Science.gov

Sample records for advanced stomach cancer

  1. Stomach Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... with stomach acid and helps digest protein. Stomach cancer mostly affects older people - two-thirds of people ... Smoke cigarettes Have a family history of stomach cancer It is hard to diagnose stomach cancer in ...

  2. Stomach cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - stomach; Gastric cancer; Gastric carcinoma; Adenocarcinoma of the stomach ... Several types of cancer can occur in the stomach. The most common type is called adenocarcinoma. It starts from one of the cell ...

  3. What Is Stomach Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment? Stomach Cancer About Stomach Cancer What Is Stomach Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body ... normal structure and function of the stomach. The stomach After food is chewed and swallowed, it enters ...

  4. Snapshot of Stomach Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Careers Visitor Information Search Search Home Cancer Types Stomach (Gastric) Cancer—Patient Version Health Professional Version Overview Gastric (stomach) cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) ...

  5. Saracatinib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Stomach or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-19

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  6. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... is the fourth most common cancer in the world. The number of deaths from stomach cancer has ... risk of stomach cancer: Diet Not eating enough fresh fruits and vegetables is linked to an increased ...

  7. Bevacizumab and Combination Chemotherapy Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Esophageal or Stomach Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage IA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer

  8. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Vismodegib in Treating Patients With Advanced Stomach Cancer or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-16

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  9. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... finding cancer before it causes symptoms ) decreases a person's chance of dying from the disease. For some types of cancer, ... Studies showed that screening a large number of people for stomach cancer using these tests did not decrease the risk of dying from stomach cancer. More studies are needed to ...

  10. What Happens After Treatment for Stomach Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Stomach Cancer? For some people with stomach cancer, treatment ... Treatment for Stomach Cancer Stops Working More In Stomach Cancer About Stomach Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  11. C-Met Inhibitor AMG 337, Oxaliplatin, Leucovorin Calcium, and Fluorouracil in Treating Patients With Advanced Stomach or Esophageal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-16

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Gastrointestinal Cancer; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  12. Irinotecan Hydrochloride With or Without Alvocidib in Treating Patients With Advanced Stomach or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-09

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  13. Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Esophageal Cancer or Stomach Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer

  14. Microanalysis of stomach cancer glycosaminoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Weyers, Amanda; Yang, Bo; Park, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Yong-Seok; Kim, Sun-Moon; Lee, Sang-Eok; Zhang, Fuming; Lee, Kyung Bok; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGS) are anionic, linear, polysaccharides involved in cell signaling. The GAG content, composition and structure of human tissue have been suggested to play a role in cancer and might provide useful diagnostic or prognostic markers. The current study examines 17 stomach tissue biopsy samples taken from normal individuals and from patients with gastric cancers. An ultrasensitive liquid chromatography (LC) – mass spectrometry assay was applied to individual biopsy samples as small 250 µg providing GAG content and disaccharide composition. The results of these analyses show a significant increase in non-sulfated chondroitin/dermatan sulfate concentration in all cancer samples when compared to normal tissues. In addition in advanced gastric cancer, a significant decrease is observed in hyaluronan. PMID:23604988

  15. Pilot Trial of CRLX101 in Treatment of Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Stomach, Gastroesophageal, or Esophageal Cancer That Cannot be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  16. Macronutrient intake and stomach cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinfu; La Vecchia, Carlo; Negri, Eva; de Groh, Margaret; Morrison, Howard; Mery, Les

    2015-06-01

    This study examines the association between intake of selected macronutrients and the risk of stomach cancer in a Northern American population. Mailed questionnaires were completed between 1994 and 1997 in eight Canadian provinces by 1,181 incident, histologically confirmed cases of stomach cancer and 5,039 population controls. Information on nutrient intake was obtained using a food frequency questionnaire. Odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived through unconditional logistic regression to adjust for potential confounders, including an estimate of total energy intake. Intakes of total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol were significantly associated with the risk of stomach cancer: The ORs for the highest versus the lowest quartile were 1.58 (95% CI 1.13-2.20), 1.86 (95% CI 1.37-2.52), and 1.75 (95% CI 1.36-2.25), respectively. Total fiber was inversely associated with stomach cancer (p = 0.03). The positive associations with intake of total fat and saturated fat were apparently stronger in women, overweight or obese subjects, and ever smokers. Saturated fat was specifically associated with increased risk of gastric cardia cancer, with an OR of 3.31 (95% CI 1.48-7.43). A diet high in saturated fat appears to increase the risk of stomach cancer, particularly among obese subjects and for gastric cardia cancer.

  17. Surgery For Stomach Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube , remains outside of the skin on the abdomen. Through this, liquid nutrition can be put directly into the intestine to ... to eat or drink enough to get adequate nutrition. A minor operation can be done to place a feeding tube through the skin of the abdomen and into the distal part of the stomach ( ...

  18. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Stomach Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Stomach Cancer? As you cope with cancer and cancer ... Ask Your Doctor About Stomach Cancer? More In Stomach Cancer About Stomach Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  19. Can Breath Test Detect Stomach Cancers Earlier?

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_163342.html Can Breath Test Detect Stomach Cancers Earlier? New technology may also spot esophageal ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A breath test to detect stomach and esophageal cancers shows promise, researchers say. The ...

  20. Effectiveness of laparoscopic stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy for patients with gastric outlet obstruction caused by advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Suda, Koichi; Satoh, Seiji; Kawamura, Yuichiro; Inaba, Kazuki; Ishida, Yoshinori; Uyama, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Distal advanced gastric cancer (AGC) occasionally causes gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). We developed a laparoscopic stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy (LSPGJ) to restore the ability of food intake. This was a retrospective study performed at a single institution. Of consecutive 78 patients with GOO caused by AGC between 2006 and 2012, 43 patients who underwent LSPGJ were enrolled. The procedure was performed in an antiperistaltic Billroth II fashion, and the afferent loop was elevated and fixed along the staple line of the proximal partitioned stomach. Then, patients for whom R0 resection was planned received chemotherapy prior to laparoscopic gastrectomy. The primary end point was food intake at the time of discharge, which was evaluated using the GOO scoring system (GOOSS). Short- and long-term outcomes were assessed as secondary end points. Overall survival was estimated and compared between the groups who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery (NAC group), definitive chemotherapy followed by curative resection (Conversion group), and best supportive care (BSC group). The median operative time was 92 min, blood loss did not exceed 30 g in any patient, and postoperative complications (Clavien-Dindo grade ≥2) were only seen in four patients (9.3 %). The median time to food intake was 3 days, and GOOSS scores were significantly improved in 41 patients (95.3 %). Chemotherapy was administered to 38 patients (88.4 %), of whom 11 later underwent radical resection, and 4 of 11 patients underwent conversion surgery following definitive chemotherapy. Median survival times were significantly superior in the NAC (n = 7; 46.8 months) and Conversion (n = 4; 35.9 months) groups than in the BSC group (n = 26; 12.2 months); however, the difference was not significant between the Conversion and NAC groups. LSPGJ is a feasible and safe minimally invasive induction surgery for patients with GOO from surgical and oncological perspectives.

  1. Risks of Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... finding cancer before it causes symptoms ) decreases a person's chance of dying from the disease. For some types of cancer, ... Studies showed that screening a large number of people for stomach cancer using these tests did not decrease the risk of dying from stomach cancer. More studies are needed to ...

  2. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Compared With Surgery Alone for Locally Advanced Cancer of the Stomach and Cardia: European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Randomized Trial 40954

    PubMed Central

    Schuhmacher, Christoph; Gretschel, Stephan; Lordick, Florian; Reichardt, Peter; Hohenberger, Werner; Eisenberger, Claus F.; Haag, Cornelie; Mauer, Murielle E.; Hasan, Baktiar; Welch, John; Ott, Katja; Hoelscher, Arnulf; Schneider, Paul M.; Bechstein, Wolf; Wilke, Hans; Lutz, Manfred P.; Nordlinger, Bernard; Cutsem, Eric Van; Siewert, Jörg R.; Schlag, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Patients with locally advanced gastric cancer benefit from combined pre- and postoperative chemotherapy, although fewer than 50% could receive postoperative chemotherapy. We examined the value of purely preoperative chemotherapy in a phase III trial with strict preoperative staging and surgical resection guidelines. Patients and Methods Patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the stomach or esophagogastric junction (AEG II and III) were randomly assigned to preoperative chemotherapy followed by surgery or to surgery alone. To detect with 80% power an improvement in median survival from 17 months with surgery alone to 24 months with neoadjuvant, 282 events were required. Results This trial was stopped for poor accrual after 144 patients were randomly assigned (72:72); 52.8% patients had tumors located in the proximal third of the stomach, including AEG type II and III. The International Union Against Cancer R0 resection rate was 81.9% after neoadjuvant chemotherapy as compared with 66.7% with surgery alone (P = .036). The surgery-only group had more lymph node metastases than the neoadjuvant group (76.5% v 61.4%; P = .018). Postoperative complications were more frequent in the neoadjuvant arm (27.1% v 16.2%; P = .09). After a median follow-up of 4.4 years and 67 deaths, a survival benefit could not be shown (hazard ratio, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.52 to 1.35; P = .466). Conclusion This trial showed a significantly increased R0 resection rate but failed to demonstrate a survival benefit. Possible explanations are low statistical power, a high rate of proximal gastric cancer including AEG and/or a better outcome than expected after radical surgery alone due to the high quality of surgery with resections of regional lymph nodes outside the perigastic area (celiac trunc, hepatic ligament, lymph node at a. lienalis; D2). PMID:21060024

  3. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for stomach (gastric) cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  4. Stomach Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Smoking and H. pylori infection are important risk factors for stomach (gastric) cancer. Learn about all of the risk factors for stomach cancer and how to prevent stomach cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  5. Treatment of stomach cancer, a national experience.

    PubMed

    Valen, B; Viste, A; Haugstvedt, T; Eide, G E; Søreide, O

    1988-07-01

    A total of 1165 patients with stomach cancer were entered into a prospective, observational national study. They represented 54 per cent of all stomach cancer patients reported to the Cancer Registry in Norway during the study period, and data are analysed for three hospital levels (local, county and university hospitals). The median age was 71 years (range 18-96 years). The median pretreatment delay was 113 days, and 46 per cent of patients had a performance status (Karnofsky index) of less than or equal to 80. The diagnosis was confirmed by pre-operative histology in 88 per cent of cases. In all, 88 per cent of patients underwent surgery, the resectability rate was 67 per cent and 50 per cent had a potential curative operation. Total gastrectomy was most commonly performed. Lymph node dissection was performed in 14 per cent of those undergoing a curative resection. The postoperative complication rate was 27 per cent but varied with the type of operation, being highest in proximal resection (55 per cent) and lowest after distal resection (19 per cent). A total of 7 per cent of the patients died postoperatively. Most patients had advanced disease at the time of treatment and only 6 per cent had stage I tumours. There were significant differences in patient and treatment characteristics between the three hospital levels. In conclusion, patient selection bias which will influence results does occur. A fairly aggressive attitude towards local disease was found, but the low proportion of patients undergoing lymph node dissection not only leads to questions regarding the efficacy of this treatment policy, but also casts doubt on the validity of staging of stomach cancer. Morbidity and mortality rates are still high. The consequences of the differences revealed between hospital groups are difficult to interpret. Proponents of both regionalization of treatment and small hospital care may find arguments for their case in the data.

  6. Advanced carcinoma of the stomach treated with definitive proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, S.; Kawanishi, N.; Fukutomi, H.; Osuga, T.; Iijima, T.; Tsujii, H.; Kitagawa, T. )

    1990-04-01

    We report the case of a 72-yr-old man who suffered from severe chronic emphysema with poor pulmonary function, and who had advanced cancer of the stomach. Proton beam radiotherapy was applied to the lesion, since surgery was contraindicated. The total dose to the stomach lesion was 61 Gy in 7 wk. The tumor on the stomach regressed, with flattening of the round wall of the lesion. The reactive changes of the proton beam radiotherapy, based on the histopathological examination, revealed extensive tumor necrosis and sparing of vital architecture of normal tissue around the irradiated tumor tissue. Only small clusters of vital or devitalized tumor cells with less than approximately 5% of the whole tumor tissue remained after treatment. We suggest that a high dose of radiation delivered by well-defined proton field could result in an improved therapeutic outcome without undue risk of injury to normal tissue.

  7. Chemo Before Surgery May Help Stomach Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Chemotherapy given before surgery for cancer of the lower esophagus and stomach increased the number of patients surviving for five years compared to surgery alone, according to findings presented at the 2007 ASCO meeting in Chicago.

  8. Phase 1a/1b and pharmacogenetic study of docetaxel, oxaliplatin and capecitabine in patients with advanced cancer of the stomach or the gastroesophageal junction.

    PubMed

    Deenen, Maarten J; Meulendijks, Didier; Boot, Henk; Legdeur, Marie-Cecile J C; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M; Cats, Annemieke

    2015-12-01

    The prognosis of gastroesophageal cancer is poor, and current regimens are associated with limited efficacy. The purpose of this study was to explore the safety and preliminary efficacy of docetaxel, oxaliplatin plus capecitabine for advanced cancer of the stomach or the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). Secondary objectives included pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic analyses. Patients were treated in escalating dose levels with docetaxel and oxaliplatin (both on day 1), plus capecitabine b.i.d. on days 1-14 every 3 weeks, to determine the dose-limiting toxicity and maximum tolerated dose (MTD). An expansion cohort was treated at the MTD. A total of ten polymorphisms in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic candidate genes were analyzed and tested for association with treatment outcome. A total of 34 evaluable patients were enrolled. The MTD was docetaxel 50 mg/m(2), oxaliplatin 100 mg/m(2) plus capecitabine 850 mg/m(2) b.i.d. The median number of treatment cycles was 6 (range 2-8). Grade ≥ 3 toxicities included neutropenia (24 %), leukocytopenia (15 %), febrile neutropenia (12 %), fatigue (9 %) and diarrhea (6 %). The overall response rate was 45 %; two patients achieved a complete response. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 6.5 months (95 % CI 5.4-7.6) and 11.0 months (95 % CI 7.9-14.1), respectively. The polymorphisms ERCC1 354C>T, TYMS 1053C>T and rs2612091 in ENOSF1 were associated with severe toxicity; ERCC1 354C>T and ERCC2 2251A>C were associated with poor progression-free survival. Docetaxel, oxaliplatin plus capecitabine are a well-tolerable, safe and effective treatment regimen for patients with advanced cancer of the stomach or GEJ. Pharmacogenetic markers in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic candidate genes may be predictive for treatment outcome.

  9. Mortality from stomach cancer in Ontario miners.

    PubMed Central

    Kusiak, R A; Ritchie, A C; Springer, J; Muller, J

    1993-01-01

    An excess of mortality from stomach cancer has been found in Ontario gold miners (observed (obs) 104, standardised mortality ratio (SMR) 152, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 125-185) and no excess of stomach cancer could be detected in other miners in Ontario (obs 74, SMR 102, 95% CI 80-128). The excess of stomach cancer appeared five to 19 years after the miners began gold mining in Ontario. In that interval, similar patterns of excess mortality from stomach cancer were found in miners born in north America (obs 14, SMR 268, CI 147-450) and in miners born outside north America (obs 12, SMR 280, 95% CI 145-489). Twenty or more years after the miners began mining gold, an excess of mortality from stomach cancer was found in gold miners born outside of north American (obs 41, SMR 160, 95% CI 115-218) but not in gold miners born in north America (obs 37, SMR 113, 95% CI 80-156). The excess of stomach cancer in gold miners under the age of 60 (obs 45, SMR 167, 95% CI 122-223) seems larger than the excess in gold miners between the ages of 60 and 74 (obs 59, SMR 143, 95% CI 109-184). Exposures to arsenic, chromium, mineral fibre, diesel emissions, and aluminium powder were considered as possible explanations of the excess of stomach cancer in Ontario gold miners. Exposure to diesel emissions and aluminium powder was rejected as gold miners and uranium miners were exposed to both agents but an excess of stomach cancer was noted only in gold miners. The association between the excess of stomach cancer and the time since the miner began mining gold suggested that duration of exposure to dust in gold mines ought to be weighted according to the time since the exposure to dust occurred and that an appropriate time weighting function would be one in the interval five to 19 years after each year of exposure to dust and zero otherwise. A statistically significant association between the relative risk of mortality from stomach cancer and the time weighted duration of exposure to

  10. TCGA researchers identify 4 subtypes of stomach cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Stomach cancers fall into four distinct molecular subtypes, researchers with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Network have found. Scientists report that this discovery could change how researchers think about developing treatments for stomach cancer, also c

  11. How Is Stomach Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... functioning well. Written by References The American Cancer Society medical and editorial content team Our team is ... 2014 Last Revised: February 10, 2016 American Cancer Society medical information is copyrighted material. For reprint requests, ...

  12. Breast cancer metastasizing to the stomach mimicking primary gastric cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Kwangil; Ro, Sang Mi; Lee, Jieun

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer with stomach metastasis rare with an incidence of 1% or less among metastatic breast cancer patients. We experienced a case of breast cancer metastasizing to the stomach in 65-year-old female patient. She experienced dyspepsia and poor oral intake before visiting the clinic. Diffuse infiltration with nodular mucosal thickening of the stomach wall was observed, suggesting advanced gastric cancer based on gross endoscopic finding. Spread of poorly cohesive tumor cells in the gastric mucosa observed upon hematoxylin and eosin stain resembled signet ring cell carcinoma, but diffuse positive staining for GATA3 in immunohistochemical stain allowed for a conclusive diagnosis of breast cancer metastasizing to the stomach. Based on the final diagnosis, systemic chemotherapy was administered instead of primary surgical resection. After 2 cycles of docetaxel administration, she showed a partial response based on abdominal computed tomography scan. This case is an unusual presentation of breast cancer metastasizing to the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:28405154

  13. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    There is no standard or routine screening test for stomach (gastric) cancer. Stomach (gastric) cancer is not common in the U.S. Learn about tests that have been studied to detect or screen for stomach cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  14. Increased stomach cancer risk following radiotherapy for testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Hauptmann, M; Fossa, S D; Stovall, M; van Leeuwen, F E; Johannesen, T B; Rajaraman, P; Gilbert, E S; Smith, S A; Weathers, R E; Aleman, B M P; Andersson, M; Curtis, R E; Dores, G M; Fraumeni, J F; Hall, P; Holowaty, E J; Joensuu, H; Kaijser, M; Kleinerman, R A; Langmark, F; Lynch, C F; Pukkala, E; Storm, H H; Vaalavirta, L; van den Belt-Dusebout, A W; Travis, L B; Morton, L M

    2015-01-06

    Abdominal radiotherapy for testicular cancer (TC) increases risk for second stomach cancer, although data on the radiation dose-response relationship are sparse. In a cohort of 22,269 5-year TC survivors diagnosed during 1959-1987, doses to stomach subsites were estimated for 92 patients who developed stomach cancer and 180 matched controls. Chemotherapy details were recorded. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using logistic regression. Cumulative incidence of second primary stomach cancer was 1.45% at 30 years after TC diagnosis. The TC survivors who received radiotherapy (87 (95%) cases, 151 (84%) controls) had a 5.9-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-20.7) increased risk of stomach cancer. Risk increased with increasing stomach dose (P-trend<0.001), with an OR of 20.5 (3.7-114.3) for ⩾50.0 Gy compared with <10 Gy. Radiation-related risks remained elevated ⩾20 years after exposure (P<0.001). Risk after any chemotherapy was not elevated (OR=1.1; 95% CI 0.5-2.5; 14 cases and 23 controls). Radiotherapy for TC involving parts of the stomach increased gastric cancer risk for several decades, with the highest risks after stomach doses of ⩾30 Gy. Clinicians should be aware of these excesses when previously irradiated TC survivors present with gastrointestinal symptoms and when any radiotherapy is considered in newly diagnosed TC patients.

  15. Transforming gene from human stomach cancers and a noncancerous portion of stomach mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, H; Mori, M; Taira, M; Yoshida, T; Matsukawa, S; Shimizu, K; Sekiguchi, M; Terada, M; Sugimura, T

    1986-01-01

    DNAs from 21 human stomach cancers, 16 metastatic stomach cancers to lymph nodes, and 21 apparently noncancerous specimens of stomach mucosae from a total of 26 patients with stomach cancer were tested for their ability to induce neoplastic transformation of NIH 3T3 cells on transfection by the calcium phosphate precipitation technique. Three samples of DNA were shown to have transforming activity; one was from a primary stomach cancer of one patient, the second was from a noncancerous portion of stomach mucosa of the same patient, and the third was from a lymph node metastasis of stomach cancer from another patient. These transformants were tumorigenic in nude mice, and DNAs from the cells could induce secondary transformants. A portion of the transforming gene from the stomach cancer of one patient, which contained the sequences expressed in the NIH 3T3 transformants, was cloned. The transforming gene did not have any homology with the transforming sequences reported previously. We have applied the term hst to this novel human transforming gene. The transforming gene, hst, was found to be present in all the primary and secondary transformants induced by the other two samples of DNA. Images PMID:3459165

  16. Increased stomach cancer risk following radiotherapy for testicular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hauptmann, M; Fossa, S D; Stovall, M; van Leeuwen, F E; Johannesen, T B; Rajaraman, P; Gilbert, E S; Smith, S A; Weathers, R E; Aleman, B M P; Andersson, M; Curtis, R E; Dores, G M; Fraumeni, J F; Hall, P; Holowaty, E J; Joensuu, H; Kaijser, M; Kleinerman, R A; Langmark, F; Lynch, C F; Pukkala, E; Storm, H H; Vaalavirta, L; van den Belt-Dusebout, A W; Travis, L B; Morton, L M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abdominal radiotherapy for testicular cancer (TC) increases risk for second stomach cancer, although data on the radiation dose–response relationship are sparse. Methods: In a cohort of 22 269 5-year TC survivors diagnosed during 1959–1987, doses to stomach subsites were estimated for 92 patients who developed stomach cancer and 180 matched controls. Chemotherapy details were recorded. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using logistic regression. Results: Cumulative incidence of second primary stomach cancer was 1.45% at 30 years after TC diagnosis. The TC survivors who received radiotherapy (87 (95%) cases, 151 (84%) controls) had a 5.9-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7–20.7) increased risk of stomach cancer. Risk increased with increasing stomach dose (P-trend<0.001), with an OR of 20.5 (3.7–114.3) for ⩾50.0 Gy compared with <10 Gy. Radiation-related risks remained elevated ⩾20 years after exposure (P<0.001). Risk after any chemotherapy was not elevated (OR=1.1; 95% CI 0.5–2.5; 14 cases and 23 controls). Conclusions: Radiotherapy for TC involving parts of the stomach increased gastric cancer risk for several decades, with the highest risks after stomach doses of ⩾30 Gy. Clinicians should be aware of these excesses when previously irradiated TC survivors present with gastrointestinal symptoms and when any radiotherapy is considered in newly diagnosed TC patients. PMID:25349972

  17. Analysis of factors affecting the life quality of the patients with late stomach cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan-Mei; Ba, Cai-Feng; Wang, Yu-Bin

    2014-05-01

    To provide a theoretical basis for the clinical care of patients with late stomach cancer, we investigated the life quality and analysed its related factor in the patients with late stomach cancer. Due to the lack of effective screening methods, stomach cancer usually has been in the advanced stage when patients are diagnosed. However, the treatment for late stomach cancer is a tough problem in today's medicine. Chemotherapy or radiotherapy brings patients physiological and psychological distress and heavy financial burden, affecting patients' therapeutic effects, prognosis and life quality. The patients with late stomach cancer were included, and then, questionnaires about the life quality were completed. Questionnaires including European Organisation for Research on Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30, Social Support Rating Scale, Medical Coping Modes Questionnaire and Self-rating Anxiety Scale were completed by 173 patients with late stomach cancer who received treatment in our hospital between May 2010 and May 2011. Correlation analyses were performed. The overall score of the life quality of the patients with late stomach cancer was only 29·54 ± 12·21. The social support, medical coping modes, anxiety and patients' clinical data (except radiotherapy) markedly affected the overall life quality of the patients with late stomach cancer (p < 0·05). The life quality of the patients with late stomach cancer is poor and is associated with many factors. This study provides a theoretical basis for better nursing the patients with late stomach cancer and improving their life quality. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Bortezomib With or Without Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Cancer of the Gastroesophageal Junction or Stomach

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  19. Everolimus and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Stomach or Esophageal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-26

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  20. Results of treatment of patients with advanced stomach cancer treated by combination of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and other methods: ten-year experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, V. A.

    2000-06-01

    In 1988 we started our investigation on the influence of low-level laser on oncologic patient. Now we have an experience of application of LLLT on more than 700 patients with the confirmed diagnosis of cancer at different stage. We used LLLT on 112 with stomach cancer 4th stage before and after operation and on patients without operating interference. LLLT investigations, with a wavelength of 890 nm, have shown that the laser therapy before operation is most effective. Laser therapy activates the immune system by increasing T-active rosette-formed cells and T-helpers and by decreasing T-suppressor cells. Application of LLLT decreases postoperative complications by 11.86 percent after palliative operations; by 9.63 percent after non-radical operations. It also promotes more rapid restorations of the motility and improves general status of patients by 58.69 percent. Investigations of low-level radiation have shown that the life-span of patients with 4th stage stomach cancer who were treated by laser therapy before surgery was increased by 2.03 percent; for those who were treated by LLLT after surgery it was increased by 1.81 times and by 3.03 times in those who took LLLT without surgery.

  1. Do We Know What Causes Stomach Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur in the stomach lining. In chronic atrophic gastritis , the normal glands of the stomach are either ... damaged by cells of the immune system). Atrophic gastritis is often caused by H pylori infection. It ...

  2. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Risk factors for stomach (gastric) cancer include certain health conditions (e.g., atrophic gastritis, pernicious anemia, H. pylori infection), genetic factors (e.g., Li-Fraumeni syndrome), or environmental factors (e.g., diet, smoking). Review the evidence on these and other risk factors and interventions to prevent stomach cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  3. Expression and role of cyclophilin B in stomach cancer.

    PubMed

    Meng, D Q; Li, P L; Xie, M

    2015-05-22

    We elucidated the expression of ciclosporin protein B (cyclophilin B) in stomach cancer tissue and the correlation between cyclophilin B and clinicopathological parameters, and determined the effect of cyclophilin B on growth and proliferation of stomach cancer cells. Pathological sections of stomach cancer and paracancerous tissue were collected for detecting the expression and distribution of cyclophilin B, using immunohistochemistry, and for analyzing the relationship between the expression levels of cyclophilin B in stomach cancer and the clinical pathological parameters of the patients. A cyclophilin BsiRNA lentiviral (LV-cyclophilin B-siRNA) and corresponding control vector (LV-siRNA-con) were constructed. MTT and cell cycle assays were used to detect the effect of downregulation of cyclophilin B expression on in vitro growth and proliferation and clone formation capacity of BGC823 and SGC7901 cells. The cyclophilin B-positive rate of stomach cancer tissue was 84.29% (59/70) and that of paracancerous tissue was 56.00% (28/50). The expression of cyclophilin B in stomach cancer tissue was significantly higher than that in paracancerous tissue (P < 0.05). Staining for cyclophilin B was primarily present in the cytoplasm and was seldom present in the cell nuclei. Downregulation of cyclophilin B significantly inhibited growth and proliferation of stomach cancer cells, cell cycle progression, and in vivo tumorigenicity capacity. Cyclophilin B has a high diagnostic value for stomach cancer and its downregulation can effectively inhibit the growth of stomach cancer cells. Thus, cyclophilin B may be a potential therapeutic target for stomach cancer treatment.

  4. Stomach cancer risk after treatment for hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Morton, Lindsay M; Dores, Graça M; Curtis, Rochelle E; Lynch, Charles F; Stovall, Marilyn; Hall, Per; Gilbert, Ethel S; Hodgson, David C; Storm, Hans H; Johannesen, Tom Børge; Smith, Susan A; Weathers, Rita E; Andersson, Michael; Fossa, Sophie D; Hauptmann, Michael; Holowaty, Eric J; Joensuu, Heikki; Kaijser, Magnus; Kleinerman, Ruth A; Langmark, Frøydis; Pukkala, Eero; Vaalavirta, Leila; van den Belt-Dusebout, Alexandra W; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Travis, Lois B; Aleman, Berthe M; van Leeuwen, Flora E

    2013-09-20

    Treatment-related stomach cancer is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among the growing number of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors, but risks associated with specific HL treatments are unclear. We conducted an international case-control study of stomach cancer nested in a cohort of 19,882 HL survivors diagnosed from 1953 to 2003, including 89 cases and 190 matched controls. For each patient, we quantified cumulative doses of specific alkylating agents (AAs) and reconstructed radiation dose to the stomach tumor location. Stomach cancer risk increased with increasing radiation dose to the stomach (Ptrend < .001) and with increasing number of AA-containing chemotherapy cycles (Ptrend = .02). Patients who received both radiation to the stomach ≥ 25 Gy and high-dose procarbazine (≥ 5,600 mg/m(2)) had strikingly elevated stomach cancer risk (25 cases, two controls; odds ratio [OR], 77.5; 95% CI, 14.7 to 1452) compared with those who received radiation < 25 Gy and procarbazine < 5,600 mg/m(2) (Pinteraction < .001). Risk was also elevated (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.3 to 6.4) among patients who received radiation to the stomach ≥ 25 Gy but procarbazine < 5,600 mg/m(2); however, no procarbazine-related risk was evident with radiation < 25 Gy. Treatment with dacarbazine also increased stomach cancer risk (12 cases, nine controls; OR, 8.8; 95% CI, 2.1 to 46.6), after adjustment for radiation and procarbazine doses. Patients with HL who received subdiaphragmatic radiotherapy had dose-dependent increased risk of stomach cancer, with marked risks for patients who also received chemotherapy containing high-dose procarbazine. For current patients, risks and benefits of exposure to both procarbazine and subdiaphragmatic radiotherapy should be weighed carefully. For patients treated previously, GI symptoms should be evaluated promptly.

  5. Stomach Cancer Risk After Treatment for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Lindsay M.; Dores, Graça M.; Curtis, Rochelle E.; Lynch, Charles F.; Stovall, Marilyn; Hall, Per; Gilbert, Ethel S.; Hodgson, David C.; Storm, Hans H.; Johannesen, Tom Børge; Smith, Susan A.; Weathers, Rita E.; Andersson, Michael; Fossa, Sophie D.; Hauptmann, Michael; Holowaty, Eric J.; Joensuu, Heikki; Kaijser, Magnus; Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Langmark, Frøydis; Pukkala, Eero; Vaalavirta, Leila; van den Belt-Dusebout, Alexandra W.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Travis, Lois B.; Aleman, Berthe M.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Treatment-related stomach cancer is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among the growing number of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors, but risks associated with specific HL treatments are unclear. Patients and Methods We conducted an international case-control study of stomach cancer nested in a cohort of 19,882 HL survivors diagnosed from 1953 to 2003, including 89 cases and 190 matched controls. For each patient, we quantified cumulative doses of specific alkylating agents (AAs) and reconstructed radiation dose to the stomach tumor location. Results Stomach cancer risk increased with increasing radiation dose to the stomach (Ptrend < .001) and with increasing number of AA-containing chemotherapy cycles (Ptrend = .02). Patients who received both radiation to the stomach ≥ 25 Gy and high-dose procarbazine (≥ 5,600 mg/m2) had strikingly elevated stomach cancer risk (25 cases, two controls; odds ratio [OR], 77.5; 95% CI, 14.7 to 1452) compared with those who received radiation < 25 Gy and procarbazine < 5,600 mg/m2 (Pinteraction < .001). Risk was also elevated (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.3 to 6.4) among patients who received radiation to the stomach ≥ 25 Gy but procarbazine < 5,600 mg/m2; however, no procarbazine-related risk was evident with radiation < 25 Gy. Treatment with dacarbazine also increased stomach cancer risk (12 cases, nine controls; OR, 8.8; 95% CI, 2.1 to 46.6), after adjustment for radiation and procarbazine doses. Conclusion Patients with HL who received subdiaphragmatic radiotherapy had dose-dependent increased risk of stomach cancer, with marked risks for patients who also received chemotherapy containing high-dose procarbazine. For current patients, risks and benefits of exposure to both procarbazine and subdiaphragmatic radiotherapy should be weighed carefully. For patients treated previously, GI symptoms should be evaluated promptly. PMID:23980092

  6. Enhanced expression of cytochrome P450 in stomach cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, G. I.; Taylor, M. C.; Burke, M. D.; Melvin, W. T.

    1998-01-01

    The cytochromes P450 have a central role in the oxidative activation and detoxification of a wide range of xenobiotics, including many carcinogens and several anti-cancer drugs. Thus the cytochrome P450 enzyme system has important roles in both tumour development and influencing the response of tumours to chemotherapy. Stomach cancer is one of the commonest tumours of the alimentary tract and environmental factors, including dietary factors, have been implicated in the development of this tumour. This type of tumour has a poor prognosis and responds poorly to current therapies. In this study, the presence and cellular localization of several major forms of P450, CYP1A, CYP2E1 and CYP3A have been investigated in stomach cancer and compared with their expression in normal stomach. There was enhanced expression of CYP1A and CYP3A in stomach cancer with CYP1A present in 51% and CYP3A present in 28% of cases. In contrast, no P450 was identified in normal stomach. The presence of CYP1A and CYP3A in stomach cancer provides further evidence for the enhanced expression of specific forms of cytochrome P450 in tumours and may be important therapeutically for the development of anti-cancer drugs that are activated by these forms of P450. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9569036

  7. [Adenocarcinoma of lung cancer with solitary metastasis to the stomach].

    PubMed

    Koh, Sung Ae; Lee, Kyung Hee

    2014-09-25

    Although hematogenous metastasis of cancer to the gastrointestinal track is rare, it sometime has been reported in patients with malignant melanoma and breast cancer. However, it is extremely rare for lung cancer to metastasize to the stomach, not to mention solitary gastric metastasis. Herein, the authors report a case of a 69-year-old man who was initially diagnosed with lung cancer with synchronous primary gastric cancer which proved to be lung cancer with solitary gastric metastasis after the operation.

  8. Spatial Analysis of Stomach Cancer Incidence in Iran.

    PubMed

    Pakzad, Reza; Khani, Yousef; Pakzad, Iraj; Momenimovahed, Zohre; Mohammadian-Hashejani, Abdollah; Salehiniya, Hamid; Towhidi, Farhad; Makhsosi, Behnam Reza

    2016-01-01

    Stomach cancer, the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death through the world, is very common in parts of Iran. Geographic variation in the incidence of stomach cancer is due to many different factors. The aim of this study was to assess the geographical and spatial distribution of stomach cancer in Iran using data from the cancer registry program in Iran for the year 2009. The reported incidences of stomach cancer for different provinces were standardized to the world population structure. ArcGIS software was used to analyse the data. Hot spots and high risk areas were determined using spatial analysis (Getis-Ord Gi). Hot and cold spots were determined as more than or less than 2 standard deviations from the national average, respectively. A significance level of 0.10 was used for statistical judgment. In 2009, a total of 6,886 cases of stomach cancers were reported of which 4,891 were in men and 1,995 in women (standardized incidence rates of 19.2 and 10.0, respectively, per 100,000 population). The results showed that stomach cancer was concentrated mainly in northwest of the country in both men and women. In women, northwest provinces such as Ardebil, East Azerbaijan, West Azerbaijan, Gilan, and Qazvin were identified as hot spots (p<0.1). In men, all northwest provinces, Ardabil, East Azerbaijan, Gilan, Qazvin, Zanjan and Kurdistan, the incidences were higher than the national average and these were identified as hot spots (P<0.01). As stomach cancer is clustered in the northwest of the country, further epidemiological studies are needed to identify factors contributing to this concentration.

  9. Dietary flavonoid intake and risk of stomach and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Hae Dong; Kim, Jeongseon

    2013-01-01

    Stomach and colorectal cancers are common cancers and leading causes of cancer deaths. Because the alimentary tract can interact directly with dietary components, stomach and colorectal cancer may be closely related to dietary intake. We systematically searched published literature written in English via PubMed by searching for terms related to stomach and colorectal cancer risk and dietary flavonoids up to June 30, 2012. Twenty-three studies out of 209 identified articles were finally selected for the analysis. Log point effect estimates and the corresponding standard errors were calculated using covariate-adjusted point effect estimates and 95%CIs from the selected studies. Total dietary flavonoid intake was not associated with a reduced risk of colorectal or stomach cancer [odds ratio (OR) (95%CI) = 1.00 (0.90-1.11) and 1.07 (0.70-1.61), respectively]. Among flavonoid subclasses, the intake of flavonols, flavan-3-ols, anthocyanidins, and proanthocyanidins showed a significant inverse association with colorectal cancer risk [OR (95%CI) = 0.71 (0.63-0.81), 0.88 (0.79-0.97), 0.68 (0.56-0.82), and 0.72 (0.61-0.85), respectively]. A significant association was found only between flavonols and stomach cancer risk based on a limited number of selected studies [OR (95%CI) = 0.68 (0.46-0.99)]. In the summary estimates from case-control studies, all flavonoid subclasses except flavones and flavanones were inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk, whereas neither total flavonoids nor any subclasses of flavonoids were associated with colorectal cancer risk in the summary estimates based on the cohort studies. The significant association between flavonoid subclasses and cancer risk might be closely related to bias derived from the case-control design. There was no clear evidence that dietary flavonoids are associated with reduced risk of stomach and colorectal cancer. PMID:23467443

  10. Dietary flavonoid intake and risk of stomach and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Woo, Hae Dong; Kim, Jeongseon

    2013-02-21

    Stomach and colorectal cancers are common cancers and leading causes of cancer deaths. Because the alimentary tract can interact directly with dietary components, stomach and colorectal cancer may be closely related to dietary intake. We systematically searched published literature written in English via PubMed by searching for terms related to stomach and colorectal cancer risk and dietary flavonoids up to June 30, 2012. Twenty-three studies out of 209 identified articles were finally selected for the analysis. Log point effect estimates and the corresponding standard errors were calculated using covariate-adjusted point effect estimates and 95%CIs from the selected studies. Total dietary flavonoid intake was not associated with a reduced risk of colorectal or stomach cancer [odds ratio (OR) (95%CI) = 1.00 (0.90-1.11) and 1.07 (0.70-1.61), respectively]. Among flavonoid subclasses, the intake of flavonols, flavan-3-ols, anthocyanidins, and proanthocyanidins showed a significant inverse association with colorectal cancer risk [OR (95%CI) = 0.71 (0.63-0.81), 0.88 (0.79-0.97), 0.68 (0.56-0.82), and 0.72 (0.61-0.85), respectively]. A significant association was found only between flavonols and stomach cancer risk based on a limited number of selected studies [OR (95%CI) = 0.68 (0.46-0.99)]. In the summary estimates from case-control studies, all flavonoid subclasses except flavones and flavanones were inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk, whereas neither total flavonoids nor any subclasses of flavonoids were associated with colorectal cancer risk in the summary estimates based on the cohort studies. The significant association between flavonoid subclasses and cancer risk might be closely related to bias derived from the case-control design. There was no clear evidence that dietary flavonoids are associated with reduced risk of stomach and colorectal cancer.

  11. Occupation and risk of stomach cancer in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Krstev, S; Dosemeci, M; Lissowska, J; Chow, W; Zatonski, W; Ward, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: In spite of the dramatic decline in the incidence of stomach cancer in the twentieth century, Poland has one of the highest rates in the world. Aims: To evaluate the risk of stomach cancer by grouped occupations and industries, as well as by some specific occupational exposures. Methods: Cases (n = 443) were newly diagnosed with stomach adenocarcinomas between 1994 and 1996. Controls (n = 479) were randomly selected from the general population in Warsaw. Results: Only a few occupations and industries were associated with significantly increased risks of stomach cancer. The most suggestive finding was for work in the leather goods industry. Risk was also significantly increased among men working in fabricated metal production and among women ever employed as managers and governmental officials. Men ever employed as teaching professionals and women employed as technical and science professionals had significantly decreased risks of stomach cancer. Among men, a significant positive trend in risk with duration of employment was observed for work in the leather industry and special trade construction. No significantly increased risks were observed for specific exposures assessed by a job-exposure matrix or by self-reports. However among men there were non-significantly increased risks with 10 or more years exposure to asbestos, metal dust, and nitrosamines assessed by a job-exposure matrix. Conclusions: Employment in the leather goods industry, special trade construction, and metal fabrication was associated with an increased risk of stomach cancer among men. However, there were only weak associations with specific exposures. Occupational exposures do not contribute substantially to the high rates of stomach cancer in Poland. PMID:15837853

  12. Update in Cancer Chemotherapy: Gastrointestinal Cancer, Cancer of the Stomach and Carcinoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jane C.

    1986-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer provides only palliation with perhaps increased survival time in some patients. The primary treatment of gastric carcinomas is surgical, as this is the only hope for cure. It is estimated that 80 to 85 percent of patients with newly diagnosed cases of stomach cancer will be dead of their disease within five years. Radiation therapy alone is seldom employed, except as a palliative measure to control hemorrhage or pain. There are no data to suggest that postoperative radiation increases survival rates. Single-agent chemotherapy is of temporary palliative value in 20 to 30 percent of cases with a duration of response from three to five months. Combination chemotherapy has shown a somewhat higher response rate than single-agent therapy. In advanced gastric cancer, there is no evidence of improved long-term disease-free survival rates with any combination yet reported. The treatment of carcinoid cancer of the intestinal tract is surgical removal, as this offers the only hope of cure. Radiation therapy is of little benefit, except for moderate palliation in cases of extensive liver metasasis. Carcinoid cancers are moderately sensitive to chemotherapy. While some adjuvant chemotherapy trials suggest improvement, major survival gains remain to be demonstrated. Uncertainty as to the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers is probably due to lack of data. PMID:3528508

  13. MDCT imaging of the stomach: advances and applications.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Prashant; Prakash, Anjali; Pradhan, Gaurav; Vidholia, Aditi; Nagpal, Nishant; Saboo, Sachin S; Kuehn, David M; Khandelwal, Ashish

    2017-01-01

    The stomach may be involved by a myriad of pathologies ranging from benign aetiologies like inflammation to malignant aetiologies like carcinoma or lymphoma. Multidetector CT (MDCT) of the stomach is the first-line imaging for patients with suspected gastric pathologies. Conventionally, CT imaging had the advantage of simultaneous detection of the mural and extramural disease extent, but advances in MDCT have allowed mucosal assessment by virtual endoscopy (VE). Also, better three-dimensional (3D) post-processing techniques have enabled more robust and accurate pre-operative planning in patients undergoing gastrectomy and even predict the response to surgery for patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for weight loss. The ability of CT to obtain stomach volume (for bariatric surgery patients) and 3D VE images depends on various patient and protocol factors that are important for a radiologist to understand. We review the appropriate CT imaging protocol in the patients with suspected gastric pathologies and highlight the imaging pearls of various gastric pathologies on CT and VE.

