colin; Spratlin, Jennifer; Lieu, Christopher H; Kane, Madeleine A; Eppers, Sarah; Freas, Elizabeth; Leong, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Background Vandetanib is a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor that affects vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and rearranged during transfection (RET) mediated receptors which are important for growth and invasion of biliary and pancreatic cancers. This phase I study evaluated the safety profile of vandetanib in combination with standard doses of gemcitabine and capecitabine in order to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Methods In this single center phase I trial, patients received gemcitabine intravenously (IV) at 1000 mg/m2 days 1, 8, 15 in a 28 day cycle, capecitabine orally at 850 mg/m2 twice daily on days 1-21, and escalating doses of vandetanib (200 or 300 mg orally daily). Once the MTD was defined, an expansion cohort of patients with advanced biliary cancers and locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer was enrolled. Blood samples were also collected at predetermined time points for biomarker analysis. Results Twenty-three patients were enrolled: 9 in the dose escalation and 14 in the dose expansion cohort. One dose limiting toxicity (DLT), of grade 4 neutropenia, occurred in the 200 mg vandetanib cohort. The most common adverse effects were diarrhea (39 %), nausea and vomiting (34 %), and rash (33 %). There were 3 partial responses and stable disease of >2 months (range 2-45, median 5) was observed in 15/23 patients. There was no association between changes in biomarker analytes and disease response. Conclusion The combination of gemcitabine, capecitabine and vandetanib is well tolerated at the recommended phase II dose of gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 weekly for three consecutive weeks, capecitabine 850 mg/m2 BID days 1-21, and vandetanib 300 mg daily, every 28 days. This combination demonstrated promising activity in pancreaticobiliary cancers and further evaluation is warranted in these diseases. NCT00551096. PMID:26715573

  7. Antibody-based immunotherapy of solid cancers: progress and possibilities.

    PubMed

    Nicodemus, Christopher F

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies remain a primary product option for novel cancer treatment. The properties of an antibody are a function of the antigen specificity and constant region incorporated. The rapid advance in molecular understanding of cancer biology and the host-tumor interaction has defined a new range of targets for antibody development. The clinical success of the checkpoint inhibitors has validated immune modulation and mobilization as a therapeutic approach. Solid cancers are distinguished from hematologic malignancies because the solid tumor stroma contains significant tumor promoting and immune dampening elements less prominent in hematologic cancer. This review highlights how engineered monoclonal antibody products are emerging as potential cornerstones of new more personalized cancer treatment paradigms that target both tumor and the stromal environment. PMID:26314410

  8. Antibody-based immunotherapy of solid cancers: progress and possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Nicodemus, Christopher F

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies remain a primary product option for novel cancer treatment. The properties of an antibody are a function of the antigen specificity and constant region incorporated. The rapid advance in molecular understanding of cancer biology and the host–tumor interaction has defined a new range of targets for antibody development. The clinical success of the checkpoint inhibitors has validated immune modulation and mobilization as a therapeutic approach. Solid cancers are distinguished from hematologic malignancies because the solid tumor stroma contains significant tumor promoting and immune dampening elements less prominent in hematologic cancer. This review highlights how engineered monoclonal antibody products are emerging as potential cornerstones of new more personalized cancer treatment paradigms that target both tumor and the stromal environment. PMID:26314410

  9. Advances in Green Cryogenic Solid Propellant Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, R. E.; Adirim, H.; Poller, S.; Glaeser, S.; Schoeyer, H.; Caramelli, F.

    2004-10-01

    The combustion of hydrocarbons with hydrogen peroxide or oxygen based oxidizers is known as the best possible realization of green bipropellants in the realm of conventional propellants. By the nature of these constituents, corresponding rocket motors are either hybrids or bi-liquids. This is advantageous in all applications requiring the merits of these categories, such as variations of the thrust - time profile (throttle-ability up to shut down and restart), or variable propellant loading and mixture ratio variation in liquid bipropellants. However, when it comes to thriving on the simplicity and reliability of solid propellant technology, it takes cryogenic solid propulsion (CSP) as enabling technology to make these normally liquid propellants available for many solid propellant applications, in particular for high thrust Earth-to-orbit boosting. It is obvious that proper CSP propellant selection yields solids that are as "green" as any chemical propellant combination can be. The paper describes recent advances in CSP technology related investigations sponsored by the German Aerospace Centre DLR and the European Space Agency ESA at AI/ICT.

  10. Pembrolizumab Combined With INCB039110 and/or Pembrolizumab Combined With INCB050465 in Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Advanced Solid Tumors; Endometrial Cancer; Melanoma; Microsatellite Unstable (MSI) Colorectal Cancer; MMR-deficient Tumors; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Genitourinary Tract; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

  11. Advanced Solid Rocket Motor nozzle development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, W. J.; Moss, J. D.

    1993-06-01

    This paper presents a status update of the design and development of an improved nozzle for the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). The ASRM nozzle incorporates advanced state-of-the-art design features and materials which contribute to enhanced safety, reliability, performance, and producibility for the space shuttle boosters. During 1992 the nozzle design progressed through a successful Preliminary Design Review (PDR). An improved ablative material development program also culminated in the selection of new standard and low density carbon cloth phenolic prepreg offering reduced variability and improved process attributes. A subscale motor test series to evaluate new materials and design features was also completed. An overview update of the matured design characteristics, supporting analysis, key development-program results and program status and plans is reported.

  12. ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect

    WONG, CPC; MALANG, S; NISHIO, S; RAFFRAY, R; SAGARA, S

    2002-04-01

    OAK A271 ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS. First wall and blanket (FW/blanket) design is a crucial element in the performance and acceptance of a fusion power plant. High temperature structural and breeding materials are needed for high thermal performance. A suitable combination of structural design with the selected materials is necessary for D-T fuel sufficiency. Whenever possible, low afterheat, low chemical reactivity and low activation materials are desired to achieve passive safety and minimize the amount of high-level waste. Of course the selected fusion FW/blanket design will have to match the operational scenarios of high performance plasma. The key characteristics of eight advanced high performance FW/blanket concepts are presented in this paper. Design configurations, performance characteristics, unique advantages and issues are summarized. All reviewed designs can satisfy most of the necessary design goals. For further development, in concert with the advancement in plasma control and scrape off layer physics, additional emphasis will be needed in the areas of first wall coating material selection, design of plasma stabilization coils, consideration of reactor startup and transient events. To validate the projected performance of the advanced FW/blanket concepts the critical element is the need for 14 MeV neutron irradiation facilities for the generation of necessary engineering design data and the prediction of FW/blanket components lifetime and availability.

  13. Pyroxamide in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Precancerous Condition; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  14. Advanced Materials and Solids Analysis Research Core (AMSARC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Advanced Materials and Solids Analysis Research Core (AMSARC), centered at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Andrew W. Breidenbach Environmental Research Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, is the foundation for the Agency's solids and surfaces analysis capabilities. ...

  15. Nanoparticle Albumin-Bound Rapamycin in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer With mTOR Mutations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Advanced Malignant Neoplasm; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Carcinoma; Malignant Uterine Neoplasm; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IVA Bladder Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Bladder Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  16. Genetically Engineered Immunotherapy for Advanced Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, doctors will collect T lymphocytes from patients with advanced mesothelin-expressing cancer and genetically engineer them to recognize mesothelin. The gene-engineered cells will be multiplied and infused into the patient to fight the cancer

  17. Motexafin Gadolinium and Doxorubicin in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-30

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Colorectal Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Leukemia; Lung Cancer; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Diseases; Prostate Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  18. Advances in cancer pain from bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Cui; Zhang, Jia-Li; Ge, Chen-Tao; Yu, Yuan-Yang; Wang, Pan; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Fu, Cai-Yun

    2015-01-01

    With the technological advances in cancer diagnosis and treatment, the survival rates for patients with cancer are prolonged. The issue of figuring out how to improve the life quality of patients with cancer has become increasingly prominent. Pain, especially bone pain, is the most common symptom in malignancy patients, which seriously affects the life quality of patients with cancer. The research of cancer pain has a breakthrough due to the development of the animal models of cancer pain in recent years, such as the animal models of mouse femur, humerus, calcaneus, and rat tibia. The establishment of several kinds of animal models related to cancer pain provides a new platform in vivo to investigate the molecular mechanisms of cancer pain. In this review, we focus on the advances of cancer pain from bone metastasis, the mechanisms involved in cancer pain, and the drug treatment of cancer pain in the animal models. PMID:26316696

  19. [Innovation in Surgery for Advanced Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Nakano, Tomoyuki; Yasunori, Sohara; Endo, Shunsuke

    2016-07-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery can be one of less invasive surgical interventions for early stage lung cancer. Locally advanced lung cancer, however, cannot avoid aggressive procedures including pneumonectomy and/or extended combined resection of chest wall, aorta, esophagus, etc. for complete resection. Surgical approach even for advanced lung cancer can be less invasive by benefit from new anti-cancer treatment, innovated manipulations of bronchoplasty and angioplasty, and bench surgery( lung autotransplantation technique). We herein reviewed the strategy to minimize invasive interventions for locally advanced lung cancer, introducing 2 successful cases with advanced lung cancer. The 1st patient is a 62-year old man with centrally advanced lung cancer invading to mediastinum. Right upper sleeve lobectomy with one-stoma carinoplasty following induction chemoradiation therapy was successful. The operation time was 241 minutes. The performance status is good with no recurrence for 60 months after surgery. The 2nd is a 79-year old man with advanced lung cancer invading to the distal aortic arch. Left upper segmentectomy following thoracic endovascular aortic repair with stentgraft was successful with no extracorporeal circulation. The operation time was 170 minutes. The performance status is good with no recurrence for 30 months after surgery. The invasiveness of surgical interventions for local advanced lung cancer can be minimized by innovated device and new anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27440037

  20. Solid cancers after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Rochelle E.; Socié, Gérard; Sobocinski, Kathleen A.; Gilbert, Ethel; Landgren, Ola; Travis, Lois B.; Travis, William D.; Flowers, Mary E. D.; Friedman, Debra L.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Wingard, John R.; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Transplant recipients have been reported to have an increased risk of solid cancers but most studies are small and have limited ability to evaluate the interaction of host, disease, and treatment-related factors. In the largest study to date to evaluate risk factors for solid cancers, we studied a multi-institutional cohort of 28 874 allogeneic transplant recipients with 189 solid malignancies. Overall, patients developed new solid cancers at twice the rate expected based on general population rates (observed-to-expected ratio 2.1; 95% confidence interval 1.8-2.5), with the risk increasing over time (P trend < .001); the risk reached 3-fold among patients followed for 15 years or more after transplantation. New findings showed that the risk of developing a non–squamous cell carcinoma (non-SCC) following conditioning radiation was highly dependent on age at exposure. Among patients irradiated at ages under 30 years, the relative risk of non-SCC was 9 times that of nonirradiated patients, while the comparable risk for older patients was 1.1 (P interaction < .01). Chronic graft-versus-host disease and male sex were the main determinants for risk of SCC. These data indicate that allogeneic transplant survivors, particularly those irradiated at young ages, face increased risks of solid cancers, supporting strategies to promote lifelong surveillance among these patients. PMID:18971419

  1. Lenvatinib: Role in thyroid cancer and other solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Cabanillas, Maria E; Habra, Mouhammed Amir

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent breakthroughs in treatment of advanced thyroid cancers, prognoses remain poor. Treatment of advanced, progressive disease remains challenging, with limited treatment options. Small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including vandetanib, cabozantinib, sorafenib, and lenvatinib, which are now FDA-approved for thyroid cancer, have shown clinical benefit in advanced thyroid cancer. Lenvatinib is approved for treatment of locally recurrent or metastatic, progressive, radioactive iodine (RAI)-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). It has been studied in phase II and III trials for treatment of advanced RAI-refractory DTC, and in a phase II trial for medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Lenvatinib targets vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1-3 (VEGFR1-3), fibroblast growth factor receptors 1-4 (FGFR-1-4), RET, c-kit, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα). Its antitumor activity may be due to antiangiogenic properties and direct antitumor effects. Lenvatinib has demonstrated antitumor activity in a variety of solid tumors, including MTC, in phase I and II clinical trials. In a phase II study in advanced RAI-refractory DTC, lenvatinib-treated patients achieved a 50% response rate (RR), with median progression-free survival (PFS) of 12.6 months. In a phase III trial in RAI-refractory DTC, median PFS in lenvatinib-treated patients was 18.3 months, with a 65% overall RR, versus 3.6 months in placebo-treated patients, with a 2% RR. Adverse events occurring in >50% of patients included hypertension, diarrhea, fatigue/asthenia, and decreased appetite. Lenvatinib is a promising new agent for treatment of patients with advanced thyroid cancer. PMID:26678514

  2. Episodic pain in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, Giovambattista; Ribeiro, Maria D C

    2002-01-01

    Episodic pain is a common problem for patients with advanced cancer and is often difficult to manage successfully. In this article, the daily variations in cancer-related episodic pain in a patient with metastatic lung cancer are described. The definition, etiology, prevalence, and pharmacological management of episodic pain are also reviewed PMID:12141792

  3. Recent advances in cancer immunotherapy with an emphasis on vaccines.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Federica; Forni, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Recent Advances in Cancer Immunotherapy with an Emphasis on Vaccines was the first meeting organized by the European Society of Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy and Progress in Vaccine against Cancer, in collaboration with the Institute of Biological Research and Biotechnology of the National Hellenic Research Foundation, in a joint effort towards the setting up of a new generation of cancer vaccines. The main topics of the meeting included: the role of the tumor microenvironment in protecting the tumor from immune attack; differences in immunotherapy outcome in hematological malignancies versus solid tumors; rationale of multi-epitope vaccines; Treg cell elimination/inactivation, tumor stroma destruction, angiogenesis inhibition and the potentiality of 'preventive' vaccination in breast, colon, prostate and ovarian cancer in the early stages and during the 'wait-and-see' period. The ninth Progress in Vaccines against Cancer meeting will be held in Sofia, Bulgaria, 8-10 October 2009, at the Hilton Hotel. PMID:19093768

  4. Everolimus and Vatalanib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Pheochromocytoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  5. Survival After Solid Cancers in Antithrombotic Trials.

    PubMed

    Serebruany, Victor L; Tomek, Ales; Kim, Moo Hyun

    2015-09-15

    The impact of antithrombotics on cancer is currently under intense investigation because of the excess of solid cancers in trials after thienopyridines such as TRITON (prasugrel), DAPT (prasugrel and clopidogrel), PAR-1 thrombin antagonist in TRACER (vorapaxar), pyrimidines in PEGASUS (ticagrelor), and in APPRAISE-2 after apixaban. However, whether patient survival after solid cancer (SASC) in antithrombotic trials may be affected is unknown. We matched the 1-year SASC rate in antithrombotic trials reported by Food and Drug Administration with the census averages in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program by the US National Cancer Institute and World Health Organization (WHO) surveys. The Food and Drug Administration provided the SASC data for 3 trials with similar cancer survival of about 70% for the first year of follow-up in TRITON, APPRAISE-2, and ARISTOTEL. Adjusted cancers in TRITON with SEER (odds ratio 0.92; 95% confidence interval 0.53 to 1.59, p = 0.4351) and WHO (odds ratio 0.99; 95% confidence interval 0.57 to 1.7, p = 1.00) revealed very close if not identical SASC rates in antithrombotic trials compared to epidemiologic census estimates. In conclusion, SASC rates in patients enrolled in antithrombotic trials do not differ from SEER or World Health Organization averages. PMID:26189037

  6. Talazoparib and HSP90 Inhibitor AT13387 in Treating Patients With Metastatic Advanced Solid Tumor or Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Primary Peritoneal, or Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-22

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; HER2/Neu Negative; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Tumor; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  7. Global controversies and advances in skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Louise; Dunn, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Advances and controversies of skin cancer prevention in the Asian-Pacific region are to be examined the world's first Global Controversies and Advances in Skin Cancer Conference to be held in Brisbane, Australia this November. APOCP Members are cordially invited to register early for the opportunity to contribute to the debate on a cancer which continues to be a prominent issue in the Asia Pacific and indeed worldwide. We need answers to the questions of why a cancer that is so preventable and easily detectable is still shrouded in controversy. Primary focuses will be on issues like viral involvement, vaccines and novel clinical approaches. PMID:23725105

  8. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is under high mortality but has few effective treatment modalities. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is becoming an emerging approach of noninvasively ablating solid tumor in clinics. A variety of solid tumors have been tried on thousands of patients in the last fifteen years with great success. The principle, mechanism, and clinical outcome of HIFU were introduced first. All 3022 clinical cases of HIFU treatment for the advanced pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy in 241 published papers were reviewed and summarized for its efficacy, pain relief, clinical benefit rate, survival, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) score, changes in tumor size, occurrence of echogenicity, serum level, diagnostic assessment of outcome, and associated complications. Immune response induced by HIFU ablation may become an effective way of cancer treatment. Comments for a better outcome and current challenges of HIFU technology are also covered. PMID:25053938

  9. Integrated Molecular Profiling in Advanced Cancers Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Breast Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Genitourinary Cancer; Pancreatobiliary Gastrointestinal Cancer; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer; Gynecological Cancers; Melanoma Cancers; Rare Cancers; Unknown Primary Cancers

  10. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mullane, Stephanie A.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Precision cancer medicine, the use of genomic profiling of patient tumors at the point-of-care to inform treatment decisions, is rapidly changing treatment strategies across cancer types. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer may identify new treatment strategies and change clinical practice. In this review, we discuss the potential and challenges of precision medicine in advanced prostate cancer. Recent findings Although primary prostate cancers do not harbor highly recurrent targetable genomic alterations, recent reports on the genomics of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer has shown multiple targetable alterations in castration-resistant prostate cancer metastatic biopsies. Therapeutic implications include targeting prevalent DNA repair pathway alterations with PARP-1 inhibition in genomically defined subsets of patients, among other genomically stratified targets. In addition, multiple recent efforts have demonstrated the promise of liquid tumor profiling (e.g., profiling circulating tumor cells or cell-free tumor DNA) and highlighted the necessary steps to scale these approaches in prostate cancer. Summary Although still in the initial phase of precision medicine for prostate cancer, there is extraordinary potential for clinical impact. Efforts to overcome current scientific and clinical barriers will enable widespread use of precision medicine approaches for advanced prostate cancer patients. PMID:26909474

  11. Novel agents for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akinleye, Akintunde; Iragavarapu, Chaitanya; Furqan, Muhammad; Cang, Shundong; Liu, Delong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is relatively insensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Therefore, novel agents targeting dysregulated pathways (MAPK/ERK, EGFR, TGF-β, HEDGEHOG, NOTCH, IGF, PARP, PI3K/AKT, RAS, and Src) are being explored in clinical trials as monotherapy or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. This review summarizes the most recent advances with the targeted therapies in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26369833

  12. Advances in bronchoscopy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Samjot Singh; Dexter, Elisabeth U.

    2012-01-01

    Bronchoscopic techniques have seen significant advances in the last decade. The development and refinement of different types of endobronchial ultrasound and navigation systems have led to improved diagnostic yield and lung cancer staging capabilities. The complication rate of these minimally invasive procedures is extremely low as compared to traditional transthoracic needle biopsy and surgical sampling. These advances augment the safe array of methods utilized in the work up and management algorithms of lung cancer. PMID:23346012

  13. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Dagmara; Król, Wojciech; Szliszka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease. PMID:26593898

  14. Advanced mid-IR Solid-State Laser Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art 2-micron solid-state laser developments. A world record one-Joule-per-pulse energy laser system and an advanced thermal management with fully conductive cooled laser technique are discussed

  15. Advances in solid dosage form manufacturing technology.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Gavin P

    2007-12-15

    Currently, the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries are moving through a period of unparalleled change. Major multinational pharmaceutical companies are restructuring, consolidating, merging and more importantly critically assessing their competitiveness to ensure constant growth in an ever-more demanding market where the cost of developing novel products is continuously increasing. The pharmaceutical manufacturing processes currently in existence for the production of solid oral dosage forms are associated with significant disadvantages and in many instances provide many processing problems. Therefore, it is well accepted that there is an increasing need for alternative processes to dramatically improve powder processing, and more importantly to ensure that acceptable, reproducible solid dosage forms can be manufactured. Consequently, pharmaceutical companies are beginning to invest in innovative processes capable of producing solid dosage forms that better meet the needs of the patient while providing efficient manufacturing operations. This article discusses two emerging solid dosage form manufacturing technologies, namely hot-melt extrusion and fluidized hot-melt granulation. PMID:17855217

  16. A phase I and pharmacokinetic study of oral 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (3-AP, NSC #663249) in the treatment of advanced stage solid cancers – A California Cancer Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Joseph; Synold, Timothy W.; Morgan, Robert J.; Kunos, Charles; Longmate, Jeff; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Lim, Dean; Shibata, Stephen; Chung, Vincent; Stoller, Ronald G.; Belani, Chandra P.; Gandara, David R.; McNamara, Mark; Gitlitz, Barbara J.; Lau, Derick H.; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Davies, Angela; Espinoza-Delgado, Igor; Newman, Edward M.; Yen, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Background 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (3-AP) is a novel small molecule ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor. This study was designed to estimate the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) and oral bioavailability of 3-AP in patients with advanced stage solid tumors. Methods Twenty patients received one dose of intravenous and subsequent cycles of oral 3-AP following a 3+3 patient dose-escalation. Intravenous 3-AP was administered to every patient at a fixed dose of 100 mg over a 2-hour infusion 1 week prior to the first oral cycle. Oral 3-AP was administered every 12 hours for 5 consecutive doses on days 1–3, days 8–10, and days 15–17 of every 28-day cycle. 3-AP was started at 50 mg with a planned dose escalation to 100, 150, and 200 mg. Dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) and bioavailability were evaluated. Results Twenty patients were enrolled. For dose level 1 (50mg), the second of three treated patients had a DLT of grade 3 hypertension. In the dose level 1 expansion cohort, three patients had no DLTs. No further DLTs were encountered during escalation until the 200 mg dose was reached. At the 200 mg 3-AP dose level, two treated patients had DLTs of grade 3 hypoxia. One additional DLT of grade 4 febrile neutropenia was subsequently observed at the de-escalated 150 mg dose. One DLT in 6 evaluable patients established the MTD as 150 mg per dose on this dosing schedule. Responses in the form of stable disease occurred in 5 (25%) of 20 patients. The oral bioavailability of 3-AP was 67 ± 29%, and was consistent with the finding that the MTD by the oral route was 33% higher than by the intravenous route. Conclusions Oral 3-AP is well-tolerated and has an MTD similar to its intravenous form after accounting for the oral bioavailability. Oral 3-AP is associated with a modest clinical benefit rate of 25% in our treated patient population with advanced solid tumors. PMID:22105720

  17. Laser cooling in solids: advances and prospects.

    PubMed

    Seletskiy, Denis V; Epstein, Richard; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2016-09-01

    This review discusses the progress and ongoing efforts in optical refrigeration. Optical refrigeration is a process in which phonons are removed from a solid by anti-Stokes fluorescence. The review first summarizes the history of optical refrigeration, noting the success in cooling rare-earth-doped solids to cryogenic temperatures. It then examines in detail a four-level model of rare-earth-based optical refrigeration. This model elucidates the essential roles that the various material parameters, such as the spacing of the energy levels and the radiative quantum efficiency, play in the process of optical refrigeration. The review then describes the experimental techniques for cryogenic optical refrigeration of rare-earth-doped solids employing non-resonant and resonant optical cavities. It then examines the work on laser cooling of semiconductors, emphasizing the differences between optical refrigeration of semiconductors and rare-earth-doped solids and the new challenges and advantages of semiconductors. It then describes the significant experimental results including the observed optical refrigeration of CdS nanostructures. The review concludes by discussing the engineering challenges to the development of practical optical refrigerators, and the potential advantages and uses of these refrigerators. PMID:27484295

  18. Laser cooling in solids: advances and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seletskiy, Denis V.; Epstein, Richard; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2016-09-01

    This review discusses the progress and ongoing efforts in optical refrigeration. Optical refrigeration is a process in which phonons are removed from a solid by anti-Stokes fluorescence. The review first summarizes the history of optical refrigeration, noting the success in cooling rare-earth-doped solids to cryogenic temperatures. It then examines in detail a four-level model of rare-earth-based optical refrigeration. This model elucidates the essential roles that the various material parameters, such as the spacing of the energy levels and the radiative quantum efficiency, play in the process of optical refrigeration. The review then describes the experimental techniques for cryogenic optical refrigeration of rare-earth-doped solids employing non-resonant and resonant optical cavities. It then examines the work on laser cooling of semiconductors, emphasizing the differences between optical refrigeration of semiconductors and rare-earth-doped solids and the new challenges and advantages of semiconductors. It then describes the significant experimental results including the observed optical refrigeration of CdS nanostructures. The review concludes by discussing the engineering challenges to the development of practical optical refrigerators, and the potential advantages and uses of these refrigerators.

  19. Scientific Advances in Lung Cancer 2015.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Anne S; Scagliotti, Giorgio V; Bunn, Paul A; Carbone, David P; Warren, Graham W; Bai, Chunxue; de Koning, Harry J; Yousaf-Khan, A Uraujh; McWilliams, Annette; Tsao, Ming Sound; Adusumilli, Prasad S; Rami-Porta, Ramón; Asamura, Hisao; Van Schil, Paul E; Darling, Gail E; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Gomez, Daniel R; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E; Zimmermann, Stefan; Peters, Solange; Ignatius Ou, Sai-Hong; Reungwetwattana, Thanyanan; Jänne, Pasi A; Mok, Tony S; Wakelee, Heather A; Pirker, Robert; Mazières, Julien; Brahmer, Julie R; Zhou, Yang; Herbst, Roy S; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki A; Redman, Mary W; Wynes, Murry W; Gandara, David R; Kelly, Ronan J; Hirsch, Fred R; Pass, Harvey I

    2016-05-01

    Lung cancer continues to be a major global health problem; the disease is diagnosed in more than 1.6 million new patients each year. However, significant progress is underway in both the prevention and treatment of lung cancer. Lung cancer therapy has now emerged as a "role model" for precision cancer medicine, with several important therapeutic breakthroughs occurring during 2015. These advances have occurred primarily in the immunotherapy field and in treatments directed against tumors harboring specific oncogenic drivers. Our knowledge about molecular mechanisms for oncogene-driven tumors and about resistance to targeted therapies has increased quickly over the past year. As a result, several regulatory approvals of new agents that significantly improve survival and quality of life for patients with lung cancer who have advanced disease have occurred. The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer has gathered experts in different areas of lung cancer research and management to summarize the most significant scientific advancements related to prevention and therapy of lung cancer during the past year. PMID:27013409

  20. Chemotherapy advances in locally advanced head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Georges, Peter; Rajagopalan, Kumar; Leon, Chady; Singh, Priya; Ahmad, Nadir; Nader, Kamyar; Kubicek, Gregory J

    2014-12-10

    The management of locally advanced unresectable head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) continues to improve. One of the major advances in the treatment of HNSCC was the addition of chemotherapy to radiation in the treatment of non-surgical patients. The majority of the data regarding chemotherapy in HNSCC involve cisplatin chemotherapy with concurrent radiation. However, several new approaches have included targeted therapy against epidermal growth factor receptor and several recent studies have explored the role of induction chemotherapy in the treatment of HNSCC. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced HNSCC. PMID:25493232

  1. Trametinib and Navitoclax in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-21

    Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer

  2. Advances in cryoablation for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiao-Mei; Niu, Li-Zhi; Chen, Ji-Bing; Xu, Ke-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is a common cancer of the digestive system with a poor prognosis. It is characterized by insidious onset, rapid progression, a high degree of malignancy and early metastasis. At present, radical surgery is considered the only curative option for treatment, however, the majority of patients with pancreatic cancer are diagnosed too late to undergo surgery. The sensitivity of pancreatic cancer to chemotherapy or radiotherapy is also poor. As a result, there is no standard treatment for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Cryoablation is generally considered to be an effective palliative treatment for pancreatic cancer. It has the advantages of minimal invasion and improved targeting, and is potentially safe with less pain to the patients. It is especially suitable in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. However, our initial findings suggest that cryotherapy combined with 125-iodine seed implantation, immunotherapy or various other treatments for advanced pancreatic cancer can improve survival in patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Although these findings require further in-depth study, the initial results are encouraging. This paper reviews the safety and efficacy of cryoablation, including combined approaches, in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26811625

  3. Palbociclib for Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An interim analysis of the PALOMA3 trial shows that women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer who received palbociclib plus fulvestrant had longer progression-free survival rates than women who received a placebo plus fulvestrant.

  4. Dual VEGF/VEGFR inhibition in advanced solid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Kriti; Koon, Henry; Elson, Paul; Triozzi, Pierre; Dowlati, Afshin; Chen, Helen; Borden, Ernest C; Rini, Brian I

    2014-01-01

    Our prior phase I study of the combination of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody, bevacizumab, and VEGF receptor (VEGFR) inhibitor, sunitinib, in advanced solid tumors identified an encouraging response evaluation. An expansion phase of this study was thus undertaken to obtain further safety data, response assessment and characterization of pharmacodynamic biomarkers in melanoma, renal, and adrenal carcinoma patients. Patients with metastatic solid tumors received sunitinib (37.5 mg/d, 4 wk on/2 wk off) and bevacizumab (5 mg/kg intravenously every 2 wk). Responses were assessed every 2 cycles. Serum levels of angiogenic molecules were measured using ELISA assays. Twenty-two patients were enrolled, including 11 melanoma, 5 renal cell carcinoma (RCC), 5 adrenal cancer, and 1 angiosarcoma. Grade 3 or higher adverse events were observed in 15 patients, including hypertension (41%), thrombocytopenia (23%), and fatigue (14%). Three RCC patients, and 1 melanoma patient developed thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Partial response (PR) occurred in 21% patients, including melanoma (2), adrenal (1), and renal (1) carcinomas. Overall, 6 patients demonstrated some reduction in their tumor burden. Serum VEGF and several other proangiogenic proteins declined over the first 4 wk of treatment whereas the putative VEGF-resistant protein, prokineticin-2, increased over 10-fold. Occurrence of TMA related to dual VEGF/VEGFR inhibition can result from systemic or nephron specific injury even in non-renal malignancies. While the combination of sunitinib and bevacizumab was clinically efficacious in renal cell carcinoma and melanoma, the observance of microangiopathy, even in non-RCC patients, is a significant toxicity that precludes further clinical development. PMID:24842548

  5. Photodynamic Cancer Therapy - Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahamse, Heidi

    2011-09-22

    The basic principle of the photodynamic effect was discovered over a hundred years ago leading to the pioneering work on PDT in Europe. It was only during the 1980s, however, when 'photoradiation therapy' was investigated as a possible treatment modality for cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a photochemotherapeutic process which requires the use of a photosensitizer (PS) that, upon entry into a cancer cell is targeted by laser irradiation to initiate a series of events that contribute to cell death. PSs are light-sensitive dyes activated by a light source at a specific wavelength and can be classified as first or second generation PSs based on its origin and synthetic pathway. The principle of PS activation lies in a photochemical reaction resulting from excitation of the PS producing singlet oxygen which in turn reacts and damages cell organelles and biomolecules required for cell function and ultimately leading to cell destruction. Several first and second generation PSs have been studied in several different cancer types in the quest to optimize treatment. PSs including haematoporphyrin derivative (HpD), aminolevulinic acid (ALA), chlorins, bacteriochlorins, phthalocyanines, naphthalocyanines, pheophorbiedes and purpurins all require selective uptake and retention by cancer cells prior to activation by a light source and subsequent cell death induction. Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is based on the fluorescence effect exhibited by PSs upon irradiation and is often used concurrently with PDT to detect and locate tumours. Both laser and light emitting diodes (LED) have been used for PDT depending on the location of the tumour. Internal cancers more often require the use of laser light delivery using fibre optics as delivery system while external PDT often make use of LEDs. Normal cells have a lower uptake of the PS in comparison to tumour cells, however the acute cytotoxic effect of the compound on the recovery rate of normal cells is not known. Subcellular

  6. Veliparib, Oxaliplatin, and Capecitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  7. Advanced materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, T.R.; Stevenson, J.

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this research is to improve the properties of the current state-of-the-art materials used for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The objectives are to: (1) develop materials based on modifications of the state-of-the-art materials; (2) minimize or eliminate stability problems in the cathode, anode, and interconnect; (3) Electrochemically evaluate (in reproducible and controlled laboratory tests) the current state-of-the-art air electrode materials and cathode/electrolyte interfacial properties; (4) Develop accelerated electrochemical test methods to evaluate the performance of SOFCs under controlled and reproducible conditions; and (5) Develop and test materials for use in low-temperature SOFCs. The goal is to modify and improve the current state-of-the-art materials and minimize the total number of cations in each material to avoid negative effects on the materials properties. Materials to reduce potential deleterious interactions, (3) improve thermal, electrical, and electrochemical properties, (4) develop methods to synthesize both state-of-the-art and alternative materials for the simultaneous fabricatoin and consolidation in air of the interconnections and electrodes with the solid electrolyte, and (5) understand electrochemical reactions at materials interfaces and the effects of component composition and processing on those reactions.

  8. Advances in gastric cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Antonio; Cito, Letizia

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a multifactorial neoplastic pathology numbering among its causes both environmental and genetic predisposing factors. It is mainly diffused in South America and South-East Asia, where it shows the highest morbility percentages and it is relatively scarcely diffused in Western countries and North America. Although molecular mechanisms leading to gastric cancer development are only partially known, three main causes are well characterized: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, diet rich in salted and/or smoked food and red meat, and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) mutations. Unhealthy diet and H. pylori infection are able to induce in stomach cancer cells genotypic and phenotypic transformation, but their effects may be crossed by a diet rich in vegetables and fresh fruits. Various authors have recently focused their attention on the importance of a well balanced diet, suggesting a necessary dietary education starting from childhood. A constant surveillance will be necessary in people carrying E-cadherin mutations, since they are highly prone in developing gastric cancer, also within the inner stomach layers. Above all in the United States, several carriers decided to undergo a gastrectomy, preferring changing their lifestyle than living with the awareness of the development of a possible gastric cancer. This kind of choice is strictly personal, hence a decision cannot be suggested within the clinical management. Here we summarize the key points of gastric cancer prevention analyzing possible strategies referred to the different predisposing factors. We will discuss about the effects of diet, H. pylori infection and E-cadherin mutations and how each of them can be handled. PMID:23061031

  9. Advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Obstein, Keith L; Valdastri, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Diagnosing colorectal has been increasingly successful due to advances in technology. Flexible endoscopy is considered to be an effective method for early diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancer, making it a popular choice for screening programs. However, millions of people who may benefit from endoscopic colorectal cancer screening fail to have the procedure performed. Main reasons include psychological barriers due to the indignity of the procedure, fear of procedure related pain, bowel preparation discomfort, and potential need for sedation. Therefore, an urgent need for new technologies addressing these issues clearly exists. In this review, we discuss a set of advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening that are either already available or close to clinical trial. In particular, we focus on visual-inspection-only advanced flexible colonoscopes, interventional colonoscopes with alternative propulsion mechanisms, wireless capsule colonoscopy, and technologies for intraprocedural bowel cleansing. Many of these devices have the potential to reduce exam related patient discomfort, obviate the need for sedation, increase diagnostic yield, reduce learning curves, improve access to screening, and possibly avert the need for a bowel preparation. PMID:23382621

  10. Radiation treatment for breast cancer. Recent advances.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Edward

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review recent advances in radiation therapy in treatment of breast cancer. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE and CANCERLIT were searched using the MeSH words breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in situ, sentinel lymph node biopsy, and postmastectomy radiation. Randomized studies have shown the efficacy of radiation treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and for invasive breast cancer. MAIN MESSAGE: Lumpectomy followed by radiation is effective treatment for DCIS. In early breast cancer, shorter radiation schedules are as efficacious for local control and short-term cosmetic results as traditional fractionation regimens. Sentinel lymph node biopsy is done in specialized cancer centres; regional radiation is recommended for patients with four or more positive axillary lymph nodes. Postmastectomy radiation has been shown to have survival benefits for high-risk premenopausal patients. Systemic metastases from breast cancer usually respond satisfactorily to radiation. CONCLUSION: Radiation therapy continues to have an important role in treatment of breast cancer. There have been great advances in radiation therapy in the last decade, but they have raised controversy. Further studies are needed to address the controversies. PMID:12113193

  11. Pain in far-advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Twycross, R G; Fairfield, S

    1982-11-01

    Hundred patients with far-advanced cancer and pain were interviewed within a few days of admission to a special care unit. Eighty had more than one pain; 34 had four or more. A total of 303 anatomically distinct pains were recorded. Ninety-one patients had pain caused by the cancer itself. Twelve had treatment-related pain; and 19 had pain related to chronic disease or debility ('associated pain'). Thirty-nine patients had one or more pains unrelated to cancer or treatment; the most common of these was myofascial pain. In 41 patients only was all the pain caused directly by the cancer. Bone involvement and nerve compression were the most common forms of cancer-related pain; soft tissue and visceral pains also occurred frequently. Fifty-seven patients had pain for more than 4 months. PMID:6218464

  12. Methoxyamine, Cisplatin, and Pemetrexed Disodium in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Mesothelioma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or Mesothelioma That Is Refractory to Cisplatin and Pemetrexed

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-15

    Advanced Peritoneal Malignant Mesothelioma; Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Peritoneal Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Pleural Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Pleural Mesothelioma; Thymoma

  13. Radiation from advanced solid rocket motor plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Richard C.; Smith, Sheldon D.; Myruski, Brian L.

    1994-01-01

    The overall objective of this study was to develop an understanding of solid rocket motor (SRM) plumes in sufficient detail to accurately explain the majority of plume radiation test data. Improved flowfield and radiation analysis codes were developed to accurately and efficiently account for all the factors which effect radiation heating from rocket plumes. These codes were verified by comparing predicted plume behavior with measured NASA/MSFC ASRM test data. Upon conducting a thorough review of the current state-of-the-art of SRM plume flowfield and radiation prediction methodology and the pertinent data base, the following analyses were developed for future design use. The NOZZRAD code was developed for preliminary base heating design and Al2O3 particle optical property data evaluation using a generalized two-flux solution to the radiative transfer equation. The IDARAD code was developed for rapid evaluation of plume radiation effects using the spherical harmonics method of differential approximation to the radiative transfer equation. The FDNS CFD code with fully coupled Euler-Lagrange particle tracking was validated by comparison to predictions made with the industry standard RAMP code for SRM nozzle flowfield analysis. The FDNS code provides the ability to analyze not only rocket nozzle flow, but also axisymmetric and three-dimensional plume flowfields with state-of-the-art CFD methodology. Procedures for conducting meaningful thermo-vision camera studies were developed.

  14. Advanced Solid State Lighting for AES Deep Space Hab Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holbert, Eirik

    2015-01-01

    The advanced Solid State Lighting (SSL) assemblies augmented 2nd generation modules under development for the Advanced Exploration Systems Deep Space Habitat in using color therapy to synchronize crew circadian rhythms. Current RGB LED technology does not produce sufficient brightness to adequately address general lighting in addition to color therapy. The intent is to address both through a mix of white and RGB LEDs designing for fully addressable alertness/relaxation levels as well as more dramatic circadian shifts.

  15. Pembrolizumab and Ziv-aflibercept in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-15

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Metastatic Melanoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer

  16. Thyroid Adenomas After Solid Cancer in Childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Haddy, Nadia; El-Fayech, Chiraz; Guibout, Catherine; Adjadj, Elisabeth; Thomas-Teinturier, Cecile; Oberlin, Odile; Veres, Cristina; Pacquement, Helene; Jackson, Angela; Munzer, Martine; N'Guyen, Tan Dat; Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Berchery, Delphine; Laprie, Anne; Bridier, Andre; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Schlumberger, Martin; Rubino, Carole; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vathaire, Florent de

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Very few childhood cancer survivor studies have been devoted to thyroid adenomas. We assessed the role of chemotherapy and the radiation dose to the thyroid in the risk of thyroid adenoma after childhood cancer. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 3254 2-year survivors of a solid childhood cancer treated in 5 French centers before 1986 was established. The dose received by the isthmus and the 2 lobes of the thyroid gland during each course of radiation therapy was estimated after reconstruction of the actual radiation therapy conditions in which each child was treated as well as the dose received at other anatomical sites of interest. Results: After a median follow-up of 25 years, 71 patients had developed a thyroid adenoma. The risk strongly increased with the radiation dose to the thyroid up to a few Gray, plateaued, and declined for high doses. Chemotherapy slightly increased the risk when administered alone but also lowered the slope of the dose-response curve for the radiation dose to the thyroid. Overall, for doses up to a few Gray, the excess relative risk of thyroid adenoma per Gray was 2.8 (90% CI: 1.2-6.9), but it was 5.5 (90% CI: 1.9-25.9) in patients who had not received chemotherapy or who had received only 1 drug, and 1.1 (90% CI: 0.4-3.4) in the children who had received more than 1 drug (P=.06, for the difference). The excess relative risk per Gray was also higher for younger children at the time of radiation therapy than for their older counterparts and was higher before attaining 40 years of age than subsequently. Conclusions: The overall pattern of thyroid adenoma after radiation therapy for a childhood cancer appears to be similar to that observed for thyroid carcinoma.

  17. Advances and Challenges in Treatment of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Joshua; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Dramatic improvements in the outcomes of patients with rectal cancer have occurred over the past 30 years. Advances in surgical pathology, refinements in surgical techniques and instrumentation, new imaging modalities, and the widespread use of neoadjuvant therapy have all contributed to these improvements. Several questions emerge as we learn of the benefits or lack thereof for components of the current multimodality treatment in subgroups of patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). What is the optimal surgical technique for distal rectal cancers? Do all patients need postoperative chemotherapy? Do all patients need radiation? Do all patients need surgery, or is a nonoperative, organ-preserving approach warranted in selected patients? Answering these questions will lead to more precise treatment regimens, based on patient and tumor characteristics, that will improve outcomes while preserving quality of life. However, the idea of shifting the treatment paradigm (chemoradiotherapy, total mesorectal excision, and adjuvant therapy) currently applied to all patients with LARC to a more individually tailored approach is controversial. The paradigm shift toward organ preservation in highly selected patients whose tumors demonstrate clinical complete response to neoadjuvant treatment is also controversial. Herein, we highlight many of the advances and resultant controversies that are likely to dominate the research agenda for LARC in the modern era. PMID:25918296

  18. Therapeutic advances in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Rader, J S

    1992-02-01

    The propensity of ovarian cancer to recur--even after initial chemotherapeutic responses--is a problem that has been given a great deal of attention during the past year in the literature dealing with the treatment of ovarian cancer. Most of the articles address techniques to improve the percent of initial and secondary treatment responses. Several studies have described cytoreductive techniques to decrease the remaining tumor size for improved chemotherapeutic response. Cross-resistance between platinum analogues has been reconfirmed. However, improved secondary responses were seen when repeat treatment with platinum agents were preceded by a longer interval from initial platinum agent therapy. Radiation therapy has been shown to offer little solution to recurrent disease except possibly in a select group of patients with microscopic disease at second-look laparotomy. Reports on the use of carboplatin continue to demonstrate good initial responses, with decreased toxicity compared with cisplatin. Granisetron has been shown to significantly decrease the nausea and vomiting caused by emetogenic chemotherapy like cisplatin. PMID:1543823

  19. Immunotherapy for lung cancer: advances and prospects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. To date, surgery is the first choice treatment, but most clinically diagnosed cases are inoperable. While chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are the next considered options for such cases, these treatment modalities have adverse effects and are sometimes lethal to patients. Thus, new effective strategies with minimal side effects are urgently needed. Cancer immunotherapy provides either active or passive immunity to target tumors. Multiple immunotherapy agents have been proposed and tested for potential therapeutic benefit against lung cancer, and some pose fewer side effects as compared to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this article, we discuss studies focusing on interactions between lung cancer and the immune system, and we place an emphasis on outcome evidence in order to create a knowledge base well-grounded in clinical reality. Overall, this review highlights the need for new lung cancer treatment options, with much ground to be paved for future advances in the field. We believe that immunotherapy agents alone or with other forms of treatment can be recognized as next modality of lung cancer treatment. PMID:27168951

  20. Immunotherapy for lung cancer: advances and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. To date, surgery is the first choice treatment, but most clinically diagnosed cases are inoperable. While chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are the next considered options for such cases, these treatment modalities have adverse effects and are sometimes lethal to patients. Thus, new effective strategies with minimal side effects are urgently needed. Cancer immunotherapy provides either active or passive immunity to target tumors. Multiple immunotherapy agents have been proposed and tested for potential therapeutic benefit against lung cancer, and some pose fewer side effects as compared to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this article, we discuss studies focusing on interactions between lung cancer and the immune system, and we place an emphasis on outcome evidence in order to create a knowledge base well-grounded in clinical reality. Overall, this review highlights the need for new lung cancer treatment options, with much ground to be paved for future advances in the field. We believe that immunotherapy agents alone or with other forms of treatment can be recognized as next modality of lung cancer treatment. PMID:27168951

  1. Treatment of advanced esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsen, D.

    1982-12-01

    When radiation therapy is used for palliation of obstruction in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma, an improvement in dysphagia can be expected in approximately 50% of patients. Major objective responses have rarely been quantitied but, in one study, were seen in 33% patients. Recurrence of dysphagia is usually seen within 2-6 months of treatment. Radiation toxicities and complications, even when used with palliative intent, can be substantial and include esophagitis, tracheoesophageal or esophageal-aortic fistula, mediastinitis, hemorrhage, pneumonitis, and myelosuppression. (JMT)

  2. Two-Pronged Chemo Helps Some with Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Two-Pronged Chemo Helps Some With Advanced Ovarian Cancer Study found using both abdomen drip and ... 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some women with advanced ovarian cancer may fare better if chemotherapy is dripped ...

  3. Advanced research on vasculogenic mimicry in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Lili; Liang, Ning; Zhang, Jiandong; Xie, Jian; Liu, Fengjun; Xu, Deguo; Yu, Xinshuang; Tian, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) is a brand-new tumour vascular paradigm independent of angiogenesis that describes the specific capacity of aggressive cancer cells to form vessel-like networks that provide adequate blood supply for tumour growth. A variety of molecule mechanisms and signal pathways participate in VM induction. Additionally, cancer stem cell and epithelial-mesenchymal transitions are also shown to be implicated in VM formation. As a unique perfusion way, VM is associated with tumour invasion, metastasis and poor cancer patient prognosis. Due to VM's important effects on tumour progression, more VM-related strategies are being utilized for anticancer treatment. Here, with regard to the above aspects, we make a review of advanced research on VM in cancer. PMID:25598425

  4. Important drugs for cough in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Homsi, J; Walsh, D; Nelson, K A

    2001-11-01

    Cough is a defense mechanism that prevents the entry of noxious materials into the respiratory system and clears foreign materials and excess secretions from the lungs and respiratory tract. In advanced cancer, it is a common symptom that interferes with the patient's daily activity and quality of life. Empiric treatment with antitussive agents is often needed. Two classes of antitussive drugs are available: (1) centrally acting: (a) opioids and (b) non-opioids; (2) peripherally acting: (a) directly and (b) indirectly. Antitussive availability varies widely around the world. Many antitussives, such as benzonatate, codeine, hydrocodone, and dextromethorphan, were extensively studied in the acute and chronic cough settings and showed relatively high efficacy and safety profiles. Benzonatate, clobutinol, dihydrocodeine, hydrocodone, and levodropropizine were the only antitussives specifically studied in cancer and advanced cancer cough. They all have shown to be effective and safe in recommended daily dose for cough. In advanced cancer the patient's current medications, previous antitussive use, the availability of routes of administration, any history of drug abuse, the presence of other symptoms and other factors, all have a role in the selection of antitussives for prescription. A good knowledge of the pharmacokinetics, dosage, efficacy, and side effects of the available antitussives provides for better management. PMID:11762966

  5. Inflammation and cancer: advances and new agents.

    PubMed

    Crusz, Shanthini M; Balkwill, Frances R

    2015-10-01

    Tumour-promoting inflammation is considered one of the enabling characteristics of cancer development. Chronic inflammatory disease increases the risk of some cancers, and strong epidemiological evidence exists that NSAIDs, particularly aspirin, are powerful chemopreventive agents. Tumour microenvironments contain many different inflammatory cells and mediators; targeting these factors in genetic, transplantable and inducible murine models of cancer substantially reduces the development, growth and spread of disease. Thus, this complex network of inflammation offers targets for prevention and treatment of malignant disease. Much potential exists in this area for novel cancer prevention and treatment strategies, although clinical research to support targeting of cancer-related inflammation and innate immunity in patients with advanced-stage cancer remains in its infancy. Following the initial successes of immunotherapies that modulate the adaptive immune system, we assert that inflammation and innate immunity are important targets in patients with cancer on the basis of extensive preclinical and epidemiological data. The adaptive immune response is heavily dependent on innate immunity, therefore, inhibiting some of the tumour-promoting immunosuppressive actions of the innate immune system might enhance the potential of immunotherapies that activate a nascent antitumour response. PMID:26122183

  6. New advances in targeted gastric cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Lazăr, Daniela Cornelia; Tăban, Sorina; Cornianu, Marioara; Faur, Alexandra; Goldiş, Adrian

    2016-08-14

    Despite a decrease in incidence over past decades, gastric cancer remains a major global health problem. In the more recent period, survival has shown only minor improvement, despite significant advances in diagnostic techniques, surgical and chemotherapeutic approaches, the development of novel therapeutic agents and treatment by multidisciplinary teams. Because multiple genetic mutations, epigenetic alterations, and aberrant molecular signalling pathways are involved in the development of gastric cancers, recent research has attempted to determine the molecular heterogeneity responsible for the processes of carcinogenesis, spread and metastasis. Currently, some novel agents targeting a part of these dysfunctional molecular signalling pathways have already been integrated into the standard treatment of gastric cancer, whereas others remain in phases of investigation within clinical trials. It is essential to identify the unique molecular patterns of tumours and specific biomarkers to develop treatments targeted to the individual tumour behaviour. This review analyses the global impact of gastric cancer, as well as the role of Helicobacter pylori infection and the efficacy of bacterial eradication in preventing gastric cancer development. Furthermore, the paper discusses the currently available targeted treatments and future directions of research using promising novel classes of molecular agents for advanced tumours. PMID:27570417

  7. New advances in targeted gastric cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lazăr, Daniela Cornelia; Tăban, Sorina; Cornianu, Marioara; Faur, Alexandra; Goldiş, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Despite a decrease in incidence over past decades, gastric cancer remains a major global health problem. In the more recent period, survival has shown only minor improvement, despite significant advances in diagnostic techniques, surgical and chemotherapeutic approaches, the development of novel therapeutic agents and treatment by multidisciplinary teams. Because multiple genetic mutations, epigenetic alterations, and aberrant molecular signalling pathways are involved in the development of gastric cancers, recent research has attempted to determine the molecular heterogeneity responsible for the processes of carcinogenesis, spread and metastasis. Currently, some novel agents targeting a part of these dysfunctional molecular signalling pathways have already been integrated into the standard treatment of gastric cancer, whereas others remain in phases of investigation within clinical trials. It is essential to identify the unique molecular patterns of tumours and specific biomarkers to develop treatments targeted to the individual tumour behaviour. This review analyses the global impact of gastric cancer, as well as the role of Helicobacter pylori infection and the efficacy of bacterial eradication in preventing gastric cancer development. Furthermore, the paper discusses the currently available targeted treatments and future directions of research using promising novel classes of molecular agents for advanced tumours. PMID:27570417

  8. Advances in the treatment of testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Yaron; Margel, David; Lubin, Marc Alan; Baniel, Jack

    2015-06-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCT) are relatively uncommon, accounting for only 1% of male malignancies in the United States. It has become an important oncological disease for several reasons. It is the most common malignancy in young men 15-35 years old. GCTs are among a unique numbers of neoplasms where biochemical markers play a critical role. Finally, it is a model of curable cancer. In this review we discuss cancer epidemiology, genetics, and therapeutic principles. Recent advances in the management of stage I GCT and controversies in the management of post chemotherapy residual mass are presented. PMID:26816836

  9. [Advance Care Planning in Cancer Care].

    PubMed

    Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Yotani, Nobuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) is one of the most important issues to consider in providing quality end of life care for cancer patients. ACP has been described as a process whereby a patient, in consultation with health care providers, family members, and important others, makes decisions about his or her future health care, in the event he or she becomes incapable of participating in medical treatment decisions. ACP improves rates of following end of life wishes, increases patient and family satisfaction, and reduces family stress, anxiety, and depression. This article clarifies the differences among ACP, advance directives, and living wills. Additionally, we describe, based on clinical experience, how to introduce ACP most effectively for all stages of cancer care. PMID:27067841

  10. Management of dysphagia in advanced oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Penner, Jamie L; McClement, Susan E; Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V

    2007-05-01

    Individuals with advanced oropharyngeal cancer often experience dysphagia as a result of their illness and its treatment. Research consistently demonstrates that dysphagia and difficulty with oral intake have many implications, including a negative impact on quality of life. Nurses are in a key position to provide support and initiate appropriate interventions for individuals with dysphagia. Using the Human Response to Illness model (Mitchell et al, 1991) as an organising framework, this paper presents a critical review of the empirical literature regarding dysphagia in individuals with advanced oropharyngeal cancer that will: i) provide the reader with a comprehensive understanding of dysphagia; ii) identify current gaps in our knowledge; and iii) establish the foundation for appropriate evidence-based interventions to optimise functioning and quality of life in this patient population. PMID:17577172

  11. Advances in biomarkers of biliary tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Yin, Baobing

    2016-07-01

    Tumor biomarkers can be applied for early diagnosis or precise treatment, thereby leading to personalized treatment and better outcomes. Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a group of cancers that occurs in different locations and have different clinical or genetic properties. Though the incidence of BTCs is rare, BTCs are among the most lethal cancers in the world and all have very low 5-year survivals. Lack of efficient early diagnostic approaches or adjuvant therapies for BTCs are main reasons. These urge us to broaden the researches into BTC biomarkers. Although few progresses of diagnostic biomarkers for BTCs have been achieved, there are still some advances in prognostic, predictive and therapeutic areas. In this review, we will focus on these achievements. PMID:27261586

  12. New treatment options for advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Gary; Ghaneh, Paula; Costello, Eithne; Greenhalf, William; Neoptolemos, John P

    2008-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a very high mortality rate and affects approximately 230,000 individuals worldwide. Gemcitabine has become established as the standard therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer; however, the survival advantage is small. Adjuvant chemotherapy using either 5-fluorouracil or gemcitabine is now established in pancreatic cancer as an alternative therapy. Combinations of gemcitabine with either platin agents or capecitabine may be advantageous. Anti-EGFR and anti-VEGF agents have been unsuccessful but multiple tyrosine kinase inhibitors are under investigation. Of the increasing number of immunological agents, the GV1001 antitelomerase vaccine holds some interest. Targeted agents against important mitogenic pathways, including MEK/ERK, Src, PI3K/Akt, mTOR, Hedgehog and NF-kappaB, as well as agents targeting histone deacetylase, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, heat shock protein 90 and other agents such as beta-lapachone, hold considerable interest for further development. However, the probability of individual success is low. PMID:19072345

  13. Advanced Solid State Lighting for Human Evaluation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, Nancy; Holbert, Eirik

    2015-01-01

    Lighting intensity and color have a significant impact on human circadian rhythms. Advanced solid state lighting was developed for the Advanced Exploration System (AES) Deep Space Habitat(DSH) concept demonstrator. The latest generation of assemblies using the latest commercially available LED lights were designed for use in the Bigelow Aerospace Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) simulator and the University of Hawaii's Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (Hi-SEAS) habitat. Agreements with both these organizations will allow the government to receive feedback on the lights and lighting algorithms from long term human interaction.

