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Sample records for advanced stage disease

  1. Nutrition Intervention for Advanced Stages of Diabetic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    IN BRIEF For the goals of reducing diabetic kidney disease (DKD) onset and progression, approaches to nutritional therapy are a subject of much debate. This article discusses selected nutrients that have a role in affecting DKD outcomes and introduces application of newer, individualized concepts for healthful eating, as supported by clinical evidence relevant to patients with DKD. Selected aspects of management of advanced DKD are also reviewed. PMID:26300611

  2. Nutrition Intervention for Advanced Stages of Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Goldstein-Fuchs, Jordi; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-08-01

    IN BRIEF For the goals of reducing diabetic kidney disease (DKD) onset and progression, approaches to nutritional therapy are a subject of much debate. This article discusses selected nutrients that have a role in affecting DKD outcomes and introduces application of newer, individualized concepts for healthful eating, as supported by clinical evidence relevant to patients with DKD. Selected aspects of management of advanced DKD are also reviewed.

  3. In search of an advance directive that works for end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Bartlow, Bruce

    2006-10-01

    Although loss, disability, and death are constant possibilities for any end-stage renal disease patient, very few have planned for the last of life. Currently available Advance Directives (ADs) are refusal of specific therapies in only specific but nebulous circumstances. They fail to provide positive guidance for a patient's remaining time. Without addressing goals, quality of life, reversibility of medical problems, and desired end-of-life (EOL) care, such ADs are useless. End-stage renal disease providers are generally untrained and unsupported in offering guidance. Financial, emotional, and structural factors collude to justify ignoring EOL planning. Several alternative ADs are offered, along with a goal-directed approach to EOL counseling for patients and staff.

  4. Results of two different surgical techniques in the treatment of advanced-stage Freiberg's disease

    PubMed Central

    Özkul, Emin; Gem, Mehmet; Alemdar, Celil; Arslan, Hüseyin; Boğatekin, Ferit; Kişin, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Background: Freiberg's disease is an osteochondrosis most commonly seen in adolescent women and characterized by pain, swelling and motion restriction in the second metatarsal. The early stages of this disease can be managed with semirigid orthoses, metatarsal bars and short leg walking cast. Number of operative methods are suggested which can be used depending on the pathophysiology of the disease, including abnormal biomechanics, joint congruence and degenerative process. We evaluated the outcomes of the patients with Freiberg's disease who were treated with dorsal closing-wedge osteotomy and resection of the metatarsal head. Patients and Methods: 16 patients (11 female, 5 male) with a mean age of 24.5 (range 13–49 years) years who underwent dorsal closing wedge osteotomy or resection of the metatarsal head were included in this retrospective study. Second metatarsal was affected in 13 and third metatarsal in three patients. According to the Smillie's classification system, ten patients had type IV osteonecrosis and six patients had type V. The results of the patients were evaluated using the lesser metatarsophalangeal-interphalangeal (LMPI) scale. Results: According to the LMPI scale, the postoperative scores for the osteotomy and excision groups were 86 (range 64–100) and 72.6 (range 60–85), respectively. In the osteotomy group, mean passive flexion restriction was 18° (range 0°–35°) and mean passive extension restriction was 12° (range 0°–25°). Mean metatarsal shortening was 2.2 mm (range 2–4 mm) in the osteotomy group as opposed to 9.8 mm (range 7–14 mm) in the excision group. Significant pain relief was obtained in both groups following the surgery. Conclusions: The decision of performing osteotomy or resection arthroplasty in the patients with advanced-stage Freiberg's disease should be based on the joint injury and the patients should be informed about the cosmetic problems like shortening which may arise from resection. PMID:26955180

  5. Advanced glycation end products, carotid atherosclerosis, and circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroki; Koyama, Hidenori; Fukumoto, Shinya; Tanaka, Shinji; Shoji, Takuhito; Shoji, Tetsuo; Emoto, Masanori; Tahara, Hideki; Inaba, Masaaki; Kakiya, Ryusuke; Tabata, Tsutomu; Miyata, Toshio; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2011-04-01

    Numbers of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been shown to be decreased in subjects with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the mechanism of which remained poorly understood. In this study, mutual association among circulating EPC levels, carotid atherosclerosis, serum pentosidine, and skin autofluorescence, a recently established noninvasive measure of advanced glycation end products accumulation, was examined in 212 ESRD subjects undergoing hemodialysis. Numbers of circulating EPCs were measured as CD34+ CD133+ CD45(low) VEGFR2+ cells and progenitor cells as CD34+ CD133+ CD45(low) fraction by flow cytometry. Skin autofluorescence was assessed by the autofluorescence reader; and serum pentosidine, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Carotid atherosclerosis was determined as intimal-medial thickness (IMT) measured by ultrasound. Circulating EPCs were significantly and inversely correlated with skin autofluorescence in ESRD subjects (R = -0.216, P = .002), but not with serum pentosidine (R = -0.079, P = .25). Circulating EPCs tended to be inversely associated with IMT (R = -0.125, P = .069). Intimal-medial thickness was also tended to be correlated positively with skin autofluorescence (R = 0.133, P = .054) and significantly with serum pentosidine (R = 0.159, P = .019). Stepwise multiple regression analyses reveal that skin autofluorescence, but not serum pentosidine and IMT, was independently associated with low circulating EPCs. Of note, skin autofluorescence was also inversely and independently associated with circulating progenitor cells. Thus, tissue accumulated, but not circulating, advanced glycation end products may be a determinant of a decrease in circulating EPCs in ESRD subjects.

  6. [Benefit of L-DOPA-without-DCI (decarboxylase inhibitor) therapy on wearing-off phenomenon in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease patients].

    PubMed

    Hironishi, Masaya; Miwa, Hideto; Kondo, Tomoyoshi

    2002-02-01

    Motor fluctuation is the most annoying complication experienced by patients in the advanced stages of Parkinson's disease. A Combination therapy of a dopamine receptor agonist and levodopa/DCI(DOPA-decarboxylase inhibitor) is commonly used to control the complication. Although administration of levodopa/DCI is useful in minimizing peripheral side effects of levodopa, it increases the incidence of motor complications due to the marked fluctuation of plasma levodopa level. The use of levodopa without DCI might be an option for controlling motor fluctuation, because the extent of plasma levodopa level fluctuation is smaller when levodopa is administered without DCI than with DCI. Six patients with Parkinson's disease who had troublesome motor complications under levodopa/DCI and DA agonist combination therapy were compared in terms of the extent of motor complications and their satisfaction after changing their therapy from levodopa/DCI to levodopa without DCI. The change from levodopa/DCI to levodopa(without DCI) was carried out all at once, and the levodopa/DCI to levodopa dose ratio was started at 1:4. The dose of levodopa(without DCI) was then increased gradually until motor complications improved or side effects were observed in patients. Except two patients who voluntarily quitted levodopa and restarted DOPA/DCI before the dose of levodopa fixed, all cases showed improvement of wearing-off phenomenon. No adverse event was observed. Levodopa-without-DCI-therapy was effective for controlling motor fluctuation in patients of Parkinson's disease in advanced stages.

  7. Human Leukocyte Antigen G Polymorphism and Expression Are Associated with an Increased Risk of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Advanced Disease Stage

    PubMed Central

    Ben Amor, Amira; Beauchemin, Karine; Faucher, Marie-Claude; Hamzaoui, Agnes; Hamzaoui, Kamel; Roger, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G acts as negative regulator of the immune responses and its expression may enable tumor cells to escape immunosurveillance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of HLA-G allelic variants and serum soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) levels on risk of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We analyzed 191 Caucasian adults with NSCLC and 191 healthy subjects recruited between January 2009 and March 2014 in Ariana (Tunisia). Serum sHLA-G levels were measured by immunoassay and HLA-G alleles were determined using a direct DNA sequencing procedures. The heterozygous genotypes of HLA-G 010101 and -G 010401 were associated with increased risks of both NSCLC and advanced disease stages. In contrast, the heterozygous genotypes of HLA-G 0105N and -G 0106 were associated with decreased risks of NSCC and clinical disease stage IV, respectively. Serum sHLA-G levels were significantly higher in patients with NSCLC and particularly in those with advanced disease stages compared to healthy subjects. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves was 0.82 for controls vs patients. Given 100% specificity, the highest sensitivity achieved to detect NSCLC was 52.8% at a cutoff value of 24.9 U/ml. Patients with the sHLA-G above median level (≥ 50 U/ml) had a significantly shorter survival time. This study demonstrates that HLA-G allelic variants are independent risk factors for NSCLC. Serum sHLA-G levels in NSCLC patients could be useful biomarkers for the diagnostic and prognosis of NSCLC. PMID:27517300

  8. Human Leukocyte Antigen G Polymorphism and Expression Are Associated with an Increased Risk of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Advanced Disease Stage.

    PubMed

    Ben Amor, Amira; Beauchemin, Karine; Faucher, Marie-Claude; Hamzaoui, Agnes; Hamzaoui, Kamel; Roger, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G acts as negative regulator of the immune responses and its expression may enable tumor cells to escape immunosurveillance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of HLA-G allelic variants and serum soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) levels on risk of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We analyzed 191 Caucasian adults with NSCLC and 191 healthy subjects recruited between January 2009 and March 2014 in Ariana (Tunisia). Serum sHLA-G levels were measured by immunoassay and HLA-G alleles were determined using a direct DNA sequencing procedures. The heterozygous genotypes of HLA-G 010101 and -G 010401 were associated with increased risks of both NSCLC and advanced disease stages. In contrast, the heterozygous genotypes of HLA-G 0105N and -G 0106 were associated with decreased risks of NSCC and clinical disease stage IV, respectively. Serum sHLA-G levels were significantly higher in patients with NSCLC and particularly in those with advanced disease stages compared to healthy subjects. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves was 0.82 for controls vs patients. Given 100% specificity, the highest sensitivity achieved to detect NSCLC was 52.8% at a cutoff value of 24.9 U/ml. Patients with the sHLA-G above median level (≥ 50 U/ml) had a significantly shorter survival time. This study demonstrates that HLA-G allelic variants are independent risk factors for NSCLC. Serum sHLA-G levels in NSCLC patients could be useful biomarkers for the diagnostic and prognosis of NSCLC.

  9. The Impact of Local and Regional Disease Extent on Overall Survival in Patients With Advanced Stage IIIB/IV Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, Daniel S.; Chen, Ronald C.; Tracton, Gregg; Morris, David E.; Halle, Jan; Rosenman, Julian G.; Stefanescu, Mihaela; Pham, Erica; Socinski, Mark A.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with advanced stage IIIB or stage IV non-small cell lung carcinoma are typically treated with initial platinum-based chemotherapy. A variety of factors (eg, performance status, gender, age, histology, weight loss, and smoking history) are generally accepted as predictors of overall survival. Because uncontrolled pulmonary disease constitutes a major cause of death in these patients, we hypothesized that clinical and radiographic factors related to intrathoracic disease at diagnosis may be prognostically significant in addition to conventional factors. The results have implications regarding the selection of patients for whom palliative thoracic radiation therapy may be of most benefit. Methods and Materials: We conducted a pooled analysis of 189 patients enrolled at a single institution into 9 prospective phase II and III clinical trials involving first-line, platinum-based chemotherapy. Baseline clinical and radiographic characteristics before trial enrollment were analyzed as possible predictors for subsequent overall survival. To assess the relationship between anatomic location and volume of disease within the thorax and its effect on survival, the pre-enrollment computed tomography images were also analyzed by contouring central and peripheral intrapulmonary disease. Results: On univariate survival analysis, multiple pulmonary-related factors were significantly associated with worse overall survival, including pulmonary symptoms at presentation (P=.0046), total volume of intrathoracic disease (P=.0006), and evidence of obstruction of major bronchi or vessels on prechemotherapy computed tomography (P<.0001). When partitioned into central and peripheral volumes, central (P<.0001) but not peripheral (P=.74) disease was associated with worse survival. On multivariate analysis with known factors, pulmonary symptoms (hazard ratio, 1.46; P=.042), central disease volume (hazard ratio, 1.47; P=.042), and bronchial/vascular compression (hazard ratio, 1

  10. Radiographic Differentiation of Advanced Fibrocystic Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Akira, Masanori

    2017-03-01

    The concept of end-stage lung disease suggests a final common pathway for most diffuse parenchymal lung diseases. In accordance with this concept, end-stage disease is characterized radiographically and pathologically by the presence of extensive honeycombing. However, sequential computed tomographic (CT) scans obtained from patients with chronic diffuse lung disease evolve over time to show various advanced lung disease patterns other than honeycombing. In addition, several radiographically distinct honeycomb patterns, including microcystic, macrocystic, mixed, and combined emphysema and honeycombing, differentiate one advanced lung disease from another. For example, usual interstitial pneumonia (IP) usually shows mixed microcystic and macrocystic honeycombing. In contrast, CT images of long-standing fibrotic nonspecific IP typically show only small, scattered foci of honeycombing; instead, most enlarged airspaces observed in the advanced stage of this disease represent dilatation of bronchioles. In desquamative IP and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, focal opacities typically evolve into emphysema-like lesions seen on CT imaging. In combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema and sarcoidosis, the cysts tend to be larger than those observed in usual IP. Sequential CT scans in other chronic, diffuse lung diseases also show various distinctive changes. This article highlights radiographic patterns of lung destruction that belie a single common pathway to end-stage lung disease. Recognition of distinct radiographic patterns of lung destruction can help differentiate diffuse parenchymal lung diseases, even in advanced stages of disease evolution.

  11. Clinical Impact of Education Provision on Determining Advance Care Planning Decisions among End Stage Renal Disease Patients Receiving Regular Hemodialysis in University Malaya Medical Centre

    PubMed Central

    Hing (Wong), Albert; Chin, Loh Ee; Ping, Tan Li; Peng, Ng Kok; Kun, Lim Soo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Advance care planning (ACP) is a process of shared decision-making about future health-care plans between patients, health care providers, and family members, should patients becomes incapable of participating in medical treatment decisions. ACP discussions enhance patient's autonomy, focus on patient's values and treatment preferences, and promote patient-centered care. ACP is integrated as part of clinical practice in Singapore and the United States. Aim: To assess the clinical impact of education provision on determining ACP decisions among end-stage renal disease patients on regular hemodialysis at University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC). To study the knowledge and attitude of patients toward ACP and end-of-life issues. Materials and Methods: Fifty-six patients were recruited from UMMC. About 43 questions pretest survey adapted from Lyon's ACP survey and Moss's cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) attitude survey was given to patients to answer. An educational brochure is then introduced to these patients, and a posttest survey carried out after that. The results were analyzed using SPSS version 22.0. Results: Opinion on ACP, including CPR decisions, showed an upward trend on the importance percentage after the educational brochure exposure, but this was statistically not significant. Seventy-five percent of participants had never heard of ACP before, and only 3.6% had actually prepared a written advanced directive. Conclusion: The ACP educational brochure clinically impacts patients’ preferences and decisions toward end-of-life care; however, this is statistically not significant. Majority of patients have poor knowledge on ACP. This study lays the foundation for execution of future larger scale clinical trials, and ultimately, the incorporation of ACP into clinical practice in Malaysia. PMID:27803566

  12. High levels of periostin correlate with increased fracture rate, diffuse MRI pattern, abnormal bone remodeling and advanced disease stage in patients with newly diagnosed symptomatic multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Terpos, E; Christoulas, D; Kastritis, E; Bagratuni, T; Gavriatopoulou, M; Roussou, M; Papatheodorou, A; Eleutherakis-Papaiakovou, E; Kanellias, N; Liakou, C; Panagiotidis, I; Migkou, M; Kokkoris, P; Moulopoulos, L A; Dimopoulos, M A

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein that is implicated in the biology of normal bone remodeling and in different cancer cell growth and metastasis. However, there is no information on the role of periostin in multiple myeloma (MM). Thus, we evaluated periostin in six myeloma cell lines in vitro; in the bone marrow plasma and serum of 105 newly diagnosed symptomatic MM (NDMM) patients and in the serum of 23 monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), 33 smoldering MM (SMM) patients, 30 patients at the plateau phase post-first-line therapy, 30 patients at first relapse and 30 healthy controls. We found high levels of periostin in the supernatants of myeloma cell lines compared with ovarian cancer cell lines that were not influenced by the incubation with the stromal cell line HS5. In NDMM patients the bone marrow plasma periostin was almost fourfold higher compared with the serum levels of periostin and correlated with the presence of fractures and of diffuse magnetic resonance imaging pattern of marrow infiltration. Serum periostin was elevated in NDMM patients compared with healthy controls, MGUS and SMM patients and correlated with advanced disease stage, high lactate dehydrogenase, increased activin-A, increased bone resorption and reduced bone formation. Patients at first relapse had also elevated periostin compared with healthy controls, MGUS and SMM patients, while even patients at the plateau phase had elevated serum periostin compared with healthy controls. These results support an important role of periostin in the biology of myeloma and reveal periostin as a possible target for the development of antimyeloma drugs. PMID:27716740

  13. Advanced staged combustion system for power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Rehmat, A.; Goyal, A.

    1993-12-31

    To respond to the increasing market need for a new generation of plants with a substantial improvement in efficiency and a reduction in capital cost, the Institute of Gas Technology has developed an advanced staged, fluidized-bed combustion system concept. The staged fluidized-bed partial combustor produces the fuel gas at about 1500 F. The fuel gas, after particulate removal, is directed to a gas turbine followed by a steam cycle. Adequate sulfur capture and solids waste stabilization are attained by separating calcination, carbonization, and gasification/combustion steps in the staged fluidized beds. Intermediate gas cooling is avoided during the process to maximize the power production. The coal-to-electricity conversion efficiency of the system approaches 49 percent, which exceeds the efficiencies of the other emerging technologies.

  14. Advanced Coats' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Haik, B G

    1991-01-01

    Advanced Coats' disease and retinoblastoma can both present with the triad of a retinal detachment, the appearance of a subretinal mass, and dilated retinal vessels. Thus, even the most experienced observer may not be able to differentiate these entities on ophthalmoscopic findings alone. Coats' disease is the most common reason for which eyes are enucleated with the misdiagnosis of retinoblastoma. Ultrasonography is the auxiliary diagnostic test most easily incorporated into the clinical examination, and can be utilized repeatedly without biologic tissue hazard. Ultrasonically identifiable features allowing differentiation between Coats' disease and retinoblastoma include the topography and character of retinal detachment and presence or absence of subretinal calcifications. Ultrasonography is of lesser use in poorly calcified retinoblastoma and in detecting optic nerve or extraocular extension in heavily calcified retinoblastoma. CT is perhaps the single most valuable test because of its ability to: (a) delineate intraocular morphology, (b) quantify subretinal densities, (c) identify vascularities within the subretinal space through the use of contrast enhancement, and (d) detected associated orbital or intracranial abnormalities. Optimal computed tomographic studies, however, require multiple thin slices both before and after contrast introduction and expose the child to low levels of radiation if studies are repeated periodically. MR imaging is valuable for its multiplanar imaging capabilities, its superior contrast resolution, and its ability to provide insights into the biochemical structure and composition of tissues. It is limited in its ability to detect calcium, which is the mainstay of ultrasonic and CT differentiation. Aqueous LDH and isoenzyme levels were not valuable in distinguishing between Coats' disease and retinoblastoma. The value of aqueous NSE levels in the differentiation of advanced Coats' disease and exophytic retinoblastoma deserves

  15. The changing hope trajectory in patients with advanced-stage cancer: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Judith Brown; Seda, Julie S; Kardinal, Carl G

    2012-06-01

    As patients with advanced-stage cancer move from the initial diagnosis through treatment, remission, recurrence, and advanced-stage disease, the hope trajectory undergoes a dynamic transformation. By identifying the hope trajectory, nurses can help patients focus on obtainable hope objects while balancing the need to present a realistic prognosis. This, in turn, may help patients find meaning and purpose in advanced-stage cancer and facilitate realistic hope when faced with a life-threatening illness.

  16. Advances in Medical Management of Early Stage and Advanced Breast Cancer: 2015.

    PubMed

    Witherby, Sabrina; Rizack, Tina; Sakr, Bachir J; Legare, Robert D; Sikov, William M

    2016-01-01

    Standard management of early stage and advanced breast cancer has been improved over the past few years by knowledge gained about the biology of the disease, results from a number of eagerly anticipated clinical trials and the development of novel agents that offer our patients options for improved outcomes or reduced toxicity or both. This review highlights recent major developments affecting the systemic therapy of breast cancer, broken down by clinically relevant patient subgroups and disease stage, and briefly discusses some of the ongoing controversies in the treatment of breast cancer and promising therapies on the horizon.

  17. Advances in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Juliane I.; Arteel, Gavin E.

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) remains a leading cause of death from liver disease in the United States. In studies from the Veterans Administration, patients with cirrhosis and superimposed alcoholic hepatitis had greater than 60% mortality over a 4-year period, with most of those deaths occurring in the first month. Thus, the prognosis for this disease is more ominous than for many common types of cancer (eg, breast, prostate, and colon). Moreover, ALD imposes a significant economic burden from lost wages, health care costs, and lost productivity. Unfortunately, there is still no Food and Drug Administration–approved or widely accepted drug therapy for any stage of ALD. Thus, a pressing need exists for a more detailed understanding of mechanisms of liver injury. This article reviews recent advances in mechanisms and therapy related to five major areas of direct relevance to ALD: oxidative stress; gut-liver axis and cytokine signaling; malnutrition; fibrin/clotting; and stellate cell activation/fibrosis. We also review why therapies related to these mechanisms have performed well in experimental animals and in vitro systems, but have not necessarily translated into effective therapy for humans with ALD. PMID:21088999

  18. Advanced two-stage compressor program design of inlet stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryce, C. A.; Paine, C. J.; Mccutcheon, A. R. S.; Tu, R. K.; Perrone, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of an inlet stage for a two-stage, 10/1 pressure ratio, 2 lb/sec flow rate compressor is discussed. Initially a performance comparison was conducted for an axial, mixed flow and centrifugal second stage. A modified mixed flow configuration with tandem rotors and tandem stators was selected for the inlet stage. The term conical flow compressor was coined to describe a particular type of mixed flow compressor configuration which utilizes axial flow type blading and an increase in radius to increase the work input potential. Design details of the conical flow compressor are described.

  19. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 3: extraprostatic extension, lymphovascular invasion and locally advanced disease.

    PubMed

    Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Evans, Andrew J; Delahunt, Brett; Epstein, Jonathan I; Griffiths, David F; van der Kwast, Theo H; Montironi, Rodolfo; Wheeler, Thomas M; Srigley, John R; Egevad, Lars L; Humphrey, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to extraprostatic extension (pT3a disease), bladder neck invasion, lymphovascular invasion and the definition of pT4 were coordinated by working group 3. It was agreed that prostate cancer can be categorized as pT3a in the absence of adipose tissue involvement when cancer bulges beyond the contour of the gland or beyond the condensed smooth muscle of the prostate at posterior and posterolateral sites. Extraprostatic extension can also be identified anteriorly. It was agreed that the location of extraprostatic extension should be reported. Although there was consensus that the amount of extraprostatic extension should be quantitated, there was no agreement as to which method of quantitation should be employed. There was overwhelming consensus that microscopic urinary bladder neck invasion by carcinoma should be reported as stage pT3a and that lymphovascular invasion by carcinoma should be reported. It is recommended that these elements are considered in the development of practice guidelines and in the daily practice of urological surgical pathology.

  20. Myeloma Today: Disease Definitions and Treatment Advances

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2015-01-01

    There have been major advances in the diagnosis, staging, risk-stratification, and management of multiple myeloma (MM). In addition to established CRAB (hypercalcemia, renal failure, anemia, and lytic bone lesions) features, new diagnostic criteria include 3 new biomarkers to diagnose the disease: bone marrow clonal plasmacytosis ≥60%, serum involved/uninvolved free light chain ratio ≥100, and >1 focal lesion on magnetic resonance imaging. MM can be classified into several subtypes based on baseline cytogenetics, and prognosis varies according to underlying cytogenetic abnormalities. A Revised International Staging System has been developed which combines markers of tumor burden (albumin, beta-2 microglobulin) with markers of aggressive disease biology (high risk cytogenetics and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase). Although the approach to therapy remains largely the same, the treatment options at every stage of the disease have changed. Carfilzomib, pomalidomide, and panobinostat have been approved for the treatment of the disease. Elotuzumab, daratumumab, and ixazomib are expected to be approved shortly. These drugs combined with older agents such as cyclophosphamide, dexamethasone, thalidomide, bortezomib, and lenalidomide dramatically increase the repertoire of regimens available for the treatment of MM. This review provides a concise overview of recent advances in MM, including updates to diagnostic criteria, staging, risk-stratification, and management. PMID:26565896

  1. Cyberknife treatment for advanced or terminal stage hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Hideo; Taniguch, Hiroyoshi; Nomura, Ryutaro; Sato, Kengo; Suzuki, Ichiro; Nakata, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the safety and efficacy of the Cyberknife treatment for patients with advanced or terminal stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Patients with HCC with extrahepatic metastasis or vascular or bile duct invasion were enrolled between May 2011 and June 2015. The Cyberknife was used to treat each lesion. Treatment response scores were based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.1. The trends of tumor markers, including alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and proteins induced by vitamin K absence II (PIVKA II) were assessed. Prognostic factors for tumor response and tumor markers were evaluated with Fisher’s exact test and a logistic regression model. Survival was evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: Sixty-five patients with 95 lesions were enrolled. Based on the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer classification, all patients were either in the advanced or terminal stage of the disease. The target lesions were as follows: 52 were bone metastasis; 9, lung metastasis; 7, brain metastasis; 9, portal vein invasion; 4, hepatic vein invasion; 4, bile duct invasion; and 10 other lesion types. The response rate and disease control rate were 34% and 53%, respectively. None of the clinical factors correlated significantly with tumor response. Fiducial marker implantation was associated with better control of both AFP (HR = 0.152; 95%CI: 0.026-0.887; P = 0.036) and PIVKA II (HR = 0.035; 95%CI: 0.003-0.342; P = 0.004). The median survival time was 9 mo (95%CI: 5-15 mo). Terminal stage disease (HR = 9.809; 95%CI: 2.589-37.17, P < 0.001) and an AFP of more than 400 ng/mL (HR = 2.548; 95%CI: 1.070-6.068, P = 0.035) were associated with worse survival. A radiation dose higher than 30 Gy (HR = 0.274; 95%CI: 0.093-0.7541, P = 0.012) was associated with better survival. In the 52 cases of bone metastasis, 36 patients (69%) achieved pain relief. One patient had cerebral

  2. The Economic Burden of Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Virginia; Vilme, Helene; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Boulware, L Ebony

    2016-07-01

    The growing prevalence and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) raises concerns about our capacity to manage its economic burden to patients, caregivers, and society. The societal direct and indirect costs of CKD and end-stage renal disease are substantial and increase throughout disease progression. There is significant variability in the evidence about direct and indirect costs attributable to CKD and end-stage renal disease, with the most complete evidence concentrated on direct health care costs of patients with advanced to end-stage CKD. There are substantial gaps in evidence that need to be filled to inform clinical practice and policy.

  3. Cutaneous mucormycosis in advanced HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Moreira, José; Ridolfi, Felipe; Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Varon, Andrea; Lamas, Cristiane C

    Angionvasive mucormycosis is an emerging fungal disease known to affect mainly diabetics or subjects with profound neutropenia. Infection usually occurs through the inhalation route, but cutaneous inoculation may occur after trauma or burns. However, mucormycosis remains unusual in HIV infection. We report a fatal case of cutaneous mucormycosis due to Rhizopus arrhizus involving the scalp following herpes zoster infection. The patient was a 42-year-old man with advanced AIDS failing on salvage antiretroviral therapy. The fungus was diagnosed on the basis of histopathology and culture. Our case emphasizes the need to consider mucormycosis in the differential diagnosis of necrotic cutaneous lesions in patients with late-stage HIV disease.

  4. Reliability and reproducibility of Kienbock's disease staging.

    PubMed

    Goeminne, S; Degreef, I; De Smet, L

    2010-09-01

    We evaluated the interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility of the Lichtman et al. classification for Kienböck's disease by getting four observers with different experience to look at 70 sets of wrist radiographs at different points in time. These observers staged each set of radiographs. Paired comparisons of the observations identified an agreement in 63% of cases and a mean weighted kappa coefficient of 0.64 confirming interobserver reliability. The stage of the involved lunate was reproduced in 78% of the observations with a mean weighted kappa coefficient of 0.81 showing intraobserver reproducibility. This classification for Kienböck's disease has good reliability and reproducibility.

  5. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research.

  6. Positron emission tomography has a high negative predictive value for progression or early relapse for patients with residual disease after first-line chemotherapy in advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kobe, Carsten; Dietlein, Markus; Franklin, Jeremy; Markova, Jana; Lohri, Andreas; Amthauer, Holger; Klutmann, Susanne; Knapp, Wolfram H.; Zijlstra, Josee M.; Bockisch, Andreas; Weckesser, Matthias; Lorenz, Reinhard; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Bares, Roland; Eich, Hans T.; Mueller, Rolf-Peter; Fuchs, Michael; Borchmann, Peter; Schicha, Harald; Diehl, Volker

    2008-01-01

    In the HD15 trial of the German Hodgkin Study Group, the negative predictive value (NPV) of positron emission tomography (PET) using [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose in advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) was evaluated. A total of 817 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive BEACOPP-based chemotherapy. After completion of chemotherapy, residual disease measuring more than or equal to 2.5 cm in diameter was assessed by PET in 311 patients. The NPV of PET was defined as the proportion of PET− patients without progression, relapse, or irradiation within 12 months after PET review panel. The progression-free survival was 96% for PET− patients (95% confidence interval [CI], 94%-99%) and 86% for PET+ patients (95% CI, 78%-95%, P = .011). The NPV for PET in this analysis was 94% (95% CI, 91%-97%). Thus, consolidation radiotherapy can be omitted in PET− patients with residual disease without increasing the risk for progression or early relapse compared with patients in complete remission. The impact of this finding on the overall survival at 5 years must be awaited. Until then, response adapted therapy guided by PET for HL patients seems to be a promising approach that should be further evaluated in clinical trials. This trial is registered at http://isrctn.org study as #ISRCTN32443041. PMID:18757777

  7. Sleep-Wake Cycle Dysfunction in the TgCRND8 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease: From Early to Advanced Pathological Stages.

    PubMed

    Colby-Milley, Jessica; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Jego, Sonia; Breitner, John C S; Quirion, Rémi; Adamantidis, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    In addition to cognitive decline, individuals affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) can experience important neuropsychiatric symptoms including sleep disturbances. We characterized the sleep-wake cycle in the TgCRND8 mouse model of AD, which overexpresses a mutant human form of amyloid precursor protein resulting in high levels of β-amyloid and plaque formation by 3 months of age. Polysomnographic recordings in freely-moving mice were conducted to study sleep-wake cycle architecture at 3, 7 and 11 months of age and corresponding levels of β-amyloid in brain regions regulating sleep-wake states were measured. At all ages, TgCRND8 mice showed increased wakefulness and reduced non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep during the resting and active phases. Increased wakefulness in TgCRND8 mice was accompanied by a shift in the waking power spectrum towards fast frequency oscillations in the beta (14-20 Hz) and low gamma range (20-50 Hz). Given the phenotype of hyperarousal observed in TgCRND8 mice, the role of noradrenergic transmission in the promotion of arousal, and previous work reporting an early disruption of the noradrenergic system in TgCRND8, we tested the effects of the alpha-1-adrenoreceptor antagonist, prazosin, on sleep-wake patterns in TgCRND8 and non-transgenic (NTg) mice. We found that a lower dose (2 mg/kg) of prazosin increased NREM sleep in NTg but not in TgCRND8 mice, whereas a higher dose (5 mg/kg) increased NREM sleep in both genotypes, suggesting altered sensitivity to noradrenergic blockade in TgCRND8 mice. Collectively our results demonstrate that amyloidosis in TgCRND8 mice is associated with sleep-wake cycle dysfunction, characterized by hyperarousal, validating this model as a tool towards understanding the relationship between β-amyloid overproduction and disrupted sleep-wake patterns in AD.

  8. Recent advances in oesophageal diseases.

    PubMed

    Al Dulaimi, David

    2014-01-01

    -quadrant biopsy protocol which may have led to an underestimation of BE prevalence. The review highlights an increasing incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in the West but unclear disease trend in Asia with inter-country variability. Similarly in Asian and Western countries BE is associated with the presence of hiatus hernia, advancing age, male gender, alcohol consumption, smoking, abdominal obesity and longer duration of gastro-esophageal reflux disease. The authors postulate that Helicobacter pylori infection, more prevalent in Asia than the West, may have a protective effect on BE. There is a need for larger, prospective studies to further clarify the disease pattern of BE in Asian countries. Clearly standardisation of the diagnostic process for BE is important to validate the differences in disease trends between Asian and Western countries. Kiadaliri AA. Gender and social disparities in esophagus cancer incidence in Iran, 2003-2009: a time trend province-level study.Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2014;15(2):623-7 Esophageal cancer (EC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality particuarly in Iran where the incidence rate exceeds the global average. An understanding of the factors influencing the province-specific incidence of EC in Iran is important to inform disease-prevention strategies and address health inequalities. This ecological study used cancer registry data to investigate the relationship between gender and social class and the incidence of EC in Iran at province-level between 2003 and 2009. The age standardised incidence rates (ASIR) of EC were greatest in the Northern provinces of Iran, specifically Razavi Khorasan in males and Kordestan in females. Overall the EC incidence did not significantly differ according to gender. Interestingly, during the study period the ASIR increased by 4.6% per year in females (p=0.08) and 6.5% per year in males (p=0.02). This may reflect increasing rates of establised risk factors for EC including obsesity and gastro

  9. Recent advances in heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, J; McCall, J W; Genchi, C; Bazzocchi, C; Kramer, L; Simòn, F; Martarino, M

    2004-10-28

    This compilation of articles consists of four papers presented at the 19th International Conference of the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) (held in New Orleans, LA, USA, on 10–14 August 2003) in a symposium session titled “ Recent Advances in Heartworm Disease,” organized and chaired by JohnW. McCall and Jorge Guerrero. The first paper(Guerrero) covered the American Heartworm Society’s most recent revision of their guidelines for the diagnosis, prevention, and management of heartworm infection in dogs, based on new research and clinical experience, particularly in the areas of heartworm chemoprophylaxis, adulticide therapy,and serologic testing and retesting. The entire updated 2003 “Guidelines” are presented herein.One paper (McCall) reviewed the “soft-kill” adulticidal and “safety-net” (reach-back, retroactive,clinical prophylactic) activity of prolonged dosing of prophylactic doses of macrocyclic lactones,concluding that ivermectin is the most effective in this way, milbemycin oxime is the least effective,and the activity of injectable moxidectin and selamectin lies between that of ivermectin and milbemycin oxime. The two remaining papers provided an overview of the discovery, rediscovery,phylogeny, and biological association between Wolbachia endosymbionts and filarial nematodes(Genchi and co-authors) and compelling evidence that Wolbachia may play a major role in the immunopathogenesis of filarial diseases of man and animals (Kramer and co-authors).

  10. Advances take stage - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Regulatory advances in proteomics will be taking center stage at a Symposia scheduled to occur at the 2011 American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Annual Meeting. The symposium entitled "Enabling Translational Proteomics with NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer" is scheduled for July 25, 2011 at AACC's annual Meeting.

  11. Initial Staging of Hodgkin’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Danieli, Roberta; Caracciolo, Cristiana Ragano; Travascio, Laura; Cantonetti, Maria; Gallamini, Andrea; Guazzaroni, Manlio; Orlacchio, Antonio; Simonetti, Giovanni; Schillaci, Orazio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of positron emission tomography/low-dose computed tomography (PET/ldCT) versus the same technique implemented by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (ceCT) in staging Hodgkin’s disease (HD). Forty patients (18 men and 22 women, mean age 30 ± 9.6) with biopsy-proven HD underwent a PET/ldCT study for initial staging including an unenhanced low-dose computed tomography for attenuation correction with positron emission tomography acquisition and a ceCT, performed at the end of the PET/ldCT scan, in the same exam session. A detailed datasheet was generated for illness locations for separate imaging modality comparison and then merged in order to compare the separate imaging method results (PET/ldCT and ceCT) versus merged results positron emission tomography/contrast-enhanced computed tomography (PET/ceCT). The nodal and extranodal lesions detected by each technique were then compared with follow-up data that served as the reference standard. No significant differences were found at staging between PET/ldCT and PET/ceCT in our series. One hundred and eighty four stations of nodal involvement have been found with no differences in both modalities. Extranodal involvement was identified in 26 sites by PET/ldCT and in 28 by PET/ceCT. We did not find significant differences concerning the stage (Ann Arbor). Our study shows a good concordance and conjunction between PET/ldCT and ceCT in both nodal and extranodal sites in the initial staging of HD, suggesting that PET/ldCT could suffice in most of these patients. PMID:25121354

  12. Mitochondrial diseases: advances and issues

    PubMed Central

    Scarpelli, Mauro; Todeschini, Alice; Volonghi, Irene; Padovani, Alessandro; Filosto, Massimiliano

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases (MDs) are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders caused by a dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. They can be related to mutation of genes encoded using either nuclear DNA or mitochondrial DNA. The advent of next generation sequencing and whole exome sequencing in studying the molecular bases of MDs will bring about a revolution in the field of mitochondrial medicine, also opening the possibility of better defining pathogenic mechanisms and developing novel therapeutic approaches for these devastating disorders. The canonical rules of mitochondrial medicine remain milestones, but novel issues have been raised following the use of advanced diagnostic technologies. Rigorous validation of the novel mutations detected using deep sequencing in patients with suspected MD, and a clear definition of the natural history, outcome measures, and biomarkers that could be usefully adopted in clinical trials, are mandatory goals for the scientific community. Today, therapy is often inadequate and mostly palliative. However, important advances have been made in treating some clinical entities, eg, mitochondrial neuro-gastrointestinal encephalomyopathy, for which approaches using allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, orthotopic liver transplantation, and carrier erythrocyte entrapped thymidine phosphorylase enzyme therapy have recently been developed. Promising new treatment methods are being identified so that researchers, clinicians, and patients can join forces to change the history of these untreatable disorders. PMID:28243136

  13. Recent Advances in Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Murch, Simon

    2016-11-01

    Recent diagnostic advances have demonstrated that celiac disease is relatively common although most patients have less florid symptoms than previously recognised. The mucosal lesion of this autoimmune disorder depends on both adaptive and innate immune responses. The characteristic antibodies to tissue transglutaminase-2 (tTG-2) and deamidated gliadin peptides may be produced in persons possessing the relevant HLA-DQ genotypes if intact gliadin peptides can penetrate the epithelial barrier to reach antigen presenting cells. Progression from celiac autoimmunity to overt disease may depend on innate immune mechanisms, not HLA-restricted, where IL-15 is generated within the epithelial compartment. A specific innate immune response previously thought restricted to invertebrates, the encapsulation reaction, may contribute to mucosal volume expansion through recruitment of syndecan-expressing leukocytes and stimulated matrix production. It is notable that tissue transglutaminase is critical in this reaction in insects, and that the very few insects that can predate wheat, possess specific salivary or intestinal enzymes that degrade gluten. Animal models in HLA-DQ transgenic mice suggest that the microbial flora of the intestine may play a role in host responses and modulate the evolution of the disease. This suggests that therapeutic modulation of the microbiome may contribute to management of celiac disease. In developing world countries, there is a potential difficulty in histological diagnosis because of the widespread incidence of environmental enteropathy amongst apparently healthy children. Thus, recognition of local patterns of enteropathy will be important for histopathologists, and high titre tTG-2 autoantibody titres may hold considerable diagnostic significance.

  14. Adiponectin and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Markaki, Anastasia; Psylinakis, Emmanuel; Spyridaki, Aspasia

    2016-07-01

    Adiponectin (ADPN) is an adipokine with significant anti-inflammatory, insulin-sensitizing and anti-atherogenic properties, which is generally associated with a beneficial cardiometabolic profile. Paradoxically, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is characterized by markedly increased plasma ADPN levels and increased cardiovascular risk. In spite of the cardioprotective properties attributed to adiponectin, cardiovascular complications remain the main cause of mortality in the ESRD population. Furthermore, these patients have enhanced chronic inflammation, increased insulin resistance and persistent protein-energy wasting. Studies of the impact of ADPN on clinical outcomes among ESRD patients have so far yielded contradictory results. This review article summarizes the current knowledge on ADPN functions and explores the role of ADPN in ESRD patients, with specific focus on inflammation, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease and wasting.

  15. Impact of Huntington's across the entire disease spectrum: the phases and stages of disease from the patient perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ho, AK; Hocaoglu, MB

    2011-01-01

    Ho AK, Hocaoglu MB for the European Huntington's Disease Network Quality of Life Working Group. Impact of Huntington disease across the entire disease spectrum: the phases and stages of disease from the patient perspective. Although Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor, cognitive and behavioural disturbances, there has been little empirical data examining what patients are most concerned about throughout the different stages of disease, which can span many years. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were individually conducted with 31 people living with different stages of Huntington's, from pre-clinical gene carriers to advanced stage. We examined how often participants raised issues and concerns regarding the impact of Huntington's on everyday life. The Physical/functional theme hardly featured pre-clinically, but was strongly present from Stage 1, rose steadily and peaked at Stage 5. There were no significant changes between stages for the Emotional, Social, and Self themes that all featured across all stages, indicating that these issues were not raised more frequently over the course of the disease. Likewise, the more rarely mentioned Financial and Legal themes also remained similar across stages. However, the Cognitive theme only featured between Stages 1 and 4, and hardly at all pre-clinically and at Stage 5. These findings provide insight into patients' important and unique perspective and have implications for the management and development of interventions across the spectrum of HD stages. Section Editor: Aad Tibben, email: a.Tibben@lumc.nl PMID:21736564

  16. Advances in motor neurone disease.

    PubMed

    Bäumer, Dirk; Talbot, Kevin; Turner, Martin R

    2014-01-01

    Motor neurone disease (MND), the commonest clinical presentation of which is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), is regarded as the most devastating of adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders. The last decade has seen major improvements in patient care, but also rapid scientific advances, so that rational therapies based on key pathogenic mechanisms now seem plausible. ALS is strikingly heterogeneous in both its presentation, with an average one-year delay from first symptoms to diagnosis, and subsequent rate of clinical progression. Although half of patients succumb within 3-4 years of symptom onset, typically through respiratory failure, a significant minority survives into a second decade. Although an apparently sporadic disorder for most patients, without clear environmental triggers, recent genetic studies have identified disease-causing mutations in genes in several seemingly disparate functional pathways, so that motor neuron degeneration may need to be understood as a common final pathway with a number of upstream causes. This apparent aetiological and clinical heterogeneity suggests that therapeutic studies should include detailed biomarker profiling, and consider genetic as well as clinical stratification. The most common mutation, accounting for 10% of all Western hemisphere ALS, is a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9orf72. This and several other genes implicate altered RNA processing and protein degradation pathways in the core of ALS pathogenesis. A major gap remains in understanding how such fundamental processes appear to function without obvious deficit in the decades prior to symptom emergence, and the study of pre-symptomatic gene carriers is an important new initiative.

  17. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  18. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  19. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  20. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  1. 42 CFR 441.40 - End-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false End-stage renal disease. 441.40 Section 441.40... General Provisions § 441.40 End-stage renal disease. FFP in expenditures for services described in subpart A of part 440 is available for facility treatment of end-stage renal disease only if the...

  2. Pregnancy in end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Hladunewich, Michelle; Hercz, Adam Engel; Keunen, Johannes; Chan, Christopher; Pierratos, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The ovulatory menstrual cycle is known to be affected on multiple levels in women with advanced renal disease. Menstrual irregularities, sexual dysfunction, and infertility worsen in parallel with the renal disease. Pregnancy in women with ESRD on dialysis is therefore uncommon. Furthermore, when pregnancy does occur, it can prove hazardous to both mother and baby owing to a multitude of potential complications including accelerated hypertension and preeclampsia, poor fetal growth, anemia, and polyhydramnios. Data are emerging, however, to suggest that pregnancy while on intensified renal replacement regimens may result in better pregnancy outcomes, and emerging trends include the decreased rate of therapeutic abortions probably reflecting a change in counseling practices over time. Nevertheless, a pregnant woman on intensive dialysis requires meticulous follow-up by a dedicated team including nephrology, obstetrics, and a full multidisciplinary staff. In this article, we will address fertility issues in young women with ESRD, review pregnancy outcomes in women on both hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, and provide suggestions for the management of the pregnant women on intensive hemodialysis.

  3. Microvessel density and p53 mutations in advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Niyati J; Geest, Koen De; Neff, Traci; Young, Barry De; Bender, David P; Ahmed, Amina; Smith, Brian J; Button, Anna; Goodheart, Michael J

    2013-04-30

    We planned to determine the relationship between angiogenesis and p53 mutational status in advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer. Using 190 tumor samples from patients with stage III and IV ovarian cancer we performed p53 sequencing, immunohistochemistry, and CD31 microvessel density (MVD) determination. MVD was elevated in tumors with p53 null mutations compared to p53 missense mutation or no mutation. Disease recurrence was increased with higher MVD in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. In adjusted analysis, p53 null mutation was associated with increased recurrence and worse overall survival. Worse overall survival and increased recurrence risk were also associated with the combination of CD31 MVD values >25 vessels/HPF and any p53 mutation. P53 mutation status and MVD may have prognostic significance in patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. Tumors with p53 null mutations are likely to be more vascular, contributing to decreased survival and increased recurrence probability.

  4. Advanced Low-Noise Research Fan Stage Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubert, Robert; Bock, Larry; Malmborg, Eric; Owen-Peer, William

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the design of the Advanced Low-Noise Research Fan stage. The fan is a variable pitch design, which is designed at the cruise pitch condition. Relative to the cruise setting, the blade is closed at takeoff and opened for reverse thrust operation. The fan stage is a split flow design with fan exit guide vanes (FEGVs) and core stators. The fan stage design is combined with a nacelle and engine core duct to form a powered fan/nacelle subscale model. This model is intended for use in combined aerodynamic, acoustic, and structural testing in a wind tunnel. The fan has an outer diameter of 22 in. and a hub-to-tip of 0.426 in., which allows the use of existing NASA fan and cowl force balance and rig drive systems. The design parameters were selected to permit valid acoustic and aerodynamic comparisons with the Pratt & Whitney (P&W) 17- and 22-in. rigs previously tested under NASA contract. The fan stage design is described in detail. The results of the design axisymmetric and Navier-Stokes aerodynamic analysis are presented at the critical design conditions. The structural analysis of the fan rotor and attachment is included. The blade and attachment are predicted to have adequate low-cycle fatigue life and an acceptable operating range without resonant stress or flutter. The stage was acoustically designed with airfoil counts in the FEGV and core stator to minimize noise. A fan/FEGV tone analysis developed separately under NASA contract was used to determine the optimum airfoil counts. The fan stage was matched to the existing nacelle, designed under the previous P&W low-noise contract, to form a fan/nacelle model for wind tunnel testing. It is an axisymmetric nacelle for convenience in testing and analysis. Previous testing confirmed that the nacelle performed as required at various aircraft operating conditions.

  5. NASA Bioreactors Advance Disease Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    the body. Experiments conducted by Johnson scientist Dr. Thomas Goodwin proved that the NASA bioreactor could successfully cultivate cells using simulated microgravity, resulting in three-dimensional tissues that more closely approximate those in the body. Further experiments conducted on space shuttle missions and by Wolf as an astronaut on the Mir space station demonstrated that the bioreactor s effects were even further expanded in space, resulting in remarkable levels of tissue formation. While the bioreactor may one day culture red blood cells for injured astronauts or single-celled organisms like algae as food or oxygen producers for a Mars colony, the technology s cell growth capability offers significant opportunities for terrestrial medical research right now. A small Texas company is taking advantage of the NASA technology to advance promising treatment applications for diseases both common and obscure.

  6. Serum markers in early-stage and locally advanced melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lugowska, Iwona; Kowalska, Maria; Fuksiewicz, Małgorzata; Kotowicz, Beata; Mierzejewska, Ewa; Koseła-Paterczyk, Hanna; Szamotulska, Katarzyna; Rutkowski, Piotr

    2015-11-01

    The identification of prognostic factors in cutaneous melanoma allows choosing the most effective treatment, especially in group of patients with locoregional disease. Markers related to carcinogenesis and angiogenesis in particular have effect on the course of the disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical utility of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), and YKL-40 in serum of melanoma patients at pathological stages I-III. We included 148 adult patients with melanoma. The median follow-up was 40 months. Disease recurrence was observed in 43 patients; 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 71.7%; 35 patients died; and the 3-year overall survival (OS) rate was 85%. Concentrations of VEGF, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and YKL-40 were measured by ELISA kits. VEGF, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and YKL-40 were significantly higher in group of patients than in controls. Increased concentrations of TIMP-1 were related to patient survival, which in the group of lower and increased TIMP-1, disease-free survival amounted to 81 vs. 61% (p = 0.014) and overall survival -88 vs. 82% (p = 0.050), respectively. An increased concentration of YKL-40 was observed in 59% of patients with ulceration and in 26% of patients without ulceration (p = 0.012). We have found a clinically significant correlation between YKL-40 and MMP-9 (rho = 0.363; p = 0.004) as well as YKL-40 and VEGF (rho = 0.306; p = 0.018). In melanoma patients at stages I-III, the high concentrations of TIMP-1 in serum predicted adverse prognosis. YKL-40 was associated with ulceration of primary tumor, which is a very important prognostic factor.

  7. Parkinson's Disease: The Newest Advances

    MedlinePlus

    ... on genetic findings, investigators have already developed improved animal models, so essential for our understanding of what causes the disease and for testing new treatments, and have made breakthroughs in cell ...

  8. Advanced imaging in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bax, Jeroen J; Delgado, Victoria

    2017-04-01

    Although echocardiography remains the mainstay imaging technique for the evaluation of patients with valvular heart disease (VHD), innovations in noninvasive imaging in the past few years have provided new insights into the pathophysiology and quantification of VHD, early detection of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, and advanced prognostic assessment. The severity grading of valve dysfunction has been refined with the use of Doppler echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and CT imaging. LV ejection fraction remains an important criterion when deciding whether patients should be referred for surgery. However, echocardiographic strain imaging can now detect impaired LV systolic function before LV ejection fraction reduces, thus provoking the debate on whether patients with severe VHD should be referred for surgery at an earlier stage (before symptom onset). Impaired LV strain correlates with the amount of myocardial fibrosis detected with CMR techniques. Furthermore, accumulating data show that the extent of fibrosis associated with severe VHD has important prognostic implications. The present Review focuses on using these novel imaging modalities to assess pathophysiology, early LV dysfunction, and prognosis of major VHDs, including aortic stenosis, mitral regurgitation, and aortic regurgitation.

  9. Physical activity in patients with advanced-stage cancer: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tara A; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2012-06-01

    The importance of physical activity for chronic disease prevention and management has become generally well accepted. The number of research interventions and publications examining the benefits of physical activity for patients with cancer has been rising steadily. However, much of that research has focused on the impact of physical activity either prior to or early in the cancer diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship process. Research focusing on the effects of physical activity, specifically for patients with advanced-stage cancer and poorer prognostic outcomes, has been addressed only recently. The purpose of this article is to examine the state of the science for physical activity in the advanced-stage disease subset of the cancer population. Exercise in a variety of intensities and forms, including yoga, walking, biking, and swimming, has many health benefits for people, including those diagnosed with cancer. Research has shown that, for people with cancer (including advanced-stage cancer), exercise can decrease anxiety, stress, and depression while improving levels of pain, fatigue, shortness of breath, constipation, and insomnia. People diagnosed with cancer should discuss with their oncologist safe, easy ways they can incorporate exercise into their daily lives.

  10. Post-operative radiation therapy for advanced-stage oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Eric; Panwala, Kathryn; Holland, John

    2002-11-01

    Between 1985 and 1999, 43 patients with locally-advanced, resectable oropharyngeal cancer were treated with combined surgery and post-operative radiation therapy (RT) at Oregon Health and Science University. Five patients (12 per cent) had Stage III disease and 38 patients (88 per cent) had Stage IV disease. All patients had gross total resections of the primary tumour. Thirty-seven patients had neck dissections for regional disease. RT consisted of a mean tumour-bed dose of 63.0 Gy delivered in 1.8-2.0 Gy fractions over a mean of 49 days. At three- and five-years, the actuarial local control was 96 per cent and the actuarial local/regional control was 80 per cent. The three- and five-year actuarial rates of distant metastases were 41 per cent and 46 per cent, respectively. The actuarial overall survival at three- and five-years was 41 per cent and 34 per cent, respectively. The actuarial rates of progression-free survival were 49 per cent at three-years and 45 per cent at five years. Combined surgery and post-operative RT for advanced-stage oropharyngeal cancer results in excellent local/regional control. This particular group of patients experienced a high-rate of developing distant metastases.

  11. Lower Extremity Revascularization in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Douglas W; Dansey, Kirsten; Hamdan, Allen D

    2016-11-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who present with critical limb ischemia (CLI) have become an increasingly common and complex treatment problem for vascular surgeons. Dialysis patients have high short-term mortality rates regardless of whether revascularization is pursued. ESRD patients with CLI can be managed with: local wound care, endovascular or surgical revascularization, or amputation. Some patients may heal small foot wounds with local wound care alone, even if distal perfusion is marginal, as long as any infectious process has been controlled. Surgical revascularization has a mortality rate of 5-10% but has a high chance of limb salvage. However, overall 5-year survival may be as low as 28%. Endovascular therapy also carries a high perioperative mortality risk in this population with similar limb salvage rates. Amputation is indicated in patients with advanced stage CLI, as described by the Society for Vascular Surgery's Wound, Ischemia and foot Infection (WIfI) system. Statistical models predict that endovascular or surgical revascularization strategies are less costly and more functionally beneficial to patients than primary amputation alone. Decisions on how to manage ESRD patients with CLI are complex but revascularization can often result in limb salvage, despite limited overall survival. Dialysis patients with good life expectancy and good quality conduit may benefit most from surgical bypass.

  12. [Advances in sickle cell disease].

    PubMed

    de Montalembert, Mariane

    2008-10-01

    Generation of transgenic mice have identified new pathophysiological mechanisms in sickle disease, including a permanent proinflammatory state and dysregulation of vascular tone. Treatment is no longer solely symptomatic. New agents target red cell hydration and the kinetics of deoxyhemoglobin S polymerization. Hydroxyurea, which reactivates fetal hemoglobin synthesis, is now widely used. Anti-adhesion molecules and agents modulating vascular tone are being tried in sickle mice. Bone marrow transplantation is widely used to cure patients with HLA-identical siblings, and gene therapy looks promising for those without a donor.

  13. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Agosta, Federica; Galantucci, Sebastiano; Filippi, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is playing an increasingly important role in the study of neurodegenerative diseases, delineating the structural and functional alterations determined by these conditions. Advanced MRI techniques are of special interest for their potential to characterize the signature of each neurodegenerative condition and aid both the diagnostic process and the monitoring of disease progression. This aspect will become crucial when disease-modifying (personalized) therapies will be established. MRI techniques are very diverse and go from the visual inspection of MRI scans to more complex approaches, such as manual and automatic volume measurements, diffusion tensor MRI, and functional MRI. All these techniques allow us to investigate the different features of neurodegeneration. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances concerning the use of MRI in some of the most important neurodegenerative conditions, putting an emphasis on the advanced techniques.

  14. Advanced imaging in equine dental disease.

    PubMed

    Selberg, Kurt; Easley, Jeremiah T

    2013-08-01

    Dental and sinus disorders are relatively common and of major clinical importance in equine medicine. Advanced diagnostic imaging has become an integral part of equine veterinary medicine. Advanced imaging has progressed the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of dental- and sinus-related diseases. As a clinician, it is important to realize the value of advanced diagnostic imaging. Although computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are both significantly more expensive compared with other diagnostic tools, the financial cost of inaccurate diagnosis and treatment can often result in higher overall costs.

  15. Hepatitis C: What Happens in End-Stage Liver Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases or liver diseases (hepatologist). Newer, more-effective hepatitis C treatments can eliminate the virus in many people, reducing the risk of end-stage liver disease. With Michael F. Picco, ... and natural history of hepatitis C virus infection. http://www.uptodate.com/home. ...

  16. [Advances in the diagnostics of Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Fiedler, U; Wiltfang, J; Peters, N; Benninghoff, J

    2012-05-01

    Due to the demographic developments, diagnosis and treatment, dementia constitutes an increasing medical challenge and is likely to have an increasing socioeconomic impact. Dementia does not reflect a single disease but encompasses a variety of underlying conditions, heterogeneous clinical courses and therapeutic approaches, among which Alzheimer's disease represents the most common cause. Therefore, a thorough differential diagnosis of dementia is of major importance. To date the current diagnosis of dementia according to ICD-10/DMS-IV is based on clinical criteria. In addition, the concept of mild cognitive impairment comprises early cognitive dysfunction without clinically apparent dementia. Alzheimer's disease is more and more conceptualized as a disease continuum with mild cognitive impairment as an early and manifest dementia as the later stage of the disease. This review gives an overview on the current diagnostic approaches and the proposed revisions of diagnostic and research criteria for Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Penile Calciphylaxis in End Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Di Lullo, Luca; Otranto, Giovanni; Floccari, Fulvio; Malaguti, Moreno; Santoboni, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Calciphylaxis, better described as “Calcific uremic arteriolopathy” (CUA), involves about 1–4% of hemodialysis patients all around the world with high mortality rates. We describe a rare clinical case of CUA in peritoneal dialysis patient associated with urological disease. Penile calciphylaxis represents rare clinical complication, and an early diagnosis and multidisciplinary approach are requested. Pathogenesis is still unclear, and therapeutic approaches need more long-term clinical trials to test their efficacy and safety. PMID:23841013

  18. Penile calciphylaxis in end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Barbera, Vincenzo; Di Lullo, Luca; Gorini, Antonio; Otranto, Giovanni; Floccari, Fulvio; Malaguti, Moreno; Santoboni, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Calciphylaxis, better described as "Calcific uremic arteriolopathy" (CUA), involves about 1-4% of hemodialysis patients all around the world with high mortality rates. We describe a rare clinical case of CUA in peritoneal dialysis patient associated with urological disease. Penile calciphylaxis represents rare clinical complication, and an early diagnosis and multidisciplinary approach are requested. Pathogenesis is still unclear, and therapeutic approaches need more long-term clinical trials to test their efficacy and safety.

  19. Advances in identifying beryllium sensitization and disease.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Dan; Kowalski, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Beryllium is a lightweight metal with unique qualities related to stiffness, corrosion resistance, and conductivity. While there are many useful applications, researchers in the 1930s and 1940s linked beryllium exposure to a progressive occupational lung disease. Acute beryllium disease is a pulmonary irritant response to high exposure levels, whereas chronic beryllium disease (CBD) typically results from a hypersensitivity response to lower exposure levels. A blood test, the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT), was an important advance in identifying individuals who are sensitized to beryllium (BeS) and thus at risk for developing CBD. While there is no true "gold standard" for BeS, basic epidemiologic concepts have been used to advance our understanding of the different screening algorithms.

  20. Advanced Strategies for End-Stage Heart Failure: Combining Regenerative Approaches with LVAD, a New Horizon?

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Cheyenne C. S.; Ramjankhan, Faiz Z.; de Jonge, Nicolaas; Chamuleau, Steven A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the improved treatment of cardiovascular diseases, the population with end-stage heart failure (HF) is progressively growing. The scarcity of the gold standard therapy, heart transplantation, demands novel therapeutic approaches. For patients awaiting transplantation, ventricular-assist devices have been of great benefit on survival. To allow explantation of the assist device and obviate heart transplantation, sufficient and durable myocardial recovery is necessary. However, explant rates so far are low. Combining mechanical circulatory support with regenerative therapies such as cell (-based) therapy and biomaterials might give rise to improved long-term results. Although synergistic effects are suggested with mechanical support and stem cell therapy, evidence in both preclinical and clinical setting is lacking. This review focuses on advanced and innovative strategies for the treatment of end-stage HF and furthermore appraises clinical experience with combined strategies. PMID:25905105

  1. Recent advances in treating Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Wolfgang H.

    2017-01-01

    This article summarizes (1) the recent achievements to further improve symptomatic therapy of motor Parkinson’s disease (PD) symptoms, (2) the still-few attempts to systematically search for symptomatic therapy of non-motor symptoms in PD, and (3) the advances in the development and clinical testing of compounds which promise to offer disease modification in already-manifest PD. However, prevention (that is, slowing or stopping PD in a prodromal stage) is still a dream and one reason for this is that we have no consensus on primary endpoints for clinical trials which reflect the progression in prodromal stages of PD, such as in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) —a methodological challenge to be met in the future. PMID:28357055

  2. [Specific care plan in different stages of Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Hein, Christophe; Villars, Hélène; Nourhashemi, Fati

    2011-09-01

    The management and follow-up of patients with Alzheimers disease have stage-specific characteristics. In the mild stage, the key challenges are above all to improve the early diagnosis and the communication of the diagnosis. With the patient's agreement, a follow-up should be scheduled to assess, at each stage of the disease, cognitive and functional decline, and detect psycho-behavioral, nutritional or mobility complications. In the moderate or severe stages, prevention and treatment of caregiver burnout should be included in the follow-up. Finally, in the very severe stage, end of life and ethical issues should be considered. The followup and the intervention plan should be adapted to each patient, and require coordination between health care professionals and social workers. However, the practical aspects of the follow-up and the ways in which those can be improved are yet to be defined.

  3. The psychosocial impact of late-stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Calne, Susan M

    2003-12-01

    The late stage of Parkinson's disease (PD) can be protracted with inexorable changes in physical and mental health, loss of autonomy and self-esteem, altered relationships, and social isolation. Severely affected patients (Hoehn & Yahr stage 4-5) present a challenge to nurses who care for them; addressing their needs takes time and patience. Changes in mental status have profound implications for the welfare of the late-stage PD patient as well as of the caregiver(s). Depression and dementia in patients with PD are two factors that interfere with the ability to deliver effective care in late-stage PD as they lead to loss of initiative and cooperation. Primary caregivers often have their own medical problems, with limited stamina and support; relationships may change, leading to sadness or conflict. Nurses can be powerful advocates for the physical and mental health of both the patient with late-stage Parkinson's disease and the primary caregiver.

  4. Early-stage Alzheimer disease represents increased suicidal risk in relation to later stages.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wee Shiong; Rubin, Eugene H; Coats, Mary; Morris, John C

    2005-01-01

    The level of risk for suicide in individuals with Alzheimer disease (AD) generally is considered to be low. It is important to recognize, however, that suicide can occur in early-stage Alzheimer disease on the background of a distinct high-risk profile. The objective of this report is to describe the clinical profiles of individuals with very mild Alzheimer disease who either attempted or completed suicide. We describe two participants in a longitudinal study of early-stage Alzheimer disease who were in the ninth decade of life and had very mild Alzheimer disease. Consistent with earlier cases reported in the literature, both displayed the following high-risk phenotype predisposing to suicidal risk: male gender, highly educated professional, preserved insight, dysthymic symptoms that did not meet criteria for major depression and post-dated the onset of cognitive decline, and suicidal ideation. Neuropathological examination confirmed histologic Alzheimer disease in both cases. These cases, taken together, emphasize the need for awareness that early-stage Alzheimer disease may present a unique suicidal risk compared with later stages.

  5. Comprehension of Complex Discourse in Different Stages of Huntington's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saldert, Charlotta; Fors, Angelika; Stroberg, Sofia; Hartelius, Lena

    2010-01-01

    Background: Huntington's disease not only affects motor speech control, but also may have an impact on the ability to produce and understand language in communication. Aims: The ability to comprehend basic and complex discourse was investigated in three different stages of Huntington's disease. Methods & Procedures: In this experimental group…

  6. Providing quality palliative care in end-stage Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Yeaman, Paul A; Ford, James L; Kim, Kye Y

    2013-08-01

    Providing quality palliative care is a daunting task profoundly impacted by diminished patient capacity at the end of life. Alzheimer disease (AD) is a disorder that erases our memories and is projected to increase dramatically for decades to come. By the time the patients with AD reach the end stage of the disease, the ability of patients to provide pertinent subjective complaints of pain and discomfort would have vanished. Historical perspectives of palliative care, exploration of the AD process, ethical issues, and crucial clinical considerations are provided to improve the understanding of disease progression and quality of care for patients with end-stage AD.

  7. Epilepsy at the prodromal stages of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Cretin, Benjamin; Philippi, Nathalie; Dibitonto, Laure; Blanc, Frédéric

    2017-03-01

    This review provides a clinically grounded description of the links between epilepsy and early common neurodegenerative diseases (i.e. Alzheimer's disease, Lewy body disease, vascular cognitive impairment, fronto-temporal lobar degeneration). It shows that epilepsy does not only concern demented patients displaying convulsive seizures (whether focal or generalized) and obvious atrophy on brain imaging. On the contrary, unprovoked seizures and epilepsy - commonly involving the temporal lobe - are now reported at the prodromal stages of these diseases, when cognitive complaints are mild or even minimal and brain imaging inconstantly abnormal. Thus epilepsy must be considered as a part of the phenotypic spectrum at any stages of the neurodegenerative diseases. This must be kept in mind in everyday practice, and when defining these diseases with clinic-biological criteria. Such entanglement also explains the growing prevalence of elderly epileptic subjects and the need of a close collaboration between geriatricians, cognitivists and epileptologists.

  8. 2nd ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer: locally advanced stage III non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, W E E; De Ruysscher, D; Weder, W; Le Péchoux, C; De Leyn, P; Hoffmann, H; Westeel, V; Stahel, R; Felip, E; Peters, S

    2015-08-01

    To complement the existing treatment guidelines for all tumour types, ESMO organises consensus conferences to focus on specific issues in each type of tumour. The 2nd ESMO Consensus Conference on Lung Cancer was held on 11-12 May 2013 in Lugano. A total of 35 experts met to address several questions on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in each of four areas: pathology and molecular biomarkers, first-line/second and further lines of treatment in advanced disease, early-stage disease and locally advanced disease. For each question, recommendations were made including reference to the grade of recommendation and level of evidence. This consensus paper focuses on locally advanced disease.

  9. Infectious diseases in end-stage liver disease patients.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Aneesh K; Lyon, G Marshall

    2010-09-01

    Patients with chronic liver diseases sustain impairment to immune systems, which worsens over time. These defects in their host defense lead to risks of bacterial infections and increased morbidity. Providers should have heightened surveillance for infectious diseases and suspect one with any acute change in status. Patient history may reveal rare infections and allow initiation of early appropriate therapy. There should be a low threshold for obtaining diagnostic cultures and peritoneal fluid samples and discussing possible causes with an infectious diseases consultant or a microbiology laboratory. These maneuvers will maximize therapy in patients at high risk for death due to infectious disease.