  14. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    For stomach (gastric) cancer, there is no standard or routine screening test for the general U.S. population. Review the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for gastric cancer using barium-meal photofluorography, gastric endoscopy, or serum pepsinogen in this expert-reviewed summary.

  15. [Vegetables and fruits and risk of stomach cancer].

    PubMed

    Zickute, Jurgita; Strumylaite, Loreta; Dregval, Liudmila; Petrauskiene, Jadvyga; Dudzevicius, Juozas; Stratilatovas, Eugenijus

    2005-01-01

    Stomach cancer is the second common cause of death in Lithuania and most countries of the world. Nevertheless, there were no reports of epidemiological studies on stomach cancer in Lithuania. Therefore, a hospital-based case-control study has been carried out in order to assess the associations between vegetables and fruits and risk of stomach cancer. Hospital-based case-control study included 379 cases with newly histologically confirmed diagnose of stomach cancer and 1137 controls that were free of cancer and stomach diseases. Cases and controls were matched by gender and age (+/-5 yr). Information on demographic variables, family history on cancer, life-style habits, such as diet, smoking, alcohol consumption, and physical activity was collected by a questionnaire. Conditional logistic regression was used to compute the odds ratio (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI). After adjustment for other food items (vegetables, fruits, different types of meat, processed meat and fish, dairy and starchy products, coffee, green tea), that were related to outcome, smoking, alcohol use, family history on cancer, education level and residence, stomach cancer risk was inversely associated with consumption of raw vegetables such as cabbage (OR=0.24; 95% CI=0.10-0.57; > or =1-3 times/month vs. almost never), carrots (OR=0.42, 95% CI=0.20-0.86; 1-6 times/week vs. almost never) and garlic (OR=0.59, 95% CI=0.37-0.96; 1-6 times/week vs. almost never). Protective effect has been observed for intake of broccoli (OR=0.52, 95% CI=0.28-0.98; 1-4 times/week vs. < or =1-3 times/month). There were no statistically significant associations between stomach cancer risk and consumption of citrus or others fruits. In conclusion, higher consumption of raw vegetables such as cabbage, carrots, garlic as well as broccoli may decrease a risk of stomach cancer, whereas intake of citrus fruits has no relation with a reduced risk of the disease.

  16. Allium Vegetables and Stomach Cancer Risk in China

    PubMed Central

    Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Yu, Guo-Pei; Lu, Qing-Yi; Lu, Ming-Lan; Yu, Shun-Zhang; Mu, Lina; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Kurtz, Robert C; Cai, Lin; Hsieh, Chung-Cheng; Zhang, Zuo-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Although the incidence of stomach cancer has been declining, it remains the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Potential protective effects of allium vegetables against cancer have been reported by a few epidemiologic studies in Chinese populations, but the sample sizes of these studies were relatively small. We examined the associations between allium vegetable consumption and stomach cancer in a large population-based case-control study in Shanghai (750 cases and 750 age- and gender-matched controls) and Qingdao (128 cases and 128 age- and gender-matched controls). Epidemiological data were collected by a standard questionnaire, and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression in SAS. After adjusting for matching variables, education, body mass index, pack-years of smoking, alcohol drinking, salt intake, and fruit and vegetable intake, inverse relationships with dose response pattern were observed between frequency of onion intake and stomach cancer in Qingdao (P for trend=0.02) and Shanghai (P for trend=0.04) populations. In Shanghai, negative dose-response relationships were observed between monthly intake of onions (P=0.03), monthly intake of garlic stalks (P=0.04) and distal cancer (but not with cardia cancer). Negative association was also noted between intake of garlic stalks (often vs. never) and risk of stomach cancer in Qingdao (OR=0.30; 95% CI: 0.12–0.77). Our results confirm the protective effect of allium vegetables (especially garlic and onions) against stomach cancer. PMID:16236005

  17. Gene methylation profile of gastric cancerous tissue according to tumor site in the stomach.

    PubMed

    Kupcinskaite-Noreikiene, Rita; Ugenskiene, Rasa; Noreika, Alius; Rudzianskas, Viktoras; Gedminaite, Jurgita; Skieceviciene, Jurgita; Juozaityte, Elona

    2016-01-26

    There is considerable information on the methylation of the promoter regions of different genes involved in gastric carcinogenesis. However, there is a lack of information on how this epigenetic process differs in tumors originating at different sites in the stomach. The aim of this study is to assess the methylation profiles of the MLH1, MGMT, and DAPK-1 genes in cancerous tissues from different stomach sites. Samples were acquired from 81 patients suffering stomach adenocarcinoma who underwent surgery for gastric cancer in the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Hospital Kaunas Clinics in 2009-2012. Gene methylation was investigated with methylation-specific PCR. The study was approved by the Lithuanian Biomedical Research Ethics Committee. The frequencies of methylation in cancerous tissues from the upper, middle, and lower thirds of the stomach were 11.1, 23.1, and 45.4%, respectively, for MLH1; 22.2, 30.8, and 57.6%, respectively, for MGMT; and 44.4, 48.7, and 51.5%, respectively, for DAPK-1. MLH1 and MGMT methylation was observed more often in the lower third of the stomach than in the upper third (p < 0.05). In the middle third, DAPK-1 promoter methylation was related to more-advanced disease in the lymph nodes (N2-3 compared with N0-1 [p = 0.02]) and advanced tumor stage (stage III rather than stages I-II [p = 0.05]). MLH1 and MGMT methylation correlated inversely when the tumor was located in the lower third of the stomach (coefficient, -0.48; p = 0.01). DAPK-1 and MLH1 methylation correlated inversely in tumors in the middle-third of the stomach (coefficient, -0.41; p = 0.01). Gene promoter methylation depends on the gastric tumor location.

  18. Bioptate phase tomography of the stomach wall in the diagnostics of pre-cancer and cancer of the stomach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peresunko, O. P.; Moysiuk, T. G.; Tryfonyuk, Liliya

    2012-01-01

    The paper was presented principles of a new polarization-correlation approach to the evaluation of microscopic images of biological tissues of different physiological state. Introduced a new option - the complex degree of mutual polarization. Was presented the method of experimental measurement of the coordinate distribution of degree of polarization states of polarization coherence laser point images of the stomach tissue.The optical model of polycrystalline networks of the stomach wall histological sections is suggested. The results of investigating the interrelation between the values of statistical (statistical moments of the 1st-4th order) parameters are presented. They characterize the coordinate distributions of complex degree of mutual polarization in the points of laser images of the stomach histological sections. The diagnostic criteria of stomach cancer nascency and its severity degree differentiation are determined.

  19. Bioptate phase tomography of the stomach wall in the diagnostics of pre-cancer and cancer of the stomach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peresunko, O. P.; Moysiuk, T. G.; Tryfonyuk, Liliya

    2011-09-01

    The paper was presented principles of a new polarization-correlation approach to the evaluation of microscopic images of biological tissues of different physiological state. Introduced a new option - the complex degree of mutual polarization. Was presented the method of experimental measurement of the coordinate distribution of degree of polarization states of polarization coherence laser point images of the stomach tissue.The optical model of polycrystalline networks of the stomach wall histological sections is suggested. The results of investigating the interrelation between the values of statistical (statistical moments of the 1st-4th order) parameters are presented. They characterize the coordinate distributions of complex degree of mutual polarization in the points of laser images of the stomach histological sections. The diagnostic criteria of stomach cancer nascency and its severity degree differentiation are determined.

  20. Local resection of the stomach for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kinami, Shinichi; Funaki, Hiroshi; Fujita, Hideto; Nakano, Yasuharu; Ueda, Nobuhiko; Kosaka, Takeo

    2017-06-01

    The local resection of the stomach is an ideal method for preventing postoperative symptoms. There are various procedures for performing local resection, such as the laparoscopic lesion lifting method, non-touch lesion lifting method, endoscopic full-thickness resection, and laparoscopic endoscopic cooperative surgery. After the invention and widespread use of endoscopic submucosal dissection, local resection has become outdated as a curative surgical technique for gastric cancer. Nevertheless, local resection of the stomach in the treatment of gastric cancer in now expected to make a comeback with the clinical use of sentinel node navigation surgery. However, there are many issues associated with local resection for gastric cancer, other than the normal indications. These include gastric deformation, functional impairment, ensuring a safe surgical margin, the possibility of inducing peritoneal dissemination, and the associated increase in the risk of metachronous gastric cancer. In view of these issues, there is a tendency to regard local resection as an investigative treatment, to be applied only in carefully selected cases. The ideal model for local resection of the stomach for gastric cancer would be a combination of endoscopic full-thickness resection of the stomach using an ESD device and hand sutured closure using a laparoscope or a surgical robot, for achieving both oncological safety and preserved functions.

  1. Computer decision support system for the stomach cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, E. V.; Sukhova, O. G.; Korenevskaya, P. Y.; Ovcharova, V. S.; Kudryavtseva, I. O.; Vlasova, S. V.; Grebennikova, O. P.; Burov, D. A.; Yemelyanova, G. S.; Selchuk, V. Y.

    2017-01-01

    The paper considers the creation of the computer knowledge base containing the data of histological, cytologic, and clinical researches. The system is focused on improvement of diagnostics quality of stomach cancer - one of the most frequent death causes among oncologic patients.

  2. Regular aspirin use and stomach cancer risk in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Shen, C; Ge, J; Duan, H

    2015-06-01

    Epidemiological studies on aspirin and stomach cancer have been inconclusive. The purpose of our study was to investigate the association between aspirin and stomach cancer in China. A 1:2 matched case-control study was conducted in four large medical centers. A self-designed questionnaire was used to collect information. Unconditional logistic regression was used to compute crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Our study indicated that risk of stomach cancer was greatly reduced for regular aspirin user (OR = 0.62; 95% CI 0.42-0.80). Specifically, dosage and tablet-years of use were associated with lower risk (OR = 0.54; 95% CI 0.29-0.84 for ≥7 tabs/week; OR = 0.47; 95% CI 0.32-0.81 for ≥10 tablet years, respectively). Furthermore, the finding was strengthened by stratified studies of gender, smoking status, body mass index (BMI) and helicobacter pylori. Our study confirmed that regular aspirin use is a protective factor to stomach cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Minimally invasive surgery for stomach cancer.

    PubMed

    Nunobe, Souya; Kumagai, Koshi; Ida, Satoshi; Ohashi, Manabu; Hiki, Naoki

    2016-05-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer has become extremely widespread in recent years especially in Asian countries due to its low invasiveness. As to evidence of indication for laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer, laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer often appears to be indicated for early gastric cancer at many institutions, while evidence was considered to be insufficient to recommend laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer at Stage II and above. There are also problems with indications for cases other than tumour factors. No meta-analyses and prospective studies have been reported, but outcomes of laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer in gastric cancer patients with co-morbid and/or existing diseases have been reported in retrospective studies. Indications in the elderly appear to be favourable in terms of post-operative ambulation considering factors such as the degree of dissection in accordance with the status of the patient. Meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials and several retrospective studies have compared the short-term usefulness of laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer with that of conventional gastrectomy. The superiority of laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer has been reported in terms of the reduced amount of bleeding, a reduction in the administration frequency and period of analgesic doses, a reduction in the duration of fever, early recovery of intestinal movement and early return to oral intake. A small-scale randomized controlled trial and several retrospective studies have demonstrated no significant differences in survival rate, recurrence rate and type of recurrence between laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer and conventional gastrectomy. The results of the aforementioned trials in early gastric cancer in Japan and Korea for which enrolment is complete remain to be published. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Lineage analysis of early and advanced tubular adenocarcinomas of the stomach: continuous or discontinuous?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Eradication of early gastric carcinoma (GC) is thought to contribute to reduction in the mortality of GC, given that most of the early GCs progress to the advanced GCs. However, early GC is alternatively considered a dormant variant of GC, and it infrequently progresses to advanced GC. The aim of this study was to clarify the extent of overlap of genetic lineages between early and advanced tubular adenocarcinomas (TUBs) of the stomach. Methods Immunohistochemical staining for p53 was performed using 28 surgically resected stomachs with 13 intramucosal and 15 invasive TUBs. By chromosome- and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), genomic copy number constitution was compared between the mucosal and invasive parts of the invasive TUBs and between the mucosal parts of the invasive and intramucosal TUBs, using 25 and 22 TUBs, respectively. TP53 mutation in exons 5-8 was examined in 20 TUBs. Results Chromosomal CGH revealed that 4q+ and 11q+ were more common in advanced and early TUBs, respectively, whereas copy number changes in 8q and 17p showed no significant differences between early and advanced TUBs. However, array CGH revealed that, of the 13 intramucosal TUBs examined, loss of MYC (MYC-) and gain of TP53 (TP53+) was detected in 9 TUBs and MYC+ and/or TP53- was detected in 3 TUBs. Of the mucosal samples of 9 invasive TUBs, 7 showed MYC-/TP53+ and none showed MYC+ and/or TP53-. Of the 9 samples from the invasive parts, 1 (from submucosal cancers) showed MYC-/TP53+ and 6 (1 from submucosal and 5 from advanced cancers) showed MYC+ and/or TP53-. The latter 6 tumours commonly showed a mutant pattern (diffuse or null) in p53 immunohistochemistry, and 4 of the 6 tumours assessable for TP53 sequence analysis revealed mutations. The overall array CGH pattern indicated that, between the mucosal and invasive parts, genetic lineage was found discontinuous in 5 advanced cancers and continuous in 3 submucosal cancers. Conclusions Genetic lineages

  5. Lineage analysis of early and advanced tubular adenocarcinomas of the stomach: continuous or discontinuous?

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Takahisa; Ling, Zhi-Qiang; Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Hattori, Takanori; Sugihara, Hiroyuki

    2010-06-21

    Eradication of early gastric carcinoma (GC) is thought to contribute to reduction in the mortality of GC, given that most of the early GCs progress to the advanced GCs. However, early GC is alternatively considered a dormant variant of GC, and it infrequently progresses to advanced GC. The aim of this study was to clarify the extent of overlap of genetic lineages between early and advanced tubular adenocarcinomas (TUBs) of the stomach. Immunohistochemical staining for p53 was performed using 28 surgically resected stomachs with 13 intramucosal and 15 invasive TUBs. By chromosome- and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), genomic copy number constitution was compared between the mucosal and invasive parts of the invasive TUBs and between the mucosal parts of the invasive and intramucosal TUBs, using 25 and 22 TUBs, respectively. TP53 mutation in exons 5-8 was examined in 20 TUBs. Chromosomal CGH revealed that 4q+ and 11q+ were more common in advanced and early TUBs, respectively, whereas copy number changes in 8q and 17p showed no significant differences between early and advanced TUBs. However, array CGH revealed that, of the 13 intramucosal TUBs examined, loss of MYC (MYC-) and gain of TP53 (TP53+) was detected in 9 TUBs and MYC+ and/or TP53- was detected in 3 TUBs. Of the mucosal samples of 9 invasive TUBs, 7 showed MYC-/TP53+ and none showed MYC+ and/or TP53-. Of the 9 samples from the invasive parts, 1 (from submucosal cancers) showed MYC-/TP53+ and 6 (1 from submucosal and 5 from advanced cancers) showed MYC+ and/or TP53-. The latter 6 tumours commonly showed a mutant pattern (diffuse or null) in p53 immunohistochemistry, and 4 of the 6 tumours assessable for TP53 sequence analysis revealed mutations. The overall array CGH pattern indicated that, between the mucosal and invasive parts, genetic lineage was found discontinuous in 5 advanced cancers and continuous in 3 submucosal cancers. Genetic lineages often differed between early and advanced

  6. [Incidence and mortality of stomach cancer in China, 2013].

    PubMed

    Zhang, S W; Yang, Z X; Zheng, R S; Zeng, H M; Chen, W Q; He, J

    2017-07-23

    Objective: To estimate the incidence and mortality of stomach cancer in China based on the cancer registration data in 2013, collected by the National Central Cancer Registry (NCCR). Methods: There were 347 cancer registries that submitted stomach cancer incidence and deaths occurred in 2013 to NCCR. After evaluating the data quality, 255 registries' data were accepted for analysis and stratified by areas (urban/rural), sex, and age group. Combined with data on national population in 2013, the nationwide incidence and mortality of stomach cancer were estimated. Chinese population census in 2000 and Segi's population were used for age-standardized incidence/mortality rates. Results: Qualified 255 cancer registries covered a total of 226 494 490 populations (111 595 772 in urban and 114 898 718 in rural areas). The percentage of cases morphologically verified and death certificate-only cases were 76.27% and 1.98%, respectively, and the mortality to incidence rate ratio was 0.72. It is estimated that there were 427 000 new cases for stomach cancer nationwide, with a crude incidence rate of 31.38 per 100 000 (42.85 per 100 000 in males, 19.33 per 100 000 in females). The age-standardized incidence rates by Chinese standard population (ASR China) and by world standard population (ASR world) were 21.40 per 100 000 and 21.32 per 100 000, respectively, with a cumulative incidence rate (0-74 age years old) of 2.66%. The crude and ASR China incidence rates of stomach cancer in urban areas were 27.80 per 100 000 and 18.48 per 100 000, respectively, whereas those were 35.54 per 100 000 and 24.93 per 100 000 in rural areas. It is estimated that there were 301 000 deaths for stomach cancer nationwide, with a crude mortality rate of 22.13 per 100 000 (29.85 per 100 000 in males, 14.03 per 100 000 in females). The ASR China and ASR world mortality rates were 14.68 per 100 000 and 14.54 per 100 000, respectively, with a cumulative mortality rate (0-74 years old) of 1.70%. The crude

  7. Increased expression of FLIP, an inhibitor of Fas-mediated apoptosis, in stomach cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sug Hyung; Kim, Hong Sug; Kim, Su Young; Lee, Yun-Sil; Park, Won Sang; Kim, Sang Ho; Lee, Jung Young; Yoo, Nam Jin

    2003-02-01

    Despite the cell surface expression of Fas (Apo-1/CD95), many types of tumor cells, including stomach cancer cells, are resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis, indicating the presence of inactivating mechanisms of Fas signaling. Expression of FLICE-like inhibitory protein (FLIP), one of the inhibitory proteins of Fas-mediated apoptosis, has been reported in several cancer types, but not in stomach cancer. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of Fas and FLIP in 60 advanced gastric adenocarcinomas by immunohistochemistry using a tissue microarray approach. Immunopositivity (defined as >/=30% of the neoplastic cells) was observed for Fas in 58 (97%) and FLIP in 54 (90%) of the 60 cancers. All of the tumors with FLIP immunostaining also showed Fas immunostaining. Loss of cell surface Fas immunostaining, another mechanism of Fas resistance, was observed in 45 tumors (75%). By contrast, normal gastric mucosal cells showed no or weak expression of both Fas and FLIP. Taken together, these results indicate that increased expression of FLIP is a frequent event in stomach carcinomas, and suggest that for evading apoptosis stomach carcinoma cells in vivo may need FLIP expression, which might contribute to tumor development.

  8. Pharmacogenetics and stomach cancer: an update.

    PubMed

    Toffoli, Giuseppe; Cecchin, Erika

    2007-05-01

    Although new drugs and association regimens have been used in recent years, the chemotherapeutic outcome for gastric cancer is still poor and improvement in patient survival is not satisfactory. Pharmacogenetics could represent a useful approach to optimize chemotherapeutic treatments in order to identify individuals that are true candidates for clinical benefits from therapy, avoiding the development of severe side effects. The most recent update regarding gastric cancer pharmacogenetics highlights a prominent role of genetic polymorphisms of thymidylate synthase and glutathione S-transferase in the pharmacological treatment with commonly used drugs, such as 5-fluorouracil and platinum derivatives. In order to validate the genetic markers, further larger scale and controlled studies are required. A future challenge is represented by the introduction of targeted therapy in gastric cancer treatment, with the potential emerging tool of pharmacogenetic impact on this field.

  9. Microfluidic optoelectronic sensor for salivary diagnostics of stomach cancer.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Yael; Sonkusale, Sameer R

    2015-05-15

    We present a microfluidic optoelectronic sensor for saliva diagnostics with a potential application for non-invasive early diagnosis of stomach cancer. Stomach cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. The primary identified cause is infection by a gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori. These bacteria secrete the enzyme urease that converts urea into carbon dioxide (CO2) and ammonia (NH3), leading to their elevated levels in breath and body fluids. The proposed optoelectronic sensor will detect clinically relevant levels of CO2 and NH3 in saliva that can potentially be used for early diagnosis of stomach cancer. The sensor is composed of the embedded in a microfluidic device array of microwells filled with ion-exchange polymer microbeads doped with various organic dyes. The optical response of this unique highly diverse sensor is monitored over a broad spectrum, which provides a platform for cross-reactive sensitivity and allows detection of CO2 and NH3 in saliva at ppm levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiation Dose and Subsequent Risk for Stomach Cancer in Long-term Survivors of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Smith, Susan A.; Holowaty, Eric; Hall, Per; Pukkala, Eero; Vaalavirta, Leila; Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita; Gilbert, Ethel; Aleman, Berthe M.P.; Kaijser, Magnus; Andersson, Michael; Storm, Hans; Joensuu, Heikki; Lynch, Charles F.; and others

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the dose–response relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a nested, matched case–control study of 201 cases and 378 controls among 53,547 5-year survivors of cervical cancer diagnosed from 1943 to 1995, from 5 international, population-based cancer registries. We estimated individual radiation doses to the site of the stomach cancer for all cases and to corresponding sites for the matched controls (overall mean stomach tumor dose, 2.56 Gy, range 0.03-46.1 and after parallel opposed pelvic fields, 1.63 Gy, range 0.12-6.3). Results: More than 90% of women received radiation therapy, mostly with external beam therapy in combination with brachytherapy. Stomach cancer risk was nonsignificantly increased (odds ratio 1.27-2.28) for women receiving between 0.5 and 4.9 Gy to the stomach cancer site and significantly increased at doses ≥5 Gy (odds ratio 4.20, 95% confidence interval 1.41-13.4, P{sub trend}=.047) compared with nonirradiated women. A highly significant radiation dose–response relationship was evident when analyses were restricted to the 131 cases (251 controls) whose stomach cancer was located in the middle and lower portions of the stomach (P{sub trend}=.003), whereas there was no indication of increasing risk with increasing dose for 30 cases (57 controls) whose cancer was located in the upper stomach (P{sub trend}=.23). Conclusions: Our findings show for the first time a significant linear dose–response relationship for risk of stomach cancer in long-term survivors of cervical cancer.

  11. Radiation dose and subsequent risk for stomach cancer in long-term survivors of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Kleinerman, Ruth A; Smith, Susan A; Holowaty, Eric; Hall, Per; Pukkala, Eero; Vaalavirta, Leila; Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita; Gilbert, Ethel; Aleman, Berthe M P; Kaijser, Magnus; Andersson, Michael; Storm, Hans; Joensuu, Heikki; Lynch, Charles F; Dores, Graça M; Travis, Lois B; Morton, Lindsay M; Curtis, Rochelle E

    2013-08-01

    To assess the dose-response relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer. We conducted a nested, matched case-control study of 201 cases and 378 controls among 53,547 5-year survivors of cervical cancer diagnosed from 1943 to 1995, from 5 international, population-based cancer registries. We estimated individual radiation doses to the site of the stomach cancer for all cases and to corresponding sites for the matched controls (overall mean stomach tumor dose, 2.56 Gy, range 0.03-46.1 and after parallel opposed pelvic fields, 1.63 Gy, range 0.12-6.3). More than 90% of women received radiation therapy, mostly with external beam therapy in combination with brachytherapy. Stomach cancer risk was nonsignificantly increased (odds ratio 1.27-2.28) for women receiving between 0.5 and 4.9 Gy to the stomach cancer site and significantly increased at doses ≥ 5 Gy (odds ratio 4.20, 95% confidence interval 1.41-13.4, Ptrend=.047) compared with nonirradiated women. A highly significant radiation dose-response relationship was evident when analyses were restricted to the 131 cases (251 controls) whose stomach cancer was located in the middle and lower portions of the stomach (Ptrend=.003), whereas there was no indication of increasing risk with increasing dose for 30 cases (57 controls) whose cancer was located in the upper stomach (Ptrend=.23). Our findings show for the first time a significant linear dose-response relationship for risk of stomach cancer in long-term survivors of cervical cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Radiation dose and subsequent risk for stomach cancer in long-term survivors of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Smith, Susan A.; Holowaty, Eric; Hall, Per; Pukkala, Eero; Vaalavirta, Leila; Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita; Gilbert, Ethel; Aleman, Berthe M.P.; Kaijser, Magnus; Andersson, Michael; Storm, Hans; Joensuu, Heikki; Lynch, Charles F.; Dores, Graça M.; Travis, Lois B.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Curtis, Rochelle E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the dose-response relationship for stomach cancer following radiotherapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials We conducted a nested, matched case-control study of 201 cases and 378 controls among 53,547 5-year survivors of cervical cancer diagnosed from 1943–1995, from five international, population-based cancer registries. We estimated individual radiation doses to the site of the stomach cancer for all cases and to corresponding sites for the matched controls (overall mean stomach tumor dose, 2.56 gray [Gy], range 0.03–46.1 and following parallel opposed pelvic fields, 1.63 Gy, range 0.12–6.3). Results Over 90% of women received radiotherapy, mostly with external beam therapy in combination with brachytherapy. Stomach cancer risk was non-significantly increased (odds ratios [ORs] 1.27–2.28) for women receiving between 0.5–4.9 Gy to the stomach cancer site and significantly increased at doses ≥5 Gy (OR=4.20, 95% confidence interval, 1.41–13.4, Ptrend=0.047) compared to non-irradiated women. A highly significant radiation dose-response relationship was evident when analyses were restricted to the 131 cases (251 controls) whose stomach cancer was located in the middle and lower portions of the stomach (Ptrend=0.003), whereas there was no indication of increasing risk with increasing dose for 30 cases (57 controls) whose cancer was located in the upper stomach (Ptrend=0.23). Conclusions Our findings showed for the first time a significant linear dose-response relationship for risk of stomach cancer in long-term survivors of cervical cancer. PMID:23707149

  13. Osteonectin-expressing cells in human stomach cancer and their possible clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Hack-Young; Song, Seok Bean; Choi, Dong-Kug; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Jeong, Hyun Young; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Furihata, Chie

    2002-10-08

    The clinical significance of osteonectin in human stomach cancer was examined immunohistochemically and molecular biologically in 31 differentiated and eight undifferentiated stomach adenocarcinomas and 19 non-cancer stomach tissues. Osteonectin-mAb-stained cells were observed in stroma of 90% differentiated and 63% undifferentiated adenocarcinomas, and of 26% non-cancer stomach tissues. Competitive reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction results generally coincided with immunohistochemical data. The present results suggest that osteonectin is highly expressed in reactive stroma associated with invasive differentiated adenocarcinomas and that it may serve as a useful clinical diagnostic marker for stomach cancer.

  14. Attributable risks for stomach cancer in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    La Vecchia, C; D'Avanzo, B; Negri, E; Decarli, A; Benichou, J

    1995-03-16

    The proportions of gastric cancer cases attributable (or attributable risks, AR) to consumption of traditional foods (i.e., pasta, rice and maize), low intake of beta-carotene and vitamin C, short duration of use of an electric refrigerator, low educational level, and family history of gastric cancer were computed using data from a case-control study conducted in Northern Italy. Between 1985 and June 1993 a total of 746 incident, histologically confirmed gastric cancer cases and 2,053 controls admitted to the same network of hospitals for acute, nonneoplastic, non-digestive-tract diseases, unrelated to long-term modifications of diet, were interviewed. The ARs were 48% for low intake of beta-carotene, 40% for high consumption of traditional foods, and 16% for low intake of vitamin C. Overall, these 3 dietary factors explained 73% of the gastric cancer cases in the population. Five percent of all cases were attributable to less than 30 years' use of an electric refrigerator, 15% to low educational level, and 5% to family history of gastric cancer. In individuals over age 60, a greater proportion of cases was attributable to traditional foods, low education and late adoption of electric refrigeration (58% vs. 32% aged under 60), suggesting that correlates of lower social class, influenced lifestyle, and dietary habits more markedly in earlier than in more recent generations. According to our estimates, over 3 quarters of the gastric cancer cases in this area are explainable in terms of the risk factors considered. Increased consumption of vitamin C and beta-carotene, and reduced consumption of traditional foods, would help to avoid over 10,000 out of 14,000 stomach-cancer deaths in Italy every year. Consequently, stomach cancer, which is still the third leading cause of cancer death in Italy, would represent only about 2% of all cancer deaths.

  15. Prevalence of stomach cancer in Shiraz, Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabani, Davood; Hosseini, Seyed V.; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Amini, Masoud; Mehrabani, Golnoosh; Tarrahi, Mohammad J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Worldwide, cancer of stomach is still the fourth common cancer and the second cause of mortality among all cancers affecting annually 870,000 subjects. This study aims to determine the frequency and the characteristics of gastric cancer in southern Iran. Materials and Methods: 10,800 of all cancers registered in Fars Hospital-based Cancer Registry were surveyed among which 574 cases were gastric cancer in both genders and all age groups. From January 2002 to December 2007, all hospital-based data were recorded according to International Classification of Disease for Oncology (ICD-O) and registered cases included all invasive cancers in ICD-10 categories of C-00 to C-80 and all duplicate cases were eliminated. Results: Among all registered cancers, there were 574 cases of gastric cancer including 69.3% males. The mean age of patients was 58.1 ± 14.8 years, 25.4% with a history of in their first relatives and most of them were smokers (50.9%) and from low socioeconomic class (45.5%). Metastasis was visible in 182 patients and majority of them underwent surgery (64.3%). The majority of gastric cancer patients were older than 50 years, smokers, low socioeconomic class, and female in favor of adenocarcinoma. Conclusion: Our results showed that in our area, treatment programs and health plans should focus on men, patients older than 50 years and with adenocarcinoma, smokers, and those in a low income level. PMID:24124433

  16. Metastatic pancreatic cancer presenting as linitis plastica of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Garg, Shivani; Mulki, Ramzi; Sher, Daniel

    2016-03-08

    Metastatic disease from pancreatic carcinoma involving the stomach is an unusual event, and the pattern of spread in the form of linitis plastica, to our knowledge, has not been reported previously. Local recurrence after curative resection for pancreatic cancer is the most common pattern of disease. We report a case of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma presenting as linitis plastica of the stomach 4 years after curative resection. A 52-year-old man presented with epigastric pain and melaena 4 years after undergoing a Whipple's procedure for a poorly-differentiated pancreatic adenocarcinoma, stage IB; T2N0M0. CT imaging of the abdomen revealed thickening of the gastric wall, and subsequent oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) revealed diffuse friable erythaematous tissue. The biopsy specimen obtained during the OGD revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, with similar appearance to the prior specimen obtained from the pancreas.

  17. Clinical and epidemiological profile of cases of deaths from stomach cancer in the National Cancer Institute, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Maria Teresa dos Santos; de Jesus, José Paulo; de Souza Filho, Odilon; Fontenele, Raquel Malta; Sousa, Ana Inês

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Stomach cancer is the third most common cause of death worldwide, mainly affecting people with low socioeconomic status. In Brazil, we expect 20,390 new cases of stomach cancer in 2014, in both sexes, and according to the proportional distribution of the ten most prevalent types of cancer (except non-melanoma skin cancer) expected for 2014, this type of cancer was estimated to be the fourth most common in men and sixth in women. Aim To investigate and analyse the clinical and epidemiological profile of deaths caused by stomach adenocarcinoma in patients enrolled in the National Cancer Institute, Brazil. Methods Cross-sectional study, with samples which consisted of data from the medical records of deaths from stomach cancer, enrolled in the period from 1 February 2009 to 31 March 2012 and who had died as of 30 April 2012. Statistical Analysis Used The Epi Info ®, version 7 Results We included 264 cases, mostly male. The mean age was 61.7 years. They were smokers, drinkers, white, and married, with elementary education and an income of one minimum salary. They had advanced stage disease (E IV), with symptoms characteristic of this phase, and the majority died within six months. Conclusion The findings are similar to other studies. The advanced stage of the disease at the time of admission of the patients reflects the difficulty for users of the Unified Health System to access early diagnosis, demonstrating the need for efforts to identify groups and risk factors for the development of gastric cancer. Training of health professionals will facilitate planning and implementation of programmes for the prevention and control of disease, considering socioeconomic conditions, as seen in the sample, which is common among most users. PMID:25114717

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence detection of stomach cancer using hypericin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dets, Sergiy M.; Buryi, Alexander N.; Melnik, Ivan S.; Joffe, Alexander Y.; Rusina, Tatyana V.

    1996-12-01

    Natural photodynamic pigment hypericin having intrinsic antitumor properties was applied for fluorescence detection of cancer. Clinical investigation of hypericin was performed to ensure high tumor/normal fluorescence contrast in digestion organs. Laser-induced autofluorescence and exogenous fluorescence analysis of normal tissue and stomach adenocarcinoma was performed using helium-cadmium laser (8 mW, 442 nm). Twenty-one patients have undergone procedure of fluorescence detection of tumors before and after photosensitization. For sensitization of patients we used five or seven capsules containing hypericin in amount of 1 mg which have been administered orally. Strong yellow-red fluorescence of hypericin in tissue with maximum at 603 nm and autofluorescence peak at 535 nm gives an intensity ratio I(603 nm)/I(535 nm) of 2 - 2.5 from cancerous tissue and provides 85% specificity. Preliminary in vivo results of auto- and fluorescence analysis using hypericin photosensitization from one patient with esophageal cancer and eleven patients with stomach cancer proven histologically are encouraging and indicate the high reliability of laser-induced fluorescence technique with hypericin in detection of early stage malignant lesions.

  19. The Synchronous Prevalence of Colorectal Neoplasms in Patients with Stomach Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Su; Kim, Cha Young; Ha, Chang Yoon; Min, Hyun Ju; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Tae Hyo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The association between stomach cancer and colorectal cancer is controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the synchronous prevalence of colorectal neoplasms in patients with stomach cancer. Methods A total of 123 patients with stomach cancer (86 male) and 246 consecutive, age- and sex-matched persons without stomach cancer were analyzed from July 2005 to June 2010. All of them underwent colonoscopy within 6 months after undergoing gastroscopy. Results The prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was significantly higher in the stomach cancer group (35.8%) than in the control group (17.9%) (P < 0.001). Colorectal neoplasms were more prevalent in the patients with stomach cancer (odds ratio [OR], 3.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71 to 5.63). In particular, the difference in the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was more prominent in the patients above 50 years old (OR, 3.54; 95% CI, 1.80 to 6.98). Conclusion The results showed that the synchronous prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was higher in patients with stomach cancer than in those without stomach cancer. Therefore, patients with stomach cancer should be regarded as a high-risk group for colorectal neoplasms, and colonoscopy should be recommended for screening. PMID:22102975

  20. The synchronous prevalence of colorectal neoplasms in patients with stomach cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Su; Jung, Woon Tae; Kim, Cha Young; Ha, Chang Yoon; Min, Hyun Ju; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Tae Hyo

    2011-10-01

    The association between stomach cancer and colorectal cancer is controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the synchronous prevalence of colorectal neoplasms in patients with stomach cancer. A total of 123 patients with stomach cancer (86 male) and 246 consecutive, age- and sex-matched persons without stomach cancer were analyzed from July 2005 to June 2010. All of them underwent colonoscopy within 6 months after undergoing gastroscopy. The prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was significantly higher in the stomach cancer group (35.8%) than in the control group (17.9%) (P < 0.001). Colorectal neoplasms were more prevalent in the patients with stomach cancer (odds ratio [OR], 3.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71 to 5.63). In particular, the difference in the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was more prominent in the patients above 50 years old (OR, 3.54; 95% CI, 1.80 to 6.98). The results showed that the synchronous prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was higher in patients with stomach cancer than in those without stomach cancer. Therefore, patients with stomach cancer should be regarded as a high-risk group for colorectal neoplasms, and colonoscopy should be recommended for screening.

  1. Stomach cancer and occupation in Sweden: 1971–89

    PubMed Central

    Aragones, N; Pollan, M; Gustavsson, P

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the relation between gastric cancer and occupation among men and women gainfully employed in 1970 in Sweden for the period 1971–89 and, more specifically, to evaluate whether any excess of incidence of gastric cancer had also occurred among the subcohort of people reporting the same occupation in 1960 and 1970. Methods: In both sexes and cohorts, relative risks adjusted for age, period of diagnosis, and geographical risk area were computed for occupational codes specified at one, two, or three level (occupational sector, occupational group, and occupation, respectively). Relative risks were calculated with all other occupations as reference and then, to take socioeconomic status into account, solely other occupations within the same occupational sector were used. Results: Among men, occupations with increased risk included miners and quarrymen, construction and metal processing workers, supporting the possible causative role of dusty environments in stomach cancer. In men, the results also provide support for increased risks among electrical and mechanical engineers, fishermen, petrol station workers, motor vehicle drivers, butchers and meat preparers, dockers, freight handlers, launderers and dry cleaners. Furthermore, it is worth noting interesting results for women, whose occupational risks have been studied less. Excess risks were found for practical nurses, cashiers, bank employees, engineering and electronic industry workers, food industry, housekeeping and cleaning workers. Due to the many occupations studied, several significant associations may be expected by chance. Conclusions: The study is explorative but provides support for the relations suggested previously between occupational exposure to dusty environments and stomach cancer, together with some new high risk occupations which should be further studied. PMID:11983848

  2. [Disease burden of stomach cancer in the Chinese population, in 1990 and 2013].

    PubMed

    Wang, B H; Wang, N; Feng, Y J; Yin, P; Li, Y C; Liu, S W; Zhou, M G

    2016-06-01

    To analyze the national and provincial disease burden on stomach cancer in the Chinese population, in 1990 and 2013. Data related to province-specific burden of disease in China was used to analyze the standardized incidence and mortality of stomach cancer in 2013. Parameters as incidence, mortality, disability-adjusted life years (DALY), years of life lost due to premature mortality (YLL) and years lived with disability (YLD) on stomach cancer in China in 1990 and 2013, were analyzed while the standardized incidence and mortality of stomach cancer in 1990 and 2013 and the changing patterns in each province were described. In 2013, there were 371 100 new cases of stomach cancer and 317 800 cases died from stomach cancer in China. Figures on the standardized incidence (26.84/100 000), mortality rate (23.55/100 000) and DALY rate (464.47/100 000) all increased with age. Between 1990 and 2013, the standardized incidence rates in men were all higher than that in women (2.03-2.67 times) but both showed a decreasing trend. Under the reported figures, 317 800 people died from stomach cancer in 2013, with an increase of 13.15%. The number of deaths was 182 700, in 1990. From 1990 to 2013, the standardized mortality rate, DALY and DALY rate decreased in both genders,with more seen in women than in men. The top three provinces that having the highest stomach cancer standardized incidences and mortality in 2013 were Qinghai, Anhui, Gansu. The top three provinces with the most reduction of figures appeared in Tianjin, Shanghai and Zhejiang. Compared with those in 1990, the standardized mortality decreased in all the provinces, in 2013. The disease burden of stomach cancer in China remained at high level in 2013. Compared with those in 1990, the disease burden of stomach cancer decreased in 2013. The standardized mortality of stomach cancer in all the provinces had decreased but the provincial differences still existed.

  3. [Could Helicobacter pylori treatment reduce stomach cancer risk?].

    PubMed

    Bretagne, Jean-François

    2003-03-01

    Despite its dramatic decline in incidence in developed countries, gastric cancer is a major public health issue in the world. Accumulating evidence for considering H. pylori as a causal factor for gastric cancer comes from recent epidemiologic studies, the advent of an animal model of gastric cancer and from new insights into the biological mechanisms for gastric carcinogenesis. The stomach cancer risk for people infected with H. pylori is rather low, inferior to 1%. It depends on genotypic polymorphisms of both the bacterium and the host. Environmental risk factors such as smoking habits, salt intake, and the amount of antioxidants in diet may interfere with H. pylori and modify the cancer risk. There is no definite clinical evidence of the benefit of eradication on cancer risk in humans due to the lack of randomized controlled studies in large populations. The occurrence of gastric adenocarcinomas in patients after complete remission of gastric MALT lymphoma induced by H. pylori eradication suggests also the limits of the preventive strategy against gastric cancer. Furthermore, the effectiveness of eradication to reverse precancerous gastric lesions such as severe atrophy and intestinal metaplasia is questionable. For many reasons discussed in our review, population-based screening and routine eradication of H. pylori infection seem to be an unrealistic goal and cannot be recommended in France. By waiting for effective anti-H. pylori vaccine, public health measures such as dietary modification should be promoted to further decrease the gastric cancer incidence. On the individual basis the specialist has a role in the diagnosis of gastric precancerous lesions by endoscopy and also in the prevention of gastric cancer by selecting indications for H. pylori therapy.

  4. Case study of stomach adenocarcinoma conducted at a cancer referral hospital in northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vinagre, Ruth Maria Dias Ferreira; Campos, Brenda Prazeres de; Sousa, Rachid Marwan Pinheiro

    2012-01-01

    Stomach cancer is the second leading cause of death due to cancer in the world and the incidence of this disease continues to be high in Brazil. In the Northern region, gastric cancer is the second most frequent cancer among men and the third among women. In the State of Pará, stomach adenocarcinoma is a public health problem since mortality rates are above the Brazilian average. To analyze the clinical and anatomopathological profile of stomach adenocarcinoma in patients seen at Ofir Loiola Hospital. In a retrospective study, records from 302 patients with gastric cancer undergoing surgery between 2006 and 2008 were analyzed. Data regarding patient profile, early symptoms, alterations upon physical examination, type of surgery, and macroscopic and histological findings were obtained from the records. Most patients (63.9%) were men, 48% were older than 60 years, 50.9% were from the metropolitan region of Belém, 68.2% presented epigastric pain as an early symptom, and abdominal tenderness upon palpation was observed in 63.7%. The antrum was the most affected anatomical site (62.1%), followed by the gastric body (26.9%). Borrmann III (ulcerated-infiltrative) was the predominant endoscopic type. Adenocarcinoma accounted for 95.4% of all cases, including the intestinal type in 56.6% and the diffuse type in 41.3%. Most patients had stage IIIB and IV tumors and total gastrectomy was the most frequent type of surgery (37.4%). The present study demonstrated that gastric adenocarcinoma mainly affected men over the age of 60 who were from the metropolitan region of Belém. Most adenocarcinomas were in an advanced stage at the time of diagnosis, a fact requiring more aggressive surgical resection in these cases. These data highlight the urgent need for the implementation of preventive measures and early detection programs of gastric cancer.