  14. Systemic Chemotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Seung; Park, Seung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal cancers. These patients often have multiple symptoms, and integrated supportive care is critical in helping them remain well for as long as possible. Fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is known to improve overall survival (OS) by approximately 3 months, compared to the best supportive care alone. A 1997 study comparing gemcitabine and fluorouracil treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer patients showed an improvement in OS of 1 month in patients receiving gemcitabine. Over the next 10 years, multiple randomized studies compared single-agent gemcitabine with combination chemotherapy and showed no effective survival improvement. However, the addition of erlotinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, was associated with a significant improvement in OS of approximately 2 weeks. However, adoption of this regimen has not been widespread because of its limited effect and added toxicity. Two clinical trials have recently prolonged OS in advanced pancreatic cancer patients by almost 1 year. The first compared FOLFIRINOX with gemcitabine alone, and was associated with a significant improvement in median survival. The second compared gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel with gemcitabine alone, and was associated with improvements in OS. At present, these regimens are considered standard treatment for patients with good performance statuses. PMID:27114434

  15. Management of advanced medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Hadoux, Julien; Pacini, Furio; Tuttle, R Michael; Schlumberger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer arises from calcitonin-producing C-cells and accounts for 3-5% of all thyroid cancers. The discovery of a locally advanced medullary thyroid cancer that is not amenable to surgery or of distant metastases needs careful work-up, including measurement of serum calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen (and their doubling times), in addition to comprehensive imaging to determine the extent of the disease, its aggressiveness, and the need for any treatment. In the past, cytotoxic chemotherapy was used for treatment but produced little benefit. For the past 10 years, tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors and RET (rearranged during transfection) have been used when a systemic therapy is indicated for large tumour burden and documented disease progression. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have shown benefits on progression-free survival compared with placebo in this setting, but their toxic effect profiles need thorough clinical management in specialised centres. This Review describes the management and treatment of patients with advanced medullary thyroid cancer with emphasis on current targeted therapies and perspectives to improve patient care. Most treatment responses are transient, emphasising that mechanisms of resistance need to be better understood and that the efficacy of treatment approaches should be improved with combination therapies or other drugs that might be more potent or target other pathways, including immunotherapy. PMID:26608066

  16. Advances in actinide solid-state and coordination chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Peter C; Ikeda, Y.; Czerwinski, K.

    2011-01-31

    Actinide solid-state and coordination chemistry has advanced through unexpected results that have further revealed the complex nature of the 5f elements. Nanoscale control of actinide materials is emerging, as shown by the creation of a considerable range of cluster and tubular topologies. Departures from established structural trends for actinyl ions are provided by cation-cation interactions in which an O atom of one actinyl ion is an equatorial ligand of a bipyramid of another actinyl ion. The solid-state structural complexity of actinide materials has been further demonstrated by open framework materials with interesting properties. The U(VI) tetraoxide core has been added to this cation's repertoire of coordination possibilities. The emergence of pentavalent uranium solid-state and coordination chemistry has resulted from the prudent selection of ligands. Finally, analogues of the uranyl ion have challenged our understanding of this normally unreactive functional group.

  17. Solid rocket technology advancements for space tug and IUS applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ascher, W.; Bailey, R. L.; Behm, J. W.; Gin, W.

    1975-01-01

    In order for the shuttle tug or interim upper stage (IUS) to capture all the missions in the current mission model for the tug and the IUS, an auxiliary or kick stage, using a solid propellant rocket motor, is required. Two solid propellant rocket motor technology concepts are described. One concept, called the 'advanced propulsion module' motor, is an 1800-kg, high-mass-fraction motor, which is single-burn and contains Class 2 propellent. The other concept, called the high energy upper stage restartable solid, is a two-burn (stop-restartable on command) motor which at present contains 1400 kg of Class 7 propellant. The details and status of the motor design and component and motor test results to date are presented, along with the schedule for future work.

  18. Sarcoidosis Occurring After Solid Cancer: A Nonfortuitous Association

    PubMed Central

    Grados, Aurélie; Ebbo, Mikael; Bernit, Emmanuelle; Veit, Véronique; Mazodier, Karin; Jean, Rodolphe; Coso, Diane; Aurran-Schleinitz, Thérèse; Broussais, Florence; Bouabdallah, Reda; Gravis, Gwenaelle; Goncalves, Anthony; Giovaninni, Marc; Sève, Pascal; Chetaille, Bruno; Gavet-Bongo, Florence; Weitten, Thierry; Pavic, Michel; Harlé, Jean-Robert; Schleinitz, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The association between cancer and sarcoidosis is controversial. Some epidemiological studies show an increase of the incidence of cancer in patients with sarcoidosis but only few cases of sarcoidosis following cancer treatment have been reported. We conducted a retrospective case study from internal medicine and oncology departments for patients presenting sarcoidosis after solid cancer treatment. We also performed a literature review to search for patients who developed sarcoidosis after solid cancer. We describe the clinical, biological, and radiological characteristics and outcome of these patients. Twelve patients were included in our study. Various cancers were observed with a predominance of breast cancer. Development of sarcoidosis appeared in the 3 years following cancer and was asymptomatic in half of the patients. The disease was frequently identified after a follow-up positron emission tomography computerized tomography evaluation. Various manifestations were observed but all patients presented lymph node involvement. Half of the patients required systemic therapy. With a median follow-up of 73 months, no patient developed cancer relapse. Review of the literature identified 61 other patients for which the characteristics of both solid cancer and sarcoidosis were similar to those observed in our series. This report demonstrates that sarcoidosis must be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with a history of malignancy who have developed lymphadenopathy or other lesions on positron emission tomography computerized tomography. Histological confirmation of cancer relapse is mandatory in order to avoid unjustified treatments. This association should be consider as a protective factor against cancer relapse. PMID:26181571

  19. Treatment for Chronic Pain in Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-11-07

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Pain; Precancerous/Nonmalignant Condition; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  20. A framework for understanding and targeting residual disease in oncogene-driven solid cancers.

    PubMed

    Bivona, Trever G; Doebele, Robert C

    2016-05-01

    Molecular targeted therapy has the potential to dramatically improve survival in patients with cancer. However, complete and durable responses to targeted therapy are rare in individuals with advanced-stage solid cancers. Even the most effective targeted therapies generally do not induce a complete tumor response, resulting in residual disease and tumor progression that limits patient survival. We discuss the emerging need to more fully understand the molecular basis of residual disease as a prelude to designing therapeutic strategies to minimize or eliminate residual disease so that we can move from temporary to chronic control of disease, or a cure, for patients with advanced-stage solid cancers. Ultimately, we propose a shift from the current reactive paradigm of analyzing and treating acquired drug resistance to a pre-emptive paradigm of defining the mechanisms that result in residual disease, to target and limit this disease reservoir. PMID:27149220

  1. Advances in the management of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaha, Ashok R

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer is rapidly increasing in the United States. A large number of incidentalomas are found during routine head and neck evaluations. The diagnostic workup still revolves around fine needle aspiration biopsy. Ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy is likely to yield the best results. Surgical resection offers the best treatment choice. Controversy continues in relation to total versus less than total thyroidectomy. The incidence of complications is inversely proportional to the extent of surgery and obviously related to the experience of the operating surgeon. The decision regarding the extent of thyroidectomy should be based on prognostic factors and risk groups. Prognostic factors are well defined, such as age, grade of the tumor, extrathyroidal extension, size, distant metastasis, and histology. Nodal metastasis has minimal implications. Based on prognostic factors, thyroid cancer can be divided into low, intermediate and high risk groups. In the high risk group and in selected intermediate risk patients, radioactive iodine dosimetry and ablation should be considered after total thyroidectomy. PET scanning and the use of recombinant TSH have been major advances in follow-up care for patients with thyroid cancer. Thyroglobulin appears to be a very good tumor marker for follow-up. No major breakthrough is noted in the management of anaplastic thyroid cancer, however, identification of RET mutation has been extremely helpful in evaluating the family members of the patient with medullary thyroid cancer with strong consideration given to total thyroidectomy. PMID:17462286

  2. Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care, a 2010 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  3. Epigenetics Advancing Personalized Nanomedicine in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shujun

    2012-01-01

    Personalized medicine aims to deliver the right drug to a right patient at the right time. It offers unique opportunities to integrate new technologies and concepts to disease prognosis, diagnosis and therapeutics. While selective personalized therapies are conceptually impressive, the majority of cancer therapies have dismal outcome. Such therapeutic failure could result from no response, drug resistance, disease relapse or severe side effect from improper drug delivery. Nanomedicine, the application of nanotechnology in medicine, has a potential to advance the identification of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and the delivery of right drug to disease sites. Epigenetic aberrations dynamically contribute to cancer pathogenesis. Given the individualized traits of epigenetic biomarkers, epigenetic considerations would significantly refine personalized nanomedicine. This review aims to dissect the interface of personalized medicine with nanomedicine and epigenetics. I will outline the progress and highlight challenges and areas that can be further explored perfecting the personalized health care. PMID:22921595

  4. Targeting angiogenesis in advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Eskander, Ramez N; Tewari, Krishnansu S

    2014-11-01

    Patients with advanced stage or recurrent cervical cancer represent a population with limited chemotherapeutic options. More specifically, patients with recurrent disease have a poor salvage rate, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. This year, the first prospective phase III clinical trial exploring the anti-angiogenic agent, bevacizumab, was published, meeting its primary endpoint, with a significant improvement in overall survival. As such, a review of anti-angiogenic therapy in the treatment of this disease is warranted. PMID:25364393

  5. [Advancement in the treatment against prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Nobuo; Abe, Takashige; Maruyama, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    With the advancement of basic science and medical technology, the treatment against prostate cancer (PC) has dramatically changed. Although the introduction of robotic radical prostatectomy and particle therapies in patients with early stage PC is of much note, the issues on the over-treatment and treatment cost should be heeded. From these points, active surveillance has been an important strategy in these patients. In patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive PC, especially high volume metastases, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with docetaxel has been reported to prolong overall survival compared with ADT alone. Lastly, several novel therapeutic agents have been investigated and shown to be favorable outcomes in patients with castration resistant PC. This review focuses on the recent advancement in the treatment against PCs. PMID:26793875

  6. The tumor-targeting immunocytokine F16-IL2 in combination with doxorubicin: dose escalation in patients with advanced solid tumors and expansion into patients with metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Catania, Chiara; Maur, Michela; Berardi, Rossana; Rocca, Andrea; Giacomo, Anna Maria Di; Spitaleri, Gianluca; Masini, Cristina; Pierantoni, Chiara; González-Iglesias, Reinerio; Zigon, Giulia; Tasciotti, Annaelisa; Giovannoni, Leonardo; Lovato, Valeria; Elia, Giuliano; Menssen, Hans D; Neri, Dario; Cascinu, Stefano; Conte, Pier Franco; de Braud, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    A phase Ib/II trial was performed to evaluate safety, tolerability, recommended dose (RD) and efficacy of F16-IL2, a recombinant antibody-cytokine fusion protein, in combination with doxorubicin in patients with solid tumors (phase Ib) and metastatic breast cancer (phase II). Six patient cohorts with progressive solid tumors (n = 19) received escalating doses of F16-IL2 [5–25 Million International Units (MIU) of IL2 equivalent dose] in combination with escalating doses of doxorubicin (0–25 mg/m2) on day 1, 8 and 15 every 4 weeks. Subsequently, patients with metastatic breast cancer (n = 10) received the drug combination at the RD. Clinical data and laboratory findings were analyzed for safety, tolerability, and activity. F16-IL2 could be administered up to 25 MIU, in combination with the RD of doxorubicin (25 mg/m2). No human anti-fusion protein antibodies (HAFA) response was detected. Pharmacokinetics of F16-IL2 was dose-dependent over the tested range, with half-lives of ca. 13 and ca. 8 hours for cohorts dosed at lower and higher levels, respectively. Toxicities were controllable and reversible, with no combination treatment-related death. After 8 weeks, 57% and 67% disease control rates were observed for Phase I and II, respectively (decreasing to 43% and 33% after 12 weeks), considering 14 and 9 patients evaluable for efficacy. One patient experienced a long lasting partial response (45 weeks), still on-going at exit of study. F16-IL2 can be safely and repeatedly administered at the RD of 25 MIU in combination with 25 mg/m2 doxorubicin; its safety and activity are currently being investigated in combination with other chemotherapeutics, in order to establish optimal therapy settings. PMID:25562532

  7. Direct therapeutic intervention for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takakura, Kazuki; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Currently, chemotherapy is an accredited, standard treatment for unresectable, advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). However, it has been still showed treatment-resistance and followed dismal prognosis in many cases. Therefore, some sort of new, additional treatments are needed for the better therapeutic results for advanced PC. According to the previous reports, it is obvious that interventional endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a well-established, helpful and low-risky procedure in general. As the additional treatments of the conventional therapy for advanced PC, many therapeutic strategies, such as immunotherapies, molecular biological therapies, physiochemical therapies, radioactive therapies, using siRNA, using autophagy have been developing in recent years. Moreover, the efficacy of the other potential therapeutic targets for PC using EUS-fine needle injection, for example, intra-tumoral chemotherapeutic agents (paclitaxel, irinotecan), several ablative energies (radiofrequency ablation and cryothermal treatment, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser, high-intensity focused ultrasound), etc., has already been showed in animal models. Delivering these promising treatments reliably inside tumor, interventional EUS may probably be indispensable existence for the treatment of locally advanced PC in near future. PMID:26677434

  8. Direct therapeutic intervention for advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Kazuki; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-12-10

    Currently, chemotherapy is an accredited, standard treatment for unresectable, advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). However, it has been still showed treatment-resistance and followed dismal prognosis in many cases. Therefore, some sort of new, additional treatments are needed for the better therapeutic results for advanced PC. According to the previous reports, it is obvious that interventional endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a well-established, helpful and low-risky procedure in general. As the additional treatments of the conventional therapy for advanced PC, many therapeutic strategies, such as immunotherapies, molecular biological therapies, physiochemical therapies, radioactive therapies, using siRNA, using autophagy have been developing in recent years. Moreover, the efficacy of the other potential therapeutic targets for PC using EUS-fine needle injection, for example, intra-tumoral chemotherapeutic agents (paclitaxel, irinotecan), several ablative energies (radiofrequency ablation and cryothermal treatment, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser, high-intensity focused ultrasound), etc., has already been showed in animal models. Delivering these promising treatments reliably inside tumor, interventional EUS may probably be indispensable existence for the treatment of locally advanced PC in near future. PMID:26677434

  9. Endoscopic palliation of advanced esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mocanu, A; Bârla, R; Hoara, P; Constantinoiu, S

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer represents one of the most aggressive digestive tumors, with a survival rate at 5 years of only 10%. Globally, during the last three decades, there has been an increasing incidence of the esophageal cancer, approx. 400,000 new esophageal cancers being currently diagnosed annually. This represents the eighth leading cause of cancer incidence and the sixth leading cause of cancer death overall. Taking into account the population’s global aging and thus, the increase in the number of patients who will not bear surgery, PCT and radiation, or the fact that they do not want it especially because of deficiencies and associated pathology, the endoscopic ablative techniques with palliation purposes represent the alternative. If we refer to the Western Europe countries and North America, we notice an increase of esophageal adenocarcinoma rate versus squamous cancer. As for the Asian region, referring in particular to China and Japan, 9 out of 10 esophageal cancers are squamous cell carcinomas. For at least half of the patients with EC (esophageal cancer) there is no hope of healing because of the advanced regional malignant invasion (T3-4, N+, M+) with no chemo and radiotherapy response, poor preoperative patients’ conditions or systemic metastasis. The low life expectancy does not justify the risky medical procedures, the goal of the therapy consisting in the improvement of the quality of life by eliminating dysphagia (reestablishing oral feeding) which represents the most common complication of EC, the respiratory tract complication caused by eso-tracheal fistulas or by eliminating chest pain. To treat dysphagia, which is the main target of palliation, combined methods like endoscopic, chemo and radio-therapy, can be used, each one with indications, benefits and risks. Abbreviations: SEPS = self expanding plastic stent, SREMS = self expanding metal stent, EBRT = Endoscopic brachy radiotherapy, EUS = Ultra sound endoscopy, CT = Computer tomograph, UGE

  10. Advanced materials for high-temperature solid electrolyte applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.L.; Chick, L.A.; Weber, W.J.; Youngblood, G.E.

    1990-05-01

    Advanced materials for use as electrodes, interconnections, and electrolytes in high-temperature electrochemical applications are under investigation. The air sinterability of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} is highly dependent upon a synergistic relationship between the (La + Sr)/Cr ratio, cation volatility, and second phase formation and transformation. Electrical conductivity in the ZrO{sub 2}--Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}--CeO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}--Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}--TiO{sub 2} systems is highly dependent on composition and atmosphere. The electrochemical processes that occur at the solid-solid-gas interfaces in La(Sr)MnO{sub 3}/ZrO{sub 2}(Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) have been studied using an unbonded interface cell and impedance spectroscopy. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Recent advances in solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ticianelli, E.A.; Srinivasan, S.; Gonzalez, E.R.

    1988-01-01

    With methods used to advance solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell technology, we are close to obtaining the goal of 1 A/cm/sup 2/ at 0.7. Higher power densities have been reported (2 A/cm/sup 2/ at 0.5 V) but only with high catalyst loading electrodes (2 mg/cm/sup 2/ and 4 mg/cm/sup 2/ at anode and cathode, respectively) and using a Dow membrane with a better conductivity and water retention characteristics. Work is in progress to ascertain performances of cells with Dow membrane impregnated electrodes and Dow membrane electrolytes. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  12. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. The main activity during this granting period was a completion of a detailed comparative analysis of the suite of spectral editing techniques developed in our laboratory for this purpose. The appended report is a manuscript being submitted to the Journal of Magnetic Resonance on this subject.

  13. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. The main activity during this granting period was a detailed comparative analysis of the suite of spectral editing results obtained on the Argonne coals. We have extended our fitting procedure to include carbons of all types in the analysis.

  14. New advances in genitourinary cancer: evidence gathered in 2014.

    PubMed

    Suárez, C; Puente, J; Gallardo, E; Méndez-Vidal, M J; Climent, M A; León, L; Olmos, D; García del Muro, X; González-Billalabeitia, E; Grande, E; Bellmunt, J; Mellado, B; Maroto, P; González del Alba, A

    2015-09-01

    This review provides updated information published in 2014 regarding advances and major achievements in genitourinary cancer. Sections include the best in prostate cancer, renal cancer, bladder cancer, and germ cell tumors. In the field of prostate cancer, data related to treatment approach of hormone-sensitive disease, castrate-resistant prostate cancer, mechanisms of resistance, new drugs, and molecular research are presented. In relation to renal cancer, relevant aspects in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma, immunotherapy, and molecular research, including angiogenesis and von Hippel-Lindau gene, molecular biology of non-clear cell histologies, and epigenetics of clear renal cell cancer are described. New strategies in the management of muscle-invasive localized bladder cancer and metastatic disease are reported as well as salient findings of biomolecular research in urothelial cancer. Some approaches intended to improve outcomes in poor prognosis patients with metastatic germ cell cancer are also reported. Results of clinical trials in these areas are discussed. PMID:26227584

  15. Dietary intake of advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T D; Bowman, K B; Jackson, G P

    1983-02-01

    A state registered dietitian assessed the voluntary dietary intake of 13 advanced cancer inpatients on one ward of St. Christopher's Hospice for five consecutive days. There were 11 females, two males; median age 74 years (range 56 to 83). Two patients died on the fourth day of the study. A partially individualised weighed technique was used. Standard sized scoops and spoons were used to serve the food in small, medium or large standard portions (depending on appetite) and were weighed as served. Individual plate waste (by weight) was subtracted to give estimated individual intake. Foods provided by visitors was not included. The median and range of individual mean daily intakes (estimated) were: energy 5760 (938-8945) kJ, 1376 (224-2137) kcal; protein 44 (11-86) g; fat 52 (9-93) g; carbohydrate 169 (21-194) g; calcium 748 (268-1457) mg; iron 4.8 (0.5-21.0) mg; dietary fibre 5.0 (0.5-21.0) g. Compared to recommended amounts, energy, iron and dietary fibre intakes were low; calcium intake was high. Nutritional status may affect prognosis and/or subjective well-being in advanced cancer. The value of nutritional supplementation and the role of appetite stimulants in improving nutritional status needs investigation. PMID:6841131

  16. Novel therapy for advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Wu, Shenhong

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a common lethal malignancy. Gastroesophageal junction and gastric cardia tumors are the fastest rising malignancies due to increasing prevalence of obesity and acid reflex in the United States. Traditional chemotherapy remains the main treatment with trastuzumab targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive disease. The median overall survival (OS) is less than one year for advanced GC patients; thus, there is an urgent unmet need to develop novel therapy for GC. Although multiple targeted agents were studied, only the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor ramucirumab was approved recently by the United States Food and Drug Administration because of its 1.4 mo OS benefit (5.2 mo vs 3.8 mo, P = 0.047) as a single agent; 2.2 mo improvement of survival (9.6 mo vs 7.4 mo, P = 0.017) when combined with paclitaxel in previously treated advanced GC patients. It is the first single agent approved for previously treated GC and the second biologic agent after trastuzumab. Even with limited success, targeted therapy may be improved by developing new biomarkers. Immune therapy is changing the paradigm of cancer treatment and is presently under active investigation for GC in clinical trials. More evidence supports GC stem cells existence and early stage studies are looking for its potential therapeutic possibilities. PMID:26600926

  17. Recent advances in the treatment of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, R; Zhou, B; Fung, P C W; Li, X

    2006-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Although surgical resection is still the only treatment capable of curing colon cancer, adjuvant therapy continues to play an important role in preventing recurrence and metastasis. In recent years remarkable progress has been made in the treatment of colon cancer. This review discusses recent advances in adjuvant therapy for colon cancer, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy, antiangiogenic therapy and apoptosis induction. In the meantime, molecular therapy is also elucidated in the above methods. All these new advances will provide new promises for patients of colon cancer. PMID:16691539

  18. ReCAP: Serum Tumor Marker Use in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jason D.; Vasan, Sowmya; Neugut, Alfred I.; Tergas, Ana; Hu, Jim C.; Hershman, Dawn L.

    2016-01-01

    QUESTION ASKED: The objective of this study is to evaluate the frequency of tumor marker use in patients with advanced solid tumors. SUMMARY ANSWER: Over a 1-year period, the mean number of any individual test per patient was seven tests, and the maximum number was 35 tests; the mean number of total tests per patient was 12 tests, and the maximum number was 70 tests. In a 1-year time frame, 16.3% of patients had more than 12 individual tests, and 34.3% had more than one individual test in a 1-month span. METHODS: For each patient with a diagnosis of advanced solid tumor who had outpatient visits between July 1, 2013, and June 30, 2014, at Columbia University Medical Center, we recorded the dates of the following tumor marker tests: α-fetoprotein, CA-125, CA 15-3, CA 19-9, CA 27-29, and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). BIAS, CONFOUNDING FACTOR(S), DRAWBACKS: This was a 1-year evaluation of tumor marker use at a single institution. As a result, our findings may be skewed by the practice patterns of a few individual providers. Our cancer center is an urban academic tertiary care center; as a result, our experience may not be applicable to the general population. REAL-LIFE IMPLICATIONS: We found a high rate of serum tumor marker testing overuse in patients with advanced solid tumors. There is currently a lack of evidence supporting the effectiveness of frequent tumor marker testing, and additional studies are needed to inform practice. Interventions to reduce overuse could help reduce the financial burden of cancer care. Future research should define the minimal frequency of testing. In the meantime, efforts should be made to limit use of tumor marker testing in patients with advanced solid tumors. FIG 2. Percentage of patients (N = 928) with solid tumors who had excessive tumor marker testing in 1 month (> one test in 1 month). (*) Maximum number of tests over 1-month period. AFP, α-fetoprotein; CEA, carcinoembryonic antigen. PMID:26374862

  19. Translation in solid cancer: are size-based response criteria an anachronism?

    PubMed

    Fernandes, M; Rosel, D; Brábek, J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of translation is the development of effective medicinal products based on validated science. A parallel objective is to obtain marketing authorization for the translated product. Unfortunately, in solid cancer, these two objectives are not mutually consistent as evidenced by the contrast between major advances in science and the continuing dismal record of pharmaceutical productivity. If the problem is unrelated to science, then the process of translation may require a closer examination, namely, the criteria for regulatory approval. This realization is important because, in this context, the objective of translation is regulatory approval, and science does not passively translate into useful medicinal products. Today, in solid cancer, response criteria related to tumor size are less useful than during the earlier cytotoxic drugs era; advanced imaging and biomarkers now allow for tracking of the natural history of the disease in the laboratory and the clinic. Also, it is difficult to infer clinical benefit from tumor shrinkage since it is rarely sustained. Accordingly, size-based response criteria may represent an anachronism relative to translation in solid cancer and it may be appropriate to align preclinical and clinical effort and shift the focus to local invasion and metastasis. The shift from a cancer cell-centric model to a stroma centric model offers novel opportunities not only to interupt the natural history of the disease, but also to rethink the relevance of outdated criteria of clinical response. Current evidence favors the opinion that, in solid cancer, a different, broader, and contextual approach may lead to interventions that could delay local invasion and metastasis. All elements supporting this shift, especially advanced imaging, are in place. PMID:25073600

  20. Solid cancers after antiplatelet therapy: Confirmations, controversies, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Serebruany, Victor L; Cherepanov, Vasily; Cabrera-Fuentes, Hector A; Kim, Moo Hyun

    2015-11-25

    The role of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents in tumour growth and prognosis is not new, and currently under intense investigation. Some randomised data strongly suggest that this association exists, but it is complex, and not necessarily pointed at the same direction. The potential mechanisms responsible for such harmful association include a direct hazard of novel antithrombotics on cancer, indirect promotion of tumour growth, easier metastatic dissemination due to instability of platelet-tumour cell aggregates, or/and inability to keep cancer cells locally in situ are considered. The latest randomised evidence ultimately rejected the drug-specific cancer risks, clearly indicating the class-effect. In lay terms "cancers follow bleeding", which seems to be true for antithrombotic agents in general. Significant excess of solid cancers which was similar after prasugrel in TRITON, and with vorapaxar in TRACER trials was confirmed by the FDA reviews. Later, extra cancer deaths reported following clopidogrel and prasugrel in DAPT, and after ticagrelor in PEGASUS are also of concern. However, there are remaining controversies with regard to published cancer risks after ticagrelor (PLATO), or another vorapaxar trial (TRA2P), while full disclosure of separate clopidogrel and prasugrel cancer data in DAPT is still lacking. In short, if we apply moderate antiplatelet strategies for over two years, or aggressive regimens including triple therapy for much less than one year, the solid cancer risks emerge. Currently, more delicate platelet inhibition, and shorter exposure to dual oral antiplatelet agents should prevail. PMID:26559427

  1. Advanced thyroid cancers: new era of treatment.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Amrallah A; El-Shentenawy, Ayman

    2014-07-01

    Since chemotherapy has been shown to be unsuccessful in case of advanced thyroid carcinomas, the research for new therapies is fundamental. Clinical trials of many tyrosine kinase inhibitors as well as anti-angiogenic inhibitors suggest that patients with thyroid cancer could have an advantage with new target therapy. Recently, Food and Drug Administration approved two targeted therapies, vandetanib and cabozantinib for the treatment of metastatic thyroid carcinomas with acceptable outcome. We summarized the results and the toxic effects associated with these treatments reported in clinical trials. Future trials should aim at combinations of targeted agents with or without other treatment modalities to obtain a more effective result in thyroid carcinoma treatment. PMID:24908065

  2. NATO PILOT STUDY ON ADVANCED CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    NCEA scientists are participating in a study of advanced cancer risk assessment methods, conducted under the auspices of NATO's Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society. The product will be a book of case studies that illustrate advanced cancer risk assessment methods, avail...

  3. Temsirolimus, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  4. Advancements in Binder Systems for Solid Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Ken; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Paper will present recent developments in advanced material binder systems for solid freeform fabrication (SFF) technologies. The advantage of SFF is the capability to custom fabricate complex geometries directly from computer aided design data in layer- by-layer fashion, eliminated the need for traditional fixturing and tooling. Binders allow for the low temperature processing of 'green' structural materials, either metal, ceramic or composite, in traditional rapid prototyping machines. The greatest obstacle comes when green parts must then go through a sintering or burnout process to remove the binders and fully densify the parent material, without damaging or distorting the original part geometry. Critical issues and up-to-date assessments will be delivered on various material systems.

  5. Robotic NDE inspection of advanced solid rocket motor casings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcneelege, Glenn E.; Sarantos, Chris

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor program determined the need to inspect ASRM forgings and segments for potentially catastrophic defects. To minimize costs, an automated eddy current inspection system was designed and manufactured for inspection of ASRM forgings in the initial phases of production. This system utilizes custom manipulators and motion control algorithms and integrated six channel eddy current data acquisition and analysis hardware and software. Total system integration is through a personal computer based workcell controller. Segment inspection demands the use of a gantry robot for the EMAT/ET inspection system. The EMAT/ET system utilized similar mechanical compliancy and software logic to accommodate complex part geometries. EMAT provides volumetric inspection capability while eddy current is limited to surface and near surface inspection. Each aspect of the systems are applicable to other industries, such as, inspection of pressure vessels, weld inspection, and traditional ultrasonic inspection applications.

  6. A review of recent advances in solid film lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1987-01-01

    Thin, adherent sputtered MoS2 and ion plated metallic (Au, Ag, Pb) lubricating films are primarily used in precision contacting triboelement surfaces where wear debris formation is critical and high reliability requirements have to be satisfied. Detailed structural and compositional characterization of solid film lubricants is of prime importance. It is this information from the nano-micro-macro level which is needed to interpret and improve the frictional behavior and assure long endurance lives. The purpose of this paper is to summarize in a concise review the solid lubricant film structure and morphology and their effects on the tribological properties of the lubricant systems. The tribological performance of thin lubricating films has significantly advanced through progressive understanding of the film parameters such as adhesion, cohesion, interface formation, nucleation and microstructural growth, critical film thickness and substrate finish, and temperature. Sputtered MoS2 and ion plated Au, Ag, and Pb films are separately discussed and evaluated in terms of the above film parameters to establish the most desirable film structures and thicknesses in order to achieve effective lubrication.

  7. Gamma-Secretase Inhibitor RO4929097 and Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; Male Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  8. Secondary solid cancer screening following hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Inamoto, Y; Shah, NN; Savani, BN; Shaw, BE; Abraham, AA; Ahmed, IA; Akpek, G; Atsuta, Y; Baker, KS; Basak, GW; Bitan, M; DeFilipp, Z; Gregory, TK; Greinix, HT; Hamadani, M; Hamilton, BK; Hayashi, RJ; Jacobsohn, DA; Kamble, RT; Kasow, KA; Khera, N; Lazarus, HM; Malone, AK; Lupo-Stanghellini, MT; Margossian, SP; Muffly, LS; Norkin, M; Ramanathan, M; Salooja, N; Schoemans, H; Wingard, JR; Wirk, B; Wood, WA; Yong, A; Duncan, CN; Flowers, MED; Majhail, NS

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients have a substantial risk of developing secondary solid cancers, particularly beyond 5 years after HCT and without reaching a plateau overtime. A working group was established through the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation with the goal to facilitate implementation of cancer screening appropriate to HCT recipients. The working group reviewed guidelines and methods for cancer screening applicable to the general population and reviewed the incidence and risk factors for secondary cancers after HCT. A consensus approach was used to establish recommendations for individual secondary cancers. The most common sites include oral cavity, skin, breast and thyroid. Risks of cancers are increased after HCT compared with the general population in skin, thyroid, oral cavity, esophagus, liver, nervous system, bone and connective tissues. Myeloablative TBI, young age at HCT, chronic GVHD and prolonged immunosuppressive treatment beyond 24 months were well-documented risk factors for many types of secondary cancers. All HCT recipients should be advised of the risks of secondary cancers annually and encouraged to undergo recommended screening based on their predisposition. Here we propose guidelines to help clinicians in providing screening and preventive care for secondary cancers among HCT recipients. PMID:25822223

  9. Are Short Telomeres Predictive of Advanced Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Shay, Jerry W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The combination of variable telomere length in cancer cells combined with shorter telomere length in cancer-associated stromal cells, strongly correlate with progression to prostate cancer metastasis and cancer death. The implications are that telomere length measurements not only have the potential as a prognostic indicator of prostate cancer outcomes but also as a risk stratification enrichment biomarker for individualized therapeutic interventions. PMID:24124228

  10. Treatment of advanced thyroid cancer: role of molecularly targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Covell, Lorinda L; Ganti, Apar Kishor

    2015-09-01

    Advanced thyroid cancer is not amenable to therapy with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy. However, newer advances in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of different subtypes of thyroid cancer have provided new opportunities for the evaluation of molecularly targeted therapies. This has led to multiple clinical trials using various multi-kinase inhibitors and the subsequent US FDA approval of sorafenib for differentiated thyroid cancer and vandetanib and cabozantinib for medullary thyroid carcinoma. This review provides a summary of the current literature for the treatment of advanced thyroid carcinoma and future directions in this disease. PMID:26335853

  11. Advances in genetics: widening our understanding of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pine, Angela C.; Fioretti, Flavia F.; Brooke, Greg N.; Bevan, Charlotte L.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death in Western men. Our understanding of the genetic alterations associated with disease predisposition, development, progression, and therapy response is rapidly improving, at least in part, owing to the development of next-generation sequencing technologies. Large advances have been made in our understanding of the genetics of prostate cancer through the application of whole-exome sequencing, and this review summarises recent advances in this field and discusses how exome sequencing could be used clinically to promote personalised medicine for prostate cancer patients. PMID:27408704

  12. Safety Study of AMG 228 to Treat Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-01

    Advanced Malignancy; Advanced Solid Tumors; Cancer; Oncology; Oncology Patients; Tumors; Melanoma; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Transitional Cell Carinoma of Bladder; Colorectal Cancer

  13. Crizotinib for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III clinical trial that compared crizotinib versus chemotherapy in previously treated patients with advanced lung cancer whose tumors have an EML4-ALK fusion gene.

  14. Combination Therapy Shows Promise for Treating Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Adding the drug everolimus (Afinitor®) to exemestane helped postmenopausal women whose advanced breast cancer had stopped responding to hormonal therapy live about 4 months longer without the disease progressing than women who received exemestane alone.

  15. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  16. Bevacizumab improves survival for patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer that was not curable with standard treatment who received the drug bevacizumab (Avastin) lived 3.7 months longer than patients who did not receive the drug, according to an interim analysis

  17. Some Advanced Kidney Cancer Patients May Postpone Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... advanced kidney cancer that has spread require immediate, aggressive treatment, a small new study suggests. "A subset ... them the inconvenience and debilitating side effects of aggressive treatments for about a year, and in some ...

  18. Blocking DNA Repair in Advanced BRCA-Mutated Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with relapsed or refractory advanced cancer and confirmed BRCA mutations who have not previously been treated with a PARP inhibitor will be given BMN 673 by mouth once a day in 28-day cycles.

  19. Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer Might Consider Gene Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Men With Advanced Prostate Cancer Might Consider Gene Test Detection of genetic flaw could help predict ... suggests. Testing for inherited abnormalities in DNA repair genes could provide patients and family members important information ...

  20. Environmental impact statement Space Shuttle advanced solid rocket motor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The proposed action is design, development, testing, and evaluation of Advanced Solid Rocket Motors (ASRM) to replace the motors currently used to launch the Space Shuttle. The proposed action includes design, construction, and operation of new government-owned, contractor-operated facilities for manufacturing and testing the ASRM's. The proposed action also includes transport of propellant-filled rocket motor segments from the manufacturing facility to the testing and launch sites and the return of used and/or refurbished segments to the manufacturing site. Sites being considered for the new facilities include John C. Stennis Space Center, Hancock County, Mississippi; the Yellow Creek site in Tishomingo County, Mississippi, which is currently in the custody and control of the Tennessee Valley Authority; and John F. Kennedy Space Center, Brevard County, Florida. TVA proposes to transfer its site to the custody and control of NASA if it is the selected site. All facilities need not be located at the same site. Existing facilities which may provide support for the program include Michoud Assembly Facility, New Orleans Parish, Louisiana; and Slidell Computer Center, St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana. NASA's preferred production location is the Yellow Creek site, and the preferred test location is the Stennis Space Center.

  1. [Concurrent proton therapy and chemotherapy for locally advanced cancers].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Mizumoto, Masashi; Murofushi, Keiko; Numajiri, Haruko; Aihara, Teruhito; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2015-02-01

    Charged particles such as protons and carbon-ions offer advantageous physical properties to radiation therapy (RT) for the treatment of various cancers when compared with photons, because they exhibit a spread-out Bragg peak, and may be utilized to achieve a desirable dose distribution to the target volume by using specified beam modulation. Interestingly, the cytocidal effect of protons is almost equal to that of photons, because both protons and photons are considered low-linear energy transfer radiations. Hence, proton beam therapy (PBT) is an attractive RT option, especially in the treatment of locally advanced cancers, as irradiation doses can be safely escalated while sparing the surrounding normal tissues, and because PBT may be concurrently combined with chemotherapy for treating such cancers. Recent advances in PBT techniques including a spot scanning method, as well as an increase in the number of particle therapy institutes are anticipated to yield favorable results through future multi-institutional prospective studies. The University of Tsukuba has carried out several studies to validate the effectiveness of PBT for many types of cancers since 1983. Here, we present our findings on the clinical outcomes of PBT for esophageal cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, intrahepatic biliary tract cancer, pancreas cancer, and bladder cancer; future aspects of PBT concurrently combined with chemotherapy for treating locally advanced cancers are also discussed. PMID:25743133

  2. Alisertib and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors or Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-09

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  3. Advances in cancer epidemiology in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hideo

    2014-02-15

    Epidemiologists in Japan have been performing calculations to estimate nationwide cancer incidence rates as well as 5-year survival rates using population-based cancer registry data. There have been remarkable changes in cancer incidence and/or mortality in cancers of the lung, liver and stomach, which were thought to be attributed to the changing impact of exposure to cigarette smoking, chronic hepatitis C virus infection and Helicobacter pylori infection, respectively. In systematic reviews providing evidence in risk/protective factors for cancer sites using case-control and cohort studies of the Japanese population, there were associations between cancer sites (esophagus, stomach, colo-rectum, liver, pancreas, lung and breast) and various lifestyle factors. In the past 10 years, a hospital-based case-control study at Aichi Cancer Center provided valuable evidence of gene-environment interaction on the development of cancer [i.e., the effects of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) polymorphism and heavy alcohol drinking on esophageal cancer, ALDH2 polymorphism and smoking on lung cancer, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphism and heavy alcohol drinking on pancreatic cancer]. The database with stored DNA was also used and identified seven loci containing significant but low-penetrance polymorphisms associated with the development of breast cancer. These findings together with established risk factors are likely to be useful to predict personalized breast cancer risk in East Asian women. In 2005, the Japan Multi-Institution Collaborative Cohort (J-MICC) study was launched to elucidate gene-environment interactions as well as to confirm preclinical diagnostic biomarkers of cancer. J-MICC, which has recruited 92,000 healthy individuals by the end of 2012, will follow the individuals until 2025. PMID:24105756

  4. A Novel Bioluminescence Orthotopic Mouse Model for Advanced Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Torossian, Artour; Li, Wenyan; Schleicher, Stephen; Niu, Kathy; Giacalone, Nicholas J.; Kim, Sung June; Chen, Heidi; Gonzalez, Adriana; Moretti, Luigi; Lu, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States despite recent advances in our understanding of this challenging disease. An animal model for high-throughput screening of therapeutic agents for advanced lung cancer could help promote the development of more successful treatment interventions. To develop our orthotopic lung cancer model, luciferase-expressing A549 cancer cells were injected into the mediastinum of athymic nude mice. To determine whether the model would allow easy monitoring of response to therapeutic interventions, tumors were treated with 30 mg/kg Paclitaxel or were irradiated with 5 fractions of 2 Gy, and tumor burden was monitored using bioluminescence imaging. Evidence of radiation-induced lung injury was assessed using immunohistochemical staining for phospho-Smad2/3 and cleaved caspase-3. We found that tumor implantation recapitulated advanced human lung cancer as evidenced by tumor establishment and proliferation within the mediastinum. The tumor responded to Paclitaxel or radiation as shown by decreased tumor bioluminescence and improved overall survival. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased phospho-Smad2/3 and cleaved caspase-3 in irradiated lungs, consistent with radiation-induced lung injury. This orthotopic lung cancer model may help provide a method to assess therapeutic interventions in a preclinical setting that recapitulates locally advanced lung cancer. PMID:21663394

  5. Visualization Skills: A Prerequisite to Advanced Solid Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gow, George

    2007-01-01

    Many educators believe that solid modeling software has made teaching two- and three-dimensional visualization skills obsolete. They claim that the visual tools built into the solid modeling software serve as a replacement for the CAD operator's personal visualization skills. They also claim that because solid modeling software can produce…

  6. Prolonged complete response following gemcitabine-erlotinib combined therapy in advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    CZARNECKA, ANNA M.; KORZEŃ, PIOTR; NOWAK-DEMENT, ANNA; KUKWA, WOJCIECH; KORNILUK, JAN; SZCZYLIK, CEZARY

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal types of malignant solid tumor and is typically associated with a poor prognosis. The majority of patients are diagnosed with advanced-stage disease, therefore, the median survival period is <6 months. Recently, a number of basic research projects and clinical trials were undertaken with the aim of improving treatment outcomes in pancreatic cancer; however, only one agent, erlotinib, passed the clinical trials. Erlotinib is an inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor, which when overexpressed in cancer, promotes angiogenesis, cell proliferation and inhibits apoptosis. The US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency approved erlotinib in combination with gemcitabine for the first-line treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. To the best of our knowledge, the current study is the first to report a case of pancreatic cancer treated with this regimen alone to achieve a complete response (CR). A 40-year-old male with a medical history of chronic pancreatitis and hypertension was diagnosed with medically inoperable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Following palliative surgery, the patient began palliative gemcitabine and erlotinib chemotherapy. After three months, this treatment strategy resulted in a CR, as determined by imaging studies. Therapy was discontinued after 14 months due to the development of peritoneal metastases and the patient was referred for treatment with the folinic acid, 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan and oxaliplatin regimen. A CR is rarely reported in pancreatic cancer, however, a treatment strategy of gemcitabine and erlotinib may induce rapid regression of advanced-stage disease. PMID:26893699

  7. Neutrophil CD64 expression: a reliable diagnostic marker of infection in advanced cancer patients?

    PubMed

    Comolli, Giuditta; Torchio, Martina; Lenta, Elisa; Franceschetti, Benvenuto; Chiesa, Antonella; Calarota, Sandra A; Baldanti, Fausto; Scudeller, Luigia; Marone, Piero; Danova, Marco; Marco, Danova

    2015-07-01

    Infection and sepsis are major health problems in cancer patients. There is a need for the identification and validation of biomarkers to improve their early diagnosis and treatment. Emerging evidence showed that neutrophil CD64 is a highly sensitive and specific marker for systemic infection and sepsis in critically ill patients with various diseases but data on patients bearing solid tumors are still lacking. Using a dedicated flow cytometric assay we evaluated neutrophil CD64 expression in patients with advanced cancer without active infections to verify if it could be utilized as a reliable biomarker of early infections also in oncologic patients. PMID:26147145

  8. An Open-Label Study of a Novel JAK-inhibitor, INCB047986, Given in Patients With Advanced Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-03

    Advanced Solid Tumors; Advanced Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Advanced Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Advanced Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Advanced Triple-Negative Breast Cancer; Advanced Urothelial Carcinoma

  9. Advances of Cancer Therapy by Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Wang, Yiqing; Chen, Zhuo Georgia

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in nanotechnology offer researchers opportunities to significantly transform cancer therapeutics. This technology has enabled the manipulation of the biological and physicochemical properties of nanomaterials to facilitate more efficient drug targeting and delivery. Clinical investigations suggest that therapeutic nanoparticles can enhance efficacy and reduced side effects compared with conventional cancer therapeutic drugs. Encouraged by rapid and promising progress in cancer nanotechnology, researchers continue to develop novel and efficacious nanoparticles for drug delivery. The use of therapeutic nanoparticles as unique drug delivery systems will be a significant addition to current cancer therapeutics. PMID:19688065

  10. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. Our goals are twofold. First, we are interested in developing new methods that will enable us to measure important structural parameters in whole coals not directly accessible by other techniques. In parallel with these efforts we will apply these NMR methods in a study of the chemical differences between gas-sourcing and oil-sourcing coals. The NMR methods work will specifically focus on determination of the number and types of methylene groups, determination of the number and types of methane groups, identification of carbons adjacent to nitrogen and sites with exchangeable protons, and methods to more finely characterize the distribution of hydrogen in coals. The motivation for investigating these specific structural features of coals arises from their relevance to the chemical reactivity of coals, and their suitability for possible correlations with the oil sourcing potential of some types of coals. The coals to be studied and contrasted include oil-prone coals from Australia and Indonesia, those comprising the Argonne Premium Coal Sample bank, and other relevant samples. In this report period we have focused our work on 1 segment of the program. Our last report outlined progress in using our NMR editing methods with higher field operation where higher magic angle spinning rates are required. Significant difficulties were identified, and these have been the main subject of study during the most recent granting period.

  11. Advancing breast cancer survivorship among African-American women.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Steven S; Yoo, Wonsuk; Whitehead, Mary S; Smith, Selina A

    2015-09-01

    Advances have occurred in breast cancer survivorship but, for many African-American women, challenges and gaps in relevant information remain. This article identifies opportunities to address disparities in breast cancer survival and quality of life, and thereby to increase breast cancer survivorship among African-American women. For breast cancer survivors, common side effects, lasting for long periods after cancer treatment, include fatigue, loss of strength, difficulty sleeping, and sexual dysfunction. For addressing physical and mental health concerns, a variety of interventions have been evaluated, including exercise and weight training, dietary interventions, yoga and mindfulness-based stress reduction, and support groups or group therapy. Obesity has been associated with breast cancer recurrence and poorer survival. Relative to white survivors, African-American breast cancer survivors are more likely to be obese and less likely to engage in physical activity, although exercise improves overall quality of life and cancer-related fatigue. Considerable information exists about the effectiveness of such interventions for alleviating distress and improving quality of life among breast cancer survivors, but few studies have focused specifically on African-American women with a breast cancer diagnosis. Studies have identified a number of personal factors that are associated with resilience, increased quality of life, and positive adaptation to a breast cancer diagnosis. There is a need for a better understanding of breast cancer survivorship among African-American women. Additional evaluations of interventions for improving the quality of life and survival of African-American breast cancer survivors are desirable. PMID:26303657

  12. Individualized management of advanced bladder cancer: Where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Burgess, Earle F

    2015-04-01

    Despite recent progress in the development of novel targeted therapies in various malignancies, the management of advanced urothelial cancer has changed little over the past 2 decades. Comorbidities inherent to patients with bladder cancer often preclude the use of standard cisplatin-based chemotherapy and underscore the need for individualized treatment recommendations and the development of more effective therapies. This review discusses current issues relevant to the management of patients with locally advanced and metastatic urothelial carcinoma of the bladder and highlights recent advances in defining molecular aberrations that may ultimately lead to personalized therapeutic decision making. PMID:24332641

  13. Clinical utility of ramucirumab in advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Matthew MK; Sjoquist, Katrin M; Zalcberg, John R

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is currently the third most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Prognosis remains poor with most patients presenting with advanced or metastatic disease. A better understanding of angiogenesis has led to the investigation of drugs that inhibit the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway including anti-VEGF antibody therapy (eg, bevacizumab), inhibitors of angiogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (eg, sunitinib, sorafenib, apatinib, regorafenib), and inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs) (eg, ramucirumab). Ramucirumab, a VEGFR-2 inhibitor, is the first anti-angiogenic agent approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in the treatment of advanced gastric cancers. This review will focus on the clinical utility and potential use of ramucirumab in advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26451083

  14. Recent advances in lung cancer biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides an overview of carcinogenesis, especially as related to lung cancers. Various growth factors and their mutated forms as oncogenes are discussed with respect to gene location and their role in the oncogenic process. Finally the data is related to lung cancer induction in uranium miners and exposure to radon.

  15. Current advances in T-cell-based cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingjun; Yin, Bingnan; Wang, Helen Y; Wang, Rong-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide; due to the lack of ideal cancer biomarkers for early detection or diagnosis, most patients present with late-stage disease at the time of diagnosis, thus limiting the potential for successful treatment. Traditional cancer treatments, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, have demonstrated very limited efficacy for patients with late-stage disease. Therefore, innovative and effective cancer treatments are urgently needed for cancer patients with late-stage and refractory disease. Cancer immunotherapy, particularly adoptive cell transfer, has shown great promise in the treatment of patients with late-stage disease, including those who are refractory to standard therapies. In this review, we will highlight recent advances and discuss future directions in adoptive cell transfer based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25524383

  16. Weekly Doses of Cilengitide and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-14

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  17. Veliparib in Combination With Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-22

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  18. Gamma-Secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097 and Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-29

    Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  19. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  20. The adverse effects of sorafenib in patients with advanced cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Gao, Zu-Hua; Qu, Xian-Jun

    2015-03-01

    Sorafenib is the first multi-kinase inhibitor (TKI) approved for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular cancer (HCC) and metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC) and is increasingly being used to treat patients with well-differentiated radioiodine-resistant thyroid cancer (DTC). Sorafenib demonstrates targeted activity on several families of receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases that are involved in angiogenesis, tumour growth and metastatic progression of cancer. Sorafenib treatment results in long-term efficacy and low incidence of life-threatening toxicities. Although sorafenib has demonstrated many benefits in patients, the adverse effects cannot be ignored. The most common treatment-related toxicities include diarrhoea, fatigue, hand-foot skin reaction and hypertension. Most of these toxicities are considered mild to moderate and manageable to varying degrees; however, cardiovascular events might lead to death. In this MiniReview, we summarize the adverse effects of sorafenib that commonly occur in patients with advanced cancers. PMID:25495944

  1. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  2. Conceptualizing prognostic awareness in advanced cancer: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Applebaum, Allison J; Kolva, Elissa A; Kulikowski, Julia R; Jacobs, Jordana D; DeRosa, Antonio; Lichtenthal, Wendy G; Olden, Megan E; Rosenfeld, Barry; Breitbart, William

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review synthesizes the complex literature on prognostic awareness in cancer. A total of 37 studies examining cancer patients’ understanding of their prognosis were included. Prognostic awareness definitions and assessment methods were inconsistent across studies. A surprisingly high percentage of patients (up to 75%) were unaware of their poor prognosis, and in several studies, even their cancer diagnosis (up to 96%), particularly in studies conducted outside of North America. This review highlights surprisingly low rates of prognostic awareness in patients with advanced cancer as well as discrepancies in prognostic awareness assessment, suggesting the need for empirically validated measures of prognostic awareness. PMID:24157936

  3. [Treatment strategies for advanced prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Küronya, Zsófia; Bíró, Krisztina; Géczi, Lajos; Németh, Hajnalka

    2015-09-01

    There has been dramatic improvement in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer recently. The treatment of localized disease became more successful with the application of new, sophisticated techniques available for urologic surgeons and radiotherapists. Nevertheless a significant proportion of patients relapses after the initial local treatment or is diagnosed with metastatic disease at the beginning. In the past five years, six new drugs became registered for the treatment of metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer, such as sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide, the α-emitting radionuclide alpharadin and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK) ligand inhibitor denosumab. The availability of these new treatment options raises numerous questions. In this review we present the standard of care of metastatic prostate cancer by disease stage (hormone naive/ hormone sensitive metastatic prostate cancer, non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, oligometastatic/multimetastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer) and the emerging treatment modalities presently assessed in clinical trials. We would also like to give advice on debatable aspects of the management of metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:26339912

  4. Phase I study of afatinib combined with nintedanib in patients with advanced solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Bahleda, Rastislav; Hollebecque, Antoine; Varga, Andrea; Gazzah, Anas; Massard, Christophe; Deutsch, Eric; Amellal, Nadia; Farace, Françoise; Ould-Kaci, Mahmoud; Roux, Flavien; Marzin, Kristell; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2015-01-01

    Background: This Phase I study evaluated continuous- and intermittent-dosing (every other week) of afatinib plus nintedanib in patients with advanced solid tumours. Methods: In the dose-escalation phase (n=45), maximum tolerated doses (MTDs) were determined for continuous/intermittent afatinib 10, 20, 30 or 40 mg once daily plus continuous nintedanib 150 or 200 mg twice daily. Secondary objectives included safety and efficacy. Clinical activity of continuous afatinib plus nintedanib at the MTD was further evaluated in an expansion phase (n=25). Results: The most frequent dose-limiting toxicities were diarrhoea (11%) and transaminase elevations (7%). Maximum tolerated doses were afatinib 30 mg continuously plus nintedanib 150 mg, and afatinib 40 mg intermittently plus nintedanib 150 mg. Treatment-related adverse events (mostly Grade ⩽3) included diarrhoea (98%), asthenia (64%), nausea (62%) and vomiting (60%). In the dose-escalation phase, two patients had partial responses (PRs) and 27 (60%) had stable disease (SD). In the expansion phase, one complete response and three PRs were observed (all non-small cell lung cancer), with SD in 13 (52%) patients. No pharmacokinetic interactions were observed. Conclusions: MTDs of continuous or intermittent afatinib plus nintedanib demonstrated a manageable safety profile with proactive management of diarrhoea. Antitumour activity was observed in patients with solid tumours. PMID:26512876

  5. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Biliary Tract or Liver Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  6. [Induction chemotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Morkhov, K Yu; Nechushkina, V M; Kuznetsov, V V

    2015-01-01

    The main methods of treatment for cervical cancer are surgery, radiotherapy or their combination. During past two decades chemotherapy are increasingly being used not only in patients with disseminated forms of this disease but also in patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy or as induction therapy. Possibilities of adjuvant chemotherapy for cervical cancer are being studied. According to A.D.Kaprin and V.V. Starinskiy in 2013 in Russia, 32% of patients with newly diagnosed cervical cancer underwent only radiation therapy, 32%--combined or complex treatment, 27.3%--only surgery, and just 8.7%--chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26087600

  7. Cancer Cachexia, Recent Advances, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Penet, Marie-France; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is defined as a multifactorial syndrome characterized by an ongoing loss of skeletal muscle mass with or without loss of fat mass. The syndrome cannot be fully reversed by conventional nutritional support, and despite an increased number of studies related to cancer cachexia, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly defined and therapeutic options are limited. This review focuses on recent studies investigating mechanisms and pathways in cancer cachexia. The role of molecular and functional imaging in identifying cachexia at an earlier stage, in identifying potential metabolic targets and pathways, and in assessing treatment efficacy is also reviewed. PMID:25815852

  8. New strategies in advanced cervical cancer: from angiogenesis blockade to immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Krishnansu S; Monk, Bradley J

    2014-11-01

    Cervical cancer remains unique among solid tumor malignancies. Persistent infection with oncogenic subtypes of the human papillomavirus (HPV) results in carcinogenesis, predominantly occurring at the cervical transformation zone where endocervical columnar cells undergo metaplasia to a stratified squamous epithelium. The molecular cascade involving viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7 and their degradative interactions with cellular tumor suppressor gene products, p53 and pRb, respectively, has been precisely delineated. The precursor state of cervical neoplasia may last for years allowing for ready detection through successful screening programs in developed countries using cervical cytology and/or high-risk HPV DNA testing. Prophylactic HPV L1 capsid protein vaccines using virus-like-particle technology have been developed to prevent primary infection by the most common high-risk HPVs (16 and 18). Women who lack access to health care and those who undergo sporadic screening remain at risk. Although radical surgery (including fertility-sparing surgery) is available for patients with early-stage cancers, and chemoradiation plus high-dose-rate brachytherapy can cure the majority of those with locally advanced disease, patients with metastatic and nonoperable recurrent cervical cancer constitute a high-risk population with an unmet clinical need. On August 14, 2014, the FDA approved the antiangiogenesis drug bevacizumab for women with advanced cervical cancer. This review will highlight advances in translational science, antiangiogenesis therapy and immunotherapy for advanced disease. PMID:25104084

  9. An advanced model framework for solid electrolyte intercalation batteries.

    PubMed

    Landstorfer, Manuel; Funken, Stefan; Jacob, Timo

    2011-07-28

    Recent developments of solid electrolytes, especially lithium ion conductors, led to all solid state batteries for various applications. In addition, mathematical models sprout for different electrode materials and battery types, but are missing for solid electrolyte cells. We present a mathematical model for ion flux in solid electrolytes, based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics and functional derivatives. Intercalated ion diffusion within the electrodes is further considered, allowing the computation of the ion concentration at the electrode/electrolyte interface. A generalized Frumkin-Butler-Volmer equation describes the kinetics of (de-)intercalation reactions and is here extended to non-blocking electrodes. Using this approach, numerical simulations were carried out to investigate the space charge region at the interface. Finally, discharge simulations were performed to study different limitations of an all solid state battery cell. PMID:21681301

  10. Can advanced-stage ovarian cancer be cured?

    PubMed

    Narod, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Approximately 20% of women with advanced-stage ovarian cancer survive beyond 12 years after treatment and are effectively cured. Initial therapy for ovarian cancer comprises surgery and chemotherapy, and is given with the goal of eradicating as many cancer cells as possible. Indeed, the three phases of therapy are as follows: debulking surgery to remove as much of the cancer as possible, preferably to a state of no visible residual disease; chemotherapy to eradicate any microscopic disease that remains present after surgery; and second-line or maintenance therapy, which is given to delay disease progression among patients with tumour recurrence. If no cancer cells remain after initial therapy is completed, a cure is expected. By contrast, if residual cancer cells are present after initial treatment, then disease recurrence is likely. Thus, the probability of cure is contingent on the combination of surgery and chemotherapy effectively eliminating all cancer cells. In this Perspectives article, I present the case that the probability of achieving a cancer-free state is maximized through a combination of maximal debulking surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. I discuss the evidence indicating that by taking this approach, cures could be achieved in up to 50% of women with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. PMID:26787282

  11. Radium-223 for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from a phase III trial that compared radium-223 dichloride plus the best standard of care versus a placebo plus the best standard of care in men with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  12. Olaparib Targets Some Advanced Prostate Cancers.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    In the phase II TOPARP-A clinical trial, patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer who were treated with the PARP inhibitor olaparib lived nearly three times longer without their cancer worsening if their tumors had mutations in at least one of 12 DNA repair genes. However, physicians say that a larger trial is needed to confirm olaparib's effectiveness against the disease before they start routinely sequencing tumors and prescribing the drug. PMID:26658963

  13. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer: A survival study

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Upasana; Barmon, Debabrata; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Deka, Pankaj; Hazarika, Munlima; Saikia, Bhargab J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Patients with advanced ovarian cancer have a poor prognosis in spite of the best possible care. Primary debulking surgery has been the standard of care in advanced ovarian cancer; however, it is associated with high mortality and morbidity rates as shown in various studies. Several studies have discussed the benefit of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Aims: This study aims to evaluate the survival statistics of the patients who have been managed with interval debulking surgery (IDS) from January 2007 to December 2009. Materials and Methods: During the period from January 2007 to December 2009, a retrospective analysis of 104 patients who underwent IDS for stage IIIC or IV advanced epithelial ovarian cancer at our institute were selected for the study. IDS was attempted after three to five courses of chemotherapy with paclitaxal (175 mg/m2 ) and carboplatin (5-6 of area under curve). Overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) were compared with results of primary debulking study from existing literature. OS and PFS rates were estimated by means of the Kaplan-Meier method. Results were statistically analyzed by IBM SPSS Statistics 19. Results: The median OS was 26 months and the median PFS was 18 months. In multivariate analysis it was found that both OS and PFS was affected by the stage, and extent of debulking. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by surgical cytoreduction is a promising treatment strategy for the management of advanced epithelial ovarian cancers. PMID:25810573

  14. Surgical adjuvant treatment of locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, C M; Abston, S; Fish, J C

    1985-01-01

    The reported incidence of local recurrence after mastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer (TNM Stage III and IV) is between 30% and 50%. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of radiation therapy (XRT) followed by total mastectomy on the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Fifty-three patients who presented with locally advanced breast cancer, without distant metastases, were treated with XRT (4500-5000 R) to the breast, chest wall, and regional lymph nodes. Five weeks after completion of XRT, total mastectomy was performed. There were no operative deaths. The complications that occurred in 22 patients after surgery were flap necrosis, wound infection, and seroma. Patients have been followed from 3 to 134 months. Twenty-five patients are alive (3-134 months), 12 free of disease; 28 patients have died with distant metastases (6-67 months). Isolated local recurrence occurred in only two patients. Four patients had local and distant recurrence (total local recurrence is 6/53). The remaining patients all developed distant metastases. We have devised a treatment strategy which significantly decreases the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. However, the rapid appearance of distant metastases emphasizes the need for systemically active therapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:3994434

  15. Advanced gastric cancer: Current treatment landscape and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Digklia, Antonia; Wagner, Anna Dorothea

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer currently ranks fourth in cancer-related mortality worldwide. In the western world, it is most often diagnosed at an advanced stage, after becoming metastatic at distant sites. Patients with advanced disease (locally advanced or metastatic) have a somber prognosis, with a median overall survival of 10-12 mo, and palliative chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment. In recent years, novel approaches using inhibition of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have demonstrated significant improvements in progression-free and overall survival, compared with chemotherapy alone, in first-line treatment of patients with overexpression of HER2. In addition, both second-line chemotherapy and treatment with the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-inhibitor ramucirumab demonstrated significant benefits in terms of overall survival, compared with best supportive care, in randomized studies. Moreover, ramucirumab in combination with chemotherapy demonstrated further significant benefits in terms of progression-free and overall survival, compared with chemotherapy alone, in second-line treatment for patients with metastatic gastric cancer. A recently published molecular classification of gastric cancer is expected to improve patient stratification and selection for clinical trials and provide a roadmap for future drug development. Nevertheless, despite these developments the prognosis of patients with advanced gastric cancer remains poor. In this review we discuss current standards of care and outline major topics of drug development in gastric cancer. PMID:26937129

  16. Myofacial Trigger Points in Advanced Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasuo, Hideaki; Ishihara, Tatsuhiko; Kanbara, Kenji; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is started to be recognized as one of important factors of pain in cancer patients. However, no reports on features of myofascial trigger points were found in terminally-ill cancer populations. This time, we encountered 5 patients with myofascial pain syndrome and terminal cancer in whom delirium developed due to increased doses of opioid without a diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome on initial presentation. The delirium subsided with dose reductions of opioid and treatment of myofascial pain syndrome. The common reason for a delayed diagnosis among the patients included an incomplete palpation of the painful sites, which led to unsuccessful myofascial trigger points identification. The features of myofascial trigger points included single onset in the cancer pain management site with opioid and the contralateral abdominal side muscles of the non-common sites. Withdrawal reflexes associated with cancer pain in the supine position, which are increasingly seen in the terminal cancer patients, were considered to have contributed to this siuation. We consider that careful palpation of the painful site is important, in order to obtain greater knowledge and understanding of the features of myofascial trigger points. PMID:26962285

  17. Radiation risk models for all solid cancers other than those types of cancer requiring individual assessments after a nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Linda; Zhang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    In the assessment of health risks after nuclear accidents, some health consequences require special attention. For example, in their 2013 report on health risk assessment after the Fukushima nuclear accident, the World Health Organisation (WHO) panel of experts considered risks of breast cancer, thyroid cancer and leukaemia. For these specific cancer types, use was made of already published excess relative risk (ERR) and excess absolute risk (EAR) models for radiation-related cancer incidence fitted to the epidemiological data from the Japanese A-bomb Life Span Study (LSS). However, it was also considered important to assess all other types of solid cancer together and the WHO, in their above-mentioned report, stated "No model to calculate the risk for all other solid cancer excluding breast and thyroid cancer risks is available from the LSS data". Applying the LSS models for all solid cancers along with the models for the specific sites means that some cancers have an overlap in the risk evaluations. Thus, calculating the total solid cancer risk plus the breast cancer risk plus the thyroid cancer risk can overestimate the total risk by several per cent. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to publish the required models for all other solid cancers, i.e. all solid cancers other than those types of cancer requiring special attention after a nuclear accident. The new models presented here have been fitted to the same LSS data set from which the risks provided by the WHO were derived. Although it is known already that the EAR and ERR effect modifications by sex are statistically significant for the outcome "all solid cancer", it is shown here that sex modification is not statistically significant for the outcome "all solid cancer other than thyroid and breast cancer". It is also shown here that the sex-averaged solid cancer risks with and without the sex modification are very similar once breast and thyroid cancers are factored out. Some other notable model

  18. TORC1/2 Inhibitor MLN0128 and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma or Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Adult Glioblastoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  19. Intelligent Nanoparticles for Advanced Drug Delivery in Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, David S.; Puranik, Amey S.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of cancer using nanoparticle-based approaches relies on the rational design of carriers with respect to size, charge, and surface properties. Polymer-based nanomaterials, inorganic materials such as gold, iron oxide, and silica as well as carbon based materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene are being explored extensively for cancer therapy. The challenges associated with the delivery of these nanoparticles depend greatly on the type of cancer and stage of development. This review highlights design considerations to develop nanoparticle-based approaches for overcoming physiological hurdles in cancer treatment, as well as emerging research in engineering advanced delivery systems for the treatment of primary, metastatic, and multidrug resistant cancers. A growing understanding of cancer biology will continue to foster development of intelligent nanoparticle-based therapeutics that take into account diverse physiological contexts of changing disease states to improve treatment outcomes. PMID:25621200

  20. [Ethics and palliative care in patients with advanced cancer].

