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Sample records for advanced stage non-small

  1. 2nd ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer: locally advanced stage III non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, W E E; De Ruysscher, D; Weder, W; Le Péchoux, C; De Leyn, P; Hoffmann, H; Westeel, V; Stahel, R; Felip, E; Peters, S

    2015-08-01

    To complement the existing treatment guidelines for all tumour types, ESMO organises consensus conferences to focus on specific issues in each type of tumour. The 2nd ESMO Consensus Conference on Lung Cancer was held on 11-12 May 2013 in Lugano. A total of 35 experts met to address several questions on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in each of four areas: pathology and molecular biomarkers, first-line/second and further lines of treatment in advanced disease, early-stage disease and locally advanced disease. For each question, recommendations were made including reference to the grade of recommendation and level of evidence. This consensus paper focuses on locally advanced disease.

  2. The potential role of bevacizumab in early stages and locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schettino, Clorinda; Bareschino, Maria Anna; Rossi, Antonio; Maione, Paolo; Castaldo, Vincenzo; Mazzeo, Nicole; Sacco, Paola Claudia; Ferrara, Marianna Luciana; Palazzolo, Giovanni; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Gridelli, Cesare

    2009-01-01

    Improving outcomes for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a major research area considering that a significant percentage of such patients develop recurrent disease within 5 years of complete lung resection. Adjuvant chemotherapy prolongs survival, with an absolute improvement in 5-year overall survival of about 5% with drawbacks such as treatment toxicity. Approximately, one third of patients with newly diagnosed NSCLC have locally advanced disease not amenable for surgical resection – in this setting of patients concurrent chemoradiation is the standard of therapy. However, the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC is still controversial and clinical outcomes are disappointing, and so new approaches are required to improve the clinical benefit in this setting of patients. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key angiogenic factor implicated in tumor blood vessels formation and permeability, and tumor VEGF overexpression in patients with early stage lung cancer has been associated with worse relapse free and overall survival. Several agents have been developed that inhibit VEGF or its receptor signalling system. Bevacizumab is the first recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody binding VEGF to demonstrate clinical benefit or rather a survival prolongation in combination with chemotherapy in the treatment of non-squamous advanced NSCLC patients. These positive results led to a large number of clinical trials to evaluate bevacizumab in combination with other targeted agents in advanced disease, and to define the role of this agent in early stage NSCLC such as the impact of bevacizumab integration in chemoradiotherapy strategy for locally advanced disease. PMID:21789109

  3. The potential role of bevacizumab in early stages and locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Schettino, Clorinda; Bareschino, Maria Anna; Rossi, Antonio; Maione, Paolo; Castaldo, Vincenzo; Mazzeo, Nicole; Sacco, Paola Claudia; Ferrara, Marianna Luciana; Palazzolo, Giovanni; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Gridelli, Cesare

    2009-07-01

    Improving outcomes for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a major research area considering that a significant percentage of such patients develop recurrent disease within 5 years of complete lung resection. Adjuvant chemotherapy prolongs survival, with an absolute improvement in 5-year overall survival of about 5% with drawbacks such as treatment toxicity. Approximately, one third of patients with newly diagnosed NSCLC have locally advanced disease not amenable for surgical resection - in this setting of patients concurrent chemoradiation is the standard of therapy. However, the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC is still controversial and clinical outcomes are disappointing, and so new approaches are required to improve the clinical benefit in this setting of patients. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key angiogenic factor implicated in tumor blood vessels formation and permeability, and tumor VEGF overexpression in patients with early stage lung cancer has been associated with worse relapse free and overall survival. Several agents have been developed that inhibit VEGF or its receptor signalling system. Bevacizumab is the first recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody binding VEGF to demonstrate clinical benefit or rather a survival prolongation in combination with chemotherapy in the treatment of non-squamous advanced NSCLC patients. These positive results led to a large number of clinical trials to evaluate bevacizumab in combination with other targeted agents in advanced disease, and to define the role of this agent in early stage NSCLC such as the impact of bevacizumab integration in chemoradiotherapy strategy for locally advanced disease.

  4. Is uniportal thoracoscopic surgery a feasible approach for advanced stages of non-small cell lung cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Fieira, Eva; Delgado, Maria; Mendez, Lucía; Fernandez, Ricardo; de la Torre, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Conventional video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) lobectomy for advanced lung cancer is a feasible and safe surgery in experienced centers. The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility of uniportal VATS approach in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and compare the perioperative outcomes and survival with those in early-stage tumors operated through the uniportal approach. Methods From June 2010 to December 2012, we performed 163 uniportal VATS major pulmonary resections. Only NSCLC cases were included in this study (130 cases). Patients were divided into two groups: (A) early stage and (B) advanced cases (>5 cm, T3 or T4, or tumors requiring neoadjuvant treatment). A descriptive and retrospective study was performed, comparing perioperative outcomes and survival obtained in both groups. A survival analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier curves and the log-rank test was used to compare survival between patients with early and advanced stages. Results A total of 130 cases were included in the study: 87 (A) vs. 43 (B) patients (conversion rate 1.1 vs. 6.5%, P=0.119). Mean global age was 64.9 years and 73.8% were men. The patient demographic data was similar in both groups. Upper lobectomies (A, 52 vs. B, 21 patients) and anatomic segmentectomies (A, 4 vs. B, 0) were more frequent in group A while pneumonectomy was more frequent in B (A, 1 vs. B, 6 patients). Surgical time was longer (144.9±41.3 vs. 183.2±48.9, P<0.001), and median number of lymph nodes (14 vs. 16, P=0.004) were statistically higher in advanced cases. Median number of nodal stations (5 vs. 5, P=0.165), days of chest tube (2 vs. 2, P=0.098), HOS (3 vs. 3, P=0.072), and rate of complications (17.2% vs. 14%, P=0.075) were similar in both groups. One patient died on the 58th postoperative day. The 30-month survival rate was 90% for the early stage group and 74% for advanced cases Conclusions Uniportal VATS lobectomy for advanced cases of NSCLC is a safe and

  5. Image Guided Hypofractionated 3-Dimensional Radiation Therapy in Patients With Inoperable Advanced Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Osti, Mattia Falchetto; Agolli, Linda; Valeriani, Maurizio; Falco, Teresa; Bracci, Stefano; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (HypoRT) can potentially improve local control with a higher biological effect and shorter overall treatment time. Response, local control, toxicity rates, and survival rates were evaluated in patients affected by inoperable advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received HypoRT. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled; 27% had stage IIIA, 50% had stage IIIB, and 23% had stage IV disease. All patients underwent HypoRT with a prescribed total dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions of 3 Gy each. Radiation treatment was delivered using an image guided radiation therapy technique to verify correct position. Toxicities were graded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity score. Survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up was 13 months (range, 4-56 months). All patients completed radiation therapy and received the total dose of 60 Gy to the primary tumor and positive lymph nodes. The overall response rate after radiation therapy was 83% (3 patients with complete response and 22 patients with partial response). The 2-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 38.1% and 36%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence/persistence occurred in 11 (37%) patients. Distant metastasis occurred in 17 (57%) patients. Acute toxicities occurred consisting of grade 1 to 2 hematological toxicity in 5 patients (17%) and grade 3 in 1 patient; grade 1 to 2 esophagitis in 12 patients (40%) and grade 3 in 1 patient; and grade 1 to 2 pneumonitis in 6 patients (20%) and grade 3 in 2 patients (7%). Thirty-three percent of patients developed grade 1 to 2 late toxicities. Only 3 patients developed grade 3 late adverse effects: esophagitis in 1 patient and pneumonitis in 2 patients. Conclusions: Hypofractionated curative radiation therapy is a feasible and well-tolerated treatment for patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Randomized

  6. Pemetrexed for advanced stage nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer: latest evidence about its extended use and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tomasini, Pascale; Barlesi, Fabrice; Mascaux, Celine; Greillier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is still the leading cause of cancer-related death, and the treatment of advanced NSCLC relies on systemic treatments. During the last decade, pemetrexed, an antifolate agent, gradually became a key component of the treatment for patients with advanced nonsquamous NSCLC. It has indeed been shown to be efficient for first-line, maintenance and second- or third-line treatment in this subgroup of NSCLC. Moreover, it is usually well tolerated, with few grade 3 and 4 toxicities. Several studies have tried to identify predictive biomarkers of pemetrexed efficacy. Due to pemetrexed’s mechanism of action, thymidilate synthase expression predictive value was investigated but could not be demonstrated. Currently, more than 400 trials of pemetrexed for the treatment of nonsquamous NSCLC are ongoing. PMID:27239238

  7. Genetically Modified T Cells in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer or Mesothelioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-01

    Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; HLA-A*0201 Positive Cells Present; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage III Pleural Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pleural Mesothelioma

  8. Consensus Statement on Proton Therapy in Early-Stage and Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Joe Y; Jabbour, Salma K; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Schild, Steven E; Simone, Charles B; Rengan, Ramesh; Feigenberg, Steven; Khan, Atif J; Choi, Noah C; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Zhu, Xiaorong R; Lomax, Antony J; Hoppe, Bradford S

    2016-05-01

    Radiation dose escalation has been shown to improve local control and survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer in some studies, but randomized data have not supported this premise, possibly owing to adverse effects. Because of the physical characteristics of the Bragg peak, proton therapy (PT) delivers minimal exit dose distal to the target volume, resulting in better sparing of normal tissues in comparison to photon-based radiation therapy. This is particularly important for lung cancer given the proximity of the lung, heart, esophagus, major airways, large blood vessels, and spinal cord. However, PT is associated with more uncertainty because of the finite range of the proton beam and motion for thoracic cancers. PT is more costly than traditional photon therapy but may reduce side effects and toxicity-related hospitalization, which has its own associated cost. The cost of PT is decreasing over time because of reduced prices for the building, machine, maintenance, and overhead, as well as newer, shorter treatment programs. PT is improving rapidly as more research is performed particularly with the implementation of 4-dimensional computed tomography-based motion management and intensity modulated PT. Given these controversies, there is much debate in the oncology community about which patients with lung cancer benefit significantly from PT. The Particle Therapy Co-operative Group (PTCOG) Thoracic Subcommittee task group intends to address the issues of PT indications, advantages and limitations, cost-effectiveness, technology improvement, clinical trials, and future research directions. This consensus report can be used to guide clinical practice and indications for PT, insurance approval, and clinical or translational research directions. PMID:27084663

  9. First-line systemic treatment of advanced stage non-small-cell lung cancer in Asia: consensus statement from the Asian Oncology Summit 2009.

    PubMed

    Soo, Ross A; Anderson, Benjamin O; Cho, Byoung Chul; Yang, Chih-Hsin; Liao, Meilin; Lim, Wan-Teck; Goldstraw, Peter; Mok, Tony S

    2009-11-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is an increasing global challenge, especially in low-income countries. Most guidelines for the management of advanced-stage NSCLC have limited effect in countries with resource constraints. Following a systematic literature search, we present an overview of the management of advanced-stage NSCLC in the first-line setting, discuss resources required for systemic therapy, and provide treatment recommendations stratified to four resources levels. Treatment guidelines appropriate for different resource levels offer a realistic approach to management of advanced-stage NSCLC, by recognising the limitations of a particular health-care system. Although there are many barriers to cancer control in low-resource countries, these can be overcome by using measures that are culturally appropriate, economically feasible, and evidence-based. Initiatives include strategic planning, tobacco control, training of health-care workers, access to therapeutic agents, acquisition of information, public education, and alliances with established institutions and international organisations. PMID:19880064

  10. Human Leukocyte Antigen G Polymorphism and Expression Are Associated with an Increased Risk of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Advanced Disease Stage

    PubMed Central

    Ben Amor, Amira; Beauchemin, Karine; Faucher, Marie-Claude; Hamzaoui, Agnes; Hamzaoui, Kamel; Roger, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G acts as negative regulator of the immune responses and its expression may enable tumor cells to escape immunosurveillance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of HLA-G allelic variants and serum soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) levels on risk of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We analyzed 191 Caucasian adults with NSCLC and 191 healthy subjects recruited between January 2009 and March 2014 in Ariana (Tunisia). Serum sHLA-G levels were measured by immunoassay and HLA-G alleles were determined using a direct DNA sequencing procedures. The heterozygous genotypes of HLA-G 010101 and -G 010401 were associated with increased risks of both NSCLC and advanced disease stages. In contrast, the heterozygous genotypes of HLA-G 0105N and -G 0106 were associated with decreased risks of NSCC and clinical disease stage IV, respectively. Serum sHLA-G levels were significantly higher in patients with NSCLC and particularly in those with advanced disease stages compared to healthy subjects. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves was 0.82 for controls vs patients. Given 100% specificity, the highest sensitivity achieved to detect NSCLC was 52.8% at a cutoff value of 24.9 U/ml. Patients with the sHLA-G above median level (≥ 50 U/ml) had a significantly shorter survival time. This study demonstrates that HLA-G allelic variants are independent risk factors for NSCLC. Serum sHLA-G levels in NSCLC patients could be useful biomarkers for the diagnostic and prognosis of NSCLC. PMID:27517300

  11. Human Leukocyte Antigen G Polymorphism and Expression Are Associated with an Increased Risk of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Advanced Disease Stage.

    PubMed

    Ben Amor, Amira; Beauchemin, Karine; Faucher, Marie-Claude; Hamzaoui, Agnes; Hamzaoui, Kamel; Roger, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G acts as negative regulator of the immune responses and its expression may enable tumor cells to escape immunosurveillance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of HLA-G allelic variants and serum soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) levels on risk of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We analyzed 191 Caucasian adults with NSCLC and 191 healthy subjects recruited between January 2009 and March 2014 in Ariana (Tunisia). Serum sHLA-G levels were measured by immunoassay and HLA-G alleles were determined using a direct DNA sequencing procedures. The heterozygous genotypes of HLA-G 010101 and -G 010401 were associated with increased risks of both NSCLC and advanced disease stages. In contrast, the heterozygous genotypes of HLA-G 0105N and -G 0106 were associated with decreased risks of NSCC and clinical disease stage IV, respectively. Serum sHLA-G levels were significantly higher in patients with NSCLC and particularly in those with advanced disease stages compared to healthy subjects. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves was 0.82 for controls vs patients. Given 100% specificity, the highest sensitivity achieved to detect NSCLC was 52.8% at a cutoff value of 24.9 U/ml. Patients with the sHLA-G above median level (≥ 50 U/ml) had a significantly shorter survival time. This study demonstrates that HLA-G allelic variants are independent risk factors for NSCLC. Serum sHLA-G levels in NSCLC patients could be useful biomarkers for the diagnostic and prognosis of NSCLC.

  12. Initial Evaluation of Treatment-Related Pneumonitis in Advanced-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yom, Sue S.; Liao Zhongxing . E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org; Liu, H. Helen; Tucker, Susan L.; Hu, C.-S.; Wei Xiong; Wang Xuanming; Wang Shulian; Mohan, Radhe; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the rate of high-grade treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP) in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: From August 2002 to August 2005, 151 NSCLC patients were treated with IMRT. We excluded patients who did not receive concurrent chemotherapy or who had early-stage cancers, a history of major lung surgery, prior chest RT, a dose <50 Gy, or IMRT combined with three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT). Toxicities were graded by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Grade {>=}3 TRP for 68 eligible IMRT patients was compared with TRP among 222 similar patients treated with 3D-CRT. Results: The median follow-up durations for the IMRT and 3D-CRT patients were 8 months (range, 0-27 months) and 9 months (range, 0-56 months), respectively. The median IMRT and 3D-CRT doses were 63 Gy. The median gross tumor volume was 194 mL (range, 21-911 mL) for IMRT, compared with 142 mL (range, 1.5-1,186 mL) for 3D-CRT (p = 0.002). Despite the IMRT group's larger gross tumor volume, the rate of Grade {>=}3 TRP at 12 months was 8% (95% confidence interval 4%-19%), compared with 32% (95% confidence interval 26%-40%) for 3D-CRT (p = 0.002). Conclusions: In advanced NSCLC patients treated with chemoradiation, IMRT resulted in significantly lower levels of Grade {>=}3 TRP compared with 3D-CRT. Clinical, dosimetric, and patient selection factors that may have influenced rates of TRP require continuing investigation. A randomized trial comparing IMRT with 3D-CRT has been initiated.

  13. The Impact of Local and Regional Disease Extent on Overall Survival in Patients With Advanced Stage IIIB/IV Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, Daniel S.; Chen, Ronald C.; Tracton, Gregg; Morris, David E.; Halle, Jan; Rosenman, Julian G.; Stefanescu, Mihaela; Pham, Erica; Socinski, Mark A.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with advanced stage IIIB or stage IV non-small cell lung carcinoma are typically treated with initial platinum-based chemotherapy. A variety of factors (eg, performance status, gender, age, histology, weight loss, and smoking history) are generally accepted as predictors of overall survival. Because uncontrolled pulmonary disease constitutes a major cause of death in these patients, we hypothesized that clinical and radiographic factors related to intrathoracic disease at diagnosis may be prognostically significant in addition to conventional factors. The results have implications regarding the selection of patients for whom palliative thoracic radiation therapy may be of most benefit. Methods and Materials: We conducted a pooled analysis of 189 patients enrolled at a single institution into 9 prospective phase II and III clinical trials involving first-line, platinum-based chemotherapy. Baseline clinical and radiographic characteristics before trial enrollment were analyzed as possible predictors for subsequent overall survival. To assess the relationship between anatomic location and volume of disease within the thorax and its effect on survival, the pre-enrollment computed tomography images were also analyzed by contouring central and peripheral intrapulmonary disease. Results: On univariate survival analysis, multiple pulmonary-related factors were significantly associated with worse overall survival, including pulmonary symptoms at presentation (P=.0046), total volume of intrathoracic disease (P=.0006), and evidence of obstruction of major bronchi or vessels on prechemotherapy computed tomography (P<.0001). When partitioned into central and peripheral volumes, central (P<.0001) but not peripheral (P=.74) disease was associated with worse survival. On multivariate analysis with known factors, pulmonary symptoms (hazard ratio, 1.46; P=.042), central disease volume (hazard ratio, 1.47; P=.042), and bronchial/vascular compression (hazard ratio, 1

  14. 77 FR 24717 - Scientific Information Request on Local Therapies for the Treatment of Stage I Non-Small Cell...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... Therapies for the Treatment of Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Endobronchial Obstruction Due to... for the Treatment of Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Endobronchial Obstruction Due to Advanced... effectiveness review of the evidence for local therapies for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung...

  15. A Phase II First-Line Study of Gemcitabine, Carboplatin, and Bevacizumab in Advanced Stage Non-squamous Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Clément-Duchêne, Christelle; Krupitskaya, Yelena; Ganjoo, Kristen; Lavori, Philip; McMillan, Alex; Kumar, Atul; Zhao, Gary; Padda, Sukhmani; Zhou, Lisa; Pedro-Salcedo, Melanie San; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Wakelee, Heather A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bevacizumab improves responses and progression-free survival when added to first-line paclitaxel/carboplatin or cisplatin/gemcitabine for patients with advanced nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer. This study was designed to evaluate toxicities and efficacy of gemcitabine/carboplatin/bevacizumab. Methods Patients with untreated advanced nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer, with no evidence of brain metastases and not on anticoagulation were eligible. Patients received gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8; carboplatin area under the curve 5 day 1; and bevacizumab 15 mg/kg day 1 every 3 weeks for up to six cycles. Bevacizumab was then continued every 3 weeks until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Results From July 2006 to December 2008, 48 patients were enrolled: 23 (48%) men, 25 (52%) women, and 19 (40%) never smokers. One patient never received therapy and is not included in the analysis. Median cycle number was 8 (1– 42) with 37 patients (78.7%) completing ≥4 cycles of three drugs. Dose reductions occurred in 34 (72.3%) patients. Grade 3/4 toxicities included neutropenia (47%/15%), thrombocytopenia (11%/15%), anemia (6%/0%), dyspnea (6%/2%), bacterial pneumonia (4%/0%), and hypertension (4%/2%). No neutropenic fevers occurred. One patient died of hemoptysis. Grade 3 bleeding occurred in three other patients. There were seven (14.9%) partial responses. Median time to first event (progression/death/toxicity requiring discontinuation) was 6.4 months (95% confidence interval: 4.8 –7.9 months). The median overall survival (OS) was 12.8 months (95% confidence interval: 10.0 –16.5). The OS is 57% at 1 year and 10% at 2 years. Conclusions Although perhaps skewed by a high proportion of nonsmokers and women, treatment with gemcitabine/carboplatin/bevacizumab has an acceptable toxicity profile with promising median OS despite a low response rate. PMID:20881641

  16. Chemotherapy for Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Martin F; Gerber, David E

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer has seen an unprecedented augmentation of therapeutic options over the last couple of years. Improved understanding of molecular drivers and the role of the immune system in cancer therapy have brought new drugs to the armamentarium. Despite these advances, cytotoxic chemotherapy remains a substantial part of therapy for most patients in locally advanced and metastatic stage. Initially thought to be a chemotherapy-resistant entity, meta-analyses in the mid-1990s demonstrated modest efficacy of platinum-based therapy. Further combination trials demonstrated enhanced efficacy for several regimen in first and second lines, including the introduction of antimetabolites, taxanes, and anti-angiogenic agents. Maintenance chemotherapy has been another novel, successful approach for management of metastatic disease. Herein, we summarize the current concepts of chemotherapy, its applicability to the different histologies, and novel concepts of therapy. PMID:27535392

  17. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  18. EF5 in Measuring Tumor Hypoxia in Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-10

    Stage IA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  19. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary, Pancreatic, Urothelial, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  20. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Improving Lung Function in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-17

    Cachexia; Fatigue; Pulmonary Complications; Radiation Toxicity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  1. Treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    De Petris, L; Crinò, L; Scagliotti, G V; Gridelli, C; Galetta, D; Metro, G; Novello, S; Maione, P; Colucci, G; de Marinis, F

    2006-03-01

    In the last decade the treatment of advanced-metastatic non-small cell lung cancer has substantially improved. If in the early 90s there was still concern about the real efficacy of chemotherapy over best suppotive care alone in the advanced setting, constant developments in clinical research have demonstrated the survival advantage of active anti-cancer drugs not only in the first-line setting, but, lately, even in patients with recurrent disease after failure of two previous chemotherapy lines. With the premises of high throughput technologies, translational research is aiming to characterize patients and tumors on a molecular basis. With pharmacogenomics it would then be possible to accurately predict patient outcome and tailor the treatment strategy according to the geno-phenotype of single patients.

  2. Challenges in optimizing chemoradiation in locally advanced non small-cell lung cancers in India.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sushma

    2013-10-01

    Data supporting use of concurrent chemoradiation in locally advanced lung cancers comes from clinical trials from developed countries. Applicability and outcomes of such schedules in developing countries is not widely reported. There are various challenges in delivering chemoradiation in locally advanced non small cell lung cancer in developing countries which is highlighted by an audit of patients treated with chemoradiation in our center. This article deals with the challenges in the context of a developing country. We conclude that sequential chemoradiotherapy is better tolerated than concurrent chemoradiation in Indian patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancers. Patients with stage IIIa, normal weight or overweight, and adequate baseline pulmonary function should be offered concurrent chemoradiation.

  3. Treatment of Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Surgery or Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Uzel, Esengül Koçak; Abacıoğlu, Ufuk

    2015-01-01

    The management of early-stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) has improved recently due to advances in surgical and radiation modalities. Minimally-invasive procedures like Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) lobectomy decreases the morbidity of surgery, while the numerous methods of staging the mediastinum such as endobronchial and endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsies are helping to achieve the objectives much more effectively. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) has become the frontrunner as the standard of care in medically inoperable early stage NSCLC patients, and has also been branded as tolerable and highly effective. Ongoing researches using SABR are continuously validating the optimal dosing and fractionation schemes, while at the same time instituting its role for both inoperable and operable patients. PMID:25759766

  4. PET-Adjusted Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-10

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  5. Palliative Care Intervention in Improving Symptom Control and Quality of Life in Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Their Family Caregivers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-13

    Caregiver; Psychological Impact of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  6. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  7. Novel treatment options in stage I non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tarasevych, Svitlana; Lauwers, Patrick; Vandaele, Frederik; van Meerbeeck, Jan P

    2014-09-01

    In the last 5 years, the current management of stage I non-small-cell lung cancer has been challenged due to novel surgical approaches and advances in radiation technology. The outcome after a sublobar resection is promising, especially for tumors less than 2 cm. Other treatment opportunities are available for high risk patients with comorbidity and impaired pulmonary function. Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy is a good alternative treatment to surgery, especially in elderly and comorbid patients. However, randomized evidence comparing sublobar resection and stereotactic radiotherapy is presently lacking. The most recent development in radiotherapy is hadron therapy with a presumed reduced toxicity because of its peculiar physical and biological effects. Promising thermal and microwave ablative techniques are in development and have specific niche indications. PMID:24930519

  8. Sirolimus and Gold Sodium Thiomalate in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-12-13

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  9. Radiation Therapy, Chemotherapy, and Soy Isoflavones in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-08

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  10. Docetaxel, Cisplatin, Pegfilgrastim, and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB or Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-13

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  11. Crizotinib for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III clinical trial that compared crizotinib versus chemotherapy in previously treated patients with advanced lung cancer whose tumors have an EML4-ALK fusion gene.

  12. New molecular targeted therapies for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Míriam; Custodio, Ana; Provencio, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a uniformly fatal disease and most patients will present with advanced stage. Treatment outcomes remain unsatisfactory, with low long-term survival rates. Standard treatment, such as palliative chemotherapy and radiotherapy, offers a median survival not exceeding 1 year. Hence, considerable efforts have started to be made in order to identify new biological agents which may safely and effectively be administered to advanced NSCLC patients. Two cancer cell pathways in particular have been exploited, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) pathways. However, novel targeted therapies that interfere with other dysregulated pathways in lung cancer are already in the clinic. This review outlines the most promising research approaches to the treatment of NSCLC, discussed according to the specific molecular pathway targeted. PMID:22263060

  13. Phase 3 Study of Bavituximab Plus Docetaxel Versus Docetaxel Alone in Patients With Late-stage Non-squamous Non-small-cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-01

    Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Stage IIIB; Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Stage IV; Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Metastatic; Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung; Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma; Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

  14. [The quality of life after chemotherapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Słowik-Gabryelska, A; Szczepanik, A; Kalicka, A

    1999-01-01

    The intensity of complains, short survival and great number of patients makes many oncologists to apply chemotherapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer/NSCLC/. The achieved median duration of life after chemotherapy was 6 to 12 month. From the other hand non small cell lung cancer chemotherapy is a big burden even to healthy persons. It can worsen the quality of life. That was the reason we evaluated the quality of life after chemotherapy in advanced non small cell lung cancer patients. Taking into account, that the evaluation of quality of life, used in most diseases is useless in advanced NSCLC patients, for appreciation the quality of life in these cases the lung cancer symptoms scale/LCSS/was adopted. In 110 non small cell lung cancer patients in stage IIIB and IV, who received combined chemotherapy by Le Chevalier/Vindesine, Cisplatin, Cyclophosphamide, Lomustin/or by Rosell/Mitomycin, Cyclophosphamide, Cisplatin/the quality of life was evaluated. In 20-persons control group all patients received the symptomatic treatment. In observed group of 110 patients, tumor regressions after 4 courses of chemotherapy allowed to resect cancer in 14 cases, to apply radiotherapy in 42 and to continue chemiotherapy in 23 persons. In every person from above mentioned group the quality of life was evaluated on the basis of intensity of cancer symptoms, accordingly to LCSS. The intensity of cancer symptoms was compared before and after treatment. There were compared; the innensity of complains, weakness, appetite, malnutrition, and hematological, neurological, performans state as well as respiratory sufficiency, infections, cardiac disorders and pain. Apart it, the side effects of applied therapy were assessed in 5 degree scale. The level of hemoglobin, the number of leucocytes, thrombocytes, bilirubine and transaminases in peripheral blood, hematurie, proteinurie, bleedings, appetite, nausea, vomitings, diarrhea, mucosal lesions, infections, skin lesions, cardiac lesions

  15. [Photodynamic therapy in combined treatment of stage III non-small cell lung carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Akopov, A L; Rusanov, A A; Molodtsova, V P; Chistiakov, I V; Kazakov, N V; Urtenova, M A; Rait, Makhmud; Papaian, G V

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of combined treatment of locally advanced lung cancer with the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgery with the use of pre- and intraoperative photodynamic therapy. 20 patients with IIIa (n=7) and IIIb (n=13) stage of non-small cell lung carcinoma were included. At the time of diagnosis the surgical treatment was decided to abstain because of the trachea invasion in 9 patients, wide mediastinal invasion in 2 patients and contralateral mediastinal lymph nodes metastases in 2 patients; pneumonectomy was not possible due to the poor respiratory function in 7 patients. Neoadjuvant therapy included 3 courses of chemotherapy and endobronchial photodynamic therapy. During the operation, along with the lung resection (pneumonectomy - 15, lobectomy - 5), photodynamic therapy of the resection margins were carried out. No adjuvant treatment was done. Preoperative treatment led to partial regress of the disease in all cases; the goal of surgery was the complete tumor removal. No complications of the photodynamic therapy were observed. 18 surgical interventions were radical and two non-complete microscopically (R1). Postoperative morbidity was 20%, one patient died due to massive gastrointestinal bleeding. The average follow-up period was 18 months: 19 patients were alive, of them 18 with no signs of the disease recurrence. The first experience of the combined use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgery with pre- and intraoperative photodynamic therapy demonstrates safety and efficacy of the suggested treatment tactics. PMID:23612332

  16. Non-small cell lung cancer: current treatment and future advances.

    PubMed

    Zappa, Cecilia; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-06-01

    Lung cancer has a poor prognosis; over half of people diagnosed with lung cancer die within one year of diagnosis and the 5-year survival is less than 18%. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for the majority of all lung cancer cases. Risk factors for developing NSCLC have been identified, with cigarette smoking being a major factor along with other environmental and genetic risk factors. Depending on the staging of lung cancer, patients are eligible for certain treatments ranging from surgery to radiation to chemotherapy as well as targeted therapy. With the advancement of genetics and biomarkers testing, specific mutations have been identified to better target treatment for individual patients. This review discusses current treatments including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy as well as how biomarker testing has helped improve survival in patients with NSCLC. PMID:27413711

  17. Non-small cell lung cancer: current treatment and future advances

    PubMed Central

    Zappa, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has a poor prognosis; over half of people diagnosed with lung cancer die within one year of diagnosis and the 5-year survival is less than 18%. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for the majority of all lung cancer cases. Risk factors for developing NSCLC have been identified, with cigarette smoking being a major factor along with other environmental and genetic risk factors. Depending on the staging of lung cancer, patients are eligible for certain treatments ranging from surgery to radiation to chemotherapy as well as targeted therapy. With the advancement of genetics and biomarkers testing, specific mutations have been identified to better target treatment for individual patients. This review discusses current treatments including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy as well as how biomarker testing has helped improve survival in patients with NSCLC. PMID:27413711

  18. Proton Beam Therapy of Stage II and III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Satoh, Hiroaki; Sugahara, Shinji; Kurishima, Koichi; Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Ishikawa, Shigemi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The present retrospective study assessed the role of proton beam therapy (PBT) in the treatment of patients with Stage II or III non-small-cell lung cancer who were inoperable or ineligible for chemotherapy because of co-existing disease or refusal. Patients and Methods: Between November 2001 and July 2008, PBT was given to 35 patients (5 patients with Stage II, 12 with Stage IIIA, and 18 with Stage IIIB) whose median age was 70.3 years (range, 47.4-85.4). The median proton dose given was 78.3 Gy (range, 67.1-91.3) (relative biologic effectiveness). Results: Local progression-free survival for Stage II-III patients was 93.3% at 1 year and 65.9% at 2 years during a median observation period of 16.9 months. Four patients (11.4%) developed local recurrence, 13 (37.1%) developed regional recurrence, and 7 (20.0%) developed distant metastases. The progression-free survival rate for Stage II-III patients was 59.6% at 1 year and 29.2% at 2 years. The overall survival rate of Stage II-III patients was 81.8% at 1 year and 58.9% at 2 years. Grade 3 or greater toxicity was not observed. A total of 15 patients (42.9%) developed Grade 1 and 6 (17.1%) Grade 2 toxicity. Conclusion: PBT for Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer without chemotherapy resulted in good local control and low toxicity. PBT has a definite role in the treatment of patients with Stage II-III non-small-cell lung cancer who are unsuitable for surgery or chemotherapy.

  19. Social factors, treatment, and survival in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, H P; Polissar, N L; Borgatta, E F; McCorkle, R; Goodman, G

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the importance of socioeconomic status, race, and likelihood of receiving surgery in explaining mortality among patients with stage-I non-small cell lung cancer. METHODS: Analyses focused on Black and White individuals 75 years of age and younger (n = 5189) diagnosed between 1980 and 1982 with stage-I non-small cell lung cancer in Detroit, San Francisco, and Seattle. The main outcome measure was months of survival after diagnosis. RESULTS: Patients in the highest income decile were 45% more likely to receive surgical treatment and 102% more likely to attain 5-year survival than those in the lowest decile. Whites were 20% more likely to undergo surgery than Blacks and 31% more likely to survive 5 years. Multivariate procedures controlling for age and sex confirmed these observations. CONCLUSIONS: Socioeconomic status and race appear to independently influence likelihood of survival. Failure to receive surgery explains much excess mortality. PMID:9807536

  20. Methoxyamine, Pemetrexed Disodium, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-05

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Stage IIIA Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  1. S0536: Cetuximab, Paclitaxel, Carboplatin, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  2. Is surgery still the optimal treatment for stage I non-small cell lung cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Moghanaki, Drew

    2016-01-01

    There is debate about what is the optimal treatment for operable stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although surgery has been the standard of care for centuries, recent retrospective and prospective randomized studies indicated that stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) could be an option for this group of patients with similar survival and less toxicities. However, to change the standard of care, more studies are needed and participating ongoing larger randomized studies is the best approach to resolve this controversy. PMID:27183993

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Aridgides, Paul; Bogart, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has had a profound impact on the treatment paradigm for medically inoperable patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer. Local control and survival outcomes from prospective collaborative trials using SBRT have been highly favorable in this challenging patient population. Further study in medically operable patients is ongoing; however, randomized trials to help answer this question have terminated early because of poor accrual. Available prospective and retrospective data are discussed for the use of SBRT with regard to the medically inoperable and operable patient populations, as well as considerations for fractionation, dose, and toxicity. PMID:27427521

  4. Upregulation of APE/ref-1 in recurrence stage I, non small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Woong; Kang, Shin Kwang; Choi, Songyi; Lee, Choong Sik; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Lim, Seung Pyung

    2012-02-01

    Lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer-related death, still lacks reliable biomarkers. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Ref-1 is a multifunctional protein involved in the base excision repair of DNA damaged by oxidative stress or alkylating compounds, as well as in the regulation of multiple transcription factors. To validate apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Ref-1 as a biomarker for prediction of lung cancer recurrence, we studied 42 patients who received curative resection and mediastinal lymph node dissection for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer. They were divided into 2 groups based on recurrence, and compared by immunohistochemistry staining of paraffin-embedded tissues and Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical staining showed a significant difference between the cytoplasm and nucleus in patients who had a recurrence compared to those with nonrecurrent adenocarcinoma. In Western blot analysis, the recurrent adenocarcinoma group showed increased expression of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Ref-1 in cytoplasm, nucleus, and in total. This indicates that apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Ref-1 is unregulated in recurrent stage I adenocarcinoma. For clinical application as a prognostic marker for non-small-cell lung cancer, further investigation into the role of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Ref-1 in carcinogenesis is needed in an expanded prospective study.

  5. GTI-2040 and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Metastatic, or Unresectable Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  6. Cost-effectiveness of paclitaxel plus cisplatin in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Earle, C C; Evans, W K

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of combination chemotherapy with paclitaxel/cisplatin, compared with standard etoposide/cisplatin in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We obtained the primary survival and resource utilization data from a large three-arm randomized trial comparing: paclitaxel 135 mg m−2 by 24-h intravenous (i.v.) infusion + cisplatin; paclitaxel 250 mg m−2 by 24-h i.v. infusion + cisplatin + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF); and standard etoposide/cisplatin in patients with stage IIIb or IV NSCLC. We also modelled the regimens with paclitaxel 135 mg m−2 + cisplatin administered as an outpatient by 3-h infusion, as clinical data suggest that this is equivalent to 24-h infusion. We collected costing data from the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre and applied it to the resources consumed in the randomized trial. We integrated these data into the Statistics Canada POpulation HEalth Model (POHEM), which generated hypothetical cohorts of patients treated with each regimen. The POHEM model assigned diagnostic work-up, treatment, disease progression and survival characteristics to each individual in these cohorts and tabulated the costs associated with each. We did sensitivity analyses around the costs of chemotherapy and its administration, and the survival differences between the two regimens. All costs are in 1997 Canadian dollars ($1.00 Canadian ˜ £0.39 sterling). The perspective is that of the Canadian health care system. In the trial, the two paclitaxel-containing arms had almost identical survival curves with a median survival of 9.7 months compared with 7.4 months for etoposide/cisplatin. As administered in the trial, paclitaxel/cisplatin cost $76 370 per life-year gained (LYG) and paclitaxel/cisplatin/G-CSF $138 578 per LYG relative to etoposide/cisplatin. However, when modelled as an outpatient 3-h infusion, paclitaxel/cisplatin was moderately cost-effective at $30 619 per LYG

  7. Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy With or Without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Adenosquamous Lung Carcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  8. Prognostic significance of circulating laminin gamma2 for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yu; Wang, Zitong; Ma, Li; Zhang, Lina; Guo, Yinan; Gu, Meng; Wang, Ziyu; Wang, Yue; Yue, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    Background Laminin gamma2 (Ln-γ2) chain, a distinctive subunit of heterotrimeric laminin-332, is frequently upregulated in carcinomas and is of great importance in cell migration and invasion. Despite this, the status of circulating Ln-γ2 in lung cancer patients is still uncertain. Patients and methods In this retrospective study, serum samples from 538 all-stage (stages I–IV) patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 94 age-matched healthy volunteers were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data were statistically analyzed in combination with clinicopathological information. Results Circulating Ln-γ2 was markedly increased in NSCLC, even in stage I cases (P<0.01), reflecting the progression of lung cancer. Survival analysis on 370 eligible patients indicated that serum Ln-γ2-negative patients survived much longer compared with Ln-γ2-positive individuals (P=0.028), and it was especially the case for stage I (P<0.001), stage T1 (P=0.001), and stage N0 patients (P=0.038), all of whom represented early-stage cases. For the advanced patients, however, overall survivals were not significantly different among stages II–IV (P=0.830), stages T2–T4 (P=0.575), stages N1–N3 (P=0.669), and stage M1 (P=0.849). Cox analysis subsequently defined serum Ln-γ2 as an independent prognostic indicator of NSCLC, particularly for early-stage patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated the association of serum Ln-γ2 with smoking behavior, but its association with tumor progression and early prognostic significance were not altered in the nonsmoking cohort. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that elevation of circulating Ln-γ2 was an early-emerging event in NSCLC and was significantly associated with poor prognosis in NSCLC, especially for early-stage cases. PMID:27462170

  9. The practice of cardiothoracic surgeons in the perioperative staging of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, G M; Watson, D C

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer, and assessment of the results of treatment, depend on accurate perioperative staging. The extent to which this is carried out in the United Kingdom is unknown. METHODS: A postal questionnaire survey was undertaken in 1990 to determine the perioperative staging practices of cardiothoracic surgeons in the United Kingdom. RESULTS: Replies from 77 surgeons, who between them performed about 4833 pulmonary resections a year for lung cancer, were analysed. Forty four per cent of surgeons, operating on 43% of the patients, do not perform computed tomography of the thorax or mediastinal exploration before surgery. They may therefore embark on a thoracotomy for stage III disease. At thoracotomy 45% of surgeons, operating on 40% of patients, do not sample macroscopically normal lymph nodes. They may therefore understage cases as N0/N1 when there is at least microscopic disease in mediastinal lymph nodes. CONCLUSIONS: The staging of lung cancer in the United Kingdom in 1990 appears in many instances to be inadequate. There should be a more organised approach to perioperative staging so that prognosis may be assessed and comparisons between groups of patients can be made. PMID:1311463

  10. Sirolimus and Auranofin in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer or Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-25

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  11. Time to Treatment in Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Li; Correa, Candace R.; Hayman, James A.; Zhao Lujun; Cease, Kemp; Brenner, Dean; Arenberg, Doug; Curtis, Jeffery; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Kong, F.-M.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether time to treatment (TTT) has an effect on overall survival (OS) in patients with unresectable or medically inoperable Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and whether patient or treatment factors are associated with TTT. Methods and Materials: Included in the study were 237 consecutive patients with Stage III NSCLC treated at University of Michigan Hospital (UM) or the Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System (VA). Patients were treated with either palliative or definitive radiotherapy and radiotherapy alone (n = 106) or either sequential (n = 69) or concurrent chemoradiation (n = 62). The primary endpoint was OS. Results: Median follow-up was 69 months, and median TTT was 57 days. On univariate analysis, the risk of death did not increase significantly with longer TTT (p = 0.093). However, subset analysis showed that there was a higher risk of death with longer TTT in patients who survived {>=} 5 years (p = 0.029). Younger age (p = 0.027), male sex (p = 0.013), lower Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) (p = 0.002), and treatment at the VA (p = 0.001) were significantly associated with longer TTT. However, on multivariate analysis, only lower KPS remained significantly associated with longer TTT (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Time to treatment is significantly associated with OS in patients with Stage III NSCLC who lived longer than 5 years, although it is not a significant factor in Stage III patients as a whole. Lower KPS is associated with longer TTT.

  12. Circulating Tumor DNA Detection in Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients by Targeted Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke-Zhong; Lou, Feng; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Ye, Hua; Chen, Wei; Guan, Tian; Zhao, Ming-Yu; Su, Xue-Xia; Shi, Rong; Jones, Lindsey; Huang, Xue F.; Chen, Si-Yi; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) isolated from peripheral blood has recently been shown to be an alternative source to detect gene mutations in primary tumors; however, most previous studies have focused on advanced stage cancers, and few have evaluated ctDNA detection in early-stage lung cancer. In the present study, blood and tumor samples were collected prospectively from 58 early-stage non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) patients (stages IA, IB, and IIA) and a targeted sequencing approach was used to detect somatic driver mutations in matched tumor DNA (tDNA) and plasma ctDNA. We identified frequent driver mutations in plasma ctDNA and tDNA in EGFR, KRAS, PIK3CA, and TP53, and less frequent mutations in other genes, with an overall study concordance of 50.4% and sensitivity and specificity of 53.8% and 47.3%, respectively. Cell-free (cfDNA) concentrations were found to be significantly associated with some clinical features, including tumor stage and subtype. Importantly, the presence of cfDNA had a higher positive predictive value than that of currently used protein tumor biomarkers. This study demonstrates the feasibility of identifying plasma ctDNA mutations in the earliest stage lung cancer patients via targeted sequencing, demonstrating a potential utility of targeted sequencing of ctDNA in the clinical management of NSCLC. PMID:27555497

  13. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-05

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  14. Impact of Neoadjuvant Radiation on Survival in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koshy, Matthew; Goloubeva, Olga; Suntharalingam, Mohan

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: The role of surgery in Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial. This study was undertaken to assess the impact of neoadjuvant radiation therapy for Stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database that included patients who were 18 years and older with NSCLC classified as Stage III and who underwent definitive therapy from 1988 to 2004. Patients were characterized by type of treatment received. Survival functions were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression model was used to analyze trends in overall (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS). Results: A total of 48,131 patients were selected, with a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 0-203 months). By type of treatment, the 3-year OS was 10% with radiation therapy (RT), 37% with surgery (S), 34% with surgery and postoperative radiation (S-RT), and 45% with neoadjuvant radiation followed by surgery (Neo-RT) (p = 0.0001). Multivariable Cox model identified sex, race, laterality, T stage, N stage, and type of treatment as factors affecting survival. Estimated hazard ratios (HR) adjusted for other variables in regression model showed the types of treatment: S (HR, 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-1.4), S-RT (HR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3), and RT (HR, 2.3; 95% CI, 2.15-2.53) were associated with significantly worse overall survival when compared with Neo-RT (p = 0.0001). Conclusion: This population based study demonstrates that patients with Stage III NSCLC receiving Neo-RT had significantly improved overall survival when compared with other treatment groups.

  15. Multimodality systematic approach to mediastinal lymph node staging in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Saettele, Timothy M; Ost, David E

    2014-08-01

    Establishing an accurate diagnosis and stage for non-small cell lung cancer has important implications for treatment and prognosis. Ideally, the process should be performed in a way that maximizes the information from each procedure while minimizing the risk to the patient. The concepts of decision analysis and Bayes' theorem form a basis to develop the strategy. In this framework, the pre-test probability of malignancy is estimated in the lung nodule or mass, the regional lymph nodes and in distant sites. Invasive diagnostic tests are performed in sites with a pre-test probability greater than the testing threshold, beginning with those sites that would yield the highest stage, if positive. Modalities are chosen that are able to biopsy the suspicious sites and present the least amount of risk to the patient. Following each test, the post-test probability of malignancy is calculated to determine if it crosses the testing or test-treatment thresholds. The process continues with further tests until a diagnosis and stage are established.

  16. Prospective study on stereotactic radiotherapy of limited-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, Morten . E-mail: hoyer@as.aaa.dk; Roed, Henrik D.; Hansen, Anders Traberg; Ohlhuis, Lars; Petersen, Jorgen; Nellemann, Hanne; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Grau, Cai D.; Engelholm, Svend Aage D.; Maase, Hans D. von der

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To test the effect of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in the treatment of medically inoperable patients with limited-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a Phase II trial. Methods and Materials: Forty patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated with SBRT with a central dose of 15 Gy x 3 within 5-8 days. Results: Eight patients (20%) obtained a complete response, 15 (38%) had a partial response, and 12 (30%) had no change or could not be evaluated. Only 3 patients had a local recurrence, and the local control rate 2 years after SBRT was 85%. At 2 years, 54% were without local or distant progression, and overall survival was 47%. Within 6 months after treatment, one or more Grade {>=}2 reactions were observed in 48% of the patients. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiotherapy in patients with limited-stage NSCLC resulted in a high probability of local control and a promising survival rate. The toxicity after SBRT of lung tumors was moderate. However, deterioration in performance status, respiratory insufficiency, and other side effects were observed.

  17. Erlotinib Hydrochloride With or Without Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Adenosquamous Lung Carcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Malignant Pericardial Effusion; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  18. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-26

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  19. Veliparib With or Without Radiation Therapy, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Patients With Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-14

    Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma, Mixed Subtype; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  20. Neoadjuvant therapy and surgical resection for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Meko, J; Rusch, V W

    2000-10-01

    During the past 15 years, treatment of stage IIIA (N2) non-small cell lung cancer has evolved considerably because of improvements in patients selection, staging, and combined modality therapy. Results of several clinical trials suggest that induction chemotherapy or chemoradiation and surgical resection is superior to surgery alone. However, the optimal induction regimen has not been defined. An intergroup trial is also underway to determine whether chemoradiation and surgical resection leads to better survival than chemotherapy and radiation alone. Future studies will assess ways to combine radiation and novel chemotherapeutic agents, and will identify molecular abnormalities that predict response to induction therapy.

  1. A Phase I Study of Dasatinib with Concurrent Chemoradiation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khurshid, Humera; Dipetrillo, Thomas; Ng, Thomas; Mantripragada, Kalyan; Birnbaum, Ariel; Berz, David; Radie-Keane, Kathy; Perez, Kimberly; Constantinou, Maria; Luppe, Denise; Schumacher, Andrew; Leonard, Kara; Safran, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Src family kinases (SFKs) are expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and may be involved in tumor growth and metastases. Inhibition of SFK may also enhance radiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if a maximum dose of 100 mg of dasatinib could be safely administered with concurrent chemoradiation and then continued as maintenance for patients with newly diagnosed stage III NSCLC. Methods: Patients with stage III locally advanced NSCLC received paclitaxel, 50 mg/m2/week, with carboplatin area under the curve (AUC) = 2, weekly for 7 weeks, and concurrent radiotherapy, 64.8 Gy. Three dose levels of dasatinib 50, 70, and 100 mg/day were planned. Results: 11 patients with locally advanced NSCLC were entered. At the 70 mg dose level 1 patient had grade 5 pneumonitis not responsive to therapy, and one patient had reversible grade 3 pneumonitis and grade 3 pericardial effusion. Due to these toxicities the Brown University Oncology Group Data Safety Monitoring Board terminated the study. Conclusion: Dasatinib could not be safely combined with concurrent chemoradiation for stage 3 lung cancer due to pneumonitis. PMID:22666662

  2. From Uniplex to Multiplex Molecular Profiling in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ileana, Ecaterina E; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Izzo, Julie G

    2015-01-01

    Non-small cell lung carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Understanding the molecular biology of survival and proliferation of cancer cells led to a new molecular classification of lung cancer and the development of targeted therapies with promising results. With the advances of image-guided biopsy techniques, tumor samples are becoming smaller, and the molecular testing techniques have to overcome the challenge of integrating the characterization of a panel of abnormalities including gene mutations, copy-number changes, and fusions in a reduced number of assays using only a small amount of genetic material. This article reviews the current knowledge about the most frequent actionable molecular abnormalities in non-small cell lung carcinoma, the new approaches of molecular analysis, and the implications of these findings in the context of clinical practice.

  3. Stereotactic radiotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Badellino, Serena; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) represents a consolidated treatment option for patients with medically inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The clinical evidence accumulated in the past decade supports its use as an alternative to surgery with comparable survival outcomes. Due to its limited toxicity, SBRT is also applicable to elderly patients with very poor baseline pulmonary function or other severe comorbidities. Recent comparative studies in operable patients raised the issue of the possible use of SBRT also for this subgroup, with quite promising results that still should be fully confirmed by prospective trials with long-term follow-up. Aim of this review is to summarize and discuss the major studies conducted over the years on SBRT and to provide data on the efficacy and toxicity of this radiotherapy technique for stage I NSCLC. Technical aspects and quality of life related issues are also discussed, with the goal to provide information on the current role and limitations of SBRT in clinical practice. PMID:26157674

  4. EGFR Mutation Positive Stage IV Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Treatment Beyond Progression

    PubMed Central

    Van Assche, Katrijn; Ferdinande, Liesbeth; Lievens, Yolande; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Surmont, Veerle

    2014-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of death from cancer for both men and women. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment in advanced disease, but is only marginally effective. In about 30% of patients with advanced NSCLC in East Asia and in 10–15% in Western countries, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations are found. In this population, first-line treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) erlotinib, gefitinib, or afatinib is recommended. The treatment beyond progression is less well-defined. In this paper, we present three patients, EGFR mutation positive, with local progression after an initial treatment with TKI. These patients were treated with local radiotherapy. TKI was temporarily stopped and restarted after radiotherapy. We give an overview of the literature and discuss the different treatment options in case of progression after TKI: TKI continuation with or without chemotherapy, TKI continuation with local therapy, alternative dosing or switch to next-generation TKI or combination therapy. There are different options for treatment beyond progression in EGFR mutation positive metastatic NSCLC, but the optimal strategy is still to be defined. Further research on this topic is ongoing. PMID:25538894

  5. Use of PET/CT for staging and radiation therapy planning in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mac Manus, M P

    2010-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and more recently PET/computed tomography (CT) scanning represent major advances in the imaging of lung cancer and have an especially high impact on the management of patients who are candidates for potentially curative or "radical" radiotherapy (RT). This article reviews the current status of PET and PET/CT for staging patients before RT and considers the use of PET and PET/CT images for target volume definition. The relevant literature on the use of PET for staging lung cancer is reviewed and placed in the context of patients who are candidates for RT. Research that specifically considers the use of PET for RT planning is considered critically and some promising areas for future research are discussed. The available literature is almost exclusively devoted to non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with few relevant studies of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The primary PET radiopharmaceutical shown to have value for staging and RT planning is 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). In prospective studies where PET imaging was used to stage radical RT candidates, 25-30% of patients were excluded from radical therapy because of PET detected advanced disease. In all studies where "PET-assisted" and conventional target or treatment volumes were compared, there were major differences between PET and conventional volumes. Because PET-assisted staging is proven to be significantly more accurate than conventional staging and because all studies show major differences between PET-assisted and conventional treatment volumes in NSCLC, routine use of PET/CT for RT planning is recommended.

  6. High-Dose Conformal Radiotherapy for Patients With Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Satoh, Hiroaki; Kurishima, Koichi; Ishikawa, Hiroichi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of high-dose conformal radiotherapy to the involved field for patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between May 1999 and April 2006, a total of 100 consecutive patients with inoperable Stage IIIA or IIIB NSCLC with a performance score of 0 to 2 and treatment by radical radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy were included. Up to August 2002, 33 patients underwent conventional radiotherapy of 56 Gy to 66 Gy using anteroposterior opposite ports to the primary tumor and elective lymph nodes (conventional group). After September 2002, the remaining 67 patients underwent high-dose radiotherapy of 66 Gy to 84 Gy to the involved volume with three-dimensional (3-D) conformal radiotherapy (conformal group). Results: The median survival was 13.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.5-18.5 months) in the conventional group and 17.3 months (95% CI, 10.7- 24.0 months) in the conformal group. The overall survival at 3 years were 9.1% (95% CI, -0.7-18.9%) in the conventional group and 31.0% (95% CI, 18.9-43.1%) in the conformal group; the conformal group had a significantly better overall survival (p < 0.05). The radiotherapy method (hazard ratio = 0.55, p < 0.05) and performance status (hazard ratio = 1.48, p < 0.05) were shown to be statistically significant independent prognostic factors. Conclusions: Based on the practical experience reported here, 3-D conformal radiotherapy allowed dose escalation without excessive toxicity, and may improve overall survival rates for patients with Stage III NSCLC.

  7. Intensity-modulated stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Eun Seok; Min, Chul Kee; Se An, Pyung

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical outcomes of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A prospective database of 16 consecutive patients receiving SBRT for pathologically-proven and peripherally-located stage I NSCLC was reviewed. Fifteen patients were medically inoperable and one patient refused to undergo surgery. The median age of the patients was 76 years (range, 69-86). Treatment planning used four-dimensional computed tomography and fixed-field IMRT (n=11) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT; n=5). The SBRT scheme was 48 Gy in four fractions (n=9) or 55 Gy in five fractions (n=7), delivered on consecutive days. The overall response rate at 6 months was 78.6%, including a complete response in three (21.4%) patients and a partial response in eight (57.1%). Three patients (21.4%) demonstrated a stable disease status. The median follow-up time was 14 months (range, 6-20) for the surviving patients. One patient developed local failure at 11 months, while another suffered from regional failure in a subcarinal lymph node at 4 months. Two patients did not survive within the first 6 months; one patient died during salvage chemotherapy for mediastinal lymph node metastasis and the other succumbed to a cause unrelated to lung cancer. The Kaplan-Meier estimates of local failure-free, progression-free and overall survival rates at 18 months were 91.0, 85.2 and 87.5%, respectively. The toxicity was mild; no severe (grade ≥3) toxicity was identified. IMRT-based (including VMAT) delivery of SBRT for patients with stage I NSCLC demonstrated favorable responses and local control without severe toxicity.

  8. Quality Assessment of Video Mediastinoscopy Performed for Staging in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Steunenberg, Bastiaan; Aerts, Bart; De Groot, Hans; Boot, Conny; Romme, Piet; Aerts, Joachim; Veen, Eelco

    2016-09-01

    Background Mediastinoscopy is considered to be the gold standard for mediastinal staging for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The diagnostic value depends on how this procedure is performed, which has resulted in drafting a guideline by the European Society of Thoracic Surgery (ESTS). Biopsy of at least stations 4R, 4L, 7, and if present stations 2R and 2L, is recommended. The objective of this study is to assess the quality of the mediastinoscopies performed in our hospital for NSCLC. Methods Medical records of 102 consecutive patients with suspected or proven NSCLC and a performed cervical mediastinoscopy between January 2009 and November 2014 were analyzed in a retrospective cohort study. The number of biopsied stations and complications has been prospectively documented, together with their clinical data. Results Cervical mediastinoscopy was performed in 102 patients and in 51 (50%) patients biopsy was taken of stations 4R, 4L, and 7. N2/N3 disease emerged more significantly (p < 0.05) if biopsies were taken of at least the paratracheal stations 4R/4L and the subcarinal region. The incidence of major complications was 3.9%. Conclusion In our clinic, 50% of the mediastinoscopies performed are executed following the ESTS guidelines. Our results subscribe the need to biopsy at least the paratracheal stations 4L/4R and the subcarinal region to obtain a reliable assessment of the mediastinum. PMID:26220697

  9. Selection of chemotherapy for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Nathan A

    2012-05-01

    Chemotherapy remains the first-line treatment for most patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but optimal regimens are now defined by histology. Platinum-based regimens with pemetrexed, bevacizumab, or both are reasonable first-line options for patients with nonsquamous NSCLC. The standard treatment for squamous NSCLC remains a platinum doublet with a drug other than pemetrexed. Maintenance therapy is emerging as a treatment strategy for patients who do not progress after four cycles of first-line chemotherapy. In the maintenance setting, pemetrexed and erlotinib significantly prolong overall survival compared with placebo after the completion of first-line chemotherapy.

  10. New and emerging targeted treatments in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Fred R; Suda, Kenichi; Wiens, Jacinta; Bunn, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    Targeted therapies are substantially changing the management of lung cancers. These treatments include drugs that target driver mutations, those that target presumed important molecules in cancer cell proliferation and survival, and those that inhibit immune checkpoint molecules. This area of research progresses day by day, with novel target discoveries, novel drug development, and use of novel combination treatments. Researchers and clinicians have also extensively investigated the predictive biomarkers and the molecular mechanisms underlying inherent or acquired resistance to these targeted therapies. We review recent progress in the development of targeted treatments for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, especially focusing on data from published clinical trials. PMID:27598681

  11. Circulating Tumor DNA in Predicting Outcomes in Patients With Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer or Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  12. Definitive radiotherapy with concurrent oncothermia for stage IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YEO, SEUNG-GU

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia enhances the susceptibility of tumors to radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy. Oncothermia, also known as electro-hyperthermia, is a new treatment modality developed to overcome the problems of traditional hyperthermia by selectively delivering energy to the malignant tissues. The present study reports the outcome of combined oncothermia and RT in a 75-year-old patient with stage IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Due to the advanced age and the performance status of the patient, the combination of systemic chemotherapy and RT was deemed infeasible; therefore, the patient instead decided to undergo oncothermia concurrently with definitive RT. The RT was administered at a dose of 64.8 Gy in 36 fractions using a three-dimensional conformal plan technique. Oncothermia was started concomitantly with RT and was performed for 60 min per session, two sessions per week, for a total of 12 sessions. No severe toxicities developed, with the exception of mild odynophagia, which resolved soon after the treatments. Follow-up computed tomography showed complete tumor response, and the patient was alive with no evidence of the disease 18 months after the completion of the treatment. In conclusion, the present case report suggests that oncothermia combined with RT, with the former possessing radiosensitizing potential and no additional toxicities, may be a promising alternative for advanced-age and/or frail patients with locally advanced NSCLC. PMID:26622391

  13. Quality of Life After Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Voort van Zyp, Noelle C. van der; Prevost, Jean-Briac; Holt, Bronno van der; Braat, Cora; Klaveren, Robertus J. van; Pattynama, Peter M.; Levendag, Peter C.; Nuyttens, Joost J.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of stereotactic radiotherapy on the quality of life of patients with inoperable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Overall survival, local tumor control, and toxicity were also evaluated in this prospective study. Methods and Materials: From January 2006 to February 2008, quality of life, overall survival, and local tumor control were assessed in 39 patients with pathologically confirmed T1 to 2N0M0 NSCLC. These patients were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ) C30 and the QLQ LC13 lung cancer-specific questionnaire were used to investigate changes in quality of life. Assessments were done before treatment, at 3 weeks, and at 2, 4, 6, 9, and 12 months after treatment, until death or progressive disease. Toxicity was evaluated using common terminology criteria for adverse events version 3.0. Results: Emotional functioning improved significantly after treatment. Other function scores and QLQ C30 and QLQ LC13 lung symptoms (such as dyspnea and coughing) showed no significant changes. The overall 2-year survival rate was 62%. After a median follow-up of 17 months, 1 patient had a local recurrence (3%). No grade 4 or 5 treatment-related toxicity occurred. Grade 3 toxicity consisted of thoracic pain, which occurred in 1 patient within 4 months of treatment, while it occurred thereafter in 2 patients. Conclusions: Quality of life was maintained, and emotional functioning improved significantly after stereotactic radiotherapy for stage I NSCLC, while survival was acceptable, local tumor control was high, and toxicity was low.

  14. The Comparative Effectiveness of Surgery and Radiosurgery for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, James B.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Cramer, Laura D.; Decker, Roy H.; Kim, Anthony W.; Gross, Cary P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although surgery is the standard treatment for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has disseminated as an alternative therapy. The comparative mortality and toxicity of these treatments for patients of different life expectancies (LE) are unknown. Methods Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare linked database, we identified patients age ≥67 who underwent SBRT or surgery for stage I NSCLC from 2007–2009. Matched patients were stratified into short (<5 years) and long (≥5 years) LE. Mortality and complication rates were compared using Poisson regression. Findings Overall, 367 SBRT and 711 surgery patients were matched. Acute toxicity (0–1-month) from SBRT was lower than surgery (7.9% vs. 54.9%, p<.001). At 24-months post-treatment, there was no difference (69.7% vs. 73.9%, p=.31). The incidence rate ratio (IRR) for toxicity for SBRT vs. surgery was 0.74 [95%CI 0.64–0.87]. Overall mortality was lower for SBRT than surgery at 3-months (2.2% vs. 6.1%; p=.005), but by 24-months, overall mortality was higher for SBRT (40.1% vs. 22.3% p<.001). For patients with short LE there was no difference in lung cancer mortality (IRR 1.01 [95% CI 0.40–2.56]). However for patients with long LE, there was greater overall mortality (IRR 1.49 [95% CI 1.11–2.01]) and a trend towards greater lung cancer mortality (IRR 1.63 [95% CI 0.95–2.79]) for SBRT vs. surgery. Conclusions SBRT was associated with lower immediate mortality and toxicity compared to surgery. However, for patients with long LE, there appears to be a relative benefit for surgery compared to SBRT. PMID:25847699

  15. Chemotherapy in elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Quoix, Elisabeth; Westeel, Virginie; Zalcman, Gérard; Milleron, Bernard

    2011-12-01

    Because of increasing life expectancy and of higher risk of cancer with ageing, lung cancer in elderly is a frequent disease. For a long time nihilism influenced treatment decisions in elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Since the beginning of the last decade single agent chemotherapy has been accepted as standard of care, vinorelbine and gemcitabine being the most frequently used drugs in Europe and US, docetaxel in Japan. Platinum-based doublets have been shown to be superior to monotherapy in young and fit patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Although there were some indications from subgroup analyses of clinical trials not specifically dedicated to elderly patients that a platinum-based doublet might also benefit to older patients, there was no definitive proof of concept until ASCO meeting 2010. At this meeting results of a phase 3 trial showed that PS 0-2 patients, aged 70-89 years drove a significant benefit from a treatment with carboplatin associated to weekly paclitaxel compared to a monotherapy. Thus, the paradigm of treatment in elderly patients should perhaps be modified from a single agent to doublet chemotherapy. Whether other platinum-based doublets would provide the same benefit as the specific one studied remains to be evaluated. PMID:21893363

  16. Genetic Testing in Screening Patients With Stage IB-IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Has Been or Will Be Removed by Surgery (The ALCHEMIST Screening Trial)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IB Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma

  17. Prognostic factors for long term survival in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moumtzi, Despoina; Lampaki, Sofia; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Lagoudi, Kalliopi; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Pataka, Athanasia; Tsiouda, Theodora; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Lazaridis, George; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Timotheadou, Helen; Barbetakis, Nikolaos; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Kontakiotis, Theodoros; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents 85% of all lung cancers. It is estimated that 60% of patients with NSCLC at time of diagnosis have advanced disease. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical and demographic prognostic factors of long term survival in patients with unresectable NSCLC. Methods We retrospectively reviewed data of 1,156 patients with NSCLC stage IIIB or IV who survived more than 60 days from the time of diagnosis and treated from August 1987 until March 2013 in the Oncology Department of Pulmonary Clinic of the General Hospital Papanikolaou. Initially univariate analysis using the log-rank test was conducted and then multivariate analysis using the proportional hazards model of Cox. Also Kaplan Meier curves were used to describe the distribution of survival times of patients. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results The mean age at diagnosis was 62 years. About 11.9% of patients were women and 88.1% were male. The majority of cases were adenocarcinomas (42.2%), followed squamous (33%) and finally the large cell (6%). Unlike men, most common histological type among women was adenocarcinoma rather than squamous (63% vs. 10.9%). In univariate analysis statistically significant factors in the progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were: weight loss ≥5%, histological type, line 1 drugs, line 1 combination, line 1 cycles and radio lung. Specifically radio lung gives clear survival benefit in the PFS and OS in stage IIIB (P=0.002) and IV (P<0.001). On the other hand, the number of distant metastases in stage IV patients did not affect OS, neither PFS. In addition patients who received platinum and taxane had better PFS (P=0.001) and OS (P<0.001) than those who received platinum without taxane. Also the third drug administration proved futile, since survival (682.06±34.9) (P=0.023) and PFS (434.93±26.93) (P=0.012) of patients who received less than three drugs was significantly larger. Finally

  18. Image-Guided Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  19. Successful pneumonectomy for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and advanced non-small cell-lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Minesaki, Shohei; Koyama, Nobuyuki; Ishida, Hironori; Kobayashi, Kunihiko

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus spp. is a pathogenic fungus in patients with malignancy, immunosuppression or respiratory diseases, and invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) caused by its infection is an aggressive and often lethal disorder. We report a case of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) where pneumonectomy concomitantly enabled radical cure of the underlying disease and IPA against which different antifungal drugs had been ineffective. In a patient with locally advanced NSCLC that progressed despite chemoradiation, radiation pneumonitis and subsequently cavitary disease developed following the administration of corticosteroids. Based upon the isolation of Aspergillus spp. from sputum, a diagnosis of IPA was made and since the latter was refractory to multiple antifungal drugs, pneumonectomy was undertaken which resulted in successful treatment of both NSCLC and IPA. Surgical intervention should be considered as a therapeutic option for IPA complicating NSCLC that is refractory to medical management. PMID:23505081

  20. A Population-Based Comparative Effectiveness Study of Radiation Therapy Techniques in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Jeremy P.; Murphy, James D.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Loo, Billy W.; Diehn, Maximilian

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concerns have been raised about the potential for worse treatment outcomes because of dosimetric inaccuracies related to tumor motion and increased toxicity caused by the spread of low-dose radiation to normal tissues in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We therefore performed a population-based comparative effectiveness analysis of IMRT, conventional 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional radiation therapy (2D-RT) in stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database to identify a cohort of patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC from 2002 to 2009 treated with IMRT, 3D-CRT, or 2D-RT. Using Cox regression and propensity score matching, we compared survival and toxicities of these treatments. Results: The proportion of patients treated with IMRT increased from 2% in 2002 to 25% in 2009, and the use of 2D-RT decreased from 32% to 3%. In univariate analysis, IMRT was associated with improved overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.90, P=.02) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR 0.89, P=.02). After controlling for confounders, IMRT was associated with similar OS (HR 0.94, P=.23) and CSS (HR 0.94, P=.28) compared with 3D-CRT. Both techniques had superior OS compared with 2D-RT. IMRT was associated with similar toxicity risks on multivariate analysis compared with 3D-CRT. Propensity score matched model results were similar to those from adjusted models. Conclusions: In this population-based analysis, IMRT for stage III NSCLC was associated with similar OS and CSS and maintained similar toxicity risks compared with 3D-CRT.

  1. Treatment approaches in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer and poor performance status.

    PubMed

    Govindan, Ramaswamy; Garfield, David H

    2004-12-01

    It is estimated that 30% to 40% of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have a poor performance status (PS)-defined as a score of 2 or higher on the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group scale-because of their disease burden, comorbidities, or both. Survival is shorter in these patients than in those with a better PS, and they do not tolerate chemotherapy as well. There is now evidence that PS2 patients with advanced NSCLC can benefit from single-agent chemotherapy with drugs such as vinorelbine, gemcitabine, paclitaxel, pemetrexed, and docetaxel and that combination chemotherapy may have additional advantages. The optimal treatment for PS2 patients with NSCLC, however, has yet to be determined. The case histories in this article demonstrate that PS2 patients are a heterogeneous group and that selecting the chemotherapy for each patient must take into consideration comorbidities and disease-related symptoms, as well as the potential toxicity of treatment. Large prospective clinical trials are needed to determine whether, and in which patients, combination chemotherapy or novel agents, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors or paclitaxel poliglumex, have advantages. Three large phase III trials-Selective Targeting for Efficacy in Lung Cancer, Lower Adverse Reactions trials (STELLAR)-are now being conducted in PS2 patients with NSCLC. It is hoped that their findings will aid in determining the best treatment options for these patients.

  2. Canadian consensus: inhibition of ALK-positive tumours in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Melosky, B.; Agulnik, J.; Albadine, R.; Banerji, S.; Bebb, D.G.; Bethune, D.; Blais, N.; Butts, C.; Cheema, P.; Cheung, P.; Cohen, V.; Deschenes, J.; Ionescu, D.N.; Juergens, R.; Kamel-Reid, S.; Laurie, S.A.; Liu, G.; Morzycki, W.; Tsao, M.S.; Xu, Z.; Hirsh, V.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (alk) is an oncogenic driver in non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc). Chromosomal rearrangements involving the ALK gene occur in up to 4% of nonsquamous nsclc patients and lead to constitutive activation of the alk signalling pathway. ALK-positive nsclc is found in relatively young patients, with a median age of 50 years. Patients frequently have brain metastasis. Targeted inhibition of the alk pathway prolongs progression-free survival in patients with ALK-positive advanced nsclc. The results of several recent clinical trials confirm the efficacy and safety benefit of crizotinib and ceritinib in this population. Canadian oncologists support the following consensus statement: All patients with advanced nonsquamous nsclc (excluding pure neuroendocrine carcinoma) should be tested for the presence of an ALK rearrangement. If an ALK rearrangement is present, treatment with a targeted alk inhibitor in the first-line setting is recommended. As patients become resistant to first-generation alk inhibitors, other treatments, including second-generation alk inhibitors can be considered. PMID:27330348

  3. Comparison of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone in advanced non-small-lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ning; Wang, Zhehai

    2016-01-01

    Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a first-line treatment for advanced nonsquamous, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 2006. This study retrospectively compared the efficacy of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone as the first-line and second-line treatment as well as the maintenance treatment for advanced NSCLC patients. A total of 1,352 patients were included and we analyzed the efficacy evaluation according to the criteria of the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST), survival, and adverse reactions. The data showed that for bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as the first-line treatment, the median progression-free survival (mPFS) and median overall survival (mOS) were 11.5 and 17.0 months, respectively, compared to 7.0 and 14 months, respectively, in patients who received chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). With bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as maintenance treatment, the mPFS and mOS were 6.0 and 17.4 months, respectively, compared to 3.0 and 15.0 months, respectively, with chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). With bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as the second-line treatment, the mPFS was 3.0 months compared to only 2.0 months with chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). The overall responses to the different regimens showed that the remission rate with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy was higher than that with chemotherapy alone (31.8% vs 25.5%, P<0.05), although there was no statistical difference in the disease control rate with either first- or second-line treatment. In conclusion, chemotherapy plus bevacizumab as the first-line and maintenance treatment, led to better curative rates and tolerable adverse reactions compared with chemotherapy alone in advanced NSCLC patients. Bevacizumab combined with cytotoxic drugs was suitable as the second-line treatment for such patients.