  5. Stomach cancer incidence rates among Americans, Asian Americans and Native Asians from 1988 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeerae; Park, Jinju; Nam, Byung-Ho; Ki, Moran

    2015-01-01

    Stomach cancer is the second most common cancer in Eastern Asia, accounting for approximately 50% of all new cases of stomach cancer worldwide. Our objective was to compare the stomach cancer incidence rates of Asian Americans in Los Angeles with those of native Asians to assess the etiology of stomach cancer from 1988 to 2011. To examine these differences, Asian Americans (Korean, Japanese, Chinese, and Filipino Americans living in Los Angeles, California, USA) and native Asians (from Korea, Japan, China, and the Philippines) were selected for this study. Using the Cancer Incidence in Five Continents database, stomach cancer incidence rates were examined. Data from the National Cancer Registry of Korea were used for native Koreans. Between native countries, the incidence rates in Japan, China, the Philippines, and the US declined over time, but the incidence in Korea has remained constant. The incidences among Asian immigrants were lower than those among native Asians. The incidence rates of males were approximately 2 times higher than those among females in Asian countries were. The effect of immigration on stomach cancer incidence suggests that lifestyle factors are a significant determinant of stomach cancer risk. However, the incidence in Korea remains the highest of these countries.

  6. Stomach cancer incidence rates among Americans, Asian Americans and Native Asians from 1988 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeerae; Park, Jinju; Nam, Byung-Ho; Ki, Moran

    2015-01-01

    Stomach cancer is the second most common cancer in Eastern Asia, accounting for approximately 50% of all new cases of stomach cancer worldwide. Our objective was to compare the stomach cancer incidence rates of Asian Americans in Los Angeles with those of native Asians to assess the etiology of stomach cancer from 1988 to 2011. To examine these differences, Asian Americans (Korean, Japanese, Chinese, and Filipino Americans living in Los Angeles, California, USA) and native Asians (from Korea, Japan, China, and the Philippines) were selected for this study. Using the Cancer Incidence in Five Continents database, stomach cancer incidence rates were examined. Data from the National Cancer Registry of Korea were used for native Koreans. Between native countries, the incidence rates in Japan, China, the Philippines, and the US declined over time, but the incidence in Korea has remained constant. The incidences among Asian immigrants were lower than those among native Asians. The incidence rates of males were approximately 2 times higher than those among females in Asian countries were. The effect of immigration on stomach cancer incidence suggests that lifestyle factors are a significant determinant of stomach cancer risk. However, the incidence in Korea remains the highest of these countries PMID:25687951

  7. Epidemiologic panorama of stomach cancer mortality in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Guzmán, V; Hernández-Girón, C; Barquera, S; Rodríguez-Salgado, N; López-Carrillo, L

    2001-01-01

    Annually, there are more than 6 million deaths from a type of malignant neoplasia worldwide. In developing countries, the highest rates of incidence of malignant neoplasias are uterine cervical cancer, stomach, lung, esophagus, pharynx, and liver cancers. Recent estimates on the incidence of cancer worldwide show that, in 1990, stomach cancer (SC) was the second most frequent type of cancer (900,000 new cases annually). Rates of incidence have decreased consistently in nearly all areas of the world. In Mexico, however, rates of incidence and mortality have increased gradually between 1980 and 1997; in 1995, 4,685 people died of SC in Mexico. This report presents a descriptive analysis of SC mortality in Mexico. A mortality database edited from the electronic files of the National Institute of Informatics, Statistics and Geography (INEGI) in Mexico was used; population denominators were edited by the Mexican National Population Council (Conapo). Adjusted mortality rates, taking as standard of reference the population of Mexico City by sex, year, and 10-year age groups were calculated as well as the sex ratio for the 1980-1997 period. To evaluate the magnitude of risks by state, the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was calculated; prematurity was evaluated through the potential lost-life years index (PLLYI). The analysis was carried out using the Excel and Stata 5.0 software programs. During the years from 1980 to 1997, in Mexico the total number of deaths from SC was 76,315. The male:female ratio was 1.2:1.0. SMR by state showed that the states of Yucatán, Sonora, Zacatecas, Michoacán, and Chiapas had higher mortality rates. The PLLYI was higher for males in the states of Chiapas, Sonora, Chihuahua, Zacatecas, and Southern Baja California, and higher for females in Chiapas, Oaxaca, Yucatán, Puebla, and Campeche. World statistics on mortality caused by SC suggest a decreasing trend. Findings for this study show an increase in the adjusted mortality rates by SC

  8. Preoperative N Staging of Gastric Cancer by Stomach Protocol Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Hoon; Kim, Jeong Jae; Lee, Jeong Sub; Kim, Seung Hyoung; Kim, Bong Soo; Maeng, Young Hee; Hyun, Chang Lim; Kim, Min Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Clinical stage of gastric cancer is currently assessed by computed tomography. Accurate clinical staging is important for the tailoring of therapy. This study evaluated the accuracy of clinical N staging using stomach protocol computed tomography. Materials and Methods Between March 2004 and November 2012, 171 patients with gastric cancer underwent preoperative stomach protocol computed tomography (Jeju National University Hospital; Jeju, Korea). Their demographic and clinical characteristics were reviewed retrospectively. Two radiologists evaluated cN staging using axial and coronal computed tomography images, and cN stage was matched with pathologic results. The diagnostic accuracy of stomach protocol computed tomography for clinical N staging and clinical characteristics associated with diagnostic accuracy were evaluated. Results The overall accuracy of stomach protocol computed tomography for cN staging was 63.2%. Computed tomography images of slice thickness 3.0 mm had a sensitivity of 60.0%; a specificity of 89.6%; an accuracy of 78.4%; and a positive predictive value of 78.0% in detecting lymph node metastases. Underestimation of cN stage was associated with larger tumor size (P<0.001), undifferentiated type (P=0.003), diffuse type (P=0.020), more advanced pathologic stage (P<0.001), and larger numbers of harvested and metastatic lymph nodes (P<0.001 each). Tumor differentiation was an independent factor affecting underestimation by computed tomography (P=0.045). Conclusions Computed tomography with a size criterion of 8 mm is highly specific but relatively insensitive in detecting nodal metastases. Physicians should keep in mind that computed tomography may not be an appropriate tool to detect nodal metastases for choosing appropriate treatment. PMID:24156034

  9. Survival of stomach and esophagus cancer patients in Germany in the early 21st century.

    PubMed

    Hiripi, Eva; Jansen, Lina; Gondos, Adam; Emrich, Katharina; Holleczek, Bernd; Katalinic, Alexander; Luttmann, Sabine; Nennecke, Alice; Brenner, Hermann

    2012-09-01

    Esophagus and stomach cancers are associated with poor prognosis. But most published population-based cancer survival estimates for stomach and esophagus cancer refer to survival experience of patients diagnosed in the 1990s or earlier years. The aim of this study was to provide up-to-date survival estimates and trends for patients with stomach and esophagus cancer in Germany. Our analysis is based on data from 11 population-based cancer registries, covering 33 million inhabitants. Patients diagnosed with stomach and esophagus cancer in 1997-2006 were included. Period analysis was used to derive five-year relative survival estimates and trends by age, sex, cancer subsite, and stage for the time period of 2002-2006. German and US survival estimates were compared utilizing the SEER 13 database. Overall age-standardized five-year relative survival was 31.8% and 18.3% for stomach and esophagus cancer, respectively, compared to 27.2% and 17.4% in the US. Survival was somewhat higher among female than among male patients for both cancer sites (33.6% vs. 30.6% and 21.5% vs. 17.5%, respectively) and much higher for non-cardia stomach cancer (40.4%) than for cardia cancer (23.4%). From 2002 to 2006, a moderate increase in five-year relative survival by 2.7 percent units was observed for non-cardia stomach cancer patients in Germany (p < 0.001). Five-year relative cancer survival has reached levels around 40% for patients with non-cardia stomach cancer in Germany in the early 21st century, whereas it remained at lower levels around 20% for patients with esophagus and cardia cancer.

  10. Review of salt consumption and stomach cancer risk: epidemiological and biological evidence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Qin; Terry, Paul-D; Yan, Hong

    2009-05-14

    Stomach cancer is still the fourth most common cancer; thus, it remains an important public health burden worldwide, especially in developing countries. The remarkable geographic variations in the rates of stomach cancer indicate that dietary factors, including a range of food groups to which salt and/or nitrates have been added, may affect stomach cancer risk. In this paper, we review the results from ecologic, case-control and cohort studies on the relationship between salt or salted foods and stomach cancer risk. The majority of ecological studies indicated that the average salt intake in each population was closely correlated with gastric cancer mortality. Most case-control studies showed similar results, indicating a moderate to high increase in risk for the highest level of salt or salted food consumption. The overall results from cohort studies are not totally consistent, but are suggestive of a moderate direct association. Since salt intake has been correlated with Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection, it is possible that these two factors may synergize to promote the development of stomach cancer. Additionally, salt may also cause stomach cancer through directly damaging gastric mucus, improving temporary epithelial proliferation and the incidence of endogenous mutations, and inducing hypergastrinemia that leads to eventual parietal cell loss and progression to gastric cancer. Based on the considerable evidence from ecological, case-control and cohort studies worldwide and the mechanistic plausibility, limitation on salt and salted food consumption is a practical strategy for preventing gastric cancer.

  11. Association between XPG polymorphisms and stomach cancer susceptibility in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Zhi; Guo, Fang; Sun, Hong-Wei; Kong, Hong-Ru; Dai, Sheng-Jie; Huang, Shi-Hao; Zhu, Wen-Wei; Yang, Wen-Jun; Zhou, Meng-Tao

    2016-05-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group G (XPG) protein plays an important role in the DNA repair process by cutting the damaged DNA at the 3' terminus. Previous studies have indicated some polymorphisms in the XPG gene are associated with stomach cancer susceptibility. We performed this hospital-based case-control study to evaluate the association of four potentially functional XPG polymorphisms (rs2094258 C>T, rs751402 C>T, rs2296147 T>C and rs873601G>A) with stomach cancer susceptibility. The four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 692 stomach cancer cases and 771 healthy controls. Logistic regression analysis was conducted, and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the association of interest. Of the studied SNPs, XPG rs873601G>A polymorphism was found to significantly associate with stomach cancer susceptibility (AA versus OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.03-1.66, P = 0.027). Combined analysis of all SNPs revealed that the individuals with two of risk genotypes had a significantly increased stomach cancer risk (OR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.13-2.06). In the stratification analysis, the association between the rs873601AA genotype and stomach cancer risk was observed in older group (>59 year), as well as patients with non-cardia stomach cancer. Further combined analysis indicated men, smokers, or non-drinkers more than one risk genotypes had a significantly increased stomach cancer risk. Our results indicate that XPG rs873601G>A polymorphism may be associated with the risk of stomach cancer. Further prospective studies with different ethnicities and large sample sizes are needed to validate our findings. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  12. Cutaneous paraneoplastic disorders in stomach cancer: Collaboration between oncologically active dermatologists and clinical oncologists.

    PubMed

    Hejna, Michael; Wöll, Ewald; Tschandl, Philipp; Raderer, Markus

    2016-07-01

    To our knowledge this is the first systemic review that provides an overview of the cutaneous paraneoplastic syndromes (CPS) (i.e., clinical manifestations, pathomechanisms, and treatment modalities) occurring in stomach cancer. CPS are caused by substances produced by stomach cancer and may precede, coincide with, or follow the diagnosis of this malignancy. More than 20 possible CPS in association with stomach cancer have been identified. CPS mostly compromises the patient's quality of life by skin impairment plus discomfort and are often associated with a dismal prognosis on survival. Studies of these CPS not only in stomach cancer have partially contributed to the understanding of pathomechanism and since CPS may be the presenting sign of an occult cancer, cognizance of their features and clinical implications are of considerable importance. Patients with these syndromes should have an appropriate work-up for a possibly occult malignancy with consecutive successful early treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Soy isoflavone intake and stomach cancer risk in Japan: From the Takayama study.

    PubMed

    Wada, Keiko; Tsuji, Michiko; Tamura, Takashi; Konishi, Kie; Kawachi, Toshiaki; Hori, Akihiro; Tanabashi, Shinobu; Matsushita, Shogen; Tokimitsu, Naoki; Nagata, Chisato

    2015-08-15

    Although several experimental studies suggested that soy isoflavone intake inhibits the growth of stomach cancer, previous epidemiological studies have observed inconsistent results. We evaluated the associations of soy or isoflavone intake with stomach cancer incidence after considering several lifestyle factors, including salt intake, in a population-based prospective cohort study in Japan. Subjects were 14,219 men and 16,573 women aged 35 years or older in September 1992. Soy and isoflavone intakes, assessed with a validated food-frequency questionnaire, were controlled for the total energy intake. Cancer incidence was mainly confirmed through regional population-based cancer registries. Until March 2008, 441 men and 237 women developed stomach cancer. After adjustments for multiple confounders, a significantly decreased relative risk of stomach cancer was observed in the highest vs. lowest quartile of soy intake; the estimated hazard ratios were 0.71 (95% CI: 0.53, 0.96) for men (p for trend = 0.039) and 0.58 (95% CI: 0.36, 0.94) for women (p for trend = 0.003). Similar inverse associations between isoflavone intake and stomach cancer risk were also observed in women. Higher intake of non-fermented soy foods was significantly associated with a lower risk of stomach cancer (p for trend: 0.022 in men and 0.005 in women), whereas there was no significant association between the intake of fermented soy foods and a risk of stomach cancer. These results suggest that a high intake of soy isoflavone, mainly nonfermented soy foods, have a protective effect against stomach cancer. © 2015 UICC.

  14. Localized amyloidosis of the stomach mimicking a superficial gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Miwako; Fujino, Yasuteru; Muguruma, Naoki; Murayama, Noriaki; Okamoto, Koichi; Kitamura, Shinji; Kimura, Tetsuo; Kishi, Kazuhiro; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Uehara, Hisanori; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2016-06-01

    A 73-year-old man was referred to our hospital for further examination of a depressed lesion in the stomach found by cancer screening gastroscopy. A barium upper gastrointestinal series showed an area of irregular mucosa measuring 15 mm on the anterior wall of the gastric body. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a 15 mm depressed lesion on the anterior wall of the lower gastric body. We suspected an undifferentiated adenocarcinoma from the appearance and took some biopsies. However, histology of the specimens revealed amyloidal deposits in the submucosal layer without malignant findings. Congo red staining was positive for amyloidal protein and green birefringence was observed under polarized light microscopy. Congo red staining with prior potassium permanganate incubation confirmed the light chain (AL) amyloid type. There were no amyloid deposits in the colon or duodenum. Computed tomography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed no remarkable findings. Thus, this case was diagnosed as a localized gastric amyloidosis characterized by AL type amyloid deposition in the mucosal or submucosal layer. As the clinical outcome of gastric AL amyloidosis seems favorable, this case is scheduled for periodic examination to recognize potential disease progression and has been stable for 2 years.

  15. Family history, body mass index and survival in Japanese patients with stomach cancer: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Minami, Yuko; Kawai, Masaaki; Fujiya, Tsuneaki; Suzuki, Masaki; Noguchi, Tetsuya; Yamanami, Hideaki; Kakugawa, Yoichiro; Nishino, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-15

    Family history and nutritional status may affect the long-term prognosis of stomach cancer, but evidence is insufficient and inconsistent. To clarify the prognostic factors of stomach cancer, we conducted a prospective study of 1,033 Japanese patients with histologically confirmed stomach cancer who were admitted to a single hospital between 1997 and 2005. Family history of stomach cancer and pretreatment body mass index (BMI) were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Clinical data were retrieved from a hospital-based cancer registry. All patients were completely followed up until December, 2008. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated according to family history in parents and siblings and BMI category. During a median follow-up of 5.3 years, 403 all-cause and 279 stomach cancer deaths were documented. Although no association with family history was observed in the patients overall, analysis according to age group found an increased risk of all-cause death associated with a history in first degree relatives (HR = 1.61, 95% CI: 0.93-2.78, p = 0.09) and with a parental history (HR = 1.86, 95% CI: 1.06-3.26) among patients aged under 60 years at diagnosis. BMI was related to all-cause and stomach cancer death among patients aged 60 and over, showing a J-shaped pattern (HR of all-cause death = 2.28 for BMI < 18.5; HR = 1.61 for 25 ≤ vs. ≥ 23.0 to < 25.0 kg/m(2)). A family history of stomach cancer, especially parental history, may affect mortality among younger stomach cancer patients, whereas nutritional status may be a prognostic factor in older patients. © 2014 UICC.

  16. Lung and stomach cancer associations with groundwater radon in North Carolina, USA.

    PubMed

    Messier, Kyle P; Serre, Marc L

    2017-04-01

    The risk of indoor air radon for lung cancer is well studied, but the risks of groundwater radon for both lung and stomach cancer are much less studied, and with mixed results. Geomasked and geocoded stomach and lung cancer cases in North Carolina from 1999 to 2009 were obtained from the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry. Models for the association with groundwater radon and multiple confounders were implemented at two scales: (i) an ecological model estimating cancer incidence rates at the census tract level; and (ii) a case-only logistic model estimating the odds that individual cancer cases are members of local cancer clusters. For the lung cancer incidence rate model, groundwater radon is associated with an incidence rate ratio of 1.03 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01, 1.06] for every 100 Bq/l increase in census tract averaged concentration. For the cluster membership models, groundwater radon exposure results in an odds ratio for lung cancer of 1.13 (95% CI = 1.04, 1.23) and for stomach cancer of 1.24 (95% CI = 1.03, 1.49), which means groundwater radon, after controlling for multiple confounders and spatial auto-correlation, increases the odds that lung and stomach cancer cases are members of their respective cancer clusters. Our study provides epidemiological evidence of a positive association between groundwater radon exposure and lung cancer incidence rates. The cluster membership model results find groundwater radon increases the odds that both lung and stomach cancer cases occur within their respective cancer clusters. The results corroborate previous biokinetic and mortality studies that groundwater radon is associated with increased risk for lung and stomach cancer.

  17. Does the risk of stomach cancer remain among second-generation immigrants in Sweden?

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen; Sundquist, Kristina; Hemminki, Kari

    2012-04-01

    The observed increased risks of noncardia stomach cancer among foreign-born second-generation immigrants compared to the Swedes suggest that these immigrants were infected by Helicobacter pylori before immigration.

  18. Suicidal Ideation and Psychological Strain Among Patients Diagnosed With Stomach Cancer: The Mediation of Psychopathological Factors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuekun; Zhang, Jie; Procter, Nicholas; Chen, Xiaoyun; Su, Yonggang; Lou, Fenglan; Cao, Fenglin

    2017-07-01

    Patients with stomach cancer are at high risk to experience suicidal ideation. Strain theory of suicide assumes that suicide is preceded by psychological strain. Despite wide international acceptance of the theory, its use with a sample of patients with stomach cancer has not previously been reported. The aims were to examine the relationship between psychological strain and suicidal ideation among patients with stomach cancer and to determine whether psychopathological factors act as mediators. A cross-sectional study was undertaken involving subjects with no history of mental disorder, and questionnaires were administered by face-to-face interview. Patients who experienced more psychological strain, especially coping strain, are more likely to experience suicidal ideation. The mediation effects of hopelessness and psychological distress are significant. Psychological strain, hopelessness, and psychological distress may be the vital factors among patients with stomach cancer in the suicide-risk assessment interview and for care planning and psychological intervention.

  19. Epidemiology characteristics and trends of incidence and morphology of stomach cancer in Iran.

    PubMed

    Almasi, Zeinab; Rafiemanesh, Hosein; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Stomach cancer is the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer- related death through the world. It is predicted that the number of new cancer cases will be more than 15 million cases by 2020. Regarding the lack of studies on this topic in the country, we have thoroughly examined the patho-epidemiology of stomach cancer in Iran. In this cross- sectional study data were collected retrospectively reviewing all new stomach cancer patients in Cancer Registry Center report of health deputy for Iran during a 6-year period (2003-2008). The study also examined the morphology of common stomach cancers. Trends in incidence and morphology underwent joinpoint regression analysis. During the six-year period, a total of 35,171 cases of stomach cancer were registered. Average age standardized rate for females and males were equal to 7.1 and 15.1 per 100,000 persons, respectively. Most common histological type was adenocarcinoma, NOS with 21,980 cases (62.50%). The annual percentage change (APC) in age-standardized incidence rate (per 100,000) was increase in both females and males at 11.1 (CI: 4.3 to 18.3) and 9.2 (CI: 5.2 to 13.4), respectively. According to our results, the incidence of gastric cancer is increasing in Iran, so further epidemiological studies into the etiology and early detection are essential.

  20. Factors associated with depression in disease-free stomach cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyung Hee; Hwang, In Cheol; Kim, Sung; Bae, Jae-Moon; Kim, Young-Woo; Ryu, Keun Won; Lee, Jun Ho; Noh, Jae-Hyung; Sohn, Tae-Sung; Shin, Dong Wook; Yun, Young Ho

    2013-10-01

    Depression in cancer survivors affects the rest of their lives in many ways. To estimate the prevalence of depression and identify associated factors in disease-free stomach cancer survivors. We enrolled 391 stomach cancer survivors who had been disease-free for at least one year after surgery from the cancer registries of two hospitals in Korea. Stomach cancer survivors were mailed a survey that included the Beck Depression Inventory, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30, and the associated stomach module, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Stomach Cancer Module 22. Forty-four percent of survivors suffered from depression, and more women (49%) than men (42%) had high depression scores (Beck Depression Inventory >13). In multiple logistic regression analysis, lower income (odds ratio [OR] 2.49; 95% CI 1.64-3.78), problems with care before treatment (OR 1.92; 95% CI 1.23-2.98), body image change (OR 2.23; 95% CI 1.41-3.53), and symptoms of fatigue (OR 3.11; 95% CI 1.49-6.52), dyspnea (OR 2.57; 95% CI 1.48-4.45), or insomnia (OR 4.51; 95% CI 1.88-10.83) were associated with depression. The prevalence of depression was high in stomach cancer survivors even after the completion of treatment, especially among those with problems amenable to treatment, and we identified the associated factors. We suggest that stomach cancer survivors should be screened for depression after the end of treatment. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Factors related with colorectal and stomach cancer screening practice among disease-free lung cancer survivors in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Min; Lee, Jongmog; Kim, Young Ae; Chang, Yoon Jung; Kim, Moon Soo; Shim, Young Mog; Zo, Jae Ill; Yun, Young Ho

    2017-08-30

    Lung cancer survivors are more likely to develop colorectal and stomach cancer than the general population. However, little is known about the current status of gastrointestinal cancer screening practices and related factors among lung cancer survivors. We enrolled 829 disease-free lung cancer survivors ≥40 years of age, who had been treated at two hospitals from 2001 to 2006. The patients completed a questionnaire that included stomach and colorectal cancer screening after lung cancer treatment, as well as other sociodemographic variables. Among lung cancer survivors, correlations with stomach and colorectal screening recommendations were 22.7 and 25.8%, respectively. Of these, 40.7% reported receiving physician advice to screen for second primary cancer (SPC). Those who were recommended for further screening for other cancers were more likely to receive stomach cancer screening [adjusted odds ratios (aOR) = 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.16-2.30] and colorectal cancer screening [aOR = 1.37, 95% CI, 0.99-1.90]. Less-educated lung cancer survivors were less likely to have stomach and colorectal cancer screenings. Lack of a physician's advice for SPC screening and lower educational status had negative impact on the gastrointestinal cancer screening rates of lung cancer survivors.

  2. Stomach cancer mortality among workers exposed to asbestos: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wen-jia; Jia, Xian-jie; Wei, Bing-gan; Yang, Lin-sheng; Yu, Ying; Zhang, Lei

    2015-07-01

    The relationship between asbestos and stomach cancer is not well understood because of small number of cases. This study aimed to determine the incidence and mortality of stomach cancer among workers exposed to asbestos based on a systematic review and meta-analysis approach. Relevant English electronic databases were systematically searched for published studies characterizing the risk of developing stomach cancer as a result of asbestos exposure. Standardized mortality rate (SMR) for stomach cancer with its 95% confidence interval (CI) was pooled using a fixed-/random-effect model in STATA. A total of 32 independent studies were included for the analysis. The overall SMR for stomach cancer was 1.19 (95% CI 1.06-1.34), with a moderate degree of heterogeneity across the studies (I(2) = 37.6%, P = 0.011). Being male, exposure to crocidolite, miners, studies conducted in Europe and Oceania, and long study follow-up (≥ 25 years) all contribute to significantly higher SMR. Significant publication bias was observed. Elevated risk of stomach cancer mortality was evidenced among workers exposed to crocidolite, especially male miners.

  3. Roles of Radiation Dose and Chemotherapy in the Etiology of Stomach Cancer as a Second Malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Belt-Dusebout, Alexandra W. van den; Aleman, Berthe M.P.; Besseling, Gijs; Bruin, Marie L. de; Hauptmann, Michael; Veer, Mars B. van't; Wit, Ronald de; Ribot, Jacques G.; Noordijk, Evert M.; Kerst, J. Martijn; Gietema, Jourik A.; Leeuwen, Flora E. van

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the roles of radiation dose, chemotherapy, and other factors in the etiology of stomach cancer in long-term survivors of testicular cancer or Hodgkin lymphoma. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cohort study in 5,142 survivors of testicular cancer or Hodgkin lymphoma treated in the Netherlands between 1965 and 1995. In a nested case-control study, detailed information on treatment, smoking, gastrointestinal diseases, and family history was collected for 42 patients with stomach cancer and 126 matched controls. For each subject, the mean radiation dose to the stomach was estimated. Relative risks (RRs) of stomach cancer and the radiation-related excess relative risk (ERR) per gray were calculated by conditional logistic regression analysis. Results: The risk of stomach cancer was 3.4-fold increased compared with the general population. The risk increased with increasing mean stomach dose (p for trend, <0.001), at an ERR of 0.84 per Gy (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.12-15.6). Mean stomach doses of more than 20 Gy were associated with a RR of 9.9 (95% CI, 3.2-31.2) compared with doses below 11 Gy. The risk was 1.8-fold (95% CI, 0.8-4.4) increased after chemotherapy and 5.4-fold (95% CI, 1.2-23.9) increased after high doses of procarbazine (>=13,000 mg) vs. <10,000 mg. The RR of smoking more than 10 cigarettes per day vs. no smoking was 1.6 (95% CI, 0.6-4.2). Conclusions: Stomach cancer risk is strongly radiation dose dependent. The role of chemotherapy, particularly of procarbazine and related agents, needs further study, because of the relatively small numbers of chemotherapy-treated subjects.

  4. Investigation of the lymphatic stream of the stomach in gastric cancer with solitary lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Masanori; Ohyama, Shigekazu; Hiki, Naoki; Fukunaga, Tetsu; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Sano, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2009-06-01

    Understanding the lymphatic drainage route in gastric cancer is crucial for complete lymph node retrieval from sites susceptible to metastasis. However, the lymphatic stream of the stomach is complex and remains incompletely characterized. Patients with small (<4 cm) serosa-negative gastric cancer with solitary lymph node metastasis treated at the Cancer Institute Hospital were included in this study. A total of 135 patients were classified according to the location of the solitary lymph node metastasis into the left gastric artery (LGA) group, the right gastroepiploic artery (RGEA) group, the right gastric artery (RGA) group, or the splenic artery (SA) group. The location of the primary tumors was investigated to aid the mapping of the lymphatic stream of the stomach. Lymphatic flow in LGA (65 patients) and in RGEA (57 patients) are main lymphatic drainage routes of the stomach. The lymphatic area overlapped in the lower third of the stomach in LGA and RGEA, and the lymphatic flow associated with gastric cancer located within this overlapped area can be multidirectional. Skip metastases were observed in 13 patients (10%), and all skip metastases were observed in the suprapancreatic area (station 7, 8a, 9, or 11p). The lymphatic stream of the stomach is complicated and multidirectional. Understanding and mapping the complex lymphatic streams of the stomach will allow surgeons to perform more effective lymph node dissection during gastric cancer surgery.

  5. XRCC1 Gene Polymorphism, Clinicopathological Characteristics and Stomach Cancer Survival in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Putthanachote, Nuntiput; Promthet, Supannee; Suwanrungruan, Krittika; Chopjitt, Peechanika; Wiangnon, Surapon; Chen, Li-Sheng; Yen, Ming-Fang; Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi

    2015-01-01

    Stomach cancer is one of leading causes of death worldwide. In Thailand, the incidence and mortality of stomach cancer are in the top ten for cancers. Effects of DNA repair gene X-ray repair cross complementary protein 1 (XRCC1) polymorphisms and clinicopathological characteristics on survival of stomach cancer in Thailand have not been previously reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of XRCC1 gene and clinicopathological characteristics on survival of stomach cancer patients in Thailand. Data and blood samples were collected from 101 newly diagnosed stomach cancer cases pathologically confirmed and recruited during 2002 to 2006 and followed-up for vital status until 31 October 2012. Genotype analysis was performed using real-time PCR-HRM. The data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method to yield cumulative survival curve, log-rank test to assess statistical difference of survival and Cox proportional hazard models to estimate adjusted hazard ratio. The total followed-up times were 2,070 person-months, and the mortality rate was 4.3 per 100 person-months. The median survival time after diagnosis was 8.07 months. The cumulative 1-, 3-, 5-years survival rates were 40.4%, 15.2 % and 10.1 % respectively. After adjustment, tumour stage were associated with an increased risk of death (p= 0.036). The XRCC1 Gln339Arg, Arg/Arg homozygote was also associated with increased risk but statistically this was non-significant. In addition to tumour stage, which is an important prognostic factor affecting to the survival of stomach cancer patients, the genetic variant Gln339Arg in XRCC1 may non-significantly contribute to risk of stomach cancer death among Thai people. Larger studies with different populations are need to verify ours findings.

  6. The burden of stomach cancer in indigenous populations: a systematic review and global assessment.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Melina; Moore, Suzanne P; Hassler, Sven; Ellison-Loschmann, Lis; Forman, David; Bray, Freddie

    2014-01-01

    Stomach cancer is a leading cause of cancer death, especially in developing countries. Incidence has been associated with poverty and is also reported to disproportionately affect indigenous peoples, many of whom live in poor socioeconomic circumstances and experience lower standards of health. In this comprehensive assessment, we explore the burden of stomach cancer among indigenous peoples globally. The literature was searched systematically for studies on stomach cancer incidence, mortality and survival in indigenous populations, including Indigenous Australians, Maori in New Zealand, indigenous peoples from the circumpolar region, native Americans and Alaska natives in the USA, and the Mapuche peoples in Chile. Data from the New Zealand Health Information Service and the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program were used to estimate trends in incidence. Elevated rates of stomach cancer incidence and mortality were found in almost all indigenous peoples relative to corresponding non-indigenous populations in the same regions or countries. This was particularly evident among Inuit residing in the circumpolar region (standardised incidence ratios (SIR) males: 3.9, females: 3.6) and in Maori (SIR males: 2.2, females: 3.2). Increasing trends in incidence were found for some groups. We found a higher burden of stomach cancer in indigenous populations globally, and rising incidence in some indigenous groups, in stark contrast to the decreasing global trends. This is of major public health concern requiring close surveillance and further research of potential risk factors. Given evidence that improving nutrition and housing sanitation, and Helicobacter pylori eradication programmes could reduce stomach cancer rates, policies which address these initiatives could reduce inequalities in stomach cancer burden for indigenous peoples.

  7. Malays in peninsular Malaysia may have the lowest incidence of stomach cancer in the world.

    PubMed

    Lim, K G

    2009-03-01

    The Malaysian National Cancer Registry (NCR) report for the period 2003-2005 shows an incidence of stomach cancer of 2.2 for Malay, 11.3 for Chinese and 11.9 for Indian males per 100,000 population. Malay (1.3), Chinese (7.2) and Indian (7.2) women have rates lower than men. Malays in Peninsular Malaysia have five times less stomach cancer than Chinese and Indians. This racial difference is more marked than that noted in the Singapore cancer registry. Regional data from Kelantan has an even lower rate for Malays there (1.5 for males and 0.9 for females per 100,000 population). The incidence of Helicobacter pylori infection, a known risk factor for stomach cancer, is low among Malays.

  8. Processed meat consumption, dietary nitrosamines and stomach cancer risk in a cohort of Swedish women.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Susanna C; Bergkvist, Leif; Wolk, Alicja

    2006-08-15

    Processed meat consumption has been associated with an increased risk of stomach cancer in some epidemiological studies (mainly case-control). Nitrosamines may be responsible for this association, but few studies have directly examined nitrosamine intake in relation to stomach cancer risk. We prospectively investigated the associations between intakes of processed meat, other meats and N-nitrosodimethylamine (the most frequently occurring nitrosamine in foods) with risk of stomach cancer among 61,433 women who were enrolled in the population-based Swedish Mammography Cohort. Information on diet was collected at baseline (between 1987 and 1990) and updated in 1997. During 18 years of follow-up, 156 incident cases of stomach cancer were ascertained. High consumption of processed meat, but not of other meats (i.e., red meat, fish and poultry), was associated with a statistically significant increased risk of stomach cancer. After adjustment for potential confounders, the hazard ratios for the highest compared with the lowest category of intake were 1.66 (95% CI = 1.13-2.45) for all processed meats, 1.55 (95% CI = 1.00-2.41) for bacon or side pork, 1.50 (95% CI = 0.93-2.41) for sausage or hotdogs and 1.48 (95% CI= 0.99-2.22) for ham or salami. Stomach cancer risk was 2-fold higher among women in the top quintile of N-nitrosodimethylamine intake when compared with those in the bottom quintile (hazard ratio = 1.96; 95% CI = 1.08-3.58). Our findings suggest that high consumption of processed meat may increase the risk of stomach cancer. Dietary nitrosamines might be responsible for the positive association.

  9. Survival and surgical outcomes of cardiac cancer of the remnant stomach in comparison with primary cardiac cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although cardiac cancer of the remnant stomach and primary cardiac cancer both occur in the same position, their clinical characteristics and outcomes have not been compared previously. The objective of this study was designed to evaluate the prognosis of cardiac cancer of the remnant stomach in comparison with primary cardiac cancer. Methods In this retrospective comparative study, clinical data and prognosis were compared in 48 patients with cardiac cancer of the remnant stomach and 96 patients with primary cardiac cancer who underwent radical resection from January 1995 to June 2007. Clinicopathologic characteristics, survival times, mortality, and complications were analyzed. Results The 5-year survival rate was significantly higher in patients with primary cardiac cancer than in those with cardiac cancer of the remnant stomach (28.4% vs. 16.7%, P = 0.035). Serosal invasion, lymph node metastasis and tumor location were independent prognostic factors for survival. Subgroup analysis, however, showed similar survival rates in patients with primary cardiac cancer and cardiac cancer of the remnant stomach without serosal invasion (25.0% vs. 43.8%, P = 0.214) and without lymph node metastasis (25.0% vs. 38.8%, P = 0.255), as well as similar complication rates (20.8% vs. 11.5%, P = 0.138). Conclusion Although the survival rates after radical resection in patients with cardiac cancer of the remnant stomach were poorer than in those with primary cardiac cancer, they were similar in survival rates when patients without serosal invasion or lymph node metastasis. Therefore, early detection is an important way to improve overall survival in cardiac cancer of the remnant stomach. PMID:24468299

  10. Survival and surgical outcomes of cardiac cancer of the remnant stomach in comparison with primary cardiac cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Huang, Chang-Ming; Wang, Jia-Bin; Zheng, Chao-Hui; Li, Ping; Xie, Jian-Wei; Lin, Jian-Xian; Lu, Jun

    2014-01-27

    Although cardiac cancer of the remnant stomach and primary cardiac cancer both occur in the same position, their clinical characteristics and outcomes have not been compared previously. The objective of this study was designed to evaluate the prognosis of cardiac cancer of the remnant stomach in comparison with primary cardiac cancer. In this retrospective comparative study, clinical data and prognosis were compared in 48 patients with cardiac cancer of the remnant stomach and 96 patients with primary cardiac cancer who underwent radical resection from January 1995 to June 2007. Clinicopathologic characteristics, survival times, mortality, and complications were analyzed. The 5-year survival rate was significantly higher in patients with primary cardiac cancer than in those with cardiac cancer of the remnant stomach (28.4% vs. 16.7%, P = 0.035). Serosal invasion, lymph node metastasis and tumor location were independent prognostic factors for survival. Subgroup analysis, however, showed similar survival rates in patients with primary cardiac cancer and cardiac cancer of the remnant stomach without serosal invasion (25.0% vs. 43.8%, P = 0.214) and without lymph node metastasis (25.0% vs. 38.8%, P = 0.255), as well as similar complication rates (20.8% vs. 11.5%, P = 0.138). Although the survival rates after radical resection in patients with cardiac cancer of the remnant stomach were poorer than in those with primary cardiac cancer, they were similar in survival rates when patients without serosal invasion or lymph node metastasis. Therefore, early detection is an important way to improve overall survival in cardiac cancer of the remnant stomach.

  11. Improving Goals of Care Discussion in Advanced Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-20

    Primary Stage IV Hepatobiliary; Esophageal; Colorectal Cancer; Glioblastoma; Cancer of Stomach; Cancer of Pancreas; Melanoma; Head or Neck Cancer; Stage III; Stage IV; Lung Cancers; Pancreatic Cancers

  12. Survival of Patients with Stomach Cancer and its Determinants in Kurdistan.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Ghobad; Karimi, Kohsar; Esmailnasab, Nader; Roshani, Daem

    2016-01-01

    Stomach cancer is the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of death from cancer in the world. In Iran, this type of cancer has high rates of incidence and mortality. This study aimed to assess the survival rate of patients with stomach cancer and its determinants in Kurdistan, a province with one of the highest incidence rates of stomach cancer in the country. We studied a total of 202 patients with stomach cancer who were admitted to Tohid Hospital in Sanandaj from 2009 to 2013. Using KaplanMeier nonparametric methods the survival rate of patients was calculated in terms of different levels of age at diagnosis, gender, education, residential area, occupation, underweight, and clinical variables including tumor histology, site of tumor, disease stage, and type of treatment. In addition, we compared the survival rates using the logrank test. Finally, Cox proportional hazards regression was applied using Stata 12 and R 3.1.0 software. The significance level was set at 0.05. The mean age at diagnosis was 64.7 ± 12.0 years. The survival rate of patients with stomach cancer was 43.9% and 7% at the first and the fifth year after diagnosis, respectively. The results of logrank test showed significant relationships between survival and age at diagnosis, education, disease stage, type of treatment, and degree of being underweight (P<0.05). Moreover, according to the results of Cox proportional hazards regression model, the variables of education, disease stage, and type of treatment were associated with patient survival (P<0.05). The survival rate of patients with stomach cancer is low and the prognosis is very poor. Given the poor prognosis of the patients, it is critical to find ways for early diagnosis and facilitating timely access to effective treatment methods.

  13. Breast cancer metastasis to the stomach confirmed using gastroscopy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    TAN, LINSHEN; PIAO, YING; LIU, ZHAOZHE; HAN, TAO; SONG, FULIN; GAO, FEI; HAN, YALING; XIE, XIAODONG

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis to the stomach is relatively rare. Unlike infiltrating ductal carcinoma, invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) has a high tendency to metastasize to the stomach. The present study reports a case of a 53-year-old female who had undergone a modified radical mastectomy of the left breast for ILC eight years previously and presented at the clinic seeking treatment for epigastric discomfort from sour regurgitation and belching that had persisted for one month. Gastroscopy revealed multiple apophysis lesions in the stomach, which were diagnosed as metastatic tumors to the stomach. The diagnosis was further established using histological and immunohistochemical analyses for gross cystic disease fluid protein-15, cytokeratin (CK) 7 and CK20. The patient was treated with systemic chemotherapy without surgery. During the treatment, two gastroscopy procedures revealed that the apophysis lesions in the gastric body had narrowed significantly. Few cases of breast cancer metastasizing to the stomach have been reported, particularly those that have been confirmed using gastroscopy. The present study reports a case of breast cancer metastasis to the stomach to raise awareness of the condition. PMID:25120688

  14. [Metastatic breast cancer to the stomach: An uncommon evolution of breast carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Hild, C; Talha-Vautravers, A; Hoefler, P; Zirabe, S; Bellocq, J-P; Mathelin, C

    2014-01-01

    Breast carcinoma exceptionally leads to metastatic linitis plastica. Distinguishing a breast cancer metastasis to the stomach from a primary gastric cancer on the basis of clinical and radiological signs is very challenging. Thanks to being cognizant of the previous history of invasive lobular carcinoma and the gastric biopsy followed by immunohistochemical analysis, gastric metastasis can be diagnosed. Despite the use of chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, gastric metastasis remains often associated with poor prognosis. We present a case where gastric biopsy allowed a metastatic breast cancer to the stomach to be diagnosed and we discuss its clinical, diagnostic, pathological and therapeutic particularities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Lack of Any Relationship of Stomach Cancer Incidence and Mortality with Development in Asia.

    PubMed

    RaFiei, Elahe; Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Abdollah; Towhidi, Farhad; Makhsosi, Behnam Reza; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and mortality of stomach cancer, and its relationship with the Human Development Index (HDI) and its components in Asia in 2012. This ecological study was conducted based on GLOBOCAN project of WHO for Asian countries. We assessed the correlations between standardized incidence rates (SIR) and standardized mortality rates (SMR) of stomach cancer with HDI and its components using SPSS18. A total of 696,231 cases (68.7% in males and 31.3% in females, ratio of 2.19:1) and 524,465 deaths (67.1% in men and 33.0% in women, ratio 2.03:1) were included in 2012. Five countries with the highest SIR of stomach cancer were Republic Korea, Mongolia, Japan, China and Tajikistan. Five countries with the highest SMR of stomach cancer were Mongolia, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan and China. Correlation between HDI and SIR was 0.241 (p = 0.106), in men 0.236 (p = 0.114) and in women -0.250 (p = 0.094). Also between HDI and SMR -0.250 (p = 0.871) in men -0.018 (p = 0.903) and in women -0.014 (p = 0.927). No significant correlation was observed between the SIR of stomach cancer, and the HDI and its dimensions, such as life expectancy at birth, mean years of schooling, and income level of the population.

  16. Comparative Study of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Tumor Marker in Stomach and Colon Cancer Patients in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Bashir; Gul, Bushra; Ali, Sajid; Bashir, Shumaila; Mahmood, Nourin; Ahmad, Jamshed; Nawaz, Seema

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increase in morbidity and mortality rate, cancer has become an alarming threat to the human population worldwide. Since cancer is a progressive disorder, timely diagnosis would be helpful to prevent/stop cancer from progressing to severe stage. In Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan, most of the time, tumors are diagnosed with endoscopy and biopsy; therefore rare studies exist regarding the diagnosis of gastrointestinal (GIT) carcinomas based on tumor markers, especially CEA. This study made a comparative analysis of CEA in admitted hospitalized stomach and colon cancer patients diagnosed as GIT with biopsy. In this study, a total of 66 cases were included. The level of CEA was determined in the blood of these patients using ELISA technique. Out of 66 patients, the level of CEA was high in 59.1% of the total, 60.7% in colon cancer patients and 57.9 % in stomach cancer patients. Moreover, the incidence of colorectal and stomach cancer was greater in males as compared to females. Patients were more of the age group of 40- 60 and the level of CEA was comparatively higher in patients (51.5%) with histology which was moderately differentiated, than patients with well differentiated and poorly differentiated tumor histology. CEA level was high in more than 50% of the total patients. Moreover, CEA exhibited higher sensitivity for colon than stomach cancer.