    PubMed

    Tenorio-González, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    Recent research in both the biology of cancer and the treatment of patients has increased the life expectancy of cancer patients with recurrence and who have a longer survival rate. Cancer is no longer considered a lethal but a chronic disease. More patients survive, but above all there are more patients with recurrences thus increasing the need for physical or psychological treatment of patients with longer lives. The American Cancer Society reported in 1992 that in the U.S. more than 8 million people survived between 4 and 5 years. This produces both an ethical and medical challenge for treatment of cancer patients. This paper reviews the actual criteria for palliative care: treatment for pain and the ethical and psychological treatment of advanced cancer patients and their families. PMID:16454965

  1. Photodynamic Cancer Therapy—Recent Advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamse, Heidi

    2011-09-01

    The basic principle of the photodynamic effect was discovered over a hundred years ago leading to the pioneering work on PDT in Europe. It was only during the 1980s, however, when "photoradiation therapy" was investigated as a possible treatment modality for cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a photochemotherapeutic process which requires the use of a photosensitizer (PS) that, upon entry into a cancer cell is targeted by laser irradiation to initiate a series of events that contribute to cell death. PSs are light-sensitive dyes activated by a light source at a specific wavelength and can be classified as first or second generation PSs based on its origin and synthetic pathway. The principle of PS activation lies in a photochemical reaction resulting from excitation of the PS producing singlet oxygen which in turn reacts and damages cell organelles and biomolecules required for cell function and ultimately leading to cell destruction. Several first and second generation PSs have been studied in several different cancer types in the quest to optimize treatment. PSs including haematoporphyrin derivative (HpD), aminolevulinic acid (ALA), chlorins, bacteriochlorins, phthalocyanines, naphthalocyanines, pheophorbiedes and purpurins all require selective uptake and retention by cancer cells prior to activation by a light source and subsequent cell death induction. Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is based on the fluorescence effect exhibited by PSs upon irradiation and is often used concurrently with PDT to detect and locate tumours. Both laser and light emitting diodes (LED) have been used for PDT depending on the location of the tumour. Internal cancers more often require the use of laser light delivery using fibre optics as delivery system while external PDT often make use of LEDs. Normal cells have a lower uptake of the PS in comparison to tumour cells, however the acute cytotoxic effect of the compound on the recovery rate of normal cells is not known. Subcellular

  2. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Kidong; Kang, Sokbom

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, 9 topics were selected as major advances in clinical research for gynecologic oncology: 2 each in cervical and corpus cancer, 4 in ovarian cancer, and 1 in breast cancer. For cervical cancer, several therapeutic agents showed viable antitumor clinical response in recurrent and metastatic disease: bevacizumab, cediranib, and immunotherapies including human papillomavirus (HPV)-tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and Z-100. The HPV test received FDA approval as the primary screening tool of cervical cancer in women aged 25 and older, based on the results of the ATHENA trial, which suggested that the HPV test was a more sensitive and efficient strategy for cervical cancer screening than methods based solely on cytology. For corpus cancers, results of a phase III Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) 249 study of early-stage endometrial cancer with high-intermediate risk factors are followed by the controversial topic of uterine power morcellation in minimally invasive gynecologic surgery. Promising results of phase II studies regarding the effectiveness of olaparib in various ovarian cancer settings are summarized. After a brief review of results from a phase III study on pazopanib maintenance therapy in advanced ovarian cancer, 2 outstanding 2014 ASCO presentations cover the topic of using molecular subtypes in predicting response to bevacizumab. A review of the use of opportunistic bilateral salpingectomy as an ovarian cancer preventive strategy in the general population is presented. Two remarkable studies that discussed the effectiveness of adjuvant ovarian suppression in premenopausal early breast cancer have been selected as the last topics covered in this review. PMID:25872896

  3. Advanced Imaging Among Health Maintenance Organization Enrollees With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loggers, Elizabeth T.; Fishman, Paul A.; Peterson, Do; O'Keeffe-Rosetti, Maureen; Greenberg, Caprice; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Kushi, Lawrence H.; Lowry, Sarah; Ramaprasan, Arvind; Wagner, Edward H.; Weeks, Jane C.; Ritzwoller, Debra P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare expenditures for advanced imaging studies (defined as computed tomography [CT], magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], positron emission tomography [PET] scans, and nuclear medicine studies [NM]) rapidly increased in the past two decades for patients with cancer. Imaging rates are unknown for patients with cancer, whether under or over age 65 years, in health maintenance organizations (HMOs), where incentives may differ. Materials and Methods: Incident cases of breast, colorectal, lung, prostate, leukemia, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) cancers diagnosed in 2003 and 2006 from four HMOs in the Cancer Research Network were used to determine 2-year overall mean imaging counts and average total imaging costs per HMO enrollee by cancer type for those under and over age 65. Results: There were 44,446 incident cancer patient cases, with a median age of 75 (interquartile range, 71-81), and 454,029 imaging procedures were performed. The mean number of images per patient increased from 7.4 in 2003 to 12.9 in 2006. Rates of imaging were similar across age groups, with the exception of greater use of echocardiograms and NM studies in younger patients with breast cancer and greater use of PET among younger patients with lung cancer. Advanced imaging accounted for approximately 41% of all imaging, or approximately 85% of the $8.7 million in imaging expenditures. Costs were nearly $2,000 per HMO enrollee; costs for younger patients with NHL, leukemia, and lung cancer were nearly $1,000 more in 2003. Conclusion: Rates of advanced imaging appear comparable among FFS and HMO participants of any age with these six cancers. PMID:24844241

  4. Colorectal cancer development and advances in screening.

    PubMed

    Simon, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Most colon tumors develop via a multistep process involving a series of histological, morphological, and genetic changes that accumulate over time. This has allowed for screening and detection of early-stage precancerous polyps before they become cancerous in individuals at average risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), which may lead to substantial decreases in the incidence of CRC. Despite the known benefits of early screening, CRC remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Hence, it is important for health care providers to have an understanding of the risk factors for CRC and various stages of disease development in order to recommend appropriate screening strategies. This article provides an overview of the histological/molecular changes that characterize the development of CRC. It describes the available CRC screening methods and their advantages and limitations and highlights the stages of CRC development in which each screening method is most effective. PMID:27486317

  5. Colorectal cancer development and advances in screening

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Most colon tumors develop via a multistep process involving a series of histological, morphological, and genetic changes that accumulate over time. This has allowed for screening and detection of early-stage precancerous polyps before they become cancerous in individuals at average risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), which may lead to substantial decreases in the incidence of CRC. Despite the known benefits of early screening, CRC remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Hence, it is important for health care providers to have an understanding of the risk factors for CRC and various stages of disease development in order to recommend appropriate screening strategies. This article provides an overview of the histological/molecular changes that characterize the development of CRC. It describes the available CRC screening methods and their advantages and limitations and highlights the stages of CRC development in which each screening method is most effective. PMID:27486317

  6. Advances in immunotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Reckamp, Karen L

    2015-12-01

    In most patients, lung cancer presents as advanced disease with metastases to lymph nodes and/or distant organs, and survival is poor. Lung cancer is also a highly immune-suppressing malignancy with numerous methods to evade antitumor immune responses, including deficiencies in antigen processing and presentation, release of immunomodulatory cytokines, and inhibition of T-cell activation. Advances in understanding the complex interactions of the immune system and cancer have led to novel therapies that promote T-cell activation at the tumor site, resulting in prolonged clinical benefit. Immune checkpoint inhibitors, specifically programmed death receptor 1 pathway antibodies, have demonstrated impressively durable responses and improved survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. This article will review the recent progress made in immunotherapy for lung cancer with data from trials evaluating programmed death receptor 1 and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 monoclonal antibodies in addition to cancer vaccines. The review will focus on studies that have been published and the latest randomized trials exploring immune therapy in lung cancer. These results form the framework for a new direction in the treatment of lung cancer toward immunotherapy. PMID:27058851

  7. [A Case of Locally Advanced Gastric Cancer after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Keita; Yonemitsu, Kimihiro; Munechika, Taro; Nomi, Masako; Maeno, Hiroshi; Nagao, Shuji; Kawamoto, Shunji; Sasaguri, Takakazu; Sueishi, Katsuo

    2015-11-01

    A 60s male was admitted to our hospital because of appetite loss and nausea. After examination, he was diagnosed with type 3 advanced gastric cancer in the antrum. Abdominal computed tomography showed gastric cancer invasion to the left liver lobe. We initiated neoadjuvant chemotherapy using S-1 plus CDDP after laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy. S-1 was orally administered for 3 weeks followed by a 2-week drug-free period. CDDP was administered intravenously on day 8 of each course. After 5 courses of chemotherapy, the gastric cancer was reduced in size. We therefore performed total gastrectomy with D2-affiliated left liver resection. S-1 plus CDDP is expected to improve outcomes in unresectable or locally advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26805257

  8. Advances in cancer research. Volume 41

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.; Weinhouse, S.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains seven chapters. They are: The Epidemiology of Diet and Cancer; Molecular Aspects of Immunoglobin Expression by Human B Cell Leukemias and Lymphomas; Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus: Transcriptional Control and Involvement in Tumorigenesis; Dominant Susceptibility to Cancer in Man; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstreom's Macroglobulinemia, and Benign Monoclonal Gammopathy: Characteristics of the B Cell Clone, Immunoregulatory Cell Populations and Clinical Implications; Idiotype Network Interactions in Tumor Immunity; and Chromosomal Location of Immunoglobulin Genes: Partial Mapping of these Genes in the Rabbit and Comparison with Ig Genes Carrying Chromosomes of Man and Mouse.

  9. Advancement in treatment and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer with radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu-Ping; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a major health problem. Conventional imaging modalities show limited accuracy for reliable assessment of the tumor. Recent researches suggest that molecular imaging techniques with tracers provide more biologically relevant information and are benefit for the diagnosis of the cancer. In addition, radiopharmaceuticals also play more important roles in treatment of the disease. This review summaries the advancement of the radiolabeled compounds in the theranostics of PC. PMID:26909131

  10. Profile of olaparib in the treatment of advanced ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Dana M; Patel, Shreya; Shields, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Olaparib is a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor that received accelerated approval from the US Food and Drug Administration as monotherapy for patients with germline BRCA mutations and ovarian cancer treated with three or more prior lines of chemotherapy. This article summarizes the mechanism of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition, therapeutic profile and uses of olaparib, and current and ongoing literature pertaining to olaparib in advanced ovarian cancer. PMID:27186080

  11. Intraarterial pelvic infusion chemotherapy in advanced gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lifshitz, S; Railsback, L D; Buchsbaum, H J

    1978-10-01

    Fourteen patients with advanced localized gynecologic cancer were treated with 44 courses of intraarterial pelvic infusion chemotherapy. All patients received methotrexate with folinic acid rescue; 9 patients also received vincristine. Tumor regression was observed in 3 of 14 patients (21.4%). In 5 patients there were major complications related to 28 intraarterial catheter placements. Two patients developed leukopenia following chemotherapy. The value of intraarterial infusion chemotherapy in gynecologic cancer is limited. Its use in gynecologic oncology is discussed. PMID:309571

  12. Immunotherapy and complexity: overcoming barriers to control of advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Lage, Agustin

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in fundamental immunology are changing paradigms for management of advanced cancer, now acknowledged as a chronic disease whose prevalence will increase, and one whose complexity makes it difficult to control. Immunotherapy is emerging as an alternative, with new monoclonal antibodies, therapeutic vaccines and deeper understanding of fundamental phenomena in the interaction between tumor and immune system. These novel insights concern mechanisms of programmed contraction of the immune response, characterization of molecular and cellular markers of immunosenescence, the dual role of inflammation, characterization of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and cancer stem cells, and the phenomena of immunogenic apoptosis and oncogene addiction. Additionally, new data drive a deeper understanding of four barriers to overcome in control of advanced cancer: the complexity of biological systems, tumor heterogeneity, tumor mutation rates, and human genome-environment mismatch. The new landscape points to six main strategies: manage advanced cancer as a chronic disease, find relevant molecular markers for patient stratification, develop a rationale for therapeutic combinations, target regulatory control loops in the immune system, expand mathematical modeling capacity, and evaluate complex health intervention packages in real-world conditions. These transitions in cancer immunotherapy research are illustrated in this paper through description of ongoing projects at Cuba's Molecular Immunology Center. PMID:25208123

  13. Advances and Challenges in Immunotherapy for Solid Organ and Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    McDonald-Hyman, Cameron; Turka, Laurence A.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2015-01-01

    Although major advances have been made in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and solid organ transplantation in the last 50 years, big challenges remain. This Review outlines the current immunological limitations for HSCT and solid organ transplantation, and discusses new immune-modulating therapies in clinical trials and under pre-clinical development that may allow these obstacles to be overcome. PMID:25810312

  14. Overview of the manufacturing sequence of the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John S.; Nix, Michael B.

    1992-01-01

    The manufacturing sequence of NASA's new Advanced Solid Rocket Motor, developed as a replacement of the Space Shuttle's existing Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor, is overviewed. Special attention is given to the case preparation, the propellant mix/cast, the nondestructuve evaluation, the motor finishing, and the refurbishment. The fabrication sequences of the case, the nozzle, and the igniter are described.

  15. New approaches for imaging and therapy of solid cancer.

    PubMed

    Sollini, M; Boni, R; Traino, A C; Lazzeri, E; Pasqualetti, F; Modeo, L; Mariani, G; Petrini, M; Erba, P A

    2015-06-01

    Radionuclide therapy is a systemic treatment that aims to deliver cytotoxic radiation to cancer cells. Due to their properties, antibodies have been considered as suitable agent for the delivery of therapeutic radioisotopes, radioimmunotherapy (RIT). This article gives an overview of new approaches for imaging and therapy of solid cancer with particular attention to strategies to enhance treatment success. Examples of increased antibody uptake by targeting stromal constituent of tumor microenvironment such as fibronectin (FN) an important tumor-associated angiogenesis targeting agent, with specifically designed antibody format will be provided. Strategies oriented to identify patients most likely to benefit from RIT including identification of radiosensitivity profiles, in vivo target identification by teragnostic approach and better prediction of dosimetric estimates would be presents. Combination regimens such as with chemo-radiotherapy and immunotherapy would be also discussed as an approach to enhance RIT success. PMID:25693421

  16. Integrative clinical genomics of advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Dan; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Wu, Yi-Mi; Schultz, Nikolaus; Lonigro, Robert J; Mosquera, Juan-Miguel; Montgomery, Bruce; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Pritchard, Colin C; Attard, Gerhardt; Beltran, Himisha; Abida, Wassim; Bradley, Robert K; Vinson, Jake; Cao, Xuhong; Vats, Pankaj; Kunju, Lakshmi P; Hussain, Maha; Feng, Felix Y; Tomlins, Scott A; Cooney, Kathleen A; Smith, David C; Brennan, Christine; Siddiqui, Javed; Mehra, Rohit; Chen, Yu; Rathkopf, Dana E; Morris, Michael J; Solomon, Stephen B; Durack, Jeremy C; Reuter, Victor E; Gopalan, Anuradha; Gao, Jianjiong; Loda, Massimo; Lis, Rosina T; Bowden, Michaela; Balk, Stephen P; Gaviola, Glenn; Sougnez, Carrie; Gupta, Manaswi; Yu, Evan Y; Mostaghel, Elahe A; Cheng, Heather H; Mulcahy, Hyojeong; True, Lawrence D; Plymate, Stephen R; Dvinge, Heidi; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Flohr, Penny; Miranda, Susana; Zafeiriou, Zafeiris; Tunariu, Nina; Mateo, Joaquin; Perez-Lopez, Raquel; Demichelis, Francesca; Robinson, Brian D; Schiffman, Marc; Nanus, David M; Tagawa, Scott T; Sigaras, Alexandros; Eng, Kenneth W; Elemento, Olivier; Sboner, Andrea; Heath, Elisabeth I; Scher, Howard I; Pienta, Kenneth J; Kantoff, Philip; de Bono, Johann S; Rubin, Mark A; Nelson, Peter S; Garraway, Levi A; Sawyers, Charles L; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2015-05-21

    Toward development of a precision medicine framework for metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), we established a multi-institutional clinical sequencing infrastructure to conduct prospective whole-exome and transcriptome sequencing of bone or soft tissue tumor biopsies from a cohort of 150 mCRPC affected individuals. Aberrations of AR, ETS genes, TP53, and PTEN were frequent (40%-60% of cases), with TP53 and AR alterations enriched in mCRPC compared to primary prostate cancer. We identified new genomic alterations in PIK3CA/B, R-spondin, BRAF/RAF1, APC, β-catenin, and ZBTB16/PLZF. Moreover, aberrations of BRCA2, BRCA1, and ATM were observed at substantially higher frequencies (19.3% overall) compared to those in primary prostate cancers. 89% of affected individuals harbored a clinically actionable aberration, including 62.7% with aberrations in AR, 65% in other cancer-related genes, and 8% with actionable pathogenic germline alterations. This cohort study provides clinically actionable information that could impact treatment decisions for these affected individuals. PMID:26000489

  17. Advances in cancer research. Volume 48

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.; Weinhouse, S.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the following five selections: Oncotrophoblast Gene Expression: Placental Alkaline Phosphatase; Cellular Events during Hepatocarcinogenesis in Rats and the Questions of Premalignancy; Human Papillomaviruses and Genital Cancer; Herpes Simplex Type 2 Virus and Cervical Neoplasia; and Transforming Genes and Target Cells of Murine Spleen Focus-Forming Viruses.

  18. Integrative clinical genomics of advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Robinson; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Wu, Yi-Mi; Schultz, Nikolaus; Lonigro, Robert J.; Mosquera, Juan-Miguel; Montgomery, Bruce; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Pritchard, Colin C; Attard, Gerhardt; Beltran, Himisha; Abida, Wassim M.; Bradley, Robert K.; Vinson, Jake; Cao, Xuhong; Vats, Pankaj; Kunju, Lakshmi P.; Hussain, Maha; Feng, Felix Y.; Tomlins, Scott A.; Cooney, Kathleen A.; Smith, David C.; Brennan, Christine; Siddiqui, Javed; Mehra, Rohit; Chen, Yu; Rathkopf, Dana E.; Morris, Michael J.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Durack, Jeremy C.; Reuter, Victor E.; Gopalan, Anuradha; Gao, Jianjiong; Loda, Massimo; Lis, Rosina T.; Bowden, Michaela; Balk, Stephen P.; Gaviola, Glenn; Sougnez, Carrie; Gupta, Manaswi; Yu, Evan Y.; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Cheng, Heather H.; Mulcahy, Hyojeong; True, Lawrence D.; Plymate, Stephen R.; Dvinge, Heidi; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Flohr, Penny; Miranda, Susana; Zafeiriou, Zafeiris; Tunariu, Nina; Mateo, Joaquin; Lopez, Raquel Perez; Demichelis, Francesca; Robinson, Brian D.; Schiffman, Marc A.; Nanus, David M.; Tagawa, Scott T.; Sigaras, Alexandros; Eng, Kenneth W.; Elemento, Olivier; Sboner, Andrea; Heath, Elisabeth I.; Scher, Howard I.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Kantoff, Philip; de Bono, Johann S.; Rubin, Mark A.; Nelson, Peter S.; Garraway, Levi A.; Sawyers, Charles L.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Toward development of a precision medicine framework for metastatic, castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), we established a multi-institutional clinical sequencing infrastructure to conduct prospective whole exome and transcriptome sequencing of bone or soft tissue tumor biopsies from a cohort of 150 mCRPC affected individuals. Aberrations of AR, ETS genes, TP53 and PTEN were frequent (40–60% of cases), with TP53 and AR alterations enriched in mCRPC compared to primary prostate cancer. We identified novel genomic alterations in PIK3CA/B, R-spondin, BRAF/RAF1, APC, β-catenin and ZBTB16/PLZF. Aberrations of BRCA2, BRCA1 and ATM were observed at substantially higher frequencies (19.3% overall) than seen in primary prostate cancers. 89% of affected individuals harbored a clinically actionable aberration including 62.7% with aberrations in AR, 65% in other cancer-related genes, and 8% with actionable pathogenic germline alterations. This cohort study provides evidence that clinical sequencing in mCRPC is feasible and could impact treatment decisions in significant numbers of affected individuals. PMID:26000489

  19. Advances in cancer research: Volume 47

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.; Weinhouse, S.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight chapters. Some of the titles are: Genetic Epidemiology of Familial Aggregation of Cancer; Terminal Transferase in Normal and Leukemic Cells; Malignant Metamorphosis: Developmental Genes as Culprits for Oncogenesis in Xiphophorus; and Transcription Activation by Viral and Cellular Oncogenes.

  20. Ixabepilone and Liposomal Doxorubicin in Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-11

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Female Reproductive Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  1. Early Gastric Cancer: Current Advances of Endoscopic Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linlin; Qin, Jinyu; Wang, Jin; Guo, Tianjiao; Wang, Zijing; Yang, Jinlin

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopy is a major method for early gastric cancer screening because of its high detection rate, but its diagnostic accuracy depends heavily on the availability of endoscopic instruments. Many novel endoscopic techniques have been shown to increase the diagnostic yield of early gastric cancer. With the improved detection rate of EGC, the endoscopic treatment has become widespread due to advances in the instruments available and endoscopist's experience. The aim of this review is to summarize frequently-used endoscopic diagnosis and treatment in early gastric cancer (EGC). PMID:26884753

  2. Early Gastric Cancer: Current Advances of Endoscopic Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Linlin; Qin, Jinyu; Wang, Jin; Guo, Tianjiao; Wang, Zijing; Yang, Jinlin

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopy is a major method for early gastric cancer screening because of its high detection rate, but its diagnostic accuracy depends heavily on the availability of endoscopic instruments. Many novel endoscopic techniques have been shown to increase the diagnostic yield of early gastric cancer. With the improved detection rate of EGC, the endoscopic treatment has become widespread due to advances in the instruments available and endoscopist's experience. The aim of this review is to summarize frequently-used endoscopic diagnosis and treatment in early gastric cancer (EGC). PMID:26884753

  3. Advances in Solid State Joining of High Temperature Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Jeff; Schneider, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Many of the metals used in the oil and gas industry are difficult to fusion weld including Titanium and its alloys. Solid state joining processes are being pursued as an alternative process to produce robust structures more amenable to high pressure applications. Various solid state joining processes include friction stir welding (FSW) and a patented modification termed thermal stir welding (TSW). The configuration of TSWing utilizes an induction coil to preheat the material minimizing the burden on the weld tool extending its life. This provides the ability to precisely select and control the temperature to avoid detrimental changes to the microstructure. The work presented in this presentation investigates the feasibility of joining various titanium alloys using the solid state welding processes of FSW and TSW. Process descriptions and attributes of each weld process will be presented. Weld process set ]up and welding techniques will be discussed leading to the challenges experienced. Mechanical property data will also be presented.

  4. Recent advances in the field of anti-cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Henrique; Kwok, Hang Fai

    2015-01-01

    Background The main goal of anti-cancer therapy is to specifically inhibit the malignant activity of cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells unaffected. As such, for every proposed therapy, it is important to keep in mind the therapeutic index — the ratio of the toxic dose over the therapeutic dose. The use of immunotherapy has allowed a means to both specifically block protein–protein interaction and deliver cytotoxic events to a tumor-specific antigen. Review scope It is the objective of this review to give an overview on current immunotherapy treatment for cancers using monoclonal antibodies. We demonstrate three exciting targets for immunotherapy, TNF-α Converting Enzyme (TACE), Cathepsin S and Urokinase Plasmogen Activator and go over the advances made with one of the most used monoclonal antibodies in cancer therapy, Rituximab; as well as Herceptin, which is used for breast cancer therapy. Furthermore, we touch on other venues of immunotherapy, such as adaptive cell transfer, the use of nucleic acids and the use of dendritic cells. Finally, we summarize some ongoing studies that spell tentative advancements for anti-cancer immunotherapy. General significance Immunotherapy is at the forefront of anti-cancer therapies, allying both a high degree of specificity to general high effectiveness and fewer side-effects. PMID:26673349

  5. PET-CT in Determining the Radioembolization Dose Delivered to Patients With Liver Metastasis, Primary Liver Cancer, or Biliary Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Stage D Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC); Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  6. [Recent advances in diagnosis of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Hara, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Most valuable tool for diagnosis of prostate cancer is PSA. Although PSA is highly specific for organ, it is not so specific for disease. Therefore, about 70% of patients whose PSA value is 4-10 ng/mL are forced to undergo unnecessary prostate biopsy. In order to discriminate the unnecessary biopsies, several markers such as free/total PSA ratio, PSA density, and PSA velocity have been developed. However, none of these markers were widely approved in daily clinical settings. Prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3) is thought to be a useful marker for necessity of repeat biopsy. Functional MR imaging such as dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE), diffusion weighted imaging(DWI), MR spectroscopy (MRS) have been developed. Recently MRI-TRUS fusion biopsy is gathering attention. In terms of pathology, atypical glands but not high grade PIN require repeat biopsy after 3 to 6 months from initial biopsy. PMID:26793874

  7. Preface: Special Topic Section on Advanced Electronic Structure Methods for Solids and Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelides, Angelos; Martinez, Todd J.; Alavi, Ali; Kresse, Georg

    2015-09-14

    This Special Topic section on Advanced Electronic Structure Methods for Solids and Surfaces contains a collection of research papers that showcase recent advances in the high accuracy prediction of materials and surface properties. It provides a timely snapshot of a growing field that is of broad importance to chemistry, physics, and materials science.

  8. Advances in the understanding of cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shore, Neal D

    2015-09-01

    The principal role of the immune system is to prevent and eradicate pathogens and infections. The key characteristics or features of an effective immune response include specificity, trafficking, antigen spread and durability (memory). The immune system is recognised to have a critical role in controlling cancer through a dynamic relationship with tumour cells. Normally, at the early stages of tumour development, the immune system is capable of eliminating tumour cells or keeping tumour growth abated; however, tumour cells may evolve multiple pathways over time to evade immune control. Immunotherapy may be viewed as a treatment designed to boost or restore the ability of the immune system to fight cancer, infections and other diseases. Immunotherapy manifests differently from traditional cancer treatments, eliciting delayed response kinetics and thus may be more effective in patients with lower tumour burden, in whom disease progression may be less rapid, thereby allowing ample time for the immunotherapy to evolve. Because immunotherapies may have a different mechanism of action from traditional cytotoxic or targeted biological agents, immunotherapy techniques have the potential to combine synergistically with traditional therapies. PMID:24612369

  9. Hormonal therapy in advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kokka, Fani; Brockbank, Elly; Oram, David; Gallagher, Chris; Bryant, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancer is a cancer of the lining of the womb and worldwide is the seventh most common cancer in women. Treatment with hormones is thought to be beneficial in patients with endometrial cancer. Objectives To assess the indications, effectiveness and safety of hormone therapy for advanced or recurrent epithelial endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE up to May 2009 and and CENTRAL (Issue 2, 2009). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies, and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that studied hormonal therapy in adult women diagnosed with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Comparisons were restricted to single-trial analyses so we did not synthesise data in meta-analyses. Main results We found six trials (542 participants) that met our inclusion criteria. These trials assessed the effectiveness of hormonal therapy in women with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer as a single agent, as part of combination therapy and as low versus high dose. All comparisons were restricted to single-trial analyses, where we found no evidence that hormonal therapy as a single agent or as a combination treatment prolonged overall or five-year disease-free survival of women with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. However, low-dose hormonal therapy may have had a benefit in terms of overall and progression-free survival (PFS) compared to high-dose hormonal therapy (HR 1.31, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.66 and HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.71 for overall and PFS, respectively). Authors’ conclusions We found insufficient evidence that hormonal treatment in any form, dose or as part of combination therapy improves the survival of patients with advanced or

  10. Radical Prostatectomy for Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Current Status.

    PubMed

    Faria, Eliney F; Chapin, Brian F; Muller, Roberto L; Machado, Roberto D; Reis, Rodolfo B; Matin, Surena F

    2015-07-01

    In the past, prostate cancer (PC) could only be detected clinically, and delayed diagnosis of locally advanced or metastatic disease at presentation was common. Prostate-specific antigen testing and magnetic resonance imaging led to PC detection in a much earlier stage. However, controversy about the best treatment for locally advanced PC remains. Recent refinements in surgery and radiation therapy have improved outcomes, but no comparative study has yet conclusively determined superiority of one option over the other. In this review, we present the most recent evidence about the role of radical prostatectomy for locally advanced PC treatment from a surgeon's perspective. PMID:26048432

  11. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Childhood Central Nervous System Choriocarcinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Germinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Teratoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Yolk Sac Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumor; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  12. ASRM plume deflector analysis program. [advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Michael C.; Douglas, Freddie, III; Orlin, Peter A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents analytical conclusions resulting from subscale solid rocket motor tests and flowfield modeling for a plume deflector. Loads, flow characteristics, and corresponding material behavior were predicted or observed and will be used in final design of the deflector. The efforts resulted in quantifiable size reductions and lower cost material selections, which will significantly reduce the deflector cost while meeting performance requirements.

  13. Treatment of advanced medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Smit, Johannes

    2013-03-14

    Therapy decisions in advanced medullary thyroid carcinoma should be guided by a critical appraisal of the natural disease course (slowly progressive vs. aggressive) and benefits and side effects of therapy. Therapy goals should be distinguished between curative and palliative. Local treatments are mainly palliative and may add to quality of life. The advent of novel systemic therapies opens promising perspectives but its place in the therapeutic arsenal must be further determined. PMID:23514632

  14. Chinese Herbal Formulation PHY906 and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced Liver Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage B Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage C Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  15. Motolimod effectively drives immune activation in advanced cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Dietsch, Gregory N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A novel approach to immunotherapy is the activation of toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8). Motolimod, a selective TLR8 agonist can act in concert with approved immunotherapies to sensitize T cells and augment natural killer (NK) cell function. Despite treatment with chemotherapeutic agents and advance disease, cancer patients remain sensitive to motolimod.

  16. Advances take stage - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Regulatory advances in proteomics will be taking center stage at a Symposia scheduled to occur at the 2011 American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Annual Meeting. The symposium entitled "Enabling Translational Proteomics with NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer" is scheduled for July 25, 2011 at AACC's annual Meeting.

  17. Recent Advances and Prospects for Multimodality Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Awalpreet S; Khoo, Allison; Aliru, Maureen L; Arora, Harpreet K; Gunther, Jillian R; Krishnan, Sunil

    2016-10-01

    The outcomes for treatment of pancreatic cancer have not improved dramatically in many decades. However, the recent promising results with combination chemotherapy regimens for metastatic disease increase optimism for future treatments. With greater control of overt or occult metastatic disease, there will likely be an expanding role for local treatment modalities, especially given that nearly a third of pancreatic cancer patients have locally destructive disease without distant metastatic disease at the time of death. Technical advances have allowed for the safe delivery of dose-escalated radiation therapy, which can then be combined with chemotherapy, targeted agents, immunotherapy, and nanoparticulate drug delivery techniques to produce novel and improved synergistic effects. Here we discuss recent advances and future directions for multimodality therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27619253

  18. Annual Advances in Cancer Prevention Lecture | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    2016 Keynote Lecture Polyvalent Vaccines Targeting Oncogenic Driver Pathways A special keynote lecture became part of the NCI Summer Curriculum in Cancer Prevention in 2000. This lecture will be held on Thursday, July 21, 2016 at 1:30pm at Masur Auditorium, Building 10, NIH Main Campus, Bethesda, MD. This year’s keynote speaker is Dr. Mary L. (Nora) Disis, MD. |

  19. Annual Advances in Cancer Prevention Lecture | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    2015 Keynote Lecture HPV Vaccination: Preventing More with Less A special keynote lecture became part of the NCI summer Curriculum in Cancer Prevention in 2000. This lecture will be held on Thursday, July 23, 2015 at 3:00pm at Masur Auditorium, Building 10, NIH Main Campus, Bethesda, MD. This year’s keynote speaker is Dr. Douglas Lowy, NCI Acting Director. |

  20. Recent anode advances in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chunwen; Stimming, Ulrich

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are electrochemical reactors that can directly convert the chemical energy of a fuel gas into electrical energy with high efficiency and in an environment-friendly way. The recent trends in the research of solid oxide fuel cells concern the use of available hydrocarbon fuels, such as natural gas. The most commonly used anode material Ni/YSZ cermet exhibits some disadvantages when hydrocarbons were used as fuels. Thus it is necessary to develop alternative anode materials which display mixed conductivity under fuel conditions. This article reviews the recent developments of anode in SOFCs with principal emphasis on the material aspects. In addition, the mechanism and kinetics of fuel oxidation reactions are also addressed. Various processes used for the cost-effective fabrication of anode have also been summarized. Finally, this review will be concluded with personal perspectives on the future research directions of this area.

  1. [Treatment strategy for advanced prostate cancer with bone metastases].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Mikio; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki

    2006-08-01

    The introduction of PSA screening has led to confirming a shift towards an earlier pathological stage in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Consequently, the proportion of detecting early stage prostate cancer has clearly been increasing. On the other hand, progressive cancers in the form of distant metastases and locally advanced ones that have been confirmed at the initial diagnosis exhibit a constant rate. In addition, there have been a lot of cases where hormonal resistance was acquired during hormonal therapy which resulted in advanced metastases of the prostate. Prostate cancer has a tendency to be metastatic to bones. Combining the fact that the survival period of patients undergoing treatment is prolonged after metastases, the length of suffering caused by complications, such as ostealgia, pathological fracture and myelopathy, becomes an issue in which QOL and ADL of the patient are sacrificed for a long time. As for treatment of prostate cancer with metastases, a palliative treatment is common in the clinical scene. However, we can extend a life prognosis with use of radiotherapy and surgical treatment in addition to the palliative treatment at an appropriate time. It appears that a combination of new chemotherapy and hormonal therapy will be promising. In the future, we believe that the appearance of new anticancer drugs, endocrine therapies, bisphosphonates and strontium treatment could be used as a part of the treatment strategy for prostate cancer with bone metastases. PMID:16912523

  2. Advanced imaging techniques for the detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jochelson, Maxine

    2012-01-01

    Mammography is the only breast imaging examination that has been shown to reduce breast cancer mortality. Population-based sensitivity is 75% to 80%, but sensitivity in high-risk women with dense breasts is only in the range of 50%. Breast ultrasound and contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have become additional standard modalities used in the diagnosis of breast cancer. In high-risk women, ultrasound is known to detect approximately four additional cancers per 1,000 women. MRI is exquisitely sensitive for the detection of breast cancer. In high-risk women, it finds an additional four to five cancers per 100 women. However, both ultrasound and MRI are also known to lead to a large number of additional benign biopsies and short-term follow-up examinations. Many new breast imaging tools have improved and are being developed to improve on our current ability to diagnose early-stage breast cancer. These can be divided into two groups. The first group is those that are advances in current techniques, which include digital breast tomosynthesis and contrast-enhanced mammography and ultrasound with elastography or microbubbles. The other group includes new breast imaging platforms such as breast computed tomography (CT) scanning and radionuclide breast imaging. These are exciting advances. However, in this era of cost and radiation containment, it is imperative to look at all of them objectively to see which will provide clinically relevant additional information. PMID:24451711

  3. [Treatment outcome of peptide vaccination for advanced colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Fumiaki; Inoue, Keisuke; Kogita, Akihiro; Yoshioka, Yasumasa; Hida, Jinichi; Okuno, Kiyotaka; Sukegawa, Yasushi

    2013-11-01

    Complementary DNA( cDNA) microarray technology coupled with laser microdissection has been used to identify human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A24-restricted epitope peptides as potential targets for cancer vaccination in colorectal cancer patients. These antigenic peptides were derived from 2 different cancer-testis antigens, ring finger protein 43 (RNF43) and translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 34( TOMM34). We conducted a clinical trial of colorectal cancer-specific peptide( RNF43, TOMM34) vaccines with uracil/tegafur( UFT)+Leucovorin( LV) for the treatment of advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. The vaccinations were well tolerated without any serious adverse events. There were long-term survivors in the group showing cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses against both RNF43 and TOMM34, as well as in the group showing CTL responses against either RNF43 or TOMM34. A new study has been planned to obtain more immunological responses. We started a clinical trial of vaccines against multiple peptides (RNF43, TOMM34, forkhead box protein M1 [FOXM1], maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase [MELK], holliday junction recognition protein[HJURP], vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1[VEGFR1], and VEGFR2) for the treatment of advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. PMID:24393856

  4. Combination Chemotherapy Plus Filgrastim in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-27

    Bladder Cancer; Breast Cancer; Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Esophageal Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Lung Cancer; Melanoma (Skin); Ovarian Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Sarcoma

  5. Preoperative treatment with radiochemotherapy for locally advanced gastroesophageal junction cancer and unresectable locally advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ratosa, Ivica; Oblak, Irena; Anderluh, Franc; Velenik, Vaneja; But-Hadzic, Jasna; Ermenc, Ajra Secerov; Jeromen, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background. To purpose of the study was to analyze the results of preoperative radiochemotherapy in patients with unresectable gastric or locoregionally advanced gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer treated at a single institution. Patients and methods. Between 1/2004 and 6/2012, 90 patients with locoregionally advanced GEJ or unresectable gastric cancer were treated with preoperative radiochemotherapy at the Institute of Oncology Ljubljana. Planned treatment schedule consisted of induction chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin, followed by concomitant radiochemotherapy four weeks later. Three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy was delivered by dual energy (6 and 15 MV) linear accelerator in 25 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy in 5 weeks with two additional cycles of chemotherapy repeated every 28 days. Surgery was performed 4–6 weeks after completing radiochemotherapy. Following the surgery, multidisciplinary advisory team reassessed patients for the need of adjuvant chemotherapy. The primary endpoints were histopathological R0 resection rate and pathological response rate. The secondary endpoints were toxicity of preoperative radiochemotherapy and survival. Results. Treatment with preoperative radiochemotherapy was completed according to the protocol in 84 of 90 patients (93.3%). Twenty patients (22.2%) did not undergo the surgery because of the disease progression, serious comorbidity, poor performance status or still unresectable tumour. In 13 patients (14.4%) only exploration was performed because the tumour was assessed as unresectable or diffuse peritoneal carcinomatosis was established. Fifty-seven patients (63.4%) underwent surgery with the aim of complete removal of the tumour. Radical resection was achieved in 50 (55.6%) patients and the remaining seven (7.8%) patients underwent non-radical surgery (R1 in five and R2 in two patients). In this group of patients (n = 57), pathological complete response of tumour was achieved in five

  6. Improving Goals of Care Discussion in Advanced Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Primary Stage IV Hepatobiliary; Esophageal; Colorectal Cancer; Glioblastoma; Cancer of Stomach; Cancer of Pancreas; Melanoma; Head or Neck Cancer; Stage III; Stage IV; Lung Cancers; Pancreatic Cancers

  7. Ondansetron in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer and Chronic Nausea and Vomiting Not Caused by Cancer Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-01

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Nausea and Vomiting; Precancerous Condition; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  8. Advances in target therapy in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sculier, Jean-Paul; Berghmans, Thierry; Meert, Anne-Pascale

    2015-03-01

    Herein, we have reviewed and analysed recent literature, published in 2013 and early 2014, in the context of pre-existing data. Considered target therapies were tyrosine kinase inhibitors of active epidermal growth factor receptor mutations (e.g. erlotinib, gefinitib and afatinib), anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangements (e.g. crizotinib) or angiogenesis (drugs under development), or monoclonal antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor (e.g. bevacizumab) or epidermal growth factor receptors (e.g. cetuximab). The therapeutic project has to consider tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the case of nonsmall cell lung cancer with active epidermal growth factor receptor mutations or anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement. However, these drugs should not be used in the absence of the targeted genetic abnormalities. PMID:25726551

  9. [Palliative surgery for malignant bowel obstruction in patients with advanced and recurrent gastroenterological cancer].

    PubMed

    Kitani, Kotaro; Yukawa, Masao; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Tsujie, Masanori; Hara, Joji; Ikeda, Mitsunori; Sato, Katsuaki; Isono, Sayuri; Kawai, Kenji; Miura, Ken; Watatani, Masahiro; Inoue, Masatoshi

    2013-11-01

    We report the outcomes of palliative surgery for the treatment of malignant bowel obstruction in patients with advanced gastroenterological cancer. We studied 20 patients who had undergone palliative surgery over 3 years. We analyzed the clinical findings, surgical procedure, postoperative clinical course, and prognosis. The origin of the patients was colorectal cancer( 9 cases), gastric cancer( 4 cases), uterine cancer( 3 cases), pancreatic cancer( 2 cases), bladder( 1 case), and anal cancer (1 case). Small bowel obstruction was noted in 8 cases and colorectal obstruction was noted in 14 cases. Colostomy was performed in 13 cases, resection and reconstruction were performed in 6 cases, and bypass was performed in 4 cases. Ninety percent of the patients were able to eat solid food following the surgery, but 20% of the patients were forced to have bowel obstruction. The median survival time after palliative surgery was 3 (range, 0-15) months, and 6 patients (30%) died within 2 months. We concluded that palliative surgery for the treatment of malignant bowel obstruction could improve the patients' quality of life. The decision for performing palliative surgery should be made while considering the patient's prognosis, wishes, and potential for symptom improvement. PMID:24393893

  10. Advances in solid-phase extraction disks for environmental chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Snavely, K.

    2000-01-01

    The development of solid-phase extraction (SPE) for environmental chemistry has progressed significantly over the last decade to include a number of new sorbents and new approaches to SPE. One SPE approach in particular, the SPE disk, has greatly reduced or eliminated the use of chlorinated solvents for the analysis of trace organic compounds. This article discusses the use and applicability of various SPE disks, including micro-sized disks, prior to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of trace organic compounds in water. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  11. Advances in open-cycle solid desiccant cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, T R; Maclaine-cross, I

    1985-05-01

    Of the solar cooling options available open cycle solid desiccant cooling looks very promising. A brief review of the experimental and analytical efforts to date shows that within the last 10 years thermal performance has doubled. Research centers have been developed to explore new materials and geometry options and to improve and validate mathematical models that can be used by design engineers to develop new product lines. Typical results from the Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) Desiccant Cooling Research Program are shown. Innovative ideas for new cycles and spinoff benefits provide incentives to continue research in this promising field.

  12. ASRM subscale plume deflector testing. [advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Freddie, III; Dawson, Michael C.; Orlin, Peter A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the scale model (1/22) testing of candidate refractory materials to be used as surface coatings for a solid rocket motor plume deflector structure. Five ROM tests were conducted to acquire data to support the selection, thickness determination, and placement of the materials. All data acquisition was achieved through nonintrusive methods. The tests demonstrated that little or no reductions in performance of the full-scale deflector would be experienced if the most economical materials were selected for construction.

  13. Advances in sputtered and ion plated solid film lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1985-01-01

    The glow discharge or ion assisted vacuum deposition techniques, primarily sputtering and ion plating, have rapidly emerged and offer great potential to deposit solid lubricants. The increased energizing of these deposition processes lead to improved adherence and coherence, favorable morphological growth, higher density, and reduced residual stresses in the film. These techniques are of invaluable importance where high precision machines tribo-components require very thin, uniform lubricating films (0.2 m), which do not interface with component tolerances. The performance of sputtered MoS2 films and ion plated Au and Pb films are described in terms of film thickness, coefficient of friction, and wear lives.

  14. Psychological distress in parents of children with advanced cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Abby R; Dussel, Veronica; Kang, Tammy; Geyer, J. Russel; Gerhardt, Cynthia A; Feudtner, Chris; Wolfe, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe the prevalence and factors of psychological distress (PD) among parents of children with advanced cancer. Design Cohort study embedded within a randomized clinical trial (Pediatric Quality of Life and Evaluation of Symptoms Technology [PediQUEST] study). Setting Multicenter study conducted at three children’s hospitals (Boston Children’s Hospital, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Seattle Children’s Hospital). Participants Parents of children with advanced (progressive, recurrent, or refractory) cancer Outcome Measure Parental PD, as measured by the Kessler-6 (K6) general psychological distress scale. Results 86 of 104 parents completed the Survey about Caring for Children with Cancer (SCCC, 83% participation); 81 parents had complete K6 data. Over 50% of parents reported high PD and 16% met criteria for serious PD (compared to US prevalence of 2–3%). Parent perceptions of prognosis, goals of therapy, child symptoms/suffering, and financial hardship were associated with PD. In multivariate analyses, average parent K6 scores were higher among parents who believed their child was suffering highly and who reported great economic hardship. Conversely, PD was significantly lower among parents whose prognostic understanding was aligned with concrete goals of care. Conclusions Parenting a child with advanced cancer is strongly associated with high to severe levels of PD. Interventions aimed at aligning prognostic understanding with concrete care goals, and easing child suffering and financial hardship may mitigate parental PD. PMID:23545569

  15. Economic Impact of Advanced Pediatric Cancer on Families

    PubMed Central

    Bona, Kira; Dussel, Veronica; Orellana, Liliana; Kang, Tammy; Geyer, Russ; Feudtner, Chris; Wolfe, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Context Despite emerging evidence of substantial financial distress in families of children with complex illness, little is known about economic hardship in families of children with advanced cancer. Objectives To describe perceived financial hardship, work disruptions, income losses and associated economic impact in families of children with advanced cancer stratified by federal poverty level (FPL). Methods This is a cross-sectional survey of 86 parents of children with progressive, recurrent or non-responsive cancer at three children’s hospitals. Seventy-one families with complete income data (82%) are included in this analysis. Results Parental work disruptions were prevalent across all income levels, with 67 (94%) families reporting some disruption. At least one parent quit a job because of the child’s illness in 29 (42%) families. Nineteen (27%) families described their child’s illness as a great economic hardship. Income losses due to work disruptions were substantial for all families; families at or below 200% FPL, however, were disproportionately affected. Six (50%) of the poorest families lost more than 40% of their annual income as compared with two (5%) of the wealthiest families (P=0.006). As a result of income losses, nine (15%) previously non-poor families fell from above to below the 200% FPL. Conclusion The economic impact of pediatric advanced cancer on families is significant at all income levels, although poorer families suffer disproportionate losses. Development of ameliorative intervention strategies is warranted. PMID:23870843

  16. Advances in Breast Cancer: Pathways to Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Grushko, Tatyana A.; Nanda, Rita; Huo, Dezheng

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex disease caused by the progressive accumulation of multiple gene mutations combined with epigenetic dysregulation of critical genes and protein pathways. There is substantial interindividual variability in both the age at diagnosis and phenotypic expression of the disease. With an estimated 1,152,161 new breast cancer cases diagnosed worldwide per year, cancer control efforts in the postgenome era should be focused at both population and individual levels to develop novel risk assessment and treatment strategies that will further reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. The discovery that mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers has radically transformed our understanding of the genetic basis of breast cancer, leading to improved management of high-risk women. A better understanding of tumor host biology has led to improvements in the multidisciplinary management of breast cancer, and traditional pathologic evaluation is being complemented by more sophisticated genomic approaches. A number of genomic biomarkers have been developed for clinical use, and increasingly, pharmacogenetic end points are being incorporated into clinical trial design. For women diagnosed with breast cancer, prognostic or predictive information is most useful when coupled with targeted therapeutic approaches, very few of which exist for women with triple-negative breast cancer or those with tumors resistant to chemotherapy. The immediate challenge is to learn how to use the molecular characteristics of an individual and their tumor to improve detection and treatment, and ultimately to prevent the development of breast cancer. The five articles in this edition of CCR Focus highlight recent advances and future directions on the pathway to individualized approaches for the early detection, treatment, and prevention of breast cancer. PMID:19088015

  17. Solid State Ionics Advanced Materials for Emerging Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdari, B. V. R.; Careem, M. A.; Dissanayake, M. A. K. L.; Rajapakse, R. M. G.; Seneviratne, V. A.