  4. Comparison of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone in advanced non-small-lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ning; Wang, Zhehai

    2016-01-01

    Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a first-line treatment for advanced nonsquamous, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 2006. This study retrospectively compared the efficacy of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone as the first-line and second-line treatment as well as the maintenance treatment for advanced NSCLC patients. A total of 1,352 patients were included and we analyzed the efficacy evaluation according to the criteria of the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST), survival, and adverse reactions. The data showed that for bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as the first-line treatment, the median progression-free survival (mPFS) and median overall survival (mOS) were 11.5 and 17.0 months, respectively, compared to 7.0 and 14 months, respectively, in patients who received chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). With bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as maintenance treatment, the mPFS and mOS were 6.0 and 17.4 months, respectively, compared to 3.0 and 15.0 months, respectively, with chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). With bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as the second-line treatment, the mPFS was 3.0 months compared to only 2.0 months with chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). The overall responses to the different regimens showed that the remission rate with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy was higher than that with chemotherapy alone (31.8% vs 25.5%, P<0.05), although there was no statistical difference in the disease control rate with either first- or second-line treatment. In conclusion, chemotherapy plus bevacizumab as the first-line and maintenance treatment, led to better curative rates and tolerable adverse reactions compared with chemotherapy alone in advanced NSCLC patients. Bevacizumab combined with cytotoxic drugs was suitable as the second-line treatment for such patients. PMID:27536131

  5. Comparison of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone in advanced non-small-lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ning; Wang, Zhehai

    2016-01-01

    Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a first-line treatment for advanced nonsquamous, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 2006. This study retrospectively compared the efficacy of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone as the first-line and second-line treatment as well as the maintenance treatment for advanced NSCLC patients. A total of 1,352 patients were included and we analyzed the efficacy evaluation according to the criteria of the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST), survival, and adverse reactions. The data showed that for bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as the first-line treatment, the median progression-free survival (mPFS) and median overall survival (mOS) were 11.5 and 17.0 months, respectively, compared to 7.0 and 14 months, respectively, in patients who received chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). With bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as maintenance treatment, the mPFS and mOS were 6.0 and 17.4 months, respectively, compared to 3.0 and 15.0 months, respectively, with chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). With bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as the second-line treatment, the mPFS was 3.0 months compared to only 2.0 months with chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). The overall responses to the different regimens showed that the remission rate with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy was higher than that with chemotherapy alone (31.8% vs 25.5%, P<0.05), although there was no statistical difference in the disease control rate with either first- or second-line treatment. In conclusion, chemotherapy plus bevacizumab as the first-line and maintenance treatment, led to better curative rates and tolerable adverse reactions compared with chemotherapy alone in advanced NSCLC patients. Bevacizumab combined with cytotoxic drugs was suitable as the second-line treatment for such patients. PMID:27536131

  6. The role of pembrolizumab in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santabarbara, Giuseppe; Maione, Paolo; Rossi, Antonio; Palazzolo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death cancer related worldwide. The standard therapies have unmet medical needs both due to the limited activity and relevant toxicity of platinum-based chemotherapy and to the low frequency of specific alterations required to use targeted therapies. Immune checkpoint inhibition due to restoring the immune system’s capacity to eradicate tumors is undergoing in extensive investigation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as a new treatment approach. Programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1) and its ligand, programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) have recently led to significantly and durable improvements in the clinical outcome of several kind of tumors including lung cancer. Pembrolizumab, approved by the U.S. FDA for the treatment of advanced NSCLC progressed after other therapies and with expression of PD-L1, has demonstrated durable response and prolonged overall survival (OS) especially in patients with high PD-L1 expression. Further investigation are needed to improve treatment outcomes through combination of immunotherapy or combined with other targeted therapies. PMID:27386489

  7. The role of pembrolizumab in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Santabarbara, Giuseppe; Maione, Paolo; Rossi, Antonio; Palazzolo, Giovanni; Gridelli, Cesare

    2016-06-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death cancer related worldwide. The standard therapies have unmet medical needs both due to the limited activity and relevant toxicity of platinum-based chemotherapy and to the low frequency of specific alterations required to use targeted therapies. Immune checkpoint inhibition due to restoring the immune system's capacity to eradicate tumors is undergoing in extensive investigation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as a new treatment approach. Programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1) and its ligand, programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) have recently led to significantly and durable improvements in the clinical outcome of several kind of tumors including lung cancer. Pembrolizumab, approved by the U.S. FDA for the treatment of advanced NSCLC progressed after other therapies and with expression of PD-L1, has demonstrated durable response and prolonged overall survival (OS) especially in patients with high PD-L1 expression. Further investigation are needed to improve treatment outcomes through combination of immunotherapy or combined with other targeted therapies.

  8. New drugs in the palliative chemotherapy of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Malayeri, R; Pirker, R; Huber, H

    2001-10-01

    In inoperable advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), palliative chemotherapy is established and aims at palliation of symptoms, improvement of quality of life and prolongation of survival. In the last years, several new drugs with enhanced activity towards NSCLC and improved toxicity profile have been characterised, for example vinorelbine, gemcitabine, paclitaxel and docetaxel. Data from randomised trials suggest that regimens containing new drugs are more active than older combinations. Platin-based combinations of either vinorelbine, gemcitabine or paclitaxel have resulted in better outcome than cisplatin alone and new drugs in combination with platins are more active than the corresponding single agent. Non-platin-based combinations must be considered investigational until their non-inferiority to platin-based protocols has been proven in randomised trials on large patient populations. Patients with good performance status and adequate organ function should receive platin-based chemotherapy that includes the new drugs (vinorelbine, gemcitabine, paclitaxel or docetaxel). New drugs without platins are suitable for elderly patients and patients with poor performance status. Second-line chemotherapy prolongs survival in selected patients and should be particularly offered to patients with good performance status. PMID:11694767

  9. Dose escalation for unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: end of the line?

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Julian C.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0617 was a randomized trial that investigated both the impact of radiation dose-escalation and the addition of cetuximab on the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The results of RTOG 0617 were surprising, with the dose escalation randomization being closed prematurely due to futility stopping rules, and cetuximab ultimately showing no overall survival benefit. Locally advanced unresectable NSCLC has conventionally been treated with concurrent chemoradiation. Though advances in treatment technology have improved the ability to deliver adequate treatment dose, the foundation for radiotherapy (RT) has remained the same since the 1980s. Since then, progressive studies have sought to establish the safety and efficacy of escalating radiation dose to loco-regional disease. Though RTOG 0617 did not produce the anticipated result, much interest remains in dose escalation and establishing an explanation for the findings of this study. Cetuximab was also not found to provide a survival benefit when applied to an unselected population. However, planned retrospective analysis suggests that those patients with high epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression may benefit, suggesting that cetuximab should be applied in a targeted fashion. We discuss the results of RTOG 0617 and additional findings from post-hoc analysis that suggest that dose escalation may be limited by normal tissue toxicity. We also present ongoing studies that aim to address potential causes for mortality in the dose escalation arm through adaptive or proton therapy, and are also leveraging additional concurrent systemic agents such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) for EGFR-activating mutations or EML4-ALK rearrangements, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. PMID:26958507

  10. Dose escalation for unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: end of the line?

    PubMed

    Hong, Julian C; Salama, Joseph K

    2016-02-01

    Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0617 was a randomized trial that investigated both the impact of radiation dose-escalation and the addition of cetuximab on the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The results of RTOG 0617 were surprising, with the dose escalation randomization being closed prematurely due to futility stopping rules, and cetuximab ultimately showing no overall survival benefit. Locally advanced unresectable NSCLC has conventionally been treated with concurrent chemoradiation. Though advances in treatment technology have improved the ability to deliver adequate treatment dose, the foundation for radiotherapy (RT) has remained the same since the 1980s. Since then, progressive studies have sought to establish the safety and efficacy of escalating radiation dose to loco-regional disease. Though RTOG 0617 did not produce the anticipated result, much interest remains in dose escalation and establishing an explanation for the findings of this study. Cetuximab was also not found to provide a survival benefit when applied to an unselected population. However, planned retrospective analysis suggests that those patients with high epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression may benefit, suggesting that cetuximab should be applied in a targeted fashion. We discuss the results of RTOG 0617 and additional findings from post-hoc analysis that suggest that dose escalation may be limited by normal tissue toxicity. We also present ongoing studies that aim to address potential causes for mortality in the dose escalation arm through adaptive or proton therapy, and are also leveraging additional concurrent systemic agents such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) for EGFR-activating mutations or EML4-ALK rearrangements, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors.

  11. Treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Gridelli, Cesare; Maione, Paolo; Rossi, Antonio; Ferrara, Marianna Luciana; Castaldo, Vincenzo; Palazzolo, Giovanni; Mazzeo, Nicole

    2009-12-01

    Lung cancer in the older individual is an increasingly common problem faced by the oncologist. Elderly patients have more co-morbidities and tend to tolerate toxic medical treatments more poorly than their younger counterparts. Thus, clinical data obtained in a younger population cannot be automatically extrapolated to the great majority of non-selected elderly patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The bulk of prospective clinical data regarding chemotherapy and molecularly targeted therapy for elderly NSCLC patients comes from studies in advanced disease. In elderly advanced NSCLC patients single-agent chemotherapy with third-generation agents (vinorelbine, gemcitabine, taxanes) is to be considered as the standard treatment for unselected patients, based on several phase II and III trials specifically designed for this special population. Retrospective analyses found no differences in survival between elderly and younger patients treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy, with a small but significant increase in toxicity in the elderly. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy with cisplatin at attenuated doses has demonstrated to be an active and feasible option in phase II trials and deserves prospective phase III comparison against monochemotherapy. Among targeted therapies, the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors erlotinib and gefitinib are the most promising agents and have relevant phase II prospective data showing activity and good tolerability as first-line treatment in this population. Concerning the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody bevacizumab, particular care must be taken for elderly patients because of a possible higher incidence of cardiovascular co-morbidities. However its role in this population remains controversial and specific prospective studies are warranted to clarify this topic. Further specifically designed phase III randomized trials are needed to optimize medical treatment of NSCLC in

  12. Optimal pharmacotherapeutic strategies for elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Quoix, Elisabeth

    2011-11-01

    Increases in both life expectancy and cancer incidence with age result in a significant rise in lung cancer rates among elderly patients, with a median age at diagnosis of between 63 and 70 years. However, elderly patients are under-represented in clinical trials and generally receive suboptimal treatment, mainly because of fears about increased toxicity of chemotherapy. Indeed, physiological modification of renal and haematopoietic functions with age together with co-morbidity and associated polypharmacy may alter the metabolism of chemotherapy drugs, resulting in greater toxicity. Moreover, performance status (PS), the main prognostic factor in younger patients, does not correlate well with geriatric indexes such as activities of daily living, cognition and physical performance, and comprehensive geriatric assessment is important in elderly patients. Until 2010, based on the small number of clinical trials designed for elderly patients, monotherapy was the recommended treatment for those with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), whereas for fit younger patients, a platinum-based doublet was and continues to be the recommended first-line therapy. However, at the plenary session of the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, results were presented from a randomized controlled trial conducted by the French Intergroup of Thoracic Oncology that demonstrated that in PS 0-2 patients aged≥70 years with advanced NSCLC, monthly carboplatin with weekly paclitaxel resulted in significantly longer survival than single-agent therapy (vinorelbine or gemcitabine). It should be noted that even in a priori unfavourable prognostic subgroups (patients with a PS score of 2, those aged>80 years or those with an activities of daily living scale score of <6), doublet therapy was associated with a survival advantage over monotherapy. Thus, the new paradigm of treatment of elderly patients with advanced NSCLC and a PS score of 0-2 should now be monthly

  13. [Treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma in early stages].

    PubMed

    Meneses, José Carlos; Avila Martínez, Régulo J; Ponce, Santiago; Zuluaga, Mauricio; Bartolomé, Adela; Gámez, Pablo

    2013-12-01

    Treatment of lung carcinoma is multidisciplinary. There are different therapeutic strategies available, although surgery shows the best results in those patients with lung carcinoma in early stages. Other options such as stereotactic radiation therapy are relegated to patients with small tumors and poor cardiopulmonary reserve or to those who reject surgery. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not justified in patients with stage i of the disease and so double adjuvant chemotherapy should be considered. This adjuvant chemotherapy should be based on cisplatin after surgery in those patients with stages ii and IIIA.

  14. [Treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma in early stages].

    PubMed

    Meneses, José Carlos; Avila Martínez, Régulo J; Ponce, Santiago; Zuluaga, Mauricio; Bartolomé, Adela; Gámez, Pablo

    2013-12-01

    Treatment of lung carcinoma is multidisciplinary. There are different therapeutic strategies available, although surgery shows the best results in those patients with lung carcinoma in early stages. Other options such as stereotactic radiation therapy are relegated to patients with small tumors and poor cardiopulmonary reserve or to those who reject surgery. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not justified in patients with stage i of the disease and so double adjuvant chemotherapy should be considered. This adjuvant chemotherapy should be based on cisplatin after surgery in those patients with stages ii and IIIA. PMID:23829961

  15. Advantages of Combined PET-CT in Mediastinal Staging in Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Beslic, Nermina; Sadija, Amera; Milardovic, Renata; Ceric, Timur; Ceric, Sejla; Beganovic, Adnan; Kristic, Spomenka; Cavaljuga, Semra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Precise mediastinal lymph node staging in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) provides important prognostic information and it is obligatory in treatment strategy planning. 18Fluoro-deoxy-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography - computerized tomography (PET-CT) based on detection of metabolic activity showed superiority in preoperative staging of lung carcinoma. Materials and Methods: Total number of 26 patients diagnosed with NSCLC were included in this retrospective, cross-sectional study. Status of mediastinal lymph nodes was assessed in all patients comparing contrast enhanced CT and 18F-FDG PET-CT findings. Discussion: We found in our study that 50% of patients had different N stage on contrast enhanced CT comparing to 18F-FDG PET-CT findings. Among the total number of patients which had different nodal status on PET-CT comparing to CT alone, we found in our study that 54% of patients had change in further therapy protocol after PET-CT change of nodal stage. Conclusion: Combined PET-CT which offers advantages of both modalities is excellent method for nodal (N) staging, so it is recommended in initial staging in patients with NSCLC. PET-CT used preopratively for mediastinal nodal staging has significant impact on further therapy planning and also has an consequential impact on health system savings. PMID:27147799

  16. Optimizing the management of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a personal view.

    PubMed

    Vincent, M D

    2009-08-01

    The management of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (a-nsclc) is currently undergoing one of its rare paradigm shifts. Just as the nihilism of the 1970s gave way to the empiricism of the 1980s and 1990s, so the current decade has seen the first truly rational therapies based on informed design. In addition, molecular markers and traditional parameters can now be combined to provide a framework of knowledge that will guide the application of not just the new therapies, but also the older ones that remain effective. This framework-as important a component of the rational paradigm as the new drugs themselves are-is necessary to decide who should and, crucially, who should not receive the various components of this rapidly expanding armamentarium. Here, I have provided a historical overview of the drug treatment of a-nsclc, a mini-review of important new data, and an integrative approach that tries to ensure that patients receive the optimal treatment choice at the appropriate time.The speed at which new knowledge now arrives, coupled with the persistent high level of unmet medical need, suggests that the traditional pace of evidence-based review needs to be accelerated. Indeed, the increased scope for personalized management constitutes something of a challenge to "business as usual" evidence-based medicine. As a result, substantial investment on the part of payers, which may or may not be possible, will be required. In the meantime, some patients may wish and may be financially able to take advantage of modern developments before they have been fully digested by the public-payer system. Responsive clinicians face difficult tradeoffs as they try to balance the pros and cons of early adoption versus excessive conservatism.The present article is my personal view of how to navigate these waters, and although it is written especially for patients who like to be the captain of their own ship, there is good reason to believe that all patients will eventually be managed by

  17. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for centrally located early stage non-small-cell lung cancer: what we have learned.

    PubMed

    Chang, Joe Y; Bezjak, Andrea; Mornex, Françoise

    2015-04-01

    Image-guided stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR; also called stereotactic body radiotherapy or radiosurgery) has become a standard treatment for medically inoperable peripherally located stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and can achieve local control rates in excess of 90%. However, the role of SABR for centrally located lesions remains controversial because of concerns about the potential for severe toxic effects. When cutting-edge technologies and knowledge-based optimization of SABR planning that considers both target coverage and normal tissue sparing are used, some patients with central lesions can be safely and effectively cured of early stage NSCLC. However, delivery of ablative doses of radiation to critical structures such as bronchial tree, esophagus, major vessels, heart, and the brachial plexus/phrenic nerve could produce severe, potentially lethal toxic effects. Here, we address the current understanding of indications, dose regimens, planning optimization, and normal tissue dose-volume constraints for using SABR to treat central NSCLC.

  18. Clinical outcome of fiducial-less CyberKnife radiosurgery for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, In-Hye; Jung, Jinhong; Cho, Byungchul; Kwak, Jungwon; Je, Hyoung Uk; Choi, Wonsik; Jung, Nuri Hyun; Kim, Su Ssan; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the treatment results in early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients who have undergone fiducial-less CyberKnife radiosurgery (CKRS). Materials and Methods From June 2011 to November 2013, 58 patients underwent CKRS at Asan Medical Center for stage I lung cancer. After excluding 14 patients, we retrospectively reviewed the records of the remaining 44 patients. All analyses were performed using SPSS ver. 21. Results The median age at diagnosis was 75 years. Most patients had inoperable primary lung cancer with a poor pulmonary function test with comorbidity or old age. The clinical stage was IA in 30 patients (68.2%), IB in 14 (31.8%). The mean tumor size was 2.6 cm (range, 1.2 to 4.8 cm), and the tumor was smaller than 2 cm in 12 patients (27.3%). The radiation dose given was 48-60 Gy in 3-4 fractions. In a median follow-up of 23.1 months, local recurrence occurred in three patients (2-year local recurrence-free survival rate, 90.4%) and distant metastasis occurred in 13 patients. All patients tolerated the radiosurgery well, only two patients developing grade 3 dyspnea. The most common complications were radiation-induced fibrosis and pneumonitis. Eight patients died due to cancer progression. Conclusion The results showed that fiducial-less CKRS shows comparable local tumor control and survival rates to those of LINAC-based SABR or CKRS with a fiducial marker. Thus, fiducial-less CKRS using Xsight lung tracking system can be effectively and safely performed for patients with medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer without any risk of procedure-related complication. PMID:26157678

  19. Treatment Recommendations for Locally Advanced, Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The Influence of Physician and Patient Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Irwin H.; Hayman, James A.; Landrum, Mary Beth; Tepper, Joel; Goodman, Karyn A.; Keating, Nancy L.

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of patient age, comorbidity, and physician factors on treatment recommendations for locally advanced, unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We surveyed radiation oncologists regarding their recommendations for treatment (chemoradiation, radiation alone, chemotherapy alone, or no therapy) for hypothetical patients with Stage IIIB NSCLC who varied by age (55 vs. 80 years) and comorbid illness (none, moderate, or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]). Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the impact of physician and practice characteristics on radiation oncologists' treatment recommendations for three scenarios with the least agreement. Results: Of 214 radiation oncologists, nearly all (99%) recommended chemoradiation for a healthy 55 year old. However, there was substantial variability in recommendations for a 55 year old with severe COPD, an 80-year-old with moderate COPD, and an 80-year-old with severe COPD. Physicians seeing a lower volume of lung cancer patients were statistically less likely to recommend radiotherapy for younger or older patients with severe COPD (both p < 0.05), but the impact was modest. Conclusions: Nearly all radiation oncologists report following the evidence-based recommendation of chemoradiation for young, otherwise healthy patients with locally advanced, unresectable NSCLC, but there is substantial variability in treatment recommendations for older or sicker patients, probably related to the lack of clinical trial data for such patients. The physician and practice characteristics we examined only weakly affected treatment recommendations. Additional clinical trial data are necessary to guide recommendations for treatment of elderly patients and patients with poor pulmonary function to optimize their management.

  20. lLong-Term Outcomes after Proton Therapy, with Concurrent Chemotherapy, for Stage II-III Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quynh-Nhu; Ly, Ngoc Bui; Komaki, Ritsuko; Levy, Lawrence B.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Chang, Joe Y.; Allen, Pamela K.; Mehran, Reza J.; Lu, Charles; Gillin, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing; Cox, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We report long-term disease control, survival, and toxicity for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer prospectively treated with concurrent proton therapy and chemotherapy on a nonrandomized case-only obervational study. Methods All patients received passive-scatter proton therapy, planned with 4D-CT–based simulation; all received proton therapy concurrent with weekly chemotherapy. Endpoints were local and distant control, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). Results The 134 patients (21 stage II, 113 stage III; median age 69 years) had a median gross tumor volume (GTV) of 70 cm3 (range, 5-753 cm3); 77 patients (57%) received 74 Gy(RBE), and 57 (42% received 60–72 Gy(RBE) (range, 60-74.1 Gy(RBE)). At a median follow-up time of 4.7 years, median OS times were 40.4 months (stage II) and 30.4 months (stage III). Five-year DFS rates were 17.3% (stage II) and 18.0% (stage III). OS, DFS, and local and distant control rates at 5 years did not differ by disease stage. Age and GTV were related to OS and DFS. Toxicity was tolerable, with 1 grade 4 esophagitis and 16 grade 3 events (2 pneumonitis, 6 esophagitis, 8 dermatitis). Conclusion This report of outcomes after proton therapy for 134 patients indicated that this regimen produced excellent OS with tolerable toxicity. PMID:26028228

  1. [Current Status of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Early-stageNon-small Cell Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Shi, Anhui; Zhu, Guangying

    2016-06-20

    High level evidence from randomized studies comparing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) to surgery is lacking. Although the results of pooled analysis of two randomized trials for STARS and ROSEL showed that SABR is better tolerated and might lead to better overall survival than surgery for operable clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), SABR, however, is only recommended as a preferred treatment option for early stage NSCLC patients who cannot or will not undergo surgery. We, therefore, are waiting for the results of the ongoing randomized studies [Veterans affairs lung cancer surgery or stereotactic radiotherapy in the US (VALOR) and the SABRTooth study in the United Kingdom (SABRTooths)]. Many retrospective and case control studies showed that SABR is safe and effective (local control rate higher than 90%, 5 years survival rate reached 70%), but there are considerable variations in the definitions and staging of lung cancer, operability determination, and surgical approaches to operable lung cancer (open vs video-assisted). Therefore, it is difficult to compare the superiority of radiotherapy and surgery in the treatment of early staged lung cancer. Most studies demonstrated that the efficacy of the two modalities for early staged lung cancer is equivalent; however, due to the limited data, the conclusions from those studies are difficult to be evidence based. Therefore, the controversies will be focusing on the safety and invasiveness of the two treatment modalities. This article will review the ongoing debate in light of these goals. PMID:27335303

  2. Effectiveness of a thoracic multidisciplinary clinic in the treatment of stage III non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Eliot L; Kruklitis, Robert J; Patson, Brian J; Sopka, Dennis M; Weiss, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Institute of Medicine, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and the European Society of Medical Oncology promote a multidisciplinary approach for the treatment of cancer. Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents a heterogeneous group of diseases necessitating coordination of care among medical, radiation, and surgical oncology. The optimal care of stage III NSCLC underscores the need for a multidisciplinary approach. Methods From tumor registry data, we identified all cases of stage III NSCLC seen at Lehigh Valley Health Network between March 2010 and March 2013. The care received by patients when seen in the thoracic multidisciplinary clinic (MDC) was compared with the care received when not seen in the thoracic MDC. Results All patients seen in the MDC, compared to <50% of patients seen outside the MDC, were evaluated by more than one physician prior to beginning the treatment. Time to initiate treatment was shorter in MDC patients than in non-MDC patients. Patients seen in the MDC had a greater concordance with clinical pathways. A greater percentage of patients seen in the thoracic MDC had pathologic staging of their mediastinum. Patients seen in the MDC were more likely to receive all of their care at Lehigh Valley Health Network. Conclusion Multidisciplinary care is essential in the treatment of patients with stage III NSCLC. Greater utilization of MDCs for this complex group of patients will result in more efficient coordination of care, pretreatment evaluation, and therapy, which in turn should translate to improve patients’ outcomes. PMID:27358568

  3. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  4. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer: a word of caution

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Hernández, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Recently published data from pooled randomised trials conclude that stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) can be considered the treatment of choice in operable lung cancer patients fit for lobectomy. This conclusion comes for comparable 3-year survival and much lower risk of early severe morbidity and mortality. In this editorial comment we discuss the validity of the conclusions due to the prematurity of the survival analysis and to the poor accuracy of patients’ staging leading to higher rates of regional relapse in the SABR arm. Besides, therapy-related mortality and morbidity in the pooled cohort is much higher that the internationally accepted standards maybe because surgery was not performed according to the best approaches and procedures currently available. The effectiveness of SABR as the sole therapy for resectable lung cancer is still awaiting for sound evidences. It could be adopted for individual cases only in two situations: (I) the patient does not accept surgical treatment; and (II) in cases were the risk of surgical related mortality is considered to exceed the probability of long-term survival after lung resection. For this, a multidisciplinary team (MDT) assessment, including surgeons and oncologists, is mandatory. PMID:26958502

  5. Prognostic significance of telomeric repeat length alterations in pathological stage I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, T; Komiya, T; Nitta, T; Takada, Y; Kobayashi, M; Masuda, N; Matui, K; Takada, M; Kikui, M; Yasumitu, T; Ohno, A; Nakagawa, K; Fukuoka, M; Kawase, I

    2000-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the prognostic significance of alteration in telomere length in pathological stage (p-stage) I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Paired cancer and normal lung tissues were obtained from 72 patients with histologically confirmed p-stage I-IIIA NSCLC. Terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length, which indicates telomere length, was measured by Southern blot analysis. Tumor telomerase activity was also assayed by non-radioactive PCR-ELISA in 55 patients. TRF length (mean +/- SD) in normal tissue was 6.2 +/- 1.1 Kb. Therefore, upper and lower limits of normal range in TRF length was set at 8.4 (mean + 2SD) Kb and 4.0 (mean-2SD) Kb, respectively. A tumor showing TRF length over normal range was defined as positive for the alteration. In 72 patients, 25 (34.7%) with alteration in TRF length had significantly shorter survival durations than those of the others. Telomerase activity did not correlate with survival duration. In multivariate analysis, alteration in TRF length (P = 0.0033) was second to p-stage (P = 0.0004) in importance among the various parameters.

  6. A Case of Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Korean Medicine Therapy Alone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-hyun; Seong, Shin; Kim, Sung-su; Han, Jae-bok

    2013-01-01

    This report presents a case that shows a significant anticancer effect of Korean medicine therapy (KMT). A 79-year-old man, who was diagnosed as stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in December 2012, was treated with KMT including intravenous pharmacopunctures and oral herbal medicine from February 22, 2013, until September 2013 without any surgical intervention, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The intravenous pharmacopunctures were the wild ginseng pharmacopuncture, Cordyceps sinensis pharmacopuncture and Trichosanthes kirilowii pharmacopuncture. The oral herbal medicine used was soramdan, made of cultivated wild ginseng. The effectiveness of this therapy was evaluated with computed tomography and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance scale. The size of the tumor mass was markedly decreased and the ECOG performance scale was also improved. These results suggest that KMT alone can be an effective method to treat NSCLC. PMID:24348396

  7. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The Pattern of Failure Is Distant

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Jeffrey D.; El Naqa, Issam; Drzymala, Robert E.; Trovo, Marco; Jones, Griffin; Denning, Mary Dee

    2010-07-15

    Background: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) represents a substantial paradigm shift in the treatment of patients with medically inoperable Stage I/II non-small-cell lung cancer. We reviewed our experience using either three- or five-fraction SBRT for peripheral or central tumors, respectively. Methods and Materials: A total of 91 patients signed an institutional review board-approved consent form, were treated with SBRT, and have had {>=}6 months of follow-up. Patients were referred for SBRT because of underlying comorbidities (poor performance status in 31 or poor lung function in 52) or refusal of surgery (8 patients). Of the cancers, 83 were peripheral and eight were central. Peripheral cancers received a mean dose of 18 Gy x three fractions. Cancers within 2 cm of the bronchus, esophagus, or brachial plexus were treated with 9 Gy x five fractions. Results: The median follow-up duration for these patients was 18 months (range, 6-42 months). TNM staging was as follows: 58 patients with T1N0M0, 22 with T2N0M0, 2 with T3N0M0 (chest wall), and 6 with T1N0M1 cancers. The median tumor diameter was 2 cm (range, 1-5 cm). The median forced expiratory volume in 1 s was 46% (range, 17-133%) and the median carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO) was 49% (range, 15-144%). Two-year local tumor control was achieved in 86% of patients. The predominant pattern of failure was the development of distant metastasis or second lung cancer. The development of distant metastasis was the only significant prognostic factor for overall survival on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Local tumor control was shown to be high using SBRT for non-small-cell lung cancer. Overall survival is highly coerrelated with the development of distant metastasis.

  8. [Advances in Bevacizumab Therapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 
with Brain Metastases].

    PubMed

    Qu, Liyan; Geng, Rui; Song, Xia

    2016-08-20

    Brain metastases are frequently encountered in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Antiangiogenesis therapy plays a major role in the management of brain metastases in lung cancer. Bevacizumab have become the novel method for the treatment of lung cancer with brain metastases beyond the whole brain radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery and chemotherapy. Recently, more and more studies and trials laid emphasis on the bevacizumab for NSCLC with brain metastases treatment. The key point is the efficacy and safety. In this review, bevacizumab therapy of NSCLC with brain metastases were summarized. PMID:27561800

  9. Mature autologous dendritic cell vaccines in advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a phase I pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Overall therapeutic outcomes of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are poor. The dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy has been developed as a new strategy for the treatment of lung cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and immunologic responses in use in mature, antigen-pulsed autologous DC vaccine in NSCLC patients. Methods Five HLA-A2 patients with inoperable stage III or IV NSCLC were selected to receive two doses of 5 × 107 DC cells administered subcutaneous and intravenously two times at two week intervals. The immunologic response, safety and tolerability to the vaccine were evaluated by the lymphoproliferation assay and clinical and laboratorial evolution, respectively. Results The dose of the vaccine has shown to be safe and well tolerated. The lymphoproliferation assay showed an improvement in the specific immune response after the immunization, with a significant response after the second dose (p = 0.005). This response was not long lasting and a tendency to reduction two weeks after the second dose of the vaccine was observed. Two patients had a survival almost twice greater than the expected average and were the only ones that expressed HER-2 and CEA together. Conclusion Despite the small sample size, the results on the immune response, safety and tolerability, combined with the results of other studies, are encouraging to the conduction of a large clinical trial with multiples doses in patients with early lung cancer who underwent surgical treatment. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN45563569 PMID:21682877

  10. A phase I study of dexosome immunotherapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Michael A; Garst, Jennifer; Osada, Takuya; Khan, Shubi; Hobeika, Amy; Clay, Timothy M; Valente, Nancy; Shreeniwas, Revati; Sutton, Mary Ann; Delcayre, Alain; Hsu, Di-Hwei; Le Pecq, Jean-Bernard; Lyerly, H Kim

    2005-01-01

    Background There is a continued need to develop more effective cancer immunotherapy strategies. Exosomes, cell-derived lipid vesicles that express high levels of a narrow spectrum of cell proteins represent a novel platform for delivering high levels of antigen in conjunction with costimulatory molecules. We performed this study to test the safety, feasibility and efficacy of autologous dendritic cell (DC)-derived exosomes (DEX) loaded with the MAGE tumor antigens in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods This Phase I study enrolled HLA A2+ patients with pre-treated Stage IIIb (N = 4) and IV (N = 9) NSCLC with tumor expression of MAGE-A3 or A4. Patients underwent leukapheresis to generate DC from which DEX were produced and loaded with MAGE-A3, -A4, -A10, and MAGE-3DPO4 peptides. Patients received 4 doses of DEX at weekly intervals. Results Thirteen patients were enrolled and 9 completed therapy. Three formulations of DEX were evaluated; all were well tolerated with only grade 1–2 adverse events related to the use of DEX (injection site reactions (N = 8), flu like illness (N = 1), and peripheral arm pain (N = 1)). The time from the first dose of DEX until disease progression was 30 to 429+ days. Three patients had disease progression before the first DEX dose. Survival of patients after the first DEX dose was 52–665+ days. DTH reactivity against MAGE peptides was detected in 3/9 patients. Immune responses were detected in patients as follows: MAGE-specific T cell responses in 1/3, increased NK lytic activity in 2/4. Conclusion Production of the DEX vaccine was feasible and DEX therapy was well tolerated in patients with advanced NSCLC. Some patients experienced long term stability of disease and activation of immune effectors PMID:15723705

  11. Percutaneous microwave ablation of stage I medically inoperable non-small cell lung cancer: clinical evaluation of 47 cases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xia; Ye, Xin; Zheng, Aimin; Huang, Guanghui; Ni, Xiang; Wang, Jiao; Han, Xiaoying; Li, Wenhong; Wei, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively evaluate safety and effectiveness of CT-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) in 47 patients with medically inoperable stage I peripheral non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods From February 2008 to October 2012, 47 patients with stage I medically inoperable NSCLC were treated in 47 MWA sessions. The clinical outcomes were evaluated. Complications after MWA were also summarized. Results At a median follow-up period of 30 months, the median time to the first recurrence was 45.5 months. The local control rates at 1, 3, 5 years after MWA were 96%, 64% and 48%, respectively. The median cancer-specific and median overall survivals were 47.4 months and 33.8 months. The overall survival rates at 1, 2, 3 and 5 years after MWA were 89%, 63%, 43%, and 16 %, respectively. Tumors ≤3.5 cm were associated with better survival than were tumors >3.5 cm. The complications after MWA included pneumothorax (63.8%), hemoptysis (31.9%), pleural effusion (34%), pulmonary infection (14.9%), and bronchopleural fistula (2.1%). Conclusions MWA is safe and effective for the treatment of medically inoperable stage I peripheral NSCLC. PMID:24965604

  12. Erlotinib in Treating Patients With Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, or Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

  13. Outcomes of Risk-Adapted Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerwaard, Frank J. Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Smit, Egbert F.; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, S.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: High local control rates can be achieved using stereotactic radiotherapy in Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but reports have suggested that toxicity may be of concern. We evaluated early clinical outcomes of 'risk-adapted' fractionation schemes in patients treated in a single institution. Methods and Materials: Of 206 patients with Stage I NSCLC, 81% were unfit to undergo surgery and the rest refused surgery. Pathologic confirmation of malignancy was obtained in 31% of patients. All other patients had new or growing 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography positive lesions with radiologic characteristics of malignancy. Planning four-dimensional computed tomography scans were performed and fractionation schemes used (3 x 20 Gy, 5 x 12 Gy, and 8 x 7.5 Gy) were determined by T stage and risk of normal tissue toxicity. Results: Median overall survival was 34 months, with 1- and 2-year survivals of 81% and 64%, respectively. Disease-free survival (DFS) at 1 and 2 years was 83% and 68%, respectively, and DFS correlated with T stage (p = 0.002). Local failure was observed in 7 patients (3%). The crude regional failure rate was 9%; isolated regional recurrence was observed in 4%. The distant progression-free survival at 1 and 2 years was 85% and 77%, respectively. SRT was well tolerated and severe late toxicity was observed in less than 3% of patients. Conclusions: SRT is well tolerated in patients with extensive comorbidity with high local control rates and minimal toxicity. Early outcomes are not inferior to those reported for conventional radiotherapy. In view of patient convenience, such risk-adapted SRT schedules should be considered treatment of choice in patients presenting with medically inoperable Stage I NSCLC.

  14. Wnt Pathway Activation Predicts Increased Risk of Tumor Recurrence in Patients with Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Mark; Akiri, Gal; Chin, Cynthia; Wisnivesky, Juan P.; Beasley, Mary B.; Weiser, Todd S.; Swanson, Scott J.; Aaronson, Stuart A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of Wnt pathway activation in patients with stage I NSCLC and its influence on lung cancer recurrence. Background Despite resection, the 5 year recurrence with localized stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is 18.4–24%. Aberrant Wnt signaling activation plays an important role in a wide variety of tumor types. However, there is not much known about the role Wnt pathway plays in patients with stage I lung cancer Methods Tumor and normal lung tissues from 55 patients following resection for stage I NSCLC were subjected to glutathione-S-transferase (GST) E-cadherin pull-down and immunoblot analysis to assess levels of uncomplexed β-catenin, a reliable measure of Wnt signaling activation. The β-catenin gene was also screened for oncogenic mutations in tumors with activated Wnt signaling. Cancer recurrence rates were correlated in a blinded manner in patients with Wnt pathway positive and negative tumors. Results Tumors in twenty patients (36.4%) scored as Wnt positive with only one exhibiting a β-catenin oncogenic mutation. Patients with Wnt positive tumors experienced a significantly higher rate of overall cancer recurrence than those with Wnt negative tumors (30.0% vs. 5.7%, p=0.02), with 25.0% exhibiting distal tumor recurrence compared to 2.9% in the Wnt negative group (p=0.02). Conclusions Wnt pathway activation was present in a substantial fraction of Stage I NSCLCs, which was rarely due to mutations. Moreover, Wnt pathway activation was associated with a significantly higher rate of tumor recurrence. These findings suggest that Wnt activation reflects a more aggressive tumor phenotype and identifies patients who may benefit from more aggressive therapy in addition to resection. PMID:23011390

  15. New treatment options for ALK+ advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: critical appraisal of ceritinib

    PubMed Central

    Rothschild, Sacha I

    2016-01-01

    Rearrangements in ALK gene and EML4 gene were first described in 2007. This genomic aberration is found in about 2%–8% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Crizotinib was the first ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor licensed for the treatment of metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC based on a randomized Phase III trial. Despite the initial treatment response of crizotinib, disease progression inevitably develops after approximately 10 months of therapy. Different resistance mechanisms have recently been described. One relevant mechanism of resistance is the development of mutations in ALK. Novel ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been developed to overcome these mutations. Ceritinib is an oral second-generation ALK inhibitor showing clinical activity not only in crizotinib-resistant ALK-positive NSCLC but also in treatment-naïve ALK-positive disease. In this paper, preclinical and clinical data of ceritinib are reviewed, and its role in the clinical setting is put into perspective. PMID:27217763

  16. Challenges in molecular testing in non-small-cell lung cancer patients with advanced disease.

    PubMed

    Hiley, Crispin T; Le Quesne, John; Santis, George; Sharpe, Rowena; de Castro, David Gonzalez; Middleton, Gary; Swanton, Charles

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer diagnostics have progressed greatly in the previous decade. Development of molecular testing to identify an increasing number of potentially clinically actionable genetic variants, using smaller samples obtained via minimally invasive techniques, is a huge challenge. Tumour heterogeneity and cancer evolution in response to therapy means that repeat biopsies or circulating biomarkers are likely to be increasingly useful to adapt treatment as resistance develops. We highlight some of the current challenges faced in clinical practice for molecular testing of EGFR, ALK, and new biomarkers such as PDL1. Implementation of next generation sequencing platforms for molecular diagnostics in non-small-cell lung cancer is increasingly common, allowing testing of multiple genetic variants from a single sample. The use of next generation sequencing to recruit for molecularly stratified clinical trials is discussed in the context of the UK Stratified Medicine Programme and The UK National Lung Matrix Trial. PMID:27598680

  17. Biomarkers and targeted systemic therapies in advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Ernani, Vinicius; Owonikoko, Taofeek K

    2015-11-01

    The last decade has witnessed significant growth in therapeutic options for patients diagnosed with lung cancer. This is due in major part to our improved technological ability to interrogate the genomics of cancer cells, which has enabled the development of biologically rational anticancer agents. The recognition that lung cancer is not a single disease entity dates back many decades to the histological subclassification of malignant neoplasms of the lung into subcategories of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). While SCLC continues to be regarded as a single histologic and therapeutic category, the NSCLC subset has undergone additional subcategorizations with distinct management algorithms for specific histologic and molecular subtypes. The defining characteristics of these NSCLC subtypes have evolved into important tools for prognosis and for predicting the likelihood of benefit when patients are treated with anticancer agents.

  18. Acute Skin Toxicity Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Who's at Risk?

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Laser, Benjamin; Kowalski, Alex V.; Fontenla, Sandra C.; Pena-Greenberg, Elizabeth; Yorke, Ellen D.; Lovelock, D. Michael; Hunt, Margie A.; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: We examined the rate of acute skin toxicity within a prospectively managed database of patients treated for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and investigated factors that might predict skin toxicity. Methods: From May 2006 through January 2008, 50 patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center with 60 Gy in three fractions or 44-48 Gy in four fractions. Patients were treated with multiple coplanar beams (3-7, median 4) with a 6 MV linac using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and dynamic multileaf collimation. Toxicity grading was performed and based on the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects. Factors associated with Grade 2 or higher acute skin reactions were calculated by Fisher's exact test. Results: After a minimum 3 months of follow-up, 19 patients (38%) developed Grade 1, 4 patients (8%) Grade 2, 2 patients (4%) Grade 3, and 1 patient Grade 4 acute skin toxicity. Factors associated with Grade 2 or higher acute skin toxicity included using only 3 beams (p = 0.0007), distance from the tumor to the posterior chest wall skin of less than 5 cm (p = 0.006), and a maximum skin dose of 50% or higher of the prescribed dose (p = 0.02). Conclusions: SBRT can be associated with significant skin toxicity. One must consider the skin dose when evaluating the treatment plan and consider the bolus effect of immobilization devices.

  19. Concomitant 5-fluorouracil infusion and high-dose radiation for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lokich, J.; Chaffey, J.; Neptune, W. )

    1989-09-01

    Thirty patients with Stage III non-small cell lung cancer were entered on a trial to evaluate the feasibility of combined radiation and concomitant 5-fluorouracil infusion. Patients had received prior debulking surgery (nine), induction chemotherapy (16), or no therapy (five). Radiation employed standard fractionation (180-200 rad/day) administered to a median cumulative dose of 5500 rad (range, 4500-6200 rad). 5-Fluorouracil was infused 24 hours per day throughout the period of radiation at a dose of 300 mg/m2/day for a median of 42 days (range, 28-56 days). Radiation complications included pneumonitis three of 30 (10%) and esophagitis (27%). Chemotherapy complications included stomatitis, two of 27 (7%), and hand-foot syndrome, three of 30 (10%). Treatment interruptions were necessary in six of 30 (20%) and four of 30 required parenteral nutrition. At a median follow-up of 12 months 26/30 (87%) maintained local control and eight had distant metastases (three of whom presented with Stage IV disease). 5-Fluorouracil delivered continuously throughout standard fractionation radiation to high cumulative doses is feasible and practical. Comparative clinical trials of the various combined radiation and chemotherapy schedules employed are in order. One additional clinical observation was the identification of six of 30 (20%) with brain metastases at presentation or after 12 months, all of whom had adenocarcinoma histologic subtype.

  20. A case of severe hemoptysis after stereotactic body radiotherapy for peripherally located stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kana; Tomita, Natsuo; Shimizu, Arisa; Sato, Yozo; Makita, Chiyoko; Kodaira, Takeshi

    2015-06-01

    In stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for centrally located non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), severe hemoptysis has been reported in several studies. We report here a rare case of hemoptysis after SBRT even though the lung tumor was peripherally located. A lung nodule of a 79-year-old man was accidentally found at the periphery of the left upper lobe. A computed tomography-guided biopsy of this nodule provided confirmation of the diagnosis of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. The clinical diagnosis was T1bN0M0, stage I primary lung cancer. The patient was treated with SBRT using helical tomotherapy at a dose of 60 Gy in 6 fractions (i.e., BED10 = 120). He obtained a complete response and did not experience recurrence. However, the patient suffered massive hemoptysis 4.5 years after SBRT. As hypervascularity of a left bronchial artery was observed at the left lung in accordance with SBRT field on bronchial arteriography, a bronchial artery embolization (BAE) procedure was performed. The patient has had no episodes of hemoptysis after BAE. Although SBRT for early stage NSCLC is usually safe and efficient, it is necessary to be careful for late-onset bronchial hemorrhage in SBRT, even for a peripheral tumor.

  1. Telomere length of tumor tissues and survival in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Choi, Yi Young; Choi, Jin Eun; Lee, Won Kee; Lee, Eungbae; Yoo, Seung Soo; Lee, Shin Yup; Lee, Jaehee; Cha, Seung Ick; Kim, Chang Ho; Park, Jae Yong

    2014-04-01

    Telomere shortening leads to genomic instability that drives oncogenesis through the activation of telomerase and the generation of other mutations necessary for tumor progression. This study was conducted to determine the impact of telomere shortening on the survival of patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Relative telomere length in tumor tissues was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 164 patients with surgically resected NSCLC. The association between telomere length and overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) was analyzed. When the patients were categorized into quartiles based on telomere length, those patients with the 1st quartile (shortest) of telomere length had a significantly worse OS and DFS compared to patients with the 2nd to the 4th quartiles of telomere length (adjusted hazard ratio for OS = 2.67, 95% confidence interval = 1.50-4.75, P = 0.001; and adjusted hazard ratio for DFS = 1.92, 95% confidence interval = 1.17-3.14, P = 0.01). An association between telomere length and survival outcome was more pronounced in squamous cell carcinomas than adenocarcinomas (P-value of test for homogeneity for OS and DFS = 0.05 and 0.02, respectively). Telomere length of tumor tissues is an independent prognostic factor in patients with surgically resected early stage NSCLC.

  2. Gene-Expression Signature Predicts Postoperative Recurrence in Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Wang, Liang; Liu, Pengyuan; Yang, Ping; You, Ming

    2012-01-01

    About 30% stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing resection will recur. Robust prognostic markers are required to better manage therapy options. The purpose of this study is to develop and validate a novel gene-expression signature that can predict tumor recurrence of stage I NSCLC patients. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to identify recurrence-related genes and a partial Cox regression model was used to generate a gene signature of recurrence in the training dataset −142 stage I lung adenocarcinomas without adjunctive therapy from the Director's Challenge Consortium. Four independent validation datasets, including GSE5843, GSE8894, and two other datasets provided by Mayo Clinic and Washington University, were used to assess the prediction accuracy by calculating the correlation between risk score estimated from gene expression and real recurrence-free survival time and AUC of time-dependent ROC analysis. Pathway-based survival analyses were also performed. 104 probesets correlated with recurrence in the training dataset. They are enriched in cell adhesion, apoptosis and regulation of cell proliferation. A 51-gene expression signature was identified to distinguish patients likely to develop tumor recurrence (Dxy = −0.83, P<1e-16) and this signature was validated in four independent datasets with AUC >85%. Multiple pathways including leukocyte transendothelial migration and cell adhesion were highly correlated with recurrence-free survival. The gene signature is highly predictive of recurrence in stage I NSCLC patients, which has important prognostic and therapeutic implications for the future management of these patients. PMID:22292069

  3. The role of prophylactic cranial irradiation in regionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. A Southwest Oncology Group Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rusch, V.W.; Griffin, B.R.; Livingston, R.B. )

    1989-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most common malignant disease in the United States. Only the few tumors detected very early are curable, but there has been some progress in the management of more advanced non-small cell lung cancer, particularly in regionally inoperable disease. Prevention of central nervous system relapse is an important issue in this group of patients because brain metastases ultimately develop in 20% to 25% of them. Seventy-three patients with regionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer were entered into a Phase II trial of neutron chest radiotherapy sandwiched between four cycles of chemotherapy including cisplatin, vinblastine, and mitomycin C. Prophylactic cranial irradiation was administered concurrently with chest radiotherapy (3000 cGy in 10 fractions in 15 patients; 3600 cGy in 18 fractions in the remaining 50 patients). Patients underwent computed tomographic scan of the brain before treatment and every 3 months after treatment. The initial overall response rate was 79%, but 65 of the 73 patients have subsequently died of recurrent disease. Median follow-up is 9 months for all 73 patients and 26 months for eight long-term survivors. No patient who completed the prophylactic cranial irradiation program had clinical or radiologic brain metastases. Toxic reactions to prophylactic cranial irradiation included reversible alopecia in all patients, progressive dementia in one patient, and possible optic neuritis in one patient. Both of these patients received 300 cGy per fraction of irradiation. The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation has been controversial, but its safety and efficacy in this trial supports its application in a group of patients at high risk for central nervous system relapse. Further evaluation of prophylactic cranial irradiation in clinical trials for regionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer is warranted.

  4. The role of maintenance treatment in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: reality or early second line?

    PubMed

    Gridelli, Cesare; Rossi, Antonio; Maione, Paolo; Ambrosio, Rita; Barbato, Valentina; Bareschino, Maria Anna; Schettino, Clorinda; Palazzolo, Giovanni; Sacco, Paola Claudia

    2010-11-01

    First-line platinum-based chemotherapy has reached a plateau of effectiveness for the treatment of patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In patients who reported a stable disease, no more than 4 cycles of chemotherapy are recommended while a maximum of 6 cycles is recommended in patients who are responding to therapy. A potential strategy with the aim of improving outcomes for NSCLC patients is to administer more therapy. This term includes different approaches: duration of therapy, sequential therapy, consolidation therapy, and maintenance therapy. Here, we attempt to define the different approaches that fall under the rubric of maintenance strategy, and discuss the results available to date.

  5. Clinical development of nintedanib for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Masayuki; Okamoto, Isamu; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process in the development, growth, and metastasis of malignant tumors including lung cancer. Several angiogenesis inhibitors have been developed as potential therapies for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Nintedanib is a small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets receptors for vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and fibroblast growth factor as well as RET (rearranged during transfection) and Flt3. When administered as monotherapy, nintedanib was well tolerated at doses up to 250 mg or 200 mg twice daily in European and Japanese patients, respectively, with liver toxicity featuring prominently among dose-limiting toxicities in both populations. A recent Phase III trial demonstrated that treatment with the combination of nintedanib and docetaxel resulted in a significant and clinically meaningful improvement in both progression-free survival and overall survival compared with docetaxel alone in predefined NSCLC patients with adenocarcinoma tumor histology. Although the incidence of elevated alanine aminotransferase or aspartate aminotransferase as well as of diarrhea was higher in patients treated with nintedanib plus docetaxel, most of these adverse events were manageable with supportive treatment or dose reduction. The results of completed and ongoing clinical trials of nintedanib monotherapy and combination therapy for the treatment of NSCLC are summarized in this study. PMID:26622180

  6. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Centrally and Superiorly Located Stage I or Isolated Recurrent Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joe Y. Balter, Peter A.; Dong Lei; Yang Qiuan; Liao Zhongxing; Jeter, Melenda; Bucci, M. Kara; McAleer, Mary F.; Mehran, Reza J.; Roth, Jack A.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in centrally/superiorly located non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and Methods: We delivered SBRT to 27 patients, 13 with Stage I and 14 with isolated recurrent NSCLC. A central/superior location was defined as being within 2 cm of the bronchial tree, major vessels, esophagus, heart, trachea, pericardium, brachial plexus, or vertebral body, but 1 cm away from the spinal canal. All patients underwent four-dimensional computed tomography-based planning, and daily computed tomography-on-rail guided SBRT. The prescribed dose of 40 Gy (n = 7) to the planning target volume was escalated to 50 Gy (n = 20) in 4 consecutive days. Results: With a median follow-up of 17 months (range, 6-40 months), the crude local control at the treated site was 100% using 50 Gy. However, 3 of 7 patients had local recurrences when treated using 40 Gy. Of the patients with Stage I disease, 1 (7.7%) and 2 (15.4%) developed mediastinal lymph node metastasis and distant metastases, respectively. Of the patients with recurrent disease, 3 (21.4%) and 5 (35.7%) developed mediastinal lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis, respectively. Four patients (28.6%) with recurrent disease but none with Stage I disease developed Grade 2 pneumonitis. Three patients (11.1%) developed Grade 2-3 dermatitis and chest wall pain. One patient developed brachial plexus neuropathy. No esophagitis was noted in any patient. Conclusions: Image-guided SBRT using 50 Gy delivered in four fractions is feasible and resulted in excellent local control.

  7. Comparative Effectiveness of 5 Treatment Strategies for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the Elderly

    SciTech Connect

    Shirvani, Shervin M.; Jiang, Jing; Chang, Joe Y.; Welsh, James W.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Swisher, Stephen; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The incidence of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) among older adults is expected to increase because of demographic trends and computed tomography-based screening; yet, optimal treatment in the elderly remains controversial. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare cohort spanning 2001-2007, we compared survival outcomes associated with 5 strategies used in contemporary practice: lobectomy, sublobar resection, conventional radiation therapy, stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), and observation. Methods and Materials: Treatment strategy and covariates were determined in 10,923 patients aged {>=}66 years with stage IA-IB NSCLC. Cox regression, adjusted for patient and tumor factors, compared overall and disease-specific survival for the 5 strategies. In a second exploratory analysis, propensity-score matching was used for comparison of SABR with other options. Results: The median age was 75 years, and 29% had moderate to severe comorbidities. Treatment distribution was lobectomy (59%), sublobar resection (11.7%), conventional radiation (14.8%), observation (12.6%), and SABR (1.1%). In Cox regression analysis with a median follow-up time of 3.2 years, SABR was associated with the lowest risk of death within 6 months of diagnosis (hazard ratio [HR] 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38-0.63; referent is lobectomy). After 6 months, lobectomy was associated with the best overall and disease-specific survival. In the propensity-score matched analysis, survival after SABR was similar to that after lobectomy (HR 0.71; 95% CI 0.45-1.12; referent is SABR). Conventional radiation and observation were associated with poor outcomes in all analyses. Conclusions: In this population-based experience, lobectomy was associated with the best long-term outcomes in fit elderly patients with early-stage NSCLC. Exploratory analysis of SABR early adopters suggests efficacy comparable with that of surgery in select populations

  8. Facility-Level Analysis of PET Scanning for Staging Among US Veterans With Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Todd H.; Schultz, Ellen M.; Xu, Xiangyan; Ghaus, Sharfun J.; Provenzale, Dawn; Au, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: PET scanning has been shown in randomized trials to reduce the frequency of surgery without cure among patients with potentially resectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We examined whether more frequent use of PET scanning at the facility level improves survival among patients with NSCLC in real-world practice. Methods: In this prospective cohort study of 622 US veterans with newly diagnosed NSCLC, we compared groups defined by the frequency of PET scan use measured at the facility level and categorized as low (< 25%), medium (25%-60%), or high (> 60%). Results: The median age of the sample was 69 years. Ninety-eight percent were men, 36% were Hispanic or nonwhite, and 54% had moderate or severe comorbidities. At low-, medium-, and high-use facilities, PET scan was performed in 13%, 40%, and 72% of patients, respectively (P < .0001). Baseline characteristics were similar across groups, including clinical stage based on CT scanning. More frequent use of PET scanning was associated with more frequent invasive staging (P < .001) and nonsignificant improvements in downstaging (P = .13) and surgery without cure (P = .12). After a median of 352 days of follow-up, 22% of the sample was still alive, including 22% at low- and medium-use facilities and 20% at high-use facilities. After adjustment and compared with patients at low-use facilities, the hazard of death was greater for patients at high-use facilities (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.35; 95% CI, 1.05-1.74) but not different for patients at medium-use facilities (adjusted HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.88-1.46). Conclusions: In this study of veterans with NSCLC, markedly greater use of PET scanning at the facility level was associated with more frequent use of invasive staging and possible improvements in downstaging and surgery without cure, but greater use of PET scanning was not associated with better survival. PMID:24306819

  9. Measuring the Population Impact of Introducing Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, George B.; Palma, David A.; Senan, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Background. The Cancer Risk Management Model (CRMM) was used to estimate the health and economic impact of introducing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in Canada. Methods. The CRMM uses Monte Carlo microsimulation representative of all Canadians. Lung cancer outputs were previously validated internally (Statistics Canada) and externally (Canadian Cancer Registry). We updated costs using the Ontario schedule of fees and benefits or the consumer price index to calculate 2013 Canadian dollars, discounted at a 3% rate. The reference model assumed that for stage I NSCLC, 75% of patients undergo surgery (lobectomy, sublobar resection, or pneumonectomy), 12.5% undergo radiotherapy (RT), and 12.5% undergo best supportive care (BSC). SABR was introduced in 2008 as an alternative to sublobar resection, RT, and BSC at rates reflective of the literature. Incremental cost effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated; a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000 (all amounts are in Canadian dollars) per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) was used from the health care payer perspective. Results. The total cost for 25,085 new cases of lung cancer in 2013 was calculated to be $608,002,599. Mean upfront costs for the 4,318 stage I cases were $7,646.98 for RT, $8,815.55 for SABR, $12,161.17 for sublobar resection, $16,266.12 for lobectomy, $22,940.59 for pneumonectomy, and $14,582.87 for BSC. SABR dominated (higher QALY, lower cost) RT, sublobar resection, and BSC. RT had lower initial costs than SABR that were offset by subsequent costs associated with recurrence. Lobectomy was cost effective when compared with SABR, with an ICER of $55,909.06. Conclusion. The use of SABR for NSCLC in Canada is projected to result in significant cost savings and survival gains. PMID:24951606

  10. Stereotactic body radiation therapy of early-stage non-small-cell lung carcinoma: Phase I study

    SciTech Connect

    McGarry, Ronald C. . E-mail: rmcgarry@iupui.edu; Papiez, Lech; Williams, Mark; Whitford, Tia; Timmerman, Robert D.

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: A Phase I dose escalation study of stereotactic body radiation therapy to assess toxicity and local control rates for patients with medically inoperable Stage I lung cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients had non-small-cell lung carcinoma, Stage T1a or T1b N0, M0. Patients were immobilized in a stereotactic body frame and treated in escalating doses of radiotherapy beginning at 24 Gy total (3 x 8 Gy fractions) using 7-10 beams. Cohorts were dose escalated by 6.0 Gy total with appropriate observation periods. Results: The maximum tolerated dose was not achieved in the T1 stratum (maximum dose = 60 Gy), but within the T2 stratum, the maximum tolerated dose was realized at 72 Gy for tumors larger than 5 cm. Dose-limiting toxicity included predominantly bronchitis, pericardial effusion, hypoxia, and pneumonitis. Local failure occurred in 4/19 T1 and 6/28 T2 patients. Nine local failures occurred at doses {<=}16 Gy and only 1 at higher doses. Local failures occurred between 3 and 31 months from treatment. Within the T1 group, 5 patients had distant or regional recurrence as an isolated event, whereas 3 patients had both distant and regional recurrence. Within the T2 group, 2 patients had solitary regional recurrences, and the 4 patients who failed distantly also failed regionally. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy seems to be a safe, effective means of treating early-stage lung cancer in medically inoperable patients. Excellent local control was achieved at higher dose cohorts with apparent dose-limiting toxicities in patients with larger tumors.

  11. Nodal Stage of Surgically Resected Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Its Effect on Recurrence Patterns and Overall Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Varlotto, John M.; Yao, Aaron N.; DeCamp, Malcolm M.; Ramakrishna, Satvik; Recht, Abe; Flickinger, John; Andrei, Adin; Reed, Michael F.; Toth, Jennifer W.; Fizgerald, Thomas J.; Higgins, Kristin; Zheng, Xiao; Shelkey, Julie; and others

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) for patients with resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with N2 involvement. We investigated the relationship between nodal stage and local-regional recurrence (LR), distant recurrence (DR) and overall survival (OS) for patients having an R0 resection. Methods and Materials: A multi-institutional database of consecutive patients undergoing R0 resection for stage I-IIIA NSCLC from 1995 to 2008 was used. Patients receiving any radiation therapy before relapse were excluded. A total of 1241, 202, and 125 patients were identified with N0, N1, and N2 involvement, respectively; 161 patients received chemotherapy. Cumulative incidence rates were calculated for LR and DR as first sites of failure, and Kaplan-Meier estimates were made for OS. Competing risk analysis and proportional hazards models were used to examine LR, DR, and OS. Independent variables included age, sex, surgical procedure, extent of lymph node sampling, histology, lymphatic or vascular invasion, tumor size, tumor grade, chemotherapy, nodal stage, and visceral pleural invasion. Results: The median follow-up time was 28.7 months. Patients with N1 or N2 nodal stage had rates of LR similar to those of patients with N0 disease, but were at significantly increased risk for both DR (N1, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.84, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.30-2.59; P=.001; N2, HR = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.55-3.48; P<.001) and death (N1, HR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.18-1.81; P<.001; N2, HR = 2.33, 95% CI: 1.78-3.04; P<.001). LR was associated with squamous histology, visceral pleural involvement, tumor size, age, wedge resection, and segmentectomy. The most frequent site of LR was the mediastinum. Conclusions: Our investigation demonstrated that nodal stage is directly associated with DR and OS but not with LR. Thus, even some patients with, N0-N1 disease are at relatively high risk of local recurrence. Prospective

  12. Dosimetric and technical aspects of intraoperative I-125 brachytherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mark; Colonias, Athanasios; Parda, David; Trombetta, Mark; Gayou, Olivier; Reitz, Bodo; Miften, Moyed

    2007-03-01

    Initial treatment outcome data from our institution for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients have shown that sublobar resection in combination with iodine-125 (I-125) brachytherapy is associated with recurrence rates of 2.0%, compared to 18.6% with sublobar resection alone. In this work, the technical and dosimetric aspects required to execute this procedure from the radiation oncology perspective as well as an analysis of the dose distributions of patients treated with this technique are presented. In this treatment technique, I-125 seeds in vicryl suture are embedded into vicryl mesh and surgically inserted providing a 2.0 cm margin on each side of the resection staple line. A nomogram is developed to determine the suture spacing in the vicryl mesh, as a function of seed activity in order to deliver 120 Gy at a distance of 0.5 cm above and below the seed array. Post-operative dosimetry consists of a CT-based planning and dose volume analysis. Dose distributions, dose volume histograms and mean dose data for lung are analysed in a group of patients. Dosimetric results show significant lung sparing with only a small volume of lung irradiated for all patients with mean lung dose values ranging from 1.5 Gy to 5.4 Gy. Lung brachytherapy with I-125 at the time of sublobar resection is a highly conformal option of dose delivery for stage I NSCLC patients with compromised physiologic reserve. Patient-related toxicity clinically measured by loss of pulmonary function and radiation-induced pneumonitis have not been linked to this procedure.

  13. Dosimetric and technical aspects of intraoperative I-125 brachytherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Mark; Colonias, Athanasios; Parda, David; Trombetta, Mark; Gayou, Olivier; Reitz, Bodo; Miften, Moyed

    2007-03-01

    Initial treatment outcome data from our institution for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients have shown that sublobar resection in combination with iodine-125 (I-125) brachytherapy is associated with recurrence rates of 2.0%, compared to 18.6% with sublobar resection alone. In this work, the technical and dosimetric aspects required to execute this procedure from the radiation oncology perspective as well as an analysis of the dose distributions of patients treated with this technique are presented. In this treatment technique, I-125 seeds in vicryl suture are embedded into vicryl mesh and surgically inserted providing a 2.0 cm margin on each side of the resection staple line. A nomogram is developed to determine the suture spacing in the vicryl mesh, as a function of seed activity in order to deliver 120 Gy at a distance of 0.5 cm above and below the seed array. Post-operative dosimetry consists of a CT-based planning and dose volume analysis. Dose distributions, dose volume histograms and mean dose data for lung are analysed in a group of patients. Dosimetric results show significant lung sparing with only a small volume of lung irradiated for all patients with mean lung dose values ranging from 1.5 Gy to 5.4 Gy. Lung brachytherapy with I-125 at the time of sublobar resection is a highly conformal option of dose delivery for stage I NSCLC patients with compromised physiologic reserve. Patient-related toxicity clinically measured by loss of pulmonary function and radiation-induced pneumonitis have not been linked to this procedure.

  14. Dosimetric Feasibility of Dose Escalation Using SBRT Boost for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T.; Peter, Justin; Hiatt, Jessica R.; Patel, Salil; Osibanjo, Oluwademilade; Safran, Howard; Curran, Bruce; DiPetrillo, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Standard chemoradiation therapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLCa) results in suboptimal outcomes with a high rate of local failure and poor overall survival. We hypothesize that dose escalation using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) boost could improve upon these results. We present here a study evaluating the dosimetric feasibility of such an approach. Methods: Anonymized CT data sets from five randomly selected patients with stage III NSCLCa undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy in our department with disease volumes appropriate for SBRT boost were selected. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) plans to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions were generated follow by SBRT plans to two dose levels, 16 Gy in two fractions and 28 Gy in two fractions. SBRT plans and total composite (3D-CRT and SBRT) were optimized and evaluated for target coverage and dose to critical structures; lung, esophagus, cord, and heart. Results: All five plans met predetermined target coverage and normal tissue dose constraints. PTV V95 was equal to or greater than 95% in all cases. The cumulative lung V20 and V5 of the combined 3D-CRT and SBRT plans were less than or equal to 30 and 55%, respectively. The 5 cc esophageal dose was less than 12 Gy for all low and high dose SBRT plans. The cumulative dose to the esophagus was also acceptable with less than 10% of the esophagus receiving doses in excess of 50 Gy. The cumulative spinal cord dose was less than 33 Gy and heart V25 was less than 5%. Conclusion: The combination of chemoradiation to 50.4 Gy followed by SBRT boost to gross disease at the primary tumor and involved regional lymph nodes is feasible with respect to normal tissue dose constraints in this dosimetric pilot study. A phase I/II trial to evaluate the clinical safety and efficacy of this approach is being undertaken. PMID:23057009

  15. Accelerated Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Soliman, Hany; Cheung, Patrick; Yeung, Latifa; Poon, Ian; Balogh, Judith; Barbera, Lisa; Spayne, Jacqueline; Danjoux, Cyril; Dahele, Max; Ung, Yee

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of a single-institution series of accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who are medically inoperable or who refuse surgery. Methods and Materials: Peripherally located T1 to T3 N0 M0 tumors were treated with 48 to 60 Gy in 12 to 15 fractions between 1996 and 2007. No elective nodal irradiation was delivered. Patient, tumor, and treatment information was abstracted from the medical records. Results: A total of 124 tumors were treated in 118 patients (56 male and 62 female). Median age at diagnosis was 76.3 years (range, 49-90 years). In all, 113 patients (95.8%) were not surgical candidates because of medical comorbidities. The 2- and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 51.0% and 23.3%, respectively, and the 2- and 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS) rates were 67.6% and 59.8%, respectively. The 2- and 5-year actuarial local control (LC) rates were 76.2% and 70.1%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that tumor size less than 3cm compared with greater than 3 cm resulted in significantly improved OS (40.0% vs. 5.0% at 5 years; p = 0.0002), CSS (69.7% vs. 45.1% at 5 years; p = 0.0461), and a trend toward better LC (82.5% vs. 66.9% at 2 years, 76.6% vs. 60.8% at 5 years; p = 0.0685). Treatment was well tolerated and there were no treatment delays because of acute toxicity. Conclusions: Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy with 48 to 60 Gy using fractions of 4 Gy per day provides very good results for small tumors in medically inoperable patients with early-stage NSCLC.

  16. Curative treatment of Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer with carbon ion beams using a hypofractionated regimen

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Tadaaki . E-mail: t_miyamt@nirs.go.jp; Baba, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Koto, Masashi; Sugawara, Toshiyuki; Yashiro, Tomoyasu; Kadono, Kennoshuke; Ezawa, Hidefumi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Mizoe, Jun-Etsu; Yoshikawa, Kyosan; Kandatsu, Susumu; Fujisawa, Takehiko

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: A phase I/II study on carbon ion radiotherapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was first conducted between 1994 and 1999 and determined the optimal dose. Second, a Phase II study using the optimal dose was performed. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the local control and 5-year survival rates. Methods and Materials: Between April 1999 and December 2000, 50 patients with 51 primary lesions were treated. Using a fixed dose of 72 GyE in nine fractions over 3 weeks, the primary tumors were irradiated with carbon ion beams alone. The average age of the patients was 74.5 years. Thirty-three (66%) of these were medically inoperable. Local control and survival were determined by using the Kaplan-Meier method and the data were statistically processed by using the log-rank test. Results: All patients were observed for a minimum of 5 years or until death with a median follow-up time of 59.2 months (range, 6.0-83.0 months). The local control rate for all patients was 94.7%. The patients' 5-year cause-specific survival rate was 75.7% (IA: 89.4; IB: 55.1), and overall survival 50.0% (IA: 55.2; IB: 42.9). No toxic reactions in the lung greater than Grade 3 were detected. Conclusions: Carbon ion radiotherapy, a new treatment modality with superior benefits in terms of quality of life and activity of daily living, has been proven as a valid alternative to surgery for Stage I NSCLC and to offer particular benefits, especially for elderly and inoperable patients.

  17. Risk Factors for Brain Metastases in Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer With Definitive Chest Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Zhe; Bi, Nan; Wang, Jingbo; Hui, Zhouguang; Xiao, Zefen; Feng, Qinfu; Zhou, Zongmei; Chen, Dongfu; Lv, Jima; Liang, Jun; Fan, Chengcheng; Liu, Lipin; Wang, Luhua

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We intended to identify risk factors that affect brain metastases (BM) in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) receiving definitive radiation therapy, which may guide the choice of selective prevention strategies. Methods and Materials: The characteristics of 346 patients with stage III NSCLC treated with thoracic radiation therapy from January 2008 to December 2010 in our institution were retrospectively reviewed. BM rates were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed to determine independent risk factors for BM. Results: The median follow-up time was 48.3 months in surviving patients. A total of 74 patients (21.4%) experienced BM at the time of analysis, and for 40 (11.7%) of them, the brain was the first site of failure. The 1-year and 3-year brain metastasis rates were 15% and 28.1%, respectively. In univariate analysis, female sex, age ≤60 years, non-squamous cell carcinoma, T3-4, N3, >3 areas of lymph node metastasis, high lactate dehydrogenase and serum levels of tumor markers (CEA, NSE, CA125) before treatment were significantly associated with BM (P<.05). In multivariate analysis, age ≤60 years (P=.004, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.491), non-squamous cell carcinoma (P=.000, HR=3.726), NSE >18 ng/mL (P=.008, HR=1.968) and CA125 ≥ 35 U/mL (P=.002, HR=2.129) were independent risk factors for BM. For patients with 0, 1, 2, and 3 to 4 risk factors, the 3-year BM rates were 7.3%, 18.9%, 35.8%, and 70.3%, respectively (P<.001). Conclusions: Age ≤60 years, non-squamous cell carcinoma, serum NSE >18 ng/mL, and CA125 ≥ 35 U/mL were independent risk factors for brain metastasis. The possibilities of selectively using prophylactic cranial irradiation in higher-risk patients with LA-NSCLC should be further explored in the future.

  18. Outcomes of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients With Potentially Operable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Verstegen, Naomi E.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Slotman, Ben J.; Paul, Marinus A.; Smit, Egbert F.; Senan, Suresh

    2012-05-01

    Background: Approximately two-thirds of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in The Netherlands currently undergo surgical resection. As an increasing number of fit patients have elected to undergo stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in recent years, we studied outcomes after SABR in patients with potentially operable stage I NSCLC. Methods and Materials: In an institutional prospective database collected since 2003, 25% of lung SABR cases (n = 177 patients) were found to be potentially operable when the following patients were excluded: those with (1) synchronous lung tumors or other malignancy, (2) prior high-dose radiotherapy/pneumonectomy, (3) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a severity score of 3-4 according to the Global initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease classification. (4) a performance score of {>=}3, and (5) other comorbidity precluding surgery. Study patients included 101 males and 76 females, with a median age of 76 years old, 60% of whom were staged as T1 and 40% of whom were T2. Median Charlson comorbidity score was 2 (range, 0-5). A SABR dose of 60 Gy was delivered using a risk-adapted scheme in 3, 5, or 8 fractions, depending on tumor size and location. Follow-up chest computed tomography scans were obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Results: Median follow-up was 31.5 months; and median overall survival (OS) was 61.5 months, with 1- and 3-year survival rates of 94.7% and 84.7%, respectively. OS rates at 3 years in patients with (n = 59) and without (n = 118) histological diagnosis did not differ significantly (96% versus 81%, respectively, p = 0.39). Post-SABR 30-day mortality was 0%, while predicted 30-day mortality for a lobectomy, derived using the Thoracoscore predictive model (Falcoz PE et al. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2007;133:325-332), would have been 2.6%. Local control rates at 1 and 3 years were 98% and 93%, respectively. Regional and distant failure rates at 3 years were each

  19. Measurement of mid-arm muscle circumference and prognosis in stage IV non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Tartari, Rafaela Festugatto; Ulbrich-Kulczynski, Jane Maria; Filho, Antônio Fabiano Ferreira

    2013-03-01

    Overall survival (OS) varies widely in patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Strong prognostic factors are still needed to improve decision-making regarding standard treatment options, to stratify patients for inclusion in innovative therapeutic trials and to identify patients who would be best treated with palliative care rather than with systemic chemotherapy. Mid-arm muscle circumference (MAMC) is a bedside anthropometric measurement that estimates somatic protein reserve, an early indicator of nutritional depletion. This measurement is simple, non-invasive, objective and inexpensive to perform. We evaluated MAMC as a potential prognostic factor in patients with stage IV NSCLC. A total of 56 non-selected consecutive patients with stage IV NSCLC were evaluated. The MAMC measurement results for these patients were expressed as a percentage of the expected reference values, adjusted for gender and age. Patients were categorized as normal (MAMC ≥90%) or depleted (MAMC <90%). The mean age of patients was 63 years (range 47-80), and the mean MAMC was 89 (range 66-122), with 55% of patients classified as depleted. The median OS was 6.2 months (95% CI, 5.1-7.3). In the subgroup with normal MAMC, the median OS was 10.2 months (95% CI, 9.2-11.1). In patients classified as depleted, the median OS was 5.0 months (95% CI, 4.2-5.8). The difference in OS between these two subgroups was highly significant (p<0.001 by the log-rank test; HR=0.21; 95% CI, 0.09-0.5 for patients with normal MAMC). In a multivariate analysis with Karnofsky status, age and gender as covariates, the difference in OS between the MAMC groups remained statistically significant (p<0.001, according to the Cox proportional hazards model). MAMC is a strong independent prognostic factor in stage IV NSCLC patients. Patients with MAMC <90% of the expected value had poor OS. PMID:23426523

  20. Measurement of mid-arm muscle circumference and prognosis in stage IV non-small cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    TARTARI, RAFAELA FESTUGATTO; ULBRICH-KULCZYNSKI, JANE MARIA; FILHO, ANTÔNIO FABIANO FERREIRA

    2013-01-01

    Overall survival (OS) varies widely in patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Strong prognostic factors are still needed to improve decision-making regarding standard treatment options, to stratify patients for inclusion in innovative therapeutic trials and to identify patients who would be best treated with palliative care rather than with systemic chemotherapy. Mid-arm muscle circumference (MAMC) is a bedside anthropometric measurement that estimates somatic protein reserve, an early indicator of nutritional depletion. This measurement is simple, non-invasive, objective and inexpensive to perform. We evaluated MAMC as a potential prognostic factor in patients with stage IV NSCLC. A total of 56 non-selected consecutive patients with stage IV NSCLC were evaluated. The MAMC measurement results for these patients were expressed as a percentage of the expected reference values, adjusted for gender and age. Patients were categorized as normal (MAMC ≥90%) or depleted (MAMC <90%). The mean age of patients was 63 years (range 47–80), and the mean MAMC was 89 (range 66–122), with 55% of patients classified as depleted. The median OS was 6.2 months (95% CI, 5.1–7.3). In the subgroup with normal MAMC, the median OS was 10.2 months (95% CI, 9.2–11.1). In patients classified as depleted, the median OS was 5.0 months (95% CI, 4.2–5.8). The difference in OS between these two subgroups was highly significant (p<0.001 by the log-rank test; HR=0.21; 95% CI, 0.09–0.5 for patients with normal MAMC). In a multivariate analysis with Karnofsky status, age and gender as covariates, the difference in OS between the MAMC groups remained statistically significant (p<0.001, according to the Cox proportional hazards model). MAMC is a strong independent prognostic factor in stage IV NSCLC patients. Patients with MAMC <90% of the expected value had poor OS. PMID:23426523

  1. Pembrolizumab for the treatment of PD-L1 positive advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Dang, Thu Oanh; Ogunniyi, Adebayo; Barbee, Meagan S; Drilon, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of immune checkpoint inhibitors marked an important advancement in the development of cancer therapeutics. Pembrolizumab is a selective humanized IgG4 kappa monoclonal antibody that inhibits the programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor, an integral component of immune checkpoint regulation in the tumor microenvironment. The drug is currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of advanced melanoma and metastatic squamous and nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Several published studies demonstrate that single-agent pembrolizumab is safe and has efficacy in patients with NSCLC. Many ongoing protocols are investigating the role of pembrolizumab in combination with other agents in lung cancer and various other cancer types. We review the available data on pembrolizumab in NSCLC and examine the role of potential predictive biomarkers of response to therapy.