  17. Simple pathological examination technique for detection of cancer located at the surgical margin of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Kotaro; Ishihara, Sho; Fujita, Yasuko; Yamamoto, Noriko; Kishimoto, Mitsuo; Konishi, Eiichi; Kato, Yo; Yanagisawa, Akio

    2014-04-01

    The technique for examining surgical resection margins described in the Japanese Classification of Gastric Carcinoma is based on the examination of continuous infiltration by the primary tumor, and discontinuous lesions such as multiple cancers are not examined. However, examining lesions-particularly cancers-at the resection margins is important for the prevention of cancers in the remaining stomach that result from cancer remnants (remnant gastric cancer). The clinical usefulness of a simple pathological examination technique for detecting cancer located at the surgical margin of the stomach was studied. A specimen 5-8 mm wide was resected from the surgical cut margin along the entire circumference of the stomach. When the pathological margin was positive for cancer, the surgical margin was also examined, and cases that were positive for cancer were regarded as marginally positive. Of the 1,498 patients with early gastric cancer who were examined using this method, 17 (1.1 %) were marginally positive for multiple cancers, and 8 of these 17 patients (57 %) had microcancers <5 mm in diameter. This method is simple and useful for detecting cancer involving the surgical margin, which occurs at a rate of 1.1 %, making it possible to prevent remnant gastric cancer by reoperation.

  18. Surgical resection of late solitary locoregional gastric cancer recurrence in stomach bed.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masanori; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Maejima, Kentaro; Komine, Osamu; Mizutani, Satoshi; Yoshino, Masanori; Bo, Hideki; Kitayama, Yasuhiko; Uchida, Eiji

    2012-07-01

    Late-onset and solitary recurrence of gastric signet ring cell (SRC) carcinoma is rare. We report a successful surgical resection of late solitary locoregional recurrence after curative gastrectomy for gastric SRC carcinoma. The patient underwent total gastrectomy for advanced gastric carcinoma at age 52. Seven years after the primary operation, he visited us again with sudden onset of abdominal pain and vomiting. We finally decided to perform an operation, based on a diagnosis of colon obstruction due to the recurrence of gastric cancer by clinical findings and instrumental examinations. The laparotomic intra-abdominal findings showed that the recurrent tumor existed in the region surrounded by the left diaphragm, colon of splenic flexure, and pancreas tail. There was no evidence of peritoneal dissemination, and peritoneal lavage fluid cytology was negative. We performed complete resection of the recurrent tumor with partial colectomy, distal pancreatectomy, and partial diaphragmectomy. Histological examination of the resected specimen revealed SRC carcinoma, identical in appearance to the previously resected gastric cancer. We confirmed that the intra-abdominal tumor was a locoregional gastric cancer recurrence in the stomach bed. The patient showed a long-term survival of 27 months after the second operation. In the absence of effective alternative treatment for recurrent gastric carcinoma, surgical options should be pursued, especially for late and solitary recurrence.

  19. Employment status and work-related difficulties in stomach cancer survivors compared with the general population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M K; Lee, K M; Bae, J-M; Kim, S; Kim, Y-W; Ryu, K W; Lee, J H; Noh, J-H; Sohn, T-S; Hong, S-K; Yun, Y H

    2008-01-01

    Little was known about work situation and work-related difficulties, including housework after stomach cancer diagnosis. We aimed to compare employment status and work-related difficulties between stomach cancer survivors and the general population. We enrolled 408 stomach cancer survivors from two hospitals 28 months after diagnosis and 994 representative volunteers from the general population from 15 geographic districts. Working was defined as being employed (including self-employed) and nonworking as being retired or a homemaker. Nonworking was significantly higher among stomach cancer survivors (46.6%) than in the general population (36.5%). Compared with the general population, the survivors had more fatigue in performing both housework (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=2.08; 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=1.01–4.29) and gainful work (aOR=4.02; 2.55–6.33). More cancer survivors had reduced working hours (aOR=1.42; 95% CI=4.60–28.35) and reduced work-related ability (aOR=6.11; 95% CI=3.64–10.27) than did the general population. The association of nonworking with older age and being female was significantly more positive for survivors than for the general population. Among survivors, poorer Eastern Cooperation Oncology Group Performance Status and receiving total gastrectomy were positively associated with nonworking. Stomach cancer survivors experienced more difficulties in both housework and gainful employment than did the general population. Our findings on stomach cancer survivors' work-related difficulties and the predictors of nonworking will help physicians guide patients towards more realistic postsurgical employment plans. PMID:18283298

  20. Mutation of FADD gene is rare in human colon and stomach cancers.

    PubMed

    Soung, Young Hwa; Lee, Jong Woo; Kim, Su Young; Nam, Suk Woo; Park, Won Sang; Kim, Sang Ho; Lee, Jung Young; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2004-09-01

    Failure of apoptosis is one of the hallmarks of cancer. As an adaptor, FADD plays a crucial role during death receptor-mediated apoptosis. We previously reported that the FADD gene is somatically mutated in non-small cell lung cancers. To explore the possibility that the genetic alterations of the FADD gene might be involved in the development of other human cancers, we analyzed the entire coding region and all splice sites of the human FADD gene to detect somatic mutations in 116 stomach cancers and 98 colon cancers. Overall, we detected a somatic missense mutation of the FADD gene in a colon carcinoma, which was predicted to change an amino acid (R140H) in the death domain (DD) of the FADD protein. This is the first report of FADD gene mutation in gastrointestinal cancers, and our data suggest that the FADD gene is rarely mutated in human colon and stomach cancers.

  1. Clinical outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer in remnant stomach or gastric tube.

    PubMed

    Nishide, N; Ono, H; Kakushima, N; Takizawa, K; Tanaka, M; Matsubayashi, H; Yamaguchi, Y

    2012-06-01

    Little information exists regarding the optimal treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC) in a remnant stomach or gastric tube. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and clinical outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for EGC in a remnant stomach and gastric tube. Between September 2002 and December 2009, ESD was performed in 62 lesions in 59 patients with EGC in a remnant stomach (48 lesions) or gastric tube (14 lesions). Clinicopathological data were retrieved retrospectively to assess the en bloc resection rate, complications, and outcomes. Treatment results were assessed according to the indications for endoscopic resection, and were compared with those of ESD performed in a whole stomach during the same study period. The en bloc resection rates for lesions within the standard and expanded indication were 100 % and 93 %, respectively. Postoperative bleeding occurred in five patients (8 %). The perforation rate was significantly higher (18 %, 11 /62) than that of ESD in a whole stomach (5 %, 69 /1479). Among the perforation cases, eight lesions involved the anastomotic site or stump line, and ulcerative changes were observed in five lesions. The 3-year overall survival rate was 85 %, with eight deaths due to other causes and no deaths from gastric cancer. A high en bloc resection rate was achieved by ESD for EGC in a remnant stomach or gastric tube; however, this procedure is still technically demanding due to the high complication rate of perforation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Three cases of laparoscopic total gastrectomy with intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy for gastric cancer in remnant stomach.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yu; Mou, Yi-Ping; Chen, Ke; Xu, Xiao-Wu; Cai, Jia-Qin; Wu, Di; Zhou, Yu-Cheng

    2014-11-13

    Gastric cancer in remnant stomach is a rare tumor but with poor prognosis. Compared with conventional open surgery, laparoscopic gastrectomy has potential benefits for these patients due to advantages resulting from its minimally invasive approach. Herein, we report on three patients with gastric cancer in remnant stomach who underwent laparoscopic total gastrectomy with intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy successfully. The operative time was 280, 250 and 225 minutes, the estimated blood loss was 100, 80 and 50 ml and the length of postoperative hospital stay was seven, eight and nine days respectively. Our experience has suggested that laparoscopic total gastrectomy with intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy can be a safe, feasible and promising option for patients with gastric cancer in remnant stomach.

  3. Frequencies of poor metabolizers of cytochrome P450 2C19 in esophagus cancer, stomach cancer, lung cancer and bladder cancer in Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei-Xing; Chen, Shu-Qing

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) gene polymorphism and cancer susceptibility by genotyping of CYP2C19 poor metabolizers (PMs) in cancer patients. METHODS: One hundred and thirty-five cases of esophagus cancer, 148 cases of stomach cancer, 212 cases of lung cancer, 112 cases of bladder cancer and 372 controls were genotyped by allele specific amplification-polymerase chain reaction (ASA-PCR) for CYP2C19 PMs. The frequencies of PMs in cancer groups and control group were compared. RESULTS: The frequencies of PMs of CYP2C19 were 34.1% (46/135) in the group of esophagus cancer patients, 31.8% (47/148) in the stomach cancer patients, 34.4% (73/212) in the group of lung cancer patients, only 4.5% (5/112) in the bladder cancer patients and 14.0% (52/372) in control group. There were statistical differences between the cancer groups and control group (esophagus cancer, χ2 = 25.65, P < 0.005, OR = 3.18, 95%CI = 2.005-5.042; stomach cancer, χ2 = 21.70, P < 0.005, OR = 2.86, 95%CI = 1.820-4.501; lung cancer, χ2 = 33.58, P < 0.005, OR = 3.23, 95%CI = 1.503-6.906; bladder cancer, χ2 = 7.50, P < 0.01, OR = 0.288, 95%CI = 0.112-0.740). CONCLUSION: CYP2C19 PMs have a high incidence of esophagus cancer, stomach cancer and lung cancer, conversely they have a low incidence of bladder cancer. It suggests that CYP2C19 may participate in the activation of procarcinogen of esophagus cancer, stomach cancer and lung cancer, but may involve in the detoxification of carcinogens of bladder cancer. PMID:15222046

  4. Basal renal function reserve and mean kidney dose predict future radiation-induced kidney injury in stomach cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yavas, Guler; Elsurer, Rengin; Yavas, Cagdas; Ata, Ozlem

    2014-02-01

    Adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) improves the survival in patients with locally advanced stomach cancer. The kidneys are the major dose-limiting organs for radiotherapy (RT) in upper abdominal cancers. We aimed to evaluate the impact of adjuvant CRT on renal function of patients with stomach cancer. Fifty-nine stomach cancer patients who underwent postoperative CRT were included. Demographic parameters (age, gender), and basal and 12th-month biochemical parameters were recorded. Mean kidney dose (MKD) administered was determined. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated by modification of diet in renal disease formula. Fifty-nine patients were recruited (age 60.8 ± 11.9 years; female/male 25/34; follow-up duration 15.6 ± 9.8 months). Twenty-one patients (35.6 %) had basal eGFR <90 ml/min/1.73 m(2). When the basal and 12th-month eGFR was compared, eGFR decreased in 27 patients (45.8 %), whereas eGFR remained stable in 32 (54.2 %) patients. Cox regression analyses revealed that a MKD ≥1,500 cGy and basal eGFR <90 ml/min/1.73 m(2) significantly increased the risk of a decreased eGFR at 12th month (HR = 2.288, 95 % CI 1.009-5.188, p = 0.048 and HR = 2.854, 95 % CI 1.121-7.262, p = 0.028, respectively). MKD ≥1,500 cGy and a basal eGFR <90 ml/min/1.73 m(2) significantly increased the risk of a decreased eGFR at 12th month. We suggest that patients with stomach cancer be evaluated for their basal renal reserve prior to RT, and it may be more convenient to further minimize the dose to the kidneys with more sophisticated RT techniques in patients with stomach cancer, more specifically in patients with decreased renal reserve.

  5. Differential expression of the UGT1A family of genes in stomach cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Beyhan; Yumrutas, Onder; Bozgeyik, Esra; Borazan, Ersin; Igci, Yusuf Ziya; Bozgeyik, Ibrahim; Oztuzcu, Serdar

    2015-08-01

    Uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) are the key players in the biotransformation of drugs, xenobiotics, and endogenous compounds. Particularly, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A (UGT1A) participates in a wide range of biological and pharmacological processes and plays a critical role in the conjugation of endogenous and exogenous components. Thirteen alternative splicing products were produced from UGT1A gene locus designated as UGT1A1 and UGT1A3-10. A growing amount of evidence suggests that they have important roles in the carcinogenesis which is well documented by colon, liver, pancreas, and kidney cancer studies. Here, we report differential expressions of UGT1A genes in normal and tumor tissues of stomach cancer patients. Total numbers of 49 patients were enrolled for this study, and expression analysis of UGT1A genes was evaluated by the real-time PCR method. Accordingly, UGT1A1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10 were found to be upregulated, and UGT1A3, UGT1A5, UGT1A7, and UGT1A9 were downregulated in stomach tumors. No expression changes were observed in UGT1A4. Also, UGT1A6 transcription variants were significantly upregulated in stomach cancer tissues compared to normal stomach tissue. Additionally, UGT1A7 gene showed highest expression in both normal and tumoral tissues, and interestingly, UGT1A7 gene expression was significantly reduced in stage II patients as compared to other patients. In conclusion, UGT1A genes are differentially expressed in normal and tumoral stomach tissues and expression changes of these genes may affect the development and progression of various types of cancer including the cancer of the stomach.

  6. The Effect of Fig Tree Latex (Ficus carica) on Stomach Cancer Line.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, S A; Abediankenari, S; Ghasemi, M; Azadbakht, M; Yousefzadeh, Y; Dehpour, A A

    2011-04-01

    The therapeutic effect of herbal materials in inhibition of cancer cell growth was shown. This study investigates the effect of fig tree latex (Ficus carica) on stomach cancer line. The in vitro effect of different doses of fig tree latex on stomach cancer cell line and the peripheral blood mononuclear cells was evaluated after 72 hours. Fig tree latex could inhibit the proliferation of cancer cell line without any cytotoxic effect on human normal cells. Five mg/ml was the optimum concentration in inhibition of cell line growth. Cancer cell line was more sensitive to Ficus carica latex than normal cells. This anticancer activity might be due to presence of its proteolytic enzymes.

  7. Efficacy of endoscopic submucosal dissection for cancer of the operated stomach.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Junichi; Nishikawa, Jun; Hamabe, Kouichi; Nakamura, Munetaka; Goto, Atsushi; Okamoto, Takeshi; Miura, Osamu; Sakaida, Isao

    2014-03-01

    Cancer can develop in the operated stomach after partial gastrectomy and in the reconstructed gastric tube after surgery for esophageal cancer. It is considered that endoscopic therapy is more safe and suitable for the early gastric cancer developed in such stomach than operation. We investigated the efficacy of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for cancer of the operated stomach. Subjects were 669 gastric cancer patients who underwent ESD: 22 patients (23 lesions) had surgically altered gastric anatomy, whereas 647 patients (727 lesions) had normal gastric anatomy. In the altered gastric anatomy group, 13 patients, 6 patients, and 3 patients had previously undergone distal gastrectomy, gastric tube reconstruction, and proximal gastrectomy, respectively. Rates of complete en bloc resection and curative resection were compared between the two groups. Influence of an anastomotic site and/or a suture line on ESD outcomes was examined in the altered gastric anatomy group. The rate of complete en bloc resection by ESD was 82.6% (19/23 lesions) in the altered gastric anatomy group and 92.3% (671/727 lesions) in the normal gastric anatomy group. The rate of curative resection and incident rates of complications were not significantly different between the groups. In the altered gastric anatomy group, the rate of complete en bloc resection was significantly lower when a lesion had spread across an anastomotic site and/or a suture line (P = 0.0372). Furthermore, duration of ESD was significantly longer (P = 0.0276), and resection efficiency was significantly lower (13 mm(2)/min, P = 0.0283), when treating lesions with an anastomotic site and/or a suture line than when treating isolated lesions. Outcome of ESD for cancer of the operated stomach compares with that in normal stomach anatomy. Anastomotic site/suture line within a lesion influenced the ESD procedure.

  8. Extracting optical scattering properties on the basis of phase contrast images for diagnosing stomach cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui; Zhang, Hui; Lin, Xiaona; Chen, Wei R.

    2013-04-01

    We combine morphological granulometry with Mie theory in order to analyze phase contrast images of biomedical tissue for cancer diagnosis. This method correlates microscopic phase distributions of the tissue image and macroscopic optical scattering properties of the tissue. Our results show that the particle size density distribution can be used to quantitatively identify morphological changes of cancerous stomach tissues. Our method can distinguish normal tissue from cancerous tissues, using the significant differences in scattering coefficient, reduced scattering coefficient and phase function. Therefore, this method can provide not only quantitative information for the diagnosis of cancer, but also accurate optical scattering parameters for photothermal therapy for cancer.

  9. Stomach cancer incidence in Southern Portugal 1998-2006: a spatio-temporal analysis.

    PubMed

    Papoila, Ana L; Riebler, Andrea; Amaral-Turkman, Antónia; São-João, Ricardo; Ribeiro, Conceição; Geraldes, Carlos; Miranda, Ana

    2014-05-01

    Stomach cancer belongs to the most common malignant tumors in Portugal. Main causal factors are age, dietary habits, smoking, and Helicobacter pylori infections. As these factors do not only operate on different time dimensions, such as age, period, or birth cohort, but may also vary along space, it is of utmost interest to model temporal and spatial trends jointly. In this paper, we analyze incidence of stomach cancer in Southern Portugal between 1998 and 2006 for females and males jointly using a spatial multivariate age-period-cohort model. Thus, we avoid age aggregation and allow the exploration of heterogeneous time trends between males and females across age, period, birth cohort, and space. Model estimation is performed within a Bayesian setting assuming (gender specific) smoothing priors. Our results show that the posterior expected rate of stomach cancer is decreasing for all counties in Southern Portugal and that males around 70 have a two times higher risk of getting stomach cancer compared with their female counterparts. We further found that, except for some few counties, the spatial influence is almost constant over time and negligible in the southern counties of Southern Portugal.

  10. Dyspnea during Advanced Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... important in planning treatment. Treatment may be to control signs and symptoms of pleural effusion and improve quality of life. A malignant pleural effusion often occurs in cancer that is advanced , cannot be removed by surgery , or continues to ...

  11. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Identified stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type gastric cancer. •In silico pathway scanning identified estrogen-α signaling is a putative regulator of SLSGS in gastric cancer. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. -- Abstract: Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC.

  12. Settling a Nervous Stomach: The Neural Regulation of Enteric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Monje, Michelle

    2017-01-09

    The nervous system is emerging as a regulator of malignancy. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Hayakawa et al. demonstrate a feedforward signaling loop in which tumor-derived nerve growth factor promotes enteric tumor innervation, and recruited nerves drive cancer growth through acetylcholine-regulated Wnt signaling and stimulation of further NGF release. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Stomach cancer and occupational exposure to asbestos: a meta-analysis of occupational cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Fortunato, L; Rushton, L

    2015-01-01

    Background: A recent Monographs Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that there is limited evidence for a causal association between exposure to asbestos and stomach cancer. Methods: We performed a meta-analysis to quantitatively evaluate this association. Random effects models were used to summarise the relative risks across studies. Sources of heterogeneity were explored through subgroup analyses and meta-regression. Results: We identified 40 mortality cohort studies from 37 separate papers, and cancer incidence data were extracted for 15 separate cohorts from 14 papers. The overall meta-SMR for stomach cancer for total cohort was 1.15 (95% confidence interval 1.03–1.27), with heterogeneous results across studies. Statistically significant excesses were observed in North America and Australia but not in Europe, and for generic asbestos workers and insulators. Meta-SMRs were larger for cohorts reporting a SMR for lung cancer above 2 and cohort sizes below 1000. Conclusions: Our results support the conclusion by IARC that exposure to asbestos is associated with a moderate increased risk of stomach cancer. PMID:25928706

  14. Disease Mapping for Stomach Cancer in Libya Based on Besag– York– Mollié (BYM) Model

    PubMed

    Alhdiri, Maryam Ahmed Salem; Samat, Nor Azah; Mohamed, Zulkifley

    2017-06-25

    Globally, Cancer is the ever-increasing health problem and most common cause of medical deaths. In Libya, it is an important health concern, especially in the setting of an aging population and limited healthcare facilities. Therefore, the goal of this research is to map of the county’ cancer incidence rate using the Bayesian method and identify the high-risk regions (for the first time in a decade). In the field of disease mapping, very little has been done to address the issue of analyzing sparse cancer diseases in Libya. Standardized Morbidity Ratio or SMR is known as a traditional approach to measure the relative risk of the disease, which is the ratio of observed and expected number of accounts in a region that has the greatest uncertainty if the disease is rare or small geographical region. Therefore, to solve some of SMR’s problems, we used statistical smoothing or Bayesian models to estimate the relative risk for stomach cancer incidence in Libya in 2007 based on the BYM model. This research begins with a short offer of the SMR and Bayesian model with BYM model, which we applied to stomach cancer incidence in Libya. We compared all of the results using maps and tables. We found that BYM model is potentially beneficial, because it gives better relative risk estimates compared to SMR method. As well as, it has can overcome the classical method problem when there is no observed stomach cancer in a region. Creative Commons Attribution License

  15. Survival of Stomach Cancer Cases in Khon Kaen, Thailand 2000-2012.

    PubMed

    Nanthanangkul, Sirinya; Suwanrungruang, Krittika; Wiangnon, Surapon; Promthet, Supannee

    2016-01-01

    Stomach cancer is an aggressive malignancy that is difficult to detect at an early stage and therefore is characterized by poor survival rates. Over the last two decades, there has been no report of gastric cancer survival in Khon Kaen province, Thailand. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to provide up-to-date information about the survival of gastric cancer patients in this province. Data from Khon Kaen population-based cancer registry, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University were newly obtained on 650 patients who were diagnosed with stomach cancer during the period 1 January, 2000 to 31 December, 2012. These were then followed up until death or the end of the study (31 December 2014). We calculated the observed survival with the actuarial life table method, and relative survival, defined as the ratio of observed survival in the group of the stomach cancer patients to the expected survival in the entire Thai population from the estimated generation life tables for Thailand of five-year birth cohorts from 1900 - 2000. The 5 year observed and 5 year relative survival rates were 17.2 % (95% CI: 13.54-21.14) and 18.2 % (95% CI: 14.3-22.4), respectively. The highest 5 year relative survival rates were demonstrated among patients aged 45-65, with stage I or II lesions, with adenocarcinomas, with a body of stomach location, well differentiated and receiving surgery and/or chemotherapy. The observed and relative survival rates were close to each other. Our findings provide basic information beneficial to development of an effective treatment system and appropriately improved population-based cancer registration.

  16. Potentially Curable Cancers of the Esophagus and Stomach.

    PubMed

    Elimova, Elena; Mizrak Kaya, Dilsa; Harada, Kazuto; Ajani, Jaffer A

    2016-09-01

    Gastric and gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas continue to be a major health burden globally and collectively represent the third leading cause of cancer death. Among patients with metastatic disease, most die of their cancer because of the limited number of modestly effective treatment regimens available today. The progress against these cancers has been slow compared with many other solid tumors despite many attempts. In-depth molecular profiling has also not been completed. Even when these cancers are localized, they impose considerable challenges for the patient, relatives, and treatment team alike. Localized gastric or gastroesophageal cancer is best managed with a multidisciplinary approach. This review focuses on the management of localized cancers by reviewing the current literature and explaining certain principles that help guide therapy for these patients. The future, however, will afford numerous opportunities, including exploitation of initial data from The Cancer Genome Atlas, to identify novel targets and drugs, harness the prowess of the immune system, and customize therapy for each patient. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya; Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-10-04

    Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC.

  18. What Are the Risk Factors for Stomach Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... germ may lead to inflammation (called chronic atrophic gastritis ) and pre-cancerous changes of the inner lining ... infections as well as other problems, including atrophic gastritis and pernicious anemia. They are also more likely ...

  19. What Are the Key Statistics about Stomach Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lodge® Lodging Rides To Treatment Online Support Communities ACS FUNDRAISERS Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walks Coaches ... Give Memorial Giving Planned Giving Leadership Giving About ACS Contact Us Local Offices Employment Become a Supplier ...

  20. Gastric Cancer in the Excluded Stomach 10 Years after Gastric Bypass.

    PubMed

    Tinoco, Augusto; Gottardi, Lorena F; Boechat, Eduardo D

    2015-01-01

    According to the Brazilian health authorities, around 2,000 new cases of gastric cancer emerge in Brazil per year (Instituto Nacional de Câncer José Alencar Gomes da Silva, 2014). Indeed, gastric cancer constitutes the second most common cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide and 95% of such malignancies are adenocarcinomas (De Roover et al., 2006, and Clark et al., 2006). Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a procedure frequently employed in bariatric surgery but restricted access to the excluded stomach means that discovery of gastric lesions is difficult, and diagnosis and treatment may be delayed. We report herein a case of gastric adenocarcinoma in the excluded stomach of a patient submitted to RYGB with the purpose of illustrating the difficulty of diagnosing and treating this rare condition.

  1. Molecular Characterization of the Human Stomach Microbiota in Gastric Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guoqin; Torres, Javier; Hu, Nan; Medrano-Guzman, Rafael; Herrera-Goepfert, Roberto; Humphrys, Michael S; Wang, Lemin; Wang, Chaoyu; Ding, Ti; Ravel, Jacques; Taylor, Philip R; Abnet, Christian C; Goldstein, Alisa M

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (Hp) is the primary cause of gastric cancer but we know little of its relative abundance and other microbes in the stomach, especially at the time of gastric cancer diagnosis. Here we characterized the taxonomic and derived functional profiles of gastric microbiota in two different sets of gastric cancer patients, and compared them with microbial profiles in other body sites. Paired non-malignant and tumor tissues were sampled from 160 gastric cancer patients with 80 from China and 80 from Mexico. The 16S rRNA gene V3-V4 region was sequenced using MiSeq platform for taxonomic profiles. PICRUSt was used to predict functional profiles. Human Microbiome Project was used for comparison. We showed that Hp is the most abundant member of gastric microbiota in both Chinese and Mexican samples (51 and 24%, respectively), followed by oral-associated bacteria. Taxonomic (phylum-level) profiles of stomach microbiota resembled oral microbiota, especially when the Helicobacter reads were removed. The functional profiles of stomach microbiota, however, were distinct from those found in other body sites and had higher inter-subject dissimilarity. Gastric microbiota composition did not differ by Hp colonization status or stomach anatomic sites, but did differ between paired non-malignant and tumor tissues in either Chinese or Mexican samples. Our study showed that Hp is the dominant member of the non-malignant gastric tissue microbiota in many gastric cancer patients. Our results provide insights on the gastric microbiota composition and function in gastric cancer patients, which may have important clinical implications.

  2. Molecular Characterization of the Human Stomach Microbiota in Gastric Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guoqin; Torres, Javier; Hu, Nan; Medrano-Guzman, Rafael; Herrera-Goepfert, Roberto; Humphrys, Michael S.; Wang, Lemin; Wang, Chaoyu; Ding, Ti; Ravel, Jacques; Taylor, Philip R.; Abnet, Christian C.; Goldstein, Alisa M.

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (Hp) is the primary cause of gastric cancer but we know little of its relative abundance and other microbes in the stomach, especially at the time of gastric cancer diagnosis. Here we characterized the taxonomic and derived functional profiles of gastric microbiota in two different sets of gastric cancer patients, and compared them with microbial profiles in other body sites. Paired non-malignant and tumor tissues were sampled from 160 gastric cancer patients with 80 from China and 80 from Mexico. The 16S rRNA gene V3–V4 region was sequenced using MiSeq platform for taxonomic profiles. PICRUSt was used to predict functional profiles. Human Microbiome Project was used for comparison. We showed that Hp is the most abundant member of gastric microbiota in both Chinese and Mexican samples (51 and 24%, respectively), followed by oral-associated bacteria. Taxonomic (phylum-level) profiles of stomach microbiota resembled oral microbiota, especially when the Helicobacter reads were removed. The functional profiles of stomach microbiota, however, were distinct from those found in other body sites and had higher inter-subject dissimilarity. Gastric microbiota composition did not differ by Hp colonization status or stomach anatomic sites, but did differ between paired non-malignant and tumor tissues in either Chinese or Mexican samples. Our study showed that Hp is the dominant member of the non-malignant gastric tissue microbiota in many gastric cancer patients. Our results provide insights on the gastric microbiota composition and function in gastric cancer patients, which may have important clinical implications. PMID:28730144

  3. Night shift work and stomach cancer risk in the MCC-Spain study.

    PubMed

    Gyarmati, Georgina; Turner, Michelle C; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Espinosa, Ana; Papantoniou, Kyriaki; Alguacil, Juan; Costas, Laura; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Martin Sanchez, Vicente; Ardanaz, Eva; Moreno, Victor; Gómez-Acebo, Inés; Fernández-Tardon, Guillermo; Villanueva Ballester, Vicent; Capelo, Rocio; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Santibáñez, Miguel; Pollán, Marina; Aragonés, Nuria; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2016-08-01

    Night shift work has been classified as a probable human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, based on experimental studies and limited evidence on human breast cancer risk. Evidence at other cancer sites is scarce. We evaluated the association between night shift work and stomach cancer risk in a population-based case-control study. A total of 374 incident stomach adenocarcinoma cases and 2481 population controls were included from the MCC-Spain study. Detailed data on lifetime night shift work were collected including permanent and rotating shifts, and their cumulative duration (years). Adjusted unconditional logistic regression models were used in analysis. A total of 25.7% of cases and 22.5% of controls reported ever being a night shift worker. There was a weak positive, non-significant association between ever having had worked for at least 1 year in permanent night shifts and stomach cancer risk compared to never having worked night shifts (OR=1.2, 95% CI 0.9 to 1.8). However, there was an inverse 'U' shaped relationship with cumulative duration of permanent night shifts, with the highest risk observed in the intermediate duration category (OR 10-20 years=2.0, 95% CI 1.1 to 3.6) (p for trend=0.19). There was no association with ever having had worked in rotating night shifts (OR=0.9, 95% CI 0.6 to 1.2) and no trend according to cumulative duration (p for trend=0.68). We found no clear evidence concerning an association between night shift work and stomach cancer risk. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Clinicopathological features of stomach cancer with invasive micropapillary component.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takeo; Gotohda, Naoto; Kato, Yuichiro; Kinoshita, Takahiro; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Konishi, Masaru; Daiko, Hiroyuki; Nishimura, Mitsuyo; Kuwata, Takeshi; Ochiai, Atsushi; Kinoshita, Taira

    2012-04-01

    Invasive micropapillary carcinoma has been recognized as a rare disease entity with aggressive tumor behavior. However, few reports have described invasive micropapillary carcinoma in the gastrointestinal tract, particularly its involvement in gastric cancer. We retrospectively analyzed 930 patients diagnosed with gastric cancer who underwent gastrectomy, and we then histopathologically evaluated the existence of a regional invasive micropapillary component. Clinicopathological features were investigated in patients with an invasive micropapillary component and compared with such features in 100 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma, selected as stage-matched controls, who underwent gastrectomy during the same period. Of the 930 patients, 14 were histopathologically diagnosed with gastric cancer with a regional invasive micropapillary component. There were no significant differences in age, gender, tumor location, macroscopic type, or type of surgery between patients with an invasive micropapillary component and the pT-matched controls. Histopathologically, significant differences were observed in lymphatic infiltration, venous invasion, the percentage of cases with lymph node metastasis, and the median number of metastatic lymph nodes. The three-year disease-free and overall survival rates of patients with an invasive micropapillary component were 40.5 and 59.3%, respectively, compared with those for the stage-matched controls, which were 72.6 and 80.6%, respectively (p = 0.02 and 0.07). Patients with gastric cancer with a regional invasive micropapillary component showed marked cancer infiltration in the lymphatic pathway and poor prognosis after gastrectomy.

  5. Neoadjuvant imatinib in locally advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Seon; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Kim, Mi-Jung; Ryu, Min-Hee; Chang, Heung Moon; Kim, Tae Won; Jang, Se Jin; Yook, Jeong Hwan; Oh, Sung Tae; Kim, Byung Sik; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2006-01-01

    Neoadjuvant imatinib therapy used to treat locally advanced or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GI ST) remains under active investigation. We studied three cases of locally advanced gastric GISTs treated with imatinib on a neoadjuvant basis, followed by a complete surgical resection. Three patients were diagnosed with locally advanced unresectable GIST of the stomach and were started on imatinib 400 mg/day. After the imatinib treatment, partial responses were achieved in all patients and the tumors were considered resectable. Surgical resection was done after 7, 11, and 8 months of imatinib therapy, respectively. In one case, a metastatic liver lesion was detected during the imatinib treatment using computed tomography scans, so the imatinib therapy was maintained for 11 months postoperatively. In the other two patients without distant metastasis, imatinib treatment was not restarted after surgery. Mutational analysis revealed a mutation in exon 11 of the c-kit gene in two patients, and wild-type c-kit and PDGFRA in one patient. During pathology review of all three cases, we noted several features common to imatinib treatment. There was no evidence of tumor recurrence in all three patients at respective follow-up visits of 22, 15, and 7 months. These results suggest that the neoadjuvant imatinib therapy is a potentially curative approach for selected patients with locally advanced GIST.

  6. Identification of valid reference genes for gene expression studies of human stomach cancer by reverse transcription-qPCR

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a powerful method for the analysis of gene expression. Target gene expression levels are usually normalized to a consistently expressed reference gene also known as internal standard, in the same sample. However, much effort has not been expended thus far in the search for reference genes suitable for the study of stomach cancer using RT-qPCR, although selection of optimal reference genes is critical for interpretation of results. Methods We assessed the suitability of six possible reference genes, beta-actin (ACTB), glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase 1 (HPRT1), beta-2-microglobulin (B2M), ribosomal subunit L29 (RPL29) and 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) in 20 normal and tumor stomach tissue pairs of stomach cancer patients and 6 stomach cancer cell lines, by RT-qPCR. Employing expression stability analyses using NormFinder and geNorm algorithms we determined the order of performance of these reference genes and their variation values. Results This RT-qPCR study showed that there are statistically significant (p < 0.05) differences in the expression levels of HPRT1 and 18S rRNA in 'normal-' versus 'tumor stomach tissues'. The stability analyses by geNorm suggest B2M-GAPDH, as best reference gene combination for 'stomach cancer cell lines'; RPL29-HPRT1, for 'all stomach tissues'; and ACTB-18S rRNA, for 'all stomach cell lines and tissues'. NormFinder also identified B2M as the best reference gene for 'stomach cancer cell lines', RPL29-B2M for 'all stomach tissues', and 18S rRNA-ACTB for 'all stomach cell lines and tissues'. The comparisons of normalized expression of the target gene, GPNMB, showed different interpretation of target gene expression depend on best single reference gene or combination. Conclusion This study validated RPL29 and RPL29-B2M as the best single reference genes and combination, for RT

  7. Acid-suppressing therapies and subsite-specific risk of stomach cancer.

    PubMed

    Wennerström, E Christina M; Simonsen, Jacob; Camargo, M Constanza; Rabkin, Charles S

    2017-04-25

    Associations of stomach cancer risk with histamine type-2 receptor antagonists (H2RA) and proton-pump inhibitors (PPI) are controversial. We hypothesised that proximal extension of Helicobacter pylori infection from acid suppression would disproportionately increase cancers at proximal subsites. A total of 1 563 860 individuals in the Danish Prescription Drug Registry first prescribed acid-suppressive drugs 1995-2011 were matched to unexposed population-based controls. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated by Cox proportional hazard regression for stomach cancers diagnosed more than one year after first prescription. There were 703 stomach cancers among H2RA-exposed individuals and 1347 among PPI-exposed. Restricted to individuals with five or more prescriptions, subsite-specific HRs for H2RA and PPI were 4.1 and 6.4 for proximal subsites vs 8.0 and 10.3 for distal subsites, respectively. Moderate exposures to acid-suppressive drugs did not favour proximal tumour localisation. Given confounding by indication, these findings do not resolve potential contribution to gastric carcinogenesis overall.

  8. Psorinum Therapy in Treating Stomach, Gall Bladder, Pancreatic, and Liver Cancers: A Prospective Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Aradeep; Biswas, Jaydip; Chatterjee, Ashim; Bhattacharya, Sudin; Mukhopadhyay, Bishnu; Mandal, Syamsundar

    2011-01-01

    We prospectively studied the clinical efficacy of an alternative cancer treatment “Psorinum Therapy” in treating stomach, gall bladder, pancreatic and liver cancers. Our study was observational, open level and single arm. The participants' eligibility criteria included histopathology/cytopathology confirmation of malignancy, inoperable tumor, and no prior chemotherapy or radiation therapy. The primary outcome measures of the study were (i) to assess the radiological tumor response (ii) to find out how many participants survived at least 1 year, 2 years, 3 years, 4 years and finally 5 years after the beginning of the study considering each type of cancer. Psorinum-6x was administered orally to all the participants up to 0.02 ml/Kg body weight as a single dose in empty stomach per day for 2 years along with allopathic and homeopathic supportive cares. 158 participants (42 of stomach, 40 of gall bladder, 44 of pancreatic, 32 of liver) were included in the final analysis of the study. Complete tumor response occurred in 28 (17.72%) cases and partial tumor response occurred in 56 (35.44%) cases. Double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial should be conducted for further scientific exploration of this alternative cancer treatment. PMID:21197093

  9. MKK6 is upregulated in human esophageal, stomach, and colon cancers.

    PubMed

    Parray, Arif Ali; Baba, Rafia Anjum; Bhat, Hina Fayaz; Wani, Lateef; Mokhdomi, Taseem Ahmad; Mushtaq, Umar; Bhat, Sehar Saleem; Kirmani, Deeba; Kuchay, Sanaullah; Wani, Mudassir Maqbool; Khanday, Firdous Ahmad

    2014-10-01

    Expression analysis of MKK6 protein in solid tumors has never been investigated. Here, we report systematic analysis of MKK6 protein in different types of human tumor samples using western blotting and immunofluorescence techniques. We observed significant increase in the expression of MKK6 in Esophageal, Stomach, and Colon cancers as compared to controls. Results were alternately confirmed by Immunofluorescence studies. Upregulation of MKK6 protein is indicative of its role in human cancers and could possibly be used as a novel diagnostic or prognostic marker in these cancers.

  10. Advances in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Levin, Mark

    2003-06-01

    From May 29 to June 5, 2003, the American Society of Clinical Oncology held its 39th Annual Meeting in Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A. The meeting was devoted to the presentation of advances in clinical sciences, diagnosis, prevention and management of malignant disorders, and brings together investigators, clinicians, policy makers and other professionals interested in the science and impact of cancer worldwide. This report will be presented in two parts, the first focusing of colon cancer, and the second on breast cancer will be published in the next issue of Drug News & Perspectives.

  11. Production of ghrelin by the stomach of patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kizaki, Junya; Aoyagi, Keishiro; Sato, Takahiro; Kojima, Masayasu; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Poor nutrition and weight loss are important factors contributing to poor quality of life (QOL) after gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer. Ghrelin is a hormone produced by the stomach that, plays a role in appetite increase and fat storage. The present study aims to clarify the location of ghrelin mRNA in the stomach, changes in blood ghrelin concentrations after gastrectomy and whether or not they are associated with the reconstruction method in patients with gastric cancer. We collected seven normal mucosa samples from different parts of six totally resected stomachs with gastric cancer. We extracted RNA from the normal mucosa, synthesized cDNA from total RNA (1 μg), and then quantified ghrelin mRNA using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Ghrelin blood concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits in 74 patients with gastric cancer (total gastrectomy (TG), n=23; distal gastrectomy (DG), n=30; proximal gastrectomy (PG), n=11; pylorus preserving gastrectomy (PPG), n=10). In order, the ghrelin gene was expressed most frequently in the gastric body, followed by the fornix, cardia, antrum and pylorus ring. Blood ghrelin concentrations after surgery similarly changed in all groups. The average blood ghrelin concentrations were significantly higher in the DG and PPG groups than in the TG group on postoperative days (POD) 1, 7, 30, 90 and 180. However, blood ghrelin concentrations did not significantly differ between the DG and TG groups on POD 270 and 360. Cells that produce ghrelin are supposed to be located mostly in the fundic gland of the stomach. We speculate that the production of ghrelin from other organs increases from around nine months after total gastrectomy. Therefore, evaluating the nutritional status and the weight of patients at nine months after total gastrectomy is important to help these patients improve their QOL.

  12. Coping with Advanced Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of palliative care Coping with your feelings and getting support Advanced planning How to talk with friends and family about your cancer Looking for meaning in your life The booklet is meant to provide you with information and ways you can still have a control of your ...