  10. Nursing care for end-stage liver disease.

    PubMed

    Clements, Amanda; Greenslade, Lynda

    Nurses are seeing more and more patients with liver disease, many of whom are under 65. Most common causes are avoidable and, as liver disease may take up to 30 years to develop, identifying those at risk is key. Patients with liver disease often have a fluctuating course of complications that needs a team approach to care. Improving end-of-life care can also reduce the number of these patients who die in hospital. This article, the first in a two-part series, explores some common complications of liver disease and best practice for nurses treating patients with end-stage liver disease.

  11. [Device-aided therapies in advanced Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, A A

    2016-01-01

    Advanced stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) is a consequence of the severe neurodegenerative process and are characterized by the development of motor fluctuations and dyskinesia, aggravation of non-motor symptoms. Treatment with peroral and transdermal drugs can't provide an adequate control of PD symptoms and quality-of-life of the patients at this stage of disease. Currently, three device-aided therapies: deep brain stimulation (DBS), intrajejunal infusion of duodopa, subcutaneous infusion of apomorphine can be used in treatment of patients with advanced stages of PD. Timely administration of device-aided therapies and right choice of the method determine, to a large extent, the efficacy and safety of their use. Despite the high efficacy of all three methods with respect to the fluctuation of separate symptoms, each method has its own peculiarities. The authors reviewed the data on the expediency of using each method according to the severity of motor and non-motor symptoms, patient's age, PD duration, concomitant pathology and social support of the patients.

  12. Alzheimer's disease: research advances and medical reality.

    PubMed

    Seiguer, Erica

    2005-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease was the eighth-leading cause of death in 2001. There is no cure and no effective treatment. Alzheimer's disease presents policy-makers with several challenges, including the level of funding and direction of federally funded research, as well as the cost pressures on Medicare and Medicaid of long-term care. These challenges will increase in intensity as demographic changes, particularly the aging of baby boomers, take hold. Better prevention of Alzheimer's, advances in therapy, and appropriate care modalities will likely require significant investment.

  13. Sialadenosis in Patients with Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Close, John M.; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2009-01-01

    Sialadenosis (sialosis) has been associated most often with alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic cirrhosis, but a number of nutritional deficiencies, diabetes, and bulimia have also been reported to result in sialadenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease. Patients in the study group consisted of 300 candidates for liver transplantation. Types of liver disease in subjects with clinical evidence of sialadenosis were compared with diagnoses in cases who had no manifestations of sialadenosis. The data were analyzed for significant association. Sialadenosis was found in 28 of the 300 subjects (9.3%). Among these 28 cases, 11 (39.3%) had alcoholic cirrhosis. The remaining 17 (60.7%) had eight other types of liver disease. There was no significant association between sialadenosis and alcoholic cirrhosis (P = 0.389). These findings suggest that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis may lead to the development of sialadenosis. Advanced liver disease is accompanied by multiple nutritional deficiencies which may be exacerbated by alcohol. Similar metabolic abnormalities may occur in patients with diabetes or bulimia. Malnutrition has been associated with autonomic neuropathy, the pathogenic mechanism that has been proposed for sialadenosis. PMID:19644542

  14. Sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease.

    PubMed

    Guggenheimer, James; Close, John M; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2009-06-01

    Sialadenosis (sialosis) has been associated most often with alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic cirrhosis, but a number of nutritional deficiencies, diabetes, and bulimia have also been reported to result in sialadenosis. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sialadenosis in patients with advanced liver disease. Patients in the study group consisted of 300 candidates for liver transplantation. Types of liver disease in subjects with clinical evidence of sialadenosis were compared with diagnoses in cases who had no manifestations of sialadenosis. The data were analyzed for significant association. Sialadenosis was found in 28 of the 300 subjects (9.3%). Among these 28 cases, 11 (39.3%) had alcoholic cirrhosis. The remaining 17 (60.7%) had eight other types of liver disease. There was no significant association between sialadenosis and alcoholic cirrhosis (P = 0.389). These findings suggest that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis may lead to the development of sialadenosis. Advanced liver disease is accompanied by multiple nutritional deficiencies which may be exacerbated by alcohol. Similar metabolic abnormalities may occur in patients with diabetes or bulimia. Malnutrition has been associated with autonomic neuropathy, the pathogenic mechanism that has been proposed for sialadenosis.

  15. Subclinical cardiopulmonary dysfunction in stage 3 chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Alexander; Otto, James; Whittle, John; Stephens, Robert C M; Martin, Daniel S; Prowle, John R

    2016-01-01

    Objective Reduced exercise capacity is well documented in end-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD), preceded by changes in cardiac morphology in CKD stage 3. However, it is unknown whether subclinical cardiopulmonary dysfunction occurs in CKD stage 3 independently of heart failure. Methods Prospective observational cross-sectional study of exercise capacity assessed by cardiopulmonary exercise testing in 993 preoperative patients. Primary outcome was peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak). Anaerobic threshold (AT), oxygen pulse and exercise-evoked measures of autonomic function were analysed, controlling for CKD stage 3, age, gender, diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Results CKD stage 3 was present in 93/993 (9.97%) patients. Diabetes mellitus (RR 2.49 (95% CI 1.59 to 3.89); p<0.001), and hypertension (RR 3.20 (95% CI 2.04 to 5.03); p<0.001)) were more common in CKD stage 3. Cardiac failure (RR 0.83 (95% CI 0.30 to 2.24); p=0.70) and ischaemic heart disease (RR 1.40 (95% CI 0.97 to 2.02); p=0.09) were not more common in CKD stage 3. Patients with CKD stage 3 had lower predicted VO2peak (mean difference: 6% (95% CI 1% to 11%); p=0.02), lower peak heart rate (mean difference:9 bpm (95% CI 3 to 14); p=0.03)), lower AT (mean difference: 1.1 mL/min/kg (95% CI 0.4 to 1.7); p<0.001) and impaired heart rate recovery (mean difference: 4 bpm (95% CI 1 to 7); p<0.001)). Conclusions Subclinical cardiopulmonary dysfunction in CKD stage 3 is common. This study suggests that maladaptive cardiovascular/autonomic dysfunction may be established in CKD stage 3, preceding pathophysiology reported in end-stage CKD. PMID:27127638

  16. New Advances in Polycystic Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Santos-Laso, A; Izquierdo-Sánchez, L; Lee-Law, P Y; Perugorria, M J; Marzioni, M; Marin, J J G; Bujanda, L; Banales, J M

    2017-02-01

    Polycystic liver diseases (PLDs) include a heterogeneous group of congenital disorders inherited as dominant or recessive genetic traits; they are manifested alone or in association with polycystic kidney disease. Ductal plate malformation during embryogenesis and the loss of heterozygosity linked to second-hit mutations may promote the dilatation and/or development of a large number (> 20) of biliary cysts, which are the main cause of morbidity in these patients. Surgical procedures aimed to eliminate symptomatic cysts show short-term beneficial effects, but are not able to block the disease progression. Therefore, liver transplantation is the only curative option. Intense studies on the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of PLDs have resulted in different clinical trials, some of them with promising outcomes. Here the authors summarize the key aspects of PLD etiology, pathogenesis, and therapy, highlighting the most recent advances and future research directions.

  17. Current stage in inflammatory bowel disease: What is next?

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Gómez, Gonzalo Jesús; Masedo, Ángeles; Yela, Carmen; Martínez-Montiel, Maria del Pilar; Casís, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been on the rise, extending to countries where it was infrequent in the past. As a result, the gap between high and low incidence countries is decreasing. The disease, therefore, has an important economic impact on the healthcare system. Advances in recent years in pharmacogenetics and clinical pharmacology have allowed for the development of treatment strategies adjusted to the patient profile. Concurrently, new drugs aimed at inflammatory targets have been developed that may expand future treatment options. This review examines advances in the optimization of existing drug treatments and the development of novel treatment options for IBD. PMID:26525013

  18. Aquaporin expression in the cerebral cortex is increased at early stages of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Esther; Barrachina, Marta; Rodríguez, Agustín; Torrejón-Escribano, Benjamín; Boada, Mercé; Hernández, Isabel; Sánchez, Marisa; Ferrer, Isidre

    2007-01-12

    Abnormalities in the cerebral microvasculature are common in Alzheimer disease (AD). Expression levels of the water channels aquaporin 1 and aquaporin 4 (AQP1, AQP4) were examined in AD cases by gel electrophoresis and Western blotting, and densitometric values normalized with beta-actin were compared with corresponding values in age-matched controls processed in parallel. In addition, samples of cases with Pick disease (PiD) were examined for comparative purposes. A significant increase in the expression levels of AQP1 was observed in AD stage II (following Braak and Braak classification). Individual variations were seen in advanced stages which resulted in non-significant differences between AD stages V-VI and age-matched controls. No differences in AQP1 levels were observed between familial AD cases (FAD, all of them at advanced stages) and corresponding age-matched controls. Immunohistochemistry showed increased AQP1 in astrocytes at early stages of AD. Double-labelling immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy disclosed AQP1 immunoreactivity at the cell surface of astrocytes which were recognized with anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein antibodies. No differences in the levels of AQP4 were observed in AD, FAD and PiD when compared with corresponding controls. These results indicate abnormal expression of AQP1 in astrocytes in AD, and they add support to the idea that abnormal regulation of mechanisms involved in the control of water fluxes occurs at early stages in AD.

  19. Management of thrombocytopenia in advanced liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gangireddy, V G R; Kanneganti, P C; Sridhar, S; Talla, S; Coleman, T

    2014-11-01

    Thrombocytopenia (defined as a platelet count <150×10(9)) is a well-known complication in patients with liver cirrhosis and has been observed in 76% to 85% of patients. Significant thrombocytopenia (platelet count <50×10(9) to 75×10(9)) occurs in approximately 13% of patients with cirrhosis. Thrombocytopenia can negatively impact the care of patients with severe liver disease by potentially interfering with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Multiple factors can contribute to the development of thrombocytopenia including splenic platelet sequestration, immunological processes, bone marrow suppression by chronic viral infection, and reduced levels or activity of the hematopoietic growth factor thrombopoietin. The present review focuses on the etiologies and management options for severe thrombocytopenia in the setting of advanced liver disease.

  20. Relationship of Clinical and Pathologic Nodal Staging in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer: Current Controversies in Daily Practice?

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Francesca; Musio, Daniela; Bulzonetti, Nadia; Raffetto, Nicola; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Systemic neo-adjuvant therapy plays a primary role in the management of locally advanced breast cancer. Without having any negative effect in overall survival, induction chemotherapy potentially assures a surgery approach in unresectable disease or a conservative treatment in technically resectable disease and acts on a well-vascularized tumor bed, without the modifications induced by surgery. A specific issue has a central function in the neo-adjuvant setting: lymph nodes status. It still represents one of the strongest predictors of long-term prognosis in breast cancer. The discussion of regional radiation therapy should be a matter of debate, especially in a pathological complete response. Currently, the indication for radiotherapy is based on the clinical stage before the surgery, even for the irradiation of the loco-regional lymph nodes. Regardless of pathological down-staging, radiation therapy is accepted as standard adjuvant treatment in locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:25247013

  1. Survival Analysis of Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, J. D.; Gayo, W. S.; Bautista, L. A.; Baccay, E. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides a survival analysis of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) under Kaplan-Meier Estimates and Weibull Distribution. The data were obtained from the records of V. L. MakabaliMemorial Hospital with respect to time t (patient's age), covariates such as developed secondary disease (Pulmonary Congestion and Cardiovascular Disease), gender, and the event of interest: the death of ESRD patients. Survival and hazard rates were estimated using NCSS for Weibull Distribution and SPSS for Kaplan-Meier Estimates. These lead to the same conclusion that hazard rate increases and survival rate decreases of ESRD patient diagnosed with Pulmonary Congestion, Cardiovascular Disease and both diseases with respect to time. It also shows that female patients have a greater risk of death compared to males. The probability risk was given the equation R = 1 — e-H(t) where e-H(t) is the survival function, H(t) the cumulative hazard function which was created using Cox-Regression.

  2. Canine stage 1 periodontal disease: a latent pathology.

    PubMed

    Whyte, A; Bonastre, C; Monteagudo, L V; Les, F; Obon, J; Whyte, J; Tejedor, M T

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the potential health issues associated with periodontal disease (PD) in dogs, 1004 teeth from 25 dogs were examined. The dogs were randomly selected, aged 2-14 years, and had at least 95% of their teeth at the first PD stage. Significant positive correlations between plaque grade (PG) and gum inflammation, gingival regression, periodontal pocket, age and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity were identified. In contrast, PG was negatively correlated to total platelet count. Altogether, these findings suggest that prevention and therapy at the first PD stages can have an important impact on the general health condition of dogs.

  3. Hirschsprung's disease management: from multi staged operation to single staged transanal pull-through.

    PubMed

    Wang, J X; Dahal, G R

    2009-06-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HD) is a common congenital disease of colorectum. Although it was described more than one century ago, the effective treatment was established only half a century later. The initially treatment consisted of preoperative diverting colostomy, followed by definite pull-through and closure of colostomy on later date. A variety of procedures like Swenson, Duhamel, Rehbein and Soave were evolved with time. With the better understanding of pathogenesis and improvement on surgical technique, now the operation has become less extensive. In recent days, the classical 3 staged procedure is replaced by single staged procedure. All the procedure can be completed transanally. Since De la Torre in 1998, first reported total transanal endorectal pull-through, it became the most popular technique for the treatment of HD.

  4. 74 FR 49921 - Medicare Programs; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2009-09-29

    ... Programs; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System; Town Hall Meeting on End-Stage Renal Disease... & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 410, 413 and 414 RIN 0938-AP57 Medicare Programs; End-Stage Renal Disease...) for Medicare outpatient end-stage renal disease (ESRD) dialysis facilities beginning January 1,...

  5. Treatment of patients with minimal stage IIIA Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Powlis, W.D.; Mauch, P.; Goffman, T.; Goodman, R.L.

    1987-10-01

    Treatment recommendations for patients with upper abdominal Stage IIIA Hodgkin's (III1A) disease have varied widely. The current study reports on a combined institutional retrospective review of 85 patients with surgically staged III1A Hodgkin's disease. Twenty-two patients received combined modality therapy (CMT), 36 patients were treated initially with total nodal irradiation (TNI), and 27 with mantle and para-aortic radiotherapy (MPA). Patients treated with CMT had an actuarial 8-year freedom from relapse (FFR) of 96% as compared to a FFR of 51% in TNI treated patients (p = 0.002), and a FFR of 54% in MPA treated patients (p = 0.004). Of the 11 relapses in MPA treated patients, 7 had a component of their failure in the untreated pelvic or inguinal nodes. The patients treated with CMT had an 8-year actuarial survival of 100% as compared to 79% in TNI treated patients (p = 0.055) and 78% in patients treated with MPA (p = 0.025). Histology and the number of splenic nodules were the most important prognostic variables. Patients with MC/LD histology and greater than or equal to 5 splenic nodules have a high risk of relapse (10/13) when treated with radiation alone (TNI or MPA). We recommend CMT for this group of patients. Patients with NS/LP histology and 1-4 splenic nodules represent a favorable subset of Stage III1A patients. Only 4/21 patients have relapsed and all 21 patients are currently alive without disease regardless of treatment. We currently feel that patients with Stage III1A Hodgkin's disease with NS/LP histology and splenic disease limited to 1-4 nodules are good candidates for MPA as an alternative to TNI or CMT.

  6. A unique description of stage IV extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (EMZL) in an adolescent associated with gamma heavy chain disease.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Nupur; Zhu, Bing; Gaitonde, Sujata; Lu, Yang; Schmidt, Mary Lou

    2015-05-01

    Extranodal Marginal zone lymphoma (EMZL) is a rare, usually localized disease in children. Advanced stage EMZL in adults is considered incurable, with prolonged remissions after chemotherapy. Gamma heavy chain disease (γHCD) is a rare disease of adults associated with lympho-proliferative processes with no comparable reports in children. A case of stage-IV EMZL with γHCD in an adolescent is discussed including treatment with Bendamustine plus Rituximab. The patient remains disease free 18 months from diagnosis. This case highlights necessity for careful diagnostic work-up to identify indolent lymphomas in children which may respond to less toxic chemotherapy than used for common pediatric lymphomas.

  7. Advances in the prevention of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mangialasche, Francesca; Kivipelto, Miia

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the leading cause of dementia, has reached epidemic proportions, with major social, medical and economical burdens. With no currently available curative treatments, both the World Health Organization and the G8 Dementia Summit recently identified dementia and AD prevention as a major public health priority. Dementia and AD have a wide range of risk factors (genetic, vascular/metabolic and lifestyle-related), which often co-occur and thus interact with each other. Previous intervention efforts aimed at preventing dementia and AD focused on the management of single risk factors, with relatively modest findings. Also, the effect of risk factors depends on age at exposure, indicating that the timing of preventive interventions needs to be carefully considered. In view of the complex multifactorial nature of AD, as well as its long pre-clinical (asymptomatic) phase, interventions simultaneously targeting multiple risk factors and disease mechanisms at an early stage of the disease are most likely to be effective. Three large European multidomain prevention trials have been launched with the goal of preventing cognitive decline, dementia and AD in older adults with different risk profiles. Pharmacological trials are also shifting towards prevention of Alzheimer dementia, by targeting at-risk individuals prior to the onset of cognitive symptoms. The current review will summarize and discuss the evidence on risk and protective factors from observational studies, ongoing lifestyle-related and pharmacological randomized controlled trials (RCTs), as well as future directions for dementia and AD prevention. PMID:26097723

  8. Advances in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    McDonald, C F; Khor, Y

    2013-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by progressive airflow limitation in the presence of identifiable risk factors. Inflammation is the central pathological feature in the pathogenesis of COPD. In addition to its pulmonary effects, COPD is associated with significant extrapulmonary manifestations, including ischaemic heart disease, osteoporosis, stroke and diabetes. Anxiety and depression are also common. Spirometry remains the gold standard diagnostic tool. Pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapy can improve symptoms, quality of life and exercise capacity and, through their effects on reducing exacerbations, have the potential to modify disease progression. Bronchodilators are the mainstay of pharmacotherapy, with guidelines recommending a stepwise escalating approach. Smoking cessation is paramount in managing COPD, with promotion of physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation being other key factors in management. Comorbidities should be actively sought and managed in their own right. Given the chronicity and progressive nature of COPD, ongoing monitoring and support with timely discussion of advanced-care planning and end-of-life issues are recommended.

  9. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won Sang

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) includes hyperthyroid Graves disease, hypothyroid autoimmune thyroiditis, and subtle subclinical thyroid dysfunctions. AITD is caused by interactions between genetic and environmental predisposing factors and results in autoimmune deterioration. Data on polymorphisms in the AITD susceptibility genes, related environmental factors, and dysregulation of autoimmune processes have accumulated over time. Over the last decade, there has been progress in the clinical field of AITD with respect to the available diagnostic and therapeutic methods as well as clinical consensus. The updated clinical guidelines allow practitioners to identify the most reasonable and current approaches for proper management. In this review, we focus on recent advances in understanding the genetic and environmental pathogenic mechanisms underlying AITD and introduce the updated set of clinical guidelines for AITD management. We also discuss other aspects of the disease such as management of subclinical thyroid dysfunction, use of levothyroxine plus levotriiodothyronine in the treatment of autoimmune hypothyroidism, risk assessment of long-standing antithyroid drug therapy in recurrent Graves' hyperthyroidism, and future research needs. PMID:27586448

  10. Cross-View Neuroimage Pattern Analysis in Alzheimer's Disease Staging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sidong; Cai, Weidong; Pujol, Sonia; Kikinis, Ron; Feng, Dagan D.

    2016-01-01

    The research on staging of pre-symptomatic and prodromal phase of neurological disorders, e.g., Alzheimer's disease (AD), is essential for prevention of dementia. New strategies for AD staging with a focus on early detection, are demanded to optimize potential efficacy of disease-modifying therapies that can halt or slow the disease progression. Recently, neuroimaging are increasingly used as additional research-based markers to detect AD onset and predict conversion of MCI and normal control (NC) to AD. Researchers have proposed a variety of neuroimaging biomarkers to characterize the patterns of the pathology of AD and MCI, and suggested that multi-view neuroimaging biomarkers could lead to better performance than single-view biomarkers in AD staging. However, it is still unclear what leads to such synergy and how to preserve or maximize. In an attempt to answer these questions, we proposed a cross-view pattern analysis framework for investigating the synergy between different neuroimaging biomarkers. We quantitatively analyzed nine types of biomarkers derived from FDG-PET and T1-MRI, and evaluated their performance in a task of classifying AD, MCI, and NC subjects obtained from the ADNI baseline cohort. The experiment results showed that these biomarkers could depict the pathology of AD from different perspectives, and output distinct patterns that are significantly associated with the disease progression. Most importantly, we found that these features could be separated into clusters, each depicting a particular aspect; and the inter-cluster features could always achieve better performance than the intra-cluster features in AD staging. PMID:26941639

  11. Exprimental Results of the First Two Stages of an Advanced Transonic Core Compressor Under Isolated and Multi-Stage Conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Patricia S.; Kulkarni, Sameer; Sohn, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program calls for investigation of the technology barriers associated with improved fuel efficiency for large gas turbine engines. Under ERA, the highly loaded core compressor technology program attempts to realize the fuel burn reduction goal by increasing overall pressure ratio of the compressor to increase thermal efficiency of the engine. Study engines with overall pressure ratio of 60 to 70 are now being investigated. This means that the high pressure compressor would have to almost double in pressure ratio while keeping a high level of efficiency. NASA and GE teamed to address this challenge by testing the first two stages of an advanced GE compressor designed to meet the requirements of a very high pressure ratio core compressor. Previous test experience of a compressor which included these front two stages indicated a performance deficit relative to design intent. Therefore, the current rig was designed to run in 1-stage and 2-stage configurations in two separate tests to assess whether the bow shock of the second rotor interacting with the upstream stage contributed to the unpredicted performance deficit, or if the culprit was due to interaction of rotor 1 and stator 1. Thus, the goal was to fully understand the stage 1 performance under isolated and multi-stage conditions, and additionally to provide a detailed aerodynamic data set for CFD validation. Full use was made of steady and unsteady measurement methods to understand fluid dynamics loss source mechanisms due to rotor shock interaction and endwall losses. This paper will present the description of the compressor test article and its measured performance and operability, for both the single stage and two stage configurations. We focus the paper on measurements at 97% corrected speed with design intent vane setting angles.

  12. Disease staging and PMCs. Can they improve DRGs?

    PubMed

    Calore, K A; Iezzoni, L

    1987-08-01

    Since the adoption of Medicare's Prospective Payment System (PPS), critics have raised concerns about the degree of variation in cost per case due to variability in severity of illness within DRGs. Using hospital (Part A) costs for all Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized in Michigan during 1982, this paper applies multivariate techniques to test the ability of two state-of-the-art case-mix measures to either replace or act as a severity modifier to DRGs. When compared with DRGs, neither Patient Management Categories (PMCs) nor Disease Staging explains any more of the variation in costs. Results show that DRGs explain 33%, while PMCs and Disease Staging explain 26% and 17%, respectively. The use of either alternative in tandem with DRGs explains only 1-2% more of the observed variation; however, both PMCs and Disease Staging identify subgroups of patients with significantly different costs. These findings suggest that the alternatives may prove modestly useful as DRG modifiers by identifying classes of patients that do not belong. More importantly, they offer a measure of "unrelated comorbidity" that may improve the performance of DRGs.

  13. Functional Impairment of Myeloid Dendritic Cells during Advanced Stage of HIV-1 Infection: Role of Factors Regulating Cytokine Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Meenakshi; Sharma, Aman; Arora, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Severely immunocompromised state during advanced stage of HIV-1 infection has been linked to functionally defective antigen presentation by dendritic cells (DCs). The molecular mechanisms behind DC impairment are still obscure. We investigated changes in DC function and association of key regulators of cytokine signaling during different stages of HIV-1 infection and following antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods Phenotypic and functional characteristics of circulating myeloid DCs (mDCs) in 56 ART-naive patients (23 in early and 33 in advanced stage of disease), 36 on ART and 24 healthy controls were evaluated. Sixteen patients were studied longitudinally prior-to and 6 months after the start of ART. For functional studies, monocyte-derived DCs (Mo-DCs) were evaluated for endocytosis, allo-stimulation and cytokine secretion. The expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-1 and other regulators of cytokine signaling was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Results The ability to respond to an antigenic stimulation was severely impaired in patients in advanced HIV-1 disease which showed partial recovery in the treated group. Mo-DCs from patients with advanced HIV-disease remained immature with low allo-stimulation and reduced cytokine secretion even after TLR-4 mediated stimulation ex-vivo. The cells had an increased expression of negative regulatory factors like SOCS-1, SOCS-3, SH2-containing phosphatase(SHP)-1 and a reduced expression of positive regulators like Janus kinase(JAK)2 and Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells(NF-κB)1. A functional recovery after siRNA mediated silencing of SOCS-1 in these mo-DCs confirms the role of negative regulatory factors in functional impairment of these cells. Conclusions Functionally defective DCs in advanced stage of HIV-1 infection seems to be due to imbalanced state of negative and positive regulatory gene expression. Whether this is a cause or effect of increased viral

  14. Implementation of the TMS in the early stages of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Guekht, A; Selikhova, M; Serkin, G; Gusev, E

    2005-01-01

    47 PD patients were investigated with the single-pulse TMS to find out changes in motor evoked potential and motor conduction related to the stage of minimal motor symptoms and its further deterioration in groups with the different clinical types of the disease. The investigation revealed a markedly longer MEP duration along with the increased number of phases, than in controls, which were bilateral and advanced despite the minimal unilateral motor symptoms. There was also increased MEP amplitude in facilitation, with a higher degree of asymmetry, compared to controls. Patients with predominant rigid clinical forms had the further MEP duration and amplitude increase proportionally to bradikinesia and rigidity in the early stages of the disease. Patients with tremor predominant forms had no further changes in the MEP duration and amplitude, but had their motor CCT decreased in the early stages. Patients with the akinetic form were characterized by the asymmetric increase in the MEP Amplitude in relaxation and motor CCT shortening. Thus, TMS allows us to diagnose early the possible central motor changes secondary to Parkinson's disease, reveals the difference in compensational capacity according to the clinical type of the disease and helps in monitoring of the severity of motor changes in early stages.

  15. Central Pain Processing in Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease: A Laser Pain fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Petschow, Christine; Scheef, Lukas; Paus, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Nadine; Schild, Hans H.; Klockgether, Thomas; Boecker, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Background & Objective Pain is a common non-motor symptom in Parkinson’s disease. As dopaminergic dysfunction is suggested to affect intrinsic nociceptive processing, this study was designed to characterize laser-induced pain processing in early-stage Parkinson’s disease patients in the dopaminergic OFF state, using a multimodal experimental approach at behavioral, autonomic, imaging levels. Methods 13 right-handed early-stage Parkinson’s disease patients without cognitive or sensory impairment were investigated OFF medication, along with 13 age-matched healthy control subjects. Measurements included warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, and central pain processing with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (erfMRI) during laser-induced pain stimulation at lower (E = 440 mJ) and higher (E = 640 mJ) target energies. Additionally, electrodermal activity was characterized during delivery of 60 randomized pain stimuli ranging from 440 mJ to 640 mJ, along with evaluation of subjective pain ratings on a visual analogue scale. Results No significant differences in warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, electrodermal activity and subjective pain ratings were found between Parkinson’s disease patients and controls, and erfMRI revealed a generally comparable activation pattern induced by laser-pain stimuli in brain areas belonging to the central pain matrix. However, relatively reduced deactivation was found in Parkinson’s disease patients in posterior regions of the default mode network, notably the precuneus and the posterior cingulate cortex. Conclusion Our data during pain processing extend previous findings suggesting default mode network dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease. On the other hand, they argue against a genuine pain-specific processing abnormality in early-stage Parkinson’s disease. Future studies are now required using similar multimodal experimental designs to examine pain processing in more advanced

  16. Advanced stages in the evolution of the sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, U. G.

    1991-06-01

    The method of analytical fits to numerical results of stellar evolutionary tracks is used to estimate the effects of using different codes and input physics, as well as to gauge the effects of uncertainties in the knowledge of the sun's chemical composition, mixing-length parameter, and mass-loss parameter. The sun is found to be in a region of parameter space where solar models with only slightly different input will lead to widely different evolutionary ends, spanning from the end of nuclear burning before the helium core flash can occur, to evolution until enough nucleosynthesized material has been dredged up to turn the sun into a carbon star with C/O approximating 1.6. The most likely final stage is an oxygen-rich red giant Mira variable with a period of around 250 days and a luminosity and temperature of around 5000 solar luminosities and 3000 K, respectively, at an age of 11.6 x 10 to the 9th yr. Between 35 and 55 percent of the mass will be lost via wind during the solar lifetime, primarily shortly before the helium core flash and at the asymptotic giant branch.

  17. Stroke and Chronic Kidney Disease: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, and Management Across Kidney Disease Stages

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Daniel E.; Dad, Taimur

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cerebrovascular disease and stroke are very common at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD), likely representing both shared risk factors as well as synergy among risk factors. More subtle ischemic brain lesions may be particularly common in the CKD population, with subtle manifestations including cognitive impairment. For individuals with nondialysis CKD, the prevention, approach to, diagnosis, and management of stroke is similar to the general, non-CKD population. For individuals with end-stage renal disease, far less is known regarding the prevention of stroke. Stroke prophylaxis using warfarin in dialysis patients with atrial fibrillation in particular remains of uncertain benefit. End-stage renal disease patients can be managed aggressively in the setting of acute stroke. Outcomes after stroke at all stages of CKD are poor, and improving these outcomes should be the subject of future clinical trials. PMID:26355250

  18. Experimental Results of the First Two Stages of an Advanced Transonic Core Compressor Under Isolated and Multi-Stage Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Patricia S.; Kulkarni, Sameer; Sohn, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program calls for investigation of the technology barriers associated with improved fuel efficiency of large gas turbine engines. Under ERA the task for a High Pressure Ratio Core Technology program calls for a higher overall pressure ratio of 60 to 70. This mean that the HPC would have to almost double in pressure ratio and keep its high level of efficiency. The challenge is how to match the corrected mass flow rate of the front two supersonic high reaction and high corrected tip speed stages with a total pressure ratio of 3.5. NASA and GE teamed to address this challenge by using the initial geometry of an advanced GE compressor design to meet the requirements of the first 2 stages of the very high pressure ratio core compressor. The rig was configured to run as a 2 stage machine, with Strut and IGV, Rotor 1 and Stator 1 run as independent tests which were then followed by adding the second stage. The goal is to fully understand the stage performances under isolated and multi-stage conditions and fully understand any differences and provide a detailed aerodynamic data set for CFD validation. Full use was made of steady and unsteady measurement methods to isolate fluid dynamics loss source mechanisms due to interaction and endwalls. The paper will present the description of the compressor test article, its predicted performance and operability, and the experimental results for both the single stage and two stage configurations. We focus the detailed measurements on 97 and 100 of design speed at 3 vane setting angles.

  19. Efficacy of Rotigotine at Different Stages of Parkinson’s Disease Symptom Severity and Disability: A Post Hoc Analysis According to Baseline Hoehn and Yahr Stage

    PubMed Central

    Giladi, Nir; Nicholas, Anthony P.; Asgharnejad, Mahnaz; Dohin, Elisabeth; Woltering, Franz; Bauer, Lars; Poewe, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of rotigotine has been demonstrated in studies of patients with early (i.e. not receiving levodopa) and advanced (i.e. not adequately controlled on levodopa; average 2.5 h/day in ‘off’ state) Parkinson’s disease (PD). Objective: To further investigate the efficacy of rotigotine transdermal patch across different stages of PD symptom severity and functional disability, according to baseline Hoehn and Yahr (HY) staging. Methods: Post hoc analysis of six placebo-controlled studies of rotigotine in patients with early PD (SP506, SP512, SP513; rotigotine ≤8 mg/24 h) or advanced-PD (CLEOPATRA-PD, PREFER, SP921; rotigotine ≤16 mg/24 h). Data were pooled and analyzed according to baseline HY stage (1, 2, 3 or 4) for change from baseline to end of maintenance in Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) II (activities of daily living), UPDRS III (motor) and UPDRS II+III; statistical tests are exploratory. Results: Data were available for 2057 patients (HY 1 : 262; HY 2 : 1230; HY 3 : 524; HY 4 : 41). Patients at higher HY stages were older, had a longer time since PD diagnosis and higher baseline UPDRS II+III scores vs patients at lower HY stages. Rotigotine improved UPDRS II+III versus placebo for each individual HY stage (p < 0.05 for each HY stage), with treatment differences increasing with increasing HY stages. Similar results were observed for UPDRS II and UPDRS III. Conclusions: This post hoc analysis suggests that rotigotine may be efficacious across a broad range of progressive stages of PD symptom severity and functional disability (HY stages 1–4). PMID:27567886

  20. A critical evaluation of glycated protein parameters in advanced nephropathy: a matter of life or death: time to dispense with the hemoglobin A1C in end-stage kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Barry I

    2012-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease remains as one of the major complications for individuals with diabetes and contributes to considerable morbidity. Individuals subjected to dialysis therapy, half of whom are diabetic, experience a mortality of ~20% per year. Understanding factors related to mortality remains a priority. Outside of dialysis units, A1C is unquestioned as the "gold standard" for glycemic control. In the recent past, however, there is evidence in large cohorts of diabetic dialysis patients that A1C at both the higher and lower levels was associated with mortality. Given the unique conditions associated with the metabolic dysregulation in dialysis patients, there is a critical need to identify accurate assays to monitor glycemic control to relate to cardiovascular endpoints. In this two-part point-counterpoint narrative, Drs. Freedman and Kalantar-Zadeh take opposing views on the utility of A1C in relation to cardiovascular disease and survival and as to consideration of use of other short-term markers in glycemia. In the narrative below, Dr. Freedman suggests that glycated albumin may be the preferred glycemic marker in dialysis subjects. In the counterpoint narrative following Dr. Freedman's contribution, Dr. Kalantar-Zadeh defends the use of A1C as the unquestioned gold standard for glycemic management in dialysis subjects.

  1. Febuxostat for hyperuricemia in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Tetsu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Chiharu; Iimura, Osamu; Tsunematsu, Sadao; Watanabe, Yuko; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Febuxostat is a nonpurine xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor, which recently received marketing approval. However, information regarding the experience with this agent among advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is limited. In the current study, we investigated the effects of oral febuxostat in patients with advanced CKD with asymptomatic hyperuricemia. We demonstrated, for the first time, that not only the serum levels of uric acid (UA) but also those of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, an oxidative stress marker, were significantly reduced after six months of febuxostat treatment, with no adverse events. These results encouraged us to pursue further investigations regarding the clinical impact of lowering the serum UA levels with febuxostat in advanced CKD patients in terms of concomitantly reducing oxidative stress via the blockade of XO. More detailed studies with a larger number of subjects and assessments of the effects of multiple factors affecting hyperuricemia, such as age, sex, and dietary habits, would shed light on the therapeutic challenges of treating asymptomatic hyperuricemia in patients with various stages of CKD.

  2. Anatomic Location of PET-Positive Aortocaval Nodes in Patients with Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Implications for Surgical Staging

    PubMed Central

    Frumovitz, Michael; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Macapinlac, Homer A.; Klopp, Ann H.; Nick, Alpa M.; Ramondetta, Lois M.; Jhingran, Anuja

    2014-01-01

    Objective Pathologic evaluation of aortocaval nodes in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer in an effort to better tailor radiotherapy has gained popularity. We sought to determine which aortocaval nodes should be sampled during surgical staging procedures. Methods From 2004 to 2011, 246 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer underwent positron emission tomography (PET) before definitive chemoradiation. We reviewed the imaging studies to determine the location of PET-positive aortocaval nodes in relationship to the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA). Results Forty-two patients (17%) had PET images suggesting aortocaval metastasis. Ten patients had stage IB, 1 had stage IIA, 13 had stage IIB, 13 had stage IIIB, and 5 had stage IV disease. Of these 42 patients, 39 (93%) had FDG-avid pelvic nodes, 1 (2%) had PET-negative pelvic nodes but FDG-avid common iliac nodes, and 2 (5%) had direct spread to the aortocaval nodes. Three patients (7%) had FDG-avid aortocaval nodes above the IMA without FDG-avid nodes between the aortic bifurcation and IMA. All 3 of these patients also had FDG-avid nodes in the pelvis. Nineteen patients (45%) had FDG-avid nodes above and below the IMA, and 20 (48%) had FDG-avid nodes below the IMA only. Conclusions This hypothesis-generating study revealed that a small number of patients have PET-positive aortocaval nodes above the IMA only. For patients undergoing surgical staging for locally advanced cervical cancer, dissection to the renal vessels may be necessary. A future international, randomized study will prospectively evaluate the locations of pathologically positive aortocaval lymph nodes. PMID:22810967

  3. Serum Bicarbonate and Mortality in Stage 3 and Stage 4 Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schold, Jesse D.; Arrigain, Susana; Jolly, Stacey E.; Wehbe, Edgard; Raina, Rupesh; Simon, James F.; Srinivas, Titte R.; Jain, Anil; Schreiber, Martin J.; Nally, Joseph V.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives The incidence and prevalence of metabolic acidosis increase with declining kidney function. We studied the associations of both low and high serum bicarbonate levels with all-cause mortality among stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We examined factors associated with low (<23 mmol/L) and high (>32 mmol/L) serum bicarbonate levels using logistic regression models and associations between bicarbonate and all-cause mortality using Cox-proportional hazard models, Kaplan–Meier survival curves, and time-dependent analysis. Results Out of 41,749 patients, 13.9% (n = 5796) had low and 1.6% (n = 652) had high serum bicarbonate levels. After adjusting for relevant covariates, there was a significant association between low serum bicarbonate and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.23, 95% CI 1.16, 1.31). This association was not statistically significant among patients with stage 4 CKD and diabetes. The time-dependent analysis demonstrated a significant mortality risk associated with a decline from normal to low bicarbonate level (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.49, 1.69). High serum bicarbonate levels were associated with death irrespective of the level of kidney function (HR 1.74, 95% CI 1.52, 2.00). When serum bicarbonate was examined as a continuous variable, a J-shaped relationship was noted between serum bicarbonate and mortality. Conclusions Low serum bicarbonate levels are associated with increased mortality among stage 3 CKD patients and patients without diabetes. High serum bicarbonate levels are associated with mortality in both stage 3 and stage 4 CKD patients. PMID:21885787

  4. The prognostic relevance of tumor associated macrophages in advanced stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jakovic, Ljubomir R; Mihaljevic, Biljana S; Perunicic Jovanovic, Maja D; Bogdanovic, Andrija D; Andjelic, Bosko M; Bumbasirevic, Vladimir Z

    2011-10-01

    Although the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) has been improved, distinguishing reliable prognostic biomarkers could better stratify patients for more effective treatment. We analyzed the prognostic relevance of CD68+ tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) by immunohistochemical analysis at diagnosis and standard clinical parameters in 52 ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine)-treated patients with advanced stage classical HL (cHL). Patients with >25% CD68+ TAMs compared to those with ≤25% had worse 5-year overall survival (45% vs. 77%, log-rank p = 0.019) and showed a trend toward shorter 5-year event-free survival (51% vs. 71%, log-rank p = 0.19). Additionally, no significant correlation with selected clinical features was found. Significantly shorter 5-year overall survival was associated with International Prognostic Score (IPS) >2, bulky disease, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (log-rank test, p = 0.003, p = 0.049, p = 0.007, respectively). In multivariate analysis, increased CD68+TAMs, IPS >2, and bulky disease were identified as independent prognostic factors for overall survival (Cox multivariate model, p = 0.006, p = 0.007, p = 0.013, respectively). Tumor-associated macrophages represent a potential prognostic biomarker which could contribute to better risk stratification of patients with cHL.

  5. Computed tomography, lymphography, and staging laparotomy: correlations in initial staging of Hodgkin disease

    SciTech Connect

    Castellino, R.A.; Hoppe, R.T.; Blank, N.; Young, S.W.; Neumann, C.; Rosenberg, S.A.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1984-07-01

    One hundred twenty-one patients with newly diagnosed, previously untreated Hodgkin disease underwent abdominal and pelvic computed tomographic (CT) scanning and bipedal lymphography. These studies were followed by staging laparotomy, which included biopsy of the liver, retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph nodes, and splenectomy. Correlation of the results of the imaging studies with the histopathologic diagnoses revealed a small - but significant - increased accuracy of lymphography compared with CT in assessing the retroperitoneal lymph nodes. The theoretical advantages of CT scanning in detecting lymphomatous deposits in lymph nodes about the celiac axis and the mesentery, or in the liver and spleen, were not confirmed.

  6. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein is associated with advanced-stage prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wan, Fangning; Qin, Xiaojian; Zhang, Guiming; Lu, Xiaolin; Zhu, Yao; Zhang, Hailiang; Dai, Bo; Shi, Guohai; Ye, Dingwei

    2015-05-01

    Clinical and epidemiological data suggest coronary artery disease shares etiology with prostate cancer (PCa). The aim of this work was to assess the effects of several serum markers reported in cardiovascular disease on PCa. Serum markers (oxidized low-density lipoprotein [ox-LDL], apolipoprotein [apo] B100, and apoB48) in peripheral blood samples from 50 patients from Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center (FUSCC) with localized or lymph node metastatic PCa were investigated in this study. Twenty-five samples from normal individuals were set as controls. We first conducted enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis to select candidate markers that were significantly different between these patients and controls. Then, the clinical relevance between OLR1 (the ox-LDL receptor) expression and PCa was analyzed in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cohort. We also investigated the function of ox-LDL in PCa cell lines in vitro. Phosphorylation protein chips were used to analyze cell signaling pathways in ox-LDL-treated PC-3 cells. The ox-LDL level was found to be significantly correlated with N stage of prostate cancer. OLR1 expression was correlated with lymph node metastasis in the TCGA cohort. In vitro, ox-LDL stimulated the proliferation, migration, and invasion of LNCaP and PC-3 in a dose-dependent manner. The results of phosphoprotein microarray illustrated that ox-LDL could influence multiple signaling pathways of PC-3. Activation of proliferation promoting signaling pathways (including β-catenin, cMyc, NF-κB, STAT1, STAT3) as well as apoptosis-associating signaling pathways (including p27, caspase-3) demonstrated that ox-LDL had complicated effects on prostate cancer. Increased serum ox-LDL level and OLR1 expression may indicate advanced-stage PCa and lymph node metastasis. Moreover, ox-LDL could stimulate PCa proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro.

  7. Pulp Stone, Haemodialysis, End-stage Renal Disease, Carotid Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Santosh; Sinha, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the presence of pulp calcification and carotid artery calcification on the dental panoramic radiographs in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients who were on haemodialysis. Methods: A total of 112 End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients on who were haemodialysis participated in this study. The periapical and the panoramic radiographs for all the patients were evaluated for the presence or absence of the narrowing of the dental pulps and for pulp stones in the pulp chambers and the pulp canals. The panoramic radiographs were also evaluated to determine the carotid calcification. Results: Carotid calcifications were detected in none of the patients. 84 (74.99%) patients had dental pulp narrowing, and 38 (33.92%) patients had pulp stones. There was no statistical correlation between pulp narrowing and Carotid Artery Calcification (CAC) in the haemodialysis patient group. There was also no statistical correlation between pulp stones and CAC in the haemodialysis patients. Conclusion: However, the incidental finding of CAC on a panoramic radiograph can provide life-saving information for the vascular disease patients, but in the present study, no significant relationship was found between the presence of the pulpal calcification and CAC in the ESRD patients who were on haemodialysis. Therefore, the presence of pulp calcification does not seem to serve as a diagnostic marker for carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:23905147

  8. Subtle Cognitive Decline and Biomarker Staging in Preclinical Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Emily C; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Galasko, Douglas R; Salmon, David P; Bondi, Mark W

    2015-01-01

    The NIA-AA criteria for "preclinical" Alzheimer's disease (AD) propose a staging method in which AD biomarkers follow an invariable temporal sequence in accordance with the amyloid cascade hypothesis. However, recent findings do not align with the proposed temporal sequence and "subtle cognitive decline," which has not been definitively operationalized, may occur earlier than suggested in preclinical AD. We aimed to define "subtle cognitive decline" using sensitive and reliable neuropsychological tests, and to examine the number and sequence of biomarker abnormalities in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). 570 cognitively normal ADNI participants were classified based on NIA-AA criteria and separately based on the number of abnormal biomarkers/cognitive markers associated with preclinical AD that each individual possessed. Results revealed that neurodegeneration alone was 2.5 times more common than amyloidosis alone at baseline. For those who demonstrated only one abnormal biomarker at baseline and later progressed to mild cognitive impairment/AD, neurodegeneration alone was most common, followed by amyloidosis alone or subtle cognitive decline alone, which were equally common. Findings suggest that most individuals do not follow the temporal order proposed by NIA-AA criteria. We provide an operational definition of subtle cognitive decline that captures both cognitive and functional decline. Additionally, we offer a new approach for staging preclinical AD based on number of abnormal biomarkers, without regard to their temporal order of occurrence. This method of characterizing preclinical AD is more parsimonious than the NIA-AA staging system and does not presume that all patients follow a singular invariant expression of the disease.

  9. Cardiac complications of end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Burke, S W; Solomon, A J

    2000-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients receiving dialysis. This is attributed in part to the shared risk factors of cardiovascular disease and end-stage renal disease. The risk factors for coronary artery disease include the classic cardiac risk factors of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and smoking. Also in this population, hyperparathyroidism, hypoalbuminemia, hyperhomocysteinemia, elevated levels of apolipoprotein (a), and the type of dialysis membrane may play a role. Management begins with risk factor modification and medical therapy including aspirin, beta blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and lipid-lowering agents. Revascularization is often important, and coronary artery bypass grafting appears to be preferable to percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. This is especially true for those with multivessel disease, impaired left ventricular function, severe symptoms, or ischemia. Congestive heart failure is another common problem in dialysis patients. The management includes correction of underlying abnormalities, optimal dialysis, and medical therapy. Data obtained from the general population indicate obvious benefits from ACE inhibitors and beta blockers, and these agents would be considered the therapies of choice. Erythropoetin is also an essential component of therapy, but the ideal hemoglobin concentration has yet to be determined. Peritoneal dialysis may be helpful in severe cases of heart failure. Pericarditis is seen in less than 10% of dialysis patients and is best diagnosed by clinical examination and echocardiography. Intensive dialysis is often the best initial therapy. Pericardiocentesis is reserved for the setting of pericardial tamponade, but a pericardial window is more definitive.

  10. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease: Advances and strategies.

    PubMed

    Delenclos, Marion; Jones, Daryl R; McLean, Pamela J; Uitti, Ryan J

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive motor disturbances and affects more than 1% of the worldwide population. Despite considerable progress in understanding PD pathophysiology, including genetic and biochemical causes, diagnostic approaches lack accuracy and interventions are restricted to symptomatic treatments. PD is a complex syndrome with different clinical subtypes and a wide variability in disorder course. In order to deliver better clinical management of PD patients and discovery of novel therapies, there is an urgent need to find sensitive, specific, and reliable biomarkers. The development of biomarkers will not only help the scientific community to identify populations at risk, but also facilitate clinical diagnosis. Furthermore, these tools could monitor progression, which could ultimately deliver personalized therapeutic strategies. The field of biomarker discovery in PD has attracted significant attention and there have been numerous contributions in recent years. Although none of the parameters have been validated for clinical practice, some candidates hold promise. This review summarizes recent advances in the development of PD biomarkers and discusses new strategies for their utilization.

  11. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease: Advances and strategies

    PubMed Central

    Delenclos, Marion; Jones, Daryl R.; McLean, Pamela J.; Uitti, Ryan J.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive motor disturbances and affects more than 1% of the worldwide population. Despite considerable progress in understanding PD pathophysiology, including genetic and biochemical causes, diagnostic approaches lack accuracy and interventions are restricted to symptomatic treatments. PD is a complex syndrome with different clinical subtypes and a wide variability in disorder course. In order to deliver better clinical management of PD patients and discovery of novel therapies, there is an urgent need to find sensitive, specific, and reliable biomarkers. The development of biomarkers will not only help the scientific community to identify populations at risk, but also facilitate clinical diagnosis. Furthermore, these tools could monitor progression, which could ultimately deliver personalized therapeutic strategies. The field of biomarker discovery in PD has attracted significant attention and there have been numerous contributions in recent years. Although none of the parameters have been validated for clinical practice, some candidates hold promise. This review summarizes recent advances in the development of PD biomarkers and discusses new strategies for their utilization. PMID:26439946

  12. The Care Needs of Community-Dwelling Seniors Suffering from Advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Donna M.; Ross, Carolyn; Goodridge, Donna; Davis, Penny; Landreville, Alison; Roebuck, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Aim: This study was undertaken to determine the care needs of Canadian seniors living at home with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Background: COPD is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although hospitalizations for illness exacerbations and end-stage care may be common, most persons with COPD live out…

  13. Bardet-Biedl Syndrome with End Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Parakh, Rajendrakumar; Nairy, Dhananjaya Matapadi

    2016-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is one of the rare autosomal recessive disorders that affect multiple organs of the body. The signs and symptoms of this condition vary among affected individuals, even among members of the same family. We present a case of BBS with features of hypogonadism and features such as marked central obesity, retinitis pigmentosa, polydactyly, renal abnormalities and mental retardation, along with a brief review of the literature. The patient had end stage renal disease and managed with dialysis. This case also exemplifies the need for multidisciplinary approach in the management of such cases. PMID:27853335

  14. Pregnancy tests with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Fahy, Brenda G; Gouzd, Valerie A; Atallah, Joseph N

    2008-12-01

    Tests to ascertain pregnancy status are often obtained during preoperative evaluation, especially when there is a history of uncertain pregnancy or suggestion of current pregnancy. A serum pregnancy test, a beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-HCG) level, was preoperatively obtained from a woman of childbearing age with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) with an unreliable history of irregular menstruation coupled with unprotected sexual activity. The beta-HCG was elevated in the range indicating pregnancy. Further work-up showed that this hormonal elevation was secondary to ESRD without pregnancy.

  15. Stage-dependent reduction in T colony formation in Hodgkin's disease. Coincidence with monocyte synthesis of prostaglandins.

    PubMed Central

    Bockman, R S

    1980-01-01

    Prostaglandin synthesis and T lymphocyte colony formation have been examined in previously untreated patients with Hodgkin's disease. Mononuclear cells have been isolated from peripheral blood and spleens of these patients. Significant augmentation in prostaglandin E levels were noted in the mononuclear cell cutures from Hodgkin's disease patients compared with controls (1.64 +/- 0.29 vs. 0.39 +/- 0.09 ng/10(6) cells, P < 0.005). Measured prostaglandin E levels increased with advancing stage of disease. Virtually all of the prostaglandins were synthesized by the adherent monocyte cell population. Prostaglandin E was the major product. Clonal expansion of a T lymphocyte precursor cell, which gives rise to colonies > 50 cells, was determined by a layered soft agar method. T colony formation was significantly reduced in patients with stage II, III, and IV disease. There were progressively reduced colony numbers seen with advancing stage of disease (609 +/- 209, 416 +/- 158, 207 +/- 58 compared with normals 2,274 +/- 360 colonies/10(6) cells plated; P < 0.005). The addition of inhibitors of endogenous prostaglandin synthesis resulted in significant augmentation of T colony number. However, a consistent relative decrease in T colony number was seen even when endogenous prostaglandin E synthesis was blocked. It would appear that both the prostaglandin-dependent and independent T colony precursor cells are lost with progressive stage of disease. A causative role of augmented prostaglandin synthesis in this stage-dependent reduction of T colony formation could not be established. PMID:6967491

  16. A Case of Primary Aldosteronism with End Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyun Hee; Park, Kyung Jun; Kim, Sun Young

    2006-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman was referred to our hospital due to chronic renal failure with a 10-year history of hypertension. We found polycystic kidney disease, pulmonary tuberculosis and an aldosterone-producing adrenocortical mass. At this time, her serum potassium level and blood pressure were within the normal range. She refused hemodialysis and then was hospitalized because of uremic encephalopathy. On admission, her serum potassium level was normal without treatment and plasma aldosterone concentration highly elevated. She received hemodialysis, and thereafter hypokalemia developed. We then administered spironolactone, whereupon serum potassium level returned to the normal range. In this case, we thought that normokalemia was balanced hypokalemia of primary aldosteronism with hyperkalemia of chronic renal failure, and that hypokalemia developed after hemodialysis was due to an imbalanced primary aldosteronism with end stage renal disease. PMID:24459492

  17. Therapeutic camping for children with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Warady, B A

    1994-06-01

    Therapeutic camping experiences for children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have proliferated in the United States and abroad. This report is based on the results of a survey designed to accumulate data on the development and implementation of 20 such camps. Children attending camp ranged in age from 1 year to 19 years. Single disease-specific camps were most common, while camps for children with a variety of chronic illnesses, including ESRD, and mainstream camps were also conducted. Facilities were available for hemodialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, but not automated peritoneal dialysis, in the majority of surveyed camps. Dialysis nurses, pediatric nephrologists, dietitians and social workers were the medical personnel that most frequently participated in the camps. On average, 32 dialysis/transplant patient campers (range 6-100) attended camp for a 1-week session. Therapeutic camping experiences for children with ESRD are extremely successful and attempts to increase the availability of similar camps should be encouraged.

  18. Calciphylaxis in pediatric end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Imam, Abubakr A; Mattoo, Tej K; Kapur, Gaurav; Bloom, David A; Valentini, Rudolph P

    2005-12-01

    Calciphylaxis is a rare, but life-threatening complication of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) that has been reported mostly in adult patients. The exact etiology is unknown, but the disease is commonly associated with a high calcium-phosphorus product and elevated levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH). We herein review the published reports on calciphylaxis in ESRD patients less than 18 years old and report the case of a patient with severe calciphylaxis who presented with lower extremity pain, muscle tenderness and difficulty in walking. The serum PTH was low, and the calcium-phosphorus product was normal. The diagnosis of calciphylaxis was confirmed by a muscle biopsy. Treatment with low calcium peritoneal dialysate and substitution of calcium-based phosphorus binders with sevelamer (Renagel) was unsuccessful. The patient's clinical condition progressed to extensive soft tissue calcification and ulcerating skin lesions. Nine months after the onset of symptoms, the patient died of cardiopulmonary arrest.

  19. Recent advances in echocardiography for valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of patients with valvular heart disease. Echocardiographic advancements may have particular impact on the assessment and management of patients with valvular heart disease. This review will summarize the current literature on advancements, such as three-dimensional echocardiography, strain imaging, intracardiac echocardiography, and fusion imaging, in this patient population.

  20. Palliative care for patients with end-stage liver disease.

    PubMed

    Larson, Anne M

    2015-05-01

    Liver disease results in over four million physician visits and over 750,000 hospitalizations per year in the USA. Those with chronic liver disease frequently progress to cirrhosis, end-stage liver disease (ESLD), and death. Patients with ESLD experience numerous complications, including muscle cramps, confusion (hepatic encephalopathy), protein calorie malnutrition, muscle wasting, fluid overload (ascites, edema), bleeding (esophagogastric variceal hemorrhage), infection (spontaneous bacterial peritonitis), fatigue, anxiety, and depression. Despite significant improvements in palliation of these complications, patients still suffer reduced quality of life and must confront the fact that their disease will often inexorably progress to death. Liver transplantation is a valid option in this setting, increasing the duration of survival and palliating many of the symptoms. However, many patients die waiting for an organ or are not candidates for transplantation due to comorbid illness. Others receive a transplant but succumb to complications of the transplant itself. Patients and families must struggle with simultaneously hoping for a cure while facing a life-threatening illness. Ideally, the combination of palliative care with life-sustaining therapy can maximize the patients' quality and quantity of life. If it becomes clear that life-sustaining therapy is no longer an option, these patients are then already in a system to help them with end-of-life care.

  1. Patterns of Cortical and Subcortical Amyloid Burden across Stages of Preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Emily C.; Bangen, Katherine J.; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Nation, Daniel A.; Furst, Ansgar J.; Salmon, David P.; Bondi, Mark W.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We examined florbetapir positron emission tomography (PET) amyloid scans across stages of preclinical Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in cortical, allocortical, and subcortical regions. Stages were characterized using empirically defined methods. Methods A total of 312 cognitively normal Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative participants completed a neuropsychological assessment and florbetapir PET scan. Participants were classified into stages of preclinical AD using (1) a novel approach based on the number of abnormal biomarkers/cognitive markers each individual possessed, and (2) National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer’s Association (NIA-AA) criteria. Preclinical AD groups were compared to one another and to a mild cognitive impairment (MCI) sample on florbetapir standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRs) in cortical and allocortical/subcortical regions of interest (ROIs). Results Amyloid deposition increased across stages of preclinical AD in all cortical ROIs, with SUVRs in the later stages reaching levels seen in MCI. Several subcortical areas showed a pattern of results similar to the cortical regions; however, SUVRs in the hippocampus, pallidum, and thalamus largely did not differ across stages of preclinical AD. Conclusions Substantial amyloid accumulation in cortical areas has already occurred before one meets criteria for a clinical diagnosis. Potential explanations for the unexpected pattern of results in some allocortical/subcortical ROIs include lack of correspondence between (1) cerebrospinal fluid and florbetapir PET measures of amyloid, or between (2) subcortical florbetapir PET SUVRs and underlying neuropathology. Findings support the utility of our novel method for staging preclinical AD. By combining imaging biomarkers with detailed cognitive assessment to better characterize preclinical AD, we can advance our understanding of who is at risk for future progression. PMID:27903335

  2. [Chronic Duodenitis and Celiac Disease: a path between the nonspecific and the early stages of Marsh].

    PubMed

    Passera, Andrea Helena; Passera, Mario Luis; Higa, Antonio Luis; Nuñez, Maria; Armando, Lucas; Barzón, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Given the advances in diagnosis for CD, some patients are detected with symptoms and signs of food intolerance, which have positive antibodies and autoantibodies for coeliac disease, whom present proximal bowel biopsies with chronic nonspecific duodenitis and are not associated with stages 0 and 1 Marsh. On the other hand, patients with bloating, abdominal pain, pondostatural delay, negative antibodies for CD, and chronic nonspecific duodenitis in whom removing cow's milk or gluten, the symptoms remit. There are also celiac patients with biopsies before diagnosis, with chronic nonspecific duodenitis. In this paper, we summarize three brothers with different degrees of chronic duodenitis, one with chronic nonspecific duodenitis, and two with histopathological sings of coeliac disease. It is an invitation to think that chronic nonspecific duodenitis in some patients may be an earlier manifestation of celiac disease.

  3. The role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with advanced (stage IIIC) epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Škof, Erik; Merlo, Sebastjan; Pilko, Gasper

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Primary treatment of patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer consists of chemotherapy either before (neoadjuvant chemotherapy, NACT) or after primary surgery (adjuvant chemotherapy). The goal of primary treatment is no residual disease after surgery (R0 resection) what is associated with an improvement in survival of patients. There is, however, no evidence of survival benefits in patients with R0 resections after prior NACT. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients who were treated with diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer at Institute of Oncology Ljubljana in the years 2005–2007. The differences in the rates of R0 resections, progression free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and in five-year and eight-year survival rates between patients treated with NACT and patients who had primary surgery were compared. Results Overall 160 patients had stage IIIC epithelial ovarian cancer. Eighty patients had NACT and eighty patients had primary surgery. Patients in NACT group had higher rates of R0 resection (42% vs. 20%; p = 0.011) than patients after primary surgery. PFS was 14.1 months in NACT group and 17.7 months after primary surgery (p = 0.213). OS was 24.8 months in NACT group and 31.6 months after primary surgery (p = 0.012). In patients with R0 resections five-year and eight-year survival rates were 20.6% and 17.6% in NACT group compared to 62.5% and 62.5% after primary surgery (p < 0.0001), respectively. Conclusions Despite higher rates of R0 resections achieved by NACT, survival of patients treated with NACT was inferior to survival of patients who underwent primary surgery. NACT should only be offered to patients with advanced epithelial cancer who are not candidates for primary surgery. PMID:27679552

  4. Role of additional radiotherapy in advanced stages of Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, J H; Coleman, C N; Fischer, R I; Lister, T A; Diehl, V

    1992-09-01

    Although radiotherapy is widely used as additional treatment following chemotherapy, its precise role has never been clearly proven. Relapses tend to occur in previously involved bulky sites. Non-randomized studies may suggest a positive effect of the addition of radiotherapy. This effect however, might also be caused by selection. Randomized studies have not resulted in a survival advantage for the patients treated with additional radiotherapy compared to no further treatment or additional chemotherapy. The SWOG study 7808 suggest a 20% benefit in remission duration for the nodular sclerosis histology subgroup. Definitive conclusions have to wait for more mature results of randomized studies including the ongoing EORTC study and the possibility to perform an overview of all studies.

  5. Advancing frontiers in Alzheimer's disease research

    SciTech Connect

    Glenner, G.G.; Wurtman, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    This book contain 16 chapters. Some of the titles are: Transmitter Alterations in Alzheimer's Disease: Relation to Cortical Dysfunction as Suggested by Positron Emission Tomography; Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in the Clinical Evaluation of Dementia; Clinical Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease; Down's Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease: What is the Relationship; and Beta Protein: A Possible Marker for Alzheimer's Disease.

  6. Hypokinesia of associated movement in Parkinson's disease: a symptom in early stages of the disease.

    PubMed

    Hoshiyama, M; Kaneoke, Y; Koike, Y; Takahashi, A; Watanabe, S

    1994-08-01

    We compared the degrees of impairment between intended voluntary movement and its simultaneous automatic associated movement in Parkinson's disease (PD). We studied wrist dorsiflexion as a movement associated with grip in 20 patients with PD and in 20 normal controls. The patients showed a significantly smaller dorsiflexion as compared with the controls. The decrease in associated movement was related to the severity of clinical stage of the disease, while gripping was performed well in each stage. The temporal relationship between grip and associated movement was the same for both groups of subjects. The patients showed no disturbance of amplitude or velocity for a single motor act of wrist dorsiflexion. Persons with PD have a greater reduction of automatic associated movement than intended voluntary movement. This may be one of the bases of clinical symptoms of PD patients in early stages of the disease.

  7. Advances in environmental and occupational respiratory diseases in 2009.

    PubMed

    Peden, David B; Bush, Robert K

    2010-03-01

    The year 2009 led to a number of significant advances in environmental and occupational allergic diseases. The role of exposure to environmental pollutants, respiratory viruses, and allergen exposure showed significant advances. New allergens were identified. Occupational asthma and the relationship of complementary and alternative medicine to allergic diseases were extensively reviewed. New approaches to immunotherapy, novel vaccine techniques, and methods to reduce risks for severe allergic disease were addressed.

  8. A Clinicoimmunohistopathologic Study of Anetoderma: Is Protruding Type More Advanced in Stage Than Indented Type?

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kwan Ho; Lee, Jeong Deuk; Park, Chul Jong; Yu, Dong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical and histopathologic classification of anetoderma are not well characterized. Objective. We aimed to investigate the clinical and histopathologic characteristics of anetoderma and to correlate clinical phenotypes with immunohistopathologic findings. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 30 patients with anetoderma and performed immunohistochemistry for elastin, fibrillin-1, metalloproteinase- (MMP-) 2, MMP-7, MMP-9, and MMP-12, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase- (TIMP-) 1 and TIMP-2. Results. Protruding type (n = 17) had a longer disease duration and more severe loss of elastin, without changes in fibrillin, than indented type (n = 13). MMP-2 and MMP-9 showed significantly higher expressions in the dermis compared with controls (p < 0.05). MMP-7 and MMP-12 showed little expressions in both anetoderma and control tissue. TIMP-1 was highly expressed in anetoderma lesions and controls. TIMP-2 expression was variable. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that protruding type anetoderma may represent a more advanced stage and that MMP-2 and MMP-9 could be responsible for elastic fiber degradation in anetoderma. PMID:28116317

  9. Burden of end-stage kidney disease: North Africa.

    PubMed

    Barsoum, Rashad S

    Geographical, ecological, and genetic factors result in many similarities among the six main countries of the African Sahara, including the epidemiology of kidney disease. With an average incidence of 182 and prevalence of 522 patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) per million population, North Africa (NA) spends $650 million on dialysis and transplantation despite an estimated annual loss of 600,000 life years. The health burden of ESKD is not limited to its directly-related morbidity and mortality but affects even more significantly other body systems, particularly the cardiovascular system. In addition, dialysis units are reservoirs for infectious agents, such as hepatitis-C (HCV) and -B (HBV) viruses, and methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRSA), which threaten the health of the community. Shortage of financial resources eventually creates inequity of health care at large since only the rich are able to find their way around the limited public services. ESKD is no exception; inequity being even further augmented by the trade of organs, particularly in Egypt. This is attributed to high demand in the absence of a deceased donor program and in the presence of a pool of young, healthy, unemployed potential donors who have no access to any social security plans. Many attempts to face the challenge of accommodating ESKD management in NA are underway, including relevant legislations, promoting deceased donor transplants, chronic kidney disease (CKD) prevention and early detection programs, and generating nontraditionally directed financial resources.

  10. Latent learning in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD).

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel J W; Butler, Laurie T; Harris, John P; Vaux, Emma C

    2015-04-01

    Cognitive functions such as attention and memory are known to be impaired in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD), but the sites of the neural changes underlying these impairments are uncertain. Patients and controls took part in a latent learning task, which had previously shown a dissociation between patients with Parkinson's disease and those with medial temporal damage. ESRD patients (n=24) and age and education-matched controls (n=24) were randomly assigned to either an exposed or unexposed condition. In Phase 1 of the task, participants learned that a cue (word) on the back of a schematic head predicted that the subsequently seen face would be smiling. For the exposed (but not unexposed) condition, an additional (irrelevant) colour cue was shown during presentation. In Phase 2, a different association, between colour and facial expression, was learned. Instructions were the same for each phase: participants had to predict whether the subsequently viewed face was going to be happy or sad. No difference in error rate between the groups was found in Phase 1, suggesting that patients and controls learned at a similar rate. However, in Phase 2, a significant interaction was found between group and condition, with exposed controls performing significantly worse than unexposed (therefore demonstrating learned irrelevance). In contrast, exposed patients made a similar number of errors to unexposed in Phase 2. The pattern of results in ESRD was different from that previously found in Parkinson's disease, suggesting a different neural origin.