  2. Rapid Response of Advanced Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with Thrombocytopenia after First-Line Treatment with Pembrolizumab Plus Autologous Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hui, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Xinwei; Ren, Baozhu; Li, Runmei; Ren, Xiubao

    2015-01-01

    We present the first clinical evidence of advanced squamous non-small cell lung cancer with severe thrombocytopenia showing dramatic improvement after first-line treatment with pembrolizumab plus autologous cytokine-induced killer cells.

  3. The chimeric transcript RUNX1-GLRX5: a biomarker for good postoperative prognosis in Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Rie; Amano, Yosuke; Kawakami, Masanori; Sunohara, Mitsuhiro; Watanabe, Kousuke; Kage, Hidenori; Ohishi, Nobuya; Yatomi, Yutaka; Nakajima, Jun; Fukayama, Masashi; Nagase, Takahide; Takai, Daiya

    2016-02-01

    Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer cases have been recognized as having a low risk of relapse; however, occasionally, relapse may occur. To predict clinical outcome in Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer patients, we searched for chimeric transcripts that can be used as biomarkers and identified a novel chimeric transcript, RUNX1-GLRX5, comprising RUNX1, a transcription factor, and GLRX5. This chimera was detected in approximately half of the investigated Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer patients (44/104 cases, 42.3%). Although there was no significant difference in the overall survival rate between RUNX1-GLRX5-positive and -negative cases (P = 0.088), a significantly lower relapse rate was observed in the RUNX1-GLRX5-positive cases (P = 0.039), indicating that this chimera can be used as a biomarker for good prognosis in Stage IA patients. Detection of the RUNX1-GLRX5 chimeric transcript may therefore be useful for the determination of a postoperative treatment plan for Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

  4. The chimeric transcript RUNX1–GLRX5: a biomarker for good postoperative prognosis in Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Rie; Amano, Yosuke; Kawakami, Masanori; Sunohara, Mitsuhiro; Watanabe, Kousuke; Kage, Hidenori; Ohishi, Nobuya; Yatomi, Yutaka; Nakajima, Jun; Fukayama, Masashi; Nagase, Takahide; Takai, Daiya

    2016-01-01

    Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer cases have been recognized as having a low risk of relapse; however, occasionally, relapse may occur. To predict clinical outcome in Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer patients, we searched for chimeric transcripts that can be used as biomarkers and identified a novel chimeric transcript, RUNX1–GLRX5, comprising RUNX1, a transcription factor, and GLRX5. This chimera was detected in approximately half of the investigated Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer patients (44/104 cases, 42.3%). Although there was no significant difference in the overall survival rate between RUNX1–GLRX5-positive and -negative cases (P = 0.088), a significantly lower relapse rate was observed in the RUNX1–GLRX5-positive cases (P = 0.039), indicating that this chimera can be used as a biomarker for good prognosis in Stage IA patients. Detection of the RUNX1–GLRX5 chimeric transcript may therefore be useful for the determination of a postoperative treatment plan for Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer patients. PMID:26685324

  5. ALCHEMIST Trials: A Golden Opportunity to Transform Outcomes in Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Govindan, Ramaswamy; Mandrekar, Sumithra J; Gerber, David E; Oxnard, Geoffrey R; Dahlberg, Suzanne E; Chaft, Jamie; Malik, Shakun; Mooney, Margaret; Abrams, Jeffrey S; Jänne, Pasi A; Gandara, David R; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Vokes, Everett E

    2015-12-15

    The treatment of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is slowly evolving from empirical cytotoxic chemotherapy to personalized treatment based on specific molecular alterations. Despite this 10-year evolution, targeted therapies have not been studied adequately in patients with resected NSCLC who have clearly defined actionable mutations. The advent of next-generation sequencing has now made it possible to characterize genomic alterations in unprecedented detail. The efforts begun by The Cancer Genome Atlas project to understand the complexities of the genomic landscape of lung cancer will be supplemented further by studying a large number of tumor specimens. The Adjuvant Lung Cancer Enrichment Marker Identification and Sequencing Trial (ALCHEMIST) is an NCI-sponsored national clinical trials network (NCTN) initiative to address the needs to refine therapy for early-stage NSCLC. This program will screen several thousand patients with operable lung adenocarcinoma to determine whether their tumors contain specific molecular alterations [epidermal growth factor receptor mutation (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement (ALK)], making them eligible for treatment trials that target these alterations. Patients with EGFR mutation or ALK gene rearrangement in their tumor will be randomized to placebo versus erlotinib or crizotinib, respectively, after completion of their standard adjuvant therapy. ALCHEMIST will also contain a large discovery component that will provide an opportunity to incorporate genomic studies to fully understand the clonal architecture, clonal evolution, and mechanisms of resistance to therapy. In this review, we describe the concept, rationale, and outline of ALCHEMIST and the plan for genomic studies in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Clin Cancer Res; 21(24); 5439-44. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26672084

  6. Is limited pulmonary resection equivalent to lobectomy for surgical management of stage I non-small-cell lung cancer?

    PubMed Central

    De Zoysa, Maya K.; Hamed, Dima; Routledge, Tom; Scarci, Marco

    2012-01-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: is limited pulmonary resection equivalent to lobectomy in terms of morbidity, long-term survival and locoregional recurrence in patients with stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)? A total of 166 papers were found using the reported search; of which, 16 papers, including one meta-analysis and one randomized control trial (RCT), represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. With regards to 5-year survival rates, the evidence is conflicting: a 2005 meta-analysis and six other retrospective or prospective nonrandomized analyses did not find any statistically significant difference when comparing lobectomy with limited resection. However, three studies found evidence of a decreased overall survival with limited resection, including the only randomized control trial, which showed a 50% increase in the cancer-related death rate (P = 0.09), and a 30% increase in the overall death rate in patients undergoing limited resection (P = 0.08). Age, tumour size and specific type of limited resection were also factors influencing the survival rates. Four studies, including the RCT, found increased locoregional recurrence rates with limited resection. There is also evidence that wedge resections, compared with segmentectomies, lead to lower survival and higher recurrence rates. In conclusion, lobectomy is still recommended for younger patients with adequate cardiopulmonary function. Although limited resection carries a decreased rate of complications and shorter hospital stays, it may also carry a higher rate of loco-regional recurrences. However, limited resection may be comparable for patients >71 years of age, and those with small peripheral tumours. PMID:22374287

  7. Fluid biopsy for circulating tumor cell identification in patients with early-and late-stage non-small cell lung cancer: a glimpse into lung cancer biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, Marco; Bazhenova, Lyudmila; Boshuizen, Rogier; Kolatkar, Anand; Honnatti, Meghana; Cho, Edward H.; Marrinucci, Dena; Sandhu, Ajay; Perricone, Anthony; Thistlethwaite, Patricia; Bethel, Kelly; Nieva, Jorge; van den Heuvel, Michel; Kuhn, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) counts are an established prognostic marker in metastatic prostate, breast and colorectal cancer, and recent data suggest a similar role in late stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, due to sensitivity constraints in current enrichment-based CTC detection technologies, there are few published data about CTC prevalence rates and morphologic heterogeneity in early-stage NSCLC, or the correlation of CTCs with disease progression and their usability for clinical staging. We investigated CTC counts, morphology and aggregation in early stage, locally advanced and metastatic NSCLC patients by using a fluid-phase biopsy approach that identifies CTCs without relying on surface-receptor-based enrichment and presents them in sufficiently high definition (HD) to satisfy diagnostic pathology image quality requirements. HD-CTCs were analyzed in blood samples from 78 chemotherapy-naïve NSCLC patients. 73% of the total population had a positive HD-CTC count (>0 CTC in 1 mL of blood) with a median of 4.4 HD-CTCs mL-1 (range 0-515.6) and a mean of 44.7 (±95.2) HD-CTCs mL-1. No significant difference in the medians of HD-CTC counts was detected between stage IV (n = 31, range 0-178.2), stage III (n = 34, range 0-515.6) and stages I/II (n = 13, range 0-442.3). Furthermore, HD-CTCs exhibited a uniformity in terms of molecular and physical characteristics such as fluorescent cytokeratin intensity, nuclear size, frequency of apoptosis and aggregate formation across the spectrum of staging. Our results demonstrate that despite stringent morphologic inclusion criteria for the definition of HD-CTCs, the HD-CTC assay shows high sensitivity in the detection and characterization of both early- and late-stage lung cancer CTCs. Extensive studies are warranted to investigate the prognostic value of CTC profiling in early-stage lung cancer. This finding has implications for the design of extensive studies examining screening, therapy and surveillance in

  8. Prognostic Value and Reproducibility of Pretreatment CT Texture Features in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, David V.; Tucker, Susan L.; Zhou, Shouhao; Liao, Zhongxing; Mawlawi, Osama; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether pretreatment CT texture features can improve patient risk stratification beyond conventional prognostic factors (CPFs) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 91 cases with stage III NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy. All patients underwent pretreatment diagnostic contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) followed by 4-dimensional CT (4D-CT) for treatment simulation. We used the average-CT and expiratory (T50-CT) images from the 4D-CT along with the CE-CT for texture extraction. Histogram, gradient, co-occurrence, gray tone difference, and filtration-based techniques were used for texture feature extraction. Penalized Cox regression implementing cross-validation was used for covariate selection and modeling. Models incorporating texture features from the 33 image types and CPFs were compared to those with models incorporating CPFs alone for overall survival (OS), local-regional control (LRC), and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM). Predictive Kaplan-Meier curves were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Patients were stratified based on whether their predicted outcome was above or below the median. Reproducibility of texture features was evaluated using test-retest scans from independent patients and quantified using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). We compared models incorporating the reproducibility seen on test-retest scans to our original models and determined the classification reproducibility. Results: Models incorporating both texture features and CPFs demonstrated a significant improvement in risk stratification compared to models using CPFs alone for OS (P=.046), LRC (P=.01), and FFDM (P=.005). The average CCCs were 0.89, 0.91, and 0.67 for texture features extracted from the average-CT, T50-CT, and CE-CT, respectively. Incorporating reproducibility within our models yielded 80.4% (±3.7% SD), 78.3% (±4.0% SD), and 78

  9. Managing treatment-related adverse events associated with egfr tyrosine kinase inhibitors in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, V.

    2011-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc) has the highest prevalence of all types of lung cancer, which is the second most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in Canada. The need for more effective and less toxic treatment options for nsclc has led to the development of agents targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (egfr)–mediated signalling pathway, such as egfr tyrosine kinase inhibitors (egfr-tkis). Although egfr-tkis are less toxic than traditional anti-neoplastic agents, they are commonly associated with acneiform-like rash and diarrhea. This review summarizes the clinical presentation and causes of egfr-tki–induced rash and diarrhea, and presents strategies for effective assessment, monitoring, and treatment of these adverse effects. Strategies to improve the management of egfr-tki–related adverse events should improve clinical outcomes, compliance, and quality of life in patients with advanced nsclc. PMID:21655159

  10. Treatment of recurrent and platinum-refractory stage IV non-small cell lung cancer with nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) as a single agent.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Ashish; Schneider, Bryan J; Christos, Paul J; Audibert, Lauren F; Cagney, Jennifer M; Scheff, Ronald J

    2016-02-01

    The role of single-agent nab-paclitaxel in relapsed or platinum-refractory advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been well reported in Western populations. We reviewed our own institution's experience using nab-paclitaxel in these settings. We analyzed the records of stage IV NSCLC patients with relapsed or platinum-refractory disease treated with single-agent nab-paclitaxel at Weill Cornell Medical College between October 2008 and December 2013. The primary endpoint of the study was treatment failure-free survival (TFFS), defined as the time from the start of nab-paclitaxel therapy to discontinuation of the drug for any reason. The best overall response was recorded for each patient, and overall response and disease control rates were calculated. Thirty-one stage IV NSCLC patients received a median of 4 cycles (range 1-40) of nab-paclitaxel. Dose reduction or drug discontinuation due to toxicity occurred in 10 patients, mainly because of grade 2/3 fatigue or peripheral neuropathy. The overall response rate was 16.1 %, and the disease control rate was 64.5 %. Median TFFS was 3.5 months (95 % CI 1.3-5.3 months). No statistically significant difference in TFFS based on line of therapy or prior taxane exposure was identified. There was a statistically significant decrease in TFFS for patients with non-adenocarcinoma histology, although there were only five patients in this group. There was a trend toward reduction in the risk of treatment failure with increasing age. One patient remained on nab-paclitaxel therapy for over 3 years. Single-agent nab-paclitaxel was well tolerated and demonstrated efficacy in advanced NSCLC patients with relapsed or platinum-refractory disease. Further prospective clinical trials with nab-paclitaxel in these settings are warranted.

  11. Are VEGFR-TKIs effective or safe for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuai; Yang, Zhe; Wang, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (VEGFR-TKIs) might be new therapeutic strategies for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here a total of 12,520 patients from 23 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were enrolled to evaluate the efficacy and safety of VEGFR-TKIs quantitatively in advanced NSCLC. Compared with non-VEGFR-TKIs, VEGFR-TKIs regimen significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) [hazard ratio (HR): 0.839, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.805-0.874, P < 0.001], objective response rates (ORR) [relative risk (RR): 1.374, 95% CI: 1.193-1.583, P < 0.001] and disease control rates (DCR) (RR: 1.113, 95% CI: 1.027-1.206, P = 0.009), but not overall survival (OS) (HR: 0.960, 95% CI: 0.921-1.002, P = 0.060) for NSCLC patients. The RR of all-grade neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, hypertension, hemorrhage, fatigue, anorexia, stomatitis, diarrhea, rash, hand-foot skin reaction (HFSR) were increased in patients received VEGFR-TKIs. As for high-grade (≥ 3) adverse events (AEs), VEGFR-TKIs were associated with higher RR of neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, hypertension, fatigue, stomatitis, diarrhea, rash and HFSR. This study demonstrates VEGFR-TKIs improve PFS, ORR and DCR, but not OS in advanced NSCLC patients. VEGFR-TKIs induce more frequent and serious AEs compared with control therapies. PMID:26156021

  12. Role of erlotinib in first-line and maintenance treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reguart, Noemí; Cardona, Andrés Felipe; Rosell, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Erlotinib hydrochloride (Tarceva®) is a member of a class of small molecule inhibitors that targets the tyrosine kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), with anti-tumor activity in preclinical models. Erlotinib represents a new-generation of agents known as “targeted therapies” designed to act upon cancer cells by interfering with aberrant specific activated pathways needed for tumor growth, angiogenesis and cell survival. Since its approval in November 2004 for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after the failure of at least one prior chemotherapy regimen and with a view to improving patients’ outcomes and prevent symptoms, the scientific community has evaluated the potential role of erlotinib in other scenarios such as in maintenance therapy and, in first-line setting for a selected population based on biological markers of response such as mutations of the EGFR. The convenient once-a-day pill administration and the good toxicity profile of erlotinib make it a reasonable candidate for testing in this context. This report provides a review of the role of erlotinib therapy in advanced NSCLC. It summarizes current data and perspectives of erlotinib in upfront treatment and maintenance for advanced NSCLC as well as looking at candidate biomarkers of response to these new targeted-agents. PMID:21188105

  13. MicroRNA expression profiling of sputum for the detection of early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a prospective case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Razzak, R.; Bédard, E.L.R.; Kim, J.O.; Gazala, S.; Guo, L.; Ghosh, S.; Joy, A.; Nijjar, T.; Wong, E.; Roa, W.H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc) is associated with very poor overall survival because 70% of patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Micrornas (mirnas) are a class of short, noncoding rna molecules whose presence in samples of biologic fluids such as sputum has demonstrated promise as a potential means of detecting nsclc. We investigated the stage-specific nsclc detection potential of an efficient panel of 3 mirnas (mir-21, mir-210, mir-372) using a single sputum sample. Methods A single spontaneously expectorated sputum sample was prospectively collected from 21 early nsclc (≤stage ii) patients, 22 advanced nsclc (≥stage iii) patients, and 10 control subjects. Mirna expression profiles were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and were analyzed by unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis. Results Mean tumour size (±95% confidence interval) in the early and advanced nsclc patients was 3.3 cm ± 0.9 cm and 4.8 cm ± 0.7 cm respectively. Adenocarcinoma constituted 61.9% of the early and 45.5% of the advanced nsclc cases respectively. In comparing the early nsclc group with the control group, the mirna panel yielded a diagnostic sensitivity of 67% and a specificity of 90.0%. For the advanced nsclc group, the mirna panel detected nsclc with a sensitivity and specificity of 64% and 100% respectively. Conclusions A sputum mir-21, mir-210, and mir-372 expression profile might provide a sensitive and highly specific means for detecting nsclc. Sputum mirna analysis demonstrates promise as a potential complementary screening tool. PMID:27122989

  14. Impact of Weight Change During the Course of Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy on Outcomes in Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients: Retrospective Analysis of 425 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Topkan, Erkan; Parlak, Cem; Selek, Ugur

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: We retrospectively investigated the impact of weight change (WC) during concurrent chemoradiation therapy (C-CRT) on clinical outcomes of stage 3B non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 425 patients treated with C-CRT were included. All patients received 60 to 66 Gy of thoracic radiation therapy concurrently with 1 to 3 cycles of platinum-based chemotherapy. Pre- and posttreatment weight measurements on first and last days of C-CRT were used for WC. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1 = weight loss (WL); group 2 = weight preservation/gain (WP) for comparative analyses. Results: Following C-CRT, 252 patients (59.3%) experienced WL, while 89 patients (20.9%) and 84 patients (19.8%) showed WP or WG. At median 24.2 months of follow-up, 142 patients (33.4%) were alive (84 WP [48.6%] and 58 WL [23.0%]), and 58 (13.6%) of them were free of disease progression (41 [23.7%] for WP and 17 [6.7%] for WL). Median overall survival (OS), locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), progression-free survival (PFS), and distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) for the entire population were 22.8, 14.4, 10.6, and 11.7 months, respectively. Intergroup comparisons between WP and WL cohorts revealed significantly superior OS, LRPFS, PFS, and DMFS in WP patients (P<.05 for each). On multivariate analyses, only WL and advanced T stage were associated with poor prognosis (P<.05). Conclusions: Present results in 425 stage 3B NSCLC patients demonstrated that WL during C-CRT is strongly associated with inferior survival outcomes compared to WP. This emerging finding might be useful by forming an encouraging basis for future investigations in facilitating a way to improve the outcomes of these patients experiencing WL during C-CRT.

  15. Gefitinib in Combination With Irradiation With or Without Cisplatin in Patients With Inoperable Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase I Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Rothschild, Sacha; Bucher, Stephan E.; Bernier, Jacques; Aebersold, Daniel M.; Zouhair, Aberrahim; Ries, Gerhard; Lombrieser, Norbert; Lippuner, Thomas; Luetolf, Urs M.; Glanzmann, Christoph; Ciernik, I. Frank

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To establish the feasibility and tolerability of gefitinib (ZD1839, Iressa) with radiation (RT) or concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) with cisplatin (CDDP) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: In this multicenter Phase I study, 5 patients with unresectable NSCLC received 250 mg gefitinib daily starting 1 week before RT at a dose of 63 Gy (Step 1). After a first safety analysis, 9 patients were treated daily with 250 mg gefitinib plus CRT in the form of RT and weekly CDDP 35 mg/m{sup 2} (Step 2). Gefitinib was maintained for up to 2 years until disease progression or toxicity. Results: Fourteen patients were assessed in the two steps. In Step 1 (five patients were administered only gefitinib and RT), no lung toxicities were seen, and there was no dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). Adverse events were skin and subcutaneous tissue reactions, limited to Grade 1-2. In Step 2, two of nine patients (22.2%) had DLT. One patient suffered from dyspnea and dehydration associated with neutropenic pneumonia, and another showed elevated liver enzymes. In both steps combined, 5 of 14 patients (35.7%) experienced one or more treatment interruptions. Conclusions: Gefitinib (250 mg daily) in combination with RT and CDDP in patients with Stage III NSCLC is feasible, but CDDP likely enhances toxicity. The impact of gefitinib on survival and disease control as a first-line treatment in combination with RT remains to be determined.

  16. Expression of Ribonucleotide Reductase Subunit-2 and Thymidylate Synthase Correlates with Poor Prognosis in Patients with Resected Stages I–III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Francesco; Dal Bello, Maria Giovanna; Salvi, Sandra; Puzone, Roberto; Pfeffer, Ulrich; Fontana, Vincenzo; Alama, Angela; Rijavec, Erika; Barletta, Giulia; Genova, Carlo; Sini, Claudio; Ratto, Giovanni Battista; Taviani, Mario; Truini, Mauro; Merlo, Domenico Franco

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers can help to identify patients with early-stages or locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have high risk of relapse and poor prognosis. To correlate the expression of seven biomarkers involved in DNA synthesis and repair and in cell division with clinical outcome, we consecutively collected 82 tumour tissues from radically resected NSCLC patients. The following biomarkers were investigated using IHC and qRT-PCR: excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1), breast cancer 1 (BRCA1), ribonucleotide reductase subunits M1 and M2 (RRM1 and RRM2), subunit p53R2, thymidylate synthase (TS), and class III beta-tubulin (TUBB3). Gene expression levels were also validated in an available NSCLC microarray dataset. Multivariate analysis identified the protein overexpression of RRM2 and TS as independent prognostic factors of shorter overall survival (OS). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a trend in shorter OS for patients with RRM2, TS, and ERCC1, BRCA1 overexpressed tumours. For all of the biomarkers except TUBB3, the OS trends relative to the gene expression levels were in agreement with those relative to the protein expression levels. The NSCLC microarray dataset showed RRM2 and TS as biomarkers significantly associated with OS. This study suggests that high expression levels of RRM2 and TS might be negative prognostic factors for resected NSCLC patients. PMID:26663950

  17. Angiogenesis inhibitors rechallenge in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a pooled analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lingdi; Li, Wei; Zhang, Huiying; Hou, Nan; Guo, Lanwei; Gao, Quanli

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Data on the role of angiogenesis inhibitors (AIs) rechallenge in the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who previously received bevacizumab remain limited. We aim to investigate the efficacy of AIs in the treatment of advanced NSCLC in this setting. Methods Studies from PubMed, Web of Science, and abstracts presented at American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting up to December 1, 2014 were searched to identify relevant studies. Eligible studies included prospective randomized controlled trials evaluating AIs in advanced NSCLC, with survival data on patients who previously received bevacizumab. The end points were overall survival and progression-free survival. Statistical analyses were conducted by using either random effects or fixed effect models according to the heterogeneity of included studies. Results A total of 452 patients with advanced NSCLC who previously received bevacizumab were identified for analysis. The meta-analysis results demonstrated that AI rechallenge significantly improved progression-free survival (hazard ratio: 0.72, 95% confidence interval: 0.58–0.89, P=0.002) when compared to non-AI containing regimens. Additionally, a nonsignificant improvement in overall survival was also observed in advanced NSCLC in this setting (hazard ratio: 0.82, 95% confidence interval: 0.65–1.03, P=0.087). Similar results were also observed in subgroup analysis according to treatment regimens. Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that NSCLC patients who relapsed after a first-line bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy obtain improved clinical benefits from AI rechallenge. Prospective clinical trials investigating the role of AI rechallenge in this setting are recommended. PMID:26491352

  18. Matrine promotes the efficacy and safety of platinum-based doublet chemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Biaoxue; Zhao, Chongchong; Gao, Wenlong; Yang, Shuanying

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Many studies have investigated the efficacy of matrine combined with platinum-based doublet chemotherapy (PBDC) versus PBDC alone for treating advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study is an analytic value of available evidence. Methods: twenty-two studies reporting matrine combined with PBDC versus PBDC alone for treating advanced NSCLC were reviewed. Pooled odds ratios and hazard ratio with 95% confidence intervals were calculated using either the fixed effects model or random effects model. Results: The overall response rate (ORR) and disease control rate (DCR) of matrine combined with PBDC for treating NSCLC were significantly higher than those of PBDC alone, with 15.1% and 19.7% improvement, respectively (P < 0.00001). In addition, the mean survival time (MST) and quality of life (QOL) were improved after the treatment of matrine combined with PBDC (P < 0.00001). The main adverse effects found in this review were hematological reactions, nausea and vomiting. Matrine combined with PBDC had a lower incidence of adverse reactions compared with PBDC alone (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Matrine combined with PBDC was associated with higher RR, DCR, and MST as well as superior QOL profiles compared with PBDC alone. Matrine combined with PBDC decrease the incidence of adverse reactions compared with PBDC alone. PMID:26628952

  19. Intrinsic resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer with activating EGFR mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Baocheng; Chu, Huili; Yao, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Identifying activating EGFR mutations is a useful predictive strategy that helps select a population of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients for treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Patients with sensitizing EGFR mutations (predominantly an in-frame deletion in exon 19 and an L858R substitution) are highly responsive to first-generation EGFR TKIs, such as gefitinib and erlotinib, and show improved progression-free survival without serious side effects. However, all patients with activating EGFR mutations who are initially responsive to EGFR TKIs eventually develop acquired resistance after a median progression-free survival of 10–16 months, followed by disease progression. Moreover, ~20%–30% of NSCLC patients have no objective tumor regression on initial EGFR TKI treatment, although they harbor an activating EGFR mutation. These patients represent an NSCLC subgroup that is defined as having intrinsic or primary resistance to EGFR TKIs. Different mechanisms of acquired EGFR TKI resistance have been identified, and several novel compounds have been developed to reverse acquired resistance, but little is known about EGFR TKI intrinsic resistance. In this review, we summarize the latest findings involving mechanisms of intrinsic resistance to EGFR TKIs in advanced NSCLC with activating EGFR mutations and present possible therapeutic strategies to overcome this resistance. PMID:27382309

  20. The Effects of Comorbidity and Age on RTOG Study Enrollment in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Who Are Eligible for RTOG Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Firat, Selim; Byhardt, Roger W.; Gore, Elizabeth

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of measured comorbidity in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) combined modality therapy (CMT) study enrollment in Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: One hundred and seventy-one patients with a Karnofsky Performance Score {>=}70 and clinical Stage III NSCLC were analyzed retrospectively for comorbidity, RTOG study eligibility, and enrollment at initial consultation. Effect of comorbidity scores (Cumulative Illness Rating Scale) were tested on patient selection for CMT, RTOG enrollment, and overall survival. Results: Comorbidity (Grade 4; p < 0.005) and use of radiation only (p {<=} 0.001) were associated with inferior survival independent of other factors. Patient selection for CMT was affected by age ({>=}70, p < 0.001), comorbidity (severity index [SI]> 2, p = 0.001), and weight loss (>5%, p = 0.001). Thirty-three patients (19%) were enrolled in a CMT RTOG study (Group 1). Forty-nine patients (29%) were eligible but not enrolled (Group 2), and 57 (33%) were ineligible (Group 3). The most common ineligibility reasons were weight loss (67%) and comorbidity in the exclusion criteria of the RTOG studies (63%). Group 1 patients were the youngest (p = 0.02), with the lowest comorbidity scores (p < 0.001) and SI (p < 0.001) compared with Groups 2 and 3. Group 3 patients were the oldest with the most unfavorable comorbidity profile. Comorbidity scores (SI >2; p = 0.006) and age ({>=}70; p = 0.05) were independent factors influencing RTOG study enrollment in patients meeting study eligibility requirements (Groups 1 and 2). Conclusions: Comorbidity scales could be useful in stratification of patients in advanced lung cancer trials and interpretation of results particularly regarding the elderly population.

  1. Genetic variants of CHRNA5-A3 and CHRNB3-A6 predict survival of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Peng, Xiaonu; Zhu, Lijun; Hu, Likuan; Song, Yipeng

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play a key role in carcinogenesis and progression of lung cancer; and polymorphisms in CHRNA5-A3 and CHRNB3-A6, two gene clusters encoding nAChR subunits, have been associated with lung cancer risk. In this study, we investigated whether variants in the two gene clusters were associated with prognosis of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 165 stage IIIB–IV NSCLC patients were enrolled in this study. Three polymorphisms (rs667282 and rs3743073 in CHRNA5-A3 and rs13280604 in CHRNB3-A6) were genotyped using the TaqMan method. Overall survival (OS) was estimated using the log-rank test and the Cox models. Our results showed that patients with CHRNA5-A3 rs667282 TT or TC genotypes had a significantly shorter OS than those carrying the CC genotype (Log-rank, P = 0.043). Furthermore, multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that rs667282 TT/TC genotypes are significantly associated with increased risk of overall deaths (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1–2.7). However, the similar results were not observed for other two polymorphisms. Furthermore, no evident association was found between these variants and clinicopathologic features of advanced NSCLC. Our present study suggested that rs667282 in CHRNA5-A3 may modify the prognosis of patients with advanced NSCLC. PMID:27050379

  2. Tetrandrine Combined with Gemcitabine and Cisplatin for Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Improve Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenchao; Zhang, Ju; Ying, Cheng; Wang, Qianrong; Yan, Chen; Jingyue, Yang; Zhaocai, Yu; Yan, Xue; Heng-jun, Shi; Lin, Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer has the highest morbidity and mortality of any malignant tumor. To improve efficacy and reduce toxicity in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), it is important to integrate traditional and conventional medicine. Two hundred and forty patients with advanced NSCLC were randomized to tetrandrine plus GP or GP only. We infused gemcitabine on days 1 and 8; cisplatin on day 1. The tetrandrine group received continuous i.v. infusion for 10 days, with treatment repeated every 21 days. After 2 consecutive treatment cycles, we used RECIST criteria to evaluate short-term efficacy. Quality of life (QOL) was assessed according to Karnofsky score (KPS) and body weight change. We used NCI CTC 3.0 to evaluate treatment toxicity. The short-term objective response rate was 36.1% in the tetrandrine group and 24.3% in the controls (P=0.057). The short-term disease control rate was 63.9% in the tetrandrine group and 52.3% in the controls (P=0.081). The 1-year survival rates were 45.7% and 31.3%, respectively (P=0.059). KPS scores improved by 49.1% and 32.4%, respectively (P=0.012). Body weight increased by 28.7% in the tetrandrine group and 16.2% in the controls (P=0.027). The incidence of grade 2-4 leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, nausea, and vomiting in the tetrandrine group was 38.0%, 19.4%, 46.3%, and 16.7%, respectively; the control group figures were 53.2%, 34.2%, 63.0% and 27.9% (P<0.05). Tetrandrine may improve short-term efficacy and survival in patients with advanced NSCLC. Tetrandrine may also mitigate adverse reactions to chemotherapy and improve QOL for patients with NSCLC. PMID:23675254

  3. Surgical Management of Early-Stage Non-small Cell Lung Carcinoma and the Present and Future Roles of Adjuvant Therapy: A Review for the Radiation Oncologist

    SciTech Connect

    Medford-Davis, Laura; DeCamp, Malcom; Recht, Abram; Flickinger, John; Belani, Chandra P.; Varlotto, John

    2012-12-01

    We review the evidence for optimal surgical management and adjuvant therapy for patients with stages I and II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) along with factors associated with increased risks of recurrence. Based on the current evidence, we recommend optimal use of mediastinal lymph node dissection, adjuvant chemotherapy, and post-operative radiation therapy, and make suggestions for areas to explore in future prospective randomized clinical trials.

  4. A clinical study evaluating dendritic and cytokine-induced killer cells combined with concurrent radiochemotherapy for stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X P; Xu, Y H; Zhou, J; Pan, X F

    2015-08-28

    To compare the efficacy of dendritic and cytokine-induced killer cells (DC-CIK) therapy combined with concurrent radiochemotherapy on stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer. Sixty-three patients with stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer were randomly divided into the study and control groups. The study group, comprising 30 patients, was treated with DC-CIK combined with docetaxel-cisplatin chemotherapy and synchronization conformal radiotherapy. The control group including 33 patients was only treated with docetaxel-cisplatin chemotherapy and synchronization conformal radiotherapy. The efficacy, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), tumor markers, 6-month and 12-month survival rate, T cell subsets, and adverse reactions of the two groups were compared. The response rate of the study group was 83.3% (25/30), and that of the control group was only 54.5% (18/33). Furthermore, the KPS, T cell subsets, and 12-month survival rate was significantly higher in the study group, and there were significant differences between the two groups. The two groups had no significant difference in adverse reactions. The combined DC-CIK therapy, with synchronous radiotherapy and chemotherapy to treat stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer was superior to single synchronous radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The combined therapy can improve the life quality and prolong the survival time of the patients.

  5. Curative Effects of Different Sequences of Vessel Interruption During the Completely Thoracoscopic Lobectomy on Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fengwei; Jiang, Guanchao; Chen, Yingtai

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the correlation between prognosis and different sequences of pulmonary artery and vein interruption during completely thoracoscopic lobectomy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 334 cases underwent completely thoracoscopic lobectomy, which were identified as stage I~II non-small cell lung cancer by pathology. They were divided into three groups according to the order of vessel interruption: pulmonary vein first (Group V, n = 174), pulmonary artery first (Group A, n = 93), and artery-vein-artery group (Group M, n = 67). Their preoperative and operative conditions, and the postoperative survival, recurrence were compared. Results: Group A had less cases with history of smoking but more with history of pulmonary infection. The average bleeding amount during the operation in Group A is significantly less Group V, and Group M fell in between them. The duration of operation and postoperative complications were similar among the three groups. The types of tumor recurrence were also similar, which were mostly distant metastasis. There was no statistically significant difference in tumor-free survival and overall survival among the three groups. Conclusions: For the treatment of stage I~II non-small cell lung cancer using completely thoracoscopic lobectomy, pulmonary artery interruption first can reduce the bleeding amount without affecting the operative difficulty and postoperative complications. The sequence of vessel interruption during lobectomy by thoracoscopic surgery would not affect tumor recurrence, metastasis and survival. PMID:26289504

  6. Cardiogenic syncope possibly related to bevacizumab-containing combination chemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Yosuke; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Matsuda, Jun; Takeda, Norihiko; Tanaka, Goh; Takai, Daiya; Nagase, Takahide

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 55-year-old man with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma who received carboplatin-paclitaxel-bevacizumab chemotherapy as second-line therapy. After four cycles of chemotherapy, he experienced syncope with a decrease in blood pressure. Electrocardiography (ECG) revealed atrial fibrillation. Cardiac ultrasonography showed a markedly reduced ejection fraction (45%), with moderate decrease in comparison to that before chemotherapy (66%). Bisoprolol fumarate was initiated, and the conversion to sinus rhythm was detected by ECG 4 days after the syncope. At that time, no improvement in the ejection fraction was detected. Bevacizumab-associated cardiotoxicity was suspected, and bevacizumab maintenance therapy was discontinued, although the chemotherapy achieved a stable disease status based on the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Two months after bevacizumab cessation, the ejection fraction improved to pretreatment level (62%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on cardiogenic syncope due to left ventricular dysfunction that is most consistent with bevacizumab-associated cardiotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our results indicate that bevacizumab could lead to cardiotoxicity in patients with NSCLC and suggest the importance of the follow-up cardiac ultrasonography. PMID:27747019

  7. Efficacy of erlotinib in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a pooled analysis of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Ding, Xin; Wei, Dong; Cheng, Peng; Su, Xiaomei; Liu, Huanyi; Aziz, Fahad; Wang, Daoyuan; Zhang, Tao

    2011-10-01

    Erlotinib is a potent reversible HER1/epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor with single-agent activity in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of erlotinib for treating advanced non-small cell lung cancer by carrying out a pooled analysis of randomized controlled trials that compared erlotinib-based regimens with other agent-based regimens between January 1997 and 2011. Outcomes analyzed were objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and adverse events. Fourteen trials including 7974 patients were identified. As first-line therapy was compared with chemotherapy, there was a similar ORR [OR: 0.33; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.64-17.36; P=0.15], but decreased PFS [hazard ratio (HR): 1.55; 95% CI: 1.24-1.93; P<0.01] and OS (HR: 1.39; 95% CI: 0.99-1.94; P=0.05). As maintenance therapy was compared with placebo, erlotinib-based regimens significantly increased ORR (OR: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.31-0.70; P<0.01), prolonged PFS (HR: 0.71; 95% CI: 0.60-0.83; P<0.01), but did not improve OS (HR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.68-1.11; P=0.22). As second/third-line therapy was compared with placebo, erlotinib-based regimens also significantly increased ORR (OR: 0.10; 95% CI: 0.02-0.41; P<0.01), prolonged PFS (HR: 0.61; 95% CI: 0.51-0.73; P<0.01), and improved OS (HR: 0.70; 95% CI: 0.58-0.84; P<0.01). However, as second/third-line therapy was compared with chemotherapy, the outcomes were similar between the two arms. When compared with PF299804, there was a decreased ORR (OR: 3.87; 95% CI: 1.27-11.81; P=0.02), and shortened PFS (HR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.49-0.95; P=0.02). Meanwhile, erlotinib-based regimens showed no significant difference in adverse events, except for diarrhea, rash, and anemia. Erlotinib-based regimens significantly increased ORR and improved PFS as a first-line maintenance therapy or as a second/third-line therapy when compared with placebo. PMID:21808188

  8. The Impact of Extent and Location of Mediastinal Lymph Node Involvement on Survival in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Definitive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, Annemarie T.; Mitra, Nandita; Xanthopoulos, Eric; Evans, Tracey; Stevenson, James; Langer, Corey; Kucharczuk, John C.; Lin, Lilie; Rengan, Ramesh

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Several surgical series have identified subcarinal, contralateral, and multilevel nodal involvement as predictors of poor overall survival in patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive resection. This retrospective study evaluates the impact of extent and location of mediastinal lymph node (LN) involvement on survival in patients with Stage III NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 106 consecutive patients with T1-4 N2-3 Stage III NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy at University of Pennsylvania between January 2003 and February 2009. For this analysis, mediastinal LN stations were divided into four mutually exclusive groups: supraclavicular, ipsilateral mediastinum, contralateral mediastinum, and subcarinal. Patients' conditions were then analyzed according to the extent of involvement and location of mediastinal LN stations. Results: The majority (88%) of patients received sequential or concurrent chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 32.6 months. By multivariable Cox modeling, chemotherapy use (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.21 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.07-0.63]) was associated with improved overall survival. Increasing primary tumor [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose avidity (HR: 1.11 [CI: 1.06-1.19]), and subcarinal involvement (HR: 2.29 [CI: 1.11-4.73]) were significant negative predictors of overall survival. On univariate analysis, contralateral nodal involvement (HR: 0.70 [CI: 0.33-1.47]), supraclavicular nodal involvement (HR: 0.78 [CI: 0.38-1.67]), multilevel nodal involvement (HR: 0.97 [CI: 0.58-1.61]), and tumor size (HR: 1.04 [CI: 0.94-1.14]) did not predict for overall survival. Patients with subcarinal involvement also had lower rates of 2-year nodal control (51.2% vs. 74.9%, p = 0.047) and 2-year distant control (28.4% vs. 61.2%, p = 0.043). Conclusions: These data suggest that the factors that determine oncologic outcome in Stage III NSCLC

  9. Impact of FDG-PET/CT on Radiotherapy Volume Delineation in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Correlation of Imaging Stage With Pathologic Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, Sergio L. Menard, Sonia; Devic, Slobodan; Sirois, Christian; Souhami, Luis; Lisbona, Robert; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomography (CT) is more accurate than CT in determining the extent of non-small-cell lung cancer. We performed a study to evaluate the impact of FDG-PET/CT on the radiotherapy volume delineation compared with CT without using any mathematical algorithm and to correlate the findings with the pathologic examination findings. Methods and Materials: A total of 32 patients with proven non-small-cell lung cancer, pathologic specimens from the mediastinum and lung primary, and pretreatment chest CT and FDG-PET/CT scans were studied. For each patient, two data sets of theoretical gross tumor volumes were contoured. One set was determined using the chest CT only, and the second, done separately, was based on the co-registered FDG-PET/CT data. The disease stage of each patient was determined using the TNM staging system for three data sets: the CT scan only, FDG-PET/CT scan, and pathologic findings. Results: Pathologic examination altered the CT-determined stage in 22 (69%) of 32 patients and the PET-determined stage in 16 (50%) of 32 patients. The most significant alterations were related to the N stage. PET altered the TNM stage in 15 (44%) of 32 patients compared with CT alone, but only 7 of these 15 alterations were confirmed by the pathologic findings. With respect to contouring the tumor volume for radiotherapy, PET altered the contour in 18 (56%) of 32 cases compared with CT alone. Conclusion: The contour of the tumor volume of non-small-cell lung cancer patients with co-registered FDG-PET/CT resulted in >50% alterations compared with CT targeting, findings similar to those of other publications. However, the significance of this change is unknown. Furthermore, pathologic examination showed that PET is not always accurate and histologic examination should be obtained to confirm the findings of PET whenever possible.

  10. Prognostic models to predict survival in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with first-line chemo- or targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Berardi, Rossana; Rinaldi, Silvia; Santoni, Matteo; Newsom-Davis, Thomas; Tiberi, Michela; Morgese, Francesca; Caramanti, Miriam; Savini, Agnese; Ferrini, Consuelo; Torniai, Mariangela; Fiordoliva, Ilaria; Bower, Marc; Cascinu, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to assess the prognostic role of neutrophilia, lymphocytopenia and the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), and to design models to define the prognosis of patients receiving first-line chemo- or targeted therapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and Methods We retrospectively analysed 401 consecutive patients with advanced NSCLC treated with first line chemo- or targeted therapy. Patients were stratified into two groups with pre-treatment NLR ≥ 3.7 (Group A) vs. < 3.7 (Group B). The best NLR cut-off was identified by ROC curve analysis. Results At baseline 264 patients had NLR≥3.7 (Group A), whilst 137 had lower NLR (Group B). Median OS was 10.8 months and 19.4 months in the two groups (p < 0.001), while median PFS was 3.6 months and 5.6 months, respectively (p = 0.012). At multivariate analysis, ECOG-PS≥2, stage IV cancer, non-adenocarcinoma histology, EGFR wild-type status and NLR were predictors of worse OS. Stage IV cancer, wild type EGFR status and NLR≥3.7 were independent prognostic factors for worse PFS. Patients were stratified according to the presence of 0-1 prognostic factors (8%), 2-3 factors (73%) and 4-5 factors (19%) and median OS in these groups was 33.7 months, 14.6 months and 6.6 months, respectively (p < 0.001). Similarly, patients were stratified for PFS based on the presence of 0-1 prognostic factor (15%), 2 factors (41%) and 3 factors (44%). The median PFS was 8.3 months, 4.6 months and 3.3 months respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusion Pre-treatment NLR is an independent prognostic factor for patients with advanced NSCLC treated with first-line therapies. PMID:27029035

  11. Comparison of dose–volume histograms between proton beam and X-ray conformal radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Toshiki; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Mizumoto, Masashi; Numajiri, Haruko; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the parameters of the dose–volume histogram (DVH) between proton beam therapy (PBT) and X-ray conformal radiotherapy (XCRT) for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to the tumor conditions. A total of 35 patients having NSCLC treated with PBT were enrolled in this analysis. The numbers of TNM stage and lymph node status were IIB (n = 3), IIIA (n = 15) and IIIB (n = 17), and N0 (n = 2), N1 (n = 4), N2 (n = 17) and N3 (n = 12), respectively. Plans for XCRT were simulated based on the same CT, and the same clinical target volume (CTV) was used based on the actual PBT plan. The treatment dose was 74 Gy-equivalent dose (GyE) for the primary site and 66 GyE for positive lymph nodes. The parameters were then calculated according to the normal lung dose, and the irradiation volumes of the doses (Vx) were compared. We also evaluated the feasibility of both plans according to criteria: V5 ≥ 42%, V20 ≥ 25%, mean lung dose ≥ 20 Gy. The mean normal lung dose and V5 to V50 were significantly lower in PBT than in XCRT. The differences were greater with the more advanced nodal status and with the larger CTV. Furthermore, 45.7% of the X-ray plans were classified as inadequate according to the criteria, whereas 17.1% of the proton plans were considered unsuitable. The number of inadequate X-ray plans increased in cases with advanced nodal stage. This study indicated that some patients who cannot receive photon radiotherapy may be able to be treated using PBT. PMID:25368341

  12. Chemotherapy for Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Protocol Versus Nonprotocol? Is Noninvestigational Treatment Worthwhile? Patient Selection? Which Regimen? What's Next?

    PubMed

    Bonomi

    1996-04-01

    The results of selected chemotherapy trials and philosophical considerations regarding the role of chemotherapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer are discussed in this review. The issue of treating patients within a clinical or with a "standard regimen" is addressed. In addition, the survival results of randomized trials in which chemotherapy was compared with supportive care and the related quality of life and economic concerns are reviewed. Physicians' attitudes regarding treating advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients as well as the questions of patient selection and the choice of regimen including the consideration of single versus combination regimens are discussed. The results of single agent phase II trials that identified new agents with response rates >/=15%-paclitaxel, docetaxel, vinorelbine, gemcitabine, CPT11-are described, and their implications for the design of new clinical trials are discussed.

  13. Toxicity of concurrent radiochemotherapy for locally advanced non--small-cell lung cancer: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Koning, Caro C; Wouterse, Sanne J; Daams, Joost G; Uitterhoeve, Lon L; van den Heuvel, Michel M; Belderbos, José S

    2013-09-01

    Concurrent radiochemotherapy (RCT) is the treatment of choice for patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two meta-analyses were inconclusive in an attempt to define the optimal concurrent RCT scheme. Besides efficacy, treatment toxicity will influence the appointed treatment of choice. A systematic review of the literature was performed to record the early and late toxicities, as well as overall survival, of concurrent RCT regimens in patients with NSCLC. The databases of PubMed, Ovid, Medline, and the Cochrane Library were searched for articles on concurrent RCT published between January 1992 and December 2009. Publications of phase II and phase III trials with ≥ 50 patients per treatment arm were selected. Patient characteristics, chemotherapy regimen (mono- or polychemotherapy, high or low dose) and radiotherapy scheme, acute and late toxicity, and overall survival data were compared. Seventeen articles were selected: 12 studies with cisplatin-containing regimens and 5 studies using carboplatin. A total of 13 series with mono- or polychemotherapy schedules--as single dose or double or triple high-dose or daily cisplatin-containing (≤ 30 mg/m(2)/wk) chemotherapy were found. Acute esophagitis ≥ grade 3 was observed in up to 18% of the patients. High-dose cisplatin regimens resulted in more frequent and severe hematologic toxicity, nausea, and vomiting than did other schemes. The toxicity profile was more favorable in low-dose chemotherapy schedules. From phase II and III trials published between 1992 and 2010, it can be concluded that concurrent RCT with monochemotherapy consisting of daily cisplatin results in favorable acute and late toxicity compared with concurrent RCT with single high-dose chemotherapy, doublets, or triplets.

  14. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Dose-Escalation Planning Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lievens, Yolande; Nulens, An; Gaber, Mousa Amr; Defraene, Gilles; De Wever, Walter; Stroobants, Sigrid; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential for dose escalation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in positron emission tomography-based radiotherapy planning for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods and Materials: For 35 LA-NSCLC patients, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and IMRT plans were made to a prescription dose (PD) of 66 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Dose escalation was performed toward the maximal PD using secondary endpoint constraints for the lung, spinal cord, and heart, with de-escalation according to defined esophageal tolerance. Dose calculation was performed using the Eclipse pencil beam algorithm, and all plans were recalculated using a collapsed cone algorithm. The normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated for the lung (Grade 2 pneumonitis) and esophagus (acute toxicity, grade 2 or greater, and late toxicity). Results: IMRT resulted in statistically significant decreases in the mean lung (p <.0001) and maximal spinal cord (p = .002 and 0005) doses, allowing an average increase in the PD of 8.6-14.2 Gy (p {<=}.0001). This advantage was lost after de-escalation within the defined esophageal dose limits. The lung normal tissue complication probabilities were significantly lower for IMRT (p <.0001), even after dose escalation. For esophageal toxicity, IMRT significantly decreased the acute NTCP values at the low dose levels (p = .0009 and p <.0001). After maximal dose escalation, late esophageal tolerance became critical (p <.0001), especially when using IMRT, owing to the parallel increases in the esophageal dose and PD. Conclusion: In LA-NSCLC, IMRT offers the potential to significantly escalate the PD, dependent on the lung and spinal cord tolerance. However, parallel increases in the esophageal dose abolished the advantage, even when using collapsed cone algorithms. This is important to consider in the context of concomitant chemoradiotherapy schedules using IMRT.

  15. Systemic inflammatory status at baseline predicts bevacizumab benefit in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Botta, Cirino; Barbieri, Vito; Ciliberto, Domenico; Rossi, Antonio; Rocco, Danilo; Addeo, Raffaele; Staropoli, Nicoletta; Pastina, Pierpaolo; Marvaso, Giulia; Martellucci, Ignazio; Guglielmo, Annamaria; Pirtoli, Luigi; Sperlongano, Pasquale; Gridelli, Cesare; Caraglia, Michele; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Correale, Pierpaolo

    2013-01-01

    Bevacizumab is a humanized anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody able to produce clinical benefit in advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients when combined to chemotherapy. At present, while there is a rising attention to bevacizumab-related adverse events and costs, no clinical or biological markers have been identified and validated for baseline patient selection. Preclinical findings suggest an important role for myeloid-derived inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils and monocytes, in the development of VEGF-independent angiogenesis. We conducted a retrospective analysis to investigate the role of peripheral blood cells count and of an inflammatory index, the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), as predictors of clinical outcome in NSCLC patients treated with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy. One hundred twelve NSCLC patients treated with chemotherapy ± bevacizumab were retrospectively evaluated for the predictive value of clinical or laboratory parameters correlated with inflammatory status. Univariate analysis revealed that a high number of circulating neutrophils and monocytes as well as a high NLR were associated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in bevacizumab-treated patients only. We have thus developed a model based on the absence or the presence of at least one of the above-mentioned inflammatory parameters. We found that the absence of all variables strongly correlated with longer PFS and OS (9.0 vs. 7.0 mo, HR: 0.39, p = 0.002; and 20.0 vs. 12.0 mo, HR: 0.29, p < 0.001 respectively) only in NSCLC patients treated with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy. Our results suggest that a baseline systemic inflammatory status is marker of resistance to bevacizumab treatment in NSCLC patients. PMID:23760488

  16. Interstitial lung abnormalities in treatment-naïve advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients are associated with shorter survival

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Mizuki; Cardarella, Stephanie; Dahlberg, Suzanne E.; Araki, Tetsuro; Lydon, Christine; Jackman, David M.; Rabin, Michael S.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Johnson, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Interstitial lung diseases are associated with increased risk of lung cancer. The prevalence of ILA at diagnosis of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its impact on overall survival (OS) remain to be investigated. Materials and Method The study included 120 treatment-naïve stage IV NSCLC patients (53 males, 67 females). ILA was scored on CT prior to any systemic therapy using a 4-point scale [0=no evidence of ILA, 1=equivocal for ILA, 2=suspicious for ILA, 3=ILA] by a sequential reading method previously reported. ILA scores of 2 or 3 indicated the presence of ILA. Results ILA was present in 17 patients (14%) with advanced NSCLC prior to any treatment (score3:n=2, score2:n=15). These 17 patients were significantly older (median age: 69 vs. 63, p=0.04) and had a heavier smoking history (median: 40 vs. 15.5 pack-year, p=0.003) than those with ILA score 0 or 1. Higher ILA scores were associated with shorter OS (p=0.001). Median OS of the 17 patients with ILA was 7.2 months [95%CI: 2.9-9.4] compared to 14.8 months [95%CI: 11.1-18.4] in patients with ILA score 0 or 1 (p=0.002). In a multivariate model, the presence of ILA remained significant for increased risk for death (HR=2.09, p=0.028) after adjusting for first-line systemic therapy (chemotherapy, p<0.001; TKI, p<0.001; each compared to no therapy) and pack years of smoking (p=0.40). Conclusion Radiographic ILA was present in 14% of treatment-naïve advanced NSCLC patients. Higher ILA scores were associated with shorter OS, indicating that ILA could be a marker of shorter survival in advanced NSCLC. PMID:25726730

  17. Prognostic Significance of Clinical/Pathological Stage IA Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Showing Partially Solid or Solid Tumours on Radiological Exam

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Yosuke; Nakao, Masayuki; Mun, Mingyon; Nakagawa, Ken; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Okumura, Sakae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Although curative resection is expected to be effective in patients with clinical (c-) stage IA/pathological (p-) stage IA non-small-cell lung cancers, recurrence is often observed. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify predictors of recurrence. Methods: Between 2005 and 2009, 138 patients with c-stage IA/p-stage IA non-small-cell lung cancers underwent resection. Recurrence and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were compared with clinical, radiographic and pathological findings. Results: The 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 97% and the RFS rate was 89% at a median follow-up time of 91 months. Recurrence was observed in 10 patients (7.2%). Significant differences were observed in RFS according to tumour dimensions on the mediastinal window image (>1.5 cm), serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels (>5.0 ng/mL), maximum standardised uptake values (SUVmax >2.5) and angiolymphatic invasion. Patients were grouped according to the number of risk factors for poor RFS. Patients with 0–1 of the identified risk factors had an RFS of 97%, where those with 2–4 factors had an RFS of 68% (p <0.001). Conclusion: Prognosis of patients exhibiting more than two of these risk factors is considerably poor. Thus, close observation and individualised adjuvant therapy may be beneficial to these patients. PMID:25740451

  18. Effects of ATP infusion on glucose turnover and gluconeogenesis in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Agteresch, H J; Leij-Halfwerk, S; Van Den Berg, J W; Hordijk-Luijk, C H; Wilson, J H; Dagnelie, P C

    2000-06-01

    Cancer cachexia is associated with elevated lipolysis, proteolysis and gluconeogenesis. ATP infusion has been found to significantly inhibit loss of body weight, fat mass and fat-free mass in patients with advanced lung cancer. The present study was aimed at exploring the effects of ATP on whole-body glucose turnover, alanine turnover and gluconeogenesis from alanine. Twelve patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were studied 1 week before and during 22-24 h of continuous ATP infusion. After an overnight fast, turnover rates of glucose and alanine, and gluconeogenesis from alanine, were determined using primed constant infusions of ¿6, 6-(2)H(2)ğlucose and ¿3-(13)Călanine. Thirteen NSCLC patients and eleven healthy subjects were studied as control groups without ATP infusion. During high-dose ATP infusion (75 microg.min(-1).kg(-1)), glucose turnover was 0.62+/-0.07 mmol.h(-1).kg(-1), compared with 0. 44+/-0.13 mmol.h(-1).kg(-1) at baseline (P=0.04). For gluconeogenesis a similar, but non-significant, trend was observed ¿baseline, 0.30+/-0.16 mmol.h(-1).kg(-1); during ATP, 0.37+/-0.13 mmol.h(-1).kg(-1) (P=0.08). At lower ATP doses (37-50 microg. min(-1).kg(-1)) these effects were not detected. The relative increase in glucose turnover during ATP infusion compared with baseline showed a significant correlation with the ATP dose (r=0.58, P=0.02). No change in alanine turnover was observed at any ATP dose. The results of this study indicate an increase in glucose turnover during high-dose ATP infusion compared with baseline levels. During high-dose ATP infusion, glucose turnover was similar to that during low-dose ATP infusion and to that in control NSCLC patients. Between ATP infusions, however, glucose turnover in patients treated with high-dose ATP was significantly lower than that in the low-dose and control NSCLC patients (P=0.04 and P=0.03 respectively), and similar to that in healthy subjects. This would suggest that repeated high

  19. Targeted drugs for unselected patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yueguang; Wang, Fang; Li, Shanshan; Wang, Xiaojie; Shou, Tao; Luo, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background Currently, targeted therapy has shown encouraging treatment benefits in selected patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the comparative benefits of targeted drugs and chemotherapy (CT) treatments in unselected patients are not clear. We therefore conduct a network meta-analysis to assess the relative efficacy and safety of these regimens. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and abstracts from major scientific meetings were searched for eligible literatures. The odds ratio (OR) for objective response rate (ORR) and safety was used for pooling effect sizes. Bayesian network meta-analysis was conducted to calculate the efficacy and safety of all included treatments. All tests of statistical significance were two sided. Results A total of 13,060 patients from 24 randomized controlled trials (RCT) were assessed. The targeted agents included bevacizumab (Bev), gefitinib (Gef), erlotinib (Erl) and cetuximab (Cet). Network meta-analysis showed that Bev + CT had a statistically significantly higher incidence of ORR relative to the other six different treatments, including placebo (OR =6.47; 95% CI, 3.85–10.29), Erl (OR =2.81; 95% CI, 2.08–3.70), CT (OR =1.92; 95% CI, 1.61–2.28), Gef (OR =1.40; 95% CI, 1.10–1.75), Erl + CT (OR =1.46; 95% CI, 1.17–1.80) and Gef + CT (OR =1.75; 95% CI, 1.36–2.22), whereas placebo and Erl were associated with statistically significantly lower incidence of ORR. Trend analyses of rank probability revealed that Bev + CT had the highest probability of being the best treatment arm in term of ORR, followed by Cet + CT. Meanwhile, Cet + CT showed significant severer rash and thrombocytopenia compared with Bev + CT. Gef was probable to be the rank 3 for ORR but was associated with relatively low risk for grade ≥3 toxicities. Conclusions Our study suggested that Bev + CT may offer better ORR in the treatment of unselected patients with advanced NSCLC. Future studies will be needed to investigate

  20. Pemetrexed combined with paclitaxel in patients with advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: a phase I-II trial.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, George P; Dimitroulis, John; Toubis, Michael; Katis, Costas; Karaindros, Dimitris; Stathopoulos, John; Koutandos, John

    2007-07-01

    Pemetrexed, a novel multi-targeted agent established for the treatment of mesothelioma, has been under investigation for other malignancies, and in recent years particularly for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the present trial we investigated pemetrexed in combination with paclitaxel as front-line treatment in advanced or metastatic NSCLC. Our objectives were to determine the response rate, median and overall survival and toxicity. From April 2005 until May 2006, 51 patients with advanced or metastatic NSCLC were enrolled and 48 were considered evaluable. There were 39 males and nine females, median age 62 years (range 37-81 years), one patient stage IIIA N(2), 23 patients, IIIB and 24, stage IV. All patients had a cytologically- or histologically-confirmed diagnosis. Pemetrexed was administered at a standard dose of 500mg/m(2) and paclitaxel at an escalating dose starting at 135mg/m(2), then 150mg/m(2) and ending at a dose of 175mg/m(2); the level was increased every three patients. Both agents were administered on day 1, repeated every 3 weeks for six courses. A 39.6% partial response rate was observed with a median survival of 14 months. Toxicity was mild with 8.3% grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and other very mild hematologic and non-hematologic adverse reactions. The combination of pemetrexed and paclitaxel at doses of 500mg/m(2) and 175mg/m(2), respectively, has been shown to be an effective combination with very limited toxicity. PMID:17382431

  1. Minimally invasive (robotic assisted thoracic surgery and video-assisted thoracic surgery) lobectomy for the treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hao-Xian; Woo, Kaitlin M.; Sima, Camelia S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Insufficient data exist on the results of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) traditionally approached by thoracotomy. The use of telerobotic surgical systems may allow for greater utilization of MIS approaches to locally advanced disease. We will review the existing literature on MIS for locally advanced disease and briefly report on the results of a recent study conducted at our institution. Methods We performed a retrospective review of a prospective single institution database to identify patients with clinical stage II and IIIA NSCLC who underwent lobectomy following induction chemotherapy. The patients were classified into two groups (MIS and thoracotomy) and were compared for differences in outcomes and survival. Results From January 2002 to December 2013, 428 patients {397 thoracotomy, 31 MIS [17 robotic and 14 video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS)]} underwent induction chemotherapy followed by lobectomy. The conversion rate in the MIS group was 26% (8/31) The R0 resection rate was similar between the groups (97% for MIS vs. 94% for thoracotomy; P=0.71), as was postoperative morbidity (32% for MIS vs. 33% for thoracotomy; P=0.99). The median length of hospital stay was shorter in the MIS group (4 vs. 5 days; P<0.001). The 3-year overall survival (OS) was 48.3% in the MIS group and 56.6% in the thoracotomy group (P=0.84); the corresponding 3-year DFS were 49.0% and 42.1% (P=0.19). Conclusions In appropriately selected patients with NSCLC, MIS approaches to lobectomy following induction therapy are feasible and associated with similar disease-free and OS to those following thoracotomy. PMID:27195138

  2. Vorinostat and bortezomib as third-line therapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a Wisconsin Oncology Network Phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Toby C.; Zhang, Chong; Kim, KyungMann; Kolesar, Jill M.; Oettel, Kurt R.; Blank, Jules H.; Robinson, Emily G.; Ahuja, Harish G.; Kirschling, Ron J.; Johnson, Peter H.; Huie, Michael S.; Wims, Mary E.; Larson, Martha M.; Hernan, Hilary R.; Traynor, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction The primary objective of this phase II trial was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of vorinostat and bortezomib as third-line therapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Eligibility criteria included recurrent/metastatic NSCLC, having received 2 prior systemic regimens, and performance status 0–2. Patients took vorinostat 400 mg PO daily days 1–14 and bortezomib 1.3 mg/m2 IV day 1, 4, 8 and 11 in a 21-day cycle. Primary endpoint was 3-month progression free survival (3m-PFS), with a goal of at least 40 % of patients being free of progression at that time point. This study followed a two-stage minimax design. Results Eighteen patients were enrolled in the first stage. All patients had two prior lines of treatment. Patients received a median of two treatment cycles (range: 1–6) on study. There were no anti-tumor responses; stable disease was observed in 5 patients (27.8 %). Median PFS was 1.5 months, 3m-PFS rate 11.1 %, and median overall survival 4.7 months. The most common grade 3/4 toxicities were thrombocytopenia and fatigue. Two patients who had baseline taxane-related grade 1 peripheral neuropathy developed grade 3 neuropathy. The study was closed at its first interim analysis for lack of efficacy. Conclusions Bortezomib and vorinostat displayed minimal anti-tumor activity as third-line therapy in NSCLC. We do not recommend this regimen for further investigation in unselected patients. PMID:23728919

  3. Relationship between quality of life and clinical outcomes in advanced non-small cell lung cancer: best supportive care (BSC) versus BSC plus chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Thongprasert, S; Sanguanmitra, P; Juthapan, W; Clinch, J

    1999-04-01

    In a prospective randomized study, 287 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) stage IIIb or IV with ECOG performance status (PS) 0-1 or 2 were randomly assigned to receive either best supportive care (BSC) or supportive care plus combination chemotherapy (IEP regimen: ifosfamide 3 gm/m2 IV with mesna uroprotection, epirubicin 60 mg/m2 IV on day 1 and cisplatin 60 mg/m2 IV on day 2; or MVP regimen: mitomycin-C 8 mg/m2, cisplatin 100 mg/m2 IV on day 1, vinblastine 4 mg/m2 IV on days 1 and 15). Serial assessment of Karnofsky performance status (KPS), modified Functional Living Index-Cancer (T-FLIC) and modified Quality of Life-Index (T-QLI) were used to estimate the quality of life. Interviews were done at entry, at the third month and at 2 months post complete treatment. At least two courses of chemotherapy were considered to be adequate for response evaluation. Patients were treated for a total of four to six courses or until progression of disease. Partial response rates were 40 and 41.7% in IEP and MVP arms. Median survival durations were 5.9 and 8.1 months for the IEP and MVP chemotherapy arms, and 4.1 months for BSC (log-rank test: P = 0.0003). One year survival was 13, 29.8 and 39.3% for the BSC, IEP and MVP regimens, respectively. Two years survival was 7.8, 6.4 and 13.1% for the BSC, IEP and MVP regimens, respectively. Improvement in quality of life (QOL) scores at the first, second and third interview were seen in chemotherapy arms only, not in the BSC arm. We conclude that combination chemotherapy improves the quality of life as well as prolonging the survival of patients with advanced NSCLC.

  4. Economic Evaluation of Companion Diagnostic Testing for EGFR Mutations and First-Line Targeted Therapy in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Eun-A; Bae, Eunmi; Lim, Jaeok; Shin, Young Kee; Choi, Sang-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background As targeted therapy becomes increasingly important, diagnostic techniques for identifying targeted biomarkers have also become an emerging issue. The study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of treating patients as guided by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status compared with a no-testing strategy that is the current clinical practice in South Korea. Methods A cost-utility analysis was conducted to compare an EGFR mutation testing strategy with a no-testing strategy from the Korean healthcare payer’s perspective. The study population consisted of patients with stage 3b and 4 lung adenocarcinoma. A decision tree model was employed to select the appropriate treatment regimen according to the results of EGFR mutation testing and a Markov model was constructed to simulate disease progression of advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The length of a Markov cycle was one month, and the time horizon was five years (60 cycles). Results In the base case analysis, the testing strategy was a dominant option. Quality-adjusted life-years gained (QALYs) were 0.556 and 0.635, and total costs were $23,952 USD and $23,334 USD in the no-testing and testing strategy respectively. The sensitivity analyses showed overall robust results. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) increased when the number of patients to be treated with erlotinib increased, due to the high cost of erlotinib. Conclusion Treating advanced adenocarcinoma based on EGFR mutation status has beneficial effects and saves the cost compared to no testing strategy in South Korea. However, the cost-effectiveness of EGFR mutation testing was heavily affected by the cost-effectiveness of the targeted therapy. PMID:27483001

  5. Potential of Adaptive Radiotherapy to Escalate the Radiation Dose in Combined Radiochemotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Wilbert, Juergen; Richter, Anne; Baier, Kurt; Flentje, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential of adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in terms of lung sparing and dose escalation. Methods and Materials: In 13 patients with locally advanced NSCLC, weekly CT images were acquired during radio- (n = 1) or radiochemotherapy (n = 12) for simulation of ART. Three-dimensional (3D) conformal treatment plans were generated: conventionally fractionated doses of 66 Gy were prescribed to the planning target volume without elective lymph node irradiation (Plan{sub 3}D). Using a surface-based algorithm of deformable image registration, accumulated doses were calculated in the CT images acquired during the treatment course (Plan{sub 4}D). Field sizes were adapted to tumor shrinkage once in week 3 or 5 and twice in weeks 3 and 5. Results: A continuous tumor regression of 1.2% per day resulted in a residual gross tumor volume (GTV) of 49% {+-} 15% after six weeks of treatment. No systematic differences between Plan{sub 3}D and Plan{sub 4}D were observed regarding doses to the GTV, lung, and spinal cord. Plan adaptation to tumor shrinkage resulted in significantly decreased lung doses without compromising GTV coverage: single-plan adaptation in Week 3 or 5 and twice-plan adaptation in Weeks 3 and 5 reduced the mean lung dose by 5.0% {+-} 4.4%, 5.6% {+-} 2.9% and 7.9% {+-} 4.8%, respectively. This lung sparing with twice ART allowed an iso-mean lung dose escalation of the GTV dose from 66.8 Gy {+-} 0.8 Gy to 73.6 Gy {+-} 3.8 Gy. Conclusions: Adaptation of radiotherapy to continuous tumor shrinkage during the treatment course reduced doses to the lung, allowed significant dose escalation and has the potential of increased local control.

  6. Pre-operative chemotherapy in early stage resectable non-small-cell lung cancer: a randomized feasibility study justifying a multicentre phase III trial

    PubMed Central

    Boer, R H de; Smith, I E; Pastorino, U; O'Brien, M E R; Ramage, F; Ashley, S; Goldstraw, P

    1999-01-01

    Surgical resection offers the best chance for cure for early stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, stage I, II, IIIA), but the 5-year survival rates are only moderate, with systemic relapse being the major cause of death. Pre-operative (neo-adjuvant) chemotherapy has shown promise in small trials restricted to stage IIIA patients. We believe similar trials are now appropriate in all stages of operable lung cancer. A feasibility study was performed in 22 patients with early stage (IB, II, IIIA) resectable NSCLC; randomized to either three cycles of chemotherapy [mitomycin-C 8 mg m−2, vinblastine 6 mg m−2 and cisplatin 50 mg m−2 (MVP)] followed by surgery (n = 11), or to surgery alone. Of 40 eligible patients, 22 agreed to participate (feasibility 55%) and all complied with the full treatment schedule. All symptomatic patients achieved either complete (50%) or partial (50%) relief of tumour-related symptoms with pre-operative chemotherapy. Fifty-five per cent achieved objective tumour response, and a further 27% minor tumour shrinkage; none had progressive disease. Partial pathological response was seen in 50%. No severe (WHO grade III–IV) toxicities occurred. No significant deterioration in quality of life was detected during chemotherapy. Pre-operative MVP chemotherapy is feasible in early stage NSCLC, and this study has now been initiated as a UK-wide Medical Research Council phase III trial. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10188899

  7. Outcomes of Lobectomy in ‘Active’ Octogenarians with Clinical Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Haruhiko; Yamada, Kouzo; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Masuda, Munetaka

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In octogenarians with early stage of lung cancer, sublobar resection has been shown to be no inferior survival to lobectomy. However, some octogenarians remain physically and mentally active. Methods: We retrospectively studied 65 octogenarians who underwent curative resection for clinical stage I NSCLC (excluding adenocarcinoma in situ). All patients were assessed by cardiologists and underwent stair-climbing tests (five flights, 18 m) and cognitive function tests. Lobectomy was performed in patients who could climb 5 flights of stairs without stopping or oxygen desaturation of >4%. Results: The actuarial survival rate was 68.6% at 5 years, and the median survival time was 109.2 months. Forty-three patients met the criteria for lobectomy. As compared with sublobar resection, lobectomy was associated with significantly higher rates of overall survival (78.4% vs. 48.5%; p = 0.02) and disease-specific survival (88.4% vs. 61.7%; p = 0.02) at 5 years. On multivariate analysis, male sex (hazard ratio, 3.827; 1.382–10.596) and sublobar resection (2.261; 1.054–5.360) were independent risk factors for survival. Mental disorders occurred in 6 patients (9.2%), and their score on preoperative cognitive function tests was significantly lower than that of patients without mental disorders (22.7 vs. 26.0, p <0.01). Conclusion: Outcomes of lobectomy are good in physically and mentally competent octogenarians. PMID:24747546

  8. Effect of Amifostine on Response Rates in Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated on Randomized Controlled Trials: A Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mell, Loren K. . E-mail: lmell@radonc.uchicago.edu; Malik, Renuka; Komaki, Ritsuko; Movsas, Benjamin; Swann, R. Suzanne; Langer, Corey; Antonadou, Dosia; Koukourakis, Michael

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: Amifostine can reduce the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, but concerns remain regarding its possible tumor-protective effects. Studies with sufficient statistical power to address this question are lacking. Methods and Materials: We performed a meta-analysis of all published clinical trials involving locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy, who had been randomized to treatment with amifostine vs. no amifostine or placebo. Random effects estimates of the relative risk of overall, partial, and complete response were obtained. Results: Seven randomized trials involving 601 patients were identified. Response rate data were available for six studies (552 patients). The pooled relative risk (RR) estimate was 1.07 (95% confidence interval, 0.97-1.18; p = 0.18), 1.21 (95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.78; p = 0.33), and 0.99 (95% confidence interval, 0.78-1.26; p = 0.95) for overall, complete, and partial response, respectively (a RR >1 indicates improvement in response with amifostine compared with the control arm). The results were similar after sensitivity analyses. No evidence was found of treatment effect heterogeneity across the studies. Conclusions: Amifostine has no effect on tumor response in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer treated with radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy.