  13. Population-based cohort studies of type 2 diabetes and stomach cancer risk in Chinese men and women.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Li; Tan, Yu-Ting; Epplein, Meira; Li, Hong-Lan; Gao, Jing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Xiang, Yong-Bing

    2015-03-01

    Although positive associations have been found for diabetes and a number of cancer sites, investigations of stomach cancer are limited and the results lack consistency. In this prospective study we investigated the relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and stomach cancer risk in mainland China. We assessed the associations among T2DM, T2DM duration, and stomach cancer risk in two prospective population-based cohorts, the Shanghai Women's Health Study and the Shanghai Men's Health Study. Included in the study were 61 480 men and 74 941 women. Stomach cancer cases were identified through annual record linkage to the Shanghai Cancer Registry, and verified through home visits and review of medical charts. After a median follow-up of 7.5 years for the Shanghai Men's Health Study and 13.2 years for the Shanghai Women's Health Study, a total of 755 incident cases of stomach cancer (376 men and 379 women) were identified through to September 2013. Overall, we did not find any evidence that T2DM was associated with an increased risk of stomach cancer either in men (multi-adjusted hazard ratio = 0.83, 95% confidence interval, 0.59-1.16) or in women (multi-adjusted hazard ratio = 0.92, 95% confidence interval, 0.68-1.25). Our findings from two large prospective population-based cohorts suggest that T2DM was not associated with stomach cancer risk. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  14. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer in the remnant stomach after gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Satoru; Oda, Ichiro; Makazu, Makomo; Haruyama, Shin; Abe, Seiichiro; Suzuki, Haruhisa; Yoshinaga, Shigetaka; Nakajima, Takeshi; Kushima, Ryoji; Saito, Yutaka

    2013-07-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early gastric cancer (EGC) after surgical gastrectomy is a technically difficult procedure because of the limited working space in the remnant stomach as well as the presence of severe gastric fibrosis and staples under the suture line. We evaluated clinical results including long-term outcomes to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of ESD for EGC in the remnant stomach of patients after gastrectomy. Retrospective study. National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. We investigated patients undergoing ESD for EGC in the remnant stomach from 1997 to 2011. We examined the patient characteristics, endoscopic findings, technical results, adverse events, and histopathologic results including curability and evaluations of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in addition to the rates of local recurrence, metachronous gastric cancer, overall survival, and cause-specific survival. A total of 128 consecutive patients with 139 lesions had previously undergone 87 distal (68%), 25 proximal (19.5%) and 16 pylorus-preserving gastrectomies (12.5%). The median period from the original gastrectomy to the subsequent ESD for EGC in the remnant stomach was 5.7 years (range 0.6-51 years), the median tumor size was 13 mm (range 1-60 mm), and the median procedure time was 60 minutes (range 15-310 minutes). There were 131 en bloc resections (94%), with curative resections achieved for 109 lesions (78%); 22 lesions (16%) resulted in non-curative resections, and 8 lesions (6%) had only a horizontal margin positive or had inconclusive results. A total of 118 patients (92%) were assessed as H pylori gastritis-positive, with 7 patients (5%) negative. Adverse events included 2 cases of delayed bleeding (1.4%) and 2 perforations (1.4%), with 1 patient requiring emergency surgery. The 5-year overall and cause-specific survival rates were 87.3% and 100%, respectively, during a median follow-up period of 4.5 years (range 0-13.7 years), with no deaths from

  15. Effects of ciglitazone and troglitazone on the proliferation of human stomach cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Chan Woo; Kim, Dae Hwan; Kim, Dong Heon; Cho, Yong Hoon; Kim, Jae Hun

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the cytological and molecular effects of peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ and PPAR-γ agonists on stomach cancer cells. METHODS: To determine the proliferation-suppressive effects of troglitazone and ciglitazone, SNU-216 and SNU-668 stomach cancer cells were plated in media containing 40 μmol/L troglitazone and ciglitazone at a density of 1 × 104 cells/well. After 3, 5 and 7 d, the cells were counted with a hemocytometer. To assess the appearance of PPAR-γ, a reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed. On day 7, Western blotting was used to determine the effects of troglitazone and ciglitazone on the expression of p21 and phosphorylated-ERK (pERK) genes. Flow cytometry analysis was used to determine which portion of the cell cycle was delayed when troglitazone was used to suppress cell proliferation. In order to clarify the mechanism underlying the activity of troglitazone, microarray analysis was conducted. RESULTS: PPAR-γ was manifested in both SNU-216 and SNU-668 cells. Ciglitazone and troglitazone suppressed cell growth, and troglitazone was a stronger suppressor of stomach cancer cells than ciglitazone, an inducer of cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. SNU-668 cells were also determined to be more sensitive to ciglitazone and troglitazone than SNU-216 cells. When troglitazone and ciglitazone were administered to stomach cancer cells, levels of p21 expression were increased, but ERK phosphorylation levels were reduced. When GW9662, an antagonist of PPAR-γ, was applied in conjunction with ciglitazone and troglitazone, the cell growth suppression effect was unaffected. The gene transcription program revealed a variety of alterations as the consequence of troglitazone treatment, and multiple troglitazone-associated pathways were detected. The genes whose expression was increased by troglitazone treatment were associated with cell development, differentiation, signal transmission between cells

  16. Elevated levels of G-quadruplex formation in human stomach and liver cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Biffi, Giulia; Tannahill, David; Miller, Jodi; Howat, William J; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Four-stranded G-quadruplex DNA secondary structures have recently been visualized in the nuclei of human cultured cells. Here, we show that BG4, a G-quadruplex-specific antibody, can be used to stain DNA G-quadruplex structures in patient-derived tissues using immunohistochemistry. We observe a significantly elevated number of G-quadruplex-positive nuclei in human cancers of the liver and stomach as compared to background non-neoplastic tissue. Our results suggest that G-quadruplex formation can be detected and measured in patient-derived material and that elevated G-quadruplex formation may be a characteristic of some cancers.

  17. New cancer cachexia rat model generated by implantation of a peritoneal dissemination-derived human stomach cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Terawaki, Kiyoshi; Sawada, Yumi; Kashiwase, Yohei; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Masami; Miyano, Kanako; Sudo, Yuka; Shiraishi, Seiji; Higami, Yoshikazu; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Kase, Yoshio; Ueta, Yoichi; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2014-02-15

    Cancer cachexia (CC), a syndrome characterized by anorexia and body weight loss due to low fat-free mass levels, including reduced musculature, markedly worsens patient quality of life. Although stomach cancer patients have the highest incidence of cachexia, few experimental models for the study of stomach CC have been established. Herein, we developed stomach CC animal models using nude rats subcutaneously implanted with two novel cell lines, i.e., MKN45c185, established from the human stomach cancer cell line MKN-45, and 85As2, derived from peritoneal dissemination of orthotopically implanted MKN45c185 cells in mice. Both CC models showed marked weight loss, anorexia, reduced musculature and muscle strength, increased inflammatory markers, and low plasma albumin levels; however, CC developed earlier and was more severe in rats implanted with 85As2 than in those implanted with MKN45cl85. Moreover, human leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a known cachectic factor, and hypothalamic orexigenic peptide mRNA levels increased in the models, whereas hypothalamic anorexigenic peptide mRNA levels decreased. Surgical removal of the tumor not only abolished cachexia symptoms but also reduced plasma LIF levels to below detectable limits. Importantly, oral administration of rikkunshito, a traditional Japanese medicine, substantially ameliorated CC-related anorexia and body composition changes. In summary, our novel peritoneal dissemination-derived 85As2 rat model developed severe cachexia, possibly caused by LIF from cancer cells, that was ameliorated by rikkunshito. This model should provide a useful tool for further study into the mechanisms and treatment of stomach CC.

  18. [A case study with bladder metastasis of renal cell carcinoma and stomach cancer].

    PubMed

    Tashiro, K; Kondo, N; Ueda, M; Ohishi, Y; Wada, T; Kido, A; Masuda, F; Machida, T

    1984-02-01

    A 64-year-old woman received nephrectomy and lymph expurgation surgery for renal cell carcinoma on Jury 1, 1981. The pathologic diagnosis was adenocarcinoma of the clear cell type at Robson's stage 2. She next visited the Department of Gastroenterology complaining of stomach discomfort on November 5, 1981. Stomach cancer of Borrmann's type IV was identified in the lesser gastric curvature, but only biopsy was performed because it was inoperable. The pathologic diagnosis was undifferentiated adenocarcinoma. On January 23, 1982, there was microscopic hematuria. A cystoscopic examination revealed one soy bean-sized, smooth, pedicle tumor to which coagula were partially adhered in the center of the triangular region. After TUR-Bt performed on March 3 the pathologic diagnosis was adenocarcinoma of the clear cell type with no submucosal infiltration. Based on these findings, the patient was diagnosed as having suffered metastasis of renal cell carcinoma to the bladder. She died of bleeding from stomach cancer on June 15. Based on the fact that the tumor was localized in the bladder mucosa, implantation through the urinary tract was strongly suspected as the metastatic route of the renal cell carcinoma to the bladder.

  19. Feasibility and Nutritional Benefits of Laparoscopic Proximal Gastrectomy for Early Gastric Cancer in the Upper Stomach.

    PubMed

    Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Komatsu, Shuhei; Okamoto, Kazuma; Konishi, Hirotaka; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Otsuji, Eigo

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy (LPG) has recently been applied for early gastric cancer (EGC) in the upper stomach as a minimally invasive and function-preserving surgery. This study aimed to clarify the feasibility and nutritional benefits of LPG over laparoscopic total gastrectomy (LTG). This was a retrospective study of 77 patients with clinical stage I gastric cancer in the upper stomach. Of these patients, 25 underwent LPG, while 52 underwent LTG. Surgical outcomes and postoperative nutritional status such as changes in body weight and blood chemistries were compared between LPG and LTG. Intraoperative blood loss and C-reactive protein levels at 3 and 7 days after surgery were significantly lower in LPG than in LTG (p = 0.018, 0.036, and 0.042, respectively). No significant differences were observed in postoperative early or late complication rates between LPG and LTG. The incidence of Los Angeles Grade B or more severe reflux esophagitis after LPG was 9.1 %, which was similar to that after LTG (9.3 %). Postoperative changes in body weight at 6 months and 1 and 2 years after surgery were consistently less in LPG than in LTG (p = 0.001, 0.022, and 0.001, respectively). Moreover, postoperative levels of hemoglobin and serum albumin and total lymphocyte count were also higher in LPG than in LTG. LPG may be a better choice for EGC in the upper stomach than LTG because it has distinct advantages in terms of surgical invasiveness and postoperative nutritional status.

  20. Synchrotron-radiation phase-contrast imaging of human stomach and gastric cancer: in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lei; Li, Gang; Sun, Ying-Shi; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiao-Peng

    2012-05-01

    The electron density resolution of synchrotron-radiation phase-contrast imaging (SR-PCI) is 1000 times higher than that of conventional X-ray absorption imaging in light elements, through which high-resolution X-ray imaging of biological soft tissue can be achieved. For biological soft tissue, SR-PCI can give better imaging contrast than conventional X-ray absorption imaging. In this study, human resected stomach and gastric cancer were investigated using in-line holography and diffraction enhanced imaging at beamline 4W1A of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. It was possible to depict gastric pits, measuring 50-70 µm, gastric grooves and tiny blood vessels in the submucosa layer by SR-PCI. The fine structure of a cancerous ulcer was displayed clearly on imaging the mucosa. The delamination of the gastric wall and infiltration of cancer in the submucosa layer were also demonstrated on cross-sectional imaging. In conclusion, SR-PCI can demonstrate the subtle structures of stomach and gastric cancer that cannot be detected by conventional X-ray absorption imaging, which prompt the X-ray diagnosis of gastric disease to the level of the gastric pit, and has the potential to provide new methods for the imageology of gastric cancer.

  1. Breast Cancer-Associated pS2 Protein: Synthesis and Secretion by Normal Stomach Mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rio, M. C.; Bellocq, J. P.; Daniel, J. Y.; Tomasetto, C.; Lathe, R.; Chenard, M. P.; Batzenschlager, A.; Chambon, P.

    1988-08-01

    The human pS2 gene is specifically expressed under estrogen transcriptional control in a subclass of estrogen receptor-containing human breast cancer cells. The pS2 gene encodes an 84-amino acid protein that is secreted after signal peptide cleavage. The distribution of pS2 protein in normal human tissues was studied with antibodies to pS2; pS2 was specifically expressed and secreted by mucosa cells of the normal stomach antrum and body of both female and male individuals. Moreover, no estrogen receptor could be detected in these cells, indicating that pS2 gene expression is estrogen-independent in the stomach. The function of the pS2 protein in the gastrointestinal tract is unknown. However, the pS2 protein is similar in sequence to a porcine pancreatic protein that has been shown to inhibit gastrointestinal motility and gastric secretion.

  2. Cigarette smoking, use of other tobacco products and stomach cancer mortality in US adults: The Cancer Prevention Study II.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ann; Thun, Michael J; Henley, S Jane; Jacobs, Eric J; McCullough, Marjorie L; Calle, Eugenia E

    2002-10-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with increased risk of stomach cancer in many studies but there are limited data on this relationship in women and on risk associated with use of tobacco products other than cigarettes. We examined stomach cancer death rates in relation to cigarette smoking in women and use of cigarette, cigar, pipe, or smokeless tobacco in men in a nationwide prospective mortality study in the United States (US). Cohort follow-up from 1982-96 identified 996 and 509 stomach cancer deaths among 467,788 men and 588,053 women, respectively. Cox proportional hazards models were fitted to estimate rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using non-users of tobacco as the referent group. Multivariate-adjusted RRs were the highest for men who currently smoked cigars (RR = 2.29, 95% CI = 1.49-3.51) or cigarettes (RR = 2.16, 95% CI = 1.75-2.67) and both increased with smoking duration. Women who currently (RR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.18-1.88) or formerly (RR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.08-1.71) smoked cigarettes were at significantly increased risk, as were men who formerly smoked cigarettes (RR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.28-1.88), or currently (RR = 1.81, 95% CI = 1.40-2.35) or formerly (RR: 1.57, 95% CI = 1.22-2.03) used more than one type of tobacco. Men who reported a history of chronic indigestion or gastroduodenal ulcer had substantially higher mortality rates associated with current cigarette (RR = 3.45, 95% CI = 2.05-5.80) or cigar (RR = 8.93, 95% CI = 4.02-19.90) smoking, as did men who were current aspirin users. If causal, the estimated proportion of stomach cancer deaths attributable to tobacco use would be 28% in US men and 14% in women. We conclude that prolonged use of tobacco products is associated with increased stomach cancer mortality in men and women. The accumulated evidence from this and other studies support reconsidering stomach cancer as a tobacco-related cancer.

  3. Stomach Cancer Following Hodgkin Lymphoma, Testicular Cancer and Cervical Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of Three International Studies with a Focus on Radiation Effects.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Ethel S; Curtis, Rochelle E; Hauptmann, Michael; Kleinerman, Ruth A; Lynch, Charles F; Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A; Weathers, Rita; Andersson, Michael; Dores, Graça M; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Fossa, Sophie D; Hall, Per; Hodgson, David C; Holowaty, Eric J; Joensuu, Heikki; Johannesen, Tom B; Langmark, Froydis; Kaijser, Magnus; Pukkala, Eero; Rajaraman, Preetha; Storm, Hans H; Vaalavirta, Leila; van den Belt-Dusebout, Alexandra W; Aleman, Berthe M; Travis, Lois B; Morton, Lindsay M; van Leeuwen, Flora E

    2017-02-01

    To further understand the risk of stomach cancer after fractionated high-dose radiotherapy, we pooled individual-level data from three recent stomach cancer case-control studies. These studies were nested in cohorts of five-year survivors of first primary Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), testicular cancer (TC) or cervical cancer (CX) from seven countries. Detailed data were abstracted from patient records and radiation doses were reconstructed to the site of the stomach cancer for cases and to the corresponding sites for matched controls. Among 327 cases and 678 controls, mean doses to the stomach were 15.3 Gy, 24.7 Gy and 1.9 Gy, respectively, for Hodgkin lymphoma, testicular cancer and cervical cancer survivors, with an overall mean dose of 10.3 Gy. Risk increased with increasing radiation dose to the stomach cancer site (P < 0.001) with no evidence of nonlinearity or of a downturn at the highest doses (≥35 Gy). The pooled excess odds ratio per Gy (EOR/Gy) was 0.091 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.036-0.20] with estimates of 0.049 (95% CI: 0.007-0.16) for Hodgkin lymphoma, 0.27 (95% CI: 0.054-1.44) for testicular cancer and 0.096 (95% CI: -0.002-0.39) for cervical cancer (P homogeneity = 0.25). The EOR/Gy increased with time since exposure (P trend = 0.004), with an EOR/Gy of 0.38 (95% CI: 0.12-1.04) for stomach cancer occurring ≥20 years postirradiation corresponding to odds ratios of 4.8 and 10.5 at radiation doses to the stomach of 10 and 25 Gy, respectively. Of 111 stomach cancers occurring ≥20 years after radiotherapy, 63.8 (57%) could be attributed to radiotherapy. Our findings differ from those based on Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, where the overall EOR/Gy was higher and where there was no evidence of an increase with time since exposure. By pooling data from three studies, we demonstrated a clear increase in stomach cancer risk over a wide range of doses from fractionated radiotherapy with the highest risks occurring many years after exposure. These

  4. Clinicopathological characteristics of clinical early gastric cancer in the upper-third stomach.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Daisuke; Komatsu, Shuhei; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Konishi, Hirotaka; Okamoto, Kazuma; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Otsuji, Eigo

    2015-12-07

    To elucidate the clinicopathological characteristics of clinically early gastric cancer in the upper-third stomach and to clarify treatment precautions. A total of 683 patients with clinical early gastric cancer were enrolled in this retrospective study, 128 of whom had gastric cancer in the upper-third stomach (U group). All patients underwent a double contrast barium examination, endoscopy, and computed tomography (CT), and were diagnosed preoperatively based on the findings obtained. The clinicopathological features of these patients were compared with those of patients with gastric cancer in the middle- and lower-third stomach (ML group). We also compared clinicopathological factors between accurate-diagnosis and under-diagnosis groups in order to identify factors affecting the accuracy of a preoperative diagnosis of tumor depth. Patients in the U group were older (P = 0.029), had a higher ratio of males to females (P = 0.015), and had more histologically differentiated tumors (P = 0.007) than patients in the ML group. A clinical under-diagnosis occurred in 57 out of 683 patients (8.3%), and was more frequent in the U group than in the ML group (16.4% vs 6.3%, P < 0.0001). Therefore, the rates of lymph node metastasis and lymphatic invasion were slightly higher in the U group than in the ML group (P = 0.071 and 0.082, respectively). An under-diagnosis was more frequent in histologically undifferentiated tumors (P = 0.094) and in those larger than 4 cm (P = 0.024). The median follow-up period after surgery was 56 mo (range, 1-186 mo). Overall, survival and disease-specific survival rates were significantly lower in the U group than in the ML group (P = 0.016 and 0.020, respectively). However, limited operation-related cancer recurrence was not detected in the U group in the present study. Clinical early gastric cancer in the upper-third stomach has distinguishable characteristics that increase the risk of a clinical under-diagnosis, especially in patients with

  5. A New Suggestion for the Radiation Target Volume After a Subtotal Gastrectomy in Patients With Stomach Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Heerim; Lim, Do Hoon Kim, Sung; Kang, Won Ki; Sohn, Tae Sung; Noh, Jae Hyung; Kim, Yong Il; Park, Chan Hyung; Park, Chul Keun; Ahn, Yong Chan; Huh, Seung Jae

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment results between the use of two different radiation fields including and excluding remnant stomach and suggest new target volumes excluding remnant stomach after subtotal gastrectomy (STG) in patients with stomach cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 291 patients treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy after STG and D2 dissection at the Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. Eighty-three patients registered from 1995 to 1997 underwent irradiation according to the INT 0116 protocol that recommended the inclusion of remnant stomach within the target volume (Group A). After this period, we excluded remnant stomach from the target volume for 208 patients (Group B). Median follow-up was 67 months. Results: Treatment failure developed in 93 patients (32.0%). Local and regional recurrence rates for Group A vs. Group B were 10.8% vs. 5.3% (p = not significant) and 9.6% vs. 6.3% (p = not significant), and recurrence rates for remnant stomach were 7.2% vs. 1.4% (p = 0.018), respectively. Overall and disease-free survival rates were not different between the two groups. Grade 3 or 4 vomiting and diarrhea developed more frequently in Group A than Group B (4.8% vs. 1.4% and 6.0% vs. 1.9%, respectively; p = 0.012; p < 0.001). Conclusion: Exclusion of remnant stomach from the radiation field had no effect on failure rates or survival, and a low complication rate occurred in patients treated excluding remnant stomach. We suggest that remnant stomach be excluded from the radiation target volume for patients with stomach cancer who undergo STG and D2 dissection.

  6. Rare Helicobacter pylori Infection May Explain Low Stomach Cancer Incidence: Ecological Observations in Bali, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Mulyadi, I Ketut; Moestikaningsih; Oka, Tjok Gede; Soeripto; Triningsih, Fx Ediati; Triyono, Teguh; Heriyanto, Didik Setyo; Hosono, Akihiro; Suzuki, Sadao; Tokudome, Shinkan

    2016-01-01

    The incidence rate of stomach cancer in Bali, Indonesia, is estimated to be strikingly lower than that in Japan. We conducted an on-site ecological study to investigate the association between the stomach cancer incidence and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Recruiting 291 healthy persons (136 men and 155 women) from the general population in Bali, Indonesia, we conducted a urea breath test (UBT) to examine H. pylori infection, along with a pepsinogen test to detect chronic atrophic gastritis and urine analysis to estimate sodium and potassium excretion. UBT positivities were 9% (2-15, 95% confidence interval) for men and 7% (1-12) for women, and positive cases for H. pylori IgG antibodies were 1% (0-3) for men and 3% (0-5) for women, significantly lower than the respective values in Japan. Positive pepsinogen tests in Bali were 0% (0-0) for men and 1% (0-4) for women, also significantly lower than the Japanese figures. Computed values for daily salt excretion were 13.3±4.1 g (mean ± SD) for men and 11.1±3.1 g for women, as high as corresponding Japanese consumption values. Moreover, the estimated potassium excretion was 3.2±0.7 g for men and 2.8±0.6 g for women in Bali, significantly higher than the figures in Japan. There were no associations across genetic polymorphisms of IL-beta, TNF-alpha, and PTPN11 with UBT positivity. The low incidence of stomach cancer in Bali may thus mainly be due to the rare H. pylori infection. Namely, the bacterium infection seems to be a critical factor for gastric cancer rather than host or other environmental factors.

  7. Twenty five years since the first prospective study by Forman et al. (1991) on Helicobacter pylori and stomach cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Sitas, Freddy

    2016-04-01

    Stomach cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide, despite its incidence and mortality falling in many places. The discovery in 1984 that a bacterial infection with Helicobacter pylori could cause stomach and duodenal ulcers prompted work in its role in causing gastritis, and led to the first prospective study in 1991 by Forman et al., showing that infection with H.pylori increased the risk of stomach cancer in those infected by almost three-fold. Prior to then, it was hypothesized that stomach was caused by poor diets. While diets may still play a role, the falls in stomach cancer incidence have been associated with reductions in population prevalence of H. pylori. Discovery of the link was accelerated by the use of stored sera from other unrelated studies, and the use of serological assays. Since those discoveries the treatment landscape of gastric disorders has changed significantly, with a rapid uptake of antibiotic and proton pump inhibitors (triple) therapies in those who are H. pylori positive. Over time we have seen falls in gastric cancer, peptic and duodenal ulcers and in many of the procedures previously used to cure peptic ulcer disease, such as vagotomies and gastrectomies. Further still, an oral vaccine against H. pylori, first trialled in China, holds much promise of being the third vaccine against a cancer causing infection. If successful this would lead to a further reduction in H. pylori related conditions, and ultimately gastric cancer, an otherwise lethal disease.

  8. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Male Breast Cancer; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Intraductal Carcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  9. Cancer in Māori: lessons from prostate, colorectal and gastric cancer and progress in hereditary stomach cancer in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Blair, Vanessa; Kahokehr, Arman; Sammour, Tarik

    2013-01-01

    Persisting ethnic disparities in cancer incidence and outcomes exist between Māori and non-Māori in Aotearoa/New Zealand. It is difficult to disentangle the complex interplay of environmental and genetic factors that contribute to the variation in cancer statistics between these two groups. In Māori, the sites of highest cancer incidence are the prostate in men, breast in women and lung in both - the next most common cancers in Māori are colorectal and stomach cancer. This paper discusses colorectal, prostate and stomach cancer in Māori to illustrate selected issues that impact on cancer care. Colorectal cancer is discussed to illustrate the importance of accurate cancer statistics to focus management strategies. Prostate cancer in Māori is reviewed - an area where cultural factors impact on care delivery. Sporadic stomach cancer in New Zealand is used to show how sub-classification of different types of cancer can be important and illustrate the breadth of putative causal factors. Then follows an overview of developments in hereditary gastric cancer in New Zealand in the last 15 years, showing how successful clinical and research partnerships can improve patient outcomes. One example is the Kimi Hauora Clinic, which provides support to cancer patients, mutation carriers and their families, helping them navigate the interface with the many health-care professionals involved in the multidisciplinary care of cancer patients in the 21st century. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  10. Incidence and survival of stomach cancer in a high-risk population of Chile

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Katy; Bertran, Enriqueta; Andia, Marcelo E; Ferreccio, Catterina

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study the incidence and survival rate of stomach cancer (SC) and its associated factors in a high risk population in Chile. METHODS: The population-based cancer registry of Valdivia, included in the International Agency for Research on Cancer system, covers 356 396 residents of Valdivia Province, Southern Chile. We studied all SC cases entered in this Registry during 1998-2002 (529 cases). Population data came from the Chilean census (2002). Standardized incidence rates per 100 000 inhabitants (SIR) using the world population, cumulative risk of developing cancer before age 75, and rate ratios by sex, age, ethnicity and social factors were estimated. Relative survival (Ederer II method) and age-standardized estimates (Brenner method) were calculated. Specific survival rates (Kaplan-Meier) were measured at 3 and 5 years and survival curves were analyzed with the Logrank and Breslow tests. Survival was studied in relation to demographics, clinical presentation, laboratory results and medical management of the cases. Those variables significantly associated with survival were later included in a Cox multivariate model. RESULTS: Between 1998 and 2002, 529 primary gastric cancers occurred in Valdivia (crude incidence rate 29.2 per 100 000 inhabitants). Most cases were male (69.0%), residents of urban areas (57.5%) and Hispanic (83.2%), with a low education level (84.5% < 8 school years). SC SIR was higher in men than women (40.8 and 14.8 respectively, P < 0.001), risk factors were low education RR 4.4 (95% CI: 2.9-6.8) and 1.6, (95% CI: 1.1-2.1) for women and men respectively and Mapuche ethnicity only significant for women (RR 2.2, 95% CI: 1.2-3.7). Of all cases, 76.4% were histologically confirmed, 11.5% had a death certificate only (DCO), 56.1% were TNM stage IV; 445 cases (84.1%) were eligible for survival analysis, all completed five years follow-up; 42 remained alive, 392 died of SC and 11 died from other causes. Specific 5-year survival, excluding cases

  11. Unemployment, public-sector healthcare spending and stomach cancer mortality in the European Union, 1981-2009.

    PubMed

    Maruthappu, Mahiben; Painter, Annabelle; Watkins, Johnathan; Williams, Callum; Ali, Raghib; Zeltner, Thomas; Faiz, Omar; Sheth, Hemant

    2014-11-01

    We sought to determine the association between changes in unemployment, healthcare spending and stomach cancer mortality. Multivariate regression analysis was used to assess how changes in unemployment and public-sector expenditure on healthcare (PSEH) varied with stomach cancer mortality in 25 member states of the European Union from 1981 to 2009. Country-specific differences in healthcare infrastructure and demographics were controlled for 1- to 5-year time-lag analyses and robustness checks were carried out. A 1% increase in unemployment was associated with a significant increase in stomach cancer mortality in both men and women [men: coefficient (R)=0.1080, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.0470-0.1690, P=0.0006; women: R=0.0488, 95% CI=0.0168-0.0809, P=0.0029]. A 1% increase in PSEH was associated with a significant decrease in stomach cancer mortality (men: R=-0.0009, 95% CI=-0.0013 to -0.005, P<0.0001; women: R=-0.0004, 95% CI=-0.0007 to -0.0001, P=0.0054). The associations remained when economic factors, urbanization, nutrition and alcohol intake were controlled for, but not when healthcare resources were controlled for. Time-lag analysis showed that the largest changes in mortality occurred 3-4 years after any changes in either unemployment or PSEH. Increases in unemployment are associated with a significant increase in stomach cancer mortality. Stomach cancer mortality is also affected by public-sector healthcare spending. Initiatives that bolster employment and maintain public-sector healthcare expenditure may help to minimize increases in stomach cancer mortality during economic downturns.

  12. Stomach Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional ... Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional ...

  13. Gastric-tube versus whole-stomach esophagectomy for esophageal cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenxiong; Yu, Dongliang; Peng, Jinhua; Xu, Jianjun; Wei, Yiping

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies comparing the gastric-tube vs. whole-stomach for esophageal cancer in order to determine the optimal surgical technique of esophagectomy. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed using PubMed, EMBASE, ScienceDirect, Ovid MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus. Clinical trials that compared the gastric-tube versus whole-stomach for esophageal cancer were selected. The clinical endpoints included anastomotic leakage, anastomotic stenosis, reflux esophagitis, pneumonia, delayed gastric emptying, and thoracic stomach syndrome. Results A total of 6 articles (1571 patients) were included. Compared to the whole-stomach approach, the gastric-tube approach was associated with a lower incidence of reflux esophagitis (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.16 to 0.81, p = 0.01) and thoracic stomach syndrome (95% CI: 0.17 to 0.55, p < 0.0001). The rates of anastomotic leakage, anastomotic stenosis, pneumonia, and delayed gastric emptying did not significantly differ between the two groups. Conclusions The gastric-tube esophagectomy is superior to the whole-stomach approach, as it is associated with a lower incidence of postoperative reflux esophagitis and thoracic stomach syndrome. Our findings must be validated in large-scale randomized controlled trials. PMID:28267808

  14. Engagement of Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-15

    End of Life; Advanced Cancer; Lung Neoplasm; Gastric Cancer; Colon Cancer; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Head and Neck Neoplasms; Rectum Cancer; Melanoma; Kidney Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Neoplasms; Liver Cancer; Cancer of Unknown Origin

  15. [Survival rate of patients with stomach cancer in Peru, 2009-2010].

    PubMed

    Tolentino, Carlos Alvarado; Ojeda, Diego Venegas

    2015-03-01

    Determine the survival rate of patients diagnosed with stomach cancer in 2009-2010 in Peru. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of patients diagnosed with stomach cancer registered in the National Epidemiological Surveillance System (SNVE) of the Directorate General of Epidemiology (DGE) and the Register of Vital Statistics (RHV) of the General Office of Statistics and Information (OGEI) for the years 2009-2010. 3 568 patients of the SNVE were included; 51.5% were men and 48.5% were women; the average age was 63.9 years; 60.07% were 60 years old or older. It was found that 33.6% had intestinal type adenocarcinoma, 18.7% had diffuse type carcinoma, and 4.1% had primary gastric lymphoma. The overall survival rate was 29.7 ± 0.8 months and was better for those under 60 years (P = 0.034), for women (P = 0.014) and for intestinal type adenocarcinoma (P< 0.001). There was no difference (P = 0.713) between the survival rate of gastric lymphomas and adenocarcinomas. In order to evaluate mortality, 6 069 patient records from the RHV were included; national mortality was 10.3 per 100 000 population; the regions with the highest mortality were Huánuco, Huancavelica, and Junín. The general survival rate was 29.7 ± 0.8 months; women, those under 60 years, and patients with intestinal type adenocarcinoma had better survival rates. The highest mortality from stomach cancer is concentrated in the poorest regions of Peru, where it is probable that living conditions facilitate the high communicability of Helicobacter pylori.

  16. Excess mortality from stomach cancer, lung cancer, and asbestosis and/or mesothelioma in crocidolite mining districts in South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Botha, J.L.; Irwig, L.M.; Strebel, P.M.

    1986-01-01

    To determine whether exposure to crocidolite is associated with excess mortality, the authors calculated standardized mortality ratios based on deaths in South African crocidolite mining districts from 1968 to 1980 for selected causes of death. Contiguous districts were used as controls. To take account of background geographic variability, they divided the control districts into groups of population size similar to those of the crocidolite mining districts. Standardized mortality ratios in crocidolite mining districts were elevated for asbestosis and/or mesothelioma, and cancer of the lung and stomach. These findings could not be explained by background geographic variability in mortality and are likely to be due to exposure to South African crocidolite during mining and milling or to environmental contamination. The increased standardized mortality ratios for stomach cancer are of particular interest, since excess deaths have not previously been shown in individuals exposed to crocidolite alone.

  17. Case-control study of stomach cancer in a coal mining region of Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, G.B.; Kuller, L.H.; Stehr, P.A.

    1985-08-01

    Historically coal mining populations have been reported to have elevated stomach cancer incidence rates. To identify which factors might be associated with cases who reside in these high risk areas, and specifically if particulate exposures from coal mining and coal utilization are associated with risk, a mining area of western Pennsylvania was defined for a retrospective case-control study. One hundred seventy-eight resident cases, identified from certificates of death, were compared to three controls: digestive cancer deaths, arteriosclerotic heart disease deaths, and neighborhood (living) controls. Controls were matched to each case on age, race, sex, and residence. Interviews were conducted during 1981 and 1982. Excess risks were shown for foreign born and eastern Europeans. Coal mining was not shown to be a risk factor for males, while an association was seen for female cases whose husbands were miners. Farming was a risk factor for males and females. Marked decreased risks were shown for gas heating and cooking fuels, with elevated risks for coal, wood and oil heating fuels, and wood cooking fuel. These findings are associated with lower socioeconomic status, and suggest environmental exposures or lifestyles that are directly and indirectly related to these risks factors. The marked inverse relationship between stomach cancer and use of gas heating and cooking fuel may be of important etiologic significance, especially in association with dietary changes. Further evaluation of prior use of various types of heating and cooking fuels needs to be considered especially using incident rather than case deaths.

  18. Scattering properties of normal and cancerous tissues from human stomach based on phase-contrast microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui

    2012-12-01

    In order to study scattering properties of normal and cancerous tissues from human stomach, we collect images for human gastric specimens by using phase-contrast microscope. The images were processed by the way of mathematics morphology. The equivalent particle size distribution of tissues can be obtained. Combining with Mie scattering theory, the scattering properties of tissues can be calculated. Assume scattering of light in biological tissue can be seen as separate scattering events by different particles, total scattering properties can be equivalent to as scattering sum of particles with different diameters. The results suggest that scattering coefficient of the cancerous tissue is significantly higher than that of normal tissue. The scattering phase function is different especially in the backscattering area. Those are significant clinical benefits to diagnosis cancerous tissue

  19. Heterogeneous expression of cholecystokinin and gastrin receptor in stomach and pancreatic cancer: An immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rajani; Kim, Jong Joo; Tewari, Mallika; Shukla, Hari Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin (Gs) are a well known trophic factor for the gastrointestinal tract and their trophic effects are shown mainly toward pancreas and stomach, respectively. Though, the exact characterization of CCK and Gs receptors subtype (cholecystokinin type A receptor [CCKAR] and cholecystokinin type B receptor/gastrin receptor [CCKBR/GR]) in stomach cancer (SC) and pancreatic cancer (PC) is still controversial and necessities further validation. CCKAR and CCKBR/GR expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 55 SC, 25 benign gastric diseases (BGDs), 38 PC (including periampullary carcinoma), and 10 normal pancreatic tissue. The results were statistically correlated with the patient's clinical history to observe the prognostic significance if any. CCKAR expression was detected in 18.2% of SC, 20% of BGD, 65.8% of PC, and 30.0% of normal pancreas tissue samples. The CCKBR/GR expression was detected in 58.2% of SC, 48.0% of BGD, 18.4% of PC, and 60.0% of normal pancreas tissue samples. CCKBR/GR expression was significantly high in well and moderately differentiated SC samples as compared to poorly differentiated samples. Our study showed significantly higher expression of CCKAR and down regulation of CCKBR in PC as compared to control while CCKBR/GR was detected in majority of SC samples. Thus, our study suggests that CCK and Gs receptors may have diagnostic and therapeutic implications. However, study need to be validated in significantly bigger sample size and need to be replicated in different cohorts.

  20. The stomach in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, R H; Camilleri, M; Crowe, S E; El-Omar, E M; Fox, J G; Kuipers, E J; Malfertheiner, P; McColl, K E L; Pritchard, D M; Rugge, M; Sonnenberg, A; Sugano, K; Tack, J

    2016-01-01

    The stomach is traditionally regarded as a hollow muscular sac that initiates the second phase of digestion. Yet this simple view ignores the fact that it is the most sophisticated endocrine organ with unique physiology, biochemistry, immunology and microbiology. All ingested materials, including our nutrition, have to negotiate this organ first, and as such, the stomach is arguably the most important segment within the GI tract. The unique biological function of gastric acid secretion not only initiates the digestive process but also acts as a first line of defence against food-borne microbes. Normal gastric physiology and morphology may be disrupted by Helicobacter pylori infection, the most common chronic bacterial infection in the world and the aetiological agent for most peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. In this state-of-the-art review, the most relevant new aspects of the stomach in health and disease are addressed. Topics include gastric physiology and the role of gastric dysmotility in dyspepsia and gastroparesis; the stomach in appetite control and obesity; there is an update on the immunology of the stomach and the emerging field of the gastric microbiome. H. pylori-induced gastritis and its associated diseases including peptic ulcers and gastric cancer are addressed together with advances in diagnosis. The conclusions provide a future approach to gastric diseases underpinned by the concept that a healthy stomach is the gateway to a healthy and balanced host. This philosophy should reinforce any public health efforts designed to eradicate major gastric diseases, including stomach cancer. PMID:26342014

  1. [Polymorphism of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and sensitivity of stomach cancer to fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Gao, Chang-Ming; Lu, Jian-Wei; Toshiro, Takezaki; Wu, Jian-Zhong; Cao, Hai-Xia; Chen, Huan-Qiu; Feng, Ji-Feng; Kazuo, Tajima

    2004-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T or A1298C and the response to fluoropyrimidine (5-FU)-based chemotherapy in advanced stomach cancer (SC). 75 cases with advanced SC were analyzed. All patients were treated with 5-FU-based chemotherapy and DNA of peripheral blood leukocytes was obtained before therapy. MTHFR genotypes were detected by PCR-RFLP method. (1) Of all the cases, the frequencies of MTHFR C677T C/C, C/T and T/T genotype were 32.0%, 44.0% and 24.0%, while the frequencies of MTHFR A1298C A/A, A/C and C/C genotype were 69.3%, 29.3% and 1.3%, respectively. The overal response rate to 5-FU-based chemotherapy was 29.3%. (2) The response rate to therapy among MTHFR C677T T/T genotype patients (83.3%) was significantly higher than the C677T C/T genotype (15.2%, chi(2) = 22.27, P = 0.000) or the C677T C/C genotype (8.3%, chi(2) = 23.44, P = 0.000). As compared with patients with C677T C allele, patients with C677T T/T genotype had a 7.64-fold sensitivity to 5-FU-based chemotherapy (adjusted for sex, age, prior adjuvant therapy and chemotherapy program, 95% CI: 3.14 - 18.62). The response rate to therapy among patients with MTHFR A1298C A/A genotype (36.5%) was significantly higher than patients with A1298C C allele (13.0%, chi(2) = 4.19, P = 0.041, adjusted OR = 3.75, 95% CI: 0.94 - 14.87). The response rate to therapy among patients with MTHFR C677T T/T and A1298C A/A genotypes (86.7%) was significantly higher than other groups of C677T and A1298C genotypes (15.0%, Fisher exact: P = 0.000, adjusted OR = 6.57, 95% CI: 2.8 - 15.6). (3) The incidence rates of nausea/vomiting in MTHFR C677T T/T, C/T or A1298C A/A genotypes were significantly higher than other genotypes, but the incidence rates of other treatment-related adverse reaction in MTHFR C677T or A1298C genotypes were not significantly different. These results in the present study suggested that the polymorphisms of MTHFR were

  2. Risk of stomach cancer in Aotearoa/New Zealand: A Māori population based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Sporle, Andrew; Corbin, Marine; Cheng, Soo; Harawira, Pauline; Gray, Michelle; Whaanga, Tracey; Guilford, Parry; Koea, Jonathan; Pearce, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Māori, the indigenous people of New Zealand, experience disproportionate rates of stomach cancer, compared to non-Māori. The overall aim of the study was to better understand the reasons for the considerable excess of stomach cancer in Māori and to identify priorities for prevention. Māori stomach cancer cases from the New Zealand Cancer Registry between 1 February 2009 and 31 October 2013 and Māori controls, randomly selected from the New Zealand electoral roll were matched by 5-year age bands to cases. Logistic regression was used to estimate odd ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) between exposures and stomach cancer risk. Post-stratification weighting of controls was used to account for differential non-response by deprivation category. The study comprised 165 cases and 480 controls. Nearly half (47.9%) of cases were of the diffuse subtype. There were differences in the distribution of risk factors between cases and controls. Of interest were the strong relationships seen with increased stomach risk and having >2 people sharing a bedroom in childhood (OR 3.30, 95%CI 1.95–5.59), testing for H pylori (OR 12.17, 95%CI 6.15–24.08), being an ex-smoker (OR 2.26, 95%CI 1.44–3.54) and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in adulthood (OR 3.29, 95%CI 1.94–5.59). Some results were attenuated following post-stratification weighting. This is the first national study of stomach cancer in any indigenous population and the first Māori-only population-based study of stomach cancer undertaken in New Zealand. We emphasize caution in interpreting the findings given the possibility of selection bias. Population-level strategies to reduce the incidence of stomach cancer in Māori include expanding measures to screen and treat those infected with H pylori and a continued policy focus on reducing tobacco consumption and uptake. PMID:28732086

  3. p53 codon 72 polymorphism interactions with dietary and tobacco related habits and risk of stomach cancer in Mizoram, India.

    PubMed

    Malakar, Mridul; Devi, K Rekha; Phukan, Rup Kumar; Kaur, Tanvir; Deka, Manab; Puia, Lalhriat; Sailo, Lalrinliana; Lalhmangaihi, T; Barua, Debajit; Rajguru, Sanjib Kumar; Mahanta, Jagadish; Narain, Kanwar

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the interaction of p53 codon 72 polymorphism, dietary and tobacco habits with reference to risk of stomach cancer in Mizoram, India. A total of 105 histologically confirmed stomach cancer cases and 210 age, sex and ethnicity matched healthy population controls were included in this study. The p53 codon 72 polymorphism was detected by PCR-RFLP and sequencing. H. pylori infection status was determined by ELISA. Information on various dietary and tobacco related habits was recorded with a standard questionnaire. This study revealed that overall, the Pro/ Pro genotype was significantly associated with a higher risk of stomach cancer (OR, 2.54; 95%CI, 1.01-6.40) as compared to the Arg/Arg genotype. In gender stratified analysis, the Pro/Pro genotype showed higher risk (OR, 7.50; 95%CI, 1.20-47.0) than the Arg/Arg genotype among females. Similarly, the Pro/Pro genotype demonstrated higher risk of stomach cancer (OR, 6.30; 95%CI, 1.41-28.2) among older people (>60 years). However, no such associations were observed in males and in individuals <60 years of age. Smoke dried fish and preserved meat (smoke dried/sun dried) consumers were at increased risk of stomach cancer (OR, 4.85; 95%CI, 1.91-12.3 and OR, 4.22; 95%CI, 1.46-12.2 respectively) as compared to non-consumers. Significant gene-environment interactions exist in terms of p53 codon 72 polymorphism and stomach cancer in Mizoram. Tobacco smokers with Pro/Pro and Arg/Pro genotypes were at higher risk of stomach cancer (OR, 16.2; 95%CI, 1.72-153.4 and OR, 9.45; 95%CI, 1.09-81.7 respectively) than the non-smokers Arg/Arg genotype carriers. The combination of tuibur user and Arg/Pro genotype also demonstrated an elevated risk association (OR, 4.76; 95%CI, 1.40-16.21). In conclusion, this study revealed that p53 codon 72 polymorphism and dietary and tobacco habit interactions influence stomach cancer development in Mizoram, India.