    2006-06-01

    Keynote lecture. Challenges and opportunities of solid state ionic devices / W. Weppner -- pt. I. Ionically conducting inorganic solids. Invited papers. Multinuclear NMR studies of mass transport of phosphoric acid in water / J. R. P. Jayakody ... [et al.]. Crystalline glassy and polymeric electrolytes: similarities and differences in ionic transport mechanisms / J.-L. Souquet. 30 years of NMR/NQR experiments in solid electrolytes / D. Brinkmann. Analysis of conductivity and NMR measurements in Li[symbol]La[symbol]TiO[symbol] fast Li[symbol] ionic conductor: evidence for correlated Li[symbol] motion / O. Bohnké ... [et al.]. Transport pathways for ions in disordered solids from bond valence mismatch landscapes / S. Adams. Proton conductivity in condensed phases of water: implications on linear and ball lightning / K. Tennakone -- Contributed papers. Proton transport in nanocrystalline bioceramic materials: an investigative study of synthetic bone with that of natural bone / H. Jena, B. Rambabu. Synthesis and properties of the nanostructured fast ionic conductor Li[symbol]La[symbol]TiO[symbol] / Q. N. Pham ... [et al.]. Hydrogen production: ceramic materials for high temperature water electrolysis / A. Hammou. Influence of the sintering temperature on pH sensor ability of Li[symbol]La[symbol]TiO[symbol]. Relationship between potentiometric and impedance spectroscopy measurements / Q. N. Pham ... [et al.]. Microstructure chracterization and ionic conductivity of nano-sized CeO[symbol]-Sm[symbol]O[symbol] system (x=0.05 - 0.2) prepared by combustion route / K. Singh, S. A. Acharya, S. S. Bhoga. Red soil in Northern Sri Lanka is a natural magnetic ceramic / K. Ahilan ... [et al.]. Neutron scattering of LiNiO[symbol] / K. Basar ... [et al.]. Preparation and properties of LiFePO[symbol] nanorods / L. Q. Mai ... [et al.]. Structural and electrochemical properties of monoclinic and othorhombic MoO[symbol] phases / O. M. Hussain ... [et al.]. Preparation of Zircon (Zr

  18. Secondary solid cancers after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation using busulfan-cyclophosphamide conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Brazauskas, Ruta; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Sobecks, Ronald M.; Wang, Zhiwei; Horowitz, Mary M.; Bolwell, Brian; Wingard, John R.; Socie, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Risks of secondary solid cancers among allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients who receive conditioning without total body irradiation are not well known. We evaluated the incidence and risk factors for solid cancers after HCT using high-dose busulfan-cyclophosphamide conditioning in 4318 recipients of first allogeneic HCT for acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission (N = 1742) and chronic myeloid leukemia in first chronic phase (N = 2576). Our cohort represented 22 041 person-years at risk. Sixty-six solid cancers were reported at a median of 6 years after HCT. The cumulative-incidence of solid cancers at 5 and 10 years after HCT was 0.6% and 1.2% among acute myeloid leukemia and 0.9% and 2.4% among chronic myeloid leukemia patients. In comparison to general population incidence rates, HCT recipients had 1.4× higher than expected rate of invasive solid cancers (95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.79, P = .01). Significantly elevated risks were observed for tumors of the oral cavity, esophagus, lung, soft tissue, and brain. Chronic graft-versus-host disease was an independent risk factor for all solid cancers, and especially cancers of the oral cavity. Recipients of allogeneic HCT using busulfan-cyclophosphamide conditioning are at risk for developing solid cancers. Their incidence continues to increase with time, and lifelong cancer surveillance is warranted in this population. PMID:20926773

  19. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of advanced energy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, George D.

    In order to better understand the physical electrochemical changes that take place in lithium ion batteries and asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been useful to probe and identify changes on the atomic and molecular level. NMR is used to characterize the local environment and investigate the dynamical properties of materials used in electrochemical storage devices (ESD). NMR investigations was used to better understand the chemical composition of the solid electrolyte interphase which form on the negative and positive electrodes of lithium batteries as well as identify the breakdown products that occur in the operation of the asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors. The use of nano-structured particles in the development of new materials causes changes in the electrical, structural and other material properties. NMR was used to investigate the affects of fluorinated and non fluorinated single wall nanotubes (SWNT). In this thesis three experiments were performed using solid state NMR samples to better characterize them. The electrochemical reactions of a lithium ion battery determine its operational profile. Numerous means have been employed to enhance battery cycle life and operating temperature range. One primary means is the choice and makeup of the electrolyte. This study focuses on the characteristics of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that is formed on the electrodes surface during the charge discharge cycle. The electrolyte in this study was altered with several additives in order to determine the influence of the additives on SEI formation as well as the intercalation and de-intercalation of lithium ions in the electrodes. 7Li NMR studies where used to characterize the SEI and its composition. Solid state NMR studies of the carbon enriched acetonitrile electrolyte in a nonaqueous asymmetric hybrid supercapacitor were performed. Magic angle spinning (MAS) coupled with cross polarization NMR

  20. Proton beam therapy for locally advanced lung cancer: A review

    PubMed Central

    Schild, Steven E; Rule, William G; Ashman, Jonathan B; Vora, Sujay A; Keole, Sameer; Anand, Aman; Liu, Wei; Bues, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Protons interact with human tissue differently than do photons and these differences can be exploited in an attempt to improve the care of lung cancer patients. This review examines proton beam therapy (PBT) as a component of a combined modality program for locally advanced lung cancers. It was specifically written for the non-radiation oncologist who desires greater understanding of this newer treatment modality. This review describes and compares photon (X-ray) radiotherapy (XRT) to PBT. The physical differences of these beams are described and the clinical literature is reviewed. Protons can be used to create treatment plans delivering significantly lower doses of radiation to the adjacent organs at risk (lungs, esophagus, and bone marrow) than photons. Clinically, PBT combined with chemotherapy has resulted in low rates of toxicity compared to XRT. Early results suggest a possible improvement in survival. The clinical results of proton therapy in lung cancer patients reveal relatively low rates of toxicity and possible survival benefits. One randomized study is being performed and another is planned to clarify the clinical differences in patient outcome for PBT compared to XRT. Along with the development of better systemic therapy, newer forms of radiotherapy such as PBT should positively impact the care of lung cancer patients. This review provides the reader with the current status of this new technology in treating locally advanced lung cancer. PMID:25302161

  1. Safety, Tolerability & Potential Anti-cancer Activity of Increasing Doses of AZD5363 in Different Treatment Schedules

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Advanced Solid Malignancy; Safety and Tolerability; Pharmacokinetics; Pharmacodynamics; Tumour Response; Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Cervical Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; PIK3CA; AKT1; PTEN; ER+; HER2+

  2. Advances in Solid State Joining of High Temperature Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeff; Schneider, Judy; Walker, Bryant

    2011-01-01

    Many of the metals used in the oil and gas industry are difficult to fusion weld including titanium and its alloys. Thus solid state joining processes, such as friction stir welding (FSWing) and a patented modification termed thermal stir welding (TSWing), are being pursued as alternatives to produce robust structures more amenable to high pressure applications. Unlike the FSWing process where the tool is used to heat the workpiece, TSWing utilizes an induction coil to preheat the material prior to stirring thus minimizing the burden on the weld tool and thereby extending its life. This study reports on the initial results of using a hybrid (H)-TSW process to join commercially pure, 1.3cm thick panels of titanium (CP Ti) Grade 2.

  3. Solid State Ionics Advanced Materials for Emerging Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdari, B. V. R.; Careem, M. A.; Dissanayake, M. A. K. L.; Rajapakse, R. M. G.; Seneviratne, V. A.

    2006-06-01

    Keynote lecture. Challenges and opportunities of solid state ionic devices / W. Weppner -- pt. I. Ionically conducting inorganic solids. Invited papers. Multinuclear NMR studies of mass transport of phosphoric acid in water / J. R. P. Jayakody ... [et al.]. Crystalline glassy and polymeric electrolytes: similarities and differences in ionic transport mechanisms / J.-L. Souquet. 30 years of NMR/NQR experiments in solid electrolytes / D. Brinkmann. Analysis of conductivity and NMR measurements in Li[symbol]La[symbol]TiO[symbol] fast Li[symbol] ionic conductor: evidence for correlated Li[symbol] motion / O. Bohnké ... [et al.]. Transport pathways for ions in disordered solids from bond valence mismatch landscapes / S. Adams. Proton conductivity in condensed phases of water: implications on linear and ball lightning / K. Tennakone -- Contributed papers. Proton transport in nanocrystalline bioceramic materials: an investigative study of synthetic bone with that of natural bone / H. Jena, B. Rambabu. Synthesis and properties of the nanostructured fast ionic conductor Li[symbol]La[symbol]TiO[symbol] / Q. N. Pham ... [et al.]. Hydrogen production: ceramic materials for high temperature water electrolysis / A. Hammou. Influence of the sintering temperature on pH sensor ability of Li[symbol]La[symbol]TiO[symbol]. Relationship between potentiometric and impedance spectroscopy measurements / Q. N. Pham ... [et al.]. Microstructure chracterization and ionic conductivity of nano-sized CeO[symbol]-Sm[symbol]O[symbol] system (x=0.05 - 0.2) prepared by combustion route / K. Singh, S. A. Acharya, S. S. Bhoga. Red soil in Northern Sri Lanka is a natural magnetic ceramic / K. Ahilan ... [et al.]. Neutron scattering of LiNiO[symbol] / K. Basar ... [et al.]. Preparation and properties of LiFePO[symbol] nanorods / L. Q. Mai ... [et al.]. Structural and electrochemical properties of monoclinic and othorhombic MoO[symbol] phases / O. M. Hussain ... [et al.]. Preparation of Zircon (Zr

  4. Drugs for solid cancer: the productivity crisis prompts a rethink

    PubMed Central

    Rösel, Daniel; Brábek, Jan; Veselý, Pavel; Fernandes, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Despite remarkable progress in cancer-drug discovery, the delivery of novel, safe, and sustainably effective products to the clinic has stalled. Using Src as a model, we examine key steps in drug development. The preclinical evidence on the relationship between Src and solid cancer is in sharp contrast with the modest anticancer effect noted in conventional clinical trials. Here, we consider Src inhibitors as an example of a promising drug class directed to invasion and metastasis and identify roadblocks in translation. We question the assumption that a drug-induced tumor shrinkage in preclinical and clinical studies predicts a successful outcome. Our analysis indicates that the key areas requiring attention are related, and include preclinical models (in vitro and mouse models), meaningful clinical trial end points, and an appreciation of the role of metastasis in morbidity and mortality. Current regulations do not reflect the natural history of the disease, and may be unrelated to the key complications: local invasion, metastasis, and the development of resistance. Alignment of preclinical and clinical studies and regulations based on mechanistic trial end points and platforms may help in overcoming these roadblocks. Viewed kaleidoscopically, most elements necessary and sufficient for a novel translational paradigm are in place. PMID:23836990

  5. A first-in-human study of AMG 208, an oral MET inhibitor, in adult patients with advanced solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hong, David S.; Rosen, Peter; Lockhart, A. Craig; Fu, Siqing; Janku, Filip; Kurzrock, Razelle; Khan, Rabia; Amore, Benny; Caudillo, Isaac; Deng, Hongjie; Hwang, Yuying C.; Loberg, Robert; Ngarmchamnanrith, Gataree; Beaupre, Darrin M.; Lee, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background This first-in-human study evaluated AMG 208, a small-molecule MET inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid tumors. Methods Three to nine patients were enrolled into one of seven AMG 208 dose cohorts (25, 50, 100, 150, 200, 300, and 400 mg). Patients received AMG 208 orally on days 1 and days 4–28 once daily. The primary objectives were to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of AMG 208. Results Fifty-four patients were enrolled. Six dose-limiting toxicities were observed: grade 3 increased aspartate aminotransferase (200 mg), grade 3 thrombocytopenia (200 mg), grade 4 acute myocardial infarction (300 mg), grade 3 prolonged QT (300 mg), and two cases of grade 3 hypertension (400 mg). The MTD was not reached. The most frequent grade ≥3 treatment-related adverse event was anemia (n = 3) followed by hypertension, prolonged QT, and thrombocytopenia (two patients each). AMG 208 exposure increased linearly with dose; mean plasma half-life estimates were 21.4–68.7 hours. One complete response (prostate cancer) and three partial responses (two in prostate cancer, one in kidney cancer) were observed. Conclusions In this study, AMG 208 had manageable toxicities and showed evidence of antitumor activity, particularly in prostate cancer. PMID:26155941

  6. High temperature solid lubricant materials for heavy duty and advanced heat engines

    SciTech Connect

    DellaCorte, C.; Wood, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature sterling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. The following paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis to heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

  7. High Temperature Solid Lubricant Materials for Heavy Duty and Advanced Heat Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, C.; Wood, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature Stirling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines, and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. This paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis on heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

  8. Advances in Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Raymond; White, Peter; Offer, John

    2016-01-01

    Today, Fmoc SPPS is the method of choice for peptide synthesis. Very-high-quality Fmoc building blocks are available at low cost because of the economies of scale arising from current multiton production of therapeutic peptides by Fmoc SPPS. Many modified derivatives are commercially available as Fmoc building blocks, making synthetic access to a broad range of peptide derivatives straightforward. The number of synthetic peptides entering clinical trials has grown continuously over the last decade, and recent advances in the Fmoc SPPS technology are a response to the growing demand from medicinal chemistry and pharmacology. Improvements are being continually reported for peptide quality, synthesis time and novel synthetic targets. Topical peptide research has contributed to a continuous improvement and expansion of Fmoc SPPS applications. PMID:26785684

  9. Advancing cancer control research in an emerging news media environment.

    PubMed

    Smith, Katherine C; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Blake, Kelly D; Cappella, Joseph N

    2013-12-01

    Cancer is both highly feared and highly newsworthy, and there is a robust body of research documenting the content and effects of cancer news coverage on health behaviors and policy. Recent years have witnessed ongoing, transformative shifts in American journalism alongside rapid advances in communication technology and the public information environment. These changes create a pressing need to consider a new set of research questions, sampling strategies, measurement techniques, and theories of media effects to ensure continued relevance and adaptation of communication research to address critical cancer control concerns. This paper begins by briefly reviewing what we know about the role of cancer news in shaping cancer-related beliefs, attitudes, behaviors, and policies. We then outline challenges and opportunities, both theoretical and methodological, posed by the rapidly changing news media environment and the nature of audience engagement. We organize our discussion around three major shifts associated with the emerging news media environment as it relates to health communication: 1) speed and dynamism of news diffusion, 2) increased narrowcasting of media content for specialized audiences, and 3) broadened participation in shaping media content. In so doing, we articulate a set of questions for future theory and research, in an effort to catalyze innovative communication scholarship to improve cancer prevention and control. PMID:24395988

  10. Recent Advances in Metabolic Profiling And Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa; Titus, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a metabolic disease. Cancer cells, being highly proliferative, show significant alterations in metabolic pathways such as glycolysis, respiration, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, lipid metabolism, and amino acid metabolism. Metabolites like peptides, nucleotides, products of glycolysis, the TCA cycle, fatty acids, and steroids can be an important read out of disease when characterized in biological samples such as tissues and body fluids like urine, serum, etc. The cancer metabolome has been studied since the 1960s by analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Current research is focused on the identification and validation of biomarkers in the cancer metabolome that can stratify high-risk patients and distinguish between benign and advanced metastatic forms of the disease. In this review, we discuss the current state of prostate cancer metabolomics, the biomarkers that show promise in distinguishing indolent from aggressive forms of the disease, the strengths and limitations of the analytical techniques being employed, and future applications of metabolomics in diagnostic imaging and personalized medicine of prostate cancer. PMID:25632377

  11. Molecular Targets of Isothiocyanates in Cancer: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Parul; Kim, Bonglee; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Srivastava, Sanjay K.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a multistep process resulting in uncontrolled cell division. It results from aberrant signaling pathways that lead to uninhibited cell division and growth. Various recent epidemiological studies have indicated that consumption of cruciferous vegetables such as garden cress, broccoli, etc., reduces the risk of cancer. Isothiocyanates (ITC) have been identified as major active constituents of cruciferous vegetables. ITCs occur in plants as glucosinolate and can readily be derived by hydrolysis. Numerous mechanistic studies have demonstrated the anti-cancer effects of ITCs in various cancer types. ITCs suppress tumor growth by generating reactive oxygen species or by inducing cycle arrest leading to apoptosis. Based on the exciting outcomes of pre-clinical studies, few ITCs have advanced to the clinical phase. Available data from pre-clinical as well as available clinical studies suggests ITCs to be one of the promising anti-cancer agents available from natural sources. This is an up-to-date exhaustive review on the preventive and therapeutic effects of ITCs in cancer. PMID:24510468

  12. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research. PMID:26925962

  13. Sequences and Combinations of Multifaceted Therapy In Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vaishampayan, Ulka

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Multiple agents with very distinct mechanisms of actions and unique toxicities and efficacies have become available for use in advanced prostate cancer. The next wave of investigations is focused on development of combinations and optimal sequences of the currently available agents. The focus of this review paper is to provide an update on clinical developments in advanced prostate cancer occurring within the past year, and to highlight the ongoing investigations of promising novel targets and compounds. Recent Findings The clinical use of enzalutamide prior to chemotherapy, demonstrated improvement in progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) as compared to placebo in metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). This report of the PREVAIL trial led to the FDA approval of this agent. Novel agents such as cabozantinib and custirsen that had shown promising results in phase II trials, revealed disappointing results in the phase III setting. The breakthrough report, of the ability of the ARV-7 mutation, detected in circulating tumor cells, to predict lack of response to abiraterone or enzalutamide, and the remarkable responses of poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in prostate cancer with BRCA1/2 mutations, have elevated hopes of a bright future in the biomarker driven therapeutic arena. Summary As the clinical application of the recently approved multifaceted therapies widens, trials addressing optimal sequences and combinations are gaining importance. In addition, exploring the utility of therapies in the hormone naïve or non-metastatic settings is an area of active investigation. Early use of available agents, optimal sequencing and aid of biomarkers to guide therapeutic choices will make the achievement of lifetime remissions in advanced prostate cancer a reachable goal. PMID:25811344

  14. Analysis of quasi-hybrid solid rocket booster concepts for advanced earth-to-orbit vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Rapp, Douglas C.

    1987-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the feasibility of quasi-hybrid solid rocket boosters for advanced Earth-to-orbit vehicles. Thermochemical calculations were conducted to determine the effect of liquid hydrogen addition, solids composition change plus liquid hydrogen addition, and the addition of an aluminum/liquid hydrogen slurry on the theoretical performance of a PBAN solid propellant rocket. The space shuttle solid rocket booster was used as a reference point. All three quasi-hybrid systems theoretically offer higher specific impulse when compared with the space shuttle solid rocket boosters. However, based on operational and safety considerations, the quasi-hybrid rocket is not a practical choice for near-term Earth-to-orbit booster applications. Safety and technology issues pertinent to quasi-hybrid rocket systems are discussed.

  15. Solid-Liquid Interface Characterization Hardware: Advanced Technology Development (ATD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N.; Sisk, R. C.; Sen, S.; Kaukler, W. F.; Curreri, Peter A.; Wang, F. C.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This ATD has the goal of enabling the integration of three separate measurement techniques to characterize the solid-liquid interface of directionally solidified materials in real-time. Arrays of film-based metal thermocouple elements are under development along with compact Seebeck furnaces suitable for interfacing with separately developed X-ray Transmission Microscopes. Results of applying film arrays to furnace profiling are shown, demonstrating their ability to identify a previously undetected hardware flaw in the development of a second-generation compact furnace. Results of real-time furnace profiling also confirmed that the compact furnace design effectively isolates the temperature profiles in two halves of the furnace, a necessary feature. This isolation had only been inferred previously from the characteristics of Seebeck data reported. Results from a 24-thermocouple array successfully monitoring heating and isothermal cooling of a tin sample are shown. The importance of non-intrusion by the arrays, as well as furnace design, on the profiling of temperature gradients is illustrated with example measurements. Further developments underway for effectively combining all three measurements are assessed in terms of improved x-ray transmission, increased magnification, integral arrays with minimum intrusion, integral scales for velocity measurements and other features being incorporated into the third generation Seebeck furnace under construction.

  16. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Young Seok; Kim, Mi-Sook; Yoo, Sung Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Yang, Kwang Mo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Choi, Chul Won; Lee, Dong Han; Kim, Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kang, Hye Jin; Kim, YoungHan

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical application of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost in locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients with a focus on local efficacy and toxicity. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients with locally advanced and nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer who had been treated between 2004 and 2006. Follow-up duration ranged from 4 to 41 months (median, 14.5 months). A total dose of 40 Gy was delivered in 20 fractions using a conventional three-field technique, and then a single fraction of 14, 15, 16, or 17 Gy SBRT was administered as a boost without a break. Twenty-one patients received chemotherapy. Overall and local progression-free survival were calculated and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: One-year overall survival and local progression-free survival rates were 60.0% and 70.2%, respectively. One patient (3%) developed Grade 4 toxicity. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 response was found to be an independent prognostic factor for survival. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that a SBRT boost provides a safe means of increasing radiation dose. Based on the results of this study, we recommend that a well controlled Phase II study be conducted on locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  17. Locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Looking beyond traditional chemotherapy and radiation.

    PubMed

    Savir, Guy; Huber, Kathryn E; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2013-07-01

    About a third of all pancreatic cancer is found to be locally advanced at the time of diagnosis, where the tumor is inoperable but remains localized to the pancreas and regional lymphatics. Sadly, this remains a universally deadly disease with progression to distant disease being the predominant mode of failure and average survival under one year. Optimal treatment of these patients continues to be an area of controversy, with chemotherapy alone being the treatment preference in Europe, and chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation in selected patients, preferred in the USA. The aim of this paper is to summarize the key abstracts presented at the 2013 ASCO Annual Meeting that address evolving approaches to the management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The late breaking abstract (#LBA4003) provided additional European data showing non-superiority of chemoradiation compared to chemotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients without distant progression following 4 months of chemotherapy. Another late breaking abstract, (#LBA4004), unfortunately showed a promising new complement to gemcitabine and capecitabine using immunotherapy in the form of a T-helper vaccine did not translate to improved survival in the phase III setting. PMID:23846922

  18. Role of primary surgery in advanced ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Münstedt, Karsten; Franke, Folker E

    2004-01-01

    Background Major issues in surgery for advanced ovarian cancer remain unresolved. Existing treatment guidelines are supported by a few published reports and fewer prospective randomized clinical trials. Methods We reviewed published reports on primary surgical treatment, surgical expertise, inadequate primary surgery/quality assurance, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, interval debulking, and surgical prognostic factors in advanced ovarian cancer to help resolve outstanding issues. Results The aim of primary surgery is a well-planned and complete intervention with optimal staging and surgery. Surgical debulking is worthwhile as there are further effective treatments available to control unresectable residual disease. Patients of gynecologic oncology specialist surgeons have better survival rates. This may reflect a working 'culture' rather than better technical skills. One major problem though, is that despite pleas to restrict surgery to experienced surgeons, specialist centers are often left to cope with the results of inadequate primary surgical resections. Patients with primary chemotherapy or those who have had suboptimal debulking may benefit from interval debulking. A proposal for a better classification of residual tumor is given. Conclusions Optimal surgical interventions have definite role to play in advanced ovarian cancers. Improvements in surgical treatment in the general population will probably improve patients' survival when coupled with improvements in current chemotherapeutic approaches. PMID:15461788

  19. [A Case of Isolated Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis from Advanced Gastric Cancer].

    PubMed

    Ji, Jung Geun; Chung, Joo Won; Nam, Seung Woo; Choi, Seung Kyu; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Dae In; Jeon, Byung Gwan; Shin, Yun Jae

    2016-08-25

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC) is rare metastatic form of gastric cancer. Most cases are diagnosed in the final stage after multiple distant metastasis. An 84-year-old woman was admitted with melena, headache and vomiting. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed an ulceroinfiltrating lesion at the stomach (Borrmann class III), and biopsy revealed a signet ring cell carcinoma. The abdominal-pelvic CT showed no evidence of metastasis. A sudden decrease of consciousness was noted, but the brain CT showed no active lesion while the brain MRI revealed enhancement of leptomeninges. A lumbar puncture was performed and the cerebrospinal fluid study revealed malignant neoplastic cells. With family consent, no further evaluation and treatment were administered and she died six weeks after the diagnosis of gastric cancer. We report an extremely rare case of a patient who initially presented with neurologic symptoms, and was diagnosed LMC from advanced gastric cancer without any evidence of metastasis in abdomen and pelvis. PMID:27554216

  20. A Review of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Wang, Ji; Ma, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Yan, Yanli; Xue, Chaofan; Hui, Beina; Liu, Rui; Ma, Hailin; Ren, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has become the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy not only can reduce tumor size and recurrence, but also increase the tumor resection rate and anus retention rate with very slight side effect. Comparing with preoperative chemotherapy, preoperative chemoradiotherapy can further reduce the local recurrence rate and downstage. Middle and low rectal cancers can benefit more from neoadjuvant chemradiotherapy than high rectal cancer. It needs to refine the selection of appropriate patients and irradiation modes for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Different therapeutic reactions to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy affect the type of surgical techniques, hence calling for the need of much attention. Furthermore, many problems such as accurate staging before surgery, selection of suitable neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy method, and sensitivity prediction to preoperative radiotherapy need to be well settled. PMID:27489505

  1. Quality of life and the treatment of advanced lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Plunkett, Tim A; Chrystal, Kathryn F; Harper, Peter G

    2003-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, with the majority of patients presenting with advanced disease. Despite the introduction of newer therapeutic agents and modest survival improvement, the overall prognosis for these patients is poor. The goals of therapy should therefore include improvement in quality of life (QOL), palliation of symptoms, and prolongation of survival. Quality of life has now become recognized as an important outcome measure for cancer therapy. Quality-of-life endpoints are being increasingly incorporated into clinical trials of newer agents to further define meaningful response. The assessment of QOL involves comprehensive measurement tools that address the physical, social, functional, and emotional well-being of the patient. Such measurements should be easy to use, meaningful, and relevant to the patients and clinician. Although these measures assess the longitudinal impact of treatment on QOL, pretreatment QOL scores may also be an important prognostic factor for survival in patients with lung carcinoma. This article reviews QOL measures and the data for QOL benefits from therapy in patients with advanced small-cell and non-small-cell lung cancer. PMID:14596700

  2. Advances in epigenetic biomarker research in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi; Kuang, Ye-Ye; Hu, Xiao-Tong

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) causes approximately 600000 deaths annually and is the third leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Despite significant advancements in treatment options, CRC patient survival is still poor owing to a lack of effective tools for early diagnosis and a limited capacity for optimal therapeutic decision making. Since there exists a need to find new biomarkers to improve diagnosis of CRC, the research on epigenetic biomarkers for molecular diagnostics encourages the translation of this field from the bench to clinical practice. Epigenetic alterations are thought to hold great promise as tumor biomarkers. In this review, we will primarily focus on recent advances in the study of epigenetic biomarkers for colorectal cancer and discuss epigenetic biomarkers, including DNA methylation, microRNA expression and histone modification, in cancer tissue, stool, plasma, serum, cell lines and xenografts. These studies have improved the chances that epigenetic biomarkers will find a place in the clinical practices of screening, early diagnosis, prognosis, therapy choice and recurrence surveillance for CRC patients. However, these studies have typically been small in size, and evaluation at a larger scale of well-controlled randomized clinical trials is the next step that is necessary to increase the quality of epigenetic biomarkers and ensure their widespread clinical use. PMID:24764665

  3. Requirement for a standardised definition of advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    DE SOL, ANGELO; TRASTULLI, STEFANO; GRASSI, VERONICA; CORSI, ALESSIA; BARILLARO, IVAN; BOCCOLINI, ANDREA; DI PATRIZI, MICOL SOLE; DI ROCCO, GIORGIO; SANTORO, ALBERTO; CIROCCHI, ROBERTO; BOSELLI, CARLO; REDLER, ADRIANO; NOYA, GIUSEPPE; KONG, SEONG-HO

    2014-01-01

    Each year, ~988,000 new cases of stomach cancer are reported worldwide. Uniformity for the definition of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) is required to ensure the improved management of patients. Various classifications do actually exist for gastric cancer, but the classification determined by lesion depth is extremely important, as it has been shown to correlate with patient prognosis; for example, early gastric cancer (EGC) has a favourable prognosis when compared with AGC. In the literature, the definition of EGC is clear, however, there is heterogeneity in the definition of AGC. In the current study, all parameters of the TNM classification for AGC reported in each previous study were individually analysed. It was necessary to perform a comprehensive systematic literature search of all previous studies that have reported a definition of ACG to guarantee homogeneity in the assessment of surgical outcome. It must be understood that the term ‘advanced gastric cancer’ may implicate a number of stages of disease, and studies must highlight the exact clinical TNM stages used for evaluation of the study. PMID:24348842

  4. Rhus verniciflua Stokes against Advanced Cancer: A Perspective from the Korean Integrative Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Woncheol; Jung, Hyunsik; Kim, Kyungsuk; Lee, Sookyung; Yoon, Seongwoo; Park, Jaehyun; Kim, Sehyun; Cheon, Seongha; Eo, Wankyo; Lee, Sanghun

    2012-01-01

    Active anticancer molecules have been searched from natural products; many drugs were developed from either natural products or their derivatives following the conventional pharmaceutical paradigm of drug discovery. However, the advances in the knowledge of cancer biology have led to personalized medicine using molecular-targeted agents which create new paradigm. Clinical benefit is dependent on individual biomarker and overall survival is prolonged through cytostatic rather than cytotoxic effects to cancer cell. Therefore, a different approach is needed from the single lead compound screening model based on cytotoxicity. In our experience, the Rhus verniciflua stoke (RVS) extract traditionally used for cancer treatment is beneficial to some advanced cancer patients though it is herbal extract not single compound, and low cytotoxic in vitro. The standardized RVS extract's action mechanisms as well as clinical outcomes are reviewed here. We hope that these preliminary results would stimulate different investigation in natural products from conventional chemicals. PMID:22174564

  5. Overcoming Drug Resistance and Treating Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Semenas, Julius; Allegrucci, Cinzia; Boorjian, Stephen A; Mongan, Nigel P; Persson, Jenny Liao

    2012-01-01

    Most of the prostate cancers (PCa) in advanced stage will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Within CRPC group, 50-70% of the patients will develop bone metastasis in axial and other regions of the skeleton. Once PCa cells spread to the bone, currently, no treatment regimens are available to eradicate the metastasis, and cancer-related death becomes inevitable. In 2012, it is estimated that there will be 28,170 PCa deaths in the United States. Thus, PCa bone metastasis-associated clinical complications and treatment resistance pose major clinical challenges. In this review, we will present recent findings on the molecular and cellular pathways that are responsible for bone metastasis of PCa. We will address several novel mechanisms with a focus on the role of bone and bone marrow microenvironment in promoting PCa metastasis, and will further discuss why prostate cancer cells preferentially metastasize to the bone. Additionally, we will discuss novel roles of several key pathways, including angiogenesis and extracellular matrix remodeling in bone marrow and stem cell niches with their relationship to PCa bone metastasis and poor treatment response. We will evaluate how various chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation therapies may allow aggressive PCa cells to gain advantageous mutations leading to increased survival and rendering the cancer cells to become resistant to treatment. The novel concept relating several key survival and invasion signaling pathways to stem cell niches and treatment resistance will be reviewed. Lastly, we will provide an update of several recently developed novel drug candidates that target metastatic cancer microenvironments or niches, and discuss the advantages and significance provided by such therapeutic approaches in pursuit of overcoming drug resistance and treating advanced PCa. PMID:22746994

  6. Advanced alternate planar geometry solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, S.; Prouse, D.; Khandkar, A.; Donelson, R.; Marianowski, L. )

    1992-11-01

    The potential of high temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells as high performance, high efficiency energy conversion device is well known. Investigation of several cell designs have been undertaken by various researchers to derive the maximum performance benefit from the device while maintaining a lower cost of production to meet the commercialization cost target. The present investigation focused on the planar SOFC design which allows for the use of mature low cost production processes to be employed. A novel design concept was investigated which allows for improvements in performance through increased interface stability, and lowering of cost through enhanced structural integrity and the use of low cost metal interconnects. The new cell design consisted of a co-sintered porous/dense/porous zirconia layer with the electrode material infiltrated into the porous layers. The two year program conducted by a team involving Ceramatec and the Institute of Gas Technology, culminated in a multi-cell stack test that exhibited high performance. Considerable progress was achieved in the selection of cell components, and establishing and optimizing the cell and stack fabrication parameters. It was shown that the stack components exhibited high conductivities and low creep at the operating temperature. The inter-cell resistive losses were shown to be small through out-of-cell characterization. The source of performance loss was identified to be the anode electrolyte interface. This loss however can be minimized by improving the anode infiltration technique. Manifolding and sealing of the planar devices posed considerable challenge. Even though the open circuit voltage was 250 mV/cell lower than theoretical, the two cell stack had a performance of 300 mA/cm[sup 2] at 0.4V/cell with an area specific resistance of 1 [Omega]-cm[sup 2]/cell. improvements in manifolding are expected to provide much higher performance.

  7. Advanced alternate planar geometry solid oxide fuel cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, S.; Prouse, D.; Khandkar, A.; Donelson, R.; Marianowski, L.

    1992-11-01

    The potential of high temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells as high performance, high efficiency energy conversion device is well known. Investigation of several cell designs have been undertaken by various researchers to derive the maximum performance benefit from the device while maintaining a lower cost of production to meet the commercialization cost target. The present investigation focused on the planar SOFC design which allows for the use of mature low cost production processes to be employed. A novel design concept was investigated which allows for improvements in performance through increased interface stability, and lowering of cost through enhanced structural integrity and the use of low cost metal interconnects. The new cell design consisted of a co-sintered porous/dense/porous zirconia layer with the electrode material infiltrated into the porous layers. The two year program conducted by a team involving Ceramatec and the Institute of Gas Technology, culminated in a multi-cell stack test that exhibited high performance. Considerable progress was achieved in the selection of cell components, and establishing and optimizing the cell and stack fabrication parameters. It was shown that the stack components exhibited high conductivities and low creep at the operating temperature. The inter-cell resistive losses were shown to be small through out-of-cell characterization. The source of performance loss was identified to be the anode electrolyte interface. This loss however can be minimized by improving the anode infiltration technique. Manifolding and sealing of the planar devices posed considerable challenge. Even though the open circuit voltage was 250 mV/cell lower than theoretical, the two cell stack had a performance of 300 mA/cm{sup 2} at 0.4V/cell with an area specific resistance of 1 {Omega}-cm{sup 2}/cell. improvements in manifolding are expected to provide much higher performance.

  8. Electrochemically Deposited Ceria Structures for Advanced Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Evan C.

    As the pursuit towards emissions reduction intensifies with growing interest and nascent technologies, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) remain an illustrious candidate for achieving our goals. Despite myriad advantages, SOFCs are still too costly for widespread deployment, even as unprecedented materials developments have recently emerged. This suggests that, in addition to informed materials selection, the necessary power output--and, thereby, cost-savings--gains must come from the fuel cell architecture. The work presented in this manuscript primarily investigates cathodic electrochemical deposition (CELD) as a scalable micro-/nanoscale fabrication tool for engineering ceria-based components in a SOFC assembly. Also, polymer sphere lithography was utilized to deposit fully connected, yet fully porous anti-dot metal films on yttira-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) with specific and knowable geometries, useful for mechanistic studies. Particular attention was given to anode structures, for which anti-dot metal films on YSZ served as composite substrates for subsequent CELD of doped ceria. By tuning the applied potential, a wide range of microstructures from high surface area coatings to planar, thin films was possible. In addition, definitive deposition was shown to occur on the electronically insulating YSZ surfaces, producing quality YSZ|ceria interfaces. These CELD ceria deposits exhibited promising electrochemical activity, as probed by A.C. Impedance Spectroscopy. In an effort to extend its usefulness as a SOFC fabrication tool, the CELD of ceria directly onto common SOFC cathode materials without a metallic phase was developed, as well as templated deposition schemes producing ceria nanowires and inverse opals.

  9. Advancing Techniques of Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sagar A; Wo, Jennifer Y; Hong, Theodore S

    2016-07-01

    Since the advent of radiation therapy for rectal cancer, there has been continual investigation of advancing technologies and techniques that allow for improved dose conformality to target structures while limiting irradiation of surrounding normal tissue. For locally advanced disease, intensity modulated and proton beam radiation therapy both provide more highly conformal treatment volumes that reduce dose to organs at risk, though the clinical benefit in terms of toxicity reduction is unclear. For early stage disease, endorectal contact therapy and high-dose rate brachytherapy may be a definitive treatment option for patients who are poor operative candidates or those with low-lying tumors that desire sphincter-preservation. Finally, there has been growing evidence that supports stereotactic body radiotherapy as a safe and effective salvage treatment for the minority of patients that locally recur following trimodality therapy for locally advanced disease. This review addresses these topics that remain areas of active clinical investigation. PMID:27238474

  10. Confocal microscopy of skin cancers: Translational advances toward clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in translational research in and technology for confocal microscopy of skin cancers, toward clinical applications, are described. Advances in translational research are in diagnosis of melanoma in vivo, pre-operative mapping of lentigo maligna melanoma margins to guide surgery and intra-operative imaging of residual basal cell carcinomas to guide shave-biopsy. Advances in technology include mosaicing microscopy for detection of basal cell carcinomas in large areas of excised tissue, toward rapid pathology-at-the-bedside, and development of small, simple and low-cost line-scanning confocal microscopes for worldwide use in diverse primary healthcare settings. Current limitations and future opportunities and challenges for both clinicians and technologists are discussed. PMID:19964286

  11. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and subsequent risk of solid cancer--A nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Ida; Basit, Saima; Jensen, Allan; Lykke, Jacob Alexander; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Kjær, Susanne K; Melbye, Mads; Boyd, Heather Allison

    2016-07-01

    Women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) have higher levels of antiangiogenic growth factors during pregnancy than women with normotensive pregnancies. Since angiogenesis is necessary for solid cancer growth and spread, we hypothesized that women with a history of HDP might have a reduced risk of solid cancers (cancers other than lymphomas, hematologic cancers and nonmelanoma skin cancers) later in life. In a register-based cohort study of 1.08 million women giving birth at least once between 1978 and 2011, we used Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) comparing solid cancer rates for women with and without a history of HDP. In this cohort, 68,236 women (6.3%) had ≥1 pregnancy complicated by HDP and 42,236 women (3.9%) developed solid tumors during follow-up. A history of HDP was not associated with a clinically meaningful reduction in the overall rate of solid cancer (HR 0.96, 95% confidence interval 0.92-1.00), regardless of HDP severity or time since HDP, nor was there a general tendency toward reduced solid cancer rates across organ sites. A history of HDP was only significantly associated with decreased rates of breast and lung cancers and with increased rates of endometrial and urinary tract cancers. Overall, our results do not support the hypothesis that women with a history of HDP have a reduced overall risk of solid cancer due to a persistent post-HDP antiangiogenic state or an innate tendency toward antiangiogenesis. Observed associations with specific cancers may instead be due to other pregnancy-related mechanisms or to residual/unmeasured confounding. PMID:26919086

  12. FAU in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-06

    Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  13. APN401 in Treating Patients With Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-07

    Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Melanoma; Stage IIIB Melanoma; Stage IIIC Melanoma; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  14. EMD 121974 in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-16

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Precancerous/Nonmalignant Condition; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  15. Advances in Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ellen; Mohammed, Shehla

    2016-01-01

    The ability to identify genetic mutations causing an increased risk of cancer represents the first widespread example of personalised medicine, in which genetic information is used to inform patients of their cancer risks and direct an appropriate strategy to minimise those risks. Increasingly, an understanding of the genetic basis of many cancers also facilitates selection of the most effective therapeutic options. The technology underlying genetic testing has been revolutionised in the years since the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2001. This has advanced knowledge of the genetic factors underlying familial cancer risk, and has also improved genetic testing capacity allowing a larger number of patients to be tested for a constitutional cancer predisposition. To use these tests safely and effectively, they must be assessed for their ability to provide accurate and useful results, and be requested and interpreted by health professionals with an understanding of their strengths and limitations. Genetic testing is increasing in its scope and ambition with each year that passes, requiring a greater proportion of the healthcare workforce to acquire a working knowledge of genetics and genetic testing to manage their patients safely and sensitively. PMID:27075345

  16. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer: recommendations of the St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) 2015.

    PubMed

    Gillessen, S; Omlin, A; Attard, G; de Bono, J S; Efstathiou, E; Fizazi, K; Halabi, S; Nelson, P S; Sartor, O; Smith, M R; Soule, H R; Akaza, H; Beer, T M; Beltran, H; Chinnaiyan, A M; Daugaard, G; Davis, I D; De Santis, M; Drake, C G; Eeles, R A; Fanti, S; Gleave, M E; Heidenreich, A; Hussain, M; James, N D; Lecouvet, F E; Logothetis, C J; Mastris, K; Nilsson, S; Oh, W K; Olmos, D; Padhani, A R; Parker, C; Rubin, M A; Schalken, J A; Scher, H I; Sella, A; Shore, N D; Small, E J; Sternberg, C N; Suzuki, H; Sweeney, C J; Tannock, I F; Tombal, B

    2015-08-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration-resistant prostate cancer and the recent studies of chemo-hormonal therapy in men with castration-naïve prostate cancer have led to considerable uncertainty as to the best treatment choices, sequence of treatment options and appropriate patient selection. Management recommendations based on expert opinion, and not based on a critical review of the available evidence, are presented. The various recommendations carried differing degrees of support, as reflected in the wording of the article text and in the detailed voting results recorded in supplementary Material, available at Annals of Oncology online. Detailed decisions on treatment as always will involve consideration of disease extent and location, prior treatments, host factors, patient preferences as well as logistical and economic constraints. Inclusion of men with APC in clinical trials should be encouraged. PMID:26041764

  17. Management of patients with advanced prostate cancer: recommendations of the St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) 2015

    PubMed Central

    Gillessen, S.; Omlin, A.; Attard, G.; de Bono, J. S.; Efstathiou, E.; Fizazi, K.; Halabi, S.; Nelson, P. S.; Sartor, O.; Smith, M. R.; Soule, H. R.; Akaza, H.; Beer, T. M.; Beltran, H.; Chinnaiyan, A. M.; Daugaard, G.; Davis, I. D.; De Santis, M.; Drake, C. G.; Eeles, R. A.; Fanti, S.; Gleave, M. E.; Heidenreich, A.; Hussain, M.; James, N. D.; Lecouvet, F. E.; Logothetis, C. J.; Mastris, K.; Nilsson, S.; Oh, W. K.; Olmos, D.; Padhani, A. R.; Parker, C.; Rubin, M. A.; Schalken, J. A.; Scher, H. I.; Sella, A.; Shore, N. D.; Small, E. J.; Sternberg, C. N.; Suzuki, H.; Sweeney, C. J.; Tannock, I. F.; Tombal, B.

    2015-01-01

    The first St Gallen Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) Expert Panel identified and reviewed the available evidence for the ten most important areas of controversy in advanced prostate cancer (APC) management. The successful registration of several drugs for castration-resistant prostate cancer and the recent studies of chemo-hormonal therapy in men with castration-naïve prostate cancer have led to considerable uncertainty as to the best treatment choices, sequence of treatment options and appropriate patient selection. Management recommendations based on expert opinion, and not based on a critical review of the available evidence, are presented. The various recommendations carried differing degrees of support, as reflected in the wording of the article text and in the detailed voting results recorded in supplementary Material, available at Annals of Oncology online. Detailed decisions on treatment as always will involve consideration of disease extent and location, prior treatments, host factors, patient preferences as well as logistical and economic constraints. Inclusion of men with APC in clinical trials should be encouraged. PMID:26041764

  18. Causal Attributions for Fatigue by Older Adults with Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Karolynn; Lekas, Helen-Maria; Maheshwari, Deepali

    2012-01-01

    Context Fatigue is a prevalent, debilitating and often disruptive symptom for cancer patients. Yet, it remains inadequately understood and managed, especially among late middle- aged and older patients with advanced disease. Few studies have explored fatigue qualitatively and almost none have focused on patients’ attributions for this subjective and multidimensional symptom. Objectives Our objectives were to: 1) examine the attributions patients 55 or older with advanced cancer made for their fatigue and how they arrived at these attributions; and 2) understand how patients’ attributions affect how they contend with fatigue, including communication with health care providers. Methods We conducted qualitative in-depth interviews with 35 patients 55 years of age or older on their experiences with fatigue. Patients had a variety of cancers and were at stages IV or late III of the disease. Interviews were thematically coded and analyzed. Results Two main themes emerged: 1) Cancer-related treatment was the master and often the sole attribution patients made for their fatigue. Patients making this attribution expressed certainty about its accuracy and seemed less distressed about the symptom. 2) Multiple causes of fatigue, typically a combination of cancer, treatment and non-threatening causes (e.g., older age, overexertion, or anemia), were also offered by some. Patients seemed to resist identifying disease severity as a cause and appeared motivated to normalize and minimize the symptom, thus decreasing its threatening impact. Conclusion Patients’ causal attributions for fatigue had a profound effect on their physical and psychological well-being, their communication with providers, and their integration of the symptom into their lives. PMID:22652133

  19. Cancer immunotherapy via combining oncolytic virotherapy with chemotherapy: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Guy R; Relph, Kate; Harrington, Kevin; Melcher, Alan; Pandha, Hardev

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are multifunctional anticancer agents with huge clinical potential, and have recently passed the randomized Phase III clinical trial hurdle. Both wild-type and engineered viruses have been selected for targeting of specific cancers, to elicit cytotoxicity, and also to generate antitumor immunity. Single-agent oncolytic virotherapy treatments have resulted in modest effects in the clinic. There is increasing interest in their combination with cytotoxic agents, radiotherapy and immune-checkpoint inhibitors. Similarly to oncolytic viruses, the benefits of chemotherapeutic agents may be that they induce systemic antitumor immunity through the induction of immunogenic cell death of cancer cells. Combining these two treatment modalities has to date resulted in significant potential in vitro and in vivo synergies through various mechanisms without any apparent additional toxicities. Chemotherapy has been and will continue to be integral to the management of advanced cancers. This review therefore focuses on the potential for a number of common cytotoxic agents to be combined with clinically relevant oncolytic viruses. In many cases, this combined approach has already advanced to the clinical trial arena.

  20. Cancer immunotherapy via combining oncolytic virotherapy with chemotherapy: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Guy R; Relph, Kate; Harrington, Kevin; Melcher, Alan; Pandha, Hardev

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are multifunctional anticancer agents with huge clinical potential, and have recently passed the randomized Phase III clinical trial hurdle. Both wild-type and engineered viruses have been selected for targeting of specific cancers, to elicit cytotoxicity, and also to generate antitumor immunity. Single-agent oncolytic virotherapy treatments have resulted in modest effects in the clinic. There is increasing interest in their combination with cytotoxic agents, radiotherapy and immune-checkpoint inhibitors. Similarly to oncolytic viruses, the benefits of chemotherapeutic agents may be that they induce systemic antitumor immunity through the induction of immunogenic cell death of cancer cells. Combining these two treatment modalities has to date resulted in significant potential in vitro and in vivo synergies through various mechanisms without any apparent additional toxicities. Chemotherapy has been and will continue to be integral to the management of advanced cancers. This review therefore focuses on the potential for a number of common cytotoxic agents to be combined with clinically relevant oncolytic viruses. In many cases, this combined approach has already advanced to the clinical trial arena. PMID:27579292

  1. Bioengineered models of solid human tumors for cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Marturano-Kruik, Alessandro; Villasante, Aranzazu; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Summary The lack of controllable in vitro models that can recapitulate the features of solid tumors such as Ewing’s sarcoma limits our understanding of the tumor initiation and progression and impedes the development of new therapies. Cancer research still relies of the use of simple cell culture, tumor spheroids, and small animals. Tissue-engineered tumor models are now being grown in vitro to mimic the actual tumors in patients. Recently, we have established a new protocol for bioengineering the Ewing’s sarcoma, by infusing tumor cell aggregates into the human bone engineered from the patient’s mesenchymal stem cells. The bone niche allows crosstalk between the tumor cells, osteoblasts and supporting cells of the bone, extracellular matrix and the tissue microenvironment. The bioreactor platform used in these experiments also allows the implementation of physiologically relevant mechanical signals. Here, we describe a method to build an in vitro model of Ewing’s sarcoma that mimics the key properties of the native tumor and provides the tissue context and physical regulatory signals. PMID:27115504

  2. A Trial for Patients With Advanced/Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2009-11-13

    Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Urogenital Neoplasms; Genital Neoplasms, Female; Uterine Neoplasms; Endometrial Neoplasms; Cancer of Endometrium; Endometrial Cancer; Cancer of the Endometrium; Endometrium Cancer; Neoplasms, Endometrial

  3. Phase I/II study of a short course of weekly cisplatin in patients with advanced solid tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Planting, A. S.; van der Burg, M. E.; de Boer-Dennert, M.; Stoter, G.; Verweij, J.

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with advanced solid tumours were entered in a phase I/II study of six, weekly cycles of cisplatin. Nineteen patients were chemonaive and six were previously treated. The starting dose was 50 mg m-2 week-1. This dose could be escalated without major toxicity to 70 mg m-2 week-1. At a dose of 80 mg m-2 myelosuppression grade 3 occurred as well as grade 1 nephro- and neurotoxicity. The maximum tolerated dose was 85 mg m-2 with dose limiting thrombocytopenia. Hypertonic saline was effective in preventing nephrotoxicity. Ondansetron was a very effective antiemetic in the first weeks of treatment but its efficacy waned later on. Responses were observed in head and neck cancer, melanoma and mesothelioma. At the dose level of 80 mg m-2 the optimal dose intensity was reached. This schedule will be tested further in phase II studies. PMID:8398709

  4. Current perspectives in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Valdespino, Victor; Tsagozis, Panagiotis; Pisa, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) continues to be an important world health problem for men. Patients with locally confined PC are treated with either radiotherapy or surgery. However, treatment of more advanced stages of the disease is problematic. Initially, androgen deprivation offers a period of clinical stability, which is however invariably followed by progression to non-responsiveness to hormonal manipulation. Current management of patients with androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC) displays modest response rates and achieves only short-term benefit. Recently, knowledge in the complex pathophysiology of advanced PC has led to the identification of mechanisms and target molecules permitting the introduction of new therapies. Consequently, many investigational treatments are ongoing for AIPC in Phase-II and Phase-III trials aiming at the combination of chemotherapeutic regimens along with immunotherapy targeting PC-associated antigens. Other attractive options are gene therapy, as well as the targeting of survival signaling, differentiation, and apoptosis of the malignant PC cells. Further treatment modalities are directed against the tumor microenvironment, bone metastasis, or both. Collectively, the aforementioned efforts introduce a new era in the management of advanced PC. Novel pharmaceutical compounds and innovative approaches, integrated into the concept of individualized therapy will hopefully, during the next decade, improve the outcome and survival for hundreds of thousands of men worldwide. PMID:17873302

  5. Photodynamic therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandanayake, N. S.; Huggett, M. T.; Bown, S. G.; Pogue, B. W.; Hasan, T.; Pereira, S. P.

    2010-02-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma ranks as the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the USA. Patients usually present late with advanced disease, limiting attempted curative surgery to 10% of cases. Overall prognosis is poor with one-year survival rates of less than 10% with palliative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Given these dismal results, a minimally invasive treatment capable of local destruction of tumor tissue with low morbidity may have a place in the treatment of this disease. In this paper we review the preclinical photodynamic therapy (PDT) studies which have shown that it is possible to achieve a zone of necrosis in normal pancreas and implanted tumour tissue. Side effects of treatment and evidence of a potential survival advantage are discussed. We describe the only published clinical study of pancreatic interstitial PDT, which was carried out by our group (Bown et al Gut 2002), in 16 patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. All patients had evidence of tumor necrosis on follow-up imaging, with a median survival from diagnosis of 12.5 months. Finally, we outline a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin single fibre PDT followed by standard gemcitabine chemotherapy which our group is currently undertaking in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Randomized controlled studies are also planned.

  6. Recent advances in active specific cancer vaccine treatment for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Kiyotaka; Sugiura, Fumiaki; Itoh, Kyogo; Yoshida, Koji; Tsunoda, Takuya; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2012-06-01

    Cloning techniques to identify genes and peptides of tumor-associated antigens have created new possibilities for the immunotherapy of patients with advanced cancer. Here, we review recent clinical trials of specific cancer vaccines, mainly HLA-restricted peptides, and epitope-encoding vectors for advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). Many researchers initially focused on carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as an immunologic target antigen that is overexpressed on virtually all CRCs. A recombinant vaccine containing the CEA gene and dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with CEA peptide was administered to patients with CEA-elevated CRC. Although CEA-specific responses were detected, the clinical responses were limited. Recently, new types of clinical trials--namely, a personalized protocol to take into account the immunological diversity of cytotoxic T cell responses among patients and a novel cancer-testis antigen protocol that uses multiple peptides derived from genes identified by the cDNA array method--have been introduced. The personalized protocol seemed to be better than the classical (non-personalized) protocol in terms of clinical response and survival. Novel cancer-testis antigen protocols that use multiple CRC-derived peptides were recently conducted in patients with advanced CRC. The preliminary study yielded promising results regarding specific T cell responses to peptides and survival benefits. In this review, we summarize these results and discuss future perspectives. PMID:22339221

  7. Integrative and complementary therapies for patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Lucille

    2014-07-01

    In integrative medicine, well-being is emphasized, and in palliative care, quality of life (QOL) is a similar concept or goal. Both can occur despite advanced cancer. Integrative medicine serves to combine the best of alternative, complementary and conventional therapies to optimize well-being and QOL, whether or not a person is at the end of their life. When integrative medicine is combined with palliative care modalities, the toolbox to provide symptom control and well-being or QOL is increased or broadened. Palliative care and integrative medicine are best provided early in the trajectory of illness such as cancer, and increase in amount as the illness progresses toward end of life. In cancer care, symptoms of the cancer, as well as symptoms produced by cancer therapies, are addressed with conventional and integrative therapies. Goals of care change as the disease progresses, and a patient's unique situation creates a different balance of integrative and conventional therapies. Integrative therapies such as music, aromatherapy, and massage might appeal to more patients than more specific, less common integrative therapies that might be more expensive, or seem more unusual such as Ayurvedic medicine and energy modalities. Each person may be drawn to different integrative modalities depending on factors such as cultural traditions, beliefs, lifestyle, internet information, advice from family and friends, books, etc. This review focuses on how integrative and complementary modalities can be included in comprehensive palliative care for patients with advanced malignancies. Nutrition and movement, often neglected in conventional treatment strategies, will also be included in the larger context of integrative and palliative modalities. Both conventional and integrative modalities in palliative care help patients live with empowerment, hope, and well-being no matter how long their lives last. A comprehensive review of all integrative and complementary therapies is

  8. Developing a common framework for integrated solid waste management advances in Managua, Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Olley, Jane E; IJgosse, Jeroen; Rudin, Victoria; Alabaster, Graham

    2014-09-01

    This article describes the municipal solid waste management system in Managua, Nicaragua. It updates an initial profile developed by the authors for the 2010 UN-HABITAT publication Solid Waste Management in the World's Cities and applies the methodology developed in that publication. In recent years, the municipality of Managua has been the beneficiary of a range of international cooperation projects aimed at improving municipal solid waste management in the city. The article describes how these technical assistance and infrastructure investments have changed the municipal solid waste management panorama in the city and analyses the sustainability of these changes. The article concludes that by working closely with the municipal government, the UN-HABITAT project Strengthening Capacities for Solid Waste Management in Managua was able to unite these separate efforts and situate them within a strategic framework to guide the evolution of the municipal solid waste management system in the forthcoming years. The creation of this multi-stakeholder platform allowed for the implementation of joint activities and ensured coherence in the products generated by the different projects. This approach could be replicated in other cities and in other sectors with similar effect. Developing a long term vision was essential for the advancement of municipal solid waste management in the city. Nevertheless, plan implementation may still be undermined by the pressures of the short term municipal administrative government, which emphasize operational over strategic investment. PMID:25236614

  9. Identification and characterization of RET fusions in advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Christopher R.; Seery, Tara; Sanford, Eric M.; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Stephens, Philip J.; Miller, Vincent A.; Ali, Siraj M.; Chiu, Vi K.

    2015-01-01

    There is an unmet clinical need for molecularly directed therapies available for metastatic colorectal cancer. Comprehensive genomic profiling has the potential to identify actionable genomic alterations in colorectal cancer. Through comprehensive genomic profiling we prospectively identified 6 RET fusion kinases, including two novel fusions of CCDC6-RET and NCOA4-RET, in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. RET fusion kinases represent a novel class of oncogenic driver in CRC and occurred at a 0.2% frequency without concurrent driver mutations, including KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA or other fusion tyrosine kinases. Multiple RET kinase inhibitors were cytotoxic to RET fusion kinase positive cancer cells and not RET fusion kinase negative CRC cells. The presence of a RET fusion kinase may identify a subset of metastatic CRC patients with a high response rate to RET kinase inhibition. This is the first characterization of RET fusions in CRC patients and highlights the therapeutic significance of prospective comprehensive genomic profiling in advanced CRC. PMID:26078337

  10. Identification and characterization of RET fusions in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Le Rolle, Anne-France; Klempner, Samuel J; Garrett, Christopher R; Seery, Tara; Sanford, Eric M; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Ross, Jeffrey S; Stephens, Philip J; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M; Chiu, Vi K

    2015-10-01

    There is an unmet clinical need for molecularly directed therapies available for metastatic colorectal cancer. Comprehensive genomic profiling has the potential to identify actionable genomic alterations in colorectal cancer. Through comprehensive genomic profiling we prospectively identified 6 RET fusion kinases, including two novel fusions of CCDC6-RET and NCOA4-RET, in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. RET fusion kinases represent a novel class of oncogenic driver in CRC and occurred at a 0.2% frequency without concurrent driver mutations, including KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA or other fusion tyrosine kinases. Multiple RET kinase inhibitors were cytotoxic to RET fusion kinase positive cancer cells and not RET fusion kinase negative CRC cells. The presence of a RET fusion kinase may identify a subset of metastatic CRC patients with a high response rate to RET kinase inhibition. This is the first characterization of RET fusions in CRC patients and highlights the therapeutic significance of prospective comprehensive genomic profiling in advanced CRC. PMID:26078337

  11. Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Cancer Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lovitt, Carrie J.; Shelper, Todd B.; Avery, Vicky M.