  9. “Old people suffer the ravages of the years”: changes of treatments in elderly patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Viti, Andrea; Terzi, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The increase in life expectancy and the spreading of lung cancer screening led to a further rise of newly detected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. Age, per se, should not be considered a contraindication for treatments in fit patients. Early stage NSCLC is more and more treated with minimally invasive surgery. Stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) has been developed as an innovative therapy for stage I NSCLC and is now considered a standard treatment option for medically inoperable patients or for patient who refuse operation. Preoperative careful functional evaluations either respiratory or cardiovascular, as well as preoperative staging, are mandatory to pose indication for surgery in elderly. On the other hand, all elderly patients with lung cancer should have some form of assessment of physiologic age. As minimally invasive thoracic surgery has reduced the postoperative morbidity and has led to a decrease in the length of hospital stay, lobectomy remains the treatment of choice for early stage NSCLC in elderly patients. Discussion by experienced multidisciplinary team is the best approach to evaluate the advantages/disadvantages of each treatment modality in elderly patients with early-stage NSCLC. PMID:26207242

  10. Intensified High-Dose Chemoradiotherapy With Induction Chemotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer-Safety and Toxicity Results Within a Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Poettgen, Christoph; Eberhardt, Wilfried E.; Gauler, Thomas; Krbek, Thomas; Berkovic, Katharina; Abu Jawad, Jehad; Korfee, Soenke; Teschler, Helmut; Stamatis, Georgios; Stuschke, Martin

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To analyze the toxicity profile of an intensified definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) schedule in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (Stage IIIA N2/selected IIIB) treated within a prospective multicenter trial. Patients and Methods: After mediastinoscopy and routine staging procedures, three cycles of induction chemotherapy (cisplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 1 and 8; paclitaxel 175 mg/m{sup 2} Day 1, every 21 days) were planned, followed by concurrent CRT (accelerated-hyperfractionated regimen, 45 Gy, 2 x 1.5 Gy/d, cisplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 64 and 71, vinorelbine 20 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 64 and 71). At 45 Gy, a multidisciplinary panel decision was made regarding operability. Inoperable patients received definitive radiotherapy (total dose 65 or 71 Gy, depending on the mean lung dose) with additional concurrent chemotherapy (cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2}, Day 85; vinorelbine 15 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 85 and 92). Results: A total of 28 patients (23 men and 5 women; median age, 58 years; range 41-73; Stage IIIA in 3 and Stage IIIB in 25) were judged ineligible for surgery by the multidisciplinary panel and underwent definitive CRT (75% of the patients received 71 Gy). The maximum toxicity (Grade 3 or greater) during induction chemotherapy included leukopenia (11%) and anemia (4%). During concurrent CRT, leukopenia (Grade 3 or greater) was observed in 39% of the patients. The maximal nonhematologic toxicity during concurrent CRT included esophagitis (Grade 3 or greater) in 18% and pneumonitis (Grade 3 or greater) in 4% of the patients. At 3 years, the locoregional control rate was 52% (95% confidence interval, 29-75%) and the overall survival rate was 31% (95% confidence interval, 12-50%). Conclusion: This intensified treatment protocol with induction chemotherapy and concurrent CRT, including hyperfractionated-accelerated RT, showed only moderate toxicity and proved feasible. This treatment represents the definitive CRT arm of our ongoing

  11. Dosimetric comparison of flattened and unflattened beams for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hrbacek, Jan; Lang, Stephanie; Graydon, Shaun N.; Klöck, Stephan; Riesterer, Oliver

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To compare contribution and accuracy of delivery for two flattening filter free (FFF) beams of the nominal energy 6 and 10 MV and a 6 MV flattened beam for early stage lung cancer. Methods: For each of 11 patients with stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer three volumetric modulated arc therapy plans were prepared utilizing a 6 MV flattened photon beam (X6FF) and two nonflattened beams of nominal energy 6 and 10 MV (X6FFF, X10FFF). Optimization constraints were set to produce dose distributions that meet the criteria of the RTOG-0915 protocol. The radiation schedule used for plan comparison in all patients was 50 Gy in five fractions. Dosimetric parameters of planning target volume (PTV) and organs-at-risk and delivery times were assessed and compared. All plans were subject to verification using Delta{sup 4} unit (Scandidos, Sweden) and absolutely calibrated gafchromic films in a thorax phantom. Results: All plans had a qualitatively comparable outcome. Obtained dose distributions were conformal (CI < 1.17) and exhibited a steep dose fall-off outside the PTV. The ratio of monitor units for FFF versus FF plans in the authors' study ranged from 0.95 to 1.21 and from 0.93 to 1.25 for X6FFF/X6FF and X10FFF/X6FF comparisons, respectively. The ratio systematically increased with increasing size of the PTV (up to +25% for 150 cm{sup 3} PTV). Yet the integral dose to healthy tissue did not follow this trend. Comparison of cumulative dose volume histograms for a patient's body showed that X6FFF plans exhibit improved conformity and reduced the volume of tissue that received more than 50% of the prescription dose. Parameters related to dose gradient showed statistically significant improvement. CI{sub 50%}, CI{sub 60%}, CI{sub 80%}, and CI{sub 100%} were on average reduced by 4.6% (p < 0.001), 4.6% (p = 0.002), 3.1% (p = 0.002), and 1.2% (p = 0.039), respectively. Gradient measure was on average reduced by 4.2% (p < 0.001). Due to dose reduction in the surrounding lung

  12. Radiological response and survival in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with three-drug induction chemotherapy followed by radical local treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, Laura; Zago, Giulia; Marulli, Giuseppe; Del Bianco, Paola; Schiavon, Marco; Pasello, Giulia; Polo, Valentina; Canova, Fabio; Tonetto, Fabrizio; Loreggian, Lucio; Rea, Federico; Conte, PierFranco; Favaretto, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives If concurrent chemoradiotherapy cannot be performed, induction chemotherapy followed by radical-intent surgical treatment is an acceptable option for non primarily resectable non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). No markers are available to predict which patients may benefit from local treatment after induction. This exploratory study aims to assess the feasibility and the activity of multimodality treatment, including triple-agent chemotherapy followed by radical surgery and/or radiotherapy in locally advanced NSCLCs. Methods We retrospectively collected data from locally advanced NSCLCs treated with induction chemotherapy with carboplatin (area under the curve 6, d [day]1), paclitaxel (200 mg/m2, d1), and gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2 d1, 8) for three to four courses, followed by radical surgery and/or radiotherapy. We analyzed radiological response and toxicity. Estimated progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were correlated to response, surgery, and clinical features. Results In all, 58 NSCLCs were included in the study: 40 staged as IIIA, 18 as IIIB (according to TNM Classification of Malignant Tumors–7th edition staging system). A total of 36 (62%) patients achieved partial response (PR), and six (10%) progressions were recorded. Grade 3–4 hematological toxicity was observed in 36 (62%) cases. After chemotherapy, 37 (64%) patients underwent surgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy, and two patients received radical-intent radiotherapy. The median PFS and OS were 11 months and 23 months, respectively. Both PFS and OS were significantly correlated to objective response (P<0.0001) and surgery (P<0.0001 and P=0.002). Patients obtaining PR and receiving local treatment achieved a median PFS and OS of 35 and 48 months, respectively. Median PFS and OS of patients not achieving PR or not receiving local treatment were 5–7 and 11–15 months, respectively. The extension of surgery did not affect the outcome. Conclusion The

  13. High plasma exposure to pemetrexed leads to severe hyponatremia in patients with advanced non small cell lung cancer receiving pemetrexed-platinum doublet chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gota, Vikram; Kavathiya, Krunal; Doshi, Kartik; Gurjar, Murari; Damodaran, Solai E; Noronha, Vanita; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background Pemetrexed-platinum doublet therapy is a standard treatment for stage IIIb/IV nonsquamous non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). While the regimen is associated with several grade ≥3 toxicities, hyponatremia is not a commonly reported adverse effect. Here we report an unusually high incidence of grade ≥3 hyponatremia in Indian patients receiving pemetrexed-platinum doublet, and the pharmacological basis for this phenomenon. Methods Forty-six patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled for a bioequivalence study of two pemetrexed formulations. All patients received the pemetrexed-platinum doublet for six cycles followed by single-agent pemetrexed maintenance until progression. Pharmacokinetic blood samples were collected at predefined time points during the first cycle and the concentration-time profile of pemetrexed was investigated by noncompartmental analysis. Hyponatremic episodes were investigated with serum electrolytes, serum osmolality, urinary sodium, and urine osmolality. Results Sixteen of 46 patients (35%) had at least one episode of grade ≥3 hyponatremia. Twenty-four episodes of grade ≥3 hyponatremia were observed in 200 cycles of doublet chemotherapy. Plasma exposure to pemetrexed was significantly higher in patients with high-grade hyponatremia than in those with low-grade or no hyponatremia (P=0.063 and P=0.001, respectively). Pemetrexed clearance in high-grade hyponatremia was quite low compared with normal and low-grade hyponatremia (P=0.001 and P=0.055, respectively). Median pemetrexed exposure in this cohort was much higher than that reported in the literature from Western studies. Conclusion Higher exposure to pemetrexed is associated with grade ≥3 hyponatremia. The pharmacogenetic basis for higher exposure to pemetrexed in Indian patients needs further investigation. PMID:24940080

  14. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Can Be Used Safely to Boost Residual Disease in Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Feddock, Jonathan; Arnold, Susanne M.; Shelton, Brent J.; Sinha, Partha; Conrad, Gary; Chen, Li; Rinehart, John; McGarry, Ronald C.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a prospective, single-institution study evaluating the feasibility of conventional chemoradiation (CRT) followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) as a means of dose escalation for patients with stage II-III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with residual disease. Methods and Materials: Patients without metastatic disease and with radiologic evidence of limited residual disease (≤5 cm) within the site of the primary tumor and good or complete nodal responses after standard CRT to a target dose of 60 Gy were considered eligible. The SBRT boost was done to achieve a total combined dose biological equivalent dose >100 Gy to the residual primary tumor, consisting of 10 Gy × 2 fractions (20 Gy total) for peripheral tumors, and 6.5 Gy × 3 fractions (19.5 Gy total) for medial tumors using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0813 definitions. The primary endpoint was the development of grade ≥3 radiation pneumonitis (RP). Results: After a median follow-up of 13 months, 4 patients developed acute grade 3 RP, and 1 (2.9%) developed late and persistent grade 3 RP. No patients developed grade 4 or 5 RP. Mean lung dose, V2.5, V5, V10, and V20 values were calculated for the SBRT boost, and none were found to significantly predict for RP. Only advancing age (P=.0147), previous smoking status (P=.0505), and high CRT mean lung dose (P=.0295) were significantly associated with RP development. At the time of analysis, the actuarial local control rate at the primary tumor site was 82.9%, with only 6 patients demonstrating recurrence. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based SBRT for dose escalation of limited residual NSCLC after definitive CRT was feasible and did not increase the risk for toxicity above that for standard radiation therapy.

  15. Pretreatment prognostic factors in patients with early-stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer treated with hyperfractionated radiation therapy alone

    SciTech Connect

    Jeremic, Branislav . E-mail: b.jeremic@iaea.org; Milicic, Biljana; Dagovic, Aleksandar; Acimovic, Ljubisa; Milisavljevic, Slobodan

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate influence of various pretreatment prognostic factors in patients with early stage (I/II) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with hyperfractionated radiation therapy alone. Patients and Methods: One hundred and sixteen patients were treated with tumor doses of 69.6 Gy, 1.2-Gy, twice-daily fractionation. There were 49 patients with Stage I and 67 patients with Stage II. Eighty patients had Karnofsky performance status (KPS) 90-100 and 95 patients had <5% weight loss. Peripheral tumors were observed in 57 patients. Squamous histology was observed in 70 patients and the majority of patients had concomitant disease (n = 72). Results: The median survival time for all patients was 29 months; 5-year survival was 29%. The median time to local progression and the distant metastasis were not achieved, whereas 5-year local progression-free and distant metastasis-free survivals were 50% and 72%, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified KPS, weight loss, location, histology, and the reason for not undergoing surgery as prognostic factors for survival. KPS, location, and histology influenced local progression-free survival, whereas only KPS and weight loss influenced distant metastasis-free survival. Conclusions: This retrospective analysis identified KPS and weight loss as the most important prognostic factors of outcome in patients with early-stage NSCLC treated with hyperfractionation radiation therapy.

  16. Hypofractionated High-Dose Proton Beam Therapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Preliminary Results of A Phase I/II Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, Masaharu . E-mail: mhata@syd.odn.ne.jp; Tokuuye, Koichi; Kagei, Kenji; Sugahara, Shinji; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Mizumoto, Masashi; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Akine, Yasuyuki

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To present treatment outcomes of hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with Stage I NSCLC (11 with Stage IA and 10 with Stage IB) underwent hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy. At the time of irradiation, patient age ranged from 51 to 85 years (median, 74 years). Nine patients were medically inoperable because of comorbidities, and 12 patients refused surgical resection. Histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 6 patients, adenocarcinoma in 14, and large cell carcinoma in 1. Tumor size ranged from 10 to 42 mm (median, 25 mm) in maximum diameter. Three and 18 patients received proton beam irradiation with total doses of 50 Gy and 60 Gy in 10 fractions, respectively, to primary tumor sites. Results: Of 21 patients, 2 died of cancer and 2 died of pneumonia at a median follow-up period of 25 months. The 2-year overall and cause-specific survival rates were 74% and 86%, respectively. All but one of the irradiated tumors were controlled during the follow-up period. Five patients showed recurrences 6-29 months after treatment, including local progression and new lung lesions outside of the irradiated volume in 1 and 4 patients, respectively. The local progression-free and disease-free rates were 95% and 79% at 2 years, respectively. No therapy-related toxicity of Grade {>=}3 was observed. Conclusions: Hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy seems feasible and effective for Stage I NSCLC. Proton beams may contribute to enhanced efficacy and lower toxicity in the treatment of patients with Stage I NSCLC.

  17. Personalized treatment in advanced ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer: from bench to clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Passaro, Antonio; Lazzari, Chiara; Karachaliou, Niki; Spitaleri, Gianluca; Pochesci, Alessia; Catania, Chiara; Rosell, Rafael; de Marinis, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements and the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) that target them have achieved unprecedented success in the management of patients with ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Despite the high efficacy of crizotinib, the first oral ALK TKI approved for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC, almost all patients inevitably develop acquired resistance, showing disease progression in the brain or in other parenchymal sites. Second- or third-generation ALK TKIs have shown to be active in crizotinib-pretreated or crizotinib-naïve ALK-positive patients, even in those with brain metastases. In this review, the current knowledge regarding ALK-positive NSCLC, focusing on the biology of the disease and the available therapeutic options are discussed. PMID:27799783

  18. Chemoradiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone in elderly patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dawe, David E; Christiansen, David; Swaminath, Anand; Ellis, Peter M; Rothney, Janet; Rabbani, Rasheda; Abou-Setta, Ahmed M; Zarychanski, Ryan; Mahmud, Salaheddin M

    2016-09-01

    In stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the standard of care in young patients is chemoradiotherapy, but this standard is not as clearly established for older patients. We aimed to determine the efficacy and harm associated with chemoradiotherapy versus radiotherapy alone in elderly (≥70 years), stage III NSCLC patients through a systematic review. We conducted a systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, Scopus, Web of Science and conference proceedings. Two reviewers independently identified randomized trials (RCT) and extracted trial-level data. Risk of bias was assessed and meta-analysis was conducted looking at survival and safety outcomes. We included three trials and subgroup data from one systematic review. The three RCTs had high risk of bias due primarily to lack of blinding and the systematic review scored 4/11 using the AMSTAR tool. Overall survival (HR 0.66, 95% CI 0.53-0.82; I2 0%; 3 trials; 407 patients) and progression-free survival (HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.53-0.85; I2 0%; 2 trials; 327 patients) both favored chemoradiotherapy. Risk of treatment-related death and grade 3+ pneumonitis were not significantly different between groups. In conclusion, treatment of stage III NSCLC patients 70 years or older with chemotherapy and radiotherapy is associated with improved overall survival compared to radiotherapy alone. With the exception of increased hematological toxicity, CRT appears to be tolerable in fit elderly patients and represents a reasonable standard of clinical care. PMID:27565937

  19. Proton Beam Therapy for Patients With Medically Inoperable Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer at the University of Tsukuba

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Sugahara, Shinji; Tokita, Mari; Satoh, Hiroaki; Tsuboi, Koji; Ishikawa, Shigemi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate in a retrospective review the role of proton beam therapy for patients with medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: From November 2001 to July 2008, 55 medically inoperable patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated with proton beam therapy. A total of 58 (T1/T2, 30/28) tumors were treated. The median age of study participants was 77 years (range, 52-86 years). A total dose of 66 GyE in 10 fractions was given to peripherally located tumors and 72.6 GyE in 22 fractions to centrally located tumors. Results: The rates (95% confidence interval) of overall and progression-free survival of all patients and of local control of all tumors at 2 years were 97.8% (93.6-102.0%), 88.7% (77.9-99.5%), and 97.0% (91.1-102.8%), respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in progression-free rate between T1 and T2 tumors (p = 0.87). Two patients (3.6%) had deterioration in pulmonary function, and 2 patients (3.6%) had Grade 3 pneumonitis. Conclusion: Proton beam therapy was effective and well tolerated in medically inoperable patients with Stage I NSCLC.

  20. Pretreatment Neutrophil to Lymphocyte Ratio Is Associated with Poor Survival in Patients with Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Kalhor, Neda; Hu, Jianhua; Wang, Baocheng; Chu, Huili; Zhang, Bicheng; Guan, Yaping; Wu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has been shown to be a prognostic indicator in several types of cancer. We aimed to investigate the association between NLR and survival in surgery-treated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Study Design This large retrospective study included 1,245 patients who underwent initial surgery for stage I–III NSCLC at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center between December 2002 and November 2010. We analyzed the relationship of NLR with clinicopathological variables, local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), distant recurrence-free survival (DRFS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), overall survival (OS), and disease-specific survival (DSS) in patients with high or low NLR using Kaplan-Meier method. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the prognostic strength of NLR. Results There was a statistically significant association between the pretreatment NLR and histology type (P = 0.003) and tumor grade (P = 0.028). At a median follow-up time of 50.6 months, high NLR was associated with reduced DRFS (P = 0.011), OS (P < 0.0001) and DSS (P = 0.004); it was not associated with LRFS and RFS. Multivariable Cox analysis further revealed that NLR (P = 0.027), pathologic stage (P < 0.0001) and lymphovascular invasion (P < 0.0001) were strong independent predictors for DRFS. NLR was also an independent marker predicting poor OS (P = 0.002) and DSS (P = 0.017). Conclusion The pretreatment NLR can serve as a biomarker to predict distant recurrence and death in stage I–III NSCLC patients. Combination of NLR and pathologic stage can better predict the OS and DSS in stage I-II NSCLC patients. PMID:27695079

  1. A Validated Prediction Model for Overall Survival From Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Toward Survival Prediction for Individual Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Oberije, Cary; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Houben, Ruud; Heuvel, Michel van de; Uyterlinde, Wilma; Deasy, Joseph O.; Belderbos, Jose; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.; Rimner, Andreas; Din, Shaun; Lambin, Philippe

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Although patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are homogeneous according to the TNM staging system, they form a heterogeneous group, which is reflected in the survival outcome. The increasing amount of information for an individual patient and the growing number of treatment options facilitate personalized treatment, but they also complicate treatment decision making. Decision support systems (DSS), which provide individualized prognostic information, can overcome this but are currently lacking. A DSS for stage III NSCLC requires the development and integration of multiple models. The current study takes the first step in this process by developing and validating a model that can provide physicians with a survival probability for an individual NSCLC patient. Methods and Materials: Data from 548 patients with stage III NSCLC were available to enable the development of a prediction model, using stratified Cox regression. Variables were selected by using a bootstrap procedure. Performance of the model was expressed as the c statistic, assessed internally and on 2 external data sets (n=174 and n=130). Results: The final multivariate model, stratified for treatment, consisted of age, gender, World Health Organization performance status, overall treatment time, equivalent radiation dose, number of positive lymph node stations, and gross tumor volume. The bootstrapped c statistic was 0.62. The model could identify risk groups in external data sets. Nomograms were constructed to predict an individual patient's survival probability ( (www.predictcancer.org)). The data set can be downloaded at (https://www.cancerdata.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.02.048). Conclusions: The prediction model for overall survival of patients with stage III NSCLC highlights the importance of combining patient, clinical, and treatment variables. Nomograms were developed and validated. This tool could be used as a first building block for a decision support system.

  2. Impact of KRAS mutation on response and outcome of patients with stage III non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yagishita, Shigehiro; Horinouchi, Hidehito; Sunami, Kuniko S; Kanda, Shintaro; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Sumi, Minako; Shiraishi, Kouya; Kohno, Takashi; Furuta, Koh; Tsuta, Koji; Tamura, Tomohide; Ohe, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    The frequency and clinical profile of patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer harboring KRAS mutations have not yet been well documented. Here, we analyzed hotspot KRAS mutations using high-resolution melting analyses in tumor specimens from patients who received chemoradiotherapy between January 2001 and December 2010 at the National Cancer Center Hospital. The associations between the presence of KRAS mutations and the response rate, relapse-free survival, first relapse sites, survival post-progression and overall survival were investigated. A total of 274 non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer patients received chemoradiotherapy at our hospital. After excluding 121 patients for whom tumor specimens were not available and 34 patients with EGFR mutations, the remaining 119 patients were included in the analysis. KRAS mutations were found at a frequency of 13%. Patients with KRAS mutations had a shorter median relapse-free survival (6.1 vs 10.9 months) and a lower response rate (63% vs 81%). As for the first relapse site, patients with KRAS mutations had fewer local relapses (8% vs 23%) and more brain metastases (46% vs 12%). After disease progression, patients with KRAS mutations had a significantly shorter median survival post-progression (2.5 vs 7.3 months, P = 0.028) and median overall survival (15.1 vs 29.1 months, P = 0.022). Our results suggested that KRAS mutation could be associated with a reduced efficacy of chemoradiotherapy and a shortened survival time. PMID:26177347

  3. SU-E-T-572: Normal Lung Tissue Sparing in Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, C; Ju, S; Ahn, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare normal lung-sparing capabilities of three advanced radiation therapy techniques for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) was performed in 10 patients with stage IIIb LA-NSCLC. The internal target volume (ITV); planning target volume (PTV); and organs at risks (OARs) such as spinal cord, total normal lung, heart, and esophagus were delineated for each CT data set. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), Tomohelical-IMRT (TH-IMRT), and TomoDirect-IMRT (TD-IMRT) plans were generated (total prescribed dose, 66 Gy in 33 fractions to the PTV) for each patient. To reduce the normal lung dose, complete and directional block function was applied outside the normal lung far from the target for both TH-IMRT and TD-IMRT, while pseudo- OAR was set in the same region for IMRT. Dosimetric characteristics of the three plans were compared in terms of target coverage, the sparing capability for the OAR, and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Beam delivery efficiency was also compared. Results: TH-IMRT and TD-IMRT provided better target coverage than IMRT plans. Lung volume receiving ≥–30 Gy, mean dose, and NTCP were significant with TH-IMRT than with IMRT (p=0.006), and volume receiving ≥20–30 Gy was lower in TD-IMRT than in IMRT (p<0.05). Compared with IMRT, TH-IMRT had better sparing effect on the spinal cord (Dmax, NTCP) and heart (V45) (p<0.05). NTCP for the spinal cord, V45 and V60 for the heart, and Dmax for the esophagus were significantly lower in TD-IMRT than in IMRT. The monitor units per fraction were clearly smaller for IMRT than for TH-IMRT and TD-IMRT (p=0.006). Conclusion: In LA-NSCLC, TH-IMRT gave superior PTV coverage and OAR sparing compared to IMRT. TH-IMRT provided better control of the lung volume receiving ≥5–30 Gy. The delivery time and monitor units were lower in TD-IMRT than in TH-IMRT.

  4. Pretreatment Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score Predicts Clinical Outcomes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Takahiro; Matsuo, Yukinori Ueki, Nami; Iizuka, Yusuke; Nakamura, Akira; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Data from 165 patients who underwent SBRT for stage I NSCLC with histologic confirmation from January 1999 to September 2010 were collected retrospectively. Factors, including age, performance status, histology, Charlson comorbidity index, mGPS, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class based on sex and T stage, were evaluated with regard to overall survival (OS) using the Cox proportional hazards model. The impact of the mGPS on cause of death and failure patterns was also analyzed. Results: The 3-year OS was 57.9%, with a median follow-up time of 3.5 years. A higher mGPS correlated significantly with poor OS (P<.001). The 3-year OS of lower mGPS patients was 66.4%, whereas that of higher mGPS patients was 44.5%. On multivariate analysis, mGPS and RPA class were significant factors for OS. A higher mGPS correlated significantly with lung cancer death (P=.019) and distant metastasis (P=.013). Conclusions: The mGPS was a significant predictor of clinical outcomes for SBRT in NSCLC patients.

  5. Flexible modeling improves assessment of prognostic value of C-reactive protein in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, B; Abrahamowicz, M; Xiao, Y; Beauchamp, M-E; MacDonald, N; Kasymjanova, G; Kreisman, H; Small, D

    2010-01-01

    Background: C-reactive protein (CRP) is gaining credibility as a prognostic factor in different cancers. Cox's proportional hazard (PH) model is usually used to assess prognostic factors. However, this model imposes a priori assumptions, which are rarely tested, that (1) the hazard ratio associated with each prognostic factor remains constant across the follow-up (PH assumption) and (2) the relationship between a continuous predictor and the logarithm of the mortality hazard is linear (linearity assumption). Methods: We tested these two assumptions of the Cox's PH model for CRP, using a flexible statistical model, while adjusting for other known prognostic factors, in a cohort of 269 patients newly diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Results: In the Cox's PH model, high CRP increased the risk of death (HR=1.11 per each doubling of CRP value, 95% CI: 1.03–1.20, P=0.008). However, both the PH assumption (P=0.033) and the linearity assumption (P=0.015) were rejected for CRP, measured at the initiation of chemotherapy, which kept its prognostic value for approximately 18 months. Conclusion: Our analysis shows that flexible modeling provides new insights regarding the value of CRP as a prognostic factor in NSCLC and that Cox's PH model underestimates early risks associated with high CRP. PMID:20234363

  6. Advances in molecular biology of lung disease: aiming for precision therapy in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Claire; Sethi, Tariq

    2015-10-01

    Lung cancer is the principal cause of cancer-related mortality in the developed world, accounting for almost one-quarter of all cancer deaths. Traditional treatment algorithms have largely relied on histologic subtype and have comprised pragmatic chemotherapy regimens with limited efficacy. However, because our understanding of the molecular basis of disease in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has improved exponentially, it has become apparent that NSCLC can be radically subdivided, or molecularly characterized, based on recurrent driver mutations occurring in specific oncogenes. We know that the presence of such mutations leads to constitutive activation of aberrant signaling proteins that initiate, progress, and sustain tumorigenesis. This persistence of the malignant phenotype is referred to as "oncogene addiction." On this basis, a paradigm shift in treatment approach has occurred. Rational, targeted therapies have been developed, the first being tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which entered the clinical arena > 10 years ago. These were tremendously successful, significantly affecting the natural history of NSCLC and improving patient outcomes. However, the benefits of these drugs are somewhat limited by the emergence of adaptive resistance mechanisms, and efforts to tackle this phenomenon are ongoing. A better understanding of all types of oncogene-driven NSCLC and the occurrence of TKI resistance will help us to further develop second- and third-generation small molecule inhibitors and will expand our range of precision therapies for this disease.

  7. Mediastinal lymph node staging of non-small-cell lung cancer: a prospective comparison of computed tomography and positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Scott, W J; Gobar, L S; Terry, J D; Dewan, N A; Sunderland, J J

    1996-03-01

    We compared the abilities of positron emission tomography and computed tomography to detect N2 or N3 lymph node metastases (N2 or N3) in patients with lung cancer. Positron emission tomography detects increased rates of glucose uptake, characteristic of malignant cells. Patients with peripheral tumors smaller than 2 cm and a normal mediastinum were ineligible. All patients underwent computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and surgical staging. The American Thoracic Society lymph node map was used. Computed and positron emission tomographic scans were read by separate radiologists blinded to surgical staging results. Lymph nodes were "positive" by computed tomography if larger than 1.0 cm in short-axis diameter. Standardized uptake values were recorded from areas on positron emission tomography corresponding to those from which biopsy specimens were taken; if greater than 4.2, they were called "positive." Seventy-five lymph node stations (2.8 per patient) were analyzed in 27 patients. Computed tomography incorrectly staged the mediastinum as positive for metastases in three patients and as negative for metastases in three patients. Sensitivity and specificity of computed tomographic scans were 67% and 83%, respectively. Positron emission tomography correctly staged the mediastinum in all 27 patients. When analyzed by individual node station, there were four false positive and four false negative results by computed tomography (sensitivity = 60%, specificity = 93%, positive predictive value = 60%). Positron emission tomography mislabeled one node station as positive (100% sensitive, 98% specific, positive predictive value 91%). The differences were significant when the data were analyzed both for individual lymph node stations (p = 0.039) and for patients (p = 0.031) (McNemar test). Positron emission tomography and computed tomography are more accurate than computed tomography alone in detecting mediastinal lymph node metastases from non-small-cell lung

  8. Outcome Study of Cobalt Based Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Patients with Inoperable Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingjie; Lan, Fengming; Kang, Xiaoli; Shao, Yinjian; Li, Hongqi; Li, Ping; Wu, Weizhang; Wang, Jidong; Chang, Dongshu; Wang, Yong; Xia, Tingyi

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this paper is to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of specialized Body Cobalt based system (BCBS) treatment in the senior patients group (.65 years) with Stage III non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). A total of 49 patients (41 males and 8 females) with Stage III NSCLC according to UICC TNM classification (6(th) edition) were treated using OUR-QGD™ BCBS which was designed and manufactured in China. Post treatment evaluation with follow-up information was collected from April 2001 to December 2006 in our department. Median age of enrolled patients was 71 years old (65-85). Among those patients, 36 patients were pathologically identified with squamous cell carcinoma, and the other 13 patients were confirmed as adenocarcinoma. All patients were immobilized by vacuum based immobilization mold and then performed slow CT scan without any respiration gating devices. The daily radiation prescription dose was defined at 50% isodose line covering primary lesions and metastatic lymph nodes with doses from 2.5 to 6 Gy in 5 fractions per week according to the tumor stage and internally approved treatment protocols by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Median daily dose and total delivery dose of 50% isodose line were 4 Gy and 41 Gy, respectively. In this study group, total of 3 patients received neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Tumor response evaluated 12 weeks after radiation has demonstrated 13 complete responses (26.5%), 21 partial responses (42.9%). The overall survival (OS) rate of 1-year, 2-year and 3-year was 63.3%, 40.8% and 20.4%, respectively. The median and mean survival time was 22 and 24 months. All 49 patients tolerated the treatment well and have completed the planned therapy regiment. Body Cobalt based system treatment of those over 65 years old patients with Stage III NSCLC had reasonable and superior curative effect as well as local control, and at the same time without severe radiation side effects.

  9. {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT Simulation for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Effect in Patients Already Staged by PET-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, Gerard G.; McAleese, Jonathan; Carson, Kathryn J.; Stewart, David P.; Cosgrove, Vivian P.; Eakin, Ruth L.; Zatari, Ashraf; Lynch, Tom; Jarritt, Peter H.; Young, V.A. Linda D.C.R.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET), in addition to computed tomography (CT), has an effect in target volume definition for radical radiotherapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In previously PET-CT staged patients with NSCLC, we assessed the effect of using an additional planning PET-CT scan for gross tumor volume (GTV) definition. Methods and Materials: A total of 28 patients with Stage IA-IIIB NSCLC were enrolled. All patients had undergone staging PET-CT to ensure suitability for radical RT. Of the 28 patients, 14 received induction chemotherapy. In place of a RT planning CT scan, patients underwent scanning on a PET-CT scanner. In a virtual planning study, four oncologists independently delineated the GTV on the CT scan alone and then on the PET-CT scan. Intraobserver and interobserver variability were assessed using the concordance index (CI), and the results were compared using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results: PET-CT improved the CI between observers when defining the GTV using the PET-CT images compared with using CT alone for matched cases (median CI, 0.57 for CT and 0.64 for PET-CT, p = .032). The median of the mean percentage of volume change from GTV{sub CT} to GTV{sub FUSED} was -5.21% for the induction chemotherapy group and 18.88% for the RT-alone group. Using the Mann-Whitney U test, this was significantly different (p = .001). Conclusion: PET-CT RT planning scan, in addition to a staging PET-CT scan, reduces interobserver variability in GTV definition for NSCLC. The GTV size with PET-CT compared with CT in the RT-alone group increased and was reduced in the induction chemotherapy group.

  10. Differential expression of Yes-associated protein is correlated with expression of cell cycle markers and pathologic TNM staging in non-small-cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Man; Kang, Dong Wook; Long, Liang Zhe; Huang, Song-Mei; Yeo, Min-Kyung; Yi, Eunhee S; Kim, Kyung-Hee

    2011-03-01

    Yes-associated protein, a downstream effector of the Hippo signaling pathway, has been linked to progression of non-small-cell lung carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate expression of Yes-associated protein in lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Associations of Yes-associated protein expression with clinicopathologic parameters, expression of cell cycle-specific markers, and epidermal growth factor receptor gene amplification were also analyzed. In a univariate analysis of the 66 adenocarcinomas, high nuclear expression of Yes-associated protein was significantly correlated with expression of cyclin A and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Multivariate analysis, including age and sex, showed that cyclin A expression was independently correlated with nuclear expression of Yes-associated protein in adenocarcinomas. Furthermore, high nuclear expression of Yes-associated protein was also a significant predictor of epidermal growth factor receptor gene amplification for adenocarcinoma. For the 102 squamous cell carcinomas, univariate analysis revealed that high cytoplasmic expression of Yes-associated protein was correlated with the low pathologic TNM staging (stage I) and histologic grading. Multivariate analysis, including age and sex, showed that cytoplasmic expression of Yes-associated protein was an independent predictor of low pathologic TNM staging. These results indicate that nuclear overexpression of Yes-associated protein contributes to pulmonary adenocarcinoma growth and that high cytoplasmic expression of Yes-associated protein is an independent predictor of low pathologic TNM staging and histologic grading. The differential effects of Yes-associated protein expression patterns in adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas suggest that Yes-associated protein may play important roles in different pathways in distinct tumor subtypes. These observations may, therefore, lead to new perspectives on therapeutic targeting of these tumor

  11. Critical appraisal of the role of gefitinib in the management of locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ying; Li, Xiao-Fen; Chen, Jia-Qi; Dong, Cai-Xia; Weng, Shan-Shan; Huang, Jian-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Past studies have demonstrated that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors can significantly improve clinical outcomes in patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and sensitive EGFR gene mutations. Gefitinib (Iressa(®)), the first oral EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been shown to be more effective and better tolerated than chemotherapy either in first-line or second-line treatment for patients with advanced NSCLC harboring sensitive EGFR mutations. Conversely, among patients with wild-type EGFR, gefitinib is inferior to standard chemotherapy in both the first-line and second-line settings. Further, gefitinib is effective in patients with brain metastases because of its low molecular weight and excellent penetration of the blood-brain barrier. In this review, we summarize the current data from clinical trials with gefitinib and appraise its role in the management of locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC.

  12. Prognostic Impact of Erythropoietin Expression and Erythropoietin Receptor Expression on Locoregional Control and Survival of Patients Irradiated for Stage II/III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Setter, Cornelia; Dahl, Olav; Schild, Steven E.; Noack, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Prognostic factors can guide the physician in selecting the optimal treatment for an individual patient. This study investigates the prognostic value of erythropoietin (EPO) and EPO receptor (EPO-R) expression of tumor cells for locoregional control and survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: Fourteen factors were investigated in 62 patients irradiated for stage II/III NSCLC, as follows: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), histology, grading, TNM/American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, surgery, chemotherapy, pack years (average number of packages of cigarettes smoked per day multiplied by the number of years smoked), smoking during radiotherapy, hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy, EPO expression, and EPO-R expression. Additionally, patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R were compared to those expressing either EPO or EPO-R and to those expressing neither EPO nor EPO-R. Results: On univariate analysis, improved locoregional control was associated with AJCC stage II cancer (p < 0.048), surgery (p < 0.042), no smoking during radiotherapy (p = 0.024), and no EPO expression (p = 0.001). A trend was observed for a KPS of >70 (p = 0.08), an N stage of 0 to 1 (p = 0.07), and no EPO-R expression (p = 0.10). On multivariate analysis, AJCC stage II and no EPO expression remained significant. No smoking during radiotherapy was almost significant. On univariate analysis, improved survival was associated with N stage 0 to 1 (p = 0.009), surgery (p = 0.039), hemoglobin levels of {>=}12 g/d (p = 0.016), and no EPO expression (p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, N stage 0 to 1 and no EPO expression maintained significance. Hemoglobin levels of {>=}12 g/d were almost significant. On subgroup analyses, patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R had worse outcomes than those expressing either EPO or EPO-R and those expressing neither EPO nor RPO-R. Conclusions: EPO expression of tumor cells

  13. First line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer - specific focus on albumin bound paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neha; Hatoum, Hassan; Dy, Grace K

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide in both men and women. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer, accounting for more than 80% of cases. Paclitaxel has a broad spectrum of activity against various malignancies, including NSCLC. Paclitaxel is poorly soluble in water and thus, until recently, its commercially available preparations contained a non-ionic solvent Cremophor EL®. Cremophor EL® improves the solubility of paclitaxel and allows its intravenous administration. However, certain side-effects associated with paclitaxel, such as hypersensitivity reactions, myelosuppression, and peripheral neuropathy, are known to be worsened by Cremophor®. Nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel ([nab-paclitaxel] ABRAXANE® ABI-007) is a new generation formulation of paclitaxel that obviates the need for Cremophor®, resulting in a safer and faster infusion without requiring the use of premedications to avoid hypersensitivity. Albumin-binding receptor-mediated delivery and lack of sequestering Cremophor® micelles allow higher intratumoral concentration of pharmacologically active paclitaxel. Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated a superior tolerability profile of nab-paclitaxel in comparison to solvent-bound paclitaxel (sb-paclitaxel). A recent Phase III trial compared the effects of weekly nab-paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin versus sb-paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin given every 3 weeks for first line treatment of NSCLC. This trial highlights the weekly nab-paclitaxel combination as an alternate treatment option for NSCLC, with higher response rate in squamous cell NSCLC and longer survival in elderly patients. This review will focus on the properties of nab-paclitaxel and its use in the first line treatment of NSCLC.

  14. Proton Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Clinically Challenging Cases of Centrally and Superiorly Located Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Register, Steven P.; Zhang Xiaodong; Mohan, Radhe; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To minimize toxicity while maintaining tumor coverage with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for centrally or superiorly located stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we investigated passive-scattering proton therapy (PSPT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with centrally or superiorly located (within 2 cm of critical structures) stage I NSCLC were treated clinically with three-dimensional photon SBRT (50 Gy in 4 fractions). The photon SBRT plan was compared with the PSPT and IMPT plans. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined as the dose that exceeded the dose--volume constraints in the critical structures. Results: Only 6 photon plans satisfied the >95% planning target volume (PTV) coverage and MTD constraints, compared to 12 PSPT plans (p = 0.009) and 14 IMPT plans (p = 0.001). Compared with the photon SBRT plans, the PSPT and IMPT plans significantly reduced the mean total lung dose from 5.4 Gy to 3.5 Gy (p < 0.001) and 2.8 Gy (p < 0.001) and reduced the total lung volume receiving 5 Gy, 10 Gy, and 20 Gy (p < 0.001). When the PTV was within 2 cm of the critical structures, the PSPT and IMPT plans significantly reduced the mean maximal dose to the aorta, brachial plexus, heart, pulmonary vessels, and spinal cord. Conclusions: For centrally or superiorly located stage I NSCLC, proton therapy, particularly IMPT, delivered ablative doses to the target volume and significantly reduced doses to the surrounding normal tissues compared with photon SBRT.

  15. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Versus Surgery for Medically Operable Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Markov Model-Based Decision Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, Alexander V.; Rodrigues, George; Palma, David A.; Cao, Jeffrey Q.; Yaremko, Brian P.; Malthaner, Richard; Mocanu, Joseph D.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the quality-adjusted life expectancy and overall survival in patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with either stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) or surgery. Methods and Materials: We constructed a Markov model to describe health states after either SBRT or lobectomy for Stage I NSCLC for a 5-year time frame. We report various treatment strategy survival outcomes stratified by age, sex, and pack-year history of smoking, and compared these with an external outcome prediction tool (Adjuvant{exclamation_point} Online). Results: Overall survival, cancer-specific survival, and other causes of death as predicted by our model correlated closely with those predicted by the external prediction tool. Overall survival at 5 years as predicted by baseline analysis of our model is in favor of surgery, with a benefit ranging from 2.2% to 3.0% for all cohorts. Mean quality-adjusted life expectancy ranged from 3.28 to 3.78 years after surgery and from 3.35 to 3.87 years for SBRT. The utility threshold for preferring SBRT over surgery was 0.90. Outcomes were sensitive to quality of life, the proportion of local and regional recurrences treated with standard vs. palliative treatments, and the surgery- and SBRT-related mortalities. Conclusions: The role of SBRT in the medically operable patient is yet to be defined. Our model indicates that SBRT may offer comparable overall survival and quality-adjusted life expectancy as compared with surgical resection. Well-powered prospective studies comparing surgery vs. SBRT in early-stage lung cancer are warranted to further investigate the relative survival, quality of life, and cost characteristics of both treatment paradigms.

  16. Prospective, Risk-Adapted Strategy of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Results of a Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Bral, Samuel; Gevaert, Thierry; Linthout, Nadine; Versmessen, Harijati; Collen, Christine; Engels, Benedikt; Verdries, Douwe; Everaert, Hendrik; Christian, Nicolas; De Ridder, Mark; Storme, Guy

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Validation of a prospective, risk-adapted strategy for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with a T1-3N0M0 (American Joint Committee on Cancer 6th edition) NSCLC were accrued. Using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group definition, patients were treated to a total dose of 60,Gy in three fractions for peripherally located lesions and four fractions for centrally located lesions. The primary endpoint was toxicity, graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute and late morbidity scoring system, and the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 3.0. Secondary endpoints were local control and survival. Results: A total of 40 patients were included, 17 with a centrally located lesion. The lung toxicity-free survival estimate at 2 years was 74% and was related to the location (central vs. peripheral) and the size of the target volume. No dose volumetric parameters could predict the occurrence of lung toxicity. One patient died because of treatment-related toxicity. The 1-year and 2-year local progression-free survival estimates were 97% and 84%, respectively, and were related to stage (T1 vs. T2) related (p = 0.006). Local failure was not more frequent for patients treated in four fractions. The 1-year local progression-free survival estimate dropped below 80% for lesions with a diameter of more than 4 cm. Conclusion: The proposed risk-adapted strategy for both centrally and peripherally located lesions showed an acceptable toxicity profile while maintaining excellent local control rates. The correlation between local control and tumor diameter calls for the inclusion of tumor stage as a variable in future study design.

  17. Survival Outcome After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Surgery for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Xiangpeng; Schipper, Matthew; Kidwell, Kelley; Lin, Jules; Reddy, Rishindra; Ren, Yanping; Chang, Andrew; Lv, Fanzhen; Orringer, Mark; Spring Kong, Feng-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: This study compared treatment outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with those of surgery in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligible studies of SBRT and surgery were retrieved through extensive searches of the PubMed, Medline, Embase, and Cochrane library databases from 2000 to 2012. Original English publications of stage I NSCLC with adequate sample sizes and adequate SBRT doses were included. A multivariate random effects model was used to perform a meta-analysis to compare survival between treatments while adjusting for differences in patient characteristics. Results: Forty SBRT studies (4850 patients) and 23 surgery studies (7071 patients) published in the same period were eligible. The median age and follow-up duration were 74 years and 28.0 months for SBRT patients and 66 years and 37 months for surgery patients, respectively. The mean unadjusted overall survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years with SBRT were 83.4%, 56.6%, and 41.2% compared to 92.5%, 77.9%, and 66.1% with lobectomy and 93.2%, 80.7%, and 71.7% with limited lung resections. In SBRT studies, overall survival improved with increasing proportion of operable patients. After we adjusted for proportion of operable patients and age, SBRT and surgery had similar estimated overall and disease-free survival. Conclusions: Patients treated with SBRT differ substantially from patients treated with surgery in age and operability. After adjustment for these differences, OS and DFS do not differ significantly between SBRT and surgery in patients with operable stage I NSCLC. A randomized prospective trial is warranted to compare the efficacy of SBRT and surgery.

  18. Which Is the Optimal Biologically Effective Dose of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer? A Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jian; Yang Fujun; Li Baosheng; Li Hongsheng; Liu Jing; Huang Wei; Wang Dongqing; Yi Yan; Wang Juan

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between biologically effective dose (BED) and efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to explore the optimal BED range for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligible studies were identified on Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and the proceedings of annual meetings through June 2010. According to the quartile of included studies, BED was divided into four dose groups: low (<83.2 Gy), medium (83.2-106 Gy), medium to high (106-146 Gy), high (>146 Gy). To obtain pooled estimates of overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and local control rate (LCR), data were combined in a random effect model. Pooled estimates were corrected for the percentage of small tumors (<3 cm). Results: Thirty-four observational studies with a total of 2,587 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Corrected pooled estimates of 2- or 3-year OS in the medium BED (76.1%, 63.5%) or the medium to high BED (68.3%, 63.2%) groups were higher than in the low (62.3%, 51.9%) or high groups (55.9%, 49.5%), respectively (p {<=} 0.004). Corrected 3-year CSS in the medium (79.5%), medium to high (80.6%), and high groups (90.0%) were higher than in the low group (70.1%, p = 0.016, 0.018, 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: The OS for the medium or medium to high BED groups were higher than those for the low or high BED group for SBRT in Stage I NSCLC. The medium or medium to high BED (range, 83.2-146 Gy) for SBRT may currently be more beneficial and reasonable in Stage I NSCLC.

  19. Using machine learning to predict radiation pneumonitis in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes, Gilmer; Solberg, Timothy D.; Heskel, Marina; Ungar, Lyle; Simone, Charles B., II

    2016-08-01

    To develop a patient-specific ‘big data’ clinical decision tool to predict pneumonitis in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). 61 features were recorded for 201 consecutive patients with stage I NSCLC treated with SBRT, in whom 8 (4.0%) developed radiation pneumonitis. Pneumonitis thresholds were found for each feature individually using decision stumps. The performance of three different algorithms (Decision Trees, Random Forests, RUSBoost) was evaluated. Learning curves were developed and the training error analyzed and compared to the testing error in order to evaluate the factors needed to obtain a cross-validated error smaller than 0.1. These included the addition of new features, increasing the complexity of the algorithm and enlarging the sample size and number of events. In the univariate analysis, the most important feature selected was the diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO adj%). On multivariate analysis, the three most important features selected were the dose to 15 cc of the heart, dose to 4 cc of the trachea or bronchus, and race. Higher accuracy could be achieved if the RUSBoost algorithm was used with regularization. To predict radiation pneumonitis within an error smaller than 10%, we estimate that a sample size of 800 patients is required. Clinically relevant thresholds that put patients at risk of developing radiation pneumonitis were determined in a cohort of 201 stage I NSCLC patients treated with SBRT. The consistency of these thresholds can provide radiation oncologists with an estimate of their reliability and may inform treatment planning and patient counseling. The accuracy of the classification is limited by the number of patients in the study and not by the features gathered or the complexity of the algorithm.

  20. Prevalence and Predictors of Neoadjuvant Therapy for Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the National Cancer Database: Importance of Socioeconomic Status and Treating Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Liptay, Michael J.; Fidler, Mary Jo

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The optimal locoregional therapy for stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial, with definitive chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery (NT-S) serving as competing strategies. In this study, we used the National Cancer Database to determine the prevalence and predictors of NT in a large, modern cohort of patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage IIIA NSCLC treated with CRT or NT-S between 2003 and 2010 at programs accredited by the Commission on Cancer were included. Predictors were categorized as clinical, time/geographic, socioeconomic, and institutional. In accord with the National Cancer Database, institutions were classified as academic/research program and as comprehensive and noncomprehensive community cancer centers. Logistic regression and random effects multilevel logistic regression were performed for univariable and multivariable analyses, respectively. Results: The cohort consisted of 18,581 patients, 3,087 (16.6%) of whom underwent NT-S (10.6% induction CRT, 6% induction chemotherapy). The prevalence of NT-S was constant over time, but there were significant relative 31% and 30% decreases in pneumonectomy and right-sided pneumonectomy, respectively, over time (P trend <.02). In addition to younger age, lower T stage, and favorable comorbidity score, indicators of higher socioeconomic status were strong independent predictors of NT-S, including white race, higher income, and private/managed insurance. The type of institution (academic/research program vs comprehensive or noncomprehensive community cancer centers, odds ratio 1.54 and 2.08, respectively) strongly predicted NT-S, but treatment volume did not. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery was an uncommon treatment approach in Commission on Cancer programs, and the prevalence of postinduction pneumonectomy decreased over time. Higher socioeconomic status and treatment at academic institutions were significant

  1. Distinct patterns of angiogenic factor expression as a predictive factor of response to chemotherapy in stage IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Koufos, Nikolaos; Syrios, John; Michailidou, Despina; Xynos, Ioannis D.; Lazaris, Andreas; Kavantzas, Nicolaos; Tomos, Periclis; Kakaris, Stamatis; Kosmas, Christos; Tsavaris, Nikolas

    2016-01-01

    The expression of various angiogenic factors was assessed in tumour samples of patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and further evaluated in terms of response to induction paclitaxel-ifosfamide-cisplatin chemotherapy. Freshly isolated lung tumour specimens obtained by bronchoscopy from 70 stage IIIA NSCLC chemotherapy-naïve patients were sampled and analysed for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1, VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3. Microvessel density was assessed through evaluating the angiogenic markers CD34 and CD105. Immunostaining scores were calculated by multiplying the percentage of labeled cells by the intensity of staining for each examined parameter. The overall mean immunostaining score value from all NSCLC samples was 7.83, 5.56 and 15.86 for VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3, respectively. The overall mean value of the endothelial antigen CD34 was 16.29, whereas the expression of the CD105 antigen in endothelial cells yielded a multivariate distribution. Patients who responded to chemotherapy expressed significantly higher VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-3 mean values compared with non-responders (P<0.001). No significant difference was noted in VEGFR-2 mean values between these two groups (P=0.06). The CD34 mean value was significantly higher in responders (P<0.001), whereas there was no significant difference in CD105 expression between the two groups (P=0.07). Angiogenic marker expression proved to be a potential predictive factor of response to chemotherapy in stage III NSCLC. which merits further investigation.

  2. Prognostic significance of postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels in patients with completely resected pathological-stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Until date, there are no clear recommendations for regular perioperative measurements of serum CEA levels for lung cancer in any guidelines. The purpose in the present study is to evaluate the prognostic significance of perioperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels in patients with pathological-stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 263 completely resected pathological-stage I NSCLC patients whose preoperative and postoperative serum CEA levels were measured. Patients were subdivided according to the perioperative change of CEA levels: continuously normal CEA levels (NN group), continuously high CEA levels (HH group), and high preoperative CEA levels that returned to normal levels post-operation (HN group). The clinicopathological factors and overall survival (OS) among these 3 groups were compared. Univariate and multivariate analyses of the correlation between clinicopathological factors and OS were performed. Results High preoperative CEA levels significantly correlated with men aged >70 years with smoking history, high serum CYFRA 21–1 levels, greater tumor diameter, presence of visceral pleural invasion (VPI), and moderate-to-poor differentiation. Five-year OS rates in the NN and HH groups were 95.5% and 59.3%, respectively. Four-year OS rate in the HN group was 85.5%. Multivariate analyses indicated tumor diameter of more than 30 mm, presence of VPI, and the HH group were independent unfavorable prognostic factors. Conclusions A high postoperative CEA level was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor in pathological-stage I NSCLC patients. Patients with high postoperative CEA levels may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:23607757

  3. Adaptive/non-adaptive proton radiation planning and outcome in a phase II trial for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koay, Eugene J.; Lege, David; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Chang, Joe Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To analyze dosimetric variables and outcomes after adaptive replanning of radiotherapy during concurrent high-dose protons and chemotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials Nine of 44 patients with stage III NSCLC in a prospective phase II trial of concurrent paclitaxel/carboplatin with proton radiation [74 Gy(RBE) in 37 fractions] had modifications to their original treatment plans after re-evaluation revealed changes that would compromise coverage of the target volume or violate dose constraints; plans for the other 35 patients were not changed. We compared patients with adaptive plans with those with nonadaptive plans in terms of dosimetry and outcomes. Results At a median follow-up of 21.2 months (median overall survival, 29.6 months), no differences were found in local, regional, or distant failure or overall survival between groups. Adaptive planning was used more often for large tumors that shrank to a greater extent (median, 107.1 cm3 adaptive and 86.4 cm3 non-adaptive; median changes in volume, 25.3% adaptive and 1.2% non-adaptive; p<0.01). The median number of fractions delivered using adaptive planning was 13 (range, 4–22). Adaptive planning generally improved sparing of the esophagus (median absolute decrease in V70, 1.8%; range, 0–22.9%) and spinal cord (median absolute change in maximum dose, 3.7 Gy; range, 0–13.8 Gy). Without adaptive replanning, target coverage would have been compromised in 2 cases (57% and 82% coverage without adaptation vs. 100% for both with adaptation); neither patient experienced local failure. Radiation-related grade 3 toxicity rates were similar between groups. Conclusions Adaptive planning can reduce normal tissue doses and prevent target misses, particularly for patients with large tumors that shrink substantially during therapy. Adaptive plans seem to have acceptable toxicity and achieve similar local, regional, and distant control and overall survival, even in

  4. Dabrafenib in BRAF V600E–Mutant Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: an Open-label, Single arm, Multicenter, Phase 2 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Planchard, David; Kim, Tae Min; Mazieres, Julien; Quoix, Elisabeth; Riely, Gregory; Barlesi, Fabrice; Souquet, Pierre-John; Smit, Egbert F.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Kelly, Ronan J.; Cho, B. C.; Socinski, Mark A.; Pandite, Lini; Nase, Christine; Ma, Bo; D’Amelio, Anthony; Mookerjee, Bijoyesh; Curtis, C. Martin; Johnson, Bruce E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Activating BRAF V600E mutations are found in approximately 1–2% of adenocarcinomas of the lung offering an opportunity to test targeted therapy for this disease. Dabrafenib is an oral selective inhibitor of the BRAF kinase. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical activity of dabrafenib in patients with advanced BRAF V600E-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods In this phase 2, multicenter, nonrandomized, open-label study of previously treated and untreated patients with stage IV, metastatic NSCLC and BRAF V600E mutation, we evaluated the antitumor activity and safety of oral dabrafenib (150 mg twice daily). The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed overall response rate (ORR) in patients receiving ≥ 1 dose of study drug. Safety analysis was performed on the all-treated population (all previously treated and untreated patients receiving ≥ 1 dose of study drug). The study is ongoing but not enrolling participants in this cohort. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01336634. Findings Between August 2011 and February 2014 a total of 84 previously treated and untreated patients were enrolled. Investigator-assessed ORR for 78 pretreated patients was 33% (95% confidence interval [CI], 23·1 to 44·9). Independent review committee assessment of ORR was consistent with investigator-based assessment. Four of the six previously untreated patients had an objective response. One patient died on study due to intracranial hemorrhage that was considered by the investigator to be due to study drug. Serious adverse events were reported in 35 (42%) of 84 patients. The most frequent grade 3 or higher adverse events were cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (10 [12%] of 84 patients), asthenia (4 [5%] of 84 patients), and basal cell carcinoma (4 [5%] of 84 patients). Interpretation This is, to our knowledge, the first prospective trial focusing on BRAF V600E-mutant NSCLC to show clinical activity of a BRAF inhibitor. The

  5. Adaptive/Nonadaptive Proton Radiation Planning and Outcomes in a Phase II Trial for Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koay, Eugene J.; Lege, David; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Chang, Joe Y.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze dosimetric variables and outcomes after adaptive replanning of radiation therapy during concurrent high-dose protons and chemotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Nine of 44 patients with stage III NSCLC in a prospective phase II trial of concurrent paclitaxel/carboplatin with proton radiation [74 Gy(RBE) in 37 fractions] had modifications to their original treatment plans after re-evaluation revealed changes that would compromise coverage of the target volume or violate dose constraints; plans for the other 35 patients were not changed. We compared patients with adaptive plans with those with nonadaptive plans in terms of dosimetry and outcomes. Results: At a median follow-up of 21.2 months (median overall survival, 29.6 months), no differences were found in local, regional, or distant failure or overall survival between groups. Adaptive planning was used more often for large tumors that shrank to a greater extent (median, 107.1 cm{sup 3} adaptive and 86.4 cm{sup 3} nonadaptive; median changes in volume, 25.3% adaptive and 1.2% nonadaptive; P<.01). The median number of fractions delivered using adaptive planning was 13 (range, 4-22). Adaptive planning generally improved sparing of the esophagus (median absolute decrease in V{sub 70}, 1.8%; range, 0%-22.9%) and spinal cord (median absolute change in maximum dose, 3.7 Gy; range, 0-13.8 Gy). Without adaptive replanning, target coverage would have been compromised in 2 cases (57% and 82% coverage without adaptation vs 100% for both with adaptation); neither patient experienced local failure. Radiation-related grade 3 toxicity rates were similar between groups. Conclusions: Adaptive planning can reduce normal tissue doses and prevent target misses, particularly for patients with large tumors that shrink substantially during therapy. Adaptive plans seem to have acceptable toxicity and achieve similar local, regional, and distant control and overall

  6. Chemotherapy versus supportive care in advanced non-small cell lung cancer: improved survival without detriment to quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Spiro, S; Rudd, R; Souhami, R; Brown, J; Fairlamb, D; Gower, N; Maslove, L; Milroy, R; Napp, V; Parmar, M; Peake, M; Stephens, R; Thorpe, H; Waller, D; West, P

    2004-01-01

    Background: In 1995 a meta-analysis of randomised trials investigating the value of adding chemotherapy to primary treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) suggested a small survival benefit for cisplatin-based chemotherapy in each of the primary treatment settings. However, the meta-analysis included many small trials and trials with differing eligibility criteria and chemotherapy regimens. Methods: The aim of the Big Lung Trial was to confirm the survival benefits seen in the meta-analysis and to assess quality of life and cost in the supportive care setting. A total of 725 patients were randomised to receive supportive care alone (n = 361) or supportive care plus cisplatin-based chemotherapy (n = 364). Results: 65% of patients allocated chemotherapy (C) received all three cycles of treatment and a further 27% received one or two cycles. 74% of patients allocated no chemotherapy (NoC) received thoracic radiotherapy compared with 47% of the C group. Patients allocated C had a significantly better survival than those allocated NoC: HR 0.77 (95% CI 0.66 to 0.89, p = 0.0006), median survival 8.0 months for the C group v 5.7 months for the NoC group, a difference of 9 weeks. There were 19 (5%) treatment related deaths in the C group. There was no evidence that any subgroup benefited more or less from chemotherapy. No significant differences were observed between the two groups in terms of the pre-defined primary and secondary quality of life end points, although large negative effects of chemotherapy were ruled out. The regimens used proved to be cost effective, the extra cost of chemotherapy being offset by longer survival. Conclusions: The survival benefit seen in this trial was entirely consistent with the NSCLC meta-analysis and subsequent similarly designed large trials. The information on quality of life and cost should enable patients and their clinicians to make more informed treatment choices. PMID:15454647

  7. EF5 and Motexafin Lutetium in Detecting Tumor Cells in Patients With Abdominal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Localized Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Localized Gallbladder Cancer; Localized Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage 0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Gastric Cancer; Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Colon Cancer; Stage II Gastric Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Rectal Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage

  8. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy vesus Chemotherapy alone Followed by Surgery for Resectable Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shan xian; Jian, Yan; Chen, Ying lan; Cai, Yun; Zhang, Qing yuan; Tou, Fang fang

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy has been used for the stage III of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and has shown good clinical effects. However, the survival benefits of radiation therapy added in induction regimens remains controversial. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis of the published clinical trials to quantitatively evaluate the benefit of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. After searching the database of Pubmed, CNKI, EMBASE, ESMO, The Cochrane Library databases, The American Society of Clinical Oncology and Clinical Trials.gov. Trials were selected for meta-analysis if they provided an independent assessment of neoadjuvant chemoradiation and neoadjuvant chemotherapy, odds ratio(OR) for tumor downstaging, mediastinal lymph nodes pathological complete response and local control, hazard ratios (HRs) for 5-year survival and progression-free survival were pooled by the stata software version 12.0. Twelve studies involving 2,724 patients were identified, tumor downstaging (p = 0.01), mediastinal lymph nodes pathological complete responses (p = 0.028) and local control (P = 0.002) were achieved, when compared with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The meta-analysis demonstrated neither 5-year survival nor progression-free-survival benefit in survival from adding radiation. In conclusion, the addition of radiotherapy into chemotherapy was not superior to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The higher quality of trials need be investigated combining with the histopathological type and genotyping of lung cancer by clinicians. PMID:27677242

  9. Feasibility and efficacy of helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer in comparison with conventionally fractionated 3D-CRT

    PubMed Central

    He, Jian; Huang, Yan; Chen, Yixing; Shi, Shiming; Ye, Luxi; Hu, Yong; Zhang, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    Background The standard treatment for stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is still 60 Gy in conventional fractions combined with concurrent chemotherapy; however, the resulting local controls are disappointing. The aim of this study was to compare and assess the feasibility and efficacy of hypofractionated chemoradiotherapy using helical tomotherapy (HT) with conventional fractionation as opposed to using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for stage III NSCLC. Methods Sixty-nine patients with stage III (AJCC 7th edition) NSCLC who underwent definitive radiation treatment at our institution between July 2011 and November 2013 were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively. A dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions was delivered in the HT group (n=34), whereas 60 Gy in 30 fractions in the 3D-CRT group (n=35). Primary endpoints were toxicity, overall response rate, overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Results The median follow-up period was 26.4 months. V20 (P=0.005), V30 (P=0.001), V40 (P=0.004), mean lung dose (P=0.000) and max dose of spinal cord (P=0.005) were significantly lower in the HT group than in the 3D-CRT group. There was no significant difference in the incidences of acute radiation pneumonitis (RP) ≥ grade 2 between the two groups, whereas the incidences of acute radiation esophagitis ≥ grade 2 were significantly lower in the HT group than in the 3D-CRT group (P=0.027). Two-year overall response rate was significantly higher in the HT group than in the 3D-CRT group (P=0.015). One- and 2-year OS rates were significantly higher in the HT group (95.0% and 68.7%, respectively) than in the 3D-CRT group (85.5% and 47.6%, respectively; P=0.0236). One- and 2-year PFS rates were significantly higher in the HT group (57.8% and 26.3%, respectively) than in the 3D-CRT group (32.7% and 11.4%, respectively; P=0.0351). Univariate analysis indicated that performance status (PS), T stage and radiotherapy technique were significant

  10. Overcoming resistance to first/second generation epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors and ALK inhibitors in oncogene-addicted advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Romanidou, Ourania; Landi, Lorenza; Cappuzzo, Federico; Califano, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activating mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represent the two oncogenic events with an impact on current clinical practice. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and crizotinib are the standard of care for the treatment of EGFR mutant and ALK gene rearranged advanced NSCLC patients. Unfortunately, despite initial clinical benefit, acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs or crizotinib usually develops after an average of 10–12 months of treatment. The aim of this review is to describe the mechanisms of resistance to first/second generation EGFR-TKIs and crizotinib. In particular, we focus on strategies to overcome resistance due to secondary EGFR T790M mutation and mutations of the ALK domain. PMID:27239236

  11. Adding Erlotinib to Chemoradiation Improves Overall Survival but Not Progression-Free Survival in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Komaki, Ritsuko; Allen, Pamela K.; Wei, Xiong; Blumenschein, George R.; Tang, Ximing; Lee, J. Jack; Welsh, James W.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Liu, Diane D.; Hong, Waun Ki

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To test, in a single-arm, prospective, phase 2 trial, whether adding the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib to concurrent chemoradiotherapy for previously untreated, locally advanced, inoperable non-small cell lung cancer would improve survival and disease control without increasing toxicity. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients with previously untreated non-small cell lung cancer received intensity modulated radiation therapy (63 Gy/35 fractions) on Monday through Friday, with chemotherapy (paclitaxel 45 mg/m², carboplatin area under the curve [AUC] = 2) on Mondays, for 7 weeks. All patients also received the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib (150 mg orally 1/d) on Tuesday-Sunday for 7 weeks, followed by consolidation paclitaxel–carboplatin. The primary endpoint was time to progression; secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), toxicity, response, and disease control and whether any endpoint differed by EGFR mutation status. Results: Of 46 patients evaluable for response, 40 were former or never-smokers, and 41 were evaluable for EGFR mutations (37 wild-type [WT] and 4 mutated [all adenocarcinoma]). Median time to progression was 14.0 months and did not differ by EGFR status. Toxicity was acceptable (no grade 5, 1 grade 4, 11 grade 3). Twelve patients (26%) had complete responses (10 WT, 2 mutated), 27 (59%) partial (21 WT, 2 mutated, 4 unknown), and 7 (15%) none (6 WT, 2 mutated, 1 unknown) (P=.610). At 37.0 months' follow-up (range, 3.6-76.5 months) for all patients, median OS time was 36.5 months, and 1-, 2-, and 5-year OS rates were 82.6%, 67.4%, and 35.9%, respectively; none differed by mutation status. Twelve patients had no progression, and 34 had local and/or distant failure. Eleven of 27 distant failures were in the brain (7 WT, 3 mutated, 1 unknown). Conclusions: Toxicity and OS were promising, but time to progression did not meet expectations. The prevalence of distant

  12. An association between preoperative anemia and decreased survival in early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with surgery alone

    SciTech Connect

    Yovino, Susannah; Kwok, Young; Krasna, Mark; Bangalore, Madan; Suntharalingam, Mohan . E-mail: msuntha@umm.edu

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: Surgical resection is the mainstay of therapy for patients presenting with Stage I and II non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Despite optimal staging and surgery, these patients are still at significant risk for failure. The purpose of this study is to report a retrospective analysis of the outcome of patients treated with surgery alone, as well as to analyze prognostic factors associated with survival. Materials and Methods: From May 2000 to November 2002, there was a total of 125 patients who were treated with surgery for NSCLC at University of Maryland Medical Center. Of these, 82 Stage I and II patients who received surgery alone as the definitive therapy were identified. The median age of the entire cohort was 68 years (range, 43-88 years). There were 48 males and 34 females. Sixty-three patients (76.8%) underwent lobectomies whereas 19 patients (23.2%) underwent nonlobectomy (wedge resection or segmentectomy) procedures. Patients who received neoadjuvant or adjuvant radiation therapy or chemotherapy were excluded from the study. Factors included in univariate and multivariate analyses were age, sex, tumor histology, pathologic stage, p53 status, preoperative hemoglobin (Hgb), and type of surgery performed. Endpoints of the study were relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: Median follow-up was 20.8 months (range, 0.4-43.2 months). For the entire cohort, the 2-year RFS was 66.0% and 2-year OS was 76.3%. Median survival for the entire cohort has not been achieved. In univariate analysis, the only factor that achieved statistical significance was preoperative Hgb level. Patients who had preoperative Hgb <12 mg/dL experienced significantly worse RFS (mean RFS: 26.6 months vs. 34.9 months, p = 0.043) and OS (median OS: 27 months vs. 42.5 months, p = 0.011). For Stage I patients (n = 72), the 2-year RFS and OS were 66.4% and 77.1%, respectively. In the subgroup of stage IA patients (n = 37), there was a trend toward decreased

  13. No Clinically Significant Changes in Pulmonary Function Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early- Stage Peripheral Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Analysis of RTOG 0236

    SciTech Connect

    Stanic, Sinisa; Paulus, Rebecca; Timmerman, Robert D.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Barriger, Robert B.; Bezjak, Andrea; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Bradley, Jeffrey

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate pulmonary function test (PFT) results and arterial blood gas changes (complete PFT) following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to see whether baseline PFT correlates with lung toxicity and overall survival in medically inoperable patients receiving SBRT for early stage, peripheral, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: During the 2-year follow-up, PFT data were collected for patients with T1-T2N0M0 peripheral NSCLC who received effectively 18 Gy × 3 in a phase 2 North American multicenter study (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] protocol 0236). Pulmonary toxicity was graded by using the RTOG SBRT pulmonary toxicity scale. Paired Wilcoxon signed rank test, logistic regression model, and Kaplan-Meier method were used for statistical analysis. Results: At 2 years, mean percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in the first second and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide declines were 5.8% and 6.3%, respectively, with minimal changes in arterial blood gases and no significant decline in oxygen saturation. Baseline PFT was not predictive of any pulmonary toxicity following SBRT. Whole-lung V5 (the percentage of normal lung tissue receiving 5 Gy), V10, V20, and mean dose to the whole lung were almost identical between patients who developed pneumonitis and patients who were pneumonitis-free. Poor baseline PFT did not predict decreased overall survival. Patients with poor baseline PFT as the reason for medical inoperability had higher median and overall survival rates than patients with normal baseline PFT values but with cardiac morbidity. Conclusions: Poor baseline PFT did not appear to predict pulmonary toxicity or decreased overall survival after SBRT in this medically inoperable population. Poor baseline PFT alone should not be used to exclude patients with early stage lung cancer from treatment with SBRT.

  14. Toxicity and Patterns of Failure of Adaptive/Ablative Proton Therapy for Early-Stage, Medically Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joe Y.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Wen, Hong Y.; De Gracia, Beth; Bluett, Jaques B.; McAleer, Mary F.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Cox, James D.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To analyze the toxicity and patterns of failure of proton therapy given in ablative doses for medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with medically inoperable T1N0M0 (central location) or T2-3N0M0 (any location) NSCLC were treated with proton therapy at 87.5 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) at 2.5 Gy /fraction in this Phase I/II study. All patients underwent treatment simulation with four-dimensional CT; internal gross tumor volumes were delineated on maximal intensity projection images and modified by visual verification of the target volume in 10 breathing phases. The internal gross tumor volumes with maximal intensity projection density was used to design compensators and apertures to account for tumor motion. Therapy consisted of passively scattered protons. All patients underwent repeat four-dimensional CT simulations during treatment to assess the need for adaptive replanning. Results: At a median follow-up time of 16.3 months (range, 4.8-36.3 months), no patient had experienced Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. The most common adverse effect was dermatitis (Grade 2, 67%; Grade 3, 17%), followed by Grade 2 fatigue (44%), Grade 2 pneumonitis (11%), Grade 2 esophagitis (6%), and Grade 2 chest wall pain (6%). Rates of local control were 88.9%, regional lymph node failure 11.1%, and distant metastasis 27.8%. Twelve patients (67%) were still alive at the last follow-up; five had died of metastatic disease and one of preexisting cardiac disease. Conclusions: Proton therapy to ablative doses is well tolerated and produces promising local control rates for medically inoperable early-stage NSCLC.

  15. Curative Treatment of Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Patients With Severe COPD: Stereotactic Radiotherapy Outcomes and Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, David; Lagerwaard, Frank; Rodrigues, George; Haasbeek, Cornelis; Senan, Suresh

    2012-03-01

    Objectives: Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of lung cancer and of postsurgical complications. We studied outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with severe COPD, as defined by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria, and performed a systematic review of the literature on outcomes after SBRT or surgery in these patients. Methods: A single-institution cohort of 176 patients with COPD GOLD III-IV and Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with SBRT was evaluated. A systematic review identified studies reporting outcomes after SBRT or surgery for Stage I NSCLC in patients with GOLD III-IV or a predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of {<=}40%. Results: In the single-institution cohort, median follow-up was 21 months and median overall survival (OS) was 32 months. Actuarial 3-year local control was 89%, and 1- and 3-year OS were 79% and 47%, respectively. COPD severity correlated with OS (p = 0.01). The systematic review identified four other studies (two surgical, two SBRT, n = 196 patients). SBRT studies were published more recently and included older patients than surgical studies. Mean 30-day mortality was 0% post-SBRT and 10% after surgery. Local or locoregional control was high ({>=}89%) after both treatments. Post-SBRT, actuarial OS was 79-95% at 1 year and 43-70% at 3 years. Postsurgical actuarial OS was 45-86% at 1 year and 31-66% at 3 years. Conclusions: SBRT and surgery differ in risk of 30-day mortality in patients with severe COPD. Despite the negative selection of SBRT patients, survival at 1 and 3 years is comparable between the two treatments.

  16. PET/CT vs. non-contrast CT alone for surveillance 1-year post lobectomy for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Dane, Bari; Grechushkin, Vadim; Plank, April; Moore, William; Bilfinger, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    (18)F-FDG PET/CT was compared with non-contrast chest CT in monitoring for recurrence 1-year after lobectomy of stage 1 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). For surveillance after treatment with curative intent, current (April 2012) National Comprehensive Cancer network guidelines recommend chest CT with or without contrast every 6-12 months for 2 years, then non-contrast chest CT annually. PET/CT is not currently indicated for routine follow-up. One hundred patients receiving surveillance PET/CT 1-year after lobectomy for the treatment of stage 1a or 1b NSCLC were included in the study. Exclusion criteria included the presence or interval diagnosis of a second malignancy, or surgical treatment more radical than single lobectomy. The non-contrast CT obtained from the 1-year PET/CT was interpreted by an experienced chest radiologist blinded to the PET/CT for evidence of recurrence using the following findings: pulmonary nodule, pleural effusion, pleural mass, adenopathy, and extrathoracic mass. The ecision about recurrence was made solely from the non-contrast CT without PET/CT findings. This was compared with the determination made with PET/CT. The reference standard for determination of recurrence was the multi-disciplinary tumor board who had access to all imaging and clinical data. Recurrence at 1 year was documented in 16 of 90 patients. All 16 recurrences were documented with PET/CT and 9 were found with non-contrast CT. Five of the 7 recurrences missed with non-contrast CT were extrathoracic metastases. Sensitivity of CT and PET/CT for recurrence was 56.3% and 100%, respectively (p = 0.015). Specificity of CT and PET/CT for recurrence was 95.9% and 93.2%, respectively (p = 0.62).