  4. Risk of stomach cancer in Aotearoa/New Zealand: A Māori population based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ellison-Loschmann, Lis; Sporle, Andrew; Corbin, Marine; Cheng, Soo; Harawira, Pauline; Gray, Michelle; Whaanga, Tracey; Guilford, Parry; Koea, Jonathan; Pearce, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Māori, the indigenous people of New Zealand, experience disproportionate rates of stomach cancer, compared to non-Māori. The overall aim of the study was to better understand the reasons for the considerable excess of stomach cancer in Māori and to identify priorities for prevention. Māori stomach cancer cases from the New Zealand Cancer Registry between 1 February 2009 and 31 October 2013 and Māori controls, randomly selected from the New Zealand electoral roll were matched by 5-year age bands to cases. Logistic regression was used to estimate odd ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) between exposures and stomach cancer risk. Post-stratification weighting of controls was used to account for differential non-response by deprivation category. The study comprised 165 cases and 480 controls. Nearly half (47.9%) of cases were of the diffuse subtype. There were differences in the distribution of risk factors between cases and controls. Of interest were the strong relationships seen with increased stomach risk and having >2 people sharing a bedroom in childhood (OR 3.30, 95%CI 1.95-5.59), testing for H pylori (OR 12.17, 95%CI 6.15-24.08), being an ex-smoker (OR 2.26, 95%CI 1.44-3.54) and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in adulthood (OR 3.29, 95%CI 1.94-5.59). Some results were attenuated following post-stratification weighting. This is the first national study of stomach cancer in any indigenous population and the first Māori-only population-based study of stomach cancer undertaken in New Zealand. We emphasize caution in interpreting the findings given the possibility of selection bias. Population-level strategies to reduce the incidence of stomach cancer in Māori include expanding measures to screen and treat those infected with H pylori and a continued policy focus on reducing tobacco consumption and uptake.

  5. Estimated amount of 24-hour urine sodium excretion is positively correlated with stomach and breast cancer prevalence in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong Chul; Koo, Ho Seok; Oh, Se Won; Kim, Suhnggwon; Chin, Ho Jun

    2014-09-01

    Stomach cancer is one of the most common cancers in Korea. The aim of this study was to identify the association between the prevalence of cancer, particularly stomach cancer, and the amount of 24-hr urine sodium excretion estimated from spot urine specimens. The study included 19,083 subjects who took part in the Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey between 2009 and 2011. The total amount of urine sodium excreted in a 24-hr period was estimated by using two equations based on the values for spot urine sodium and creatinine. In subjects who had an estimated 24-hr urine sodium excretion of more than two standard deviations above the mean (group 2), the prevalence of stomach cancer was higher than in subjects with lower 24-hr sodium excretion (group 1). By using the Tanaka equation to estimate it, the prevalence of stomach cancer was 0.6% (114/18,331) in group 1, whereas it was 1.6% (9/568) in group 2 (P=0.006). By using the Korean equation, the prevalence was 0.6% (115/18,392) in group 1, and 1.6% in group 2 (8/507) (P=0.010). By using the Tanaka equation, breast cancer in women is more prevalent in group 2 (1.9%, 6/324) than group 1 (0.8%, 78/9,985, P=0.039). Higher salt intake, as defined by the estimated amount of 24-hr urine sodium excretion, is positively correlated with a higher prevalence of stomach or breast cancer in the Korean population.

  6. Role of gastric bypass in patients with unresectable advanced carcinoma of stomach.

    PubMed

    Maturu, Nagarjuna V; Pai, Dinker R; Prasad, Vishnu N R

    2008-12-01

    Role of bypass as a palliative surgery for advanced gastric cancer remains controversial. To determine the role of bypass in advanced gastric cancer in comparision to resection as gold standard. Hospital-based retrospective outcome as study. Patients were divided into three groups: group I (gastric resection), group II (bypass) and group III (exploratory laparotomy alone). The three groups were analysed for palliation of symptoms, operative morbidity and mortality and survival. Chi-square, Fischer, One-way Anova, Unpaired-t, Kaplan-Meier analysis. In-hospital morbidity was 19.38% (19 patients) for the entire study group. Bypass group had a lower morbidity rate as compared to the resection group (p=0.029). In-hospital mortality rate was 6.12% (6 patients) for the entire study group. Mortality rates did not differ between the groups. Patient satisfaction with palliation of symptoms was similar between gastric bypass and resection. Gastric resection group had significantly better survival (p=0.002) compared to the nonresective procedures. However, gastric bypass did not confer any survival benefit over exploratory laparotomy (p=0.501). Gastric bypass can be done when resection is not possible as it palliates symptoms on par with resection and is associated with low operative morbidity though it does not improve the survival outlook of patients.

  7. Recent Advances in Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Arthur-Quan; Gehrig, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy in the United States, with yearly rates continuing to increase. Most women present with early stage disease; however, advanced disease carries a grave prognosis. As a result, novel therapies are currently under investigation for the treatment of endometrial cancer. These advances include a better understanding of the genetic basis surrounding the development of endometrial cancer, novel surgical therapies, and new molecular targets for the treatment of this disease. This review explores the literature regarding these advancements in endometrial cancer. PMID:28184290

  8. [Activity of cathepsin D in the blood serum and urine of patients with cancer of the stomach, pancreas and liver].

    PubMed

    Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Snarska, Jadwiga; Roszkowska-Jakimiec, Wiesława; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Siedlecka, Katarzyna; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Krupkowska, Agnieszka

    2006-12-01

    Cathepsin D is a protease involved in invasion of the cancer and metastasis formation. The purpose of the study was to evaluate a prognostic value of cathepsin D activity in blood serum and urine of patients with cancer of the stomach, pancreas and liver. The study was carried out on the samples of blood serum and urine obtained from patients with cancer of the stomach, pancreas and liver treated surgically at the First Department of General Surgery and Endocrinology of the Medical University of Białystok. The control group consisted of healthy individuals. Activity of cathepsin D was determined in serum and urine by the Folin-Ciocaltau method with the cupric modification and was expressed in nmol Tyr/ml/6h. Specific activity of cathepsin D was determined in the urine, and was expressed in nmol Tyr/mg of protein/6h. Protein concentration in serum was assessed with Lowry et al. method and results were expressed in mg/ml. A significant increase in activity of cathepsin D in serum (p = 0.0169) and urine (p = 0.0008) and an enhanced specific activity in the urine (p = 0.0085) was found in patients with cancer of the pancreas as compared with the controls. A significantly increased activity of cathepsin was revealed in serum (p = 0.0233) of patients with cancer of the stomach. No significant differences of cathepsin D activity were found in urine of the patients with cancer of the stomach when compared to the controls. Additionally, an upward tendency (almost two-fold increase) of cathepsin D activity was shown in blood serum and an increase in the activity and in specific activity was observed in urine of both patients with cancer of the liver in comparison with the healthy individuals. There were no significant differences in the activity of cathepsin D in serum of the patients with cancer of the pancreas and stomach (p = 0.4156). A statistically significantly higher activity (p = 0.0004) and specific (0.0048) cathepsin D activity was demonstrated in urine of the

  9. Photodynamic therapy application of PAMAM-porphyrin molecule on stomach cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiris, Tugba; Burgucu, Mehmet Necmi; Sagir, Tugba; Senel, Mehmet; Isik, Sevim; Bölük-basi Ates, Gamze; Tabakoglu, Hasim Ozgur

    2015-03-01

    In this study, effect of a novel LED-based light source developed for 96-well-plates cell culture applications, was tried on AGS stomach cancer cell line, in combination with Poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) modified - porhyrin molecule. For each 4 generation of modified PpIX molecule 5 different concentrations tried. According to results PAMAM molecule doesnt have any photosensitizer property also didn't show any toxic effect even if higher concentrations. Morphology and real time monitoring analysis results hold up each other and confirmed that, PpIX molecules with and without modificated high concentrations (>100μM) caused cell death via toxicicity this reason optimal concentration for PAMAM modified PpIX should be between 25 - 50 μm concentration .

  10. [The joint effects of major lifestyle factors on stomach cancer risk among Chinese men: a prospective cohort study].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q L; Zheng, W; Li, H L; Gao, J; Fang, J; Gao, L F; Liu, D K; Shu, X O; Xiang, Y B

    2017-05-06

    Objective: To investigate the combined impact of lifestyle factors on stomach cancer risk. Methods: We analyzed the data from the Shanghai Men's Health Study (SMHS) (2002-2013). The SMHS was conducted in eight neighborhood communities of urban Shanghai. From 2002 through June 2006, 61 480 residents aged 40 to 74 years old with no history of cancer were recruited. Failure time was the date of stomach cancer incidence, death or date of the last follow-up (December 31, 2013). The first two in-person follow-up surveys were conducted in 2004-2008, and 2008-2011, respectively. Using data on lifestyle, the healthy lifestyle index (HLI) was developed. The following lifestyle factors were included: smoking, alcohol consumption, diet habit, overweighted and physical activity. Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate the association of stomach cancer risk with lifestyle factors and HLI. Results: Over 9.28 years' follow-up, 477 incident cases of stomach cancer were identified from 59 503 study participants. Participants with zero, one, two, three, four, and five favorable lifestyle behaviors accounted for 3.44% (n=2 045), 18.14% (n=10 793), 33.68% (n=20 041), 29.43% (n=17 511), 12.82% (n=7 627), and 2.50% (n=1 486), respectively. Among all the five lifestyle factors, smoking and alcohol use were significantly related to stomach cancer risk. The relative risk of stomach cancer was 0.71 (95%CI: 0.57-0.87) for those who never smoked or quitted smoking for no less than 10 years and 0.70 (95%CI: 0.55-0.90) for those who consumed alcohol no more than 14 drinks per week. For each increment of healthy lifestyle index, the relative risk of stomach cancer was 0.86 (95%CI: 0.79-0.95). Compared to men with none or one healthy lifestyle factor, the relative risk for those with four or five was 0.62 (95%CI: 0.46-0.83). When we rebuilt HLI using more categories of each lifestyle factors, the HLI ranged from 0 to 11. For each point increase, the relative risk of stomach cancer was

  11. Modification of Helicobacter pylori peptidoglycan enhances NOD1 activation and promotes cancer of the stomach

    DOE PAGES

    Suarez, Giovanni; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; ...

    2015-03-02

    Helicobacter pylori is the strongest known risk factor for gastric carcinogenesis. One cancer-linked locus is the cag pathogenicity island, which translocates components of peptidoglycan (PGN) into host cells. NOD1 is an intracellular immune receptor that senses PGN from Gram-negative bacteria and responds by inducing autophagy and activating NF-κB, leading to inflammation-mediated bacterial clearance; however chronic pathogens can evade NOD1-mediated clearance by altering PGN structure. We previously demonstrated that the H. pylori cag+ strain 7.13 rapidly induces gastric cancer in Mongolian gerbils. Using 2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry, we identified a novel mutation within the gene encoding the peptidoglycan deacetylase PgdA; therefore,more » we sought to define the role of H. pylori PgdA in NOD1-dependent activation of NF-κB, inflammation, and cancer. Co-culture of H. pylori strain 7.13 or its pgdA$-$ isogenic mutant with AGS gastric epithelial cells or HEK293 epithelial cells expressing a NF-κB reporter revealed that pgdA inactivation significantly decreased NOD1-dependent NF-κB activation and autophagy. Infection of Mongolian gerbils with an H. pylori pgdA$-$ mutant strain led to significantly decreased levels of inflammation and malignant lesions in the stomach; however, pre-activation of NOD1 prior to bacterial challenge reciprocally suppressed inflammation and cancer in response to wild-type H. pylori. Expression of NOD1 differs in human gastric cancer specimens compared to non-cancer samples harvested from the same patients. In conclusion, these results indicate that PGN deacetylation plays an important role in modulating host inflammatory responses to H. pylori, allowing the bacteria to persist and induce carcinogenic consequences in the gastric niche.« less

  12. Long-term survival after endoscopic resection for early gastric cancer in the remnant stomach: comparison with radical surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yamashina, Takeshi; Uedo, Noriya; Dainaka, Katsuyuki; Aoi, Kenji; Matsuura, Noriko; Ito, Takashi; Fujii, Mototsugu; Kanesaka, Takashi; Yamamoto, Sachiko; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Hanaoka, Noboru; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Ishihara, Ryu; Kishi, Kentaro; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    Background Endoscopic resection (ER) has recently become standard treatment, even for early gastric cancer (EGC) in the remnant stomach. We aimed to compare long-term survival after ER versus radical surgery for EGC in the remnant stomach. Methods We retrospectively compared overall and cause-specific survival of patients who had undergone ER or radical surgery for EGC in the remnant stomach from 1998 to 2012. Results During the study period, 32 patients with intramucosal (M), two with shallow submucosal (SM1) and eight with deep submucosal (SM2) cancers had undergone ER (ER group) whereas six with M and seven with SM2 cancers had undergone surgery (surgery group). All patients were followed up for a median of 60 months; during follow up, 15 patients died, including three in the ER group with SM2 cancer who died of gastric cancer. The overall 5-year survival rates of M-SM1 and SM2 cancer patients in the ER and surgery groups were 89%, 48%, 80%, and 67%, respectively (P=0.079). The disease-specific 5-year survival rates of M-SM1 and SM2 cancer patients in the ER and surgery groups were 100%, 48%, 100%, and 100%, respectively (P=0.000). Operation time and hospital stay were significantly shorter in the ER than the surgery group (P<0.001). Grade 2 perforation occurred in two patients in the ER group and Grade 3 anastomotic leakage in two patients in the surgery group. Conclusion ER provides excellent outcomes, comparable with those of radical surgery, in patients with M-SM1 gastric cancer in the remnant stomach; however, patients with SM2 cancer require radical surgery. PMID:25608929

  13. [New molecular classification of colorectal cancer, pancreatic cancer and stomach cancer: Towards "à la carte" treatment?].

    PubMed

    Dreyer, Chantal; Afchain, Pauline; Trouilloud, Isabelle; André, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    This review reports 3 of recently published molecular classifications of the 3 main gastro-intestinal cancers: gastric, pancreatic and colorectal adenocarcinoma. In colorectal adenocarcinoma, 6 independent classifications were combined to finally hold 4 molecular sub-groups, Consensus Molecular Subtypes (CMS 1-4), linked to various clinical, molecular and survival data. CMS1 (14% MSI with immune activation); CMS2 (37%: canonical with epithelial differentiation and activation of the WNT/MYC pathway); CMS3 (13% metabolic with epithelial differentiation and RAS mutation); CMS4 (23%: mesenchymal with activation of TGFβ pathway and angiogenesis with stromal invasion). In gastric adenocarcinoma, 4 groups were established: subtype "EBV" (9%, high frequency of PIK3CA mutations, hypermetylation and amplification of JAK2, PD-L1 and PD-L2), subtype "MSI" (22%, high rate of mutation), subtype "genomically stable tumor" (20%, diffuse histology type and mutations of RAS and genes encoding integrins and adhesion proteins including CDH1) and subtype "tumors with chromosomal instability" (50%, intestinal type, aneuploidy and receptor tyrosine kinase amplification). In pancreatic adenocarcinomas, a classification in four sub-groups has been proposed, stable subtype (20%, aneuploidy), locally rearranged subtype (30%, focal event on one or two chromosoms), scattered subtype (36%,<200 structural variation events), and unstable subtype (14%,>200 structural variation events, defects in DNA maintenance). Although currently away from the care of patients, these classifications open the way to "à la carte" treatment depending on molecular biology. Copyright © 2016 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Anticarcinogenic effects of glycoalkaloids from potatoes against human cervical, liver, lymphoma, and stomach cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mendel; Lee, Kap-Rang; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Lee, In-Seon; Kozukue, Nobuyuke

    2005-07-27

    Methods were devised for the isolation of large amounts of pure alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine from Dejima potatoes and for the extraction and analysis of total glycoalkaloids from five fresh potato varieties (Dejima, Jowon, Sumi, Toya, and Vora Valley). These compounds were then evaluated in experiments using a tetrazolium microculture (MTT) assay to assess the anticarcinogenic effects of (a) the isolated pure glycoalkaloids separately, (b) artificial mixtures of the two glycoalkaloids, and (c) the total glycoalkaloids isolated from each of the five potato varieties. All samples tested reduced the numbers of the following human cell lines: cervical (HeLa), liver (HepG2), lymphoma (U937), stomach (AGS and KATO III) cancer cells and normal liver (Chang) cells. The results show that (a) the effects of the glycoalkaloids were concentration dependent in the range of 0.1-10 mug/mL (0.117-11.7 nmol/mL); (b) alpha-chaconine was more active than was alpha-solanine; (c) some mixtures exhibited synergistic effects, whereas other produced additive ones; (d) the different cancer cells varied in their susceptibilities to destruction; and (e) the destruction of normal liver cells was generally lower than that of cancer liver cells. The decreases in cell populations were also observed visually by reversed-phase microscopy. The results complement related observations on the anticarcinogenic potential of food ingredients.

  15. Modification of Helicobacter pylori Peptidoglycan Enhances NOD1 Activation and Promotes Cancer of the Stomach.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Giovanni; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Wang, Ge; Maier, Robert J; Forsberg, Lennart S; Azadi, Parastoo; Gomez, Martin A; Correa, Pelayo; Peek, Richard M

    2015-04-15

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the strongest known risk factor for gastric carcinogenesis. One cancer-linked locus is the cag pathogenicity island, which translocates components of peptidoglycan into host cells. NOD1 is an intracellular immune receptor that senses peptidoglycan from Gram-negative bacteria and responds by inducing autophagy and activating NF-κB, leading to inflammation-mediated bacterial clearance; however chronic pathogens can evade NOD1-mediated clearance by altering peptidoglycan structure. We previously demonstrated that the H. pylori cag(+) strain 7.13 rapidly induces gastric cancer in Mongolian gerbils. Using 2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry, we identified a novel mutation within the gene encoding the peptidoglycan deacetylase PgdA; therefore, we sought to define the role of H. pylori PgdA in NOD1-dependent activation of NF-κB, inflammation, and cancer. Coculture of H. pylori strain 7.13 or its pgdA(-) isogenic mutant with AGS gastric epithelial cells or HEK293 epithelial cells expressing a NF-κB reporter revealed that pgdA inactivation significantly decreased NOD1-dependent NF-κB activation and autophagy. Infection of Mongolian gerbils with an H. pylori pgdA(-) mutant strain led to significantly decreased levels of inflammation and malignant lesions in the stomach; however, preactivation of NOD1 before bacterial challenge reciprocally suppressed inflammation and cancer in response to wild-type H. pylori. Expression of NOD1 differs in human gastric cancer specimens compared with noncancer samples harvested from the same patients. These results indicate that peptidoglycan deacetylation plays an important role in modulating host inflammatory responses to H. pylori, allowing the bacteria to persist and induce carcinogenic consequences in the gastric niche.

  16. The allele combinations of three loci based on, liver, stomach cancers, hematencephalon, COPD and normal population: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Gai, Liping; Liu, Hui; Cui, Jing-Hui; Yu, Weijian; Ding, Xiao-Dong

    2017-03-20

    The purpose of this study was to examine the specific allele combinations of three loci connected with the liver cancers, stomach cancers, hematencephalon and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to explore the feasibility of the research methods. We explored different mathematical methods for statistical analyses to assess the association between the genotype and phenotype. At the same time we still analyses the statistical results of allele combinations of three loci by difference value method and ratio method. All the DNA blood samples were collected from patients with 50 liver cancers, 75 stomach cancers, 50 hematencephalon, 72 COPD and 200 normal populations. All the samples were from Chinese. Alleles from short tandem repeat (STR) loci were determined using the STR Profiler plus PCR amplification kit (15 STR loci). Previous research was based on combinations of single-locus alleles, and combinations of cross-loci (two loci) alleles. Allele combinations of three loci were obtained by computer counting and stronger genetic signal was obtained. The methods of allele combinations of three loci can help to identify the statistically significant differences of allele combinations between liver cancers, stomach cancers, patients with hematencephalon, COPD and the normal population. The probability of illness followed different rules and had apparent specificity. This method can be extended to other diseases and provide reference for early clinical diagnosis.

  17. [Characteristic of inflammatory infiltrate of gastric mucosa in patients with grade II-III gastric dysplasia and of stomach cancer].

    PubMed

    Evtushenko, V A; Vusik, M V; Karakeshisheva, M B; Pleshko, R I; Ermolaeva, L A

    2008-01-01

    The study included 85 inpatients and outpatients in whom composition of inflammatory infiltrate from gastric mucosa (GM) was determined at the Oncological Research Institute, Tomsk Research Centre of the Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. The patients were allocated to 4 groups depending on nosological form of the disease. Group 1 comprised 21 patients with grade II-III GM epithelial dysplasia, group 2 - 24 patients having stomach cancer (histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma), group 3 - 19 patients with stage II-III mucinous gastric carcinoma, group 4 - 20 allegedly healthy subjects without signs of gastrointestinal pathology. It was shown that dysplastic processes in GM are associated with an increase of neutrophil, eosinophil, macrophage, and mast cell count along with a drop in the number of lymphocytes and plasmocytes. Stroma of invasive stomach cancer underwent intense inflammatory infiltration accompanied by a rise in the number of lymphocytes, plasmocytes, and neutrophils. Mucinous gastric carcinoma was characterized by an increase of the number of neutrophils and macrophages. Patients having adenocarcinoma of the stomach showed enhanced plasmocytic infiltration by plasmocytes with a low number of eosinophils and mast cells. It is concluded that characteristics of inflammatory GM infiltrate may be useful for the objective assessment of stomach cancer risk in patients with GM dysplasia, formation of a high oncological risk group, adequate dynamic monitoring and treatment of these patients.

  18. Evidence for cancer-associated expression of NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1)-based oxidase system in the human stomach.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Kumiko; Kawahara, Tsukasa; Sano, Toshiaki; Toida, Kazunori; Kuwano, Yuki; Sasaki, Hideyuki; Kawai, Tomoko; Teshima-Kondo, Shigetada; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    2007-12-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection has been suggested to stimulate expression of the NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1)-based oxidase system in guinea pig gastric epithelium, whereas Nox1 mRNA expression has not yet been documented in the human stomach. PCR of human stomach cDNA libraries showed that Nox1 and Nox organizer 1 (NOXO1) messages were absent from normal stomachs, while they were specifically coexpressed in intestinal- and diffuse-type adenocarcinomas including signet-ring cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry showed that Nox1 and NOXO1 proteins were absent from chronic atrophic gastritis (15 cases), adenomas (4 cases), or surrounding tissues of adenocarcinomas (45 cases). In contrast, Nox1 and its partner proteins were expressed in intestinal-type adenocarcinomas (19/21 cases), diffuse-type adenocarcinomas (15/15 cases), and signet-ring cell carcinomas (9/9 cases). Confocal microscopy revealed that Nox1, NOXO1, Nox activator 1, and p22(phox) were predominantly associated with Golgi apparatus in these cancer cells, while diffuse-type adenocarcinomas also contained cancer cells having Nox1 and its partner proteins in their nuclei. Nox1-expressing cancer cells exhibited both gastric and intestinal phenotypes, as assessed by expression of mucin core polypeptides. Thus, the Nox1-base oxidase may be a potential marker of neoplastic transformation and play an important role in oxygen radical- and inflammation-dependent carcinogenesis in the human stomach.

  19. Mortality differences by surgical volume among patients with stomach cancer: a threshold for a favorable volume-outcome relationship.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeok; Yang, Seong-Yoon; Cho, Hee-Seung; Kim, Woorim; Park, Eun-Cheol; Han, Kyu-Tae

    2017-07-17

    Many studies have assessed the volume-outcome relationship in cancer patients, but most focused on better outcomes in higher volume groups rather than identifying a specific threshold that could assist in clinical decision-making for achieving the best outcomes. The current study suggests an optimal volume for achieving good outcome, as an extension of previous studies on the volume-outcome relationship in stomach cancer patients. We used National Health Insurance Service (NHIS) Sampling Cohort data during 2004-2013, comprising healthcare claims for 2550 patients with newly diagnosed stomach cancer. We conducted survival analyses adopting the Cox proportional hazard model to investigate the association of three threshold values for surgical volume of stomach cancer patients for cancer-specific mortality using the Youden index. Overall, 17.10% of patients died due to cancer during the study period. The risk of mortality among patients who received surgical treatment gradually decreased with increasing surgical volume at the hospital, while the risk of mortality increased again in "high" surgical volume hospitals, resulting in a j-shaped curve (mid-low = hazard ratio (HR) 0.773, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.608-0.983; mid-high = HR 0.541, 95% CI 0.372-0.788; high = HR 0.659, 95% CI 0.473-0.917; ref = low). These associations were especially significant in regions with unsubstantial surgical volumes and less severe cases. The optimal surgical volume threshold was about 727.3 surgical cases for stomach cancer per hospital over the 1-year study period in South Korea. However, such positive effects decreased after exceeding a certain volume of surgeries.

  20. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    flSttfiferrces ReferentHistory Alternative Medicine Alternative and Complementary/Integrative Nutritional Therapies in Cancer Prevention and Treatment ...to meet a clear and compelling need to respond to Florida’s "cancer epidemic." Building a major cancer research and treatment center at the... Medicine . This Department includes all the basic science faculty recruited by the Cancer Center and will be the academic home for a new interdisciplinary

  1. [Economic burden of stomach cancer in China during 1996-2015: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Yao, F; Shi, C L; Liu, C C; Wang, L; Song, S M; Ren, J S; Guo, C G; Lou, P A; Dai, M; Zhu, L; Shi, J F

    2017-08-06

    Objective: To clarify the research status of economic burden of stomach cancer in China from 1996 to 2015. Methods: Based on three electronic literature databases (China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database, Wanfang Database and PubMed), a total of 2 873, 1 244 and 84 articles published during 1996 to 2015 were found, respectively, using keywords of"cancer","neoplasms","malignant tumor","tumor","economic burden","health expenditure","cost","cost of illness", and"China". According to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 30 literatures were included in the final analysis. Then the basic information and study subjects, indicators and main results of economic burden were abstracted and analyzed. All the expenditure data were discounted to the values in 2013 by using China's percapita consumer price index. Results: Totally, 30 articles were included, covering 14 provinces and of which 16 were published during 2011-2015. One article was based on population-level and the remaining studies were all based on individual-level. The number of individual-level articles that reported direct medical, non-medical and indirectly economic burden was 29, 1 and 2, respectively. The main indicators of direct medical expenditure were expenditure per patient (22), per clinical visit (9) and per diem (11), respectively. The median expenditure per patient was 7 387-28 743 RMB (CNY), with average annual growth rate (AAGR) of 1.7% (1996-2013). The median expenditure per clinical visit was 18 504-41 871 RMB (2003-2013), with AAGR of 5.5%. The median expenditure per diem was 313-1 445 RMB (1996-2012), with AAGR of 3.7%. Difference was found among provinces. Conclusions: The evidence for economic burden of stomach cancer was still limited over the past two decades and mainly focused on individual and regional levels. An increase and differences in provinces were observed in direct medical expenditure. Evaluation on direct non-medical and indirect medical expenditure needs to be addressed.

  2. Desmoplastic small round cell tumor of the stomach mimicking a gastric cancer in a child.

    PubMed

    Moon, Suk-Bae; Hur, Jung-Min; Koo, Hong-Hoe; Suh, Yeon-Lim; Shin, Hyun-Baek; Seo, Jeong-Meen; Lee, Suk-Koo

    2011-06-01

    Intra-abdominal desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a highly malignant tumor of uncertain histogenesis. Here we report a case of DSRCT involving the stomach, initially misdiagnosed as gastric cancer. A 12-year-old boy presented with upper abdominal pain developed 1 month prior. On gastroscopy, a 7-cm mass was noted involving the esophago-gastric junction to the fundus, and positron emission tomography showed multiple hot uptakes suggesting distant metastasis. Gastroscopic biopsy showed poorly differentiated malignant cells. We diagnosed as stage IV gastric cancer and treated with 6 cycles of chemotherapy. Laparotomy revealed a huge gastric mass along with peritoneal disseminations. Palliative proximal gastrectomy was performed. Pathological examination revealed transmural involvement of DSRCT, and t(11;22)(p12;q12) was demonstrated on fluorescence in situ hybridization test. The chemotherapeutic regimen was changed and the patient underwent 8 additional cycles of post-operative chemotherapy. The patient is now alive and the residual tumor shows no significant changes after chemotherapy.

  3. Post-traumatic growth in stomach cancer survivors: Prevalence, correlates and relationship with health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Sim, Bo Yun; Lee, Young Whee; Kim, Hwasoon; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2015-06-01

    Post-traumatic growth (PTG) is defined as positive psychological changes experienced as a result of struggle with highly challenging life circumstances. Interest in PTG has increased in cancer survivorship care; however, little is known about PTG among stomach cancer survivors. This study aimed to examine the prevalence and correlates of PTG, and to identify relationships between PTG and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Cross-sectional descriptive design. In total, 122 stomach cancer survivors were recruited from one university hospital in South Korea. Measurements included the Korean version of the Post-traumatic Growth Inventory and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy--General Population. Over half (53.3%) of the participants experienced moderate to high levels of PTG. 'Change of self-perception' was the most common growth domain, followed by 'relating to others', 'new possibilities' and 'spiritual change'. Older age, low socio-economic status (i.e. low education level and low monthly income) and lack of religion were associated with lower levels of PTG. Survivors with higher levels of PTG had better social/family well-being (P < 0.001) and better functional well-being (P < 0.001). Psychological interventions to enhance PTG may have a positive effect on impaired HRQOL among stomach cancer survivors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pembrolizumab and Palliative Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Esophagus, Stomach, or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-31

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Gastric Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Stomach; Stage IV Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  5. Trends in mortality from cancers of the breast, colon, prostate, esophagus, and stomach in East Asia: role of nutrition transition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianjun; Dhakal, Ishwori B; Zhao, Zijin; Li, Lang

    2012-09-01

    Although substantial nutrition transition, characterized by an increased intake of energy, animal fat, and red meats, has occurred during the last several decades in East Asia, few studies have systematically evaluated temporal trends in cancer incidence or mortality among populations in this area. Therefore, we sought to investigate this question with tremendous public health implications. Data on mortality rates of cancers of the breast, colon, prostate, esophagus, and stomach for China (1988-2000), Hong Kong (1960-2006), Japan (1950-2006), Korea (1985-2006), and Singapore (1963-2006) were obtained from WHO. Joinpoint regression was used to investigate trends in mortality of these cancers. A remarkable increase in mortality rates of breast, colon, and prostate cancers and a precipitous decrease in those of esophageal and stomach cancers have been observed in selected countries (except breast cancer in Hong Kong) during the study periods. For example, the annual percentage increase in breast cancer mortality was 5.5% (95% confidence interval: 3.8, 7.3%) for the period 1985-1993 in Korea, and mortality rates for prostate cancer significantly increased by 3.2% (95% confidence interval: 3.0, 3.3%) per year from 1958 to 1993 in Japan. These changes in cancer mortality lagged ∼ 10 years behind the inception of the nutrition transition toward a westernized diet in selected countries or regions. There have been striking changes in mortality rates of breast, colon, prostate, esophageal, and stomach cancers in East Asia during the last several decades, which may be at least in part attributable to the concurrent nutrition transition.

  6. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-25

    Establish a center to expand cancer screening and education programs; find cancers in the population early enough to make a difference in morbidity and mortality; research and implement high quality, high technology, and cost effective communication delivery methods via telemedicine and teleconferencing; and implement basic science investigations of early genetic and biochemical transformations related to cancer that can be detected early in the disease process.

  7. Evaluation of trace element concentration in cancerous and non-cancerous tissues of human stomach.

    PubMed

    Kohzadi, Shadi; Sheikhesmaili, Farshad; Rahehagh, Ramesh; Parhizkar, Baran; Ghaderi, Ebrahim; Loqmani, Hozan; Shahmoradi, Behzad; Mohammadi, Ebrahim; Maleki, Afshin

    2017-10-01

    Gastric cancer has a high mortality rate in west of Iran. Various environmental elements are proposed as cancer risk factors including trace elements. Trace elements can induce initiation or progression of carcinogenesis via oxidative stress and DNA injury. The aim of this study was to measure and compare some trace element concentration (Ca, Cu, Fe, As, Mg, Ni, Cd and Cr) in gastric cancer tissues and normal tissues. For this purpose, 35 patients with gastric cancer and 30 without any cancer were biopsied. Biopsies were taken from cancerous tissue and non-cancerous tissue of gastric cancer patients and gastric tissue of normal patients. The analysis of trace elements was performed using Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Data analysis was carried out using SPSS and STATA 12 software. The research found that the concentrations of Fe, Mg, and As were higher in cancerous tissues compared with non-cancerous tissues whereas Cr, Cu, Ca, and Ni concentrations were higher in non-cancerous tissues of cancerous patients. When comparisons were made for cancer and normal samples, copper was the only metal, which was significantly higher in cancerous samples (p < 0.05) and Cr mean concentration in normal tissues was significantly higher compared with cancerous tissues (P = 0.02). Chi-Square test showed that there was no significant relationship in the demographic information between cancerous and normal patients except for location with K(2) = 7.604. Increased Cu and As concentration in gastric patients (both tissues) propose that these elements may have carcinogenic effects, although further study is suggested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cancer Screening Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Camelia S.; Panageas, Katherine S.; Schrag, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Context Cancer screening has been integrated into routine primary care but does not benefit patients with limited life expectancy. Objective To evaluate the extent to which patients with advanced cancer continue to be screened for new cancers. Design, Setting, and Participants Utilization of cancer screening procedures (mammography, Papanicolaou test, prostate-specific antigen [PSA], and lower gastrointestinal [GI] endoscopy) was assessed in 87 736 fee-for-service Medicare enrollees aged 65 years or older diagnosed with advanced lung, colorectal, pancreatic, gastroesophageal, or breast cancer between 1998 and 2005, and reported to one of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) tumor registries. Participants were followed up until death or December 31, 2007, whichever came first. A group of 87 307 Medicare enrollees without cancer were individually matched by age, sex, race, and SEER registry to patients with cancer and observed over the same period to evaluate screening rates in context. Demographic and clinical characteristics associated with screening were also investigated. Main Outcome Measure For each cancer screening test, utilization rates were defined as the percentage of patients who were screened following the diagnosis of an incurable cancer. Results Among women following advanced cancer diagnosis compared with controls, at least 1 screening mammogram was received by 8.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.6%-9.1%) vs 22.0% (95% CI, 21.7%-22.5%); Papanicolaou test screening was received by 5.8% (95% CI, 5.6%-6.1%) vs 12.5% (95% CI, 12.2%-12.8%). Among men following advanced cancer diagnosis compared with controls, PSA test was received by 15.0% (95% CI, 14.7%-15.3%) vs 27.2% (95% CI, 26.8%-27.6%). For all patients following advanced diagnosis compared with controls, lower GI endoscopy was received by 1.7% (95% CI, 1.6%-1.8%) vs 4.7% (95% CI, 4.6%-4.9%). Screening was more frequent among patients with a recent history of screening (16.2% [95

  9. Genetic analysis in APC, KRAS, and TP53 in patients with stomach and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Palacio-Rúa, K A; Isaza-Jiménez, L F; Ahumada-Rodríguez, E; Muñetón-Peña, C M

    2014-01-01

    Stomach cancer (SC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) present with high rates of incidence and mortality in the worldwide population. These 2 tumors are characterized by great genetic heterogeneity. Up to now, there have been no molecular studies that analyze the mutations in the APC, KRAS, and TP53 genes in the Colombian/Latin American population. To analyze mutations in the APC, KRAS, and TP53 genes through direct sequencing in 59 patients with SC and CRC. Twenty-nine patients with SC and 30 with CRC were studied. An analysis of the mutations of the 3 genes was carried out using polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing techniques. A 30.5% total mutation frequency was found. The most frequently mutated gene was APC (15.3%), followed by KRAS (10.1%) and TP53 (5.1%). The CRC samples had a mutation frequency of 46.7% and it was 13.3% in the SC samples (P=.006). No mutations occurred simultaneously in the 3 genes. Mutations in 2 genes were found in only 6 tumor samples (10%). There was also a high frequency of polymorphisms in both types of cancer, the most common of which was the rs41115 polymorphism, located on the APC gene. The APC, KRAS, and TP53 gene mutations were more common in CRC than in SC. Our results suggest the existence of different genetic pathways in the carcinogenesis of SC and CRC and they also reveal a particular mutation frequency in the Colombian patients studied; this could be influenced by factors related to the environment, ethnicity, and lifestyle of this population. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of the Trends of Stomach Cancer Incidence in Districts of Iran from 2000-2010: Application of a Random Effects Markov Model.

    PubMed

    Zayeri, Farid; Mansouri, Anita; Sheidaei, Ali; Rahimzadeh, Shadi; Rezaei, Nazila; Modirian, Mitra; Khademioureh, Sara; Baghestani, Ahmad Reza; Farzadfar, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    Stomach cancer is the fifth most common cancer and the third leading cause of death among cancers throughout the world. Therefore, stomach cancer outcomes can affect health systems at the national and international levels. Although stomach cancer mortality and incidence rates have decreased in developed countries, these indicators have a raising trend in East Asian developing countries, particularity in Iran. In this study, we aimed to determine the time trend of age-standardized rates of stomach cancer in different districts of Iran from 2000 to 2010. Cases of cancer were registered using a pathology-based system during 2000-2007 and with a population-based system since 2008 in Iran. In this study, we collected information about the incidence of stomach cancer during a 10 year period for 31 provinces and 376 districts, with a total of 49,917 cases. We employed two statistical approaches (a random effects and a random effects Markov model) for modeling the incidence of stomach cancer in different districts of Iran during the studied period. The random effects model showed that the incidence rate of stomach cancer among males and females had an increasing trend and it increased by 2.38 and 0.87 persons every year, respectively. However, after adjusting for previous responses, the random effects Markov model showed an increasing rate of 1.53 and 0.75 for males and females, respectively. This study revealed that there are significant differences between different areas of Iran in terms of age-standardized incidence rates of stomach cancer. Our study suggests that a random effects Markov model can adjust for effects of previous. responses.

  11. Stomach Polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach and duodenum. In: Textbook of Gastrointestinal Radiology. 4th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed July 28, 2015. Odze RD. Polyps of the stomach. ...

  12. Stomach Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... stores swallowed food. It mixes the food with stomach acids. Then it sends the mixture on to the small intestine. Most people have a problem with their stomach at one time or another. Indigestion and heartburn ...

  13. Stomach (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The stomach is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for breaking down food. The lower esophageal sphincter at the top of the stomach regulates food passing from the esophagus into the ...

  14. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    Cancer Treatment Affecting the Central Nervous System (HLMCC 0707) • Melatonin and sleep hygiene for the treatment of insomnia following cancer...Determinants of Diabetes in the Young. (PI: Jeffrey Krischer, Ph.D.) Moffitt Community Clinical Oncology Program Research Base (PI: Jeffrey Krischer

  15. Identification of transporters associated with Etoposide sensitivity of stomach cancer cell lines and methotrexate sensitivity of breast cancer cell lines by quantitative targeted absolute proteomics.

    PubMed

    Obuchi, Wataru; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Uchida, Yasuo; Ohmine, Ken; Yamori, Takao; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2013-02-01

    Membrane transporter proteins may influence the sensitivity of cancer cells to anticancer drugs that can be recognized as substrates. The purpose of this study was to identify proteins that play a key role in the drug sensitivity of stomach and breast cancer cell lines by measuring the absolute protein expression levels of multiple transporters and other membrane proteins and examining their correlation to drug sensitivity. Absolute protein expression levels of 90 membrane proteins were examined by quantitative targeted absolute proteomics using liquid chromatography-linked tandem mass spectrometry. Among them, 11 and 14 membrane proteins, including transporters, were present in quantifiable amounts in membrane fraction of stomach cancer and breast cancer cell lines, respectively. In stomach cancer cell lines, the protein expression level of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) was inversely correlated with etoposide sensitivity. MK571, an MRP inhibitor, increased both the cell-to-medium ratio of etoposide and the etoposide sensitivity of MRP1-expressing stomach cancer cell lines. In breast cancer cell lines, the protein expression level of reduced folate carrier 1 (RFC1) was directly correlated with methotrexate (MTX) sensitivity. Initial uptake rate and steady-state cell-to-medium ratio of [(3)H]MTX were correlated with both RFC1 expression level and MTX sensitivity. These results suggest that MRP1 modulates the etoposide sensitivity of stomach cancer cell lines and RFC1 modulates the MTX sensitivity of breast cancer cell lines. Our results indicate that absolute quantification of multiple membrane proteins could be a useful strategy for identification of candidate proteins involved in drug sensitivity.

  16. Improvements in diagnosis have changed the incidence of histological types in advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Y.; Mori, M.; Kamakura, T.; Haraguchi, Y.; Saku, M.; Sugimachi, K.

    1995-01-01

    The data on 912 patients with early cancer and 1245 with advanced cancer who were seen between 1971 and 1990 were compared. The incidence of undifferentiated-type cancer increased significantly in patients with advanced gastric cancer, but not in patients with early gastric cancer. When the histological types were compared with regard to sex, age and location in patients with early gastric cancer the undifferentiated type was found to increase only in males, while in patients with advanced gastric cancer the undifferentiated type increased in both sexes as well as in younger patients and in both the upper and middle third of the stomach. These differences in the trends between early and advanced cancers are probably due to the different degrees of diagnostic accuracy for the early detection of histological types. PMID:7640228

  17. Indigenous inequities in the presentation and management of stomach cancer in New Zealand: a country with universal health care coverage.

    PubMed

    Signal, Virginia; Sarfati, Diana; Cunningham, Ruth; Gurney, Jason; Koea, Jonathon; Ellison-Loschmann, Lis

    2015-07-01

    Māori in New Zealand have markedly higher incidence and poorer survival from stomach cancer than non-Māori. We investigated the presentation, management and survival of stomach cancer in a cohort of newly diagnosed Māori and non-Māori patients. A clinical notes review of all Māori from the North Island diagnosed between 2006 and 2008, and a random equivalent sample of non-Māori, was conducted (final cohort n = 335). Patient characteristics, tumour characteristics, receipt and timing of treatment and cancer-specific survival were compared. Compared to non-Māori, Māori patients had a younger average age at diagnosis, higher prevalence of congestive heart failure and renal disease, and were more likely to be diagnosed with distal disease (43 % Māori, 26 % non-Māori, p = 0.004). Stage and grade distributions were similar between ethnic groups. Two-thirds (66 %) of stage I-III patients had definitive surgery, with similar rates for Māori (71 %) and non-Māori (68 %). Māori were less likely to have surgery performed by a specialist upper gastrointestinal surgeon (38 % Māori, 79 % non-Māori, p < 0.01) and less likely to be treated in a main centre (44 % Māori, 87 % non-Māori, p < 0.01). After adjusting for age, sex, stage, tumour site and comorbidity, Māori had nonsignificant 27 % poorer survival (hazard ratio 1.27, 95 % CI 0.96-1.68). There was evidence of differential presentation and access to specialised surgical services, as well as differential survival, for Māori stomach cancer patients compared to non-Māori. These findings support the development of the national stomach cancer treatment standards and highlight the need for an equity focus within these guidelines.