  11. Statin as a Combined Therapy for Advanced-Stage Ovarian Cancer: A Propensity Score Matched Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong-Yu; Wang, Qian; Xu, Qiu-Hong; Yan, Li; Gao, Xue-Feng; Lu, Yan-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite the great achievements in the treatment of advanced-stage ovarian cancer, it is still a severe condition with an unfavorable 5-year survival rate. Statins have been suggested to reduce the risk of several cancers beyond their cholesterol-lowing effects. However, the prognostic significance of statins in patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer remains controversial. Methods. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the association between statin intake and overall survival (OS) among patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. Patients who underwent cytoreductive surgery followed by courses of intravenous chemotherapy were matched through a propensity score analysis. Results. A total of 60 propensity-matched patients were included. Women in statin group showed a similar OS than the nonstatin counterparts (P = 0.966), whereas residual tumor was significantly associated with better OS (P = 0.013) and was an independent factor that associated with OS (P = 0.002, hazard ratio = 5.460, and 95% confidence interval: 1.894 to 15.742) in multivariable analysis. Conclusions. Our results suggested that statin usage was not associated with improved OS in patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer undergoing surgery and chemotherapy. Considering the retrospective nature and the relative small sample size of the study, further prospective studies and random control trials are needed. PMID:27975064

  12. Successful treatment of advanced stage yolk sac tumour of extragonadal origin: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Vilius, Rudaitis; Ugnius, Mickys; Justina, Katinaite; Justyna, Dulko

    2016-01-01

    Background. Yolk sac tumour diagnosis should be considered for young age patients admitted to the hospital with non-specific complaints of widespread disease. Correct diagnosis and carefully planned treatment is the key to a successful outcome. Methods and materials. We present a rare case of a widespread yolk sack tumour of a uterine broad ligament. Our team directed a special attention towards the patient’s young age, advanced disease, and fertility sparing strategy of treatment. Results and conclusions. Stage IV yolk sac tumours of extragonadal origin are rarely reported in the literature. Hence, diagnosis and treatment often pose a challenge for emergency care unit doctors, gynaecologists, and oncologists. However, it can be a potentially curable disease. Moreover, patients’ fertility can also be preserved. We believe that further analysis of similar cases is necessary to study outcomes and evaluate patients’ responses to a sequence of medical decisions taken for this specific case.

  13. Successful Advance Directives through Quality Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Parke, Bob; Krajewski, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Recently there has been talk about the benefit of advance care planning. This is an issue which resurfaces from time to time, as is evident in recent New England Journal of Medicine articles and editorials (April 2010). It has also resurfaced in Canada in a recent document titled Advance Care Planning in Canada: National Framework for Consultation (Health Canada 2010). This document acknowledges that many of us believe in the value of advance directives, finding "that most of the general public (60-90%) is supportive of advance care planning. However, only 10-20% of the public in the US, Canada and Australia have completed an advance care plan of any kind" (Health Canada 2010: 6). In Muriel R. Gillick's editorial in the New England Journal Medicine, she strongly makes the point that few people complete advance directives and further states that "directives have been a resounding failure" (Gillick 2010: 1239). These statements, although not exhaustive on the subject, show that we have a problem translating the support for advance directives into actual plans.

  14. Coping strategies utilized by adolescents with end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Snethen, Julia A; Broome, Marion E; Kelber, Sheryl; Warady, Bradley A

    2004-01-01

    Children and adolescents with end stage renal disease (ESRD) require life-long treatment. The purpose of this descriptive investigation was to identify coping strategies that adolescents with ESRD use to manage their chronic illness. Participants for this investigation were 35 adolescents, 13-18 years of age, with ESRD. The A-COPE survey instrument was used in a clinical and camp setting to measure the coping strategies used by adolescents with ESRD. Analyses revealed that adolescents with ESRD utilized a variety of coping strategies to manage the stresses of living with their chronic condition. Personal characteristics of gender, transplant status, age, and religious views were significantly related to the coping strategies the adolescents reported using.

  15. Reaching Those Most in Need – A Call to Action for Advanced Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shashank; Fleisher, Jori E

    2016-01-01

    Much of the clinical and research attention for Parkinson's Disease (PD) has focused on mild to moderate stages. As the disease advances, it can become difficult for patients to attend clinical visits. These patients are often lost to follow-up, and consequently, vanish from the pool of potential research subjects who could inform our management of this understudied population. We aim to increase awareness about this population and potential interventions to improve continuity of care and foster research in advanced PD. PMID:27708720

  16. Questions and Answers for Transplant Candidates about Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) and Pediatric End-Stage ....

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the Pediatric End-stage Liver Disease (PELD) scoring system. Again there is a Status 1 category ... urgency categories. The categories were based on a scoring system that in- cluded some laboratory test results ...

  17. Defining end-stage renal disease in clinical trials: a framework for adjudication.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv

    2016-06-01

    Unlike definition of stroke and myocardial infarction, there is no uniformly agreed upon definition to adjudicate end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ESRD remains the most unambiguous and clinically relevant end point for clinical trialists, regulators, payers and patients with chronic kidney disease. The prescription of dialysis to patients with advanced chronic kidney disease is subjective and great variations exist among physicians and countries. Given the difficulties in diagnosing ESRD, the presence of estimated GFR <15 mL/min/1.7 3m(2) itself has been suggested as an end point. However, this definition is still a surrogate since many patients may live years without being symptomatic or needing dialysis. The purpose of this report is to describe a framework to define when the kidney function ends and when ESRD can be adjudicated. Discussed in this report are (i) the importance of diagnosing symptomatic uremia or advanced asymptomatic uremia thus establishing the need for dialysis; (ii) establishing the chronicity of dialysis so as to distinguish it from acute dialysis; (iii) establishing ESRD when dialysis is unavailable, refused or considered futile and (iv) the adjudication process. Several challenges and ambiguities that emerge in clinical trials and their possible solutions are provided. The criteria proposed herein may help to standardize the definition of ESRD and reduce the variability in adjudicating the most important renal end point in clinical trials of chronic kidney disease.

  18. Obesity end stage renal disease and survival in an elderly cohort with cardiovascular disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is highly prevalent in African-Americans and is associated with increased risk of end stage renal disease (ESRD) and death. It is not known if the effect of obesity is similar among Blacks and whites. The aim of this study is to examine racial differences in the association of obesity with E...

  19. Caregiver burden and coping in early-stage Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Zucchella, Chiara; Bartolo, Michelangelo; Pasotti, Chiara; Chiapella, Laura; Sinforiani, Elena

    2012-01-01

    This study was set out to describe caregiver-perceived burden and coping in early-stage Alzheimer disease (AD). A total of 163 consecutive pairs of patients with AD and their principal caregivers were initially recruited. The caregivers completed the Caregiver Burden Inventory (CBI) and the Coping Orientations to Problems Experienced scale, and also provided sociodemographic information; the patients with AD were assessed by means of the Mini Mental State Examination and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Data from 126 patient-caregiver pairs were analyzed. The caregivers (mean age 56.11±12.37 y) were mainly women (76%); 64% were the patient's offspring; 39% lived with the patient. From the CBI data, it emerged that caregivers perceived loss of personal time (objective burden, 33%) and the feeling of missing out on opportunities (developmental burden, 25%) as their main stressors. Total CBI score was negatively correlated with Mini Mental State Examination (P=0.005). As regards coping strategies, the caregivers predominantly used problem-oriented strategies associated with a positive attitude. The use of dysfunctional strategies was predictive of caregiver burden. It is important to be aware that avoidance and dysfunctional coping strategies predispose caregivers of patients with AD to higher level of distress, whereas successful caregiving seems to be based on the use of problem-oriented strategies early in the disease when solutions are still available.

  20. Role of laparoscopy in the staging of malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Pratt, B L; Greene, F L

    2000-08-01

    Although diagnostic laparoscopy has been used by surgeons and gastroenterologists since the early 1900s, today's surgical oncologists have been relatively slow to embrace this technology. Together with the fervor and benefits afforded by laparoscopic therapeutic interventions in the management of patients with benign disease and the diagnostic usefulness in blunt trauma and abdominal pain, awareness has been rekindled regarding the advantages of laparoscopy for the staging of abdominal malignancy. As surgeons begin to realize that extirpative procedures are doomed to failure in curing patients with diffuse abdominal metastases disclosed on laparoscopic assessment, palliative measures, such as stent placement, ablative procedures, balloon dilatation, intraluminal high-dose radiation, and laser techniques will be used commonly by surgical endoscopists and gastroenterologists. Similarly, it is hoped that the use of systemic chemotherapy will achieve better specificity in cell destruction in patients identified laparoscopically to have uncontained disease in the abdominal cavity. The sensitivity of sonography combined with laparoscopy has been shown to approach that of celiotomy in the evaluation of solid organs, thereby avoiding unnecessary laparotomy and its associated morbidities. Using sonography as a complement to laparoscopy will extend the usefulness of both techniques. The application of laparoscopy and the advent of miniaturized laparoscopic instrumentation (Fig. 7), both diagnostic and therapeutic, in the management of patients with abdominal malignancy will be limited only by the creativity and expertise of physicians and instrument makers.

  1. Stereopsis in end-stage renal disease (ESRD).

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel J W; Harris, John P; Butler, Laurie T; Vaux, Emma C

    2017-03-15

    We investigated an effect of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on the visual system by measuring the ability of 21 patients to perceive depth in the random dot stereograms and circles of the Randot Test. To control for other factors which might influence performance on the tests of stereopsis, patients were compared with healthy controls matched for age, years of education, IQ, and general cognitive ability. Vernier acuity (thought to reflect mainly central processing) and Landolt acuity (more sensitive to retinal and optical abnormalities) were also measured, but the study did not include a formal ophthalmological examination. All controls could perceive depth in random dot stereograms, whereas 9/21 patients could not. Patients who could perceive depth had worse stereoacuity than did their matched controls. The patient group as a whole had worse Vernier and Landolt acuities than the controls. The stereoblind patient subgroup had similar Vernier acuity to the stereoscopic subgroup, but worse Landolt acuity, and was more likely to have peripheral vascular disease. We conclude that ESRD had affected structures both within the eye, and within the visual brain. However, the similarity of Vernier acuity and difference of Landolt acuity in the stereoblind and stereoscopic patient subgroups suggest that the differences in stereoscopic ability arise from abnormalities in the eyes rather than in the brain.

  2. Sevelamer carbonate experience in Indian end stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Abraham, G; Kher, V; Saxena, S; Jayakumar, M; Chafekar, D; Pargaonkar, P; Shetty, M; Reddy, Y N V; Reddy, Y N V

    2012-05-01

    This open label, multicentric, comparative clinical trial was done to compare the efficacy and tolerability of two sevelamer formulations, sevelamer carbonate, and sevelamer hydrochloride, in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in Indian end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. A total of 97 ESRD patients on hemodialysis, were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive either sevelamer carbonate or sevelamer hydrochloride. All patients were evaluated every week for 6 weeks for efficacy and safety variables. Total 88 patients completed the study. After 6 weeks of therapy, there were similar reductions (P<0.0001) in mean serum phosphorus and the CaxP product both the groups. The responder rates for test and reference groups were 75%, 68.18% respectively (P=0.3474). The adverse events reported were nausea, abdominal pain/discomfort, heartburn, constipation, diarrhea, increased prothrombin time, and severe arthritis. No serious adverse events were reported. There was no significant difference between the groups for adverse events and the laboratory parameters. From the results of this multicentric, comparative, randomized clinical study on sevelamer carbonate we can recommend that sevelamer carbonate may be used as a phosphate binder in Indian chronic kidney disease patients.

  3. The conjoint use of music therapy and reflexology with hospitalized advanced stage cancer patients and their families.

    PubMed

    Magill, Lucanne; Berenson, Susan

    2008-09-01

    Advanced stage cancer patients experience debilitating physical symptoms as well as profound emotional and spiritual struggles. Advanced disease is accompanied by multiple changes and losses for the patient and the family. Palliative care focuses on the relief of overall suffering of patients and families, including symptom control, psychosocial support, and the meeting of spiritual needs. Music therapy and reflexology are complementary therapies that can soothe and provide comfort. When used conjointly, they provide a multifaceted experience that can aid in the reduction of anxiety, pain, and isolation; facilitate communication between patients, family members, and staff; and provide the potential for a more peaceful dying experience for all involved. This article addresses the benefits of the combined use of music therapy and reflexology. Two case studies are presented to illustrate the application and benefits of this dual approach for patients and their families regarding adjustment to the end of life in the presence of anxiety and cognitive impairment.

  4. Advanced Development Program for a 625 lbf thrust engine for Ares First Stage Roll Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Matt; Chenevert, Blake; Brewster, Gerry; Frei, Tom; Bullard, Brad; Fuller, Ray

    2009-01-01

    NASA's new Ares Launch Vehicle will require twelve thrusters to provide roll control of the vehicle during the first stage firing. All twelve roll control thrusters will be located at the inter-stage segment that separates the solid rocket booster first stage from the second stage. NASA selected a mono propellant hydrazine solution and as a result awarded Aerojet-General a contract in 2007 for an advanced development program for an MR-80- series 625 Ibf vacuum thrust monopropellant hydrazine thruster. This thruster has heritage dating back to the 1976 Viking Landers and most recently for the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory. Prior to the Ares application, the MR-80-series thrusters had been equipped with throttle valves and not typically operated in pulse mode. The primary objective of the advanced development program was to increase the technology readiness level and retire major technical risks for the future flight qualification test program. Aerojet built on their heritage MR-80 rocket engine designs to achieve the design and performance requirements. Significant improvements to cost and lead-time were achieved by applying Design for Manufacturing and Assembly (DFMA) principles. AerojetGeneral has completed Preliminary and Critical Design Reviews, followed by two successful rocket engine development test programs. The test programs included qualification random vibration and firing lite that significantly exceed the flight qualification requirements. This paper discusses the advanced development program and the demonstrated capability of the MR-80C engine. Y;

  5. Interdisciplinary Management of Patient with Advanced Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Kochar, Gagan Deep; Jayan, B; Chopra, S S; Mechery, Reenesh; Goel, Manish; Verma, Munish

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes the interdisciplinary management of an adult patient with advanced periodontal disease. Treatment involved orthodontic and periodontal management. Good esthetic results and dental relationships were achieved by the treatment.

  6. Confidence Interval Estimation for Sensitivity to the Early Diseased Stage Based on Empirical Likelihood.

    PubMed

    Dong, Tuochuan; Tian, Lili

    2015-01-01

    Many disease processes can be divided into three stages: the non-diseased stage: the early diseased stage, and the fully diseased stage. To assess the accuracy of diagnostic tests for such diseases, various summary indexes have been proposed, such as volume under the surface (VUS), partial volume under the surface (PVUS), and the sensitivity to the early diseased stage given specificity and the sensitivity to the fully diseased stage (P2). This paper focuses on confidence interval estimation for P2 based on empirical likelihood. Simulation studies are carried out to assess the performance of the new methods compared to the existing parametric and nonparametric ones. A real dataset from Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is analyzed.

  7. Advancing swine models for human health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Walters, Eric M; Prather, Randall S

    2013-01-01

    Swine models are relatively new kids on the block for modeling human health and diseases when compared to rodents and dogs. Because of the similarity to humans in size, physiology, and genetics, the pig has made significant strides in advancing the understanding of the human condition, and is thus an excellent choice for an animal model. Recent technological advances to genetic engineering of the swine genome enhance the utility of swine as models of human genetic diseases.

  8. Reusable launch vehicles, enabling technology for the development of advanced upper stages and payloads

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, John D.

    1998-01-15

    In the near future there will be classes of upper stages and payloads that will require initial operation at a high-earth orbit to reduce the probability of an inadvertent reentry that could result in a detrimental impact on humans and the biosphere. A nuclear propulsion system, such as was being developed under the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Program, is an example of such a potential payload. This paper uses the results of a reusable launch vehicle (RLV) study to demonstrate the potential importance of a Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) to test and implement an advanced upper stage (AUS) or payload in a safe orbit and in a cost effective and reliable manner. The RLV is a horizontal takeoff and horizontal landing (HTHL), two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) vehicle. The results of the study shows that an HTHL is cost effective because it implements airplane-like operation, infrastructure, and flight operations. The first stage of the TSTO is powered by Rocket-Based-Combined-Cycle (RBCC) engines, the second stage is powered by a LOX/LH rocket engine. The TSTO is used since it most effectively utilizes the capability of the RBCC engine. The analysis uses the NASA code POST (Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories) to determine trajectories and weight in high-earth orbit for AUS/advanced payloads. Cost and reliability of an RLV versus current generation expandable launch vehicles are presented.

  9. Locomotor function in the early stage of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Carpinella, Ilaria; Crenna, Paolo; Calabrese, Elena; Rabuffetti, Marco; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Nemni, Raffaello; Ferrarin, Maurizio

    2007-12-01

    The cardinal motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) have been widely investigated with particular reference to abnormalities of steady-state walking. The great majority of studies, however are related to severe forms of PD patients (phases > = 3 of Hoehn and Yahr scale), where locomotor abnormalities are clearly manifested. Goal of the present study was to quantitatively describe locomotor symptoms in subjects with mild PD. Accordingly, a multitask protocol involving instrumental analysis of steady-state linear walking, initiation of gait, and turning while walking was applied to a group of patients with idiopathic PD in their early clinical stage (phases 1 and 2 of Hoehn and Yahr scale), as well as in age-matched elderly controls. Kinematic, kinetic, and myoelectric measures were obtained by optoelectronic motion analysis, force platform, and telemetric electromyography. Results in PD patients showed a tendency to bradykinetic gait, with reduction of walking speed and cadence. Impairments of gait initiation consisted in reduction of the backward shift of the center of pressure (CoP) and prolongation of the stepping phase. Alterations of the turning task were more consistent and included delayed reorientation of the head toward the new direction, altered head-upper trunk rotational strategy, and adoption of a greater number of steps to complete the turning. It is concluded that patients in the early stage of PD reveal mild alterations of steady-state linear walking and more significant anomalies in the transitional conditions, especially during changes in the travel direction. Quantitative analysis of nonstationary locomotor tasks might be a potentially useful starting point for further studies on the pathophysiology of PD.

  10. The Influence of Social Norms on Advancement Through Bystander Stages for Preventing Interpersonal Violence.

    PubMed

    Deitch-Stackhouse, Jacqueline; Kenneavy, Kristin; Thayer, Richard; Berkowitz, Alan; Mascari, Janine

    2015-10-01

    This research evaluates the impact of social norms on the advancement through the bystander stages toward prosocial (active) intervention in interpersonal violence (IPV): emotional abuse, physical violence, controlling behavior, sexual violence, and stalking. The influence of social norms on bystander behavior across stages and types of violence varies. Accurate social norms perceptions are associated with routine intervention, although social norms misperceptions are not always a strong deterrent to intervention. Interpretation of a violent situation as problematic predicts increased willingness to intervene. Implications for the development of social norms antiviolence campaigns and strategies for reducing barriers to prosocial intervention are discussed.

  11. Advances in management of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, M B

    2003-08-01

    Sickle cell disease is numerically as common as thalassaemia. However, it affects relatively under privileged population i.e. tribal population belonging to economically poor class and having inadequate access to education and modern health facilities. A recent explosion acknowledged in understanding the pathogenesis of this disease has lead to newer dimensions in treatment. Some of these viz. prevention of overwhelming bacterial infection, present indications and controversies regarding blood transfusion, prevention of stroke, acute chest syndrome, hydroxyurea therapy--probably the best disease modifying agent at the moment, stem cell transplantation--a cure and certain promising experimental therapies including gene therapy have been discussed in this review.

  12. Plasma Epidermal Growth Factor Decreased in the Early Stage of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qian-Wen; Wang, Cheng; Zhou, Yi; Hou, Miao-Miao; Wang, Xi; Tang, Hui-Dong; Wu, Yi-Wen; Ma, Jian-Fang; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a neurotrophic factor that plays an important role in Parkinson’s disease (PD). We measured plasma EGF level in PD, essential tremor (ET) and normal controls to investigate whether it changes in PD and whether it is associated with motor and non-motor symptoms of PD. 100 patients with PD, 40 patients with ET as disease control and 76 healthy persons were enrolled in the present study. Motor and non-motor symptoms were assessed by different scales. Plasma EGF levels of three groups were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Spearman test and linear logistics regression model were used to test the correlation of EGF with motor and non-motor symptoms of PD. Plasma EGF level was significantly decreased in early PD patients compared with normal control, but not in advanced PD patients. Interestingly, plasma EGF level was significantly increased in advanced PD and total PD patients compared with ET patients, but not in early PD patients. In addition, plasma EGF level was correlated with UPDRS-III scores in PD. Also plasma EGF level was correlated with UPDRS-III scores and NMS scores in early PD. Our results suggested that plasma EGF decreased in the early stage of PD and increased later on in the PD disease course. Also, plasma EGF level was increased significantly in PD compared with ET patients and correlated with motor and non-motor symptoms in early PD. PMID:26029474

  13. Advances in Biomarker Research in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Shyamal H; Adler, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, and the numbers are projected to double in the next two decades with the increase in the aging population. An important focus of current research is to develop interventions to slow the progression of the disease. However, prerequisites to it include the development of reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis which would identify at-risk groups and disease progression. In this review, we present updated evidence of already known clinical biomarkers (such as hyposmia and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD)) and neuroimaging biomarkers, as well as newer possible markers in the blood, CSF, and other tissues. While several promising candidates and methods to assess these biomarkers are on the horizon, it is becoming increasingly clear that no one candidate will clearly fulfill all the roles as a single biomarker. A multimodal and combinatorial approach to develop a battery of biomarkers will likely be necessary in the future.

  14. Sevelamer therapy for pediatric end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Storms, Lara E; Chicella, Michael F; Dice, James E

    2006-03-01

    Sevelamer, a non-calcium-containing, non-aluminum-containing phosphate binder, is frequently prescribed for treatment in adults with hyperphosphatemia secondary to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, published information regarding sevelamer use in children younger than 11 years is lacking. We report the use of sevelamer as a phosphate binder in a 19-month-old girl with ESRD who was receiving calcium carbonate 1250 mg 3 times/day for hyperphosphatemia. The patient's initial serum phosphorus concentration was 8.6 mg/dl, and the calcium-phosphorus product was 75 mg(2)/dl(2). This was well above the level that places patients at risk for complications such as joint, vessel, and soft-tissue calcification. An aluminum-containing phosphate binder was not an option given the patient's renal disease and the concern for neurotoxicity. Sevelamer was considered, but a MEDLINE search revealed no pediatric dosing information. An initial dosage of 100 mg/kg/day divided every 8 hours was administered, as extrapolated from adult data, and then titrated to 130 mg/kg/day divided every 8 hours based on the patient's response. The child's dietary phosphorus intake remained constant throughout her hospital stay. During sevelamer therapy, her serum phosphorus concentration dropped as low as 5.2 mg/dl; at discharge it was 6.5 mg/dl, with a corresponding calcium-phosphorus product in the upper 50s. No adverse effects associated with sevelamer were observed. In the dosages we used, sevelamer resulted in an acceptable calcium-phosphorus product and returned the patient's serum phosphorus concentration to near normal. Sevelamer appears to be a viable option as a phosphate binder in children with ESRD.

  15. Hypertension in children with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria; Skrzypczyk, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    This review summarizes current data on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of hypertension (HTN) in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Worldwide prevalence of ESRD ranges from 5.0 to 84.4 per million age-related population. HTN is present in 27-79% of children with ESRD, depending on the modality of renal replacement therapy and the exact definition of hypertension. Ambulatory BP monitoring has been recommended for the detection of HTN and evaluation of treatment effectiveness. HTN in dialyzed patients is mostly related to hypervolemia, sodium overload, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and sympathetic nervous system, impaired nitric oxide synthesis, reduced vitamin D levels, and effects of microRNA. In children undergoing chronic dialysis therapy, important factors include optimization of renal replacement therapy and preservation of residual renal function, allowing reduction of volume- and sodium-overload, along with appropriate drug treatment, particularly with calcium channel blockers, RAAS inhibitors, and loop diuretics.

  16. Fertility and contraception in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R J; Holley, J L

    1998-01-01

    The hormonal aberrations that occur with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are presented in this review in relation to fertility and conception among women on dialysis. The imbalance in gonadotropin production in dialysis-dependent men and women is characterized by elevations in luteinizing hormone (LH). In women dialysis patients, the normal estradiol-stimulated LH surge does not occur, resulting in anovulation. In men dialysis patients spermatogenesis is impaired, and low testosterone levels cause elevated LH. Infertility in those with ESRD is a culmination of many factors, including impotence and loss of libido, anovulation, and an altered hormonal milieu. Despite these inhibitors of conception, women on dialysis can conceive; pregnancy has been reported in 1% to 7% of women on dialysis in survey studies. The influence of dialysis mode (hemodialysis v peritoneal dialysis), recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO), and dialysis adequacy on the likelihood of conception among patients of either sex on dialysis is unknown. Reduced sexual activity and interest has consistently been reported in the ESRD population. The reasons for this are complex and likely involve the effects of comorbid illnesses, overall health status, body image factors, and hormonal alterations. Nephrologists rarely discuss conception and contraception with their women dialysis patients. Greater attention to these issues is needed.

  17. Ethics and decision making in end stage lung disease.

    PubMed

    Simonds, A K

    2003-03-01

    Most physicians believe they do more good than harm, and these duties of helping and not harming the patient are rooted in the Hippocratic oath, the good Samaritan tradition, and the Order of the Knight Hospitallers founded in the 11th century to care for pilgrims and those wounded in the Crusades.(1) In recent times the simple principles of beneficence and non-maleficence have been augmented and sometimes challenged by a rising awareness of patient/consumer rights, and the public expectation of greater involvement in medical, social and scientific affairs which affect them. In a publicly funded healthcare system in which rationing (explicit or otherwise) is inevitable, the additional concepts of utility and distributive justice can easily come into conflict with the individual's right to autonomy. Possible treatment options for end stage lung disease include transplantation and long term invasive ventilation which are challenging in resource terms. Other interventions such as pulmonary rehabilitation and palliative care are relatively low cost but not uniformly accessible.

  18. Ghrelin and obestatin levels in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Aygen, B; Dogukan, A; Dursun, F E; Aydin, S; Kilic, N; Sahpaz, F; Celiker, H

    2009-01-01

    Malnutrition is fairly common in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, persistent lack of appetite being a major symptom. Ghrelin and obestatin are two hormones that are involved in appetite and energy homeostasis. The present study examined ghrelin and obestatin levels in 24 ESRD patients undergoing haemodialysis and 24 age-matched healthy controls. Serum and saliva ghrelin and obestatin levels in the ESRD patients were significantly higher compared with controls, while saliva ghrelin and obestatin levels in all study participants were significantly higher than serum levels. Saliva ghrelin correlated with serum ghrelin and saliva obestatin correlated with serum obestatin in all study participants, although there was no correlation between ghrelin and obestatin levels. In conclusion, the results suggest that the kidneys may have a role in the metabolism and/or clearance of obestatin, as they do for ghrelin. Further studies are needed to determine if elevated levels of these hormones in ESRD patients contribute to the malnutrition that is common in these patients.

  19. Ordering of mutations in preinvasive disease stages of esophageal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Jamie M J; Ross-Innes, Caryn S; Shannon, Nicholas; Lynch, Andy G; Forshew, Tim; Barbera, Mariagnese; Murtaza, Muhammed; Ong, Chin-Ann J; Lao-Sirieix, Pierre; Dunning, Mark J; Smith, Laura; Smith, Mike L; Anderson, Charlotte L; Carvalho, Benilton; O'Donovan, Maria; Underwood, Timothy J; May, Andrew P; Grehan, Nicola; Hardwick, Richard; Davies, Jim; Oloumi, Arusha; Aparicio, Sam; Caldas, Carlos; Eldridge, Matthew D; Edwards, Paul A W; Rosenfeld, Nitzan; Tavaré, Simon; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2014-08-01

    Cancer genome sequencing studies have identified numerous driver genes, but the relative timing of mutations in carcinogenesis remains unclear. The gradual progression from premalignant Barrett's esophagus to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) provides an ideal model to study the ordering of somatic mutations. We identified recurrently mutated genes and assessed clonal structure using whole-genome sequencing and amplicon resequencing of 112 EACs. We next screened a cohort of 109 biopsies from 2 key transition points in the development of malignancy: benign metaplastic never-dysplastic Barrett's esophagus (NDBE; n=66) and high-grade dysplasia (HGD; n=43). Unexpectedly, the majority of recurrently mutated genes in EAC were also mutated in NDBE. Only TP53 and SMAD4 mutations occurred in a stage-specific manner, confined to HGD and EAC, respectively. Finally, we applied this knowledge to identify high-risk Barrett's esophagus in a new non-endoscopic test. In conclusion, mutations in EAC driver genes generally occur exceptionally early in disease development with profound implications for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  20. Satellite hemodialysis services for patients with end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Organ, Kathy; MacDonald, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    More than 40,000 Canadians are living with end stage renal disease and approximately 22,400 of those are currently being treated with hemodialysis (The Kidney Foundation of Canada, 2013). Long distance travel to access hemodialysis services can be a serious burden for patients, and travelling more than 60 minutes can mean a 20% greater risk for death, as compared with those who travel 15 minutes or less (Moist et al., 2008). Satellite hemodialysis units are seen as one solution to this problem. This study assessed the impact of services provided by one satellite hemodialysis unit on patients' satisfaction, access to care and quality of life using a qualitative interview research design. Seven patients were interviewed and three themes emerged including the burden of long distance travel before satellite services (safety, time and cost), satisfaction with satellite services (pleasant environment and continuity of care), and improved quality of life. This study showed that a satellite hemodialysis unit improved access to services and enhanced the quality of life of those patients who participated in the study.

  1. A Novel Therapeutic Modality for Advanced-Stage Prostate Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    There is an urgent need to develop effective therapies for the treatment of advanced stage prostate cancer (PrCa) due to their limited or no response to...metastatic PrCa. Our results illustrated that ORM treatment effectively inhibited invasion and motility of PrCa cells. Further, we observed that ORM... effectively inhibits metastasis associated protein 1 (MTA1) in PrCa cells. MTA1 has been reported to be very tightly associated with cancer metastasis in

  2. Primary Tumor Site as a Predictor of Treatment Outcome for Definitive Radiotherapy of Advanced-Stage Oral Cavity Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Kang, Chung-Jan; Lee, Li-Yu; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of definitive radiotherapy (RT) for oral cavity cancers and to assess prognostic factors. Methods and Materials: Definitive RT was performed on 115 patients with oral cavity cancers at Stages III, IVA, and IVB, with a distribution of 6%, 47%, and 47%, respectively. The median dose of RT was 72Gy (range, 62-76Gy). Cisplatin-based chemotherapy was administered to 95% of the patients. Eleven patients underwent salvage surgery after RT failure. Results: Eight-eight (76.5%) patients responded partially and 23 (20%) completely; of the patients who responded, 18% and 57%, respectively, experienced a durable effect of treatment. The 3-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, and progression-free survival were 22%, 27%, and 25%, respectively. The 3-year PFS rates based on the primary tumor sites were as follows: Group I (buccal, mouth floor, and gum) 51%, Group II (retromolar and hard palate) 18%, and Group III (tongue and lip) 6% (p < 0.0001). The 3-year progression-free survival was 41% for N0 patients and 19% for patients with N+ disease (p = 0.012). The T stage and RT technique did not affect survival. The patients who underwent salvage surgery demonstrated better 3-year overall survival and disease-specific survival (53% vs. 19%, p = 0.015 and 53% vs. 24%, p = 0.029, respectively). Subsite group, N+, and salvage surgery were the only significant prognostic factors for survival after multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The primary tumor site and neck stage are prognostic predictors in advanced-stage oral cancer patients who received radical RT. The primary tumor extension and RT technique did not influence survival.

  3. Controversies on the prognostic value of interim FDG-PET in advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Adams, Hugo J A; Kwee, Thomas C

    2016-12-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma, even in advanced-stage, is a highly curable malignancy, but treatment is associated with short-term toxicity and long-term side effects. Early predictive markers are required to identify those patients who do not require the full-length standard therapy (and thus qualify for therapy de-escalation) and those patients who will not be cured by standard therapy (and thus qualify for therapy escalation). Multiple trials have assessed the value of (18) F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) after a few cycles of chemotherapy (also known as 'interim FDG-PET') in predicting outcome in advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma. Furthermore, multiple interim FDG-PET-adapted trials, in which patients with positive interim FDG-PET scans are assigned to escalated therapies, and patients with negative interim FDG-PET scans are assigned to de-escalated therapies, have recently been published or are currently ongoing, with generally heterogeneous results. The present article reports the currently available evidence (and controversies) on the prognostic value of interim FDG-PET in advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma in patients with positive and negative interim FDG-PET findings following continuation of standard chemotherapy or escalated/de-escalated therapy.

  4. Advances in the genetics of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Joanne; Farrer, Matt

    2013-08-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease that was long considered the result of environmental factors. In the past 15 years, however, a genetic aetiology for PD has begun to emerge. Here, we review results from linkage and next-generation sequencing studies of familial parkinsonism, as well as candidate gene and genome-wide association findings in sporadic PD. In these studies, many of the genetic findings overlap, despite different designs and study populations, highlighting novel therapeutic targets. The molecular results delineate a sequence of pathological events whereby deficits in synaptic exocytosis and endocytosis, endosomal trafficking, lysosome-mediated autophagy and mitochondrial maintenance increase susceptibility to PD. These discoveries provide the rationale, molecular insight and research tools to develop neuroprotective and disease-modifying therapies.

  5. Chemotherapy in advanced malignant diseases in Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Talib, Hussein

    1971-01-01

    This work discusses the experience of one surgical team in the Third Surgical Unit at the Republican Teaching Hospital, Baghdad, from 1967 to 1970. 112 patients with advanced malignant lesions in various parts of the body were dealt with. In 84, the intra-arterial route was adopted; in the remaining, systemic administration of cytotoxic agents either singly or in combination was employed. The results are reported in terms of subjective and objective response, and the various complications are discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:5137574

  6. Automated Peritoneal Dialysis is Suitable for Polycystic Kidney Disease Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Ren, Hong; Xie, Jingyuan; Huang, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Chun-Yan; Chen, Nan

    2015-01-01

    A female patient with polycystic kidney disease (PKD) was treated with automated peritoneal dialysis when she reached end-stage renal disease. The patient has been doing very well on automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) for almost 6 years without peritonitis or abdominal hernias. Intra-abdominal pressures are lower in the supine position than in an erect or sitting position. Larger volumes of dialysate are better tolerated while the patient is supine, as during nocturnal APD. Therefore, APD is an option of the renal replacement therapy for patients with PKD.

  7. PET-CT for staging and early response: results from the Response-Adapted Therapy in Advanced Hodgkin Lymphoma study.

    PubMed

    Barrington, Sally F; Kirkwood, Amy A; Franceschetto, Antonella; Fulham, Michael J; Roberts, Thomas H; Almquist, Helén; Brun, Eva; Hjorthaug, Karin; Viney, Zaid N; Pike, Lucy C; Federico, Massimo; Luminari, Stefano; Radford, John; Trotman, Judith; Fosså, Alexander; Berkahn, Leanne; Molin, Daniel; D'Amore, Francesco; Sinclair, Donald A; Smith, Paul; O'Doherty, Michael J; Stevens, Lindsey; Johnson, Peter W

    2016-03-24

    International guidelines recommend that positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) should replace CT in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). The aims of this study were to compare PET-CT with CT for staging and measure agreement between expert and local readers, using a 5-point scale (Deauville criteria), to adapt treatment in a clinical trial: Response-Adapted Therapy in Advanced Hodgkin Lymphoma (RATHL). Patients were staged using clinical assessment, CT, and bone marrow biopsy (RATHL stage). PET-CT was performed at baseline (PET0) and after 2 chemotherapy cycles (PET2) in a response-adapted design. PET-CT was reported centrally by experts at 5 national core laboratories. Local readers optionally scored PET2 scans. The RATHL and PET-CT stages were compared. Agreement among experts and between expert and local readers was measured. RATHL and PET0 stage were concordant in 938 (80%) patients. PET-CT upstaged 159 (14%) and downstaged 74 (6%) patients. Upstaging by extranodal disease in bone marrow (92), lung (11), or multiple sites (12) on PET-CT accounted for most discrepancies. Follow-up of discrepant findings confirmed the PET characterization of lesions in the vast majority. Five patients were upstaged by marrow biopsy and 7 by contrast-enhanced CT in the bowel and/or liver or spleen. PET2 agreement among experts (140 scans) with a κ (95% confidence interval) of 0.84 (0.76-0.91) was very good and between experts and local readers (300 scans) at 0.77 (0.68-0.86) was good. These results confirm PET-CT as the modern standard for staging HL and that response assessment using Deauville criteria is robust, enabling translation of RATHL results into clinical practice.

  8. [Advances in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Belén Arnalich; Pumarega, Irene Cano; Ausiró, Anna Mola; Izquierdo Alonso, José Luis

    2009-01-01

    Although chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by poorly reversible, chronic airflow obstruction, from the clinical point of view we must continue to make progress in the diagnosis and management of these patients so that spirometry is not the only technique used. Understanding that COPD is a heterogeneous process and that patient complexity usually increases due to the presence of comorbidities will allow more individualized strategies to be designed, which may improve control of the process. The TORCH and UPLIFT trials have shown that current treatment can improve important aspects of the disease, including mortality. However, the finalizing of these two large trials has generated a current of opinion favoring a more individually-tailored approach that should include all the factors -both pulmonary and extrapulmonary- that can modify the patient's form of presentation. Although we are witnessing a change in the therapeutic approach to COPD, future treatment will probably be based on studies performed in specific patient subgroups and on clarifying the interrelation between COPD and other diseases that are common in these patients. Greater knowledge of the pathogenesis of the disease may improve pharmacological treatment but drugs that, by themselves, alter the short- and longterm course of COPD are not on the horizon. However, a more patient-focussed approach may be the main tool available to physicians to increase quality of life -and possibly survival- in these patients.

  9. Advances in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Loomba, Rohit; Sirlin, Claude B.; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B.; Lavine, Joel E.

    2009-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as the leading cause of chronic liver disease in children and adolescents in the United States. A two- to three-fold rise in the rates of obesity and overweight in children over the last 2 decades is probably responsible for the epidemic of NAFLD. Emerging data suggest that children with NASH progress to cirrhosis which may ultimately increase liver-related mortality. More worrisome is the recognition that cardiovascular risk and morbidity in children and adolescents is associated with fatty liver. Pediatric fatty liver disease often displays a histologic pattern distinct from that found in adults. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosis of NASH. Non-invasive biomarkers are needed to identify individuals with progressive liver injury. Targeted therapies to improve liver histology and metabolic abnormalities associated with fatty liver are needed. Currently, randomized-controlled trials are underway in the pediatric population to define pharmacologic therapy for NAFLD. Public health awareness and intervention are needed to promote healthy diet, exercise, and lifestyle modifications to prevent and reduce the burden of disease in the community. PMID:19637286

  10. Atrophy patterns in early clinical stages across distinct phenotypes of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Cohn-Sheehy, Brendan I; La Joie, Renaud; Vogel, Jacob W; Möller, Christiane; Lehmann, Manja; van Berckel, Bart N M; Seeley, William W; Pijnenburg, Yolande A; Gorno-Tempini, Maria L; Kramer, Joel H; Barkhof, Frederik; Rosen, Howard J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Jagust, William J; Miller, Bruce L; Scheltens, Philip; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2015-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) can present with distinct clinical variants. Identifying the earliest neurodegenerative changes associated with each variant has implications for early diagnosis, and for understanding the mechanisms that underlie regional vulnerability and disease progression in AD. We performed voxel-based morphometry to detect atrophy patterns in early clinical stages of four AD phenotypes: Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA, "visual variant," n=93), logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia (lvPPA, "language variant," n=74), and memory-predominant AD categorized as early age-of-onset (EOAD, <65 years, n=114) and late age-of-onset (LOAD, >65 years, n=114). Patients with each syndrome were stratified based on: (1) degree of functional impairment, as measured by the clinical dementia rating (CDR) scale, and (2) overall extent of brain atrophy, as measured by a neuroimaging approach that sums the number of brain voxels showing significantly lower gray matter volume than cognitively normal controls (n=80). Even at the earliest clinical stage (CDR=0.5 or bottom quartile of overall atrophy), patients with each syndrome showed both common and variant-specific atrophy. Common atrophy across variants was found in temporoparietal regions that comprise the posterior default mode network (DMN). Early syndrome-specific atrophy mirrored functional brain networks underlying functions that are uniquely affected in each variant: Language network in lvPPA, posterior cingulate cortex-hippocampal circuit in amnestic EOAD and LOAD, and visual networks in PCA. At more advanced stages, atrophy patterns largely converged across AD variants. These findings support a model in which neurodegeneration selectively targets both the DMN and syndrome-specific vulnerable networks at the earliest clinical stages of AD.

  11. The IASLC Mesothelioma Staging Project: Improving Staging of a Rare Disease Through International Participation.

    PubMed

    Pass, Harvey; Giroux, Dorothy; Kennedy, Catherine; Ruffini, Enrico; Cangir, Ayten K; Rice, David; Asamura, Hisao; Waller, David; Edwards, John; Weder, Walter; Hoffmann, Hans; van Meerbeeck, Jan P; Nowak, Anna; Rusch, Valerie W

    2016-12-01

    For nearly 40 years, there was no generally accepted staging system for malignant pleural mesothelioma. In 1994, members of the International Mesothelioma Interest Group, in collaboration with the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, proposed a TNM staging system based on analyses of outcomes in retrospective surgical series and small clinical trials. Subsequently accepted by the American Joint Commission on Cancer and the Union for International Cancer Control for the sixth editions of their staging manuals, this system has since been the international staging standard. However, it has significant limitations, particularly with respect to clinical staging and to the categories for lymph node staging. Here we provide an overview of the development of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer malignant pleural mesothelioma staging database, which was designed to address these limitations through the development of a large international data set. Analyses of this database, described in papers linked to this overview, are being used to inform revisions in the eighth editions of the American Joint Commission on Cancer and Union for International Cancer Control staging systems.

  12. Long-Term Outcomes and Prognostic Factors in Advanced Gallbladder Cancer: Focus on the Advanced T Stage

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Haoxin; Song, Huwei; Zhao, Yaling; Zhang, Guanjun; Li, Wenzhi; Ma, Li; Wang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background Radical resection is an effective therapeutic method to increase the survival rate of patients with gallbladder cancer (GBC). In addition to the surgical approach, the relationships between various clinicopathologic factors and the outcome of patients with GBC remain controversial. Methods Clinical and laboratory examination characteristics, pathological and surgical data, and post-operative survival time of 338 patients with advanced GBC who received treatment at the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, China from January 2008 to December 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. Factors influencing the prognosis of GBC after surgery were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results The overall survival rates for curative resection patients were significantly greater than those for non-curative resection patients (1-,3-,5-year survival rate and mean-survival time: 59.0%, 47.3%, 44.3% and 22.0 months vs. 12.7%, 8.3%, 7.7% and 3.0 months) (P < 0.001). For the curative resection patients, positive margin, lymph node metastasis, poorly pathological differentiation and the presence of ascites were all independent risk factors for poor prognosis. For patients with T3 stage, neither segmentectomy of IVb and V nor common bile duct resection improved the prognosis (P = 0.867 and P = 0.948). For patients with T4 stage, aggressive curative resection improved the prognosis (P = 0.007). Conclusions An advanced T stage does not preclude curative resection. Positive margin, lymph node metastasis, poorly pathological differentiation and the presence of ascites are all independent risk factors for poor prognosis in the curative intent resection patients. The range of liver resection and whether common bile duct resection is performed do not influence the prognosis as long as R0 resection is achieved. PMID:27846279

  13. Homovanillic acid in CSF of mild stage Parkinson's disease patients correlates with motor impairment.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Alessandro; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Olivola, Enrica; Galati, Salvatore; Cerroni, Rocco; D'Angelo, Vincenza; Hainsworth, Atticus H; Saviozzi, Valentina; Fedele, Ernesto; Liguori, Claudio

    2017-05-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), several efforts have been spent in order to find biochemical parameters able to identify the progression of the pathological processes at the basis of the disease. It is already known that advanced PD patients manifesting dyskinesia are featured by the high homovanillic acid (HVA)/dopamine (DA) ratio, suggesting the increased turnover of DA in these patients. Less clear is whether similar changes affect mild and moderate stages of the disease (between 1 and 2.5 of Hoehn & Yahr -H&Y- stage). Hence, here we tested whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of DA and its major metabolites, either 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) or HVA, correlate with motor performance in mild and moderate PD patients. CSF samples were collected after 2 days of anti-PD drugs washout, via lumbar puncture (LP) performed 130 min following administration of oral levodopa (LD) dose (200 mg). LP timing was determined in light of our previous tests clarifying that 2 h after oral LD administration CSF DA concentration reaches a plateau, which was un-respective of PD stage or duration. DA, DOPAC and HVA were assayed by high performance liquid chromatography in a group of 19 patients, distributed in two groups on the basis of the H&Y stage with a cut-off of 1.5. In these PD patients, HVA was correlated with DOPAC (R = 0,56, p < 0,01) and both HVA and DOPAC CSF levels increased in parallel with the motor impairment. More importantly, HVA correlated with motor impairment measured by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Score -III (UPDRS) (R = 0.61; p < 0.0001). The present findings showed the early alteration of the DA pre-synaptic machinery, as documented by the progressive increase of CSF HVA concentrations, which also correlated with PD motor impairment. Therefore, we suggest the potential use of measuring the CSF HVA level as a possible biomarker of PD stage changes in order to monitor the effectiveness of PD-modifying pharmacological therapies.

  14. Low Circulating Levels of Dehydroepiandrosterone in Histologically Advanced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, Michael; Angulo, Paul; Chalasani, Naga; Merriman, Ralph; Viker, Kimberly; Charatcharoenwitthaya, Phunchai; Sanderson, Schuyler; Gawrieh, Samer; Krishnan, Anuradha; Lindor, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The biological basis of variability in histological progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is unknown. Dehydroepiandrosterone(DHEA) is the most abundant steroid hormone and has been shown to influence sensitivity to oxidative stress, insulin sensitivity, and expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and procollagen messenger RNA. Our aim was to determine whether more histologically advanced NAFLD is associated with low circulating levels of DHEA. Serum samples were obtained prospectively at the time of liver biopsy in 439 patients with NAFLD (78 in an initial and 361 in validation cohorts) and in controls with cholestatic liver disease (n = 44). NAFLD was characterized as mild [simple steatosis or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with fibrosis stage 0–2] or advanced (NASH with fibrosis stage 3–4). Serum levels of sulfated DHEA (DHEA-S) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients with advanced NAFLD had lower plasma levels of DHEA-S than patients with mild NAFLD in both the initial (0.25 ± 0.07 versus 1.1 ± 0.09 µg/mL, P < 0.001) and validation cohorts (0.47 ± 0.06 versus 0.99 ± 0.04 µg/mL, P < 0.001). A “dose effect” of decreasing DHEA-S and incremental fibrosis stage was observed with a mean DHEA-S of 1.03 ± 0.05, 0.96 ± 0.07, 0.83 ± 0.11, 0.66 ± 0.11, and 0.35 ± 0.06 µg/mL for fibrosis stages 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. All patients in both cohorts in the advanced NAFLD group had low DHEA-S levels, with the majority in the hypoadrenal range. The association between DHEA-S and severity of NAFLD persisted after adjusting for age. A relationship between disease/fibrosis severity and DHEA-S levels was not seen in patients with cholestatic liver diseases. Conclusion More advanced NAFLD, as indicated by the presence of NASH with advanced fibrosis stage, is strongly associated with low circulating DHEA-S. These data provide novel evidence for relative DHEA-S deficiency in patients with

  15. The End-Stage Renal Disease Program: Basis for the Army Organ Transplant Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-19

    NO.NO. 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) THE END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE PROGRAM: BASIS FOR THE ARMY ORGAN TRANSPLANT PROGRAM 12. PERSONAL...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE BEST AVAILABLE COPY 8 9 BEST AvAILABLE COPY THE END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE PROGRAM: BASIS FOR THE ARMY ORGAN...Conditions Which Prompted the Study . .... . . . . . 4 Literature Review--End-Stage Renal Disease Program . 4 Technological Aspects .............. . 4

  16. Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease: advances and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ates, Fehmi; Francis, David O; Vaezi, Michael F

    2014-08-01

    'Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease' is one of the most common misnomers in the area of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The term implies reflux as the underlying etiology despite unresponsiveness to aggressive proton pump inhibitor therapy. The term should be replaced with 'refractory symptoms.' We must acknowledge that in many patients symptoms of reflux often overlap with non-GERD causes such as gastroparesis, dyspepsia, hypersensitive esophagus and functional disorders. Lack of response to aggressive acid suppressive therapy often leads to diagnostic testing. In majority of patients these tests are normal. The role of non-acid reflux in this group is uncertain and patients should not undergo surgical fundoplication based on this parameter. In patients unresponsive to acid suppressive therapy GERD is most commonly not causal and a search for non-GERD causes must ensue.

  17. Treatment of osteoporosis in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Paul D

    2005-03-01

    As glomerular filtration rate (GFR) declines from age-related bone loss or disease that specifically induces a decline in GFR, there are a number of metabolic bone conditions that may accompany the decline in GFR. These metabolic bone conditions span a spectrum from mild-to-severe secondary hyperparathyroidism in early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) to the development of additional heterogeneous forms of bone diseases each with its distinctly quantitative bone histomorphometric characteristics. Osteoporosis can also develop in patients with CKD and ESRD for many reasons beyond age-related bone loss and postmenopausal bone loss. The diagnosis of osteoporosis in patients with severe CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is not as easy to do as it is in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO)--neither fragility fractures nor The World Health Organization bone mineral density criteria can be used to diagnose osteoporosis in this population since all forms of renal bone disease may fracture or have low "T scores". The diagnosis of osteoporosis in patients with CKD/ESRD must be done by first the exclusion of the other forms of renal osteodystrophy, by biochemical profiling or by double tetracycline-labeled bone biopsy; and the finding of low trabecular bone volume. In such patients, preliminary data would suggest that oral bisphosphonates seem to be safe and effective down to GFR levels of 15 mL/min. In patients with stage 5 CKD who are fracturing because of osteoporosis or who are on chronic glucocorticoids, reducing the oral bisphosphonate dosage to half of its usual prescribed dosing for PMO seems reasonable from known bisphosphonate pharmacokinetics, though we do need better scientific data to fully understand bisphosphonate usage in this population.

  18. End-stage renal disease associated with prophylactic lithium treatment.

    PubMed

    Aiff, Harald; Attman, Per-Ola; Aurell, Mattias; Bendz, Hans; Schön, Staffan; Svedlund, Jan

    2014-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of lithium associated end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and to compare the relative risk of ESRD in lithium users versus non-lithium users. Second, the role of lithium in the pathogenesis of ESRD was evaluated. We used the Swedish Renal Registry to search for lithium-treated patients with ESRD among 2644 patients with chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT)-either dialysis or transplantation, within two defined geographical areas in Sweden with 2.8 million inhabitants. The prevalence date was December 31, 2010. We found 30 ESRD patients with a history of lithium treatment. ESRD with RRT was significantly more prevalent among lithium users than among non-lithium users (p<0.001). The prevalence of ESRD with RRT in the lithium user population was 15.0‰ (95% CI 9.7-20.3), and close to two percent of the RRT population were lithium users. The relative risk of ESRD with RRT in the lithium user population compared with the general population was 7.8 (95% CI 5.4-11.1). Out of those 30 patients, lithium use was classified, based on chart reviews, as being the sole (n=14) or main (n=10) cause of ESRD in 24 cases. Their mean age at the start of RRT was 66 years (46-82), their mean time on lithium 27 years (12-39), and 22 of them had been on lithium for 15 years or more. We conclude that lithium-associated ESRD is an uncommon but not rare complication of lithium treatment.

  19. Dream features in the early stages of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bugalho, Paulo; Paiva, Teresa

    2011-11-01

    Few studies have investigated the relation between dream features and cognition in Parkinson's disease (PD), although vivid dreams, hallucinations and cognitive decline have been proposed as successive steps of a pathological continuum. Our objectives were therefore to characterize the dreams of early stage PD and to study the relation between dream characteristics, cognitive function, motor status, depression, dopaminergic treatment, and the presence of REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) and hallucinations. Dreams of 19 male PD patients and 21 matched control subjects were classified according to Hall and van de Castle system. h statistics was used to compare the dream content between patients and controls. We tested the relation between patients' dreams characteristics and cognitive function (Frontal assessment battery (FAB) and Mini-Mental State Examination tests) depression (Beck depression inventory), motor function (UPDRS), dopaminergic treatment, the presence of RBD (according to clinical criteria) and hallucinations, using general linear model statistics. Patients and controls differed only on FAB scores. Relevant differences in the Hall and van de Castle scale were found between patient's dreams and those of the control group, regarding animals, aggression/friendliness, physical aggression, befriender (higher in the patient group) and aggressor and bodily misfortunes (lower in the patient group) features. Cognitive and particularly frontal dysfunction had a significant influence on the frequency of physical aggression and animal related features, while dopaminergic doses, depressive symptoms, hallucinations and RBD did not. We found a pattern of dream alteration characterized by heightened aggressiveness and the presence of animals. These were related to more severe frontal dysfunction, which could be the origin of such changes.

  20. Oral squamous cell carcinoma among Yemenis: Onset in young age and presentation at advanced stage

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohaya, Maha; Abdulhuq, Mahmoud; Al-Mandili, Ahmad; Al-Anazi, Yousef

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Oral cancer represents a health burden worldwide. Up to 90% of oral cancer cases are squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). The data on oral SCC in Yemen are lacking. The objective of this study therefore was to describe and analyze the demographic, clinical and histological characteristics of Yemeni patients with oral SCC. Study Design: In this cross-sectional study, two sets of retrospective data for Yemeni cancer patients were obtained officially by two different registries. Patients with oral SCC were included. Their ages were dichotomized using 40 and 45 years alternately as individual cut-points for young and old patients. The patients` demographic, clinical and histological characteristics were statistically analyzed. Results: There were 457 Yemenis with oral SCC; 253 patients (55.4%) were men. The overall mean age was 58.15±14.11 years. The tongue was the most affected oral sub-site accounting for 53% of the reported cases. The well and moderately differentiated oral SCC accounted for 55.5% and 25.6% of the total cases respectively. Noteworthy, 62 patients (14%) were affected by the age of ?40; this increased to 105 patients (23%) aged ?45 years. Additionally, a high proportion of oral SCC patients (62%, 283) were diagnosed at advanced tumor stages (regional extension or metastasized). The distributions of histological grades and tumor stages in young and old patients were significantly different (P=0.006 and 0.026 respectively). Conclusion: The relative frequency of oral SCC among Yemeni young people is high. Unfortunately, most of oral SCC patients in Yemen were diagnosed at advanced stage. Key words:Oral squamous cell carcinoma, Yemen, young patients, advanced stage. PMID:24558559

  1. Treatment options for non-motor symptoms in late-stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Miguel; Ferreira, Joaquim; Rosa, Mário; Sampaio, Cristina

    2008-03-01

    Late-stage Parkinson's disease is characterised by patients dependent on caregivers for their activities of daily living, even under the best levodopa benefit. Non-motor signs that overcome the well-known motor signs of Parkinson's disease dominate late-stage Parkinson's disease and few systematic data exist for the treatment of these signs. The objective of this study was to review the treatment options for Parkinson's disease dementia, psychosis, falls, bone fractures, joint and skeletal deformities, pain, orthostatic hypotension, gastrointestinal abnormalities and urological dysfunction in late-stage Parkinson's disease. The study analysed the available controlled clinical trials for the above medical conditions. When absent, data from case series and the authors' own experience was considered. Few controlled clinical trials specifically addressed late-stage Parkinson's disease as a target population. There is a need for therapeutic data on the symptoms that most afflict late-stage Parkinson's disease patients.

  2. Ares First Stage "Systemology" - Combining Advanced Systems Engineering and Planning Tools to Assure Mission Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiler, James; Brasfield, Fred; Cannon, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Ares is an integral part of NASA s Constellation architecture that will provide crew and cargo access to the International Space Station as well as low earth orbit support for lunar missions. Ares replaces the Space Shuttle in the post 2010 time frame. Ares I is an in-line, two-stage rocket topped by the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. The Ares I first stage is a single, five-segment reusable solid rocket booster derived from the Space Shuttle Program's reusable solid rocket motor. The Ares second or upper stage is propelled by a J-2X main engine fueled with liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. This paper describes the advanced systems engineering and planning tools being utilized for the design, test, and qualification of the Ares I first stage element. Included are descriptions of the current first stage design, the milestone schedule requirements, and the marriage of systems engineering, detailed planning efforts, and roadmapping employed to achieve these goals.

  3. Future care planning: a first step to palliative care for all patients with advanced heart disease.

    PubMed

    Denvir, M A; Murray, S A; Boyd, K J

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care is recommended for patients with end-stage heart failure with several recent, randomised trials showing improvements in symptoms and quality of life and more studies underway. Future care planning provides a framework for discussing a range of palliative care problems with patients and their families. This approach can be introduced at any time during the patient's journey of care and ideally well in advance of end-of-life care. Future care planning is applicable to a wide range of patients with advanced heart disease and could be delivered systematically by cardiology teams at the time of an unplanned hospital admission, akin to cardiac rehabilitation for myocardial infarction. Integrating cardiology care and palliative care can benefit many patients with advanced heart disease at increased risk of death or hospitalisation. Larger, randomised trials are needed to assess the impact on patient outcomes and experiences.

  4. Identifying Depression in South Asian Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: Considerations for Practice

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shivani; Bhui, Kamaldeep; Chilcot, Joseph; Wellsted, David; Farrington, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Depression is a prevalent burden for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and one that is under-recognized and consequently under-treated. Although several studies have explored the association between depression symptoms, treatment adherence and outcomes in Euro-American patient groups, quantitative and qualitative exploration of these issues in patients from different cultural and ethnic backgrounds has been lacking. This review discusses the methodological issues associated with measuring depression in patients of South Asian origin who have a 3- to 5-fold greater risk of developing ESRD. There is a need to advance research into the development of accurate screening practices for this patient group, with an emphasis on studies utilizing rigorous approaches to evaluating the use of both emic (culture-specific) and etic (universal or culture-general) screening instruments. PMID:22470400

  5. Prostate cancer: 9. Treatment of advanced disease

    PubMed Central

    Gleave, M E; Bruchovsky, N; Moore, M J; Venner, P

    1999-01-01

    A 70-year-old man is referred to a urologist for recommendations on the management of metastatic prostate cancer. His cancer was diagnosed 5 years ago, and he underwent radical prostatectomy at that time. The tumour was confined to the prostate gland (Gleason score 7), and during surgery the lymph nodes were assessed as being clear of cancer. Before the surgery, the patient's prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level had been 8 ng/mL. After the prostatectomy, PSA was at first undetectable, but recently the PSA level rose to 2 ng/mL and then, at the most recent test, to 16 ng/mL. A bone scan was ordered to investigate back discomfort, which has been persistent but easily controlled with acetaminophen. Unfortunately, the bone scan shows several sites of metastatic disease. The man's medical history includes type 2 diabetes, which has developed during the past 3 years and which is controlled by diet, as well as asymptomatic hypertension, which is managed by means of a thiazide diuretic. The patient asks what treatments are available, what impact they are likely to have on his disease and what risks are associated with the therapies. PMID:9951446

  6. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: Part II

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Chopra, Angeli; Clandinin, Michael Tom; Freeman, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all areas of gastroenterology and hepatology, in 2009 and 2010 there were many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases. Over 1000 publications were reviewed, and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered. In Part II we review six topics: absorption, short bowel syndrome, smooth muscle function and intestinal motility, tumors, diagnostic imaging, and cystic fibrosis. PMID:22807605

  7. Two-stage, low noise advanced technology fan. 5: Acoustic final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofrin, T. G.; Riloff, N., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The NASA Q2S(quiet two-stage) fan is a 0.836m (32.9 in.) diameter model of the STF 433 engine fan, selected in a 1972 study for an Advanced Technology Transport (ATT) airplane. Noise-control features include: low tip speed, moderate stage pressure rise, large blade-vane spacings, no inlet guide vanes, and optimum blade and vane numbers. Tests were run on the baseline Q2S fan with standard inlet and discharge ducts. Further tests were made of a translating centerbody sonic inlet device and treated discharge ducts. Results were scaled to JT8D and JT3D engine fan size for comparison with current two-stage fans, and were also scaled to STF 433 fan size to compare calculated ATT flyover noise with FAR 36 limits. Baseline Q2S results scaled to JT8D and JT3D engine fan sizes showed substantial noise reductions. Calculated unsuppressed baseline ATT flyovers averaged about 2.5 EPNdB below FAR 36 limits. Using measured sonic inlet results, scaled baseline Q2S fan results, and calculated attenuations for a 1975 technology duct liner, projected flyover noise calculations for the ATT averaged about FAR 36 limits minus 10 EPNdB. Advances in suppression technology required to meet the 1985 goal of FAR 36 limits minus 20 EPNdB are discussed.

  8. Advances in environmental and occupational respiratory disease in 2010.

    PubMed

    Peden, David B; Bush, Robert K

    2011-03-01

    2010 Found a number of significant advances in environmental and occupational respiratory disease. The role of sensitization and the subsequent production of allergic disease have been explored. New allergens and their T- and B-cell epitopes have been characterized. Novel approaches to the diagnosis and evaluation of food allergy have been described. The role of pollutants as they affect respiratory disease and the effects of age extremes on sensitization and asthma have been addressed. Significant advances in the understanding of inflammatory changes in both the upper and lower respiratory systems occurred. Novel therapeutic approaches have been explored, including the development of hypoallergens from improved molecular biology techniques. New effective approaches to asthma therapy have been identified. Exposure reduction through air filtration and novel immunotherapy approaches, such as sublingual therapy, have made significant advances.

  9. New NIA Booklet By and For People With Early-Stage Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Booklet By and For People With Early-Stage Alzheimer's Disease Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... you have a family member or friends with Alzheimer's disease? Are you wondering what they're going through ...

  10. Impact of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography staging in newly diagnosed classical Hodgkin lymphoma: fewer cases with stage I disease and more with skeletal involvement.

    PubMed

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Hutchings, Martin; Mylam, Karen Juul; Brown, Peter de Nully; Bukh, Anne; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Kamper, Peter; Loft, Annika; Iyer, Victor; Gormsen, Lars Christian; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg; Bøgsted, Martin; d'Amore, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/ computed tomography (PET/CT) is a highly accurate staging method in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). We retrospectively compared the staging results obtained in two large cohorts of patients with cHL diagnosed before (n = 324) and after (n = 406) the introduction of PET/CT staging in a retrospective study. In PET/CT staged patients, stage I disease was less frequent (16% vs. 27%, p < 0.001) while stage IV disease was more frequent (17% vs. 10%, p = 0.02). Imaging-detected skeletal involvement was recognized more often in PET/CT staged patients (17% vs. 2%, p < 0.001), and the presence of focal skeletal PET/CT lesions was associated with higher risk of progression (hazard ratio [HR] 1.96, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14-3.36). The German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) risk classification (early, intermediate, advanced disease) predicted outcome in PET/CT staged patients. In conclusion, PET/CT led to higher disease stages, and the more frequently diagnosed skeletal lesions may be an adverse prognostic factor.

  11. Role of Bone Biopsy in Stages 3 to 4 Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sprague, Stuart M.

    2008-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism develops relatively early in chronic kidney disease as a consequence of impaired phosphate, calcium, and vitamin D homeostasis. The disease state in chronic kidney disease, which includes the histologic features of bone disease, defined as renal osteodystrophy, and the hormonal and biochemical disturbances, have recently been redefined as a disease syndrome and is referred to as “chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder.” As chronic kidney disease progresses, specific histologic disturbances in the bone develop, which may or may not be predictable from the biochemical and hormonal changes that are associated with chronic kidney disease. In addition, patients may have had underlying bone disease before developing kidney failure or may have been treated with agents that will alter the classical pathologic findings of the bones in chronic kidney disease and their relation to parathyroid hormone. Thus, in stage 5 chronic kidney disease, bone biopsy with quantitative histomorphometric analysis is considered the gold standard in the diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy. In contrast to stage 5 chronic kidney disease, there are very few data on the histologic changes in bone in earlier stages of chronic kidney disease. There also is no adequate information on the etiopathogenesis of bone disease in stages 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease. Thus, because biochemical data cannot predict bone pathology in stages 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease, bone biopsy should be used to define these bone changes and to allow appropriate therapeutic approaches. PMID:18988703

  12. Alzheimer's disease: recent advances and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ubhi, Kiren; Masliah, Eliezer

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory deficits and other cognitive disturbances. Neuropathologically, AD is characterized by the progressive loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons that innervate the hippocampus and cortex and the abnormal extracellular accumulation of amyloid-β and intracellular tau protein. Current research on AD is focused on the mechanisms underlying the abnormal oligomerization, fibrillation, and accumulation of the amyloid-β and tau proteins, mechanisms that may alter the dynamics of this accumulation and on experimental therapeutics approaches aimed at the clearance of the abnormally folded proteins and other potentially neuroprotective interventions. This review will summarize the main areas of investigation in AD and present ways forward for future work.

  13. Kidney disease in children: latest advances and remaining challenges.

    PubMed

    Bertram, John F; Goldstein, Stuart L; Pape, Lars; Schaefer, Franz; Shroff, Rukshana C; Warady, Bradley A

    2016-03-01

    To mark World Kidney Day 2016, Nature Reviews Nephrology invited six leading researchers to highlight the key advances and challenges within their specialist field of paediatric nephrology. Here, advances and remaining challenges in the fields of prenatal patterning, acute kidney injury, renal transplantation, genetics, cardiovascular health, and growth and nutrition, are all discussed within the context of paediatric and neonatal patients with kidney disease. Our global panel of researchers describe areas in which further studies and clinical advances are needed, and suggest ways in which research in these areas should progress to optimize renal care and long-term outcomes for affected patients.

  14. Hypercalcemia of advanced chronic liver disease: a forgotten clinical entity!

    PubMed

    Kuchay, Mohammad Shafi; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Farooqui, Khalid Jamal; Bansal, Beena; Wasir, Jasjeet Singh; Mithal, Ambrish

    2016-01-01

    Hypercalcemia caused by advanced chronic liver disease (CLD) without hepatic neoplasia is uncommonly reported and poorly understood condition. We are reporting two cases of advanced CLD who developed hypercalcemia in the course of the disease. This diagnosis of exclusion was made only after meticulous ruling out of all causes of hypercalcemia. The unique feature of this type of hypercalcemia is its transient nature that may or may not require treatment. This clinical condition in patients with CLD should be kept in mind while evaluating the cause of hypercalcemia in them.

  15. Hypercalcemia of advanced chronic liver disease: a forgotten clinical entity!

    PubMed Central

    Kuchay, Mohammad Shafi; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Farooqui, Khalid Jamal; Bansal, Beena; Wasir, Jasjeet Singh; Mithal, Ambrish

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hypercalcemia caused by advanced chronic liver disease (CLD) without hepatic neoplasia is uncommonly reported and poorly understood condition. We are reporting two cases of advanced CLD who developed hypercalcemia in the course of the disease. This diagnosis of exclusion was made only after meticulous ruling out of all causes of hypercalcemia. The unique feature of this type of hypercalcemia is its transient nature that may or may not require treatment. This clinical condition in patients with CLD should be kept in mind while evaluating the cause of hypercalcemia in them. PMID:27252737

  16. IgA nephropathy factors that predict and accelerate progression to end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lan; Guo, Feng-Ling; Zhou, Jin; Zhao, Ya-Juan

    2014-04-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) or Berger's disease is a slowly progressing disease that leads to end-stage renal disease in 50 % of the patients within 25 years of the disease. However, several factors are associated with the accelerated progression of this disease causing early development of end-stage disease. Persistent proteinuria or hematuria, poorly controlled hypertension, elevated serum creatinine and prevalent glomerulosclerosis are some of the risk factors that expedite the deteriorative effects of IgAN. Thus, the progression of the disease can be delayed if the associated risk factors are handled and addressed in the nick of time.