  17. Fibroblast Growth Factor 2-A Predictor of Outcome for Patients Irradiated for Stage II-III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Setter, Cornelia; Dahl, Olav; Schild, Steven E.; Noack, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The prognostic value of the tumor cell expression of the fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unclear. The present study investigated the effect of tumor cell expression of FGF-2 on the outcome of 60 patients irradiated for Stage II-III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: The effect of FGF-2 expression and 13 additional factors on locoregional control (LRC), metastasis-free survival (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were retrospectively evaluated. These additional factors included age, gender, Karnofsky performance status, histologic type, histologic grade, T and N category, American Joint Committee on Cancer stage, surgery, chemotherapy, pack-years, smoking during radiotherapy, and hemoglobin during radiotherapy. Locoregional failure was identified by endoscopy or computed tomography. Univariate analyses were performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and the Wilcoxon test and multivariate analyses with the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: On univariate analysis, improved LRC was associated with surgery (p = .017), greater hemoglobin levels (p = .036), and FGF-2 negativity (p <.001). On multivariate analysis of LRC, surgery (relative risk [RR], 2.44; p = .037), and FGF-2 expression (RR, 5.06; p <.001) maintained significance. On univariate analysis, improved MFS was associated with squamous cell carcinoma (p = .020), greater hemoglobin levels (p = .007), and FGF-2 negativity (p = .001). On multivariate analysis of MFS, the hemoglobin levels (RR, 2.65; p = .019) and FGF-2 expression (RR, 3.05; p = .004) were significant. On univariate analysis, improved OS was associated with a lower N category (p = .048), greater hemoglobin levels (p <.001), and FGF-2 negativity (p <.001). On multivariate analysis of OS, greater hemoglobin levels (RR, 4.62; p = .002) and FGF-2 expression (RR, 3.25; p = .002) maintained significance. Conclusions: Tumor cell expression of FGF-2 appeared to be an independent negative predictor

  18. Comparison of toxicity and outcomes of concurrent radiotherapy with carboplatin/paclitaxel or cisplatin/etoposide in stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Liew, Mun Sem; Sia, Joseph; Starmans, Maud H W; Tafreshi, Ali; Harris, Sam; Feigen, Malcolm; White, Shane; Zimet, Allan; Lambin, Philippe; Boutros, Paul C; Mitchell, Paul; John, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) has become the standard of care for patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The comparative merits of two widely used regimens: carboplatin/paclitaxel (PC) and cisplatin/etoposide (PE), each with concurrent radiotherapy, remain largely undefined. Records for consecutive patients with stage III NSCLC treated with PC or PE and ≥60 Gy chest radiotherapy between 2000 and 2011 were reviewed for outcomes and toxicity. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox modeling with the Wald test. Comparison across groups was done using the student's t and chi-squared tests. Seventy-five (PC: 44, PE: 31) patients were analyzed. PC patients were older (median 71 vs. 63 years; P = 0.0006). Other characteristics were comparable between groups. With PE, there was significantly increased grade ≥3 neutropenia (39% vs. 14%, P = 0.024) and thrombocytopenia (10% vs. 0%, P = 0.039). Radiation pneumonitis was more common with PC (66% vs. 38%, P = 0.033). Five treatment-related deaths occurred (PC: 3 vs. PE: 2, P = 1.000). With a median follow-up of 51.6 months, there were no significant differences in relapse-free survival (median PC 12.0 vs. PE 11.5 months, P = 0.700) or overall survival (median PC 20.7 vs. PE 13.7 months; P = 0.989). In multivariate analyses, no factors predicted for improved survival for either regimen. PC was more likely to be used in elderly patients. Despite this, PC resulted in significantly less hematological toxicity but achieved similar survival outcomes as PE. PC is an acceptable CCRT regimen, especially in older patients with multiple comorbidities.

  19. An in-silico comparison of proton beam and IMRT for postoperative radiotherapy in completely resected stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Post-operative radiotherapy (PORT) for stage IIIA completely-resected non-small cell lung cancer (CR-NSCLC) has been shown to improve local control; however, it is unclear that this translates into a survival benefit. One explanation is that the detrimental effect of PORT on critical organs at risk (OARs) negates its benefit. This study reports an in-silico comparative analysis of passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT)- and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) with intensity modulated photon beam radiotherapy (IMRT) PORT. Methods The computed tomography treatment planning scans of ten patients with pathologic stage IIIA CR-NSCLC treated with IMRT were used. IMRT, PSPT, and IMPT plans were generated and analyzed for dosimetric endpoints. The proton plans were constructed with two or three beams. All plans were optimized to deliver 50.4 Gy(RBE) in 1.8 Gy(RBE) fractions to the target volume. Results IMPT leads to statistically significant reductions in maximum spinal cord, mean lung dose, lung volumes treated to 5, 10, 20, and 30 Gy (V5, V10, V20, V30), mean heart dose, and heart volume treated to 40 Gy (V40), when compared with IMRT or PSPT. PSPT reduced lung V5 but increased lung V20, V30, and heart and esophagus V40. Conclusions IMPT demonstrates a large decrease in dose to all OARs. PSPT, while reducing the low-dose lung bath, increases the volume of lung receiving high dose. Reductions are seen in dosimetric parameters predictive of radiation pneumonitis and cardiac morbidity and mortality. This reduction may correlate with a decrease in dose-limiting toxicity and improve the therapeutic ratio. PMID:23767810

  20. High Radiation Dose May Reduce the Negative Effect of Large Gross Tumor Volume in Patients With Medically Inoperable Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Lujun; West, Brady T.; Hayman, James A.; Lyons, Susan; Cease, Kemp; Kong, F.-M. . E-mail: Fengkong@med.umich.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the effect of radiation dose varies with gross tumor volume (GTV) in patients with stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Included in the study were 114 consecutive patients with medically inoperable stage I/II NSCLC treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy between 1992 and 2004. The median biologic equivalent dose (BED) was 79.2 Gy (range, 58.2-124.5 Gy). The median GTV was 51.8 cm{sup 3} (range, 2.1-727.8 cm{sup 3}). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Kaplan-Meier estimation and Cox regression models were used for survival analyses. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that there was a significant interaction between radiation dose and GTV (p < 0.001). In patients with BED {<=}79.2 Gy (n = 68), the OS medians for patients with GTV >51.8 cm{sup 3} and {<=}51.8 cm{sup 3} were 18.2 and 23.9 months, respectively (p 0.015). If BED was >79.2 Gy (n = 46), no significant difference was found between GTV groups (p = 0.681). For patients with GTV >51.8 cm{sup 3} (n = 45), the OS medians in those with BED >79.2 Gy and {<=}79.2 Gy were 30.4 and 18.2 months, respectively (p < 0.001). If GTV was {<=}51.8 cm{sup 3} (n = 45), the difference was no longer significant (p = 0.577). Conclusion: High-dose radiation is more important for patients with larger tumors and may be effective in reducing the adverse outcome associated with large GTV. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm this finding.

  1. Comprehensive dosimetric planning comparison for early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer with SABR: fixed-beam IMRT versus VMAT versus TomoTherapy.

    PubMed

    Xhaferllari, Ilma; El-Sherif, Omar; Gaede, Stewart

    2016-09-08

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is emerging as a leading technology in treating early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). However, two other modalities capable of deliver-ing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) include fixed-beam and helical TomoTherapy (HT). This study aims to provide an extensive dosimetric compari-son among these various IMRT techniques for treating early-stage NSCLC with SABR. Ten early-stage NSCLC patients were retrospectively optimized using three fixed-beam techniques via nine to eleven beams (high and low modulation step-and-shoot (SS), and sliding window (SW)), two VMAT techniques via two partial arcs (SmartArc (SA) and RapidArc (RA)), and three HT techniques via three different fan beam widths (1 cm, 2.5 cm, and 5 cm) for 80 plans total. Fixed-beam and VMAT plans were generated using flattening filter-free beams. SS and SA, HT treatment plans, and SW and RA were optimized using Pinnacle v9.1, Tomoplan v.3.1.1, and Eclipse (Acuros XB v11.3 algorithm), respectively. Dose-volume histogram statistics, dose conformality, and treatment delivery efficiency were analyzed. VMAT treatment plans achieved significantly lower values for contralat-eral lung V5Gy (p ≤ 0.05) compared to the HT plans, and significantly lower mean lung dose (p < 0.006) compared to HT 5 cm treatment plans. In the comparison between the VMAT techniques, a significant reduction in the total monitor units (p = 0.05) was found in the SA plans, while a significant decrease was observed in the dose falloff parameter, D2cm, (p = 0.05), for the RA treatments. The maximum cord dose was significantly reduced (p = 0.017) in grouped RA&SA plans com-pared to SS. Estimated treatment time was significantly higher for HT and fixed-beam plans compared to RA&SA (p < 0.001). Although, a significant difference was not observed in the RA vs. SA (p = 0.393). RA&SA outperformed HT in all parameters measured. Despite an

  2. Comprehensive dosimetric planning comparison for early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer with SABR: fixed-beam IMRT versus VMAT versus TomoTherapy.

    PubMed

    Xhaferllari, Ilma; El-Sherif, Omar; Gaede, Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is emerging as a leading technology in treating early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). However, two other modalities capable of deliver-ing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) include fixed-beam and helical TomoTherapy (HT). This study aims to provide an extensive dosimetric compari-son among these various IMRT techniques for treating early-stage NSCLC with SABR. Ten early-stage NSCLC patients were retrospectively optimized using three fixed-beam techniques via nine to eleven beams (high and low modulation step-and-shoot (SS), and sliding window (SW)), two VMAT techniques via two partial arcs (SmartArc (SA) and RapidArc (RA)), and three HT techniques via three different fan beam widths (1 cm, 2.5 cm, and 5 cm) for 80 plans total. Fixed-beam and VMAT plans were generated using flattening filter-free beams. SS and SA, HT treatment plans, and SW and RA were optimized using Pinnacle v9.1, Tomoplan v.3.1.1, and Eclipse (Acuros XB v11.3 algorithm), respectively. Dose-volume histogram statistics, dose conformality, and treatment delivery efficiency were analyzed. VMAT treatment plans achieved significantly lower values for contralat-eral lung V5Gy (p ≤ 0.05) compared to the HT plans, and significantly lower mean lung dose (p < 0.006) compared to HT 5 cm treatment plans. In the comparison between the VMAT techniques, a significant reduction in the total monitor units (p = 0.05) was found in the SA plans, while a significant decrease was observed in the dose falloff parameter, D2cm, (p = 0.05), for the RA treatments. The maximum cord dose was significantly reduced (p = 0.017) in grouped RA&SA plans com-pared to SS. Estimated treatment time was significantly higher for HT and fixed-beam plans compared to RA&SA (p < 0.001). Although, a significant difference was not observed in the RA vs. SA (p = 0.393). RA&SA outperformed HT in all parameters measured. Despite an

  3. The postoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and changes in this ratio predict survival after the complete resection of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Feng; Han, Anqin; Shi, Fang; Kong, Li; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although numerous studies have demonstrated associations between the preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and long-term outcomes in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the prognostic significance of postoperative NLR and change in NLR (ΔNLR) is unknown for patients who underwent complete resection of stage I NSCLC. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of postoperative NLR and ΔNLR in 123 patients with stage I NSCLC. Patients and methods This retrospective study included preoperative and postoperative data of 123 patients who underwent surgical resection for stage I NSCLC. The relationship between disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and clinicopathological factors, including NLR, lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio, and their changes, was analyzed using both univariate Kaplan–Meier and multivariate Cox regression methods. Results The 5-year DFS and OS rates in our cohort were 60.16% and 67.48%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that age (P=0.045), smoking status (P=0.033), preoperative NLR (P=0.032), postoperative NLR (P<0.001), ΔNLR (P=0.004), and change in LMR (ΔLMR) (P=0.025) were significant predictors of DFS and that age (P=0.039), smoking status (P=0.042), postoperative NLR (P<0.001), ΔNLR (P=0.004), and ΔLMR (P=0.011) were independent predictors of OS. Multivariate analysis confirmed that postoperative NLR (hazard ratio [HR] =2.435, P=0.001) and ΔNLR (HR =2.103, P=0.012) were independent predictors of DFS and that postoperative NLR (HR =2.747, P=0.001) and ΔNLR (HR =2.052, P=0.018) were significant prognostic factors of OS. Conclusion Our study reported for the first time that postoperative NLR and ΔNLR – but not preoperative NLR – were independent prognostic factors of DFS and OS in patients with stage I NSCLC who underwent complete resection. This easily available biomarker might be helpful in individual risk

  4. Functional FLT1 genetic variation is a prognostic factor for recurrence in stage I-III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glubb, Dylan M.; Paré-Brunet, Laia; Jantus-Lewintre, Eloisa; Jiang, Chen; Crona, Daniel; Etheridge, Amy S.; Mirza, Osman; Zhang, Wei; Seiser, Eric L.; Rzyman, Witold; Jassem, Jacek; Auman, Todd; Hirsch, Fred R.; Owzar, Kouros; Camps, Carlos; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Innocenti, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis We propose that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes of the VEGF-pathway of angiogenesis will associate with survival in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Fifty-three SNPs in VEGF-pathway genes were genotyped in 150 European stage I-III NSCLC patients and tested for associations with patient survival. Replication was performed in an independent cohort of 142 European stage I-III patients. Reporter gene assays were used to assess the effects of SNPs on transcriptional activity. Results In the initial cohort, five SNPs associated (q<0.05) with relapse-free survival (RFS). The minor alleles of intronic FLT1 SNPs, rs7996030 and rs9582036, associated with reduced RFS (HR=1.67 [95% CI, 1.22 to 2.29] and HR=1.51 [95% CI, 1.14 to 2.01], respectively) and reduced transcriptional activity. The minor alleles of intronic KRAS SNPs, rs12813551 and rs10505980, associated with increased RFS (HR=0.64 [0.46 to 0.87] and HR=0.64 [0.47 to 0.87], respectively) and the minor allelic variant of rs12813551 also reduced transcriptional activity. Lastly, the minor allele of the intronic KRAS SNP rs10842513 associated with reduced RFS (HR=1.65 [95% CI, 1.16 to 2.37]). Analysis of the functional variants suggests they are located in transcriptional enhancer elements. The negative effect of rs9582036 on RFS was confirmed in the replication cohort (HR=1.69 [0.99 to 2.89], p=0.028) and the association was significant in pooled analysis of both cohorts (HR=1.67 [1.21-2.30], p=0.0001). Conclusions The functional FLT1 variant rs9582036 is a prognostic determinant of recurrence in stage I-III NSCLC. Its predictive value should be tested in the adjuvant setting of stage I-III NSCLC. PMID:26134224

  5. Advances in molecular-based personalized non-small-cell lung cancer therapy: targeting epidermal growth factor receptor and mechanisms of resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jotte, Robert M; Spigel, David R

    2015-01-01

    Molecularly targeted therapies, directed against the features of a given tumor, have allowed for a personalized approach to the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The reversible epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib and erlotinib had undergone turbulent clinical development until it was discovered that these agents have preferential activity in patients with NSCLC harboring activating EGFR mutations. Since then, a number of phase 3 clinical trials have collectively shown that EGFR-TKI monotherapy is more effective than combination chemotherapy as first-line therapy for EGFR mutation-positive advanced NSCLC. The next generation of EGFR-directed agents for EGFR mutation-positive advanced NSCLC is irreversible TKIs against EGFR and other ErbB family members, including afatinib, which was recently approved, and dacomitinib, which is currently being tested in phase 3 trials. As research efforts continue to explore the various proposed mechanisms of acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI therapy, agents that target signaling pathways downstream of EGFR are being studied in combination with EGFR TKIs in molecularly selected advanced NSCLC. Overall, the results of numerous ongoing phase 3 trials involving the EGFR TKIs will be instrumental in determining whether further gains in personalized therapy for advanced NSCLC are attainable with newer agents and combinations. This article reviews key clinical trial data for personalized NSCLC therapy with agents that target the EGFR and related pathways, specifically based on molecular characteristics of individual tumors, and mechanisms of resistance. PMID:26310719

  6. Advances in molecular-based personalized non-small-cell lung cancer therapy: targeting epidermal growth factor receptor and mechanisms of resistance.

    PubMed

    Jotte, Robert M; Spigel, David R

    2015-11-01

    Molecularly targeted therapies, directed against the features of a given tumor, have allowed for a personalized approach to the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The reversible epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib and erlotinib had undergone turbulent clinical development until it was discovered that these agents have preferential activity in patients with NSCLC harboring activating EGFR mutations. Since then, a number of phase 3 clinical trials have collectively shown that EGFR-TKI monotherapy is more effective than combination chemotherapy as first-line therapy for EGFR mutation-positive advanced NSCLC. The next generation of EGFR-directed agents for EGFR mutation-positive advanced NSCLC is irreversible TKIs against EGFR and other ErbB family members, including afatinib, which was recently approved, and dacomitinib, which is currently being tested in phase 3 trials. As research efforts continue to explore the various proposed mechanisms of acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI therapy, agents that target signaling pathways downstream of EGFR are being studied in combination with EGFR TKIs in molecularly selected advanced NSCLC. Overall, the results of numerous ongoing phase 3 trials involving the EGFR TKIs will be instrumental in determining whether further gains in personalized therapy for advanced NSCLC are attainable with newer agents and combinations. This article reviews key clinical trial data for personalized NSCLC therapy with agents that target the EGFR and related pathways, specifically based on molecular characteristics of individual tumors, and mechanisms of resistance. PMID:26310719

  7. A phase II study of cisplatin, vindesine and continuously infused 5-fluorouracil in the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. Osaka Lung Cancer Chemotherapy Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, T.; Ikegami, H.; Nakamura, S.; Kawase, T.; Nishikawa, H.; Yokota, S.; Yoshida, M.; Tachibana, T.; Igarashi, T.; Komuta, K.; Higashino, K.

    1996-01-01

    Fifty-two previously untreated patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were treated on a 14 day cycle with cisplatin (60 mg m-2 i.v.) and vindesine (3 mg m-2 i.v.) on day 1, followed by a 3 day continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (800 mg m-2 day-1) starting on day 8. An overall response rate of 40.4% was observed in 47 evaluable patients, which included one complete response and 18 partial responses. Responses were achieved in 61.1% of stage 3 patients and 27.6% of stage 4 patients. The median progression-free interval was 19.3 weeks, and median survival time was 41.6 weeks (47.1 weeks for patients with stage 3 disease and 38.7 weeks for those with stage 4 disease). Toxicity was well tolerated. Gastrointestinal and renal toxicities did not exceed WHO grade 2. Grade 3 or 4 leucopenia and anaemia occurred in nine (19%) and four (9%) patients respectively, but only grade 2 thrombocytopenia was observed. Phlebitis at the infusion site was observed in 24 patients (53%). This treatment programme achieved a response rate similar to other active combination regimens for the treatment of advanced NSCLC, and was less toxic. PMID:8624270

  8. Survivorship Care Planning in Patients With Colorectal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-16

    Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  9. Advantages of CyberKnife for inoperable stage I peripheral non-small-cell lung cancer compared to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    TONG, AN-NA; YAN, PENG; YUAN, GUANG-HUI; LV, XIAO-YAN; GONG, HAI; ZHAO, HUI; WANG, YAN-MING

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the clinical curative effect and acute radiation lung reactions between CyberKnife (CK) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) treatment for inoperable stage I peripheral non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We retrospectively analyzed 68 patients with inoperable stage I peripheral NSCLC between 2012 and 2013 in our institution. The CK patients were treated with 42–60 Gy in three fractions, while the 3DCRT patients were treated with a total of 60 Gy, at 2 Gy per fraction. The patients were followed up and the clinical outcome was evaluated according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours. We assessed the presence of acute radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary function status by thoracic scan and pulmonary function tests following CK and 3DCRT treatment. The binary univariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that treatment method and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) prior to treatment (pre-FEV1/FVC) were the main factors affecting the risk of radiation pneumonitis. The analysis of these factors through multivariate logistic regression method demonstrated that treatment method for grade 1 and 2 [odds ratio (OR)= 7.866 and 11.334, respectively) and pre-FEV1/FVC for grade 1, 2 and 3 (OR = 5.062, 11.498 and 15.042, respectively) were significant factors affecting the risk of radiation pneumonitis (P<0.05). The 68 patients were divided into two subgroups using the threshold of pre-FEV1/FVC selected by the receiver operating characteristic curve. There were significant differences between the 3DCRT and CK treatment in both the pre-FEV1/FVC <68% and ≥68% subgroups for radiation pneumonitis (P=0.023 and 0.002, respectively). There was no statistically significant change in FVC, FEV1 and carbon monoxide diffusion capacity (DCLO) in the CK group, whereas there was a decrease in DCLO in the 3DCRT group. The complete remission rate was 40 vs. 34.2% at 1 year in the CK and

  10. MicroRNA-related single-nucleotide polymorphism of XPO5 is strongly correlated with the prognosis and chemotherapy response in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Geng, Ji-Qun; Wang, Xiao-Chen; Li, Long-Fei; Zhao, Jun; Wu, Song; Yu, Gui-Ping; Zhu, Kou-Jun

    2016-02-01

    This study was performed to investigate if the microRNA-related single-nucleotide polymorphisms (miR-SNPs) of XPO5 gene predicted the prognosis and pathological features of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. A total of 131 advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were recruited. MicroRNA (miRNA) binding site prediction software was adopted for the prediction and screening of SNPs in XPO5 and miRNA binding regions. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was further performed. Time-dependent survival-free curves were constructed using the Kaplan-Meier technique. Univariate and the multivariate survival analyses were conducted for confirmation of prognostic factor for advanced NSCLC patients receiving chemotherapy. There were no significant differences of SNP distribution frequencies between groups, without statistical significance (P > 0.05). Included clinical pathological features and chemotherapy regimens showed no apparent statistical significance in influencing the curative effect of chemotherapy in advanced NSCLC patients (all P > 0.05). While the objective response rate (ORR) in patients who carried AA and AC genotype was 35.48 and 51.22 %, respectively, with statistically significant difference (P < 0.05). Univariate survival analysis indicated that patients who carried AA genotype showed a significantly lower 5-year survival rate to those who carried AC genotype (P < 0.05). And, considering pathological features, statistical significance was found in patients with different pathological types, lymph node metastasis, differentiation degree, T staging, and pathological staging (all P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis results indicated that the SNP sites of rs11077 might be an independent prognostic factor of advanced NSCLC patients receiving chemotherapy (risk ratio [RR] = 0.346; 95 % confidence interval [95 % CI] = 0.174-0.685, P = 0.002). Other clinical features were all

  11. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Radiofrequency Ablation for Medically Inoperable, Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The standard management of medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) conventionally has been fractionated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). The relatively poor local control rate and inconvenience associated with this therapy have prompted the development of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), a technique that delivers very high doses of irradiation typically over 3 to 5 sessions. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has also been investigated as a less costly, single-day therapy that thermally ablates small, peripheral tumors. The cost-effectiveness of these three techniques has never been compared. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to describe health states of 65-year-old men with medically inoperable NSCLC after treatment with 3D-CRT, SBRT, and RFA. Given their frail state, patients were assumed to receive supportive care after recurrence. Utility values, recurrence risks, and costs were adapted from the literature. Sensitivity analyses were performed to model uncertainty in these parameters. Results: The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for SBRT over 3D-CRT was $6,000/quality-adjusted life-year, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for SBRT over RFA was $14,100/quality-adjusted life-year. One-way sensitivity analysis showed that the results were robust across a range of tumor sizes, patient utility values, and costs. This result was confirmed with probabilistic sensitivity analyses that varied local control rates and utilities. Conclusion: In comparison to 3D-CRT and RFA, SBRT was the most cost-effective treatment for medically inoperable NSCLC over a wide range of treatment and disease assumptions. On the basis of efficacy and cost, SBRT should be the primary treatment approach for this disease.

  12. Oral nutritional supplements containing (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids affect the nutritional status of patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer during multimodality treatment.

    PubMed

    van der Meij, Barbara S; Langius, Jacqueline A E; Smit, Egbert F; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke D; von Blomberg, B Mary E; Heijboer, Annemieke C; Paul, Marinus A; van Leeuwen, Paul A M

    2010-10-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), (n-3) fatty acids from fish oil, have immune-modulating effects and may improve nutritional status in cancer. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of an oral nutritional supplement containing (n-3) fatty acids on nutritional status and inflammatory markers in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) undergoing multimodality treatment. In a double-blind experiment, 40 patients with stage III NSCLC were randomly assigned to receive 2 cans/d of a protein- and energy-dense oral nutritional supplement containing (n-3) fatty acids (2.0 g EPA + 0.9 g DHA/d) or an isocaloric control supplement. EPA in plasma phospholipids, energy intake, resting energy expenditure (REE), body weight, fat free mass (FFM), mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC), and inflammatory markers were assessed. Effects of intervention were analyzed by generalized estimating equations and expressed as regression coefficients (B). The intervention group (I) had a better weight maintenance than the control (C) group after 2 and 4 wk (B = 1.3 and 1.7 kg, respectively; P < 0.05), a better FFM maintenance after 3 and 5 wk (B = 1.5 and 1.9 kg, respectively; P < 0.05), a reduced REE (B = -16.7% of predicted; P = 0.01) after 3 wk, and a trend for a greater MUAC (B = 9.1; P = 0.06) and lower interleukin-6 production (B = -27.9; P = 0.08) after 5 wk. After 4 wk, the I group had a higher energy and protein intake than the C group (B = 2456 kJ/24 h, P = 0.03 and B = 25.0 g, P = 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, a protein- and energy-dense oral nutritional supplement containing (n-3) fatty acids beneficially affects nutritional status during multimodality treatment in patients with NSCLC.

  13. Does immunohistochemistry affect response to therapy and survival of inoperable non-small cell lung carcinoma patients? A survey of 145 stage III-IV consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Giuseppe; Haspinger, Eva Regina; Bimbatti, Manuela; Leone, Giorgia; Paolini, Biagio; Fabbri, Alessandra; Tamborini, Elena; Perrone, Federica; Testi, Adele; Garassino, Marina; Maisonneuve, Patrick; de Braud, Filippo; Pilotti, Silvana; Pastorino, Ugo

    2014-04-01

    Whether non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) unveiled by immunohistochemistry (IHC) has the same clinical outcome as those typed by morphology is still matter of debate. A total of 145 stage III-IV, consecutive inoperable NSCLC patients treated by chemotherapy (133 cases) or EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (12 cases) and including 100 biopsies, 11 surgical specimens, and 34 cytological samples had originally accounted for 120 adenocarcinomas (ADs), 19 squamous cell carcinomas (SQCs), and 6 adenosquamous carcinomas (ADSQCs) by integrating morphology and thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF1)/p40 IHC. Thirty-two NSCLC-not otherwise specified (NSCLC-NOS) cases were identified by morphology revision of the original diagnoses, which showed solid growth pattern (P < .001), 22 ADs, 5 SQCs, and 5 ADSQCs by IHC profiling (P < .001), and 10 gene-altered tumors (3 EGFR, 5 KRAS, and 2 ALK). While no significant relationships were observed between response to therapy and original, morphology or IHC diagnoses, driver mutations and tumor differentiation by TTF1 expression, AD run better progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) than other tumor types by morphology (P = .010 and P = .047) and IHC (P = .033 and P = .046), respectively. Furthermore, patients with NSCLC-NOS confirmed as AD by IHC tended to have poorer OS (P = .179) and PFS (P = .193) similar to that of ADSQC and SQC (P = .702 and P = .540, respectively). A category of less differentiated AD with poorer prognosis on therapy could be identified by IHC, while there were no differences for SQC or ADSQC. The terminology of "NSCLC-NOS, favor by IHC" is appropriate to alert clinicians toward more aggressive tumors. PMID:24326823

  14. Protocol for the isotoxic intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Haslett, Kate; Franks, Kevin; Harden, Susan; Hatton, Matthew; McDonald, Fiona; Ashcroft, Linda; Falk, Sally; Groom, Nicki; Harris, Catherine; McCloskey, Paula; Whitehurst, Philip; Bayman, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The majority of stage III patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are unsuitable for concurrent chemoradiotherapy, the non-surgical gold standard of care. As the alternative treatment options of sequential chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy alone are associated with high local failure rates, various intensification strategies have been employed. There is evidence to suggest that altered fractionation using hyperfractionation, acceleration, dose escalation, and individualisation may be of benefit. The MAASTRO group have pioneered the concept of ‘isotoxic’ radiotherapy allowing for individualised dose escalation using hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy based on predefined normal tissue constraints. This study aims to evaluate whether delivering isotoxic radiotherapy using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is achievable. Methods and analysis Isotoxic IMRT is a multicentre feasibility study. From June 2014, a total of 35 patients from 7 UK centres, with a proven histological or cytological diagnosis of inoperable NSCLC, unsuitable for concurrent chemoradiotherapy will be recruited. A minimum of 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy is mandated before starting isotoxic radiotherapy. The dose of radiation will be increased until one or more of the organs at risk tolerance or the maximum dose of 79.2 Gy is reached. The primary end point is feasibility, with accrual rates, local control and overall survival our secondary end points. Patients will be followed up for 5 years. Ethics and dissemination The study has received ethical approval (REC reference: 13/NW/0480) from the National Research Ethics Service (NRES) Committee North West—Greater Manchester South. The trial is conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and Good Clinical Practice (GCP). The trial results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented internationally. Trial registration number NCT01836692; Pre-results. PMID:27084277

  15. Post-study therapy as a source of confounding in survival analysis of first-line studies in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zietemann, Vera D; Schuster, Tibor; Duell, Thomas HG

    2011-01-01

    Clinical trials exploring the long-term effects of first-line therapy in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer generally disregard subsequent treatment although most patients receive second and third-line therapies. The choice of further therapy depends on critical intermediate events such as disease progression and it is usually left at the physician’s discretion. Time-dependent confounding may then arise with standard survival analyses producing biased effect estimates, even in randomized trials. Herein we describe the concept of time-dependent confounding in detail and discuss whether the response to first-line treatment may be a potential time-dependent confounding factor for survival in the context of subsequent therapy. A prospective observational study of 406 patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer served as an example base. There is evidence that time-dependent confounding may occur in multivariate survival analysis after first-line therapy when disregarding subsequent treatment. In the light of this important but underestimated aspect some of the large and meaningful recent clinical first-line lung cancer studies are discussed, focussing on subsequent treatment and its potential impact on the survival of the study patients. No recently performed lung cancer trial applied adequate statistical analyses despite the frequent use of subsequent therapies. In conclusion, effect estimates from standard survival analysis may be biased even in randomized controlled trials because of time-dependent confounding. To adequately assess treatment effects on long-term outcomes appropriate statistical analyses need to take subsequent treatment into account. PMID:22263071

  16. Id1 and Id3 co-expression correlates with clinical outcome in stage III-N2 non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (Id1) and 3 (Id3) genes have been related with the inhibition of cell differentiation, cell growth promotion and tumor metastasis. Recently, Id1 has been identified as an independent prognostic factor in patients with lung adenocarcinoma, regardless of the stage. Furthermore, Id1 may confer resistance to treatment (both, radiotherapy and chemotherapy). Methods We have studied, using monoclonal antibodies for immunohistochemistry, the Id1 and Id3 tumor epithelial expression in 17 patients with stage III-N2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy. Results Id1 expression is observed in 82.4% of the tumors, whereas Id3 expression is present in 41.2% of the samples. Interestingly, Id1 and Id3 expression are mutually correlated (R = 0.579, p = 0.015). In a subgroup analysis of patients with the most locally advanced disease (T4N2 stage), co-expression of Id1 and Id3 showed to be related with a worse overall survival (45 vs 6 months, p = 0.002). A trend towards significance for a worse progression free survival (30 vs 1 months, p = 0.219) and a lower response rate to the treatment (RR = 50% vs 87.5%, p = 0.07) were also observed. Conclusions A correlation between Id1 and Id3 protein expression is observed. Id1 and Id3 co-expression seems associated with a poor clinical outcome in patients with locally advanced NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy. PMID:23311395

  17. A short radiotherapy course for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): effective palliation and patients' convenience.

    PubMed

    Plataniotis, G A; Kouvaris, J R; Dardoufas, C; Kouloulias, V; Theofanopoulou, M A; Vlahos, L

    2002-02-01

    In order to facilitate patients with symptomatic locally advanced NSCLC, especially those coming from remote areas we have employed two palliative RT schedules. The first (S1) is the well known from Medical Research Council (MRC) randomized studies 2 x 8.5 Gy one week apart and the second (S2) is a two-day RT schedule: three fractions of 4.25 Gy are given on the first day and two fractions of 4.25 Gy on the second day. The records of 92 patients were reviewed (48 for S1 and 44 for S2). Patients, disease characteristics and results were similar for both groups; rates of symptom disappearance were for S1 and S2, respectively: cough 24 and 20%, hemoptysis 60 and 67%, chest pain 57 and 64% and dyspnoea 55 and 45% The overall condition improved in 39 and 36%, respectively. The median palliation time in days was in S1 and S2, respectively: cough 70 and 66, haemoptysis 133 and 139, chest pain 68 and 62 and dyspnoea 74 and 69 days. The median survival was 25 weeks in both S1 and S2 groups (P=0.89 log-rank test). At 52 weeks (one year), ten (21%) and seven (16%) of the patients were alive in S1 and S2 groups, respectively. At 104 weeks, the corresponding figures were two (4%) and two (4.7%) for S1 and S2. Our results are in accordance to those reported in literature regarding the safety and efficacy of palliative hypofractionated radiotherapy schemes. Their use in selected patients could be cost-effective and convenient for patients especially those coming from remote areas.

  18. The Impact of Tumor Size on Outcomes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Medically Inoperable Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Allibhai, Zishan; Taremi, Mojgan; Bezjak, Andrea; Brade, Anthony; Hope, Andrew J.; Sun, Alexander; Cho, B.C. John

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) offers excellent control rates. Most published series deal mainly with small (usually <4 cm), peripheral, solitary tumors. Larger tumors are associated with poorer outcomes (ie, lower control rates, higher toxicity) when treated with conventional RT. It is unclear whether SBRT is sufficiently potent to control these larger tumors. We therefore evaluated and examined the influence of tumor size on treatment outcomes after SBRT. Methods and Materials: Between October 2004 and October 2010, 185 medically inoperable patients with early (T1-T2N0M0) NSCLC were treated on a prospective research ethics board-approved single-institution protocol. Prescription doses were risk-adapted based on tumor size and location. Follow-up included prospective assessment of toxicity (as per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) and serial computed tomography scans. Patterns of failure, toxicity, and survival outcomes were calculated using Kaplan-Meier method, and the significance of tumor size (diameter, volume) with respect to patient, treatment, and tumor factors was tested. Results: Median follow-up was 15.2 months. Tumor size was not associated with local failure but was associated with regional failure (P=.011) and distant failure (P=.021). Poorer overall survival (P=.001), disease-free survival (P=.001), and cause-specific survival (P=.005) were also significantly associated with tumor size (with tumor volume more significant than diameter). Gross tumor volume and planning target volume were significantly associated with grade 2 or worse radiation pneumonitis. However, overall rates of grade ≥3 pneumonitis were low and not significantly affected by tumor or target size. Conclusions: Currently employed stereotactic body radiation therapy dose regimens can provide safe effective local therapy even for larger solitary NSCLC tumors (up to 5.7 cm

  19. Residual {sup 18}F-FDG-PET Uptake 12 Weeks After Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Predicts Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Bollineni, Vikram Rao; Widder, Joachim; Pruim, Jan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wiegman, Erwin M.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) uptake at 12 weeks after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From November 2006 to February 2010, 132 medically inoperable patients with proven Stage I NSCLC or FDG-PET-positive primary lung tumors were analyzed retrospectively. SABR consisted of 60 Gy delivered in 3 to 8 fractions. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of the treated lesion was assessed 12 weeks after SABR, using FDG-PET. Patients were subsequently followed at regular intervals using computed tomography (CT) scans. Association between post-SABR SUV{sub max} and local control (LC), mediastinal failure, distant failure, overall survival (OS), and disease-specific survival (DSS) was examined. Results: Median follow-up time was 17 months (range, 3-40 months). Median lesion size was 25 mm (range, 9-70 mm). There were 6 local failures: 15 mediastinal failures, 15 distant failures, 13 disease-related deaths, and 16 deaths from intercurrent diseases. Glucose corrected post-SABR median SUV{sub max} was 3.0 (range, 0.55-14.50). Using SUV{sub max} 5.0 as a cutoff, the 2-year LC was 80% versus 97.7% for high versus low SUV{sub max}, yielding an adjusted subhazard ratio (SHR) for high post-SABR SUV{sub max} of 7.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-38.5; p = 0.019). Two-year DSS rates were 74% versus 91%, respectively, for high and low SUV{sub max} values (SHR, 2.2; 95% CI, 0.8-6.3; p = 0.113). Two-year OS was 62% versus 81% (hazard ratio [HR], 1.6; 95% CI, 0.7-3.7; p = 0.268). Conclusions: Residual FDG uptake (SUV{sub max} {>=}5.0) 12 weeks after SABR signifies increased risk of local failure. A single FDG-PET scan at 12 weeks could be used to tailor further follow-up according to the risk of failure, especially in patients potentially eligible for salvage surgery.

  20. Distinctive Patterns of Initially Presenting Metastases and Clinical Outcomes According to the Histological Subtypes in Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Yeon S.; Kay, Chul S.; Kim, Sung H.; Yeo, Chang D.; Kim, Jin W.; Kim, Seung Joon; Kim, Young K.; Ko, Yoon H.; Kang, Jin H.; Lee, Kyo Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study was designed to compare the primary patterns of metastases and clinical outcomes between adenocarcinoma (Adenoca) and squamous cell carcinoma (SQ) in initially diagnosed stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Between June 2007 and June 2013, a total of 427 eligible patients were analyzed. These patients were histologically confirmed as Adenoca or SQ and underwent systemic imaging studies, including 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography and brain imaging. Synchronous metastatic sites were categorized into 7 areas, and whole-body metastatic scores were calculated from 1 to 7 by summation of each involved region. We compared the patient, tumor, and metastatic characteristics according to the histological subtypes, and examined clinical outcomes. The enrolled study cohort comprised 81% (n = 346) Adenoca patients and 19% (n = 81) SQ patients. The median age of the study population was 65 years (range, 30–94 years), and 263 (61.6%) patients were male. The most common metastatic sites were thoracic lymph nodes (LNs) (84.3%), followed by lung to lung/lymphangitic spread (59%) and bone (54.8%). The distribution of patient characteristics revealed that age ≥65 years (69.1% vs 50.6%; P = 0.003) and male sex (84% vs 56.4%; P < 0.001) were more frequently found in SQ patients. Regarding metastatic features, bone metastasis (60.4% vs 30.9%; P < 0.001), lung to lung/lymphangitic metastasis (63% vs 42%; P = 0.001), and brain metastasis (35% vs 16%; P = 0.001) were significantly and more frequently found in Adenoca patients. Patients with high metastatic scores (score 3–6) were more frequently found to have Adenoca (91.6% vs 73.4%; P < 0.001). In multivariate prognostic evaluation, sex (P = 0.001), age (P < 0.001), histology (P < 0.001), LN status (P = 0.032), pleural/pericardial metastasis (P = 0.003), abdomen/pelvis metastasis (P < 0.001), axilla

  1. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma: Four-Year Results of a Prospective Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fakiris, Achilles J.; McGarry, Ronald C.; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T.; Papiez, Lech; Williams, Mark; Henderson, Mark A.; Timmerman, Robert

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: The 50-month results of a prospective Phase II trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in medically inoperable patients are reported. Methods and Materials: A total of 70 medically inoperable patients had clinically staged T1 (34 patients) or T2 (36 patients) (<=7 cm), N0, M0, biopsy-confirmed non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and received SBRT as per our previously published reports. The SBRT treatment dose of 60-66 Gy was prescribed to the 80% isodose volume in three fractions. Results: Median follow-up was 50.2 months (range, 1.4-64.8 months). Kaplan-Meier local control at 3 years was 88.1%. Regional (nodal) and distant recurrence occurred in 6 (8.6%) and 9 (12.9%) patients, respectively. Median survival (MS) was 32.4 months and 3-year overall survival (OS) was 42.7% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 31.1-54.3%). Cancer-specific survival at 3 years was 81.7% (95% CI, 70.0-93.4%). For patients with T1 tumors, MS was 38.7 months (95% CI, 25.3-50.2) and for T2 tumors MS was 24.5 months (95% CI, 18.5-37.4) (p = 0.194). Tumor volume (<=5 cc, 5-10 cc, 10-20 cc, >20 cc) did not significantly impact survival: MS was 36.9 months (95% CI, 18.1-42.9), 34.0 (95% CI, 16.9-57.1), 32.8 (95% CI, 21.3-57.8), and 21.4 months (95% CI, 17.8-41.6), respectively (p = 0.712). There was no significant survival difference between patients with peripheral vs. central tumors (MS 33.2 vs. 24.4 months, p = 0.697). Grade 3 to 5 toxicity occurred in 5 of 48 patients with peripheral lung tumors (10.4%) and in 6 of 22 patients (27.3%) with central tumors (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.088). Conclusion: Based on our study results, use of SBRT results in high rates of local control in medically inoperable patients with Stage I NSCLC.

  2. Advanced two-stage incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rehmat, A.; Khinkis, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is developing an advanced incinerator that combines the fluidized-bed agglomeration/incineration and cyclonic combustion/incineration technologies that have been developed separately at IGT over many years. This combination results in a unique and extremely flexible incinerator for solid, sludge, liquid, and gaseous wastes. This system can operate over a wide range of conditions in the first stage, from low temperature (desorption) to high temperature (agglomeration), including gasification of high-Btu wastes. In the combined system, solid, liquid, and gaseous organic wastes would be easily and efficiently destroyed (>99.99% destruction and removal efficiency (DRE)), whereas solid inorganic contaminants would be contained within a glassy matrix, rendering them benign and suitable for disposal in an ordinary landfill. This technology is different from other existing technologies because of its agglomeration and encapsulation capability and its flexibility with respect to the types wastes it can handle. Both the fluidized-bed as well as the cyclonic incineration technologies have been fully developed and tested separately at pilot scales. 12 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Evaluation of epidermal growth factor-related growth factors and receptors and of neoangiogenesis in completely resected stage I-IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer: amphiregulin and microvessel count are independent prognostic indicators of survival.

    PubMed

    Fontanini, G; De Laurentiis, M; Vignati, S; Chinè, S; Lucchi, M; Silvestri, V; Mussi, A; De Placido, S; Tortora, G; Bianco, A R; Gullick, W; Angeletti, C A; Bevilacqua, G; Ciardiello, F

    1998-01-01

    We have determined the expression of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha), amphiregulin (AR), CRIPTO, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), erbB-2, erbB-3, and tumor angiogenesis in a series of 195 patients with stage I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with radical surgery to define their usefulness as prognostic indicators of survival. A variable degree of specific staining in cancer cells was observed for the three growth factors and for the three growth factor receptors in the majority of NSCLC patients. A statistically significant association between overexpression of TGF alpha, AR, and CRIPTO was observed. Enhanced expression of AR was significantly correlated with enhanced expression of erbB-2 and advanced T-stage. A direct association was also detected for overexpression of TGF alpha and of erbB-2 or erbB-3, respectively. Sex, tumor size, nodal status, stage, microvessel count, as a measure of neovascularization, and AR overexpression significantly correlated with overall survival at univariate analysis. In a Cox multivariate analysis, the only characteristics with an independent prognostic effect on OAS were microvessel count [relative hazard (RH), 6.61; P < 0.00001), nodal status (RH, 1.59; P = 0.0013), and AR overexpression (RH, 1.72; P = 0.02). These results suggest that evaluation of neoangiogenesis and of certain growth factors, such as AR, can be useful in addition to conventional pathological staging to select high-risk NSCLC patients who may benefit from post-surgical systemic therapies.

  4. Gefitinib Combined With Standard Chemoradiotherapy in EGFR-Mutant Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The LOGIK0902/OLCSG0905 Intergroup Study Protocol.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Katsuyuki; Sasaki, Jiichiro; Saeki, Sho; Takigawa, Nagio; Katsui, Kuniaki; Takayama, Koichi; Nogami, Naoyuki; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Bessho, Akihiro; Kishimoto, Junji; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Ichinose, Yukito

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we describe an ongoing phase II trial in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with mutated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Patients with chemotherapy-naive locally advanced disease with active EGFR mutations will receive the induction treatment, specified as gefitinib monotherapy (250 mg/body) for 8 weeks. Patients whose disease has not progressed during the induction therapy will receive cisplatin and docetaxel (40 mg/m(2)) on days 1, 8, 29, and 36, and concurrent 3-dimensional conformal thoracic radiotherapy with a single daily fraction of 2 Gy, for 5 consecutive days each week to provide a total dose of 60 Gy. The primary end point is overall survival at 24 months. A target sample size of 21 evaluable patients is considered sufficient to validate an expected rate of 85%, and 60% would be the lower limit of interest, with 80% power and a 1-sided α of 5%. Secondary end points include toxicity, response rate, and overall survival. This study will clarify whether tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeted to EGFR can produce a maximal effect in selected NSCLC patients with the relevant driver mutation, even in the locally advanced setting. PMID:26387039

  5. [Analysis of the risk factors for severe neutropenia in advanced non-small cell lung cancer after the first course of chemotherapy with third-generation agents].

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Midori; Kogo, Mari; Kurihara, Tatsuya; Shikama, Yusuke; Nakajima, Hiroaki; Yoneyama, Keiichiro; Kiuchi, Yuji

    2013-01-01

      We retrospectively evaluated clinical data before therapy to determine the risk factors for severe neutropenia in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with third-generation agents. We analyzed 100 patients who received such agents (paclitaxel, docetaxel, gemcitabine, irinotecan, or vinorelbine) for advanced NSCLC. The endpoint of the survey was the occurrence of severe neutropenia (grade 4). Risk factors significantly related to severe neutropenia were identified using logistic regression analysis. Of the 100 patients studied, the median age was 62.0 (32-81 years), and 77 (77.0%) were male. CEA 6.6 (0-2220) ng/dL and cytokeratin 19 fragment 21-1 (CYFRA) 4.8 (0.2-173.8) ng/dL before chemotherapy were higher than normal range. Severe neutropenia occurred in 36.0%, the incidence being highest in the first cycle (61.1%). In the univariate analysis, variables associated with severe neutropenia were sex, chest pain, absolute neutrophil count (ANC), Cr, CRP, and CYFRA. In the multivariate analysis, low CYFRA level was identified as a significant risk factor that contributed independently to chemotherapy-induced severe neutropenia (p<0.05). Our analysis suggests that low CYFRA level is the most important risk factor for severe neutropenia in advanced NSCLC patients after the first course of chemotherapy with third-generation agents. PMID:23728094

  6. Gefitinib Combined With Standard Chemoradiotherapy in EGFR-Mutant Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The LOGIK0902/OLCSG0905 Intergroup Study Protocol.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Katsuyuki; Sasaki, Jiichiro; Saeki, Sho; Takigawa, Nagio; Katsui, Kuniaki; Takayama, Koichi; Nogami, Naoyuki; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Bessho, Akihiro; Kishimoto, Junji; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Ichinose, Yukito

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we describe an ongoing phase II trial in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with mutated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Patients with chemotherapy-naive locally advanced disease with active EGFR mutations will receive the induction treatment, specified as gefitinib monotherapy (250 mg/body) for 8 weeks. Patients whose disease has not progressed during the induction therapy will receive cisplatin and docetaxel (40 mg/m(2)) on days 1, 8, 29, and 36, and concurrent 3-dimensional conformal thoracic radiotherapy with a single daily fraction of 2 Gy, for 5 consecutive days each week to provide a total dose of 60 Gy. The primary end point is overall survival at 24 months. A target sample size of 21 evaluable patients is considered sufficient to validate an expected rate of 85%, and 60% would be the lower limit of interest, with 80% power and a 1-sided α of 5%. Secondary end points include toxicity, response rate, and overall survival. This study will clarify whether tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeted to EGFR can produce a maximal effect in selected NSCLC patients with the relevant driver mutation, even in the locally advanced setting.

  7. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy versus lobectomy for operable stage I non-small-cell lung cancer: a pooled analysis of two randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Joe Y; Senan, Suresh; Paul, Marinus A; Mehran, Reza J; Louie, Alexander V; Balter, Peter; Groen, Harry J M; McRae, Stephen E; Widder, Joachim; Feng, Lei; van den Borne, Ben E E M; Munsell, Mark F; Hurkmans, Coen; Berry, Donald A; van Werkhoven, Erik; Kresl, John J; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Dawood, Omar; Haasbeek, Cornelis J A; Carpenter, Larry S; De Jaeger, Katrien; Komaki, Ritsuko; Slotman, Ben J; Smit, Egbert F; Roth, Jack A

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The standard of care for operable, stage I, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is lobectomy with mediastinal lymph node dissection or sampling. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for inoperable stage I NSCLC has shown promising results, but two independent, randomised, phase 3 trials of SABR in patients with operable stage I NSCLC (STARS and ROSEL) closed early due to slow accrual. We aimed to assess overall survival for SABR versus surgery by pooling data from these trials. Methods Eligible patients in the STARS and ROSEL studies were those with clinical T1–2a (<4 cm), N0M0, operable NSCLC. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to SABR or lobectomy with mediastinal lymph node dissection or sampling. We did a pooled analysis in the intention-to-treat population using overall survival as the primary endpoint. Both trials are registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (STARS: NCT00840749; ROSEL: NCT00687986). Findings 58 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned (31 to SABR and 27 to surgery). Median follow-up was 40.2 months (IQR 23.0–47.3) for the SABR group and 35.4 months (18.9–40.7) for the surgery group. Six patients in the surgery group died compared with one patient in the SABR group. Estimated overall survival at 3 years was 95% (95% CI 85–100) in the SABR group compared with 79% (64–97) in the surgery group (hazard ratio [HR] 0.14 [95% CI 0.017–1.190], log-rank p=0.037). Recurrence-free survival at 3 years was 86% (95% CI 74–100) in the SABR group and 80% (65–97) in the surgery group (HR 0.69 [95% CI 0.21–2.29], log-rank p=0.54). In the surgery group, one patient had regional nodal recurrence and two had distant metastases; in the SABR group, one patient had local recurrence, four had regional nodal recurrence, and one had distant metastases. Three (10%) patients in the SABR group had grade 3 treatment-related adverse events (three [10%] chest wall pain, two [6%] dyspnoea or cough, and one [3%] fatigue and rib

  8. Risk of venous and arterial thromboembolic events associated with anti-VEGF agents in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dianbao; Zhang, Xianfen; Zhao, Chunling

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess the incidence and risk of arterial and venous thromboembolic events (ATEs and VTEs) associated with antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents, including VEGF receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors and VEGF monoclonal antibodies, in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods We performed a broad search of PubMed for relevant trials. Prospective randomized trials evaluating therapy with or without anti-VEGF agents in patients with advanced NSCLC were included for analysis. Data on VTEs and ATEs were extracted. The overall incidence, Peto odds ratio (Peto OR), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled according to the heterogeneity of included trials. Results A total of 13,436 patients from 23 trials were included for analysis. Our results showed that anti-VEGF agents significantly increased the risk of developing high-grade ATEs (Peto OR: 1.44, 95% CI: 1.00–2.07, P=0.048), but not for all-grade ATEs (Peto OR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.56–1.59, P=0.82) compared with controls. Additionally, no increased risk of all-grade and high-grade VTEs (Peto OR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.67–1.31, P=0.71 and Peto OR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.73–1.22, P=0.67, respectively) was observed in advanced NSCLC patients receiving anti-VEGF agents. Conclusion The use of anti-VEGF agents in advanced NSCLC patients significantly increased the risk of high-grade ATEs, but not for VTEs. Clinicians should be aware of the risk of severe ATEs with administration of these drugs in advanced NSCLC patients. PMID:27382307

  9. Serum Biomarkers Associated with Clinical Outcomes Fail to Predict Brain Metastases in Patients with Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bob T.; Lou, Emil; Hsu, Meier; Yu, Helena A.; Naidoo, Jarushka; Zauderer, Marjorie G.; Sima, Camelia; Johnson, Melissa L.; Daras, Mariza; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Fleisher, Martin; Kris, Mark G.; Azzoli, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancers account for the majority of brain metastases which pose major therapeutic challenges. Biomarkers prognosticating for the development of brain metastases in patients with non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) may improve personalized care. Six serum proteomic biomarkers were previously investigated at Memorial Sloan Kettering but their associations with brain metastases were unknown. Methods Serum NSE, CYFRA 21–1, ProGRP, SCC-Ag, TIMP1, and HE4 by ELISA-based proteomic assays were prospectively collected from consecutive patients with stage IV NSCLC. Pre-treatment serum biomarker levels as well as age, histology, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status were evaluated for association with the baseline presence of brain metastases using logistic regression and multivariable analysis. For patients without brain metastases at baseline, the cumulative incidence of subsequent brain metastases were compared according to baseline biomarkers and clinical factors using Gray’s test. Results A total of 118 patients were enrolled, 31 (26%; 95% CI 0.19–0.35) had brain metastases at baseline and a further 26 (22%; 95% CI 0.15–0.30) developed brain metastases subsequently. Pre-treatment serum biomarker levels were available in 104 patients. There was no significant association between the six serum biomarkers and the baseline presence or subsequent development of brain metastases. Age younger than 65 years was the only clinical factor significantly associated with brain metastasis at baseline (OR 3.00; 95% CI 1.22–7.34, P = 0.02) by multivariable analysis. A trend toward increased cumulative incidence of subsequent brain metastases was observed in patients with EGFR mutation (p = 0.2), but this was not statistically significant possibly due to small sample size. Conclusions Serum NSE, CYFRA 21–1, Pro-GRP, SCC-Ag, TIMP1, and HE4 are not significantly associated with brain metastases. Our methods taking into account follow-up time

  10. Support Vector Machine-Based Prediction of Local Tumor Control After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Klement, Rainer J.; Allgäuer, Michael; Appold, Steffen; Dieckmann, Karin; Ernst, Iris; Ganswindt, Ute; Holy, Richard; Nestle, Ursula; Nevinny-Stickel, Meinhard; Semrau, Sabine; Sterzing, Florian; Wittig, Andrea; Andratschke, Nicolaus; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2014-03-01

    Background: Several prognostic factors for local tumor control probability (TCP) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been described, but no attempts have been undertaken to explore whether a nonlinear combination of potential factors might synergistically improve the prediction of local control. Methods and Materials: We investigated a support vector machine (SVM) for predicting TCP in a cohort of 399 patients treated at 13 German and Austrian institutions. Among 7 potential input features for the SVM we selected those most important on the basis of forward feature selection, thereby evaluating classifier performance by using 10-fold cross-validation and computing the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The final SVM classifier was built by repeating the feature selection 10 times with different splitting of the data for cross-validation and finally choosing only those features that were selected at least 5 out of 10 times. It was compared with a multivariate logistic model that was built by forward feature selection. Results: Local failure occurred in 12% of patients. Biologically effective dose (BED) at the isocenter (BED{sub ISO}) was the strongest predictor of TCP in the logistic model and also the most frequently selected input feature for the SVM. A bivariate logistic function of BED{sub ISO} and the pulmonary function indicator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) yielded the best description of the data but resulted in a significantly smaller AUC than the final SVM classifier with the input features BED{sub ISO}, age, baseline Karnofsky index, and FEV1 (0.696 ± 0.040 vs 0.789 ± 0.001, P<.03). The final SVM resulted in sensitivity and specificity of 67.0% ± 0.5% and 78.7% ± 0.3%, respectively. Conclusions: These results confirm that machine learning techniques like SVMs can be successfully applied to predict treatment outcome after SBRT. Improvements over traditional TCP

  11. Genetic Association of Curative and Adverse Reactions to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Chinese advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Yunfeng; Jiang, Jie; Guo, Liang; Li, Yan; Huang, Hailiang; Shen, Lu; Luan, Mengqi; Li, Mo; Du, Huihui; Ma, Cheng; He, Lin; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Qin, Shengying

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) Tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) is an effective targeted therapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but also causes adverse drug reactions (ADRs) e.g., skin rash and diarrhea. SNPs in the EGFR signal pathway, drug metabolism/ transport pathways and miRNA might contribute to the interpersonal difference in ADRs but biomarkers for therapeutic responses and ADRs to TKIs in Chinese population are yet to be fully investigated. We recruited 226 Chinese advanced NSCLC patients who received TKIs erlotinib, gefitinib and icotinib hydrochloride and systematically studied the genetic factors associated with therapeutic responses and ADRs. Rs884225 (T > C) in EGFR 3′ UTR was significantly associated with lower risk of ADRs to erlotinib (p value = 0.0010, adjusted p value = 0.042). A multivariant interaction four-SNP model (rs884225 in EGFR 3′UTR, rs7787082 in ABCB1 intron, rs38845 in MET intron and rs3803300 in AKT1 5′UTR) was associated with ADRs in general and the more specific drug induced skin injury. The SNPs associated with both therapeutic responses and ADRs indicates they might share a common genetic basis. Our study provided potential biomarkers and clues for further research of biomarkers for therapeutic responses and ADRs in Chinese NSCLC patients. PMID:26988277

  12. A Phase II Study of Synchronous Three-Dimensional Conformal Boost to the Gross Tumor Volume for Patients With Unresectable Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Results of Korean Radiation Oncology Group 0301 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Kwan Ho Ahn, Sung Ja; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Kim, Kyu-Sik; Kim, Young-Chul; Moon, Sung Ho; Han, Ji-Youn; Kim, Heung Tae; Koom, Woong Sub; Lee, Jin Soo

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the efficacy of synchronous three-dimensional (3D) conformal boost to the gross tumor volume (GTV) in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included unresectable Stage III NSCLC with no pleural effusion, no supraclavicular nodal metastases, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score of 0-1. Forty-nine patients with pathologically proven NSCLC were enrolled. Eighteen patients had Stage IIIA and 31 had Stage IIIB. By using 3D conformal radiotherapy (RT) techniques, a dose of 1.8 Gy was delivered to the planning target volume with a synchronous boost of 0.6 Gy to the GTV, with a total dose of 60 Gy to the GTV and 45 Gy to the planning target volume in 25 fractions during 5 weeks. All patients received weekly chemotherapy consisting of paclitaxel and carboplatin during RT. Results: With a median follow-up of 36.8 months (range, 29.0-45.5 months) for surviving patients, median survival was 28.1 months. One-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 77%, 56.4%, and 43.8%, respectively. Corresponding local progression-free survival rates were 71.2%, 53.7%, and 53.7%. Compliance was 90% for RT and 88% for chemotherapy. Acute esophagitis of Grade 2 or higher occurred in 29 patients. Two patients with T4 lesions died of massive bleeding and hemoptysis during treatment (Grade 5). Overall late toxicity was acceptable. Conclusions: Based on the favorable outcome with acceptable toxicity, the acceleration scheme using 3D conformal GTV boost in this trial is warranted to compare with conventional fractionation in a Phase III trial.

  13. Efficacy of tamoxifen in combination with docetaxel in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer pretreated with platinum-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shimin; Fu, Xi; Li, Guangming; He, Lang; Zhao, Caixia; Hu, Xin; Pan, Rongqiang; Guo, Cuihua; Zhang, Xinping; Hu, Xingsheng

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the combination of docetaxel (TXT) plus tamoxifen (TAM) in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who had received platinum-based first-line chemotherapy. A total of 120 advanced NSCLC patients pretreated with platinum-based chemotherapy were randomized into two treatment groups (the TXT and TXT+TAM groups) in a 1 : 1 ratio. Reversal of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression, tumor response, progression-free survival, overall survival, and safety were evaluated on an intention-to-treat basis. The median number of cycles of allocated chemotherapy was four in each treatment group (range: 2-6 cycles). The overall response rate and disease control rate in the TXT+TAM group were significantly higher than those in the TXT group (36.7 vs. 15.0% for overall response rate, P=0.007; 85.0 vs. 68.3% for disease control rate, P=0.031). The combination of TXT and TAM could effectively reverse P-gp expression in tumor tissues and provide a significant survival benefit for advanced NSCLC patients compared with TXT alone (11.6 vs. 9.1 months, P=0.030). In addition, in the TXT+TAM group, patients achieving P-gp reversal had a significantly greater median progression-free survival and overall survival than nonreversal patients. Furthermore, the combined therapy showed a safety profile comparable to that of TXT. The combination of TXT and TAM may be an effective and safe treatment option for advanced NSCLC patients who have already developed P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance. PMID:26882453

  14. Efficacy of targeted agents in the treatment of elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianqing; Chen, Jianbo; Wu, Xiaoan; Shi, Tao; Kang, Meiling

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The efficacy of targeted agents (TAs) in the treatment of elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains controversial. We aimed to assess the efficacy of TAs in the treatment of advanced NSCLC in this setting. Materials and methods Relevant trials were identified by searching electronic databases and conference meetings. Prospective randomized controlled trials assessing chemotherapies with or without TAs in elderly patients with advanced NSCLC were included. Outcomes of interest included overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in elderly patients with advanced NSCLC. Results A total of 4,093 elderly patients from 17 randomized controlled trials were included for analysis. The addition of TAs to chemotherapy significantly improved PFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.85, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.75–0.96, P=0.01) when compared to chemotherapy alone. There was also a tendency to improve OS in the combination groups (HR 0.92, 95% CI: 0.85–1.01, P=0.064). Subgroup analysis based on treatment line indicated that TAs plus chemotherapy as first-line chemotherapy in elderly patients with advanced NSCLC significantly improved PFS (HR 0.80, 95% CI: 0.68–0.95, P=0.01) and OS (HR 0.91, 95% CI: 0.83–0.99, P=0.037), while the use of TA-containing regimens as second-line therapy in these patients did not significantly improve PFS (HR 0.91, 95% CI: 0.75–1.10, P=0.33) and OS (HR 1.04, 95% CI: 0.81–1.33, P=0.77) in comparison with chemotherapy alone. No publication bias was detected by Begg’s and Egger’s tests for OS. Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that the addition of TAs to first-line chemotherapy in elderly patients with advanced NSCLC offers an improved PFS and OS. Further trials are recommended to clearly investigate the efficacy of adding specific TAs to first-line chemotherapy for advanced NSCLC in this setting. PMID:27536143

  15. Optimized selection of three major EGFR-TKIs in advanced EGFR-positive non-small cell lung cancer: a network metaanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Wenfeng; Kang, Shiyang; He, Yang; Hong, Shaodong; Zhan, Jianhua; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Xue, Cong; Ma, Yuxiang; Zhou, Ting; Ma, Shuxiang; Gao, Fangfang; Qin, Tao; Hu, Zhihuang; Tian, Ying; Hou, Xue; Huang, Yan; Zhou, Ningning; Zhao, Hongyun; Zhang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background: To answer which epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) is the best choice for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) EGFR mutants. Results: 16 phase III randomized trials involving 2962 advanced NSCLC EGFR mutants were enrolled. Multiple treatment comparisons showed different EGFR-TKIs shared equivalent curative effect in terms of all outcome measures among the overall, chemo-naïve and previously treated patients. Rank probabilities showed that erlotinib and afatinib had potentially better efficacy compared with gefitinib in both of the overall and chemo-naïve patients. Potentially survival benefit of erlotinib was also observed in previously treated patients compared with gefitinib. Additionally, EGFR-TKI showed numerically greater survival benefit in 19 Del compared with chemotherapy, while it was opposite in 21 L858R. Furthermore, afatinib, erlotinib and gefitinib had high, moderate and low risk of rash & diarrhea, respectively, while the occurrence of elevated liver transaminase was more common in gefitinib. Methods: Data of objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and adverse events were extracted from included studies. Efficacy and toxicity of all included treatments were integrated by network meta-analyses. Conclusion: Our study indicated a high efficacy-high toxicity pattern of afatinib, a high efficacy-moderate toxicity pattern of erlotinib and a medium efficacy-moderate toxicity pattern of gefitinib. Recommended EGFR-TKI should be suggested according to patients' tolerability and therapeutic efficacy in clinical practice. Moreover, the treatment for advanced EGFR-positive NSCLC might be different between 19 Del and 21 L858R. PMID:26933807

  16. Feasibility, tolerability, and efficacy of the concurrent addition of erlotinib to thoracic radiotherapy in locally advanced unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer: a Phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Enrique; Martínez, Maite; Rico, Mikel; Hernández, Berta; Casas, Francesc; Viñolas, Nuria; Pérez-Casas, Ana; Dómine, Manuel; Mínguez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although many studies have confirmed the synergic effects of combining chemotherapy (CT) and radiotherapy (RT), clinical data evaluating safety and efficacy of erlotinib in combination with RT in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are limited. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility, tolerability, and efficacy of the concurrent addition of erlotinib to the standard three-dimensional conformal thoracic RT in patients with unresectable or locally advanced NSCLC who are not candidates for receiving standard CT. Patients and methods Feasibility and tolerability, assessed by evaluating adverse events (AEs), and effectiveness, by calculating progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and objective response rate (ORR), were analyzed in 30 patients receiving RT alone and 60 receiving RT and erlotinib. Results Erlotinib with RT showed an extended CSS and a higher rate of complete responses compared with RT alone. No differences between groups were found regarding OS, PFS, and ORR. AEs were significantly higher in the combined treatment, which mainly included cutaneous toxicity, dyspnea, fatigue, hyporexia, diarrhea, and infection. Erlotinib did not increase the toxicity produced by RT. Conclusion The combination of erlotinib with RT produced, in our study, a scarce clinical benefit in the treatment of unresectable or locally advanced NSCLC, limited to complete responses and longer CSS rate compared with RT alone. Increased toxicity events were associated with combined therapy, which mainly included cutaneous toxicity. In our opinion, further studies in molecularly unselected lung cancer patients treated with EGFR TKIs and RT are not indicated. The use of biomarkers for the identification of patients that are most likely to benefit from this treatment is an essential next step in the research of this condition. PMID:27042098

  17. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor-2/beta3 Integrin Expression Profile: Signature of Local Progression After Chemoradiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Massabeau, Carole; Rouquette, Isabelle; Lauwers-Cances, Valerie; Mazieres, Julien; Bachaud, Jean-Marc; Armand, Jean-Pierre; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette; Favre, Gilles; Toulas, Christine; Cohen-Jonathan-Moyal, Elizabeth

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: No biologic signature of chemoradiotherapy sensitivity has been reported for patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We have previously demonstrated that basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) and alphavbeta3 integrin pathways control tumor radioresistance. We investigated whether the expression of the proteins involved in these pathways might be associated with the response to treatment and, therefore, the clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: FGF-2, beta3 integrin, angiopoietin-2, and syndecan-1 expression was studied using immunohistochemistry performed on biopsies obtained, before any treatment, from 65 patients exclusively treated with chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced NSCLC. The response to treatment was evaluated according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria using computed tomography at least 6 weeks after the end of the chemoradiotherapy. Local progression-free survival, metastasis-free survival, and disease-free survival were studied using the log-rank test and Cox proportional hazard analysis. Results: Among this NSCLC biopsy population, 43.7% overexpressed beta3 integrin (beta3{sup +}), 43% FGF-2 (FGF-2{sup +}), 41.5% syndecan-1, and 59.4% angiopoietin-2. Our results showed a strong association between FGF-2 and beta3 integrin expression (p = .001). The adjusted hazard ratio of local recurrence for FGF-2{sup +}/beta3{sup +} tumors compared with FGF-2{sup -}/beta3{sup -} tumors was 6.1 (95% confidence interval, 2.6-14.6, p = .005). However, the risk of local recurrence was not increased when tumors overexpressed beta3 integrin or FGF-2 alone. Moreover, the co-expression of these two proteins was marginally associated with the response to chemoradiotherapy and metastasis-free survival. Conclusion: The results of this study have identified the combined profile FGF-2/beta3 integrin expression as a signature of local control in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced

  18. Comprehensive geriatric assessment and traditional Chinese medicine intervention benefit symptom control in elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dong; Han, Shuyan; Jiang, Shantong; Sun, Hong; Chen, Yanzhi; Li, Yuanqing; Wang, Wei; Feng, Ye; Wang, Ke; Li, Pingping

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the symptom improvement and clinical benefit in elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) stratified on the basis of CGA findings after treatment with a combination of traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine. Twenty-four elderly advanced NSCLC patients with a mean age of 73.0 ± 5.3 (65-83) years were categorized into three stratifications according to CGA results, namely function independent, mildly function impaired, and function dependent. They received standardized therapy, individualized therapy, and best supportive care, respectively. The patients receiving standardized therapy and individualized therapy were randomized into two groups, with or without traditional Chinese medicine for symptom control, while for all the patients receiving best supportive care, traditional Chinese medicine was administered. Nine non-elderly NSCLC patients (<65 years old) were enrolled as control and treated in accordance with NCCN NSCLC treatment guidelines. EORTC QLQ-C30 core scale, LC13 scale, and MDASI-TCM scale were used to assess relevant symptoms before and after treatment. After treatment for 3 weeks, it was shown by QLQ-C30+LC13 scales, for function-dependent patients, that the physical and role performances and the global health status were improved and the symptoms of fatigue and cough were alleviated; by MDASI-TCM scale, the symptoms of fatigue, cough, and expectoration were improved. In function-independent and mildly function-impaired elderly patients, there were no significant changes in functional status and symptoms. But in non-elderly patients, the physical and social performances were lowered, and the symptoms of fatigue, constipation, and poor appetite were aggravated. The elderly patients with advanced NSCLC were categorized on the basis of CGA findings, and traditional Chinese medicine may be beneficial to symptom control of function-dependent patients.

  19. Dendritic cell vaccine and cytokine-induced killer cell therapy for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, LIHONG; YANG, XUEJING; SUN, ZHEN; LI, JIALI; ZHU, HUI; LI, JING; PANG, YAN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the survival time, immune response and safety of a dendritic cell (DC) vaccine and cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cell therapy (DC-CIK) in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The present retrospective study enrolled 507 patients with advanced NSCLC; 99 patients received DC-CIK [immunotherapy group (group I)] and 408 matched patients did not receive DC-CIK, and acted as the control [non-immunotherapy group (group NI)]. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), quality of life (QOL) and safety were analyzed in group I. The follow-up period for the two groups was 489.2±160.4 days. The overall survival (OS) time was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. DTH was observed in 59 out of 97 evaluated patients (60.8%) and 67 out of 98 evaluated patients (68.4%) possessed an improved QOL. Fever and a skin rash occurred in 36 out of 98 patients (36.7%) and 7 out of 98 patients (7.1%) in group I. DTH occurred more frequently in patients with squamous cell carcinoma compared with patients with adenocarcinoma (77.1 vs. 40.4%; P=0.0013). Radiotherapy was not associated with DC-CIK-induced DTH (72.7 vs. 79.6%; P=0.18), but chemotherapy significantly reduced the rate of DTH (18.2 vs. 79.6%; P=0.00). The OS time was significantly increased in group I compared with group NI (P=0.03). In conclusion, DC-CIK may induce an immune response against NSCLC, improve the QOL, and prolong the OS time of patients, without adverse effects. Therefore, the present study recommends DC-CIK for the treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC. PMID:27073525

  20. Treatment and prognosis after progression in long-term responders to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhengbo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the treatment and prognosis of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients after failure of long-term treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI). Material and methods We retrospectively analyzed all NSCLC patients with EGFR-TKI (gefitinib or erlotinib) treatment at our institution between 2011 and 2013 who progressed after at least stable disease on erlotinib or gefitinib for more than 6 months. Survival curves were plotted using the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox proportional hazard model was used for multivariate analysis. Results In total, 521 patients were administered EGFR-TKI. Of these, 298 patients received EGFR-TKI with progression-free survival less than 6 months (group A), and the other 223 patients more than 6 months (group B). There was a significant difference in overall survival (OS) between group A and group B (7.2 months vs. 5.0 months, p < 0.0001). The median OS for group B patients was 5.0 months. Among the 223 patients in group B, 38 patients received chemotherapy with continued EGFR-TKI after failure of prior gefitinib or erlotinib treatment, 92 with chemotherapy alone and 93 with best supportive care. Patients who continued gefitinib or erlotinib had a significantly longer OS (median: 7.5 months), followed by chemotherapy (5.5 months) and best supportive care (4.0 months) (p < 0.001). Conclusions The prognosis of advanced NSCLC patients after failure of long-term treatment with EGFR-TKI was poor. Chemotherapy with continued EGFR-TKI beyond progression of long-term responders was feasible and led to prolonged OS in advanced NSCLC patients. PMID:26925125

  1. The genetic variations in DNA repair genes ERCC2 and XRCC1 were associated with the overall survival of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suhan; Wang, Jianzhong; Bai, Yansen; Wang, Qing; Liu, Li; Zhang, Kai; Hong, Xiaohua; Deng, Qifei; Zhang, Xiaomin; He, Meian; Wu, Tangchun; Xu, Ping; Guo, Huan

    2016-09-01

    It was reported that DNA repair can confer cancer cell resistance to therapeutic treatments by activating antiapoptotic cellular defense. We hypothesized that genetic variants of DNA repair genes may be associated with lung cancer prognosis. Seventeen tagging single-nucleotide polymorphism (tagSNPs) selected from 12 DNA repair genes were genotyped in 280 advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients by TaqMan assay. The associations of these SNPs and overall survival of advanced NSCLC patients were investigated. Advanced NSCLC patients carrying ERCC2 rs50872 CT+TT genotypes had significantly longer median survival time (MST) and decreased death risk than patients with rs50872 CC genotype [log-rank P = 0.031; adjusted HR(95% CI) = 0.73 (0.55-0.98), P = 0.033]. These effects were mainly seen among younger patients (≤65 years old) [HR(95% CI) = 0.57 (0.37-0.87), P = 0.010], patients without surgery [HR(95% CI) = 0.68 (0.47-0.98), P = 0.036] but with chemotherapy [HR(95% CI) = 0.64 (0.46-0.91), P = 0.012] or radiotherapy [HR(95% CI) = 0.58 (0.38-0.89), P = 0.013]. Meanwhile, compared to advanced NSCLC patients with rs25487 GG genotype, patients carrying XRCC1 rs25487 GA+AA genotypes had significantly shorter MST (MST = 11.7 vs. 16.7, log-rank P = 0.048). In addition, advanced NSCLC patients carrying the ERCC2 rs50872 CC in combination with XRCC1 rs25487 GA+AA genotype had the shortest MST (11.2 month) and highest death risk [HR(95% CI) = 1.70 (1.15-2.52), P = 0.008] when compared with those carrying rs50872 CT+TT and rs25487 GG genotype (MST = 22.0 month). The ERCC2 rs50872 T allele was associated with favorable but XRCC1 rs25487 A allele with bad survival for advanced NSCLC in Chinese population, which may offer novel biomarkers for predicting clinical outcomes.