  18. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of One-Carbon Metabolism and Cancers of the Esophagus, Stomach, and Liver in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shen-Chih; Chang, Po-Yin; Butler, Brendan; Goldstein, Binh Y.; Mu, Lina; Cai, Lin; You, Nai-Chieh Y.; Baecker, Aileen; Yu, Shun-Zhang; Heber, David; Lu, Qing-Yi; Li, Liming; Greenland, Sander; Zhang, Zuo-Feng

    2014-01-01

    One-carbon metabolism (folate metabolism) is considered important in carcinogenesis because of its involvement in DNA synthesis and biological methylation reactions. We investigated the associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in folate metabolic pathway and the risk of three GI cancers in a population-based case-control study in Taixing City, China, with 218 esophageal cancer cases, 206 stomach cancer cases, 204 liver cancer cases, and 415 healthy population controls. Study participants were interviewed with a standardized questionnaire, and blood samples were collected after the interviews. We genotyped SNPs of the MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, DNMT1, and ALDH2 genes, using PCR-RFLP, SNPlex, or TaqMan assays. To account for multiple comparisons and reduce the chances of false reports, we employed semi-Bayes (SB) shrinkage analysis. After shrinkage and adjusting for potential confounding factors, we found positive associations between MTHFR rs1801133 and stomach cancer (any T versus C/C, SB odds-ratio [SBOR]: 1.79, 95% posterior limits: 1.18, 2.71) and liver cancer (SBOR: 1.51, 95% posterior limits: 0.98, 2.32). There was an inverse association between DNMT1 rs2228612 and esophageal cancer (any G versus A/A, SBOR: 0.60, 95% posterior limits: 0.39, 0.94). In addition, we detected potential heterogeneity across alcohol drinking status for ORs relating MTRR rs1801394 to esophageal (posterior homogeneity P = 0.005) and stomach cancer (posterior homogeneity P = 0.004), and ORs relating MTR rs1805087 to liver cancer (posterior homogeneity P = 0.021). Among non-alcohol drinkers, the variant allele (allele G) of these two SNPs was inversely associated with the risk of these cancers; while a positive association was observed among ever-alcohol drinkers. Our results suggest that genetic polymorphisms related to one-carbon metabolism may be associated with cancers of the esophagus, stomach, and liver. Heterogeneity across alcohol consumption status of the

  19. Incidence of metachronous gastric cancer in the remnant stomach after synchronous multiple cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Isao; Hato, Shinji; Kobatake, Takaya; Ohta, Koji; Kubo, Yoshirou; Nishimura, Rieko; Kurita, Akira

    2014-01-01

    In the preoperative evaluation for gastric cancer, high-resolution endoscopic technologies allow us to detect small accessory lesions. However, it is not known if the gastric remnant after partial gastrectomy for synchronous multiple gastric cancers has a greater risk for metachronous cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of metachronous cancer in this patient subset compared with that after solitary cancer surgery. Data on a consecutive series of 1,281 patients gastrectomized for early gastric cancer from 1991 to 2007 were analyzed retrospectively. The 715 gastric remnants after distal gastrectomy were periodically surveyed by endoscopic examination in Shikoku Cancer Center. Among those surveyed cases, 642 patients were pathologically diagnosed with solitary lesion (SO group) and 73 patients with synchronous multiple lesions (MU group) at the time of the initial surgery. In the follow-up period, 15 patients in the SO group and 3 patients in the MU group were diagnosed as having metachronous cancer in the gastric remnant. The cumulative 4-year incidence rate was 1.9 % in the SO group and 5.5 % in the MU group. The difference did not reach the significant level by the log-rank test. The incidence of metachronous cancer is higher after multiple cancer surgery; however, the difference is not statistically significant.

  20. [A Case of Concurrent Cancer of the Esophagus and Stomach with Severe Sepsis following Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Amatatsu, Masahiko; Okumura, Hiroshi; Uchikado, Yasuto; Megumi, Koichi; Kita, Yoshiaki; Uenosono, Yoshikazu; Arigami, Takaaki; Mori, Shinichiro; Ishigami, Sumiya; Owaki, Tetsuhiro; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2015-10-01

    A 66-year-old man was diagnosed with synchronous early esophageal cancer and advanced gastric cancer. He received CDDP-based combination chemotherapy (docetaxcel, CDDP, and TS-1). During chemotherapy for gastric cancer, he suddenly developed septic shock, requiring intensive treatment with antibiotics, intravenous immunoglobulin, circulatory and respiratory care, and hemoperfusion with a polymyxin B column. He also had disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), complicated by sepsis. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin (rTM) was administered to treat DIC. The intensive treatments described above allowed the patient to recover from septic shock and DIC several days later. Early and adequate treatment could be used to rescue a compromised cancer-bearing patient from septic shock following chemotherapy.

  1. [A Case of Ovarian Cancer with Lymph Node Metastasis in the Lesser Curvature of the Stomach Resected Using Laparoscopic Surgery].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Katsunao; Jeongho, Moon; Hatanaka, Nobutaka; Inoue, Masashi; Miyamoto, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Megumi; Seo, Shingo; Misumi, Toshihiro; Shimizu, Wataru; Irei, Toshimitsu; Suzuki, Takahisa; Onoe, Takashi; Sudo, Takeshi; Shimizu, Yosuke; Hinoi, Takao; Tashiro, Hirotaka

    2016-11-01

    A 67-year-old woman, who was diagnosed with ovarian cancer with multiple metastases, underwent abdominal total hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, para-aortic lymph node dissection(b2), omental subtotal hysterectomy, and lower anterior rectal resection after receiving a combination of PTX plus CBDCA chemotherapy. Macroscopically, complete resection was achieved and histopathological examination of the resectedspecimen showedpoorly differentiatedserous adenocarcinoma. After surgery, additional chemotherapy was administered. However, increasing only lesser curvature of stomach lymph node, we performed laparoscopic lymph node resection as debulking surgery. It is often said that macroscopic complete resection of ovarian cancer improves the prognosis. In particular, we hope that this patient will survive longer with a sustainable quality of life as a result of laparoscopic stomach- andnerve -sparing surgery.

  2. Advanced Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... if it has spread to: • Bones • Lungs • Liver • Brain • Lymph nodes outside the pelvis • Other organs You may be diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer when you are first diagnosed, after having completed ...

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Kluyvera intestini Strain GT-16 Isolated from the Stomach of a Patient with Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tetz, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the novel, non-spore-forming Kluyvera intestini strain GT-16, isolated from the stomach of a patient with gastric cancer. The genome is 5,868,299 bp in length with a G+C content of 53.0%. It possesses 5,350 predicted protein-coding genes encoding virulence factors and antibiotic resistance proteins. PMID:28007864

  4. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Colorectal, Stomach, or Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-21

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  5. A possible association between quality of drinking water and stomach cancer incidence among native and immigrant populations of a selected industrial city.

    PubMed

    Zemła, B

    1980-01-01

    The city Zabrze (Upper Silesian Region, Poland) was divided into districts differing in respect to drinking water stations. Geographic correlation between the stomach cancer incidence in native and immigrant populations and the quality of water used for drinking were investigated. It has been shown that in the districts where water of greater hardness has been used for drinking, the stomach cancer incidence was much lower than in other areas, especially in native male populations.

  6. Intrathoracic stomach mimicking bone metastasis from thyroid cancer in whole-body iodine-131 scan diagnosed by SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, Francisco Javier; la Riva-Pérez, Pablo Antonio de; Calvo-Morón, Cinta; Buján-Lloret, Cristina; Cambil-Molina, Teresa; Castro-Montaño, Juan

    2017-01-01

    The whole-body iodine-131 scintigraphy is an imaging technique in monitoring patients with a history of thyroid cancer. Although the rate of false positives is negligible, it is not nonexistent. We report the case of an intervened and treated patient for thyroid cancer with good clinical and biochemical response. Scintigraphic findings were consistent with unsuspected bone metastasis. Fused SPECT/CT data allowed accurate diagnosis of giant diaphragmatic hernia associated with intrathoracic stomach, a very rare pathology that can lead to false positive results.

  7. [Therapeutic advances in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, B C

    2006-04-01

    The treatment of breast cancer has made significant improvements during the past ten years. For early breast cancer with a clinically negative axilla sentinel node biopsy has become the preferred approach. For endocrine therapy of postmenopausal patients the selective aromatase inhibitors have become standard in metastatic as well as in early breast cancer. Trastuzumab (Herceptin) plays an important role in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer in the metastatic and since 2005 also in the adjuvant setting. When chemotherapy is used to treat metastatic breast cancer drug combinations are superior to monotherapy only in terms of response rates. By contrast, in the adjuvant setting combination drug therapy is the standard. New methods of tissue analysis including expression patterns of mRNA and proteins are promising research strategies to further advance the field.

  8. Plasma Folate, Vitamin B12, and Homocysteine and Cancers of the Esophagus, Stomach, and Liver in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shen-Chih; Goldstein, Binh Y.; Mu, Lina; Cai, Lin; You, Nai-Chieh Y.; He, Na; Ding, Bao-Guo; Zhao, Jin-Kou; Yu, Shun-Zhang; Heber, David; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Lu, Qing-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating regarding a role of micronutrients in folate metabolism in cancer risk. We investigated the associations of plasma folate, vitamin B12, and homocysteine with upper gastrointestinal (GI) cancers in a population-based case-control study in Taixing City, China. With informed consent, we recruited cases with cancers of esophagus (n = 218), stomach (n = 206), and liver (n = 204), and one common healthy control group (n = 405). A standardized epidemiologic questionnaire was used in face-to-face interviews, and blood samples were collected during interviews. We observed an inverse association between plasma folate levels and liver cancer. The adjusted odds ratio (aOR) was 0.46 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.24–0.88] comparing individuals in the highest quartile to those in the lowest. We found a positive association between plasma vitamin B12 levels and all three cancers. The aORs for those in the highest quartile were 2.80 (95% CI = 1.51–5.18) for esophageal cancer, 2.17 (1.21–3.89) for stomach cancer, and 9.97 (4.82–20.60) for liver cancer, comparing to those in the lowest quartile. We further observed interaction between plasma folate and vitamin B12 on these cancers. Our data indicated associations between plasma folate and vitamin B12 with upper GI cancers in Chinese population. Further research is warranted considering the debate over the necessity of food fortification. PMID:25607998

  9. The stomach in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Hunt, R H; Camilleri, M; Crowe, S E; El-Omar, E M; Fox, J G; Kuipers, E J; Malfertheiner, P; McColl, K E L; Pritchard, D M; Rugge, M; Sonnenberg, A; Sugano, K; Tack, J

    2015-10-01

    The stomach is traditionally regarded as a hollow muscular sac that initiates the second phase of digestion. Yet this simple view ignores the fact that it is the most sophisticated endocrine organ with unique physiology, biochemistry, immunology and microbiology. All ingested materials, including our nutrition, have to negotiate this organ first, and as such, the stomach is arguably the most important segment within the GI tract. The unique biological function of gastric acid secretion not only initiates the digestive process but also acts as a first line of defence against food-borne microbes. Normal gastric physiology and morphology may be disrupted by Helicobacter pylori infection, the most common chronic bacterial infection in the world and the aetiological agent for most peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. In this state-of-the-art review, the most relevant new aspects of the stomach in health and disease are addressed. Topics include gastric physiology and the role of gastric dysmotility in dyspepsia and gastroparesis; the stomach in appetite control and obesity; there is an update on the immunology of the stomach and the emerging field of the gastric microbiome. H. pylori-induced gastritis and its associated diseases including peptic ulcers and gastric cancer are addressed together with advances in diagnosis. The conclusions provide a future approach to gastric diseases underpinned by the concept that a healthy stomach is the gateway to a healthy and balanced host. This philosophy should reinforce any public health efforts designed to eradicate major gastric diseases, including stomach cancer. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. [Polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T and the risk of stomach cancer].

    PubMed

    Gao, Changming; Wu, Jianzhong; Ding, Jianhua; Liu, Yanting; Zang, Yu; Li, Suping; Su, Ping; Hu, Xu; Xu, Tianliang; Toshiro, Takezaki; Kazuo, Tajima

    2002-08-01

    In order to study the relation between polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T (MTHFR) and susceptibility of stomach cancer (SC). We conducted a case-control study with 107 cases of SC and 200 population-based controls in Huaian city of Jiangsu province, China. The epidemiological data were collected, and DNA of peripheral blood leukocytes was obtained from all of the subjects. MTHFR genotypes were detected by PCR-RFLP method. (1) The frequency of MTHFR variant genotypes (C/T + T/T) among the cases (79.4%) was significantly higher than the controls (68.5%) (P = 0.041 6); the crude OR for SC was 1.78 (95% CI: 0.99 - 3.22). After adjustment for sex and age, the OR for SC was 1.89 (95% CI: 1.08 - 3.32). (2) Subjects who had MTHFR variant genotypes and having smoking habit were at a significantly higher risk of developing SC (OR = 7.72, 95% CI: 2.23 - 26.79) compared with those who had wild-type homozygotes (C/C) genotype and no smoking habit. Individuals who had variant genotypes and who had habit of frequent alcohol drinking were at an increased risk of developing SC (OR = 3.08, 95% CI: 1.30 - 7.23) compared with those with C/C genotype and low consumption of alcohol. As compared with subjects with C/C genotype and low consumption of alcohol and no smoking habit, individuals who had variant genotypes and who had habits of frequent alcohol drinking and smoking had 12.96 (95% CI: 2.76 - 70.46) folds risk developing SC. These results in the present study suggested that the polymorphisms of MTHFR C677T was associated with risk of developing SC, and there was a coordinated effect between MTHFR genotypes and habits of smoking and alcohol drinking in the development of SC.

  11. Advances in cancer immunology and cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Voena, Claudia; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    After decades of setbacks, cancer immunology is living its Golden Age. Recent advances in cancer immunology have provided new therapeutic approaches to treat cancer. The objective clinical response observed in patients treated with antibodies that block the immune checkpoints, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell-death protein 1 (PD-1)/programmed cell-death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathways, has led to their FDA approval for the treatment of melanoma in 2011 and in 2014, respectively. The anti-PD-1 antibody nivolumab has received the FDA-approval in March 2015 for squamous lung cancer treatment. In addition, antibodies targeting PD-1 or PD-L1 have demonstrated their efficacy and safety in additional tumors, including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), renal cell carcinoma (RCC), bladder cancer, and Hodgkin's lymphoma. Almost at the same time, the field of adoptive cell transfer has exploded. The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T technology has provided strong evidence of efficacy in the treatment of B cell malignancies, and different T cell based treatments are currently under investigation for different types of tumors. In this review we will discuss the latest advances in cancer immunology and immunotherapy as well as new treatments now under development in the clinic and potential strategies that have shown promising results in preclinical models.

  12. Recent Advances in Management of Laryngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Laryngeal cancers account for approximately 1.5% (1~2%) of the total cancers in Korea, and 30% of all head and neck cancers, not including thyroid cancer. Early laryngeal cancer is treated by operation, including transoral laser excision or radiotherapy. Advanced laryngeal cancer has been treated with mutilating operations, such as a total laryngectomy. However, a laryngeal preserving approach, which can improve the quality of life, has recently been tried with advanced laryngeal cancer. PMID:20396561

  13. [Radiotherapy in cancers of the oesophagus, the gastric cardia and the stomach].

    PubMed

    Créhange, G; Huguet, F; Quero, L; N'Guyen, T V; Mirabel, X; Lacornerie, T

    2016-09-01

    Localized oesophageal and gastric cancers have a poor prognosis. In oesophageal cancer, external radiotherapy combined with concomitant chemotherapy is accepted as part of the therapeutic armamentarium in a curative intent in the preoperative setting for resectable tumours; or without surgery in inoperable patients or non-resectable tumours due to wide local and/or regional extension. Data from the literature show conflicting results with no clinical evidence in favour of either a unique dose protocol or consensual target volume definition in the setting of exclusive chemoradiation. In the preoperative setting, chemoradiotherapy has become the standard in oesophageal cancer, even though there is no evidence that surgery may be beneficial in locally advanced tumours that respond to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The main cause of failure after exclusive chemoradiotherapy in oesophageal cancer is locoregional relapse suggesting that doses and volumes usually considered may be inadequate. In gastric cancer, radiotherapy may be indicated postoperatively in patients with resected tumours that include less than D2 lymph node dissection or in the absence of perioperative chemotherapy. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in gastric cancers is still under investigation. The evolving techniques of external radiotherapy, such as image-guided radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arctherapy (VMAT) have reduced the volume of lung and heart exposed to radiation, which seems to have diminished radiotherapy-related morbi-mortality rates. Given this, quality assurance for radiotherapy and protocols for radiotherapy delivery must be better standardized. This article on the indications for radiotherapy and the techniques used in oesophageal and gastric cancers is included in a special issue dedicated to national recommendations from the French society of radiation oncology (SFRO) on radiotherapy indications, planning, dose prescription, and techniques of radiotherapy delivery

  14. Role of age and tumour stage in the temporal pattern of 'cure' from stomach cancer: a population-based study in Osaka, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yuri; Nakayama, Tomio; Tsukuma, Hideaki; Miyashiro, Isao; Ioka, Akiko; Sugimoto, Tomoyuki; Rachet, Bernard

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate progress in stomach cancer care in Japan since 1975. Population-based study of data extracted from the Osaka Cancer Registry. Population-based cancer registry in the area of Osaka Prefecture. All 66,032 cases diagnosed with a stomach cancer in Osaka Prefecture, Japan between 1975 and 2000 and registered in the Osaka Cancer Registry. 'Cure' fraction and median survival time for 'uncured' patients were estimated with multivariable mixture 'cure' model. The role played by age and stage at diagnosis on the changes in 'cure' parameters between 1975 and 2000 was evaluated. Missing stage was handled by multiple imputation approach. More than 50% of the patients diagnosed with a stomach cancer in 1996-2000 were estimated 'cured' from their cancer, corresponding to a 20% increase since 1975-1980. Median survival time for 'uncured' patients however remained unchanged at about 8 months. 'Cure' fraction was over 85% for localised tumours and 30% for regional tumours, but stayed as low as 2.5% for distant metastatic cancers. Improvement was underestimated by about 10% because of ageing of cancer patients. Changes in stage distribution explained up to 40% of the increase in 'cure' fraction among men and up to 13% in women. Overdiagnosis was unlikely to play any role in these patterns. 'Cure' fraction from stomach cancer dramatically increased in Osaka, Japan since 1975, partly because of earlier stage at diagnosis, but mostly due to improvement in treatment of stomach cancer patients. This study, based on a leading country in term of stomach cancer management, provides insightful results for other countries in which 'cure' fraction is usually much lower. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Associations between stomach cancer incidence and drinking water contamination with atrazine and nitrate in Ontario (Canada) agroecosystems, 1987-1991.

    PubMed

    Van Leeuwen, J A; Waltner-Toews, D; Abernathy, T; Smit, B; Shoukri, M

    1999-10-01

    Nitrate and atrazine are two chemicals that are heavily used in certain sectors of agriculture. They are suspected to be associated with the development of certain types of tumours. Existing data were obtained on the incidence of specific types of cancers, contamination of drinking water with atrazine and nitrate, and related agricultural practices for the 40 ecodistricts in the province of Ontario. The data were merged into a georelational database for geographical and statistical analyses. Weighted (by population size) least squares regression analyses were conducted while controlling for confounding socioeconomic and lifestyle factors. Maximum likelihood spatial error models were estimated when least square regression error terms were found to be spatially autocorrelated using the Moran's I statistic. Atrazine contamination levels (range 50-649 ng/l, maximum acceptable concentration [MAC] = 60000 ng/l) were positively associated (P < 0.05) with stomach cancer incidence and negatively associated with colon cancer incidence. Nitrate levels, (range 0-91 mg/l, MAC = 10 mg/l) were negatively associated with stomach cancer incidence. The associations found at the ecodistrict level, both positive and negative, if confirmed by other studies, raise serious questions about maximum allowable limits for atrazine, as well as possibilities of complex trade-offs among disease outcomes, and interactions of biophysical and social mechanisms which might explain them. Although the negative associations appear to have no direct biological explanations, such counter-intuitive outcomes may occur in complex systems where social and biological variables interact.

  16. [Study of 5'-DFUR treatment as postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy for stomach and colorectal cancer. Tokai GATS Group (pilot study)].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, A; Maeda, A; Hachisuka, K; Yura, J; Honda, K; Honda, H; Yoshizaki, S; Tsuruga, N; Nakazato, H

    1994-04-01

    In order to study preliminary the safety of 5'-DFUR treatment as postoperative adjuvant therapy, intermittent and continuous treatment regimens were administered to patients undergoing curative resection of carcinomas of the stomach and the colorectum. Two treatment schedules were employed: 5'-DFUR was either given continuously in a daily oral dose of 600 mg/patient (continuous group) or for 2 weeks in a daily oral dose of 1,200 mg/patient followed by 2 weeks of no treatment (intermittent group). Twenty-one stomach cancer patients and 34 colorectal cancer patients were registered in the study. The rates of adverse drug reactions in the patients who completed treatment were 20.0% (2/10) in the continuous group and 50.0% (4/8) in the intermittent group of gastric cancer patients, and 16.6% (2/12) in the continuous group and 17.6% (3/17) in the intermittent group of colorectal cancer patients. The main adverse drug reactions were gastrointestinal symptoms. The incidence of diarrhea, a problematic side effect of 5'-DFUR, was 4.5% (1/22) in the continuous group and 12.0% (3/25) in the intermittent group. There were no statistically significant differences between the continuous group and the intermittent group in regard to the incidence of adverse drug reactions and survival rate. In addition, as there were no serious adverse drug reactions, both treatment regimens were demonstrated to be highly safe when administered as postoperative adjuvant therapy.

  17. Intervening factors for the initiation of treatment of patients with stomach and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Valle, Thaína Dalla; Turrini, Ruth Natalia Teresa; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito

    2017-05-15

    to identify the time between symptoms, the request for care and the beginning of treatment in patients with stomach and colorectal cancer as well as the factors that interfere in these processes. correlational descriptive study, including 101 patients diagnosed with stomach or colorectal cancer, treated in a hospital specialized in oncology. the 101 patients investigated there was predominance of males, mean age of 61.7 years. The search for medical care occurred within 30 days after the onset of symptoms, in most cases. The mean total time between the onset of symptoms and the beginning of treatment ranged from 15 to 16 months, and the mean time between the search for medical care and the diagnosis was 4.78 months. The family history of cancer (p=0.008) and the implementation of preventive follow-up (p<0.001) were associated with shorter periods between the search for care and the beginning of treatment. Nausea, vomiting, hematochezia, weight loss and pain were associated with faster demand for care. the longer interval between the search for medical care and the diagnosis was possibly due to the non-association between the presented symptoms and the disease. identificar o tempo entre os sintomas, a busca por assistência e o início do tratamento em pacientes com câncer de estômago e colorretal e os fatores que interferem nesses processos. estudo descritivo correlacional, incluindo 101 pacientes com diagnóstico de câncer de estômago ou colorretal, atendidos por um hospital especializado em oncologia. dos 101 pacientes investigados, houve predomínio do sexo masculino, média de idade de 61,7 anos. A busca por assistência médica ocorreu em até 30 dias após o início dos sintomas, na maioria dos casos. O tempo médio total entre o aparecimento dos sintomas e o início do tratamento foi de 15,16 meses, sendo que, o tempo médio entre a busca por assistência médica e o diagnóstico foi de 4,78 meses. O histórico familiar de câncer (p=0,008) e a realiza

  18. [Effect of erythromycin on electrical activity and gastric emptying of the intrathoracic stomach after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-feng; Liu, Cheng-jun; Shi, Zhi-hua; Liu, Xin-bo; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Fu-shun; Cao, Fu-min; Li, Bao-qing

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the effect of erythromycin on electrical activity and emptying of the intrathoracic stomach after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer. Thirty patients undergoing esophagectomy for cancer and esophagogastrostomy above the aortic arch were divided into the study group (n=15) and the control group (n=15). Electrogastrography and radionuclide gastric emptying were examined for these patients before and 1, 3, 6, 12 months after surgery. Patients in the study group received erythromycin (0.25 g tid po) for 1 week before examination. The wave amplitude (Uv), dominant frequency (CPM) and percentage of normal slow wave (%) of electrogastrogram decreased after surgery and returned to normal at the first postoperative month in the study group and the 12th postoperative month in the control group (P>0.05). Gastric emptying was significantly delayed after esophagectomy, and returned to normal one year after operation in the study group (P>0.05). However, gastric emptying remained abnormal in the control group (P<0.01). Erythromycin improves electrical activity and emptying of the stomach after esophagectomy for cancer. Gastric emptying recovery later than the recovery of electrical activity, which may be related to gastric ischemia and edema.

  19. BREAST CANCER METASTASIS IN THE STOMACH: WHEN THE GASTRECTOMY IS INDICATED ?

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marcus Vinicius Rozo; Tercioti-Junior, Valdir; Lopes, Luiz Roberto; Coelho-Neto, João de Souza; Andreollo, Nelson Adami

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant neoplasm in the female population. However, stomach is a rare site for metastasis, and can show up many years after initial diagnosis and treatment of the primary tumor. Analyze a case series of this tumor and propose measures that can diagnose it with more precocity. Were analyzed 12 patients with secondary gastric tumors. Immunohistochemistry has demonstrated that primary tumor was breast cancer. We retrieved information of age, histological type, interval between diagnosis of the primary breast cancer and its metastases, immunohistochemistry results, treatment and survival. The mean age was 71.3 years (ranging 40-86). Ten cases had already been underwent mastectomy in the moment of the diagnosis of gastric metastasis. Two patients had diagnosis of both primary and secondary tumors concomitantly. At average, diagnosis of gastric metastasis was seven years after diagnosis of primary breast cancer (ranging 0-13). Besides, nine cases had also metastases in other organs, being bones the most affected ones. Immunohistochemistry of the metastases has shown positivity for CK7 antibody in 83.34%, estrogen receptor in 91.67%, progesterone receptor in 66.67% and AE1AE3 antibody in 75%, considering all 12 cases. Moreover, CK20 was absent significantly (66.67%). The positivity of BRST2 marker did not present statistical significance (41.67%). Eight cases were treated with chemotherapy associated or not with hormonal blockade. Surgical treatment of gastric metastasis was performed in four cases: three of them with total gastrectomy and one with distal gastrectomy. Follow-up has shown a mean survival of 14.58 months after diagnosis of metastasis, with only two patients still alive. Patients with a history of breast cancer presenting endoscopic diagnosis of gastric cancer it is necessary to consider the possibility of gastric metastasis of breast cancer. The confirmation is by immunohistochemistry and gastrectomy should be oriented in

  20. Cancer risks among iron and steel workers in Anshan, China, Part II: Case-control studies of lung and stomach cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Brown, L M; Pan, G W; Liu, T F; Gao, G S; Stone, B J; Cao, R M; Guan, D X; Sheng, J H; Yan, Z S; Dosemeci, M; Fraumeni, J F; Blot, W J

    1996-07-01

    Nested case-control interview studies of lung cancer (610 incident cases), stomach cancer (292 incident cases), and 959 controls were conducted to follow up leads from a proportional mortality analysis of deaths among male workers in a large integrated iron-steel complex in Anshan, China. For lung cancer, after adjusting for the significant non-occupational risk factors (smoking, other pulmonary disease, family history of lung cancer, and low consumption of fruit or tea), risks were significantly elevated for those employed for 15 or more years in smelting and rolling (OR = 1.5, CI = 1.1-2.2), in the fire-resistant brick factory (OR = 2.9, CI = 1.4-5.9), in general loading (OR = 2.5, CI = 1.0-6.1), and as coke oven workers (OR = 3.4; CI = 1.4-8.5). For stomach cancer, after adjusting for consumption of pickled vegetables, prior gastric diseases, family history of stomach cancer, low intake of fruits and vegetables, and education, risks were significantly elevated for those employed for 15 or more years in ore sintering and transportation (OR = 2.1, CI = 1.0-4.4), in the fire-resistant brick factory (OR = 2.5, CI = 1.1-5.8), in general loading (OR = 3.2, CI = 1.2-8.9), as boilerworkers and cooks (OR = 2.6, CI = 1.2-5.6), and as coke oven workers (OR = 5.4, CI = 1.8-16.0). For both lung and stomach cancers, significant dose-response gradients were observed for exposure to total dust and benzo(a)pyrene, but not for specific chemical components of dust. Overall, long-term steel workers with exposure to workplace pollutants had a 40% increased risk of both lung and stomach cancers. These case-control studies confirm many of the occupational findings reported in the proportionate mortality analysis, and suggest avenues for further work to evaluate the carcinogenicity of individual components of dust.

  1. Stomach ulcer

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... are absorbed in the small intestine. It produces acid and various enzymes that break down food into ... wall of the stomach is protected from the acid and enzymes by a mucous lining. Ulcers are ...

  2. Determinants of plasma pepsinogen levels in a population at high risk for stomach cancer in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Kato, I; Miki, K; Muñoz, N; Vivas, J H; Lopez, G; Peraza, S; Carillo, E; Castro, D; Andrade, O; Sanchez, V

    1995-09-04

    Determinants of plasma pepsinogens (PG) levels were studied in 1365 participants in a chemoprevention trial for gastric pre-cancerous lesions being conducted in Venezuela. Gastric biopsies, plasma samples and information on smoking and dietary habits were obtained at baseline examination. Both PG-I and PG-II levels increased progressively with the level of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric biopsies, resulting in no clear trend in the I/II ratio. Instead, there was a progressive decrease in the I/II ratio with increasing degrees of infiltration of polynuclear cells and monocytes, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia and the stage of pre-cancerous lesions. The mean I/II ratios for atrophic gastritis or more advanced lesions were less than 4.0. When subjects with the I/II ratio 4 or higher were used as controls, severe reduction in the I/II ratio (< 2.0) was inversely associated with tobacco consumption. This may be due to a pharmacological effect of nicotine. The severe reduction of I/II ratio was also inversely associated with fresh fruit consumption. In addition, a decreased I/II ratio was positively associated with rice/pasta and arepas (tortilla made from corn) consumption and inversely associated with plantain consumption. Possible effects of vitamins and starchy food on the development of atrophic gastritis need to be studied further.

  3. Importance of maintaining left gastric arterial flow at Appleby operation preserving whole stomach for central pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Akifumi; Yamamoto, Junji; Aosasa, Suefumi; Hatsuse, Kazuo; Nishikawa, Makoto; Nishiyama, Kiyoshi; Tsujimoto, Hironori; Moriya, Tomoyuki; Hase, Kazuo; Shinmoto, Hiroshi; Kaji, Tatsumi

    2012-01-01

    The safety of whole stomach-preserving Appleby operation with resection of the left gastric artery (LGA) for pancreatic cancer cannot be assured. The anatomy of the celiac axis (CA) with special regard to the position of the origin of the LGA was examined. Using 3D images of the vascular architecture reconstructed from volume data of helical CT, the length of the CA and the position of the origin of the LGA from the CA were measured in 53 patients. Among 53 patients, 47 patients (89%) had classical anatomy of the CA branches. The mean length(2 standard deviation) of the CA and the distance from the root of the LGA to the bifurcation of the CA were 25.2mm (-4.9) (range 14.6-36.5) and 10.3mm (+4.5)(range 2.4-21.9), respectively. In 23 (45%) cases, the LGA arose farther than 10mm away from the bifurcation of the CA. Among six patients with anatomical variation of the arteries, two (4%) had the LGA directly arising from the aorta. Conservation of the LGA at modified Appleby operation would give complete cancer removal by en bloc resection of the nerve plexus, without risk of ischemic complications of the stomach and liver.

  4. Efficacy of Helicobacter pylori eradication on the chronic mucosal inflammation of the remnant stomach after distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Onoda, N; Katsuragi, K; Sawada, T; Maeda, K; Mino, A; Ohira, M; Ishikawa, T; Wakasa, K; Hirakawa, K

    2005-12-01

    Although eradication of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) after early gastric carcinoma has been recommended, very limited studies have been reported and the method differs from standard therapy. Here, we attempted the eradication of Hp in the remnant stomach after surgery for primary gastric cancer with the standardized method. We examined efficacy and the safeness of the treatment. Thirty-three H. pylori-positive patients after distal gastrectomy were treated with proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-based triple therapies. After eradication, endoscopic and histological changes were classified on the basis of the Updated Sydney System. The eradication rate in the remnant stomach was 90.9% (30 out of 33 cases) after triple therapy. Temporal minor side effects were notified in 3 cases. After eradication, the remnant stomach showed significant decreases in inflammation- and activity-scores. Moreover, significant improvement in glandular atrophy to normal mucosa was found. In conclusion, PPI-based standard therapy is just as effective for Hp eradication in the remnant stomach than it is in the non-operative stomach. Eradication therapy could be performed safely and resulted in a significant improvement in inflammation and atrophy of the mucosal layer in the remnant stomach after early gastric cancer surgery.

  5. Epstein-Barr virus BARF1-induced NFκB/miR-146a/SMAD4 alterations in stomach cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Chan Jin; Middeldorp, Jaap M.; Martinez, Olivia M.; Byeon, Sun-ju; Rha, Sun Young; Kim, Sung Han; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded BamHI-A rightward frame 1 (BARF1) is a putative viral oncogene in EBV-infected stomach cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate BARF1-induced cellular protein and microRNA alterations. In this study, BARF1-expressing stomach cancer cells showed a high rate of proliferation, high levels of NFκB, and miR-146a upregulation, which was reversed by NFκB knockdown. During BARF1-induced NFκB upregulation, hCSF1 receptor level was unchanged. Knockdown of BARF1 in the naturally EBV-infected YCCEL1 stomach cancer cells suppressed cell proliferation, and downregulated NFκB and miR-146a. SMAD4 was identified as a miR-146a target and was downregulated in BARF1-expressing cells, whereas SMAD4 expression was restored by anti-miR-146a. Knockdown of BARF1 in YCCEL1 cells upregulated SMAD4, and this effect was reversed by miR-146a overexpression. Transfection of BARF1-expressing cells with pCEP4-SMAD4 abolished the cell proliferating effect of BARF1. In stomach cancer tissues, miR-146a was expressed at higher levels, and more frequent NFκB nuclear positivity immunohistochemically, but not of SMAD4 nuclear loss was found in the EBV-positive group compared with the EBV-negative group. In conclusion, EBV-encoded BARF1 promotes cell proliferation in stomach cancer by upregulating NFκB and miR-146a and downregulating SMAD4, thereby contributing to EBV-induced stomach cancer progression. PMID:27438138

  6. Advancing Public Health in Cancer - Annual Plan

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer is the leading cause of death from disease among Americans under 85. Learn how NCI advances public health by conducting research to improve the delivery of quality cancer prevention, screening, and treatment to all Americans.

  7. Genetically Engineered Immunotherapy for Advanced Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, doctors will collect T lymphocytes from patients with advanced mesothelin-expressing cancer and genetically engineer them to recognize mesothelin. The gene-engineered cells will be multiplied and infused into the patient to fight the cancer

  8. Influence of transposed stomach on cardiac function in patients with resected esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Coral, R P; Constant-Neto, M; Silva, I S; Barros, S; Jawetz, J

    2004-01-01

    Although the use of the posterior mediastinum and the stomach as a reconstruction option after esophagectomy has wide acceptance, there are concerns about the potential cardiac impairment it could cause. We prospectively studied 27 patients regarding the function and the systolic diameter, diastolic diameter, shortening fraction, ejection fraction and the presence of extrinsic compression. The patients were studied preoperatively and between the 45th and 60th postoperative days. The parameters were still within normal clinical ranges. We concluded that this type of reconstruction does not harm the patients in terms of their cardiac function.

  9. Common symptoms in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Lagman, Ruth L; Davis, Mellar P; LeGrand, Susan B; Walsh, Declan

    2005-04-01

    The key points of this article are anorexia and cachexia are: A major cause of cancer deaths. Several drugs are available to treat anorexia and cachexia. Dyspnea in cancer usually is caused by several factors. Treatment consists of reversing underlying causes, empiric bronchodilators, cortico-steroids--and in the terminally ill patients-opioids, benzodiazepines,and chlorpromazine. Delirium is associated with advanced cancer. Empiric treatment with neuroleptics while evaluating for reversible causes is a reasonable approach to management. Nausea and vomiting are caused by extra-abdominal factors (drugs,electrolyte abnormalities, central nervous system metastases) or intra-abdominal factors (gastroparesis, ileus, gastric outlet obstruction, bowel obstruction). The pattern of nausea and vomiting differs depending upon whether the cause is extra- or intra-abdominal. Reversible causes should be sought and empiric metoclopramide or haloperidol should be initiated. Fatigue may be caused by anemia, depression, endocrine abnormalities,or electrolyte disturbances that should be treated before using empiric methylphenidate. Constipation should be treated with laxatives and stool softeners. Both should start with the first opioid dose.

  10. Exposure to nitrosamines, carbon black, asbestos, and talc and mortality from stomach, lung, and laryngeal cancer in a cohort of rubber workers.

    PubMed

    Straif, K; Keil, U; Taeger, D; Holthenrich, D; Sun, Y; Bungers, M; Weiland, S K

    2000-08-15

    There is sufficient evidence for an excess occurrence of stomach and lung cancer among rubber workers. However, evidence for causal associations with specific exposures is still limited. A cohort of 8,933 male German rubber workers was followed for mortality from January 1, 1981 through December 31, 1991. Work histories were reconstructed using routinely documented cost center codes. For each cost center code, calendar time-and plant-specific levels of exposure to nitrosamines, asbestos, talc (low, medium (m), and high (h)), and carbon black (two levels) were estimated by industrial hygienists. Rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models, with the lowest exposure level used as the reference category. Exposure was lagged 10 years to account for latency. Exposure-response relations between exposure to asbestos and lung cancer mortality (RRm = 1.3, 95% CI: 0.9, 1.9; RRh = 2.0, 95% CI: 0.9, 4.1) and between exposure to dust (talc and asbestos combined) and stomach cancer mortality (RRm = 1.8, 95% CI: 0.9, 3.8; RRh = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.0, 7.1) were observed. Exposure to nitrosamines was not associated with mortality from stomach or lung cancer. These results suggest that the increased mortality from lung and stomach cancer among rubber workers is associated with exposure to asbestos and dust, respectively.

  11. Cross-talk between EPAS-1/HIF-2α and PXR signaling pathway regulates multi-drug resistance of stomach cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiuda; Bai, Zhenzhong; Feng, Fan; Song, Erlin; Du, Feng; Zhao, Junhui; Shen, Guoshuang; Ji, Faxiang; Li, Guoyuan; Ma, Xinfu; Hang, Xingyi; Xu, Binghe

    2016-03-01

    EPAS-1/HIF-2α (Endothelial PAS domain-containing protein 1/hypoxia-inducible transcription factors 2α) is a transcription factor expressed in a wide range of human cancers, including stomach cancer. Although EPAS-1 has been studied for years, its function in oncogenic transformation processes needs to be further investigated. In this study, we found that EPAS-1 would promote the growth of stomach cancer cell line BGC-823. Our results revealed that EPAS-1 interacts with Pregnane X Receptor (PXR), a nuclear receptor that regulates multiple genes' transcription involved in multi-drugs resistance (MDR) process. Protein-protein interaction between EPAS-1 and PXR was identified by co-immunoprecipitation and GST-pull down assays. By this interaction, EPAS-1 recruited PXR to its response elements in promoter/enhancer regions of CYP3A4, a PXR target gene. Over-expression of EPAS-1 increased the expression of PXR responsive genes, enhanced the proliferation of BGC-823 cells and boosted the resistance of BGC-823 cells against the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs, e.g. Mitomycin C and Paclitaxel. Reduction of EPAS-1 level via its siRNA disrupted the proliferation, and enhanced the susceptibility of BGC-823 cells to those chemotherapeutic drugs. Our findings suggested that EPAS-1 and PXR may cooperatively participate in development and especially MDR process of stomach cancer. These findings may contribute to more effective targeted drugs discovery for the stomach cancer therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Novel Endoscopic Technique to Diagnose Gastric Cancer in Excluded Stomach after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rashmi; Pitea, Teodor C

    2017-01-01

    Access to the bypassed portion of the stomach after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass remains a challenge. We present a case of 64-year-old woman who presented with gastric outlet obstruction. We used a novel endoscopic technique to access the bypassed stomach by creating a jejunogastrostomy using a specialized stent, which allowed the insertion of a pediatric gastroscope to examine the bypassed portion of the stomach. Stomach biopsies revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with signet cell features.

  13. A Novel Endoscopic Technique to Diagnose Gastric Cancer in Excluded Stomach after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Pitea, Teodor C.