  17. Glucocerebrosidase and Parkinson disease: Recent advances.

    PubMed

    Schapira, Anthony H V

    2015-05-01

    Mutations of the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene are the most important risk factor yet discovered for Parkinson disease (PD). Homozygous GBA mutations result in Gaucher disease (GD), a lysosomal storage disorder. Heterozygous mutations have not until recently been thought to be associated with any pathological process. However, it is clear that the presence of a GBA mutation in homozygous or heterozygous form is associated with an approximately 20-fold increase in the risk for PD, with little if any difference in risk burden related to gene dose. Most studies suggest that 5-10% of PD patients have GBA mutations, although this figure is greater in the Ashkenazi population and may be an underestimate overall if the entire exome is not sequenced. GBA-associated PD is clinically indistinguishable from idiopathic PD, except for slightly earlier age of onset and a greater frequency of cognitive impairment. Pathological and imaging features, and response to pharmacotherapy are identical to idiopathic PD. GBA mutations result in reduced enzyme activity and mutant protein may become trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) leading to unfolded protein response and ER associated degradation and stress. Both mechanisms may be relevant in GD and PD pathogenesis and lead to impaired lysosomal function. Of particular relevance to PD is the interaction of glucocerebrosidase enzyme (GCase) with alpha-synuclein (SNCA). There appears to be a bi-directional reciprocal relationship between GCase levels and those of SNCA. Thus reduced GCase in GBA mutation PD brain is associated with increased SNCA, and increased SNCA deposition is associated with reduced GCase even in GBA wild-type PD brains. It is noteworthy that GBA mutations are also associated with an increase in risk for dementia with Lewy bodies, another synucleinopathy. It has been suggested that the relationship between GCase and SNCA may be leveraged to reduce SNCA levels in PD by enhancing GCase levels and activity. This

  18. Increased level of Hsp90-beta in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid correlates with lymphatic invasion and advanced stage of lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Biaoxue; Cai, Xiguang; Liu, Hua; Fu, Tian; Gao, Wenlong; Zhao, Chongchong; Lin, Yurong

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this work is to explore the correlation between Hsp90-beta level in broncheoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung cancer. Methods: Hsp90-beta level was measured by immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Sensitivity and specificity of Hsp90-beta were calculated by receiver operator characteristic curve. Results: BALF in patients with lung cancer showed a higher expression of Hsp90-beta than those with benign lung disease (P<0.05). Elevated Hsp90-beta was closely related to lymphatic invasion and advanced stage of patients with lung cancer (P<0.05). The sensitivity of BALF Hsp90-beta for discerning lung cancer from patients with benign disease was 82.56% and specificity was 97.56%. Conclusion: Increased BALF Hsp90-beta correlates with lymphatic invasion and advanced stage of patients with lung cancer, suggesting it could be a diagnostic indicator for patients with lung cancer. PMID:27829999

  19. Dynamics of Sleep Stage Transitions in Health and Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishi, Akifumi; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Natelson, Benjamin H.; Togo, Fumiharu; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2007-07-01

    Sleep dynamics emerges from complex interactions between neuronal populations in many brain regions. Annotated sleep stages from electroencephalography (EEG) recordings could potentially provide a non-invasive way to obtain valuable insights into the mechanisms of these interactions, and ultimately into the very nature of sleep regulation. However, to date, sleep stage analysis has been restricted, only very recently expanding the scope of the traditional descriptive statistics to more dynamical concepts of the duration of and transitions between vigilance states and temporal evaluation of transition probabilities among different stages. Physiological and/or pathological implications of the dynamics of sleep stage transitions have, to date, not been investigated. Here, we study detailed duration and transition statistics among sleep stages in healthy humans and patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, known to be associated with disturbed sleep. We find that the durations of waking and non-REM sleep, in particular deep sleep (Stages III and IV), during the nighttime, follow a power-law probability distribution function, while REM sleep durations follow an exponential function, suggestive of complex underlying mechanisms governing the onset of light sleep. We also find a substantial number of REM to non-REM transitions in humans, while this transition is reported to be virtually non-existent in rats. Interestingly, the probability of this REM to non-REM transition is significantly lower in the patients than in controls, resulting in a significantly greater REM to awake, together with Stage I to awake, transition probability. This might potentially account for the reported poor sleep quality in the patients because the normal continuation of sleep after either the lightest or REM sleep is disrupted. We conclude that the dynamical transition analysis of sleep stages is useful for elucidating yet-to-be-determined human sleep regulation mechanisms with a

  20. A Two Stage Solution Procedure for Production Planning System with Advance Demand Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Nobuyuki; Kadomoto, Kiyotaka; Hasuike, Takashi; Okuhara, Koji

    We model for ‘Naiji System’ which is a unique corporation technique between a manufacturer and suppliers in Japan. We propose a two stage solution procedure for a production planning problem with advance demand information, which is called ‘Naiji’. Under demand uncertainty, this model is formulated as a nonlinear stochastic programming problem which minimizes the sum of production cost and inventory holding cost subject to a probabilistic constraint and some linear production constraints. By the convexity and the special structure of correlation matrix in the problem where inventory for different periods is not independent, we propose a solution procedure with two stages which are named Mass Customization Production Planning & Management System (MCPS) and Variable Mesh Neighborhood Search (VMNS) based on meta-heuristics. It is shown that the proposed solution procedure is available to get a near optimal solution efficiently and practical for making a good master production schedule in the suppliers.

  1. Comparison of weight changes following unilateral and staged bilateral STN DBS for advanced PD.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric M; Kurundkar, Ashish; Cutter, Gary R; Huang, He; Guthrie, Barton L; Watts, Ray L; Walker, Harrison C

    2011-09-01

    Unilateral and bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) result in weight gain in the initial postoperative months, but little is known about the changes in weight following unilateral and staged bilateral STN DBS over longer time intervals. A case-control comparison evaluated weight changes over 2 years in 43 consecutive unilateral STN DBS patients, among whom 25 elected to undergo staged bilateral STN DBS, and 21 age-matched and disease severity matched PD controls without DBS. Regression analyses incorporating age, gender, and baseline weight in case or control were conducted to assess weight changes 2 years after the initial unilateral surgery. Unilateral STN DBS and staged bilateral STN DBS patients gained 3.9 ± 2.0 kg and 5.6 ± 2.1 kg versus their preoperative baseline weight (P < 0.001, respectively) while PD controls without DBS lost 0.8 ± 1.1 kg. Although bilateral STN DBS patients gained 1.7 kg more than unilateral STN DBS patients at 2 years, this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.885). Although there was a trend toward greater weight gain in staged bilateral STN DBS patients versus unilateral patients, we found no evidence for an equivalent or synergistic increase in body weight following placement of the second DBS electrode.

  2. Molecular targeted therapy in the treatment of advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    PubMed

    Kumarakulasinghe, Nesaretnam Barr; van Zanwijk, Nico; Soo, Ross A

    2015-04-01

    Historically, patients with advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were treated with chemotherapy alone, but a therapeutic plateau has been reached. Advances in the understanding of molecular genetics have led to the recognition of multiple molecularly distinct subsets of NSCLC. This in turn has led to the development of rationally directed molecular targeted therapy, leading to improved clinical outcomes. Tumour genotyping for EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangement has meant chemotherapy is no longer given automatically as first-line treatment but reserved for when patients do not have a 'druggable' driver oncogene. In this review, we will address the current status of clinically relevant driver mutations and emerging new molecular subsets in lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, and the role of targeted therapy and mechanisms of acquired resistance to targeted therapy.

  3. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation in Early Stage Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Charles, David; Konrad, Peter E.; Neimat, Joseph S.; Molinari, Anna L.; Tramontana, Michael G.; Finder, Stuart G.; Gill, Chandler E.; Bliton, Mark J.; Kao, Chris C.; Phibbs, Fenna T.; Hedera, Peter; Salomon, Ronald M.; Cannard, Kevin R.; Wang, Lily; Song, Yanna; Davis, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective and approved therapy for advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD), and a recent study suggests efficacy in mid-stage disease. This manuscript reports the results of a pilot trial investigating preliminary safety and tolerability of DBS in early PD. Methods Thirty subjects with idiopathic PD (Hoehn & Yahr Stage II off medication), age 50–75, on medication ≥ 6 months but < 4 years, and without motor fluctuations or dyskinesias were randomized to optimal drug therapy (ODT) (n=15) or DBS+ODT (n=15). Co-primary endpoints were the time to reach a 4-point worsening from baseline in the UPDRS-III off therapy and the change in levodopa equivalent daily dose from baseline to 24 months. Results As hypothesized, the mean UPDRS total and part III scores were not significantly different on or off therapy at 24 months. The DBS+ODT group took less medication at all time points, and this reached maximum difference at 18 months. With a few exceptions, differences in neuropsychological functioning were not significant. Two subjects in the DBS+ODT group suffered serious adverse events; remaining adverse events were mild or transient. Conclusions This study demonstrates that subjects with early stage PD will enroll in and complete trials testing invasive therapies and provides preliminary evidence that DBS is well tolerated in early PD. The results of this trial provide the data necessary to design a large, phase III, double-blind, multicenter trial investigating the safety and efficacy of DBS in early PD. PMID:24768120

  4. Microscopic Haematuria and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Stage 3-5 Nondiabetic Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    You-Hsien Lin, Hugo; Yen, Chun-Yu; Lim, Lee-Moay; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Tsai, Jer-Chia; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Hung, Chi-Chih; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2015-10-16

    Microscopic haematuria is proposed as a prognostic factor for renal outcomes in patients with glomerulonephritis. However, the role of haematuria in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) or heavy proteinuria has not been investigated. We divided 1799 patients with stage 3-5 nondiabetic CKD into 3 groups according to the results from 3 urinalyses: no haematuria (0-2 red blood cells [RBCs]/hpf ≥2 times), mild haematuria (2-5 RBCs/hpf ≥2 times) and moderate haematuria (≥5-10 RBCs/hpf ≥2 times). The estimated glomerular filtration rate was 25.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2), with a urine protein-to-creatinine ratio (UPCR) of 881 mg/g. The hazard ratios (HRs) of mild and moderate haematuria for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were 1.28 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-1.56, P = 0.024) and 1.34 (95% CI: 1.03-1.74, P = 0.030), respectively. The HR of moderate haematuria for mortality was 1.56 (95% CI: 1.11-2.20, P = 0.011). According to subgroup analysis, the HR of moderate haematuria for ESRD in patients with a UPCR of <500 mg/g was more prominent than that in patients with a UPCR of ≥500 mg/g. Microscopic haematuria in patients with stage 3-5 nondiabetic CKD is associated with increased risks of ESRD and mortality.

  5. Long-Term Results of Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Advanced N2-3 Stage Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Chen, Meng; Wu, Jing; Xu, Jian-Hua; Qian, Pu-Dong; Guo, Wen-Jie; Jiang, Xue-Song; Zhu, Huan-Feng; Gu, Jia-Jia; Wu, Jian-Feng; Zhang, Ye-wei; He, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Background N-stage is related to distant metastasis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of different nedaplatin-based chemotherapy regimens in advanced N2-3 stage NPC patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Patients and Methods Between April 2005 and December 2009, a total of 128 patients with N2-3 advanced NPC were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were treated with IMRT concurrent with 2 cycles of chemotherapy consisting of either nedaplatin plus paclitaxel (NP group, n = 67) or nedaplatin plus fluorouracil and paclitaxel (NFP group, n = 61). Two to four cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy were then administered every 21 days following concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Results With a median follow-up of 60 months, the 5-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local-regional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) for all patients were 81.4%, 71.5%, 87.8% and 82.0%, respectively. No significant difference in PFS (66.6% vs. 76.7%, P = 0.212) and LRRFS rates (89.0% vs. 86.3%, P = 0.664) was observed between the NP and NFP groups. The 5-year OS (75.4% vs. 88.5%, P = 0.046) and DMFS (75.1% vs. 89.0%, P = 0.042) rate were superior in the NFP group compared with the NP group. The NFP group had a higher incidence of grade 3–4 acute toxicities including bone marrow suppression (leukopenia: χ2 = 3.935, P = 0.047; anemia: χ2 = 9.760, P = 0.002; thrombocytopenia: χ2 = 8.821, P = 0.003), and both liver and renal dysfunction (χ2 = 5.206, P = 0.023) compared with the NP group. Late toxicities were moderate and no difference was observed between the two groups. Conclusion IMRT concurrent with nedaplatin-based chemotherapy is an advocated regimen for patients with advanced N2-3 stage NPC. Patients with advanced N2-3 stage may be better candidates for the NFP regimen although this regimen was associated with a high acute

  6. 77 FR 34047 - Medicare Program; Proposal Evaluation Criteria and Standards for End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... and Standards for End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Network Organizations AGENCY: Centers for Medicare... procedures we will use to evaluate an End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Network Organization's capabilities to perform, and actual performance of, the duties and functions under the ESRD Network Statement of Work...

  7. Image Guided Hypofractionated 3-Dimensional Radiation Therapy in Patients With Inoperable Advanced Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Osti, Mattia Falchetto; Agolli, Linda; Valeriani, Maurizio; Falco, Teresa; Bracci, Stefano; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (HypoRT) can potentially improve local control with a higher biological effect and shorter overall treatment time. Response, local control, toxicity rates, and survival rates were evaluated in patients affected by inoperable advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received HypoRT. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled; 27% had stage IIIA, 50% had stage IIIB, and 23% had stage IV disease. All patients underwent HypoRT with a prescribed total dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions of 3 Gy each. Radiation treatment was delivered using an image guided radiation therapy technique to verify correct position. Toxicities were graded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity score. Survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up was 13 months (range, 4-56 months). All patients completed radiation therapy and received the total dose of 60 Gy to the primary tumor and positive lymph nodes. The overall response rate after radiation therapy was 83% (3 patients with complete response and 22 patients with partial response). The 2-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 38.1% and 36%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence/persistence occurred in 11 (37%) patients. Distant metastasis occurred in 17 (57%) patients. Acute toxicities occurred consisting of grade 1 to 2 hematological toxicity in 5 patients (17%) and grade 3 in 1 patient; grade 1 to 2 esophagitis in 12 patients (40%) and grade 3 in 1 patient; and grade 1 to 2 pneumonitis in 6 patients (20%) and grade 3 in 2 patients (7%). Thirty-three percent of patients developed grade 1 to 2 late toxicities. Only 3 patients developed grade 3 late adverse effects: esophagitis in 1 patient and pneumonitis in 2 patients. Conclusions: Hypofractionated curative radiation therapy is a feasible and well-tolerated treatment for patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Randomized

  8. Metabolomics provide new insights on lung cancer staging and discrimination from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Deja, Stanislaw; Porebska, Irena; Kowal, Aneta; Zabek, Adam; Barg, Wojciech; Pawelczyk, Konrad; Stanimirova, Ivana; Daszykowski, Michal; Korzeniewska, Anna; Jankowska, Renata; Mlynarz, Piotr

    2014-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are widespread lung diseases. Cigarette smoking is a high risk factor for both the diseases. COPD may increase the risk of developing lung cancer. Thus, it is crucial to be able to distinguish between these two pathological states, especially considering the early stages of lung cancer. Novel diagnostic and monitoring tools are required to properly determine lung cancer progression because this information directly impacts the type of the treatment prescribed. In this study, serum samples collected from 22 COPD and 77 lung cancer (TNM stages I, II, III, and IV) patients were analyzed. Then, a collection of NMR metabolic fingerprints was modeled using discriminant orthogonal partial least squares regression (OPLS-DA) and further interpreted by univariate statistics. The constructed discriminant models helped to successfully distinguish between the metabolic fingerprints of COPD and lung cancer patients (AUC training=0.972, AUC test=0.993), COPD and early lung cancer patients (AUC training=1.000, AUC test=1.000), and COPD and advanced lung cancer patients (AUC training=0.983, AUC test=1.000). Decreased acetate, citrate, and methanol levels together with the increased N-acetylated glycoproteins, leucine, lysine, mannose, choline, and lipid (CH3-(CH2)n-) levels were observed in all lung cancer patients compared with the COPD group. The evaluation of lung cancer progression was also successful using OPLS-DA (AUC training=0.811, AUC test=0.904). Based on the results, the following metabolite biomarkers may prove useful in distinguishing lung cancer states: isoleucine, acetoacetate, and creatine as well as the two NMR signals of N-acetylated glycoproteins and glycerol.

  9. End-Stage Kidney Disease After Pediatric Nonrenal Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Peter P.; Denburg, Michelle R.; Abt, Peter L.; Furth, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Adult solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients commonly develop advanced kidney disease; however, the burden of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) in children after SOT is not well-described. The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence of ESKD after pediatric SOT and the relative risk by SOT type. METHODS: Retrospective multicenter cohort study of children, ages ≤18 years, who received SOTs from 1990 through 2010 using Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients data linked to the US Renal Data System. We performed a competing risks analysis to determine cumulative incidence of ESKD (chronic dialysis or kidney transplant), treating death as a competing risk, and fit a multivariable Cox regression model to assess hazard of ESKD by organ type. RESULTS: The cohort included 16 604 pediatric SOT recipients (54% liver, 34% heart, 6% lung, 6% intestine, and 1% heart–lung). During a median follow-up of 6.2 years (interquartile range 2.2–12.1), 426 (3%) children developed ESKD. Compared with liver transplant recipients, in whom the incidence of ESKD was 2.1 cases per 1000 person-years, in adjusted analyses the highest risk of ESKD was among intestinal (hazard ratio [HR] 7.37, P < .001), followed by lung (HR 5.79, P < .001) and heart transplant recipients (HR 1.79, P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: In a 20-year national cohort of pediatric SOT recipients, the risk of ESKD was highest among intestinal and lung transplant recipients. The burden of earlier stages of chronic kidney disease is probably much higher; modifiable risk factors should be targeted to prevent progressive kidney damage in this high-risk population. PMID:24127468

  10. Oral cancer treatment costs in Greece and the effect of advanced disease

    PubMed Central

    Zavras, Athanasios; Andreopoulos, Nikos; Katsikeris, Nikos; Zavras, Dimitrios; Cartsos, Vassiliki; Vamvakidis, Athanasios

    2002-01-01

    Background The main purpose of the study was to quantify the direct costs of oral cancer treatment to the healthcare system of Greece. Another aim was to identify factors that affect costs and potential cost reduction items. More specifically, we examined the relationship between stage of disease, modality of treatment and total direct costs. Methods The medical records and clinic files of the Oral and Maxillofacial Clinic of the Athens General Hospital "Genimatas" were abstracted to investigate clinical treatment characteristics, including length of hospitalization, modes of treatment, stage of disease etc. Records of 95 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSSC), with at least six months of follow-up, were examined. The clinical data was then used to calculate actual direct costs, based on 2001 market values. Results The mean total direct costs for OSSC treatment estimated at euro 8,450 or approximately US$ 7,450. Costs depended on the stage of the disease, with significant increases in stages III and IV, as compared with stages I and II (p < 0.05). Multi-modality treatment applied mainly to patients in stages III and IV was the factor that affected the cost. Disease stage was also associated with the total duration of hospitalization (p < 0.05). Conclusions The clinical management of advanced oral cancer is strongly associated with higher costs. Although the ideal would be to prevent cancer, the combination of high-risk screening, early diagnosis and early treatment seems the most efficient way to reduce costs, and most importantly, prolong life. PMID:12133170

  11. Task-set switching deficits in early-stage Huntington's disease: implications for basal ganglia function.

    PubMed

    Aron, Adam R; Watkins, Laura; Sahakian, Barbara J; Monsell, Stephen; Barker, Roger A; Robbins, Trevor W

    2003-07-01

    Executive functions are likely mediated by interconnected circuits including frontal lobe and basal ganglia structures. We assessed the executive function of task switching in patients with early-stage Huntington's disease (HD), a neurodegenerative disease affecting the basal ganglia. In two experiments, the HD patients had greater difficulty when switching than when repeating a task than matched controls, and this was true even when scaling for the overall slowing of the patients. In the first experiment, HD patients had a switching deficit even in a "pure" condition where they had to switch, predictably, and with substantial preparation time, between stimuli having only one possible response, indicating a switching deficit different from that for patients with Parkinson's disease or frontal lobe trauma, and possibly relating to inadequate activation of stimulus-response links or "response set." In the more elaborate second experiment, we could not account for the switching deficit of the patients in terms of inadequate preparation in advance of a switch, deficient suppression of task-set processing from the preswitch trial, or impaired suppression of interference due to the presence of a competing task set. Instead, we found that part of the switching deficit was due to elevated reaction time and errors on switch trials for a repeated response (same button press as on preswitch trial) relative to an alternated response (different button press from preswitch trial). We argue that this elevated "repetition effect" for the HD patients is due to excessive inhibition of the just-performed response in advance of a switch. Alterations in the "response-setting" process alone (Experiment 1) and both the response-setting and "response inhibition" process (Experiment 2) probably arise from striatal pathology in HD, thus accounting for the task-switching deficits and showing how basal ganglia implemented response processes may underpin executive function.

  12. [Recent advances in immunologic laboratory testing for rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Akahoshi, Tohru

    2004-09-01

    Immunologic laboratory tests serve critical roles in the care of patients with various rheumatic diseases. These tests can provide relevant information of rheumatic diseases based on their immunopathophysiological condition. Although immunologic laboratory tests are quite useful for the determination of diagnosis and the estimation of disease activity, organ involvement and prognosis, they are frequently misused and resulted in an inappropriate diagnosis and treatment. Appropriate use of immunologic laboratory tests and accurate clinical interpretation of the test results can prevent false diagnosis and unnecessary treatment. In order to improve clinical care of patients with rheumatic diseases, clinicians caring patients with rheumatic disease should recognize meanings, characteristics and limitations of each result of immunologic laboratory testing. This article reviewed recent advances in immunologic laboratory testing such as antinuclear antibody, anti-DNA antibody and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, and introduced guidelines for these testing. These guidelines based on evidences of EBM may contribute to the appropriate use of immunologic laboratory tests for rheumatic diseases.

  13. Modified approach for extraperitoneal laparoscopic staging for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Gil-Moreno, A; Maffuz, A; Díaz-Feijoo, B; Puig, O; Martínez-Palones, J M; Pérez, A; García, A; Xercavins, J

    2007-12-01

    Describe a modified approach to the technique for staging laparoscopic extraperitoneal aortic and common iliac lymph node dissection for locally advanced cervical cancer.Retrospective, nonrandomized clinical study. (Canadian Task Force classification II-2), setting in an acute-care, teaching hospital. Thirty-six patients with locally advanced cervical cancer underwent laparoscopic surgical staging via extraperitoneal approach with the conventional or the modified technique from August 2001 through September 2004. Clinical outcomes in 23 patients who were operated on with the conventional technique using index finger for first trocar entrance; 12 patients with the modified technique using direct trocar entrance, were compared. One patient was excluded due to peritoneal carcinomatosis. Technique, baseline characteristics, histopathologic variables and surgical outcome were measured. There were no significant differences in patients basal characteristics on comparative analysis between conventional and modified technique. With our proposed modified technique, we obtained a reduced surgical procedure duration and blood loss. The proposed modified surgical technique offers some advantages, is an easier approach because the parietal pelvic peritoneum is elastic and this helps to avoid its disruption at time of trocar insertion, size of incision is shorter, we achieved no CO2 leak through the trocar orifice, and wound suture is fast and simple.

  14. Emerging and Neglected Infectious Diseases: Insights, Advances, and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Infectious diseases are a significant burden on public health and economic stability of societies all over the world. They have for centuries been among the leading causes of death and disability and presented growing challenges to health security and human progress. The threat posed by infectious diseases is further deepened by the continued emergence of new, unrecognized, and old infectious disease epidemics of global impact. Over the past three and half decades at least 30 new infectious agents affecting humans have emerged, most of which are zoonotic and their origins have been shown to correlate significantly with socioeconomic, environmental, and ecological factors. As these factors continue to increase, putting people in increased contact with the disease causing pathogens, there is concern that infectious diseases may continue to present a formidable challenge. Constant awareness and pursuance of effective strategies for controlling infectious diseases and disease emergence thus remain crucial. This review presents current updates on emerging and neglected infectious diseases and highlights the scope, dynamics, and advances in infectious disease management with particular focus on WHO top priority emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) and neglected tropical infectious diseases. PMID:28286767

  15. Loss-of-heterozygosity on chromosome 19q in early-stage serous ovarian cancer is associated with recurrent disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease and prognosis for apparently similar cases of ovarian cancer varies. Recurrence of the disease in early stage (FIGO-stages I-II) serous ovarian cancer results in survival that is comparable to those with recurrent advanced-stage disease. The aim of this study was to investigate if there are specific genomic aberrations that may explain recurrence and clinical outcome. Methods Fifty-one women with early stage serous ovarian cancer were included in the study. DNA was extracted from formalin fixed samples containing tumor cells from ovarian tumors. Tumor samples from thirty-seven patients were analysed for allele-specific copy numbers using OncoScan single nucleotide polymorphism arrays from Affymetrix and the bioinformatic tool Tumor Aberration Prediction Suite. Genomic gains, losses, and loss-of-heterozygosity that associated with recurrent disease were identified. Results The most significant differences (p < 0.01) in Loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) were identified in two relatively small regions of chromosome 19; 8.0-8,8 Mbp (19 genes) and 51.5-53.0 Mbp (37 genes). Thus, 56 genes on chromosome 19 were potential candidate genes associated with clinical outcome. LOH at 19q (51-56 Mbp) was associated with shorter disease-free survival and was an independent prognostic factor for survival in a multivariate Cox regression analysis. In particular LOH on chromosome 19q (51-56 Mbp) was significantly (p < 0.01) associated with loss of TP53 function. Conclusions The results of our study indicate that presence of two aberrations in TP53 on 17p and LOH on 19q in early stage serous ovarian cancer is associated with recurrent disease. Further studies related to the findings of chromosomes 17 and 19 are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanism behind the recurring genomic aberrations and the poor clinical outcome. PMID:22967087

  16. Survival analysis of patients with advanced-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma according to the Epstein-Barr virus status

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Rui; Li, Wen-Fei; Mao, Yan-Ping; Tan, Ling-Long; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Li-Zhi; Tian, Li; Lin, Ai-Hua; Ma, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The main aim of this study is to analyze the prognostic differences in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients who are positive and negative for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Results Of the 1106 patients, 248 (22.4%) had undetectable pre-treatment plasma EBV DNA levels. The total distant metastasis rate for EBV-negative group vs. EBV-positive group were 3.6% (9/248) vs. 15.0% (128/858) (P < 0.001). The estimated 4-year disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and locoregional relapse-free survival (LRRFS) for EBV-negative group vs. EBV-positive group were 88.9% vs. 76.9% (P < 0.001), 93.6% vs. 85.9% (P = 0.001), 96.7% vs. 84.8% (P < 0.001) and 94.1% vs. 90.0% (P = 0.1), respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that the EBV status was an independent prognostic factor for DFS (HR, 1.813; 95% CI, 1.219-2.695; P = 0.003), OS (HR, 1.828; 95% CI, 1.075-3.107; P = 0.026) and DMFS (HR, 3.678; 95% CI, 1.859-7.277; P <0.001), and overall stage still remained the most important prognostic factor in patients with stage III-IVB NPC. Methods and Materials Data on 1106 patients with non-metastatic, histologically proven advanced-stage (III-IVB) NPC who underwent intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were retrospectively reviewed. Patient survival between different EBV status groups were compared. Conclusions EBV status was an independent prognostic factor for patients with stage III–IVB NPC. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) plus concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) should be better treatment regimen for EBV-positive patients since distant metastasis was the main failure pattern, and CCRT may be enough for EBV-negative patients. PMID:27008701

  17. Up-regulation of the Kv3.4 potassium channel subunit in early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Ester; Noé, Véronique; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Gomez-Isla, Teresa; Lluis, Carmen; Ferrer, Isidre; Ciudad, Carlos J; Franco, Rafael

    2004-11-01

    Gene expression throughout the different stages of Alzheimer's disease was analysed in samples from cerebral cortex. The gene encoding the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv3.4 was already overexpressed in early stages of the disease, and in advanced stages Kv3.4 was present at high levels in neurodegenerative structures. This subunit regulates delayed-rectifier currents, which are primary determinants of spike repolarization in neurones. In unique samples from a patient with Alzheimer's disease whose amount of amyloid plaques was decreased by beta amyloid immunization, Kv3.4 was overexpressed. The channel subunit was expressed in the neuropil, in the remaining conventional plaques in the frontal cortex and in collapsed plaques in the orbitary cortex. Therefore, amyloid deposition in plaques does not seem to be responsible for the increase in Kv3.4 levels. Nevertheless, Kv3.4 up-regulation is related to amyloid pathology, given that transgenic mice with the Swedish mutation of amyloid precursor protein showed increased expression of Kv3.4. Up-regulation of voltage-gated potassium channel subunits alters potassium currents in neurones and leads to altered synaptic activity that may underlie the neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer's disease. Thus, Kv3.4 likely represents a novel therapeutic target for the disease.

  18. Advances in environmental and occupational respiratory disease in 2007.

    PubMed

    Bush, Robert K; Peden, David

    2008-06-01

    This review of key articles appearing in the Journal in 2008 represents significant advances in the understanding of the interrelationships between the environment and allergic respiratory diseases. New allergens have been identified and characterized. Improvements in diagnostic techniques and methods to assess environmental allergen exposure have been developed. The novel therapeutics and refinements of allergen avoidance approaches will improve patient care. A fuller appreciation of the complexities of environmental factors in allergic diseases can lead to better preventative measures. Lastly, the increasingly important role of pollutants on inflammatory processes is evolving. The articles discussed will add to our increasing knowledge base and advance the ability to more effectively treat patients with allergic respiratory diseases and expand research opportunities.

  19. Two-stage, low noise advanced technology fan. Volume 2: Aerodynamic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harley, K. G.; Odegard, P. A.

    1975-01-01

    Aerodynamic data from static tests of a two-stage advanced technology fan designed to minimize noise are presented. Fan design conditions include delivery of 209.1kg/sec/sq m (42.85 lbm/sec/sq ft) specific corrected flow at an overall pressure ratio of 1.9 and an adiabatic efficiency of 85.3 percent. The 0.836m (2.74ft) diameter first stage rotor has a hub/tip ratio of 0.4 and 365.8m/sec (1200ft/sec) design tip speed. In addition to the moderate tip speed and pressure rise per stage, other noise control design features involve widely spaced blade rows and proper selection of blade-vane ratios. Aerodynamic data are presented for tests with unifrom and with hub and tip radially distorted inlet flow. Aerodynamic data are also presented for tests of this fan with acoustic treatments, including acoustically treated casing walls, a flowpath exit acoustic ring, and a translating centerbody sonic inlet device. A complete tabulation of the overall performance data, the blade element data, and the power spectral density information relating to turbulence levels generated by the sonic inlet obtained during these tests is included. For vol. 1, see N74-33789.

  20. Transcriptome portrait of cellulose-enriched flax fibres at advanced stage of specialization.

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, Oleg; Mokshina, Natalia; Gorshkov, Vladimir; Chemikosova, Svetlana; Gogolev, Yuri; Gorshkova, Tatyana

    2017-03-01

    Functional specialization of cells is among the most fundamental processes of higher organism ontogenesis. The major obstacle to studying this phenomenon in plants is the difficulty of isolating certain types of cells at defined stages of in planta development for in-depth analysis. A rare opportunity is given by the developed model system of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) phloem fibres that can be purified from the surrounding tissues at the stage of the tertiary cell wall deposition. The performed comparison of the whole transcriptome profile in isolated fibres and other portions of the flax stem, together with fibre metabolism characterization, helped to elucidate the general picture of the advanced stage of plant cell specialization and to reveal novel participants potentially involved in fibre metabolism regulation and cell wall formation. Down-regulation of all genes encoding proteins involved in xylan and lignin synthesis and up-regulation of genes for the specific set of transcription factors transcribed during tertiary cell wall formation were revealed. The increased abundance of transcripts for several glycosyltransferases indicated the enzymes that may be involved in synthesis of fibre-specific version of rhamnogalacturonan I.

  1. Advances in high-rate anaerobic treatment: staging of reactor systems.

    PubMed

    van Lier, J B; van der Zee, F P; Tan, N C; Rebac, S; Kleerebezem, R

    2001-01-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment (AnWT) is considered as the most cost-effective solution for organically polluted industrial waste streams. Particularly the development of high-rate systems, in which hydraulic retention times are uncoupled from solids retention times, has led to a world-wide acceptance of AnWT. In the last decade up to the present, the application potentials of AnWT are further explored. Research shows the feasibility of anaerobic reactors under extreme conditions, such as low and high temperatures. Also toxic and/or recalcitrant wastewaters, that were previously believed not to be suitable for anaerobic processes, are now effectively treated. The recent advances are made possible by adapting the conventional anaerobic high-rate concept to the more extreme conditions. Staged anaerobic reactor concepts show advantages under non-optimal temperature conditions as well as during the treatment of chemical wastewater. In other situations, a staged anaerobic-aerobic approach is required for biodegradation of specific pollutants, e.g. the removal of dyes from textile processing wastewaters. The current paper illustrates the benefits of reactor staging and the yet un-exploited potentials of high-rate AnWT.

  2. Prognostic factors of advanced stage non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ben Amar, Jihen; Ben Safta, Boutheina; Zaibi, Haifa; Dhahri, Besma; Baccar, Mohamed Ali; Azzabi, Saloua

    2016-05-01

    Background Lung cancer is the main cause of death from cancer in the world. The 5-year survival is about 15%. Despite the progress of medicine the mortality rate decreased only marginally. This poor prognosis is due to late diagnosis. Aim To evaluate overall survival and prognostic factors in patients locally advanced or metastatic non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Retrospective study including 180 patients with non-small cell lung cancer hospitalized in the department of Charles Nicolle Hospital of Tunis between January 2007 and December 2014. Results The mean age was 61.5 years with a male predominance (93.3%). The median overall survival was 6 months. The poor prognostic factors were the performans status (PS) and early delays of management (<30 days). The factors that improve survival were surgical treatment and delays of management more than 45 days.  Conclusion The prognostic factors in locally advanced and metastatic NSLC in our patient were: PS, management delay and treatment. These factors should be considered in management of patient with advanced stage NSCLC.

  3. Recent advances in metabolomics in neurological disease, and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai-hua; Sun, Hui; Wang, Xi-jun

    2013-10-01

    Discovery of clinically relevant biomarkers for diseases has revealed metabolomics has potential advantages that classical diagnostic approaches do not. The great asset of metabolomics is that it enables assessment of global metabolic profiles of biofluids and discovery of biomarkers distinguishing disease status, with the possibility of enhancing clinical diagnostics. Most current clinical chemistry tests rely on old technology, and are neither sensitive nor specific for a particular disease. Clinical diagnosis of major neurological disorders, for example Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, on the basis of current clinical criteria is unsatisfactory. Emerging metabolomics is a powerful technique for discovering novel biomarkers and biochemical pathways to improve diagnosis, and for determination of prognosis and therapy. Identifying multiple novel biomarkers for neurological diseases has been greatly enhanced with recent advances in metabolomics that are more accurate than routine clinical practice. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is known to be a rich source of small-molecule biomarkers for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases, and is in close contact with diseased areas in neurological disorders, could potentially be used for disease diagnosis. Metabolomics will drive CSF analysis, facilitate and improve the development of disease treatment, and result in great benefits to public health in the long-term. This review covers different aspects of CSF metabolomics and discusses their significance in the postgenomic era, emphasizing the potential importance of endogenous small-molecule metabolites in this emerging field.

  4. Advanced drug delivery and targeting technologies for the ocular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Barar, Jaleh; Aghanejad, Ayuob; Fathi, Marziyeh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ocular targeted therapy has enormously been advanced by implementation of new methods of drug delivery and targeting using implantable drug delivery systems (DDSs) or devices (DDDs), stimuli-responsive advanced biomaterials, multimodal nanomedicines, cell therapy modalities and medical bioMEMs. These technologies tackle several ocular diseases such as inflammation-based diseases (e.g., scleritis, keratitis, uveitis, iritis, conjunctivitis, chorioretinitis, choroiditis, retinitis, retinochoroiditis), ocular hypertension and neuropathy, age-related macular degeneration and mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Such therapies appear to provide ultimate treatments, even though much more effective, yet biocompatible, noninvasive therapies are needed to control some disabling ocular diseases/disorders. Methods: In the current study, we have reviewed and discussed recent advancements on ocular targeted therapies. Results: On the ground that the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses of ophthalmic drugs need special techniques, most of ocular DDSs/devices developments have been designed to localized therapy within the eye. Application of advanced DDSs such as Subconjunctival insert/implants (e.g., latanoprost implant, Gamunex-C), episcleral implant (e.g., LX201), cationic emulsions (e.g., Cationorm™, Vekacia™, Cyclokat™), intac/punctal plug DDSs (latanoprost punctal plug delivery system, L-PPDS), and intravitreal implants (I-vitaion™, NT-501, NT- 503, MicroPump, Thethadur, IB-20089 Verisome™, Cortiject, DE-102, Retisert™, Iluvein™ and Ozurdex™) have significantly improved the treatment of ocular diseases. However, most of these DDSs/devices are applied invasively and even need surgical procedures. Of these, use of de novo technologies such as advanced stimuli-responsive nanomaterials, multimodal nanosystems (NSs)/nanoconjugates (NCs), biomacromolecualr scaffolds, and bioengineered cell therapies

  5. Baseline characteristics of patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 and stage 4 in spain: the MERENA observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To obtain information on cardiovascular morbidity, hypertension control, anemia and mineral metabolism based on the analysis of the baseline characteristics of a large cohort of Spanish patients enrolled in an ongoing prospective, observational, multicenter study of patients with stages 3 and 4 chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Methods Multicenter study from Spanish government hospital-based Nephrology outpatient clinics involving 1129 patients with CKD stages 3 (n = 434) and 4 (n = 695) defined by GFR calculated by the MDRD formula. Additional analysis was performed with GFR calculated using the CKD-EPI and Cockcroft-Gault formula. Results In the cohort as a whole, median age 70.9 years, morbidity from all cardiovascular disease (CVD) was very high (39.1%). In CKD stage 4, CVD prevalence was higher than in stage 3 (42.2 vs 35.6% p < 0.024). Subdividing stage 3 in 3a and 3b and after adjusting for age, CVD increased with declining GFR with the hierarchy (stage 3a < stage 3b < stage 4) when calculated by CKD-EPI (31.8, 35.4, 42.1%, p 0.039) and Cockcroft-Gault formula (30.9, 35.6, 43.4%, p 0.010) and MDRD formula (32.5, 36.2, 42.2%,) but with the latter, it did not reach statistical significance (p 0.882). Hypertension was almost universal among those with stages 3 and 4 CKD (91.2% and 94.1%, respectively) despite the use of more than 3 anti-hypertensive agents including widespread use of RAS blockers. Proteinuria (> 300 mg/day) was present in more than 60% of patients and there was no significant differences between stages 3 and 4 CKD (1.2 ± 1.8 and 1.3 ± 1.8 g/day, respectively). A majority of the patients had hemoglobin levels greater than 11 g/dL (91.1 and 85.5% in stages 3 and 4 CKD respectively p < 0.001) while the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) was limited to 16 and 34.1% in stages 3 and 4 CKD respectively. Intact parathyroid hormone (i-PTH) was elevated in stage 3 and stage 4 CKD patients (121 ± 99 and 166 ± 125 pg/mL p 0

  6. Volumetric capnography and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease staging

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Pablo V; Rodriguez, Benigno; de Oliveira, Daniela; Blanch, L; Manresa, Federico

    2007-01-01

    Spirometry is difficult for some COPD patient to perform. Volumetric capnography could be a second choice test to evaluate the severity of functional disturbances. The aim of this work is to test this hypothesis. A total number of 98 subjects were classified either as normal ex-smokers (N = 14) or COPD patients. The latter were staged following GOLD recommendations. Spirometry and volumetric capnography recordings were obtained from each patient. Spirometry parameters, Bohr Dead Space (VD Bohr), Airways Dead Space from the pre-interface expirate corrected curve (VD aw), Phase III slope (SlIII) and Volume of alveolar ejection (VAE) were measured. Index of Ventilatory Efficiency (IVE), and Index of Airways Heterogeneity (IAH) were calculated as: IVE = VAE/(VT – VD aw) and IAH = 1 – [(VT – VD Bohr)/(VT – VD aw)]. In ANOCOVA analysis IAH showed the greatest association with stage (F > 40), with no significant covariant dependence on VT. A receiver operating characteristics curve analysis showed values of the area under the curve greater than 0.9 for IAH and IVE at all stage levels, with a sensitivity = specificity value greater than 80%. We conclude that IAH and IVE can be used when spirometry cannot be reliably performed, as an alternative test to evaluate the degree of functional involvement in COPD patients. PMID:18229577

  7. Advancing research diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease: the IWG-2 criteria.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Bruno; Feldman, Howard H; Jacova, Claudia; Hampel, Harald; Molinuevo, José Luis; Blennow, Kaj; DeKosky, Steven T; Gauthier, Serge; Selkoe, Dennis; Bateman, Randall; Cappa, Stefano; Crutch, Sebastian; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Fox, Nick C; Galasko, Douglas; Habert, Marie-Odile; Jicha, Gregory A; Nordberg, Agneta; Pasquier, Florence; Rabinovici, Gil; Robert, Philippe; Rowe, Christopher; Salloway, Stephen; Sarazin, Marie; Epelbaum, Stéphane; de Souza, Leonardo C; Vellas, Bruno; Visser, Pieter J; Schneider, Lon; Stern, Yaakov; Scheltens, Philip; Cummings, Jeffrey L

    2014-06-01

    In the past 8 years, both the International Working Group (IWG) and the US National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association have contributed criteria for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that better define clinical phenotypes and integrate biomarkers into the diagnostic process, covering the full staging of the disease. This Position Paper considers the strengths and limitations of the IWG research diagnostic criteria and proposes advances to improve the diagnostic framework. On the basis of these refinements, the diagnosis of AD can be simplified, requiring the presence of an appropriate clinical AD phenotype (typical or atypical) and a pathophysiological biomarker consistent with the presence of Alzheimer's pathology. We propose that downstream topographical biomarkers of the disease, such as volumetric MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose PET, might better serve in the measurement and monitoring of the course of disease. This paper also elaborates on the specific diagnostic criteria for atypical forms of AD, for mixed AD, and for the preclinical states of AD.

  8. Diagnosis of cardiac disease in pediatric end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Chavers, Blanche M.; Solid, Craig A.; Sinaiko, Alan; Daniels, Frank X.; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Collins, Allan J.; Frankenfield, Diane L.; Herzog, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Cardiac disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This study aimed to report the frequency of cardiac disease diagnostic methods used in US pediatric maintenance hemodialysis patients. Methods. A cross-sectional analysis of all US pediatric (ages 0.7–18 years, n = 656) maintenance hemodialysis patients was performed using data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services ESRD Clinical Performance Measures Project. Clinical and laboratory information was collected in 2001. Results were analysed by age, sex, race, Hispanic ethnicity, dialysis duration, body mass index (BMI), primary ESRD cause and laboratory data. Results. Ninety-two percent of the patients had a cardiovascular risk factor (63% hypertension, 38% anemia, 11% BMI > 94th percentile, 63% serum phosphorus > 5.5 mg/dL and 55% calcium–phosphorus product ≥ 55 mg2/dL2). A diagnosis of cardiac disease was reported in 24% (n = 155) of all patients: left ventricular hypertrophy/enlargement 17%, congestive heart failure/pulmonary edema 8%, cardiomyopathy 2% and decreased left ventricular function 2%. Thirty-one percent of patients were not tested. Of those tested, the diagnostic methods used were chest X-rays in 60%, echocardiograms in 35% and electrocardiograms in 33%; left ventricular hypertrophy/enlargement was diagnosed using echocardiogram (72%), chest X-ray (20%) and electrocardiogram (15%). Conclusions. Although 92% of patients had cardiovascular risk factors, an echocardiography was performed in only one-third of the patients. Our study raises the question of why echocardiography, considered the gold standard for cardiac disease diagnosis, has been infrequently used in pediatric maintenance dialysis patients, a high-risk patient population. PMID:20861193

  9. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Chopra, Angeli; Clandinin, Michael Tom; Freeman, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all parts of gastroenterology and hepatology, there have been many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases. Over 1000 publications were reviewed for 2008 and 2009, and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered. In Part I of this Editorial Review, seven topics are considered: intestinal development; proliferation and repair; intestinal permeability; microbiotica, infectious diarrhea and probiotics; diarrhea; salt and water absorption; necrotizing enterocolitis; and immunology/allergy. These topics were chosen because of their importance to the practicing physician. PMID:22807604

  10. Desmoplasia Influenced Recurrence of Disease and Mortality in Stage III Colorectal Cancer within Five Years after Surgery and Adjuvant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zippi, Maddalena; De Toma, Giorgio; Minervini, Giovanni; Cassieri, Claudio; Pica, Roberta; Colarusso, Diodoro; Stock, Simon; Crispino, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims: In patients with colon cancer who undergo resection for potential cure, 40–60% have advanced locoregional disease (stage III). Those who are suitable for adjuvant treatment had a definite disease-free-survival benefit. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate whether the presence of desmoplasia influenced the mortality rate of stage III colorectal cancer (CRC) within 5 years from the surgery and adjuvant therapy. Patients and Methods: Sixty-five patients with stage III CRC underwent resection and adjuvant therapy. Qualitative categorization of desmoplasia was obtained using Ueno's stromal CRC classification. Desmoplasia was related to mortality using Spearman correlation and stratified with other histological variables (inflammation, grading) that concurred to the major determinant of malignancy (venous invasion and lymph nodes) using the Chi-square test. Result: The 5-year survival rate was 65% and the relapse rate was 37%. The mortality rate in patients with immature desmoplasia was 86%, 27% in intermediate desmoplasia, and 0% in mature desmoplasia (Spearman correlation coefficient: −0.572, P = 0.05). Conclusion: Immature desmoplasia appears to be associated with disease recurrence and mortality in stage III CRC patients. PMID:28139499

  11. End-stage renal disease and chronic kidney disease in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lugon, Jocemir R

    2009-01-01

    The world is facing an epidemic of chronic kidney disease (CKD). This report discusses the present state of chronic kidney disease care in Brazil. We report frequency of dialysis treatment and prevalence of kidney transplantation throughout Brazil. We estimated the number of CKD patients in the country through a mathematical extrapolation based on data generated by the NHANES. On January 2007, 73,605 patients were on dialysis, which corresponds to 390 patients per million of population (pmp); the majority of these patients (approximately 90%) were funded by the Brazilian Public Health System. If we aggregate patients with a functioning kidney graft, unofficially estimated by ABTO as 27,500 (approximately 150 pmp), the whole adjusted prevalence of end-stage renal disease patients in Brazil by January 2007 is approximately 540 pmp. We estimate that the number of patients with glomerular filtration rate < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 of body surface approximates 15 million people in Brazil, many of whom are not in treatment.

  12. The Impact of Diabetes Mellitus on Vascular Biomarkers in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jeonggeun; Lee, Chan Joo; Lee, Sang-Hak; Kang, Seok-Min; Choi, Donghoon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and an important risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) disease. We investigated the impact of DM on subclinical CV damage by comprehensive screening protocol in ESRD patients. Materials and Methods Echocardiography, coronary computed tomography angiogram, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and central blood pressure with pulse wave velocity (PWV) were performed in 91 ESRD patients from the Cardiovascular and Metabolic disease Etiology Research Center-HIgh risk cohort. Results The DM group (n=38) had higher systolic blood pressure than the non-DM group (n=53), however, other clinical CV risk factors were not different between two groups. Central aortic systolic pressure (148.7±29.8 mm Hg vs. 133.7±27.0 mm Hg, p= 0.014), PWV (12.1±2.7 m/s vs. 9.4±2.1 m/s, p<0.001), and early mitral inflow to early mitral annulus velocity (16.7±6.4 vs. 13.7±5.9, p=0.026) were higher in the DM group. Although the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) was not different between the DM and the non-DM group (95% vs. 84.4%, p=0.471), the severity of CAD was higher in the DM group (p=0.01). In multivariate regression analysis, DM was an independent determinant for central systolic pressure (p=0.011), PWV (p<0.001) and the prevalence of CAD (p=0.046). Conclusion Diabetic ESRD patients have higher central systolic pressure and more advanced arteriosclerosis than the non-DM control group. These findings suggest that screening for subclinical CV damage may be helpful for diabetic ESRD patients. PMID:27873498

  13. Advances in non-dopaminergic treatments for Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Stayte, Sandy; Vissel, Bryce

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1960's treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD) have traditionally been directed to restore or replace dopamine, with L-Dopa being the gold standard. However, chronic L-Dopa use is associated with debilitating dyskinesias, limiting its effectiveness. This has resulted in extensive efforts to develop new therapies that work in ways other than restoring or replacing dopamine. Here we describe newly emerging non-dopaminergic therapeutic strategies for PD, including drugs targeting adenosine, glutamate, adrenergic, and serotonin receptors, as well as GLP-1 agonists, calcium channel blockers, iron chelators, anti-inflammatories, neurotrophic factors, and gene therapies. We provide a detailed account of their success in animal models and their translation to human clinical trials. We then consider how advances in understanding the mechanisms of PD, genetics, the possibility that PD may consist of multiple disease states, understanding of the etiology of PD in non-dopaminergic regions as well as advances in clinical trial design will be essential for ongoing advances. We conclude that despite the challenges ahead, patients have much cause for optimism that novel therapeutics that offer better disease management and/or which slow disease progression are inevitable. PMID:24904259

  14. Advances in celiac disease and gluten-free diet.

    PubMed

    Niewinski, Mary M

    2008-04-01

    Celiac disease is becoming an increasingly recognized autoimmune enteropathy caused by a permanent intolerance to gluten. Once thought to be a rare disease of childhood characterized by diarrhea, celiac disease is actually a multisystemic disorder that occurs as a result of an immune response to ingested gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Screening studies have revealed that celiac disease is most common in asymptomatic adults in the United States. Although considerable scientific progress has been made in understanding celiac disease and in preventing or curing its manifestations, a strict gluten-free diet is the only treatment for celiac disease to date. Early diagnosis and treatment, together with regular follow-up visits with a dietitian, are necessary to ensure nutritional adequacy and to prevent malnutrition while adhering to the gluten-free diet for life. The purpose of this review is to provide clinicians with current updated information about celiac disease, its diverse clinical presentation and increased prevalence, the complex pathophysiology and strong genetic predisposition to celiac disease, and its diagnosis. This review focuses in detail on the gluten-free diet and the importance of intense expert dietary counseling for all patients with celiac disease. Recent advances in the gluten-free diet include food allergen labeling as well as the US Food and Drug Administration's proposed definition of the food-labeling term gluten-free. The gluten-free diet is complex and patients need comprehensive nutrition education from a skilled dietitian.

  15. Targeting multiple cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways with a resorcinol derivative leads to inhibition of advanced stages of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murase, Ryuichi; Kawamura, Rumi; Singer, Eric; Pakdel, Arash; Sarma, Pranamee; Judkins, Jonathon; Elwakeel, Eiman; Dayal, Sonali; Martinez-Martinez, Esther; Amere, Mukkanti; Gujjar, Ramesh; Mahadevan, Anu; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; McAllister, Sean D

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The psychoactive cannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and the non-psychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) can both reduce cancer progression, each through distinct anti-tumour pathways. Our goal was to discover a compound that could efficiently target both cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways. Experimental Approach To measure breast cancer cell proliferation/viability and invasion, MTT and Boyden chamber assays were used. Modulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis was measured using dichlorodihydrofluorescein and annexin/propidium iodide, respectively, in combination with cell flow cytometry. Changes in protein levels were evaluated using Western analysis. Orthotopic and i.v. mouse models of breast cancer metastasis were used to test the activity of cannabinoids in vivo. Key Results CBD reduced breast cancer metastasis in advanced stages of the disease as the direct result of down-regulating the transcriptional regulator Id1. However, this was associated with moderate increases in survival. We therefore screened for analogues that could co-target cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways (CBD- and THC-associated) and discovered the compound O-1663. This analogue inhibited Id1, produced a marked stimulation of ROS, up-regulated autophagy and induced apoptosis. Of all the compounds tested, it was the most potent at inhibiting breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in culture and metastasis in vivo. Conclusions and Implications O-1663 prolonged survival in advanced stages of breast cancer metastasis. Developing compounds that can simultaneously target multiple cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways efficiently may provide a novel approach for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer. PMID:24910342

  16. Effect of p53 codon 72 polymorphism on the survival outcome in advanced stage cervical cancer patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Akanksha; Das, Poulami; Kannan, Sadhana; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Mulherkar, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The Arg>Pro polymorphism in codon 72 of p53 gene is known to affect the susceptibility of cervical cancer differently in different population worldwide although information regarding its role in determining survival status and disease outcome in patients is lacking. The present study was conducted to determine the genotype frequency and prognostic role of p53 codon 72 Arg>Pro polymorphism in patients with advanced stage cervical cancer in India. Methods: The p53 codon 72 polymorphism was determined in tumour biopsies (n = 107) and matched blood samples (n = 19) in cervical cancer patients using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method (PCR-RFLP). Effect of p53 genotype on the overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) was analyzed. Individual Arg or Pro alleles were studied for their significance on survival as Pro carriers (Pro/Pro + Arg/Pro) versus Arg/Arg individuals or Arg carriers (Arg/Arg + Arg/Pro) versus Pro/Pro individuals. Results: The frequencies for Arg/Arg, Arg/Pro and Pro/Pro genotypes were 27.2, 49.5 and 23.3 per cent, respectively. There was no significant difference in the genotypes with respect to patients’ OS or RFS. Interpretation & conclusions: The findings of our study indicated that p53 codon 72 polymorphism might not be an independent marker in predicting clinical outcome in advanced stage cervical cancer patients. Further studies need to be done in larger samples to confirm these findings. PMID:28139534

  17. Clinical trials in predementia stages of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Jagan A; Cummings, Jeffrey L

    2013-05-01

    Effective treatments of Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia are an urgent necessity. There is a growing consensus that effective disease-modifying treatment before the onset of clinical dementia and slowing the progression of mild symptoms are needed after recent setbacks in AD therapeutics. The identification of at-risk and preclinical AD populations is becoming important for targeting primary and secondary prevention clinical trials in AD. This article reviews the strategies and challenges in targeting at-risk and preclinical AD populations for a new generation of AD clinical trials. Design, outcome measures, and complexities in successfully completing a clinical trial targeting this population are reviewed.

  18. Unicentric Castleman’s disease associated with end stage renal disease caused by amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Eray; Kocyigit, Ismail; Unal, Aydin; Sipahioglu, Murat Hayri; Akgun, Hulya; Kaynar, Leylagul; Tokgoz, Bulent; Oymak, Oktay

    2017-01-01

    Castleman’s disease (CD), also known as angiofolicular lymph node hyperplasia, is a rare heterogenous group of lymphoproliferative disorders. Histologically, it can be classified as hyaline vascular type, plasma cell type, or mixed type. Clinically two different subtypes of the CD are present: Unicentric and multicentric. Unicentric CD is generally asymptomatic and associated with hyaline vascular type, and its diagnoses depend on the localized lymphadenopathy on examination or imaging studies. However, multicentric CD presents with generalized lymphadenopathy and systemic symptoms including malaise, fever, night sweats, weight loss, and it is associated with the plasma cell type and mix type. Herein, we report a patient with unicentric CD of the plasma cell type without systemic symptoms, who developed end stage renal failure caused by amyloidosis 6 years after onset of CD. PMID:28352636

  19. Changes in Semantic Memory in Early Stage Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weingartner, Herbert J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Contrasts changes in semantic memory in elderly normal controls and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients before patients expressed symptoms. Found that controls generated more uncommon exemplars from closed semantic categories (fruits and vegetables) than did AD patients prior to presumed onset of AD. AD patients were just as productive as controls…

  20. Problem solving, impulse control and planning in patients with early- and late-stage Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Mörkl, Sabrina; Müller, Nicole J; Blesl, Claudia; Wilkinson, Leonora; Tmava, Adelina; Wurm, Walter; Holl, Anna K; Painold, Annamaria

    2016-10-01

    Sub-domains of executive functions, including problems with planning, accuracy, impulsivity, and inhibition, are core features of Huntington's disease. It is known that the decline of cognitive function in Huntington's disease is related to the anatomical progression of pathology in the basal ganglia. However, it remains to be determined whether the severity of executive dysfunction depends on the stage of the disease. To examine the severity of sub-domains of executive dysfunction in early- and late-stage Huntington's disease, we studied performance in the Tower of London task of two groups of Huntington's disease patients (Group 1: early, n = 23, and Group 2: late stage, n = 29), as well as a third group of age, education, and IQ matched healthy controls (n = 34). During the task, we measured the total number of problems solved, total planning time, and total number of breaks taken. One aspect of executive function indexed by the number of solved problems seems to progress in the course of the disease. Late-stage Huntington's disease patients scored significantly worse than early-stage patients and controls, and early-stage patients scored significantly worse than controls on this measure of accuracy. In contrast, late- and early-stage HD patients did not differ in terms of planning time and number of breaks. Early- and late-stage HD pathology has a different impact on executive sub-domains. While accuracy differs between early- and late-stage HD patients, other domains like planning time and number of breaks do not. Striatal degeneration, which is a characteristic feature of the disease, might not affect all aspects of executive function in HD.

  1. Con: Nutritional vitamin D replacement in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv; Georgianos, Panagiotis I

    2016-05-01

    Insufficiency of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is highly prevalent among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and is a critical component in the pathogenesis of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Accordingly, current National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend the correction of hypovitaminosis D through nutritional vitamin D replacement as a first-step therapeutic approach targeting secondary hyperparathyroidism. In this Polar Views debate, we summarize the existing evidence, aiming to defend the position that nutritional vitamin D replacement is not evidence-based and should not be applied to patients with CKD. This position is supported by the following: (i) our meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials shows that whereas nutritional vitamin D significantly increases serum 25(OH)D levels relative to placebo, there is no evidence either in predialysis CKD or in ESRD that parathyroid hormone (PTH) is lowered; (ii) on the other hand, in randomized head-to-head comparisons, nutritional vitamin D is shown to be inferior to activated vitamin D analogs in reducing PTH levels; (iii) nutritional vitamin D is reported to exert minimal to no beneficial actions in a series of surrogate risk factors, including aortic stiffness, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), epoetin utilization and immune function among others; and (iv) there is no evidence to support a benefit of nutritional vitamin D on survival and other 'hard' clinical outcomes. Whereas nutritional vitamin D replacement may restore 25(OH)D concentration to near normal, the real target of treating vitamin D insufficiency is to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism, which is untouched by nutritional vitamin D. Furthermore, the pleotropic benefits of nutritional vitamin D remain to be proven. Thus, there is little, if any, benefit of nutritional vitamin D replacement in CKD.

  2. Effect of bicarbonate supplementation on renal function and nutritional indices in predialysis advanced chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jiwon; Kwon, Soon Kil; Kim, Hye-Young

    2014-12-01

    Current practice guidelines recommend alkali therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and metabolic acidosis to prevent complications. This study aims to investigate the effect of oral sodium bicarbonate supplementation on the progression of renal function and nutritional indices in patients with predialysis advanced CKD. Forty patients with predialysis stage 5 CKD(estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR <15mL/min per 1.73m(2)) and 40 patients with stage 4 CKD (eGFR 15 to 30mL/min per 1.73m(2)) who had a total CO2 less than 22mEq/L were assigned into the bicarbonate treatment group or control group for 12 months. In stage 4 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of eGFR during the study between the treatment group and the control group (-2.30±4.49 versus -6.58±6.32mL/min/1.73m(2), p<0.05). However, in stage 5 CKD, there were no significant differences in the change of eGFR during the study between the two groups (-2.10±2.06 versus -3.23±1.95mL/min/1.73 m(2)).There were no significant differences in the changes of nutritional indices such as albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, total lymphocyte count (TLC), and Ondodera's prognostic nutritional index (OPNI) during the study between the two groups. In stage 5 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of TLC and OPNI between the two groups. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that bicarbonate supplementation slows the rate of decline of renal function in stage 4 CKD and improves nutritional indices in stage 5 CKD. Alkali therapy in advanced CKD may have beneficial effect on renal function and malnutrition.

  3. Effect of Bicarbonate Supplementation on Renal Function and Nutritional Indices in Predialysis Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jiwon; Kwon, Soon Kil

    2014-01-01

    Current practice guidelines recommend alkali therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and metabolic acidosis to prevent complications. This study aims to investigate the effect of oral sodium bicarbonate supplementation on the progression of renal function and nutritional indices in patients with predialysis advanced CKD. Forty patients with predialysis stage 5 CKD(estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR <15mL/min per 1.73m2) and 40 patients with stage 4 CKD (eGFR 15 to 30mL/min per 1.73m2) who had a total CO2 less than 22mEq/L were assigned into the bicarbonate treatment group or control group for 12 months. In stage 4 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of eGFR during the study between the treatment group and the control group (-2.30±4.49 versus -6.58±6.32mL/min/1.73m2, p<0.05). However, in stage 5 CKD, there were no significant differences in the change of eGFR during the study between the two groups (-2.10±2.06 versus -3.23±1.95mL/min/1.73 m2).There were no significant differences in the changes of nutritional indices such as albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, total lymphocyte count (TLC), and Ondodera's prognostic nutritional index (OPNI) during the study between the two groups. In stage 5 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of TLC and OPNI between the two groups. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that bicarbonate supplementation slows the rate of decline of renal function in stage 4 CKD and improves nutritional indices in stage 5 CKD. Alkali therapy in advanced CKD may have beneficial effect on renal function and malnutrition. PMID:25606047

  4. Single stage, low noise, advanced technology fan. Volume 5: Fan acoustics. Section 1: Results and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutras, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    The acoustic tests and data analysis for a 0.508-scale fan vehicle of a 111,300 newton (25,000 pound) thrust, full-size engine, which would have application on an advanced transport aircraft, is described. The single-stage advanced technology fan was designed to a pressure ratio of 1.8 at a tip speed of 503 m/sec (1,650 ft/sec) to achieve the desired pressure ratio in a single-stage fan with low radius ratio (0.38), and to maintain adequate stall margin. The fan has 44 tip-shrouded rotor blades and 90 outlet guide vanes. The two basic approaches taken in the acoustic design were: (1) minimization of noise at the source, and (2) suppression of the generated noise in the inlet and bypass exhaust duct. Suppression of the generated noise was accomplished in the inlet through use of the hybrid concept (wall acoustic treatment plus airflow acceleration suppression) and in the exhaust duct with extensive acoustic treatment including a splitter. The goal of the design was attainment of twenty effective perceived noise decibels (20 EPNdB) below current Federal Air Regulation noise standards for a full-scale fan at the takeoff, cutback, and approach conditions. The suppression goal of FAR 36-20 was not reached, but improvements in the technology of both front and aft fan-noise suppression were realized. The suppressed fan noise was shown to be consistent with the proposed federal regulation on aircraft noise.

  5. Glutathione peroxidase in early and advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Johannsen, P; Velander, G; Mai, J; Thorling, E B; Dupont, E

    1991-01-01

    A defective antioxidant scavenging system plays a major role in one of the theories of the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a general difference in antioxidant activity between early and advanced cases of Parkinson's disease. Twenty five recently diagnosed patients, without any clinical fluctuations (group A), and 25 patients in a late phase of the disease with severe fluctuations in response to levodopa therapy (group B) were included in the study. Erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase was determined as a measure of antioxidant activity and significantly lower values were found in group B than in group A. Regression analyses in groups A and B showed significant correlation between glutathione peroxidase and duration of disease, but not between glutathione peroxidase and age of patients. Images PMID:1940936

  6. Advancing digital methods in the fight against communicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Chabot-Couture, Guillaume; Seaman, Vincent Y; Wenger, Jay; Moonen, Bruno; Magill, Alan

    2015-03-01

    Important advances are being made in the fight against communicable diseases by using new digital tools. While they can be a challenge to deploy at-scale, GPS-enabled smartphones, electronic dashboards and computer models have multiple benefits. They can facilitate program operations, lead to new insights about the disease transmission and support strategic planning. Today, tools such as these are used to vaccinate more children against polio in Nigeria, reduce the malaria burden in Zambia and help predict the spread of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa.

  7. Dual-Fuel Propulsion in Single-Stage Advanced Manned Launch System Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepsch, Roger A., Jr.; Stanley, Douglas O.; Unal, Resit

    1995-01-01

    As part of the United States Advanced Manned Launch System study to determine a follow-on, or complement, to the Space Shuttle, a reusable single-stage-to-orbit concept utilizing dual-fuel rocket propulsion has been examined. Several dual-fuel propulsion concepts were investigated. These include: a separate-engine concept combining Russian RD-170 kerosene-fueled engines with space shuttle main engine-derivative engines: the kerosene- and hydrogen-fueled Russian RD-701 engine; and a dual-fuel, dual-expander engine. Analysis to determine vehicle weight and size characteristics was performed using conceptual-level design techniques. A response-surface methodology for multidisciplinary design was utilized to optimize the dual-fuel vehicles with respect to several important propulsion-system and vehicle design parameters, in order to achieve minimum empty weight. The tools and methods employed in the analysis process are also summarized. In comparison with a reference hydrogen- fueled single-stage vehicle, results showed that the dual-fuel vehicles were from 10 to 30% lower in empty weight for the same payload capability, with the dual-expander engine types showing the greatest potential.

  8. Single stage, low noise, advanced technology fan. Volume 1: Aerodynamic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. J.; Younghans, J. L.; Little, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    The aerodynamic design for a half-scale fan vehicle, which would have application on an advanced transport aircraft, is described. The single stage advanced technology fan was designed to a pressure ratio of 1.8 at a tip speed of 503 m/sec 11,650 ft/sec). The fan and booster components are designed in a scale model flow size convenient for testing with existing facility and vehicle hardware. The design corrected flow per unit annulus area at the fan face is 215 kg/sec sq m (44.0 lb m/sec sq ft) with a hub-tip ratio of 0.38 at the leading edge of the fan rotor. This results in an inlet corrected airflow of 117.9 kg/sec (259.9 lb m/sec) for the selected rotor tip diameter if 90.37 cm (35.58 in.). The variable geometry inlet is designed utilizing a combination of high throat Mach number and acoustic treatment in the inlet diffuser for noise suppression (hybrid inlet). A variable fan exhaust nozzle was assumed in conjunction with the variable inlet throat area to limit the required area change of the inlet throat at approach and hence limit the overall diffusion and inlet length. The fan exit duct design was primarily influenced by acoustic requirements, including length of suppressor wall treatment; length, thickness and position on a duct splitter for additional suppressor treatment; and duct surface Mach numbers.