  2. Activity of weekly irinotecan (CPT-11) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer pretreated with platinum and taxanes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Rosa; Esteban, Emilio; Palacio, Isabel; Fernández, Yolanda; Muñiz, Isabel; Vieitez, Jose M; Fra, Joaquin; Blay, Pilar; Villanueva, Noemí; Uña, Esther; Mareque, Beatriz; Estrada, Enrique; Buesa, Jose M; Lacave, Angel J

    2003-11-01

    Irinotecan (CPT-11), a semisynthetic derivative of camptothecin, is active in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this report we describe our experience with this drug when used as a single agent in patients with advanced NSCLC refractory to chemotherapy with platinum and taxanes. Nineteen NSCLC patients (thirteen males and six females; 53% adenocarcinoma and 26% squamous cell carcinoma) with a median age of 52 years (range 34-71) and a Karnofsky performance status of 60% (60-80%) were included in the study. At baseline, the patients had a median of two disease sites and had been treated with a median of two prior regimens. Irinotecan was given at a dose of 100 mg/m(2) i.v.) weekly for 4 weeks followed by 1 week of rest. A total of 123 weekly infusions were administered, and each patient received a median of 4 weeks of treatment (range 1-32). All patients were evaluated by intention-to-treat analysis for efficacy and safety. Main toxicities reported were grade 3 neutropenia (10% of patients), diarrhea (10% of patients), and grade 4 thrombocytopenia (5% of patients). The overall clinical response rate was 16% (95% CI: 8-24) with three partial responses and 9 (47%) patients with stable disease. The median time to progression and the median survival time were 7 and 15 weeks, respectively. In conclusion, weekly irinotecan showed antitumoral activity and minimum toxicity in NSCLC patients refractory to platinum and taxanes.

  3. Activity of pemetrexed-based regimen as first-line chemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer with asymptomatic inoperable brain metastasis: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weiyou; Røe, Oluf Dimitri; Wu, Chen; Li, Wei; Guo, Renhua; Gu, Yanhong; Liu, Yiqian; Shu, Yongqian; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2015-08-01

    This retrospective study was conducted to assess the efficacy of combination of pemetrexed and cisplatin/carboplatin as first-line treatment in inoperable and asymptomatic brain metastasis (BM) from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 30 patients with adenocarcinoma were included. Nine patients had solitary, and 21 patients had multiple BM. At evaluation after two cycles, the complete response (CR) rate, partial response (PR) rate, and stable disease (SD) for brain lesions was 0, 33.3, and 46.7%, respectively. The overall CR, PR, and SD were 0, 23.3, and 46.7%, respectively. The median time to tumour progression of BM (TTP-BM) was 6.0 months (95% CI 4.068-7.932). The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 5.0 months (95% CI 4.197-5.803) and 11.0 months (95% CI 7.398-14.602), respectively. Pemetrexed has comparable activity on brain lesions as on extracranial tumours in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients with inoperable and asymptomatic BM.

  4. Interfractional Positional Variability of Fiducial Markers and Primary Tumors in Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer During Audiovisual Biofeedback Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, Nicholas O.; Shepherd, Wes; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Weiss, Elisabeth

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate implanted markers as a surrogate for tumor-based setup during image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy with audiovisual biofeedback. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer were implanted bronchoscopically with gold coils. Markers, tumor, and a reference bony structure (vertebra) were contoured for all 10 phases of the four-dimensional respiration-correlated fan-beam computed tomography and weekly four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography. Results: The systematic/random interfractional marker-to-tumor centroid displacements were 2/3, 2/2, and 3/3 mm in the x (lateral), y (anterior-posterior), and z (superior-inferior) directions, respectively. The systematic/random interfractional marker-to-bone displacements were 2/3, 2/3, and 2/3 mm in the x, y, and z directions, respectively. The systematic/random tumor-to-bone displacements were 2/3, 2/4, and 4/4 mm in the x, y, and z directions, respectively. All displacements changed significantly over time (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Although marker-based image guidance may decrease the risk for geometric miss compared with bony anatomy-based positioning, the observed displacements between markers and tumor centroids indicate the need for repeated soft tissue imaging, particularly in situations with large tumor volume change and large initial marker-to-tumor centroid distance.

  5. Induction Chemotherapy and Continuous Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy (CHART) for Patients With Locally Advanced Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The MRC INCH Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Hatton, Matthew; Nankivell, Matthew; Lyn, Ethan; Falk, Stephen; Pugh, Cheryl; Navani, Neal; Stephens, Richard; Parmar, Mahesh

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Recent clinical trials and meta-analyses have shown that both CHART (continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy) and induction chemotherapy offer a survival advantage over conventional radical radiotherapy for patients with inoperable non-small cell-lung cancer (NSCLC). This multicenter randomized controlled trial (INCH) was set up to assess the value of giving induction chemotherapy before CHART. Methods and Materials: Patients with histologically confirmed, inoperable, Stage I-III NSCLC were randomized to induction chemotherapy (ICT) (three cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by CHART) or CHART alone. Results: Forty-six patients were randomized (23 in each treatment arm) from 9 UK centers. As a result of poor accrual, the trial was closed in December 2007. Twenty-eight patients were male, 28 had squamous cell histology, 34 were Stage IIIA or IIIB, and all baseline characteristics were well balanced between the two treatment arms. Seventeen (74%) of the 23 ICT patients completed the three cycles of chemotherapy. All 42 (22 CHART + 20 ICT) patients who received CHART completed the prescribed treatment. Median survival was 17 months in the CHART arm and 25 months in the ICT arm (hazard ratio of 0.60 [95% CI 0.31-1.16], p = 0.127). Grade 3 or 4 adverse events (mainly fatigue, dysphagia, breathlessness, and anorexia) were reported for 13 (57%) CHART and 13 (65%) ICT patients. Conclusions: This small randomized trial indicates that ICT followed by CHART is feasible and well tolerated. Despite closing early because of poor accrual, and so failing to show clear evidence of a survival benefit for the additional chemotherapy, the results suggest that CHART, and ICT before CHART, remain important options for the treatment of inoperable NSCLC and deserve further study.

  6. Phase I Study of Oral S-1 Plus Cisplatin With Concurrent Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kaira, Kyoichi Sunaga, Noriaki; Yanagitani, Noriko; Kawata, Tadayoshi; Utsugi, Mitsuyoshi; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Ebara, Takeshi; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Nonaka, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Suga, Tatsuo; Hara, Kenichiro; Hisada, Takeshi; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Nakano, Takashi; Mori, Masatomo

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and recommended dose (RD) of S-1 in combination with cisplatin and thoracic radiotherapy in patients with unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: S-1 was administered orally twice daily for 14 days and cisplatin on Days 1 and 8 of each cycle; this was repeated every 3 weeks. Doses of each drug were planned as follows: level 0, 50/40; level 1, 60/40; level 2, 70/40; level 3, 80/40 (S-1 [mg/m{sup -2}/day{sup -1}]/cisplatin [mg/m{sup -2}/day{sup -1}]). Thoracic radiation therapy was administered in 2 Gy fractions five times weekly to a total dose of 60 Gy. Results: Ten patients were enrolled in this study. All patients received 60 Gy of thoracic radiotherapy and 7 (70%) patients received four cycles of chemotherapy. At level 1, 2 of 3 patients experienced a delay exceeding 10 days in the cisplatin administration of Day 29. Grade 4 neutropenia and Grade 3 fever occurred in 1 and 1 patients, respectively. Nonhematologic toxicities were mild. None developed {>=}Grade 3 esophagitis or lung toxicity. At level 0, 2 of 7 patients developed dose-limiting toxicity. Thus, level 1 was considered the MTD and Level 0 was selected as the RD. Objective responses were seen in all patients. Conclusions: The RD is the level 0 dose, and this regimen is a feasible and well-tolerated regimen for the treatment of patients with Stage III NSCLC.

  7. Single-agent maintenance therapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): a systematic review and Bayesian network meta-analysis of 26 randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiaoning; Ma, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background The benefit of maintenance therapy has been confirmed in patients with non-progressing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after first-line therapy by many trials and meta-analyses. However, since few head-to-head trials between different regimens have been reported, clinicians still have little guidance on how to select the most efficacious single-agent regimen. Hence, we present a network meta-analysis to assess the comparative treatment efficacy of several single-agent maintenance therapy regimens for stage III/IV NSCLC. Methods A comprehensive literature search of public databases and conference proceedings was performed. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) meeting the eligible criteria were integrated into a Bayesian network meta-analysis. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS) and the secondary outcome was progression free survival (PFS). Results A total of 26 trials covering 7,839 patients were identified, of which 24 trials were included in the OS analysis, while 23 trials were included in the PFS analysis. Switch-racotumomab-alum vaccine and switch-pemetrexed were identified as the most efficacious regimens based on OS (HR, 0.64; 95% CrI, 0.45–0.92) and PFS (HR, 0.54; 95% CrI, 0.26–1.04) separately. According to the rank order based on OS, switch-racotumomab-alum vaccine had the highest probability as the most effective regimen (52%), while switch-pemetrexed ranked first (34%) based on PFS. Conclusions Several single-agent maintenance therapy regimens can prolong OS and PFS for stage III/IV NSCLC. Switch-racotumomab-alum vaccine maintenance therapy may be the most optimal regimen, but should be confirmed by additional evidence. PMID:27781159

  8. Hydration with magnesium and mannitol without furosemide prevents the nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin and pemetrexed in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muraki, Keiko; Koyama, Ryo; Honma, Yuichiro; Yagishita, Shigehiro; Shukuya, Takehito; Ohashi, Rina; Takahashi, Fumiyuki; Kido, Kenji; Iwakami, Shin-ichiro; Sasaki, Shinichi; Iwase, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to examine the effect of hydration with magnesium and mannitol without furosemide on the nephrotoxocity accompanying combination chemotherapy using cisplatin and pemetrexed in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Fifty patients with NSCLC who received cisplatin plus pemetrexed, using either old hydration protocol including normal saline with mannitol and furosemide, or a new one including normal saline with magnesium and mannitol without furosemide were retrospectively analyzed. Nephrotoxicity was compared between patients treated using the old protocol and those treated with the new protocol. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the independent factors associated with protection against nephrotoxicity in patients with NSCLC who received cisplatin plus pemetrexed. Results Thirty patients received the old hydration protocol, while 20 patients were treated using the new hydration protocol. The patients treated using the new hydration protocol showed a significantly greater increase in creatinine clearance (P=0.0004) and a decrease in the serum creatinine level (P=0.0148) after one course of chemotherapy compared with those treated using the old hydration protocol. There were no differences in the chemotherapeutic response or overall survival between the groups (P=0.572). The new hydration protocol with supplemented magnesium with mannitol without furosemide was an independent factor for the protection against nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin and pemetrexed in patients with advanced NSCLC [HR 0.232 (95% CI: 0.055-0.986), P=0.039]. Conclusions These results demonstrate that the new hydration protocol comprising supplementation with magnesium without furosemide could prevent the nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin and pemetrexed without affecting the treatment outcome. PMID:23205279

  9. Gemcitabine plus paclitaxel versus carboplatin plus either gemcitabine or paclitaxel in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a literature-based meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenguang; Sun, Yihua; Pan, Yunjian; Wang, Qifeng; Yang, Shu; Chen, Haiquan

    2010-10-01

    The combination of gemcitabine plus paclitaxel has been proposed as an alternative to the platinum-based combinations for treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, conflicting results have been reported. This meta-analysis was performed to compare the activity, efficacy, and toxicity of gemcitabine plus paclitaxel versus carboplatin plus either gemcitabine or paclitaxel in patients with untreated advanced NSCLC. Randomized phase II and phase III clinical trials comparing gemcitabine plus paclitaxel with carboplatin plus gemcitabine or paclitaxel were collected from electronic databases (Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), relevant reference lists, and abstract books. The published languages and years were not limited. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for the 1-year survival rate (1-year SR), the overall response rate (ORR), and grade 3 and grade 4 toxicities. Four randomized controlled trials (2186 patients) were identified from 2051 reports. They were all published as full-text articles. No significant heterogeneity was detected in these studies. A significant difference in ORR favoring gemcitabine plus paclitaxel over carboplatin-based doublets was observed [OR = 1.20; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.02-1.42; P = 0.03], whereas the trend toward an improved 1-year SR was not significant (OR = 1.07; 95% CI = 0.91-1.26; P = 0.41). An increased risk of grade 3-4 toxicities for patients receiving carboplatin-based chemotherapy was statistically demonstrated. The gemcitabine plus paclitaxel combination showed an improved ORR and a better toxicity profile but a similar 1-year SR compared to carboplatin-based doublets. For nonplatinum-based chemotherapy, gemcitabine plus paclitaxel is a useful alternative. PMID:20703493

  10. S0819: Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab and/or Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Stage IV or Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Recurrent Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma

  11. Indirect comparison of the efficacy and safety of gefitinib and cetuximab-based therapy in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    TANG, JIFENG; ZHANG, HENA; YAN, JIANZHOU; SHAO, RONG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the efficacy and safety of gefitinib and cetuximab-based therapies in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The studies to be used for the comparisons were selected from the available literature on gefitinib and cetuximab-based therapies compared to conventional chemotherapy in patients with advanced NSCLC. The meta-analysis was performed with RevMan 5.0 software and the Bucher approach was applied to conduct the indirect comparisons. A total of 4 studies, including 935 patients, on gefitinib therapy vs. conventional chemotherapy and 4 studies, including 1,015 patients, on cetuximab-based therapy vs. conventional chemotherapy, were used for indirect comparisons. As regards efficacy, the risk ratio (RR) of objective response rate and 1-year survival rate between gefitinib and cetuximab-based therapies in patients with advanced NSCLC were 0.99 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.75–1.32; P=0.9584] and 0.85 (95% CI: 0.71–1.01; P=0.0696), respectively, and the mean difference of progression-free survival and overall survival (OS) were −0.15 (95% CI: −0.90 to 0.60; P=0.6946) and −1.84 (95% CI: −3.53 to −0.15; P=0.0331), respectively. As regards safety, the RR of grade 3/4 adverse events (AEs) was 0.29 (95% CI: 0.19–0.44; P=0.0001). The results demonstrated that cetuximab-based therapy was superior to gefitinib therapy in terms of OS and inferior to gefitinib therapy in terms of AEs, whereas there were no significant differences in terms of efficacy and safety between the two therapies on other endpoints adopted for advanced NSCLC. However, further well-designed randomized controlled trials and continuous studies are required to confirm our findings. PMID:25469285

  12. The efficacy and safety of nivolumab in previously treated advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis of prospective clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiaxing; Zhang, Yaxiong; Sheng, Jin; Zhang, Hongyu; Fang, Wenfeng; Zhan, Jianhua; Zhou, Ting; Chen, Ying; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background Nivolumab (BMS-936558/ONO-4538) was the first monoclonal antibody targeting programmed death (PD)-1. So far, a number of clinical trials on nivolumab have showed satisfactory efficacy in treating non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Herein, we present a meta-analysis evaluating the efficacy and safety of nivolumab for previously treated advanced NSCLC patients. Methods Electronic databases were searched for eligible literature. Data of objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate, overall survival, progression-free survival, and adverse effects (AEs) were extracted and pooled. Outcomes analyzed and presented in this study were according to the original data from nivolumab 3 mg/kg. Results In general, nine trials with 817 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled ORR, disease control rate, 1-year overall survival rate, and 1-year progression-free survival rate were 20% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 17%–23%), 36% (95% CI: 22%–51%), 47% (95% CI: 40%–53%), 21% (95% CI: 18%–24%), respectively. In addition, the rate of grade 3–4 AEs was only 8% (95% CI: 6%–12%). Subgroup analysis showed no significant difference in terms of ORR between squamous and non-squamous NSCLC (odds ratio 1.23, 95% CI: 0.63–2.39, P=0.51). However, significantly greater ORR was presented in programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) positive cohort (ORR 31%, 95% CI: 24%–38%), compared to PD-L1 negative cohort (ORR 12%, 95% CI: 9%–17%). The odds ratio for objective response to nivolumab in PD-L1 positive cases relative to negative cases was 3.08 (95% CI: 1.87–5.08, P<0.0001). Conclusion In conclusion, nivolumab is a promising second-line agent for previously treated advanced NSCLC with manageable AEs. Both squamous and non-squamous NSCLC patients showed similar efficacy. In addition, patients with positive PD-L1 expression had better response from nivolumab. Microabstract We present a meta-analysis evaluating the efficacy and safety of nivolumab for

  13. Multicentre prospective phase II trial of gefitinib for advanced non-small cell lung cancer with epidermal growth factor receptor mutations: results of the West Japan Thoracic Oncology Group trial (WJTOG0403)

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, K; Okamoto, I; Kashii, T; Negoro, S; Hirashima, T; Kudoh, S; Ichinose, Y; Ebi, N; Shibata, K; Nishimura, T; Katakami, N; Sawa, T; Shimizu, E; Fukuoka, J; Satoh, T; Fukuoka, M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of gefitinib and the feasibility of screening for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations among select patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Stage IIIB/IV NSCLC, chemotherapy-naive patients or patients with recurrences after up to two prior chemotherapy regimens were eligible. Direct sequencing using DNA from tumour specimens was performed by a central laboratory to detect EGFR mutations. Patients harbouring EGFR mutations received gefitinib. The primary study objective was response; the secondary objectives were toxicity, overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), 1-year survival (1Y-S) and the disease control rate (DCR). Between March 2005 and January 2006, 118 patients were recruited from 15 institutions and were screened for EGFR mutations, which were detected in 32 patients – 28 of whom were enrolled in the present study. The overall response rate was 75%, the DCR was 96% and the median PFS was 11.5 months. The median OS has not yet been reached, and the 1Y-S was 79%. Thus, gefitinib chemotherapy in patients with advanced NSCLC harbouring EGFR mutations was highly effective. This trial documents the feasibility of performing a multicentre phase II study using a central typing laboratory, demonstrating the benefit to patients of selecting gefitinib treatment based on their EGFR mutation status. PMID:18283321

  14. The Efficacy of Chinese Herbal Medicine as an Adjunctive Therapy for Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ou-Yang, Chen Sheng; Wang, Xi-Xin; Yang, Zhen-Jiang; Tong, Yao; Cho, William C.S.

    2013-01-01

    Many published studies reflect the growing application of complementary and alternative medicine, particularly Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) use in combination with conventional cancer therapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but its efficacy remains largely unexplored. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of CHM combined with conventional chemotherapy (CT) in the treatment of advanced NSCLC. Publications in 11 electronic databases were extensively searched, and 24 trials were included for analysis. A sum of 2,109 patients was enrolled in these studies, at which 1,064 patients participated in CT combined CHM and 1,039 in CT (six patients dropped out and were not reported the group enrolled). Compared to using CT alone, CHM combined with CT significantly increase one-year survival rate (RR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.15–1.60, p = 0.0003). Besides, the combined therapy significantly increased immediate tumor response (RR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.19–1.56, p<1.0E−5) and improved Karnofsky performance score (KPS) (RR = 2.90, 95% CI = 1.62–5.18, p = 0.0003). Combined therapy remarkably reduced the nausea and vomiting at toxicity grade of III–IV (RR = 0.24, 95% CI = 0.12–0.50, p = 0.0001) and prevented the decline of hemoglobin and platelet in patients under CT at toxicity grade of I–IV (RR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.51–0.80, p<0.0001). Moreover, the herbs that are frequently used in NSCLC patients were identified. This systematic review suggests that CHM as an adjuvant therapy can reduce CT toxicity, prolong survival rate, enhance immediate tumor response, and improve KPS in advanced NSCLC patients. However, due to the lack of large-scale randomized clinical trials in the included studies, further larger scale trials are needed. PMID:23469033

  15. Association of CHEK2 polymorphisms with the efficacy of platinum-based chemotherapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer in Chinese never-smoking women

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen; Liu, Di; Yang, Yang; Ding, Xi; Sun, Yifeng; Zhang, Baohong

    2016-01-01

    Background Cell cycle checkpoint kinase 2 (CHEK2) plays an essential role in the repair of DNA damage. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repair genes are thought to influence treatment effects and survival of cancer patients. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between polymorphisms in the CHEK2 gene and efficacy of platinum-based doublet chemotherapy in never-smoking Chinese female patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Using DNA from blood samples of 272 Chinese advanced NSCLC non-smoking female patients treated with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy, we have analyzed the relationships between four SNPs in the CHEK2 gene and clinical outcomes. Results We found that overall survival (OS) was significantly associated with CHEK2 rs4035540 (Log-Rank P=0.020), as well as the CHEK2 rs4035540 dominant model (Log-Rank P=0.026), especially in the lung adenocarcinoma group. After multivariate analysis, patients with rs4035540 A/G genotype had a significantly better OS than those with the G/G genotype (HR =0.67, 95% CI, 0.48–0.93; P=0.016). In the toxicity analysis, it was observed that patients with the CHEK2 rs4035540 A/A genotype had a higher risk of gastrointestinal toxicity than the G/G genotype group (P=0.009). However, there are no significant associations between chemotherapy treatments and genetic variations. Conclusions Our findings indicate that SNPs in CHEK2 are related to Chinese advanced NSCLC never-smoking female patients receiving platinum-based doublet chemotherapy in China. Patients with rs4035540 A/G genotype have a better OS. And patients with rs4035540 A/A genotype have a higher risk of gastrointestinal toxicity. These results point to a direction for predicting the prognosis for Chinese never-smoking NSCLC female patients. However, there are no significant associations between chemotherapy treatments and SNPs in CHEK2, which need more samples to the further study. PMID:27747004

  16. Incidence and clinical implication of tumor cavitation in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer induced by Endostar, an angiogenesis inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Jing; Lin, Li; Liu, Zhujun; Xu, Wenjing; Wang, Liuchun; Xiao, Jianyu; Li, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiangiogenesis plays a key role in the treatment of non-small lung cancer (NSCLC). We observed the cavitation of lesions in patients with stage IIIB/IV NSCLC treated with Endostar and vinorelbine-cisplatin (NP) chemotherapy, and evaluated the imaging characteristics and clinical outcome of patients who developed tumor cavitation. Methods Our study included 105 untreated NSCLC patients who received Endostar in combination with NP chemotherapy at the Tianjin Lung Cancer Center. Chest computed tomography (CT) was performed to evaluate the efficacy every two cycles. The number of activated circulating endothelial cells (aCECs) was measured by flow cytometry. Rates of tumor cavitation were documented and their clinical CT imaging data were analyzed. Results Tumor cavitation occurred in 11 of the 105 (10.5%) patients treated with Endostar and NP. The response rates were 37.2% (35/94) in patients without cavitation, 27.3% (3/11) evaluated by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, and 100.0% (11/11) if evaluated by an alternate method in patients who developed cavitation. Three of the 11 cases with cavitation had a centrally located tumor. No patients had hemoptysis or any other severe side effects. Compared with patients not developing cavitation, cavity formation resulted in a longer median survival time (13.6 vs. 11.8 months, P = 0.011) and an increase in the number of aCECs (244.4/105 vs. 23.3/105, P = 0.000). Conclusions Intratumoral cavitation induced by Endostar is common in NSCLC patients, and is not correlated with squamous histology, tumor location or pulmonary hemorrhage. Cavitation might have a significant effect on the number of aCECs and overall prognosis. PMID:26767036

  17. Clinically Meaningful Differences in Patient-Reported Outcomes With Amifostine in Combination With Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: An Analysis of RTOG 9801

    SciTech Connect

    Sarna, Linda Swann, Suzanne; Langer, Corey; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Nicolaou, Nicos; Komaki, Ritsuko; Machtay, Mitchell; Byhardt, Roger; Wasserman, Todd; Movsas, Benjamin

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to analyze changes in quality of life (QOL) and symptoms from pretreatment to 6 weeks posttreatment in a Phase III randomized study (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9801) of amifostine (AM) vs. no AM in patients with Stages II-III non-small-cell lung cancer receiving paclitaxel and carboplatin as induction and then concurrently with hyperfractionated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: One hundred thirty-eight patients with baseline and 6-week posttreatment QOL data were analyzed. There were no significant differences in baseline demographics between those who did and did not have QOL data. The QOL and symptoms were assessed by using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Global QOL and Pain subscales and the EORTC-Lung Cancer-13 symptom tool. Clinically relevant changes in QOL were characterized by 10-point differences in individual scores pre/post treatment. A daily diary of patient-rated difficulty swallowing and a weekly physician-rated dysphagia log (using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria) were completed during treatment. Weight loss was monitored. Differences in outcomes were examined according to smoking status, alcohol use, and sex. Results: Patients receiving AM reported significantly greater pain reduction after chemoradiation (34% vs. no AM, 21%), less difficulty swallowing during chemoradiation, and less weight loss than patients not receiving AM. However, physician-rated assessments of dysphagia were not significantly different by treatment arm. There were no other significant changes in QOL or symptoms according to treatment arm, smoking status, alcohol use, or sex. Conclusions: Patient evaluations of difficulty swallowing and pain suggest benefits from AM use that are distinct from clinician-rated assessments.

  18. Sequential measurements of serum matrix metalloproteinase 9 to monitor chemotherapy responses in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Xiaojuan; Zhai, Xiaoran; Wang, Jinghui; Zhao, Xiaoting; Yang, Xinjie; Lv, Jialin; Ma, Li; Zhang, Lina; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Shucai; Yue, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) plays an important role in tumor invasion and metastasis, including lung cancer. However, whether variations in serum MMP-9 levels can serve as a biomarker for monitoring chemotherapy curative effect remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the association between variations in serum MMP-9 levels and chemotherapy curative effect in patients with lung cancer. Patients and methods A total of 82 patients with advanced lung cancer were included. All newly diagnosed patients were treated with platinum-based doublet chemotherapy. Serial measurements of serum MMP-9 levels were performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In this manner, we chose four time points to examine the association, including before chemotherapy, and 3 weeks after the beginning of the first, second, and fourth cycles of chemotherapy. Results Compared with the serum level of MMP-9 before progressive disease, patients with progressive disease had elevated serum levels of MMP-9. Compared with the previous time point of collecting specimens, the serum levels of MMP-9 in the patients with a complete response/partial response/stable disease decreased or were maintained stable. The differences of variation in serum MMP-9 levels in patients with different chemotherapy curative effects were all statistically significant after one cycle, two cycles, and four cycles (after one cycle: P<0.001; after two cycles: P<0.001; after four cycles: P=0.01). However, patients with small-cell lung cancer did not exhibit similar test results. Conclusion The variation in serum MMP-9 levels in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer during chemotherapy was closely related to chemotherapy curative effect and could be useful to monitor chemotherapy curative effect for a small portion of patients. PMID:27330309

  19. Mutation status concordance between primary lesions and metastatic sites of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer and the impact of mutation testing methodologies: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, James; Dearden, Simon; Ratcliffe, Marianne; Walker, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Increased understanding of the genetic aetiology of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (aNSCLC) has facilitated personalised therapies that target specific molecular aberrations associated with the disease. Biopsy samples for mutation testing may be taken from primary or metastatic sites, depending on which sample is most accessible, and upon differing diagnostic practices between territories. However, the mutation status concordance between primary tumours and corresponding metastases is the subject of debate. This review aims to ascertain whether molecular diagnostic testing of either the primary or metastatic tumours is equally suitable to determine patient eligibility for targeted therapies. A literature search was performed to identify articles reporting studies of mutations in matched primary and metastatic aNSCLC tumour samples. Clinical results of mutation status concordance between matched primary and metastatic tumour samples from patients with aNSCLC were collated. Articles included in this review (N =26) all reported mutation status data from matched primary and metastatic tumour samples obtained from adult patients with aNSCLC. Generally, substantial concordance was observed between primary and metastatic tumours in terms of EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, p16 and p53 mutations. However, some level of discordance was seen in most studies; mutation testing methodologies appeared to play a key role in this, along with underlying tumour heterogeneity. Substantial concordance in mutation status observed between primary and metastatic tumour sites suggests that diagnostic testing of either tumour type may be suitable to determine a patient's eligibility for personalised therapies. As with all diagnostic testing, highly sensitive and appropriately validated mutation analysis methodologies are desirable to ensure accuracy. Additional work is also required to define how much discordance is clinically significant given natural tumour heterogeneity. The ability of both

  20. Chemotherapy With Erlotinib or Chemotherapy Alone in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer With Acquired Resistance to EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Oxnard, Geoffrey R.; Digumarthy, Subba; Muzikansky, Alona; Jackman, David M.; Lennes, Inga T.; Sequist, Lecia V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant non-small cell lung cancer has an oncogene-addicted biology that confers sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Published data suggest that EGFR addiction persists after development of TKI acquired resistance, leading many clinicians to continue TKI with subsequent chemotherapy; however, this strategy has not been formally evaluated. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed an institutional database to identify patients with advanced EGFR mutation with acquired resistance who subsequently received chemotherapy. Patients were classified as receiving chemotherapy with continued erlotinib or chemotherapy alone. We assessed differences in outcomes between the two strategies. Results. Seventy-eight patients were included, 34 treated with chemotherapy and erlotinib and 44 treated with chemotherapy alone. Objective response rate was evaluable in 57 patients and was 41% for those treated with chemotherapy and erlotinib and 18% for those treated with chemotherapy alone. After adjusting for chemotherapy regimen and length of initial TKI course, the odds ratio for the response rate was 0.20 (95% confidence interval: 0.05–0.78; p = .02) favoring treatment with chemotherapy and erlotinib. The median progression-free survival was 4.4 months on chemotherapy and erlotinib and 4.2 months on chemotherapy alone (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.79; 95% confidence interval: 0.48–1.29; p = .34). There was no difference in overall survival. Conclusion. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to demonstrate that continuation of EGFR TKI with chemotherapy in patients with acquired resistance improves outcomes compared with chemotherapy alone. We observed an improved response rate but no difference in progression-free survival or overall survival. A larger prospective clinical trial is needed to evaluate this promising strategy further. PMID:24072220

  1. Thymidylate synthase polymorphisms in genomic DNA as clinical outcome predictors in a European population of advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients receiving pemetrexed

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We studied whether thymidylate synthase (TS) genotype has an independent prognostic/predictive impact on a European population of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving pemetrexed. Methods Twenty-five patients treated with pemetrexed-based regimens were included. Genomic DNA was isolated prior to treatment. The variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphisms, the G > C single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and the TS 6-bp insertion/deletion (6/6) in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) polymorphisms were analyzed and correlated with overall response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall-survival (OS) and toxicity. Results The genotype +6/+6 predicted a higher ORR among active/former smokers compared to +6/-6 genotype (100% vs. 50%; p = 0.085). Overall, the 3R/3R genotype predicted a higher ORR (100%) over the rest VNTR polymorphisms (p = 0.055). The presence of 3R/3R genotype significantly correlated with a superior ORR in patients without EGFR activating mutations (100%) compared to 2R/2R, 2R/3R and 3R/4R genotype (77.8%, 33.3% and 0% respectively; p = 0.017). After a median follow-up of 21 months, a trend towards a better PFS, although not significant, was found among subjects showing 3R/3R polymorphisms (p = 0.089). A significantly superior OS was found in patients showing 3R/3R genotype rather than other VNTR polymorphisms (p = 0.019). No significant correlation with the toxicity was observed. Conclusion In our series, 3R/3R polymorphism correlated with a superior OS. Also, this polymorphism, when associated to wild type EGFR, was related to a higher ORR to pemetrexed. Toxicity was not significantly correlated with a specific TS genotype. PMID:24726028

  2. Second- and Further-Line Therapy with Erlotinib in Patients with Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Daily Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Krainhöfer, Josephine; Steinert, Matthias; Reissig, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this retrospective study was to examine effect of erlotinib in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in second-line and further therapy in daily clinical practice. Methods. Patients with histologically or cytologically proven NSCLC (n = 84) treated with erlotinib in second-line (n = 34), third-line (n = 36), and more-line therapy (n = 14) were examined for progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), disease control rate (DCR), duration of therapy, and adverse effects. Results. Median PFS of all lines was 83 days (CI 70.0–96.0), OS was 7 months (CI 4.7–9.3), DCR was 66.2% (CI 55–77%), and 1-year survival rate was 33% (CI 22–43%), with no significant difference between therapy lines. Median duration of treatment was 76 days (IQR 39–139.5). Patients with epidermal growth factor receptor mutation (EGFR-M) reached the highest PFS (204 days), as did patients with good performance status (ECOG 0-1: 94 versus ECOG 2-3: 65 days, P = 0.035). Patients with EGFR-M also revealed a DCR of 100%. The most frequent side effects were rash (69%) and diarrhoea (41%), without any significant difference between therapy lines. In 24 patients, the treatment dose was reduced and in 18, the therapy was paused. Conclusion. Erlotinib works in all therapy lines without any significant differences in efficacy and side effects. PMID:25028671

  3. Efficacy and safety of maintenance erlotinib in Asian patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a subanalysis of the phase III, randomized SATURN study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Long; Kim, Joo-Hang; Park, Keunchil; Zaatar, Adel; Klingelschmitt, Gaëlle; Ng, Christina

    2012-08-01

    Maintenance therapy, commenced immediately after the completion of first-line chemotherapy, is a promising strategy for improving treatment outcomes in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The global phase III SequentiAl Tarceva in UnResectable NSCLC (SATURN) study evaluated the efficacy and safety of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine-kinase inhibitor erlotinib as maintenance treatment in NSCLC patients without progression after first-line chemotherapy. We report a retrospective subanalysis of Asian patients enrolled in SATURN. Patients with advanced NSCLC with no evidence of progression after four cycles of chemotherapy were randomized to receive erlotinib 150 mg/day or placebo, until progressive disease or limiting toxicity. The co-primary endpoints of SATURN were progression-free survival (PFS) in all patients and in those with positive EGFR immunohistochemistry (IHC) status. Secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), disease control rate, safety, quality of life (QoL) and biomarker analyses. In total, 126 patients from East and South-East Asian centers were randomized (14% of the intent-to-treat population): 88 from Korea, 28 from China and 10 from Malaysia; one patient was excluded from this analysis due to Indian ethnicity. PFS was significantly prolonged in the erlotinib treatment arm, both overall (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.57; p=0.0067) and in patients with EGFR IHC-positive disease (HR=0.50; p=0.0057). There was a trend towards an increase in OS, which reached statistical significance in the EGFR IHC-positive subgroup (p=0.0233). The overall response rate was significantly higher with erlotinib compared with placebo (24% versus 5%; p=0.0025). Erlotinib was generally well tolerated and had no negative impact on QoL in this subpopulation. The most common treatment-related adverse events were rash, diarrhea and pruritus. Erlotinib was effective and well tolerated in Asian patients, producing benefits consistent with those

  4. Early Change in Metabolic Tumor Heterogeneity during Chemoradiotherapy and Its Prognostic Value for Patients with Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xinzhe; Sun, Xiaorong; Sun, Lu; Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Huang, Yong; Li, Wenwu; Wan, Honglin; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To observe the early change of metabolic tumor heterogeneity during chemoradiotherapy and to determine its prognostic value for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods From January 2007 to March 2010, 58 patients with NSCLC were included who were received 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT before and following 40 Gy radiotherapy with the concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy (CCRT). Primary tumor FDG uptake heterogeneity was determined using global and local scale textural features extracted from standardized uptake value (SUV) histogram analysis (coefficient of variation [COV], skewness, kurtosis, area under the curve of the cumulative SUV histogram [AUC-CSH]) and normalized gray-level co-occurrence matrix (contrast, dissimilarity, entropy, homogeneity). SUVmax and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) were also evaluated. Correlations were analyzed between parameters on baseline or during treatments with tumor response, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Results Compared with non-responders, responders showed significantly greater pre-treatment COV, contrast and MTV (AUC = 0.781, 0.804, 0.686, respectively). Receiver-operating-characteristic curve analysis showed that early change of tumor textural analysis serves as a response predictor with higher sensitivity (73.2%~92.1%) and specificity (80.0%~83.6%) than baseline parameters. Change in AUC-CSH and dissimilarity during CCRT could also predict response with optimal cut-off values (33.0% and 28.7%, respectively). The patients with greater changes in contrast and AUC-CSH had significantly higher 5-year OS (P = 0.008, P = 0.034) and PFS (P = 0.007, P = 0.039). In multivariate analysis, only change in contrast was found as the independent prognostic factor of PFS (HR 0.476, P = 0.021) and OS (HR 0.519, P = 0.015). Conclusions The metabolic tumor heterogeneity change during CCRT characterized by global and local scale textural features may be

  5. Systematic Endobronchial Ultrasound-guided Mediastinal Staging Versus Positron Emission Tomography for Comprehensive Mediastinal Staging in NSCLC Before Radical Radiotherapy of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Steinfort, Daniel P; Siva, Shankar; Leong, Tracy L; Rose, Morgan; Herath, Dishan; Antippa, Phillip; Ball, David L; Irving, Louis B

    2016-02-01

    Despite known limitations of positron emission tomography (PET) for mediastinal staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radiation treatment fields are generally based on PET-identified disease extent. However, no studies have examined the accuracy of FDG-PET/CT on a per-node basis in patients being considered for curative-intent radiotherapy in NSCLC.In a prospective trial, patients with NSCLC being considered for definitive thoracic radiotherapy (± systemic chemotherapy) underwent minimally invasive systematic mediastinal evaluation with endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) following noninvasive staging with integrated PET-CT.Thirty patients underwent EBUS-TBNA, with TBNA performed from a mean 2.5 lymph node (LN) stations per patient (median 3, range 1-5). Discordant findings between PET-CT and EBUS-TBNA were observed in 10 patients (33%, 95% CI 19%-51%). PET-occult LN metastases were demonstrated by EBUS in 4 patients, whereas a lesser extent of mediastinal involvement, compared with FDG-PET, was demonstrated by EBUS in 6 patients, including 2 patients downstaged from cN3 to pN2. LNs upstaged by EBUS were significantly smaller than nodes downstaged by EBUS, 7.5 mm (range 7-9) versus 12 mm (range 6-21), P = 0.005.A significant proportion of patients considered for definitive radiotherapy (+/-chemotherapy) undergoing systematic mediastinal evaluation with EBUS-TBNA in this study have an extent of mediastinal NSCLC involvement discordant with that indicated by PET-CT. Systematic EBUS-TBNA may aid in defining the extent of mediastinal involvement in NSCLC patients undergoing radiotherapy. Systematic EBUS-TBNA has the potential to contribute significantly to radiotherapy planning and delivery, by either identifying occult nodal metastases, or demonstrating FDG-avid LNs to be disease-free. PMID:26937894

  6. Impact of metformin use on survival in locally-advanced, inoperable non-small cell lung cancer treated with definitive chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Inaya; Ferro, Adam; Cohler, Alan; Langenfeld, John; Surakanti, Sujani G.; Aisner, Joseph; Zou, Wei; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated survival outcomes in diabetic patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with concurrent metformin and definitive chemoradiation. Methods This single-institution, retrospective cohort study included 166 patients with NSCLC who were treated definitively with chemoradiation between 1999 and 2013. Of 40 patients who had type II diabetes, 20 (50%) were on metformin, and 20 (50%) were not on metformin. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS), and secondary outcomes included progression-free survival (PFS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS). Kaplan Meier method and log-rank test were performed in survival analysis. Cox regression was utilized in univariate analysis of potential confounders. Results Median follow-up was 17.0 months. Compared with non-diabetic patients, diabetic patients on metformin demonstrated similar OS (16.3 vs. 14.3 mo, P=0.23), PFS (11.6 vs. 9.7 mo, P=0.26), LRRFS (14.1 vs. 11.9 mo, P=0.78), and DMFS (13.4 vs. 10.0 mo, P=0.69). Compared with diabetic patients not on metformin, diabetic patients on metformin also exhibited similar OS (14.3 vs. 19.2 mo, P=0.18), PFS (19.7 vs. 10.1 mo, P=0.38), LRRFS (11.9 vs. 15.5 mo, P=0.69), and DMFS (10.0 vs. 17.4 mo, P=0.12). Identified negative prognostic factors on included squamous cell histology, lower performance status, higher T stage, and non-caucasian ethnicity. Conclusions No statistically significant differences in survival or patterns of failure were found among the three cohorts in this small set of patients. No statistically significant differences in survival or patterns of failure were found between the three cohorts in this small set of patients. Though it is possible that metformin use may in fact have no effect on survival in NSCLC patients treated with definitive RT, larger-scale retrospective and prospective studies are implicated for clarification. PMID:25922712

  7. The Cardiac Markers and Oxidative Stress Parameters in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Biatas-Chromiec, Beata; Stelmaszczyk-Emmel, Anna; Radzikowska, Elzbieta; Wiatr, Elzbieta; Radwan-Rohrenschef, Piotr; Szturmowicz, Monika

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiotoxicity is a well known long-term consequence of lung cancer chemotherapy, however little is known about early subclinical changes in cardiac function. Aim: The goal of the study was to assess early cardiotoxic effects of cisplatin-containing chemotherapy in stage III and IV lung cancer patients, measuring serum levels of selected cardiac markers in relation to oxidant effects. Methods: We quantified the immediate impact of chemotherapy on cardiac troponin T (TnT), creatine kinase-myocardial band (CK-MB) and N- terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in blood samples obtained from 12 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. All markers were measured using commercially available immunoassays. To investigate the oxidant effects of cisplatin-containing chemotherapy, we evaluated reduced glutathione (GSH), nitrite (NO2), derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) and thiols (SH). Samples were collected prior to chemotherapy and 1 day after the first cycle of cisplatin administration. Results: Chemotherapy did not cause statistically significant elevations in serum CK-MB. Serum TnT levels were undetectable at both time points in 11 out of 12 patients with a threshold of 0.01 ng/ml. In the single patient with undetectable TnT at the baseline, after the first infusion TnT level reversibly rose to 0.03 ng/ml. The pre-treatment value of NT-proBNP was slightly elevated in 7 out of 12 lung cancer patients. In 1 case NT-proBNP level significantly increased after chemotherapy (from 221.8 to 1489.0 pg/ml p<0.001), in the remaining 11 patients it was stable Cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy induced significant nitrite production in 5 patients (p<0.05). The other measured oxidative stress parameters remained unchanged after the first infusion. Conclusion: This pilot study demonstrated occasional elevations of cardiac biomarkers during cisplatin administration. Administration of cisplatin-containing chemotherapy caused significant

  8. Nintedanib in combination with docetaxel for second-line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer; GENESIS-SEFH drug evaluation report.

    PubMed

    Espinosa Bosch, María; Asensi Diez, Rocío; García Agudo, Sara; Clopes Estela, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Nintedanib is a triple angiokinase inhibitor that has been approved by the European Agency Medicines (EMA) in combination with docetaxel for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced, metastatic or locally recurrent non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) of adenocarcinoma tumour histology, after first-line chemotherapy. In LUME-Lung 1 clinical trial, the combination of nintedanib plus docetaxel vs. placebo plus docetaxel improved progression free survival (PFS) in NSCLC patients, and improved overall survival in the population of adenocarcinoma patients, particularly in those with progression within 9 months after first line treatment initiation, median 10.9 months ( [95% CI 8.5-12.6] vs. 7.9 months [6.7-9.1]; HR 0.75 [95% CI 0.60-0.92], p=0.0073). The toxicity profile of the combination included a higher incidence of neutropenia, gastro-intestinal (GI) disorders, and liver enzyme elevations; however, this did not cause a detrimental effect on patient quality of life. According to data from the clinical trial mentioned, the addition of nintedanib to docetaxel would lead to an estimated incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) per year of life with PFS in the overall population of 134,274.47 € (notified price). In the adenocarcinoma population per each life of year gained (LYG), the ICER of adding nintedanib to docetaxel would be 40,886.14 €; while by implementing a sensitivity analysis with a 25% discount in the drug price, the cost per LYG would be 32,364.05 €, and would place it close to the threshold of cost-effectiveness usually considered acceptable in our setting. In view of efficacy and safety results the proposed positioning is to recommend its inclusion in the Hospital Formulary only for adult patients with metastatic or locally recurrent NSCLC with adenocarcinoma histology after first line chemotherapy, with progression < 9 months from the initiation of first line treatment, taking into account the inclusion and exclusion criteria in the

  9. A comparison of ARMS and mutation specific IHC for common activating EGFR mutations analysis in small biopsy and cytology specimens of advanced non small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Guoqing; Hao, Yueyue; Xu, Yinhong; Zhang, Lihua

    2014-01-01

    We have compared mutation analysis by Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant-specific antibodies for their ability to detect two common activating EGFR mutations in a cohort of 115 advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including cytology material, core biopsy, and bronchoscopic biopsies. Assessment of EGFR mutation status was performed by using antibodies and ARMS assay specific to the two major forms of mutant EGFR, exon 19 deletion E746-A750 (c.2235_2249del15 or c.2236_2250del15, p. Glu746_Ala750 del) and exon 21 L858R point mutation (c.2573T>G, p.Leu858Arg). In this study the optimal buffer for antigen retrieval was sodium citrate (pH 6.0). Q score was used to evaluate the specific mutant EGFR proteins expression. Validation using clinical material showed deletions in exon 19 were detected in 19.1% and L858R mutation in 20% of all cases by ARMS assay. A cutoff value of score 1 was used as positive by IHC. No wild type cases were immuno-reactive. The antibodies performed well in cytology, core biopsies and bronchoscopic biopsies. There were only one false positive case using L858R IHC (sensitivity 100%, specificity 98.5%, positive predictive value 96%, negative predictive value 100%). All 23 E746-A750 exon 19 deletions identified by mutation analysis were positive by IHC. The sensitivity of exon 19 IHC for E746-A750 was 100%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100% and negative predictive value 100%. The result of the IHC stains was finely correlated with mutations status determined by ARMS assay. Although inferior to molecular genetic analysis of the EGFR gene, IHC is highly specific and sensitive for the targeted EGFR mutations. The antibodies are likely to be of clinical value in cases especially where limited tumor material is available, or in situations where molecular genetic analysis is not readily available.

  10. Nintedanib in combination with docetaxel for second-line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer; GENESIS-SEFH drug evaluation report.

    PubMed

    Espinosa Bosch, María; Asensi Diez, Rocío; García Agudo, Sara; Clopes Estela, Ana

    2016-06-01

    Nintedanib is a triple angiokinase inhibitor that has been approved by the European Agency Medicines (EMA) in combination with docetaxel for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced, metastatic or locally recurrent non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) of adenocarcinoma tumour histology, after first-line chemotherapy. In LUME-Lung 1 clinical trial, the combination of nintedanib plus docetaxel vs. placebo plus docetaxel improved progression free survival (PFS) in NSCLC patients, and improved overall survival in the population of adenocarcinoma patients, particularly in those with progression within 9 months after first line treatment initiation, median 10.9 months ( [95% CI 8.5-12.6] vs. 7.9 months [6.7-9.1]; HR 0.75 [95% CI 0.60-0.92], p=0.0073). The toxicity profile of the combination included a higher incidence of neutropenia, gastro-intestinal (GI) disorders, and liver enzyme elevations; however, this did not cause a detrimental effect on patient quality of life. According to data from the clinical trial mentioned, the addition of nintedanib to docetaxel would lead to an estimated incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) per year of life with PFS in the overall population of 134,274.47 € (notified price). In the adenocarcinoma population per each life of year gained (LYG), the ICER of adding nintedanib to docetaxel would be 40,886.14 €; while by implementing a sensitivity analysis with a 25% discount in the drug price, the cost per LYG would be 32,364.05 €, and would place it close to the threshold of cost-effectiveness usually considered acceptable in our setting. In view of efficacy and safety results the proposed positioning is to recommend its inclusion in the Hospital Formulary only for adult patients with metastatic or locally recurrent NSCLC with adenocarcinoma histology after first line chemotherapy, with progression < 9 months from the initiation of first line treatment, taking into account the inclusion and exclusion criteria in the

  11. SU-E-J-244: Development and Validation of a Knowledge Based Planning Model for External Beam Radiation Therapy of Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z; Kennedy, A; Larsen, E; Hayes, C; Grow, A; Bahamondes, S.; Zheng, Y; Wu, X; Choi, M; Pai, S; Li, J; Cranford, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The study aims to develop and validate a knowledge based planning (KBP) model for external beam radiation therapy of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods: RapidPlan™ technology was used to develop a lung KBP model. Plans from 65 patients with LA-NSCLC were used to train the model. 25 patients were treated with VMAT, and the other patients were treated with IMRT. Organs-at-risk (OARs) included right lung, left lung, heart, esophagus, and spinal cord. DVH and geometric distribution DVH were extracted from the treated plans. The model was trained using principal component analysis and step-wise multiple regression. Box plot and regression plot tools were used to identify geometric outliers and dosimetry outliers and help fine-tune the model. The validation was performed by (a) comparing predicted DVH boundaries to actual DVHs of 63 patients and (b) using an independent set of treatment planning data. Results: 63 out of 65 plans were included in the final KBP model with PTV volume ranging from 102.5cc to 1450.2cc. Total treatment dose prescription varied from 50Gy to 70Gy based on institutional guidelines. One patient was excluded due to geometric outlier where 2.18cc of spinal cord was included in PTV. The other patient was excluded due to dosimetric outlier where the dose sparing to spinal cord was heavily enforced in the clinical plan. Target volume, OAR volume, OAR overlap volume percentage to target, and OAR out-of-field volume were included in the trained model. Lungs and heart had two principal component scores of GEDVH, whereas spinal cord and esophagus had three in the final model. Predicted DVH band (mean ±1 standard deviation) represented 66.2±3.6% of all DVHs. Conclusion: A KBP model was developed and validated for radiotherapy of LA-NSCLC in a commercial treatment planning system. The clinical implementation may improve the consistency of IMRT/VMAT planning.

  12. [Occult mediastinal node involvement in non-small cell lung cancer after negative uptake on PET/CT: ripples through staging and therapy. Case report and critical review].

    PubMed

    Trodella, L; Salvati, F; Martelli, M; Mattia, P; Graziano, P; Ippolito, E

    2011-01-01

    A 78-years old man, heavy smoker, with a persistent and hacking cough, was diagnosed with an adenocarcinoma of upper lobe of left lung. Clinical stage was defined as cT2N0M0 also on the basis of a negative (18)FDG-PET/TC. After lobectomy, pathological stage resulted, on the contrary, pT2N2M0. Because the considerable incidence of preoperative false negative uptakes of PET/TC for involvement of mediastinal lymph nodes, this case report is highlighted as emblematic, particularly in relation to post-operative treatment of early stage NSCLC. PMID:22262330

  13. Variations in Target Volume Definition for Postoperative Radiotherapy in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Analysis of an International Contouring Study

    SciTech Connect

    Spoelstra, Femke; Senan, Suresh; Le Pechoux, Cecile; Ishikura, Satoshi; Casas, Francesc; Ball, David; Price, Allan; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) in patients with completely resected non-small-cell lung cancer with mediastinal involvement is controversial because of the failure of earlier trials to demonstrate a survival benefit. Improved techniques may reduce toxicity, but the treatment fields used in routine practice have not been well studied. We studied routine target volumes used by international experts and evaluated the impact of a contouring protocol developed for a new prospective study, the Lung Adjuvant Radiotherapy Trial (Lung ART). Methods and Materials: Seventeen thoracic radiation oncologists were invited to contour their routine clinical target volumes (CTV) for 2 representative patients using a validated CD-ROM-based contouring program. Subsequently, the Lung ART study protocol was provided, and both cases were contoured again. Variations in target volumes and their dosimetric impact were analyzed. Results: Routine CTVs were received for each case from 10 clinicians, whereas six provided both routine and protocol CTVs for each case. Routine CTVs varied up to threefold between clinicians, but use of the Lung ART protocol significantly decreased variations. Routine CTVs in a postlobectomy patient resulted in V{sub 20} values ranging from 12.7% to 54.0%, and Lung ART protocol CTVs resulted in values of 20.6% to 29.2%. Similar results were seen for other toxicity parameters and in the postpneumectomy patient. With the exception of upper paratracheal nodes, protocol contouring improved coverage of the required nodal stations. Conclusion: Even among experts, significant interclinician variations are observed in PORT fields. Inasmuch as contouring variations can confound the interpretation of PORT results, mandatory quality assurance procedures have been incorporated into the current Lung ART study.

  14. Genetic polymorphisms in glycolytic pathway are associated with the prognosis of patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shin Yup; Jin, Cheng Cheng; Choi, Jin Eun; Hong, Mi Jeong; Jung, Deuk Kju; Do, Sook Kyung; Baek, Sun Ah; Kang, Hyo Jung; Kang, Hyo-Gyoung; Choi, Sun Ha; Lee, Won Kee; Seok, Yangki; Lee, Eung Bae; Jeong, Ji Yun; Shin, Kyung Min; Cho, Sukki; Yoo, Seung Soo; Lee, Jaehee; Cha, Seung Ick; Kim, Chang Ho; Lee, You Mie; Lee, In-Kyu; Jheon, Sanghoon; Park, Jae Yong

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate whether polymorphisms of genes involved in glycolysis are associated with the prognosis of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after surgical resection. Forty-four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 17 genes in glycolytic pathway were investigated in a total of 782 patients with NSCLC who underwent curative surgical resection. The association of the SNPs with overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) were analyzed. Among the 44 SNPs investigated, four SNPs (ENO1 rs2274971A > G, PFKM rs11168417C > T, PFKP rs1132173C > T, PDK2 rs3785921G > A) were significantly associated with survival outcomes in multivariate analyses. When stratified by tumor histology, three SNPs (ENO1 rs2274971A > G, PFKM rs11168417C > T, and PDK2 rs3785921G > A) were significantly associated with OS and/or DFS only in squamous cell carcinoma, whereas PFKP rs1132173C > T exhibited a significant association with survival outcomes only in adenocarcinoma. When the four SNPs were combined, OS and DFS decreased as the number of bad genotypes increased (Ptrend = 8 × 10−4 and 3 × 10−5, respectively). Promoter assays showed that ENO1 rs2274971G allele had significantly higher promoter activity compared to the rs2274971A allele. The four SNPs, especially ENO1 rs2274971A > G, may be useful for the prediction of prognosis in patients with surgically resected NSCLC. PMID:27767175

  15. Comparison of the 7th and proposed 8th editions of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system for non-small cell lung cancer undergoing radical surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ying; Chen, Ming; Yu, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to compare the 7th and the proposed 8th edition of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system for NSCLC in a cohort of patients from a single institution. A total of 408 patients with NSCLC who underwent radical surgery were analyzed retrospectively. Survivals were analyzed using the Kaplan –Meier method and were compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was performed by the Cox proportional hazard model. The Akaike information criterion (AIC) and C-index were applied to compare the two prognostic systems with different numbers of stages. The 7th AJCC T categories, the proposed 8th AJCC T categories, N categories, visceral pleural invasion, and vessel invasion were found to have statistically significant associations with disease-free survival (DFS) on univariate analysis. In the 7th edition staging system as well as in the proposed 8th edition, T categories, N categories, and pleural invasion were independent factors for DFS on multivariate analysis. The AIC value was smaller for the 8th edition compared to the 7th edition staging system. The C-index value was larger for the 8th edition compared to the 7th edition staging system. Based on the data from our single center, the proposed 8th AJCC T classification seems to be superior to the 7th AJCC T classification in terms of DFS for patients with NSCLC underwent radical surgery. PMID:27641932

  16. Comparison of the 7(th) and proposed 8(th) editions of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system for non-small cell lung cancer undergoing radical surgery.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ying; Chen, Ming; Yu, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to compare the 7(th) and the proposed 8(th) edition of the AJCC/UICC TNM staging system for NSCLC in a cohort of patients from a single institution. A total of 408 patients with NSCLC who underwent radical surgery were analyzed retrospectively. Survivals were analyzed using the Kaplan -Meier method and were compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was performed by the Cox proportional hazard model. The Akaike information criterion (AIC) and C-index were applied to compare the two prognostic systems with different numbers of stages. The 7(th) AJCC T categories, the proposed 8(th) AJCC T categories, N categories, visceral pleural invasion, and vessel invasion were found to have statistically significant associations with disease-free survival (DFS) on univariate analysis. In the 7(th) edition staging system as well as in the proposed 8(th) edition, T categories, N categories, and pleural invasion were independent factors for DFS on multivariate analysis. The AIC value was smaller for the 8(th) edition compared to the 7(th) edition staging system. The C-index value was larger for the 8(th) edition compared to the 7(th) edition staging system. Based on the data from our single center, the proposed 8(th) AJCC T classification seems to be superior to the 7(th) AJCC T classification in terms of DFS for patients with NSCLC underwent radical surgery. PMID:27641932

  17. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors for epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancers: an update for recent advances in therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chung, Clement

    2016-06-01

    The presence of activating gene mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor of non-small cell lung cancer patients is predictive (improved progression-free survival and improved response rate) when treated with small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib. The two most common mutations that account for greater than 85% of all EGFR gene mutations are in-frame deletions in exon 19 (LREA deletions) and substitution in exon 21 (L858R). Exon 18 mutations occur much less frequently at about 4% of all EGFR gene mutations. Together, exon 19 deletion and exon 21 L858R gene substitution are present in about 10% of Caucasian patients and 20-40% of Asian patients with non-small cell lung cancer. T790M gene mutation at exon 20 is associated with acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Early studies showed that activating EGFR gene mutations are most common in patients with adenocarcinoma histology, women, never smokers and those of Asian ethnicity. A recent multi-center phase III trial suggested that frontline epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy with afatinib is associated with improved progression-free survival compared to chemotherapy regardless of race. Moreover, guidelines now suggest EGFR gene mutation testing should be conducted in all patients with lung adenocarcinoma or mixed lung cancers with an adenocarcinoma component, regardless of characteristics such as smoking status, gender or race. The success of targeted therapies in non-small cell lung cancer patients has changed the treatment paradigm in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. However, despite a durable response of greater than a year, resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors inevitably occurs. This mini-review describes the clinically relevant EGFR gene mutations and the efficacy/toxicity of small molecule epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase

  18. 30 Gy or 34 Gy? Comparing 2 Single-Fraction SBRT Dose Schedules for Stage I Medically Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Videtic, Gregory M.M. Stephans, Kevin L.; Woody, Neil M.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Zhuang, Tingliang; Magnelli, Anthony; Djemil, Toufik

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To review outcomes of 2 single-fraction lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) schedules used for medically inoperable early stage lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients in our institution have been treated on and off protocols using single-fraction SBRT (30 Gy and 34 Gy, respectively). All patients had node-negative lung cancer measuring ≤5 cm and lying ≥2 cm beyond the trachea-bronchial tree and were treated on a Novalis/BrainLAB system with the ExactTrac positioning system for daily image guidance. Results: For the interval from 2009 to 2012, 80 patients with 82 lesions were treated with single-fraction lung SBRT. Fifty-five patients (69%) and 25 patients (31%) received 30 Gy and 34 Gy, respectively. In a comparison of 30 Gy and 34 Gy cohorts, patient and tumor characteristics were balanced and median follow-up in months was 18.7 and 17.8, respectively. The average heterogeneity-corrected mean doses to the target were 33.75 Gy and 37.94 Gy for the 30-Gy and 34-Gy prescriptions, respectively. Comparing 30-Gy and 34-Gy cohorts, 92.7% and 84.0% of patients, respectively, experienced no toxicity (P was not significant), and had neither grade 3 nor higher toxicities. For the 30-Gy and 34-Gy patients, rates of 1-year local failure, overall survival, and lung cancer-specific mortality were 2.0% versus 13.8%, 75.0% versus 64.0%, and 2. 1% versus 16.0%, respectively (P values for differences were not significant). Conclusions: This is the largest single-fraction lung SBRT series yet reported. and it confirms the safety, efficacy, and minimal toxicity of this schedule for inoperable early stage lung cancer.

  19. A window of opportunity study of potential tumor and soluble biomarkers of response to preoperative erlotinib in early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sacher, Adrian G.; Le, Lisa W.; Lara-Guerra, Humberto; Waddell, Thomas K.; Sakashita, Shingo; Chen, Zhuo; Kim, Lucia; Zhang, Tong; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Salvarrey, Alexandra; Darling, Gail; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Keshavjee, Shaf; de Perrot, Marc; Shepherd, Frances A.; Liu, Geoffrey; Tsao, Ming Sound; Leighl, Natasha B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Erlotinib is highly active in EGFR mutant NSCLC, but may benefit some with wild-type tumors. We examined pre-operative erlotinib in early stage NSCLC to assess response and correlation with potential biomarkers. Results: Twenty-five patients were enrolled; 22 received erlotinib treatment and were evaluable (median follow-up 4.4 years). Histology was predominantly adenocarcinoma although 31% had squamous carcinoma. PET response was observed in 2 patients (9%), both with squamous carcinoma. Most (20/22) had stable disease (RECIST), with frequent minor radiographic regression and histologic findings of fibrosis/necrosis including in squamous histology. Only two had EGFR mutations identified, one with minor radiographic response and the other stable disease after 4 weeks of EGFR TKI. High pre-treatment serum levels of TGF-α correlated with primary resistance to erlotinib (p = 0.02), whereas high post-treatment soluble EGFR levels correlated with response (p = 0.03). EGFR, PTEN, cMET and AXL expression did not correlate with tumor response. Methods: Clinical stage IA–IIB NSCLC patients received erlotinib 150 mg daily for 4 weeks followed by resection. Tumor response was assessed using CT, PET and pathological response. Tumor genotype was established using Sequenom Mass ARRAY; EGFR, PTEN, cMET and AXL expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry, circulating markers of EGFR activation (TGF-α, amphiregulin, epiregulin, EGFR ECD) by ELISA and EGFR, MET copy number by FISH. Conclusions: Erlotinib appears to demonstrate activity in EGFR wild-type tumors including squamous carcinoma. Further research is needed to characterize those wild-type patients that may benefit from EGFR TKI and predictive biomarkers including TGF-α, EGFR copy and others. PMID:27028852

  20. Phase 2 Study of Concurrent Cetuximab Plus Definitive Thoracic Radiation Therapy Followed by Consolidation Docetaxel Plus Cetuximab in Poor Prognosis or Elderly Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dilling, Thomas J.; Extermann, Martine; Kim, Jongphil; Thompson, Lora M.; Yue, Binglin; Stevens, Craig W.; Antonia, Scott; Gray, Jhanelle; Williams, Charles; Haura, Eric; Pinder-Schenck, Mary; Tanvetyanon, Tawee; Kim, Sungjune; Chiappori, Alberto

    2014-11-15

    Background: Recursive partitioning analysis has shown that Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) Performance Status (PS) ≥2, male sex, and age ≥70 years are prognostic of poor outcome in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) patients. Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) improves survival, but toxicity is a concern in this frail patient cohort. We therefore opened this trial of concurrent definitive thoracic radiation therapy (XRT) and cetuximab, followed by consolidation docetaxel plus cetuximab. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had pathologically proven, unresectable LA-NSCLC (stage IIA-“dry” IIIB). They had ECOG PS 2 or weight loss ≥5% in 3 months or were aged ≥70 years. The primary objective was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary objectives included overall survival (OS) and overall response rate (ORR). Results: From May 2008 to November 2010, a total of 32 patients were evaluated in our single-institution, institutional review board–approved prospective clinical trial. Three patients were screen failures and 2 more withdrew consent before treatment, leaving 27 evaluable patients. One was removed because of poor therapy compliance, and 2 were taken off trial because of grade 3 cetuximab-related toxicities but were followed up under intent-to-treat analysis. The median follow-up and OS were 10.5 months. The median PFS was 7.5 months. The ORR was 59.3%. Eight early/sudden deaths were reported. Upon review, 6 patients developed severe pulmonary complications. Conclusions: Patients enrolled in this trial had improved OS compared with poor-PS historical controls (10.5 vs 6.4 months) and comparable OS to good-PS historical controls (10.5 vs 11.9 months) treated with XRT alone. However, pulmonary toxicity is a concern. Consolidative cetuximab/docetaxel, in conjunction with high-dose radiation therapy, is a putative cause.

  1. Phase I Results of Vinorelbine With Concurrent Radiotherapy in Elderly Patients With Unresectable, Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: West Japan Thoracic Oncology Group (WJTOG3005-DI)

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Hideyuki; Seto, Takashi; Igawa, Satoshi; Tsuya, Asuka; Wada, Mayuko; Kaira, Kyoichi; Naito, Tateaki; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Masuda, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of concurrent vinorelbine and thoracic radiotherapy in elderly patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients were 71 years of age or older with unresectable Stage III NSCLC. Patients were treated with thoracic radiotherapy (60 Gy) and concurrent vinorelbine (20 mg/m{sup 2} in Level 1 and 25 mg/m{sup 2} in Level 2) on Days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks for two cycles, followed by adjuvant vinorelbine (25 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks for two cycles. Results: Four patients were enrolled at Level 1. One patient experienced Grade 3 febrile neutropenia at Level 1 and the dose was escalated to Level 2. At Level 2, 2 of 6 patients experienced dose-limiting toxicities (Grade 4 neutropenia in 1 patient and Grade 3 infection in another). Three of 6 patients developed late Grade 2 or 3 pneumonitis. Therefore, the dose was de-escalated to Level 1. An additional 6 patients were enrolled at Level 1, 4 of whom experienced dose-limiting toxicities (incomplete radiotherapy because of Grade 2 pneumonitis in 1 patient and Grade 3 infection in 1, Grade 3 febrile neutropenia in 1, and Grade 3 esophagitis in 1). Moreover, late Grade 3 pneumothorax and Grade 5 pneumonitis occurred in 1 and 1 patient, respectively. Overall, Grade 2, 3 and 5 pneumonitis occurred in 3, 3, and 1 among 16 patients, respectively. Conclusions: Concurrent vinorelbine and thoracic radiotherapy resulted in a high incidence of severe pneumonitis when the standard dose of this agent was used for elderly patients. We therefore recommend caution in the use of this regimen and schedule for elderly patients.

  2. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy With Bi-Weekly Docetaxel and Carboplatin for Stage III Unresectable, Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Clinical Application of a Protocol Used in a Previous Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, Jun-Ichi; Saito, Yoshihiro; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Kudo, Shigehiro; Yoshida, Daisaku; Ichikawa, Akihiro; Sakai, Hiroshi; Kurimoto, Futoshi; Kato, Shingo; Shibuya, Kei

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical applicability of a protocol evaluated in a previously reported phase II study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy with bi-weekly docetaxel and carboplatin in patients with stage III, unresectable, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and March 2006, 116 previously untreated patients with histologically proven, stage III NSCLC were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Radiation therapy was administered in 2-Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 60 Gy in combination with docetaxel, 30 mg/m{sup 2}, and carboplatin at an area under the curve value of 3 every 2 weeks during and after radiation therapy. Results: The median survival time for the entire group was 25.5 months. The actuarial 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 53% and 31%, respectively. The 3-year cause-specific survival rate was 60% in patients with stage IIIA disease, whereas it was 35% in patients with stage IIIB disease (p = 0.007). The actuarial 2-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 55%, respectively. Acute hematologic toxicities of Grade {>=}3 severity were observed in 20.7% of patients, while radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade {>=}3 severity were observed in 2.6% and 1.7% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: The feasibility of the protocol used in the previous phase II study was reconfirmed in this series, and excellent treatment results were achieved.

  3. The clinical effects of low-dose splenic irradiation combined with chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy on patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongsheng; Qu, Yong; Shang, Qingjun; Yan, Chao; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Xiang; Liang, Donghai; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the clinical effects of low-dose splenic irradiation on locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Thirty-eight patients with stage III NSCLC were randomly divided into a control group and a combined treatment group. The control group only received chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, while the combined treatment group received low-dose splenic irradiation followed by chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy after 6 hours. T lymphocyte subsets of the blood cells were tested before, during, and after treatment once a week. The side effects induced by radiation were observed, and a follow-up was done to observe the survival statistics. Results The ratio differences in CD4+ cells, CD8+ cells, and CD4+/CD8+ before and after treatment were not statistically significant (P>0.05) in both the groups. The immune indexes were also not statistically significant (P>0.05) before and after radiotherapy in the combined treatment group. However, the numbers of CD4+ cells and CD4+/CD8+ ratios before radiotherapy were higher than after radiotherapy in the control group. There were no differences in the incidence of radiation toxicities between the two groups; however, the incidence of grade III or IV radiation toxicities was lower, and the dose at which the radiation toxicities appeared was higher in the combined treatment group. The total response rate was 63.16% (12/19) in the combined treatment group vs 42.11% (8/19) in the control group. The median 2-year progression-free survival (15 months in the combined treatment group vs 10 months in the control group) was statistically significant (P<0.05). The median 2-year overall survival (17.1 months in the combined treatment group vs 15.8 months in the control group) was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion Low-dose radiation can alleviate the radiation toxicities, improve the short-term efficacy of radiotherapy, and improve

  4. Vandetanib plus docetaxel versus docetaxel as second-line treatment for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (ZODIAC): a double-blind, randomised, phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Roy S; Sun, Yan; Eberhardt, Wilfried E E; Germonpré, Paul; Saijo, Nagahiro; Zhou, Caicun; Wang, Jie; Li, Longyun; Kabbinavar, Fairooz; Ichinose, Yukito; Qin, Shukui; Zhang, Li; Biesma, Bonne; Heymach, John V; Langmuir, Peter; Kennedy, Sarah J; Tada, Hiroomi; Johnson, Bruce E

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Vandetanib is a once-daily oral inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, and rearranged during transfection (RET) tyrosine kinases. In a randomised phase 2 study in patients with previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), adding vandetanib 100 mg to docetaxel significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) compared with docetaxel alone, including a longer PFS in women. These results supported investigation of the combination in this larger, definitive phase 3 trial (ZODIAC). Methods Between May, 2006, and April, 2008, patients with locally advanced or metastatic (stage IIIB–IV) NSCLC after progression following first-line chemotherapy were randomly assigned 1:1 through a third-party interactive voice system to receive vandetanib (100 mg/day) plus docetaxel (75 mg/m2 IV every 21 days; maximum six cycles) or placebo plus docetaxel. The primary objective was comparison of PFS between the two groups in the intention-to-treat population. Women were a coprimary analysis population. This study has been completed and is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00312377. Findings 1391 patients received vandetanib plus docetaxel (n=694 [197 women]) or placebo plus docetaxel (n=697 [224 women]). Vandetanib plus docetaxel led to a significant improvement in PFS versus docetaxel alone (hazard ratio [HR] 0·79, 97·58% CI 0·70–0·90; p<0·0001); median PFS was 4·0 months in the vandetanib group versus 3·2 months in placebo group. A similar improvement in PFS with vandetanib plus docetaxel versus placebo plus docetaxel was seen in women (HR 0·79, 0·62–1·00, p=0·024); median PFS was 4·6 months in the vandetanib group versus 4·2 months in the placebo group. Among grade 3 or higher adverse events, rash (63/689 [9%] vs 7/690 [1%]), neutropenia (199/689 [29%] vs 164/690 [24%]), and febrile neutropenia (61/689 [9%] vs 48/690 [7%]) were more common with vandetanib plus docetaxel

  5. The clinical effects of low-dose splenic irradiation combined with chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy on patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongsheng; Qu, Yong; Shang, Qingjun; Yan, Chao; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Xiang; Liang, Donghai; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the clinical effects of low-dose splenic irradiation on locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Thirty-eight patients with stage III NSCLC were randomly divided into a control group and a combined treatment group. The control group only received chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, while the combined treatment group received low-dose splenic irradiation followed by chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy after 6 hours. T lymphocyte subsets of the blood cells were tested before, during, and after treatment once a week. The side effects induced by radiation were observed, and a follow-up was done to observe the survival statistics. Results The ratio differences in CD4+ cells, CD8+ cells, and CD4+/CD8+ before and after treatment were not statistically significant (P>0.05) in both the groups. The immune indexes were also not statistically significant (P>0.05) before and after radiotherapy in the combined treatment group. However, the numbers of CD4+ cells and CD4+/CD8+ ratios before radiotherapy were higher than after radiotherapy in the control group. There were no differences in the incidence of radiation toxicities between the two groups; however, the incidence of grade III or IV radiation toxicities was lower, and the dose at which the radiation toxicities appeared was higher in the combined treatment group. The total response rate was 63.16% (12/19) in the combined treatment group vs 42.11% (8/19) in the control group. The median 2-year progression-free survival (15 months in the combined treatment group vs 10 months in the control group) was statistically significant (P<0.05). The median 2-year overall survival (17.1 months in the combined treatment group vs 15.8 months in the control group) was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion Low-dose radiation can alleviate the radiation toxicities, improve the short-term efficacy of radiotherapy, and improve

  6. Photodynamic therapy for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B; Friedberg, Joseph S; Glatstein, Eli; Stevenson, James P; Sterman, Daniel H; Hahn, Stephen M; Cengel, Keith A

    2012-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy is increasingly being utilized to treat thoracic malignancies. For patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer, photodynamic therapy is primarily employed as an endobronchial therapy to definitely treat endobronchial, roentgenographically occult, or synchronous primary carcinomas. As definitive monotherapy, photodynamic therapy is most effective in treating bronchoscopically visible lung cancers ≤1 cm with no extracartilaginous invasion. For patients with advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer, photodynamic therapy can be used to palliate obstructing endobronchial lesions, as a component of definitive multi-modality therapy, or to increase operability or reduce the extent of operation required. A review of the available medical literature detailing all published studies utilizing photodynamic therapy to treat at least 10 patients with non-small cell lung cancer is performed, and treatment recommendations and summaries for photodynamic therapy applications are described.