    2014-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are an integral part of drug discovery practices. However, modeling the complexity of cancer utilizing these cell lines on standard plastic substrata, does not accurately represent the tumor microenvironment. Research into developing advanced tumor cell culture models in a three-dimensional (3D) architecture that more prescisely characterizes the disease state have been undertaken by a number of laboratories around the world. These 3D cell culture models are particularly beneficial for investigating mechanistic processes and drug resistance in tumor cells. In addition, a range of molecular mechanisms deconstructed by studying cancer cells in 3D models suggest that tumor cells cultured in two-dimensional monolayer conditions do not respond to cancer therapeutics/compounds in a similar manner. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of utilizing 3D cell culture models in drug discovery programs; however, it is evident that further research is required for the development of more complex models that incorporate the majority of the cellular and physical properties of a tumor. PMID:24887773

  12. Solid cancer incidence other than lung, liver and bone in Mayak workers: 1948–2004

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, N; Kuznetsova, I S; Labutina, E V; Harrison, J D

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cancer incidence in the Mayak Production Association (PA) cohort was analysed to investigate for the first time whether external gamma-ray and internal plutonium exposure are associated with raised incidence of solid cancers other than lung, liver and bone (other solid cancers). Methods: The cohort includes 22 366 workers of both sexes who were first employed between 1948 and 1982. A total of 1447 cases of other solid cancers were registered in the follow-up period until 2004. The Poisson regression was used to estimate the excess relative risk (ERR) per unit of cumulative exposure to plutonium and external gamma-ray. Results: A weak association was found between cumulative exposure to external gamma-ray and the incidence of other solid cancers (ERR/Gy=0.07; 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 0.01–0.15), but this association lost its significance after adjusting for internal plutonium exposure. There was no indication of any association with plutonium exposure for other solid cancers. Among 16 individual cancer sites, there was a statistically significant association with external exposure for lip cancer (ERR/Gy=1.74; 95% CI: 0.37; 6.71) and with plutonium exposure for pancreatic cancer (ERR/Gy=1.58; 95% CI; 0.17; 4.77). Conclusion: This study of Mayak workers does not provide evidence of an increased risk of other solid cancers. The observed increase in the risk of cancer of the lip and pancreas should be treated with caution because of the limited amount of relevant data and because the observations may be simply due to chance. PMID:24022197

  13. Spinal analgesia for advanced cancer patients: an update.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Porzio, Giampiero; Gebbia, Vittorio

    2012-05-01

    In the nineties, spinal analgesia has been described as an useful means to control pain in advanced cancer patients. The aim of this review was to update this information with a systematic analysis of studies performed in the last 10 years. 27 papers pertinent with the topic selected for review were collected according to selection criteria. Few studies added further information on spinal analgesia in last decade. Despite a lack of a clinical evidence, spinal analgesia with a combination of opioids, principally morphine, and local anesthetics may allow to achieve analgesia in patients who had been intensively treated unsuccessfully with different trials of opioids. Some adjuvant drugs such as clonidine, ketamine, betamethasone, meperidine, and ziconotide may be promising agents, but several problems have to be solved before they can be used in the daily practice. In complex pain situations, spinal analgesia should not be negated to cancer patients, and oncologists should address this group of patients to other specialists. PMID:21684173

  14. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Gemcitabine for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Jain, Sanjay; Goldstein, Michael; Miksad, Rebecca; Pleskow, Douglas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Brennan, Darren M.D.; Callery, Mark; Vollmer, Charles

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis. Conventional concurrent chemoradiotherapy requires 6 weeks of daily treatment and can be arduous. We explored the safety and effectiveness of a 3-day course of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) followed by gemcitabine in this population. Patients and Methods: A total of 36 patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with {>=}12 months of follow-up were included. They received three fractions of 8, 10, or 12 Gy (total dose, 24-36 Gy) of SBRT according to the tumor location in relation to the stomach and duodenum, using fiducial-based respiratory motion tracking on a robotic radiosurgery system. The patients were then offered gemcitabine for 6 months or until tolerance or disease progression. Results: With an overall median follow-up of 24 months (range, 12-33), the local control rate was 78%, the median overall survival time was 14.3 months, the median carbohydrate antigen 19-9-determined progression-free survival time was 7.9 months, and the median computed tomography-determined progression-free survival time was 9.6 months. Of the 36 patients, 28 (78%) eventually developed distant metastases. Six patients (17%) were free of progression at the last follow-up visit (range, 13-30 months) as determined by normalized tumor markers with stable computed tomography findings. Nine Grade 2 (25%) and five Grade 3 (14%) toxicities attributable to SBRT occurred. Conclusion: Hypofractionated SBRT can be delivered quickly and effectively in patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with acceptable side effects and minimal interference with gemcitabine chemotherapy.

  15. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Male Breast Cancer; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Intraductal Carcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  16. [Certain aspects of neoadjuvant therapy of locally advanced breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Voznyĭ, E K; Gurov, S N; Dobrovol'skaia, N Iu

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a complex investigation of patients with locally-advanced breast cancer who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation at initial stage. The clinical and pathomorphological effects, nature of neoadjuvant therapy and number of courses were followed up for 5- and 10-year periods. A direct correlation was found between number of courses for chemotherapy-sensitive patients, on the one hand, and greater effect, more intensive medicinal pathomorphism and longer recurrence-free survival, particularly, at later stages, on the other. PMID:11826490

  17. [Maintenance therapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Saruwatari, Koichi; Yoh, Kiyotaka

    2014-08-01

    Maintenance therapy is a new treatment strategy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer(NSCLC), and it consists of switch maintenance and continuation maintenance.Switch maintenance is the introduction of a different drug, not included as part of the induction therapy, immediately after completion of 4 cycles of first-line platinum-based chemotherapy.Continuation maintenance is a continuation of at least one of the drugs used in the induction therapy in the absence of disease progression.Several phase III trials have reported survival benefits with continuation maintenance of pemetrexed and switch maintenance of pemetrexed or erlotinib.Therefore, maintenance therapy has become a part of the standard first-line treatment for advanced NSCLC.However, further research is needed to elucidate the selection criteria of patients who may benefit the most from maintenance therapy. PMID:25132023

  18. Improvements in diagnosis have changed the incidence of histological types in advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Y.; Mori, M.; Kamakura, T.; Haraguchi, Y.; Saku, M.; Sugimachi, K.

    1995-01-01

    The data on 912 patients with early cancer and 1245 with advanced cancer who were seen between 1971 and 1990 were compared. The incidence of undifferentiated-type cancer increased significantly in patients with advanced gastric cancer, but not in patients with early gastric cancer. When the histological types were compared with regard to sex, age and location in patients with early gastric cancer the undifferentiated type was found to increase only in males, while in patients with advanced gastric cancer the undifferentiated type increased in both sexes as well as in younger patients and in both the upper and middle third of the stomach. These differences in the trends between early and advanced cancers are probably due to the different degrees of diagnostic accuracy for the early detection of histological types. PMID:7640228

  19. Crizotinib Improves Progression-Free Survival in Some Patients with Advanced Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Crizotinib Improves Progression-Free Survival in Some Patients with Advanced Lung Cancer ( ... starting treatment without their disease getting worse (progression-free survival), as assessed by radiologic review. Results Progression- ...

  20. Advanced Solid State Pixel Detectors for Future High Energy X-ray Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Fiona

    We propose to advance the state of the art in solid state high energy X-ray pixel detectors for astrophysics. This program builds on advanced readout technology developed for suborbital and the NuSTAR space mission, and combines newly-developed CdTe PIN sensors and materials characterization techniques to achieve detectors broad band (1 - 200 keV), sub-keV energy resolution, and 300 micron spatial resolution. The low-noise readout technology will also be taken to the next generation with reduced pixel size, lower noise and significantly reduced dead time.

  1. Advances in inducing adaptive immunity using cell-based cancer vaccines: Clinical applications in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is on the rise, and the prognosis is extremely poor because PDA is highly aggressive and notoriously difficult to treat. Although gemcitabine- or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is typically offered as a standard of care, most patients do not survive longer than 1 year. Therefore, the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for patients with PDA is imperative. As PDA cells express numerous tumor-associated antigens that are suitable vaccine targets, one promising treatment approach is cancer vaccines. During the last few decades, cell-based cancer vaccines have offered encouraging results in preclinical studies. Cell-based cancer vaccines are mainly generated by presenting whole tumor cells or dendritic cells to cells of the immune system. In particular, several clinical trials have explored cell-based cancer vaccines as a promising therapeutic approach for patients with PDA. Moreover, chemotherapy and cancer vaccines can synergize to result in increased efficacies in patients with PDA. In this review, we will discuss both the effect of cell-based cancer vaccines and advances in terms of future strategies of cancer vaccines for the treatment of PDA patients. PMID:27182156

  2. Advances in inducing adaptive immunity using cell-based cancer vaccines: Clinical applications in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-14

    The incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is on the rise, and the prognosis is extremely poor because PDA is highly aggressive and notoriously difficult to treat. Although gemcitabine- or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is typically offered as a standard of care, most patients do not survive longer than 1 year. Therefore, the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for patients with PDA is imperative. As PDA cells express numerous tumor-associated antigens that are suitable vaccine targets, one promising treatment approach is cancer vaccines. During the last few decades, cell-based cancer vaccines have offered encouraging results in preclinical studies. Cell-based cancer vaccines are mainly generated by presenting whole tumor cells or dendritic cells to cells of the immune system. In particular, several clinical trials have explored cell-based cancer vaccines as a promising therapeutic approach for patients with PDA. Moreover, chemotherapy and cancer vaccines can synergize to result in increased efficacies in patients with PDA. In this review, we will discuss both the effect of cell-based cancer vaccines and advances in terms of future strategies of cancer vaccines for the treatment of PDA patients. PMID:27182156

  3. Risk of cancer in the vicinity of municipal solid waste incinerators: importance of using a flexible modelling strategy

    PubMed Central

    Goria, Sarah; Daniau, Côme; de Crouy-Chanel, Perrine; Empereur-Bissonnet, Pascal; Fabre, Pascal; Colonna, Marc; Duboudin, Cedric; Viel, Jean-François; Richardson, Sylvia

    2009-01-01

    Background We conducted an ecological study in four French administrative departments and highlighted an excess risk in cancer morbidity for residents around municipal solid waste incinerators. The aim of this paper is to show how important are advanced tools and statistical techniques to better assess weak associations between the risk of cancer and past environmental exposures. Methods The steps to evaluate the association between the risk of cancer and the exposure to incinerators, from the assessment of exposure to the definition of the confounding variables and the statistical analysis carried out are detailed and discussed. Dispersion modelling was used to assess exposure to sixteen incinerators. A geographical information system was developed to define an index of exposure at the IRIS level that is the geographical unit we considered. Population density, rural/urban status, socio-economic deprivation, exposure to air pollution from traffic and from other industries were considered as potential confounding factors and defined at the IRIS level. Generalized additive models and Bayesian hierarchical models were used to estimate the association between the risk of cancer and the index of exposure to incinerators accounting for the confounding factors. Results Modelling to assess the exposure to municipal solid waste incinerators allowed accounting for factors known to influence the exposure (meteorological data, point source characteristics, topography). The statistical models defined allowed modelling extra-Poisson variability and also non-linear relationships between the risk of cancer and the exposure to incinerators and the confounders. Conclusion In most epidemiological studies distance is still used as a proxy for exposure. This can lead to significant exposure misclassification. Additionally, in geographical correlation studies the non-linear relationships are usually not accounted for in the statistical analysis. In studies of weak associations it is

  4. Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Bladder Cancer; Breast Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Lung Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  5. Ignition transient modelling for the Space Shuttle Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagar, M. A.; Luke, G. D.; Stockham, L. W.

    1993-06-01

    Prediction of the ignition transient for the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) for the Space Shuttle presents an unusual set of modelling challenges because of its high length-to-diameter ratio and complex internal flow environment. A review of ignition modelling experience on the Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM), which is similar in size and configuration to the ASRM, reveals that classical igniter design theory and modelling methods under-predict, by a factor of two, the measured pressure and thrust rise rates experienced on the RSRM. This paper (1) reviews the Titan and Shuttle SRM test experience, (2) presents the results of 0-Dimensional (0-D) and 1-Dimensional (1-D) analysis of the RSRM and ASRM motors, and (3) addresses the need for advanced analysis techniques, as they relate to ASRM ignition transient modelling requirements and igniter design drivers.

  6. Advances of stereotactic body radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qichun; Yu, Wei; Rosati, Lauren M.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PCA) is one of the most aggressive tumors with few effective treatment modalities. It is the 4th and 7th leading cause of cancer death in the United States and China, respectively. At the time of diagnosis, only 20% of cases present with a resectable tumor, and about 40% with a locally advanced tumor that is considered unresectable. Even resected patients still have a poor prognosis, with an incidence of local recurrence ranging from 20% to 60%. It is also reported that up to 30% of PCA patients die from locally obstructive disease with few or no distant metastases. These findings have highlighted the importance of local radiation therapy in the treatment of PCA. As the role of conventional chemoradiotherapy remains controversial, the dawn of the pancreas stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) era represents a potential paradigm shift in the management of PCA. SBRT delivers a higher biological effective dose to the tumor with sharp dose escalation in a shorter treatment time course. Pancreas SBRT is a novel therapeutic option to achieve local tumor control with minimal toxicity. Herein, we review the advancement of SBRT for PCA patients with different stages of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:26361404

  7. Targeted therapy in Advanced Bladder cancer- what have we learned?

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Emmet; Iyer, Gopa

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis Urothelial carcinoma (UC) is the second most common genitourinary malignancy in the United States. In the metastatic setting, cisplatin-based chemotherapy results in a median overall survival (OS) of 12–15 months and remains the only standard of care for this disease. Despite advances in the treatment of other genitourinary malignancies, no novel therapies have been FDA-approved for UC in the last 20 years. To date, no clinical trials of targeted agents in UC have led to improvements in survival compared to cytotoxic therapy. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has detected numerous potentially actionable genetic alterations in bladder cancer, providing a roadmap for the use of small molecule inhibitors in this disease. Additionally, the advancement of Next Generation sequencing technologies within the past five years has allowed for rapid, deep sequencing to define the molecular profile of tumors in real time. In this chapter, we outline representative trials of targeted therapies in UC and discuss the significance of genetic pre-selection in trial design as a method to optimize responses to these agents, thus hopefully expanding the armamentarium of treatment options against this lethal disease. PMID:25882566

  8. A Study of CDX-1127 (Varlilumab) in Patients With Select Solid Tumor Types or Hematologic Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    CD27 Expressing B-cell Malignancies, (for Example: Hodgkin's Lymphoma,; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Burkett's Lymphoma,; Mantle Cell Lymphoma, Primary Lymphoma of the Central Nervous System,; Marginal Zone B Cell Lymphoma);; Any T-cell Malignancy;; Solid Tumors (Metastatic Melanoma, Renal (Clear) Cell Carcinoma,; Hormone-refractory Prostate Adenocarcinoma, Ovarian Cancer; Colorectal Adenocarcinoma, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer)

  9. The space shuttle advanced solid rocket motor: Quality control and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Congressional committees that authorize the activities of NASA requested that the National Research Council (NRC) review the testing and quality assurance programs for the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) program. The proposed ASRM design incorporates numerous features that are significant departures from the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). The NRC review concentrated mainly on these features. Primary among these are the steel case material, welding rather than pinning of case factory joints, a bolted field joint designed to close upon firing the rocket, continuous mixing and casting of the solid propellant in place of the current batch processes, use of asbestos-free insulation, and a lightweight nozzle. The committee's assessment of these and other features of the ASRM are presented in terms of their potential impact on flight safety.

  10. The role of surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cameán, María; Delgado-Sánchez, Elsa; Piñera, Antonio; Diestro, Maria Dolores; De Santiago, Javier; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the standard management of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer is correct surgical staging and optimal tumour cytoreduction followed by platinum and taxane-based chemotherapy. Standard surgical staging consists of peritoneal washings, total hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, inspection of all abdominal organs and the peritoneal surface, biopsies of suspicious areas or randomised biopsies if they are not present, omentectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. After this complete surgical staging, the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system for ovarian cancer is applied to determine the management and prognosis of the patient. Complete tumour cytoreduction has shown an improvement in survival. There are some criteria to predict cytoreduction outcomes based on serum biomarkers levels, preoperative imaging techniques, and laparoscopic-based scores. Optimised patient selection for primary cytoreduction would determine patients who could benefit from an optimal cytoreduction and might benefit from interval surgery. The administration of intraperitoneal chemotherapy after debulking surgery has shown an increase in progression-free survival and overall survival, especially in patients with no residual disease after surgery. It is considered that 3–17% of all epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) occur in young women that have not fulfilled their reproductive desires. In these patients, fertility-sparing surgery is a worthy option in early ovarian cancer. PMID:27594911

  11. The role of surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cameán, María; Delgado-Sánchez, Elsa; Piñera, Antonio; Diestro, Maria Dolores; De Santiago, Javier; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the standard management of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer is correct surgical staging and optimal tumour cytoreduction followed by platinum and taxane-based chemotherapy. Standard surgical staging consists of peritoneal washings, total hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, inspection of all abdominal organs and the peritoneal surface, biopsies of suspicious areas or randomised biopsies if they are not present, omentectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. After this complete surgical staging, the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system for ovarian cancer is applied to determine the management and prognosis of the patient. Complete tumour cytoreduction has shown an improvement in survival. There are some criteria to predict cytoreduction outcomes based on serum biomarkers levels, preoperative imaging techniques, and laparoscopic-based scores. Optimised patient selection for primary cytoreduction would determine patients who could benefit from an optimal cytoreduction and might benefit from interval surgery. The administration of intraperitoneal chemotherapy after debulking surgery has shown an increase in progression-free survival and overall survival, especially in patients with no residual disease after surgery. It is considered that 3-17% of all epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) occur in young women that have not fulfilled their reproductive desires. In these patients, fertility-sparing surgery is a worthy option in early ovarian cancer. PMID:27594911

  12. Meaning-centered group psychotherapy for patients with advanced cancer: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, William; Rosenfeld, Barry; Gibson, Christopher; Pessin, Hayley; Poppito, Shannon; Nelson, Christian; Tomarken, Alexis; Timm, Anne Kosinski; Berg, Amy; Jacobson, Colleen; Sorger, Brooke; Abbey, Jennifer; Olden, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives An increasingly important concern for clinicians who care for patients at the end of life is their spiritual well-being and sense of meaning and purpose in life. In response to the need for short-term interventions to address spiritual well-being, we developed Meaning Centered Group Psychotherapy (MCGP) to help patients with advanced cancer sustain or enhance a sense of meaning, peace and purpose in their lives, even as they approach the end of life. Methods Patients with advanced (stage III or IV) solid tumor cancers (N = 90) were randomly assigned to either MCGP or a supportive group psychotherapy (SGP). Patients were assessed before and after completing the 8-week intervention, and again 2 months after completion. Outcome assessment included measures of spiritual well-being, meaning, hopelessness, desire for death, optimism/pessimism, anxiety, depression and overall quality of life. Results MCGP resulted in significantly greater improvements in spiritual well-being and a sense of meaning. Treatment gains were even more substantial (based on effect size estimates) at the second follow-up assessment. Improvements in anxiety and desire for death were also significant (and increased over time). There was no significant improvement on any of these variables for patients participating in SGP. Conclusions MCGP appears to be a potentially beneficial intervention for patients’ emotional and spiritual suffering at the end of life. Further research, with larger samples, is clearly needed to better understand the potential benefits of this novel intervention. PMID:19274623

  13. FOREWORD: Conference on Advanced Metrology for Cancer Therapy 2011 Conference on Advanced Metrology for Cancer Therapy 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankerhold, Ulrike

    2012-10-01

    Although physical treatments play a central role in cancer therapy, SI-traceable metrology has only been established for some of them. Several forms of treatment currently used (particularly intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), hadron therapy, high-intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) and brachytherapy) suffer from the limited metrological support, which restricts the success of these techniques. Recognizing this deficit, the European Union identified metrology for health as one of the first four Targeted Programmes in the framework of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) running from 2008 to 2011. This programme included two EMRP projects addressing metrology for cancer therapy: project T2.J06 dealing with brachytherapy project T2.J07 dealing with external beam cancer therapy using ionizing radiation and high-intensity therapeutic ultrasound. Primary measurement standards applicable to modern treatment conditions were developed under both projects, together with measurement techniques which are meant as a basis for future protocols for dosimetry, treatment planning and monitoring. In order to provide a platform for the presentation of current developments in clinical measurement techniques for cancer therapy, together with the achievements of both projects, an international Conference on Advanced Metrology for Cancer Therapy (CAMCT) was held from 29 November to 1 December 2011 at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig, Germany. The main sessions of the conference: Primary and secondary standards of absorbed dose to water for IMRT and brachytherapy, 3D dose distributions and treatment planning for IMRT and brachytherapy, Hadron therapy (protons and carbon ions), High-intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU), were geared to the main foci of the projects. Metrologists and medical physicists from countries all over the world attended the conference and made it into a forum for the exchange of information and expertise

  14. Hypermetabolism and symptom burden in advanced cancer patients evaluated in a cachexia clinic

    PubMed Central

    Dev, Rony; Hui, David; Chisholm, Gary; Delgado-Guay, Marvin; Dalal, Shalini; Del Fabbro, Egidio; Bruera, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated resting energy expenditure (REE) may contribute to weight loss and symptom burden in cancer patients. Aims The aim of this study was to compare the velocity of weight loss, symptom burden (fatigue, insomnia, anxiety, and anorexia—combined score as measured by the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Score), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and survival among cancer patients referred to a cachexia clinic with hypermetabolism, elevated REE > 110% of predicted, with normal REE. Methods A retrospective analysis of 60 advanced cancer patients evaluated in a cachexia clinic for either >5% weight loss or anorexia who underwent indirect calorimetry to measure REE. Patients were dichotomized to either elevated or normal REE. Descriptive statistics were generated, and a two-sample Student's t-tests were used to compare the outcomes between the groups. Kaplan–Meier and Cox regression methodology were used to examine the survival times between groups. Results Thirty-seven patients (62%) were men, 41 (68%) were White, 59 (98%) solid tumours, predominantly 23 gastrointestinal cancers (38%), with a median age of 60 (95% confidence interval 57.0–62.9). Thirty-five patients (58%) were hypermetabolic. Non-Caucasian patients were more likely to have high REE [odds ratio = 6.17 (1.56, 24.8), P = 0.01]. No statistical difference regarding age, cancer type, gender, active treatment with chemotherapy, and/or radiation between hypermetabolic and normal REE was noted. The velocity of weight loss over a 3 month period (−8.5 kg vs. −7.2 kg, P = 0.68), C-reactive protein (37.3 vs. 55.6 mg/L, P = 0.70), symptom burden (4.2 vs. 4.5, P = 0.54), and survival (288 vs. 276 days, P = 0.68) was not significantly different between high vs. normal REE, respectively. Conclusion Hypermetabolism is common in cancer patients with weight loss and noted to be more frequent in non-Caucasian patients. No association among velocity of weight loss

  15. Chemotherapy advances in small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chan, Bryan A; Coward, Jermaine I G

    2013-10-01

    Although chemotherapeutic advances have recently been heralded in lung adenocarcinomas, such success with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) has been ominously absent. Indeed, the dismal outlook of this disease is exemplified by the failure of any significant advances in first line therapy since the introduction of the current standard platinum-etoposide doublet over 30 years ago. Moreover, such sluggish progress is compounded by the dearth of FDA-approved agents for patients with relapsed disease. However, over the past decade, novel formulations of drug classes commonly used in SCLC (e.g. topoisomerase inhibitors, anthracyclines, alkylating and platinum agents) are emerging as potential alternatives that could effectively add to the armamentarium of agents currently at our disposal. This review is introduced with an overview on the historical development of chemotherapeutic regimens used in this disease and followed by the recent encouraging advances witnessed in clinical trials with drugs such as amrubicin and belotecan which are forging new horizons for future treatment algorithms. PMID:24163749

  16. Second solid cancers after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation using reduced intensity conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Ringdén, Olle; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Zhiwei; Ahmed, Ibrahim; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Buchbinder, David; Burns, Linda J.; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Duncan, Christine; Hale, Gregory A.; Halter, Joerg; Hayashi, Robert J.; Hsu, Jack W.; Jacobsohn, David A.; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Kamani, Naynesh R.; Kasow, Kimberly A.; Khera, Nandita; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Loren, Alison W.; Marks, David I.; Myers, Kasiani C.; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N.; Schouten, Harry C.; Socie, Gérard; Sorror, Mohamed L.; Steinberg, Amir; Popat, Uday; Wingard, John R.; Mattsson, Jonas; Majhail, Navneet S.

    2014-01-01

    We examined risk of second solid cancers after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) using reduced intensity/non-myeloablative conditioning (RIC/NMC). RIC/NMC recipients with leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n=2833) and lymphoma (n=1436) between 1995–2006 were included. In addition, RIC/NMC recipients 40–60 years of age (n=2138) were compared with patients of the same age receiving myeloablative conditioning (MAC, n=6428). The cumulative incidence of solid cancers was 3.35% at 10-years. There was no increase in overall cancer risk compared to the general population (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] 0.99, P=1.00 for leukemia/MDS and 0.92, P=0.75 for lymphoma). However, risks were significantly increased in leukemia/MDS patients for cancers of lip (SIR 14.28), tonsil (SIR 8.66), oropharynx (SIR 46.70), bone (SIR 23.53), soft tissue (SIR 12.92), and vulva (SIR 18.55) and skin melanoma (SIR 3.04). Lymphoma patients had significantly higher risks of oropharyngeal cancer (SIR 67.35) and skin melanoma (SIR 3.52). Among RIC/NMC recipients, age >50 years was the only independent risk factor for solid cancers (hazard ratio [HR] 3.02, P<0.001). Among patients age 40–60 years, when adjusted for other factors, there was no difference in cancer risks between RIC/NMC and MAC in leukemia/MDS patients (HR 0.98, P=0.905). In lymphoma patients, risks were lower after RIC/NMC (HR 0.51, P=0.047). In conclusion, the overall risks of second solid cancers in RIC/NMC recipients are similar to the general population, although there is an increased risk of cancer at some sites. Studies with longer follow-up are needed to realize the complete risks of solid cancers after RIC/NMC AHCT. PMID:25042734

  17. Systematic review of novel ablative methods in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Margaret G; Bramis, Konstantinos; Pereira, Stephen P; Fusai, Giuseppe K

    2014-01-01

    Unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer with or without metastatic disease is associated with a very poor prognosis. Current standard therapy is limited to chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Few regimens have been shown to have a substantial survival advantage and novel treatment strategies are urgently needed. Thermal and laser based ablative techniques are widely used in many solid organ malignancies. Initial studies in the pancreas were associated with significant morbidity and mortality, which limited widespread adoption. Modifications to the various applications, in particular combining the techniques with high quality imaging such as computed tomography and intraoperative or endoscopic ultrasound has enabled real time treatment monitoring and significant improvements in safety. We conducted a systematic review of the literature up to October 2013. Initial studies suggest that ablative therapies may confer an additional survival benefit over best supportive care but randomised studies are required to validate these findings. PMID:24605026

  18. Optimal Number of Endoscopic Biopsies in Diagnosis of Advanced Gastric and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeowon; Choi, Hyo Sun; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Park, Dong Il; Cho, Yong Kyun; Kim, Hong Joo; Park, Jung Ho

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic biopsy is necessary to confirm a histopathologic diagnosis. Currently, 6 to 8 biopsies are recommended for diagnosis of a suspected malignant lesion. However, multiple biopsies may result in several problems, such as an increased risk of bleeding, procedure prolongation, and increased workload to pathologists. The aim of this study was to clarify the optimal number of endoscopic biopsy specimens required in diagnosis of advanced gastrointestinal cancer. Patients who were diagnosed with advanced gastrointestinal cancer during endoscopy were included. Five specimens were obtained sequentially from viable tissue of the cancer margin. Experienced pathologists evaluated each specimen and provided diagnoses. A total of 91 patients were enrolled. Fifty-nine subjects had advanced gastric cancer, and 32 had advanced colon cancer. Positive diagnosis rates of the first, second, and third advanced gastric cancer specimens were 81.3%, 94.9%, and 98.3%, respectively, while positive diagnosis rates of advanced colon cancer specimens were 78.1%, 87.5%, and 93.8%. Further biopsies did not increase positive diagnosis cumulative rates. This study demonstrated that three specimens were sufficient to make correct pathologic diagnoses in advanced gastrointestinal cancer. Therefore, we recommend 3 or 4 biopsies from viable tissue in advanced gastrointestinal cancer to make a pathologic diagnosis during endoscopy. PMID:22219611

  19. Cancer Related Fatigue and Quality of Life in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Charalambous, Andreas; Kouta, Christiana

    2016-01-01

    Cancer related fatigue (CRF) is a common and debilitating symptom that can influence quality of life (QoL) in cancer patients. The increase in survival times stresses for a better understanding of how CRF affects patients' QoL. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study with 148 randomly recruited prostate cancer patients aiming to explore CRF and its impact on QoL. Assessments included the Cancer Fatigue Scale, EORTC QLQ-C30, and EORTC QLQ-PR25. Additionally, 15 in-depth structured interviews were performed. Quantitative data were analyzed with simple and multiple regression analysis and independent samples t-test. Qualitative data were analyzed with the use of thematic content analysis. The 66.9% of the patients experienced CRF with higher levels being recorded for the affective subscale. Statistically significant differences were found between the patients reporting CRF and lower levels of QoL (mean = 49.1) and those that did not report fatigue and had higher levels of QoL (mean = 72.1). The interviews emphasized CRF's profound impact on the patients' lives that was reflected on the following themes: “dependency on others,” “loss of power over decision making,” and “daily living disruption.” Cancer related fatigue is a significant problem for patients with advanced prostate cancer and one that affects their QoL in various ways. PMID:26981530

  20. Solid Cancer Mortality in the Techa River Cohort (1950–2007)

    PubMed Central

    Schonfeld, S. J.; Krestinina, L. Y.; Epifanova, S.; Degteva, M. O.; Akleyev, A. V.; Preston, D. L.

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of cancer risk from ionizing radiation is largely based on studies of populations exposed at high dose and high dose rates. Less certain is the magnitude of cancer risk from protracted, low-dose and low-dose-rate radiation exposure. We estimated the dose-response relationship for solid cancer mortality in a cohort of 29,730 individuals who lived along the Techa River between 1950 and 1960. This population was exposed to both external γ radiation and internal 90Sr, 137Cs and other radionuclides after the release of radioactive waste into the river by the Mayak Radiochemical Plant. The analysis utilized the latest individualized doses from the Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS) 2009. We estimated excess relative risks (ERRs) per Gy for solid cancer mortality using Poisson regression methods with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and P values based on likelihood ratio tests. Between 1950 and 2007, there were 2,303 solid cancer deaths. The linear ERR/Gy = 0.61 (95%; CI 0.04–1.27), P = 0.03. It is estimated that approximately 2% (49.7) of solid cancers deaths were associated with the radiation exposure. Our results, based on 2,303 solid cancer deaths and more than 50 years of follow-up, support an increased risk of solid cancer mortality following protracted radiation exposure from the Techa River contamination. The wide confidence interval of our estimate reflects the challenges of quantifying and describing the shape of the dose-response relationship in the low dose range. Nevertheless, the risk estimates provide important information concerning health risks from whole-body radiation exposure that can occur from accidents that result in wide-scale environmental contamination. PMID:23289384

  1. Borrmann Type 4 Advanced Gastric Cancer: Focus on the Development of Scirrhous Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyoungwon; Park, Moo In; Kim, Sung Eun; Park, Seun Ja

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Borrmann type 4 advanced gastric cancer (AGC) is very important for improving the prognosis of AGC patients. Because there is no definite mass in most cases of Borrmann type 4 AGC, its accurate diagnosis via endoscopy requires an understanding of its pathogenesis and developmental process. Moreover, many people confuse linitis plastica (LP) type gastric cancer (GC), scirrhous GC, and Borrmann type 4 AGC. To distinguish each of these cancers, knowledge of their endoscopic and pathological differences is necessary, especially for LP type GCs in the developmental stage. In conclusion, diagnosis of pre-stage or latent LP type GC before progression to typical LP type GC requires the detection of IIc-like lesions in the fundic gland area. It is also crucial to identify any abnormalities such as sclerosis of the gastric wall and hypertrophy of the mucosal folds during endoscopy. PMID:27456608

  2. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  3. CD44 variant 6 is correlated with peritoneal dissemination and poor prognosis in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tjhay, Francisca; Motohara, Takeshi; Tayama, Shingo; Narantuya, Dashdemberel; Fujimoto, Koichi; Guo, Jianying; Sakaguchi, Isao; Honda, Ritsuo; Tashiro, Hironori; Katabuchi, Hidetaka

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) drive tumor initiation and metastasis in several types of human cancer. However, the contribution of ovarian CSCs to peritoneal metastasis remains unresolved. The cell adhesion molecule CD44 has been identified as a major marker for CSCs in solid tumors, including epithelial ovarian cancer. CD44 exists as a standard form (CD44s) and also as numerous variant isoforms (CD44v) generated by alternative mRNA splicing. Here we show that disseminated ovarian tumors in the pelvic peritoneum contain highly enriched CD44v6-positive cancer cells, which drive tumor metastasis and are responsible for tumor resistance to chemotherapy. Clinically, an increased number of CD44v6-positive cancer cells in primary tumors was associated with a shortened overall survival in stage III–IV ovarian cancer patients. Furthermore, a subpopulation of CD44v6-positive cancer cells manifested the ability to initiate tumor metastasis in the pelvic peritoneum in an in vivo mouse model, suggesting that CD44v6-positive cells show the potential to serve as metastasis-initiating cells. Thus, the peritoneal disseminated metastasis of epithelial ovarian cancer is initiated by the CD44v6-positive subpopulation, and CD44v6 expression is a biomarker for the clinical outcome of advanced ovarian cancer patients. Given that a distinct subpopulation of CD44v6-positive cancer cells plays a critical role in peritoneal metastasis, definitive treatment should target this subpopulation of CD44v6-positive cells in epithelial ovarian cancer. PMID:26250934

  4. Phase 1 study of pembrolizumab (MK-3475; anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody) in Japanese patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toshio; Seto, Takashi; Hirai, Fumihiko; Takenoyama, Mitsuhiro; Nosaki, Kaname; Tsurutani, Junji; Kaneda, Hiroyasu; Iwasa, Tsutomu; Kawakami, Hisato; Noguchi, Kazuo; Shimamoto, Takashi; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Background This phase I study evaluated the safety and tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, immunogenicity, and antitumor activity of pembrolizumab in Japanese patients with advanced solid tumors. Methods Following an initial dose and a 28-day rest (cycle 1), pembrolizumab was administered as an intravenous infusion at escalating doses (2 or 10 mg/kg) every 2 weeks (Q2W) until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Adverse events (AEs) were assessed using CTCAE v4.0, and tumor response was assessed using both RECIST v1.1 and immune-related response criteria (irRC). Full pharmacokinetic sampling was performed during cycle 1. Results Three patients received pembrolizumab at 2.0 mg/kg and seven at 10 mg/kg. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed during cycle 1. Eighty percent of patients experienced drug-related AEs (mostly grade 1 or 2); the most common drug-related AEs were nausea, malaise, pyrexia, and aspartate aminotransferase/alanine transaminase (AST/ALT) elevations (n = 2 each). No drug-related grade 4 or 5 AEs occurred. Immune-related AEs comprised grade 3 ALT elevation (n = 1), grade 3 AST elevation (n = 1), grade 1 pneumonitis (n = 1), and grade 1 thyroid-stimulating hormone elevation (n = 1). The safety and pharmacokinetic profiles of Japanese patients were similar to those previously reported for Caucasian patients. A partial tumor response was observed in one patient with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and in one patient with melanoma. Conclusions Pembrolizumab at both 2 and 10 mg/kg Q2W was well tolerated in Japanese patients with advanced solid tumors and showed encouraging anti-tumor activity against melanoma and NSCLC. PMID:27000274

  5. Advances in Breast Cancer – Looking Back over the Year

    PubMed Central

    Lüftner, D.; Lux, M. P.; Maass, N.; Schütz, F.; Schwidde, I.; Fasching, P. A.; Fehm, T.; Janni, W.; Kümmel, S.; Kolberg, H.-C.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment options as well as the characteristics for therapeutic decisions in patients with primary and advanced breast cancer are increasing in number and variety. New targeted therapies in combination with established chemotherapy schemes are broadening the spectrum, yet not every new, promising combination achieves a better result. New data from the field of pharmacogenomics point to prognostic and predictive factors that take not only the properties of the tumour but also the genetic disposition of the patient into consideration. Current therapeutic decision-making is thus based on a combination of classical clinical and modern molecular biomarkers. Health-economic concerns are also being taken into consideration more frequently, meaning political decisions may also become a factor. This review presents the trends over the past year. PMID:26640285

  6. Evaluation of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living in Greek Patients with Advanced Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Parpa, Efi; Tsilika, Eleni; Panagiotoua, Irene; Roumeliotou, Anna; Symeonidi, Matina; Galanos, Antonis; Kouvaris, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Translation of the instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) was carried out and its psychometric properties were assessed in a Greek sample of patients with advanced cancer. The scale was translated with the forward-backward procedure into the Greek language. It was initially administered to 136 advanced cancer patients. To assess…

  7. Aggressive chemosurgical debulking in patients with advanced ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ng, L W; Rubin, S C; Hoskins, W J; Jones, W B; Hakes, T B; Markman, M; Reichman, B; Almadrones, L; Lewis, J L

    1990-09-01

    From July 1986 to June 1989, 43 evaluable patients with advanced ovarian cancer were treated on protocol with initial cytoreductive surgery, two courses of high-intensity intravenous Cytoxan (1000 mg/m2) and cisplatin (120-200 mg/m2) chemotherapy, and repeat debulking laparotomy in an effort to maximize response to a subsequent four cycles of intraperitoneal platinum-based chemotherapy. Two patients were stage IIIA, 2 stage IIIB, 28 stage IIIC, and 11 stage IV. Five tumors were grade 1, 9 grade 2, and 29 grade 3. Thirty-eight (88%) patients had bulky tumor (5-25 cm) found at first laparotomy; 25 of these had greater than 1-cm residual after initial debulking. Following two cycles of intensive intravenous chemotherapy 18 of these 25 had greater than 1-cm disease found at second laparotomy; 12 of 18 underwent secondary cytoreduction to less than 1 cm. Thus, 30 of these 38 (79%) patients entered the intraperitoneal phase of the protocol with less than 1-cm disease. Four patients had 2- to 5-cm tumor at initial laparotomy; two of four were debulked to less than 1-cm residual. All four were found to have less than 1-cm disease at second laparotomy. This combination regimen was well tolerated. There was one treatment-related death. In sum, 42 of 43 patients had tumor greater than 2 cm at staging laparotomy and 38 (88%) had large, bulky disease (5-25 cm); 34 of 43 (79%) entered the intraperitoneal phase of the protocol with optimal (less than 1-cm) disease. Aggressive chemosurgical cytoreduction in patients with bulky advanced ovarian cancer can leave a large proportion of patients with minimal residual disease and maximize their chances of responding to subsequent intraperitoneal chemotherapy. PMID:2227548

  8. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for high-grade advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yonemura, Y; Sawa, T; Kinoshita, K; Matsuki, N; Fushida, S; Tanaka, S; Ohoyama, S; Takashima, T; Kimura, H; Kamata, T

    1993-01-01

    Fifty-five patients with high-grade advanced gastric cancer in whom the presence of stage IV was confirmed by preoperative diagnostic imaging were treated with PMUE therapy by a combined use of cisplatin (CDDP) 75 mg/m2, mitomycin C (MMC) 10 mg/body, etoposide 150 mg/body, and UFT (a combination of 1-(2-tetrahydrofuryl)-5-fluorouracil and uracil in a molar ratio of 1:4) 400 mg/day. CDDP and MMC was administered intravenously on the first day, followed by etoposide 50 mg/day on the 3rd, 4th, and 5th days. All the patients had measurable lesions that were evaluated by computed tomography scanning before and after the treatments. These patients were allocated randomly to two groups. Of these cases, 29 belonged to the neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) group to whom PMUE therapy was given preoperatively; the remaining 26 patients underwent operation first and received PMUE thereafter (control group). Background factors did not differ significantly between the two groups. The response rate was higher in the NAC group than in the control group (62% in the former versus 35% in the latter). The resectability rates were 79% and 88% in the NAC and control groups, respectively. However, the rate of potentially curable cases was higher in the NAC group than in the control group (38% in the former versus 15% in the latter). Among the nonresection cases, the prognosis was highly unfavorable in both groups. In the resection cases, however, the survival rate was significantly better in the NAC group than in the control group. These results may indicate that in patients with high-grade, advanced gastric cancer initial chemotherapy (neoadjuvant chemotherapy) and then surgery should be considered. PMID:8511923

  9. Orphan symptoms in advanced cancer patients followed at home.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Porzio, Giampiero; Valle, Alessandro; Fusco, Flavio; Aielli, Federica; Adile, Claudio; Casuccio, Alessandra

    2013-12-01

    Orphan symptoms are rarely assessed, particularly at home. The aim of this multicenter prospective study was to assess the prevalence of these symptoms and eventual factors possibly associated in advanced cancer patients at admission of a home care program. A prospective study was performed at three home care programs in Italy. Patients' data were collected, including age, sex, diagnosis, and Karnofsky status. Possible contributing factors were analyzed; preexisting neurological diseases, cerebral metastases, hyperthermia, diabetes, a state of dehydration clinically evident and/or oliguria, possible biochemical parameters when available, data regarding recent chemotherapy, opioids and doses, use of neuroleptics, benzodiazepine or anticonvulsants, corticosteroids, anti-inflammatory, and antibiotics were collected. Myoclonus, hiccup, sweating, pruritus, and tenesmus, either rectal or vesical, were assessed, according to a preliminary definition, at time of home care program admission. Three hundred sixty-two patients were surveyed at the three home care programs. Globally, 48 patients presented one or more orphan symptoms in the period taken into consideration, and 7 patients presented more than 1 symptom. One patient presented occasional and diffuse myoclonus. Nineteen patients presented sweating, 13 patients presented pruritus, and 14 patients presented hiccup. Finally, nine patients presented rectal or vesical tenesmus. There was a significant correlation between sweating and transdermal fentanyl use (P = 0.044), fever (P = 0.001), hiccup (P < 0.0005), and vesical tenesmus (P = 0.028). Pruritus was not associated to any factor. Hiccup was associated with gender (males, P = 0.006) and sweating (P < 0.0005). Vesical tenesmus was associated with fever (P = 0.019) and sweating (P = 0.028). Although the symptoms examined have a low prevalence in advanced cancer patients admitted to home care, the distress for patients may be high and

  10. Integrating Palliative Care Into the Care of Patients With Advanced Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kapo, Jennifer M; Akgün, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death due to malignancy. Although lung cancer mortality has been decreasing in recent years, it remains substantially higher than other causes of cancer death. Median survival for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, defined as lung cancer involving regional lymph nodes, is estimated to be approximately 10 to 17 months, and median survival for patients with metastatic disease is only 6 to 9 months. In addition, patients with advanced lung cancer often experience debilitating symptoms and poor quality of life. Pain, dyspnea, and fatigue are most frequently reported and affect at least 65% of patients with advanced lung cancer. Given this burden of symptoms and high mortality, patients and their families facing a diagnosis of advanced lung cancer are in need of support. Palliative care, with its focus on addressing the emotional, physical, and spiritual sources of suffering utilizing the expertise of an interdisciplinary team, can provide this comprehensive support. This review describes the role of supportive and palliative care integrated into the treatment of patients with a diagnosis of advanced lung cancer with sections focused on the evaluation and treatment of pain and dyspnea, approaches to challenging communication tasks, and the support of caregivers who care for patients with advanced lung cancer. PMID:26389769

  11. New clinical advances in immunotherapy for the treatment of solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Zavala, Valentina A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-01-01

    Advances in understanding the mechanisms of cancer cells for evading the immune system surveillance, including how the immune system modulates the phenotype of tumours, have allowed the development of new therapies that benefit from this complex cellular network to specifically target and destroy cancer cells. Immunotherapy researchers have mainly focused on the discovery of tumour antigens that could confer specificity to immune cells to detect and destroy cancer cells, as well as on the mechanisms leading to an improved activation of effector immune cells. The Food and Drug Administration approval in 2010 of ipilumumab for melanoma treatment and of pembrolizumab in 2014, monoclonal antibodies against T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 and programmed cell death 1, respectively, are encouraging examples of how research in this area can successfully translate into clinical use with promising results. Currently, several ongoing clinical trials are in progress testing new anti-cancer therapies based on the enhancement of immune cell activity against tumour antigens. Here we discuss the general concepts related to immunotherapy and the recent application to the treatment of cancer with positive results that support their consideration of clinical application to patients. PMID:25826229

  12. Recent advances in biomarker discovery in solid organ transplant by proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Sigdel, Tara K; Sarwal, Minnie M

    2012-01-01

    The identification and clinical use of more sensitive and specific biomarkers in the field of solid organ transplantation is an urgent need in medicine. Solid organ transplantation has seen improvements in the short-term survival of transplanted organs due to recent advancements in immunosuppressive therapy. However, the currently available methods of allograft monitoring are not optimal. Recent advancements in assaying methods for biomolecules such as genes, mRNA and proteins have helped to identify surrogate biomarkers that can be used to monitor the transplanted organ. These high-throughput ‘omic’ methods can help researchers to significantly speed up the identification and the validation steps, which are crucial factors for biomarker discovery efforts. Still, the progress towards identifying more sensitive and specific biomarkers remains a great deal slower than expected. In this article, we have evaluated the current status of biomarker discovery using proteomics tools in different solid organ transplants in recent years. This article summarizes recent reports and current status, along with the hurdles in efficient biomarker discovery of protein biomarkers using proteomics approaches. Finally, we will touch upon personalized medicine as a future direction for better management of transplanted organs, and provide what we think could be a recipe for success in this field. PMID:22087656

  13. Incidence of non-lung solid cancers in Czech uranium miners: A case-cohort study

    SciTech Connect

    Kulich, M.; Rericha, V.; Rericha, R.; Shore, D.L.; Sandler, D.P.

    2011-04-15

    Objectives: Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon and its progeny, which are known to cause lung cancer and may be associated with leukemia. This study was undertaken to evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners in Pribram region, Czech Republic. Methods: A retrospective stratified case-cohort study in a cohort of 22,816 underground miners who were employed between 1949 and 1975. All incident non-lung solid cancers were ascertained among miners who worked underground for at least 12 months (n=1020). A subcohort of 1707 subjects was randomly drawn from the same population by random sampling stratified on age. The follow-up period lasted from 1977 to 1996. Results: Relative risks comparing 180 WLM (90th percentile) of cumulative lifetime radon exposure to 3 WLM (10th percentile) were 0.88 for all non-lung solid cancers combined (95% CI 0.73-1.04, n=1020), 0.87 for all digestive cancers (95% CI 0.69-1.09, n=561), 2.39 for gallbladder cancer (95% CI 0.52-10.98, n=13), 0.79 for larynx cancer (95% CI 0.38-1.64, n=62), 2.92 for malignant melanoma (95% CI 0.91-9.42, n=23), 0.84 for bladder cancer (95% CI 0.43-1.65, n=73), and 1.13 for kidney cancer (95% CI 0.62-2.04, n=66). No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure; only malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed elevated but non-significant association with radon. Conclusions: Radon was not significantly associated with incidence of any cancer of interest, although a positive association of radon with malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer cannot be entirely ruled out. - Research highlights: {yields} Uranium miners are chronically exposed to radon. {yields} We evaluate risk of non-lung solid cancers among uranium miners. {yields} No cancer type was significantly associated with radon exposure. {yields} Malignant melanoma and gallbladder cancer showed non-significant elevated risk.

  14. War and peace? The oncologic and the palliative care perspective on personalized cancer treatment in a patient with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Masel, Eva K; Schur, Sophie; Posch, Doris; Weixler, Dietmar; Meran, Johannes G; Schmidinger, Manuela; Watzke, Herbert H

    2015-08-01

    Personalized cancer treatment utilizing targeted therapies in a tailored approach is based on tumor and/or patient-specific molecular profiles. Recent clinical trials continue to look for new potential targets in heavily pretreated patients or rare disease entities. Careful selection of patients who may derive benefit from such therapies constitutes a challenge. This case report presents an experimental personalized cancer treatment in an advanced cancer patient and provides a list of issues for discussion: How can we combine treatment goals and simultaneously meet the individual needs in advanced cancer reconciling both perspectives: oncology and palliative care? PMID:25986998

  15. Environmental performance evaluation of an advanced-design solid-state television camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The development of an advanced-design black-and-white solid-state television camera which can survive exposure to space environmental conditions was undertaken. A 380 x 488 element buried-channel CCD is utilized as the image sensor to ensure compatibility with 525-line transmission and display equipment. Specific camera design approaches selected for study and analysis included: (1) component and circuit sensitivity to temperature; (2) circuit board thermal and mechanical design; and (3) CCD temperature control. Preferred approaches were determined and integrated into the final design for two deliverable solid-state TV cameras. One of these cameras was subjected to environmental tests to determine stress limits for exposure to vibration, shock, acceleration, and temperature-vacuum conditions. These tests indicate performance at the design goal limits can be achieved for most of the specified conditions.

  16. Advanced materials and electrochemical processes in high-temperature solid electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.L.; Chick, L.A.; Youngblood, G.E.; Weber, W.J.

    1990-10-01

    Fuel cells for the direct conversion of fossil fuels to electric energy necessitates the use of high-temperature solid electrodes. This study has included: (1) determination of electrical transport, thermal and electrical properties to illucidate the effects of microstructure, phase equilibria, oxygen partial pressure, additives, synthesis and fabrication on these properties; (2) investigation of synthesis and fabrication of advanced oxide materials, such as La{sub 0.9}Sn{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3}; and (3) application of new analytical techniques using complex impedance coupled with conventional electrochemical methods to study the electrochemical processes and behavior of materials for solid oxide fuel cells and other high-temperature electrolyte electrochemical process. 15 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs. (BM)

  17. Characterization of welded HP 9-4-30 steel for the advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watt, George William

    1990-01-01

    Solid rocket motor case materials must be high-strength, high-toughness, weldable alloys. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) cases currently being developed will be made from a 9Ni-4Co quench and temper steel called HP 9-4-30. These ultra high-strength steels must be carefully processed to give a very clean material and a fine grained microstructure, which insures excellent ductility and toughness. The HP 9-4-30 steels are vacuum arc remelted and carbon deoxidized to give the cleanliness required. The ASRM case material will be formed into rings and then welded together to form the case segments. Welding is the desired joining technique because it results in a lower weight than other joining techniques. The mechanical and corrosion properties of the weld region material were fully studied.

  18. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary, Pancreatic, Urothelial, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  19. Does Multidisciplinary Care Enhance the Management of Advanced Breast Cancer?: Evaluation of Advanced Breast Cancer Multidisciplinary Team Meetings

    PubMed Central

    Chirgwin, Jacquie; Craike, Melinda; Gray, Christine; Watty, Kathy; Mileshkin, Linda; Livingston, Patricia M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the contribution of the advanced breast cancer (ABC) multidisciplinary team meetings (MDMs) to patient care and clinical outcomes. Methods: Members of ABC MDMs at two health services completed questionnaires in November 2007. The questionnaire asked about the performance of the MDMs and their contribution to improvement in patient care in five domains: medical management, psychosocial care, palliative care, care in the community, and benefits for team members. A final section covered the perceived value and importance of the MDM in patient management. Descriptive statistics (frequencies, mean, and standard deviation) were used to summarize the performance, improvement, and importance scores. Results: A total of 27 multidisciplinary team members (73%) completed the questionnaire. The MDM performed best in medical management (mean performance score out of 5 [M] = 3.78) and palliative care (M = 3.77). These were also the areas that were most improved through the MDM. Benefits to team members and care in the community (both M = 3.05) ranked lowest by both measures. The MDM provided the most benefit for patient management in the areas of “awareness of services available” (M = 4.32), “efficiency of referrals” (M = 4.27) and “supportive care for patients” (M = 4.27). “Awareness of services available,” “psychological care for patients,” and “continuity of care” were considered the most important (M = 4.64). Conclusion: The study provides evidence that MDMs make an important contribution to the logistical and medical management of patients with advanced breast cancer. PMID:21358959

  20. Solid Cancer Incidence in the Techa River Incidence Cohort: 1956-2007.

    PubMed

    Davis, F G; Yu, K L; Preston, D; Epifanova, S; Degteva, M; Akleyev, A V

    2015-07-01

    Previously reported studies of the Techa River Cohort have established associations between radiation dose and the occurrence of solid cancers and leukemia (non-CLL) that appear to be linear in dose response. These analyses include 17,435 cohort members alive and not known to have had cancer prior to January 1, 1956 who lived in areas near the river or Chelyabinsk City at some time between 1956 and the end of 2007, utilized individualized dose estimates computed using the Techa River Dosimetry System 2009 and included five more years of follow-up. The median and mean dose estimates based on these doses are consistently higher than those based on earlier Techa River Dosimetry System 2000 dose estimates. This article includes new site-specific cancer risk estimates and risk estimates adjusted for available information on smoking. There is a statistically significant (P = 0.02) linear trend in the smoking-adjusted all-solid cancer incidence risks with an excess relative risk (ERR) after exposure to 100 mGy of 0.077 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.013-0.15. Examination of site-specific risks revealed statistically significant radiation dose effects only for cancers of the esophagus and uterus with an ERR per 100 mGy estimates in excess of 0.10. Esophageal cancer risk estimates were modified by ethnicity and sex, but not smoking. While the solid cancer rates are attenuated when esophageal cancer is removed (ERR = 0.063 per 100 mGy), a dose-response relationship is present and it remains likely that radiation exposure has increased the risks for most solid cancers in the cohort despite the lack of power to detect statistically significant risks for specific sites. PMID:26121228

  1. Palliative Surgical Approach in Advanced Nonresponsive Mucinous Ovarian Cancer: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Manika; Kumar, Ritesh; Topno, Noor; Mishra, Shweta; Dhirasaria, Ashish; Singh, A Santa

    2016-01-01

    Advanced mucinous ovarian cancer is a separate entity and has different biological behaviour. There is a wide range of therapeutic challenges and dilemmas in the management of these patients. The authors present a case of advanced ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma with pseudomyxoma peritonei who had poor response to standard neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This case is highlighted to emphasize the challenges in the decision making for the management of advanced mucinous ovarian cancer. PMID:27162429

  2. Talazoparib in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery and Liver or Kidney Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; HER2/Neu Negative; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Mesothelioma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  3. Draft environmental impact statement: Space Shuttle Advanced Solid Rocket Motor Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The proposed action is design, development, testing, and evaluation of Advanced Solid Rocket Motors (ASRM) to replace the motors currently used to launch the Space Shuttle. The proposed action includes design, construction, and operation of new government-owned, contractor-operated facilities for manufacturing and testing the ASRM's. The proposed action also includes transport of propellant-filled rocket motor segments from the manufacturing facility to the testing and launch sites and the return of used and/or refurbished segments to the manufacturing site.

  4. Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal- based power generation. Quarterly report, December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-15

    The program is conducted by a team consisting of AiResearch Los Angeles Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

  5. Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal- based power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-15

    The program is conducted by a team consisting of AiResearch Los Angeles Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

  6. Development of an advanced bond coat for solid oxide fuel cell interconnector applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, An-Chou; Chen, Yu-Ming; Liu, Chien-Kuo; Shong, Wei-Ja

    2015-11-01

    An advanced bond coat has been developed for solid oxide fuel cell interconnector applications; a low thermal expansion superalloy has been selected as the substrate, and the newly developed bond coat is applied between the substrate and the LSM top coat. The bond coat composition is designed to be near thermodynamic equilibrium with the substrate to minimize interdiffusion with the substrate while providing oxidation protection for the substrate. The bond coat exhibits good oxidation resistance, a low area specific resistance, and a low thermal expansion coefficient at 800 °C; experimental results indicate that interdiffusion between the bond coat and the substrate can be hindered.