  9. Single stage, low noise advanced technology fan. Volume 3: Acoustic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Mishler, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    The acoustic design for a half-scale fan vehicle, which would have application on an advanced transport aircraft, is described. The single stage advanced technology fan was designed to a pressure ratio of 1.8 at a tip speed of 503 m/sec (1,650 ft/sec). The two basic approaches taken in the acoustic design were: (1) minimization of noise at the source, and (2) suppression of the generated noise in the inlet and bypass exhaust duct. Suppression of the generated noise is accomplished in the inlet through use of the hybrid concept (wall acoustic treatment plus airflow acceleration suppression) and in the exhaust duct with extensive acoustic treatment including a splitter. The goal of the design was attainment of twenty effective perceived noise decibels (20 EPNdB) below current Federal Air Regulation noise standards for a full-scale fan at the takeoff, cutback, and approach conditions. Predicted unsuppressed and suppressed fore and aft maximum perceived noise levels indicate that the cutback condition is the most critical with respect to the goal, which is probably unattainable for that condition. This is also true for aft radiated noise in the approach condition.

  10. Linear and Curvilinear Trajectories of Cortical Loss with Advancing Age and Disease Duration in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Daniel O; Dobolyi, David G; Isaacs, David A; Roman, Olivia C; Herb, Joshua; Wylie, Scott A; Neimat, Joseph S; Donahue, Manus J; Hedera, Peter; Zald, David H; Landman, Bennett A; Bowman, Aaron B; Dawant, Benoit M; Rane, Swati

    2016-05-01

    Advancing age and disease duration both contribute to cortical thinning in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the pathological interactions between them are poorly described. This study aims to distinguish patterns of cortical decline determined by advancing age and disease duration in PD. A convenience cohort of 177 consecutive PD patients, identified at the Vanderbilt University Movement Disorders Clinic as part of a clinical evaluation for Deep Brain Stimulation (age: M= 62.0, SD 9.3), completed a standardized clinical assessment, along with structural brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging scan. Age and gender matched controls (n=53) were obtained from the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative and Progressive Parkinson's Marker Initiative (age: M= 63.4, SD 12.2). Estimated changes in cortical thickness were modeled with advancing age, disease duration, and their interaction. The best-fitting model, linear or curvilinear (2(nd), or 3(rd) order natural spline), was defined using the minimum Akaike Information Criterion, and illustrated on a 3-dimensional brain. Three curvilinear patterns of cortical thinning were identified: early decline, late decline, and early-stable-late. In contrast to healthy controls, the best-fit model for age related changes in PD is curvilinear (early decline), particularly in frontal and precuneus regions. With advancing disease duration, a curvilinear model depicts accelerating decline in the occipital cortex. A significant interaction between advancing age and disease duration is evident in frontal, motor, and posterior parietal areas. Study results support the hypothesis that advancing age and disease duration differentially affect regional cortical thickness and display regional dependent linear and curvilinear patterns of thinning.

  11. Radiotherapy of stage I and II Hodgkin disease with inguinal presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzillo, J.H.; Moylan, D.J.; Mohiuddin, M.; Kramer, S.

    1985-01-01

    Seventeen patients who presented with inguinal adenopathy were found to have stage I or II infradiaphragmatic Hodgkin disease. Two patients with stage IIB disease also received MOPP chemotherapy. Fifteen patients currently have no evidence of recurrence; one died of acute myelogenous leukemia 6 years after total nodal irradiation, while another died of cardiopulmonary disease but had no evidence of Hodgkin disease at autopsy. In one patient, progressive peripheral atherosclerosis developed in an irradiated inguinal area, requiring angioplasty. Patient characteristics and results of treatment are analyzed and implications for management presented.

  12. Confidence interval estimation of the difference between two sensitivities to the early disease stage.

    PubMed

    Dong, Tuochuan; Kang, Le; Hutson, Alan; Xiong, Chengjie; Tian, Lili

    2014-03-01

    Although most of the statistical methods for diagnostic studies focus on disease processes with binary disease status, many diseases can be naturally classified into three ordinal diagnostic categories, that is normal, early stage, and fully diseased. For such diseases, the volume under the ROC surface (VUS) is the most commonly used index of diagnostic accuracy. Because the early disease stage is most likely the optimal time window for therapeutic intervention, the sensitivity to the early diseased stage has been suggested as another diagnostic measure. For the purpose of comparing the diagnostic abilities on early disease detection between two markers, it is of interest to estimate the confidence interval of the difference between sensitivities to the early diseased stage. In this paper, we present both parametric and non-parametric methods for this purpose. An extensive simulation study is carried out for a variety of settings for the purpose of evaluating and comparing the performance of the proposed methods. A real example of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is analyzed using the proposed approaches.

  13. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal...

  14. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal...

  15. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal...

  16. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal...

  17. 42 CFR 488.60 - Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special procedures for approving end stage renal disease facilities. 488.60 Section 488.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.60 Special procedures for approving end stage renal...

  18. Enteric hyperoxaluria: an important cause of end-stage kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Nazzal, Lama; Puri, Sonika; Goldfarb, David S

    2016-03-01

    Hyperoxaluria is a frequent complication of inflammatory bowel diseases, ileal resection and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and is well-known to cause nephrolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis. The associated prevalence of chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) is less clear but may be more consequential than recognized. In this review, we highlight three cases of ESKD due to enteric hyperoxaluria following small bowel resections. We review current information on the pathophysiology, complications and treatment of this complex disease.

  19. Risk Factors for End-Stage Kidney Disease after Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ruebner, RL; Reese, PP; Denburg, MR; Rand, EB; Abt, PL; Furth, SL

    2015-01-01

    Adult liver transplant (LT) recipients commonly develop advanced kidney disease. However, burden of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) after pediatric LT has not been well-described. We performed a retrospective cohort study of pediatric LTs in the US from 1990–2010. Multivariable Cox regression models were fit to determine risk factors for ESKD and death. 8976 children received LTs. During median follow-up of 7.8 years, 2005 (22%) subjects died (mortality rate 26.1 cases/1000 person-years); 167 (2%) developed ESKD (incidence rate 2.2 cases/1000 person-years). Risk factors for ESKD included older age at LT (highest risk age>15 vs <5 years, HR=4.94, p<0.001), hepatitis C (HR 2.79, p=0.004), liver re-transplant (HR 2.67, p<0.001), eGFR pre-LT <60 vs ≥60 (HR 2.37, p<0.001), hepatitis B (HR 2.25, p=0.027), black race (HR 1.46, p=0.046), and male sex (HR 1.44, p=0.022). LT recipients with ESKD had increased risk of mortality (HR 2.37, p<0.001). Among pediatric LT recipients, rate of ESKD was lower than among adults and far exceeded by rate of death, however follow-up time in this study may underestimate lifetime burden of ESKD. Although uncommon, ESKD was highly associated with mortality. Pediatric LT recipients should be routinely monitored for kidney disease, particularly those at highest risk of ESKD. PMID:22994862

  20. Phosphorus management in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Finn, William F

    2005-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is an important public health problem, with an increasing number of patients worldwide. One important outcome of renal failure is disordered mineral metabolism, most notably involving calcium and phosphorus balance. Of importance is that increased serum phosphorus levels are associated with increased mortality rates. Despite dietary restrictions, patients receiving dialysis invariably experience hyperphosphatemia and require treatment with phosphate binders. Existing phosphate binders are effective in reducing serum phosphorus levels, but are associated with a number of important disadvantages. Lanthanum carbonate, a new noncalcium, nonaluminum phosphate binder, represents a promising treatment for hyperphosphatemia.

  1. Cutaneous Lymphoma International Consortium Study of Outcome in Advanced Stages of Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome: Effect of Specific Prognostic Markers on Survival and Development of a Prognostic Model

    PubMed Central

    Scarisbrick, Julia J.; Prince, H. Miles; Vermeer, Maarten H.; Quaglino, Pietro; Horwitz, Steven; Porcu, Pierluigi; Stadler, Rudolf; Wood, Gary S.; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Pham-Ledard, Anne; Foss, Francine; Girardi, Michael; Bagot, Martine; Michel, Laurence; Battistella, Maxime; Guitart, Joan; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Martinez-Escala, Maria Estela; Estrach, Teresa; Papadavid, Evangelia; Antoniou, Christina; Rigopoulos, Dimitis; Nikolaou, Vassilki; Sugaya, Makoto; Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Gniadecki, Robert; Sanches, José Antonio; Cury-Martins, Jade; Miyashiro, Denis; Servitje, Octavio; Muniesa, Cristina; Berti, Emilio; Onida, Francesco; Corti, Laura; Hodak, Emilia; Amitay-Laish, Iris; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L.; Rodríguez-Peralto, Jose L.; Knobler, Robert; Porkert, Stefanie; Bauer, Wolfgang; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Grandi, Vieri; Cowan, Richard; Rook, Alain; Kim, Ellen; Pileri, Alessandro; Patrizi, Annalisa; Pujol, Ramon M.; Wong, Henry; Tyler, Kelly; Stranzenbach, Rene; Querfeld, Christiane; Fava, Paolo; Maule, Milena; Willemze, Rein; Evison, Felicity; Morris, Stephen; Twigger, Robert; Talpur, Rakhshandra; Kim, Jinah; Ognibene, Grant; Li, Shufeng; Tavallaee, Mahkam; Hoppe, Richard T.; Duvic, Madeleine; Whittaker, Sean J.; Kim, Youn H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Advanced-stage mycosis fungoides (MF; stage IIB to IV) and Sézary syndrome (SS) are aggressive lymphomas with a median survival of 1 to 5 years. Clinical management is stage based; however, there is wide range of outcome within stages. Published prognostic studies in MF/SS have been single-center trials. Because of the rarity of MF/SS, only a large collaboration would power a study to identify independent prognostic markers. Patients and Methods Literature review identified the following 10 candidate markers: stage, age, sex, cutaneous histologic features of folliculotropism, CD30 positivity, proliferation index, large-cell transformation, WBC/lymphocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase, and identical T-cell clone in blood and skin. Data were collected at specialist centers on patients diagnosed with advanced-stage MF/SS from 2007. Each parameter recorded at diagnosis was tested against overall survival (OS). Results Staging data on 1,275 patients with advanced MF/SS from 29 international sites were included for survival analysis. The median OS was 63 months, with 2- and 5-year survival rates of 77% and 52%, respectively. The median OS for patients with stage IIB disease was 68 months, but patients diagnosed with stage III disease had slightly improved survival compared with patients with stage IIB, although patients diagnosed with stage IV disease had significantly worse survival (48 months for stage IVA and 33 months for stage IVB). Of the 10 variables tested, four (stage IV, age > 60 years, large-cell transformation, and increased lactate dehydrogenase) were independent prognostic markers for a worse survival. Combining these four factors in a prognostic index model identified the following three risk groups across stages with significantly different 5-year survival rates: low risk (68%), intermediate risk (44%), and high risk (28%). Conclusion To our knowledge, this study includes the largest cohort of patients with advanced-stage MF/SS and

  2. Nonsurgical Management of Cervical Cancer: Locally Advanced, Recurrent, and Metastatic Disease, Survivorship, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Helen J.; Wenzel, Lari; Mileshkin, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Overview Despite the declining incidence of cervical cancer as a result of the introduction of screening programs, globally it remains a leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Outcomes for patients who are diagnosed with anything but early-stage disease remain poor. Here we examine emerging strategies to improve the treatment of locally advanced disease. We discuss emerging biologic data, which are informing our investigation of new therapeutic interventions in persistent, recurrent, and metastatic cervical cancer. We recognize the importance of interventions to improve quality of life and to prevent long-term sequelae in women undergoing treatment. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we recognize the need for global collaboration and advocacy to improve the outcome for all women at risk of and diagnosed with this disease. PMID:25993189

  3. Kienböck Disease: Recent Advances in the Basic Science, Assessment and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bain, Gregory Ian; Yeo, Chong Jin; Morse, Levi Philip

    2015-10-01

    Kienböck disease is a disorder of impaired lunate vascularity which ultimately has the potential to lead to marked degeneration of the wrist and impaired wrist function. The aetiology of the avascular necrosis is uncertain, but theories relate to ulnar variance, variability in lunate vascularity and intraosseous pressures. Clinical symptoms can be subtle and variable, requiring a high index of suspicion for the diagnosis. The Lichtmann classification has historically been used to guide management. We present a review of Kienböck disease, with a focus on the recent advances in assessment and treatment. Based on our understanding thus far of the pathoanatomy of Kienböck's disease, we are proposing a pathological staging system founded on the vascularity, osseous and chondral health of the lunate. We also propose an articular-based approach to treatment, with an arthroscopic grading system to guide management.

  4. Cerebrovascular Disease in Children: Recent Advances in Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Karen J.; deVeber, Gabrielle A.; Ferriero, Donna M.; Roach, E. Steve; Vexler, Zinaida S.; Maria, Bernard L.

    2017-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease in children manifests in many forms, all of which have devastating and long-lasting effects. Recent advances in diagnostic imaging have revealed that this condition is much more common in the pediatric population than previously believed, affecting as many as 1 in 1500 neonates and 1 in 3000 children. The underlying mechanisms that cause stroke—ischemic stroke, sinovenous thrombosis, and hemorrhagic stroke—are only beginning to be understood; however, progress has been made toward better understanding the mechanisms of disease, particularly in the fields of genetics, inflammation, and thrombus formation. Furthermore, new imaging techniques, and better understanding of how to use imaging in managing stroke, have enabled practitioners to more quickly and accurately identify cerebrovascular disease type in children, which is key to mitigation of negative outcomes. The 2010 Neurobiology of Disease in Children symposium, held in conjunction with the 39th annual meeting of the Child Neurology Society, aimed to (1) describe clinical issues surrounding childhood stroke, including diagnosis and acute care; (2) discuss recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of childhood stroke; (3) review current management of and therapies for childhood stroke, including controversial therapies; and (4) establish research directions for investigators. This article summarizes the speakers’ presentations and includes an edited transcript of question-and-answer sessions. PMID:21778188

  5. Initial Stage Affects Survival Even After Complete Pathologic Remission is Achieved in Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer: Analysis of 70 Patients With Pathologic Major Response After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min Kyoung; Cho, Kyung-Ja; Park, Seung-Il; Kim, Yong Hee; Kim, Jong Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Shin, Ji Hoon; Jung, Hwoon Yong; Lee, Gin Hyug; Choi, Kee Don; Song, Ho June; Ryu, Jin-Sook; Kim, Sung-Bae

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes and factors predictive for recurrence and survival in patients with operable esophageal carcinoma who achieved pathologic complete response (PCR) or microscopic residual disease (MRD) after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Materials and Methods: Outcomes were assessed in 70 patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who achieved pathologic major response (53 with PCR and 17 with MRD) after preoperative CRT. Results: At a median follow-up of 38.6 months for surviving patients, 17 of 70 patients (24.3%) experienced disease recurrence and 31 (44.3%) died. Clinical stage (II vs III; p = 0.013) and pathologic response (PCR vs. MRD; p = 0.014) were independent predictors of disease recurrence. Median overall survival (OS) was 99.6 months (95% CI, 44.1-155.1 months) and the 5-year OS rate was 57%. Median recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 71.5 months (95% CI, 39.5-103.6 months) and the 5-year RFS rate was 51.3%. Median OS of patients with Stage II and Stage III disease was 108.8 months and 39.9 months, respectively, and the 5-year OS rates were 68.2% and 27.0%, respectively (p = 0.0003). In a subgroup of patients with PCR, median OS and RFS were also significantly different according to clinical stage. Multivariate analysis showed that clinical stage was an independent predictor of RFS (p = 0.01) and OS (p = 0.008). Conclusions: Even though patients achieved major response after preoperative CRT, pretreatment clinical stage is an important prognostic marker for recurrence and survival. Patients with MRD have an increased recurrence risk but similar survival compared with patients achieved PCR.

  6. Advances in epigenetics and epigenomics for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2011-10-01

    In the post-genomic era, epigenetic factors-literally those that are "over" or "above" genetic ones and responsible for controlling the expression and function of genes-have emerged as important mediators of development and aging; gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions; and the pathophysiology of complex disease states. Here, we provide a brief overview of the major epigenetic mechanisms (ie, DNA methylation, histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, and non-coding RNA regulation). We highlight the nearly ubiquitous profiles of epigenetic dysregulation that have been found in Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. We also review innovative methods and technologies that enable the characterization of individual epigenetic modifications and more widespread epigenomic states at high resolution. We conclude that, together with complementary genetic, genomic, and related approaches, interrogating epigenetic and epigenomic profiles in neurodegenerative diseases represent important and increasingly practical strategies for advancing our understanding of and the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders.

  7. Rates and causes of end-stage renal disease in Navajo Indians, 1971-1985.

    PubMed

    Megill, D M; Hoy, W E; Woodruff, S D

    1988-08-01

    The rates of end-stage renal disease are much increased in American Indians, but no longitudinal study of its rates and causes has been undertaken in any tribe. This 15-year study of rates and causes of treated end-stage renal disease in the Navajo, the largest Indian tribe, supplies an important model on which to base projections and plan interventions. Treated end-stage renal disease in Navajos has increased to an age-adjusted incidence 4 times that in whites in the United States. Diabetic nephropathy accounted for 50% of all new cases in 1985, with an incidence 9.6 times that in US whites, and was due entirely to type II disease. Glomerulonephritis caused end-stage renal disease in Navajos at a rate at least 1.8 times that in US whites and afflicted a much younger population. The predominant form was mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis associated with an immune complex deposition. Renal disease of unknown etiology, which probably includes much silent glomerulonephritis, accounted for 20% of all new cases. The aggregate Navajo population with end-stage renal disease was 9 years younger than its US counterpart. These observations reflect the genesis of the epidemic of diabetic nephropathy afflicting many tribes. Urgent measures are needed to contain this. In addition, the etiology and control of mesangiopathic, immune-complex glomerulonephritis of unusual severity, a previously unrecognized problem, need to be addressed.

  8. A prospective evaluation of the impact of 18-F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography staging on survival for patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Blackstock, A. William . E-mail: ablackst@wfubmc.edu; Farmer, Michael R.; Lovato, James; Mishra, Girish; Melin, Susan A.; Oaks, Timothy; Aklilu, Mabea; Clark, Paige B.; Levine, Edward A.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of 18-F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the staging and prognosis of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (LAEC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and October 2004, all patients with LAEC evaluated in the Department of Radiation Oncology were considered for enrollment into a Phase II trial of preoperative chemoradiation. Entry required a staging whole-body FDG-PET scan. Results: One hundred ten consecutive patients were evaluated; 38 were ineligible for reasons including treatment elsewhere, prior malignancy, or refusal of treatment. After conventional staging (clinical examination, endoscopic ultrasound, and chest/abdominal computerized tomography), 33 patients were ineligible because of metastatic disease or poor performance status. Of the remaining 39 patients, 23 were confirmed to have LAEC after FDG-PET staging and were treated in the Phase II trial (Cohort I). Sixteen patients, however, had FDG-PET findings consistent with occult metastatic disease and were deemed ineligible for the trial but were treated with curative intent (Cohort II). The 2-year survival rate for the 23 patients in Cohort I was 64%, compared with 17% (p = 0.003) for patients in Cohort II (FDG-PET positive). Conclusions: More than one-third of patients determined to have LAEC with conventional staging were upstaged with the use of FDG-PET. Despite comparable therapy, upstaging with FDG-PET predicts poor 2-year survival.

  9. Kienböck's disease associated with radiocephalic fistula formation in a patient with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gun Woo; Lee, Da Young; Lee, Young-Hwan; Ahn, Ki Sung; Kim, Shin-Kun; Lee, In Hee

    2013-10-01

    Kienböck's disease, which consists of osteonecrosis and collapse of the lunate bone, causes chronic pain and dysfunction of the wrist. Patients on hemodialysis are occasionally present with wrist pain, but Kienböck's disease is rarely reported in dialysis patients. This case study describes Kienböck's disease in a patient with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis. A 39-year-old male with a 1-year history of hemodialysis presented with left wrist pain that increased progressively over 6 months. The patient had no history of trauma or any other risk factors known to be associated with Kienböck's disease. Physical examination of the wrist at the site of the arteriovenous fistula showed swelling and tenderness with decreased range of motion. Radiographic examination showed articular collapse and fracture of the body of lunate consistent with stage IIIb Kienböck's disease. An intercarpal arthrodesis with autogenous bone graft was performed.

  10. The Serum Glycome to Discriminate between Early-Stage Epithelial Ovarian Cancer and Benign Ovarian Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Braicu, Elena Iona; Sehouli, Jalid; Tauber, Rudolf; Blanchard, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the sixth most common cause of cancer deaths in women because the diagnosis occurs mostly when the disease is in its late-stage. Current diagnostic methods of EOC show only a moderate sensitivity, especially at an early-stage of the disease; hence, novel biomarkers are needed to improve the diagnosis. We recently reported that serum glycome modifications observed in late-stage EOC patients by MALDI-TOF-MS could be combined as a glycan score named GLYCOV that was calculated from the relative areas of the 11 N-glycan structures that were significantly modulated. Here, we evaluated the ability of GLYCOV to recognize early-stage EOC in a cohort of 73 individuals comprised of 20 early-stage primary serous EOC, 20 benign ovarian diseases (BOD), and 33 age-matched healthy controls. GLYCOV was able to recognize stage I EOC whereas CA125 values were statistically significant only for stage II EOC patients. In addition, GLYCOV was more sensitive and specific compared to CA125 in distinguishing early-stage EOC from BOD patients, which is of high relevance to clinicians as it is difficult for them to diagnose malignancy prior to operation. PMID:25183900

  11. [Application of levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel in advanced Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Toth, Adrián; Nagy, Helga; Wacha, Judit; Bereczki, Dániel; Takáts, Annamária

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder around the world. Levodopa has remained the "gold standard" of the therapy even several decades after its introduction. Chronic levodopa treatment is associated with the development of motor complications in most patients. Advanced Parkinson's disease is characterized by these complications: motor and non-motor fluctuation and disturbing dyskinesia. Continuous dopaminergic stimulation might reduce these complications. In advanced Parkinson's disease levodopa is still effective. In the treatment of this stage there are several advanced or device-aided therapies: apomorphine pump, deep brain stimulation and levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel. Levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel is an aqueous gel that can be delivered to the jejunum via a percutaneous gastrojejunostomy tube which is connected to an infusion pump dosing the levodopa gel continuously to the place of absorption. Levodopa/carbidopa gel infusion can be used as monotherapy, can be tested, can be used individually and this therapy is reversible. Several clinical trials demonstrated that levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel therapy is of long-term benefit, improves the quality of life of the patients and can reduce motor fluctuation and dyskinesia.

  12. Febuxostat-induced agranulocytosis in an end-stage renal disease patient

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Xue Er; Lee, Chien-Te; Pei, Sung-Nan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Febuxostat, a nonpurine xanthine oxidase inhibitor, is approved as the first-line urate-lowering therapy in gout patients with normal renal function or mild to moderate renal impairment. The most common adverse effects of febuxostat are liver function test abnormalities, diarrhea, and skin rash. However, there is insufficient data in patients with severe renal impairment and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We report the first case, to our knowledge, in which agranulocytosis developed after febuxostat treatment in an ESRD patient. Clinical presentation: A 67-year-old woman with gout and ESRD received febuxostat 40 mg a day for 2.5 months. She subsequently complicated with febrile neutropenia and the absolute neutrophil count was only 14/μL. After broad-spectrum antibiotics treatment and no more exposure to febuxostat for 17 days, her infection and neutrophil count recovered. Bone marrow study during neutropenic period showed myeloid hypoplasia without evidence of hematologic neoplasms. Conclusion: As febuxostat use may become more common in the population of advanced renal failure, clinicians should be aware of this rare but potentially life-threatening adverse effect. Based on our experience, close monitoring hemogram and immediate discontinuation of this medication may prevent serious consequences. PMID:28079821

  13. [Adding value to the care at the final stage of chronic diseases].

    PubMed

    Vacas Guerrero, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing number of people with advanced chronic health conditions and with palliative care needs who die without their health and social needs satisfied. This is enough to redefine the traditional models of care in order to focus on the person, rather than on the disease. In these new models, the important role of nursing is unquestionably to promote an approach based on comprehensive care, coordination and continuity, and at a social health level appropriate to respond to the care of patients who require complex long-term care. The nurse contribution in the end stages of chronic conditions must be in the value of care. Taking care of someone is to be concerned about them. And this is related to attitude, commitment and responsibility. In the care of patients who live in a situation of extreme vulnerability, it is possible to help them feel warmth, confident, relieve their suffering, respect their autonomy, and help them them find sense and hope, through daily tasks. With gestures, words and facial expressions that go with this care, it is possible to preserve patient dignity.

  14. Trace minerals in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kasama, Richard K

    2010-01-01

    The kidneys are famously responsible for maintaining external balance of prevalent minerals, such as sodium, chloride, and potassium. The kidney's role in handling trace minerals is more obscure to most nephrologists. Similarly, the impact of kidney failure on trace mineral metabolism is difficult to anticipate. The associated dietary modifications and dialysis create the potential for trace mineral deficiencies and intoxications. Indeed, there are numerous reports of dialysis-associated mishaps causing mineral intoxication, notable for the challenge of assigning causation. Equally challenging has been the recognition of mineral deficiency syndromes, amid what is often a cacophony of multiple comorbidities that vie for the attention of clinicians who care for patients with chronic kidney disease. In this paper, I review a variety of minerals, some of which are required for maintenance of normal human physiology (the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's list of essential minerals), and some that have attracted attention in the care of dialysis patients. For each mineral, I will discuss its role in normal physiology and will review reported deficiency and toxicity states. I will point out the interesting inter-relationships between several of the elements. Finally, I will address the special concerns of aluminum and magnesium as they pertain to the dialysis population.

  15. Visuomotor integration is impaired in early stage Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tippett, William J; Sergio, Lauren E

    2006-08-02

    When the sensory information guiding a reach movement is dissociated from the required motor output, humans must integrate rule-based information in order to reach accurately. Here, we examine the accuracy of movements requiring a visuomotor transformation in neurologically healthy elderly subjects and patients diagnosed with probable Alzheimer's disease. Participants made sliding finger movements over a clear touch-sensitive screen positioned in three spatial planes to displace a cursor from a central target to one of four peripheral targets viewed on a monitor. These spatial plane conditions were repeated under conditions where the direction of cursor motion was rotated 180 degrees relative to the direction of hand motion. Significant main effects were observed between patient and control groups on reaction time and movement time measures. Also, significant increases in task completion errors were observed in the patient population. Further, performance was affected more by the visual feedback changes relative to the plane location changes. Notably, there were substantial performance deficits observed in the patient population, even those with minimal cognitive deficits. We suggest that the integration of eye and hand information may be impaired in these patients.

  16. Marriage and End-Stage Renal Disease: Implications for African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shortridge, Emily F.; James, Cara V.

    2010-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately represented among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ESRD is managed with a strict routine that might include regular dialysis as well as dietary, fluid intake, and other lifestyle changes. In a disease such as this, with such disruptive treatment modalities, marriage, specifically, and its ties…

  17. Hypertension, End-Stage Renal Disease and Rehabilitation: A Look at Black Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Ivor Lensworth; Ackah, Samuel

    1992-01-01

    Reviews the important relationship between end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and hypertension for African Americans; and considers issues associated with ESRD and the subsequent need for kidney transplants, including organ availability. Individual and societal implications of these diseases are discussed. (SLD)

  18. 78 FR 8535 - Medicare Program: Comprehensive End-Stage Renal Disease Care Model Announcement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... Disease Care Model Announcement AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION... the testing of the Comprehensive End- Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Care Model, a new initiative from the... Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), was created to develop and test innovative health...

  19. Whole-body FDG-PET imaging for staging of Hodgkin`s disease and lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hoh, C.K.; Glaspy, J.; Rosen, P.

    1997-03-01

    Accurate staging of Hodgkin`s disease (HD) and non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma (NHL) is important for treatment management. In this study, the utility of 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) wholebody PET was evaluated as an imaging modality for initial staging or restaging of 7 HD and 11 NHL patients. Whole-body PET-based staging results were compared to the patient`s clinical stage based on conventional staging studies, which included combinations of CT of the chest, abdomen and pelvis, MRI scans, gallium scans, lymphangiograms, staging laparatomies and bone scans. Accurate staging was performed in 17 of 18 patients using a whole-body PET-based staging algorithm compared to the conventional staging algorithm in 15 of 18 patients. In 5 of 18 patients, whole-body PET-based staging showed additional lesions not detected by conventional staging modalities, whereas conventional staging demonstrated additional lesions in 4 of 18 patients not detected by whole-body PET. The total cost of conventional staging was $66,292 for 16 CT chest scans, 16 CT abdominal/pelvis scans, three limited MRI scans, four bone scans, give gallium scans, two laparotomies and one lymphangiogram. In contrast, scans cost $36,250 for 18 whole-body PET studies and additional selected correlative studies: one plain film radiograph, one limited CT, one bone marrow san, one upper GI and one endoscopy. A whole-body FDG-PET-based staging algorithm may be an accurate and cost-effective method for staging or restaging HD and NHL. 10 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Albuminuria and posttransplant chronic kidney disease stage predict transplant outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lam, Ngan N; Tonelli, Marcello; Lentine, Krista L; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Ye, Feng; Wen, Kevin; Klarenbach, Scott

    2017-03-30

    In 2012, the KDIGO guidelines updated the classification system for chronic kidney disease to include albuminuria. Whether this classification system predicts adverse clinical outcomes among kidney transplant recipients is unclear. To evaluate this, we conducted a retrospective study using linked databases in Alberta, Canada to follow kidney transplant recipients from 2002-2011. We examined the association between an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR of 60 or more, 45-59, 30-44, 15-29 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and albuminuria (normal, mild, heavy) at one year post-transplant and subsequent mortality and graft loss. There were 900 recipients with a functioning graft and at least one outpatient serum creatinine and urine protein measurement at one year post-transplant. The median age was 51.2 years, 38.7% were female, and 52% had an eGFR of 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) or more. The risk of all-cause mortality and death-censored graft loss was increased in recipients with reduced eGFR or heavier albuminuria. The adjusted incidence rate per 1000 person-years of all-cause mortality for recipients with an eGFR of 15-29 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and heavy albuminuria vs. an eGFR 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) or more and normal protein excretion was 117 (95% confidence interval 38-371) vs. 15 (9-23) (rate ratio 8). Corresponding rates for death-censored graft loss were 273 (88-1203) vs. 6 (3-9) (rate ratio 49). Reduced eGFR and heavier albuminuria in kidney transplant recipients are associated with an increased risk of mortality and graft loss. Thus, eGFR and albuminuria may be used together to identify, evaluate, and manage transplant recipients who are at higher risk of adverse clinical outcomes.

  1. Advances in Chagas disease drug development: 2009-2010

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Frederick S.; Navabi, Nazlee

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review The need for better drugs to treat patients with Chagas disease remains urgent. This review summarizes the advancements in drug development over the past two years. Recent Findings Drug development efforts are almost exclusively occurring as preclinical research. The exceptions being Phase I safety studies for the cruzain inhibitor, K-777, and potential Phase II studies for the antifungal drug, posaconazole, and a prodrug of ravuconazole. Several recent laboratory investigations demonstrate anti-T. cruzi activity of novel small molecules in animal models. These include nonpeptidic cruzain inhibitors, novel inhibitors of the sterol 14α-demethylase enzyme, new compounds (arylimidamides) related to pentamidine, derivatives of nifurtimox, compounds using ruthenium complexes, and several natural products. The recent implementation of a high-throughput screen of >300,000 compounds against intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes done at the Broad Institute is an important development, yielding ~300 selective inhibitors, many of which may serve as leads for medicinal chemistry efforts. Summary Progress is slow, but recent advancements in both drug development and advocacy for research on neglected diseases are encouraging. Efforts to define a target product profile and to harmonize methodologies for testing drugs for Chagas disease are described herein. PMID:20885320

  2. Recent advances in the medical treatment of Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Fleseriu, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Cushing's disease is a condition of hypercortisolism caused by an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenoma. While rare, it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, which suggests that early and aggressive intervention is required. The primary, definitive therapy for patients with Cushing's disease in the majority of patients is pituitary surgery, generally performed via a transsphenoidal approach. However, many patients will not achieve remission or they will have recurrences. The consequences of persistent hypercortisolism are severe and, as such, early identification of those patients at risk of treatment failure is exigent. Medical management of Cushing's disease patients plays an important role in achieving long-term remission after failed transsphenoidal surgery, while awaiting effects of radiation or before surgery to decrease the hypercortisolemia and potentially reducing perioperative complications and improving outcome. Medical therapies include centrally acting agents, adrenal steroidogenesis inhibitors and glucocorticoid receptor blockers. Furthermore, several new agents are in clinical trials. To normalize the devastating disease effects of hypercortisolemia, it is paramount that successful patient disease management includes individualized, multidisciplinary care, with close collaboration between endocrinologists, neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, and general surgeons. This commentary will focus on recent advances in the medical treatment of Cushing's, with a focus on newly approved ACTH modulators and glucocorticoid receptor blockers.

  3. Glial alterations from early to late stages in a model of Alzheimer's disease: Evidence of autophagy involvement in Aβ internalization.

    PubMed

    Pomilio, Carlos; Pavia, Patricio; Gorojod, Roxana Mayra; Vinuesa, Angeles; Alaimo, Agustina; Galvan, Veronica; Kotler, Monica Lidia; Beauquis, Juan; Saravia, Flavia

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease without effective therapy. Brain amyloid deposits are classical histopathological hallmarks that generate an inflammatory reaction affecting neuronal and glial function. The identification of early cell responses and of brain areas involved could help to design new successful treatments. Hence, we studied early alterations of hippocampal glia and their progression during the neuropathology in PDAPP-J20 transgenic mice, AD model, at 3, 9, and 15 months (m) of age. At 3 m, before deposits formation, microglial Iba1+ cells from transgenic mice already exhibited signs of activation and larger soma size in the hilus, alterations appearing later on stratum radiatum. Iba1 immunohistochemistry revealed increased cell density and immunoreactive area in PDAPP mice from 9 m onward selectively in the hilus, in coincidence with prominent amyloid Congo red + deposition. At pre-plaque stages, GFAP+ astroglia showed density alterations while, at an advanced age, the presence of deposits was associated with important glial volume changes and apparently being intimately involved in amyloid degradation. Astrocytes around plaques were strongly labeled for LC3 until 15 m in Tg mice, suggestive of increased autophagic flux. Moreover, β-Amyloid fibrils internalization by astrocytes in in vitro conditions was dependent on autophagy. Co-localization of Iba1 with ubiquitin or p62 was exclusively found in microglia contacting deposits from 9 m onward, suggesting torpid autophagy. Our work characterizes glial changes at early stages of the disease in PDAPP-J20 mice, focusing on the hilus as an especially susceptible hippocampal subfield, and provides evidence that glial autophagy could play a role in amyloid processing at advanced stages.

  4. HLA-G Expression and Role in Advanced-Stage Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Caocci, G.; Greco, M.; Fanni, D.; Senes, G.; Littera, R.; Lai, S.; Risso, P.; Carcassi, C.; Faa, G.; La Nasa, G.

    2016-01-01

    Non-classical human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G class I molecules have an important role in tumor immune escape mechanisms. We investigated HLA-G expression in lymphonode biopsies taken from 8 controls and 20 patients with advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), in relationship to clinical outcomes and the HLA-G 14-basepair (14-bp) deletion-insertion (del-ins) polymorphism. Lymphnode tissue sections were stained using a specific murine monoclonal HLA-G antibody. HLA-G protein expression was higher in cHL patients than controls. In the group of PET-2 positive (positron emission tomography carried out after 2 cycles of standard chemotherapy) patients with a 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS) of 40%, we observed high HLA-G protein expression within the tumor microenvironment with low expression on Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. Conversely, PET-2 negative patients with a PFS of 86% had higher HLA-G protein expression levels on HRS cells compared to the microenvironment. Lower expression on HRS cells was significantly associated with the HLA-G 14-bp ins/ins genotype. These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2. PMID:27349312

  5. Glacier advance during Marine Isotope Stage 11 in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Swanger, Kate M.; Lamp, Jennifer L.; Winckler, Gisela; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Marchant, David R.

    2017-01-01

    We mapped six distinct glacial moraines alongside Stocking Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Stocking Glacier is one of several alpine glaciers in the Dry Valleys fringed by multiple cold-based drop moraines. To determine the age of the outermost moraine, we collected 10 boulders of Ferrar Dolerite along the crest of the moraine and analyzed mineral separates of pyroxene for cosmogenic 3He. On the basis of these measurements, the exposure age for the outermost moraine is 391 ± 35 ka. This represents the first documented advance of alpine glacier ice in the Dry Valleys during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11. At this time, Stocking Glacier was ~20–30% larger than today. The cause of ice expansion is uncertain, but most likely it is related to increased atmospheric temperature and precipitation, associated with reduced ice extent in the nearby Ross Embayment. The data suggest complex local environmental response to warm climates in Antarctica and have implications for glacial response to Holocene warming. The study also demonstrates the potential for using alpine glacier chronologies in the Transantarctic Mountains as proxies for retreat of grounded glacier ice in the Ross Embayment. PMID:28139676

  6. Glacier advance during Marine Isotope Stage 11 in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanger, Kate M.; Lamp, Jennifer L.; Winckler, Gisela; Schaefer, Joerg M.; Marchant, David R.

    2017-01-01

    We mapped six distinct glacial moraines alongside Stocking Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Stocking Glacier is one of several alpine glaciers in the Dry Valleys fringed by multiple cold-based drop moraines. To determine the age of the outermost moraine, we collected 10 boulders of Ferrar Dolerite along the crest of the moraine and analyzed mineral separates of pyroxene for cosmogenic 3He. On the basis of these measurements, the exposure age for the outermost moraine is 391 ± 35 ka. This represents the first documented advance of alpine glacier ice in the Dry Valleys during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11. At this time, Stocking Glacier was ~20–30% larger than today. The cause of ice expansion is uncertain, but most likely it is related to increased atmospheric temperature and precipitation, associated with reduced ice extent in the nearby Ross Embayment. The data suggest complex local environmental response to warm climates in Antarctica and have implications for glacial response to Holocene warming. The study also demonstrates the potential for using alpine glacier chronologies in the Transantarctic Mountains as proxies for retreat of grounded glacier ice in the Ross Embayment.

  7. Glacier advance during Marine Isotope Stage 11 in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Swanger, Kate M; Lamp, Jennifer L; Winckler, Gisela; Schaefer, Joerg M; Marchant, David R

    2017-01-31

    We mapped six distinct glacial moraines alongside Stocking Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Stocking Glacier is one of several alpine glaciers in the Dry Valleys fringed by multiple cold-based drop moraines. To determine the age of the outermost moraine, we collected 10 boulders of Ferrar Dolerite along the crest of the moraine and analyzed mineral separates of pyroxene for cosmogenic (3)He. On the basis of these measurements, the exposure age for the outermost moraine is 391 ± 35 ka. This represents the first documented advance of alpine glacier ice in the Dry Valleys during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11. At this time, Stocking Glacier was ~20-30% larger than today. The cause of ice expansion is uncertain, but most likely it is related to increased atmospheric temperature and precipitation, associated with reduced ice extent in the nearby Ross Embayment. The data suggest complex local environmental response to warm climates in Antarctica and have implications for glacial response to Holocene warming. The study also demonstrates the potential for using alpine glacier chronologies in the Transantarctic Mountains as proxies for retreat of grounded glacier ice in the Ross Embayment.

  8. Two-stage, low noise advanced technology fan. 4: Aerodynamic final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harley, K. G.; Keenan, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    A two-stage research fan was tested to provide technology for designing a turbofan engine for an advanced, long range commercial transport having a cruise Mach number of 0.85 -0.9 and a noise level 20 EPNdB below current requirements. The fan design tip speed was 365.8m/sec (1200ft/sec);the hub/tip ratio was 0.4; the design pressure ratio was 1.9; and the design specific flow was 209.2 kg/sec/sq m(42.85lbm/sec/sq ft). Two fan-versions were tested: a baseline configuration, and an acoustically treated configuration with a sonic inlet device. The baseline version was tested with uniform inlet flow and with tip-radial and hub-radial inlet flow distortions. The baseline fan with uniform inlet flow attained an efficiency of 86.4% at design speed, but the stall margin was low. Tip-radial distortion increased stall margin 4 percentage points at design speed and reduced peak efficiency one percentage point. Hub-radial distortion decreased stall margin 4 percentage points at all speeds and reduced peak efficiency at design speed 8 percentage points. At design speed, the sonic inlet in the cruise position reduced stall margin one percentage point and efficiency 1.5 to 4.5 percentage points. The sonic inlet in the approach position reduced stall margin 2 percentage points.

  9. Development of advanced heat pump. Part 2: Preliminary test of two-stage compression heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwatsubo, Tetsushiro; Saikawa, Michinori; Hamamatsu, Teruhide

    1988-03-01

    A heat pump driven by electricity is one of the excellent electricity utilization systems and is promoted to be widely used. An advanced heat pump has been investigated to enlarge its applications in the field of hot water supply for domestic use which will be competitive with city gas and air conditioning in large scale buildings. An experimental unit with two-stage compression system was designed, which has the multi-function of air conditioning and hot water supply, and the trial system was fabricated. In the design, followings were considered; cooperative operations of two compressors by inverter driving, the temperature conditions of both the air for the air conditioning and the heat source, additional setting of the intermediate heat exchanger. The test operation was carried out with checking the start up procedure, the control sequence and so on. The probability of five operation modes: cooling, heating, hot water supply, cooling/hot water supply, and heating/hot water supply, were confirmed. In the mode of heating/hot water supply the hot water temperature was increased to 65 C, the excellent performance in hot water supply was demonstrated.

  10. Cardiac complications of arteriovenous fistulas in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Alkhouli, Mohamad; Sandhu, Paul; Boobes, Khlaed; Hatahet, Kamel; Raza, Farhan; Boobes, Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of the death in dialysis patients. Arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are associated with lower mortality and are viewed as the desired access option in most patients with advanced kidney disease needing dialysis. However, AVFs have significant and potentially deleterious effects on cardiac functions particularly in the setting of preexisting heart disease. This article provides a comprehensive and contemporary review to what is known about the impact of AVFs on: congestive heart failure, left ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular dysfunction, coronary artery disease and valvular heart disease.

  11. [Advances in the researches of lutein and alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xianrong; Lin, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    Lutein, a kind of oxycarotenoid, can pass the blood brain barrier and preferentially accumulate in the human brain, which is the most abundant carotenoid in human brain. Evidence from multiple studies suggested that lutein was closely related to age-related cognitive decline and risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in human. Dietary, plasma and brain concentrations of lutein were negatively associated with age-related cognitive decline. Lutein concentrations in plasma and brain were significantly lower in AD patients than those of health control. In human brain, lutein was the sole carotenoid which consistently associated with a range of cognitive function measures. In elderly women, lutein supplement can improve the cognitive function. In this article, we systematically reviewed the literature on the role of lutein in age-related cognitive decline and alzheimer's disease and its possible mechanisms. It may prove some benefit information for the advanced research and prevention of AD.

  12. Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of jaws in advanced stage breast cancer was detected from bone scan: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chirappapha, Prakasit; Thongjood, Thanaporn; Aroonroch, Rangsima

    2017-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are indicated to treat skeletal-related events (SREs) for cancer patients with bone metastasis. We report a 79-year-old woman with advanced stage breast cancer with bone metastasis who was prescribed BPs (zoledronate), then developed osteonecrosis of jaw. We provide a brief review of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of this complication. PMID:28210558

  13. Long-term outcome of enzyme-replacement therapy in advanced Fabry disease: evidence for disease progression towards serious complications

    PubMed Central

    Weidemann, F; Niemann, M; Störk, S; Breunig, F; Beer, M; Sommer, C; Herrmann, S; Ertl, G; Wanner, C

    2013-01-01

    Objective The long-term effects of enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) in Fabry disease are unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether ERT in patients with advanced Fabry disease affects progression towards ‘hard’ clinical end-points in comparison with the natural course of the disease. Methods A total of 40 patients with genetically proven Fabry disease (mean age 40 ± 9 years; n = 9 women) were treated prospectively with ERT for 6 years. In addition, 40 subjects from the Fabry Registry, matched for age, sex, chronic kidney disease stage and previous transient ischaemic attack (TIA), served as a comparison group. The main outcome was a composite of stroke, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death. Secondary outcomes included changes in myocardial left ventricular (LV) wall thickness and replacement fibrosis, change in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), new TIA and change in neuropathic pain. Results During a median follow-up of 6.0 years (bottom and top quartiles: 5.1, 7.2), 15 events occurred in 13 patients (n = 7 deaths, n = 4 cases of ESRD and n = 4 strokes). Sudden death occurred (n = 6) only in patients with documented ventricular tachycardia and myocardial replacement fibrosis. The annual progression of myocardial LV fibrosis in the entire cohort was 0.6 ± 0.7%. As a result, posterior end-diastolic wall thinning was observed (baseline, 13.2 ± 2.0 mm; follow-up, 11.4 ± 2.1 mm; P < 0.01). GFR decreased by 2.3 ± 4.6 mL min−1 per year. Three patients experienced a TIA. The major clinical symptom was neuropathic pain (n = 37), and this symptom improved in 25 patients. The event rate was not different between the ERT group and the untreated (natural history) group of the Fabry Registry. Conclusion Despite ERT, clinically meaningful events including sudden cardiac death continue to develop in patients with advanced Fabry disease. PMID:23586858

  14. Advances in nutritional therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases: Review

    PubMed Central

    Wędrychowicz, Andrzej; Zając, Andrzej; Tomasik, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are chronic, life-long, and relapsing diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Currently, there are no complete cure possibilities, but combined pharmacological and nutritional therapy may induce remission of the disease. Malnutrition and specific nutritional deficiencies are frequent among IBD patients, so the majority of them need nutritional treatment, which not only improves the state of nutrition of the patients but has strong anti-inflammatory activity as well. Moreover, some nutrients, from early stages of life are suspected as triggering factors in the etiopathogenesis of IBD. Both parenteral and enteral nutrition is used in IBD therapy, but their practical utility in different populations and in different countries is not clearly established, and there are sometimes conflicting theories concerning the role of nutrition in IBD. This review presents the actual data from research studies on the influence of nutrition on the etiopathogenesis of IBD and the latest findings regarding its mechanisms of action. The use of both parenteral and enteral nutrition as therapeutic methods in induction and maintenance therapy in IBD treatment is also extensively discussed. Comparison of the latest research data, scientific theories concerning the role of nutrition in IBD, and different opinions about them are also presented and discussed. Additionally, some potential future perspectives for nutritional therapy are highlighted. PMID:26811646

  15. Clinical trials and late-stage drug development for Alzheimer's disease: an appraisal from 1984 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Schneider, L S; Mangialasche, F; Andreasen, N; Feldman, H; Giacobini, E; Jones, R; Mantua, V; Mecocci, P; Pani, L; Winblad, B; Kivipelto, M

    2014-03-01

    The modern era of drug development for Alzheimer's disease began with the proposal of the cholinergic hypothesis of memory impairment and the 1984 research criteria for Alzheimer's disease. Since then, despite the evaluation of numerous potential treatments in clinical trials, only four cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine have shown sufficient safety and efficacy to allow marketing approval at an international level. Although this is probably because the other drugs tested were ineffective, inadequate clinical development methods have also been blamed for the failures. Here, we review the development of treatments for Alzheimer's disease during the past 30 years, considering the drugs, potential targets, late-stage clinical trials, development methods, emerging use of biomarkers and evolution of regulatory considerations in order to summarize advances and anticipate future developments. We have considered late-stage Alzheimer's disease drug development from 1984 to 2013, including individual clinical trials, systematic and qualitative reviews, meta-analyses, methods, commentaries, position papers and guidelines. We then review the evolution of drugs in late clinical development, methods, biomarkers and regulatory issues. Although a range of small molecules and biological products against many targets have been investigated in clinical trials, the predominant drug targets have been the cholinergic system and the amyloid cascade. Trial methods have evolved incrementally: inclusion criteria have largely remained focused on mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease criteria, recently extending to early or prodromal Alzheimer disease or 'mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease', for drugs considered to be disease modifying. The duration of trials has remained at 6-12 months for drugs intended to improve symptoms; 18- to 24-month trials have been established for drugs expected to attenuate clinical course. Cognitive performance, activities of daily living

  16. Nitric Oxide Dysregulation in Platelets from Patients with Advanced Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maglione, Vittorio; Damato, Antonio; Amico, Enrico; Formisano, Luigi; Vecchione, Carmine; Squitieri, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a biologically active inorganic molecule involved in the regulation of many physiological processes, such as control of blood flow, platelet adhesion, endocrine function, neurotransmission and neuromodulation. In the present study, for the first time, we investigated the modulation of NO signaling in platelets of HD patients. We recruited 55 patients with manifest HD and 28 gender- and age-matched healthy controls. Our data demonstrated that NO-mediated vasorelaxation, when evoked by supernatant from insulin-stimulated HD platelets, gradually worsens along disease course. The defective vasorelaxation seems to stem from a faulty release of NO from platelets of HD patients and, it is associated with impairment of eNOS phosphorylation (Ser1177) and activity. This study provides important insights about NO metabolism in HD and raises the hypothesis that the decrease of NO in platelets of HD individuals could be a good tool for monitoring advanced stages of the disease. PMID:24587005

  17. Prevalence and prognosis of Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage.

    PubMed

    Vos, Stephanie J B; Verhey, Frans; Frölich, Lutz; Kornhuber, Johannes; Wiltfang, Jens; Maier, Wolfgang; Peters, Oliver; Rüther, Eckart; Nobili, Flavio; Morbelli, Silvia; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Drzezga, Alexander; Didic, Mira; van Berckel, Bart N M; Simmons, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Kłoszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Lovestone, Simon; Muscio, Cristina; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Salmon, Eric; Bastin, Christine; Wallin, Anders; Nordlund, Arto; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Silva, Dina; Santana, Isabel; Lemos, Raquel; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Van der Mussele, Stefan; Freund-Levi, Yvonne; Wallin, Åsa K; Hampel, Harald; van der Flier, Wiesje; Scheltens, Philip; Visser, Pieter Jelle

    2015-05-01

    Three sets of research criteria are available for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in subjects with mild cognitive impairment: the International Working Group-1, International Working Group-2, and National Institute of Aging-Alzheimer Association criteria. We compared the prevalence and prognosis of Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage according to these criteria. Subjects with mild cognitive impairment (n = 1607), 766 of whom had both amyloid and neuronal injury markers, were recruited from 13 cohorts. We used cognitive test performance and available biomarkers to classify subjects as prodromal Alzheimer's disease according to International Working Group-1 and International Working Group-2 criteria and in the high Alzheimer's disease likelihood group, conflicting biomarker groups (isolated amyloid pathology or suspected non-Alzheimer pathophysiology), and low Alzheimer's disease likelihood group according to the National Institute of Ageing-Alzheimer Association criteria. Outcome measures were the proportion of subjects with Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage and progression to Alzheimer's disease-type dementia. We performed survival analyses using Cox proportional hazards models. According to the International Working Group-1 criteria, 850 (53%) subjects had prodromal Alzheimer's disease. Their 3-year progression rate to Alzheimer's disease-type dementia was 50% compared to 21% for subjects without prodromal Alzheimer's disease. According to the International Working Group-2 criteria, 308 (40%) subjects had prodromal Alzheimer's disease. Their 3-year progression rate to Alzheimer's disease-type dementia was 61% compared to 22% for subjects without prodromal Alzheimer's disease. According to the National Institute of Ageing-Alzheimer Association criteria, 353 (46%) subjects were in the high Alzheimer's disease likelihood group, 49 (6%) in the isolated amyloid pathology group, 220 (29%) in the suspected non

  18. Helicobacter pylori-negative gastric cancer: advanced-stage undifferentiated adenocarcinoma located in the pyloric gland area.

    PubMed

    Okano, Akihiro; Kato, Shigeru; Ohana, Masaya

    2017-02-01

    The incidence of Helicobacter pylori-negative gastric cancer (HpNGC) is extremely low. A 78-year old female without H. pylori infection was diagnosed with type 4 advanced-stage gastric prepylorus cancer. Distal gastrectomy was performed as for HpNGC (cT3N0M0). Histological findings of the resected specimen showed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma and signet ring cell carcinoma, which were located in the pyloric gland area, diffusely invaded beyond the serosa without lymph node metastasis (pT4aN0M0). Most cases of undifferentiated-type HpNGC are diagnosed in the early stage and are located in the fundic gland area. We report the first case of advanced-stage undifferentiated HpNGC located in the pyloric gland area.

  19. Advances in vaccine research against economically important viral diseases of food animals: Infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Jackwood, Daral J

    2016-11-22

    Numerous reviews have been published on infectious bursal disease (IBD) and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Many high quality vaccines are commercially available for the control of IBD that, when used correctly, provide solid protection against infection and disease caused by IBDV. Viruses are not static however; they continue to evolve and vaccines need to keep pace with them. The evolution of IBDV has resulted in very virulent strains and new antigenic types of the virus. This review will discuss some of the limitations associated with existing vaccines, potential solutions to these problems and advances in new vaccines for the control of IBD.

  20. Rethinking the Food and Drug Administration's 2013 guidance on developing drugs for early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Lon S

    2014-03-01

    The February 2013 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft guidance for developing drugs for early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) creates certain challenges as they guide toward the use of one cognitive outcome to gain accelerated marketing approval for preclinical AD drugs, and a composite clinical scale - the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale in particular - for the primary outcome for prodromal AD clinical trials. In light of the developing knowledge regarding early stage diagnoses and clinical trials outcomes, we recommend that FDA describe its requirements for validating preclinical AD diagnoses for drug development purposes, maintain the principle for requiring coprimary outcomes, and encourage the advancement of outcomes for early stage AD trials. The principles for drug development for early stage AD should not differ from those for clinical AD, especially as the diagnoses of prodromal and early AD impinge on each other. The FDA should not recommend that a composite scale be used as a sole primary efficacy outcome to support a marketing claim unless it requires that the cognitive and functional components of such a scale are demonstrated to be individually meaningful. The current draft guidelines may inadvertently constrain efforts to better assess the clinical effects of new drugs and inhibit innovation in an area where evidence-based clinical research practices are still evolving.

  1. GPs’ views on managing advanced chronic kidney disease in primary care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin-Crine, Sarah; Santer, Miriam; Leydon, Geraldine M; Murtagh, Fliss EM; Farrington, Ken; Caskey, Fergus; Rayner, Hugh; Roderick, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a significant part of the GP’s workload since the introduction of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines in 2008. Patients with advanced CKD (stages G4 and G5) often have comorbidities, varied disease progression, and are likely to be older. GPs may experience difficulties with management decisions for patients with advanced CKD, including when to refer to nephrology. Aim To explore GPs’ views of managing patients with advanced CKD and referral to secondary care. Design and setting Qualitative study with GPs in four areas of England: London, Bristol, Birmingham, and Stevenage. Method Semi-structured interviews with 19 GPs. Transcribed interviews were thematically analysed. Results GPs had little experience of managing patients with advanced CKD, including those on dialysis or having conservative care (treatment without dialysis or a transplant), and welcomed guidance. Some GPs referred patients based on renal function alone and some used wider criteria including age and multimorbidity. GPs reported a tension between national guidance and local advice, and some had learnt from experience that patients were discharged back to primary care. GPs with more experience of managing CKD referred patients later, or sometimes not at all, if there were no additional problems and if dialysis was seen as not in the patient’s interests. Conclusion GPs want guidance on managing older patients with advanced CKD and comorbidities, which better incorporates agreement between local and national recommendations to clarify referral criteria. GPs are not generally aware of conservative care programmes provided by renal units, however, they appear happy to contribute to such care or alternatively, lead conservative management with input from renal teams. PMID:26120137

  2. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  3. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  4. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal... REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement...

  5. Treatment of Parkinson disease: a 64-year-old man with motor complications of advanced Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Tarsy, Daniel

    2012-06-06

    In early stages, Parkinson disease typically begins with asymmetric or unilateral motor symptoms due to combinations of mild bradykinesia, rigidity, and tremor. In most cases, with progression, signs of more generalized bradykinesia appear, which include facial masking, reduced voice volume, and slowing of activities of daily living. In more advanced Parkinson disease, other disabling manifestations may follow, such as impaired balance, gait freezing, falls, speech disturbance, and cognitive impairment. Levodopa is the most effective medical treatment for Parkinson disease. However, motor complications uniquely related to levodopa treatment may emerge that may be difficult to manage. These include fluctuating levodopa responses and involuntary movements and postures known as dyskinesia and dystonia. Medication adjustments are usually effective, but in some cases surgical intervention with deep brain stimulation becomes necessary to alleviate motor complications. The case of Mr L, a man with an 11-year history of Parkinson disease, illustrates these emerging motor complications and the manner in which they may be managed both medically and surgically.

  6. Pregnancy in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis: how to achieve a successful delivery.

    PubMed

    Manisco, Gianfranco; Potì', Marcello; Maggiulli, Giuseppe; Di Tullio, Massimo; Losappio, Vincenzo; Vernaglione, Luigi

    2015-06-01

    Pregnancy in women with chronic kidney disease has always been considered as a challenging event both for the mother and the fetus. Over the years, several improvements have been achieved in the outcome of pregnant chronic renal patients with increasing rates of successful deliveries. To date, evidence suggests that the stage of renal failure is the main predictive factor of worsening residual kidney function and complications in pregnant women. Moreover, the possibility of success of the pregnancy depends on adequate depurative and pharmacological strategies in patients with end-stage renal disease. In this paper, we propose a review of the current literature about this topic presenting our experience as well.

  7. Pregnancy in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis: how to achieve a successful delivery

    PubMed Central

    Manisco, Gianfranco; Potì’, Marcello; Maggiulli, Giuseppe; Di Tullio, Massimo; Losappio, Vincenzo; Vernaglione, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with chronic kidney disease has always been considered as a challenging event both for the mother and the fetus. Over the years, several improvements have been achieved in the outcome of pregnant chronic renal patients with increasing rates of successful deliveries. To date, evidence suggests that the stage of renal failure is the main predictive factor of worsening residual kidney function and complications in pregnant women. Moreover, the possibility of success of the pregnancy depends on adequate depurative and pharmacological strategies in patients with end-stage renal disease. In this paper, we propose a review of the current literature about this topic presenting our experience as well. PMID:26034591

  8. [The period of dialysis and nutritional habits of patients with the end stage renal disease].

    PubMed

    Wyszomierska, Agnieszka; Puka, Janusz; Myszkowska-Ryciak, Joanna; Narojek, Lucyna

    2009-01-01

    The influence of dialysis's period on energy and selected nutrients intake was examined on 38 patients with end stage renal disease. The longer period of dialysis caused higher energy and protein content in daily food rations. Furthermore lower intake of energy, protein, iron and calcium were observed as well as too high level of saturated fatty acids comparing to recommendations. Our data strongly suggest that constant dietician care might be essential to correct nutrients intake and prevent possible deficiencies among patients with the end stage renal disease.

  9. Clinical trials and late-stage drug development for Alzheimer’s disease: an appraisal from 1984 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Lon S.; Mangialasche, Francesca; Andreasen, Niels; Feldman, Howard; Giacobini, Ezio; Jones, Roy; Mantua, Valentina; Mecocci, Patrizia; Pani, Luca; Winblad, Bengt; Kivipelto, Miia

    2014-01-01

    The modern era of drug development for Alzheimer’s disease began with the proposal of the cholinergic hypothesis of memory impairment and the 1984 research criteria for Alzheimer’s disease. Since then, despite the evaluation of numerous potential treatments in clinical trials, only four cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine have shown sufficient safety and efficacy to allow marketing approval at an international level. Although this is probably because the other drugs tested were ineffective, inadequate clinical development methods have also been blamed for the failures. Here we review the development of treatments for Alzheimer’s disease during the past 30 years, considering the drugs, potential targets, late-stage clinical trials, development methods, emerging use of biomarkers and evolution of regulatory considerations in order to summarize advances and anticipate future developments. We have considered late-stage Alzheimer’s disease drug development from 1984 to 2013, including individual clinical trials, systematic and qualitative reviews, meta-analyses, methods, commentaries, position papers and guidelines. We then review the evolution of drugs in late clinical development, methods, biomarkers and regulatory issues. Although a range of small molecules and biological products against many targets have been investigated in clinical trials, the predominant drug targets have been the cholinergic system and the amyloid cascade. Trial methods have evolved incrementally: inclusion criteria have largely remained focused on mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease criteria, recently extending to early or prodromal Alzheimer disease or ‘mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer’s disease’, for drugs considered to be disease modifying. The duration of trials has remained at 6 to 12 months for drugs intended to improve symptoms; 18- to 24-month trials have been established for drugs expected to attenuate clinical course. Cognitive performance, activities

  10. Advances in the assessment of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Camilleri, M.; Proano, M. )

    1989-07-01

    Knowledge of the severity and extent of the inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases provides a means of determining rational therapeutic strategies in affected patients. During the past 3 decades, several clinical, laboratory, and combined indices have been proposed for the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease; refinements in radiologic methods and the availability of endoscopy and biopsy have facilitated the accurate assessment of the extent and severity of the disease. In relapsing conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, however, the use of such procedures is limited by the radiation exposure or the relatively invasive nature of the technique. In this article, we review the proposed methods and recent advances in assessment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease; we also discuss possible strategies at the time of diagnosis, during recurrence, and in evaluation of the efficacy of drug or dietic therapy. 58 references.

  11. Usefulness of a disease severity staging classification system for IPF in Japan: 20 years of experience from empirical evidence to randomized control trial enrollment.

    PubMed

    Homma, Sakae; Sugino, Keishi; Sakamoto, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Since 1991, the severity of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) has been classified into 4 stages-stage I (characterized by a resting PaO2 ≥ 80 Torr), stage II (70-79 Torr), stage III (60-69 Torr), or stage IV (<60 Torr)-to aid decisions on medical care subsidization in Japan. Among patients with stage II/III IPF, the severity should be increased by one stage if the lowest oxygen saturation on pulse oximetry (SpO2) is <90% during a 6-min walk test. Patients with stage III/IV IPF receive Japanese government subsidies for incurable diseases. This classification system highly correlates with serial changes in the percentage of vital capacity (%VC), the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide, the incidence of acute exacerbation, and survival. A phase III trial of pirfenidone showed that IPF patients with an SpO2 on exertion of <90% and either a %VC ≥ 70% or a PaO2 ≥ 70 Torr (which includes most patients with stage III disease) at baseline would benefit from pirfenidone treatment. Recent post-marketing surveillance of 1370 patients--67.3% of whom had stage III/IV IPF--showed that pirfenidone was well-tolerated among those treated for longer than 6 months (63% of patients). A Japanese randomized controlled trial (RCT) demonstrated that inhaled N-acetylcysteine monotherapy benefitted patients with early IPF (stage I/II, with no desaturation on exertion). Thus, N-acetylcysteine monotherapy is suitable for early IPF, and pirfenidone is indicated for advanced disease. The classification of IPF severity is important in identifying clinically responsive patients and those suitable for RCT enrollment.

  12. Advanced mast cell disease: an Italian Hematological Multicenter experience.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Livio; Valentini, Caterina Giovanna; Caira, Morena; Rondoni, Michela; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Candoni, Anna; Allione, Bernardino; Cattaneo, Chiara; Marbello, Laura; Caramatti, Cecilia; Pogliani, Enrico Maria; Iannitto, Emilio; Giona, Fiorina; Ferrara, Felicetto; Invernizzi, Rosangela; Fanci, Rosa; Lunghi, Monia; Fianchi, Luana; Sanpaolo, Grazia; Stefani, Pietro Maria; Pulsoni, Alessandro; Martinelli, Giovanni; Leone, Giuseppe; Musto, Pellegrino

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate clinical features, treatments and outcome of patients with systemic mast cell disease (MCD) who arrived to the attention of hematologists. A retrospective study was conducted over 1995-2006 in patients admitted in 18 Italian hematological divisions. Twenty-four cases of advanced MCD were collected: 12 aggressive SM (50%), 8 mast cell leukemia (33%), 4 SM with associated clonal non-mast cell-lineage hematologic disease (17%). Spleen and liver were the principal extramedullary organ involved. The c-kit point mutation D816V was found in 13/18 patients in which molecular biology studies were performed (72%). Treatments were very heterogeneous: on the whole Imatinib was administered in 17 patients, alpha-Interferon in 8, 2-CdA in 3; 2 patients underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The overall response rate to Imatinib, the most frequently employed drugs, was of 29%, registering one complete remission and four partial remission; all responsive patients did not present D816V c-kit mutation. Overall three patients (12%) died for progression of disease. We conclude that MCD is characterized by severe mediator-related symptoms but with a moderate mortality rate. D816V c-kit mutation is frequent and associated with resistance against Imatinib. Because of the rarity of these forms, an effective standard of care is lacking. More data are needed to find new and successful therapeutic strategies.