  7. FR901228 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Progressive Small Cell Lung Cancer or Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-14

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  8. Tumor Volume Combined With Number of Positive Lymph Node Stations Is a More Important Prognostic Factor Than TNM Stage for Survival of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With (Chemo)radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dehing-Oberije, Cary Ruysscher, Dirk de; Weide, Hiska van der; Hochstenbag, Monique; Bootsma, Gerben; Geraedts, Wiel; Pitz, Cordula; Simons, Jean; Teule, Jaap; Rahmy, Ali; Thimister, Paul; Steck, Harald; Lambin, Philippe

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: The current tumor, node, metastasis system needs refinement to improve its ability to predict survival of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with (chemo)radiation. In this study, we investigated the prognostic value of tumor volume and N status, assessed by using fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET). Patients and Methods: Clinical data from 270 consecutive patients with inoperable NSCLC Stages I-IIIB treated radically with (chemo)radiation were collected retrospectively. Diagnostic imaging was performed using either integrated PET-computed tomography or computed tomography and PET separately. The Kaplan-Meier method, as well as Cox regression, was used to analyze data. Results: Univariate survival analysis showed that number of positive lymph node stations (PLNSs), as well as N stage on PET, was associated significantly with survival. The final multivariate Cox model consisted of number of PLNSs, gross tumor volume (i.e., volume of the primary tumor plus lymph nodes), sex, World Health Organization performance status, and equivalent radiation dose corrected for time; N stage was no longer significant. Conclusions: Number of PLNSs, assessed by means of fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, was a significant factor for survival of patients with inoperable NSCLC treated with (chemo)radiation. Risk stratification for this group of patients should be based on gross tumor volume, number of PLNSs, sex, World Health Organization performance status, and equivalent radiation dose corrected for time.

  9. Clinical comparative investigation of efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin plus gemcitabine or plus Abraxane as first-line chemotherapy for stage III/IV non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Dan; Guan, Yan; Liu, Xiu-Ju; Zhang, Chu-Feng; Wang, Peng; Liang, Hong-Lu; Guo, Qi-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to observe the clinical efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin in combination with gemcitabine or Abraxane as first-line chemotherapy for stage III/IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and methods A total of 200 patients with advanced NSCLC, which was confirmed by pathology or cytology, were enrolled into our research by reviewing previous complete and retrievable medical records data of our hospital. A total of 100 patients were treated with gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2, day 1 and day 8) in combination with cisplatin (75 mg/m2, days 1–3; GP group) and another 100 patients were treated with Abraxane (260 mg/m2, day 1) in combination with cisplatin (75 mg/m2, days 1–3; TP group). Twenty-one days were required to complete one cycle; at least two cycles were completed by each group. Results For the 100 patients in the GP group, the effective response rate (RR) was 27%, the disease control rate (DCR) was 63%, and the median progression-free survival (PFS) time was 8 months. For the 100 patients in the TP group, the RR was 52%, the DCR was 75%, and the median PFS was 20 months. There was significant difference in RR (P<0.001), but no significant difference in DSR and PFS (P>0.05). Common treatment-related adverse events were hematologic toxicity and gastrointestinal reaction. Hematologic toxicity mainly included decreased white blood cells and platelets. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant (P<0.05). Gastrointestinal reaction mainly included nausea and vomiting. There was no statistical significance between them (P=0.805). For the 85 patients with squamous carcinoma in the TP group, the RR was 60%, the DCR was 78%, and the median PFS was 7.5 months. For the 85 patients with squamous carcinoma in the GP group, the RR was 36%, the DCR was 62%, and the median PFS was 18.5 months. There was significant difference in RR (P=0.024), but no significant difference in DSR and PFS (P>0.05). For the 115

  10. Clinical comparative investigation of efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin plus gemcitabine or plus Abraxane as first-line chemotherapy for stage III/IV non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Dan; Guan, Yan; Liu, Xiu-Ju; Zhang, Chu-Feng; Wang, Peng; Liang, Hong-Lu; Guo, Qi-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to observe the clinical efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin in combination with gemcitabine or Abraxane as first-line chemotherapy for stage III/IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and methods A total of 200 patients with advanced NSCLC, which was confirmed by pathology or cytology, were enrolled into our research by reviewing previous complete and retrievable medical records data of our hospital. A total of 100 patients were treated with gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2, day 1 and day 8) in combination with cisplatin (75 mg/m2, days 1–3; GP group) and another 100 patients were treated with Abraxane (260 mg/m2, day 1) in combination with cisplatin (75 mg/m2, days 1–3; TP group). Twenty-one days were required to complete one cycle; at least two cycles were completed by each group. Results For the 100 patients in the GP group, the effective response rate (RR) was 27%, the disease control rate (DCR) was 63%, and the median progression-free survival (PFS) time was 8 months. For the 100 patients in the TP group, the RR was 52%, the DCR was 75%, and the median PFS was 20 months. There was significant difference in RR (P<0.001), but no significant difference in DSR and PFS (P>0.05). Common treatment-related adverse events were hematologic toxicity and gastrointestinal reaction. Hematologic toxicity mainly included decreased white blood cells and platelets. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant (P<0.05). Gastrointestinal reaction mainly included nausea and vomiting. There was no statistical significance between them (P=0.805). For the 85 patients with squamous carcinoma in the TP group, the RR was 60%, the DCR was 78%, and the median PFS was 7.5 months. For the 85 patients with squamous carcinoma in the GP group, the RR was 36%, the DCR was 62%, and the median PFS was 18.5 months. There was significant difference in RR (P=0.024), but no significant difference in DSR and PFS (P>0.05). For the 115

  11. A Phase I/II Radiation Dose Escalation Study With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Inoperable Stages I to III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Phase I Results of RTOG 0117

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Moughan, Jennifer; Graham, Mary V.; Byhardt, Roger; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Fowler, Jack; Purdy, James A.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Gore, Elizabeth; Choy, Hak

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: In preparation for a Phase III comparison of high-dose versus standard-dose radiation therapy, this Phase I/II study was initiated to establish the maximum tolerated dose of radiation therapy in the setting of concurrent chemotherapy, using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included patients with histologically proven, unresectable Stages I to III non-small-cell lung cancer. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of paclitaxel, 50 mg/m{sup 2}, and carboplatin, AUC of 2, given weekly. The radiation dose was to be sequentially intensified by increasing the daily fraction size, starting from 75.25 Gy/35 fractions. Results: The Phase I portion of this study accrued 17 patients from 10 institutions and was closed in January 2004. After the initial 8 patients were accrued to cohort 1, the trial closed temporarily on September 26, 2002, due to reported toxicity. Two acute treatment-related dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were reported at the time: a case of grade 5 and grade 3 radiation pneumonitis. The protocol, therefore, was revised to de-escalate the radiation therapy dose (74 Gy/37 fractions). Patients in cohort 1 continued to develop toxicity, with 6/8 (75%) patients eventually developing grade >=3 events. Cohort 2 accrued 9 patients. There was one DLT, a grade 3 esophagitis, in cohort 2 in the first 5 patients (1/5 patients) and no DLTs for the next 2 patients (0/2 patients). Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was determined to be 74 Gy/37 fractions (2.0 Gy per fraction) using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent paclitaxel and carboplatin therapy. This dose level in the Phase II portion has been well tolerated, with low rates of acute and late lung toxicities.

  12. Impact of [{sup 18}F]Fluorodeoxyglucose PET-CT Staging on Treatment Planning in Radiotherapy Incorporating Elective Nodal Irradiation for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Prospective Study;Non-small-cell lung cancer; PET; Radiotherapy; Elective nodal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kolodziejczyk, Milena; Kepka, Lucyna; Dziuk, Miroslaw; Zawadzka, Anna; Szalus, Norbert; Gizewska, Agnieszka; Bujko, Krzysztof

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate prospectively how positron emission tomography (PET) information changes treatment plans for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving or not receiving elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Methods and Materials: One hundred consecutive patients referred for curative radiotherapy were included in the study. Treatment plans were carried out with CT data sets only. For stage III patients, mediastinal ENI was planned. Then, patients underwent PET-CT for diagnostic/planning purposes. PET/CT was fused with the CT data for final planning. New targets were delineated. For stage III patients with minimal N disease (N0-N1, single N2), the ENI was omitted in the new plans. Patients were treated according to the PET-based volumes and plans. The gross tumor volume (GTV)/planning tumor volume (PTV) and doses for critical structures were compared for both data sets. The doses for areas of potential geographical misses derived with the CT data set alone were compared in patients with and without initially planned ENI. Results: In the 75 patients for whom the decision about curative radiotherapy was maintained after PET/CT, there would have been 20 cases (27%) with potential geographical misses by using the CT data set alone. Among them, 13 patients would receive ENI; of those patients, only 2 patients had the PET-based PTV covered by 90% isodose by using the plans based on CT alone, and the mean of the minimum dose within the missed GTV was 55% of the prescribed dose, while for 7 patients without ENI, it was 10% (p = 0.006). The lung, heart, and esophageal doses were significantly lower for plans with ENI omission than for plans with ENI use based on CT alone. Conclusions: PET/CT should be incorporated in the planning of radiotherapy for NSCLC, even in the setting of ENI. However, if PET/CT is unavailable, ENI may to some extent compensate for an inadequate dose coverage resulting from diagnostic uncertainties.

  13. A randomized study of oral nutritional support versus ad lib nutritional intake during chemotherapy for advanced colorectal and non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Evans, W K; Nixon, D W; Daly, J M; Ellenberg, S S; Gardner, L; Wolfe, E; Shepherd, F A; Feld, R; Gralla, R; Fine, S

    1987-01-01

    One hundred ninety-two patients with previously untreated metastatic cancer (102 non-small-cell lung cancer [NSCLC]; 90 colorectal cancer) were randomized to receive either ad lib nutritional intake (control group) or specific nutritional intervention during a 12-week study period when chemotherapy was administered. Those patients randomized to nutritional interventions were counselled to take oral nutrients with caloric intake equal to 1.7 to 1.95 times their basal energy expenditure, depending on their pretreatment nutritional status ("standard" group). An augmented group was counselled to have a caloric intake equivalent to that of the standard group but with 25% of calories provided as protein and additional supplements of zinc and magnesium. Counselling increased caloric intake in both tumor types but reduced weight loss in the short term only for lung cancer patients. Ninety-three NSCLC patients were evaluable for tumor response to vindesine and cisplatin. Overall, only 20.4% of the patients responded, and there were no significant differences in response rates, median time to progression, or overall duration of survival between the nutrition intervention groups and the control group. The tumor response rate to time-sequenced 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and methotrexate in the 81 evaluable patients with colorectal cancer was only 14.8%, and no significant differences in tumor response rates were noted between the three groups. Furthermore, the median time to progression and overall duration of survival were not different for the control, standard, and augmented groups. Nutritional interventions using dietary counselling had no impact on the percent of planned chemotherapy dose administered, the degree of toxicity experienced by patients, or the frequency of treatment delays. A multivariate prognostic factor analysis demonstrated that for lung cancer, the percent of weight loss, serum albumin concentration, and presence of liver metastases were significant (P less

  14. [Detection and evaluation of EGFR mutation status in serum of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with EGFR-TKIs].

    PubMed

    Ma, Ling; Liu, Li; Zhang, Tao; Shan, Li

    2013-06-01

    背景与目的 小分子酪氨酸激酶抑制剂(tyrosine kinase inhibitors, TKIs)对于表皮生长因子受体(epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR)基因突变的肺癌患者显示出良好的治疗效果。本研究旨在探讨晚期非小细胞肺癌(non-small cell lung cancer, NSCLC)患者血清EGFR基因突变状态与EGFR-TKIs疗效的关系。 方法 检测80例一线口服EGFR-TKIs晚期NSCLC患者血清EGFR基因的突变状态,对患者进行长期随访并评价治疗效果。结果 80例患者血清EGFR基因突变27例(33.8%),其中外显子19缺失突变12例(44.4%),外显子21点突变15例(55.6%);血清EGFR基因突变患者的有效率(55.6%, 15/27)高于野生型患者(17.0%, 9/53),差异具有统计学意义(χ2=0.370, P<0.001);血清EGFR基因突变患者中位无进展生存时间(progress free survival, PFS)明显长于野生型患者(9.8个月 vs 5.7个月,P=0.014)。结论 血清EGFR基因突变患者一线口服EGFR-TKIs的疗效优于野生型患者,血清EGFR基因状态可为EGFR-TKIs的一线治疗提供有效依据。

  15. Current treatment options for non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Elizabeth S

    2012-08-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains a difficult-to-treat malignancy, and durable long-term survival is elusive for patients with advanced-stage disease. Chemotherapy, especially with platinum-based combinations, is the mainstay of treatment, yet these regimens yield only modest response and survival rates. Outcomes of recent clinical trials have shown that histology, mutation analyses, and biomarkers have an impact on the selection and combination of chemotherapeutic agents. Oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies are now part of the treatment schema. Other changes to the treatment paradigm include the duration of treatment and the use of maintenance therapy. Additionally, chemotherapy is now employed in earlier-stage disease in neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and combined-modality treatments. The aim of this article is to review the current systemic treatments for NSCLC.

  16. A treatment planning comparison between modulated tri-cobalt-60 teletherapy and linear accelerator-based stereotactic body radiotherapy for central early-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Merna, Catherine; Rwigema, Jean-Claude M; Cao, Minsong; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kishan, Amar U; Michailian, Argin; Lamb, James; Sheng, Ke; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Low, Daniel A; Kupelian, Patrick; Steinberg, Michael L; Lee, Percy

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of planning stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for large central early-stage non-small cell lung cancer with a tri-cobalt-60 (tri-(60)Co) system equipped with real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance, as compared to linear accelerator (LINAC)-based SBRT. In all, 20 patients with large central early-stage non-small cell lung cancer who were treated between 2010 and 2015 with LINAC-based SBRT were replanned using a tri-(60)Co system for a prescription dose of 50Gy in 4 fractions. Doses to organs at risk were evaluated based on established MD Anderson constraints for central lung SBRT. R100 values were calculated as the total tissue volume receiving 100% of the dose (V100) divided by the planning target volume and compared to assess dose conformity. Dosimetric comparisons between LINAC-based and tri-(60)Co SBRT plans were performed using Student׳s t-test and Wilcoxon Ranks test. Blinded reviews by radiation oncologists were performed to assess the suitability of both plans for clinical delivery. The mean planning target volume was 48.3cc (range: 12.1 to 139.4cc). Of the tri-(60)Co SBRT plans, a mean 97.4% of dosimetric parameters per patient met MD Anderson dose constraints, whereas a mean 98.8% of dosimetric parameters per patient were met with LINAC-based SBRT planning (p = 0.056). R100 values were similar between both plans (1.20 vs 1.21, p = 0.79). Upon blinded review by 4 radiation oncologists, an average of 90% of the tri-(60)Co SBRT plans were considered acceptable for clinical delivery compared with 100% of the corresponding LINAC-based SBRT plans (p = 0.17). SBRT planning using the tri-(60)Co system with built-in MRI is feasible and achieves clinically acceptable plans for most central lung patients, with similar target dose conformity and organ at risk dosimetry. The added benefit of real-time MRI-guided therapy may further optimize tumor targeting while improving normal tissue sparing, which warrants further

  17. Relationship Between Radiation Therapy Dose and Outcome in Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy and Surgery for Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Population-Based, Comparative Effectiveness Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Fidler, Mary Jo; Seder, Christopher W.; Liptay, Michael J.; Koshy, Matthew

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To compare, using the National Cancer Database, survival, pathologic, and surgical outcomes in patients with stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer treated with differential doses of neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy, with the aim to discern whether radiation dose escalation was associated with a comparative effectiveness benefit and/or toxicity risk. Methods and Materials: Patients in the National Cancer Database with stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and surgery between 1998 and 2005 were analyzed. Dose strata were divided between 36 to 45 Gy (low-dose radiation therapy, LD-RT), 45 to 54 Gy (inclusive, standard-dose, SD-RT), and 54 to 74 Gy (high-dose, HD-RT). Outcomes included overall survival, residual nodal disease, positive surgical margin status, hospital length of stay, and adverse surgical outcomes (30-day mortality or readmission). Results: The cohort consisted of 1041 patients: 233 (22%) LD-RT, 584 (56%) SD-RT, and 230 (22%) HD-RT. The median, 3-year, and 5-year overall survival outcomes were 34.9 months, 48%, and 37%, respectively. On univariable analysis, patients treated with SD-RT experienced prolonged overall survival (median 38.3 vs 31.8 vs 29.0 months for SD-RT, LD-RT, and HD-RT, respectively, P=.0089), which was confirmed on multivariable analysis (hazard ratios 0.77 and 0.81 vs LD and HD, respectively). Residual nodal disease was seen less often after HD-RT (25.5% vs 31.8% and 37.5% for HD-RT, LD-RT, and SD-RT, respectively, P=.0038). Patients treated with SD-RT had fewer prolonged hospital stays. There were no differences in positive surgical margin status or adverse surgical outcomes between the cohorts. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy between 45 and 54 Gy was associated with superior survival in comparison with doses above and below this threshold. Although this conclusion is limited by selection bias, clear candidates for trimodality therapy do not seem to

  18. Treatment of advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros P; Johnson, Peter W M

    2016-07-01

    There is now good evidence that the escalated BEACOPP regimen (bleomycin, etoposide, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone) is more effective in controlling advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) than the widely used ABVD regimen (adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine), but the extra efficacy comes at the expense of both short- and long-term toxicity, and there is debate as to whether overall survival is affected. Baseline prognostic factors have proven of limited utility for determining which patients require more intensive therapy and recent studies have sought to use interim fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) evaluation as a means to guide the modulation of treatment, both upwards and downwards in intensity. These suggest that if treatment starts with ABVD then patients remaining PET-positive after 2 months can be salvaged with escalated BEACOPP in around 65% of cases, but those becoming PET-negative may still experience recurrences in 15%-20%, an event that is more common in those with more advanced disease at presentation. There are early data to suggest that starting with escalated BEACOPP may reduce the rate of recurrence after a negative interim PET to less than 10%. This may be an attractive approach for those with very high-risk features at presentation, but risks overtreating many patients if applied nonselectively. New regimens incorporating antibody-drug conjugates may shift the balance of efficacy and toxicity once again, and further studies are underway to evaluate this. PMID:27496308

  19. Radiotherapy With 8-MHz Radiofrequency-Capacitive Regional Hyperthermia for Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: The Radiofrequency-Output Power Correlates With the Intraesophageal Temperature and Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Ohguri, Takayuki Imada, Hajime; Yahara, Katsuya; Morioka, Tomoaki; Nakano, Keita; Terashima, Hiromi; Korogi, Yukunori

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of radiotherapy (RT) combined with regional hyperthermia (HT) guided by radiofrequency (RF)-output power and intraesophageal temperature and evaluate the potential contribution of HT to clinical outcomes in patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients with Stage III NSCLC treated with RT plus regional HT were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-two of the 35 patients underwent intraesophageal temperature measurements. Patients with subcutaneous fat of 2.5 cm or greater, older age, or other serious complications did not undergo this therapy. The 8-MHz RF-capacitive heating device was applied, and in all patients, both the upper and lower electrodes were 30 cm in diameter, placed on opposite sides of the whole thoracic region, and treatment posture was the prone position. The HT was applied within 15 minutes after RT once or twice a week. Results: All thermal parameters, minimum, maximum, and mean of the four intraesophageal temperature measurements at the end of each session and the proportion of the time during which at least one of the four intraesophageal measurements was 41{sup o}C or higher in the total period of each session of HT, of the intraesophageal temperature significantly correlated with median RF-output power. Median RF-output power ({>=}1,200 W) was a statistically significant prognostic factor for overall, local recurrence-free, and distant metastasis-free survival. Conclusions: The RT combined with regional HT using a higher RF-output power could contribute to better clinical outcomes in patients with Stage III NSCLC. The RF-output power thus may be used as a promising parameter to assess the treatment of deep regional HT if deep heating using this device is performed with the same size electrodes and in the same body posture.

  20. Comparison of treatment outcomes between single-port video-assisted thoracoscopic anatomic segmentectomy and lobectomy for non-small cell lung cancer of early-stage: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuxing; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Yong; Guo, Zhaohui; Zheng, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background There are few reports of single-port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (S-VATS) anatomic segmentectomy and S-VATS lobectomy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and no comparisons between them have yet been reported. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of S-VATS anatomic segmentectomy and S-VATS lobectomy for early-stage NSCLC. Methods In this retrospective observational study, the outcomes of 79 consecutive patients who had undergone S-VATS anatomic segmentectomy (32 patients) or S-VATS lobectomy (47 patients) for early-stage NSCLC from April 2014 to June 2015 were examined. The operation time, intraoperative blood loss, numbers of dissected lymph nodes and mediastinal nodal stations, numbers of staples used, postoperative drainage volume and duration, duration of hospital stay, costs, postoperative complications, local recurrence, and survival were compared between these two groups. Results The postoperative drainage volume was smaller and the postoperative drainage duration shorter in the S-VATS segmentectomy than the lobectomy group (P<0.05). There were no significant differences in operation time, intraoperative blood loss, number of staples used, number and stations of dissected mediastinal lymph nodes, duration of hospital stay, costs, or postoperative complications. At the time of writing, no deaths or local recurrences had occurred in either group. Conclusions S-VATS segmentectomy is as safe and effective as S-VATS lobectomy. Patients who undergo S-VATS segmentectomy seem to recover faster. PMID:27293849

  1. [A meta-analysis of platinum plus docetaxel or vinorelbine in the first-line treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Liu, Taisheng; Wu, Hua; Zhuang, Xianmian; Lu, Di; Cai, Ruijun; Wang, Wujun

    2014-04-01

    背景与目的 以铂类为基础联合第三代药物的双药化疗方案是治疗晚期非小细胞肺癌(non-small cell lung cancer, NSCLC)的标准一线治疗方案。本研究采用meta分析的方法评价多西他赛联合铂类(docetaxel plus platinum, DP)方案对比长春瑞滨联合铂类(vinorelbine plus platinum, VP)方案治疗晚期NSCLC的疗效和安全性。方法 计算机检索Pubmed、EMBASE、Cochrane Library、中国期刊全文数据库(CNKI)、中国生物医学文献数据库(CBM)、中文科技期刊全文数据(VIP)库及万方数据库关于DP方案与VP方案治疗晚期NSCLC的随机对照试验(randomized controlled trial, RCT)。根据Cochrane Handbook 5.1.0的质量评价标准,用Stata 12.0软件进行统计学分析。结果 研究共纳入7项RCTs,包括晚期NSCLC患者2,381例。DP方案的2年生存率(HR=0.887, 95%CI: 0.810-0.972, P=0.010)、有效率(RR=1.276, 95%CI: 1.107-1.450, P=0.001)和腹泻发生率(RR=3.134, 95%CI: 1.918-5.121, P<0.001)较VP方案高;DP方案减少了贫血的发生率(RR=0.386, 95%CI: 0.311-0.478, P<0.001);DP方案与VP方案在1年生存率、白细胞减少、中性粒细胞减少、血小板减少、厌食、恶心、呕吐方面的差异无统计学意义。结论 DP方案虽然增加了腹泻发生率,但却减少了贫血的发生率,同时提高了2年生存率和有效率。相比VP方案,DP方案可能更适合一线治疗晚期NSCLC。

  2. Methoxyamine, Cisplatin, and Pemetrexed Disodium in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Mesothelioma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or Mesothelioma That Is Refractory to Cisplatin and Pemetrexed

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Advanced Peritoneal Malignant Mesothelioma; Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Peritoneal Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Pleural Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Pleural Mesothelioma; Thymoma

  3. A randomized, double-blind, phase III study of Docetaxel and Ramucirumab versus Docetaxel and placebo in the treatment of stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer after disease progression after 1 previous platinum-based therapy (REVEL): treatment rationale and study design.

    PubMed

    Garon, Edward B; Cao, Dachuang; Alexandris, Ekaterine; John, William J; Yurasov, Sergey; Perol, Maurice

    2012-11-01

    This article describes the treatment rationale and study-related procedures for the A Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase 3 Study of Docetaxel and Ramucirumab Versus Docetaxel and Placebo in the Treatment of Stage IV Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Following Disease Progression after One Prior Platinum-Based Therapy (REVEL) study (I4T-MC-JVBA; ClinicalTrials.govNCT01168973). This international, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded phase III trial examines the efficacy and safety of ramucirumab treatment administered in combination with docetaxel, as compared with docetaxel administered with placebo, in patients with stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose disease progressed during or after first-line platinum-based chemotherapy with or without maintenance treatment. The primary end point is overall survival; secondary end points include progression-free survival, objective response rate, disease control rate, patient-reported outcomes, and assessment of safety and tolerability of ramucirumab. Eligible patients (enrollment N = 1242) are randomized at a 1:1 ratio to receive either docetaxel (75 mg/m(2)) plus ramucirumab (10 mg/kg) (Arm A) or docetaxel (75 mg/m(2)) plus placebo (Arm B). Both drugs are administered via intravenous infusion once every 3 weeks until evidence of disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, noncompliance, or patient's consent withdrawal. Efficacy and safety will be compared between the study arms and in patient subgroups including patients with nonsquamous versus squamous tumor histology and patients who received prior bevacizumab treatment. Multiple blood and tumor tissue biomarker samples are collected during the study. The goal of the REVEL study is to demonstrate that ramucirumab in combination with docetaxel improves overall survival of patients with NSCLC with progressive disease after first-line therapy, and to advance our knowledge of the role of angiogenesis blockade in patients with NSCLC by identifying patients who are

  4. High-Dose Hypofractionated Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Is Safe and Effective for Central and Peripheral Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of a 12-Year Experience at Loma Linda University Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, David A.; Cheek, Gregory; Zaheer, Salman; Wallen, Jason; Mirshahidi, Hamid; Katerelos, Ari; Grove, Roger; Slater, Jerry D.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We update our previous reports on the use of hypofractionated proton beam radiation therapy for early-stage lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Eligible subjects had biopsy-proven non-small cell carcinoma of the lung and were medically inoperable or refused surgery. Clinical workup required staging of T1 or T2, N0, M0. Subjects received hypofractionated proton beam therapy to the primary tumor only. The dose delivered was sequentially escalated from 51 to 60 Gy, then to 70 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. Endpoints included toxicity, pulmonary function, overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and local control (LC). Results: One hundred eleven subjects were analyzed for treatment outcomes. The patient population had the following average characteristics; age 73.2 years, tumor size 3.6 cm, and 1.33 L forced expiratory volume in 1 second. The entire group showed improved OS with increasing dose level (51, 60, and 70 Gy) with a 4-year OS of 18%, 32%, and 51%, respectively (P=.006). Peripheral T1 tumors exhibited LC of 96%, DSS of 88%, and OS of 60% at 4 years. Patients with T2 tumors showed a trend toward improved LC and survival with the 70-Gy dose level. On multivariate analysis, larger tumor size was strongly associated with increased local recurrence and decreased survival. Central versus peripheral location did not correlate with any outcome measures. Clinical radiation pneumonitis was not found to be a significant complication, and no patient required steroid therapy after treatment for radiation pneumonitis. Pulmonary function was well maintained 1 year after treatment. Conclusions: High-dose hypofractionated proton therapy achieves excellent outcomes for lung carcinomas that are peripherally or centrally located. The 70-Gy regimen has been adopted as standard therapy for T1 tumors at our institution. Larger T2 tumors show a trend toward improved outcomes with higher doses, suggesting that better results could be seen with

  5. Nonresected Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Stages I Through IIIB: Accelerated, Twice-Daily, High-Dose Radiotherapy-A Prospective Phase I/II Trial With Long-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Wurstbauer, Karl; Deutschmann, Heinz; Kopp, Peter; Kranzinger, Manfred; Merz, Florian; Nairz, Olaf; Studnicka, Michael; Sedlmayer, Felix

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Our purpose was to investigate the tolerability of accelerated, twice-daily, high-dose radiotherapy. The secondary endpoints were survival and locoregional tumor control. Methods and Materials: Thirty consecutive patients with histologically/cytologically proven non-small-cell lung cancer were enrolled. Tumor Stage I, II, IIIA, and IIIB was found in 7, 3, 12, and 8 patients, respectively. We applied a median of 84.6 Gy (range, 75.6-90.0 Gy) to the primary tumors, 63.0 Gy (range, 59.4-72.0 Gy) to lymph nodes, and 45 Gy to nodes electively (within a region of about 6 cm cranial to macroscopically involved sites). Fractional doses of 1.8 Gy twice daily, with an interval of 11 hours, were given, resulting in a median treatment time of 35 days. In the majority of patients the conformal target-splitting technique was used. In 19 patients (63%) two cycles of induction chemotherapy were given. The median follow-up time of survivors is 72 months (range, 62-74 months). Results: We found Grade 1, 2 and 3 acute esophageal toxicity in 11 patients (37%), 2 patients (7%), and 2 patients (7%), respectively. Grade 2 acute pneumonitis was seen in 2 patients (7%). No late toxicity greater than Grade 1 was observed. The actual overall survival rates at 2 and 5 years are 63% and 23%, respectively; the median overall survival, 27.7 months. In 9 patients a local failure occurred, 7 of them presenting initially with an atelectasis without availability of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography staging at that time. In 4 patients recurrence occurred regionally. Conclusions: This Phase I/II trial with long-term follow-up shows low toxicity with promising results for survival and locoregional tumor control.

  6. Patterns of Local-Regional Failure in Completely Resected Stage IIIA(N2) Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cases: Implications for Postoperative Radiation Therapy Clinical Target Volume Design

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Wen; Fu, Xiao-Long; Cai, Xu-Wei; Yang, Huan-Jun; Wu, Kai-Liang; Fan, Min; Xiang, Jia-Qing; Zhang, Ya-Wei; Chen, Hai-Quan

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze patterns of local-regional failure (LRF) for completely resected stage IIIA(N2) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated in our hospital and to propose a clinical target volume (CTV) for postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) in these patients. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2011, consecutive patients with pT1-3N2 NSCLC who underwent complete resection in our hospital but who did not receive PORT were identified. The patterns of first LRF were assessed and evaluated as to whether these areas would be encompassed by our proposed PORT CTV. Results: With a median follow-up of 24 months, 173 of 250 patients (69.2%) experienced disease recurrence. Of the 54 patients with LRF as the first event, 48 (89%) had recurrence within the proposed PORT CTV, and 6 (11%) had failures occurring both within and outside the proposed CTV (all of which occurred in patients with right-lung cancer). Ninety-three percent of failure sites (104 of 112) would have been contained within the proposed PORT CTV. For left-sided lung cancer, the most common lymph node station failure site was 4R, followed by 7, 4L, 6, 10L, and 5. For right-sided lung cancer, the most common site was station 2R, followed by 10R, 4R, and 7. Conclusions: LRF following complete surgery was an important and potentially preventable pattern of failure in stage IIIA(N2) patients. Ipsilateral superior mediastinal recurrences dominated for right-sided tumors, whereas left-sided tumors frequently involved the bilateral superior mediastinum. Most of the LRF sites would have been covered by the proposed PORT CTV. A prospective investigation of patterns of failure after PORT (following our proposed CTV delineation guideline) is presently underway and will be reported in a separate analysis.

  7. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Male Breast Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  8. Phase I/II study of bortezomib in combination with carboplatin and bevacizumab as first line therapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    PubMed Central

    Piperdi, Bilal; Walsh, William V; Bradley, Kendra; Zhou, Zheng; Bathini, Venu; Hanrahan-Boshes, Meredith; Hutchinson, Lloyd; Perez-Soler, Roman

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of weekly bortezomib in combination with fixed standard doses of carboplatin and bevacizumab and to estimate the efficacy (response rate and progression free survival) and safety of combination therapy with carboplatin, bortezomib and bevacizumab as first line therapy in patients with advanced NSCLC. Experimental Design Patients were assigned to three dose levels of weekly bortezomib with the fixed standard doses of carboplatin (AUC 6) and bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) q 3 wks using a standard phase I design. Bortezomib doses were 1.3 mg/m21.6 mg/m2 and 1.8 mg/m2 weekly on D1 and D8 of q 3wk cycle. A maximum of six cycles was administered. Patients with complete, partial response (PR) or stable disease were continued on single agent bevacizumab (15 mg/kg q 3 wks) as maintenance therapy. In phase II, either level III or MTD was administered to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the combination in first line treatment of advanced NSCLC. Results 16 patients were enrolled (3, 4 and 9 pts in dose level I, II and III respectively). There was no pre-defined dose limiting toxicity in cycle 1 in all 16 patients. The recommended phase II dose is bortezomib 1.8 mg/m2 weekly on day 1 and day 8 in combination with carboplatin AUC of 6 and bevacizumab 15 mg/kg on every 21 day cycle. Total of 9 patients were treated at the recommended phase II dose level. The most common treatment related grade 3/4 toxicities during the subsequent cycles were thrombocytopenia (58%), lymphopenia (25%), neutropenia (12%) and diarrhea (25%). The grade 1/2 neuropathy was seen in 7 out of 16 pts (44%). The response rate, PFS and OS in all patients were 37.5% (95%CI 13.8% - 61.2%), 5.0 months (m) (95%CI: 3.1-8.4), 9.9 m (95% CI: 8.2-14.1) and the 9 patients in phase II portion are 44% (95%CI 15.3% - 77.3%), 5.5 m (95%CI: 3.1-12.2) and 10.9 months (95%CI: 8.0-14.1). Conclusion The recommended phase II dose for this combination is: carboplatin AUC 6

  9. Impact of Incidental Irradiation on Clinically Uninvolved Nodal Regions in Patients With Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Involved-Field Radiation Therapy: Does Incidental Irradiation Contribute to the Low Incidence of Elective Nodal Failure?

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Tomoki; Togami, Taro; Nishiyama, Yoshihiro; Ohkawa, Motoomi; Takashima, Hitoshi

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidental irradiation dose to elective nodal regions in the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer with involved-field radiation therapy (IF-RT) and the pattern of elective nodal failure (ENF). Methods and Materials: Fifty patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, who received IF-RT at Kagawa University were enrolled. To evaluate the dose of incidental irradiation, we delineated nodal regions with a Japanese map and the American Thoracic Society map (levels 1-11) in each patient retrospectively and calculated the dose parameters such as mean dose, D95, and V95 (40 Gy as the prescribed dose of elective nodal irradiation). Results: Using the Japanese map, the median mean dose was more than 40 Gy in most of the nodal regions, except at levels 1, 3, and 7. In particular, each dosimetric parameter of level 1 was significantly lower than those at other levels, and each dosimetric parameter of levels 10 to 11 ipsilateral (11I) was significantly higher than those in other nodal regions. Using the American Thoracic Society map, basically, the results were similar to those of the Japanese map. ENF was observed in 4 patients (8%), five nodal regions, and no mean dose to the nodal region exceeded 40 Gy. On the Japanese map, each parameter of these five nodal region was significantly lower than those of the other nodal regions. Conclusions: These results show that a high dose of incidental irradiation may contribute to the low incidence of ENF in patients who have received IF-RT.

  10. Spleen Volume Variation in Patients with Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Receiving Platinum-Based Chemo-Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shu Wen; Everitt, Sarah J; Bedő, Justin; Chabrot, Marine; Ball, David L; Solomon, Benjamin; MacManus, Michael; Hicks, Rodney J; Möller, Andreas; Leimgruber, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    There is renewed interest in the immune regulatory role of the spleen in oncology. To date, very few studies have examined macroscopic variations of splenic volume in the setting of cancer, prior to or during therapy, especially in humans. Changes in splenic volume may be associated with changes in splenic function. The purpose of this study was to investigate variations in spleen volume in NSCLC patients during chemo-radiotherapy. Sixty patients with stage I-IIIB NSCLC underwent radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions) for six weeks with concomitant carboplatin/paclitaxel (Ca/P; n = 32) or cisplatin/etoposide (Ci/E; n = 28). A baseline PET/CT scan was performed within 2 weeks prior to treatment and during Weeks 2 and 4 of chemo-radiotherapy. Spleen volume was measured by contouring all CT slices. Significant macroscopic changes in splenic volume occurred early after the commencement of treatment. A significant decrease in spleen volume was observed for 66% of Ca/P and 79% of Ci/E patients between baseline and Week 2. Spleen volume was decreased by 14.2% for Ca/P (p<0.001) and 19.3% for Ci/E (p<0.001) patients. By Week 4, spleen volume was still significantly decreased for Ca/P patients compared to baseline, while for Ci/E patients, spleen volume returned to above baseline levels. This is the first report demonstrating macroscopic changes in the spleen in NSCLC patients undergoing radical chemo-radiotherapy that can be visualized by non-invasive imaging.

  11. MiRNA-Related Genetic Variations Associated with Radiotherapy-Induced Toxicities in Patients with Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Pu, Xia; Chang, Joe Y; Ye, Yuanqing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Minna, John D; Roth, Jack A; Han, Baohui; Wu, Xifeng

    2016-01-01

    Severe radiation-induced toxicities limit treatment efficacy and compromise outcomes of lung cancer. We aimed to identify microRNA-related genetic variations as biomarkers for the prediction of radiotherapy-induced acute toxicities. We genotyped 233 SNPs (161 in microRNA binding site and 72 in processing gene) and analyzed their associations with pneumonitis and esophagitis in 167 stage III NSCLC patients received definitive radiation therapy. Sixteen and 11 SNPs were associated with esophagitis and pneumonitis, respectively. After multiple comparison correction, RPS6KB2:rs10274, SMO:rs1061280, SMO:rs1061285 remained significantly associated with esophagitis, while processing gene DGCR8:rs720014, DGCR8:rs3757, DGCR8:rs1633445 remained significantly associated with pneumonitis. Patients with the AA genotype of RPS6KB2:rs10274 had an 81% reduced risk of developing esophagitis (OR: 0.19, 95% CI: 0.07-0.51, p = 0.001, q = 0.06). Patients with the AG+GG genotype of SMO:rs1061280 had an 81% reduced risk of developing esophagitis (OR: 0.19, 95% CI: 0.07-0.53, p = 0.001, q = 0.06). Patients with the GG+GA genotype of DGCR8:rs720014 had a 3.54-fold increased risk of pneumonitis (OR: 3.54, 95% CI: 1.65-7.61, p <0.05, q <0.1). Significantly cumulative effects of the top SNPs were observed for both toxicities (P-trend <0.001). Using bioinformatics tools, we found that the genotype of rs10274 was associated with altered expression of the RPS6KB2 gene. Gene-based analysis showed DGCR8 (p = 0.010) and GEMIN4 (p = 0.039) were the top genes associated with the risk of developing pneumonitis. Our results provide strong evidence that microRNA-related genetic variations contribute to the development of radiotherapy-induced acute esophagitis and pneumonitis and could thus serve as biomarkers to help accurately predict radiotherapy-induced toxicity in NSCLC patients.

  12. Impact of Postoperative Radiation Therapy on Survival in Patients With Complete Resection and Stage I, II, or IIIA Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Adjuvant Chemotherapy: The Adjuvant Navelbine International Trialist Association (ANITA) Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Douillard, Jean-Yves Rosell, Rafael; De Lena, Mario; Riggi, Marcello; Hurteloup, Patrick; Mahe, Marc-Andre

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) on survival in the Adjuvant Navelbine International Trialist Association (ANITA) randomized study of adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: ANITA is a randomized trial of adjuvant cisplatin and vinorelbine chemotherapy vs. observation in completely resected non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) Stages IB to IIIA. Use of PORT was recommended for pN+ disease but was not randomized or mandatory. Each center decided whether to use PORT before initiation of the study. We describe here the survival of patients with and without PORT within each treatment group of ANITA. No statistical comparison of survival was performed because this was an unplanned subgroup analysis. Results: Overall, 232 of 840 patients received PORT (33.3% in the observation arm and 21.6% in the chemotherapy arm). In univariate analysis, PORT had a deleterious effect on the overall population survival. Patients with pN1 disease had an improved survival from PORT in the observation arm (median survival [MS] 25.9 vs. 50.2 months), whereas PORT had a detrimental effect in the chemotherapy group (MS 93.6 months and 46.6 months). In contrast, survival was improved in patients with pN2 disease who received PORT, both in the chemotherapy (MS 23.8 vs. 47.4 months) and observation arm (median 12.7 vs. 22.7 months). Conclusion: This retrospective evaluation suggests a positive effect of PORT in pN2 disease and a negative effect on pN1 disease when patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. The results support further evaluation of PORT in prospectively randomized studies in completely resected pN2 NSCLC.

  13. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism predicts response and time to progression to gemcitabine-based chemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer in a Chinese Han population*

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Wei; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Yi-ping; Kou, Jun-yan; Hong, Dan; Su, Dan; Mao, Wei-min; Yu, Xin-min; Xie, Fa-jun; Wang, Xiao-jian

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) genetic polymorphisms and the clinical efficacy of gemcitabine-based chemotherapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: A total of 135 chemonaive patients with unresectable advanced NSCLC were treated with gemcitabine/platinum regimens. The polymorphisms of MTHFR C677T, ERCC1 C8092A, and ERCC1 C118T were genotyped using the TaqMan methods. Results: The overall response rate was 28.9%. Patients with MTHFR CC genotype had a higher rate of objective response than patients with variant genotype (TT or CT) (41.2% versus 19.1%, P=0.01). Median time to progression (TTP) of patients with MTHFR CC genotype was longer than that of patients with variant genotype (7.6 months versus 5.0 months, P=0.003). No significant associations were obtained between ERCC1 C118T and C8092A polymorphisms and both response and survival. Conclusions: Our data suggest the value of MTHFR C677T polymorphism as a possible predictive marker of response and TTP in advanced NSCLC patients treated with gemcitabine/platinum. PMID:23463763

  14. Nintedanib Compared With Placebo in Treating Against Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery and Are Undergoing Chemoradiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-27

    Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  15. Combination of low-dose gemcitabine in 6-hour infusion and carboplatin is a favorable option for patients in poor performance status with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-Yong; Guan, Hui-Hong; Lin, Ze-Xiao; Yang, Hong-Kai; Zhou, Lan; Cai, Qi-Chun

    2014-10-01

    This study sought to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of the regimen of low-dose gemcitabine combined with carboplatin in chemo-naïve patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The study involved 37 chemo-naive patients with unresectable stage IIIB or stage IV NSCLC. The predominant histological type was squamous carcinoma (22/37), and the performance status (PS) was 2 in 23 patients (62%). All received gemcitabine, 250 mg/m(2) in 6-hour infusion on days 1 and 8 plus carboplatin area under the curve (AUC)  =  5 on day 1, every 28 days. The overall response rate (ORR) was 62·2% and disease stabilization was achieved in 21·6% of the patients. After a median follow-up duration of 13 months, the median overall survival (OS) time was 14·0 months (95% CI 13·3-16·6 months), and the median progression-free survival (PFS) time was 7·0 months (95% CI 6·1-8·9 months). Hematological toxicities were well-tolerated with the development of grade 3/4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia in 10·3 and 10·3% of patients respectively, and the gastrointestinal toxicities were mild.

  16. EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in a patient with advanced non-small cell lung cancer and concurrent exon 19 and 21 EGFR mutations: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    YANG, YANG; ZHANG, BIAO; LI, RUTIAN; LIU, BAORUI; WANG, LIFENG

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) are considered to be effective treatments for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with sensitizing EGFR mutations, including exon 19 deletion and exon 21 L858R mutations. However, with the development of EGFR mutation detection assays, patients with complex EGFR mutations are emerging, and their response to EGFR-TKIs remains unclear. The present study reports a case of a 62-year-old, non-smoking female patient with advanced NSCLC, presenting with concurrent EGFR 19+21 sensitizing mutations, who had a poor response to the first-line EGFR-TKI erlotinib and succumbed 5 months subsequent to diagnosis. Furthermore, the present study performed a literature review, and 18 patients with complex EGFR 19+21 mutations that had received EGFR-TKIs were identified. The majority of these patients responded well to EGFR-TKIs. To the best of our knowledge, the present case is the first to report a patient with lung adenocarcinoma with complex EGFR 19+21 sensitizing mutations that had a poor clinical response to a first-line EGFR-TKI. Despite the 70% response rate of sensitizing EGFR-mutant NSCLCs to EGFR-TKIs, there is still a proportion of patients that experience de novo resistance, and heterogeneity is likely to be important in this resistance mechanism. Therefore, comprehensive genomic detection assays and multi-targeted therapies for patients with NSCLC with complex EGFR mutations require additional investigation. PMID:27123149

  17. Randomized Phase II Study of Docetaxel plus Personalized Peptide Vaccination versus Docetaxel plus Placebo for Patients with Previously Treated Advanced Wild Type EGFR Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Koichi; Sugawara, Shunichi; Saijo, Yasuo; Maemondo, Makoto; Sato, Atsushi; Takamori, Shinzo; Harada, Taishi; Sasada, Tetsuro; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Kishimoto, Junji; Yamada, Akira; Noguchi, Masanori; Itoh, Kyogo; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) combined with chemotherapy for patients with previously treated advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods. Previously treated PS0-1 patients with IIIB/IV EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) wild genotype NSCLC were randomly assigned to docetaxel (60 mg/m(2) on Day 1) plus PPV based on preexisting host immunity or docetaxel plus placebo. Docetaxel administration was repeated every 3 weeks until disease progression. Personalized peptides or placebo was injected subcutaneously weekly in the first 8 weeks and biweekly in subsequent 16 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Results. PPV related toxicity was grade 2 or less skin reaction. The median PFS for placebo arm and PPV arm was 52 days and 59 days, respectively. There was no significant difference between two arms by log-rank test (p = 0.42). Interestingly, PFS and overall survival (OS) in humoral immunological responder were significantly longer than those in nonresponder. Conclusion. PPV did not improve the survival in combination with docetaxel for previously treated advanced NSCLC. However, PPV may be efficacious for the humoral immunological responders and a further clinical investigation is needed. PMID:27274999

  18. Definitive Upfront Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Combined with Image-Guided, Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) or IG-IMRT Alone for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Alexander; Wen, Sijin; Monga, Manish; Almubarak, Mohammed; He, Xiaoqing; Rojanasakul, Yon; Tse, William; Remick, Scot C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Image-guided (IG) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) enables maximal tumor margin reduction for the sparing of organs at risk (OARs) when used to treat locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with definitive chemo-radiation. It also allows for the incorporation of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) into the treatment regimen. Here, we describe our initial experience in combining definitive upfront SABR to the primary lesion with chemo-radiation delivered with conventionally fractionated IG-IMRT to the remaining regional disease; along with clinical outcome following chemo-radiation with conventionally fractionated IG-IMRT alone in the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC. Methods The clinical outcome of 29 patients with locally advanced NSCLC who underwent conventionally fractionated IG-IMRT, or definitive upfront SABR followed by IG-IMRT combined with chemotherapy (induction, concurrent, or both) was retrospectively reviewed. Results After a median follow up of 23.7 months, the median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 19.8 and 11.3 months, respectively. The 2 year local, regional, and distant control was 60%, 62%, and 38%, respectively. No local failure was observed in 3 patients following SABR + IG-IMRT while 6/26 patients failed locally following IG-IMRT alone. SABR + IG-IMRT was well tolerated. No ≥ grade 3 radiation-related toxicity was observed. Conclusion Definitive upfront SABR followed by IG-IMRT in selected patients with locally advanced NSCLC warrants further investigation in future clinical trials, while chemo-radiation with IG-IMRT alone was well tolerated. PMID:27611833

  19. Computed Tomography-Based Anatomic Assessment Overestimates Local Tumor Recurrence in Patients With Mass-like Consolidation After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlap, Neal E.; Yang Wensha; McIntosh, Alyson; Sheng, Ke; Benedict, Stanley H.; Read, Paul W.; Larner, James M.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate pulmonary radiologic changes after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), to distinguish between mass-like fibrosis and tumor recurrence. Methods and Materials: Eighty consecutive patients treated with 3- to 5-fraction SBRT for early-stage peripheral non-small cell lung cancer with a minimum follow-up of 12 months were reviewed. The mean biologic equivalent dose received was 150 Gy (range, 78-180 Gy). Patients were followed with serial CT imaging every 3 months. The CT appearance of consolidation was defined as diffuse or mass-like. Progressive disease on CT was defined according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.1. Positron emission tomography (PET) CT was used as an adjunct test. Tumor recurrence was defined as a standardized uptake value equal to or greater than the pretreatment value. Biopsy was used to further assess consolidation in select patients. Results: Median follow-up was 24 months (range, 12.0-36.0 months). Abnormal mass-like consolidation was identified in 44 patients (55%), whereas diffuse consolidation was identified in 12 patients (15%), at a median time from end of treatment of 10.3 months and 11.5 months, respectively. Tumor recurrence was found in 35 of 44 patients with mass-like consolidation using CT alone. Combined with PET, 10 of the 44 patients had tumor recurrence. Tumor size (hazard ratio 1.12, P=.05) and time to consolidation (hazard ratio 0.622, P=.03) were predictors for tumor recurrence. Three consecutive increases in volume and increasing volume at 12 months after treatment in mass-like consolidation were highly specific for tumor recurrence (100% and 80%, respectively). Patients with diffuse consolidation were more likely to develop grade {>=}2 pneumonitis (odds ratio 26.5, P=.02) than those with mass-like consolidation (odds ratio 0.42, P=.07). Conclusion: Incorporating the kinetics of mass-like consolidation and PET to the current criteria for evaluating posttreatment response will

  20. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Centrally Located Early Stage or Isolated Parenchymal Recurrences of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: How to Fly in a “No Fly Zone”

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joe Y.; Li, Qiao-Qiao; Xu, Qing-Yong; Allen, Pamela K.; Rebueno, Neal; Gomez, Daniel R.; Balter, Peter; Komaki, Ritsuko; Mehran, Reza; Swisher, Stephen G.; Roth, Jack A.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: We extended our previous experience with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR; 50 Gy in 4 fractions) for centrally located non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); explored the use of 70 Gy in 10 fractions for cases in which dose-volume constraints could not be met with the previous regimen; and suggested modified dose-volume constraints. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT)-based volumetric image-guided SABR was used for 100 patients with biopsy-proven, central T1-T2N0M0 (n=81) or isolated parenchymal recurrence of NSCLC (n=19). All disease was staged with positron emission tomography/CT; all tumors were within 2 cm of the bronchial tree, trachea, major vessels, esophagus, heart, pericardium, brachial plexus, or vertebral body. Endpoints were toxicity, overall survival (OS), local and regional control, and distant metastasis. Results: At a median follow-up time of 30.6 months, median OS time was 55.6 months, and the 3-year OS rate was 70.5%. Three-year cumulative actuarial local, regional, and distant control rates were 96.5%, 87.9%, and 77.2%, respectively. The most common toxicities were chest-wall pain (18% grade 1, 13% grade 2) and radiation pneumonitis (11% grade 2 and 1% grade 3). No patient experienced grade 4 or 5 toxicity. Among the 82 patients receiving 50 Gy in 4 fractions, multivariate analyses showed mean total lung dose >6 Gy, V{sub 20} >12%, or ipsilateral lung V{sub 30} >15% to independently predict radiation pneumonitis; and 3 of 9 patients with brachial plexus D{sub max} >35 Gy experienced brachial neuropathy versus none of 73 patients with brachial D{sub max} <35 Gy (P=.001). Other toxicities were analyzed and new dose-volume constraints are proposed. Conclusions: SABR for centrally located lesions produces clinical outcomes similar to those for peripheral lesions when normal tissue constraints are respected.

  1. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  2. Circulating miR-22, miR-24 and miR-34a as novel predictive biomarkers to pemetrexed-based chemotherapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Franchina, Tindara; Amodeo, Valeria; Bronte, Giuseppe; Savio, Giuseppina; Ricciardi, Giuseppina R R; Picciotto, Maria; Russo, Antonio; Giordano, Antonio; Adamo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Pemetrexed has been widely used in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The clinical relevance of polymorphisms of folate pathway genes for pemetrexed metabolism have not been fully elucidated yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of circulating miR-22, miR-24, and miR-34a, possibly involved in folate pathway, in NSCLC patients treated with pemetrexed compared with healthy controls and to investigate their impact on patient clinical outcomes. A total of 22 consecutive patients with advanced NSCLC, treated with pemetrexed-based chemotherapy and 27 age and sex matched healthy controls were included in this preliminary analysis. miR-22, miR-24, and miR-34a targets were identified by TargetScan 6.2 algorithm, validating the involvement of these microRNAs in folate pathway. MicroRNAs were isolated from whole blood and extracted with miRNAeasy Mini Kit (Qiagen). miRNA profiling was performed using Real-Time PCR. SPSS 17 was used to data analysis. miR-22, miR-24, and miR-34a were found upregulated (P<0.05) in NSCLC patients versus healthy controls. Higher expression levels were recorded for miR-34a. Nevertheless, significantly higher miR-22 expression was observed in patients developing progressive disease (P=0.03). No significant associations with clinical outcome were recorded for miR-24 and miR-34a. Albeit preliminary, these data support the involvement of miR-22, miR-24, and miR-34a in advanced NSCLC. The correlation between high expression of miR-22 in whole blood and the lack of response in pemetrexed treated NSCLC patients indicates that miR-22 could represent a novel predictive biomarker for pemetrexed-based treatment.

  3. Live cumulative network meta-analysis: protocol for second-line treatments in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer with wild-type or unknown status for epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Créquit, Perrine; Trinquart, Ludovic; Ravaud, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many second-line treatments for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been assessed in randomised controlled trials, but which treatments work the best remains unclear. Novel treatments are being rapidly developed. We need a comprehensive up-to-date evidence synthesis of all these treatments. We present the protocol for a live cumulative network meta-analysis (NMA) to address this need. Methods and analysis We will consider trials of second-line treatments in patients with advanced NSCLC with wild-type or unknown epidermal growth factor receptor status. We will consider any single agent of cytotoxic chemotherapy, targeted therapy, combination of cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapy and any combination of targeted therapies. The primary outcomes will be overall survival and progression-free survival. The live cumulative NMA will be initiated with a NMA and then iterations will be repeated at regular intervals to keep the NMA up-to-date over time. We have defined the update frequency as 4 months, based on an assessment of the pace of evidence production on this topic. Each iteration will consist of six methodological steps: adaptive search for treatments and trials, screening of reports and selection of trials, data extraction, assessment of risk of bias, update of the network of trials and synthesis, and dissemination. We will set up a research community in lung cancer, with different groups of contributors of different skills. We will distribute tasks through online crowdsourcing. This proof-of-concept study in second-line treatments of advanced NSCLC will allow one for assessing the feasibility of live cumulative NMA and opening the path for this new form of synthesis. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not required because our study will not include confidential participant data and interventions. The description of all the steps and the results of this live cumulative NMA will be available online. Trial registration

  4. A Significant Statistical Advancement on the Predictive Values of ERCC1 Polymorphisms for Clinical Outcomes of Platinum-Based Chemotherapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Updated Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yali; Liu, Jie; Sun, Meili; Zhang, Zongpu; Liu, Chuanyong; Sun, Yuping

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is no definitive conclusion so far on the predictive values of ERCC1 polymorphisms for clinical outcomes of platinum-based chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We updated this meta-analysis with an expectation to obtain some statistical advancement on this issue. Methods. Relevant studies were identified by searching MEDLINE, EMBASE databases from inception to April 2015. Primary outcomes included objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). All analyses were performed using the Review Manager version 5.3 and the Stata version 12.0. Results. A total of 33 studies including 5373 patients were identified. ERCC1 C118T and C8092A could predict both ORR and OS for platinum-based chemotherapy in Asian NSCLC patients (CT + TT versus CC, ORR: OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.67–0.94; OS: HR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.01–1.53) (CA + AA versus CC, ORR: OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.60–0.96; OS: HR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.06–1.75). Conclusions. Current evidence strongly indicated the prospect of ERCC1 C118T and C8092A as predictive biomarkers for platinum-based chemotherapy in Asian NSCLC patients. However, the results should be interpreted with caution and large prospective studies are still required to further investigate these findings. PMID:27057082

  5. A phase I trial of an oral subtype-selective histone deacetylase inhibitor, chidamide, in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xingsheng; Wang, Lin; Lin, Lin; Han, Xiaohong; Dou, Guifang; Meng, Zhiyun; Shi, Yuankai

    2016-01-01

    Objective This phase I study was to evaluate safety, maximum tolerated dose, pharmacokinetics and preliminary antitumor activity of chidamide, a novel subtype-selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Ten patients received oral chidamide 20, 25, or 30 mg twice per week continuously with paclitaxel (175 mg/m2) and carboplatin [area under the curve (AUC) 5 mg/mL/min] administered in a 3-week cycle. Patients with response and stable disease after four cycles maintained chidamide monotherapy until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Blood samples were collected for pharmacokinetic analysis after the first single oral of chidamide and first combination treatment in cycle 1 from all patients. Results Two dose-limiting toxicities were recorded in the 30 mg cohort, including thrombocytopenia and prolonged neutropenia in the first cycle. Grade 3/4 neutropenia in any cycle was observed in all patients, but was not associated with significant complications. Other grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities included thrombocytopenia and leucopenia. No significant changes were observed in pharmacokinetic parameters for both chidamide and paclitaxel. One patient in the 20 mg cohort had confirmed partial response (PR). Two out of 5 patients with brain metastases had intracranial complete remission after 4-cycle treatment. Conclusions Chidamide combined with paclitaxel and carboplatin was generally tolerated without unanticipated toxicities or clinically relevant pharmacokinetic interactions. The recommended dose for chidamide in this combination was established at 20 mg, and a phase II trial is ongoing with this regimen in patients with advanced NSCLC. PMID:27647973

  6. A phase I trial of an oral subtype-selective histone deacetylase inhibitor, chidamide, in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xingsheng; Wang, Lin; Lin, Lin; Han, Xiaohong; Dou, Guifang; Meng, Zhiyun; Shi, Yuankai

    2016-01-01

    Objective This phase I study was to evaluate safety, maximum tolerated dose, pharmacokinetics and preliminary antitumor activity of chidamide, a novel subtype-selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Ten patients received oral chidamide 20, 25, or 30 mg twice per week continuously with paclitaxel (175 mg/m2) and carboplatin [area under the curve (AUC) 5 mg/mL/min] administered in a 3-week cycle. Patients with response and stable disease after four cycles maintained chidamide monotherapy until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Blood samples were collected for pharmacokinetic analysis after the first single oral of chidamide and first combination treatment in cycle 1 from all patients. Results Two dose-limiting toxicities were recorded in the 30 mg cohort, including thrombocytopenia and prolonged neutropenia in the first cycle. Grade 3/4 neutropenia in any cycle was observed in all patients, but was not associated with significant complications. Other grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities included thrombocytopenia and leucopenia. No significant changes were observed in pharmacokinetic parameters for both chidamide and paclitaxel. One patient in the 20 mg cohort had confirmed partial response (PR). Two out of 5 patients with brain metastases had intracranial complete remission after 4-cycle treatment. Conclusions Chidamide combined with paclitaxel and carboplatin was generally tolerated without unanticipated toxicities or clinically relevant pharmacokinetic interactions. The recommended dose for chidamide in this combination was established at 20 mg, and a phase II trial is ongoing with this regimen in patients with advanced NSCLC.

  7. Comparison of treatment costs of grade 3/4 adverse events associated with erlotinib or pemetrexed maintenance therapy for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in Germany, France, Italy, and Spain.

    PubMed

    Banz, Kurt; Bischoff, Helge; Brunner, Matthias; Chouaid, Christos; de Castro Carpeño, Javier; de Marinis, Filippo; Grossi, Francesco; Vergnenègre, Alain; Walzer, Stefan

    2011-12-01

    Objective of this indirect economic comparison was to estimate and compare management costs of grade 3/4 adverse events (AEs) reported for first-line erlotinib or pemetrexed maintenance therapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The economic analysis was performed for Germany, France, Italy and Spain. Types and incidences of reported grade 3/4 AEs observed with erlotinib or pemetrexed maintenance therapy were retrieved from two recently published placebo-controlled trials. Country-specific estimates on standard treatment algorithms and incremental medical resource utilization associated with each of the reported grade 3/4 AEs have been obtained from clinical oncologists practicing in the four countries and co-authoring this article. The resource use items were subsequently assigned country-specific tariffs to estimate total per-patients costs associated with the AE profiles of the two compared maintenance regimens. For the economic analysis a customized economic spreadsheet model was employed. Our comparison shows lower total average per-patient AE management costs for erlotinib than for pemetrexed maintenance therapy in all four studied countries. Total estimated cost savings per patient in favour of erlotinib amount to € 121, € 237, € 106, and € 119 for Germany, France, Italy and Spain, respectively. These AE cost savings for erlotinib when compared to pemetrexed represent a decrease by 80%, 71%, 94%, and 82%, respectively. The study also discovered considerable differences in AE management costs across countries which are primarily due to differences in clinician's estimates of hospitalization referral rates. Erlotinib maintenance therapy in patients with advanced NSCLC causes lower AE management costs than pemetrexed maintenance therapy indicating a potentially superior tolerability profile. PMID:21592611

  8. Activity of topotecan given intravenously for 5 days every three weeks in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer pretreated with platinum and taxanes: a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Emilio Esteban; Villanueva, Noemi; Fra, Joaquin; Berros, Jose Pablo; Jimenez, Paula; Luque, María; Muñiz, Isabel; Blay, Pilar; Fernandez, Yolanda; Vieitez, José María; Muriel, Carolina; Sanmamed, Miguel; Coto, Pablo Pardo; Izquierdo, Marta; Estrada, Enrique; Lacave, Angel J

    2011-12-01

    Topotecan, a semi-synthetic camptothecin analogue with topoisomerase I interaction, has shown to be an active agent in the treatment of advanced refractory lung cancer. This paper describes the authors' experience with this drug when used as a single agent in patients (pts) with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) refractory to platinum- and taxane-containing chemotherapy regimens. Thirty-five patients with NSCLC refractory to previous chemotherapy and KI ≥ 60% were included in the study. Their characteristics are as follows: median age of 52 years (range 43-69) and Karnofsky PS of 70 (60-80); 27 were male and 8 were female. Twenty-one (60%) patients had adenocarcinoma; eleven (31.4%), squamous cell, and three (8.5%), undifferentiated carcinoma. There was a median of two disease sites and two prior chemotherapy regimens. Topotecan was administered at a dose of 1.25 mg/m(2) I.V. daily for 5 days, repeated every 21 days until disease progression, maximal response, or intolerable toxicity. After 73 cycles, patients received a median of 2 treatment cycles (1-9). All patients except one were considered evaluable for toxicity; eight episodes (24%) of nausea/vomiting and two episodes (6%) of grade 1-2 asthenia, respectively, were reported. Four (12%) patients developed grade 1-2 anemia and two (6%) subjects suffered grade 3 anemia. Seven (21%) patients had grade 1-2 neutropenia and one (3%) presented grade 5 neutropenia. In 33 patients evaluable for activity of the 35 subjects included in the study; one (2.8%) presented a partial response; nine (25.7%) had stable disease, and 23 (65.7%) exhibited disease progression. Median time to progression and overall survival were 54 (12-210) and 70 (12-324) days, respectively. Intravenous topotecan at that dose and administration schedule displays scant activity in terms of response rate in individuals with advanced NSCLC previously treated with platinum and taxanes. The role and usefulness of chemotherapy in this setting

  9. A phase I/II trial of irinotecan-cisplatin combined with an anti-late-diarrhoeal programme to evaluate the safety and antitumour response of this combination therapy in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Y; Tsuduki, E; Izumi, S; Hojo, M; Kamimura, M; Naka, G; Kobayashi, K; Kudo, K

    2005-12-12

    We conducted a phase I/II study in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to increase the therapeutic index of the cisplatin-irinotecan combination by institution of an anti-late-diarrhoeal program (ADP). A total of 77 chemotherapy-naive patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled. The cisplatin dose was fixed at 60 mg m(-2) (Day 1). Irinotecan was escalated in 5 mg m(-2) increments, starting from 60 mg m(-2) (Days 1 and 8). ADP consisted of oral sodium bicarbonate, magnesium oxide, basic water, and ursodeoxycholic acid, and was administered orally for 4 days with each dose of irinotecan. In the phase I portion, irinotecan pharmacokinetics was also examined. After the recommended dose of irinotecan with ADP was determined, a phase II study was conducted to evaluate the response. Maximum tolerated dose was reached at an irinotecan dose of 80 mg m(-2) (Grade 4 diarrhoea and neutropenia). Pharmacokinetic studies show that the maximum concentration and the area under the curve of both irinotecan and SN38 (active metabolite of irinotecan) tend to increase in the dose-dependent manner of irinotecan. The phase II portion of the study included 48 patients, who were treated with 75 mg m(-2) of irinotecan. Grade 3/4 toxicities included neutropenia in 65%, leucopenia in 33%, and late diarrhoea in 6% of the patients. During this treatment, PS did not change in 65% of patients. At the end of the chemotherapy, PS did not decline in 90% of patients. In the phase II portion, a response occurred in 63% (95% confidential interval (CI), 47-76%) of patients. Median time to progression was 19 weeks (95% CI, 15-22 weeks), and median survival was 52 weeks (95% CI, 39-64 weeks). This regimen of irinotecan and cisplatin with ADP resulted in promising efficacy with acceptable toxicity for patients with advanced NSCLC. This regimen is a candidate for the experimental arm towards future phase III studies. PMID:16288302

  10. Regional Lymph Node Uptake of [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose After Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Predicts Local-Regional Failure of Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results of ACRIN 6668/RTOG 0235

    PubMed Central

    Markovina, Stephanie; Duan, Fenghai; Snyder, Bradley S.; Siegel, Barry A.; Machtay, Mitchell; Bradley, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) ACRIN 6668/RTOG 0235 demonstrated that standardized uptake value (SUV) on post-treatment [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) correlates with survival in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This secondary analysis determines if SUV of regional lymph nodes (RLNs) on post-treatment FDG-PET correlates with patient outcomes. Methods and Materials Included for analysis were patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy using radiation doses ≥60 Gy, with identifiable FDG-avid RLNs (distinct from primary tumor) on pre-treatment FDG-PET, and post-treatment FDG-PET data. ACRIN Core Laboratory SUV measurements were used. Event time was calculated from the date of post-treatment FDG-PET. Local-regional failure was defined as failure within the treated RT volume and reported by the treating institution. Statistical analyses included Wilcoxon signed-rank test, Kaplan-Meier curves (log rank test), and Cox proportional hazards regression modeling. Results Of 234 trial-eligible patients, 139 (59%) had uptake in both primary tumor and RLNs on pre-treatment FDG-PET, and had SUV data from post-treatment FDG-PET. Maximum SUV was greater for primary tumor than for RLNs before treatment (p<0.001), but not different post-treatment (p=0.320). Post-treatment SUV of RLNs was not associated with overall survival. However, elevated post-treatment SUV of RLNs, both the absolute value and the percent residual activity compared to the pre-treatment SUV, were associated with inferior local-regional control (p<0.001). Conclusions High residual metabolic activity in RLNs on post-treatment FDG-PET is associated with worse local-regional control. Based on these data, future trials evaluating a radiotherapy boost should consider inclusion of both primary tumor and FDG-avid RLNs in the boost volume to maximize local-regional control. PMID:26461002

  11. Adenovirus-mediated wild-type p53 gene transfer in combination with bronchial arterial infusion for treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, one year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yong-song; Liu, Yuan; Zou, Qing; He, Qing; La, Zi; Yang, Lin; Hu, Ying

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In the present study, we have examined the safety and efficacy of recombinant adenovirus encoding human p53 tumor suppressor gene (rAd-p53) injection in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the combination with the therapy of bronchial arterial infusion (BAI). Methods: A total of 58 patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled in a non-randomized, two-armed clinical trial. Of which, 19 received a combination treatment of BAI and rAd-p53 (the combo group), while the remaining 39 were treated with only BAI (the control group). Patients were followed up for 12 months, with safety and local response evaluated by the National Cancer Institute’s Common Toxicity Criteria and response evaluation criteria in solid tumor (RECIST), respectively. Time to progression (TTP) and survival rates were also analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method. Results: In the combo group, 19 patients received a total of 49 injections of rAd-p53 and 46 times of BAI, respectively, while 39 patients in the control group received a total of 113 times of BAI. The combination treatment was found to have less adverse events such as anorexia, nausea and emesis, pain, and leucopenia (P<0.05) but more arthralgia, fever, influenza-like symptom, and myalgia (P<0.05), compared with the control group. The overall response rates (complete response (CR)+partial response (PR)) were 47.3% and 38.4% for the combo group and the control group, respectively (P>0.05). Patients in the combo group had a longer TTP than those in the control group (a median 7.75 vs 5.5 months, P=0.018). However, the combination treatment did not lead to better survival, with survival rates at 3, 6, and 12 months in the combo group being 94.74%, 89.47%, and 52.63%, respectively, compared with 92.31%, 69.23%, and 38.83% in the control group (P=0.224). Conclusion: Our results show that the combination of rAd-p53 and BAI was well tolerated in patients with NSCLC and may have improved the quality of life and delayed

  12. Randomized phase III trial of platinum-doublet chemotherapy followed by gefitinib compared with continued platinum-doublet chemotherapy in Japanese patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: results of a west Japan thoracic oncology group trial (WJTOG0203).

    PubMed

    Takeda, Koji; Hida, Toyoaki; Sato, Tosiya; Ando, Masahiko; Seto, Takashi; Satouchi, Miyako; Ichinose, Yukito; Katakami, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Kudoh, Shinzoh; Sasaki, Jiichiro; Matsui, Kaoru; Takayama, Koichi; Kashii, Tatsuhiko; Iwamoto, Yasuo; Sawa, Toshiyuki; Okamoto, Isamu; Kurata, Takayasu; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Fukuoka, Masahiro

    2010-02-10

    PURPOSE Gefitinib is a small molecule inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase. We conducted a phase III trial to evaluate whether gefitinib improves survival as sequential therapy after platinum-doublet chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). PATIENTS AND METHODS Chemotherapy-naïve patients with advanced stage (IIIB/IV) NSCLC, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 to 1, and adequate organ function were randomly assigned to either platinum-doublet chemotherapy up to six cycles (arm A) or platinum-doublet chemotherapy for three cycles followed by gefitinib 250 mg orally once daily, until disease progression (arm B). Patients were stratified by disease stage, sex, histology, and chemotherapy regimens. The primary end point was overall survival; secondary end points included progression-free survival, tumor response, safety, and quality of life. Results Between March 2003 and May 2005, 604 patients were randomly assigned. There was a statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival in arm B (hazard ratio [HR], 0.68; 95% CI, 0.57 to 0.80; P < .001); however, overall survival results did not reach statistical significance (HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.72 to 1.03; P = .11). In an exploratory subset analysis of overall survival by histologic group, patients in arm B with adenocarcinoma did significantly better than patients in arm A with adenocarcinoma (n = 467; HR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.65 to 0.98; P = .03). CONCLUSION This trial failed to meet the primary end point of OS in patients with NSCLC. The exploratory subset analyses demonstrate a possible survival prolongation for sequential therapy of gefitinib, especially for patients with adenocarcinoma.