  7. CPI-613 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-28

    Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  8. Pragmatic medicine in solid cancer: a translational alternative to precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Brábek, Jan; Rosel, Daniel; Fernandes, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The precision medicine (PM) initiative is a response to the dismal outlook in solid cancer. Despite heterogeneity, common mechanistic denominators may exist across the spectrum of solid cancer. A shift from conventional research and development (R&D) toward PM will require conceptual and structural change. As individuals and as a society, we welcome innovation, but question change. We ask: In solid cancer, does PM identify and address the causes of prior failures, and, if so, are the proposed solutions feasible? And, when may we expect safer, more effective and affordable drugs in the clinic? Considerations that prompt a pragmatic rethink include a failure analysis of translational R&D in solid cancer suggesting that trials and regulations need to be aligned with the natural history of the disease. In successful therapeutic interventions in chronic, complex disease, surrogate markers and endpoints should be consistent with the Prentice's criteria. In solid cancer, drug induced tumor shrinkage, is a drug effect and not a disease response; tumor shrinkage does not reflect nor predict interruption of the disease. Overall, we support a pragmatic, multidisciplinary, and collaborative R&D, and suggest that direction be set by clinical need and utility, and by questions, not answers. PM will prove worthwhile if it could improve clinical outcomes. The lag in therapeutics relative to diagnostics is a cause for confusion. Overdiagnosis adds to fear and harm, especially in the absence of effective interventions. A revised initiative that prioritizes metastasis research could replicate the successful HIV/AIDS model in solid cancer. A pragmatic approach may further translational efforts toward meaningfully effective, generally available, and affordable solutions. PMID:27103822

  9. Pragmatic medicine in solid cancer: a translational alternative to precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Brábek, Jan; Rosel, Daniel; Fernandes, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The precision medicine (PM) initiative is a response to the dismal outlook in solid cancer. Despite heterogeneity, common mechanistic denominators may exist across the spectrum of solid cancer. A shift from conventional research and development (R&D) toward PM will require conceptual and structural change. As individuals and as a society, we welcome innovation, but question change. We ask: In solid cancer, does PM identify and address the causes of prior failures, and, if so, are the proposed solutions feasible? And, when may we expect safer, more effective and affordable drugs in the clinic? Considerations that prompt a pragmatic rethink include a failure analysis of translational R&D in solid cancer suggesting that trials and regulations need to be aligned with the natural history of the disease. In successful therapeutic interventions in chronic, complex disease, surrogate markers and endpoints should be consistent with the Prentice’s criteria. In solid cancer, drug induced tumor shrinkage, is a drug effect and not a disease response; tumor shrinkage does not reflect nor predict interruption of the disease. Overall, we support a pragmatic, multidisciplinary, and collaborative R&D, and suggest that direction be set by clinical need and utility, and by questions, not answers. PM will prove worthwhile if it could improve clinical outcomes. The lag in therapeutics relative to diagnostics is a cause for confusion. Overdiagnosis adds to fear and harm, especially in the absence of effective interventions. A revised initiative that prioritizes metastasis research could replicate the successful HIV/AIDS model in solid cancer. A pragmatic approach may further translational efforts toward meaningfully effective, generally available, and affordable solutions. PMID:27103822

  10. Chemical structure and heterogeneity differences of two lignins from loblolly pine as investigated by advanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advanced solid-state NMR was employed to investigate differences in chemical structure and heterogeneity between milled wood lignin (MWL) and residual enzyme lignin (REL). Wiley and conventional milled woods were also studied. The advanced NMR techniques included 13C quantitative direct polarization...

  11. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Triple Negative Breast Cancer (Currently Accruing Only Triple-negative Breast Cancer Patients Since 6/8/2007)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-stromal Tumor; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral

  12. Advanced Intestinal Cancers often Maintain a Multi-Ancestral Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Zahm, Christopher D.; Szulczewski, Joseph M.; Leystra, Alyssa A.; Paul Olson, Terrah J.; Clipson, Linda; Albrecht, Dawn M.; Middlebrooks, Malisa; Thliveris, Andrew T.; Matkowskyj, Kristina A.; Washington, Mary Kay; Newton, Michael A.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Halberg, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    A widely accepted paradigm in the field of cancer biology is that solid tumors are uni-ancestral being derived from a single founder and its descendants. However, data have been steadily accruing that indicate early tumors in mice and humans can have a multi-ancestral origin in which an initiated primogenitor facilitates the transformation of neighboring co-genitors. We developed a new mouse model that permits the determination of clonal architecture of intestinal tumors in vivo and ex vivo, have validated this model, and then used it to assess the clonal architecture of adenomas, intramucosal carcinomas, and invasive adenocarcinomas of the intestine. The percentage of multi-ancestral tumors did not significantly change as tumors progressed from adenomas with low-grade dysplasia [40/65 (62%)], to adenomas with high-grade dysplasia [21/37 (57%)], to intramucosal carcinomas [10/23 (43%]), to invasive adenocarcinomas [13/19 (68%)], indicating that the clone arising from the primogenitor continues to coexist with clones arising from co-genitors. Moreover, neoplastic cells from distinct clones within a multi-ancestral adenocarcinoma have even been observed to simultaneously invade into the underlying musculature [2/15 (13%)]. Thus, intratumoral heterogeneity arising early in tumor formation persists throughout tumorigenesis. PMID:26919712

  13. Development and validation of the JAX Cancer Treatment Profile™ for detection of clinically actionable mutations in solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ananda, Guruprasad; Mockus, Susan; Lundquist, Micaela; Spotlow, Vanessa; Simons, Al; Mitchell, Talia; Stafford, Grace; Philip, Vivek; Stearns, Timothy; Srivastava, Anuj; Barter, Mary; Rowe, Lucy; Malcolm, Joan; Bult, Carol; Karuturi, Radha Krishna Murthy; Rasmussen, Karen; Hinerfeld, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Background The continued development of targeted therapeutics for cancer treatment has required the concomitant development of more expansive methods for the molecular profiling of the patient’s tumor. We describe the validation of the JAX Cancer Treatment Profile™ (JAX-CTP™), a next generation sequencing (NGS)-based molecular diagnostic assay that detects actionable mutations in solid tumors to inform the selection of targeted therapeutics for cancer treatment. Methods NGS libraries are generated from DNA extracted from formalin fixed paraffin embedded tumors. Using hybrid capture, the genes of interest are enriched and sequenced on the Illumina HiSeq 2500 or MiSeq sequencers followed by variant detection and functional and clinical annotation for the generation of a clinical report. Results The JAX-CTP™ detects actionable variants, in the form of single nucleotide variations and small insertions and deletions (≤50bp) in 190 genes in specimens with a neoplastic cell content of ≥10%. The JAX-CTP™ is also validated for the detection of clinically actionable gene amplifications. Conclusions There is a lack of consensus in the molecular diagnostics field on the best method for the validation of NGS-based assays in oncology, thus the importance of communicating methods, as contained in this report. The growing number of targeted therapeutics and the complexity of the tumor genome necessitates continued development and refinement of advanced assays for tumor profiling to enable precision cancer treatment. PMID:25562415

  14. Phase I Study of CKD-516, a Novel Vascular Disrupting Agent, in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Do-Youn; Kim, Tae-Min; Han, Sae-Won; Shin, Dong-Yeop; Lee, Yun Gyoo; Lee, Keun-Wook; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kim, Tae-You; Jang, In-Jin; Lee, Jong-Seok; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2016-01-01

    Purpose CKD-516 is a newly developed vascular disrupting agent. This phase I dose-escalation study of CKD-516 was conducted to determine maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary antitumor efficacy in patients with advanced solid tumors. Materials and Methods Patients received CKD-516 intravenously on D1 and D8 every 3 weeks, in a standard 3+3 design. Safety was evaluated by National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events ver. 4.02 and response was assessed by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumor ver. 1.1. Results Twenty-three patients were treated with CKD-516 at seven dosing levels: 1 mg/m2/day (n=3), 2 mg/m2/day (n=3), 3.3 mg/m2/day (n=3), 5 mg/m2/day (n=3), 7 mg/m2/day (n=3), 9 mg/m2/day (n=6), and 12 mg/m2/day (n=2). Mean age was 54 and 56.5% of patients were male. Two dose-limiting toxicities, which were both grade 3 hypertension, were observed in two patients at 12 mg/m2/day. The MTD was determined as 12 mg/m2/day. Most common adverse events were gastrointestinal adverse events (diarrhea, 34.8% [30.4% grade 1/2, 13.0% grade 3]; nausea, 21.7% [all grade 1/2]; vomiting, 21.7% [all grade 1/2]), myalgia (17.4%, all grade 1/2), and abdominal pain (21.7% [21.7% grade 1/2, 4.3% grade 3]). The pharmacokinetic study showed the dose-linearity of all dosing levels. Among 23 patients, six patients (26.1%) showed stable disease. Median progression-free survival was 39 days (95% confidence interval, 37 to 41 days). Conclusion This study demonstrates feasibility of CKD-516, novel vascular disrupting agent, in patients with advanced solid tumor. MTD of CKD-516 was defined as 12 mg/m2/day on D1 and D8 every 3 weeks. PMID:25715767

  15. Sirolimus and Gold Sodium Thiomalate in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-12-13

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. [Advances in Surgical Treatment of Early Stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian; Bao, Feichao

    2016-06-20

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, computed tomography screening has made the disease spectrum of lung cancer shift from the previously predominating central local advanced squamous cell carcinoma to early stage lung adenocarcinoma represented by solitary pulmonary nodule, ground-glass opacity (GGO) and sub-centimeter nodule. This paper reviewed the recent proceeding in the surgical management of early stage lung cancer. PMID:27335305

  17. Cancer of the Pancreas: Molecular Pathways and Current Advancement in Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Polireddy, Kishore; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers among all malignances, with a median overall survival of <1 year and a 5-year survival of ~5%. The dismal survival rate and prognosis are likely due to lack of early diagnosis, fulminant disease course, high metastasis rate, and disappointing treatment outcome. Pancreatic cancers harbor a variety of genetic alternations that render it difficult to treat even with targeted therapy. Recent studies revealed that pancreatic cancers are highly enriched with a cancer stem cell (CSC) population, which is resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs, and therefore escapes chemotherapy and promotes tumor recurrence. Cancer cell epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is highly associated with metastasis, generation of CSCs, and treatment resistance in pancreatic cancer. Reviewed here are the molecular biology of pancreatic cancer, the major signaling pathways regulating pancreatic cancer EMT and CSCs, and the advancement in current clinical and experimental treatments for pancreatic cancer. PMID:27471566

  18. [A Case of Advanced Esophageal Cancer and Tongue Cancer Treated with Induction DCF Chemotherapy Followed by Radical Surgery].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Motomu; Koyanagi, Kazuo; Sugiura, Hitoshi; Kakefuda, Toshihiro

    2015-11-01

    A man in his 60s was admitted for the treatment of advanced cervical esophageal cancer with metastasis to the lymph nodes and advanced tongue cancer with metastasis to the lymph nodes. Esophageal cancer was suspected to have invaded the trachea. The tongue cancer was located on the left side and had invaded beyond the median line of the tongue. Both cancers were pathologically diagnosed as squamous cell carcinomas. Therefore, it was determined that pharyngo-laryngo- esophagectomy and total glossectomy were required prior to the treatment. However, after 2 courses of docetaxel/cisplatin/ 5-FU combined induction chemotherapy, both cancers remarkably decreased; consequently, an esophagectomy to preserve laryngeal function and partial glossectomy could be performed simultaneously. The patient is well without recurrence 1 year post-surgery. PMID:26602401

  19. High-Dose Chemotherapy, Total-Body Irradiation, and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation or Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer or Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Breast Cancer; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  20. Emerging therapies in the treatment of locally advanced squamous cell cancers of head and neck.

    PubMed

    Raza, Shahzad; Kornblum, Noah; Kancharla, Venkat P; Baig, Mahadi A; Singh, Amrit B; Kalavar, Madhumati

    2011-05-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCCs) represent 4 to 5% of all solid malignancies. Despite improvements in diagnostic techniques, 60% of patients will present with locally advanced HNSCCs with a median survival of about 12 months and 5-year overall survival of approximately 10-40%. Recent clinical trials have altered the treatment landscape by refining existing forms of radiation, incorporation of IMRT, choice of chemotherapeutic agents, introduction of biological and targeted therapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy. Cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), has recently been approved in combination with RT in patients with locally advanced HNSCCs. Antiangiogenic therapies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (gefitinib and erlotinib) have also shown promise in the clinical trials. Vandetanib, an antagonist of both vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the EGFR is currently being tested in phase II trial. New patents on hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha, mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor, insulin-like growth factor or the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, farnesyl transferase inhibitors have shown promise in the management of HNSCCs. Nevertheless, identification of predictive biomarkers of resistance or sensitivity to these therapies remains a fundamental challenge in the optimal selection of patients most likely to benefit from them. However, increase in efficacy comes at the cost of increased toxicity. The current review focuses on insight into recent patents and updates on the clinical trials using new investigational agents in the management for HNSCCs. PMID:21247406

  1. An Overview of Combustion Mechanisms and Flame Structures for Advanced Solid Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckstead, M. W.

    2000-01-01

    Ammonium perchlorate (AP) and cyclotretamethylenetetranitramine (HMX) are two solid ingredients often used in modern solid propellants. Although these two ingredients have very similar burning rates as monopropellants, they lead to significantly different characteristics when combined with binders to form propellants. Part of the purpose of this paper is to relate the observed combustion characteristics to the postulated flame structures and mechanisms for AP and HMX propellants that apparently lead to these similarities and differences. For AP composite, the primary diffusion flame is more energetic than the monopropellant flame, leading to an increase in burning rate over the monopropellant rate. In contrast the HMX primary diffusion flame is less energetic than the HMX monopropellant flame and ultimately leads to a propellant rate significantly less than the monopropellant rate in composite propellants. During the past decade the search for more energetic propellants and more environmentally acceptable propellants is leading to the development of propellants based on ingredients other than AP and HMX. The objective of this paper is to utilize the more familiar combustion characteristics of AP and HMX containing propellants to project the combustion characteristics of propellants made up of more advanced ingredients. The principal conclusion reached is that most advanced ingredients appear to burn by combustion mechanisms similar to HMX containing propellants rather than AP propellants.

  2. Temsirolimus and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Endometrial, Ovarian, Liver, Carcinoid, or Islet Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  3. Clinical cancer advances 2007: major research advances in cancer treatment, prevention, and screening--a report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Gralow, Julie; Ozols, Robert F; Bajorin, Dean F; Cheson, Bruce D; Sandler, Howard M; Winer, Eric P; Bonner, James; Demetri, George D; Curran, Walter; Ganz, Patricia A; Kramer, Barnett S; Kris, Mark G; Markman, Maurie; Mayer, Robert J; Raghavan, Derek; Ramsey, Scott; Reaman, Gregory H; Sawaya, Raymond; Schuchter, Lynn M; Sweetenham, John W; Vahdat, Linda T; Davidson, Nancy E; Schilsky, Richard L; Lichter, Allen S

    2008-01-10

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT: For the third year, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is publishing Clinical Cancer Advances: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention, and Screening, an annual review of the most significant cancer research presented or published over the past year. ASCO publishes this report to demonstrate the important progress being made on the front lines of clinical cancer research today. The report is intended to give all those with an interest in cancer care-the general public, cancer patients and organizations, policymakers, oncologists, and other medical professionals-an accessible summary of the year's most important cancer research advances. These pages report on the use of magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer screening, the association between hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer incidence, the link between human papillomavirus and head and neck cancers, and the use of radiation therapy to prevent lung cancer from spreading. They also report on effective new targeted therapies for cancers that have been historically difficult to treat, such as liver cancer and kidney cancer, among many others. A total of 24 advances are featured in this year's report. These advances and many more over the past several years show that the nation's long-term investment in cancer research is paying off. But there are disturbing signs that progress could slow. We are now in the midst of the longest sustained period of flat government funding for cancer research in history. The budgets for the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have been unchanged for four years. When adjusted for inflation, cancer research funding has actually declined 12% since 2004. These budget constraints limit the NCI's ability to fund promising cancer research. In the past several years the number of grants that the NCI has been able to fund has significantly decreased; this year, in response to just the

  4. Solid state fermentation for production of microbial cellulases: Recent advances and improvement strategies.

    PubMed

    Behera, Sudhanshu S; Ray, Ramesh C

    2016-05-01

    Lignocellulose is the most plentiful non-food biomass and one of the most inexhaustible renewable resources on the planet, which is an alternative sustainable energy source for the production of second generation biofuels. Lignocelluloses are composed of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, in which the sugar polymers account for a large portion of the biomass. Cellulases belong to the glycoside hydrolase family and catalyze the hydrolysis of glyosidic linkages depolymerizing cellulose to fermentable sugars. They are multi-enzymatic complex proteins and require the synergistic action of three key enzymes: endoglucanase (E.C. 3.2.1.4), exoglucanase (E.C. 3.2.1.176) (E.C. 3.2.1.91) and β-glucosidase (E.C. 3.2.1.21) for the depolymerization of cellulose to glucose. Solid state fermentation, which holds growth of microorganisms on moist solid substrates in the absence of free flowing water, has gained considerable attention of late due its several advantages over submerged fermentation. The review summarizes the critical analysis of recent literature covering production of cellulase in solid state fermentation using advance technologies such as consolidated bioprocessing, metabolic engineering and strain improvement, and circumscribes the strategies to improve the enzyme yield. PMID:26601764

  5. New Players for Advanced Prostate Cancer and the Rationalisation of Insulin-Sensitising Medication

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Jennifer H.; Sarkar, Phoebe L.; Lubik, Amy A.; Nelson, Colleen C.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are recognised risk factors for the development of some cancers and, increasingly, predict more aggressive disease, treatment failure, and cancer-specific mortality. Many factors may contribute to this clinical observation. Hyperinsulinaemia, dyslipidaemia, hypoxia, ER stress, and inflammation associated with expanded adipose tissue are thought to be among the main culprits driving malignant growth and cancer advancement. This observation has led to the proposal of the potential utility of “old players” for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome as new cancer adjuvant therapeutics. Androgen-regulated pathways drive proliferation, differentiation, and survival of benign and malignant prostate tissue. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) exploits this dependence to systemically treat advanced prostate cancer resulting in anticancer response and improvement of cancer symptoms. However, the initial therapeutic response from ADT eventually progresses to castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) which is currently incurable. ADT rapidly induces hyperinsulinaemia which is associated with more rapid treatment failure. We discuss current observations of cancer in the context of obesity, diabetes, and insulin-lowering medication. We provide an update on current treatments for advanced prostate cancer and discuss whether metabolic dysfunction, developed during ADT, provides a unique therapeutic window for rapid translation of insulin-sensitising medication as combination therapy with antiandrogen targeting agents for the management of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:23573093

  6. Targeting cancer stem cells in solid tumors by vitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Jae Young, So; Nanjoo, Suh

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subset of cells that may be responsible for initiation, progression and recurrence of tumors. Recent studies have demonstrated that CSCs are highly tumorigenic and resistant to conventional chemotherapies, making them a promising target for the development of preventive/therapeutic agents. A single or combination of various markers, such as CD44, EpCAM, CD49f, CD133, CXCR4, ALDH-1 and CD24, were utilized to isolate CSCs fromvarious types of human cancers. Notch, Hedgehog, Wnt, and TGF-β signalingregulate self-renewal and differentiation of normal stem cells andare aberrantly activated in CSCs. In addition, many studies have demonstrated that these stem cell-associated signaling pathways are required for the maintenance of CSCs in differentmalignancies, including breast, colorectal, prostate and pancreatic cancers. Accumulating evidence hasshowninhibitory effects of vitamin D and its analogs on the cancer stem cell signaling pathways, suggesting vitamin D as a potential preventive/therapeutic agent against CSCs.In this review, we summarize recent findings about the roles of Notch, Hedgehog, Wnt, and TGF-β signaling in CSCs as well as the effects of vitamin D on these stem cell signaling pathways. PMID:25460302

  7. Living Fully in the Shadow of Mortal Time: Psychosocial Assets in Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Meg; Marchand, Lucille

    2013-01-01

    Objective To characterize the strategies and psychosocial conditions that influence how resilient people live in the face of advanced cancer. Methods Grounded theory interviews and surveys of ten resilient people with advanced cancer were collected and analyzed. Findings Personal assets including positive relationships, purpose in life, faith, and a sense of mastery contributed to living fully in “mortal time.” Strategies included embracing paradox, reframing time, deepening connections, and aligning actions with priorities. Open-ended interviews yielded rich illness and life stories; many participants requested a copy of the transcript. Conclusions Resilient people use a range of strategies to thrive in the face of advanced cancer. PMID:23923470

  8. Hypofractionated ablative radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is controversial. Randomized trials evaluating standard doses of chemoradiation have not shown a significant benefit from the use of consolidative radiation. Results from non-randomized studies of 3–5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been similar to standard chemoradiation, but with less toxicity and a shorter treatment time. Doses of SBRT have been reduced to subablative levels for the sake of tolerability. The benefit of both options is unclear. In contrast, ablative doses can be delivered using an SBRT technique in 15–28 fractions. The keys to the delivery of ablative doses are computed tomography (CT) image guidance and respiratory gating. Higher doses have resulted in encouraging long-term survival results. In this review, we present a comprehensive solution to achieving ablative doses for selected patients with pancreatic tumors by using a combination of classical, modern and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, CT image guidance, respiratory gating, intentional dose heterogeneity, and simultaneous integrated protection. PMID:27029741

  9. [Complications of radical surgery for advanced ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Chéreau, E; Ballester, M; Lesieur, B; Selle, F; Coutant, C; Rouzier, R; Daraï, E

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of advanced ovarian cancer should include surgery with optimal cytoreduction, which is the first prognosis factor. This surgery usually requires extensive resection (pelvic surgery, extensive lymphadenectomy, upper abdominal surgery and sometimes multiple intestinal resection). The complete surgery usually requires a resection of the diaphragm peritoneum in 10 to 100% of cases, intestinal resection in 20 to 100% of cases, splenectomy in 1 to 33% of cases, pancreatectomy in 0 11% of cases, resection of liver metastases in 0 to 16% of cases and cholecystectomy in 2 to 20% of cases. The main complications reported were digestive fistula (1.4 to 8.2%), lymphocyst (0.6 to 32%), septic complications (3.7 to 41.4%) and pulmonary complications (0 to 59%) in case of diaphragmatic surgery. The postoperative mortality ranges from 0.3 to 5.7%. Radical surgery increases the rate of complete cytoreduction with significant morbidity and postoperative mortality. Because these complications decrease survival, it is essential to assess the risk of occurrence of these events to inform patients. PMID:21183387

  10. Managing addiction in advanced cancer patients: why bother?

    PubMed

    Passik, S D; Theobald, D E

    2000-03-01

    The management of addiction in patients with advanced cancer can be time-consuming, labor-intensive, and difficult. Some clinicians believe that it is not worth the effort, due in part to a failure to appreciate the deleterious impact of addiction on palliative care efforts and a view of addiction as intractable in any case. Indeed, it is possible that some clinicians perceive addiction not only fatalistically but, because of common misconceptions, believe that managing or attempting to decrease the patient's use of alcohol or illicit substances would be tantamount to depriving a dying patient of a source of pleasure. In this paper, we argue that managing addiction is an essential aspect of palliative care for chemically-dependent and alcoholic patients. The goal of such efforts is not complete abstinence, but exerting enough control over illicit drug and alcohol use to allow palliative care interventions to decrease suffering. To illustrate this view, we describe two patients with chemical-dependency. We highlight the impact of unchecked substance abuse on patients' perpetuation of their own suffering, the complication of symptom management, the diagnosis and treatment of mood/anxiety disorders, and the effect on the patients' family and caregivers. PMID:10760628

  11. Intraoperative and external beam irradiation for locally advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, L L; Martin, J K; Bèart, R W; Nagorney, D M; Fieck, J M; Wieand, H S; Martinez, A; O'Connell, M J; Martenson, J A; McIlrath, D C

    1988-01-01

    In view of poor local control rates obtained with standard treatment, intraoperative radiation (IORT) using electrons was combined with external beam irradiation and surgical resection, with or without 5-fluorouracil (5FU), in 51 patients with locally advanced colorectal cancer (recurrent, 36 patients; primary, 15 patients). Patients received 4500-5500 cGy (rad) of fractionated, multiple field external beam irradiation and an IORT dose of 1000-2000 cGy. Thirty of 51 patients (59%) are alive and 22 patients (43%) are free of disease. In 44 patients at risk greater than or equal to 1 year, local progression within the IORT field has occurred in 1 of 44 (2%) and within the external beam field in 8 of 44 (18%). All local failures have occurred in patients with recurrence or with gross residual after partial resection, and the risk was less in patients who received 5FU during external irradiation (1 of 11, 9% vs. 6 of 31, 19%). The incidence of distant metastases is high in patients with recurrence, but subsequent peritoneal failures are infrequent. Acute and chronic tolerance have been acceptable, but peripheral nerve appears to be a dose-limiting structure. Randomized trials are needed to determine whether potential gains with IORT are real. PMID:3337561

  12. Postmastectomy radiotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Meattini, Icro; Cecchini, Sara; Di Cataldo, Vanessa; Saieva, Calogero; Francolini, Giulio; Scotti, Vieri; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Mangoni, Monica; Greto, Daniela; Nori, Jacopo; Orzalesi, Lorenzo; Casella, Donato; Simoncini, Roberta; Fambrini, Massimiliano; Bianchi, Simonetta; Livi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is widely used in locally advanced breast cancer (BC) treatment. The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) after NAC is strongly debated. The aim of our analysis was to identify major prognostic factors in a single-center series, with emphasis on PMRT. From 1997 to 2011, 170 patients were treated with NAC and mastectomy at our center; 98 cases (57.6%) underwent PMRT and 72 cases (42.4%) did not receive radiation. At a median follow-up period of 7.7 years (range 2-16) for the whole cohort, median time to locoregional recurrence (LRR) was 3.3 years (range 0.7-12.4). The 5-year and 10-year actuarial LRR rate were 14.5% and 15.9%, respectively. At the multivariate analysis the factors that significantly correlated with survival outcome were ≥ 4 positive nodes (HR 5.0, 1.51-16.52; P = 0.035), extracapsular extension (HR 2.18, 1.37-3.46; P = 0.009), and estrogen receptor positive disease (HR 0.57, 0.36-0.90; P = 0.003). Concerning LRR according to use of radiation, PMRT reduced LRR for patient with clinical T3 staged disease (P = 0.015). Our experience confirmed the impact of pathological nodal involvement on survival outcome. PMRT was found to improve local control in patients presenting with clinical T3 tumors, regardless of the response to chemotherapy. PMID:25045694

  13. Advances in the care of patients with mucinous colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hugen, Niek; Brown, Gina; Glynne-Jones, Robert; de Wilt, Johannes H W; Nagtegaal, Iris D

    2016-06-01

    The majority of colorectal cancers (CRCs) are classified as adenocarcinoma not otherwise specified (AC). Mucinous carcinoma (MC) is a distinct form of CRC and is found in 10-15% of patients with CRC. MC differs from AC in terms of both clinical and histopathological characteristics, and has long been associated with an inferior response to treatment compared with AC. The debate concerning the prognostic implications of MC in patients with CRC is ongoing and MC is still considered an unfavourable and unfamiliar subtype of the disease. Nevertheless, in the past few years epidemiological and clinical studies have shed new light on the treatment and management of patients with MC. Use of a multidisciplinary approach, including input from surgeons, pathologists, oncologists and radiologists, is beginning to lead to more-tailored approaches to patient management, on an individualized basis. In this Review, the authors provide insight into advances that have been made in the care of patients with MC. The prognostic implications for patients with colon or rectal MC are described separately; moreover, the predictive implications of MC regarding responses to commonly used therapies for CRC, such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy, and the potential for, and severity of, metastasis are also described. PMID:26323388

  14. Selective Mastectomy in the Management of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ahern, Verity . E-mail: verity.ahern@swahs.healthnsw.gov.au; Boyages, John; Gebski, Val M. Stat; Moon, Dominic; Wilcken, Nicholas

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate local control for patients with locally advanced noninflammatory breast cancer (LABC) managed by selective mastectomy. Methods and Materials: Between 1979 and 1996, 176 patients with LABC were prospectively managed by chemotherapy (CT)-irradiation (RT)-CT without routine mastectomy. All surviving patients were followed for a minimum of 5 years. Results: A total of 132 patients (75%) had a T4 tumor and 22 (12.5%) supraclavicular nodal disease. The clinical complete response rate was 91% (160/176), which included 13 patients who underwent mastectomy and 2 an iridium wire implant. The first site of failure was local for 43 patients (breast {+-} axilla for 38); 27 of these patients underwent salvage mastectomy and 11 did not for an overall mastectomy rate of 23% (40/176). If all 176 patients had undergone routine mastectomy (136 extra mastectomies), 11 additional patients may have avoided an unsalvageable first local relapse. The others would have either have not had a local relapse or would have suffered local relapse after distant disease. No tumor or treatment related factor was found to predict local disease at death. Median disease-free and overall survival for all patients was 26 and 52 months, respectively. Conclusions: Selective mastectomy in LABC may not jeopardize local control or survival.

  15. [Resection for advanced pancreatic cancer following multimodal therapy].

    PubMed

    Kleeff, J; Stöß, C; Yip, V; Knoefel, W T

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer patients presenting with borderline resectable or locally advanced unresectable tumors remain a therapeutic challenge. Despite the lack of high quality randomized controlled trials, perioperative neoadjuvant treatment strategies are often employed for this group of patients. At present the FOLFIRINOX regimen, which was established in the palliative setting, is the backbone of neoadjuvant therapy, whereas local ablative treatment, such as stereotactic irradiation and irreversible electroporation are currently under investigation. Resection after modern multimodal neoadjuvant therapy follows the same principles and guidelines as upfront surgery specifically regarding the extent of resection, e.g. lymphadenectomy, vascular resection and multivisceral resection. Because it is still exceedingly difficult to predict tumor response after neoadjuvant therapy, a special treatment approach is necessary. In the case of localized stable disease following neoadjuvant therapy, aggressive surgical exploration with serial frozen sections at critical (vascular) margins might be necessary to minimize the risk of debulking procedures and maximize the chance of a curative resection. A multidisciplinary and individualized approach is mandatory in this challenging group of patients. PMID:27138271

  16. Hospitalists caring for patients with advanced cancer: An experience-based guide.

    PubMed

    Koo, Douglas J; Tonorezos, Emily S; Kumar, Chhavi B; Goring, Tabitha N; Salvit, Cori; Egan, Barbara C

    2016-04-01

    Every year, nearly 5 million adults with cancer are hospitalized. Limited evidence suggests that hospitalization of the cancer patient is associated with adverse morbidity and mortality. Hospitalization of the patient with advanced cancer allows for an intense examination of health status in the face of terminal illness and an opportunity for defining goals of care. This experience-based guide reports what is currently known about the topic and outlines a systematic approach to maximizing opportunities, improving quality, and enhancing the well-being of the hospitalized patient with advanced cancer. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:292-296. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:26588430

  17. Recent Advances in Molecular Biology of Thyroid Cancer and Their Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Mingzhao

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy with a rapid rising incidence in recent years. Novel efficient management strategies are increasingly needed for this cancer. Remarkable advances have occurred in recent years in understanding the molecular biology of thyroid cancer. This is reflected in several major biological areas of thyroid cancer, including the molecular alterations for the loss of radioiodine avidity of thyroid cancer, the pathogenic role of the MAP kinase and PI3K/Akt pathways and their related genetic alterations, and the aberrant methylation of functionally important genes in thyroid tumorigenesis and pathogenesis. These exciting advances in molecular biology of thyroid cancer provide unprecedented opportunities for the development of molecular-based novel diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:19040974

  18. Phase I study of XL281 (BMS-908662), a potent oral RAF kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Mark A; Gordon, Michael S; Edelman, Gerald; Bendell, Johanna C; Kudchadkar, Ragini R; LoRusso, Patricia M; Johnston, Stuart H; Clary, Douglas O; Schwartz, Gary K

    2015-04-01

    Background XL281 is a potent and selective inhibitor of wild-type and mutant RAF kinases with anti-tumor activity in multiple xenograft models. Mutations in KRAS or BRAF can activate the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway in human tumors and may confer sensitivity to RAF kinase inhibitors. Methods We performed a phase I study of XL281 in patients with advanced solid tumors. Patients were enrolled in successive cohorts of XL281 orally once daily in 28-day cycles. Twice daily dosing, different formulations, and the effect of food and famotidine were also studied. At the MTD expanded cohorts with defined mutations were treated. Results In total, 160 patients were treated. The MTD on the QD schedule was 150 mg. The most common toxicities were diarrhea, nausea, and fatigue. Plasma Cmax and AUC increased with dose. Famotidine resulted in lower AUC while food had no effect. Two patients had partial responses by RECIST: One with papillary thyroid cancer with NRAS mutation and one with uveal melanoma. Another nine patients had tumor decrease of >10% but did not meet RECIST criteria for PR. Matched tumors pairs from 33 patients showed evidence of RAF inhibition with significant decreases in pERK, pMEK and pAKT. Conclusions XL281 was generally well tolerated and the MTD was established at 150 mg/day. Partial responses and clinical benefit were observed in several patients. Tumor biopsies demonstrated effective target inhibition. PMID:25476894

  19. Interaction of Porosity with an Advancing Solid/Liquid Interface: a Real-Time Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Kaukler, W.; Catalina, A.; Stefanescu, D.; Curreri, P.

    1999-01-01

    Problems associated with formation of porosity during solidification continue to have a daily impact on the metal forming industry. Several past investigations have dealt with the nucleation and growth aspects of porosity. However, investigations related to the interaction of porosity with that of a solidification front has been limited mostly to organic analogues. In this paper we report on real time experimental observations of such interactions in metal alloys. Using a state of the art X-Ray Transmission Microscope (XTM) we have been able to observe and record the dynamics of the interaction. This includes distortion of the solid/liquid interface near a poro.sity, solute segr,egation patterns surrounding a porosity and the change in shape of the porosity during interaction with an advancing solid/liquid interface. Results will be presented for different Al alloys and growth conditions. The experimental data will be compared to theory using a recently developed 2D numerical model. The model employs a finite difference approach where the solid/liquid interface is defined through the points at which the interface intersects the grid lines. The transport variables are calculated at these points and the motion of the solidification front is determined by the magnitude of the transport variables. The model accounts for the interplay of the thermal and solutal field and the influence of capilarity to predict the shape of the solid/liquid interface with time in the vicinity of porosity. One can further calculate the perturbation of the solutal field by the presence of porosity in the melt.

  20. Combined MTOR and autophagy inhibition: phase I trial of hydroxychloroquine and temsirolimus in patients with advanced solid tumors and melanoma.

    PubMed

    Rangwala, Reshma; Chang, Yunyoung C; Hu, Janice; Algazy, Kenneth M; Evans, Tracey L; Fecher, Leslie A; Schuchter, Lynn M; Torigian, Drew A; Panosian, Jeffrey T; Troxel, Andrea B; Tan, Kay-See; Heitjan, Daniel F; DeMichele, Angela M; Vaughn, David J; Redlinger, Maryann; Alavi, Abass; Kaiser, Jonathon; Pontiggia, Laura; Davis, Lisa E; O'Dwyer, Peter J; Amaravadi, Ravi K

    2014-08-01

    The combination of temsirolimus (TEM), an MTOR inhibitor, and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), an autophagy inhibitor, augments cell death in preclinical models. This phase 1 dose-escalation study evaluated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), safety, preliminary activity, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of HCQ in combination with TEM in cancer patients. In the dose escalation portion, 27 patients with advanced solid malignancies were enrolled, followed by a cohort expansion at the top dose level in 12 patients with metastatic melanoma. The combination of HCQ and TEM was well tolerated, and grade 3 or 4 toxicity was limited to anorexia (7%), fatigue (7%), and nausea (7%). An MTD was not reached for HCQ, and the recommended phase II dose was HCQ 600 mg twice daily in combination with TEM 25 mg weekly. Other common grade 1 or 2 toxicities included fatigue, anorexia, nausea, stomatitis, rash, and weight loss. No responses were observed; however, 14/21 (67%) patients in the dose escalation and 14/19 (74%) patients with melanoma achieved stable disease. The median progression-free survival in 13 melanoma patients treated with HCQ 1200mg/d in combination with TEM was 3.5 mo. Novel 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) measurements predicted clinical outcome and provided further evidence that the addition of HCQ to TEM produced metabolic stress on tumors in patients that experienced clinical benefit. Pharmacodynamic evidence of autophagy inhibition was evident in serial PBMC and tumor biopsies only in patients treated with 1200 mg daily HCQ. This study indicates that TEM and HCQ is safe and tolerable, modulates autophagy in patients, and has significant antitumor activity. Further studies combining MTOR and autophagy inhibitors in cancer patients are warranted. PMID:24991838

  1. Effect of food on the pharmacokinetics of TAS-102 and its efficacy and safety in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Takayuki; Kojima, Takashi; Bando, Hideaki; Yamazaki, Tomoko; Naito, Yoichi; Mukai, Hirofumi; Fuse, Nozomu; Goto, Koichi; Ito, Yuko; Doi, Toshihiko; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2016-05-01

    TAS-102, a novel oral antitumor agent, consists of trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride (molar ratio, 1:0.5). We investigated the effects of food on trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride. The efficacy and safety of TAS-102 were evaluated in patients with advanced solid tumors. We analyzed drug pharmacokinetics using a randomized, single-dose, two-treatment (fed versus fasting), two-period, two-sequence cross-over design, followed by repeated administration. Patients were given single doses of TAS-102 (35 mg/m(2) ) in the pharmacokinetic phase and received twice-daily doses of TAS-102 in 28-day cycles in the repeated administration phase for evaluating efficacy and safety. Food showed no effect on the area under the curve from 0 to 12 h or 0 h-infinity values of trifluridine following administration of TAS-102 under fasting and fed conditions, whereas those of tipiracil hydrochloride decreased by approximately 40%. Maximum concentrations of both drugs decreased by approximately 40%, indicating that food influenced the absorption and bioavailability of trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride, respectively. During the repeated administration, stable disease was observed in nine patients with rectal, small-cell lung, breast, thymic, duodenal, and prostate cancers. Major adverse events were neutropenia, leukopenia, anemia, and nausea. Postprandial administration was optimal for TAS-102 because trifluridine's area under the curve was not changed by food, indicating that its clinical efficacy would not be affected. Additionally, postprandial administration was reasonable because the maximum concentration of trifluridine decreased in neutrophils, which correlated with previous studies. These results suggest that TAS-102 would be an effective treatment for small-cell lung, thymic, and colorectal cancers. This trial is registered with the Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center (no. JapicCTI-111482). PMID:26918279

  2. NCCAM/NCI Phase 1 Study of Mistletoe Extract and Gemcitabine in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mansky, Patrick J.; Sannes, Timothy S.; Johnson, Laura Lee; Blackman, Marc R.; Grem, Jean L.; Swain, Sandra M.; Monahan, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. European Mistletoe (Viscum album L.) extracts (mistletoe) are commonly used for cancer treatment in Europe. This phase I study of gemcitabine (GEM) and mistletoe in advanced solid cancers (ASC) evaluated: (1) safety, toxicity, and maximum tolerated dose (MTD), (2) absolute neutrophil count (ANC) recovery, (3) formation of mistletoe lectin antibodies (ML ab), (4) cytokine plasma concentrations, (5) clinical response, and (6) pharmacokinetics of GEM. Methods. Design: increasing mistletoe and fixed GEM dose in stage I and increasing doses of GEM with a fixed dose of mistletoe in stage II. Dose limiting toxicities (DLT) were grade (G) 3 nonhematologic and G4 hematologic events; MTD was reached with 2 DLTs in one dosage level. Response in stage IV ASC was assessed with descriptive statistics. Statistical analyses examined clinical response/survival and ANC recovery. Results. DLTs were G4 neutropenia, G4 thrombocytopenia, G4 acute renal failure, and G3 cellulitis, attributed to mistletoe. GEM 1380 mg/m2 and mistletoe 250 mg combined were the MTD. Of 44 patients, 24 developed nonneutropenic fever and flu-like syndrome. GEM pharmacokinetics were unaffected by mistletoe. All patients developed ML3 IgG antibodies. ANC showed a trend to increase between baseline and cycle 2 in stage I dose escalation. 6% of patients showed partial response, 42% stable disease. Median survival was 200 days. Compliance with mistletoe injections was high. Conclusion. GEM plus mistletoe is well tolerated. No botanical/drug interactions were observed. Clinical response is similar to GEM alone. PMID:24285980

  3. Magnetic solid lipid nanoparticles in hyperthermia against colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Muñoz de Escalona, María; Sáez-Fernández, Eva; Prados, José C; Melguizo, Consolación; Arias, José L

    2016-05-17

    A reproducible double emulsion/solvent evaporation procedure is developed to formulate magnetic solid lipid nanoparticles (average size≈180 nm) made of iron oxide cores embedded within a glyceryl trimyristate solid matrix. The physicochemical characterization of the nanocomposites ascertained the efficacy of the preparation conditions in their production, i.e. surface properties (electrokinetic and thermodynamic data) were almost indistinguishable from those of the solid lipid nanomatrix, while electron microscopy characterizations and X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the satisfactory coverage of the magnetite nuclei. Hemocompatibility of the particles was established in vitro. Hysteresis cycle determinations defined the appropriate magnetic responsiveness of the nanocomposites, and their heating characteristics were investigated in a high frequency alternating gradient of magnetic field: a constant maximum temperature of 46 °C was obtained within 40 min. Finally, in vitro tests performed on human HT29 colon adenocarcinoma cells demonstrated a promising decrease in cell viability after treatment with the nanocomposites and exposure to that alternating electromagnetic field. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that such type of nanoformulation with very promising hyperthermia characteristics has been developed for therapeutic aims. PMID:26969080

  4. Research Opportunities for Cancer Associated with Indoor Air Pollution from Solid-Fuel Combustion

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Indoor air pollution (IAP) derived largely from the use of solid fuels for cooking and heating affects about 3 billion people worldwide, resulting in substantial adverse health outcomes, including cancer. Women and children from developing countries are the most expos...

  5. Development of advanced blanket materials for a solid breeder blanket of a fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, H.; Ishitsuka, E.; Tsuchiya, K.; Nakamichi, M.; Uchida, M.; Yamada, H.; Nakamura, K.; Ito, H.; Nakazawa, T.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, S.; Yoshida, N.; Kato, S.; Ito, Y.

    2003-08-01

    The design of an advanced solid breeding blanket in a DEMO reactor requires a tritium breeder and a neutron multiplier that can withstand high temperatures and high neutron fluences, and the development of such advanced blanket materials has been carried out by collaboration between JAERI, universities and industries in Japan. The Li2TiO3 pebble fabricated by a wet process is a reference material as a tritium breeder, but its stability at high temperatures has to be improved for its application in a DEMO blanket. One of these improved materials, TiO2-doped Li2TiO3 pebbles, was successfully fabricated and studied. For the advanced neutron multiplier, beryllides that have a high melting point and good chemical stability have been studied. Some characterization of Be12Ti was conducted, and it became clear that it had lower swelling and tritium inventory than beryllium metal. Pebble fabrication study for Be12Ti was also performed and Be12Ti pebbles were successfully fabricated. These activities have shown that there is a bright prospect in realizing a DEMO blanket by the application of TiO2-doped Li2TiO3 and beryllides.

  6. Azacitidine and Entinostat in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-26

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  7. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  8. Comparison of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone in advanced non-small-lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ning; Wang, Zhehai

    2016-01-01

    Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a first-line treatment for advanced nonsquamous, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 2006. This study retrospectively compared the efficacy of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone as the first-line and second-line treatment as well as the maintenance treatment for advanced NSCLC patients. A total of 1,352 patients were included and we analyzed the efficacy evaluation according to the criteria of the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST), survival, and adverse reactions. The data showed that for bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as the first-line treatment, the median progression-free survival (mPFS) and median overall survival (mOS) were 11.5 and 17.0 months, respectively, compared to 7.0 and 14 months, respectively, in patients who received chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). With bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as maintenance treatment, the mPFS and mOS were 6.0 and 17.4 months, respectively, compared to 3.0 and 15.0 months, respectively, with chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). With bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as the second-line treatment, the mPFS was 3.0 months compared to only 2.0 months with chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). The overall responses to the different regimens showed that the remission rate with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy was higher than that with chemotherapy alone (31.8% vs 25.5%, P<0.05), although there was no statistical difference in the disease control rate with either first- or second-line treatment. In conclusion, chemotherapy plus bevacizumab as the first-line and maintenance treatment, led to better curative rates and tolerable adverse reactions compared with chemotherapy alone in advanced NSCLC patients. Bevacizumab combined with cytotoxic drugs was suitable as the second-line treatment for such patients. PMID:27536131

  9. Comparison of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone in advanced non-small-lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ning; Wang, Zhehai

    2016-01-01

    Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a first-line treatment for advanced nonsquamous, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 2006. This study retrospectively compared the efficacy of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone as the first-line and second-line treatment as well as the maintenance treatment for advanced NSCLC patients. A total of 1,352 patients were included and we analyzed the efficacy evaluation according to the criteria of the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST), survival, and adverse reactions. The data showed that for bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as the first-line treatment, the median progression-free survival (mPFS) and median overall survival (mOS) were 11.5 and 17.0 months, respectively, compared to 7.0 and 14 months, respectively, in patients who received chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). With bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as maintenance treatment, the mPFS and mOS were 6.0 and 17.4 months, respectively, compared to 3.0 and 15.0 months, respectively, with chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). With bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as the second-line treatment, the mPFS was 3.0 months compared to only 2.0 months with chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). The overall responses to the different regimens showed that the remission rate with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy was higher than that with chemotherapy alone (31.8% vs 25.5%, P<0.05), although there was no statistical difference in the disease control rate with either first- or second-line treatment. In conclusion, chemotherapy plus bevacizumab as the first-line and maintenance treatment, led to better curative rates and tolerable adverse reactions compared with chemotherapy alone in advanced NSCLC patients. Bevacizumab combined with cytotoxic drugs was suitable as the second-line treatment for such patients. PMID:27536131

  10. p53 mutations and overexpression in locally advanced breast cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Faille, A.; De Cremoux, P.; Extra, J. M.; Linares, G.; Espie, M.; Bourstyn, E.; De Rocquancourt, A.; Giacchetti, S.; Marty, M.; Calvo, F.

    1994-01-01

    Alterations in the p53 gene were analysed in 39 patients with locally advanced breast cancers (LABCs) (stage III-IV) with inflammatory signs in most cases (UICC stage T4d = 32 patients) by molecular and immunohistochemical (IHC) approaches. All patients were included in the same therapy protocol. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a single-strand conformational polymorphism migration technique (SSCP), the presence of mutations in exons 2-11, covering the entire coding sequence of the p53 gene, was evaluated. Using the mouse specific anti-human p53 monoclonal antibody (PAb 1801), we also looked for overexpression of the p53 protein in tissue sections. In 16 cases shifted bands were reproducibly identified by PCR-SSCP, and all but one (localised to exon 10) were in exons 5-8, the usual mutational hotspots. Fifteen of these 16 samples were sequenced and 14 of the suspected mutations (36%) were confirmed. Most of them (12) were single nucleotide substitutions, and transitions were more frequent (eight cases) than transversions (four cases). Fourteen of the tumour samples were positively stained with the monoclonal antibody PAb 1801, 11 with nuclear staining only, two with mixed cytoplasmic and nuclear staining and one with cytoplasmic staining only. Staining patterns were very heterogeneous in terms of the percentage of positive cells (10-75%) and their distribution in the tissue section (isolated foci or dispersed cells). In 11 of the 14 mutated cases a positive immunostaining was observed. The presence of a p53 mutation was significantly associated with larger tumour diameter (chi 2 = 7.490, P = 0.0062) and the presence of clinical metastases (stage IV) (chi 2 = 10.113, P = 0.0015). A non-statistically significant trend of association was observed between p53 mutation, negative oestrogen receptors and lower response rate to therapy. Our results in this group of patients and the heterogeneity of the staining of tumour cells in tissue sections suggest that p53

  11. 1st International consensus guidelines for advanced breast cancer (ABC 1).

    PubMed

    Cardoso, F; Costa, A; Norton, L; Cameron, D; Cufer, T; Fallowfield, L; Francis, P; Gligorov, J; Kyriakides, S; Lin, N; Pagani, O; Senkus, E; Thomssen, C; Aapro, M; Bergh, J; Di Leo, A; El Saghir, N; Ganz, P A; Gelmon, K; Goldhirsch, A; Harbeck, N; Houssami, N; Hudis, C; Kaufman, B; Leadbeater, M; Mayer, M; Rodger, A; Rugo, H; Sacchini, V; Sledge, G; van't Veer, L; Viale, G; Krop, I; Winer, E

    2012-06-01

    The 1st international Consensus Conference for Advanced Breast Cancer (ABC 1) took place on November 2011, in Lisbon. Consensus guidelines for the management of this disease were developed. This manuscript summarizes these international consensus guidelines. PMID:22425534

  12. Polypharmacy in patients with advanced cancer and the role of medication discontinuation.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Thomas W; McNeil, Michael J; Kamal, Arif H; Currow, David C; Abernethy, Amy P

    2015-07-01

    Polypharmacy is a well known problem in elderly patients in general, but its prevalence and effects in patients with cancer are less clear, particularly in end-of-life settings. This Review examines the existing literature on polypharmacy in advanced cancer and end-of-life settings by reviewing evidence-based approaches to reduce polypharmacy, and outlining the potential benefits of decreasing the number of drugs that patients with cancer can take, with emphasis on the need for thoughtful discontinuation initiatives in the context of life-limiting malignant disease. In view of the apparent burden of polypharmacy in patients with advanced cancer, we expect that greater attention to polypharmacy could lead to improvements in adverse drug events, cost, and possibly quality of life. However, few data for specific interventions in the advanced cancer population are available, and thus more research is warranted. PMID:26149885

  13. Advanced gastric cancer: What we know and what we still have to learn

    PubMed Central

    Coccolini, Federico; Montori, Giulia; Ceresoli, Marco; Cima, Simona; Valli, Maria Carla; Nita, Gabriela E; Heyer, Arianna; Catena, Fausto; Ansaloni, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a common neoplastic disease and, more precisely, is the third leading cause of cancer death in the world, with differences amongst geographic areas. The definition of advanced gastric cancer is still debated. Different stadiating systems lead to slightly different stadiation of the disease, thus leading to variations between the single countries in the treatment and outcomes. In the present review all the possibilities of treatment for advanced gastric cancer have been analyzed. Surgery, the cornerstone of treatment for advanced gastric cancer, is analyzed first, followed by an investigation of the different forms and drugs of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. New frontiers in treatment suggest the growing consideration for intraperitoneal administration of chemotherapeutics and combination of traditional drugs with new ones. Moreover, the necessity to prevent the relapse of the disease leads to the consideration of administering intraperitoneal chemotherapy earlier in the therapeutical algorithm. PMID:26811653

  14. [Effect of Jinshuibao capsule on the immunological function of 36 patients with advanced cancer].

    PubMed

    Zhou, D H; Lin, L Z

    1995-08-01

    Jinshuibao Capsule (JSBC), produced by Jiangxi Jinshuibao pharmaceutical Company Limited, possesses the similar active principles and pharmacological activity with those of Cordyceps sinensis. The effect of JSBC on the immunological function of 36 patients with advanced cancer showed that it could restore cellular immunological function, improve quality of life, but had no significant effect on humoral immunological function. The results suggested that JSBC could be used as adjuvant drug in advanced cancer. PMID:8580695

  15. [Clinical study of recombinant interferon alpha-2 (Sch 30500) in advanced gynecological cancers].

    PubMed

    Kasamatsu, T; Ohmi, K; Takeuchi, S; Takamizawa, H; Matsuzawa, M; Kawana, T; Ueda, K; Kubo, H; Tsumuji, Y; Kawashima, Y

    1985-08-01

    Recombinant interferon alpha-2 (Sch 30500) was administered to 29 patients with advanced gynecological cancers (14 patients with cancer of the cervix, 8 with ovarian cancer, 4 with uterine sarcoma, 2 with endometrial cancer and 1 with unclassified cancer). No antitumor effects (CR and PR) were noted in 23 evaluable patients. Side effects observed were fever, tachycardia, diarrhea, chills, general fatigue, anorexia, nausea and vomiting. In some patients, leukopenia, decrease of hemoglobin and elevation of SGOT and SGPT were observed. No production of antibody for Sch 30500 was noted. PMID:3896157

  16. Advanced solid-state array spectroradiometer data collection during HAPEX-2 Sahel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walthall, Charles L.; Halthore, Rangshai N.; Russell, Carol; Dabney, Phillip W.; Irons, James R.; Kovalick, Bill; Graham, David; Bur, Mike

    1993-01-01

    Data collection using the Advanced Solid-state Array Spectroradiometer (ASAS) during the Hydrologic Atmospheric Pilot Experiment in the Sahel (HAPEX-II Sahel) field campaign in the Republic of Niger, West Central Africa from 22 Aug. to 19 Sep. 1992 is documented. Details on the ASAS system such as the hardware, data collection methods, information on system calibration, and data processing procedures are included. The ASAS configuration deployed for HAPEX-II Sahel contains several new components, including a new sensor array and pointing system. Because of this, new calibration procedures are being developed at the same time that the first ASAS images from HAPEX-II Sahel are being processed. These new calibration procedures will be documented in a future publication.

  17. Particulate multi-phase flowfield analysis for advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Yen-Sen; Shang, Huan-Min; Doran, Denise

    1993-01-01

    Particulate multi-phase flowfield with chemical reaction for a 2D advanced solid rocket motor (ASRM) is analyzed using the finite difference Navier-Stokes (FDNS) code. The flowfield in the aft dome cavity of the ASRM is examined and its significant impact on the motor operation and performance is demonstrated. Chemical reaction analysis is performed for H2O, O2, H2, O, H, OH, CO, CO2, Cl, Cl2, HCl, and N2. The turbulent dispersion effect is calculated with the Monte Carlo method. Result show that a recirculation zone exists at the entry of the aft-dome cavity. The particle impingement could cause the erosion and damage nozzle wall. Accumulating in the impingement area the particles change the wall shape and affect the motor performance.

  18. Solid Waste Management Requirements Definition for Advanced Life Support Missions: Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alazraki, Michael P.; Hogan, John; Levri, Julie; Fisher, John; Drysdale, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Prior to determining what Solid Waste Management (SWM) technologies should be researched and developed by the Advanced Life Support (ALS) Project for future missions, there is a need to define SWM requirements. Because future waste streams will be highly mission-dependent, missions need to be defined prior to developing SWM requirements. The SWM Working Group has used the mission architecture outlined in the System Integration, Modeling and Analysis (SIMA) Element Reference Missions Document (RMD) as a starting point in the requirement development process. The missions examined include the International Space Station (ISS), a Mars Dual Lander mission, and a Mars Base. The SWM Element has also identified common SWM functionalities needed for future missions. These functionalities include: acceptance, transport, processing, storage, monitoring and control, and disposal. Requirements in each of these six areas are currently being developed for the selected missions. This paper reviews the results of this ongoing effort and identifies mission-dependent resource recovery requirements.

  19. Supplemental final environmental impact statement for advanced solid rocket motor testing at Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Since the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision on the FEIS describing the potential impacts to human health and the environment associated with the program, three factors have caused NASA to initiate additional studies regarding these issues. These factors are: (1) The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) agreed to use the same comprehensive procedures to identify and delineate wetlands; (2) EPA has given NASA further guidance on how best to simulate the exhaust plume from the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) testing through computer modeling, enabling more realistic analysis of emission impacts; and (3) public concerns have been raised concerning short and long term impacts on human health and the environment from ASRM testing.