  13. Advances in stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease (Review)

    PubMed Central

    SUN, RONGRONG; LI, XIANCHI; LIU, MIN; ZENG, YI; CHEN, SHUANG; ZHANG, PEYING

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the primary cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, and represents a group of disorders associated with the loss of cardiac function. Despite considerable advances in the understanding of the pathologic mechanisms of the disease, the majority of the currently available therapies remain at best palliative, since the problem of cardiac tissue loss has not yet been addressed. Indeed, few therapeutic approaches offer direct tissue repair and regeneration, whereas the majority of treatment options aim to limit scar formation and adverse remodeling, while improving myocardial function. Of all the existing therapeutic approaches, the problem of cardiac tissue loss is addressed uniquely by heart transplantation. Nevertheless, alternative options, particularly stem cell therapy, has emerged as a novel and promising approach. This approach involves the transplantation of healthy and functional cells to promote the renewal of damaged cells and repair injured tissue. Bone marrow precursor cells were the first cell type used in clinical studies, and subsequently, preclinical and clinical investigations have been extended to the use of various populations of stem cells. This review addresses the present state of research as regards stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease. PMID:27220939

  14. Once-Weekly, High-Dose Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer: 6-Year Analysis of 60 Early-Stage, 42 Locally Advanced, and 7 Metastatic Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, Omar M. Sandhu, Taljit S.; Lattin, Paul B.; Chang, Jung H.; Lee, Choon K.; Groshko, Gayle A.; Lattin, Cheryl J.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To explore once-weekly stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in nonoperable patients with localized, locally advanced, or metastatic lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 primary (89 untreated plus 13 recurrent) and 7 metastatic tumors were studied. The median follow-up was 38 months, the average patient age was 75 years. Of the 109 tumors studied, 60 were Stage I (45 IA and 15 IB), 9 were Stage II, 30 were Stage III, 3 were Stage IV, and 7 were metastases. SBRT only was given in 73% (40 Gy in four fractions to the planning target volume to a total dose of 53 Gy to the isocenter for a biologically effective dose of 120 Gy{sub 10}). SBRT was given as a boost in 27% (22.5 Gy in three fractions once weekly for a dose of 32 Gy at the isocenter) after 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the primary plus the mediastinum. The total biologically effective dose was 120 Gy{sub 10}. Respiration gating was used in 46%. Results: The overall response rate was 75%; 33% had a complete response. The overall response rate was 89% for Stage IA patients (40% had a complete response). The local control rate was 82%; it was 100% and 93% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The failure rate was 37%, with 17% within the planning target volume. No Grade 3-4 acute toxicities developed in any patient; 12% and 7% of patients developed Grade 1 and 2 toxicities, respectively. Late toxicity, all Grade 2, developed in 3% of patients. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate for Stage I was 70% and was 74% and 64% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The 3-year Stage III cause-specific survival rate was 30%. The patients with metastatic lung cancer had a 57% response rate, a 27% complete response rate, an 86% local control rate, a median survival time of 19 months, and 23% 3-year survival rate. Conclusions: SBRT is noninvasive, convenient, fast, and economically attractive; it achieves results similar to surgery for early or metastatic lung cancer patients who are older

  15. Advanced gastrointestinal endoscopic imaging for inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Rath, Timo; Neumann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal luminal endoscopy is of paramount importance for diagnosis, monitoring and dysplasia surveillance in patients with both, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Moreover, with the recent recognition that mucosal healing is directly linked to the clinical outcome of patients with inflammatory bowel disorders, a growing demand exists for the precise, timely and detailed endoscopic assessment of superficial mucosal layer. Further, the novel field of molecular imaging has tremendously expanded the clinical utility and applications of modern endoscopy, now encompassing not only diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment but also the prediction of individual therapeutic responses. Within this review, we describe how novel endoscopic approaches and advanced endoscopic imaging methods such as high definition and high magnification endoscopy, dye-based and dye-less chromoendoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy, endocytoscopy and molecular imaging now allow for the precise and ultrastructural assessment of mucosal inflammation and describe the potential of these techniques for dysplasia detection. PMID:26811662

  16. Advances in Nanotechnology for the Management of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, June-Wha; Wu, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology holds tremendous potential to advance the current treatment of coronary artery disease. Nanotechnology may assist medical therapies by providing a safe and efficacious delivery platform for a variety of drugs aimed at modulating lipid disorders, decreasing inflammation and angiogenesis within atherosclerotic plaques, and preventing plaque thrombosis. Nanotechnology may improve coronary stent applications by promoting endothelial recovery on a stent surface utilizing bio-mimetic nanofibrous scaffolds, and also by preventing in-stent restenosis using nanoparticle-based delivery of drugs that are decoupled from stents. Additionally, nanotechnology may enhance tissue-engineered graft materials for application in coronary artery bypass grafting by facilitating cellular infiltration and remodeling of a graft matrix. PMID:23245913

  17. Nursing staff's understanding expressions of people with advanced dementia disease.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Thomas; Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa; Norberg, Astrid

    2013-01-01

    People with advanced dementia disease (ADD) are known to have communication difficulties and thus it presents a challenge in understanding the expressions of these people. Because successful communication presupposes cooperation at least between 2 individuals, both individual's actions must be acknowledged. The aim of this study is to describe nursing staff's ways of understanding the expressions of people with ADD when communicating with them. Interviews from 8 nursing staff were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Two themes were constructed: "Being in communication" and "Doing communication." Being in communication means that nursing staff perceive people with ADD as being capable of communication. Doing communication means that nursing staff attempt different individualized strategies to understand what people with ADD communicate. Good care of people with ADD presupposes nursing staff that are willing and able to relate to other people and to maintain good care for people with ADD continuous education and supervision are needed.

  18. CAP--advancing the evaluation of preclinical Alzheimer disease treatments.

    PubMed

    Reiman, Eric M; Langbaum, Jessica B; Tariot, Pierre N; Lopera, Francisco; Bateman, Randall J; Morris, John C; Sperling, Reisa A; Aisen, Paul S; Roses, Allen D; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Carrillo, Maria C; Weninger, Stacie

    2016-01-01

    If we are to find treatments to postpone, reduce the risk of, or completely prevent the clinical onset of Alzheimer disease (AD), we need faster methods to evaluate promising preclinical AD treatments, new ways to work together in support of common goals, and a determination to expedite the initiation and performance of preclinical AD trials. In this article, we note some of the current challenges, opportunities and emerging strategies in preclinical AD treatment. We describe the Collaboration for Alzheimer's Prevention (CAP)-a convening, harmonizing and consensus-building initiative to help stakeholders advance AD prevention research with rigour, care and maximal impact-and we demonstrate the impact of CAP on the goals and design of new preclinical AD trials.

  19. CAP—advancing the evaluation of preclinical Alzheimer disease treatments

    PubMed Central

    Reiman, Eric M.; Langbaum, Jessica B.; Tariot, Pierre N.; Lopera, Francisco; Bateman, Randall J.; Morris, John C.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Aisen, Paul S.; Roses, Allen D.; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Carrillo, Maria C.; Weninger, Stacie

    2016-01-01

    If we are to find treatments to postpone, reduce the risk of, or completely prevent the clinical onset of Alzheimer disease (AD), we need faster methods to evaluate promising preclinical AD treatments, new ways to work together in support of common goals, and a determination to expedite the initiation and performance of preclinical AD trials. In this article, we note some of the current challenges, opportunities and emerging strategies in preclinical AD treatment. We describe the Collaboration for Alzheimer’s Prevention (CAP)—a convening, harmonizing and consensus-building initiative to help stakeholders advance AD prevention research with rigour, care and maximal impact—and we demonstrate the impact of CAP on the goals and design of new preclinical AD trials. PMID:26416539

  20. Advances in the genetic mechanisms of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Vladutiu, G D

    1997-12-01

    During the past 16 years since the delineation of the human mitochondrial genome, substantial advances have been made in identifying pathogenic mutations causing mitochondrial disorders. However, just as we have come to accept the unexpected in the nontraditional aspects of Mendelian inheritance with the discovery of trinucleotide expansions, imprinting and uniparental disomy, unusual characteristics of mitochondrial inheritance also have been found that defy existing laws. For example, we now know that the nuclear genetic background of an individual might influence the expression and tissue specificity of mitochondrial mutations. Pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations contribute to the generation of new mutations by compromising mitochondrial function and increasing free radical production. Evidence for recombination raises new questions about repair mechanisms of mitochondrial DNA. It appears that the more we learn about the bases of mitochondrial disease, the more complex diagnosis, treatment, and genetic counseling become.

  1. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.210 Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment...

  2. 42 CFR 413.210 - Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... disease (ESRD) prospective payment system. 413.210 Section 413.210 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.210 Conditions for payment under the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment...

  3. Who will be active? Predicting exercise stage transitions after hospitalization for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Reid, Robert D; Tulloch, Heather; Kocourek, Jana; Morrin, Louise I; Beaton, Louise J; Papadakis, Sophia; Blanchard, Chris M; Riley, Dana L; Pipe, Andrew L

    2007-01-01

    We describe transitions between exercise stages of change in people with coronary artery disease (CAD) over a 6-month period following a CAD-related hospitalization and evaluate constructs from Protection Motivation Theory, Theory of Planned Behavior, Social Cognitive Theory, the Ecological Model, and participation in cardiac rehabilitation as correlates of stage transition. Seven hundred eighty-two adults hospitalized with CAD were recruited and administered a baseline survey including assessments of theory-based constructs and exercise stage of change. Mailed surveys were used to gather information concerning exercise stage of change and participation in cardiac rehabilitation 6 months later. Progression from pre-action stages between baseline and 6 month follow-up was associated with greater perceived efficacy of exercise to reduce risk of future disease, fewer barriers to exercise, more access to home exercise equipment, and participation in cardiac rehabilitation. Regression from already active stages between baseline and 6 month follow-up was associated with increased perceived susceptibility to a future CAD-related event, fewer intentions to exercise, lower self-efficacy, and more barriers to exercise.

  4. Recent advancement of therapeutic endoscopy in the esophageal benign diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bechara, Robert; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, the field of endoscopy has witnessed several advances. With the advent of endoscopic mucosal resection, removal of large mucosal lesions have become possible. Thereafter, endoscopic submucosal resection was refined, permitting en bloc removal of large superficial neoplasms. Such techniques have facilitated the development of antireflux mucosectomy, a promising novel treatment for gastroesophageal reflux. The introduction and use of over the scope clips has allowed for endoscopic closure of defects in the gastrointestinal tract, which were traditionally treated with surgical intervention. With the development of per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), the treatment of achalasia and spastic disorders of the esophagus have been revolutionized. From the submucosal tunnelling technique developed for POEM, Per oral endoscopic tumor resection of subepithelial tumors was made possible. Simultaneously, advances in biotechnology have expanded esophageal stenting capabilities with the introduction of fully covered metal and plastic stents, as well as biodegradable stents. Once deemed a primarily diagnostic tool, endoscopy has quickly transcended to a minimally invasive intervention and therapeutic tool. These techniques are reviewed with regards to their application to benign disease of the esophagus. PMID:25992187

  5. A novel mouse model of advanced diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Jean-Francois; Holterman, Chet E; Burger, Dylan; Read, Naomi C; Reudelhuber, Timothy L; Kennedy, Christopher R J

    2014-01-01

    Currently available rodent models exhibit characteristics of early diabetic nephropathy (DN) such as hyperfiltration, mesangial expansion, and albuminuria yet features of late DN (hypertension, GFR decline, tubulointerstitial fibrosis) are absent or require a significant time investment for full phenotype development. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to develop a mouse model of advanced DN with hypertension superimposed (HD mice). Mice transgenic for human renin cDNA under the control of the transthyretin promoter (TTRhRen) were employed as a model of angiotensin-dependent hypertension. Diabetes was induced in TTRhRen mice through low dose streptozotocin (HD-STZ mice) or by intercrossing with OVE26 diabetic mice (HD-OVE mice). Both HD-STZ and HD-OVE mice displayed more pronounced increases in urinary albumin levels as compared with their diabetic littermates. Additionally, HD mice displayed renal hypertrophy, advanced glomerular scarring and evidence of tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Both HD-OVE and HD-STZ mice showed evidence of GFR decline as FITC-inulin clearance was decreased compared to hyperfiltering STZ and OVE mice. Taken together our results suggest that HD mice represent a robust model of type I DN that recapitulates key features of human disease which may be significant in studying the pathogenesis of DN and in the assessment of putative therapeutics.

  6. Advanced glycation end products contribute to amyloidosis in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vitek, M P; Bhattacharya, K; Glendening, J M; Stopa, E; Vlassara, H; Bucala, R; Manogue, K; Cerami, A

    1994-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by deposits of an aggregated 42-amino-acid beta-amyloid peptide (beta AP) in the brain and cerebrovasculature. After a concentration-dependent lag period during in vitro incubations, soluble preparations of synthetic beta AP slowly form fibrillar aggregates that resemble natural amyloid and are measurable by sedimentation and thioflavin T-based fluorescence. Aggregation of soluble beta AP in these in vitro assays is enhanced by addition of small amounts of pre-aggregated beta-amyloid "seed" material. We also have prepared these seeds by using a naturally occurring reaction between glucose and protein amino groups resulting in the formation of advanced "glycosylation" end products (AGEs) which chemically crosslink proteins. AGE-modified beta AP-nucleation seeds further accelerated aggregation of soluble beta AP compared to non-modified "seed" material. Over time, nonenzymatic advanced glycation also results in the gradual accumulation of a set of posttranslational covalent adducts on long-lived proteins in vivo. In a standardized competitive ELISA, plaque fractions of AD brains were found to contain about 3-fold more AGE adducts per mg of protein than preparations from healthy, age-matched controls. These results suggest that the in vivo half-life of beta-amyloid is prolonged in AD, resulting in greater accumulation of AGE modifications which in turn may act to promote accumulation of additional amyloid. PMID:8197133

  7. Advances in designs for Alzheimer's disease clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Gould, Heath; Zhong, Kate

    2012-01-01

    There is an urgent need to identify new treatments for the rapidly growing population of people with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Innovations in clinical trial designs many help to reduce development time, provide more definitive answers regarding drug efficacy, and facilitate prioritizing compounds to be advanced to Phase III clinical trials. Standard designs compare drug and placebo changes from baseline on a rating scale. Baysian adaptive clinical trials allow the use of data collected in the trial to modify doses, sample size, trial duration, and entry criteria in an ongoing way as the data are collected. Disease-modification is supported by findings on staggered start and delayed withdrawal designs. Futility designs can use historical controls and may shorten trial duration. Combination therapy designs may allow investigation of additive or synergistic treatment effects. Novel trial selection criteria allow investigation of treatment effects in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic, prodromal AD populations. The Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (CDR-SOB) can be considered as a single trial outcome in early disease populations. Alternate forms of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Portion (ADAS-cog), computerized measures, and pharmacoeconomic scales provide new and relevant information on drug effects. Comparative dose strategies are used in trials of symptomatic agents, and novel methods including withdrawal designs, symptom emergence analyses, and sequential designs are being utilized to assess the efficacy of putative psychotropic agents. The choice of trial design is driven by the question to be answered by the clinical trial; an increasing number of design approaches are available and may be useful in accelerating and refining AD drug development.

  8. Advances in designs for Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Gould, Heath; Zhong, Kate

    2012-01-01

    There is an urgent need to identify new treatments for the rapidly growing population of people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Innovations in clinical trial designs many help to reduce development time, provide more definitive answers regarding drug efficacy, and facilitate prioritizing compounds to be advanced to Phase III clinical trials. Standard designs compare drug and placebo changes from baseline on a rating scale. Baysian adaptive clinical trials allow the use of data collected in the trial to modify doses, sample size, trial duration, and entry criteria in an ongoing way as the data are collected. Disease-modification is supported by findings on staggered start and delayed withdrawal designs. Futility designs can use historical controls and may shorten trial duration. Combination therapy designs may allow investigation of additive or synergistic treatment effects. Novel trial selection criteria allow investigation of treatment effects in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic, prodromal AD populations. The Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (CDR-SOB) can be considered as a single trial outcome in early disease populations. Alternate forms of the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Portion (ADAS-cog), computerized measures, and pharmacoeconomic scales provide new and relevant information on drug effects. Comparative dose strategies are used in trials of symptomatic agents, and novel methods including withdrawal designs, symptom emergence analyses, and sequential designs are being utilized to assess the efficacy of putative psychotropic agents. The choice of trial design is driven by the question to be answered by the clinical trial; an increasing number of design approaches are available and may be useful in accelerating and refining AD drug development. PMID:23383393

  9. 75 FR 49029 - Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ...This final rule implements a case-mix adjusted bundled prospective payment system (PPS) for Medicare outpatient end-stage renal disease (ESRD) dialysis facilities beginning January 1, 2011 (ESRD PPS), in compliance with the statutory requirement of the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act (MIPPA), enacted July 15, 2008. This ESRD PPS also replaces the current basic case-mix......

  10. How End-Stage Renal Disease Patients Manage the Medicare Part D Coverage Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacs, Pamela J.; Perkins, Nathan; Nuschke, Elizabeth; Carroll, Norman

    2012-01-01

    Medicare Part D was enacted to help elderly and disabled individuals pay for prescription drugs, but it was structured with a gap providing no coverage in 2010 between $2,830 and $6,440. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are especially likely to be affected due to high costs of dialysis-related drugs and the importance of adherence for…

  11. Is radial shortening useful for Litchman stage 3B Kienbock's disease?

    PubMed

    Altay, Taskin; Kaya, Ahmet; Karapinar, Levent; Ozturk, Hasan; Kayali, Cemil

    2008-12-01

    Treatment of Litchman stage 3 Kienböck's disease is still controversial. In this study our aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of radial shortening on stage 3B Kienböck's disease in comparison with stage 3A cases. Radial shortening was performed for 23 patients who had stage 3A (group I, n = 13) and 3B (group II, n = 10) Kienböck's disease between 1994 and 2004. The radial osteotomy was performed 4.5 cm proximal to the distal articular surface. The mean shortening was 2.6 mm (range 2 to 4.5). The average follow-up period was 85 months (range 26-147). Based on the modified Nakamura system, the mean clinical points were 14.3 in group I and 13.3 in group II. There was no statistical difference between both groups with regard to clinical points (P = 0.483). The extension-flexion arc showed significant improvement in both groups. Based on the results of this long-term follow-up study, we concluded that radial shortening osteotomy can be performed in the treatment of type 3B Kienböck's disease as reliably as type 3A, despite the lack of evident radiological improvement.

  12. Arthroscopic core decompression of the lunate in early stage Kienbock disease of the lunate.

    PubMed

    Bain, Gregory I; Smith, Michael L; Watts, Adam C

    2011-03-01

    Since the first description of Kienbock disease in 1910, the etiology and treatment have remained controversial topics. Core decompression is an accepted treatment option in early-stage avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and more recently the humeral head. This paper reports the technique of arthroscopic fluoroscopically guided core decompression of the lunate with 6-year results.

  13. [Effectiveness of radiotherapy in patients with lymphogranulomatosis depending on the stage of the disease].

    PubMed

    Mendeleev, I M; Miasnikov, A A; Oleĭnik, V A

    1984-01-01

    The authors review variants of radiotherapy of patients with lymphogranulomatosis. Regard the method of irradiation with broad fields of complicated configuration as preferable. Point to the advisability of using one or another method depending on the disease stage. Describe the conditions necessary, in their opinion, for successful radiotherapy of lymphogranulomatosis patients.

  14. 42 CFR 406.13 - Individual who has end-stage renal disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 406.13 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... 226A of the Social Security Act. (b) Definitions. As used in this section: End-stage renal disease... regular course of dialysis or kidney transplantation to maintain life. Child or spouse means a child...

  15. 77 FR 67449 - Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System, Quality Incentive Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ...This final rule updates and makes revisions to the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system (PPS) for calendar year (CY) 2013. This rule also sets forth requirements for the ESRD quality incentive program (QIP), including for payment year (PY) 2015 and beyond. In addition, this rule implements changes to bad debt reimbursement for all Medicare providers, suppliers, and other......

  16. Using Spirituality to Cope with Early Stage Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Grando, Victoria T.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) robs persons living with this disease of their independence and self-esteem, which can lead to depression, anxiety, and loneliness. Understanding how people with early stage AD cope is a critical step to enhance their adaptive abilities and ultimately improve their quality of life. This qualitative study describes how individuals with early stage AD use spirituality to cope with the losses of self-esteem, independence, and social interaction that they face. The purposive sample for this focused ethnography study consisted of 15 participants living at home in central Arkansas. Holding onto faith, seeking reassurance and hope, and staying connected were the global themes. Personal faith, prayer, connection to church, and family support enhanced the ability for people with early stage AD to keep a positive attitude as they face living with Alzheimer’s. PMID:19282270

  17. The role of the amygdala during emotional processing in Huntington's disease: From pre-manifest to late stage disease

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Sarah L.; Zhang, Jiaxiang; Begeti, Faye; Guzman, Natalie Valle; Lazar, Alpar S.; Rowe, James B.; Barker, Roger A.; Hampshire, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Background Deficits in emotional processing can be detected in the pre-manifest stage of Huntington's disease and negative emotion recognition has been identified as a predictor of clinical diagnosis. The underlying neuropathological correlates of such deficits are typically established using correlative structural MRI studies. This approach does not take into consideration the impact of disruption to the complex interactions between multiple brain circuits on emotional processing. Therefore, exploration of the neural substrates of emotional processing in pre-manifest HD using fMRI connectivity analysis may be a useful way of evaluating the way brain regions interrelate in the period prior to diagnosis. Methods We investigated the impact of predicted time to disease onset on brain activation when participants were exposed to pictures of faces with angry and neutral expressions, in 20 pre-manifest HD gene carriers and 23 healthy controls. On the basis of the results of this initial study went on to look at amygdala dependent cognitive performance in 79 Huntington's disease patients from a cross-section of disease stages (pre-manifest to late disease) and 26 healthy controls, using a validated theory of mind task: “the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test” which has been previously been shown to be amygdala dependent. Results Psychophysiological interaction analysis identified reduced connectivity between the left amygdala and right fusiform facial area in pre-manifest HD gene carriers compared to controls when viewing angry compared to neutral faces. Change in PPI connectivity scores correlated with predicted time to disease onset (r=0.45, p<0.05). Furthermore, performance on the “Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test” correlated negatively with proximity to disease onset and became progressively worse with each stage of disease. Conclusion Abnormalities in the neural networks underlying social cognition and emotional processing can be detected prior to clinical

  18. Consequences of Advanced Glycation End Products Accumulation in Chronic Kidney Disease and Clinical Usefulness of Their Assessment Using a Non-invasive Technique - Skin Autofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Oleniuc, Mihaela; Secara, Irina; Onofriescu, Mihai; Hogas, Simona; Voroneanu, Luminita; Siriopol, Dimitrie; Covic, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    Accelerated formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end-products occur under circumstances of increased supply of substrates such as hyperglycaemic or oxidative stress and in age-related and chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure, neurodegenerative diseases, osteoarthritis and also non-diabetic atherosclerosis and chronic heart failure. Advanced glycation end-products accumulation occurs especially on long-lived proteins such as collagen in the skin and in vascular basement membranes leading to vascular damage. Adequate renal clearance capacity is an important factor in the effective removal of advanced glycation end-products. The Autofluorescence Reader was developed as a marker, representative for tissue advanced glycation end-products accumulation, easily applicable in a clinical setting, initially for predicting diabetes related complications. Studies have already shown a relationship between skin autofluorescence and diabetes complications, as well as its predictive value for total and cardiovascular mortality in type 2 diabetes. Moreover skin autofluorescence was demonstrated to be superior to Haemoglobin A1c and other conventional risk factors. Advanced glycation end-products have been proposed as a novel factor involved in the development and progression of chronic heart failure. Assessment of advanced glycation end-products accumulation in end-stage renal disease and undergoing renal replacement therapies patients has become of great importance. Cardiovascular and connective tissue disorders are very common in patients with end-stage renal disease, and the accumulation of advanced glycation end-products is significantly increased in these patients. Mortality is markedly increased in patients with decreased kidney function, particularly in patients with end-stage renal disease. Skin advanced glycation end-products levels are strong predictors of survival in haemodialysis patients independent of other established risk factors

  19. Amygdalohippocampal MR volume measurements in the early stages of Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lehericy, S.; Baulac, M.; Chiras, J.; Pierot, L.; Martin, N.; Pillon, B.; Deweer, B.; Dubois, B.; Marsault, C.

    1994-05-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of hippocampal and amygdala volume measurements in diagnosing patients in the early stages of Alzheimer disease. Measurements of the hippocampal formation, amygdala, amygdalohippocampal complex (the two measurements summed), caudate nucleus, and ventricles, normalized for total intracranial volume, were obtained on coronal sections (1.5 T, 400/13 [repetition time/echo time], 5 mm) of 13 patients in the mild (minimental status {ge} 21) and five patients in the moderate stages of Alzheimer disease (10 < minimental status < 21), and eight age-matched control subjects. For patients with a minimental status score of 21 or greater, atrophy was significant for the amygdala and hippocampal formation (-36% and -25% for amygdala/total intracranial volume and hippocampal formation/total intracranial volume, respectively), but not for the caudate nucleus. No significant ventricular enlargement was found. For patients with a minimental status score less than 21, atrophy was more severe in all structures studied (amygdala/total intracranial volume -40%; hippocampal formation/total intracranial volume, -45%; caudate nucleus/total intracranial volume, -21%), and ventricles were enlarged (63%). No overlap was found between Alzheimer disease and control values for the amygdalohippocampal volume, even in the mild stages of the disease. In Alzheimer disease patients, hippocampal formation volumes correlated with the minimental status. Hippocampal and amygdala atrophy is marked and significant in the mild stages of Alzheimer disease. Volumetric measurements of the amygdala and the amygdalohippocampal complex appear more accurate than those of the hippocampal formation alone in distinguishing patients with Alzheimer disease. 46 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Relationship between disease stage and renal function in bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Bisphosphonate is the primary cause of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ). Bisphosphonates are eliminated from the human body by the kidneys. It is anticipated that bisphosphonate levels in the body will increase if the kidney is in a weak state or if there is systemic disease that affects kidney function. The aim of this study was to analyze the relevance of renal function in the severity of BRONJ. Materials and Methods Ninety-three patients diagnosed with BRONJ in Pusan National University Dental Hospital from January 2012 to December 2014 were included in this study. All patients underwent a clinical exam, radiographs, and serologic lab test, including urine analysis. The patient's medical history was also taken, including the type of bisphosphonate drug, the duration of administration and drug holiday, route of administration, and other systemic diseases. In accordance with the guidelines of the 2009 position paper of American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, the BRONJ stage was divided into 4 groups, from stage 0 to 3, according to the severity of disease. IBM SPSS Statistics version 21.0 (IBM Co., USA) was used to perform regression analysis with a 0.05% significance level. Results BRONJ stage and renal factor (estimated glomerular filtration rate) showed a moderate statistically significant correlation. In the group with higher BRONJ stage, the creatinine level was higher, but the increase was not statistically significant. Other factors showed no significant correlation with BRONJ stage. There was a high statistically significant correlation between BRONJ stage and ‘responder group’ and ‘non-responder group,’ but there was no significant difference with the ‘worsened group.’ In addition, the age of the patients was a relative factor with BRONJ stage. Conclusion With older age and lower renal function, BRONJ is more severe, and there may be a decrease in patient response to treatment. PMID:28280705

  1. Clinical and Genetic Advances in Paget's Disease of Bone: a Review.

    PubMed

    Alonso, N; Calero-Paniagua, I; Del Pino-Montes, J

    2017-01-01

    Paget's disease of bone (PDB) is the second most common metabolic bone disorder, after osteoporosis. It is characterised by focal areas of increased and disorganised bone turnover, coupled with increased bone formation. This disease usually appears in the late stages of life, being slightly more frequent in men than in women. It has been reported worldwide, but primarily affects individuals of British descent. Majority of PDB patients are asymptomatic, but clinical manifestations include pain, bone deformity and complications, like pathological fractures and deafness. The causes of the disease are poorly understood and it is considered as a complex trait, combining genetic predisposition with environmental factors. Linkage analysis identified SQSTM1, at chromosome 5q35, as directly related to the disease. A number of mutations in this gene have been reported, pP392L being the most common variant among different populations. Most of these variants affect the ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain of the protein, which is involved in autophagy processes. Genome-wide association studies enlarged the number of loci associated with PDB, and further fine-mapping studies, combined with functional analysis, identified OPTN and RIN3 as causal genes for Paget's disease. A combination of risk alleles identified by genome-wide association studies led to the development of a score to predict disease severity, which could improve the management of the disease. Further studies need to be conducted to elucidate other important aspects of the trait, such as its focal nature and the epidemiological changes found in some populations. In this review, we summarize the clinical characteristics of the disease and the latest genetic advances to identify susceptibility genes. We also list current available treatments and prospective options.

  2. Prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and risk factors for advanced fibrosis and mortality in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Le, Michael H.; Devaki, Pardha; Ha, Nghiem B.; Jun, Dae Won; Te, Helen S.; Cheung, Ramsey C.

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and associated with higher mortality according to data from earlier National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1988–1994. Our goal was to determine the NAFLD prevalence in the recent 1999–2012 NHANES, risk factors for advanced fibrosis (stage 3–4) and mortality. NAFLD was defined as having a United States Fatty Liver Index (USFLI) > 30 in the absence of heavy alcohol use and other known liver diseases. The probability of low/high risk of having advanced fibrosis was determined by the NAFLD Fibrosis Score (NFS). In total, 6000 persons were included; of which, 30.0% had NAFLD and 10.3% of these had advanced fibrosis. Five and eight-year overall mortality in NAFLD subjects with advanced fibrosis was significantly higher than subjects without NAFLD ((18% and 35% vs. 2.6% and 5.5%, respectively) but not NAFLD subjects without advanced fibrosis (1.1% and 2.8%, respectively). NAFLD with advanced fibrosis (but not those without) is an independent predictor for mortality on multivariate analysis (HR = 3.13, 95% CI 1.93–5.08, p<0.001). In conclusion, in this most recent NHANES, NAFLD prevalence remains at 30% with 10.3% of these having advanced fibrosis. NAFLD per se was not a risk factor for increased mortality, but NAFLD with advanced fibrosis was. Mexican American ethnicity was a significant risk factor for NAFLD but not for advanced fibrosis or increased mortality. PMID:28346543

  3. 'Making the best you can of it': living with early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Macrae, Hazel

    2008-04-01

    Drawing upon data from a qualitative study of persons who are in the early stage of the condition, this paper examines the meaning of Alzheimer's disease. It contrasts the meaning of the disease as portrayed in popular culture with its meaning as interpreted by persons living with it. Findings show that persons with the illness do not necessarily accept the negative cultural meaning of the disease, nor the helpless 'victim' role in which they are generally cast. With a determination to 'make the best of it', strategies such as humour, normalisation, present-time orientation, and life review are employed to create a meaningful life.

  4. [Species composition of anaerobic microflora in parodontal pocket depending upon disease stage].

    PubMed

    Zyrianova, N V; Grigor'ian, A S; Grudianov, A I; Frolova, O A; Shil'nikova, I I; Kobozev, M I

    2009-01-01

    With the help of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) the dynamic of species composition of anaerobic microflora in cases of generalized parodontitis was established. It was detected that disease severity increase was followed by the increase of the number of anaerobic microflora species in parodontal pocket; at that it was impossible to connect the presence of some determined type of microorganism with the inflammatory parodontal process intensity. It was shown that proteins fimbrilin and gingipain were not the only parodontitis pathogenic factors although the first one (fimbrilin) could be connected with aggressive disease flow. The suggested PCR scheme could be useful for early disease stage diagnostic and substantiation of antimicrobial therapy method selection.

  5. Treatment of patients with stages I and II nonmediastinal Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hagemeister, F.B.; Fuller, L.M.; Sullivan, J.; Johnston, D.; North, L.; Butler, J.J.; Velasquez, W.S.; Shullenberger, C.C.

    1982-12-01

    In this study, 95 patients with laparotomy-staged I and II nonmediastinal Hodgkin's disease were treated with involved fields (41 patients), mantle (17), extended fields (26), or involved fields followed by 6 cycles of chemotherapy (11). Eighty-five patients had upper torso presentations. Seventy had Stage I disease and 25 had stage II. Pathologic findings were nodular sclerosing, 33; mixed cellularity, 41; lymphocyte predominance, 20; and unclassified, one. Five-year overall survivals were excellent regardless of stage, pathologic findings, or treatment: 98% for involved fields or mantle, and 100% for both extended fields and involved fields followed by 6 cycles of chemotherapy. Corresponding disease-free survivals were 77%, 82%, and 86%, respectively. For patients with upper torso presentations, disease-free figures for the mantle (94%) were better than those for involved fields alone (67%). In addition, regression analysis proved involved fields to be a prognostic factor for a lower disease-free survival. No difference between extended fields or mantle radiotherapy could be detected using this model. Relapses usually occurred in nonirradiated upper torso sites. Only three of the 36 patients treated with involved fields and one of 21 treated with extended fields relapsed in the abdomen alone. Most patients in relapse were salvaged. Rescue treatment was most often radiotherapy and adjuvant combination chemotherapy. Based on this study, the use of mantle radiotherapy is recommended in treating laparotomy-staged I and II patients with nonmediastinal presentations, and the use of extended fields or adjuvant chemotherapy as primary prevention is not recommended. (JMT)

  6. Conivaptan increases serum sodium in hyponatremic patients with end-stage liver disease.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Jacqueline G; Davis, Gary L

    2009-10-01

    Hyponatremia is associated with increased mortality in patients with end-stage liver disease and a greater risk of perioperative mortality with liver transplantation. We performed a retrospective review of our experience with conivaptan as a means of acutely increasing serum sodium in end-stage liver disease patients. The primary group consisted of 15 patients with end-stage liver disease who remained hyponatremic despite discontinuation of diuretics and a 1-L fluid restriction. Twenty milligrams of conivaptan was intravenously administered over 30 minutes, and this was followed by an infusion of 20 mg over 24 hours for 1 to 4 days. A second group of 9 hyponatremic end-stage liver disease patients was treated with 1-L fluid restriction and conivaptan while remaining on diuretics. In the group without diuretics, the mean serum sodium was 124 mmol/L 1 day before and on the day of conivaptan initiation, but the serum sodium rose to a mean of 127.7 mmol/L by day 1 and further increased to 128.6 mmol/L by the second day of the infusion. Despite the continuation of diuretics, the second group of 9 patients also had an increase in serum sodium from the day of conivaptan initiation (125.7 mmol/L) to 2 days after the treatment (130.6 mmol/L). Eleven patients underwent successful liver transplantation, 2 remained on the list for transplantation, and 11 were not candidates for transplantation and either died (7) or were discharged home and lost to follow-up (4). In conclusion, a short course of conivaptan increases serum sodium in patients with end-stage liver disease and may reduce the risk of proceeding to liver transplantation. Further study in a prospective clinical trial is needed to confirm safety and efficacy.

  7. Drosophila models of Alzheimer's disease: advances, limits, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bouleau, Sylvina; Tricoire, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) and the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) are the two key players involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and are associated with amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles respectively, two key hallmarks of the disease. Besides vertebrate models, Drosophila models have been widely used to understand the complex events leading to AD in relation to aging. Drosophila benefits from the low redundancy of the genome which greatly simplifies the analysis of single gene disruption, sophisticated molecular genetic tools, and reduced cost compared to mammals. The aim of this review is to describe the recent advances in modeling AD using fly and to emphasize some limits of these models. Genetic studies in Drosophila have revealed some key aspects of the normal function of Appl and Tau, the fly homologues of AβPP and MAPT that may be disrupted during AD. Drosophila models have also been useful to uncover or validate several pathological pathways or susceptibility genes, and have been readily implemented in drug screening pipelines. We discuss some limitations of the current models that may arise from differences in structure of Appl and Tau compared to their human counterparts or from missing AβPP or MAPT protein interactors in flies. The advent of new genome modification technologies should allow the development of more realistic fly models and to better understand the relationship between AD and aging, taking advantage of the fly's short lifespan.

  8. Advances in pleural disease management including updated procedural coding.

    PubMed

    Haas, Andrew R; Sterman, Daniel H

    2014-08-01

    Over 1.5 million pleural effusions occur in the United States every year as a consequence of a variety of inflammatory, infectious, and malignant conditions. Although rarely fatal in isolation, pleural effusions are often a marker of a serious underlying medical condition and contribute to significant patient morbidity, quality-of-life reduction, and mortality. Pleural effusion management centers on pleural fluid drainage to relieve symptoms and to investigate pleural fluid accumulation etiology. Many recent studies have demonstrated important advances in pleural disease management approaches for a variety of pleural fluid etiologies, including malignant pleural effusion, complicated parapneumonic effusion and empyema, and chest tube size. The last decade has seen greater implementation of real-time imaging assistance for pleural effusion management and increasing use of smaller bore percutaneous chest tubes. This article will briefly review recent pleural effusion management literature and update the latest changes in common procedural terminology billing codes as reflected in the changing landscape of imaging use and percutaneous approaches to pleural disease management.

  9. Recent Advances in Conjugated Polymer Materials for Disease Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Fengting; Qiu, Tian; Liu, Libing; Ying, Jianming; Wang, Shu

    2016-02-10

    The extraordinary optical amplification and light-harvesting properties of conjugated polymers impart sensing systems with higher sensitivity, which meets the primary demands of early cancer diagnosis. Recent advances in the detection of DNA methylation and mutation with polyfluorene derivatives based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) as a means to modulate fluorescent responses attest to the great promise of conjugated polymers as powerful tools for the clinical diagnosis of diseases. To facilitate the ever-changing needs of diagnosis, the development of detection approaches and FRET signal analysis are highlighted in this review. Due to their exceptional brightness, excellent photostability, and low or absent toxicity, conjugated polymers are verified as superior materials for in-vivo imaging, and provide feasibility for future clinical molecular-imaging applications. The integration of conjugated polymers with clinical research has shown profound effects on diagnosis for the early detection of disease-related biomarkers, as well as in-vivo imaging, which leads to a multidisciplinary scientific field with perspectives in both basic research and application issues.

  10. Oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation and medical non-neoplastic disease in a terminal stage.

    PubMed

    Díez-Manglano, Jesús; Bernabeu-Wittel, Máximo; Murcia-Zaragoza, José; Escolano-Fernández, Belén; Jarava-Rol, Guadalupe; Hernández-Quiles, Carlos; Oliver, Miguel; Sanz-Baena, Susana

    2017-02-01

    Many patients with non-neoplastic disease develop atrial fibrillation in advanced stages of their disease. The aim of this study is to determine the factors associated with the use of oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation and non-neoplastic medical disease in a terminal stage, and whether their use is associated with a longer survival. Design is prospective, observational, multicentre study. Patients with atrial fibrillation and non-neoplastic disease (severe not reversible organ insufficiency) in a terminal stage were included between February 2009 and September 2010. A 6-month follow-up was carried out. We included 314 patients with a mean (SD) age of 82.6 (7.0) years. Their mean (SD) scores in CHADS2 and ATRIA scales were 3.4 (1.2) and 4.7 (2.0), respectively. Anticoagulants were prescribed to 112 (37.5 %) patients. The use of anticoagulants was associated with age (OR 0.96 95 % CI 0.93-0.99, p = 0.046) and to the Barthel index (OR 1.01 95 % CI 1.00-1.02; p = 0.034). After performing a propensity score matching analysis, 262 patients were included in the survival analysis. After 6 months, 133 (50.8 %) patients were dead. The mortality is higher among patients who are not treated with oral anticoagulants (57.1 vs. 39.4 %; p = 0.006), but it is independently associated only with the Barthel index score (HR 0.99 95 % CI 0.98-1.00; p = 0.039), delirium (HR 1.60, 95 % CI 1.08-2.36; p = 0.018), anorexia (HR 1.58 95 % CI 1.05-2.38; p = 0.027), and with the use of calcium channel blockers (HR 0.50 95 % CI 0.30-0.84; p = 0.009). In patients with atrial fibrillation and non-neoplastic disease in a terminal stage, the use of oral anticoagulants is not independently associated with a higher probability of survival.

  11. Method and apparatus for advanced staged combustion utilizing forced internal recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Rabovitser, Iosif K.; Knight, Richard A.; Cygan, David F.; Nester, Serguei; Abbasi, Hamid A.

    2003-12-16

    A method and apparatus for combustion of a fuel in which a first-stage fuel and a first-stage oxidant are introduced into a combustion chamber and ignited, forming a primary combustion zone. At least about 5% of the total heat output produced by combustion of the first-stage fuel and the first-stage oxidant is removed from the primary combustion zone, forming cooled first-stage combustion products. A portion of the cooled first-stage combustion products from a downstream region of the primary combustion zone is recirculated to an upstream region of primary combustion zone. A second-stage fuel is introduced into the combustion chamber downstream of the primary combustion zone and ignited, forming a secondary combustion zone. At least about 5% of the heat from the secondary combustion zone is removed. In accordance with one embodiment, a third-stage oxidant is introduced into the combustion chamber downstream of the secondary combustion zone, forming a tertiary combustion zone.

  12. End-stage renal disease in Brazil: epidemiology, prevention, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marília Bahiense; Romão, João Egídio; Zatz, Roberto

    2005-08-01

    Brazil is one of the largest and most populous nations in the world, ranking among the 5 largest economies in the Americas and among the 15 largest economies in the world. However, Brazil is still plagued by social problems such as the persistence of poverty and immense deficiencies in its health system. Currently, there are approximately 390 patients on chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT) per million population, about one third the US prevalence, which suggests that end-stage renal disease is either underdiagnosed or undertreated. The epidemiology of renal disease in the small remaining native Brazilian population is largely unknown. However, it is likely that the prevalence of renal disease is low among at least 2 tribes: the Yanomamis in northern Brazil and the Xingu Indians in central Brazil. Sodium intake is very low, physical activity is intense, and the prevalence of hypertension and cardiovascular disease is negligible among these people, which stresses the potential pathogenic importance of so-called civilized habits. There is currently no conclusive evidence that African descendants or any other Brazilian ethnic minorities are especially vulnerable to renal disease. Access to RRT in Brazil is universal. However, because both the end-stage renal disease population and operational RRT costs are steadily increasing, the system may face severe limitations in the near future. Much effort is needed to limit the prevalence of renal disease, to detain or retard the progression of chronic nephropathies, and to ensure that high-quality RRT will remain available to all those who need it.

  13. Cognition and neuropsychiatry in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia by disease stage

    PubMed Central

    Ranasinghe, Kamalini G.; Lobach, Iryna V.; Kramer, Joel H.; Sturm, Virginia E.; Bettcher, Brianne M.; Possin, Katherine; Christine You, S.; Lamarre, Amanda K.; Shany-Ur, Tal; Stephens, Melanie L.; Perry, David C.; Lee, Suzee E.; Miller, Zachary A.; Gorno-Tempini, Maria L.; Rosen, Howard J.; Boxer, Adam; Seeley, William W.; Rabinovici, Gil D.; Vossel, Keith A.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms of patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) over the natural course of the disease. Methods: We examined the initial and subsequent neuropsychological test performance and neuropsychiatric symptoms in a large cohort of patients with bvFTD (n = 204) across progressive stages of disease as measured by the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR). We also compared cognitive and neuropsychiatric impairments of patients with bvFTD to those of an age-matched cohort with Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia (n = 674). Results: At the earliest stage (CDR = 0.5), patients with bvFTD had profound neuropsychiatric disturbances, insensitivity to errors, slower response times, and poor naming, with intact attention span, memory, and facial affect naming. Tests continuing to show progressive, statistically significant stepwise declines after the CDR = 1 stage included free recall, visuoconstruction, set-shifting, error insensitivity, semantic fluency, design fluency, emotion naming, calculations, confrontation naming, syntax comprehension, and verbal agility. At CDR = 0.5, patients with bvFTD significantly outperformed patients with AD in episodic memory and were faster in set-shifting, while scoring quantitatively worse in lexical fluency, emotion naming, and error sensitivity. The overall rate of disease progression in bvFTD was more rapid than in AD. Conclusion: There are distinct patterns of cognitive deficits differentiating the earlier and later disease stages in bvFTD, with the pattern of cognitive decline revealing in greater detail the natural history of the disease. These cognitive symptoms are readily apparent clinical markers of dysfunction in the principal brain networks known to undergo molecular and anatomical changes in bvFTD, thus are important indicators of the evolving pathology in individual patients. PMID:26802093

  14. Neuroanatomical Correlates of Recognizing Face Expressions in Mild Stages of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sapey-Triomphe, Laurie-Anne; Heckemann, Rolf A; Boublay, Nawele; Dorey, Jean-Michel; Hénaff, Marie-Anne; Rouch, Isabelle; Padovan, Catherine; Hammers, Alexander; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Early Alzheimer's disease can involve social disinvestment, possibly as a consequence of impairment of nonverbal communication skills. This study explores whether patients with Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia stage have impaired recognition of emotions in facial expressions, and describes neuroanatomical correlates of emotion processing impairment. As part of the ongoing PACO study (personality, Alzheimer's disease and behaviour), 39 patients with Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia stage and 39 matched controls completed tests involving discrimination of four basic emotions-happiness, fear, anger, and disgust-on photographs of faces. In patients, automatic volumetry of 83 brain regions was performed on structural magnetic resonance images using MAPER (multi-atlas propagation with enhanced registration). From the literature, we identified for each of the four basic emotions one brain region thought to be primarily associated with the function of recognizing that emotion. We hypothesized that the volume of each of these regions would be correlated with subjects' performance in recognizing the associated emotion. Patients showed deficits of basic emotion recognition, and these impairments were correlated with the volumes of the expected regions of interest. Unexpectedly, most of these correlations were negative: better emotional facial recognition was associated with lower brain volume. In particular, recognition of fear was negatively correlated with the volume of amygdala, disgust with pallidum, and happiness with fusiform gyrus. Recognition impairment in mild stages of Alzheimer's disease for a given emotion was thus associated with less visible atrophy of functionally responsible brain structures within the patient group. Possible explanations for this counterintuitive result include neuroinflammation, regional β-amyloid deposition, or transient overcompensation during early stages of

  15. Optimization of two-stage production/inventory systems under order base stock policy with advance demand information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakade, Koichi; Yokozawa, Shiori

    2016-08-01

    It is important to share demand information among the members in supply chains. In recent years, production and inventory systems with advance demand information (ADI) have been discussed, where advance demand information means the information of demand which the decision maker obtains before the corresponding actual demand arrives. Appropriate production and inventory control using demand information leads to the decrease of inventory and backlog costs. For a single stage system, the optimal base stock and release lead time have been discussed in the literature. In practical production systems the manufacturing system has multiple processes. The multiple stage production and inventory system with ADI, however, has been analyzed by simulation or assuming exponential processing time. That is, their theoretical analysis and optimization of release lead time and base stock level have little been obtained because of its difficulty. In this paper, theoretical analysis of a two-stage production inventory system with advance demand information is developed, where the processing time is assumed deterministic and identical; demand arrival process is Poisson, and an order base stock policy is adopted. Using the analytical results, optimal release lead time and optimal base stock levels for minimizing the average cost on the holding and backlog costs are explicitly derived.

  16. Motor Sequence Learning Performance in Parkinson's Disease Patients Depends on the Stage of Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephan, Marianne A.; Meier, Beat; Zaugg, Sabine Weber; Kaelin-Lang, Alain

    2011-01-01

    It is still unclear, whether patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are impaired in the incidental learning of different motor sequences in short succession, although such a deficit might greatly impact their daily life. The aim of this study was thus to clarify the relation between disease parameters of PD and incidental motor learning of two…

  17. A Small Molecule p75NTR Ligand, LM11A-31, Reverses Cholinergic Neurite Dystrophy in Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Models with Mid- to Late-Stage Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Danielle A.; Knowles, Juliet K.; Belichenko, Nadia P.; Banerjee, Gargi; Finkle, Carly; Massa, Stephen M.; Longo, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons contributes significantly to the cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and has been attributed to aberrant signaling through the neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR). Thus, modulating p75NTR signaling is considered a promising therapeutic strategy for AD. Accordingly, our laboratory has developed small molecule p75NTR ligands that increase survival signaling and inhibit amyloid-β-induced degenerative signaling in in vitro studies. Previous work found that a lead p75NTR ligand, LM11A-31, prevents degeneration of cholinergic neurites when given to an AD mouse model in the early stages of disease pathology. To extend its potential clinical applications, we sought to determine whether LM11A-31 could reverse cholinergic neurite atrophy when treatment begins in AD mouse models having mid- to late stages of pathology. Reversing pathology may have particular clinical relevance as most AD studies involve patients that are at an advanced pathological stage. In this study, LM11A-31 (50 or 75 mg/kg) was administered orally to two AD mouse models, Thy-1 hAPPLond/Swe (APPL/S) and Tg2576, at age ranges during which marked AD-like pathology manifests. In mid-stage male APPL/S mice, LM11A-31 administered for 3 months starting at 6–8 months of age prevented and/or reversed atrophy of basal forebrain cholinergic neurites and cortical dystrophic neurites. Importantly, a 1 month LM11A-31 treatment given to male APPL/S mice (12–13 months old) with late-stage pathology reversed the degeneration of cholinergic neurites in basal forebrain, ameliorated cortical dystrophic neurites, and normalized increased basal forebrain levels of p75NTR. Similar results were seen in female Tg2576 mice. These findings suggest that LM11A-31 can reduce and/or reverse fundamental AD pathologies in late-stage AD mice. Thus, targeting p75NTR is a promising approach to reducing AD-related degenerative processes that have progressed

  18. Proteinuria as a Therapeutic Target in Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease: a Retrospective Multicenter Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chang-Hsu; Wu, Hon-Yen; Wang, Chieh-Li; Yang, Feng-Jung; Wu, Pei-Chen; Hung, Szu-Chun; Kan, Wei-Chih; Yang, Chung-Wei; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Current evidence of proteinuria reduction as a surrogate target in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) is incomplete due to lack of patient-pooled database. We retrospectively studied a multicenter cohort of 1891 patients who were enrolled in the nationwide multidisciplinary pre-end stage renal disease care program with a baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <45 mL/min/1.73 m2 and followed longitudinally to investigate the effect of the change in proteinuria on renal death (defined as composite of dialysis and death occurring before initiation of dialysis). The group with a change in proteinuria ≤0.30 g/g (n = 1261) had lower cumulative probabilities of renal death (p < 0.001). In a linear regression model, a higher baseline proteinuria and a greater increase in proteinuria were associated with faster annual GFR decline. Cox’s analysis showed that every 1 unit increase in natural log(baseline proteinuria, 10 g/g) and every 0.1 g/g increase in the change in proteinuria resulted in 67% (HR = 1.67, 95% CI: 1.46–1.91) and 1% (HR = 1.01, 95% CI: 1.01–1.01) greater risk of renal death respectively after adjusting for the effects of the other covariates. Our study provided a patient-based evidence to support proteinuria as a therapeutic target in advanced CKD. PMID:27198863

  19. Liver transplantation for chronic liver disease: advances and controversies in an era of organ shortages

    PubMed Central

    Prince, M; Hudson, M

    2002-01-01

    Since liver transplantation was first performed in 1968 by Starzl et al, advances in case selection, liver surgery, anaesthetics, and immunotherapy have significantly increased the indications for and success of this operation. Liver transplantation is now a standard therapy for many end stage liver disorders as well as acute liver failure. However, while demand for cadaveric organ grafts has increased, in recent years the supply of organs has fallen. This review addresses current controversies resulting from this mismatch. In particular, methods for increasing graft availability and difficulties arising from transplantation in the context of alcohol related cirrhosis, primary liver tumours, and hepatitis C are reviewed. Together these three indications accounted for 42% of liver transplants performed for chronic liver disease in the UK in 2000. Ethical frameworks for making decisions on patients' suitability for liver transplantation have been developed in both the USA and the UK and these are also reviewed. PMID:11884694

  20. Screening for a Chronic Disease: A Multiple Stage Duration Model with Partial Observability.

    PubMed

    Mroz, Thomas A; Picone, Gabriel; Sloan, Frank; Yashkin, Arseniy P

    2016-08-01

    We estimate a dynamic multi-stage duration model to investigate how early detection of diabetes can delay the onset of lower extremity complications and death. We allow for partial observability of the disease stage, unmeasured heterogeneity, and endogenous timing of diabetes screening. Timely diagnosis appears important. We evaluate the effectiveness of two potential policies to reduce the monetary costs of frequent screening in terms of lost longevity. Compared to the status quo, the more restrictive policy yields an implicit value for an additional year of life of about $50,000, while the less restrictive policy implies a value of about $120,000.

  1. Regional staging of white matter signal abnormalities in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lindemer, Emily R; Greve, Douglas N; Fischl, Bruce R; Augustinack, Jean C; Salat, David H

    2017-01-01

    White matter lesions, quantified as 'white matter signal abnormalities' (WMSA) on neuroimaging, are common incidental findings on brain images of older adults. This tissue damage is linked to cerebrovascular dysfunction and is associated with cognitive decline. The regional distribution of WMSA throughout the cerebral white matter has been described at a gross scale; however, to date no prior study has described regional patterns relative to cortical gyral landmarks which may be important for understanding functional impact. Additionally, no prior study has described how regional WMSA volume scales with total global WMSA. Such information could be used in the creation of a pathologic 'staging' of WMSA through a detailed regional characterization at the individual level. Magnetic resonance imaging data from 97 cognitively-healthy older individuals (OC) aged 52-90 from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study were processed using a novel WMSA labeling procedure described in our prior work. WMSA were quantified regionally using a procedure that segments the cerebral white matter into 35 bilateral units based on proximity to landmarks in the cerebral cortex. An initial staging was performed by quantifying the regional WMSA volume in four groups based on quartiles of total WMSA volume (quartiles I-IV). A consistent spatial pattern of WMSA accumulation was observed with increasing quartile. A clustering procedure was then used to distinguish regions based on patterns of scaling of regional WMSA to global WMSA. Three patterns were extracted that showed high, medium, and non-scaling with global WMSA. Regions in the high-scaling cluster included periventricular, caudal and rostral middle frontal, inferior and superior parietal, supramarginal, and precuneus white matter. A data-driven staging procedure was then created based on patterns of WMSA scaling and specific regional cut-off values from the quartile analyses. Individuals with Alzheimer's disease

  2. Two-stage designs to identify the effects of SNP combinations on complex diseases.

    PubMed

    Kang, Guolian; Yue, Weihua; Zhang, Jifeng; Huebner, Marianne; Zhang, Handi; Ruan, Yan; Lu, Tianlan; Ling, Yansu; Zuo, Yijun; Zhang, Dai

    2008-01-01

    The genetic basis of complex diseases is expected to be highly heterogeneous, with many disease genes, where each gene by itself has only a small effect. Based on the nonlinear contributions of disease genes across the genome to complex diseases, we introduce the concept of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) synergistic blocks. A two-stage approach is applied to detect the genetic association of synergistic blocks with a disease. In the first stage, synergistic blocks associated with a complex disease are identified by clustering SNP patterns and choosing blocks within a cluster that minimize a diversity criterion. In the second stage, a logistic regression model is given for a synergistic block. Using simulated case-control data, we demonstrate that our method has reasonable power to identify gene-gene interactions. To further evaluate the performance of our method, we apply our method to 17 loci of four candidate genes for paranoid schizophrenia in a Chinese population. Five synergistic blocks are found to be associated with schizophrenia, three of which are negatively associated (odds ratio, OR < 0.3, P < 0.05), while the others are positively associated (OR > 2.0, P < 0.05). The mathematical models of these five synergistic blocks are presented. The results suggest that there may be interactive effects for schizophrenia among variants of the genes neuregulin 1 (NRG1, 8p22-p11), G72 (13q34), the regulator of G-protein signaling-4 (RGS4, 1q21-q22) and frizzled 3 (FZD3, 8p21). Using synergistic blocks, we can reduce the dimensionality in a multi-locus association analysis, and evaluate the sizes of interactive effects among multiple disease genes on complex phenotypes.

  3. Towards non-invasive diagnostic imaging of early-stage Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Kirsten L.; Sbarboro, James; Sureka, Ruchi; de, Mrinmoy; Bicca, Maíra A.; Wang, Jane; Vasavada, Shaleen; Satpathy, Sreyesh; Wu, Summer; Joshi, Hrushikesh; Velasco, Pauline T.; Macrenaris, Keith; Waters, E. Alex; Lu, Chang; Phan, Joseph; Lacor, Pascale; Prasad, Pottumarthi; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Klein, William L.

    2015-01-01

    One way to image the molecular pathology in Alzheimer's disease is by positron emission tomography using probes that target amyloid fibrils. However, these fibrils are not closely linked to the development of the disease. It is now thought that early-stage biomarkers that instigate memory loss are composed of Aβ oligomers. Here, we report a sensitive molecular magnetic resonance imaging contrast probe that is specific for Aβ oligomers. We attach oligomer-specific antibodies onto magnetic nanostructures and show that the complex is stable and binds to Aβ oligomers on cells and brain tissues to give a magnetic resonance imaging signal. When intranasally administered to an Alzheimer's disease mouse model, the probe readily reached hippocampal Aβ oligomers. In isolated samples of human brain tissue, we observed a magnetic resonance imaging signal that distinguished Alzheimer's disease from controls. Such nanostructures that target neurotoxic Aβ oligomers are potentially useful for evaluating the efficacy of new drugs and ultimately for early-stage Alzheimer's disease diagnosis and disease management.

  4. Risk of Tractional Retinal Detachment Following Intravitreal Bevacizumab Along with Subretinal Fluid Drainage and Cryotherapy for Stage 3B Coats’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Vishalakshi; D’Souza, Palmeera; Shah, Parag K.; Narendran, V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To review the surgical outcomes of intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) along with subretinal fluid drainage with cryotherapy in patients with stage 3B Coats’ disease. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of seven cases of stage 3B Coats’ disease, who underwent subretinal fluid drainage with cryopexy, from May 2011 to March 2014. Five eyes received additional IVB at the end of surgery. Green laser therapy was performed on telangiectatic vessels postoperatively. Results: The mean age was 34 months (range, 10-84 months). Mean follow-up was 19 months. Six patients (85.7%) had an attached retina at final follow-up. Three out of four patients (75%) that received IVB developed tractional retinal detachments (TRDs). Two eyes that did not receive bevacizumab did not develop any traction. None progressed to neovascular glaucoma or phthisis bulbi. Conclusion: Simultaneous injection of bevacizumab along with subretinal drainage and cryotherapy for advanced Coats’ disease could not avoid TRD. PMID:27162454

  5. Intraoperative radiation therapy as adjuvant treatment in locally advanced stage tumours involving the middle ear: a hypothesis-generating retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Cristalli, G; Mercante, G; Marucci, L; Soriani, A; Telera, S; Spriano, G

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety, effectiveness and functional outcomes of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) followed by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in locally advanced stage tumours involving the middle ear. Data on 13 consecutive patients treated for malignant tumor of external auditory canal involving the middle ear were retrospectively reviewed. Median follow-up was 33 months (range 6-133). Five (38%) patients were stage III and 8 (62%) were Stage IV according to the University of Pittsburgh staging system. Lateral temporal bone resection (LTBR) was performed in all cases. LTBR was associated with parotidectomy in 5 (38%) cases, and with neck dissection and parotidectomy in 6 (46%) cases. No patients had gross residual tumour. Surgical treatment was followed by IORT (12 Gy) and IMRT (50 Gy). Adjuvant chemotherapy was used in 4 (30%) cases. Preoperative and postoperative audiometric tests were performed to assess hearing loss. 5-year local-control (LC), 5-year distant-metastasis (DM), 5-year disease-free-survival (DFS) and 5-year overall-survival (OS) were calculated with Kaplan-Meyer method. Significant changes in bone conduction were reported after treatment. Partial flap necrosis was the only early complication observed in three (23%) cases, while meningeal fistula was seen in one (7.6%) case as a late complication. The 5-year LC-rate was 68%. The 5-year DM-rate was 90%. The 5-year DFS-rate was 61%. The 5-year OS-rate was 69%. IORT followed by IMRT for the treatment of advanced external auditory canal and middle ear tumours seems to be safe. No intraoperative death was reported. IORT may reduce the postoperative irradiation of remnant tissue obtaining the same full dose on the tumour bed. No complications of the residual external ear were observed. Detriment of neurosensory hearing may be expected. Future studies are required to confirm the benefit of this procedure in the ear.

  6. Inflammatory Markers and Procoagulants in Chronic Renal Disease Stages 1-4

    PubMed Central

    Muslimovic, Alma; Rasic, Senija; Tulumovic, Denijal; Hasanspahic, Senad; Rebic, Damir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Starting from the point that the chronic kidney disease (CKD) is chronic, inflammatory and hypercoagulable state characterized by an increase in procoagulant and inflammatory markers high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in these patients could be explained. Aim: The aim of the research was to monitor inflammatory markers and procoagulants in various stages of kidney disease (stage 1-4). Materials and Methods: The research included 120 subjects older than 18 years with CKD stages 1-4 examined and monitored in Clinic of Nephrology, University Clinical Centre Sarajevo over a period of 24 months. The research included determining the following laboratory parameters: serum creatinine, serum albumin, C-reactive protein, leukocytes in the blood, plasma fibrinogen, D-dimer, antithrombin III, coagulation factors VII (FC VII) and coagulation factor VIII (FC VIII). Results: With the progression of kidney disease (CKD stages 1-4), there was a significant increase of inflammatory and procoagulant markers: CRP, fibrinogen and coagulation factor VIII, and an increase in the average values of leukocytes and a reduction in the value of antithrombin III, but without statistical significance. Also, there were no significant differences in the values of D-dimer and coagulation factor VII. Conclusion: The progression of kidney disease is significantly associated with inflammation, which could in the future be useful in prognostic and therapeutic purposes. Connection of CKD with inflammation and proven connection of inflammation with cardiovascular risk indicates the potential value of some biomarkers, which could in the future identify as predictors of outcome and could have the benefit in the early diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease in CKD. PMID:26622082

  7. Valuing Lives: The Policy Debate on Patient Care Financing for Victims of End-Stage Renal Disease,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    In Public Law 92-603, the Social Security Amendments of 1972, Medicare health insurance coverage for end-stage renal disease was effectively extended... disease . A substantial number of potential end-stage renal disease patients, approximately 60 percent of the total, however, could not qualify for...Act and included those who were medically determined to have chronic renal disease and to require hemodialysis or renal transplantation. What is the

  8. Prevalence and prognosis of Alzheimer’s disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage

    PubMed Central

    Verhey, Frans; Frölich, Lutz; Kornhuber, Johannes; Wiltfang, Jens; Maier, Wolfgang; Peters, Oliver; Rüther, Eckart; Nobili, Flavio; Morbelli, Silvia; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Drzezga, Alexander; Didic, Mira; van Berckel, Bart N. M.; Simmons, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Kłoszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Lovestone, Simon; Muscio, Cristina; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Salmon, Eric; Bastin, Christine; Wallin, Anders; Nordlund, Arto; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Silva, Dina; Santana, Isabel; Lemos, Raquel; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Van der Mussele, Stefan; Freund-Levi, Yvonne; Wallin, Åsa K.; Hampel, Harald; van der Flier, Wiesje; Scheltens, Philip; Visser, Pieter Jelle

    2015-01-01

    Three sets of research criteria are available for diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease in subjects with mild cognitive impairment: the International Working Group-1, International Working Group-2, and National Institute of Aging-Alzheimer Association criteria. We compared the prevalence and prognosis of Alzheimer’s disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage according to these criteria. Subjects with mild cognitive impairment (n = 1607), 766 of whom had both amyloid and neuronal injury markers, were recruited from 13 cohorts. We used cognitive test performance and available biomarkers to classify subjects as prodromal Alzheimer’s disease according to International Working Group-1 and International Working Group-2 criteria and in the high Alzheimer’s disease likelihood group, conflicting biomarker groups (isolated amyloid pathology or suspected non-Alzheimer pathophysiology), and low Alzheimer’s disease likelihood group according to the National Institute of Ageing-Alzheimer Association criteria. Outcome measures were the proportion of subjects with Alzheimer’s disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage and progression to Alzheimer’s disease-type dementia. We performed survival analyses using Cox proportional hazards models. According to the International Working Group-1 criteria, 850 (53%) subjects had prodromal Alzheimer’s disease. Their 3-year progression rate to Alzheimer’s disease-type dementia was 50% compared to 21% for subjects without prodromal Alzheimer’s disease. According to the International Working Group-2 criteria, 308 (40%) subjects had prodromal Alzheimer’s disease. Their 3-year progression rate to Alzheimer’s disease-type dementia was 61% compared to 22% for subjects without prodromal Alzheimer’s disease. According to the National Institute of Ageing-Alzheimer Association criteria, 353 (46%) subjects were in the high Alzheimer’s disease likelihood group, 49 (6%) in the isolated amyloid pathology group, 220 (29%) in

  9. Treatment of stage i and ii mediastinal Hodgkin disease: a comparison of involved fields, extended fields, and involved fields followed by MOPP in patients stage by laparotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Hagemeister, F.B.; Fuller, L.M.; Sullivan, J.A.; North, L.; Velasquez, W.; Conrad, F.G.; McLaughlin, P.; Butter, J.J.; Shullenberger, C.C.

    1981-12-01

    Three treatment programs for Stage I and II mediastinal Hodgkin disease (established by laparotomy) were compared. Involved-field radiotherapy + MOPP gave a disease-free survival rate of 97%, significantly different from 62% and 55% for involved and extended fields, respectively. Corresponding survival figures of 97%, 88%, and 84% were not signiticantly different statistically due to salvage with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. Among patients given radiotherapy alone, the survival figure of 94% for limited mediastinal disease was significantly better than 63% for extensive mediastinal and hilar disease; corresponding disease-free figures of 72% and 35% were also significantly different. Constitutional symptoms were an important prognostic factor in disease-free survival following the use of involved fields; hilar disease was important only with large mediastinal masses. Most relapses were intrathoracic; MOPP alone salvaged only 47%. Treatment of State I and II Hodgkin disease should be based on symptoms, extent of mediastinal disease, and hilar involvement.

  10. A review of the Mark 48-F, 3.50 pitch diameter, 2-stage reaction turbine designed for the staged combustion cycle requirements of an advanced space engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macaluso, S. B.

    1976-01-01

    The Mark 48-F two-stage reaction turbine was designed as a component for an advanced space engine propellant feed system, high-pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump. The turbine total inlet temperature and total inlet pressure were designed to be 1860 R and 3420 psia, respectively. At a design speed of 95,000 rpm, the turbine will develop 2543 horsepower with LO2/LH2 working fluid. The aerothermodynamic performance of a prototype turbine assembly was evaluated with gaseous nitrogen working fluid. Turbine performance was evaluated at turbine velocity ratios ranging from 0.250 to 0.782, and turbine speeds up to 25,250 rpm. Turbine test efficiency at the design velocity ratio of 0.483 was found to be 79.5% total-to-total.

  11. The principles of cancer staging

    PubMed Central

    Brierley, James; Gospodarowicz, Mary; O’Sullivan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The anatomic disease extent or tumour stage of a cancer at diagnosis as a determinant of prognosis is discussed. The importance of cancer stage in individual patient prognosis and determination of treatment is reviewed as well as its value in research and cancer control activities. The conflict between the need for stability of cancer stage definitions over time and the need to evolve with advances in medicine are examined. The ecancer elearning modules on Cancer Stage are introduced. PMID:28101141

  12. Two-stage hybrid feature selection algorithms for diagnosing erythemato-squamous diseases.

    PubMed

    Xie, Juanying; Lei, Jinhu; Xie, Weixin; Shi, Yong; Liu, Xiaohui

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes two-stage hybrid feature selection algorithms to build the stable and efficient diagnostic models where a new accuracy measure is introduced to assess the models. The two-stage hybrid algorithms adopt Support Vector Machines (SVM) as a classification tool, and the extended Sequential Forward Search (SFS), Sequential Forward Floating Search (SFFS), and Sequential Backward Floating Search (SBFS), respectively, as search strategies, and the generalized F-score (GF) to evaluate the importance of each feature. The new accuracy measure is used as the criterion to evaluated the performance of a temporary SVM to direct the feature selection algorithms. These hybrid methods combine the advantages of filters and wrappers to select the optimal feature subset from the original feature set to build the stable and efficient classifiers. To get the stable, statistical and optimal classifiers, we conduct 10-fold cross validation experiments in the first stage; then we merge the 10 selected feature subsets of the 10-cross validation experiments, respectively, as the new full feature set to do feature selection in the second stage for each algorithm. We repeat the each hybrid feature selection algorithm in the second stage on the one fold that has got the best result in the first stage. Experimental results show that our proposed two-stage hybrid feature selection algorithms can construct efficient diagnostic models which have got better accuracy than that built by the corresponding hybrid feature selection algorithms without the second stage feature selection procedures. Furthermore our methods have got better classification accuracy when compared with the available algorithms for diagnosing erythemato-squamous diseases.