  13. Role of gefitinib in the targeted treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng-Jiao; He, Qing; Li, Mei; Luo, Feng; Guan, Yong-Song

    2016-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer. Conventional treatment options have limited efficacy because most cases are in the advanced stage at the time of diagnosis. In recent years, gefitinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has shown its good antitumor activities in treating NSCLC in a number of studies. This paper reviews its role in the targeted treatment of NSCLC in Chinese patients. PMID:27022285

  14. Adherence to Survivorship Care Guidelines in Health Care Providers for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Colorectal Cancer Survivor Care

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  15. Treatment Rationale and Study Design for the JUNIPER Study: A Randomized Phase III Study of Abemaciclib With Best Supportive Care Versus Erlotinib With Best Supportive Care in Patients With Stage IV Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer With a Detectable KRAS Mutation Whose Disease Has Progressed After Platinum-Based Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Jonathan W; Shi, Peipei; Reck, Martin; Paz-Ares, Luis; Koustenis, Andrew; Hurt, Karla C

    2016-01-01

    This clinical trial summary provides the background and rationale for the JUNIPER study (NCT02152631). JUNIPER is a randomized study of abemaciclib (200 mg orally every 12 hours) with best supportive care (BSC) versus erlotinib (150 mg orally every 24 hours) with BSC in patients with stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors have detectable Kirsten rat sarcoma (KRAS) mutations and whose disease has progressed after platinum-based chemotherapy and 1 other previous therapy, or who are not eligible for further chemotherapy. Approximately 550 patients will be randomized in a 3:2 ratio and stratified according to number of previous chemotherapy regimens (1 vs. 2), Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0 vs. 1), sex (male vs. female), and KRAS mutation (G12C vs. others). Erlotinib was chosen as the control arm, because it is the only agent indicated for second- and third-line therapy in advanced NSCLC. Treatment will continue until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurs, with assessments every 28 days, followed by short-term and long-term follow-up. The coprimary efficacy objectives of this study are progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS); secondary objectives are overall response rate, changes in patient-reported pain and disease-related symptoms, changes in health status, resource utilization, safety and tolerability, and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics. This design has 80% power to detect OS hazard ratio (HR) of 0.75 (type I error 0.045) and PFS HR of 0.67 (type I error 0.005). If the coprimary objectives (OS and PFS) are achieved, this study will provide a new alternative third-line treatment option for patients with NSCLC whose tumors have detectable KRAS mutations.

  16. Bronchoscopy: Diagnostic and Therapeutic for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Thomas L; Berkheim, David B

    2016-07-01

    The bronchoscope has gone through much advancement from its origin as a thin metal tube. It has become a highly sophisticated tool for clinicians. Both rigid and the flexible bronchoscopes are invaluable in the diagnosis and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Treatment of this disease process hinges on accurate diagnosis and lymph node staging. Technologies, such as endobronchial ultrasound, navigational bronchoscopy, and autofluorescence, have improved efficacy of endobronchial diagnosis and sample collection. If a patient is not a candidate for surgery and has a complication from a centrally located mass, the bronchoscope has been used to deliver palliative therapies. PMID:27261910

  17. Quantitative study of lung perfusion SPECT scanning and pulmonary function testing for early radiation-induced lung injury in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, WEI; WANG, JIEZHONG; TANG, MINGDENG; PAN, JIANJI; BAI, PENGGANG; LIN, DUANYU; QIAN, FEIYU; LIN, FENGJIE; YANG, XUEQIN; ZHANG, SHENGLI

    2012-01-01

    Radiation lung injury is a common side-effect of pulmonary radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess early changes in lung perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanning and pulmonary function testing (PFT) prior to and after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for patients suffering from locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LANSCLC). Twenty patients with LANSCLC received lung perfusion SPECT scanning and PFT prior to IMRT and immediately after IMRT. Lung perfusion index (LPI) was calculated after the quantification of perfusion SPECT images. The LPI of the two groups was analyzed by matched t-test. The radioactive count of each layer of single lung was added to obtain the sum of the irradiated area. The percentage of the irradiated area of single lung was calculated. Linear correlation analysis was carried out between the percentage of the irradiated area and LPI in order to verify the validity of LPI. In this study, LPI and the percentage of the irradiated area of single lung exhibited an excellent correlation either prior to or after IMRT (r=0.820 and r=0.823, respectively; p<0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between pre-IMRT LPI and post-IMRT LPI (p=0.135). LPI in the group receiving a radical dose had no statistically significant difference (p=0.993), however, it showed a statistically significant difference in the group receiving a non-radical dose (p=0.025). In the non-radical dose group, the post-IMRT LPI was larger compared to pre-IMRT. None of the parameters of PFT exhibited a statistically significant difference prior to and after IMRT (p>0.05). The quantitative method of lung perfusion SPECT scanning can be used to evaluate changes in perfusion early in patients receiving a non-radical dose (BED ≤126,500 cGy) IMRT. Evaluating early changes in global lung function using the current method of PFT is difficult, since time can be a contributing factor for radiation

  18. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB or Stage IV Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  19. Advances take stage - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Regulatory advances in proteomics will be taking center stage at a Symposia scheduled to occur at the 2011 American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Annual Meeting. The symposium entitled "Enabling Translational Proteomics with NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer" is scheduled for July 25, 2011 at AACC's annual Meeting.

  20. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Abigail T.; St. James, Sara; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning. PMID:26147335

  1. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Berman, Abigail T; James, Sara St; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning. PMID:26147335

  2. Astragalus-containing Traditional Chinese Medicine, with and without prescription based on syndrome differentiation, combined with chemotherapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a systemic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S.F.; Wang, Q.; Jiao, L.J.; Huang, Y.L.; Garfield, D.; Zhang, J.; Xu, L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Traditional Chinese Medicine (tcm) is used in China as part of the treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc) and often includes prescription of herbal therapy based on syndrome differentiation. Studies of various Astragalus-based Chinese medicines combined with platinum-based chemotherapy in the treatment of lung cancer are popular in East Asia, particularly in China. The aim of the present study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing platinum-based chemotherapy alone with platinum-based chemotherapy plus Astragalus-based Chinese botanicals, with and without prescription based on syndrome differentiation, as first-line treatment for advanced nsclc. Methods We searched the Chinese Biomedical Literature database, the China National Knowledge Internet, the VIP Chinese Science and Technology Periodicals Database, PubMed, embase, the Cochrane databases, and abstracts presented at meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the World Conference on Lung Cancer, the European Society for Medical Oncology, and the Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology for all eligible studies. Endpoints were overall survival; 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year survival rates; performance status; overall response rate; and grade 3 or 4 adverse events. Subgroup analyses based on herbal formulae individualized using syndrome differentiation or on oral or injection patent medicines were performed using the Stata software application (version 11.0: StataCorp LP, College Station, TX, U.S.A.) and a fixed-effects or random-effects model in case of heterogeneity. Results are expressed as a hazard ratio (hr) or relative risk (rr), with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (cis). Results Seventeen randomized studies with scores on the Jadad quality scale of 2 or more, representing 1552 patients, met the inclusion criteria. Compared with platinum-based chemotherapy alone, the addition of Astragalus-based tcm to chemotherapy was associated with significantly

  3. Safety and Palliative Efficacy of Single-Dose 8-Gy Reirradiation for Painful Local Failure in Patients With Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Radical Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Topkan, Erkan; Yildirim, Berna Akkus; Guler, Ozan Cem; Parlak, Cem; Pehlivan, Berrin; Selek, Ugur

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of single-dose 8-Gy palliative chest reirradiation (CRI) in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (M-NSCLC) patients with painful thoracic failures (TF) within the previous radiation portal. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 78 M-NSCLC patients who received single-dose 8-Gy CRI for painful TF after concurrent chemoradiation therapy to a total radiation dose of 52 to 66 Gy between 2007 and 2012. Primary endpoints included significant pain relief (SPR) defined as a ≥2 point decrement in the Visual Analogue Scale for Pain inventory (VAS-P), time to pain relief, and duration of pain control. Secondary objectives were survival and prognostic factors. Results: Treatment was well tolerated, with only 5.1% grade 3 pneumonitis and 1.3% grade 2 esophagitis. Pre-CRI median and post-CRI minimum VAS-P were 7 and 3 (P<.001), respectively. SPR was noted in 67 (85.9%) patients, and only 3 (3.9%) scored progressive pain. Median time to lowest VAS-P and duration of pain control were 27 days and 6.1 months, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 7.7 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 26.5%. On multivariate analyses, lower Eastern Cooperative Oncology group score (1-2; P<.001), absence of anemia (P=.001), and fewer metastatic sites (1-2; P<.001) were found to be associated with longer OS. Conclusions: Single-dose 8-Gy CRI provides safe, effective, and durable pain palliation for TF in radically irradiated M-NSCLC patients. Because of its convenience, lower cost, and higher comfort, the present protocol can be considered an appropriate option for patients with limited life spans.

  4. Profile of nivolumab in the treatment of metastatic squamous non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Yvonne LE; Lim, Joline SJ; Soo, Ross A

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, the prognosis and treatment of patients with advanced-stage squamous cell lung cancers have been limited. An improvement in the understanding of the role of the immune system in tumor immunosurveillance has led to the development of the programmed death-1 (PD-1) immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab (Opdivo). Nivolumab is the first PD-1 inhibitor approved for the treatment of advanced-stage squamous cell non-small-cell lung cancer following platinum-based chemotherapy. In the key Phase III trial CHECKMATE 017, a better overall survival and progression-free survival were seen in patients treated with second-line nivolumab compared with docetaxel. Programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) expression did not predict for outcome. In addition, nivolumab had better safety and tolerability, and led to better patient reported outcomes. Further research on the role of PD-L1 expression as a predictive biomarker should be performed, and other biomarkers that can predict the efficacy of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors should also be pursued. Further studies on the combination treatment are ongoing to determine the optimal role of nivolumab as monotherapy or nivolumab with other agents in non-small-cell lung cancer. PMID:27313464

  5. WE-G-BRD-06: Variation in Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia in Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kelada, O; Decker, R; Rockwell, S; Carlson, D; Zheng, M; Huang, Y; Xia, Y; Gallezot, J; Liu, C; Carson, R; Oelfke, U

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Tumor hypoxia is correlated with treatment failure. To date, there are no published studies investigating hypoxia in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing SBRT. We aim to use 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to non-invasively quantify the tumor hypoxic volume (HV), to elucidate potential roles of reoxygenation and tumor vascular response at high doses, and to identify an optimal prognostic imaging time-point. Methods: SBRT-eligible patients with NSCLC tumors >1cm were prospectively enrolled in an IRB-approved study. Computed Tomography and dynamic PET images (0–120min, 150–180min, and 210–240min post-injection) were acquired using a Siemens BiographmCT PET/CT scanner. 18F-FMISO PET was performed on a single patient at 3 different time points around a single SBRT delivery of 18 Gy and HVs were compared using a tumor-to-blood ratio (TBR)>1.2 and rate of influx (Ki)>0.0015 (Patlak). Results: Results from our first patient showed substantial temporal changes in HV following SBRT. Using a TBR threshold >1.2 and summed images 210–240min, the HVs were 19%, 31% and 13% of total tumor volume on day 0, 2 (48 hours post-SBRT), and 4 (96 hours post-SBRT). The absolute volume of hypoxia increased by nearly a factor of 2 after 18 Gy and then decreased almost to baseline 96 hours later. Selected imaging timepoints resulted in temporal changes in HV quantification obtained with TBR. Ki, calculated using 4-hour dynamic data, evaluated HVs as 22%, 75% and 21%, respectively. Conclusions: ith the results of only one patient, this novel pilot study highlights the potential benefit of 18F-FMISO PET imaging as results indicate substantial temporal changes in tumor HV post-SBRT. Analysis suggests that TBR is not a robust parameter for accurate HV quantification and heavily influenced by imaging timepoint selection. Kinetic modeling parameters are more sensitive and may aid in future treatment individualization

  6. Advanced statistical methods for the definition of new staging models.

    PubMed

    Kates, Ronald; Schmitt, Manfred; Harbeck, Nadia

    2003-01-01

    Adequate staging procedures are the prerequisite for individualized therapy concepts in cancer, particularly in the adjuvant setting. Molecular staging markers tend to characterize specific, fundamental disease processes to a greater extent than conventional staging markers. At the biological level, the course of the disease will almost certainly involve interactions between multiple underlying processes. Since new therapeutic strategies tend to target specific processes as well, their impact will also involve interactions. Hence, assessment of the prognostic impact of new markers and their utilization for prediction of response to therapy will require increasingly sophisticated statistical tools that are capable of detecting and modeling complicated interactions. Because they are designed to model arbitrary interactions, neural networks offer a promising approach to improved staging. However, the typical clinical data environment poses severe challenges to high-performance survival modeling using neural nets, particularly the key problem of maintaining good generalization. Nonetheless, it turns out that by using newly developed methods to minimize unnecessary complexity in the neural network representation of disease course, it is possible to obtain models with high predictive performance. This performance has been validated on both simulated and real patient data sets. There are important applications for design of studies involving targeted therapy concepts and for identification of the improvement in decision support resulting from new staging markers. In this article, advantages of advanced statistical methods such as neural networks for definition of new staging models will be illustrated using breast cancer as an example.

  7. Weekly regimen of paclitaxel and carboplatin as first-line chemotherapy in elderly patients with stage IIIB-IV non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): results of a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Rozzi, A; Nardoni, C; Corona, M; Restuccia, M R; Falbo, T; Lanzetta, G

    2010-12-01

    Single-agent chemotherapy is the preferred treatment option in chemonaive elderly patients with advanced nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The role of combination chemotherapy in this setting is uncertain although several studies report satisfactory efficacy and safety using weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin (AUC=6) as first-line chemotherapy in elderly patients. It is still unclear which schedule of this regimen which could offer the best therapeutic index. The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity and tolerability of concomitant weekly administration of paclitaxel and carboplatin in untreated elderly patients with advanced NSCLC. From february 2005 to April 2008 36 consecutive elderly patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled. Median age was 74 years (range, 70-83 years) and median ECOG PS was 1 (range, 0-1). patients received carboplatin (AUC=2) and paclitaxel 80 mg/m² on days 1,8 and 15 every 28 days. All patients were evaluable for efficacy and toxicity; a median of 4 cycles was administered. Twelve patients had partial response (33%; 95% C.I. 15,8-52,3%), 10 patients (28%) showed stable disease. The median time to progression (TTP) was 5.7 months (95% C.I. 3.1-8.6 months) with a median overall survival (MOS) of 9 months (95% C.I. 4.4-13.9 months). Toxicity was mild with no cases of febrile neutropenia; 5 patients (14%) developed grade 2 neuropathy. Our study confirms the substantial activity of weekly regimen of paclitaxel and carboplatin. Due to its favorable profile of toxicity this schedule could represent an interesting therapeutic option in selected chemonaive elderly patients with advanced NSCLC.

  8. Advanced technologies for rocket single-stage-to-orbit vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhite, Alan W.; Bush, Lance B.; Cruz, Christopher I.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Morris, W. Douglas; Stanley, Douglas O.; Wurster, Kathryn E.

    1991-01-01

    A single-stage-to-orbit vertical takeoff/horizontal landing rocket vehicle was studied to determine the benefits of advanced technology. Advanced technologies that were included in the study were variable mixture ratio oxygen/hydrogen rocket engines and materials, structures, and subsystem technologies currently being developed in the National Aero-Space Plane Program. The application of advanced technology results in an 85 percent reduction in vehicle dry weight. With advanced materials, an external thermal protection system, like the Space Shuttle tiles, was not required. Compared to an all-airbreathing horizontal takeoff/horizontal landing vehicle using the same advanced technologies and mission requirements, the rocket vehicle is lighter in dry weight and has fewer subsystems. To increase reliability and safety, operational features were included in the rocket vehicle-robust subsystems, 5 percent additional margin, no slush hydrogen, fail-operational with an engine out, and a crew escape module. The resulting vehicle grew in dry weight and was still lower in dry weight than the airbreathing vehicle.

  9. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutation testing in adults with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, Marie; Joore, Manuela; Whiting, Penny; van Asselt, Thea; Ramaekers, Bram; Armstrong, Nigel; Misso, Kate; Severens, Johan; Kleijnen, Jos

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common form of lung cancer. Some epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutations make tumours responsive to treatment with EGFR-TK inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) but less responsive to treatment with standard chemotherapy. Patients with NSCLC are therefore tested for EGFR-TK tumour gene mutations to inform treatment decisions. There are a variety of tests available to detect these mutations. The different tests vary in the specific mutations that they attempt to detect, the amount of tumour cells needed for the test to work, the time that it takes to give a result, the error rate of the test, and the cost of the test. OBJECTIVE To compare the performance and cost-effectiveness of EGFR-TK mutation tests used to identify previously untreated adults with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC, who may benefit from first-line treatment with TKIs. DATA SOURCES Twelve databases to August 2012 [including MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations and Daily Update (OvidSP), EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), Health Technology Assessment database (HTA), Science Citation Index (SCI), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), BIOSIS Previews, NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme, PROSPERO (International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews)], research registers and conference proceedings. A web-based survey gathered data on technical performance of EGFR-TK mutation tests. METHODS Randomised controlled trials were assessed for methodological quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Diagnostic accuracy studies were assessed using QUADAS-2. There were insufficient data for meta-analysis. For accuracy studies, we calculated sensitivity and specificity together with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Survival data were summarised

  10. Advanced Low-Noise Research Fan Stage Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubert, Robert; Bock, Larry; Malmborg, Eric; Owen-Peer, William

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the design of the Advanced Low-Noise Research Fan stage. The fan is a variable pitch design, which is designed at the cruise pitch condition. Relative to the cruise setting, the blade is closed at takeoff and opened for reverse thrust operation. The fan stage is a split flow design with fan exit guide vanes (FEGVs) and core stators. The fan stage design is combined with a nacelle and engine core duct to form a powered fan/nacelle subscale model. This model is intended for use in combined aerodynamic, acoustic, and structural testing in a wind tunnel. The fan has an outer diameter of 22 in. and a hub-to-tip of 0.426 in., which allows the use of existing NASA fan and cowl force balance and rig drive systems. The design parameters were selected to permit valid acoustic and aerodynamic comparisons with the Pratt & Whitney (P&W) 17- and 22-in. rigs previously tested under NASA contract. The fan stage design is described in detail. The results of the design axisymmetric and Navier-Stokes aerodynamic analysis are presented at the critical design conditions. The structural analysis of the fan rotor and attachment is included. The blade and attachment are predicted to have adequate low-cycle fatigue life and an acceptable operating range without resonant stress or flutter. The stage was acoustically designed with airfoil counts in the FEGV and core stator to minimize noise. A fan/FEGV tone analysis developed separately under NASA contract was used to determine the optimum airfoil counts. The fan stage was matched to the existing nacelle, designed under the previous P&W low-noise contract, to form a fan/nacelle model for wind tunnel testing. It is an axisymmetric nacelle for convenience in testing and analysis. Previous testing confirmed that the nacelle performed as required at various aircraft operating conditions.

  11. Cediranib Maleate and Whole Brain Radiation Therapy in Patients With Brain Metastases From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-07

    Male Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Tumors Metastatic to Brain

  12. Neuropsychological resiliency after treatment for advanced stage neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Carpentieri, S C; Diller, L R

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the neuropsychological functioning of survivors of advanced stage neuroblastoma. In all, 16 survivors, diagnosed at a median of 2.8 years, who had received intensive chemotherapy and surgical treatments, were identified; 11 had received myeloablative consolidation therapy, eight with total body irradiation (TBI). All patients were evaluated with a neuropsychological assessment battery at a median age of 8.8 years. Analyses included comparison of the performances of the TBI group vs the no-TBI group; determination of whether the proportion of individuals with impaired or superior performance on each measure exceeded normative expectations; and performance indexes reflecting patterns of performance. Results indicate no significant deleterious impact of TBI and/or presence or absence of myeloablative therapy on neurocognitive and neurobehavioral functioning. For this cohort, resilience to neuropsychological vulnerability was observed, which included the emergence of a profile of full-scale IQ, verbal IQ, and mathematical achievement well above average expectations. We concluded that the results document a lack of neuropsychological morbidity among this cohort of survivors of advanced stage neuroblastoma, regardless of the inclusion of TBI. Moreover, a striking pattern of excellent neurocognitive functioning with intact neurobehavioral functioning was observed.

  13. Can advanced-stage ovarian cancer be cured?

    PubMed

    Narod, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Approximately 20% of women with advanced-stage ovarian cancer survive beyond 12 years after treatment and are effectively cured. Initial therapy for ovarian cancer comprises surgery and chemotherapy, and is given with the goal of eradicating as many cancer cells as possible. Indeed, the three phases of therapy are as follows: debulking surgery to remove as much of the cancer as possible, preferably to a state of no visible residual disease; chemotherapy to eradicate any microscopic disease that remains present after surgery; and second-line or maintenance therapy, which is given to delay disease progression among patients with tumour recurrence. If no cancer cells remain after initial therapy is completed, a cure is expected. By contrast, if residual cancer cells are present after initial treatment, then disease recurrence is likely. Thus, the probability of cure is contingent on the combination of surgery and chemotherapy effectively eliminating all cancer cells. In this Perspectives article, I present the case that the probability of achieving a cancer-free state is maximized through a combination of maximal debulking surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. I discuss the evidence indicating that by taking this approach, cures could be achieved in up to 50% of women with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. PMID:26787282

  14. Cyberknife treatment for advanced or terminal stage hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Hideo; Taniguch, Hiroyoshi; Nomura, Ryutaro; Sato, Kengo; Suzuki, Ichiro; Nakata, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the safety and efficacy of the Cyberknife treatment for patients with advanced or terminal stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Patients with HCC with extrahepatic metastasis or vascular or bile duct invasion were enrolled between May 2011 and June 2015. The Cyberknife was used to treat each lesion. Treatment response scores were based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.1. The trends of tumor markers, including alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and proteins induced by vitamin K absence II (PIVKA II) were assessed. Prognostic factors for tumor response and tumor markers were evaluated with Fisher’s exact test and a logistic regression model. Survival was evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: Sixty-five patients with 95 lesions were enrolled. Based on the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer classification, all patients were either in the advanced or terminal stage of the disease. The target lesions were as follows: 52 were bone metastasis; 9, lung metastasis; 7, brain metastasis; 9, portal vein invasion; 4, hepatic vein invasion; 4, bile duct invasion; and 10 other lesion types. The response rate and disease control rate were 34% and 53%, respectively. None of the clinical factors correlated significantly with tumor response. Fiducial marker implantation was associated with better control of both AFP (HR = 0.152; 95%CI: 0.026-0.887; P = 0.036) and PIVKA II (HR = 0.035; 95%CI: 0.003-0.342; P = 0.004). The median survival time was 9 mo (95%CI: 5-15 mo). Terminal stage disease (HR = 9.809; 95%CI: 2.589-37.17, P < 0.001) and an AFP of more than 400 ng/mL (HR = 2.548; 95%CI: 1.070-6.068, P = 0.035) were associated with worse survival. A radiation dose higher than 30 Gy (HR = 0.274; 95%CI: 0.093-0.7541, P = 0.012) was associated with better survival. In the 52 cases of bone metastasis, 36 patients (69%) achieved pain relief. One patient had cerebral

  15. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D; Killoran, J; Wagar, M; Lee, S; Hacker, F; Aerts, H; Lewis, J; Mak, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye

  16. “EXHALE”: exercise as a strategy for rehabilitation in advanced stage lung cancer patients: a randomized clinical trial comparing the effects of 12 weeks supervised exercise intervention versus usual care for advanced stage lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in North America and Western Europe. Patients with lung cancer in general have reduced physical capacity, functional capacity, poor quality of life and increased levels of anxiety and depression. Intervention studies indicate that physical training can address these issues. However, there is a lack of decisive evidence regarding the effect of physical exercise in patients with advanced lung cancer. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of a twelve weeks, twice weekly program consisting of: supervised, structured training in a group of advanced lung cancer patients (cardiovascular and strength training, relaxation). Methods/Design A randomized controlled trial will test the effects of the exercise intervention in 216 patients with advanced lung cancer (non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) stage IIIb - IV and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) extensive disease (ED)). Primary outcome is maximal oxygen uptake (VO2peak). Secondary outcomes are muscle strength (1RM), functional capacity (6MWD), lung capacity (Fev1) and patient reported outcome (including anxiety, depression (HADS) and quality of life (HRQOL)). Discussion The present randomized controlled study will provide data on the effectiveness of a supervised exercise intervention in patients receiving systemic therapy for advanced lung cancer. It is hoped that the intervention can improve physical capacity and functional level, during rehabilitation of cancer patients with complex symptom burden and help them to maintain independent function for as long as possible. Trial registration http://ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01881906 PMID:24124893

  17. Advances in Medical Management of Early Stage and Advanced Breast Cancer: 2015.

    PubMed

    Witherby, Sabrina; Rizack, Tina; Sakr, Bachir J; Legare, Robert D; Sikov, William M

    2016-01-01

    Standard management of early stage and advanced breast cancer has been improved over the past few years by knowledge gained about the biology of the disease, results from a number of eagerly anticipated clinical trials and the development of novel agents that offer our patients options for improved outcomes or reduced toxicity or both. This review highlights recent major developments affecting the systemic therapy of breast cancer, broken down by clinically relevant patient subgroups and disease stage, and briefly discusses some of the ongoing controversies in the treatment of breast cancer and promising therapies on the horizon.

  18. Advanced bronchoscopic techniques in diagnosis and staging of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zaric, Bojan; Stojsic, Vladimir; Sarcev, Tatjana; Stojanovic, Goran; Carapic, Vladimir; Perin, Branislav; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Darwiche, Kaid; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzos, Ilias; Kesisis, Georgios; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Stylianaki, Aikaterini; Foroulis, Christophoros N; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2013-09-01

    The role of advanced brochoscopic diagnostic techniques in detection and staging of lung cancer has steeply increased in recent years. Bronchoscopic imaging techniques became widely available and easy to use. Technical improvement led to merging in technologies making autofluorescence or narrow band imaging incorporated into one bronchoscope. New tools, such as autofluorescence imagining (AFI), narrow band imaging (NBI) or fuji intelligent chromo endoscopy (FICE), found their place in respiratory endoscopy suites. Development of endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) improved minimally invasive mediastinal staging and diagnosis of peripheral lung lesions. Linear EBUS proven to be complementary to mediastinoscopy. This technique is now available in almost all high volume centers performing bronchoscopy. Radial EBUS with mini-probes and guiding sheaths provides accurate diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary lesions. Combining EBUS guided procedures with rapid on site cytology (ROSE) increases diagnostic yield even more. Electromagnetic navigation technology (EMN) is also widely used for diagnosis of peripheral lesions. Future development will certainly lead to new improvements in technology and creation of new sophisticated tools for research in respiratory endoscopy. Broncho-microscopy, alveoloscopy, optical coherence tomography are some of the new research techniques emerging for rapid technological development.

  19. Treatment Options by Stage (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung cancer include a cough that doesn't go away and shortness of breath. Sometimes lung cancer ... discomfort or pain. A cough that doesn’t go away or gets worse over time. Trouble breathing. ...

  20. Stages of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung cancer include a cough that doesn't go away and shortness of breath. Sometimes lung cancer ... discomfort or pain. A cough that doesn’t go away or gets worse over time. Trouble breathing. ...

  1. Racial disparities in advanced stage colorectal cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Kristin; Hill, Elizabeth G.; Lewin, David N.; Williamson, Grace; Oppenheimer, Stephanie; Ford, Marvella E.; Wargovich, Michael J.; Berger, Franklin G.; Bolick, Susan W.; Thomas, Melanie B.; Alberg, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose African Americans (AA) have a higher incidence and lower survival from colorectal cancer (CRC) compared to European Americans (EA). In the present study, statewide, population-based data from South Carolina Central Cancer Registry (SCCCR) is used to investigate the relationship between race and age on advanced stage CRC survival. Methods The study population was comprised of 3865 advanced pathologically documented colon and rectal adenocarcinoma cases diagnosed between 01 January 1996 and 31 December 2006: 2673 (69%) EA and 1192 (31%) AA. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to generate median survival time and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) by race, age, and gender. Factors associated with survival were evaluated by fitting Cox proportional hazards (CPH) regression models to generate Hazard Ratios (HR) and 95% CI. Results We observed a significant interaction between race and age on CRC survival (p = 0.04). Among younger patients (< 50 years), AA race was associated with a 1.34 (95% CI 1.06-1.71) higher risk of death compared to EA. Among older patients, we observed a modest increase risk of death among AA men compared to EA (HR 1.16 (95% CI 1.01-1.32) but no difference by race among women (HR 0.94 (95% CI 0.82-1.08)). Moreover, we observed that the disparity in survival has worsened over the past 15 years. Conclusions Future studies that integrate clinical, molecular, and treatment-related data are needed for advancing understanding of the racial disparity in CRC survival, especially for those < 50 years old. PMID:23296454

  2. SEOM clinical guidelines for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) 2015.

    PubMed

    García-Campelo, R; Bernabé, R; Cobo, M; Corral, J; Coves, J; Dómine, M; Nadal, E; Rodriguez-Abreu, D; Viñolas, N; Massuti, B

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide as well as the leading cause of cancer related deaths as reported by Torre et al (CA Cancer J Clin 65:87-108, 2015]. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for up to 85 % of all lung cancers. Multiple advances in the staging, diagnostic procedures, therapeutic options, as well as molecular knowledge have been achieved during the past years, although the overall outlook has not greatly changed for the majority of patients with the overall 5-year survival having marginally increased over the last decade from 15.7 to 17.4 % as reported by Howlader et al. (SEER Cancer Statistics Review 2015).

  3. Management of non-small cell lung cancer in the era of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Gaetano; Morabito, Alessandro; Leone, Alessandra; Muto, Paolo; Fiore, Francesco; Budillon, Alfredo

    2016-09-01

    Despite major advances in the molecular definition of the disease, screening and therapy, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is still characterized by a disappointing overall survival, depending on subtype and tumor stage. To address this challenge, in the last years the therapeutic algorithm of NSCLC has become much more complex and articulated, with different kinds of drugs, including chemotherapy, targeted-based agents, angiogenesis inhibitors and immunotherapy, and multiple lines of treatments, for patients with squamous and non-squamous hystology, EGFR mutation and ALK rearrangement. This short viewpoint describes the emerging strategies for the management of NSCLC, indicating how a personalized approach, characterized by a specific multidisciplinary involvement, implies a process that starts with early detection and includes surgery and systemic therapy. PMID:27425397

  4. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Aftab, Blake T.; Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John; Rudin, Charles M.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hales, Russell K.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  5. The role of post-operative radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer: a multicentre randomised trial in patients with pathologically staged T1-2, N1-2, M0 disease. Medical Research Council Lung Cancer Working Party.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, R. J.; Girling, D. J.; Bleehen, N. M.; Moghissi, K.; Yosef, H. M.; Machin, D.

    1996-01-01

    The role of post-operative radiotherapy for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unclear despite five previous randomised trials. One deficiency with these trials was that they did not include adequate TNM staging, and so the present randomised trial was designed to compare surgery alone (S) with surgery plus post-operative radiotherapy (SR) in patients with pathologically staged T1-2, N1-2. M0 NSCLC. Between July 1986 and October 1993, 308 patients (154 S, 154 SR) were entered from 16 centres in the UK. The median age of the patients was 62 years, 74% were male, > 85% had normal or near normal levels of general condition, activity and breathlessness, 68% had squamous carcinoma, 52% had had a pneumonectomy, 63% had N1 disease and 37% N2 disease. SR patients received 40 Gy in 15 fractions starting 4-6 weeks post-operatively. Overall there was no advantage to either group in terms of survival, although definite local recurrence and bony metastases appeared less frequently and later in the SR group. In a subgroup analysis, in the N1 group no differences between the treatment groups were seen, but in the N2 group SR patients appeared to gain a one month survival advantage, delayed time to local recurrence and time to appearance of the bone metastases. There is, therefore, no clear indication for post-operative radiotherapy in N1 disease, but the question remains unresolved in N2 disease. PMID:8761382

  6. Potentially Curative Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Norway: A Population-Based Study of Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Strand, Trond-Eirik; Brunsvig, Paal Fredrik; Johannessen, Dag Clement; Sundstrom, Stein; Wang, Mari; Hornslien, Kjersti; Bremnes, Roy Martin; Stensvold, Andreas; Garpestad, Oddveig; Norstein, Jarle

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: The efficacy of curative irradiation in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer patients is considered limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate long-term survival in a population-based approach. Methods and Materials: Cases of non-small-cell lung cancer diagnosed from 1993 to 2001 were identified in the Cancer Registry of Norway. Electronic linkage with national data from the hospitals' radiotherapy verification systems identified those who received potentially curative doses ({>=}50 Gy). Hospital records were reviewed for all patients. Results: A total of 497 patients (336 men) were identified with a radiation dose of {>=}50 Gy delivered to the lung region. Of these, 41% received 60 Gy or more. The majority (70%) of patients included had advanced stage disease: 24% Stage IIIA and 46% Stage IIIB. The overall 1-, 3-, and 5-year observed survival rates were 53%, 16%, and 9%, respectively. Multivariable analyses identified stage and chemotherapy, but not radiation dose, as significant independent prognostic variables for survival. However, 68% of patients treated with chemotherapy participated in prospective studies with inclusion criteria that excluded patients with less favorable prognostic factors, leading to a selection bias. The number of fractions and the radiation doses varied widely among different hospitals. Conclusion: The long-term prognosis after radiation therapy is poor. More sophisticated, targeted, and uniform delivery of radiation therapy is needed. The apparent benefit of chemotherapy may in part be due to selection of patients with more favorable prognostic factors for this therapy.

  7. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research. PMID:26925962

  8. Tumor Volume Decrease at 8 weeks is Associated with Longer Survival in EGFR-mutant Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients treated with EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Mizuki; Dahlberg, Suzanne E.; Cardarella, Stephanie; Jackman, David M.; Rabin, Michael S.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Jänne, Pasi A.; Johnson, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Background The study investigated if tumor volume changes at 8 weeks of therapy are associated with outcomes in advanced NSCLC patients with sensitizing EGFR mutations treated with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Patients and methods In 56 advanced NSCLC patients with sensitizing EGFR mutations treated with first-line erlotinib or gefitinib, tumor volumes of dominant lung lesions were measured on baseline and follow-up CT and were analyzed for association with survival. Results Among 56 eligible patients, the median tumor volume was 17.8 cm3 (range: 1.3-172.7 cm3) on the baseline scans. 49 patients had follow-up CT at approximately 8 weeks; the median tumor volume at 8 weeks was 7.1 cm3 (range: 0.4-62.3 cm3), with the median proportional volume change of -59% (range: -90% to +91%) from baseline. The proportional volume change at 8 weeks was associated with survival (p=0.02). Using the cut-off value of 38% volume decrease (75th percentile) at 8 weeks, patients with volume decrease >38% (n=37) had a median overall survival of 43.5 months compared to 16.3 months among those with volume decrease ≤38% (n=12) (p=0.01). The median progression-free survival for patients with >38% volume decrease was 12.6 months, compared to 5.5 months for those with ≤38% volume decrease (p=0.2). Conclusions The proportional volume change at 8 weeks is associated with overall survival in EGFR-mutant advanced NSCLC patients treated with first-line EGFR-TKIs. The observation of the study, if confirmed in larger study cohorts, indicates that tumor volume analysis at 8 weeks may provide an early marker for survival, and contribute to therapeutic decision making by identifying patients who may benefit from additional anti-cancer therapy after 8 weeks of EGFR-TKI therapy. PMID:23787800

  9. The changing hope trajectory in patients with advanced-stage cancer: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Judith Brown; Seda, Julie S; Kardinal, Carl G

    2012-06-01

    As patients with advanced-stage cancer move from the initial diagnosis through treatment, remission, recurrence, and advanced-stage disease, the hope trajectory undergoes a dynamic transformation. By identifying the hope trajectory, nurses can help patients focus on obtainable hope objects while balancing the need to present a realistic prognosis. This, in turn, may help patients find meaning and purpose in advanced-stage cancer and facilitate realistic hope when faced with a life-threatening illness.

  10. Pretreatment [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose Positron Emission Tomography Maximum Standardized Uptake Value as Predictor of Distant Metastasis in Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy: Rethinking the Role of Positron Emission Tomography in Personalizing Treatment Based on Risk Status

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Vimoj J.; MacRae, Robert; Sirisegaram, Abby; Pantarotto, Jason R.

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether the preradiation maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of the primary tumor for [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has a prognostic significance in patients with Stage T1 or T2N0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with curative radiation therapy, whether conventional or stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Between January 2007 and December 2011, a total of 163 patients (180 tumors) with medically inoperable histologically proven Stage T1 or T2N0 NSCLC and treated with radiation therapy (both conventional and SBRT) were entered in a research ethics board approved database. All patients received pretreatment FDG-PET / computed tomography (CT) at 1 institution with consistent acquisition technique. The medical records and radiologic images of these patients were analyzed. Results: The overall survival at 2 years and 3 years for the whole group was 76% and 67%, respectively. The mean and median SUV{sub max} were 8.1 and 7, respectively. Progression-free survival at 2 years with SUV{sub max} <7 was better than that of the patients with tumor SUV{sub max} ≥7 (67% vs 51%; P=.0096). Tumors with SUV{sub max} ≥7 were associated with a worse regional recurrence-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival. In the multivariate analysis, SUV{sub max} ≥7 was an independent prognostic factor for distant metastasis-free survival. Conclusion: In early-stage NSCLC managed with radiation alone, patients with SUV{sub max} ≥7 on FDG-PET / CT scan have poorer outcomes and high risk of progression, possibly because of aggressive biology. There is a potential role for adjuvant therapies for these high-risk patients with intent to improve outcomes.

  11. Pulmonary Toxicity in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With High-Dose (74 Gy) 3-Dimensional Conformal Thoracic Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Trial 30105

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, Joseph K.; Stinchcombe, Thomas E.; Gu Lin; Wang Xiaofei; Morano, Karen; Bogart, Jeffrey A.; Crawford, Jeffrey C.; Socinski, Mark A.; Blackstock, A. William; Vokes, Everett E.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30105 tested two different concurrent chemoradiotherapy platforms with high-dose (74 Gy) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy for Stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to determine if either could achieve a primary endpoint of >18-month median survival. Final results of 30105 demonstrated that induction carboplatin and gemcitabine and concurrent gemcitabine 3D-CRT was not feasible because of treatment-related toxicity. However, induction and concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel with 74 Gy 3D-CRT had a median survival of 24 months, and is the basis for the experimental arm in CALGB 30610/RTOG 0617/N0628. We conducted a secondary analysis of all patients to determine predictors of treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patient, tumor, and treatment-related variables were analyzed to determine their relation with treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Results: Older age, higher N stage, larger planning target volume (PTV)1, smaller total lung volume/PTV1 ratio, larger V20, and larger mean lung dose were associated with increasing pulmonary toxicity on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that V20 and nodal stage as well as treatment with concurrent gemcitabine were associated with treatment-related toxicity. A high-risk group comprising patients with N3 disease and V20 >38% was associated with 80% of Grades 3-5 pulmonary toxicity cases. Conclusions: Elevated V20 and N3 disease status are important predictors of treatment related pulmonary toxicity in patients treated with high-dose 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Further studies may use these metrics in considering patients for these treatments.

  12. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Reduces the Dose to Normal Tissue Compared With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy or Passive Scattering Proton Therapy and Enables Individualized Radical Radiotherapy for Extensive Stage IIIB Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Virtual Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaodong; Li Yupeng; Pan Xiaoning; Xiaoqiang, Li; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Chang, Joe Y.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To compare dose volume histograms of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) with those of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT) for the treatment of stage IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to explore the possibility of individualized radical radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Dose volume histograms designed to deliver IMRT at 60 to 63 Gy, PSPT at 74 Gy, and IMPT at the same doses were compared and the use of individualized radical radiotherapy was assessed in patients with extensive stage IIIB NSCLC (n = 10 patients for each approach). These patients were selected based on their extensive disease and were considered to have no or borderline tolerance to IMRT at 60 to 63 Gy, based on the dose to normal tissue volume constraints (lung volume receiving 20 Gy [V20] of <35%, total mean lung dose <20 Gy; spinal cord dose, <45 Gy). The possibility of increasing the total tumor dose with IMPT for each patient without exceeding the dose volume constraints (maximum tolerated dose [MTD]) was also investigated. Results: Compared with IMRT, IMPT spared more lung, heart, spinal cord, and esophagus, even with dose escalation from 63 Gy to 83.5 Gy, with a mean MTD of 74 Gy. Compared with PSPT, IMPT allowed further dose escalation from 74 Gy to a mean MTD of 84.4 Gy (range, 79.4-88.4 Gy) while all parameters of normal tissue sparing were kept at lower or similar levels. In addition, IMPT prevented lower-dose target coverage in patients with complicated tumor anatomies. Conclusions: IMPT reduces the dose to normal tissue and allows individualized radical radiotherapy for extensive stage IIIB NSCLC.

  13. NCCTG N0821 (Alliance): A phase II first-line study of pemetrexed, carboplatin and bevacizumab in elderly patients with advanced nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer with good performance status

    PubMed Central

    Dy, Grace K.; Molina, Julian R.; Qi, Yingwei; Ansari, Rafat; Thomas, Sachdev; Ross, Helen J.; Soori, Gamini; Anderson, Daniel; Aubry, Marie Christine; Meyers, Jeffrey; Adjei, Araba A.; Mandrekar, Sumithra; Adjei, Alex A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We hypothesized that the combination of bevacizumab, carboplatin and pemetrexed will be an effective first-line regimen in fit, elderly patients with nonsquamous NSCLC. PATIENTS AND METHODS Treatment-naïve, stage IIIB/IV nonsquamous NSCLC patients ≥ 70 years old with good performance status (ECOG PS 0-1) and adequate organ function were eligible. Carboplatin AUC 6, pemetrexed 500 mg/m2 and bevacizumab 15 mg/kg were administered on day 1 of each 21-day cycle (up to 6 cycles) followed by maintenance pemetrexed and bevacizumab. The primary endpoint of 6-month progression-free survival rate (PFS6) of at least 70% was assessed using a one-stage binomial design. Quality of life (QOL) questionnaires were administered. Polymorphisms in genes encoding relevant proteins (drug targets, transport and metabolism proteins) were correlated with treatment outcome. RESULTS Fifty-seven eligible patients were enrolled. Median age was 74.5 years. Median treatment cycles received was 6. The most common grade 3 or higher non-hematologic adverse events were fatigue (26%) and hypertension (11%). 16% had grade 4 neutropenia and 6.5% had grade 4 thrombocytopenia. Three patients experienced grade 3/4 hemorrhagic events (one pulmonary, two gastrointestinal). Primary endpoint of PFS6 was 60% (95% CI: 45.9–73%). Median PFS was 7.0 months (95% CI: 5.9–10.1), median overall survival was 13.7 months (95% CI: 9.4–16.8). Polymorphic KDR and VEGFA variants correlated with survival and toxicity, respectively. There was no significant change in overall QOL scores over time. CONCLUSION This regimen is feasible and did not decrease the QOL in this study population. However, it did not meet the primary efficacy endpoint. PMID:25157767

  14. Identification of serum proteome components associated with progression of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pietrowska, Monika; Jelonek, Karol; Michalak, Malwina; Roś, Małgorzata; Rodziewicz, Paweł; Chmielewska, Klaudia; Polański, Krzysztof; Polańska, Joanna; Gdowicz-Kłosok, Agnieszka; Giglok, Monika; Suwiński, Rafał; Tarnawski, Rafał; Dziadziuszko, Rafał; Rzyman, Witold; Widłak, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to perform comparative analysis of serum from patients with different stages of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using the three complementary proteomic approaches to identify proteome components associated with the progression of cancer. Serum samples were collected before any treatment from 200 patients with NSCLC, including 103 early stage, 64 locally advanced and 33 metastatic cancer samples, and from 200 donors without malignancy. The low-molecular-weight fraction of serum proteome was MALDI-profiled in all samples. Serum proteins were characterized using 2D-PAGE and LC-MS/MS approaches in a representative group of 30 donors. Several significant differences were detected between serum samples collected from patients with early stage cancer and patients with locally advanced cancer, as well as between patients with metastatic cancer and patients with local disease. Of note, serum components discriminating samples from early stage cancer and healthy persons were also detected. In general, about 70 differentiating serum proteins were identified, including inflammatory and acute phase proteins already reported to be associated with the progression of lung cancer (serum amyloid A or haptoglobin). Several differentiating proteins, including apolipoprotein H or apolipoprotein A1, were not previously associated with NSCLC. No significant differences in patterns of serum proteome components were detected between patients with adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. In conclusion, we identified the biomarker candidates with potential importance for molecular proteomic staging of NSCLC. Additionally, several serum proteome components revealed their potential applicability in early detection of the lung cancer. PMID:24872961

  15. Trial Comparing the Use of FLT PET to Standard CT to Assess Treatment Response of Neoadjuvant Docetaxel and Cisplatin in Stage IB-IIIA Resectable NSCLC

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-30

    Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  16. Vaccine therapy in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Albright, Carol; Garst, Jennifer

    2007-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer worldwide. First-line therapy is based on stage at diagnosis and can include chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. Despite advances, the prognosis for advanced-stage lung cancer is very poor. Vaccines with the capability to activate the host immune system may have a role in second-line therapy. Advances in the understanding of cellular and molecular immunology are forming the basis for improving vaccine therapy. Most trials to date have demonstrated safety but inconsistent efficacy. Further research is needed to enhance this potential. PMID:17588347

  17. Therapeutic cancer vaccines in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Limacher, Jean-Marc; Spring-Giusti, Clémentine; Bellon, Nadine; Ancian, Philippe; Rooke, Ronald; Bonnefoy, Jean-Yves

    2013-03-01

    Therapeutic vaccines are different from the well-known prophylactic vaccines in that they are designed to treat patients already suffering from a disease instead of preventing the disease in healthy individuals. Several therapeutic vaccines are today in late-stage clinical development for non-small-cell lung cancer. These vaccines use different approaches including peptides, cell lines and viral vectors, and explore different settings within the pathology. Some are given in monotherapy while others are combined with the classic therapies used with non-small-cell lung cancer. This review gives a summary of the therapeutic vaccines currently in late-stage clinical development for non-small-cell lung cancer. PMID:23496666

  18. Curative radiotherapy in non-small cell carcinoma of the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Talton, B.M.; Constable, W.C.; Kersh, C.R. )

    1990-07-01

    Recent reports suggest radiotherapy administered to the 5000-6000 cGy level can result in significant long-term survival in non-small cell carcinoma of the lung. This is particularly true for many cases that are technically operable but for medical or other reasons thoracotomy cannot be performed. Such patients drawn from Southern Appalachia where the principal industry is coal mining are the subject of this report. In this region coal miners pneumoconiosis (black lung) is common as well as other chronic respiratory disorders resulting in poor tolerance for surgery. Three hundred and eleven cases of non-small cell carcinoma were irradiated during the 4 years of 1980 through 1983. This group consisted of 77 patients with clinical Stage T1, T2, T3 all N0, M0 tumors, the majority of which were technically operable but upon whom no thoracotomy was performed because of medical reasons or patient refusal. All are available for 5-year study. Each of these patients was uniformly irradiated to 6000 cGy target dose in 30 fractions over 6 weeks using standard techniques.Comparison with reported surgical series treated for cure show little difference in survival up to 2 years. Thereafter, the survival curves diverge with radiotherapy patients dying at a somewhat higher rate although by 4 years both survival curves slope similarly. A possible explanation for this difference is the advantage thoracotomy offers in early case selection allowing exclusion of advance cases from surgical reports whereas radiotherapy must include patients with occult local metastasis not identifiable on clinical grounds. This experience, among other reports include evidence that radiotherapy can result in long-term survival or cure with minimal morbidity in lung cancer patients in whom surgery carries excessive risk.

  19. Advanced two-stage incineration: Research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Rehmat, A.; Khinkis, M.

    1991-01-01

    IGT is currently developing a two-stage fluidized-bed/cyclonic agglomerating incineration system that is based on combining the fluidized-bed agglomeration/incineration and cyclonic combustion technologies, both of which have been developed individually at IGT over many years. This combination has resulted in a unique and extremely flexible incinerator for solid, liquid, and gaseous wastes. The system can operate over a wide range of conditions in the first stage, from low temperature (desorption) to high temperature (agglomeration), including gasification of high-Btu wastes. In the combined system, solid, liquid, and gaseous organic wastes are expected to be easily and efficiently destroyed (>99.99% destruction and removal efficiency (DRE)) while solid inorganic contaminants are expected to be contained within a glassy matrix, rendering them benign and suitable for disposal in an ordinary landfill. The development of the two-stage incinerator is a culmination of extensive research and development efforts on each stage of the incinerator. A variety of data obtained for both stages includes agglomeration of ash, incineration and reclamation of used blast grit and foundry sand, partial combustion of carbonaceous fuels, in-situ desulfurization, combustion of low-Btu gases, incineration of industrial wastewater, and incineration of carbon tetrachloride.

  20. New targeted treatments for non-small-cell lung cancer - role of nivolumab.

    PubMed

    Zago, Giulia; Muller, Mirte; van den Heuvel, Michel; Baas, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is often diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease, where it is no longer amenable to curative treatment. During the last decades, the survival has only improved significantly for lung cancer patients who have tumors harboring a driver mutation. Therefore, there is a clear unmet need for effective therapies for patients with no mutation. Immunotherapy has emerged as an effective treatment for different cancer types. Nivolumab, a monoclonal inhibitory antibody against PD-1 receptor, can prolong survival of NSCLC patients, with a manageable toxicity profile. In two Phase III trials, nivolumab was compared to docetaxel in patients with, respectively, squamous (CheckMate 017) and non-squamous NSCLC (CheckMate 057). In both trials, nivolumab significantly reduced the risk of death compared to docetaxel (41% and 27% lower risk of death for squamous and non-squamous NSCLC, respectively). Therefore, nivolumab has been approved in the US and in Europe as second-line treatment for advanced NSCLC. Unfortunately, accurate predictive factors for patient selection are lacking, making it difficult to decide who will benefit and who will not. Currently, there are many ongoing trials that evaluate the efficacy of nivolumab in different settings and in combination with other agents. This paper reviews the present literature about the role of nivolumab in the treatment of NSCLC. Particular attention has been given to efficacy studies, toxicity profile, and current and emerging predictive factors. PMID:27536062

  1. New targeted treatments for non-small-cell lung cancer – role of nivolumab

    PubMed Central

    Zago, Giulia; Muller, Mirte; van den Heuvel, Michel; Baas, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is often diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease, where it is no longer amenable to curative treatment. During the last decades, the survival has only improved significantly for lung cancer patients who have tumors harboring a driver mutation. Therefore, there is a clear unmet need for effective therapies for patients with no mutation. Immunotherapy has emerged as an effective treatment for different cancer types. Nivolumab, a monoclonal inhibitory antibody against PD-1 receptor, can prolong survival of NSCLC patients, with a manageable toxicity profile. In two Phase III trials, nivolumab was compared to docetaxel in patients with, respectively, squamous (CheckMate 017) and non-squamous NSCLC (CheckMate 057). In both trials, nivolumab significantly reduced the risk of death compared to docetaxel (41% and 27% lower risk of death for squamous and non-squamous NSCLC, respectively). Therefore, nivolumab has been approved in the US and in Europe as second-line treatment for advanced NSCLC. Unfortunately, accurate predictive factors for patient selection are lacking, making it difficult to decide who will benefit and who will not. Currently, there are many ongoing trials that evaluate the efficacy of nivolumab in different settings and in combination with other agents. This paper reviews the present literature about the role of nivolumab in the treatment of NSCLC. Particular attention has been given to efficacy studies, toxicity profile, and current and emerging predictive factors. PMID:27536062

  2. Local Therapy Indications in the Management of Patients with Oligometastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas A; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    Advances in surgical, radiation, and interventional radiology therapies carry a reduction in morbidity associated with therapy. Aggressive management of patients with oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer offers the potential for improved disease-free survival and quality of life compared with traditional systemic therapy alone. PMID:27261919

  3. Factors related to advanced stage oral squamous cell carcinoma in southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kerdpon, D; Sriplung, H

    2001-04-01

    A critical factor that indicates a poor prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is advanced stage disease. This study, therefore, aimed to identify the factors related to advanced stage (TNM staging III, IV) OSCC in Thailand. There were 161 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and lip (ICD-9 140, 141, 143-5), included in the study. Sixty-two per cent of the patients presented with advanced stage disease. Information on demographic characteristics, risk habits, health-seeking behaviour prior to health care professional (HCP) consultation, tumour characteristics and patient and professional delay was obtained by questionnaire-based interview of the patients. These variables were included as initial variables in a logistic regression to calculate the odds ratio (OR) of advanced versus early stage OSCC. Having traditional herbal medication before HCP consultation significantly increased the risk of advanced stage OSCC (OR 5.77; 95% C.I. 1.25-26.62). Floor of mouth location of tumour was associated with a lower risk of advanced stage disease (OR 0.27; 95% C.I. 0.09-0.82) as was having an ulcer (OR 0.43, 95% C.I. 0.02-0.89). The findings indicate that having traditional herbal medication before HCP consultation increased the risk of advanced stage disease. The lower risk of advanced stage OSCC associated with ulcerative tumours and those on the floor of the mouth may be due to their being more readily detected by the patients. PMID:11287274

  4. East Asian Subgroup Analysis of a Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase 3 Study of Docetaxel and Ramucirumab Versus Docetaxel and Placebo in the Treatment of Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Following Disease Progression after One Prior Platinum-Based Therapy (REVEL)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Keunchil; Kim, Joo-Hang; Cho, Eun Kyung; Kang, Jin-Hyoung; Shih, Jin-Yuan; Zimmermann, Annamaria Hayden; Lee, Pablo; Alexandris, Ekaterine; Puri, Tarun; Orlando, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose REVEL demonstrated improved overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and objective response rate (ORR) with docetaxel+ramucirumab versus docetaxel+placebo in 1,253 intent-to-treat (ITT) stage IV non-small cell lung cancer patients with disease progression following platinum-based chemotherapy. Results from the East Asian subgroup analysis are reported. Materials and Methods Subgroup analyses were performed in the East Asian ITT population (n=89). Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression were performed for OS and PFS, and the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test was performed for response rate. Results In docetaxel+ramucirumab (n=43) versus docetaxel+placebo (n=46), median OS was 15.44 months versus 10.17 months (hazard ratio [HR], 0.762; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.444 to 1.307), median PFS was 4.88 months versus 2.79 months (HR, 0.658; 95% CI, 0.408 to 1.060), and ORR was 25.6% (95% CI, 13.5 to 41.2) versus 8.7% (95% CI, 2.4 to 20.8). Due to increased incidence of neutropenia and febrile neutropenia in East Asian patients, starting dose of docetaxel was reduced for newly enrolled East Asian patients (75 to 60 mg/m2, n=24). In docetaxel+ramucirumab versus docetaxel+placebo, incidence of neutropenia was 84.4% versus 72.7% (75 mg/m2) and 54.5% versus 38.5% (60 mg/m2). Incidence of febrile neutropenia was 43.8% versus 12.1% (75 mg/m2) and 0% versus 7.7% (60 mg/m2). Conclusion Results of this subgroup analysis showed a trend favoring ramucirumab+docetaxel for median OS, PFS, and improved ORR in East Asian patients, consistent with ITT population results. Reduction of starting dose of docetaxel in East Asian patients was associated with improved safety. PMID:26910471

  5. Exprimental Results of the First Two Stages of an Advanced Transonic Core Compressor Under Isolated and Multi-Stage Conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Patricia S.; Kulkarni, Sameer; Sohn, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program calls for investigation of the technology barriers associated with improved fuel efficiency for large gas turbine engines. Under ERA, the highly loaded core compressor technology program attempts to realize the fuel burn reduction goal by increasing overall pressure ratio of the compressor to increase thermal efficiency of the engine. Study engines with overall pressure ratio of 60 to 70 are now being investigated. This means that the high pressure compressor would have to almost double in pressure ratio while keeping a high level of efficiency. NASA and GE teamed to address this challenge by testing the first two stages of an advanced GE compressor designed to meet the requirements of a very high pressure ratio core compressor. Previous test experience of a compressor which included these front two stages indicated a performance deficit relative to design intent. Therefore, the current rig was designed to run in 1-stage and 2-stage configurations in two separate tests to assess whether the bow shock of the second rotor interacting with the upstream stage contributed to the unpredicted performance deficit, or if the culprit was due to interaction of rotor 1 and stator 1. Thus, the goal was to fully understand the stage 1 performance under isolated and multi-stage conditions, and additionally to provide a detailed aerodynamic data set for CFD validation. Full use was made of steady and unsteady measurement methods to understand fluid dynamics loss source mechanisms due to rotor shock interaction and endwall losses. This paper will present the description of the compressor test article and its measured performance and operability, for both the single stage and two stage configurations. We focus the paper on measurements at 97% corrected speed with design intent vane setting angles.

  6. The Critical Technologies and Applications on Advanced Upper Stage Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Feng; Wang, Guo-hui

    2016-07-01

    Upper Stage Vehicle(USV) is a kind of independent one-stop-into-space launching vehicles. In this article, different new-conception USVs are mentioned and out of them, on basis of the possibility in future application, laser propelling USV and nuclear-thermal propelling USV are selected and discussed in technical details, especially in critical technologies and recent relative technical improvements about new propelling methods within these two kinds. Furthermore, laser propelled USV and nuclear-thermal propelled USV both seem to have important roles to play in future space exploring projects. And several possible applications of the two kinds of USVs emphasized above are carried out at the end of this piece of article.

  7. Telomerase activity in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dobija-Kubica, Katarzyna; Bruliński, Krzysztof; Rogoziński, Paweł; Wiczkowski, Andrzej; Gawrychowska, Agata; Gawrychowski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction High telomerase activity has been detected in the majority of malignant neoplasms including lung cancer. The purpose of the study was to attempt to use telomerase activity as a prognostic factor in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and methods Telomerase activity was analyzed in 47 tissue specimens taken from patients with NSCLC. The control group consisted of 30 specimens of non-cancerous lung parenchyma. Telomerase activity was measured by means of the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP). Results Telomerase activity in the neoplastic tissue was significantly higher than in the lung parenchyma that was free from neoplastic infiltration. There was no significant association between telomerase activity and age, gender, tobacco smoking, histological type of the tumor, or staging (pTNM). No association was found between the level of telomerase activity in NSCLC specimens and the two-year survival rate of patients (p = 0.326). A higher level of telomerase activity in poorly differentiated tumors (G3) as compared to moderately differentiated tumors (G2) was detected (p = 0.008). A positive association was identified between telomerase activity in pulmonary parenchyma free from tumor infiltration and the presence of leukocyte infiltration (p = 0.0001). Conclusions No association was found between the level of telomerase activity in NSCLC specimens and the two-year survival rate of patients. The study has revealed a positive association between telomerase activity and the grade of differentiation (G) in NSCLC. PMID:27212973

  8. Bilateral Choroidal Metastasis from Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Namad, Tariq; Wang, Jiang; Tilton, Annemarie; Abdel Karim, Nagla

    2014-01-01

    Breast and lung cancers are the most common primary neoplasms to manifest with choroidal metastases. The incidence of choroidal metastases from metastatic lung cancer was reported to be 2–6.7%. We report a case of bilateral choroidal metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer. A 59-year-old Caucasian female patient, never a smoker, was diagnosed with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma metastatic to the pleura, bones, and the brain. Her initial scan of the chest showed innumerable soft tissue nodules and mediastinal adenopathy compatible with metastatic disease. Her initial brain MRI showed numerous small enhancing lesions consistent with extensive disease. Unfortunately, during her follow-up visits, she presented with bulge on her left eye. Simultaneously, her follow-up chest scan showed increase in the size of the lung nodules. She continued to have a reasonable performance status at that time, except for mild increase in her dyspnea. The choroidal metastases require a multidisciplinary care and should be among the differential patients with malignancy who present with ocular symptoms. PMID:25295203

  9. Autophagy in non-small cell lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shuan; Yang, Heng; Penninger, Josef M; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    In a mouse model of non-small cell lung carcinogenesis, we recently found that the inactivation of the essential autophagy gene Atg5 causes an acceleration of the early phases of oncogenesis. Thus, hyperplastic lesions and adenomas are more frequent at early stages after adenoviral delivery of Cre recombinase via inhalation, when Cre—in addition to activating the KRasG12D oncogene—inactivates both alleles of the Atg5 gene. The accelerated oncogenesis of autophagy-deficient tumors developing in KRas;Atg5fl/fl mice (as compared with autophagy-competent KRas;Atg5fl/+ control tumors) correlates with an increased infiltration by FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Depletion of such Tregs by means of specific monoclonal antibodies inhibits the accelerated oncogenesis of autophagy-deficient tumors down to the level observed in autophagy-competent controls. Subsequent analyses revealed that the combination of KRas activation and Atg5 inactivation favors the expression of ENTPD1/CD39, an ecto-ATPase that initiates the conversion of extracellular ATP, which is immunostimulatory, into adenosine, which is immunosuppressive. Pharmacological inhibition of ENTPD1 or blockade of adenosinergic receptors reduces the infiltration of KRas;Atg5fl/fl tumors by Tregs and reverses accelerated oncogenesis. Altogether these data favor a model according to which autophagy deficiency favors oncogenesis via changes in the tumor microenvironment that ultimately entail the Treg-mediated inhibition of anticancer immunosurveillance. PMID:24413089

  10. Experimental Results of the First Two Stages of an Advanced Transonic Core Compressor Under Isolated and Multi-Stage Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Patricia S.; Kulkarni, Sameer; Sohn, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program calls for investigation of the technology barriers associated with improved fuel efficiency of large gas turbine engines. Under ERA the task for a High Pressure Ratio Core Technology program calls for a higher overall pressure ratio of 60 to 70. This mean that the HPC would have to almost double in pressure ratio and keep its high level of efficiency. The challenge is how to match the corrected mass flow rate of the front two supersonic high reaction and high corrected tip speed stages with a total pressure ratio of 3.5. NASA and GE teamed to address this challenge by using the initial geometry of an advanced GE compressor design to meet the requirements of the first 2 stages of the very high pressure ratio core compressor. The rig was configured to run as a 2 stage machine, with Strut and IGV, Rotor 1 and Stator 1 run as independent tests which were then followed by adding the second stage. The goal is to fully understand the stage performances under isolated and multi-stage conditions and fully understand any differences and provide a detailed aerodynamic data set for CFD validation. Full use was made of steady and unsteady measurement methods to isolate fluid dynamics loss source mechanisms due to interaction and endwalls. The paper will present the description of the compressor test article, its predicted performance and operability, and the experimental results for both the single stage and two stage configurations. We focus the detailed measurements on 97 and 100 of design speed at 3 vane setting angles.

  11. Dyspnea as a Prognostic Factor in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Wooho; Lee, Jong Min; Ha, Jick Hwan; Yeo, Chang Dong; Kang, Hyeon Hui; Rhee, Chin Kook; Moon, Hwa Sik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate associations between dyspnea and clinical outcomes in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and Methods From 2001 to 2014, we retrospectively reviewed the prospective lung cancer database of St. Paul's Hospital at the Catholic University of Korea. We enrolled patients with NSCLC and evaluated symptoms of dyspnea using modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) scores. Also, we estimated pulmonary functions and analyzed survival data. Results In total, 457 NSCLC patients were enrolled, and 259 (56.7%) had dyspnea. Among those with dyspnea and whose mMRC scores were available (109 patients had no mMRC score), 85 (56.6%) patients had an mMRC score <2, while 65 (43.3%) had an mMRC score ≥2. Significant decreased pulmonary functions were observed in patients with dyspnea. In multivariate analysis, aging, poor performance status, advanced stage, low forced expiratory volume in 1 second (%), and an mMRC score ≥2 were found to be significant prognostic factors for patient survival. Conclusion Dyspnea could be a significant prognostic factor in patients with NSCLC. PMID:27401635

  12. Adoptive immunotherapy combined chemoradiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Haili; Wang, Haijuan; Guan, Xiuwen; Yi, Zongbi; Ma, Fei

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacies between adoptive immunotherapy combined chemoradiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy alone in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The databases PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane database were searched to identify eligible clinical trials. Data analyses were carried out using a comprehensive meta-analysis program, version 2 software. A total of seven articles were finally included in the analysis. Meta-analyses showed that compared with chemoradiotherapy alone, adoptive immunotherapy combined with chemoradiotherapy could improve the 2-year overall survival [odds ratio (OR)=2.45, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.60-3.75, P<0.001], but not 2-year progression-free survival (OR=1.81, 95% CI: 0.61-5.36, P=0.284). Specifically, early (OR=3.32, 95% CI: 1.38-7.95, P<0.01) but not advanced (OR=3.75, 95% CI: 0.96-14.68, P=0.057) NSCLC patients were likely to gain a large benefit from the adoptive immunotherapy. Most of the adoptive immunotherapy-induced adverse effects were self-limited, mainly including fever, shiver, nausea, fatigue, etc. and severe toxicities were not observed. Adoptive immunotherapy combined with chemoradiotherapy can delay the recurrence of NSCLC and improve survival in patients, where the benefits are even more significant in patients with early-stage NSCLC. PMID:26872311

  13. Surgical treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer in octogenarians

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Miguel; Neves, Paulo; Miranda, José

    2013-01-01

    Reluctance to recommend lung cancer surgery for octogenarians is partly based on the expectation that the rate of complications and mortality is higher in this group of patients, and on the impression that the life expectancy of an octogenarian with lung cancer is limited by death from natural causes. Moreover, the belief that radiation therapy and observation yield similar results to surgery in early-stage disease have influenced low resection rates in this population. Nevertheless, advances in surgical techniques, anaesthesia and postoperative care have made surgical lung resection a safer procedure than it was in the past. Judging from the more recent findings, surgery should not be withheld because of postoperative mortality, but suboptimal or palliative treatment may be necessary in patients with poor physical or mental function. To enable informed decision-making, both patients and clinicians need information on the risks of surgical treatment. In this review, available information from the literature was collected in an effort to understand the real benefit of surgical treatment in octogenarians with non-small-cell lung cancer, and to determine what should be done or avoided during the selection course. PMID:23396622

  14. Bronchial involvement in advanced stage lymphangioleiomyomatosis: histopathologic and molecular analyses.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takuo; Kumasaka, Toshio; Mitani, Keiko; Okada, Yoshinori; Kondo, Takashi; Date, Hiroshi; Chen, Fengshi; Oto, Takahiro; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Akinori; Hara, Kieko; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Ando, Katsutoshi; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Gunji-Niitsu, Yoko; Kunogi, Makiko; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yao, Takashi; Seyama, Kuniaki

    2016-04-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), a rare progressive disease that almost exclusively affects women, is characterized by pulmonary cysts and neoplastic proliferation of smooth muscle-like cells (LAM cells). Airflow obstruction is a physiologic consequence that is commonly observed in LAM and has been attributed to narrowing of peripheral airways. However, histopathologic examinations of the entire airway have been precluded by the limited availability of such specimens. Here, we used explanted lung tissues from 30 LAM patients for a thorough histologic analysis with a special emphasis on the bronchi. We found bronchial involvement by LAM cells and lymphatics in all patients examined. Furthermore, a moderate to severe degree of chronic inflammation (73%), goblet cell hyperplasia (97%), squamous cell metaplasia (83%) of the epithelium, and thickening of basal lamina (93%) were identified in the bronchi. Because LAM cells are transformed by the functional loss of the TSC genes leading to a hyperactivated mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway, we confirmed the expression of phospho-p70S6K, phospho-S6, phospho-4E-BP1, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-D in LAM cells from all of the patients examined. In contrast, no protein expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, a downstream molecule indicative of mTORC1 activation and leading to VEGF production, was detected in any patient. Our study indicates that late-stage LAM patients commonly have bronchi involved by the proliferation of both LAM cells and lymphatics and that chronic inflammation complicated their disease. Furthermore, the up-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, a common event in mTORC1-driven tumor cells, does not occur in LAM cells and plays no role in VEGF-D expression in LAM cells. PMID:26997436

  15. Time-to-Progression of NSCLC from Early to Advanced Stages: An Analysis of data from SEER Registry and a Single Institute

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ping; Cao, Jin Lin; Rustam, Azmat; Zhang, Chong; Yuan, Xiao Shuai; Bao, Fei Chao; Lv, Wang; Hu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The average time required for cancers to progress through stages can be reflected in the average age of the patients diagnosed at each stage of disease. To estimate the time it takes for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to progress through different tumor, node and metastasis (TNM) stages and sizes, we compared the mean adjusted age of 45904 NSCLC patients with different stages and tumor sizes from Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry database and our institute. Multiple-linear-regression models for age were generated adjusting for various factors. Caucasian, African-American and Asian patients with stage IA cancers were on average 0.8, 1.0 and 1.38 adjusted years younger, respectively, than those with stage IIIB cancers (p < 0.001). And these with T1a cancers were on average 0.84, 0.92 and 1.21 adjusted years younger, respectively, than patients with T3 cancers (p < 0.001). Patients with tumors measuring larger than 8 cm in diameter were on average 0.85 adjusted years older than these with tumors smaller than 1 cm (p < 0.001), with Caucasian demonstrating the shortest age span (0.79 years, P < 0.001). In conclusion, the time-to-progression of NSCLC from early to advanced stages varied among ethnicities, Caucasian patients demonstrating a more rapid progression nature of tumor than their African-American and Asian counterparts. PMID:27346236

  16. Executive summary of the SEPAR recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Villar Álvarez, Felipe; Muguruza Trueba, Ignacio; Belda Sanchis, José; Molins López-Rodó, Laureano; Rodríguez Suárez, Pedro Miguel; Sánchez de Cos Escuín, Julio; Barreiro, Esther; Borrego Pintado, M Henar; Disdier Vicente, Carlos; Flandes Aldeyturriaga, Javier; Gámez García, Pablo; Garrido López, Pilar; León Atance, Pablo; Izquierdo Elena, José Miguel; Novoa Valentín, Nuria M; Rivas de Andrés, Juan José; Royo Crespo, Íñigo; Salvatierra Velázquez, Ángel; Seijo Maceiras, Luís M; Solano Reina, Segismundo; Aguiar Bujanda, David; Avila Martínez, Régulo J; de Granda Orive, Jose Ignacio; de Higes Martinez, Eva; Diaz-Hellín Gude, Vicente; Embún Flor, Raúl; Freixinet Gilart, Jorge L; García Jiménez, María Dolores; Hermoso Alarza, Fátima; Hernández Sarmiento, Samuel; Honguero Martínez, Antonio Francisco; Jimenez Ruiz, Carlos A; López Sanz, Iker; Mariscal de Alba, Andrea; Martínez Vallina, Primitivo; Menal Muñoz, Patricia; Mezquita Pérez, Laura; Olmedo García, María Eugenia; Rombolá, Carlos A; San Miguel Arregui, Iñigo; de Valle Somiedo Gutiérrez, María; Triviño Ramírez, Ana Isabel; Trujillo Reyes, Joan Carles; Vallejo, Carmen; Vaquero Lozano, Paz; Varela Simó, Gonzalo; Zulueta, Javier J

    2016-07-01

    The Thoracic Surgery and Thoracic Oncology groups of the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR) have backed the publication of a handbook on recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Due to the high incidence and mortality of this disease, the best scientific evidence must be constantly updated and made available for consultation by healthcare professionals. To draw up these recommendations, we called on a wide-ranging group of experts from the different specialties, who have prepared a comprehensive review, divided into 4 main sections. The first addresses disease prevention and screening, including risk factors, the role of smoking cessation, and screening programs for early diagnosis. The second section analyzes clinical presentation, imaging studies, and surgical risk, including cardiological risk and the evaluation of respiratory function. The third section addresses cytohistological confirmation and staging studies, and scrutinizes the TNM and histological classifications, non-invasive and minimally invasive sampling methods, and surgical techniques for diagnosis and staging. The fourth and final section looks at different therapeutic aspects, such as the role of surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, a multidisciplinary approach according to disease stage, and other specifically targeted treatments, concluding with recommendations on the follow-up of lung cancer patients and surgical and endoscopic palliative interventions in advanced stages. PMID:27237592

  17. Executive summary of the SEPAR recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Villar Álvarez, Felipe; Muguruza Trueba, Ignacio; Belda Sanchis, José; Molins López-Rodó, Laureano; Rodríguez Suárez, Pedro Miguel; Sánchez de Cos Escuín, Julio; Barreiro, Esther; Borrego Pintado, M Henar; Disdier Vicente, Carlos; Flandes Aldeyturriaga, Javier; Gámez García, Pablo; Garrido López, Pilar; León Atance, Pablo; Izquierdo Elena, José Miguel; Novoa Valentín, Nuria M; Rivas de Andrés, Juan José; Royo Crespo, Íñigo; Salvatierra Velázquez, Ángel; Seijo Maceiras, Luís M; Solano Reina, Segismundo; Aguiar Bujanda, David; Avila Martínez, Régulo J; de Granda Orive, Jose Ignacio; de Higes Martinez, Eva; Diaz-Hellín Gude, Vicente; Embún Flor, Raúl; Freixinet Gilart, Jorge L; García Jiménez, María Dolores; Hermoso Alarza, Fátima; Hernández Sarmiento, Samuel; Honguero Martínez, Antonio Francisco; Jimenez Ruiz, Carlos A; López Sanz, Iker; Mariscal de Alba, Andrea; Martínez Vallina, Primitivo; Menal Muñoz, Patricia; Mezquita Pérez, Laura; Olmedo García, María Eugenia; Rombolá, Carlos A; San Miguel Arregui, Iñigo; de Valle Somiedo Gutiérrez, María; Triviño Ramírez, Ana Isabel; Trujillo Reyes, Joan Carles; Vallejo, Carmen; Vaquero Lozano, Paz; Varela Simó, Gonzalo; Zulueta, Javier J

    2016-07-01

    The Thoracic Surgery and Thoracic Oncology groups of the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR) have backed the publication of a handbook on recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Due to the high incidence and mortality of this disease, the best