  20. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Meattini, Icro; Di Cataldo, Vanessa; Saieva, Calogero; Francolini, Giulio; Scotti, Vieri; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Mangoni, Monica; Greto, Daniela; Nori, Jacopo; Orzalesi, Lorenzo; Casella, Donato; Simoncini, Roberta; Fambrini, Massimiliano; Bianchi, Simonetta; Livi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is widely used in locally advanced breast cancer (BC) treatment. The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) after NAC is strongly debated. The aim of our analysis was to identify major prognostic factors in a single-center series, with emphasis on PMRT. From 1997 to 2011, 170 patients were treated with NAC and mastectomy at our center; 98 cases (57.6%) underwent PMRT and 72 cases (42.4%) did not receive radiation. At a median follow-up period of 7.7 years (range 2–16) for the whole cohort, median time to locoregional recurrence (LRR) was 3.3 years (range 0.7–12.4). The 5-year and 10-year actuarial LRR rate were 14.5% and 15.9%, respectively. At the multivariate analysis the factors that significantly correlated with survival outcome were ≥4 positive nodes (HR 5.0, 1.51–16.52; P = 0.035), extracapsular extension (HR 2.18, 1.37–3.46; P = 0.009), and estrogen receptor positive disease (HR 0.57, 0.36–0.90; P = 0.003). Concerning LRR according to use of radiation, PMRT reduced LRR for patient with clinical T3 staged disease (P = 0.015). Our experience confirmed the impact of pathological nodal involvement on survival outcome. PMRT was found to improve local control in patients presenting with clinical T3 tumors, regardless of the response to chemotherapy. PMID:25045694

  1. Locally Advanced Breast Cancer: Autologous Versus Implant-based Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Prousskaia, Elena; Chow, Whitney; Angelaki, Anna; Cirwan, Cleona; Hamed, Hisham; Farhadi, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent papers and guidelines agree that patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) should be offered breast reconstruction. Yet, the type of reconstruction in this group of patients is still a point of controversy. Methods: One hundred fourteen patients, treated for LABC from 2007 to 2013, were divided into 3 groups based on the reconstructive option: no reconstruction (NR), implant-based/expander-based reconstruction (IBR), and autologous tissue reconstruction (ATR). We analyzed demographics and compared delay in adjuvant therapy, length of hospitalization, surgical complications, failure of reconstruction, local recurrence, and disease-free survival. Results: Twenty-six patients had NR, 38 had IBR, and 50 had ATR. No significant difference was found in the percentage of patients who had their adjuvant treatment delayed [16% (NR) vs 22% (IBR) vs 14% (ATR)]. Mean length of hospitalization for the NR, IBR, and ATR groups was 2.7, 6, and 7.5 days, respectively. Complication rates requiring readmission were 36% (NR), 42% (IBR), and 32% (ATR). In the IBR group, 37% of implants were removed because of complications. Failure of reconstruction was 37% and 0% for the IBR and ATR groups, respectively. Local recurrence rates in the NR and Reconstruction (groups IBR and ATR combined) groups were 7% and 2%, respectively. Mean survival times in patients were 18 (NR), 10.3 (IBR), and 12.2 (ATR) months. Conclusions: No significant difference was found in the hospital stay length, adjuvant treatment delay, and complication rates between IBR and ATR. High rates of failed reconstruction suggest that the use of implants should be considered very carefully in patients with LABC. PMID:27014551

  2. STAT3 Decoy Oligodeoxynucleotides-Loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Induce Cell Death and Inhibit Invasion in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yanhui; Zhang, Xiaolei; Xu, Xiaoxuan; Shen, Liang; Yao, Yao; Yang, Ziyan; Liu, Peishu

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the synthesis of multi-functional nanoparticles have opened up tremendous opportunities for the targeted delivery of genes of interest. Cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) can efficiently bind nucleic acid molecules and transfect genes in vitro. Few reports have combined SLN with therapy using decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN). In the present study, we prepared SLN to encapsulate STAT3 decoy ODN; then, the properties and in vitro behavior of SLN-STAT3 decoy ODN complexes were investigated. SLN-STAT3 decoy ODN complexes were efficiently taken up by human ovarian cancer cells and significantly suppressed cell growth. Blockage of the STAT3 pathway by SLN-STAT3 decoy ODN complexes resulted in an evident induction of cell death, including apoptotic and autophagic death. The mechanism involved the increased expression of cleaved caspase 3, Bax, Beclin-1 and LC3-II and reduced expression of Bcl-2, pro-caspase 3, Survivin, p-Akt and p-mTOR. In addition, SLN-STAT3 decoy ODN complexes inhibited cell invasion by up-regulating E-cadherin expression and down-regulating Snail and MMP-9 expression. These findings confirmed that SLN as STAT3 decoy ODN carriers can induce cell death and inhibit invasion of ovarian cancer cells. We propose that SLN represent a potential approach for targeted gene delivery in cancer therapy. PMID:25923701

  3. Advanced 2-micron Solid-state Laser for Wind and CO2 Lidar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Significant advancements in the 2-micron laser development have been made recently. Solid-state 2-micron laser is a key subsystem for a coherent Doppler lidar that measures the horizontal and vertical wind velocities with high precision and resolution. The same laser, after a few modifications, can also be used in a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system for measuring atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles. The world record 2-micron laser energy is demonstrated with an oscillator and two amplifiers system. It generates more than one joule per pulse energy with excellent beam quality. Based on the successful demonstration of a fully conductive cooled oscillator by using heat pipe technology, an improved fully conductively cooled 2-micron amplifier was designed, manufactured and integrated. It virtually eliminates the running coolant to increase the overall system efficiency and reliability. In addition to technology development and demonstration, a compact and engineering hardened 2-micron laser is under development. It is capable of producing 250 mJ at 10 Hz by an oscillator and one amplifier. This compact laser is expected to be integrated to a lidar system and take field measurements. The recent achievements push forward the readiness of such a laser system for space lidar applications. This paper will review the developments of the state-of-the-art solid-state 2-micron laser.

  4. Advances in solid state switchgear technology for large space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, G. R.

    1984-01-01

    High voltage solid state remote power controllers (RPC's) and the required semiconductor power switches to provide baseline technology for large, high power distribution systems in the space station, all electric airplane and other advanced aerospace applications were developed. The RPC's were developed for dc voltages from 28 to 1200 V and ac voltages of 115, 230, and 440 V at frequencies of 400 Hz to 20 kHz. The benefits and operation of solid state RPC's and highlights of several developments to bring the RPC to technology readiness for future aerospace needs are examined. The 28 V dc Space Shuttle units, three RPC types at 120 V dc, two at 270/300 V dc, two at 230 V ac and several high power RPC models at voltages up to 1200 V dc with current ratings up to 100 A are reviewed. New technology programs to develop a new family of (DI)2 semiconductor switches and 20 kHz, 440 V ac RPC's are described.

  5. Requirements Development Issues for Advanced Life Support Systems: Solid Waste Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levri, Julie A.; Fisher, John W.; Alazraki, Michael P.; Hogan, John A.

    2002-01-01

    Long duration missions pose substantial new challenges for solid waste management in Advanced Life Support (ALS) systems. These possibly include storing large volumes of waste material in a safe manner, rendering wastes stable or sterilized for extended periods of time, and/or processing wastes for recovery of vital resources. This is further complicated because future missions remain ill-defined with respect to waste stream quantity, composition and generation schedule. Without definitive knowledge of this information, development of requirements is hampered. Additionally, even if waste streams were well characterized, other operational and processing needs require clarification (e.g. resource recovery requirements, planetary protection constraints). Therefore, the development of solid waste management (SWM) subsystem requirements for long duration space missions is an inherently uncertain, complex and iterative process. The intent of this paper is to address some of the difficulties in writing requirements for missions that are not completely defined. This paper discusses an approach and motivation for ALS SWM requirements development, the characteristics of effective requirements, and the presence of those characteristics in requirements that are developed for uncertain missions. Associated drivers for life support system technological capability are also presented. A general means of requirements forecasting is discussed, including successive modification of requirements and the need to consider requirements integration among subsystems.

  6. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-03-12

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Precancerous/Nonmalignant Condition; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  7. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Melanoma or Other Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-13

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Precancerous Condition; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  8. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-03-25

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Precancerous Condition; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  9. The association between metabolic syndrome and the risk of prostate cancer, high-grade prostate cancer, advanced prostate cancer, prostate cancer-specific mortality and biochemical recurrence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although a previous meta-analysis reported no association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and prostate cancer risk, a number of studies suggest that MetS may be associated with the aggressiveness and progression of prostate cancer. However, these results have been inconsistent. This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated the nature of this association. Methods We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and bibliographies of retrieved studies up to January 2013 using the keywords “metabolic syndrome” and “prostate cancer”. We assessed relative risks (RRs) of the prostate cancer, several parameters of prostate cancer aggressiveness and progression associated with MetS using 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Results The literature search produced 547 hits from which 19 papers were extracted for the meta-analysis. In cancer-free population with and without MetS, the combined adjusted RR (95% CI) of prostate cancer risk and prostate cancer-specific mortality in longitudinal cohort studies is 0.96 (0.85 ~ 1.09) and 1.12 (1.02 ~ 1.23) respectively. In the prostate cancer patients with and without MetS, the combined unadjusted OR (95% CI) of high grade Gleason prostate cancer is 1.44 (1.20 ~ 1.72), the OR of advanced prostate cancer is 1.37 (1.12 ~ 1.68) and the OR of biochemical recurrence is 2.06 (1.43 ~ 2.96). Conclusions The overall analyses revealed no association between MetS and prostate cancer risk, although men with MetS appear more likely to have high-grade prostate cancer and more advanced disease, were at greater risk of progression after radical prostatectomy and were more likely to suffer prostate cancer-specific death. Further primary studies with adjustment for appropriate confounders and larger, prospective, multicenter investigations are required. PMID:23406686

  10. Biomodulation of capecitabine by paclitaxel and carboplatin in advanced solid tumors and adenocarcinoma of unknown primary.

    PubMed

    Mikhail, Sameh; Lustberg, Maryam B; Ruppert, Amy S; Mortazavi, Amir; Monk, Paul; Kleiber, Barbara; Villalona-Calero, Miguel; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios

    2015-11-01

    Paclitaxel and carboplatin upregulate thymidine phosphorylase and thus may provide synergistic antitumor activity in combination with capecitabine (CTX). We, therefore, performed a phase I/II study of CTX. In the phase I study, patients with advanced solid tumors received carboplatin on day 1, paclitaxel on days 1, 8, 15 and capecitabine orally twice a day on days 8-21, every 4 weeks. Phase II patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of unknown primary (ACUP) were treated at the maximal tolerable dose. The phase I study enrolled 29 patients evaluable for dose limiting toxicity. The recommended phase II dose was capecitabine 750 mg/m(2) bid, paclitaxel 60 mg/m(2)/week and carboplatin AUC of 6. There were 9 confirmed responses, 5 partial responses and disease stabilization >3 months in 14 patients. The phase II study was prematurely terminated at 25 patients due to cessation of funding. The objective response rate was 32 % (95 % CI 0.15-0.54), the median progression-free survival 5.5 months (95 % CI 2.8-10.8 months) and the median overall survival 10.8 months (95 % CI 6.0-32.0 months). CTX demonstrated acceptable tolerability and antitumor activity. At the recommended dose level in patients with ACUP, this regimen showed encouraging preliminary activity. PMID:26416564

  11. Augmented delivery of gemcitabine in lung cancer cells exploring mannose anchored solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Soni, Namrata; Soni, Neetu; Pandey, Himanshu; Maheshwari, Rahul; Kesharwani, Prashant; Tekade, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Gemcitabine (GmcH) is an effective anti-cancer agent used in the chemotherapy of lung cancer. However, the clinical applications of GmcH has been impeded primarily due to its low blood residence time, unfavorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) profile, and poor penetration in the complex environment of lung cancer cells. Thus, the present study aims to formulate GmcH loaded mannosylated solid lipid nanoparticles (GmcH-SLNs) for improving its drug uptake into the lung cancer cells. GmcH-SLNs were prepared by emulsification and solvent evaporation process, and surface modification was done with mannose using ring opening technique. The cellular toxicity and cell uptake studies were performed in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cell line. The developed nanoformulation appears to be proficient in targeted delivery of GmcH with improved therapeutic effectiveness and enhanced safety. PMID:27459173

  12. Distinguishing Symptoms of Grief and Depression in a Cohort of Advanced Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Juliet C.; Zhang, Baohui; Block, Susan D.; Maciejewski, Paul K.; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the symptoms of grief are different from symptoms of depression among bereaved family members. This study is an attempt to replicate this finding among advanced cancer patients and examine clinical correlates of patient grief and depression. Analyses were conducted on data from interviews with 123 advanced cancer…

  13. Advances in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer with follicular cell strain.

    PubMed

    Ben Slimène, Faouzi; Mhiri, Aida; Ben Ali, Moez; Slimène, Hédia; Ben Raies, Nouzha; Karboua, Esma; Schlumberger, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The management of nodules and thyroid cancer is evolving. The aim is to individualize the treatment, decreasing aggression in the forms low risk and instead seeking new therapeutic options in advanced disease. This update shows the main recent advances in this field. PMID:27575497

  14. Therapeutic vaccines for prostate cancer: recent advances and future directions.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Julius; Madan, Ravi A

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, therapeutic cancer vaccines have emerged as a viable and promising treatment for prostate cancer. Beyond sipuleucel-T, phase III trials are evaluating multiple vaccine platforms in men with this disease. Growing data evaluating vaccine therapies suggests that these agents are more effective in patients with more indolent and possibly also earlier stages of disease. In addition, a wealth of preclinical data has shown that traditional prostate cancer treatments including anti androgens, cytotoxic and radiation therapies may provide immunologic synergy when given in combination with vaccine platforms. Building off this data, numerous clinical trials are evaluating therapeutic cancer vaccines in early stage prostate cancer and also in combination with traditional prostate cancer therapies. In addition, in order to optimize immune responses, ongoing trials are evaluating vaccines in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Preliminary data from these trials have been promising and are offering an exciting glimpse at the future of immunotherapy for this disease. PMID:26889831

  15. Advanced Gold Nanomaterials for Photothermal Therapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rasheed; Fu, Juan; He, Nongyue; Li, Song

    2016-01-01

    Photothermal therapy represents a non-invasive therapeutic tool to eradicate cancer tumor with minimum toxic effects. In this ablative therapy, accurate delivery of efficient photothermal conversion agents followed by laser irradiation results in tumor ablation with lower toxicity compared to other cancer therapies. Gold nanomaterials are efficient to passively target and deliver photothermal agents to the cancer tumor. Through surface plasma resonance, gold nanomaterials including nanorods, nanostars, nanoflowers, nanocages and nanoshells exhibited strong NIR absorption and are widely utilized during photothermal ablative therapy of cancer. Currently, researchers have devoted their attention to minimize toxicity of photothermal agents using modified probe design. By developing this noninvasive cancer therapy, expectations to minimize toxicity of cancer treatment may become reality sooner. PMID:27398434

  16. Clinical Management of Pain in Advanced Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Claribel P.L.; MacLeod, Nicholas; Laird, Barry J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer in the world and pain is its most common symptom. Pain can be brought about by several different causes including local effects of the tumor, regional or distant spread of the tumor, or from anti-cancer treatment. Patients with lung cancer experience more symptom distress than patients with other types of cancer. Symptoms such as pain may be associated with worsening of other symptoms and may affect quality of life. Pain management adheres to the principles set out by the World Health Organization’s analgesic ladder along with adjuvant analgesics. As pain can be caused by multiple factors, its treatment requires pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures from a multidisciplinary team linked in with specialist palliative pain management. This review article examines pain management in lung cancer. PMID:23115483

  17. Study of solid oxide fuel cell interconnects, protective coatings and advanced physical vapor deposition techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannon, Paul Edward

    High energy conversion efficiency, decreased environmentally-sensitive emissions and fuel flexibility have attracted increasing attention toward solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems for stationary, transportation and portable power generation. Critical durability and cost issues, however, continue to impede wide-spread deployment. Many intermediate temperature (600-800°C) planar SOFC systems employ metallic alloy interconnect components, which physically connect individual fuel cells into electric series, facilitate gas distribution to appropriate SOFC electrode chambers (fuel/anode and oxidant[air]/cathode) and provide SOFC stack mechanical support. These demanding multifunctional requirements challenge commercially-available and inexpensive metallic alloys due to corrosion and related effects. Many ongoing investigations are aimed at enabling inexpensive metallic alloys (via bulk and/or surface modifications) as SOFC interconnects (SOFC(IC)s). In this study, two advanced physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques: large area filtered vacuum arc deposition (LAFAD), and filtered arc plasma-assisted electron beam PVD (FA-EBPVD) were used to deposit a wide-variety of protective nanocomposite (amorphous/nanocrystalline) ceramic thin-film (<5microm) coatings on commercial and specialty stainless steels with different surface finishes. Both bare and coated steel specimens were subjected to SOFC(IC)-relevant exposures and evaluated using complimentary surface analysis techniques. Significant improvements were observed under simulated SOFC(IC) exposures with many coated specimens at ˜800°C relative to uncoated specimens: stable surface morphology; low area specific resistance (ASR <100mO·cm 2 >1,000 hours); and, dramatically reduced Cr volatility (>30-fold). Analyses and discussions of SOFC(IC) corrosion, advanced PVD processes and protective coating behavior are intended to advance understanding and accelerate the development of durable and commercially-viable SOFC

  18. Research Opportunities for Cancer Associated with Indoor Air Pollution from Solid-Fuel Combustion

    PubMed Central

    Ghazarian, Armen A.; DeMarini, David M.; Sapkota, Amir; Jack, Darby; Lan, Qing; Winn, Deborah M.; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Indoor air pollution (IAP) derived largely from the use of solid fuels for cooking and heating affects about 3 billion people worldwide, resulting in substantial adverse health outcomes, including cancer. Women and children from developing countries are the most exposed populations. A workshop was held in Arlington, Virginia, 9–11 May 2011, to better understand women’s and children’s potential health effects from IAP in developing countries. Workshop participants included international scientists, manufacturers, policy and regulatory officials, community leaders, and advocates who held extensive discussions to help identify future research needs. Objectives: Our objective was to identify research opportunities regarding IAP and cancer, including research questions that could be incorporated into studies of interventions to reduce IAP exposure. In this commentary, we describe the state of the science in understanding IAP and its associations with cancer and suggest research opportunities for improving our understanding of the issues. Discussion: Opportunities for research on IAP and cancer include studies of the effect of IAP on cancers other than lung cancer; studies of genetic factors that modify susceptibility; studies to determine whether the effects of IAP are mediated via germline, somatic, and/or epigenetic changes; and studies of the effects of IAP exposure via dermal and/or oral routes. Conclusions: IAP from indoor coal use increases the risk of lung cancer. Installing chimneys can reduce risk, and some genotypes, including GSTM1-null, can increase risk. Additional research is needed regarding the effects of IAP on other cancers and the effects of different types of solid fuels, oral and dermal routes of IAP exposure, genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, and genetic susceptibility. PMID:22846419

  19. Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Johung, Kimberly; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Chang, Bryan W.

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Surgical resection can be curative, but the majority of patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Treatment for patients with locally advanced disease is controversial. Therapeutic options include systemic therapy alone, concurrent chemoradiation, or induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. We review the evidence to date regarding the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), as well as evolving strategies including the emerging role of targeted therapies. We propose that if radiation is used for patients with LAPC, it should be delivered with concurrent chemotherapy and following a period of induction chemotherapy.

  20. Recent advances in cancer stem/progenitor cell research: therapeutic implications for overcoming resistance to the most aggressive cancers.

    PubMed

    Mimeault, M; Hauke, R; Mehta, P P; Batra, S K

    2007-01-01

    Overcoming intrinsic and acquired resistance of cancer stem/progenitor cells to current clinical treatments represents a major challenge in treating and curing the most aggressive and metastatic cancers. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the cellular origin and molecular mechanisms at the basis of cancer initiation and progression as well as the heterogeneity of cancers arising from the malignant transformation of adult stem/progenitor cells. We describe the critical functions provided by several growth factor cascades, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), stem cell factor (SCF) receptor (KIT), hedgehog and Wnt/beta-catenin signalling pathways that are frequently activated in cancer progenitor cells and are involved in their sustained growth, survival, invasion and drug resistance. Of therapeutic interest, we also discuss recent progress in the development of new drug combinations to treat the highly aggressive and metastatic cancers including refractory/relapsed leukaemias, melanoma and head and neck, brain, lung, breast, ovary, prostate, pancreas and gastrointestinal cancers which remain incurable in the clinics. The emphasis is on new therapeutic strategies consisting of molecular targeting of distinct oncogenic signalling elements activated in the cancer progenitor cells and their local microenvironment during cancer progression. These new targeted therapies should improve the efficacy of current therapeutic treatments against aggressive cancers, and thereby preventing disease relapse and enhancing patient survival. PMID:17979879

  1. A Phase 2 Study of Cediranib in Combination With Olaparib in Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-05

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  2. Targeted therapy for advanced urothelial cancer of the bladder: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhaowei; Shen, Zhoujun; Xu, Chen

    2012-11-01

    The treatment of advanced urothelial cancer of the bladder has evolved substantially during recent years. Chemotherapy has been the mainstay of treatment and confers survival advantage. Despite such advances, the chemotherapy of bladder cancer is far from satisfactory due to severe side effects. Targeted therapy with novel drugs directed at specific molecular pathways opens promising new avenues to improve patient outcome. A systematic review examined the clinical data for novel targeted agents in 10 phase II trials, with a focus on bevacizumab, aflibercept, sunitinib, sorafenib, gefitinib, lapatinib and trastuzumab. Besides, we present studies on other novel, promising targeted agents, including pazopanib, cetuximab and everolimus. Although bevacizumab and trastuzumab have shown promising results for patients with advanced bladder cancer, other targeted agents have not achieved the same clinical benefit in this disease as seen in other common epithelial cancers. Ultimately, combination targeted therapy, sequential therapy, adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapy may yield the best outcomes. PMID:22583418

  3. Formation of solid tumors by a single multinucleated cancer cel

    PubMed Central

    Weihua, Zhang; Lin, Qingtang; Ramoth, Asa J.; Fan, Dominic; Fidler, Isaiah J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Large multinucleated cells (MNC) commonly exist in tumorigenic cancer cell lines widely used in research, but their contributions to tumorigenesis are unknown. METHODS In this study, we characterized MNCs in the murine fibrosarcoma cell line UV-2237 in vitro and in vivo at a single cell level. RESULTS We observed that MNCs originated from a rare subpopulation of mononuclear cells; MNCs were positive for a senescent marker, β-galacosidase (SA-β-Gal); MNCs were responsible for the majority of clonogenic activity when cultured in hard agar; MNCs were more resistant to chemotherapeutic agents than were mononuclear cells; MNCs could undergo asymmetric division (producing mononuclear cells) and self-renewal in vitro and in vivo; and, most importantly a single MNC produced orthotopic subcutaneous tumors (composed mainly of mononuclear cells) that gave rise to spontaneous lung metastases in nude mice. CONCLUSIONS MNCs can be growth-arrested under stress, are highly resistant to chemotherapy, and can generate clonal orthotopic metastatic tumors PMID:21365635

  4. Serum cytokeratin 19 fragment in advanced lung cancer: could we eventually have a serum tumor marker?

    PubMed Central

    Bastawisy, Ahmed El; azzouny, Mahmoud El; Mohammed, Gamal; allah, Ahmad Awad; Behiry, Eman

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Lung cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies; however, no serum marker has been routinely recommended until now. Methods: This is a prospective case control study including two groups of patients: Group I—patients with advanced lung cancer and Group II—patients with benign lung disease as control. Serum cytokeratin 19 (CK19) fragment levels were measured at baseline by real-time polymerase chain reaction before first-line chemotherapy. The CK19 cut-off taken was 15-cycle threshold. The primary end point was the comparison of high CK19 in cases and controls. The secondary end point was the correlation between high CK19 and progressive disease (PD), progression-free survival, and overall survival (OS) in advanced lung cancer patients. Results: A total of 30 patients with advanced lung cancer (16 non-small and 14 small cell lung cancer) and 15 patients with benign lung disease were included and followed up during the period from October 2008 to October 2011 with median follow-up of one and half years. High CK19 was found in 90% of lung cancer cases as compared with 7% in controls (p < 0.001). High CK19 was found in all cases showing PD (p = 0.04). One-year OS in high CK was 61% as compared with 33% in normal CK (p = 0.1). Conclusion: Serum CK19 fragment is a potential diagnostic and prognostic marker for advanced lung cancer. PMID:24567753

  5. Advances in cancer research using gold nanoparticles mediated photothermal ablation

    PubMed Central

    MOCAN, LUCIAN; MATEA, CRISTIAN T.; BARTOS, DANA; MOSTEANU, OFELIA; POP, TEODORA; MOCAN, TEODORA; IANCU, CORNEL

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggests that nanotechnologies may lead to the development of novel cancer treatment. Gold nanoparticles with their unique physical and chemical properties hold great hopes for the development of thermal-based therapies against human malignancies. This review will focus on various strategies that have been developed to use gold nanoparticles as photothermal agents against human cancers. PMID:27152068

  6. Phase I Safety, Pharmacokinetic, and Pharmacodynamic Study of ENMD-2076, a Novel Angiogenic and Aurora Kinase Inhibitor, in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Jennifer R.; Bastos, Bruno R.; Hansen, Ryan J.; Gustafson, Daniel L.; Eckhardt, S. Gail; Kwak, Eunice L.; Pandya, Shuchi S.; Fletcher, Graham C.; Pitts, Todd M.; Kulikowski, Gillian N.; Morrow, Mark; Arnott, Jamie; Bray, Mark R.; Sidor, Carolyn; Messersmith, Wells; Shapiro, Geoffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose ENMD-2076 is a unique orally bioavailable Aurora kinase and VEGFR inhibitor. The purpose of this phase 1 study of ENMD-2076 was to determine the MTD, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic profiles and preliminary antitumor activity. Experimental Design Patients with refractory advanced solid malignancies were treated with ENMD-2076 orally with continuous once daily dosing. Doses from 60 to 200 mg/m2 were evaluated using a standard 3 (to 4) +3 design. Pharmacokinetic parameters were studied on days 1, 28, and 30 to 35 of cycle 1. Expanded MTD cohorts included patients with ovarian cancer, colorectal cancer, and refractory solid tumors. Results A total of 67 patients (46 F, 21M; ages 30–76) entered the study. Dose levels of 60, 80, 120, 200, and 160 mg/m2 were evaluated. Two patients experienced grade 3 hypertension at 200 mg/m2, and additional grade 3 neutropenia events limited tolerability at this dose. An intermediate dose of 160 mg/m2 was determined to be the MTD. The most common drug-related adverse events included hypertension, nausea/vomiting, and fatigue. The pharmacokinetics of ENMD-2076 were characterized by a rapid absorption phase (Tmax 3–7.8 hours), a t1/2 of 27.3 to 38.3 hours after a single dose, and dose proportional exposure. Decreased plasma sVEGFR2 was observed posttreatment. Two patients with platinum refractory/resistant ovarian cancer had RECIST partial responses. Conclusions ENMD-2076 was well tolerated, had a linear pharmacokinetic profile, and showed promising antitumor activity, particularly in ovarian cancer. The recommended phase 2 dose of ENMD-2076 is 160 mg/m2 administered orally once daily with continuous dosing. PMID:21131552

  7. The next steps in improving the outcomes of advanced ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Openshaw, Mark R; Fotopoulou, Christina; Blagden, Sarah; Gabra, Hani

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide ovarian cancer affects over 200,000 women per year. Overall survival rates are poor due to two predominate reasons. First, the majority of patients present with advanced disease creating significant difficulty with effecting disease eradication. Second, acquisition of chemotherapy resistance results in untreatable progressive disease. Advances in treatment of advanced ovarian cancer involve a spectrum of interventions including improvements in frontline debulking surgery and combination chemotherapy. Anti-angiogenic factors have been shown to have activity in frontline and recurrent disease while novel chemotherapeutic agents and targeted treatments are in development particularly for disease that is resistant to platinum-based chemotherapy. These developments aim to improve the progression-free and overall survival of women with advanced ovarian cancer. PMID:26102473

  8. Surgery for Locally Advanced T4 Rectal Cancer: Strategies and Techniques.

    PubMed

    Helewa, Ramzi M; Park, Jason

    2016-06-01

    Locally advanced T4 rectal cancer represents a complex clinical condition that requires a well thought-out treatment plan and expertise from multiple specialists. Paramount in the management of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer are accurate preoperative staging, appropriate application of neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatments, and, above all, the provision of high-quality, complete surgical resection in potentially curable cases. Despite the advanced nature of this disease, extended and multivisceral resections with clear margins have been shown to result in good oncological outcomes and offer patients a real chance of cure. In this article, we describe the assessment, classification, and multimodality treatment of primary locally advanced T4 rectal cancer, with a focus on surgical planning, approaches, and outcomes. PMID:27247535

  9. Androgen Receptor as a Driver of Therapeutic Resistance in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Barbara; Collazo, Joanne; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    The role of the androgen receptor (AR) signaling axis in the progression of prostate cancer is a cornerstone to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms causing castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Resistance of advanced prostate cancer to available treatment options makes it a clinical challenge that results in approximately 30,000 deaths of American men every year. Since the historic discovery by Dr. Huggins more than 70 years ago, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the principal treatment for advanced prostate cancer. Initially, ADT induces apoptosis of androgen-dependent prostate cancer epithelial cells and regression of androgen-dependent tumors. However, the majority of patients with advanced prostate cancer progress and become refractory to ADT due to emergence of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells driven by aberrant AR activation. Microtubule-targeting agents such as taxanes, docetaxel and paclitaxel, have enjoyed success in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer; although new, recently designed mitosis-specific agents, such as the polo-kinase and kinesin-inhibitors, have yielded clinically disappointing results. Docetaxel, as a first-line chemotherapy, improves prostate cancer patient survival by months, but tumor resistance to these therapeutic agents inevitably develops. On a molecular level, progression to CRPC is characterized by aberrant AR expression, de novo intraprostatic androgen production, and cross talk with other oncogenic pathways. Emerging evidence suggests that reactivation of epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) processes may facilitate the development of not only prostate cancer but also prostate cancer metastases. EMT is characterized by gain of mesenchymal characteristics and invasiveness accompanied by loss of cell polarity, with an increasing number of studies focusing on the direct involvement of androgen-AR signaling axis in EMT, tumor progression, and therapeutic resistance. In this article, we

  10. A novel tumor suppressor function of Kindlin-3 in solid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Menashi, Suzanne; Tost, Jorg; Podgorniak, Marie-Pierre; Sadoux, Aurelie; Daunay, Antoine; Teixeira, Luis; Soulier, Jean; Idbaih, Ahmed; Setterblad, Niclas; Fauvel, Françoise; Calvo, Fabien; Janin, Anne; Lebbé, Celeste; Mourah, Samia

    2014-01-01

    Kindlin-3 (FERMT-3) is known to be central in hemostasis and thrombosis control and its deficiency disrupts platelet aggregation and causes Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency disease. Here we report that Kindlin-3 has a tumor suppressive role in solid cancer. Our present genetic and functional data show that Kindlin-3 is downregulated in several solid tumors by a mechanism involving gene hypermethylation and deletions. In vivo experiments demonstrated that Kindlin-3 knockdown in 2 tumor cell models (breast cancer and melanoma) markedly increases metastasis formation, in accord with the in vitro increase of tumor cell malignant properties. The metastatic phenotype was supported by a mechanism involving alteration in β3-integrin activation including decreased phosphorylation, interaction with talin and the internalization of its active form leading to less cell attachment and more migration/invasion. These data uncover a novel and unexpected tumor suppressor role of Kindin-3 which can influence integrins targeted therapies development. PMID:25344860

  11. Physical Activity in Patients With Advanced-Stage Cancer: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Tara A.; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2014-01-01

    The importance of physical activity for chronic disease prevention and management has become generally well accepted. The number of research interventions and publications examining the benefits of physical activity for patients with cancer has been rising steadily. However, much of that research has focused on the impact of physical activity either prior to or early in the cancer diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship process. Research focusing on the effects of physical activity, specifically for patients with advanced-stage cancer and poorer prognostic outcomes, has been addressed only recently. The purpose of this article is to examine the state of the science for physical activity in the advanced-stage disease subset of the cancer population. Exercise in a variety of intensities and forms, including yoga, walking, biking, and swimming, has many health benefits for people, including those diagnosed with cancer. Research has shown that, for people with cancer (including advanced-stage cancer), exercise can decrease anxiety, stress, and depression while improving levels of pain, fatigue, shortness of breath, constipation, and insomnia. People diagnosed with cancer should discuss with their oncologist safe, easy ways they can incorporate exercise into their daily lives. PMID:22641322

  12. Physical activity in patients with advanced-stage cancer: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tara A; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2012-06-01

    The importance of physical activity for chronic disease prevention and management has become generally well accepted. The number of research interventions and publications examining the benefits of physical activity for patients with cancer has been rising steadily. However, much of that research has focused on the impact of physical activity either prior to or early in the cancer diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship process. Research focusing on the effects of physical activity, specifically for patients with advanced-stage cancer and poorer prognostic outcomes, has been addressed only recently. The purpose of this article is to examine the state of the science for physical activity in the advanced-stage disease subset of the cancer population. Exercise in a variety of intensities and forms, including yoga, walking, biking, and swimming, has many health benefits for people, including those diagnosed with cancer. Research has shown that, for people with cancer (including advanced-stage cancer), exercise can decrease anxiety, stress, and depression while improving levels of pain, fatigue, shortness of breath, constipation, and insomnia. People diagnosed with cancer should discuss with their oncologist safe, easy ways they can incorporate exercise into their daily lives. PMID:22641322

  13. A profile of enzalutamide for the treatment of advanced castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Greasley, Rosa; Khabazhaitajer, Mohammad; Rosario, Derek J

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of castration resistant prostate cancer from androgen-sensitive prostate cancer have provided new avenues exploring efficacious therapies in a disease which is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the western world. In the evolution of second generation anti-androgens, enzalutamide, a novel androgen-receptor signaling inhibitor, has emerged targeting multiple steps within the androgenic stimulation pathway. This review discusses what is currently known of the mechanisms surrounding castration resistant prostate cancer development and the current human clinical trials to determine whether enzalutamide presents a new hope for men with advanced prostate cancer. The issues of therapy resistance, withdrawal effects and cross-resistance are briefly touched upon. PMID:26109877

  14. Risk estimation for fast neutrons with regard to solid cancer.

    PubMed

    Kellerer, A M; Walsh, L

    2001-12-01

    In the absence of epidemiological information on the effects of neutrons, their cancer mortality risk coefficient is currently taken as the product of two low-dose extrapolations: the nominal risk coefficient for photons and the presumed maximum relative biological effectiveness of neutrons. This approach is unnecessary. Since linearity in dose is assumed for neutrons at low to moderate effect levels, the risk coefficient can be derived in terms of the excess risk from epidemiological observations at an intermediate dose of gamma rays and an assumed value, R(1), of the neutron RBE relative to this reference dose of gamma rays. Application of this procedure to the A-bomb data requires accounting for the effect of the neutron dose component, which, according to the current dosimetry system, DS86, amounts on average to 11 mGy in the two cities at a total dose of 1 Gy. With R(1) tentatively set to 20 or 50, it is concluded that the neutrons have caused 18% or 35%, respectively, of the total effect at 1 Gy. The excess relative risk (ERR) for neutrons then lies between 8 per Gy and 16 per Gy. Translating these values into risk coefficients in terms of the effective dose, E, requires accounting for the gamma-ray component produced by the neutron field in the human body, which will require a separate analysis. The risk estimate for neutrons will remain essentially unaffected by the current reassessment of the neutron doses in Hiroshima, because the doses are unlikely to change much at the reference dose of 1 Gy. PMID:11741494

  15. Combination Chemotherapy Plus Amifostine in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-18

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Drug/Agent Toxicity by Tissue/Organ; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Precancerous Condition; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. Selumetinib and Akt Inhibitor MK-2206 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Advanced Gallbladder or Bile Duct Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-08

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma With Squamous Metaplasia of the Gallbladder; Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Stage II Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

  17. Systematic genomic identification of colorectal cancer genes delineating advanced from early clinical stage and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. The initial assessment of colorectal cancer involves clinical staging that takes into account the extent of primary tumor invasion, determining the number of lymph nodes with metastatic cancer and the identification of metastatic sites in other organs. Advanced clinical stage indicates metastatic cancer, either in regional lymph nodes or in distant organs. While the genomic and genetic basis of colorectal cancer has been elucidated to some degree, less is known about the identity of specific cancer genes that are associated with advanced clinical stage and metastasis. Methods We compiled multiple genomic data types (mutations, copy number alterations, gene expression and methylation status) as well as clinical meta-data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We used an elastic-net regularized regression method on the combined genomic data to identify genetic aberrations and their associated cancer genes that are indicators of clinical stage. We ranked candidate genes by their regression coefficient and level of support from multiple assay modalities. Results A fit of the elastic-net regularized regression to 197 samples and integrated analysis of four genomic platforms identified the set of top gene predictors of advanced clinical stage, including: WRN, SYK, DDX5 and ADRA2C. These genetic features were identified robustly in bootstrap resampling analysis. Conclusions We conducted an analysis integrating multiple genomic features including mutations, copy number alterations, gene expression and methylation. This integrated approach in which one considers all of these genomic features performs better than any individual genomic assay. We identified multiple genes that robustly delineate advanced clinical stage, suggesting their possible role in colorectal cancer metastatic progression. PMID:24308539

  18. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2012.

    PubMed

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jae-Weon; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Hak Jae; Lee, Kyung-Hun

    2013-01-01

    Ten topics were chosen among major clinical research achievements in gynecologic oncology in 2012. For ovarian cancer, comprehensive review of the history of bevacizumab studies was followed by poly adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and other molecular targeted agents such as epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor and AMG 386. For the development of genomic study in gynecologic cancers, BRCA and DICER1 mutations were covered in epithelial and nonepithelial ovarian cancer, respectively. For endometrial cancer, targeted agents including mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors and bevacizumab were discussed. Radiation therapy "sandwiched" between combination chemotherapy schedules for the treatment of uterine papillary serous carcinoma was also reviewed. Preoperative prediction of lymph node metastasis, definition of low-risk group, and recurrence and survival outcomes of laparoscopic approaches were addressed. For cervical cancer, we reviewed long-term benefit of human papillomavirus test and efficacy of paclitaxel/carboplatin versus paclitaxel/cisplatin in stage IVB, persistent or recurrent disease. In addition, the effect of three dimensional image-based high-dose rate brachytherapy was also reviewed. For vulvar cancer, the diagnostic value of sentinel lymph node biopsy was discussed. For breast cancer, positive results of three outstanding phase III randomized clinical trials, CLEOPATRA, EMILIA, and BOLERO-2 were introduced. Lastly, updates of major practice guidelines were summarized. PMID:23346316

  19. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Hak Jae; Lee, Kyung-Hun

    2013-01-01

    Ten topics were chosen among major clinical research achievements in gynecologic oncology in 2012. For ovarian cancer, comprehensive review of the history of bevacizumab studies was followed by poly adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and other molecular targeted agents such as epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor and AMG 386. For the development of genomic study in gynecologic cancers, BRCA and DICER1 mutations were covered in epithelial and nonepithelial ovarian cancer, respectively. For endometrial cancer, targeted agents including mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors and bevacizumab were discussed. Radiation therapy "sandwiched" between combination chemotherapy schedules for the treatment of uterine papillary serous carcinoma was also reviewed. Preoperative prediction of lymph node metastasis, definition of low-risk group, and recurrence and survival outcomes of laparoscopic approaches were addressed. For cervical cancer, we reviewed long-term benefit of human papillomavirus test and efficacy of paclitaxel/carboplatin versus paclitaxel/cisplatin in stage IVB, persistent or recurrent disease. In addition, the effect of three dimensional image-based high-dose rate brachytherapy was also reviewed. For vulvar cancer, the diagnostic value of sentinel lymph node biopsy was discussed. For breast cancer, positive results of three outstanding phase III randomized clinical trials, CLEOPATRA, EMILIA, and BOLERO-2 were introduced. Lastly, updates of major practice guidelines were summarized. PMID:23346316

  20. The NASA "PERS" Program: Solid Polymer Electrolyte Development for Advanced Lithium-Based Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Richard S.; Bennett, William R.

    2007-01-01

    In fiscal year 2000, The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) established a collaborative effort to support the development of polymer-based, lithium-based cell chemistries and battery technologies to address the next generation of aerospace applications and mission needs. The ultimate objective of this development program, which was referred to as the Polymer Energy Rechargeable System (PERS), was to establish a world-class technology capability and U.S. leadership in polymer-based battery technology for aerospace applications. Programmatically, the PERS initiative exploited both interagency collaborations to address common technology and engineering issues and the active participation of academia and private industry. The initial program phases focused on R&D activities to address the critical technical issues and challenges at the cell level. Out of a total of 38 proposals received in response to a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) solicitation, 18 proposals (13 contracts and 5 grants) were selected for initial award to address these technical challenges. Brief summaries of technical approaches, results and accomplishments of the PERS Program development efforts are presented. With Agency support provided through FY 2004, the PERS Program efforts were concluded in 2005, as internal reorganizations and funding cuts resulted in shifting programmatic priorities within NASA. Technically, the PERS Program participants explored, to various degrees over the lifetime of the formal program, a variety of conceptual approaches for developing and demonstrating performance of a viable advanced solid polymer electrolyte possessing the desired attributes, as well as several participants addressing all components of an integrated cell configuration. Programmatically, the NASA PERS Program was very successful, even though the very challenging technical goals for achieving a viable solid polymer electrolyte material or

  1. Phase I Clinical, Pharmacokinetic, and Pharmacodynamic Study of KOS-862 (Epothilone D) in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors and Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Konner, Jason; Grisham, Rachel N.; Park, Jae; O’Connor, Owen A.; Cropp, Gillian; Johnson, Robert; Hannah, Alison L.; Hensley, Martee L.; Sabbatini, Paul; Miranov, Svetlana; Danishefsky, Samuel; Hyman, David; Spriggs, David R.; Dupont, Jakob; Aghajanian, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the maximum tolerated dose and safety of the epothilone, KOS-862, in patients with advanced solid tumors or lymphoma. Patients and Methods Patients were treated weekly for 3 out of 4 weeks (Schedule A) or 2 out of 3 weeks (Schedule B) with KOS-862 (16 – 120mg/m2). Pharmacokinetic (PK) sampling was performed during cycles 1 and 2; pharmacodynamic (PD) assessment for microtubule bundle formation (MTBF) was performed after the 1st dose, only at or above 100 mg/m2. Results Thirty-two patients were enrolled, and twenty-nine completed ≥1 cycle of therapy. Dose limiting toxicity [DLT] was observed at 120 mg/m2. PK data were linear from 16 to 100 mg/m2, with proportional increases in mean Cmax and AUCtot as a function of dose. Full PK analysis (mean±SD) at 100 mg/m2 revealed the following: half-life (t½) = 9.1 ± 2.2 hours; volume of distribution (Vz) = 119 ± 41 L/m2; clearance (CL) = 9.3 ± 3.2 L/h/m2. MTBF (n=9) was seen in 40% of PBMCs within 1 hour and in 15% of PBMC at 24-hours post infusion at 100 mg/m2. Tumor shrinkage (n=2, lymphoma), stable disease >3 months (n=5, renal, prostate, oropharynx, cholangiocarcinoma, and Hodgkin lymphoma), and tumor marker reductions (n=1, colorectal cancer/CEA) were observed. Conclusion KOS-862 was well tolerated with manageable toxicity, favorable PK profile, and the suggestion of clinical activity. The maximum tolerated dose was determined to be 100 mg/m2 weekly 3-on/1-off. MTBF can be demonstrated in PBMCs of patients exposed to KOS-862. PMID:22072399

  2. Clinical cancer advances 2011: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Benowitz, Steven I; Adams, Sylvia; Aghajanian, Carol; Chang, Susan Marina; Dreyer, Zoann Eckert; Janne, Pasi A; Ko, Andrew H; Masters, Greg A; Odenike, Olatoyosi; Patel, Jyoti D; Roth, Bruce J; Samlowski, Wolfram E; Seidman, Andrew D; Tap, William D; Temel, Jennifer S; Von Roenn, Jamie H; Kris, Mark G

    2012-01-01

    A message from ASCO'S President. It has been forty years since President Richard Nixon signed the National Cancer Act of 1971, which many view as the nation's declaration of the "War on Cancer." The bill has led to major investments in cancer research and significant increases in cancer survival. Today, two-thirds of patients survive at least five years after being diagnosed with cancer compared with just half of all diagnosed patients surviving five years after diagnosis in 1975. The research advances detailed in this year's Clinical Cancer Advances demonstrate that improvements in cancer screening, treatment, and prevention save and improve lives. But although much progress has been made, cancer remains one of the world's most serious health problems. In the United States, the disease is expected to become the nation's leading cause of death in the years ahead as our population ages. I believe we can accelerate the pace of progress, provided that everyone involved in cancer care works together to achieve this goal. It is this viewpoint that has shaped the theme for my presidential term: Collaborating to Conquer Cancer. In practice, this means that physicians and researchers must learn from every patient's experience, ensure greater collaboration between members of a patient's medical team, and involve more patients in the search for cures through clinical trials. Cancer advocates, insurers, and government agencies also have important roles to play. Today, we have an incredible opportunity to improve the quality of cancer care by drawing lessons from the real-world experiences of patients. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is taking the lead in this area, in part through innovative use of health information technology. In addition to our existing quality initiatives, ASCO is working with partners to develop a comprehensive rapid-learning system for cancer care. When complete, this system will provide physicians with personalized, real

  3. Selection Criteria for the Radical Treatment of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Mansel Leigh; Harris, Dean; Davies, Mark; Lucas, Malcolm; Drew, Peter; Beynon, John

    2011-01-01

    There are over 14,000 newly diagnosed rectal cancers per year in the United Kingdom of which between 50 and 64 percent are locally advanced (T3/T4) at presentation. Pelvic exenterative surgery was first described by Brunschwig in 1948 for advanced cervical cancer, but early series reported high morbidity and mortality. This approach was later applied to advanced primary rectal carcinomas with contemporary series reporting 5-year survival rates between 32 and 66 percent and to recurrent rectal carcinoma with survival rates of 22–42%. The Swansea Pelvic Oncology Group was established in 1999 and is involved in the assessment and management of advanced pelvic malignancies referred both regionally and UK wide. This paper will set out the selection, assessment, preparation, surgery, and outcomes from pelvic exenterative surgery for locally advanced primary rectal carcinomas. PMID:22312517

  4. Advanced Multi-Phase Flow CFD Model Development for Solid Rocket Motor Flowfield Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.; Doran, Denise

    1993-01-01

    It is known that the simulations of solid rocket motor internal flow field with AL-based propellants require complex multi-phase turbulent flow model. The objective of this study is to develop an advanced particulate multi-phase flow model which includes the effects of particle dynamics, chemical reaction and hot gas flow turbulence. The inclusion of particle agglomeration, particle/gas reaction and mass transfer, particle collision, coalescence and breakup mechanisms in modeling the particle dynamics will allow the proposed model to realistically simulate the flowfield inside a solid rocket motor. The Finite Difference Navier-Stokes numerical code FDNS is used to simulate the steady-state multi-phase particulate flow field for a 3-zone 2-D axisymmetric ASRM model and a 6-zone 3-D ASRM model at launch conditions. The 2-D model includes aft-end cavity and submerged nozzle. The 3-D model represents the whole ASRM geometry, including additional grain port area in the gas cavity and two inhibitors. FDNS is a pressure based finite difference Navier-Stokes flow solver with time-accurate adaptive second-order upwind schemes, standard and extended k-epsilon models with compressibility corrections, multi zone body-fitted formulations, and turbulence particle interaction model. Eulerian/Lagrangian multi-phase solution method is applied for multi-zone mesh. To simulate the chemical reaction, penalty function corrected efficient finite-rate chemistry integration method is used in FDNS. For the AL particle combustion rate, the Hermsen correlation is employed. To simulate the turbulent dispersion of particles, the Gaussian probability distribution with standard deviation equal to (2k/3)(exp 1/2) is used for the random turbulent velocity components. The computational results reveal that the flow field near the juncture of aft-end cavity and the submerged nozzle is very complex. The effects of the turbulent particles affect the flow field significantly and provide better

  5. Advanced multi-phase flow CFD model development for solid rocket motor flowfield analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.; Doran, Denise

    1993-07-01

    It is known that the simulations of solid rocket motor internal flow field with AL-based propellants require complex multi-phase turbulent flow model. The objective of this study is to develop an advanced particulate multi-phase flow model which includes the effects of particle dynamics, chemical reaction and hot gas flow turbulence. The inclusion of particle agglomeration, particle/gas reaction and mass transfer, particle collision, coalescence and breakup mechanisms in modeling the particle dynamics will allow the proposed model to realistically simulate the flowfield inside a solid rocket motor. The Finite Difference Navier-Stokes numerical code FDNS is used to simulate the steady-state multi-phase particulate flow field for a 3-zone 2-D axisymmetric ASRM model and a 6-zone 3-D ASRM model at launch conditions. The 2-D model includes aft-end cavity and submerged nozzle. The 3-D model represents the whole ASRM geometry, including additional grain port area in the gas cavity and two inhibitors. FDNS is a pressure based finite difference Navier-Stokes flow solver with time-accurate adaptive second-order upwind schemes, standard and extended k-epsilon models with compressibility corrections, multi zone body-fitted formulations, and turbulence particle interaction model. Eulerian/Lagrangian multi-phase solution method is applied for multi-zone mesh. To simulate the chemical reaction, penalty function corrected efficient finite-rate chemistry integration method is used in FDNS. For the AL particle combustion rate, the Hermsen correlation is employed. To simulate the turbulent dispersion of particles, the Gaussian probability distribution with standard deviation equal to (2k/3)(exp 1/2) is used for the random turbulent velocity components. The computational results reveal that the flow field near the juncture of aft-end cavity and the submerged nozzle is very complex. The effects of the turbulent particles affect the flow field significantly and provide better

  6. Stromal Expression of MicroRNA-21 in Advanced Colorectal Cancer Patients with Distant Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu Sang; Nam, Soo Kyung; Koh, Jiwon; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum; Choe, Gheeyoung; Kim, Woo Ho; Lee, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the regional heterogeneity and clinicopathological significance of microRNA-21 (miR-21) in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with distant metastasis. Methods: miR-21 expression was investigated by using locked nucleic acid– fluorescence in situ hybridization in the center and periphery of the primary cancer and in distant metastasis from 170 patients with advanced CRC. In addition, α-smooth muscle actin and desmin were evaluated to identify cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) by using immunohistochemistry. Results: The miR-21 signal was observed in the cancer stroma. The expression of miR-21 (a score of 1–4) in the center and periphery of the primary cancer and in distant metastasis was observed in specimens from 133 (78.2%), 105 (61.8%), and 91 (53.5%) patients, respectively. miR-21 expression was heterogeneous in advanced CRC. Discordance between miR-21 expression in the center of the primary cancer and either the periphery of the primary cancer or distant metastasis was 31.7% or 44.7%, respectively. miR-21 stromal expression in the periphery of the primary cancer was significantly associated with a better prognosis (p=.004). miR-21 expression was significantly associated with CAFs in the center of the primary cancer (p=.001) and distant metastases (p=.041). Conclusions: miR-21 expression is observed in cancer stroma related to the CAF quantity and frequently presents regional heterogeneity in CRC. Our findings indicate that the role of miR-21 in predicting prognosis may be controversial but provide a new perspective of miR-21 level measurement in cancer specimens. PMID:27240857

  7. Cancer: An Oxidative Crosstalk between Solid Tumor Cells and Cancer Associated Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Arcucci, Alessandro; Ruocco, Maria Rosaria; Granato, Giuseppina; Sacco, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Redox balance is associated with the regulation of several cell signalling pathways and functions. In fact, under physiological conditions, cells maintain a balance between oxidant and antioxidant systems, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) can act as second messengers to regulate cell proliferation, cell death, and other physiological processes. Cancer tissues usually contain higher levels of ROS than normal tissues, and this ROS overproduction is associated with tumor development. Neoplastic tissues are very heterogeneous systems, composed of tumor cells and microenvironment that has a critical role in tumor progression. Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) represent the main cell type of tumor microenvironment, and they contribute to tumor growth by undergoing an irreversible activation process. It is known that ROS can be transferred from cancer cells to fibroblasts. In particular, ROS affect the behaviour of CAFs by promoting the conversion of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts that support tumor progression and dissemination. Furthermore, the wrecking of redox homeostasis in cancer cells and tumor microenvironment induces a metabolic reprogramming in tumor cells and cancer associated fibroblasts, giving advantage to cancer growth. This review describes the role of ROS in tumor growth, by focusing on CAFs activation and metabolic interactions between cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts. PMID:27595103

  8. Cancer: An Oxidative Crosstalk between Solid Tumor Cells and Cancer Associated Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Arcucci, Alessandro; Ruocco, Maria Rosaria; Granato, Giuseppina; Sacco, Anna Maria; Montagnani, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Redox balance is associated with the regulation of several cell signalling pathways and functions. In fact, under physiological conditions, cells maintain a balance between oxidant and antioxidant systems, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) can act as second messengers to regulate cell proliferation, cell death, and other physiological processes. Cancer tissues usually contain higher levels of ROS than normal tissues, and this ROS overproduction is associated with tumor development. Neoplastic tissues are very heterogeneous systems, composed of tumor cells and microenvironment that has a critical role in tumor progression. Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) represent the main cell type of tumor microenvironment, and they contribute to tumor growth by undergoing an irreversible activation process. It is known that ROS can be transferred from cancer cells to fibroblasts. In particular, ROS affect the behaviour of CAFs by promoting the conversion of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts that support tumor progression and dissemination. Furthermore, the wrecking of redox homeostasis in cancer cells and tumor microenvironment induces a metabolic reprogramming in tumor cells and cancer associated fibroblasts, giving advantage to cancer growth. This review describes the role of ROS in tumor growth, by focusing on CAFs activation and metabolic interactions between cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts. PMID:27595103

  9. HGF as a circulating biomarker of onartuzumab treatment in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Penuel, Elicia; Li, Congfen; Parab, Vaishali; Burton, Luciana; Cowan, Kyra J; Merchant, Mark; Yauch, Robert L; Patel, Premal; Peterson, Amy; Hampton, Garret M; Lackner, Mark R; Hegde, Priti S

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate circulating hepatocyte growth factor (cHGF) as a pharmacodynamic biomarker of Met inhibition for onartuzumab (MetMAb, OA5D5v2) in a phase I trial in patients with advanced cancers and a phase II trial in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The phase I study was a dose escalation trial with onartuzumab administered i.v. once every three weeks. The phase II study was a randomized two-arm trial in which onartuzumab or placebo was administered in combination with erlotinib in 137 patients with second and third line (2/3L) NSCLC. cHGF levels were evaluated by ELISA at multiple time points over the treatment period. Onartuzumab administration resulted in an acute and sustained rise in cHGF in both the phase I and phase II studies. Elevation in cHGF was independent of dose or drug exposure and was restricted to onartuzumab treatment. Neither higher baseline nor elevated change in cHGF levels upon treatment could simply be attributed to tumor burden or number of liver metastasis. We have shown that elevated cHGF can consistently and reproducibly be measured as a pharmacodynamic biomarker of onartuzumab activity. The elevation in cHGF is independent of tumor type, dose administered, or dose duration. Although these studies were not powered to directly address the contribution of cHGF as a predictive, on-treatment, circulating biomarker, these data suggest that measurement of cHGF in future expanded studies is warranted. PMID:23536720

  10. [Advances in studies on metabolic syndrome and breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Cao, Li; Yao, Guangyu; Hu, Xiaolei; Chen, Lujia; Ye, Changsheng

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women. Over these years, the morbidity of metabolic syndrome (MS) has also been increasing in China, probably due to changes in economies and lifestyles. As a result, the association to between these two diseases has at tracted much attention. Results demonstrated the presence of MS was associated with breast cancer risk, and the risk became higher when more MS components were present compared to no components. Moreover, a specific association was indicated between MS and breast cancer recurrence and metastasis to some extent as well. Further, for breast cancer patients, being diagnosed with MS can increase the mortality and lead to poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying the association is not clear yet, but several factors are speculated to be the possible causes, including the elevated level of insulin, insulin like growth factor-1, leptin and pro-inflammatory cytokines, the decreased level of adiponectin as well as the interaction between DBC1 and SIRT1. The prognosis of patients with breast cancer combined MS can be improved by means of changing diet habits, increasing physical activities and drug-intervention. Although the specific mechanisms underlying the association are still need to be elucidated, better understanding of the association must help us with new strategies for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26850671

  11. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases. PMID:27171673

  12. Advances in cancer therapeutics and patient access to new drugs.

    PubMed

    Dranitsaris, George; Truter, Ilse; Lubbe, Martie S; Amir, Eitan; Evans, William

    2011-03-01

    Globally, there are approximately 7.4 million cancer deaths annually, approximately 13% of deaths from all causes. Cancer is a disease of older people and, as the population ages over the next 10-20 years, we can expect an increase in the cancer incidence. Encouragingly, cancer mortality has stabilized in many countries. Part of this success may be attributed to the development of new cancer agents, collectively called 'targeted therapies', that are more specific to key components of tumour growth. Worldwide, however, one of the main factors that limit patient access to these important new drugs is their cost, which is higher than traditional chemotherapy. In this review, the clinical and pharmacoeconomic data of selected targeted agents are discussed. In the second part of this article, the challenges faced by healthcare systems in making such drugs available to patients is reviewed. Current strategies used by many countries around the world to manage cancer drug budgets are presented, along with a proposed approach using pharmacoeconomic methodology that may increase patient access. PMID:21184619

  13. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoran; Wu, Xiaohua; Cheng, Xi

    2016-07-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases. PMID:27171673

  14. Phase I study of a new cancer vaccine of ten mixed peptides for advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Iwasa, Satoru; Yamada, Yasuhide; Heike, Yuji; Shoji, Hirokazu; Honma, Yoshitaka; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Matsueda, Satoko; Yamada, Akira; Morita, Michi; Yamaguchi, Rin; Tanaka, Natsuki; Kawahara, Akihiko; Kage, Masayoshi; Shichijo, Shigeki; Sasada, Tetsuro; Itoh, Kyogo

    2016-05-01

    A phase I study of a new cancer vaccine (KRM-10), consisting of a mixture of 10 different short peptides, was conducted for patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancers. Primary or secondary endpoints included the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), or safety and immune responses, respectively. Peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and immunoglobulin G (IgG), together with soluble inflammatory factors, were measured before and after vaccination. Twenty-one patients were vaccinated with KRM-10 at dose levels of 10 (n = 6), 20 (n = 8) or 30 mg (n = 7) of peptides every week for 6 weeks. No DLT were observed in the dose range evaluated. Common treatment-related adverse events were a grade 1 injection site reaction in 15 patients, and fever in three patients (grade 1 in two patients and grade 2 in one patient). CTL activity to at least one peptide at the time of the third and sixth vaccination increased in 2 and 3 of 6 (10 mg), 2 of 8 and 4 of 6 (20 mg), or 2 and 1 of 6 (30 mg) patients, respectively. IgG levels, at the third and sixth vaccination, were also increased in 1 and 1 of 6 (10 mg), 2 of 8 and 4 of 6 (20 mg), or 1 and 3 of 6 (30 mg) patients, respectively. The KRM-10 vaccine consisting of 20 mg of peptides was determined as the optimal dose for a coming phase II trial because of its safety, and also for demonstrating the most potent activity for augmenting the immune response of the three doses tested. This trial was registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000008820. PMID:26920496

  15. Factors associated with attrition from a randomized controlled trial of meaning-centered group psychotherapy for patients with advanced cancer

    PubMed Central

    Applebaum, Allison J.; Lichtenthal, Wendy G.; Pessin, Hayley A.; Radomski, Julia N.; Gökbayrak, N. Simay; Katz, Aviva M.; Rosenfeld, Barry; Breitbart, William

    2013-01-01

    Objective The generalizability of palliative care intervention research is often limited by high rates of study attrition. This study examined factors associated with attrition from a randomized controlled trial comparing meaning-centered group psychotherapy (MCGP), an intervention designed to help advanced cancer patients sustain or enhance their sense of meaning to the supportive group psychotherapy (SGP), a standardized support group. Methods Patients with advanced solid tumor cancers (n = 153) were randomized to eight sessions of either the MCGP or SGP. They completed assessments of psychosocial, spiritual, and physical well-being pretreatment, midtreatment, and 2 months post-treatment. Attrition was assessed in terms of the percent of participants who failed to complete these assessments, and demographic, psychiatric, medical, and study-related correlates of attrition were examined for the participants in each of these categories. Results The rates of attrition at these time points were 28.1%, 17.7%, and 11.1%, respectively; 43.1% of the participants (66 of 153) completed the entire study. The most common reason for dropout was patients feeling too ill. Attrition rates did not vary significantly between study arms. The participants who dropped out pretreatment reported less financial concerns than post-treatment dropouts, and the participants who dropped out of the study midtreatment had poorer physical health than treatment completers. There were no other significant associations between attrition and any demographic, medical, psychiatric, or study-related variables. Conclusions These findings highlight the challenge of maintaining advanced cancer patients in longitudinal research and suggest the need to consider alternative approaches (e.g., telemedicine) for patients who might benefit from group interventions but are too ill to travel. PMID:21751295

  16. In vivo Biocompatibility, Biodistribution and Therapeutic Efficiency of Titania Coated Upconversion Nanoparticles for Photodynamic Therapy of Solid Oral Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lucky, Sasidharan Swarnalatha; Idris, Niagara Muhammad; Huang, Kai; Kim, Jaejung; Li, Zhengquan; Thong, Patricia Soo Ping; Xu, Rong; Soo, Khee Chee; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advantages of using photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of head and neck tumors, it can only be used to treat early stage flat lesions due to the limited tissue penetration ability of the visible light. Here, we developed near-infrared (NIR) excitable upconversion nanoparticle (UCN) based PDT agent that can specifically target epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpressing oral cancer cells, in a bid to widen the application of PDT against thick and solid advanced or recurrent head and neck cancers. In vivo studies using the synthesized anti-EGFR-PEG-TiO2-UCNs following systemic administration displayed no major sub-acute or long term toxic effects in terms of blood biochemical, hematological or histopathological changes at a concentration of 50 mg/kg. NIR-PDT even in the presence of a 10 mm tissue phantom placed over the xenograft tumor, showed significant delay in tumor growth and improved survival rate compared to conventional chlorin-e6 (Ce6) PDT using 665 nm red light. Our work, one of the longest study till date in terms of safety (120 d), PDT efficacy (35 d) and survival (60 d), demonstrates the usefulness of UCN based PDT technology for targeted treatment of thick and bulky head and neck tumors. PMID:27570555

  17. In vivo Biocompatibility, Biodistribution and Therapeutic Efficiency of Titania Coated Upconversion Nanoparticles for Photodynamic Therapy of Solid Oral Cancers.