  13. The effect of regular hemodialysis on the nutritional status of children with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Lotfy, Hala M; Sabry, Samar M; Ghobrial, Emad E; Abed, Samer A

    2015-03-01

    Growth failure is one of the most common and profound clinical manifestation of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in infants, children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to assess the nutritional status of Egyptian children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on regular hemodialysis (HD). The study included 50 Egyptian children with ESRD on regular HD, following-up at the Pediatric Nephrology unit, Cairo University. History, including dietary history, was taken for all patients and clinical examination was performed on all of them. Body weight, standing height, height or length SD score, the skin fold thickness, mid-arm circumference, mid-arm muscle circumference and mid-arm muscle circumference area were also assessed. The height of the patients was the most affected anthropometric parameter, as 78% of the patients were shorter (height SDS below -3). Body weight is less affected than height, as body weight SDS of 34% of patients was less than -3 SDS. In addition, the body mass index of 16% of the patients was <3 rd percentile, while only 4% of the patients were >97 th percentile. Although most ESRD patients received adequate protein and caloric intake, their growth was markedly affected, especially with longer period on HD. We suggest that assessment of growth parameters should be performed at a minimum period of every six months in children with CKD stages 2-3. For children with more advanced CKD (stages 4-5 and 5D), more frequent evaluation may be warranted due to the greater risk of abnormalities.

  14. Chronic kidney disease-epidemiology formula and model for end-stage liver disease score in the assessment of renal function in candidates for liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tinti, F; Lai, S; Umbro, I; Mordenti, M; Barile, M; Ginanni Corradini, S; Rossi, M; Poli, L; Nofroni, I; Berloco, P B; Mitterhofer, A P

    2010-05-01

    Assessment of renal function in patients with end-stage liver disease (ESLD) awaiting liver transplantation (OLT) is critical. Various conditions may cause renal damage in ESLD. Renal and liver functions are intertwined due to splanchnic hemodynamic relationships; renal failure rarely occurs in patients without advanced decompensated cirrhosis. The recent literature suggests that evaluation of renal function should include an assessment of liver function. The aim of this study was to evaluate different methods to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in patient among ESLD candidates for OLT over 1 year. We also correlated renal and hepatic functions. Fifty-two cirrhotic patients Model for End-Stage Liver Disease [MELD] > 10) were enrolled in the study. All patients were evaluated at baseline and every 4 months (T1-T4) thereafter for 1 year. The GFR was calculated by creatinine clearance, and estimated by Cockroft and Gault, Modified Diet Renal Disease (MDRD) 4 and 6 variable and Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology (CKD-EPI) formulae. Hepatic functions were evaluated by MELD score, albumin, bilirubin, and International Normalized Ratio (INR). We observed not statistically significant increase mean value of MELD score, bilirubin, serum creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen and a reduced serum sodium. There were no significant differences among various methods to evaluate GFR at each time over 1 year. We did not observe any association between renal and hepatic function, except at T4 for MELD and GFR estimated with MDRD 4 (P = .009) and 6 (P = .008) parameters or CKD-EPI (P = .036), and MELD and sodium (P = .001). Our results showed that evaluation of renal function in cirrhosis should include an evaluation of hepatic function. In our case, MDRD and CKD-EPI seemed to be the more accurate formulae to evaluate renal function in relation to hepatic function.

  15. Clinical outcomes of advanced-stage glassy cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix: a need for reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Nara; Kim, Ji-Ye; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    We performed a retrospective analysis of the clinical features and patient outcomes for advanced-stage glassy cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix. The study was restricted to cases in which the glassy cell features constituted at least 95% of the biopsied specimen. During the study period, 675 patients were diagnosed with primary cervical carcinoma. Five (0.7%) of the 675 patients had cervical glassy cell carcinoma; of these, three were premenopausal, and two were postmenopausal. Abnormal vaginal bleeding was the most frequent presenting symptom. Glassy cell carcinoma presented as a fungating, exophytic, or infiltrative mass. The greatest tumor dimension ranged from 3 to 9 cm. All patients had parametrial extension. Four patients had stage IIB tumors, and one had a stage IIIB tumor. All patients received concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The patient with a stage IIIB tumor died of hypovolemic shock caused by upper gastrointestinal bleeding during radiation therapy. Three patients with stage IIB tumors survived for more than 8 years without tumor recurrence or metastasis. One of these three patients died of pelvic recurrence 10 years after the initial diagnosis. Cervical glassy cell carcinoma has traditionally been considered an aggressive, highly malignant tumor with poor prognosis, but our data suggest that patient survival is not significantly decreased compared with other histological types of cervical carcinoma. It will be necessary to analyze patient outcomes using a larger number of cervical glassy cell carcinoma cases to confirm our findings. PMID:27793022

  16. Recent Advances in Traditional Chinese Medicine for Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yifei; Menon, Madhav C; Deng, Yueyi; Chen, Yiping; He, John Cijiang

    2015-09-01

    Because current treatment options for chronic kidney disease (CKD) are limited, many patients seek out alternative therapies such as traditional Chinese medicine. However, there is a lack of evidence from large clinical trials to support the use of traditional medicines in patients with CKD. Many active components of traditional medicine formulas are undetermined and their toxicities are unknown. Therefore, there is a need for research to identify active compounds from traditional medicines and understand the mechanisms of action of these compounds, as well as their potential toxicity, and subsequently perform well-designed, randomized, controlled, clinical trials to study the efficacy and safety of their use in patients with CKD. Significant progress has been made in this field within the last several years. Many active compounds have been identified by applying sophisticated techniques such as mass spectrometry, and more mechanistic studies of these compounds have been performed using both in vitro and in vivo models. In addition, several well-designed, large, randomized, clinical trials have recently been published. We summarize these recent advances in the field of traditional medicines as they apply to CKD. In addition, current barriers for further research are also discussed. Due to the ongoing research in this field, we believe that stronger evidence to support the use of traditional medicines for CKD will emerge in the near future.

  17. Diseases causing end-stage renal failure in New South Wales.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, J H; McCarthy, S W; Storey, B G; Roberts, B A; Gallery, E; Mahony, J F

    1975-01-01

    The nature of the original renal disease was determined in 403 consecutive cases of end-stage renal failure, in 317 of which the clinical diagnosis was corroborated by histological examination of the kidney. Five diseases accounted for 20 or more cases--glomerulonephritis (31% of the total), analgesic nephropathy (29%), primary vesicoureteral reflux (8%), essential hypertension (6%), and polycystic kidneys (5%). In only four cases did renal failure result from chronic pyelonephritis without a demonstrable primary cause. Greater use of micturating cystography and cystoscopy and routine urine testing for salicylate are advocated for earlier diagnosis of the major causes of "pyelonephritis". The incidence of end-stage renal failure in people aged 15-55 in New South Wales was estimated to be at least 34 new cases per million of total population each year. PMID:1090338

  18. Arthroscopic assisted bone grafting for early stages of Kienböck's disease.

    PubMed

    Pegoli, L; Ghezzi, A; Cavalli, E; Luchetti, R; Pajardi, G

    2011-01-01

    Kienböck's disease is known for its difficulty in being diagnosed and treated at early stages; option treatments are few and most of them quite aggressive. The author describes his experience with arthroscopic assisted lunate bone grafting. Three patients with diagnosis of stage I avascular necrosis of the lunate (average age: 45 years), were treated. Before surgical procedure, the patients underwent to a conservative treatment. After harvesting the bone graft from the volar surface of the radius, arthroscopic bone grafting was performed. At an average follow-up of 13.5 months (9-15), all the patients show a normal density of the lunate and no arthritic changes in radiographs. The MRI confirmed the lunate vascularity. The number of patients is definitely small, due also to the rarity of the disease and the difficulty in diagnosis, but, despite the very high learning curve, could be the proper first choice of treatment.

  19. Disordered sleep and noncompliance in a patient with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, P L; Gavin, C; Miller, G; Mendelson, W B; Wernli, I; Neugarten, J

    1997-01-01

    Sleep disorders are relatively common in patients with end-stage renal disease, but the diagnosis may be difficult to establish because of the similarity of uremic symptoms to those of the sleep apnea syndrome. After excluding anatomic and metabolic disorders associated with excessive sleepiness and disordered breathing in sleep and after ensuring that the patient is receiving adequate dialysis, the sleep disorder should be diagnosed using polysomnography. Continuous positive pressure airway breathing is an effective treatment for hemodialysis patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, but the use of this machinery requires patient compliance, as does the delivery of an adequate amount of dialysis. The difficulties adjusting to end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis can be multiplied by the coexistence of a sleep disorder that requires some ventilatory assistance at night; the case presented in this article characterizes precisely that circumstance.

  20. Acquired Factor V Inhibitors in a Patient with End-stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, Atsushi; Misawa, Hideo; Nagahori, Katsuhiro; Koda, Ryo; Yoshino, Atsunori; Kawamoto, Shinya; Takeda, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of acquired factor V inhibitors (AFVIs) in a patient with end-stage renal disease receiving warfarin therapy for atrial fibrillation. A 72-year-old Japanese man was admitted to our hospital complaining of tarry stools and abdominal pain. The laboratory findings revealed eosinophilia (52.1%), prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) (98 s), PT (84 s), a factor V (FV) activity of <3%, and an FV inhibitor level of 6 Bethesda units/mL. After administration of prednisolone was started, his coagulation findings improved. However, his renal failure progressed, and he ultimately required chronic hemodialysis. This is the first case of AFVIs in a patient starting hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease. PMID:27904118

  1. Acquired Factor V Inhibitors in a Patient with End-stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Atsushi; Misawa, Hideo; Nagahori, Katsuhiro; Koda, Ryo; Yoshino, Atsunori; Kawamoto, Shinya; Takeda, Tetsuro

    We report a case of acquired factor V inhibitors (AFVIs) in a patient with end-stage renal disease receiving warfarin therapy for atrial fibrillation. A 72-year-old Japanese man was admitted to our hospital complaining of tarry stools and abdominal pain. The laboratory findings revealed eosinophilia (52.1%), prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) (98 s), PT (84 s), a factor V (FV) activity of <3%, and an FV inhibitor level of 6 Bethesda units/mL. After administration of prednisolone was started, his coagulation findings improved. However, his renal failure progressed, and he ultimately required chronic hemodialysis. This is the first case of AFVIs in a patient starting hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease.

  2. Postoperative oxycodone toxicity in a patient with chronic pain and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Tran, Bryant W; Kohan, Lynn R; Vorenkamp, Kevin E

    2015-02-15

    We present this case to review the metabolism of oxycodone and the effects of end-stage renal disease on the elimination of oxycodone and its metabolites. A 42-year-old female with end-stage renal disease who was dependent on hemodialysis presented for left hamstring posterior capsule release. She had been receiving methadone for 2 years for chronic leg pain. On postoperative day 1, the patient's medication was changed from IV hydromorphone to oral oxycodone to treat breakthrough pain. By the next day, the patient was unarousable with notable respiratory depression. She did not fully recover after urgent hemodialysis but did have full recovery after receiving an IV naloxone infusion for 22 hours. Further study of the safety of oxycodone in hemodialysis patients is warranted.

  3. Heterogeneity of Parkinson's disease in the early clinical stages using a data driven approach

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, S; Foltynie, T; Blackwell, A; Robbins, T; Owen, A; Barker, R

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the heterogeneity of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) in a data driven manner among a cohort of patients in the early clinical stages of the disease meeting established diagnostic criteria. Methods: Data on demographic, motor, mood, and cognitive measures were collected from 120 consecutive patients in the early stages of PD (Hoehn and Yahr I–III) attending a specialist PD research clinic. Statistical cluster analysis of the data allowed the existence of the patient subgroups generated to be explored. Results: The analysis revealed four main subgroups: (a) patients with a younger disease onset; (b) a tremor dominant subgroup of patients; (c) a non-tremor dominant subgroup with significant levels of cognitive impairment and mild depression; and (d) a subgroup with rapid disease progression but no cognitive impairment. Conclusions: This study complements and extends previous research by using a data driven approach to define the clinical heterogeneity of early PD. The approach adopted in this study for the identification of subgroups of patients within Parkinson's disease has important implications for generating testable hypotheses on defining the heterogeneity of this common condition and its aetiopathological basis and thus its treatment. PMID:15716523

  4. Neuroprotection of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor for Early Stage Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Sheng-Tzung; Chu, Sung-Chao; Liu, Shu-Hsin; Pang, Cheng-Yoong; Hou, Ting-Wen; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chen, Shin-Yuan

    2017-03-13

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease. Both medical and surgical choices provide symptomatic treatment. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), a conventional treatment for hematological diseases, has demonstrated its effectiveness in acute and chronic neurological diseases through its anti-inflammatory and antiapoptosis mechanisms. Based on previous in vitro and in vivo studies, we administered a lower dose (3.3 μg/kg) G-CSF injection for 5 days and six courses for 1 year in early-stage PD patients as a phase I trial. The four PD patient's mean unified PD rating scale motor scores in medication off status remained stable from 23 before the first G-CSF injection to 22 during the 2-year follow-up. 3,4-Dihydroxy-6-18F-fluoro-l-phenylalanine (18F-DOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) studies also revealed an annual 3.5% decrease in radiotracer uptake over the caudate nucleus and 7% in the putamen, both slower than those of previous reports of PD. Adverse effects included transient muscular-skeletal pain, nausea, vomiting, and elevated liver enzymes. Based on this preliminary report, G-CSF seems to alleviate disease deterioration for early stage PD patients. The effectiveness of G-CSF was possibly due to its amelioration of progressive dopaminergic neuron degeneration.

  5. Vitamin D (25(OH)D) in patients with chronic kidney disease stages 2-5

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre Arango, José Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To establish the impact the chronic kidney disease stage has in the native vitamin D levels in patients not undergoing dialysis treatment. Methods: A study performed in Manizales, Colombia, a city located 2,200 meters above sea level, without important stational variations. Patients with 18 years of age or more, with chronic kidney disease stages 2 to 5 and not undergoing dialysis treatment were recruited for this study. Demographic and anthropometric variations were evaluated as well as solar exposure, CKD etiology and laboratory variables related to bone and mineral diseases. For each CKD clinical stage, correlations were evaluated for vitamin D levels, laboratory results for bone and mineral diseases, solar exposure and ethnicity. Results: Three hundred thirty-three patients were evaluated with a median age of 71 years, most of them mestizo (71%), 173 were women. The main CKD etiology was hypertensive nephropathy (32.2%). 21.1% of patients had normal vitamin D levels, 70.1% were within insufficient range and 8.8% were in deficit. A negative correlation was found between the levels of vitamin 25 (OH) D and the values for: creatinine, phosphorous, calcium x phosphorous product, PTH, 24 hours urine protein and BMI. A positive relationship was found for calcium and albumin. Positive significant statistical correlation was found for vitamin 25(OH) D levels and solar exposure for stages 3b and 4 of CKD. Conclusions: It is common to find low levels of vitamin 25(OH) D in patients with CKD; these can contribute to the appearance of secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:27821896

  6. [Notalgia paresthetica, "posterior pigmented pruritic patch" and macular amyloidosis. Three stages of a disease].

    PubMed

    Cerroni, L; Kopera, D; Soyer, H P; Kerl, H

    1993-12-01

    We report on nine cases of notalgia paresthetica, a cutaneous condition that has rarely been described in the dermatological literature and is characterized by localized pruritus, burning and hyperesthesia and/or paresthesia on the back. Histological and immunohistochemical studies have not clarified the pathogenesis of this disease. Several factors might be involved in various cases, including increased cutaneous innervation and neuropathy. The so-called posterior pigmented pruritic patch and macular amyloidosis may be considered as progressive evolutional stages of notalgia paresthetica.

  7. Successful pregnancy outcome among women with end-stage renal disease requiring haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Arora, Nalini; Mahajan, Kirti; Jana, Narayan; Maiti, Tapan Kumar; Mandal, Debasmita; Pandey, Rajendra

    2009-04-01

    Pregnancy is rare in women with end-stage renal disease, and perinatal outcome remains suboptimal because of prematurity and foetal growth restriction. Successful obstetrical outcome in two women presented with chronic renal failure requiring serial haemodialysis and multiple blood transfusions during pregnancy is reported. Both women had vaginal delivery of low birth weight neonates--2100 g and 1540 g at 33 and 37 weeks' gestations respectively. With specialised neonatal care, both neonates survived, and the mothers were counselled for renal replacement therapy.

  8. Stage IV and age over 45 years are the only prognostic factors of the International Prognostic Score for the outcome of advanced Hodgkin lymphoma in the Spanish Hodgkin Lymphoma Study Group series.

    PubMed

    Guisado-Vasco, Pablo; Arranz-Saez, Reyes; Canales, Miguel; Cánovas, Araceli; Garcia-Laraña, José; García-Sanz, Ramón; Lopez, Andrés; López, José Luis; Llanos, Marta; Moraleda, José Maria; Rodriguez, José; Rayón, Consuelo; Sabin, Pilar; Salar, Antonio; Marín-Niebla, Ana; Morente, Manuel; Sánchez-Godoy, Pedro; Tomás, José Francisco; Muriel, Alfonso; Abraira, Victor; Piris, Miguel A; Garcia, Juán F; Montalban, Carlos

    2012-05-01

    The International Prognostic Score (IPS) is the most widely used system to date for identifying risk groups for the outcome of patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma, although important limitations have been recognized. We analyzed the value of the IPS in a series of 311 patients with advanced classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) (Ann Arbor stage III, IV or stage II with B symptoms and/or bulky masses) treated with first-line chemotherapy including adriamycin (adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine [ABVD] or equivalent variants). In univariate and multivariate analyses, stage IV disease and age ≥ 45 years were the only factors with independent predictive significance for overall survival (OS) (p = 0.002 and p < 0.001, respectively). Stage IV was still significant for freedom from progression (FFP) (p = 0.001) and age ≥ 45 years was borderline significant (p = 0.058). IPS separates prognostic groups, as in the original publication, but this is mainly due to the high statistical significance of stage IV and age ≥ 45 years. Moreover, the combination of these two factors enables a simpler system to be constructed that separates groups with different FFP and OS. In conclusion, in our series, stage IV and age ≥ 45 years are the key prognostic factors for the outcome of advanced cHL.

  9. Effect of rifaximin on gut microbiota composition in advanced liver disease and its complications.

    PubMed

    Ponziani, Francesca Romana; Gerardi, Viviana; Pecere, Silvia; D'Aversa, Francesca; Lopetuso, Loris; Zocco, Maria Assunta; Pompili, Maurizio; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2015-11-21

    Liver cirrhosis is a paradigm of intestinal dysbiosis. The qualitative and quantitative derangement of intestinal microbial community reported in cirrhotic patients seems to be strictly related with the impairment of liver function. A kind of gut microbial "fingerprint", characterized by the reduced ratio of "good" to "potentially pathogenic" bacteria has recently been outlined, and is associated with the increase in Model for End-Stage Liver Disease and Child Pugh scores. Moreover, in patients presenting with cirrhosis complications such as spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and, portal hypertension intestinal microbiota modifications or the isolation of bacteria deriving from the gut are commonly reported. Rifaximin is a non-absorbable antibiotic used in the management of several gastrointestinal diseases. Beyond bactericidal/bacteriostatic, immune-modulating and anti-inflammatory activity, a little is known about its interaction with gut microbial environment. Rifaximin has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on cognitive function in patients with HE, and also to prevent the development of SBP, to reduce endotoxemia and to improve hemodynamics in cirrhotics. These results are linked to a shift in gut microbes functionality, triggering the production of favorable metabolites. The low incidence of drug-related adverse events due to the small amount of circulating drug makes rifaximin a relatively safe antibiotic for the modulation of gut microbiota in advanced liver disease.

  10. Effect of rifaximin on gut microbiota composition in advanced liver disease and its complications

    PubMed Central

    Ponziani, Francesca Romana; Gerardi, Viviana; Pecere, Silvia; D’Aversa, Francesca; Lopetuso, Loris; Zocco, Maria Assunta; Pompili, Maurizio; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a paradigm of intestinal dysbiosis. The qualitative and quantitative derangement of intestinal microbial community reported in cirrhotic patients seems to be strictly related with the impairment of liver function. A kind of gut microbial “fingerprint”, characterized by the reduced ratio of “good” to “potentially pathogenic” bacteria has recently been outlined, and is associated with the increase in Model for End-Stage Liver Disease and Child Pugh scores. Moreover, in patients presenting with cirrhosis complications such as spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and, portal hypertension intestinal microbiota modifications or the isolation of bacteria deriving from the gut are commonly reported. Rifaximin is a non-absorbable antibiotic used in the management of several gastrointestinal diseases. Beyond bactericidal/bacteriostatic, immune-modulating and anti-inflammatory activity, a little is known about its interaction with gut microbial environment. Rifaximin has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on cognitive function in patients with HE, and also to prevent the development of SBP, to reduce endotoxemia and to improve hemodynamics in cirrhotics. These results are linked to a shift in gut microbes functionality, triggering the production of favorable metabolites. The low incidence of drug-related adverse events due to the small amount of circulating drug makes rifaximin a relatively safe antibiotic for the modulation of gut microbiota in advanced liver disease. PMID:26604640

  11. The influence of baseline characteristics and disease stage on health-related quality of life in multiple myeloma: findings from six randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Don; Esseltine, Dixie-Lee; Regnault, Antoine; Meunier, Juliette; Liu, Kevin; van de Velde, Helgi

    2016-08-01

    This descriptive, cross-sectional analysis evaluated the impact of baseline characteristics on health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) at different stages of multiple myeloma (MM). The bortezomib clinical-trial programme evaluated HR-QoL early and consistently, producing a large multi-study dataset. Baseline data, captured using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) quality-of-life questionnaire (QLQ-C30), were pooled from six bortezomib randomized trials conducted in different disease-stage categories: 'New' (previously untreated; n = 753), 'Early' (1-3 prior therapies; n = 1569) and 'Late' (≥4 prior therapies; n = 239) disease. Mean EORTC global health scores were similar across the three stages. Unexpectedly, emotional, physical and role functioning were higher in the later stages, indicating better perceived health. Symptom scores, including pain, were largely similar or lower in the later versus earlier stages, signifying a lower symptom burden/better symptom control with more advanced disease. Notable variation in HR-QoL was observed by age and clinical parameters within and across stages. Multivariate modelling indicated that opioid use and performance status were key factors driving overall HR-QoL across stages. Using an age-restricted analysis, transplant eligibility had little impact on HR-QoL in New disease patients. Thus, changes in HR-QoL over the treatment course of MM are complex and impacted by baseline factors. A prospective observational international inception cohort study that captures key clinical, HR-QoL and demographic characteristics, along with safety and supportive care information, is needed.

  12. A population-based study of prognosis in advanced stage follicular lymphoma managed by watch and wait.

    PubMed

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Bilgrau, Anders E; de Nully Brown, Peter; Mylam, Karen J; Ahmad, Syed A; Pedersen, Lars M; Gang, Anne O; Bentzen, Hans H; Juul, Maja B; Bergmann, Olav J; Pedersen, Robert S; Nielsen, Berit J; Johnsen, Hans E; Dybkaer, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin; Hutchings, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Watch and wait (WAW) is a common approach for asymptomatic, advanced stage follicular lymphoma (FL), but single-agent rituximab is an alternative for these patients. In this nationwide study we describe the outcome of patients selected for WAW. A cohort of 286 out of 849 (34%) stage III-IVA FL patients seen between 2000 and 2011, were managed expectantly and included. The 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 35% [95% confidence interval (CI) 29-42]. The 10-year overall survival (OS) was 65% (95%CI 54-78), and the cumulative risk of dying from lymphoma within 10 years of diagnosis was 13% (95%CI 7-20). Elevated lactate dehydrogenase and > four nodal regions involved were associated with a higher risk of lymphoma treatment and death from lymphoma. The WAW patients and a matched background population had similar OS during the first 50 months after diagnosis (P = 0·7), but WAW patients had increased risk of death after 50 months (P < 0·001). The estimated loss of residual life after 10 years was 6·8 months. The 10-year cumulative risk of histological transformation was 22% (95%CI 15-29) and the 3-year OS after transformation was 71% (95%CI 58-87%). In conclusion, advanced stage FL managed by WAW had a favourable outcome and abandoning this strategy could lead to overtreatment in some patients.

  13. StrandAdvantage test for early-line and advanced-stage treatment decisions in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Sen, Manimala; Katragadda, Shanmukh; Ravichandran, Aarthi; Deshpande, Gouri; Parulekar, Minothi; Nayanala, Swetha; Vittal, Vikram; Shen, Weiming; Phooi Nee Yong, Melanie; Jacob, Jemima; Parchuru, Sravanthi; Dhanuskodi, Kalpana; Eyring, Kenneth; Agrawal, Pooja; Agarwal, Smita; Shanmugam, Ashwini; Gupta, Satish; Vishwanath, Divya; Kumari, Kiran; Hariharan, Arun K; Balaji, Sai A; Liang, Qiaoling; Robolledo, Belen; Gauribidanur Raghavendrachar, Vijayashree; Oomer Farooque, Mohammed; Buresh, Cary J; Ramamoorthy, Preveen; Bahadur, Urvashi; Subramanian, Kalyanasundaram; Hariharan, Ramesh; Veeramachaneni, Vamsi; Sankaran, Satish; Gupta, Vaijayanti

    2017-04-03

    Comprehensive genetic profiling of tumors using next-generation sequencing (NGS) is gaining acceptance for guiding treatment decisions in cancer care. We designed a cancer profiling test combining both deep sequencing and immunohistochemistry (IHC) of relevant cancer targets to aid therapy choices in both standard-of-care (SOC) and advanced-stage treatments for solid tumors. The SOC report is provided in a short turnaround time for four tumors, namely lung, breast, colon, and melanoma, followed by an investigational report. For other tumor types, an investigational report is provided. The NGS assay reports single-nucleotide variants (SNVs), copy number variations (CNVs), and translocations in 152 cancer-related genes. The tissue-specific IHC tests include routine and less common markers associated with drugs used in SOC settings. We describe the standardization, validation, and clinical utility of the StrandAdvantage test (SA test) using more than 250 solid tumor formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples and control cell line samples. The NGS test showed high reproducibility and accuracy of >99%. The test provided relevant clinical information for SOC treatment as well as more information related to investigational options and clinical trials for >95% of advanced-stage patients. In conclusion, the SA test comprising a robust and accurate NGS assay combined with clinically relevant IHC tests can detect somatic changes of clinical significance for strategic cancer management in all the stages.

  14. Relationship between human herpesvirus 8 loads and disease stage in classic Kaposi sarcoma patients.

    PubMed

    Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Abada, Rinat; Kra-Oz, Zipi; Sattinger, Judith; Perelman, Alex; Bergman, Reuven; Sarid, Ronit

    2007-04-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus, is causally implicated in all forms of KS, including the classic form. Our objective was to investigate the relationship between HHV-8 load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and the stage of the disease in classic KS (CKS) patients. HHV-8 loads were measured in 41 PBMC samples from CKS patients with different Krigel-based classification stages using a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. Low HHV-8 DNA loads reaching a maximum of 75.5 copies/10(5) cells were detected in 73.2% of the patients. HHV-8 loads in patients with stages I and II were similarly distributed. An increased detection rate of HHV-8 DNA, although not statistically significant, was evident in patients diagnosed with CKS stages III and IV. We conclude that the measurements of HHV-8 load in PBMCs provide a limited correlation with the clinical stage of KS.

  15. Trefoil Factor 1 Excretion Is Increased in Early Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Tudor, Bianca; Ankersmit, Hendrik J.; Reiter, Thomas; Haas, Martin; Roth-Walter, Franziska; Krenn, Claus G.; Roth, Georg A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In many patients CKD is diagnosed late during disease progression. Therefore, the implementation of potential biomarkers may facilitate the early identification of individuals at risk. Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides promote restitution processes of mucous epithelia and are abundant in the urinary tract. We therefore sought to investigate the TFF peptide levels in patients suffering from CKD and their potential as biomarkers for CKD. We analysed TFF1 and TFF3 in serum and urine of 115 patients with CKD stages 1–5 without dialysis by ELISA. 20 healthy volunteers served as controls. Our results showed, that urinary TFF1 levels were significantly increased with the onset of CKD in stages 1–4 as compared to controls and declined during disease progression (p = 0.003, < 0.001, 0.005, and 0.007. median concentrations: 3.5 pg/mL in controls vs 165.2, 61.1, 17.2, and 15.8 pg/mL in CKD 1–4). TFF1 and TFF3 serum levels were significantly elevated in stages 3–5 as compared to controls (TFF1: p < 0.01; median concentrations: 12.1, 39.7, and 34.5 pg/mL in CKD 3–5. TFF3: p < 0.001; median concentrations: 7.1 ng/mL in controls vs 26.1, 52.8, and 78.8 ng/mL in CKD 3–5). TFF3 excretion was increased in stages 4 and 5 (p < 0.001; median urinary levels: 65.2 ng/mL in controls vs 231.5 and 382.6 ng/mL in CKD 4/5; fractional TFF3 excretion: 6.4 in controls vs 19.6 and 44.1 in CKD 4/5). ROC curve analyses showed, that monitoring TFF peptide levels can predict various CKD stages (AUC urinary/serum TFF > 0.8). In conclusion our results show increased levels of TFF1 and TFF3 in CKD patients with a pronounced elevation of urinary TFF1 in lower CKD stages. Furthermore, TFF1 and TFF3 seems to be differently regulated and show potential to predict various CKD stages, as shown by ROC curve analysis. PMID:26390128

  16. Advancing Early Detection of Autism Spectrum Disorder by Applying an Integrated Two-Stage Screening Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oosterling, Iris J.; Wensing, Michel; Swinkels, Sophie H.; van der Gaag, Rutger Jan; Visser, Janne C.; Woudenberg, Tim; Minderaa, Ruud; Steenhuis, Mark-Peter; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Few field trials exist on the impact of implementing guidelines for the early detection of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The aims of the present study were to develop and evaluate a clinically relevant integrated early detection programme based on the two-stage screening approach of Filipek et al. (1999), and to expand the evidence…

  17. Impact of HLA on the underlying primary diseases in Turkish patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Gonca Emel; Seyhun, Yalcin; Oguz, Fatma Savran; Kekik, Cigdem; Onal, Ayse Emel; Yazici, Halil; Turkmen, Aydin; Aydin, Ali Emin; Sever, Mehmet Sukru; Eldegez, Ulug; Carin, Mahmut Nezih

    2009-01-01

    The number of patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasing faster than the number of renal transplantations performed per year worldwide. Of the primary diseases leading to ESRD, diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the association of HLA with the primary diseases leading to ESRD in Turkish patients. A total of 3230 individuals comprising 587 ESRD patients and 2643 healthy controls were enrolled into the study. Class I HLA-A, -B typing was performed by CDC method, while class II HLA-DRB1 typing was performed by low resolution PCR-SSP. We found a significant negative association between almost all A locus antigens and primary disease groups classified as chronic glomerulonephritis and hypertensive nephrosclerosis (p < 0.05). HLA-B58 and HLA-DRB1*03 significantly correlated with amyloidosis and diabetic nephropathy, respectively. Determination of HLAs as risk factors for primary diseases leading to ESRD might be beneficial in preventing progression to ESRD and recurrence of the primary disease post-transplantation.

  18. Staging of osteonecrosis of the jaw requires computed tomography for accurate definition of the extent of bony disease.

    PubMed

    Bedogni, Alberto; Fedele, Stefano; Bedogni, Giorgio; Scoletta, Matteo; Favia, Gianfranco; Colella, Giuseppe; Agrillo, Alessandro; Bettini, Giordana; Di Fede, Olga; Oteri, Giacomo; Fusco, Vittorio; Gabriele, Mario; Ottolenghi, Livia; Valsecchi, Stefano; Porter, Stephen; Petruzzi, Massimo; Arduino, Paolo; D'Amato, Salvatore; Ungari, Claudio; Fung Polly, Pok-Lam; Saia, Giorgia; Campisi, Giuseppina

    2014-09-01

    Management of osteonecrosis of the jaw associated with antiresorptive agents is challenging, and outcomes are unpredictable. The severity of disease is the main guide to management, and can help to predict prognosis. Most available staging systems for osteonecrosis, including the widely-used American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS) system, classify severity on the basis of clinical and radiographic findings. However, clinical inspection and radiography are limited in their ability to identify the extent of necrotic bone disease compared with computed tomography (CT). We have organised a large multicentre retrospective study (known as MISSION) to investigate the agreement between the AAOMS staging system and the extent of osteonecrosis of the jaw (focal compared with diffuse involvement of bone) as detected on CT. We studied 799 patients with detailed clinical phenotyping who had CT images taken. Features of diffuse bone disease were identified on CT within all AAOMS stages (20%, 8%, 48%, and 24% of patients in stages 0, 1, 2, and 3, respectively). Of the patients classified as stage 0, 110/192 (57%) had diffuse disease on CT, and about 1 in 3 with CT evidence of diffuse bone disease was misclassified by the AAOMS system as having stages 0 and 1 osteonecrosis. In addition, more than a third of patients with AAOMS stage 2 (142/405, 35%) had focal bone disease on CT. We conclude that the AAOMS staging system does not correctly identify the extent of bony disease in patients with osteonecrosis of the jaw.

  19. First human treatment with investigational rhGUS enzyme replacement therapy in an advanced stage MPS VII patient.

    PubMed

    Fox, Joyce E; Volpe, Linda; Bullaro, Josephine; Kakkis, Emil D; Sly, William S

    2015-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII, Sly syndrome) is a very rare lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of the enzyme β-glucuronidase (GUS), which is required for the degradation of three glycosaminoglycans (GAGs): dermatan sulfate, heparan sulfate, and chondroitin sulfate. Progressive accumulation of these GAGs in lysosomes leads to increasing dysfunction in numerous tissues and organs. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been used successfully for other MPS disorders, but there is no approved treatment for MPS VII. Here we describe the first human treatment with recombinant human GUS (rhGUS), an investigational therapy for MPS VII, in a 12-year old boy with advanced stage MPS VII. Despite a tracheostomy, nocturnal continuous positive airway pressure, and oxygen therapy, significant pulmonary restriction and obstruction led to oxygen dependence and end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) levels in the 60-80mmHg range, eventually approaching respiratory failure (ETCO2 of 100mmHg) and the need for full-time ventilation. Since no additional medical measures could improve his function, we implemented experimental ERT by infusing rhGUS at 2mg/kg over 4h every 2 weeks for 24 weeks. Safety was evaluated by standard assessments and observance for any infusion associated reactions (IARs). Urinary GAG (uGAG) levels, pulmonary function, oxygen dependence, CO2 levels, cardiac valve function, liver and spleen size, and growth velocity were assessed to evaluate response to therapy. rhGUS infusions were well tolerated. No serious adverse events (SAEs) or IARs were observed. After initiation of rhGUS infusions, the patient's uGAG excretion decreased by more than 50%. Liver and spleen size were reduced within 2 weeks of the first infusion and reached normal size by 24 weeks. Pulmonary function appeared to improve during the course of treatment based on reduced changes in ETCO2 after off-ventilator challenges and a reduced oxygen requirement. The patient regained the

  20. Health-Related Quality-of-Life Outcomes: A Reflexology Trial With Patients With Advanced-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Gwen; Sikorskii, Alla; Rahbar, Mohammad Hossein; Victorson, David; You, Mei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To evaluate the safety and efficacy of reflexology, a complementary therapy that applies pressure to specific areas of the feet. Design Longitudinal, randomized clinical trial. Setting Thirteen community-based medical oncology clinics across the midwestern United States. Sample A convenience sample of 385 predominantly Caucasian women with advanced-stage breast cancer receiving chemotherapy and/or hormonal therapy. Methods Following the baseline interview, women were randomized into three primary groups: reflexology (n = 95), lay foot manipulation (LFM) (n = 95), or conventional care (n = 96). Two preliminary reflexology (n = 51) and LFM (n = 48) test groups were used to establish the protocols. Participants were interviewed again postintervention at study weeks 5 and 11. Main Research Variables Breast cancer–specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL), physical functioning, and symptoms. Findings No adverse events were reported. A longitudinal comparison revealed significant improvements in physical functioning for the reflexology group compared to the control group (p = 0.04). Severity of dyspnea was reduced in the reflexology group compared to the control group (p < 0.01) and the LFM group (p = 0.02). No differences were found on breast cancer–specific HRQOL, depressive symptomatology, state anxiety, pain, and nausea. Conclusions Reflexology may be added to existing evidence-based supportive care to improve HRQOL for patients with advanced-stage breast cancer during chemotherapy and/or hormonal therapy. Implications for Nursing Reflexology can be recommended for safety and usefulness in relieving dyspnea and enhancing functional status among women with advanced-stage breast cancer. PMID:23107851

  1. Hepatitis C virus infection in end-stage renal disease and kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Burra, Patrizia; Rodríguez-Castro, Kryssia I; Marchini, Francesco; Bonfante, Luciana; Furian, Lucrezia; Ferrarese, Alberto; Zanetto, Alberto; Germani, Giacomo; Russo, Francesco Paolo; Senzolo, Marco

    2014-09-01

    Liver disease secondary to chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on renal replacement therapy and after kidney transplantation (KT). Hemodialytic treatment (HD) for ESRD constitutes a risk factor for bloodborne infections because of prolonged vascular access and the potential for exposure to infected patients and contaminated equipment. Evaluation of HCV-positive/ESRD and HCV-positive/KT patients is warranted to determine the stage of disease and the appropriateness of antiviral therapy, despite such treatment is challenging especially due to tolerability issues. Antiviral treatment with interferon (IFN) is contraindicated after transplantation due to the risk of rejection, and therefore, treatment is recommended before KT. Newer treatment strategies of direct-acting antiviral agents in combination are revolutionizing HCV therapy, as a result of encouraging outcomes streaming from recent studies which report increased sustained viral response, low or no resistance, and good safety profiles, including preservation of renal function. KT has been demonstrated to yield better outcomes with respect to remaining on HD although survival after KT is penalized by the presence of HCV infection with respect to HCV-negative transplant recipients. Therefore, an appropriate, comprehensive, easily applicable set of clinical practice management guidelines is necessary in both ESRD and KT patients with HCV infection and HCV-related liver disease.

  2. An advanced case of indium lung disease with progressive emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Makiko; Tanaka, Akiyo; Hirata, Miyuki; Kumazoe, Hiroyuki; Wakamatsu, Kentaro; Kamada, Dan; Omae, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To report the occurrence of an advanced case of indium lung disease with severely progressive emphysema in an indium-exposed worker. Case report: A healthy 42-year-old male smoker was employed to primarily grind indium-tin oxide (ITO) target plates, exposing him to indium for 9 years (1998-2008). In 2004, an epidemiological study was conducted on indium-exposed workers at the factory in which he worked. The subject's serum indium concentration (In-S) was 99.7 μg/l, while his serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 level was 2,350 U/ml. Pulmonary function tests showed forced vital capacity (FVC) of 4.17 l (91.5% of the JRS predicted value), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) of 3.19 l (80.8% of predicted), and an FEV1-to-FVC ratio of 76.5%. A high-resolution chest computed tomography (HRCT) scan showed mild interlobular septal thickening and mild emphysematous changes. In 2008, he was transferred from the ITO grinding workplace to an inspection work section, where indium concentrations in total dusts had a range of 0.001-0.002 mg/m3. In 2009, the subject's In-S had increased to 132.1 μg/l, and pulmonary function tests revealed obstructive changes. In addition, HRCT scan showed clear evidence of progressive lung destruction with accompanying severe centrilobular emphysema and interlobular septal thickening in both lung fields. The subject's condition gradually worsened, and in 2015, he was registered with the Japan Organ Transplant Network for lung transplantation (LTx). Conclusions: Heavy indium exposure is a risk factor for emphysema, which can lead to a severity level that requires LTx as the final therapeutic option. PMID:27488043

  3. Protein Kinase Activity Decreases with Higher Braak Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Andrea F.N.; Hilhorst, Riet; Coart, Elisabeth; García Barrado, Leandro; Naji, Faris; Rozemuller, Annemieke J.M.; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Scheltens, Philip; Hoozemans, Jeroen J.M.; van der Vies, Saskia M.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by a long pre-clinical phase (20–30 years), during which significant brain pathology manifests itself. Disease mechanisms associated with pathological hallmarks remain elusive. Most processes associated with AD pathogenesis, such as inflammation, synaptic dysfunction, and hyper-phosphorylation of tau are dependent on protein kinase activity. The objective of this study was to determine the involvement of protein kinases in AD pathogenesis. Protein kinase activity was determined in postmortem hippocampal brain tissue of 60 patients at various stages of AD and 40 non-demented controls (Braak stages 0-VI) using a peptide-based microarray platform. We observed an overall decrease of protein kinase activity that correlated with disease progression. The phosphorylation of 96.7% of the serine/threonine peptides and 37.5% of the tyrosine peptides on the microarray decreased significantly with increased Braak stage (p-value <0.01). Decreased activity was evident at pre-clinical stages of AD pathology (Braak I-II). Increased phosphorylation was not observed for any peptide. STRING analysis in combination with pathway analysis and identification of kinases responsible for peptide phosphorylation showed the interactions between well-known proteins in AD pathology, including the Ephrin-receptor A1 (EphA1), a risk gene for AD, and sarcoma tyrosine kinase (Src), which is involved in memory formation. Additionally, kinases that have not previously been associated with AD were identified, e.g., protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6/BRK), feline sarcoma oncogene kinase (FES), and fyn-associated tyrosine kinase (FRK). The identified protein kinases are new biomarkers and potential drug targets for early (pre-clinical) intervention. PMID:26519433

  4. End-stage renal disease in Tunisian infants: Etiology and outcome.

    PubMed

    Jellouli, M; Boussetta, A; Abidi, K; Hammi, Y; Zarrouk, C; Gargah, T

    2016-01-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) in infants has particular features in terms of etiologies and therapeutic modalities. The aim of our study is to describe the etiologies and the ESRD outcomes among Tunisian infants. This retrospective study was conducted over 15 years (from January 1998 to December 31, 2013) in the Pediatric Department at Charles Nicolle Hospital. In total, 157 pediatric patients had ESRD. The mean incidence was 4.25 million children. The study involved 24 infants; the sex ratio was equal to 2. The mean age at diagnosis of ESRD was 8 months (range, 1-21 months). Growth retardation was noticed in 14 patients. The main causes were Congenital Anomalies of the Kidneys and Urinary Tract (9 infants) and hereditary renal disease (9 infants). All patients were treated with peritoneal dialysis; 16 infants presented peritonitis. Mortality rate was about 28%. The leading causes of death were cardiovascular diseases and infections.

  5. Efficacy of dietary interventions in end-stage renal disease patients; a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nazar, Chaudhary Muhamamd Juniad; Bojerenu, Micheal Mauton; Safdar, Muhammad; Ahmed, Armughan; Akhtar, Muhammad Hammad; Kindratt, Tiffany Billmeier

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are common comorbid conditions. Life style, particularly diet is a critical component of treatment for these conditions. Register dietitians play a key role in bridging the gap between the science of nutrition and the empowerment of individuals to alter their lifestyles in a healthy manner. A range of dietary manipulations has been reported to reduce risk factors and decrease risk of CVD and CKD outcomes. However, many studies provided food to participants or were limited to adjustment of few specific nutrients. Diet intervention in relation with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is really complicated topic. As multiple co morbid conditions such as hypertension, CVD, CKD, and diabetes mellitus (DM) are associated with ESRD, which made the scenario really worse while fixing the dose of any diet. Still a lot of research work is required to understand this topic. PMID:28197497

  6. Two stage low noise advanced technology fan. 1: Aerodynamic, structural, and acoustic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, H. E.; Ruschak, J. T.; Sofrin, T. G.

    1974-01-01

    A two-stage fan was designed to reduce noise 20 db below current requirements. The first-stage rotor has a design tip speed of 365.8 m/sec and a hub/tip ratio of 0.4. The fan was designed to deliver a pressure ratio of 1.9 with an adiabatic efficiency of 85.3 percent at a specific inlet corrected flow of 209.2kg/sec/sq m. Noise reduction devices include acoustically treated casing walls, a flowpath exit acoustic splitter, a translating centerbody sonic inlet device, widely spaced blade rows, and the proper ratio of blades and vanes. Multiple-circular-arc rotor airfoils, resettable stators, split outer casings, and capability to go to close blade-row spacing are also included.

  7. Impact of Pretreatment Combined {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Staging on Radiation Therapy Treatment Decisions in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Sweet Ping; David, Steven; Alamgeer, Muhammad; Ganju, Vinod

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic performance of pretreatment {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) and its impact on radiation therapy treatment decisions in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Methods and Materials: Patients with LABC with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status <2 and no contraindication to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant radiation therapy were enrolled on a prospective trial. All patients had pretreatment conventional imaging (CI) performed, including bilateral breast mammography and ultrasound, bone scan, and CT chest, abdomen, and pelvis scans performed. Informed consent was obtained before enrolment. Pretreatment whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans were performed on all patients, and results were compared with CI findings. Results: A total of 154 patients with LABC with no clinical or radiologic evidence of distant metastases on CI were enrolled. Median age was 49 years (range, 26-70 years). Imaging with PET/CT detected distant metastatic disease and/or locoregional disease not visualized on CI in 32 patients (20.8%). Distant metastatic disease was detected in 17 patients (11.0%): 6 had bony metastases, 5 had intrathoracic metastases (pulmonary/mediastinal), 2 had distant nodal metastases, 2 had liver metastases, 1 had pulmonary and bony metastases, and 1 had mediastinal and distant nodal metastases. Of the remaining 139 patients, nodal disease outside conventional radiation therapy fields was detected on PET/CT in 15 patients (10.8%), with involvement of ipsilateral internal mammary nodes in 13 and ipsilateral level 5 cervical nodes in 2. Conclusions: Imaging with PET/CT provides superior diagnostic and staging information in patients with LABC compared with CI, which has significant therapeutic implications with respect to radiation therapy management. Imaging with PET/CT should be considered in all patients undergoing primary

  8. Identification of Early-Stage Alzheimer's Disease Using Sulcal Morphology and Other Common Neuroimaging Indices

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Kunpeng; Xu, Hong; Guan, Hao; Zhu, Wanlin; Jiang, Jiyang; Cui, Yue; Zhang, Jicong; Liu, Tao; Wen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Identifying Alzheimer’s disease (AD) at its early stage is of major interest in AD research. Previous studies have suggested that abnormalities in regional sulcal width and global sulcal index (g-SI) are characteristics of patients with early-stage AD. In this study, we investigated sulcal width and three other common neuroimaging morphological measures (cortical thickness, cortical volume, and subcortical volume) to identify early-stage AD. These measures were evaluated in 150 participants, including 75 normal controls (NC) and 75 patients with early-stage AD. The global sulcal index (g-SI) and the width of five individual sulci (the superior frontal, intra-parietal, superior temporal, central, and Sylvian fissure) were extracted from 3D T1-weighted images. The discriminative performances of the other three traditional neuroimaging morphological measures were also examined. Information Gain (IG) was used to select a subset of features to provide significant information for separating NC and early-stage AD subjects. Based on the four modalities of the individual measures, i.e., sulcal measures, cortical thickness, cortical volume, subcortical volume, and combinations of these individual measures, three types of classifiers (Naïve Bayes, Logistic Regression and Support Vector Machine) were applied to compare the classification performances. We observed that sulcal measures were either superior than or equal to the other measures used for classification. Specifically, the g-SI and the width of the Sylvian fissure were two of the most sensitive sulcal measures and could be useful neuroanatomical markers for detecting early-stage AD. There were no significant differences between the three classifiers that we tested when using the same neuroanatomical features. PMID:28129351

  9. A quality improvement model for optimizing care of the diabetic end-stage renal disease patient.

    PubMed

    Mahnensmith, Rex L; Zorzanello, Mary; Hsu, Yueh-Han; Williams, Mark E

    2010-01-01

    Persons with diabetes mellitus whose kidney disease progresses to end-stage requiring dialysis have poorer outcomes compared to nondiabetic patients who commence maintenance dialysis. In the diabetic patient without renal failure, sustained strict glycemic, lipid, and blood pressure (BP) control can retard or thwart diabetic complications such as retinopathy, neuropathy, coronary disease, and peripheral vascular disease. Achieving these outcomes requires multidisciplinary collaborative care. Best care of the diabetic person requires a dedicated clinician who knows the patient well, who closely follows the course of clinical problems, who provides frequent assessments and interventions, and who also directs care to other agencies, clinics, and specialized clinicians who provide expert focused evaluations and interventions aimed at specific clinical concerns. Diabetic patients who reach end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have even greater clinical need of a dedicated principal care clinician than the diabetic patient who has minimal or moderate kidney disease. The diabetic patient with ESRD exhibits greater fluctuations in glucose and BP due to dialysis-related diet patterns and fluid balances and has more active cardiovascular problems due to the combined influences of calcium, phosphorus, and lipid imbalances. These problems warrant exceptional care that includes frequent surveillance and monitoring with timely interventions if patient outcomes are to be improved. We present here a quality improvement model for optimizing care of the diabetic dialysis patient that relies on a dedicated practitioner who can evaluate and intervene on the multiple variables within and beyond the dialysis clinic that impact the patient's health. We present three detailed clinical care pathways that the dedicated clinician can follow. We believe that patient outcomes can be improved with this approach that provides customized problem-focused care, collaborates with the dialysis

  10. Impact of disease stage and aetiology on survival in hepatocellular carcinoma: implications for surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Philip; Berhane, Sarah; Kagebayashi, Chiaki; Satomura, Shinji; Teng, Mabel; Fox, Richard; Yeo, Winnie; Mo, Frankie; Lai, Paul; Chan, Stephen L; Tada, Toshifumi; Toyoda, Hidenori; Kumada, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Variation in survival in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been attributed to different aetiologies or disease stages at presentation. While international guidelines recommend surveillance of high-risk groups to permit early diagnosis and curative treatment, the evidence that surveillance decreases disease-specific mortality is weak. Methods: We compared HCC survival figures from Japan (n=1174) and Hong Kong (n=1675) over similar time periods (Japan 2000–2013, Hong Kong, China 2003–2014). The former has an intensive national surveillance programme, while the latter has none. We also analysed changes in survival in Japan over a 50-year period including data from before and after institution of a national HCC surveillance programme. Results: In Japan, over 75% of cases are currently detected by surveillance, whereas in Hong Kong <20% of cases are detected presymptomatically. Median survival was 52 months in Japan and 17.8 months in Hong Kong; this survival advantage persisted after allowance for lead-time bias. Sixty-two per cent of Japanese patients had early disease at diagnosis and 63% received curative treatment. The comparable figures for Hong Kong were 31.7% and 44.1%, respectively. These differences could not be accounted for by disease aetiology, and patients in Hong Kong who were detected at an early stage had a similar survival to the analogous patients in Japan. Conclusions: The variation in survival is largely accounted for by stage at diagnosis, which in turn relates to the intensity of surveillance programmes and the consequent variation in curative therapeutic options. PMID:28081537

  11. Angiogenic inhibitors for older patients with advanced colorectal cancer: Does the age hold the stage?

    PubMed Central

    Aprile, Giuseppe; Fontanella, Caterina; Lutrino, Eufemia Stefania; Ferrari, Laura; Casagrande, Mariaelena; Cardellino, Giovanni Gerardo; Rosati, Gerardo; Fasola, Gianpiero

    2013-01-01

    Although major progress has been achieved in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) with the employment of antiangiogenic agents, several questions remain on the use of these drugs in older patients. Since cardiovascular, renal and other comorbidities are common in the elderly, an accurate assessment of the patients’ conditions should be performed before a treatment decision is made. Since most CRC patients enrolled in clinical trials testing antiangiogenic drugs were aged < 65 years, the efficacy and tolerability of these agents in elderly patients has not been adequately explored. Data suggest that patients with advanced CRC derive similar benefit from bevacizumab treatment regardless of age, but the advantage of other antiangiogenic drugs in the same class of patients appears more blurred. Literature data suggest that specific antiangiogenic-related toxicities such as hypertension or arterial thromboembolic events may be higher in the elderly than in the younger patients. In addition, it should be emphasized that the patients included in the clinical studies discussed herein were selected and therefore may not be representative of the usual elderly population. Advanced age alone should not discourage the use of bevacizumab. However, a careful patients’ selection and watchful monitoring of toxicities are required to optimize the use of antiangiogenics in this population. PMID:23847406

  12. Improvement with ongoing Enzyme Replacement Therapy in advanced late-onset Pompe disease: a case study.

    PubMed

    Case, Laura E; Koeberl, Dwight D; Young, Sarah P; Bali, Deeksha; DeArmey, Stephanie M; Mackey, Joanne; Kishnani, Priya S

    2008-12-01

    Benefits of enzyme replacement therapy with Myozyme (alglucosidase alfa), anecdotally reported in late-onset Pompe disease, range from motor and pulmonary improvement in less severely affected patients, to stabilization with minimal improvement in those with advanced disease. We report a case of a 63-year-old patient with significant morbidity who made notable motor and pulmonary function gains after two years on therapy. Thus, improvements in those with advanced disease may be possible after long-term treatment.

  13. [Disease control in the Red Army during the final stages of the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Butakov, S S; Berskii, O V; Zetkin, A Yu; Zobov, A E

    2015-05-01

    Forms and methods of disease, control in troops were fully developed during the Great Patriotic War 1941-1945 years. An improvement of anti-epidemic organization in the Red Army was based on military medical doctrine, which demanded united views on methods of disease prevention and in accordance with the 'main tasks of medical support of the army, including prevention of epidemic outbreaks in the army. Disease control system in the Red Army during the war was a series of targeted, science-based and proved by military practice measures .aimed at both the prevention and the immediate elimination of epidemic diseases. when they occur. The questions of disease control forces in the final stage of the Great Patriotic War (January 1944 - May 1945). Depending on the progress of the war and the conditions of the fighting, given the period laid down in the principles of disease control of military operations, discussed aspects of the organization of sanitary-epidemiological (preventive) measures in the armed forces.

  14. Fetal Origins of Life Stage Disease: A Zebrafish Model for the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In the U.S., childhood obesity has more than doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents in the past 30 years, affects 35% of adults, and costs the U.S. healthcare industry >$200 billion annually. The chemical environment in the womb may cause susceptibility to different life-stage and life-long metabolic diseases including obesity. The challenge is to understand if exposures during developmentally sensitive windows impact life-stage disease, such as obesity, by increasing adipose tissue mass. In vitro models lack the integrated systems approach needed to assess adipose development, while mammalian models are impractical in a screen of thousands of chemicals. Therefore, an obesogen screening method was developed to interrogate bioactivity using a full systems approach, in a vertebrate zebrafish model with complete metabolic activity, at a time when the full signaling repertoire is expressed and active, to optimally examine how chemical dose and duration impact life-stage adipose mass. A time-line for adipose depot formation was mapped in zebrafish 6−14 days post fertilization (dpf) using the lipophilic dye, Nile Red, in combination with fluorescent microscopy. Those time points were then used to investigate the impact of embryonic tributyltin chloride (TBT, a known obesogen) exposure (10nM daily renewal, 0−5dpf) on adipose mass. Fluorescent microscopy revealed adipose depots that were larger and appeared 2 days earlier in TBT treated compared to contro

  15. Advanced Tracers in PET Imaging of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Hua; Liu, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers by positron emission tomography (PET) allows for the noninvasive detection and characterization of biological changes at the molecular level, leading to earlier disease detection, objective monitoring of therapies, and better prognostication of cardiovascular diseases progression. Here we review, the current role of PET in cardiovascular disease, with emphasize on tracers developed for PET imaging of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25389529

  16. Stages of the pathologic process in Alzheimer disease: age categories from 1 to 100 years.

    PubMed

    Braak, Heiko; Thal, Dietmar R; Ghebremedhin, Estifanos; Del Tredici, Kelly

    2011-11-01

    Two thousand three hundred and thirty two nonselected brains from 1- to 100-year-old individuals were examined using immunocytochemistry (AT8) and Gallyas silver staining for abnormal tau; immunocytochemistry (4G8) and Campbell-Switzer staining were used for the detection ofβ-amyloid. A total of 342 cases was negative in the Gallyas stain but when restaged for AT8 only 10 were immunonegative. Fifty-eight cases had subcortical tau predominantly in the locus coeruleus, but there was no abnormal cortical tau (subcortical Stages a-c). Cortical involvement (abnormal tau in neurites) was identified first in the transentorhinal region (Stage 1a, 38 cases). Transentorhinal pyramidal cells displayed pretangle material (Stage 1b, 236 cases). Pretangles gradually became argyrophilic neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) that progressed in parallel with NFT Stages I to VI. Pretangles restricted to subcortical sites were seen chiefly at younger ages. Of the total cases, 1,031 (44.2%) had β-amyloid plaques. The first plaques occurred in the neocortex after the onset of tauopathy in the brainstem. Plaques generally developed in the 40s in 4% of all cases, culminating in their tenth decade (75%). β-amyloid plaques and NFTs were significantly correlated (p < 0.0001). These data suggest that tauopathy associated with sporadic Alzheimer disease may begin earlier than previously thought and possibly in the lower brainstem rather than in the transentorhinal region.

  17. Early stages of probable Alzheimer disease are associated with changes in platelet amyloid precursor protein forms.

    PubMed

    Borroni, B; Colciaghi, F; Corsini, P; Akkawi, N; Rozzini, L; Del Zotto, E; Talarico, G; Cattabeni, F; Lenzi, G L; Di Luca, M; Padovani, A

    2002-12-01

    Previous findings demonstrated an altered pattern of amyloid precursor protein (APP) forms in platelets of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients, compared both with healthy control subjects or patients with non-Alzheimer-type dementia. The present study aims to evaluate whether platelet APP form ratio (APPr) is altered in patients with early stage AD. We selected 40 patients with early stage AD and 40 age-matched healthy controls. Compared with controls (mean+/-SD=0.91+/-0.3), mean APPr was decreased in AD (mean+/-SD=0.46+/-0.26, p<0.0001). Sixteen very mild AD patients (clinical dementia rating=0.5), identified among the AD group, showed a significant decrease of APPr values (mean+/-SD=0.50+/-0.3, p<0.0001). These findings indicate that alteration of APP processing in platelets is an early event and suggest that this assay might be of diagnostic value in differentiating mild AD from normal ageing.

  18. [Pre- and postoperative radiotherapy of oral carcinoma of a locally advanced stage. An analysis of the results and complications].

    PubMed

    Zini, G; Barbieri, E; Campobassi, A; Dallera, P; Emiliani, E; Frezza, G; Marchetti, C; Neri, S; Romagnoli, D; Silvano, M

    1989-01-01

    The combination of radiotherapy and surgery in the treatment of advanced oral carcinoma (T3 and T4 lesions) yields good possibilities of recovery; whether radiotherapy should be given before or after surgery is still debated. Fifty patients with advanced oral carcinomas were analyzed: 24 of them were irradiated before and 26 after surgery; doses ranged from 40 to 56 Gy for the first group of patients, and from 50 to 68 Gy for the second one. The disease-free survival 48 months after the diagnosis was 36% in patients who received preoperative irradiation, and 53.6% in patients who received postoperative radiotherapy; the latter allowed local control of the disease to be significantly improved (chi 2 3.99, 0.01 less than p less than 0.05). The quality of survival was worse in the group receiving preoperative irradiation, because of radiation-induced surgical complications, which were especially observed in patients with diffuse disease. Our findings suggest that postoperative radiotherapy may be advisable if the tumor is resectable, since tolerance and local control rate were acceptable. On the contrary, nearly inoperable masses and massive neck diseases often require preoperative irradiation.

  19. Design of the standardizing care to improve outcomes in pediatric end stage renal disease collaborative.

    PubMed

    Neu, Alicia M; Miller, Marlene R; Stuart, Jayne; Lawlor, John; Richardson, Troy; Martz, Karen; Rosenberg, Carol; Newland, Jason; McAfee, Nancy; Begin, Brandy; Warady, Bradley A

    2014-09-01

    The Standardizing Care to Improve Outcomes in Pediatric End Stage Renal Disease (SCOPE) Collaborative is a North American multi-center quality transformation effort whose primary aim is to minimize exit-site infection and peritonitis rates among pediatric chronic peritoneal dialysis patients. The project, developed by the quality improvement faculty and staff at the Children's Hospital Association's Quality Transformation Network (QTN) and content experts in pediatric nephrology and pediatric infectious diseases, is modeled after the QTN's highly successful Pediatric Intensive Care Unit and Hematology-Oncology central line-associated blood-stream infection (CLABSI) Collaboratives. Like the Association's other QTN efforts, the SCOPE Collaborative is part of a broader effort to assist pediatric nephrology teams in learning about and using quality improvement methods to develop and implement evidence-based practices. In addition, the design of this project allows for targeted research that builds on high-quality, ongoing data collection. Finally, the project, while focused on reducing peritoneal dialysis catheter-associated infections, will also serve as a model for future pediatric nephrology projects that could further improve the quality of care provided to children with end stage renal disease.

  20. Cognitive deterioration in Alzheimer's disease: is the early course predictive of the later stages?

    PubMed

    Capitani, E; Cazzaniga, R; Francescani, A; Spinnler, H

    2004-10-01

    This study investigated the predictive value of the early progression rate of Alzheimer's disease on that of the later stages. We retrospectively evaluated 91 patients affected by possible Alzheimer's disease; the patients had been examined twice with the Milan overall dementia assessment (MODA) scale at an interval of 12 months (53 patients) or 24 months (38 patients). At the first assessment, speed of progression was calculated for each patient dividing the MODA difference from the normality threshold by the time elapsed from the cognitive decline onset. The second assessment of speed of progression was calculated dividing the difference between the two MODA scores by the time elapsed from the first examination. Patients with a slow progression rate in the early stage were unlikely to show a subsequent fast progression rate, and vice versa for patients with a fast early progression. A tool is provided for predicting the speed of cognitive decline of patients from a single MODA assessment. We suggest that, in future clinical trials on Alzheimer's disease, a stratification of participants based on the early rate of cognitive deterioration may be considered.

  1. Coronary calcification in patients with end-stage renal disease: a novel endocrine disorder?

    PubMed

    Efstratiadis, Georgios; Koskinas, Konstantinos; Pagourelias, Efstathios

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular mortality is significantly increased among patients with end-stage renal disease. The commonly observed vascular calcification in such patients has been considered as one of the causative factors. In patients undergoing dialysis, the incidence of coronary artery calcification is 2-5 times higher compared to patients with normal renal function and angiographically demonstrated coronary artery disease. Moreover, epidemiological studies have revealed a significant correlation of the extent of coronary artery calcification with the severity of underlying atherosclerotic lesions. Vascular calcification was initially considered as a passive process of hydroxyapatite deposition due to elevated plasma concentrations of calcium and phosphate. Nevertheless, there is a growing body of evidence that vascular calcification is an actively regulated and cell-mediated process. This phenomenon includes phenotypic alterations of vascular smooth muscle cells mainly resulting from an imbalance between promoters (such as increased Ca x P product) and inhibitors (fetuin-A, GLA protein, osteoprotegerin) of mineral deposition. With regard to the therapeutic approach, despite the evident effectiveness of both traditional and innovative remedies in the management of metabolic and electrolytic abnormalities of patients with end-stage renal disease, an individualized intervention based on etiopathogenesis is really required.

  2. Treatment outcome of patients with advanced stage natural killer/T-cell lymphoma: elucidating the effects of asparaginase and postchemotherapeutic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xi-Wen; Jiang, Wen-Qi; Zhang, Wen-Wen; Huang, Jia-Jia; Xia, Yi; Wang, Yu; Sun, Peng; Li, Zhi-Ming

    2015-07-01

    The prognosis of advanced stage natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL) remains relatively disappointing, and the optimal treatment strategy for this disease has yet to be discovered. Seventy-three patients with Ann Arbor stage III or IV NKTCL were retrospectively reviewed. The treatment efficacies of asparaginase-containing and asparaginase-absent chemotherapy regimens were compared, and the effects of postchemotherapeutic radiotherapy were explored. The overall response rate (ORR) of the asparaginase-containing regimens was marginally higher than that of the asparaginase-absent regimens (56.5 vs 32.6 %, P = 0.057). However, no significant difference was observed in 2-year overall survival (OS) (38.3 vs 22.7 %, P = 0.418) or 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) (25.4 vs 14.9 %, P = 0.134) between the asparaginase-containing and asparaginase-absent groups. Postchemotherapeutic radiotherapy was associated with a significantly prolonged survival (2-year OS 57.5 vs 14.5 %, P < 0.001; 2-year PFS 46.3 vs 8.4 %, P < 0.001) and was an independent predictor of both OS and PFS. Radiotherapy significantly improved the prognosis among the patients who exhibited complete or partial remission after initial chemotherapy (2-year OS 81.5 vs 40.2 %, P = 0.002; 2-year PFS 65.6 vs 23.4 %, P = 0.008) but failed to provide a significant survival advantage among those who experienced stable or progressive disease after initial chemotherapy. In conclusion, the use of asparaginase did not significantly improve survival for the treatment of patients with stage III/IV NKTCL. Postchemotherapeutic radiotherapy provided additional prognostic benefits to patients who responded well to the initial chemotherapy, which requires further validation in future prospective studies using larger sample sizes.

  3. High expression of Wls is associated with lymph node metastasis and advanced TNM stage in gastric carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Tao, Hong; Chen, Xiao; Sugimura, Haruhiko; Wang, Jiandong; Zhou, Ping

    2017-03-01

    The roles of Wnt protein in carcinogenesis have been well documented in human cancers. Wls is a key modulator for the secretion of Wnt protein. We previously found that Wls was aberrantly expressed in colorectal carcinomas. Studies have revealed that dysregulation of Wnt signal transduction plays an important role in gastric carcinoma. We hypothesized that Wls may play a role in the development and progression of gastric carcinoma. In this study, three gastric cancer cell lines MGC-803, SGC-7901, and AGS, and a set of gastric carcinoma tissue specimens were subjected to immunohistochemistry. The relationship between the expression of Wls and clinicopathological parameters was analyzed. Wls was negatively detected in MGC-803, positively detected in SGC-7901 and AGS cell lines. Wls was weakly expressed in 9.7% (15/154), moderately in 33.1% (51/154), and strongly in 57.1% (88/154) of tested gastric carcinoma specimens. High expression of Wls was positively associated with well and moderately differentiated tumors (P = 0.035, rs  = 0.170), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.001, rs  = 0.276), and advanced TNM stage (P = 0.006, rs  = 0.219). Our data suggest that Wls protein is related to tumor metastasis and advanced TNM stage, and may be used as a new marker for prognosis of gastric carcinoma.

  4. Analysis of Outcome of Intraplueral Streptokinase in Pediatric Empyema Thoracis even in Advanced Stages: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Kallol; Saha, Sudip; Mridha, Dhrubojyoti; Das, Kallol; Mondal, Piyasi; Das, Ira

    2015-01-01

    Background: Empyema thoracis in children causes significant morbidity. Standard treatment of Empyema thoracis includes tube drainage and antibiotics. But the tube drainage often fails. Intrapleural Streptokinase has been used in empyema thoracis with good success rate. Objectives: We evaluated the efficacy of intra-pleural Streptokinase in management of empyema thoracis even in advanced stages. Patients and Methods: A total of 28 patients with empyema thoracis requiring intercostal tube drainage aged zero to twelve years were included in the study who were admitted in Pediatric intensive care unit. 15,000 units/kg of Streptokinase was instilled into the pleural cavity. Response was assessed by clinical outcome, after unclamping and subsequent chest radiography and serial chest ultrasounds. Results: Streptokinase enhanced drainage in all patients with complete resolution of empyema thoracis in 26 patients. Two patients were referred for surgery. Only 7.2% required surgery. Streptokinase was equally effective if started before or after seven days. Conclusions: Intrapleural Streptokinase is the preferred treatment for treating pediatric empyema thoracis even in advanced stages and can avoid surgery. PMID:26495096

  5. Targeted O-glycoproteomics explored increased sialylation and identified MUC16 as a poor prognosis biomarker in advanced stage bladder tumours.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Sofia; Azevedo, Rita; Gaiteiro, Cristiana; Ferreira, Dylan; Lima, Luís; Peixoto, Andreia; Fernandes, Elisabete; Neves, Manuel; Neves, Diogo; Amaro, Teresina; Cruz, Ricardo; Tavares, Ana; Rangel, Maria; Silva, André M N; Santos, Lúcio Lara; Ferreira, José Alexandre

    2017-02-03

    Bladder carcinogenesis and tumour progression is accompanied by profound alterations in protein glycosylation on the cell surface, which may be explored for improving disease management. In a search for prognosis biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets we have screened, using immunohistochemistry, a series of bladder tumours with differing clinicopathology for short-chain O-glycans commonly found in glycoproteins of human solid tumours. These included the Tn and T antigens and their sialylated counterparts sialyl-Tn(STn) and sialyl-T(ST), which are generally associated with poor prognosis. We have also explored the nature of T antigen sialylation, namely the sialyl-3-T(S3T) and sialyl-6-T(S6T) sialoforms, based on combinations of enzymatic treatments. We observed a predominance of sialoglycans over neutral glycoforms (Tn and T antigens) in bladder tumours. In particular, the STn antigen was associated with high-grade disease and muscle invasion, in accordance with our previous observations. The S3T and S6T antigens were detected for the first time in bladder tumours but not in healthy urothelia, highlighting their cancer-specific nature. These glycans were also overexpressed in advanced lesions, especially in cases showing muscle invasion. Glycoproteomic analyses of advanced bladder tumours based on enzymatic treatments, Vicia Villosa lectin-affinity chromatography enrichment and nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of several key cancer-associated glycoproteins (MUC16, CD44, integrins) carrying altered glycosylation. Of particular interest were MUC16 STn(+) -glycoforms, characteristic of ovarian cancers, which were found in a subset of advanced-stage bladder tumours facing the worst prognosis. In summary, significant alterations in the O-glycome and O-glycoproteome of bladder tumors hold promise for the development of novel non-invasive diagnostic tools and targeted therapeutics. Furthermore, abnormal MUC16 glycoforms hold potential as

  6. Pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver disease: classical concepts and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Seth, Devanshi; Haber, Paul S; Syn, Wing-Kin; Diehl, Anna Mae; Day, Christopher P

    2011-07-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a primary consequence of heavy and prolonged drinking. ALD contributes to the bulk of liver disease burden worldwide. Progression of ALD is a multifactorial and multistep process that includes many genetic and environmental risk factors. The molecular pathogenesis of ALD involves alcohol metabolism and secondary mechanisms such as oxidative stress, endotoxin, cytokines and immune regulators. The histopathological manifestation of ALD occurs as an outcome of complex but controlled interactions between hepatic cell types. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the key drivers of fibrogenesis, but transformation of hepatocytes to myofibroblastoids also implicate parenchymal cells as playing an active role in hepatic fibrogenesis. Recent discoveries indicate that lipogenesis during the early stages of ALD is a risk for advancement to cirrhosis. Other recently identified novel molecules and physiological/cell signaling pathways include fibrinolysis, osteopontin, transforming growth factor-β-SMAD and hedgehog signaling, and involvement of novel cytokines in hepatic fibrogenesis. The observation that ALD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis share common pathways and genetic polymorphisms suggests operation of parallel pathogenic mechanisms. Future research involving genomics, epigenomics, deep sequencing and non-coding regulatory elements holds promise to identify novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets for ALD. There is also a need for adequate animal models to study pathogenic mechanisms at the molecular level and targeted therapy.

  7. Disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with end-stage renal disease: systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Patrícia; Santiago, Mittermayer B

    2012-06-01

    It is not unusual that patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) progress to terminal renal failure and subsequently require renal replacement therapy. Previous studies have shown that clinical and/or serological remission in patients with SLE is common in those who develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD). On the other hand, the persistence of lupus activity among patients undergoing long-term dialysis is not rare, either. The aim of this study is to define, by means of a systematic review, the course of SLE activity in patients who developed ESRD. Data were obtained through searches for articles in the MEDLINE (1966 to 2011), SCielo, and LILACS databases, using the following keywords: "chronic renal failure", "systemic lupus erythematosus", "end-stage renal disease", "lupus activity", "disease activity", "lupus flare", "hemodialysis", and "renal replacement therapy" and their corresponding translations in Portuguese. Twenty-four articles were found which evaluated the degree of lupus activity in patients with ESRD. Fifteen of these studies spoke of a substantial reduction of clinical and/or serological activity after the development of ESRD, while nine articles found that the amount of clinical and/or serological activity was similar to that of the phase prior to terminal renal failure, or it occurred in at least 50% of the patients studied. Although the majority of studies showed that lupus flares tend to decrease in frequency in patients who develop ESRD, in this scenario, one should be prepared to correctly diagnose a recurrence of the disease, as well as to perform appropriate therapy.

  8. Relationship of dietary phosphate intake with risk of end-stage renal disease and mortality in chronic kidney disease stages 3-5: The Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Selamet, Umut; Tighiouart, Hocine; Sarnak, Mark J; Beck, Gerald; Levey, Andrew S; Block, Geoffrey; Ix, Joachim H

    2016-01-01

    KDIGO guidelines recommend dietary phosphate restriction to lower serum phosphate levels in CKD stages 3-5. Recent studies suggest that dietary phosphate intake is only weakly linked to its serum concentration, and the relationship of phosphate intake with adverse outcomes is uncertain. To evaluate this, we used Cox proportional hazards models to assess associations of baseline 24-h urine phosphate excretion with risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), all-cause mortality, and mortality subtypes (cardiovascular disease [CVD] and non-CVD) using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease data. Models were adjusted for demographics, CVD risk factors, iothalamate GFR, and urine protein and nitrogen excretion. Phosphate excretion was modestly inversely correlated with serum phosphate concentrations. There was no association of 24-h urinary phosphate excretion with risk of ESRD, CVD, non-CVD, or all-cause mortality. For comparison, higher serum phosphate concentrations were associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio per 0.7 mg/dl higher, 1.15 [95% CI 1.01, 1.30]). Thus, phosphate intake is not tightly linked with serum phosphate concentrations in CKD stages 3-5, and there was no evidence that greater phosphate intake, assessed by 24-h phosphate excretion, is associated with ESRD, CVD, non-CVD, or all-cause mortality in CKD stages 3-5. Hence, factors other than dietary intake may be key determinants of serum phosphate concentrations and require additional investigation.

  9. Comprehensive out-patient pulmonary rehabilitation: Treatment outcomes in early and late stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Ergün, Pinar; Kaymaz, Dicle; Günay, Ersin; Erdoğan, Yurdanur; Turay, Ülkü Yilmaz; Demir, Neşe; Çanak, Ebru; Sengül, Fatma; Egesel, Nurcan; Köse, Serdal Kenan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to evaluate the outcomes of a comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to establish whether in early disease stage PR is as effective as in late stages of disease. METHODS: A total of 55 stable COPD patients, 28 with early and 27 with late disease stages, were assessed. Patients underwent a comprehensive out-patient PR program for 8 weeks. To eluciate the effects of PR and compare the level of improvement; lung function, dyspnea sensation [Medical Research Council (MRC)], body composition [body mass index (BMI), fat free mass (FFM), fat free mass index (FFMI)], exercise capacity [incremental shuttle walking test, endurance shuttle walking test], health related quality of life (HRQoL) with St. George Respiratory Disease Questionnaire, psycohological status (Hospital anxiety–depression (HAD) scale) were evaluated before and after PR. RESULTS: At the end of PR in the early disease stage group, the improvement in forced vital capacity (FVC) reached a statistically significant level (P < 0.05). In both disease stages, there were no significant differences in BMI, FFM, and FFMI. The decrease in exertional dyspnea for the two groups evaluated with the modified BORG scale were not found statistically significant, though the dyspnea scores evaluated with MRC showed significant improvements (P < 0.001). HRQoL and exercise capacity were significantly improved for the two groups (P < 0.001). Psychological status evaluated with the HAD scale improved after PR (P < 0.001) both in early and late stages. Gainings in the study parameters did not differ in the early and the late disease stages. CONCLUSIONS: These results showed that patients with COPD had benefited from a comprehensive PR program in an out-patient setting regardless of disease severity. Even patients with earlier stage of disease should be referred and encouraged to participate in a PR program. PMID:21572695

  10. Advances of multidetector computed tomography in the characterization and staging of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsili, Athina C; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 90%-95% of kidney tumors. With the widespread use of cross-sectional imaging modalities, more than half of RCCs are detected incidentally, often diagnosed at an early stage. This may allow the planning of more conservative treatment strategies. Computed tomography (CT) is considered the examination of choice for the detection and staging of RCC. Multidetector CT (MDCT) with the improvement of spatial resolution and the ability to obtain multiphase imaging, multiplanar and three-dimensional reconstructions in any desired plane brought about further improvement in the evaluation of RCC. Differentiation of RCC from benign renal tumors based on MDCT features is improved. Tumor enhancement characteristics on MDCT have been found closely to correlate with the histologic subtype of RCC, the nuclear grade and the cytogenetic characteristics of clear cell RCC. Important information, including tumor size, localization, and organ involvement, presence and extent of venous thrombus, possible invasion of adjacent organs or lymph nodes, and presence of distant metastases are provided by MDCT examination. The preoperative evaluation of patients with RCC was improved by depicting the presence or absence of renal pseudocapsule and by assessing the possible neoplastic infiltration of the perirenal fat tissue and/or renal sinus fat compartment. PMID:26120380

  11. Prevalence and incidence of chronic kidney disease stage G5 in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Kunihiro; Yagisawa, Takashi; Nakai, Shigeru; Nakayama, Masaaki; Imai, Enyu; Hattori, Motoshi; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Akiba, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence and incidence of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) have continued to increase worldwide. Japan was known as having the highest prevalence of ESKD in the world; however, Taiwan took this place in 2001, with the USA still in third position. However, the prevalence data from Japan and Taiwan consisted of dialysis patients only. The prevalence and incidence of Kidney Transplantation (KT) in Japan were quite low, and the number of KT patients among those with ESKD was regarded as negligibly small. However, the number of KT recipients has increased recently. Furthermore, there are no reports about nationwide surveys on the prevalence and incidence of predialysis chronic kidney failure patients in Japan. This review describes our recent study on the estimated number of chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage G5 patients and the number of ESKD patients living in Japan, obtained via the cooperation of five related medical societies. From the results, as of Dec 31, 2007, 275,242 patients had received dialysis therapy and 10,013 patients had a functional transplanted kidney, and as of Dec 31, 2008, 286,406 patients had received dialysis therapy and 11,157 patients had a functional transplanted kidney. Consequently, there were 285,255 patients with CKD who reached ESKD and were living in Japan in 2008 and 297,563 in 2009. We also estimated that there were 67,000 predialysis CKD stage G5 patients in 2009, 37,365 patients introduced to dialysis therapy, and 101 patients who received pre-emptive renal transplantation in this year. In total, there were 37,466 patients who newly required renal replacement therapy (RRT) in 2009. Not only the average ages, but also the primary renal diseases of the new ESKD patients in each RRT modality were different.

  12. A voice that wraps around the body--communication problems in the advanced stages of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R. J.; Chamberlain, R. M.; Khuri, F. R.

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Significant problems in clinician-patient communication have been described in the oncology literatures. Advanced stage non-small lung cancer a devastating disease, can cause the communication between survivors, significant others, and clinicians to falter. To date, however, no studies have used qualitative methods to examine experiential aspects of living with non-small cell lung cancer. Nor have any studies evaluated the tools survivors might use to repair some of the damage caused by living with this disease. METHODS: Exploratory, two-part qualitative design. RESULTS: Survivors of non-small cell lung cancer live with multiple fears and losses. These include a diminished sense of self, the loss of health, fears of pain in a future tainted by the threat of death, and increased feelings of alienation due to the loss of previous sources of meaning in life. These experiences significantly affect cancer survivors abilities to communicate with clinicians and significant others. CONCLUSIONS: Survivors of non-small cell lung cancer often have difficulty sharing their experiences with others not suffering a similar affliction. Through their narratives with other survivors, however, patients are better able to initiate a biopsychosocial mechanism which enables them to create a cognitive map. This cognitive map helps survivors share their experiences with others, thereby repairing some of the damage caused by this disease, including the harm done to their communication with other people. PMID:11922184

  13. Parkinson's Disease and Cognitive-Motor Dual-Task: Is Motor Prioritization Possible in the Early Stages of the Disease?

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ângela; Sousa, Andreia S P; Rocha, Nuno; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2016-01-01

    The authors aimed to compare the postural phase of gait initiation under single-task (gait initiation) and dual-task (gait initiation plus Stroop test) conditions in healthy subjects and in subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD) in the early stages (Hoehn and Yahr scale < 3). The postural phase of gait initiation was assessed through the centre of pressure in single and dual task in 10 healthy subjects and 9 with PD. The analysis indicated that in the early stages of PD, an additional cognitive task did not affect the displacement of the gait initiation. No significant effects occurred between the groups and within-subjects (p > .05). Also, no interaction was found between the groups and the conditions (single- and dual-task). Differences were found in the duration of the mediolateral postural phase (p = .003), which was higher in PD subjects than in healthy subjects. The findings suggest that subjects in the early stages of PD prioritize gait initiation, as their motor performance was similar to that of healthy subjects.

  14. Nutrition for Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... peanut oil canola oil Why is knowing about sodium important for someone with advanced CKD? Too much ... who have high blood pressure. High- and Low-sodium Foods High-sodium Foods Low-sodium Alternatives Salt ...

  15. New MS Drug Shows 'Breakthrough' Promise for Advanced Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... News) -- A new drug slows the progress of multiple sclerosis, including an advanced form of the degenerative nerve ... also proved superior in treating people with relapsing multiple sclerosis, the most common form of MS, compared with ...

  16. Chromosome 21 BACE2 haplotype associates with Alzheimer's disease: a two-stage study.

    PubMed

    Myllykangas, Liisa; Wavrant-De Vrièze, Fabienne; Polvikoski, Tuomo; Notkola, Irma-Leena; Sulkava, Raimo; Niinistö, Leena; Edland, Steven D; Arepalli, Sampath; Adighibe, Omanma; Compton, Danielle; Hardy, John; Haltia, Matti; Tienari, Pentti J

    2005-09-15

    Genetic linkage studies have provided evidence for a late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) susceptibility locus on chromosome 21q. We have tested, in a two-stage association study, whether allelic or haplotype variation of the beta-amyloid cleaving enzyme-2 (BACE2) locus on chromosome 21q affects the risk of late-onset AD. In stage-1, an unselected population-based sample of Finns aged 85 years or over (n=515) was analysed. Neuropathologic examination including beta-amyloid load quantification was possible in over 50% (n=264) of these subjects. AD patients (n=100) and controls (n=48) were defined by modified neuropathological NIA-RI criteria. Positive associations were taken as a hypothesis, and tested in stage-2 using 483 AD families from the USA. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of BACE2 gene were tested in stage-1. A SNP close to exon-6 was associated with neuropathologically verified AD (p=0.02) and also with beta-amyloid load in non-selected autopsied subjects after conditioning with APOE genotype (p=0.001). In haplotype analysis a specific, relatively common haplotype (H5) was found to associate with AD (p=0.004) and a second haplotype (H7) showed a weaker association with protection against AD (p=0.04). In stage-2, the SNP association was not replicated, whereas the haplotype H5 association was replicated (p=0.004) and a trend to association was found with the putative protective haplotype H7 (two-sided p=0.08). BACE2 haplotype association with AD in two independent datasets provides further evidence for an AD susceptibility locus on chromosome 21q within or close to BACE2.

  17. Apathy in untreated early-stage Parkinson disease: relationship with other non-motor symptoms.

    PubMed

    Dujardin, Kathy; Langlois, Carole; Plomhause, Lucie; Carette, Anne-Sophie; Delliaux, Marie; Duhamel, Alain; Defebvre, Luc

    2014-12-01

    Apathy is a frequent and disabling behavioral disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Its prevalence in treatment-naive patients with early-stage PD has not been extensively investigated. Moreover, whether apathy is related to other non-motor symptoms in early-stage PD is unknown. Our objective was to determine the prevalence and features of apathy and associated factors in a group of treatment-naive patients with early-stage PD. Ninety-five treatment-naive patients with early-stage PD participated in the study. Apathy, depression, motor symptoms, and overall cognitive efficiency were assessed. The presence of the main non-motor symptoms was checked during a detailed clinical interview. Group comparisons were carried out to investigate the association with apathy. Eighteen patients (18.95%) were diagnosed as apathetic, and five of the latter had concomitant depression. Apathetic patients had significantly more severe motor symptoms (P < 0.001) and a lower cognitive status (P = 0.032) than non-apathetic patients. When considering non-motor symptoms, apathy was significantly associated only with fatigue (P = 0.007) and anhedonia (P = 0.010), both of which were more prevalent in apathetic patients than in non-apathetic patients. In treatment-naive patients with early-stage PD, apathy was significantly associated with more severe motor symptoms and a lower cognitive status. After adjustment for these factors, apathy appeared to be a relatively isolated, independent symptom because the only other associated non-motor symptoms were fatigue and anhedonia.

  18. Current advances on genetic resistance to rice blast disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast disease caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most threatening fungal diseases resulting in significant annual crop losses worldwide. Blast disease has been effectively managed by a combination of resistant (R) gene deployment, application of fungicides, and suita...

  19. Identification and Validation of Novel Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Staging Early Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Malone, James P.; Shah, Aarti R.; Gilmore, Petra; Davis, Alan E.; Roe, Catherine M.; Peskind, Elaine R.; Li, Ge; Galasko, Douglas R.; Clark, Christopher M.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Kaye, Jeffrey A.; Morris, John C.; Holtzman, David M.; Townsend, R. Reid; Fagan, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ideally, disease modifying therapies for Alzheimer disease (AD) will be applied during the ‘preclinical’ stage (pathology present with cognition intact) before severe neuronal damage occurs, or upon recognizing very mild cognitive impairment. Developing and judiciously administering such therapies will require biomarker panels to identify early AD pathology, classify disease stage, monitor pathological progression, and predict cognitive decline. To discover such biomarkers, we measured AD-associated changes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome. Methods and Findings CSF samples from individuals with mild AD (Clinical Dementia Rating [CDR] 1) (n = 24) and cognitively normal controls (CDR 0) (n = 24) were subjected to two-dimensional difference-in-gel electrophoresis. Within 119 differentially-abundant gel features, mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) identified 47 proteins. For validation, eleven proteins were re-evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Six of these assays (NrCAM, YKL-40, chromogranin A, carnosinase I, transthyretin, cystatin C) distinguished CDR 1 and CDR 0 groups and were subsequently applied (with tau, p-tau181 and Aβ42 ELISAs) to a larger independent cohort (n = 292) that included individuals with very mild dementia (CDR 0.5). Receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses using stepwise logistic regression yielded optimal biomarker combinations to distinguish CDR 0 from CDR>0 (tau, YKL-40, NrCAM) and CDR 1 from CDR<1 (tau, chromogranin A, carnosinase I) with areas under the curve of 0.90 (0.85–0.94 95% confidence interval [CI]) and 0.88 (0.81–0.94 CI), respectively. Conclusions Four novel CSF biomarkers for AD (NrCAM, YKL-40, chromogranin A, carnosinase I) can improve the diagnostic accuracy of Aβ42 and tau. Together, these six markers describe six clinicopathological stages from cognitive normalcy to mild dementia, including stages defined by increased risk of cognitive decline. Such a panel

  20. Disseminated Cryptococcosis with Rapidly Growing Lung Nodules in an End-stage Renal Disease Patient

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Atsushi; Okada, Akira; Yoshida, Taiko; Itoyama, Satoshi; Nakai, Tatsuro; Hisada, Tetsuya; Takano, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    A 73-year-old man with type 2 diabetes mellitus and end-stage renal disease was diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. He required continuous dialysis after percutaneous coronary intervention. Subsequently, multiple nodules were discovered in both lungs for the first time, and Cryptococcus neoformans was isolated from the patient's sputum, blood, bilateral pleural fluid, and cerebrospinal fluid cultures, resulting in a diagnosis of disseminated cryptococcosis. This case represents an invaluable example of disseminated cryptococcosis with rapidly growing lung nodules in a dialysis patient, and illustrates that dialysis causes innate immune disorder and the reactivation of cryptococcosis. PMID:28154287

  1. Patient Perspectives on Deep Brain Stimulation Clinical Research in Early Stage Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Heusinkveld, Lauren; Hacker, Mallory; Turchan, Maxim; Bollig, Madelyn; Tamargo, Christina; Fisher, William; McLaughlin, Lauren; Martig, Adria; Charles, David

    2017-01-01

    The FDA has approved a multicenter, double-blind, Phase III, pivotal trial testing deep brain stimulation (DBS) in 280 people with very early stage Parkinson's disease (PD; IDE#G050016). In partnership with The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research, we conducted a survey to investigate motivating factors, barriers, and gender differences among potentially eligible patients for participation in a trial testing DBS in early PD compared to standard medical treatment. The majority of survey respondents (72%) indicated they would consider learning more about participating. Early PD patients are therefore likely to consider enrolling in trials of invasive therapies that may slow symptom progression and help future patients.

  2. Can evidence-based prevention programs be sustained in community practice settings? The Early Risers' Advanced-Stage Effectiveness Trial.

    PubMed

    August, Gerald J; Bloomquist, Michael L; Lee, Susanne S; Realmuto, George M; Hektner, Joel M

    2006-06-01

    This study evaluated institutional sustainability of the Early Risers "Skills for Success" conduct problems prevention program. In a previous early-stage effectiveness trial Early Risers had been successfully implemented by a nonprofit community agency with guidance, supervision, technical assistance and fiscal support/oversight provided by program developers. The current advanced-stage effectiveness trial applied a randomized, control group design to determine whether this community agency could replicate earlier positive findings with a new cohort of participants, but with less direct involvement of program developers. An intent-to-intervene strategy was used to compare children randomly assigned to Early Risers or a no-intervention comparison group. Compared to results obtained in an early-stage effectiveness trial, program attendance rates were much lower and only one positive outcome was replicated. Failure to replicate program effects was not attributed to poor program implementation, because data collected pertaining to exposure, adherence and quality of delivery were acceptable, and a participation analysis showed that families who attended at higher levels did benefit. It was difficulties that the community agency experienced in engaging families in program components at recommended levels that primarily accounted for the results. Possible organizational barriers that impeded sustainability included unreliable transportation, poor collaboration between the agency and the local public school system, high staff turnover, agency downsizing, and fiduciary responsibility and accountability. It was concluded that both program developers and program providers need to be proactive in planning for sustainability.

  3. Drug nanocarrier, the future of atopic diseases: Advanced drug delivery systems and smart management of disease.

    PubMed

    Shao, Mei; Hussain, Zahid; Thu, Hnin Ei; Khan, Shahzeb; Katas, Haliza; Ahmed, Tarek A; Tripathy, Minaketan; Leng, Jing; Qin, Hua-Li; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas

    2016-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronically relapsing skin inflammatory disorder characterized by perivascular infiltration of immunoglobulin-E (IgE), T-lymphocytes and mast cells. The key pathophysiological factors causing this disease are immunological disorders and the compromised epidermal barrier integrity. Pruritus, intense itching, psychological stress, deprived physical and mental performance and sleep disturbance are the hallmark features of this dermatological complication. Preventive interventions which include educational programs, avoidance of allergens, exclusive care towards skin, and the rational selection of therapeutic regimen play key roles in the treatment of dermatosis. In last two decades, it is evident from a plethora of studies that scientific focus is being driven from conventional therapies to the advanced nanocarrier-based regimen for an effective management of AD. These nanocarriers which include polymeric nanoparticles (NPs), hydrogel NPs, liposomes, ethosomes, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanoemulsion, provide efficient roles for the target specific delivery of the therapeutic payload. The success of these targeted therapies is due to their pharmaceutical versatility, longer retention time at the target site, avoiding off-target effects and preventing premature degradation of the incorporated drugs. The present review was therefore aimed to summarise convincing evidence for the therapeutic superiority of advanced nanocarrier-mediated strategies over the conventional therapies used in the treatment of AD.

  4. Advances in surveillance of periodontitis: the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention periodontal disease surveillance project.

    PubMed

    Eke, Paul I; Thornton-Evans, Gina; Dye, Bruce; Genco, Robert

    2012-11-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has as one of its strategic goals to support and improve surveillance of periodontal disease. In 2003, the CDC initiated the CDC Periodontal Disease Surveillance Project in collaboration with the American Academy of Periodontology to address population-based surveillance of periodontal disease at the local, state, and national levels. This initiative has made significant advancements toward the goal of improved surveillance, including developing valid self-reported measures that can be obtained from interview-based surveys to predict prevalence of periodontitis in populations. This will allow surveillance of periodontitis at the state and local levels and in countries where clinical resources for surveillance are scarce. This work has produced standard case definitions for surveillance of periodontitis that are now widely recognized and applied in population studies and research. At the national level, this initiative has evaluated the validity of previous clinical examination protocols and tested new protocols on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), recommending and supporting funding for the gold-standard full-mouth periodontal examination in NHANES 2009 to 2012. These examinations will generate accurate estimates of the prevalence of periodontitis in the US adult population and provide a superior dataset for surveillance and research. Also, this data will be used to generate the necessary coefficients for our self-report questions for use in subsets of the total US population. The impact of these findings on population-based surveillance of periodontitis and future directions of the project are discussed along with plans for dissemination and translation efforts for broader public health use.

  5. Effect of L-Dopa on the pattern of movement-related (de)synchronisation in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Devos, D; Labyt, E; Derambure, P; Bourriez, J L; Cassim, F; Guieu, J D; Destée, A; Defebvre, L

    2003-11-01

    In the early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD), impaired motor preparation has been related to a delay of mu rhythm movement-related desynchronisation, suggesting hypoactivation of the contralateral, primary sensorimotor (PSM) cortex. Following movement, a decrease in the amplitude of beta rhythm movement-related synchronisation was observed over the same region. This decrease--not seen in control subjects--was thus thought to be related to an impairment in cortical deactivation. By monitoring movement-related (de)synchronisation, we aimed (i) to extend to advanced PD the observations made in less-advanced situations and (ii) to test the effect of acute L-Dopa on these abnormalities. The United Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) III score decreased by about 60% following acute L-Dopa administration, and we observed the following concurrent changes: a marked increase in mu desynchronisation pre-movement latency (thus reduced delay) during movement preparation over contralateral, central regions; an increase in mu desynchronisation during movement execution over bilateral central regions; a decrease in mu desynchronisation latency over bilateral frontocentral regions, and a significant increase in beta synchronisation over contralateral, central regions after movement. Changes of mu and beta rhythm parameters seemed to be inversely correlated with bradykinesia. Mu rhythm desynchronisation latency and beta synchronisation amplitude further decreased in advanced PD compared to earlier stages of the disease, suggesting greater impairment of cortical activation/deactivation as the disease progresses. L-Dopa partially restored the abnormal mu and beta rhythm cortical (de)synchronisation patterns over the PSM cortex.

  6. Exact alpha-error determination for two-stage sampling strategies to substantiate freedom from disease.

    PubMed

    Kopacka, I; Hofrichter, J; Fuchs, K

    2013-05-01

    Sampling strategies to substantiate freedom from disease are important when it comes to the trade of animals and animal products. When considering imperfect tests and finite populations, sample size calculation can, however, be a challenging task. The generalized hypergeometric formula developed by Cameron and Baldock (1998a) offers a framework that can elegantly be extended to multi-stage sampling strategies, which are widely used to account for disease clustering at herd-level. The achieved alpha-error of such surveys, however, typically depends on the realization of the sample and can differ from the pre-calculated value. In this paper, we introduce a new formula to evaluate the exact alpha-error induced by a specific sample. We further give a numerically viable approximation formula and analyze its properties using a data example of Brucella melitensis in the Austrian sheep population.

  7. Vitamins and Microelement Bioavailability in Different Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jankowska, Magdalena; Rutkowski, Bolesław; Dębska-Ślizień, Alicja

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) predisposes one to either deficiency or toxic excess of different micronutrients. The knowledge on micronutrients—specifically water-soluble vitamins and trace elements—in CKD is very limited. Consequently, current guidelines and recommendations are mostly based on expert opinions or poor-quality evidence. Abnormalities of micronutrient resources in CKD develop for several reasons. Dietary restrictions and anorexia lead to an insufficient micronutrient intake, while diuretics use and renal replacement therapy lead to their excessive losses. Absorption is unpredictable, and metabolism impaired. Better understanding of the micronutrient needs of CKD patients could have an impact on many complications linked to vitamin and trace element disorders, including high mortality, increased risk of atherosclerosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, anemia, polyneuropathy, encephalopathy, weakness and fragility, muscle cramps, bone disease, depression, or insomnia. Here, we summarize the up-to-date knowledge on micronutrient resources in different stages of CKD, and share our experience with the assessment of micronutrient status. PMID:28294976

  8. A retrospective study of end-stage renal disease in captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    LaDouceur, Elise E B; Davis, Barbara; Tseng, Flo

    2014-03-01

    This retrospective study summarizes 11 cases of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from eight zoologic institutions across the United States and Canada. Ten bears were female, one was male, and the mean age at the time of death was 24 yr old. The most common clinical signs were lethargy, inappetence, and polyuria-polydipsia. Biochemical findings included azotemia, anemia, hyperphosphatemia, and isosthenuria. Histologic examination commonly showed glomerulonephropathies and interstitial fibrosis. Based on submissions to a private diagnostic institution over a 16-yr period, ESRD was the most commonly diagnosed cause of death or euthanasia in captive polar bears in the United States, with an estimated prevalence of over 20%. Further research is needed to discern the etiology of this apparently common disease of captive polar bears.

  9. Correlation of mast cells in different stages of human periodontal diseases: Pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Raina; Gupta, Jagriti; Gupta, Krishna Kumar; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate and correlate the relationship between mast cells counts and different stages of human periodontal diseases. Materials and Methods: The study sample comprised 50 patients, which were divided into three groups, consisting of 10 cases of clinically healthy gingival tissues (control group) 20 cases of dental plaque-induced gingivitis with no attachment loss and 20 cases of localized chronic periodontitis (LCP) characterized by the loss of periodontal support. The samples for control group were obtained during tooth extractions for orthodontic reasons. The specimens were immediately fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin. Conclusion: In this study, LCP cases had higher mast cell counts compared to gingivitis sites or healthy tissues. Increased mast cell counts in the progressing sites of periodontal diseases may indicate the importance of these cells in the progression of chronic periodontitis. PMID:27194868

  10. Non-pharmacological interventions and neuroplasticity in early stage Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Herholz, Sibylle C; Herholz, Regina S; Herholz, Karl

    2013-11-01

    Non-pharmacological interventions have the potential to reduce cognitive decline and to improve psychosocial aspects in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's dementia, and the absence of side effects makes them a favorable option also for preventive strategies. We provide an overview on recent studies involving cognitive training and reminiscence, stimulating and challenging experiences such as visual art and music, physical activities, and electromagnetic stimulation. We review findings on neuroplasticity in the aging brain and their relevance for cognitive improvement in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. We discuss cognitive reserve and possible mechanisms that drive neuroplasticity and new learning. Finally, we identify promising avenues for future intervention strategies and research, such as combinations of cognitive and pharmaceutical interventions, and individual strategies adapted to the disease stage and tailored to the needs, predispositions and preferences of patients.

  11. Phosphate control in end-stage renal disease: barriers and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Ahmed A.; Pedraza, Fernando; Lenz, Oliver; Isakova, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is a nearly universal complication of end-stage renal disease that is widely recognized as one of the most important and most challenging clinical targets to meet in the care of dialysis patients. Left untreated, it can lead to bone pain, pruritus and worsening secondary hyperparathyroidism. Data from observational studies demonstrate that an elevated serum phosphorus level is an independent risk factor for mortality, and that treatment with phosphate binders is independently associated with improved survival. Experimental studies provide support for the epidemiologic findings: phosphate excess promotes vascular calcification, induces endothelial dysfunction and may contribute to other emerging chronic kidney disease-specific mechanisms of cardiovascular toxicity. On the basis of this evidence, clinical practice guidelines recommend specific targets for serum phosphorus levels in the dialysis population. The purpose of this review is to summarize common challenges in meeting these targets and to identify potential opportunities for improvement. PMID:23901051

  12. End stage renal disease serum contains a specific renal cell growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, L.H.; Kulkarni, C.; Mills, G. )

    1991-01-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) kidneys display abnormal growth characterized by a continuum of cystic disease, adenoma and carcinoma. This study evaluates the hypothesis that serum of patients with ESRD contains increased amounts of a growth factor which specifically induces proliferation of renal cells. ESRD sera compared to sera from normal controls induced a two to three-fold increase in the proliferative rate of renal cell carcinoma cell lines and normal kidney explants compared to cell lines from other sites. The increased proliferative activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was paralleled by an increase in cytosolic free calcium. The growth factor activity was encoded by a polypeptide of between 15 and 30 kd. The activity of ESRD sera on renal cells was not mimicked or inhibited by epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and platelet derived growth factor indicating that the renal cell specific growth factor activity in ESRD is different from these factors.

  13. Phosphate control in end-stage renal disease: barriers and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Ahmed A; Pedraza, Fernando; Lenz, Oliver; Isakova, Tamara

    2013-12-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is a nearly universal complication of end-stage renal disease that is widely recognized as one of the most important and most challenging clinical targets to meet in the care of dialysis patients. Left untreated, it can lead to bone pain, pruritus and worsening secondary hyperparathyroidism. Data from observational studies demonstrate that an elevated serum phosphorus level is an independent risk factor for mortality, and that treatment with phosphate binders is independently associated with improved survival. Experimental studies provide support for the epidemiologic findings: phosphate excess promotes vascular calcification, induces endothelial dysfunction and may contribute to other emerging chronic kidney disease-specific mechanisms of cardiovascular toxicity. On the basis of this evidence, clinical practice guidelines recommend specific targets for serum phosphorus levels in the dialysis population. The purpose of this review is to summarize common challenges in meeting these targets and to identify potential opportunities for improvement.

  14. Stroke and Risks of Development and Progression of Kidney Diseases and End-Stage Renal Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Lin; Tsai, Chun-Chieh; Kor, Chew-Teng; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Lian, Ie-Bin; Yang, Tao-Hsiang; Chiu, Ping-Fang; Chang, Chia-Chu

    2016-01-01

    Background There is little information about the association between stroke and kidney diseases. We aimed to investigate the impact of stroke on long-term renal outcomes. Methods In this large population-based retrospective cohort study, we identified 100,353 subjects registered in the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2012, including 33,451 stroke patients and 66,902 age-, sex- and Charlson’s comorbidity index score-matched controls. Results The incidence rate of chronic kidney disease (CKD) was higher in the stroke than in the control cohort (17.5 vs. 9.06 per 1000 person-years). After multivariate adjustment, the risk of developing CKD was significantly higher in patients with stroke (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.43, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36–1.50, P<0.001). Subgroup analysis showed that stroke patients <50 years (aHR 1.61, P<0.001) and those with concomitant diabetes mellitus (aHR 2.12, P<0.001), hyperlipidemia (aHR 1.53, P<0.001) or gout (aHR 1.84, P<0.001) were at higher risk of incident CKD. Additionally, the risks of progression to advanced CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were significantly higher for stroke patients (aHRs, 1.22 and 1.30; P = 0.04 and P = 0.008, respectively), independent of age, sex, comorbidities and long-term medications. Conclusions Stroke is associated with higher risks for incident CKD, decline in renal function and ESRD. Younger stroke patients, as well as those with concomitant diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia or gout are at greater risk for kidney diseases. PMID:27355475

  15. Human papillomavirus type 16 long control region and E6 variants stratified by cervical disease stage

    PubMed Central

    Marongiu, Luigi; Godi, Anna; Parry, John V.; Beddows, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Objective Certain intra-type variants of HPV16 have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of developing high grade cervical disease, but their potential association is confounded by apparent geographic and phylogenetic lineage dependency. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between HPV16 sequence variants and cervical disease stage in monospecific infection samples from a single lineage (European, EUR) in England. Methods One hundred and twelve women singly infected with HPV16 and displaying normal and abnormal cytology grades were selected. An 1187 bp fragment encompassing the entire LCR and a portion of the E6 open reading frame was sequenced to identify intra-type variants. Intra-type diversity was estimated using Shannon entropy. Results Almost all samples (110/112; 98%) were assigned to the EUR lineage, one sample was classified as European-Asian (EAS) and another African (Afr1a). The mean pairwise distance of the EUR sequences in this study was low (0.29%; 95%CI 0.13–0.45%) but there were nevertheless several sites in the LCR (n = 5) and E6 (n = 2) that exhibited a high degree of entropy. None of these sites, however, including the T350G non-synonymous (L83V) substitution in E6, alone or in combination, were found to be associated with cervical disease stage. Conclusions Despite using single infection samples and samples from a single variant lineage, intra-type variants of HPV16 were not differentially associated with cervical disease. Monitoring intra-lineage, site-specific variants, such as T350G, is unlikely to be of diagnostic value. PMID:24823962

  16. Effects of Cardiovascular Events on End-Stage Renal Disease and Mortality in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease Before Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Michio; Takehara, Eriko; Sasaki, Yasunori; Azetsu, Haruna; Kusaka, Keita; Shikuma, Satomi; Akita, Wataru

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular events (CVEs) are major complications in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, few studies have investigated the effects of CVEs on end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and mortality of pre-dialysis patients. We followed 377 CKD patients who were at stage ≥G3 at first clinic visit in the Shuuwa General Hospital between April 2005 and July 2014. After taking baseline patient data, we evaluated renal survival rates and all-cause and CVE-related mortality in patients with CVEs [(+)CVEs] and without CVEs [(-)CVEs]. A total of 99 CVEs occurred in 93 study patients (57.0% cardiac events, 43.0% cerebrovascular events, and 6.5% peripheral artery disease events). During the study period, 127 patients reached ESRD over a median of 4.51 years' follow-up. Kaplan-Meier analysis found longer renal survival rates in the (-)CVEs group compared with the (+)CVEs group. Forty patients died during the study period over a median of 5.43 years' follow-up. Survival rates for all-cause and CVE-related mortality of (-)CVEs patients were higher than in (+)CVEs patients. After adjustment for sex, age, current smoking, blood pressure, diabetes, estimated glomerular filtration rate, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, left ventricular hypertrophy, body mass index, albumin, hemoglobin, calcium, phosphate, C-reactive protein, and spot urine protein, the occurrence of CVEs was still a significant risk factor for ESRD (HR 1.516, P = 0.017) and all-cause mortality (HR 7.871, P < 0.001). Our findings suggest that the occurrence of CVEs is a potent risk factor for ESRD and mortality in CKD patients before dialysis.

  17. Complexity of resting-state EEG activity in the patients with early-stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xi-Le

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the abnormal brain activities in the early stage of Parkinson's disease (PD), the electroencephalogram (EEG) signals were recorded with 20 channels from non-dementia PD patients (18 patients, 8 females) and age matched healthy controls (18 subjects, 8 females) during the resting state. Two methods based on the ordinal patterns of the recorded series, i.e., permutation entropy (PE) and order index (OI), were introduced to characterize the complexity of the cortical activities for two groups. It was observed that the resting-state EEG of PD patients showed lower PE and higher OI than healthy controls, which indicated that the early-stage PD caused the reduced complexity of EEG. We further applied two methods to determine the complexity of EEG rhythms in five sub-bands. The results showed that the gamma, beta and alpha rhythms of PD patients were characterized by lower PE and higher OI, i.e., reduced complexity, than healthy subjects. No significant differences were observed in theta or delta rhythms between two groups. The findings suggested that PE and OI were promising methods to detect the abnormal changes in the dynamics of EEG signals associated with early-stage PD. Further, such changes in EEG complexity may be the early markers of the cortical or subcortical dysfunction caused by PD.

  18. Time and Circumstances: Cancer Cell Metabolism at Various Stages of Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Georg F.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, research into the unique ways, in which cancer cells skew their metabolism, has had a renaissance—for the repeated time over more than 80 years since the discovery of an inherent preference for glycolysis. Importantly, the Warburg effect that arises in primary neoplasms is not the sole prominent metabolic phenomenon. Once the transformed cells are shed from their initial growth and begin the process of metastasis, their energy requirements change and they adapt to the increased demand for adenosine triphosphate, which if not satisfied would lead to anoikis. At that stage, oxidoreductases and the respiratory chain are activated. Furthermore, the intrinsic metabolic characteristics of tumor cells may be influenced by extrinsic factors, comprising metabolite secretions from stromal cells or acidification and nutrient deprivation in the late-stage hypoxic environment. While there is metabolic adjustment in cancer cells throughout the disease history, its phenotypic manifestation changes at various times. This stage selectivity has implications for pharmacotherapy ambitions. PMID:28018856

  19. Review of genitourinary tuberculosis with focus on end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Lima, Neiberg A; Vasconcelos, Carol C; Filgueira, Pedro Henrique O; Kretzmann, Meissa; Sindeaux, Ticiano A S; Feitosa Neto, Beni; Silva Junior, Geraldo B; Daher, Elizabeth F

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a current public health problem, remaining the most common worldwide cause of mortality from infectious disease. Recent studies indicate that genitourinary TB is the third most common form of extra-pulmonary disease. The diagnosis of renal TB can be hypothesized in a non-specific bacterial cystitis associated with a therapeutic failure or a urinalysis with a persistent leukocyturia in the absence of bacteriuria. We report on the case of a 33-year-old man who presented on admission end stage renal disease (ESRD) secondary to renal TB and a past history of pulmonary TB with important radiologic findings. The diagnosis was based on clinical findings despite all cultures being negative. Empiric treatment with tuberculostatic drugs was started and the patient became stable. He was discharged with no symptom, but without renal function recovery. He is on maintenance hemodialysis three times a week. TB is an important cause of kidney disease and can lead to irreversible renal function loss.

  20. Etiology of End-Stage Renal Disease and Arterial Stiffness among Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    El Ghoul, Balsam; Korjian, Serge; El Alam, Andrew; Samad, Salam; Dahdah, Georges; Blacher, Jacques; Safar, Michel E.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Prior studies have demonstrated that conventional and emerging CV risk factors are associated with worsening arterial stiffness among end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on hemodialysis. The present cross-sectional study evaluates the association between the etiology of ESRD and arterial stiffness among a cohort of hemodialysis patients. Methods. Etiology of ESRD was identified from patients' medical records and classified as either vascular renal disease, diabetic nephropathy, nondiabetic glomerulopathy, tubular interstitial nephropathy, hereditary nephropathy, or ESRD of unconfirmed etiology. Results. A total of 82 subjects were enrolled. cfPWV was independently associated with the composite of either diabetic nephropathy or vascular renal disease (p = 0.022), pulse pressure (p = 0.001), and a history of CV events (p = 0.025), but not history of hypertension or diabetes mellitus alone. The median cfPWVs in diabetic nephropathy and vascular renal disease were comparable and significantly higher than median cfPWVs in other etiologies of ESRD. Conclusion. The study suggests that the etiology of ESRD is independently associated with arterial stiffness among hemodialysis patients. Furthermore, arterial stiffness was higher among patients who developed renal sequelae of either diabetes mellitus or hypertension as compared with those who have a history of either diabetes mellitus or hypertension alone. PMID:28299320

  1. Cytokines in atherosclerosis: Key players in all stages of disease and promising therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Ramji, Dipak P.; Davies, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disorder of the arteries, is responsible for most deaths in westernized societies with numbers increasing at a marked rate in developing countries. The disease is initiated by the activation of the endothelium by various risk factors leading to chemokine-mediated recruitment of immune cells. The uptake of modified lipoproteins by macrophages along with defective cholesterol efflux gives rise to foam cells associated with the fatty streak in the early phase of the disease. As the disease progresses, complex fibrotic plaques are produced as a result of lysis of foam cells, migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and continued inflammatory response. Such plaques are stabilized by the extracellular matrix produced by smooth muscle cells and destabilized by matrix metalloproteinase from macrophages. Rupture of unstable plaques and subsequent thrombosis leads to clinical complications such as myocardial infarction. Cytokines are involved in all stages of atherosclerosis and have a profound influence on the pathogenesis of this disease. This review will describe our current understanding of the roles of different cytokines in atherosclerosis together with therapeutic approaches aimed at manipulating their actions. PMID:26005197

  2. Genetics, Environment, and Diabetes-Related End-Stage Renal Disease in the Canary Islands

    PubMed Central

    González, Ana M.; Maceira, Benito M.; Pérez, Estefanía; Cabrera, Vicente M.; López, Alfonso J.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Type 1 and type 2 diabetes, complicated with renal disease, have a significantly higher incidence in the Canary Islands than in mainland Spain and other European countries. Present-day Canarian inhabitants consist of a mixed population with North African indigenous and European colonizer ancestors who have rapidly evolved from a rural to an urban life style. The aim of this work was to assess the possible role of genetic and environmental factors on diabetes-related end-stage renal disease incidence in the Canary Islands. Results: For both types of diabetes there is an ethnic susceptibility increased by diabetes family history. Whereas the Y-chromosome does not play a significant role, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup differences point to a maternal origin for this ethnic predisposition, confirming susceptible and protective effects for haplogroups J and T, respectively. In addition, urban life style seems to be an additional risk factor for type 1 diabetes. Conclusions: The maternal ethnic predisposition to diabetes complicated with kidney disease detected in the Canary Islands signals mtDNA and X-chromosome markers as the best candidates to uncover the genetic predisposition to this disease. PMID:22480375

  3. Prenatal sonography in hydranencephaly: findings during the early stages of disease.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, Waldo; Cortes-Yepes, Hernan; Wong, Amy E; Dezerega, Victor; Corral, Edgardo; Malinger, Gustavo

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the prenatal sonographic findings in fetuses with hydranencephaly diagnosed during the early stages of disease. Four cases with characteristics of hydranencephaly were retrospectively identified from 2 Latin American fetal medicine referral centers. Information on maternal demographics, sonographic findings, antenatal courses, and pregnancy outcomes was retrieved from the ultrasound reports and medical records. Cases were diagnosed between 21 and 23 weeks' gestation. The sonographic findings were similar in all cases and included absent cerebral hemispheres, which were replaced by homogeneous echogenic material filling the supratentorial space, and preservation of the thalami, brain stem, and cerebellum. The head circumference measurement was within the normal range, but the transverse cerebellar diameter was below the fifth percentile in 3 of the 4 cases. A follow-up scan in 1 of these cases demonstrated the classic anechoic fluid-filled appearance of hydranencephaly 2 weeks after diagnosis. Confirmation of the diagnosis was available in 2 cases, by postmortem examination in 1 and by fetal magnetic resonance imaging in the other. No further investigations were performed in the 2 women who opted for termination of pregnancy. In conclusion, during the early stages of disease, hydranencephaly is characterized by the presence of a large intracranial saclike structure containing homogeneous echogenic material, representing blood and necrotic debris secondary to massive liquefaction of the developing cerebral hemispheres.

  4. Improving Hepatitis B Vaccine Efficacy in End-Stage Renal Diseases Patients and Role of Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Hajipour, Babak

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a serious global health problem.The prevalence of viral hepatitis is higher in dialysis patients than in the general population because of the opportunity for exposure during the dialysis procedure. Immunization is the most effective way to prevent transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hence the development of acute or chronic hepatitis B. It is well established that patients with end-stage renal disease including dialysis-dependent patients, have an impaired immune response to hepatitis B vaccine. End stage renal diseases (ESRD) patients have lower seroconversion rates compared with the subjects with intact renal function. Moreover, even after the completion of vaccination schedule anti-hepatitis B (anti-HBs) titers of responder dialysis, patients are low and decline logarithmically with time. The impaired efficacy of HBV vaccine in patients with ESRD has been attributed to numerous factors such as immune compromise because of uremia and some other factors. One approach to improve the immunogenicity of existing HBV vaccines is adjuvantation, and it's very important to find more effective adjutants for improving HBV vaccine efficacy. In this paper we have a brief review on recently known new ways for improving HBV vaccine efficacy. PMID:23029621

  5. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists in End-Stage Renal Disease: Efficacy and Safety.

    PubMed

    Bomback, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) that block aldosterone's effects on both epithelial and non-epithelial receptors have become a mainstay of therapy for chronic heart failure. Given that cardiovascular events remain the leading cause of death for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), the question of whether these MRAs can be employed in dialysis patients arises. This review summarizes the rationale for blocking aldosterone in patients with chronic and end-stage kidney disease and surveys the data on both the efficacy and safety of using MRAs in the ESRD population. A small but growing body of literature suggests that use of MRAs by ESRD patients is associated with lower blood pressure, reduced left ventricular (LV) mass, and improved LV ejection fraction. Recently, a large randomized trial found an overall 3-year mortality rate of 6.4% in ESRD patients on spironolactone 25 mg daily vs. 19.7% in ESRD patients on no MRA therapy (p = 0.002), without a significantly increased risk of hyperkalemia.

  6. Living with moderate-stage Parkinson disease: intervention needs and preferences of elderly couples.

    PubMed

    Beaudet, Line; Ducharme, Francine

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the principal intervention needs of elderly couples living with moderate-stage Parkinson disease and their preferences regarding the modalities of a possible nursing intervention. The study's framework of reference consisted of the transitions theory developed by Meleis, Sawyer, Im, Hilfinger Messias, and Schumacher (2000) and of the systemic approach developed by Wright and Leahey (2009). A qualitative design and a participative process were employed. Ten couples were interviewed dyadically. Intra- and interdyad content analyses were performed. Results indicate that the principal intervention needs of couples are geared to developing effective strategies for remaining healthy and planning for the future, to improving communication between spouses and with the formal and informal support networks, and to adopting concerted strategies to facilitate problem solving and role adjustment. Couples would prefer six or seven dyadic meetings, each 60-90 minutes long, every 2 weeks, at an easily accessible location. This study affords avenues for the conceptualization of a psychoeducational nursing intervention intended for couples where a spouse has moderate-stage Parkinson disease.

  7. Brain Event-Related Potentials: Diagnosing Early-Stage Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Robert M.; Nowlis, Geoffrey H.; McCrary, John W.; Chapman, John A.; Sandoval, Tiffany C.; Guillily, Maria D.; Gardner, Margaret N.; Reilly, Lindsey A.

    2009-01-01

    A pattern of components from brain Event-Related Potentials (ERP) (cognitive non-invasive electrical brain measures) performed well in separating early-stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD) subjects from normal-aging control subjects and shows promise for developing a clinical diagnostic for Probable AD. A Number-Letter task elicited brain activity related to cognitive processes. In response to the task stimuli, brain activity was recorded as ERPs, whose components were measured by Principal Components Analysis (PCA). The ERP component scores to relevant and irrelevant stimuli were used in Discriminant Analyses to develop functions that successfully classified individuals as belonging to an early-stage Alzheimer’s disease group or a like-aged Control group, with probabilities of an individual belonging to each group. Applying the discriminant function to the developmental half of the data showed 92% of the subjects were correctly classified into either the AD group or the Control group with a sensitivity of 1.00. The two crossvalidation results were good with sensitivities of 0.83 and classification accuracies of 0.75–0.79. P3 and CNV components, as well as other, earlier ERP components, e.g. C145 and the memory “Storage” component, were useful in the discriminant functions. PMID:16430992

  8. Synergizing acute care and palliative care to optimise nursing care in end-stage cardiorespiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Patricia M; Introna, Kate; Cockburn, Jill; Daly, John; Dunford, Mary; Paull, Glenn; Dracup, Kathleen

    2002-05-01

    Advances in the practice of medicine and nursing science have increased survival for patients with chronic cardiorespiratory disease. Parallel to this positive outcome is a societal expectation of longevity and cure of disease. Chronic disease and the inevitability of death creates a dilemma, more than ever before, for the health care professional, who is committed to the delivery of quality care to patients and their families. The appropriate time for broaching the issue of dying and determining when palliative care is required is problematic. Dilemmas occur with a perceived dissonance between acute and palliative care and difficulties in determining prognosis. Palliative care must be integrated within the health care continuum, rather than being a discrete entity at the end of life, in order to achieve optimal patient outcomes. Anecdotally, acute and critical care nurses experience frustration from the tensions that arise between acute and palliative care philosophies. Many clinicians are concerned that patients are denied a good death and yet the moment when care should be oriented toward palliation rather than aggressive management is usually unclear. Clearly this has implications for the type and quality of care that patients receive. This paper provides a review of the extant literature and identifies issues in the end of life care for patients with chronic cardiorespiratory diseases within acute and critical care environments. Issues for refinement of acute and critical care nursing practice and research priorities are identified to create a synergy between these philosophical perspectives.

  9. United States Renal Data System public health surveillance of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Allan J; Foley, Robert N; Gilbertson, David T; Chen, Shu-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The United States Renal Data System (USRDS) began in 1989 through US Congressional authorization under National Institutes of Health competitive contracting. Its history includes five contract periods, two of 5 years, two of 7.5 years, and the fifth, awarded in February 2014, of 5 years. Over these 25 years, USRDS reporting transitioned from basic incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), modalities, and overall survival, as well as focused special studies on dialysis, in the first two contract periods to a comprehensive assessment of aspects of care that affect morbidity and mortality in the second two periods. Beginning in 1999, the Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation investigative team transformed the USRDS into a total care reporting system including disease severity, hospitalizations, pediatric populations, prescription drug use, and chronic kidney disease and the transition to ESRD. Areas of focus included issues related to death rates in the first 4 months of treatment, sudden cardiac death, ischemic and valvular heart disease, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and infectious complications (particularly related to dialysis catheters) in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients; the burden of congestive heart failure and infectious complications in pediatric dialysis and transplant populations; and morbidity and access to care. The team documented a plateau and decline in incidence rates, a 28% decline in death rates since 2001, and changes under the 2011 Prospective Payment System with expanded bundled payments for each dialysis treatment. The team reported on Bayesian methods to calculate mortality ratios, which reduce the challenges of traditional methods, and introduced objectives under the Health People 2010 and 2020 national health care goals for kidney disease. PMID:26097778

  10. United States Renal Data System public health surveillance of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Collins, Allan J; Foley, Robert N; Gilbertson, David T; Chen, Shu-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    The United States Renal Data System (USRDS) began in 1989 through US Congressional authorization under National Institutes of Health competitive contracting. Its history includes five contract periods, two of 5 years, two of 7.5 years, and the fifth, awarded in February 2014, of 5 years. Over these 25 years, USRDS reporting transitioned from basic incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), modalities, and overall survival, as well as focused special studies on dialysis, in the first two contract periods to a comprehensive assessment of aspects of care that affect morbidity and mortality in the second two periods. Beginning in 1999, the Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation investigative team transformed the USRDS into a total care reporting system including disease severity, hospitalizations, pediatric populations, prescription drug use, and chronic kidney disease and the transition to ESRD. Areas of focus included issues related to death rates in the first 4 months of treatment, sudden cardiac death, ischemic and valvular heart disease, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and infectious complications (particularly related to dialysis catheters) in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients; the burden of congestive heart failure and infectious complications in pediatric dialysis and transplant populations; and morbidity and access to care. The team documented a plateau and decline in incidence rates, a 28% decline in death rates since 2001, and changes under the 2011 Prospective Payment System with expanded bundled payments for each dialysis treatment. The team reported on Bayesian methods to calculate mortality ratios, which reduce the challenges of traditional methods, and introduced objectives under the Health People 2010 and 2020 national health care goals for kidney disease.

  11. Rocket-Induced Magnetohydrodynamic Ejector: A Single-Stage-to-Orbit Advanced Propulsion Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, John; Campbell, Jonathan; Robertson, Anthony

    1995-01-01

    During the atmospheric boost phase of a rocket trajectory, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) principles can be utilized to augment the thrust by several hundred percent without the input of additional energy. The concept is an MHD implementation of a thermodynamic ejector. Some ejector history is described and some test data showing the impressive thrust augmentation capabilities of thermodynamic ejectors are provided. A momentum and energy balance is used to derive the equations to predict the MHD ejector performance. Results of these equations are compared with the test data and then applied to a specific performance example. The rocket-induced MHD ejector (RIME) engine is described and a status of the technology and availability of the engine components is provided. A top level vehicle sizing analysis is performed by scaling existing MHD designs to the required flight vehicle levels. The vehicle can achieve orbit using conservative technology. Modest improvements are suggested using recently developed technologies, such as superconducting magnets, which can improve predicted performance well beyond those expected for current single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) designs.

  12. Molecular Classification of Endometriosis and Disease Stage Using High-Dimensional Genomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Tamaresis, John S.; Irwin, Juan C.; Goldfien, Gabriel A.; Rabban, Joseph T.; Burney, Richard O.; Nezhat, Camran; DePaolo, Louis V.

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis (E), an estrogen-dependent, progesterone-resistant, inflammatory disorder, affects 10% of reproductive-age women. It is diagnosed and staged at surgery, resulting in an 11-year latency from symptom onset to diagnosis, underscoring the need for less invasive, less expensive approaches. Because the uterine lining (endometrium) in women with E has altered molecular profiles, we tested whether molecular classification of this tissue can distinguish and stage disease. We developed classifiers using genomic data from n = 148 archived endometrial samples from women with E or without E (normal controls or with other common uterine/pelvic pathologies) across the menstrual cycle and evaluated their performance on independent sample sets. Classifiers were trained separately on samples in specific hormonal milieu, using margin tree classification, and accuracies were scored on independent validation samples. Classification of samples from women with E or no E involved 2 binary decisions, each based on expression of specific genes. These first distinguished presence or absence of uterine/pelvic pathology and then no E from E, with the latter further classified according to severity (minimal/mild or moderate/severe). Best performing classifiers identified E with 90%–100% accuracy, were cycle phase-specific or independent, and used relatively few genes to determine disease and severity. Differential gene expression and pathway analyses revealed immune activation, altered steroid and thyroid hormone signaling/metabolism, and growth factor signaling in endometrium of women with E. Similar findings were observed with other disorders vs controls. Thus, classifier analysis of genomic data from endometrium can detect and stage pelvic E with high accuracy, dependent or independent of hormonal milieu. We propose that limited classifier candidate genes are of high value in developing diagnostics and identifying therapeutic targets. Discovery of endometrial molecular

  13. Advancing the understanding of autism disease mechanisms through genetics

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre-Ubieta, Luis; Won, Hyejung; Stein, Jason L; Geschwind, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    Progress in understanding the genetic etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has fueled remarkable advances in our understanding of its potential neurobiological mechanisms. Yet, at the same time, these findings highlight extraordinary causal diversity and complexity at many levels ranging from molecules to circuits and emphasize the gaps in our current knowledge. Here we review current understanding of the genetic architecture of ASD and integrate genetic evidence, neuropathology and studies in model systems with how they inform mechanistic models of ASD pathophysiology. Despite the challenges, these advances provide a solid foundation for the development of rational, targeted molecular therapies. PMID:27050589

  14. Clostridial abdominal gas gangrene masquerading as a bowel perforation in an advanced-stage ovarian cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Abaid, L N; Thomas, R H; Epstein, H D; Goldstein, B H

    2013-08-01

    The coexistence of clostridial gas gangrene and a gynecologic malignancy is extremely rare, with very few cases involving ovarian cancer. A patient originally presented to our gynecologic oncology service with stage IV ovarian cancer; she underwent a diagnostic laparoscopy and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. On postoperative day 6, the patient developed severe abdominal pain, nausea, and emesis, suggestive of a bowel perforation. Further evaluation confirmed that her symptoms were attributed to Clostridium perfringens-related gas gangrene. Despite immediate surgical intervention, the patient succumbed to her disease. Clostridial gas gangrene is associated with an extremely high mortality rate. Therefore, accurate detection and prompt management are indispensable to ensuring a favorable patient outcome.

  15. Expression of programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) in advanced stage EBV-associated extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma is associated with better prognosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wook Youn; Jung, Ho Young; Nam, Soo Jeong; Kim, Tae Min; Heo, Dae Seog; Kim, Chul-Woo; Jeon, Yoon Kyung

    2016-11-01

    Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1)/PD-1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathway blockade has emerged as a promising strategy for cancer therapy. Extranodal natural killer/T cell lymphoma (ENKTL) is an aggressive disease characterized by a strong association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and chronic EBV infection is known to induce PD-L1 expression. However, the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway status in ENKTL remains elusive. Thus, the expression pattern of PD-1 and PD-L1 was investigated in 73 ENKTL cases, and its clinicopathological features and prognostic significance were analyzed. Most ENKTLs had few PD-1(+) lymphocytes in the tumor microenvironment. PD-L1 was positive in 56 % (n = 41/73) with a cutoff value of ≥10 % of tumor cells and in 62 % (n = 45/73) with a cutoff value of ≥10 % of total cells including malignant and non-malignant cells. PD-L1 expression on tumor cells was mostly correlated with PD-L1 expression on non-malignant cells. PD-L1 positivity showed no significant relationship with clinicopathological features. However, patients with PD-L1(+) ENKTL exhibited better 5-year overall survival (OS) and a trend for longer 5-year progression-free survival. Moreover, in the subgroups with clinically advanced parameters including late stage III/IV, higher International Prognostic Index scores of 2-5 or non-upper aerodigestive tract involvement PD-L1 positivity was also associated with favorable OS. PD-L1 expression was the only significant independent predictor for longer OS in patients with advanced stage (III/IV) ENKTL. These results suggest that PD-L1 might be used as a novel prognostic marker.

  16. Advances and Limitations of Disease Biogeography Using Ecological Niche Modeling.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Luis E; Craft, Meggan E

    2016-01-01

    Mapping disease transmission risk is crucial in public and animal health for evidence based decision-making. Ecology and epidemiology are highly related disciplines that may contribute to improvements in mapping disease, which can be used to answer health related questions. Ecological niche modeling is increasingly used for understanding the biogeography of diseases in plants, animals, and humans. However, epidemiological applications of niche modeling approaches for disease mapping can fail to generate robust study designs, producing incomplete or incorrect inferences. This manuscript is an overview of the history and conceptual bases behind ecological niche modeling, specifically as applied to epidemiology and public health; it does not pretend to be an exhaustive and detailed description of ecological niche modeling literature and methods. Instead, this review includes selected state-of-the-science approaches and tools, providing a short guide to designing studies incorporating information on the type and quality of the input data (i.e., occurrences and environmental variables), identification and justification of the extent of the study area, and encourages users to explore and test diverse algorithms for more informed conclusions. We provide a friendly introduction to the field of disease biogeography presenting an updated guide for researchers looking to use ecological niche modeling for disease mapping. We anticipate that ecological niche modeling will soon be a critical tool for epidemiologists aiming to map disease transmission risk, forecast disease distribution under climate change scenarios, and identify landscape factors triggering outbreaks.

  17. Advances and Limitations of Disease Biogeography Using Ecological Niche Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Luis E.; Craft, Meggan E.

    2016-01-01

    Mapping disease transmission risk is crucial in public and animal health for evidence based decision-making. Ecology and epidemiology are highly related disciplines that may contribute to improvements in mapping disease, which can be used to answer health related questions. Ecological niche modeling is increasingly used for understanding the biogeography of diseases in plants, animals, and humans. However, epidemiological applications of niche modeling approaches for disease mapping can fail to generate robust study designs, producing incomplete or incorrect inferences. This manuscript is an overview of the history and conceptual bases behind ecological niche modeling, specifically as applied to epidemiology and public health; it does not pretend to be an exhaustive and detailed description of ecological niche modeling literature and methods. Instead, this review includes selected state-of-the-science approaches and tools, providing a short guide to designing studies incorporating information on the type and quality of the input data (i.e., occurrences and environmental variables), identification and justification of the extent of the study area, and encourages users to explore and test diverse algorithms for more informed conclusions. We provide a friendly introduction to the field of disease biogeography presenting an updated guide for researchers looking to use ecological niche modeling for disease mapping. We anticipate that ecological niche modeling will soon be a critical tool for epidemiologists aiming to map disease transmission risk, forecast disease distribution under climate change scenarios, and identify landscape factors triggering outbreaks. PMID:27547199

  18. The experiences of close persons caring for people with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on conservative kidney management: Contested discourses of ageing

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jason; Smith, Glenn; Higgs, Paul; Burns, Aine; Hopkins, Katherine; Jones, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease stage 5 is a global health challenge in the context of population ageing across the world. The range of treatment options available to patients at all ages has increased and includes transplantation and dialysis. However, these options are often seen as inappropriate for older frailer patients who are now offered the option of conservative kidney management, which is presented as a non-invasive alternative to dialysis, involving symptom management and addressing psychosocial needs. In this study, we conducted qualitative interviews with 26 close persons caring for someone with chronic kidney disease stage 5 in the United Kingdom to investigate how conservative kidney management interacted with implicit ideas of ageing, in both the experience of conservative kidney management and the understanding of the prognosis and future care of the kidney disease. Our findings highlighted participant confusion about the nature of conservative kidney management, which stems from an initial lack of clarity about how conservative kidney management differed from conventional treatments for chronic kidney disease stage 5. In particular, some respondents were not aware of the implicit palliative nature of the intervention or indeed the inevitable end-of-life issues. Although these findings can be situated within the context of communication failure, we would further argue that they also bring to the surface tensions in the discourses surrounding ageing and old age, drawing on the use of a ‘natural’ and a ‘normal’ paradigm of ageing. In the context of chronic kidney disease stage 5, more patients are being dialysed at older ages, but conservative kidney management is being advanced as a better option than dialysis in terms of quality of life and experience. However, in doing so, conservative kidney management implicitly draws on a notion of older age that echoes natural ageing rather than advocate a more interventionist approach. The role of discourses

  19. The experiences of close persons caring for people with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on conservative kidney management: contested discourses of ageing.

    PubMed

    Low,