    PubMed

    Lucky, Sasidharan Swarnalatha; Idris, Niagara Muhammad; Huang, Kai; Kim, Jaejung; Li, Zhengquan; Thong, Patricia Soo Ping; Xu, Rong; Soo, Khee Chee; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advantages of using photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of head and neck tumors, it can only be used to treat early stage flat lesions due to the limited tissue penetration ability of the visible light. Here, we developed near-infrared (NIR) excitable upconversion nanoparticle (UCN) based PDT agent that can specifically target epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpressing oral cancer cells, in a bid to widen the application of PDT against thick and solid advanced or recurrent head and neck cancers. In vivo studies using the synthesized anti-EGFR-PEG-TiO2-UCNs following systemic administration displayed no major sub-acute or long term toxic effects in terms of blood biochemical, hematological or histopathological changes at a concentration of 50 mg/kg. NIR-PDT even in the presence of a 10 mm tissue phantom placed over the xenograft tumor, showed significant delay in tumor growth and improved survival rate compared to conventional chlorin-e6 (Ce6) PDT using 665 nm red light. Our work, one of the longest study till date in terms of safety (120 d), PDT efficacy (35 d) and survival (60 d), demonstrates the usefulness of UCN based PDT technology for targeted treatment of thick and bulky head and neck tumors. PMID:27570555

  18. Recent evidence, advances, and current practices in surgical treatment of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Suda, Kenichi; Sato, Katsuaki; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Yoshihisa; Shimoji, Masaki; Tomizawa, Kenji; Takemoto, Toshiki; Iwasaki, Takuya; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2014-11-01

    In the last 10-15 years, strategies and modalities of lung cancer treatment have changed dramatically. Meanwhile, the treatment objectives, the lung cancers themselves, have also changed, probably owing to early detection by computed tomography and aging of the population. In particular, the proportions of smaller lung cancers, lung adenocarcinomas with ground-glass opacity, and lung cancers in older patients are increasing. Along with these changes, surgeons have innovated and evaluated novel procedures for pulmonary resection. These include the application of minimally invasive surgical techniques, such as video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) and robotic surgery, and sub-lobar resection, such as wedge resection and segmentectomy, for small peripheral lung cancers. Currently, VATS has gained wide acceptance and several institutions in Japan have started using robotic surgery for lung cancers. Two important clinical trials of sub-lobar resection for small peripheral lung cancers are now underway in Japan. In addition, surgery itself is of growing importance in lung cancer treatment. In particular, recent evidence supports the use of surgery in strictly selected patients with locally advanced disease, lung cancers with N2 lymph node metastases, small cell lung cancers, recurrent oligo-metastasis after pulmonary resection, or relapsed tumors after drug treatment. Surgical treatment also provides abundant tumor samples for molecular analysis, which can be used for drug selection in the adjuvant setting or after disease relapse. In the era of personalized treatment, surgery is still one of the most important treatment modalities to combat lung cancer. PMID:25453375

  19. PI-3 kinase p110β: a therapeutic target in advanced prostate cancers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Benyi; Sun, Aijing; Jiang, Wencong; Thrasher, J Brantley; Terranova, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancers in the castration-resistant stage are life-threatening because they are not curable in clinic. The novel androgen receptor inhibitor Xandi (Enzalutamide) and the new CYP17 inhibitor Zytiga (Abiraterone) prolonged patient survival only a few months in advanced prostate cancers. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents for advanced prostate cancers are urgently needed. PI-3 kinases are major intracellular signaling molecules that regulate multiple signal pathways related to cellular metabolism, cytokinesis, growth and survival. Accumulating evidence in the literature indicates that some isoforms of this kinase family are oncogenic and abnormally expressed in various human cancers, including prostate cancers. Recent extensive studies from our group and others showed that PI-3 kinase p110β is aberrantly overexpressed in advanced prostate cancers and is critical for prostate cancer development and progression as demonstrated in cell-based and animal models. Importantly, novel p110β-specific inhibitors have been developed and are currently been testing in clinical trials. In this article, we will briefly summarize recent developments in this regard. PMID:25374921

  20. Advanced Si solid phase crystallization for vertical channel in vertical NANDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangsoo; Son, Yong-Hoon; Hwang, Kihyun; Shin, Yoo Gyun; Yoon, Euijoon

    2014-07-01

    The advanced solid phase crystallization (SPC) method using the SiGe/Si bi-layer structure is proposed to obtain high-mobility poly-Si thin-film transistors in next generation vertical NAND (VNAND) devices. During the SPC process, the top SiGe thin film acts as a selective nucleation layer to induce surface nucleation and equiaxial microstructure. Subsequently, this SiGe thin film microstructure is propagated to the underlying Si thin film by epitaxy-like growth. The initial nucleation at the SiGe surface was clearly observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) when heating up to 600 °C. The equiaxial microstructures of both SiGe nucleation and Si channel layers were shown in the crystallized bi-layer plan-view TEM measurements. Based on these experimental results, the large-grained and less-defective Si microstructure is expected to form near the channel region of each VNAND cell transistor, which may improve the electrical characteristics.

  1. Forest and grassland ecosystem studies using the advanced solid-state array spectroradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irons, James R.; Ranson, K. Jon; Williams, Darrel L.; Irish, Richard R.

    1989-01-01

    The advanced solid-state array spectroradiometer (ASAS) is an airborne, off-nadir pointing imaging spectroradiometer used to acquire bidirectional radiance data for terrestrial targets. As its platform aircraft flies over a target the sensor can image the target through a sequence of at least seven fore-to-aft view directions ranging up to 45 deg on either side of nadir. ASAS acquires data for 29 spectral bands in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum with a resolution of 15 nm. ASAS data were recently acquired for a prairie ecosystem and a northern forest ecosystem. The data demonstrate the combined effects of reflectance anisotropy and increased atmospheric path length on off-nadir observations. One result of these effects is a variation in vegetation indices as a function of view direction. Normalized-difference-vegetation-indices for prairie grass, coniferous, and deciduous canopies varied up to 14 percent, 23 percent, and 6 percent, respectively, relative to nadir as a function of view zenith angle along the solar principal plane.

  2. Advances in solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell technology with low-platinum-loading electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Ticianelli, E. A.; Derouin, C. R.; Redondo, A.

    1987-01-01

    The Gemini Space program demonstrated the first major application of fuel cell systems. Solid polymer electrolyte fuel cells were used as auxiliary power sources in the spacecraft. There has been considerable progress in this technology since then, particularly with the substitution of Nafion for the polystyrene sulfonate membrane as the electrolyte. Until recently the performance was good only with high platinum loading (4 mg/sq cm) electrodes. Methods are presented to advance the technology by (1) use of low platinum loading (0.35 mg/sq cm) electrodes; (2) optimization of anode/membrane/cathode interfaces by hot pressing; (3) pressurization of reactant gases, which is most important when air is used as cathodic reactant; and (4) adequate humidification of reactant gases to overcome the water management problem. The high performance of the fuel cell with the low loading of platinum appears to be due to the extension of the three dimensional reaction zone by introduction of a proton conductor, Nafion. This was confirmed by cyclic voltammetry.

  3. Advanced Si solid phase crystallization for vertical channel in vertical NANDs

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sangsoo; Son, Yong-Hoon; Hwang, Kihyun; Shin, Yoo Gyun; Yoon, Euijoon

    2014-07-01

    The advanced solid phase crystallization (SPC) method using the SiGe/Si bi-layer structure is proposed to obtain high-mobility poly-Si thin-film transistors in next generation vertical NAND (VNAND) devices. During the SPC process, the top SiGe thin film acts as a selective nucleation layer to induce surface nucleation and equiaxial microstructure. Subsequently, this SiGe thin film microstructure is propagated to the underlying Si thin film by epitaxy-like growth. The initial nucleation at the SiGe surface was clearly observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) when heating up to 600 °C. The equiaxial microstructures of both SiGe nucleation and Si channel layers were shown in the crystallized bi-layer plan-view TEM measurements. Based on these experimental results, the large-grained and less-defective Si microstructure is expected to form near the channel region of each VNAND cell transistor, which may improve the electrical characteristics.

  4. Lung Cancer Workshop XI: Tobacco-Induced Disease: Advances in Policy, Early Detection and Management.

    PubMed

    Mulshine, James L; Avila, Rick; Yankelevitz, David; Baer, Thomas M; Estépar, Raul San Jose; Ambrose, Laurie Fenton; Aldigé, Carolyn R

    2015-05-01

    The Prevent Cancer Foundation Lung Cancer Workshop XI: Tobacco-Induced Disease: Advances in Policy, Early Detection and Management was held in New York, NY on May 16 and 17, 2014. The two goals of the Workshop were to define strategies to drive innovation in precompetitive quantitative research on the use of imaging to assess new therapies for management of early lung cancer and to discuss a process to implement a national program to provide high quality computed tomography imaging for lung cancer and other tobacco-induced disease. With the central importance of computed tomography imaging for both early detection and volumetric lung cancer assessment, strategic issues around the development of imaging and ensuring its quality are critical to ensure continued progress against this most lethal cancer. PMID:25898957

  5. Mistletoe and gemcitabine in patients with advanced cancer: a model for the phase I study of botanicals and botanical-drug interactions in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Mansky, Patrick J; Grem, Jean; Wallerstedt, Dawn B; Monahan, Brian P; Blackman, Marc R

    2003-12-01

    Plant extracts of the European mistletoe (MTE), Viscum album, the most widely used cancer treatment in Germany, have been used in European countries as sole intervention or as adjunct to conventional cancer therapies for more than 80 years. Preclinical data suggest immunostimulatory and cytotoxic effects of MTE. While the clinical efficacy of MTE in cancer is being investigated, toxicity and potential interactions of MTE with standard chemotherapeutic agents are unknown. Gemcitabine is an approved antimetabolite chemotherapeutic agent effective as single agent in patients with solid tumors (ST). The documented metabolism and pharmacokinetics of gemcitabine make this agent well suited for the study of botanical-chemotherapy drug interactions (BDIA) in cancer. Based on reports of altered drug metabolism associated with botanical preparations, research into BDIA has intensified. The phase I, 2-stage, dose-escalation study outlined here will test MTE with gemcitabine as a paradigm for the phase I investigation of botanical-drug combination treatments in patients with advanced ST. The protocol including the following components has been reviewed and approved by the National Cancer Institute Institutional Review Board (IRB), the National Naval Medical Center IRB, and the Navy Clinical Investigation Program (study 02-074): (1) use of a standardized MTE, approved by the Food and Drug Administration for investigational use; (2) independent verification of key MTE components considered biologically active; (3) identification of contaminants and adulterants; (4) pharmacokinetics of gemcitabine and its principal metabolites before and upon exposure to MTE; (5) safety and toxicity data collection; (6) assays of plasma ML antibody production in vivo; and (7) pharmacodynamic studies of the botanical-drug combination. PMID:14713326

  6. Recent advances in robotic surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Soichiro; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Junichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kazama, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-08-01

    Robotic technology, which has recently been introduced to the field of surgery, is expected to be useful, particularly in treating rectal cancer where precise manipulation is necessary in the confined pelvic cavity. Robotic surgery overcomes the technical drawbacks inherent to laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer through the use of multi-articulated flexible tools, three-dimensional stable camera platforms, tremor filtering and motion scaling functions, and greater ergonomic and intuitive device manipulation. Assessments of the feasibility and safety of robotic surgery for rectal cancer have reported similar operation times, blood loss during surgery, rates of postoperative morbidity, and circumferential resection margin involvement when compared with laparoscopic surgery. Furthermore, rates of conversion to open surgery are reportedly lower with increased urinary and male sexual functions in the early postoperative period compared with laparoscopic surgery, demonstrating the technical advantages of robotic surgery for rectal cancer. However, long-term outcomes and the cost-effectiveness of robotic surgery for rectal cancer have not been fully evaluated yet; therefore, large-scale clinical studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of this new technology. PMID:26059248

  7. Using implementation science to advance cancer prevention in India.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Suneeta; Sivaram, Sudha; Anderson, Benjamin O; Basu, Partha; Belinson, Jerome L; Bhatla, Neerja; D'Cruz, Anil; Dhillon, Preet K; Gupta, Prakash C; Joshi, Niranjan; Jhulka, P K; Kailash, Uma; Kapambwe, Sharon; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan; Kaur, Prabhdeep; Kaur, Tanvir; Mathur, Prashant; Prakash, Anshu; Sankaranarayanan, R; Selvam, Jerard M; Seth, Tulika; Shah, Keerti V; Shastri, Surendra; Siddiqi, Maqsood; Srivastava, Anurag; Trimble, Edward; Rajaraman, Preetha; Mehrotra, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Oral, cervical and breast cancers, which are either preventable and/or amenable to early detection and treatment, are the leading causes of cancer-related morbidity and mortality in India. In this paper, we describe implementation science research priorities to catalyze the prevention and control of these cancers in India. Research priorities were organized using a framework based on the implementation science literature and the World Health Organization's definition of health systems. They addressed both community-level as well as health systems-level issues. Community-level or "pull" priorities included the need to identify effective strategies to raise public awareness and understanding of cancer prevention, monitor knowledge levels, and address fear and stigma. Health systems-level or "push" and "infrastructure" priorities included dissemination of evidence- based practices, testing of point-of-care technologies for screening and diagnosis, identification of appropriate service delivery and financing models, and assessment of strategies to enhance the health workforce. Given the extent of available evidence, it is critical that cancer prevention and treatment efforts in India are accelerated. Implementation science research can generate critical insights and evidence to inform this acceleration. PMID:25987015

  8. Role of Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer: advances and controversies.

    PubMed

    Meng, Wenbo; Bai, Bing; Sheng, Liang; Li, Yan; Yue, Ping; Li, Xun; Qiao, Liang

    2015-11-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers of digestive system globally and Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection is believed to be a major risk factor. HP can be classified into different types based on the presence and expression level of CagA and VacA, and, when exposed to adverse environment, HP changes its phenotype from helical type to coccoid type, with each having different pathogenicity. The mechanisms of HP-induced gastric carcinogenesis and progression are complicated, including DNA nitration and oxidation induced by mutagenic factors, HP-induced epigenetic modifications, HP-induced disruption of the balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis, and HP-induced cancer cell invasion and metastasis. HP may also affect the biological function of cancer stem cells and induction of cell autophagy. The lipopolysaccharide produced by HP can act through toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) to induce gastric mucosal inflammation and is thereby linked to the development of gastric cancer. PMID:26645900

  9. Advances in immunotherapy for treatment of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante Alvarez, Jean G.; González-Cao, María; Karachaliou, Niki; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Viteri, Santiago; Teixidó, Cristina; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Different approaches for treating lung cancer have been developed over time, including chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted therapies against activating mutations. Lately, better understanding of the role of the immunological system in tumor control has opened multiple doors to implement different strategies to enhance immune response against cancer cells. It is known that tumor cells elude immune response by several mechanisms. The development of monoclonal antibodies against the checkpoint inhibitor programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and its ligand (PD-L1), on T cells, has led to high activity in cancer patients with long lasting responses. Nivolumab, an anti PD-1 inhibitor, has been recently approved for the treatment of squamous cell lung cancer patients, given the survival advantage demonstrated in a phase III trial. Pembrolizumab, another anti PD-1 antibody, has received FDA breakthrough therapy designation for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), supported by data from a phase I trial. Clinical trials with anti PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies in NSCLC have demonstrated very good tolerability and activity, with response rates around 20% and a median duration of response of 18 months. PMID:26487966

  10. The Emerging Role of Extracellular Vesicle-Mediated Drug Resistance in Cancers: Implications in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Soekmadji, Carolina; Nelson, Colleen C.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that the extracellular vesicles (EVs) regulate various biological processes and can control cell proliferation and survival, as well as being involved in normal cell development and diseases such as cancers. In cancer treatment, development of acquired drug resistance phenotype is a serious issue. Recently it has been shown that the presence of multidrug resistance proteins such as Pgp-1 and enrichment of the lipid ceramide in EVs could have a role in mediating drug resistance. EVs could also mediate multidrug resistance through uptake of drugs in vesicles and thus limit the bioavailability of drugs to treat cancer cells. In this review, we discussed the emerging evidence of the role EVs play in mediating drug resistance in cancers and in particular the role of EVs mediating drug resistance in advanced prostate cancer. The role of EV-associated multidrug resistance proteins, miRNA, mRNA, and lipid as well as the potential interaction(s) among these factors was probed. Lastly, we provide an overview of the current available treatments for advanced prostate cancer, considering where EVs may mediate the development of resistance against these drugs. PMID:26587537

  11. Feasibility of intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy for locally advanced esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study the feasibility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and tomotherapy-based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for locally advanced esophageal cancer was assessed. Methods A retrospective study of ten patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who underwent concurrent chemotherapy with IMRT (1) and IGRT (9) was conducted. The gross tumor volume was treated to a median dose of 70 Gy (62.4-75 Gy). Results At a median follow-up of 14 months (1-39 months), three patients developed local failures, six patients developed distant metastases, and complications occurred in two patients (1 tracheoesophageal fistula, 1 esophageal stricture requiring repeated dilatations). No patients developed grade 3-4 pneumonitis or cardiac complications. Conclusions IMRT and IGRT may be effective for the treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer with acceptable complications. PMID:24742268

  12. Imaging heterogeneous absorption distribution of advanced breast cancer by optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Zhu, Quing

    2010-11-01

    Tumor vascular patterns of advanced breast cancers are complex and heterogeneous. Two typical light absorption patterns of periphery enhancement and posterior shadowing have been observed when imaging these advanced cancers using optical tomography guided by ultrasound. We perform a series simulation and phantom experiments to systemically evaluate the effects of target parameters, target locations, and target optical properties on imaging periphery enhancement absorption distribution using reflection geometry. Large tumors are modeled as concentric semiellipsoidal targets of different outer shell and inner core optical properties. We show that larger targets of more than 3 to 4 cm diameter with outer shell thicknesses less than 1 cm can be resolved at a depth less than 3 cm. A clinical example is given to show the complex vasculature distributions seen from an advanced cancer.

  13. Recent advances in the pharmacogenetics of cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Watters, James W; McLeod, Howard L

    2002-12-01

    Patient response to chemotherapy varies widely between individuals. Pharmacogenetics is the study of inherited DNA polymorphisms that influence drug disposition and effects, the goal of which is the individualization of drug treatment. As unpredictable efficacy and high levels of systemic toxicity are common in cancer chemotherapy, pharmacogenetics is particularly appealing for oncology. Recent studies have shown that polymorphisms in genes involved in drug metabolism, nucleotide synthesis and DNA repair contribute to inter-patient variability in the efficacy and toxicity of many chemotherapy agents. This review will discuss recent developments in the most clinically relevant examples of cancer pharmacogenetics, and how genetic differences among individuals are shaping the future of cancer chemotherapy. PMID:12596358

  14. Role of STAT3 in Cancer Metastasis and Translational Advances

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Prachi; Gude, Rajiv P.

    2013-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a latent cytoplasmic transcription factor, originally discovered as a transducer of signal from cell surface receptors to the nucleus. It is activated by tyrosine phosphorylation at position 705 leading to its dimerization, nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and activation of gene transcription. Under normal physiological conditions, STAT3 activation is tightly regulated. However, compelling evidence suggests that STAT3 is constitutively activated in many cancers and plays a pivotal role in tumor growth and metastasis. It regulates cellular proliferation, invasion, migration, and angiogenesis that are critical for cancer metastasis. In this paper, we first describe the mechanism of STAT3 regulation followed by how STAT3 is involved in cancer metastasis, then we summarize the various small molecule inhibitors that inhibit STAT3 signaling. PMID:24199193

  15. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Rathi N; Ramalingam, Suresh S

    2014-03-01

    The diagnostic and therapeutic landscape of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has changed dramatically in the past 50 years since the Surgeon General's report on smoking and lung cancer. Early detection is now a reality for lung cancer. The use of low-dose computed tomography scans for early detection decreases mortality and is beginning to be used in routine clinical practice. Technological advances such as positron emission tomography and endobronchial ultrasound have improved the accuracy of NSCLC staging. The cure rate for early-stage NSCLC has improved as a result of multimodality treatment approaches. The role of systemic therapy has also expanded to earlier stages of the disease. In recent years, the initial steps toward personalized medicine by utilization of targeted treatments based on tumor genotype have been undertaken. Emerging technological advances and greater insights into tumor biology are poised to greatly reduce the burden of lung cancer in the years to come. PMID:24516099

  16. Connecting Prognostic Ligand Receptor Signaling Loops in Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Kevin H.; Ruggeri, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Understanding cancer cell signal transduction is a promising lead for uncovering therapeutic targets and building treatment-specific markers for epithelial ovarian cancer. To brodaly assay the many known transmembrane receptor systems, previous studies have employed gene expression data measured on high-throughput microarrays. Starting with the knowledge of validated ligand-receptor pairs (LRPs), these studies postulate that correlation of the two genes implies functional autocrine signaling. It is our goal to consider the additional weight of evidence that prognosis (progression-free survival) can bring to prioritize ovarian cancer specific signaling mechanism. We survey three large studies of epithelial ovarian cancers, with gene expression measurements and clinical information, by modeling survival times both categorically (long/short survival) and continuously. We use differential correlation and proportional hazards regression to identify sets of LRPs that are both prognostic and correlated. Of 475 candidate LRPs, 77 show reproducible evidence of correlation; 55 show differential correlation. Survival models identify 16 LRPs with reproduced, significant interactions. Only two pairs show both interactions and correlation (PDGFAPDGFRA and COL1A1CD44) suggesting that the majority of prognostically useful LRPs act without positive feedback. We further assess the connectivity of receptors using a Gaussian graphical model finding one large graph and a number of smaller disconnected networks. These LRPs can be organized into mutually exclusive signaling clusters suggesting different mechanisms apply to different patients. We conclude that a mix of autocrine and endocrine LRPs influence prognosis in ovarian cancer, there exists a heterogenous mix of signaling themes across patients, and we point to a number of novel applications of existing targeted therapies which may benefit ovarian cancer. PMID:25244152

  17. Advances in glucose metabolism research in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Sitian; Fang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells uptake glucose at a higher rate and produce lactic acid rather than metabolizing pyruvate through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. This adaptive metabolic shift is termed the Warburg effect. Recently progress had been made regarding the mechanistic understanding of glucose metabolism and associated diagnostic and therapeutic methods, which have been investigated in colorectal cancer. The majority of novel mechanisms involve important glucose metabolism associated genes and miRNA regulation. The present review discusses the contribution of these research results to facilitate with the development of novel diagnosis and anticancer treatment options. PMID:27602209

  18. Advances in the surgical treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lei; He, Qiang; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Hong-Yuan; Ren, Guo-Sheng

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer has become the top malignant neoplasm in Chinese women with an increasing risk of morbidity and mortality. As a crucial part of comprehensive treatment of breast cancer, breast surgical technique is ceaselessly ameliorating and enriching its features. With the purpose of achieving minimal surgical intervention and satisfactory cosmetic results, the trend of mammary surgery is focusing on minimally invasive treatment and aesthetics in the 21st century. This article gives an overview of the most representative surgical procedures, such as breast conservative surgery, sentinel lymph node dissection, oncoplastic technique and breast reconstructive surgery. PMID:27265302

  19. Multifunctional nanomaterials for advanced molecular imaging and cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Prasad

    Nanotechnology offers tremendous potential for use in biomedical applications, including cancer and stem cell imaging, disease diagnosis and drug delivery. The development of nanosystems has aided in understanding the molecular mechanisms of many diseases and permitted the controlled nanoscale manipulation of biological phenomena. In recent years, many studies have focused on the use of several kinds of nanomaterials for cancer and stem cell imaging and also for the delivery of anticancer therapeutics to tumor cells. However, the proper diagnosis and treatment of aggressive tumors such as brain and breast cancer requires highly sensitive diagnostic agents, in addition to the ability to deliver multiple therapeutics using a single platform to the target cells. Addressing these challenges, novel multifunctional nanomaterial-based platforms that incorporate multiple therapeutic and diagnostic agents, with superior molecular imaging and targeting capabilities, has been presented in this work. The initial part of this work presents the development of novel nanomaterials with superior optical properties for efficiently delivering soluble cues such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) into brain cancer cells with minimal toxicity. Specifically, this section details the development of non-toxic quantums dots for the imaging and delivery of siRNA into brain cancer and mesenchymal stem cells, with the hope of using these quantum dots as multiplexed imaging and delivery vehicles. The use of these quantum dots could overcome the toxicity issues associated with the use of conventional quantum dots, enabled the imaging of brain cancer and stem cells with high efficiency and allowed for the delivery of siRNA to knockdown the target oncogene in brain cancer cells. The latter part of this thesis details the development of nanomaterial-based drug delivery platforms for the co-delivery of multiple anticancer drugs to brain tumor cells. In particular, this part of the thesis focuses on

  20. Recent advances and challenges for diode-pumped solid-state lasers as an inertial fusion energy driver candidate

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, S.A.; Beach, R.J.; Bibeau, C.

    1997-12-23

    We discuss how solid-state laser technology can serve in the interests of fusion energy beyond the goals of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), which is now being constructed to ignite a deuterium-tritium target to fusion conditions in the laboratory for the first time. We think that advanced solid-state laser technology can offer the repetition-rate and efficiency needed to drive a fusion power plant, in contrast to the single-shot character of NIF. As discuss below, we propose that a gas-cooled, diode-pumped Yb:S-FAP laser can provide a new paradigm for fusion laser technology leading into the next century.

  1. Ramucirumab for advanced gastric cancer or gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Young, Kate; Smyth, Elizabeth; Chau, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Ramucirumab, a fully humanized monoclonal antibody directed against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, is the first targeted agent to have demonstrated an improvement in survival, as a single agent or in combination, in a molecularly unselected population in gastro-oesophageal cancer. Now that second-line treatment is routinely considered for patients with advanced gastro-oesophageal cancer, ramucirumab, with its favourable toxicity profile compared with cytotoxic treatment, provides a valuable additional treatment option. PMID:26557893

  2. Interleukin-6 and leptin as markers of energy metabolic changes in advanced ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Macciò, Antonio; Madeddu, Clelia; Massa, Daniela; Astara, Giorgio; Farci, Daniele; Melis, Gian Benedetto; Mantovani, Giovanni

    2009-09-01

    The progression of the neoplastic disease is characterized by specific alterations of energy metabolism and by symptoms like fatigue, anorexia, nausea, anaemia, immunodepression and poor performance status (PS). The main cause of these symptoms and metabolic abnormalities is the chronic action of proinflammatory cytokines released both by tumour and immune cells. The present study aimed to assess the relationship between markers of inflammation (C-Reactive Protein, Fibrinogen, proinflammatory cytokines) and energy metabolic status (BMI, leptin, oxidative stress) according to clinical parameters in 104 ovarian cancer patients at different stage and, moreover, to evaluate prospectively the changes of these parameters in accordance to tumour response in a subgroup of 70 advanced stage ovarian cancer patients. Advanced stage and poor PS were associated to high-grade inflammation and impaired energy metabolism. Among inflammatory mediators, interleukin (IL)-6 had a central role as predictive factor of leptin, reactive oxygen species and glutathione peroxidase. In turn, leptin considered the key marker of the nutritional status and energy metabolism, was independently determined from stage and IL-6, not only from BMI. Moreover, the evaluation of the changes of these parameters during the course of the neoplastic disease in the subgroup of advanced ovarian cancer patients clearly unveils the central role of IL-6 and leptin as early markers of the metabolic alterations and symptoms associated to disease progression in advanced stage ovarian cancer. Their assessment should be included in monitoring disease outcome, especially when cancer is no longer curable and quality of life becomes the primary endpoint. PMID:18624749

  3. Independent contributors to overall quality of life in people with advanced cancer

    PubMed Central

    M Rodríguez, A; Mayo, N E; Gagnon, B

    2013-01-01

    Background: The definition of health for people with cancer is not focused solely on the physiology of illness and the length of life remaining, but is also concerned with improving the well-being and the quality of the life (QOL) remaining to be lived. This study aimed to identify the constructs most associated with QOL in people with advanced cancer. Methods: Two hundred three persons with recent diagnoses of different advanced cancers were evaluated with 65 variables representing individual and environmental factors, biological factors, symptoms, function, general health perceptions and overall QOL at diagnosis. Three independent stepwise multiple linear regressions identified the most important contributors to overall QOL. R2 ranking and effect sizes were estimated and averaged by construct. Results: The most important contributor of overall QOL for people recently diagnosed with advanced cancer was social support. It was followed by general health perceptions, energy, social function, psychological function and physical function. Conclusions: We used effect sizes to summarise multiple multivariate linear regressions for a more manageable and clinically interpretable picture. The findings emphasise the importance of incorporating the assessment and treatment of relevant symptoms, functions and social support in people recently diagnosed with advanced cancer as part of their clinical care. PMID:23591199

  4. Recent advances in solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell technology with low platinum loading electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Manko, David J.; Enayatullah, Mohammad; Appleby, A. John

    1989-01-01

    High power density fuel cell systems for defense and civilian applications are being developed. Taking into consideration the main causes for efficiency losses (activation, mass transport and ohmic overpotentials) the only fuel cell systems capable of achieving high power densities are the ones with alkaline and solid polymer electrolyte. High power densities (0.8 W/sq cm at 0.8 V and 1 A/sq cm with H2 and O2 as reactants), were already used in NASA's Apollo and Space Shuttle flights as auxiliary power sources. Even higher power densities (4 W/sq cm - i.e., 8 A sq cm at 0.5 V) were reported by the USAF/International Fuel Cells in advanced versions of the alkaline system. High power densities (approximately 1 watt/sq cm) in solid polymer electrolyte fuel cells with ten times lower platinum loading in the electrodes (i.e., 0.4 mg/sq cm) were attained. It is now possible to reach a cell potential of 0.620 V at a current density of 2 A/sq cm and at a temperature of 95 C and pressure of 4/5 atm with H2/O2 as reactants. The slope of the linear region of the potential-current density plot for this case is 0.15 ohm-sq cm. With H2/air as reactants and under the same operating conditions, mass transport limitations are encountered at current densities above 1.4 A/sq cm. Thus, the cell potential at 1 A/sq cm with H2/air as reactants is less than that with H2/O2 as reactants by 40 mV, which is the expected value based on electrode kinetics of the oxygen reduction reaction, and at 2 A/sq cm with H2/air as reactant is less than the corresponding value with H2/O2 as reactants by 250 mV, which is due to the considerably greater mass transport limitations in the former case.

  5. Endoscopic therapy for early gastric cancer: Standard techniques and recent advances in ESD

    PubMed Central

    Kume, Keiichiro

    2014-01-01

    The technique of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is now a well-known endoscopic therapy for early gastric cancer. ESD was introduced to resect large specimens of early gastric cancer in a single piece. ESD can provide precision of histologic diagnosis and can also reduce the recurrence rate. However, the drawback of ESD is its technical difficulty, and, consequently, it is associated with a high rate of complications, the need for advanced endoscopic techniques, and a lengthy procedure time. Various advances in the devices and techniques used for ESD have contributed to overcoming these drawbacks. PMID:24914364

  6. Current advances in targeted therapies for metastatic gastric cancer: improving patient care.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Pedro Nazareth; Muniz, Thiago Pimentel; Miranda, Raelson Rodrigues; Tadokoro, Hakaru; Forones, Nora Manoukian; Monteiro, Ines-de-Paula; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Janjigian, Yelena Y; de Mello, Ramon Andrade

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we review the literature on the current advances in targeted therapies for metastatic gastric cancer aimed at improving patient care. We conclude that the key to guiding targeted therapy is individual biomarkers, which are not completely elucidated. HER2 overexpression is the only predictive biomarker currently in use. Furthermore, it is necessary to understand that gastric tumors are heterogeneous; therefore, is impossible to evaluate a novel biological compound without evaluating personal biomarkers. The selection of patients who are able to receive each treatment is paramount for improving advanced gastric cancer survival and reducing unnecessary costs. PMID:26838766

  7. Vitamin B12-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles as a drug carrier in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Genç, Lütfi; Kutlu, H Mehtap; Güney, Gamze

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructure-mediated drug delivery, a key technology for the realization of nanomedicine, has the potential to improve drug bioavailability, ameliorate release deviation of drug molecules and enable precision drug targeting. Due to their multifunctional properties, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have received great attention of scientists to find a solution to cancer. Vitamin supplements may contribute to a reduction in the risk of cancer. Vitamin B12 has several characteristics that make it an attractive entity for cancer treatment and possible therapeutic applications. The aim of this study was to produce B12-loaded SLNs (B12-SLNs) and determine the cytotoxic effects of B12-SLNs on H-Ras 5RP7 and NIH/3T3 control cell line. Results obtained by MTT assay, transmission electron and confocal microscopy showed that B12-loaded SLNs are more effective than free vitamin B12 on cancer cells. In addition, characterization studies indicate that while the average diameter of the B12 was about 650 nm, B12-SLNs were about 200 nm and the drug release efficiency of vit. B12 by means of SLNs increased up to 3 h. These observations point to the fact that B12-SLNs could be used as carrier systems due to the therapeutic effects on cancer. PMID:24344935

  8. Phase I clinical and pharmacokinetic study of titanocene dichloride in adults with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Korfel, A; Scheulen, M E; Schmoll, H J; Gründel, O; Harstrick, A; Knoche, M; Fels, L M; Skorzec, M; Bach, F; Baumgart, J; Sass, G; Seeber, S; Thiel, E; Berdel, W E

    1998-11-01

    This Phase I dose-escalation clinical trial of a lyophilized formulation of titanocene dichloride (MKT4) was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose, the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), and pharmacokinetics of titanium (Ti) after a single i.v. infusion of MKT4. Forty patients with refractory solid malignancies were treated with a total of 78 courses. Using a modified Fibonacci scheme, 15 mg/m2 initial doses of titanocene dichloride were increased in cohorts of three patients up to level 11 (560 mg/m2) if DLT was not observed. The maximum tolerated dose was 315 mg/m2, and nephrotoxicity was DLT. Two minor responses (bladder carcinoma and non-small cell lung cancer) were observed. The pharmacokinetics of plasma Ti were assessed in 14 treatment courses by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The ratio for the area under the curve(0-infinity) in plasma and whole blood was 1.2. The following pharmacokinetic parameters were determined for plasma, as calculated in a two-compartment model: biological half-life t1/2beta in plasma was 22.8+/-11.2 h (xh +/- pseudo-SD), peak plasma concentration cmax approximately 30 microg/ml at a dose of 420 mg/m2, distribution volume Vss= 5.34+/-2.1 L (xa +/- SD), and a total clearance CItotal = 2.58+/-1.23 ml/min (xa +/- SD). There was a linear correlation between the area under the curve(0-infinity) of Ti in plasma and the titanocene dichloride dose administered with a correlation coefficient r2 of 0.8856. Plasma protein binding of Ti was in the 70-80% range. Between 3% and 16% of the total amount of Ti administered were renally excreted during the first 36 h. The recommended dose for Phase II evaluation is 240 mg/m2 given every 3 weeks with i.v. hydration to reduce renal toxicity. PMID:9829732

  9. [Advances in Lung Stem Cells and Lung Cancer Stem Cells].

    PubMed

    Yin, Huijing; Deng, Jiong

    2015-10-20

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are emerging as a hot topic for cancer research. Lung CSCs share many characteristics with normal lung stem cells (SCs), including self-renewal and multi-potency for differentiation. Many molecular markers expressed in various types of CSCs were also found in lung CSCs, such as CD133, CD44, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2). Similarly, proliferation and expansion of lung CSCs are regulated not only by signal transduction pathways functioning in normal lung SCs, such as Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt pathways, but also by those acting in tumor cells, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) pathways. As CSC plays an critical role in tumor recurrence, metastasis and drug-resistance, understanding the difference between lung CSCs and normal lung SCs, identifying and targeting CSC markers or related signaling pathways may increase the efficacy of therapy on lung cancer and improved survival of lung cancer patients. PMID:26483336

  10. Colorectal cancer tumour markers and biomarkers: Recent therapeutic advances

    PubMed Central

    Lech, Gustaw; Słotwiński, Robert; Słodkowski, Maciej; Krasnodębski, Ireneusz Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among females and third among males worldwide. It also contributes significantly to cancer-related deaths, despite the continuous progress in diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Biomarkers currently play an important role in the detection and treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Risk stratification for screening might be augmented by finding new biomarkers which alone or as a complement of existing tests might recognize either the predisposition or early stage of the disease. Biomarkers have also the potential to change diagnostic and treatment algorithms by selecting the proper chemotherapeutic drugs across a broad spectrum of patients. There are attempts to personalise chemotherapy based on presence or absence of specific biomarkers. In this review, we update review published last year and describe our understanding of tumour markers and biomarkers role in CRC screening, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Goal of future research is to identify those biomarkers that could allow a non-invasive and cost-effective diagnosis, as well as to recognise the best prognostic panel and define the predictive biomarkers for available treatments. PMID:26855534

  11. The Awakening of an Advanced Malignant Cancer: An Insult to the Mitochondrial Genome

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Cody C.; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Background In only months-to-years a primary cancer can progress to an advanced phenotype that is metastatic and resistant to clinical treatments. As early as the 1900s, it was discovered that the progression of a cancer to the advanced phenotype is often associated with a shift in the metabolic profile of the disease from a state of respiration to anaerobic fermentation – a phenomenon denoted as the Warburg Effect. Scope of Review Reports in the literature strongly suggest that the Warburg Effect is generated as a response to a loss in the integrity of the sequence and/or copy number of the mitochondrial genome content within a cancer. Multiple studies regarding the progression of cancer indicate that mutation, and/or, a flux in the copy number, of the mitochondrial genome content can support the early development of a cancer, until; the mutational load and/or the reduction-to-depletion of the copy number of the mitochondrial genome content induces the progression of the disease to an advanced phenotype. General Significance Collectively, evidence has revealed that the human cell has incorporated the mitochondrial genome content into a cellular mechanism that, when pathologically actuated, can de (un)differentiate a cancer from the parental tissue of origin into an autonomous disease that disrupts the hierarchical structure-and-function of the human body. PMID:21920409

  12. Review of systemic therapies for locally advanced and metastatic rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Osipov, Arsen; Tan, Carlyn; Tuli, Richard; Hendifar, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer, along with colon cancer, is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. Up to a quarter of patients have metastatic disease at diagnosis and 40% will develop metastatic disease. The past 10 years have been extremely exciting in the treatment of both locally advanced and metastatic rectal cancer (mRC). With the advent of neoadjuvant chemoradiation, increased numbers of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) are surviving longer and some are seeing their tumors shrink to sizes that allow for resection. The advent of biologics and monoclonal antibodies has propelled the treatment of mRC further than many could have hoped. Combined with regimens such as FOLFOX or FOLFIRI, median survival rates have been increased to an average of 23 months. However, the combinations of chemotherapy regimens seem endless for rectal cancer. We will review the major chemotherapies available for locally advanced and mRC as well as regimens currently under investigation such as FOLFOXIRI. We will also review vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors as single agents and in combination with traditional chemotherapy regimens. PMID:25830038

  13. Management of locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Kurniali, Peter C; Hrinczenko, Borys; Al-Janadi, Anas

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States with a median age at diagnosis of 69 years. Sixty percent are diagnosed over the age of 65 years and 36% are 75 years or older. At diagnosis, approximately 58% of patients will have locally advanced and metastatic disease, for which systemic chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival. Treatment of cancer in elderly patients is more challenging due to multiple factors, including disabling co-morbidities as well as a decline in organ function. Cancer treatment of elderly patients is often associated with more toxicities that may lead to frequent hospitalizations. In locally advanced disease, fewer older patients receive adjuvant chemotherapy despite survival benefit and similar toxicity when compared to their younger counterparts. A survival benefit is also observed in the palliative chemotherapy setting for elderly patients with metastatic disease. When treating elderly patients with colon cancer, one has to consider drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Since chronological age is a poor marker of a patient’s functional status, several methods of functional assessment including performance status and activities of daily living (ADL) or instrumental ADL, or even a comprehensive geriatric assessment, may be used. There is no ideal chemotherapy regimen that fits all elderly patients and so a regimen needs to be tailored for each individual. Important considerations when treating elderly patients include convenience and tolerability. This review will discuss approaches to the management of elderly patients with locally advanced and metastatic colon cancer. PMID:24616568

  14. Advances in molecular imaging: targeted optical contrast agents for cancer diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Hellebust, Anne; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Over the last three decades, our understanding of the molecular changes associated with cancer development and progression has advanced greatly. This has led to new cancer therapeutics targeted against specific molecular pathways; such therapies show great promise to reduce mortality, in part by enabling physicians to tailor therapy for patients based on a molecular profile of their tumor. Unfortunately, the tools for definitive cancer diagnosis – light microscopic examination of biopsied tissue stained with nonspecific dyes – remain focused on the analysis of tissue ex vivo. There is an important need for new clinical tools to support the molecular diagnosis of cancer. Optical molecular imaging is emerging as a technique to help meet this need. Targeted, optically active contrast agents can specifically label extra-and intracellular biomarkers of cancer. Optical images can be acquired in real time with high spatial resolution to image-specific molecular targets, while still providing morphologic context. This article reviews recent advances in optical molecular imaging, highlighting the advances in technology required to improve early cancer detection, guide selection of targeted therapy and rapidly evaluate therapeutic efficacy. PMID:22385200

  15. Novel therapy for locally advanced triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    YAMADA, ATSUKO; OSADA, SHINJI; TANAHASHI, TOSHIYUKI; MATSUI, SATOSHI; SASAKI, YOSHIYUKI; TANAKA, YOSHIHIRO; OKUMURA, NAOKI; MATSUHASHI, NOBUHISA; TAKAHASHI, TAKAO; YAMAGUCHI, KAZUYA; YOSHIDA, KAZUHIRO

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate a novel therapy for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), the biological responses to vitamin K3 (VK3) should be considered with the understanding of the features of breast cancer. In human breast cancer cell lines, the effects of VK3 on cell growth inhibition and the cellular signaling pathway were determined by MTT assay and western blotting. In the in vivo study, a subcutaneous tumor model of breast cancer was created, VK3 was injected into the subcutaneous tumors, and tumor size was measured. The IC50 of VK3 for breast cancer cells was calculated to be 11.3–25.1 μM. VK3 induced phosphorylation of whole tyrosine and epidermal growth factor receptor. VK3 mediated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) for 30 min. ERK but not JNK phosphorylation was maintained for at least 6 h. In contrast, another antioxidant agent, catalase, showed no effect on either ERK phosphorylation or growth inhibition. On built-up tumors under the skin of mice, local treatment with VK3 was effective in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and the experiments for total tumor volume also showed a dose-dependent effect of VK3. The expression of phosphorylated ERK was clearly detected at 10.9 times the control in tumor tissue, whereas ethanol itself showed no effect. In conclusion, ERK plays a critical role in VK3-induced growth inhibition, and it will be the focus of next steps in the development of molecular therapy for TNBC. PMID:26252842

  16. Risk coefficient for gamma-rays with regard to solid cancer.

    PubMed

    Kellerer, Albrecht M; Walsh, Linda; Nekolla, Elke A

    2002-06-01

    A previous investigation has uncoupled the solid cancer risk coefficient for neutrons from the low dose estimates of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons and the photon risk coefficient, and has related it to two more tangible quantities, the excess relative risk (ERR1) due to an intermediate reference dose D1 = 1 Gy of gamma-rays and the RBE of neutrons, R1, against this reference dose. With tentatively assumed RBE values between 20 and 50 and in terms of organ-averaged doses--rather than the usually invoked colon doses--the neutron risk factor was seen to be in general agreement with the current risk estimate of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP). The present assessment of the risk coefficient for gamma-rays incorporates--in terms of the unchanged A-bomb dosimetry system, DS86--this treatment of the neutrons, but is otherwise largely analogous to the evaluation of the A-bomb data for the ICRP report and for the recent report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the effects of ionizing radiation, UNSCEAR. The resulting central estimate of the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for solid cancer mortality is 0.043/Gy for a working population (ages 25-65), and is nearly the same whether the age at exposure or the attained age model is used for risk projection. For a population of all ages 0.042/Gy is obtained with the attained age model and 0.068/Gy with the age at exposure model. The values do not include a dose and dose rate effectiveness factor (DDREF), and they are only half as large as the new UNSCEAR estimates of 0.082/Gy (attained age model and all ages) and 0.13/Gy (age at exposure model and all ages). The difference is only partly due to the more explicit treatment of the neutrons. It reflects also the fact that UNSCEAR has converted ERR into LAR in a way that differs from the ICRP procedure, and that it has summed the overall risk coefficient for solid tumor mortality and incidence from separate estimates

  17. Aloe-emodin loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: formulation design and in vitro anti-cancer study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruie; Wang, Shengpeng; Zhang, Jinming; Chen, Meiwan; Wang, Yitao

    2015-01-01

    Aloe-emodin (AE) is a promising anti-tumor candidate for its significant activity against various tumors such as lung cancer, hepatic cancer, breast cancer and so on. Nevertheless, AE is clinically limited due to its poor water solubility and low bioavailability. This study was designed to prepare AE-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (AE-SLNs) in an attempt to improve the anti-cancer efficacy of AE. The AE-SLNs were prepared with optimized prescription using high pressure homogenization (HPH) technique. Ultimately, the AE-SLNs showed stable particle size at 88.9 ± 5.2 nm, ideal drug entrapment efficiency (EE) of 97.71 ± 0.5% and good stability with regard to zeta-potential as high as -42.8 mV. The in vitro release profiles revealed that AE achieved sustained release by loading into SLNs. Moreover, AE-SLNs showed significantly higher in vitro cytotoxicity against human breast cancer MCF-7 cells and human hepatoma HepG2 cells as compared to the AE solution, while they showed no significant toxicity on human mammary epithelial MCF-10A cells. Hoechst 33342 staining and Annexin V/PI double staining indicated that AE-SLNs induced higher apoptotic rates in MCF-7 cells. Further study elucidated that the improved anti-cancer efficacy may be attributed to the increased cellular uptake of AE. Based on these findings, we believe that the development of AE-SLNs is an effective way for improving the anti-cancer efficacy of AE. PMID:24512431

  18. PIM serine/threonine kinases in the pathogenesis and therapy of hematologic malignancies and solid cancers

    PubMed Central

    Brault, Laurent; Gasser, Christelle; Bracher, Franz; Huber, Kilian; Knapp, Stefan; Schwaller, Jürg

    2010-01-01

    The identification as cooperating targets of Proviral Integrations of Moloney virus in murine lymphomas suggested early on that PIM serine/threonine kinases play an important role in cancer biology. Whereas elevated levels of PIM1 and PIM2 were mostly found in hematologic malignancies and prostate cancer, increased PIM3 expression was observed in different solid tumors. PIM kinases are constitutively active and their activity supports in vitro and in vivo tumor cell growth and survival through modification of an increasing number of common as well as isoform-specific substrates including several cell cycle regulators and apoptosis mediators. PIM1 but not PIM2 seems also to mediate homing and migration of normal and malignant hematopoietic cells by regulating chemokine receptor surface expression. Knockdown experiments by RNA interference or dominant-negative acting mutants suggested that PIM kinases are important for maintenance of a transformed phenotype and therefore potential therapeutic targets. Determination of the protein structure facilitated identification of an increasing number of potent small molecule PIM kinase inhibitors with in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity. Ongoing efforts aim to identify isoform-specific PIM inhibitors that would not only help to dissect the kinase function but hopefully also provide targeted therapeutics. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about the role of PIM serine/threonine kinases for the pathogenesis and therapy of hematologic malignancies and solid cancers, and we highlight structural principles and recent progress on small molecule PIM kinase inhibitors that are on their way into first clinical trials. PMID:20145274

  19. Phase I study of olaratumab in Japanese patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Doi, Toshihiko; Ma, Yan; Dontabhaktuni, Aruna; Nippgen, Cornelia; Nippgen, Johannes; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2014-07-01

    Olaratumab (IMC-3G3) is a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that selectively binds the external domain of human platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α with high affinity and blocks ligand binding. This was a single-center, dose-escalation, phase I trial of olaratumab in Japanese patients with advanced/refractory solid malignancies. Three to six patients were enrolled into each of three cohorts: Patients received i.v. olaratumab: 10 mg/kg on days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks (cohort 1); 20 mg/kg every 2 weeks (cohort 2); and 15 mg/kg on days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks (cohort 3). Doses were escalated from cohort 1 through cohort 3. The primary objective was to establish the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of olaratumab. Sixteen patients were treated across three cohorts. There were no dose-limiting toxicities, so the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The most common olaratumab-related treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were proteinuria (25.0%) and elevated aspartate transaminase (12.5%). One patient (cohort 2) had two olaratumab-related Grade 3 TEAEs (increased aspartate aminotransferase and tumor hemorrhage); otherwise, olaratumab-related TEAEs were Grade 1/2. Seven patients (43.8%) had a best response of stable disease. Based on the pharmacokinetic concentration profile of olaratumab, the trough concentrations following single and multiple doses at 15 mg/kg on days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks (cohort 3) and multiple doses at 20 mg/kg every 2 weeks (cohort 2) were above the 155 μg/mL target. Thus, these two doses could represent an acceptable schedule for future trials in Japanese patients. Olaratumab had an acceptable safety profile and was well tolerated. PMID:24816152

  20. Phase 1 Study of VEGF Trap (Aflibercept) Administered Subcutaneously to Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tew, William P.; Gordon, Michael; Murren, John; Dupont, Jakob; Pezzulli, Sandra; Aghajanian, Carol; Sabbatini, Paul; Mendelson, David; Schwartz, Lawrence; Gettinger, Scott; Psyrri, Amanda; Cedarbaum, Jesse M.; Spriggs, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or maximal administered dose (MAD) and pharmacokinetic and safety profiles of subcutaneously administered VEGF Trap (aflibercept), a novel anti-angiogenic agent. Experimental Design In this open-label, dose-escalation study, patients with advanced solid tumors were treated with subcutaneous doses of aflibercept at seven dose levels. Patients received a single dose of aflibercept and then underwent safety and pharmacokinetic assessments over the next 4 weeks. Patients then received weekly or bi-weekly treatment over the subsequent 6 weeks. Patients tolerating and benefiting could continue on aflibercept at the same dose and schedule until progression of disease. Results Thirty-eight patients received at least one dose of aflibercept. MTD was not reached. Due to solubility/dosing limits with the subcutaneous formulation, 1600mcg/kg/week was the MAD. The most common toxicities were proteinuria (37%), fatigue (32%), injection site reactions (18%), nausea (17%), myalgia and anorexia (16% each), hypertension (13%), and voice hoarseness (11%). Drug-related grade 3–4 toxicity was uncommon (7%) and reversible: dehydration, cerebral ischemia, proteinuria, hypertension, leukopenia, and pulmonary embolism. We identified dose-proportional increases in plasma concentrations of aflibercept bound to VEGF with a t1/2 of 18 days. No anti-aflibercept antibodies were detected. Stable disease was maintained for at least 10 weeks in 18 patients (47%), and 2 patients maintained on study for more than 1 year. Conclusion Subcutaneous aflibercept was well-tolerated and had manageable side effects. Its favorable pharmacokinetic profile and potential antitumor activity warrants further evaluation. PMID:20028764