    2017-01-01

    Access to the bypassed portion of the stomach after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass remains a challenge. We present a case of 64-year-old woman who presented with gastric outlet obstruction. We used a novel endoscopic technique to access the bypassed stomach by creating a jejunogastrostomy using a specialized stent, which allowed the insertion of a pediatric gastroscope to examine the bypassed portion of the stomach. Stomach biopsies revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with signet cell features. PMID:28331875

  14. Pemetrexed in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Louvet, Christophe; de Gramont, Aimery

    2004-11-01

    Pemetrexed (Alimta) shows single-agent activity in advanced colorectal cancer. In two phase II studies in which patients received pemetrexed at 600 mg/m2 or 500 mg/m2 as first-line treatment for metastatic disease, objective response rates were 15.4% and 17.2%. These trials were conducted prior to supplementation with folic acid and vitamin B12, which markedly decreased the frequency of hematologic toxicities of pemetrexed; routine supplementation is now included in all clinical trials of the agent. The marked improvement in toxicity and tolerance with vitamin supplementation suggests the need to reexamine optimal dosing in pemetrexed combination schedules. In a National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project phase II trial in 54 patients with previously untreated advanced colorectal cancer, pemetrexed at 500 mg/m2 plus oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) at 120 mg/m2 every 21 days with folic acid/vitamin B12 supplementation resulted in an objective response of 23%. Three additionalpatients (5.6%) had unconfirmed partial response (partial response at one visit), and 27 patients (50%) had stable disease. Median progression-free survival was 5.3 months and median duration of response was 5.7 months; median overall survival was approximately 11.05 months. Grade 3/4 neutropenia was observed in only 17% of patients and treatment was well tolerated. A phase I/II study is under way to identify and assess the optimal combination of pemetrexed/irinotecan in second-line treatment of advanced colorectal cancer. Planned studies include a phase I study examining the combination of pemetrexed and oxaliplatin given every 2 weeks as first-line treatment, and a phase I/II trial to identify the optimal pemetrexed/ oxaliplatin dose in a 21-day schedule and to compare pemetrexed/ oxaliplatin with FOLFOX4 in first-line treatment of metastatic disease. All of these trials include vitamin supplementation. A phase III trial comparing the every-3-week pemetrexed/oxaliplatin regimen with FOLFOX4 as

  15. Associations of Genetic Variants in the PSCA, MUC1 and PLCE1 Genes with Stomach Cancer Susceptibility in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongwei; Wu, Xiaoli; Wu, Fang; Li, Ying; Yu, Zhengping; Chen, Xiangrong; Chen, Yunzhi; Yang, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    Background Several genetic variants including PSCA rs2294008 C>T and rs2976392 G>A, MUC1 rs4072037 T>C, and PLCE1 rs2274223 A>G have shown significant association with stomach cancer risk in the previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs). Methods To evaluate associations of these SNPs in the Han Chinese, an independent hospital based case-control study was performed by genotyping these four polymorphisms in a total of 692 stomach cancer cases and 774 healthy controls acquired by using frequency matching for age and gender. False-positive report probability (FPRP) analysis was also performed to validate all statistically significant findings. Results In the current study, significant association with stomach cancer susceptibility was observed for all the four polymorphisms of interest. Specifically, a significant increased stomach cancer risk was associated with PSCA rs2294008 (CT vs. CC: adjusted OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.07–1.74, and CT/TT vs.CC: adjusted OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.03–1.63), PSCA rs2976392 (AG vs. GG: adjusted OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.02–1.65, and AG/AA vs. GG: adjusted OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.00–1.59), or PLCE1 rs2274223 (AG vs. AA: adjusted OR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.15–1.90, and AG/GG vs. AA: adjusted OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.14–1.84), respectively. In contrast, MUC1 rs4072037 was shown to decrease the cancer risk (CT vs. TT: adjusted OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.60–0.98). Patients with more than one risk genotypes had significant increased risk to develop stomach cancer (adjusted OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.03–1.64), when compared with those having 0–1 risk genotypes. Stratified analysis indicated that the increased risk was more pronounced in younger subjects, men, ever smokers, smokers with pack years ≤ 27, patients with high BMI, or non-cardia stomach cancer. Conclusions This study substantiated the associations between four previous reported genetic variants and stomach cancer susceptibility in an independent Han Chinese population. Further studies

  16. Associations of genetic variants in the PSCA, MUC1 and PLCE1 genes with stomach cancer susceptibility in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongwei; Wu, Xiaoli; Wu, Fang; Li, Ying; Yu, Zhengping; Chen, Xiangrong; Chen, Yunzhi; Yang, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    Several genetic variants including PSCA rs2294008 C>T and rs2976392 G>A, MUC1 rs4072037 T>C, and PLCE1 rs2274223 A>G have shown significant association with stomach cancer risk in the previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs). To evaluate associations of these SNPs in the Han Chinese, an independent hospital based case-control study was performed by genotyping these four polymorphisms in a total of 692 stomach cancer cases and 774 healthy controls acquired by using frequency matching for age and gender. False-positive report probability (FPRP) analysis was also performed to validate all statistically significant findings. In the current study, significant association with stomach cancer susceptibility was observed for all the four polymorphisms of interest. Specifically, a significant increased stomach cancer risk was associated with PSCA rs2294008 (CT vs. CC: adjusted OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.07-1.74, and CT/TT vs.CC: adjusted OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.03-1.63), PSCA rs2976392 (AG vs. GG: adjusted OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.02-1.65, and AG/AA vs. GG: adjusted OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.00-1.59), or PLCE1 rs2274223 (AG vs. AA: adjusted OR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.15-1.90, and AG/GG vs. AA: adjusted OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.14-1.84), respectively. In contrast, MUC1 rs4072037 was shown to decrease the cancer risk (CT vs. TT: adjusted OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.60-0.98). Patients with more than one risk genotypes had significant increased risk to develop stomach cancer (adjusted OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.03-1.64), when compared with those having 0-1 risk genotypes. Stratified analysis indicated that the increased risk was more pronounced in younger subjects, men, ever smokers, smokers with pack years ≤ 27, patients with high BMI, or non-cardia stomach cancer. This study substantiated the associations between four previous reported genetic variants and stomach cancer susceptibility in an independent Han Chinese population. Further studies with larger sample size and different ethnicities are

  17. Rare Helicobacter pylori infection as a factor for the very low stomach cancer incidence in Yogyakarta, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Shinkan; Soeripto; Triningsih, F X Ediati; Ananta, Indrawati; Suzuki, Sadao; Kuriki, Kiyonori; Akasaka, Susumu; Kosaka, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Hideki; Azuma, Takeshi; Moore, Malcolm A

    2005-02-28

    To elucidate factors associated with the very low risk of gastric neoplasia in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, approximately 1/50 of the level in Japan, we recruited 52 male and 39 female participants from the general populace in the city of Yogyakarta in October 2003. Helicobacter pylori IgG antibodies were found in only 5% (0-13) (95% confidence interval) and 4% (0-9) for Javanese males and females, respectively, and were statistically lower than the 62% (58-65) and 57% (53-60), respectively, in Japanese. Furthermore, positive findings of pepsinogen test were only 0 and 2% (0-6) for males and females, in Yogyakarta, and were again significantly lower than the 23% (22-25) and 22% (20-23), in Japan. The very low incidence of stomach cancer in Yogyakarta may be due to a low prevalence of H. pylori infection and chronic atrophic gastritis.

  18. Aminoglutethimide in advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ceci, G; Passalacqua, R; Bisagni, G; Bella, M; Cocconi, G

    1985-10-31

    From July 1980 to June 1983, 61 postmenopausal women with progressive metastatic breast cancer were treated with aminoglutethimide, 250 mg 4 times daily, plus cortisone acetate, 25 mg twice daily. Of 51 evaluable patients, an objective remission was observed in 22 (43%) (partial remission in 19, complete in 3), stable disease in 14 (27%), and progressive disease in 15 (30%). The median duration of response was 60 weeks (range 12+; 94+). The response rate was higher when the dominant disease site was soft tissue (50%) or bone (56%) rather than viscera (29%). Side effects were common but usually slight and transient. Somnolence (69%), dizziness (41%), nausea (35%) and skin rash (27%) were the most frequent. Serum levels of gamma-GT, alkaline phosphatase and total cholesterol rose during aminoglutethimide treatment, whereas levels of uric acid and indirect bilirubin decreased. Aminoglutethimide plus cortisone acetate appears to be an active and relatively safe treatment in advanced breast cancer and may be recommended as second-line endocrine treatment.

  19. [Chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Bazaeva, I Ia; Gorbunova, V A; Kravets, O A; Khokhlova, S V; Limareva, S V; Panov, V O; Strel'tsova, O N; Tarachkova, E V

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer takes second place in morbidity and third place in mortality from gynecological cancer. Advanced stages among newly diagnosed cases is still large. The "gold standard" of treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer is chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin that results in a lower risk of death. Improvement of radiotherapy methods allowed to bring optimal dose to the primary tumor with the inclusion of regional metastasis areas with less risk of damage to surrounding healthy tissue and organs. The search for alternative combinations of cytostatics, modes of drug administration, adjuvant chemotherapy after chemoradiotherapy showed an increase in survival of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer.

  20. A tissue-engineered stomach as a replacement of the native stomach.

    PubMed

    Maemura, Tomoyuki; Shin, Michael; Sato, Michio; Mochizuki, Hidetaka; Vacanti, Joseph P

    2003-07-15

    Despite recent advances in reconstruction techniques, total gastrectomy is still accompanied by various complications. As an alternative treatment, we propose a tissue-engineered stomach that replaces the mechanical and metabolic functions of a normal stomach. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the function of a tissue-engineered stomach as a replacement of the native stomach. Tissue-engineered stomachs were formed in recipient rats from stomach epithelium organoid units isolated from neonatal donor rats. After 12 weeks, the animals underwent a second operation for replacement of the native stomachs. Tissue-engineered stomachs were successfully used as a substitute of the native stomach in a rat model. An upper gastrointestinal tract study revealed no evidence of bowel stenosis or obstruction at both anastomosis sites. Histologically, the tissue-engineered stomachs had well-developed vascularized tissue with a neomucosa continuously lining the lumen and stratified smooth muscle layers. Immunohistochemical staining for alpha-actin smooth muscle showed that the smooth muscle layers were arranged in a regular fashion. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the surface topography of the tissue-engineered stomachs resembled that of native stomachs. It has been demonstrated that a tissue-engineered stomach can replace a native stomach in a rat model. Replacement of the native stomach by a tissue-engineered stomach had beneficial effects on the formation of neomucosa and smooth muscle layers in the tissue-engineered stomach.

  1. Advances in Hereditary Colorectal and Pancreatic Cancers.

    PubMed

    Underhill, Meghan L; Germansky, Katharine A; Yurgelun, Matthew B

    2016-07-01

    Innovations in genetic medicine have led to improvements in the early detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer for patients with inherited risks of gastrointestinal cancer, particularly hereditary colorectal cancer and hereditary pancreatic cancer. This review provides an update on recent data and key advances that have improved the identification, understanding, and management of patients with hereditary colorectal cancer and hereditary pancreatic cancer. This review details recent and emerging data that highlight the developing landscape of genetics in hereditary colorectal and pancreatic cancer risk. A summary is provided of the current state-of-the-art practices for identifying, evaluating, and managing patients with suspected hereditary colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer risk. The impact of next-generation sequencing technologies in the clinical diagnosis of hereditary gastrointestinal cancer and also in discovery efforts of new genes linked to familial cancer risk are discussed. Emerging targeted therapies that may play a particularly important role in the treatment of patients with hereditary forms of colorectal cancer and pancreatic cancer are also reviewed. Current approaches for pancreatic cancer screening and the psychosocial impact of such procedures are also detailed. Given the availability of new diagnostic, risk-reducing, and therapeutic strategies that exist for patients with hereditary risk of colorectal or pancreatic cancer, it is imperative that clinicians be vigilant about evaluating patients for hereditary cancer syndromes. Continuing to advance genetics research in hereditary gastrointestinal cancers will allow for more progress to be made in personalized medicine and prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Advances in cancer research. Volume 54

    SciTech Connect

    Vande Woude, G.F. ); Klein, G. )

    1990-01-01

    This book contains articles pertaining to Advances in Cancer Research. Included are the following groups: (1) The Role of DNA Methylation in Cancer, (2) Genetic and Epigenetic Losses of Heterozygosity in Cancer Predisposition and Progression, (3) Genetic and Molecular Studies of Cellular Immortalization.

  3. Chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Anna Dorothea; Syn, Nicholas Lx; Moehler, Markus; Grothe, Wilfried; Yong, Wei Peng; Tai, Bee-Choo; Ho, Jingshan; Unverzagt, Susanne

    2017-08-29

    Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. In "Western" countries, most people are either diagnosed at an advanced stage, or develop a relapse after surgery with curative intent. In people with advanced disease, significant benefits from targeted therapies are currently limited to HER-2 positive disease treated with trastuzumab, in combination with chemotherapy, in first-line. In second-line, ramucirumab, alone or in combination with paclitaxel, demonstrated significant survival benefits. Thus, systemic chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Uncertainty remains regarding the choice of the regimen. To assess the efficacy of chemotherapy versus best supportive care (BSC), combination versus single-agent chemotherapy and different chemotherapy combinations in advanced gastric cancer. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and Embase up to June 2016, reference lists of studies, and contacted pharmaceutical companies and experts to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We considered only RCTs on systemic, intravenous or oral chemotherapy versus BSC, combination versus single-agent chemotherapy and different chemotherapy regimens in advanced gastric cancer. Two review authors independently identified studies and extracted data. A third investigator was consulted in case of disagreements. We contacted study authors to obtain missing information. We included 64 RCTs, of which 60 RCTs (11,698 participants) provided data for the meta-analysis of overall survival. We found chemotherapy extends overall survival (OS) by approximately 6.7 months more than BSC (hazard ratio (HR) 0.3, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.24 to 0.55, 184 participants, three studies, moderate-quality evidence). Combination chemotherapy extends OS slightly (by an additional month) versus single-agent chemotherapy (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.79 to 0.89, 4447 participants, 23 studies, moderate-quality evidence), which is

  4. Another Obesity Downside: Higher Esophageal Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... In the United States, esophageal cancer is rare, accounting for only 1 percent of all new cancers ... advanced stage. Stomach cancer, likewise, is also rare, accounting for fewer than 2 percent of all new ...

  5. A Serological Biopsy Using Five Stomach-Specific Circulating Biomarkers for Gastric Cancer Risk Assessment: A Multi-Phase Study.

    PubMed

    Tu, Huakang; Sun, Liping; Dong, Xiao; Gong, Yuehua; Xu, Qian; Jing, Jingjing; Bostick, Roberd M; Wu, Xifeng; Yuan, Yuan

    2017-05-01

    We aimed to assess a serological biopsy using five stomach-specific circulating biomarkers-pepsinogen I (PGI), PGII, PGI/II ratio, anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) antibody, and gastrin-17 (G-17)-for identifying high-risk individuals and predicting risk of developing gastric cancer (GC). Among 12,112 participants with prospective follow-up from an ongoing population-based screening program using both serology and gastroscopy in China, we conducted a multi-phase study involving a cross-sectional analysis, a follow-up analysis, and an integrative risk prediction modeling analysis. In the cross-sectional analysis, the five biomarkers (especially PGII, the PGI/II ratio, and H. pylori sero-positivity) were associated with the presence of precancerous gastric lesions or GC at enrollment. In the follow-up analysis, low PGI levels and PGI/II ratios were associated with higher risk of developing GC, and both low (<0.5 pmol/l) and high (>4.7 pmol/l) G-17 levels were associated with higher risk of developing GC, suggesting a J-shaped association. In the risk prediction modeling analysis, the five biomarkers combined yielded a C statistic of 0.803 (95% confidence interval (CI)=0.789-0.816) and improved prediction beyond traditional risk factors (C statistic from 0.580 to 0.811, P<0.001) for identifying precancerous lesions at enrollment, and higher serological biopsy scores based on the five biomarkers at enrollment were associated with higher risk of developing GC during follow-up (P for trend <0.001). A serological biopsy composed of the five stomach-specific circulating biomarkers could be used to identify high-risk individuals for further diagnostic gastroscopy, and to stratify individuals' risk of developing GC and thus to guide targeted screening and precision prevention.

  6. Molecular characterization of the stomach microbiota in patients with gastric cancer and controls

    SciTech Connect

    Dicksved, J.; Lindberg, M.; Rosenquist, M.; Enroth, H.; Jansson, J.K.; Engstrand, L.

    2009-01-15

    Persistent infection of the gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori, can initiate an inflammatory cascade that progresses into atrophic gastritis, a condition associated with reduced capacity for secretion of gastric acid and an increased risk in developing gastric cancer. The role of H. pylori as an initiator of inflammation is evident but the mechanism for development into gastric cancer has not yet been proven. A reduced capacity for gastric acid secretion allows survival and proliferation of other microbes that normally are killed by the acidic environment. It has been postulated that some of these species may be involved in the development of gastric cancer, however their identities are poorly defined. In this study, the gastric microbiota from ten patients with gastric cancer was characterized and compared with five dyspeptic controls using the molecular profiling approach, terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), in combination with 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing. T-RFLP analysis revealed a complex bacterial community in the cancer patients that was not significantly different from the controls. Sequencing of 140 clones revealed 102 phylotypes, with representatives from five bacterial phyla (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria). The data revealed a relatively low abundance of H. pylori and showed that the gastric cancer microbiota was instead dominated by different species of the genera Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Veillonella and Prevotella. The respective role of these species in development of gastric cancer remains to be determined.

  7. Molecular characterization of the stomach microbiota in patients with gastric cancer and in controls.

    PubMed

    Dicksved, Johan; Lindberg, Mathilda; Rosenquist, Magnus; Enroth, Helena; Jansson, Janet K; Engstrand, Lars

    2009-04-01

    Persistent infection of the gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori can initiate an inflammatory cascade that progresses into atrophic gastritis, a condition associated with reduced capacity for secretion of gastric acid and an increased risk of developing gastric cancer. The role of H. pylori as an initiator of inflammation is evident but the mechanism for development into gastric cancer has not yet been proven. A reduced capacity for gastric acid secretion allows survival and proliferation of other microbes that normally are killed by the acidic environment. It has been postulated that some of these species may be involved in the development of gastric cancer; however, their identities are poorly defined. In this study, the gastric microbiota from ten patients with gastric cancer was characterized and compared with that from five dyspeptic controls using the molecular profiling approach terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), in combination with 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing. T-RFLP analysis revealed a complex bacterial community in the cancer patients that was not significantly different from that in the controls. Sequencing of 140 clones revealed 102 phylotypes, with representatives from five bacterial phyla (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria). The data revealed a relatively low abundance of H. pylori and showed that the gastric cancer microbiota was instead dominated by different species of the genera Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Veillonella and Prevotella. The respective role of these species in development of gastric cancer remains to be determined.

  8. Advanced spatiotemporal mapping methods give new insights into the coordination of contractile activity in the stomach of the rat.

    PubMed

    Lentle, R G; Reynolds, G W; Hulls, C M; Chambers, J P

    2016-12-01

    We used spatiotemporal mapping of strain rate to determine the direction of propagation and amplitudes of the longitudinal and circumferential components of antrocorporal (AC) contractions and fundal contractions in the rat stomach maintained ex vivo and containing a volume of fluid that was within its normal functional capacity. In the region of the greater curvature the longitudinal and circular components of AC contractions propagated synchronously at right angles to the arciform geometric axis of the stomach. However, the configuration of AC contractions was U shaped, neither the circular nor the longitudinal component of contractions being evident in the upper proximal corpus. Similarly, in the distal upper antrum of some preparations, circumferential components propagated more rapidly than longitudinal components. Ongoing "high-frequency, low-amplitude myogenic contractions" were identified in the upper proximal gastric corpus and on the anterior and posterior wall of the fundus. The amplitudes of these contractions were modulated in the occluded stomach by low-frequency pressure waves that occurred spontaneously. Hence the characteristics of phasic contractions vary regionally in the antrum and corpus and a previously undescribed high-frequency contractile component was identified in the proximal corpus and fundus, the latter being modulated in synchrony with cyclic variation in intrafundal pressure in the occluded fundus. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. [Autopsy case of von Recklinghausen's disease associated with lung cancer, gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach, and duodenal carcinoid tumor].

    PubMed

    Satoh, Miki; Wakabayashi, Osamu; Araya, Yoshikazu; Jinushi, Eisei; Yoshida, Fumiaki

    2009-09-01

    A 58-year-old man with von Recklinghausen's disease was admitted for further investigation of right chest pain. Chest X-ray revealed multiple emphysematous bullae in both lungs and a tumor shadow in the right upper lobe. Bronchofiberscopy was performed, but an adequate specimen was not obtained. The tumor was diagnosed as a non-small-cell lung cancer with direct invasion to the adjacent rib. Although chemotherapy and radiotherapy resulted in decrease in tumor size, the tumor subsequently increased in size and the patient died 14 months after the first admission. Autopsy revealed multiple emphysematous bullae, poorly differentiated adenosquamous cell carcinoma of the lung, gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach, and duodenal carcinoid tumor. This case suggests the possibility that von Recklinghausen's disease associated with emphysematous bullae is a risk factor for lung cancer. It has also been suggested that the genetic abnormality responsible for von Recklinghausen's disease increases the risk for various types of malignancy. Although von Recklinghausen's disease is reportedly associated with various malignant tumors, it is quite rare for von Recklinghausen's disease to be associated with triple non-neurogenic tumors. Careful observation is mandatory for patients with von Recklinghausen's disease.

  10. Detection and characterization of stomach cancer and atrophic gastritis with fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Lin, Junxiu; Jia, Chunde; Wang, Rong

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, we attempt to find a valid method to distinguish gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis. Auto-fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy of laser induced (514.5 nm and 488.0 nm) was measured. The serum spectrum is different between normal and cancer. Average value of diagnosis parameter for normal serum, red shift is less than 12 nm and Raman relative intensity of peak C by 514.5 nm excited is stronger than that of 488.0 nm. To gastric cancer, its red shift of average is bigger than 12 nm and relative intensity of Raman peak C by 514.5 nm excited is weaker than that by 488.0 nm. To atrophic gastritis, the distribution state of Raman peaks is similar with normal serum and auto-fluorescence spectrum's shape is similar to that of gastric cancer. Its average Raman peak red shift is bigger than 12 nm and the relative intensity of peak C by 514.5 excited is stronger than that of by 488.0. We considered it as a criterion and got an accuracy of 85.6% for diagnosis of gastric cancer compared with the result of clinical diagnosis.

  11. Breast Cancer Metastasis to the Stomach That Was Diagnosed after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Masahide; Hori, Keisuke; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Taira, Naruto; Nogami, Tomohiro; Shien, Tadahiko; Tanaka, Takehiro; Doihara, Hiroyoshi; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman presented with stage IIB primary breast cancer (cT2N1M0), which was treated using neoadjuvant chemotherapy (epirubicin, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel). However, the tumor persisted in patchy areas; therefore, we performed modified radical mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection. Routine endoscopy at 8 months revealed a depressed lesion on the gastric angle's greater curvature, and histology revealed signet ring cell proliferation. We performed endoscopic submucosal dissection for gastric cancer, although immunohistochemistry revealed that the tumor was positive for estrogen receptor, mammaglobin, and gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 (E-cadherin-negative). Therefore, we revised the diagnosis to gastric metastasis from the breast cancer. PMID:27957354

  12. Targeted therapies in advanced differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Raquel M; Carneiro, Benedito A; Agulnik, Mark; Kopp, Peter A; Giles, Francis J

    2015-09-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, and its incidence has been rising rapidly over the past 10 years. Although most patients with this disease have an excellent prognosis, a subset develops a more aggressive disease phenotype refractory to conventional therapies. Until recently, there was no effective therapy for these patients. With increasing knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of thyroid cancer, novel targeted therapies are being developed for this group of patients. Sorafenib and lenvatinib, small-molecule multikinase inhibitors, were approved for the treatment of progressive, symptomatic, radioactive iodine refractory, advanced differentiated thyroid cancer in 2013 and 2015, respectively. This represents a major innovation in the therapy of patients with advanced thyroid cancer. However, these therapies still have many limitations and further research needs to be pursued with the ultimate goal of providing safe and effective personalized therapy for patients with advanced thyroid cancer.

  13. Novel agents for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akinleye, Akintunde; Iragavarapu, Chaitanya; Furqan, Muhammad; Cang, Shundong; Liu, Delong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is relatively insensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Therefore, novel agents targeting dysregulated pathways (MAPK/ERK, EGFR, TGF-β, HEDGEHOG, NOTCH, IGF, PARP, PI3K/AKT, RAS, and Src) are being explored in clinical trials as monotherapy or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. This review summarizes the most recent advances with the targeted therapies in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26369833

  14. Modification of Helicobacter pylori peptidoglycan enhances NOD1 activation and promotes cancer of the stomach

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez, Giovanni; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Wang, Ge; Maier, Robert J.; Forsberg, Lennart S.; Azadi, Parastoo; Gomez, Martin A.; Correa, Pelayo; Peek, Jr., Richard M.

    2015-03-02

    Helicobacter pylori is the strongest known risk factor for gastric carcinogenesis. One cancer-linked locus is the cag pathogenicity island, which translocates components of peptidoglycan (PGN) into host cells. NOD1 is an intracellular immune receptor that senses PGN from Gram-negative bacteria and responds by inducing autophagy and activating NF-κB, leading to inflammation-mediated bacterial clearance; however chronic pathogens can evade NOD1-mediated clearance by altering PGN structure. We previously demonstrated that the H. pylori cag+ strain 7.13 rapidly induces gastric cancer in Mongolian gerbils. Using 2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry, we identified a novel mutation within the gene encoding the peptidoglycan deacetylase PgdA; therefore, we sought to define the role of H. pylori PgdA in NOD1-dependent activation of NF-κB, inflammation, and cancer. Co-culture of H. pylori strain 7.13 or its pgdA$-$ isogenic mutant with AGS gastric epithelial cells or HEK293 epithelial cells expressing a NF-κB reporter revealed that pgdA inactivation significantly decreased NOD1-dependent NF-κB activation and autophagy. Infection of Mongolian gerbils with an H. pylori pgdA$-$ mutant strain led to significantly decreased levels of inflammation and malignant lesions in the stomach; however, pre-activation of NOD1 prior to bacterial challenge reciprocally suppressed inflammation and cancer in response to wild-type H. pylori. Expression of NOD1 differs in human gastric cancer specimens compared to non-cancer samples harvested from the same patients. In conclusion, these results indicate that PGN deacetylation plays an important role in modulating host inflammatory responses to H. pylori, allowing the bacteria to persist and induce carcinogenic consequences in the gastric niche.

  15. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Gemcitabine for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Anand; Jain, Sanjay; Goldstein, Michael; Miksad, Rebecca; Pleskow, Douglas; Sawhney, Mandeep; Brennan, Darren M.D.; Callery, Mark; Vollmer, Charles

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis. Conventional concurrent chemoradiotherapy requires 6 weeks of daily treatment and can be arduous. We explored the safety and effectiveness of a 3-day course of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) followed by gemcitabine in this population. Patients and Methods: A total of 36 patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with {>=}12 months of follow-up were included. They received three fractions of 8, 10, or 12 Gy (total dose, 24-36 Gy) of SBRT according to the tumor location in relation to the stomach and duodenum, using fiducial-based respiratory motion tracking on a robotic radiosurgery system. The patients were then offered gemcitabine for 6 months or until tolerance or disease progression. Results: With an overall median follow-up of 24 months (range, 12-33), the local control rate was 78%, the median overall survival time was 14.3 months, the median carbohydrate antigen 19-9-determined progression-free survival time was 7.9 months, and the median computed tomography-determined progression-free survival time was 9.6 months. Of the 36 patients, 28 (78%) eventually developed distant metastases. Six patients (17%) were free of progression at the last follow-up visit (range, 13-30 months) as determined by normalized tumor markers with stable computed tomography findings. Nine Grade 2 (25%) and five Grade 3 (14%) toxicities attributable to SBRT occurred. Conclusion: Hypofractionated SBRT can be delivered quickly and effectively in patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced, unresectable pancreatic cancer with acceptable side effects and minimal interference with gemcitabine chemotherapy.

  16. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mullane, Stephanie A; Van Allen, Eliezer M

    2016-05-01

    Precision cancer medicine, the use of genomic profiling of patient tumors at the point-of-care to inform treatment decisions, is rapidly changing treatment strategies across cancer types. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer may identify new treatment strategies and change clinical practice. In this review, we discuss the potential and challenges of precision medicine in advanced prostate cancer. Although primary prostate cancers do not harbor highly recurrent targetable genomic alterations, recent reports on the genomics of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer has shown multiple targetable alterations in castration-resistant prostate cancer metastatic biopsies. Therapeutic implications include targeting prevalent DNA repair pathway alterations with PARP-1 inhibition in genomically defined subsets of patients, among other genomically stratified targets. In addition, multiple recent efforts have demonstrated the promise of liquid tumor profiling (e.g., profiling circulating tumor cells or cell-free tumor DNA) and highlighted the necessary steps to scale these approaches in prostate cancer. Although still in the initial phase of precision medicine for prostate cancer, there is extraordinary potential for clinical impact. Efforts to overcome current scientific and clinical barriers will enable widespread use of precision medicine approaches for advanced prostate cancer patients.

  17. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mullane, Stephanie A.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Precision cancer medicine, the use of genomic profiling of patient tumors at the point-of-care to inform treatment decisions, is rapidly changing treatment strategies across cancer types. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer may identify new treatment strategies and change clinical practice. In this review, we discuss the potential and challenges of precision medicine in advanced prostate cancer. Recent findings Although primary prostate cancers do not harbor highly recurrent targetable genomic alterations, recent reports on the genomics of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer has shown multiple targetable alterations in castration-resistant prostate cancer metastatic biopsies. Therapeutic implications include targeting prevalent DNA repair pathway alterations with PARP-1 inhibition in genomically defined subsets of patients, among other genomically stratified targets. In addition, multiple recent efforts have demonstrated the promise of liquid tumor profiling (e.g., profiling circulating tumor cells or cell-free tumor DNA) and highlighted the necessary steps to scale these approaches in prostate cancer. Summary Although still in the initial phase of precision medicine for prostate cancer, there is extraordinary potential for clinical impact. Efforts to overcome current scientific and clinical barriers will enable widespread use of precision medicine approaches for advanced prostate cancer patients. PMID:26909474

  18. K-sam, an amplified gene in stomach cancer, is a member of the heparin-binding growth factor receptor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Yutaka; Odagiri, Hiroki; Nakatani, Hiroshi; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Naito, Kenichiro; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Katoh, Osamu; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Sugimura, Takashi; Terada, Masaaki )

    1990-08-01

    DNA fragments amplified in a stomach cancer-derived cell line, KATO-III, were previously identified by the in-gel DNA renaturation method, and a 0.2-kilobase-pair fragment of the amplified sequence was subsequently cloned. By genomic walking, a portion of the exon of the gene flanking this 0.2-kilobase-pair fragment was cloned, and the gene was designated as K-sam ({und K}ATO-III cell-derived {und s}tomach cancer {und am}plified gene). The K-sam cDNAs, corresponding to the 3.5-kilobase K-sam mRNA, were cloned from the KATO-III cells. Sequence analysis revealed that this gene coded for 682 amino acid residues that satisfied the characteristics of the receptor tyrosine kinase. The K-sam gene had significant homologies with bek, FLG, and chicken basic fibroblast growth factor receptor gene. The K-sam gene was amplified in KATO-III cells with the major transcript of 3.5-kilobases in size. This gene was also expressed in some other stomach cancer cells, a small cell lung cancer, and germ cell tumors.

  19. K-sam, an amplified gene in stomach cancer, is a member of the heparin-binding growth factor receptor genes.

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Y; Odagiri, H; Nakatani, H; Miyagawa, K; Naito, K; Sakamoto, H; Katoh, O; Yoshida, T; Sugimura, T; Terada, M

    1990-01-01

    DNA fragments amplified in a stomach cancer-derived cell line, KATO-III, were previously identified by the in-gel DNA renaturation method, and a 0.2-kilobase-pair fragment of the amplified sequence was subsequently cloned. By genomic walking, a portion of the exon of the gene flanking this 0.2-kilobase-pair fragment was cloned, and the gene was designated as K-sam (KATO-III cell-derived stomach cancer amplified gene). The K-sam cDNAs, corresponding to the 3.5-kilobase K-sam mRNA, were cloned from the KATO-III cells. Sequence analysis revealed that this gene coded for 682 amino acid residues that satisfied the characteristics of the receptor tyrosine kinase. The K-sam gene had significant homologies with bek, FLG, and chicken basic fibroblast growth factor receptor gene. The K-sam gene was amplified in KATO-III cells with the major transcript of 3.5-kilobases in size. This gene was also expressed in some other stomach cancer cells, a small cell lung cancer, and germ cell tumors. Images PMID:2377625

  20. Effect of nursing care given at home on the quality of life of patients with stomach cancer and their family caregivers' nursing care.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, S; Gozum, S

    2016-12-22

    In Turkey, the high incidences of stomach and oesophageal cancers in East and high incidence of stomach cancer in Northeast regions are remarkable. This study was conducted to identify homecare needs of patients with stomach cancer and their caregivers and the effect of family supportive nursing care on the quality of life of patients and families. The patient and his/her caregiver were assessed with respect to their daily life activities and NANDA was used for the identified nursing diagnoses, NIC for the appropriate interventions and NOC for assessment of the results. This study was conducted in a pre-test, post-test, controlled trial model to identify. The sample of the investigation consisted of 72 patients and 72 caregivers. As a data-collecting instrument, the Quality of Life Scale and Caregiver Quality of Life Index-Cancer were used. The overall quality of life, global health status and emotional and cognitive functions of the patients in the experimental group improved after the interventions. The overall quality of life and global health status was found to be poorer in the control group patients at post-test as compared to pre-test and their physical, role and social functions deteriorated. The caregivers' quality of life in the control group was affected more negatively with respect to the "Disruption in Daily Life" subscale as compared to pre-test values.

  1. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Dagmara; Król, Wojciech; Szliszka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease. PMID:26593898

  2. Integrated Molecular Profiling in Advanced Cancers Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Breast Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Genitourinary Cancer; Pancreatobiliary Gastrointestinal Cancer; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer; Gynecological Cancers; Melanoma Cancers; Rare Cancers; Unknown Primary Cancers

  3. Determination of glucose in human stomach cancer cell extracts and single cells by capillary electrophoresis with a micro-biosensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolei; Ma, Yanfang; Zhao, Man; Zhou, Minfeng; Xiao, Yan; Sun, Zifei; Tong, Lili

    2016-10-21

    Bioactive species in cells can provide information about signal transduction, cell function, and the effects of disease treatment. In this article, a novel micro-biosensor was fabricated to detect glucose in individual human stomach cancer cells (MGC80-3 cells) with capillary electrophoresis (CE). We fabricated the micro-biosensors by immobilizing a single-walled carbon nanotube-glucose oxidase (GOx)-glutaraldehyde (GA) bio-composite at the palladium nanoparticle (PdNPs) modified Pt electrode. The linear concentration of glucose ranged from 2.0μM to 1.0mM, with a detection limit of 0.5μM. Using this method, the mean amount of glucose in MGC80-3 cell extracts and in single cells was 20.0 fmol and 20±6 fmol (n=10), respectively. The micro-biosensor exhibited high sensitivity, stability, and a long operating life, which are likely due to the biocompatible environment provided by BSA and GA, and the adsorption and faster electron transfer of SWNTs and PdNPs to GOx.

  4. Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin, Robert C G

    2016-12-01

    The diagnosis for locally advanced pancreatic cancer is based on high-quality cross-sectional imaging, which shows tumor invasion into the celiac/superior mesenteric arteries and/or superior mesenteric/portal venous system that is not reconstructable. The optimal management of these patients is evolving quickly with the advent of newer chemotherapeutics, radiation, and nonthermal ablation modalities. This article presents the current status of initial chemotherapy, surgical therapy, ablative therapy, and radiation therapy for patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer. Surgical resection offers the best chance of long-term disease control and the only chance for cure for patients with nonmetastatic exocrine pancreatic cancer.

  5. A retrospective cohort study of patients with stomach and liver cancers: the impact of comorbidity and ethnicity on cancer care and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sarfati, Diana; Gurney, Jason; Stanley, James; Koea, Jonathan

    2014-11-07

    Comorbidity has an adverse impact on cancer survival partly through its negative impact on receipt of curative treatment. Comorbidity is unevenly distributed within populations, with some ethnic and socioeconomic groups having considerably higher burden. The aim of this study was to investigate the inter-relationships between comorbidity, ethnicity, receipt of treatment, and cancer survival among patients with stomach and liver cancer in New Zealand. Using the New Zealand Cancer Registry, Māori patients diagnosed with stomach and liver cancers were identified (n = 269), and compared with a randomly selected group of non-Māori patients (n = 255). Clinical and outcome data were collected from medical records, and the administrative hospitalisation and mortality databases. Logistic and Cox regression modelling with multivariable adjustment were used to examine the impacts of ethnicity and comorbidity on receipt of treatment, and the impact of these variables on all-cause and cancer specific survival. More than 70% of patients had died by two years post-diagnosis. As comorbidity burden increased among those with Stage I-III disease, the likelihood that the patient would receive curative surgery decreased (e.g. C3 Index score 6 vs 0, adjusted OR: 0.32, 95% CI 0.13-0.78) and risk of mortality increased (e.g. C3 Index score 6 vs 0, adjusted all-cause HR: 1.44, 95% CI 0.93-2.23). Receipt of curative surgery reduced this excess mortality, in some cases substantially; but the extent to which this occurred varied by level of comorbidity. Māori patients had somewhat higher levels of comorbidity (34% in highest comorbidity category compared with 23% for non-Māori) and poorer survival that was not explained by age, sex, site, stage, comorbidity or receipt of curative surgery (adjusted cancer-specific HR: 1.36, 95% CI 0.97-1.90; adjusted all-cause HR: 1.33, 95% CI 0.97-1.82). Access to healthcare factors accounted for 25-36% of this survival difference. Patients with

  6. [New concepts on precancerous lesions of the stomach].

    PubMed

    Mai, M; Takagi, S

    1995-12-01

    As for precancerous lesion of the stomach detail analysis of endoscopic follow-up cases and histopathological investigations brought some new informations on its carcinogenesis. In this paper recent several reports were introduced and discussed on new opinion of precancerous conditions such as adenoma, intestinal metaplasia, gastric ulcer, remnant stomach and H. pylori. Gastric adenoma was considered to be neoplastic because of high incidence of carcinoma in situ. The stomach coexisted with adenoma showed high percentage of new arising tumor in same stomach and therefore, we can say that these are thought to be high risk group for well differentiated adenocarcinoma. Concerning the relation between intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer we have never obtained final conclusion. However, it is likely that incomplete type of intestinal metaplasia appeared to be coexistent with gastric cancer, especially intestinal type carcinoma, which was thought to be paracancerous lesions. Recent advance of molecular biology has indicated new knowledge on gastric carcinogenesis, suggestive of multistep pathways. According to their reports, genomic instanbility appeared frequently in gastric adenoma and intestinal metaplasia as well as gastric carcinoma. Gastric carcinogenesis for ulcer, remnant stomach and H. pylori was also discussed. In near future the mechanism of gastric carcinogenesis is expected to be solved from view point of genetic events.

  7. Recent developments in advanced urothelial cancer.

    PubMed

    Chee, Karen Giselle; Cambio, Angelo; Lara, Primo N

    2005-09-01

    Metastatic or unresectable urothelial cancer of the urinary bladder has traditionally been treated with systemic chemotherapy, which is most often platinum-based. The long-term survival data and the associated toxicities from this form of therapy have spurred continuing interest in finding novel treatment options for this malignancy. Recently, trials of new chemotherapy combinations, many incorporating platinum analogs or deleting platinum entirely, have been reported. None has yet been shown to be superior to cisplatin-based regimens. In addition, recent advances in imaging and laboratory technologies have provided new avenues to understand urothelial cancer behavior and prognosis. These advances provide optimism for improvements in the diagnosis, staging, and ultimately, selection of therapy for patients with urothelial cancer. This review will summarize recent developments (circa 2004) in the diagnosis and management of advanced bladder cancer.

  8. Advances in personalized cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Karasaki, Takahiro; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Sugie, Tomoharu

    2017-01-01

    There are currently three major approaches to T cell-based cancer immunotherapy, namely, active vaccination, adoptive cell transfer therapy and immune checkpoint blockade. Recently, this latter approach has demonstrated remarkable clinical benefits, putting cancer immunotherapy under the spotlight. Better understanding of the dynamics of anti-tumor immune responses (the "Cancer-Immunity Cycle") is crucial for the further development of this form of treatment. Tumors employ multiple strategies to escape from anti-tumor immunity, some of which result from the selection of cancer cells with immunosuppressive activity by the process of cancer immunoediting. Apart from this selective process, anti-tumor immune responses can also be inhibited in multiple different ways which vary from patient to patient. This implies that cancer immunotherapy must be personalized to (1) identify the rate-limiting steps in any given patient, (2) identify and combine strategies to overcome these hurdles, and (3) proceed with the next round of the "Cancer-Immunity Cycle". Cancer cells have genetic alterations which can provide the immune system with targets by which to recognize and eradicate the tumor. Mutated proteins expressed exclusively in cancer cells and recognizable by the immune system are known as neoantigens. The development of next-generation sequencing technology has made it possible to determine the genetic landscape of human cancer and facilitated the utilization of genomic information to identify such candidate neoantigens in individual cancers. Future immunotherapies will need to be personalized in terms of the identification of both patient-specific immunosuppressive mechanisms and target neoantigens.

  9. Lgr5-expressing chief cells drive epithelial regeneration and cancer in the oxyntic stomach.

    PubMed

    Leushacke, Marc; Tan, Si Hui; Wong, Angeline; Swathi, Yada; Hajamohideen, Amin; Tan, Liang Thing; Goh, Jasmine; Wong, Esther; Denil, Simon L I J; Murakami, Kazuhiro; Barker, Nick

    2017-07-01

    The daily renewal of the corpus epithelium is fuelled by adult stem cells residing within tubular glands, but the identity of these stem cells remains controversial. Lgr5 marks homeostatic stem cells and 'reserve' stem cells in multiple tissues. Here, we report Lgr5 expression in a subpopulation of chief cells in mouse and human corpus glands. Using a non-variegated Lgr5-2A-CreERT2 mouse model, we show by lineage tracing that Lgr5-expressing chief cells do not behave as corpus stem cells during homeostasis, but are recruited to function as stem cells to effect epithelial renewal following injury by activating Wnt signalling. Ablation of Lgr5(+) cells severely impairs epithelial homeostasis in the corpus, indicating an essential role for these Lgr5(+) cells in maintaining the homeostatic stem cell pool. We additionally define Lgr5(+) chief cells as a major cell-of-origin of gastric cancer. These findings reveal clinically relevant insights into homeostasis, repair and cancer in the corpus.

  10. Advances in Breast Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    will be scheduled in Q3 2010 Agustin Garcia, MD University of Southern California / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center 1441 Eastlake Avenue Los...A 6 6 Agustin Garcia, MD USC / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center • Q3 Approval by DoD Expected • June -- December Accrual Anticipated at 12

  11. Astragalus mongholicus regulate the Toll-like-receptor 4 meditated signal transduction of dendritic cells to restrain stomach cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Li, Xueliang; Li, Hongxia; Lu, Qing; Sun, Guoping; Chen, Hongjing

    2014-01-01

    According to the traditional view, we depend on three methods to treat tumors; surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, these methods have its own limitations in application. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is one of the oldest healing systems. Astragalus mongholicus (AMs) that is the common herbal medicine, the biggest part of TCM, have been proved to be effective in treating cancers from lots of clinical cases. However, we have not fully understood the anti-tumor mechanism of AMs, and this has lead to some doubt for some Western-Medicine scholars and restricts its wide use. The main objective of this research is to discuss the effect and mechanism of AMs to human stomach cancer. To observe the effect and mechanism of tumor treatment by AMs, we have done the research from three major aspects, the influence of DCs, the inhibition of tumor in vitro as well as the animal studies in vivo after treatment. First, we culture the mouse dendritic cells (DCs) from bone marrow of mouse hind legs according to the method using Interleukin-4(IL-4) and Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), which refer to the way established by Inaba (Inaba K, 1992). And then we investigate the growth-rate of the DCs co-cultured with AMs injection. We analyze the expression of the Toll-like-receptor 4 (TLR4), with SYBR-Green I Real-time PCR and the I-kappa-B-alpha (IκB-α) with Western-Blot, the main regulatory protein to control nuclear factor NFκB-p65 nuclear translocation. Second, we choose the human gastric cancer cell lines MKN 45 as the target cell, which was co-cultured with DCs, T cells from spleen of mouse and AMs injection, and use MTT assay to judge the amount of cell lines and Immnunoflurescene to analyze the expression of anti-active caspase 3 pAb anti-PARP P85 fragment pAb, the mark of apoptosis of cells. Third, we have conducted the animal studies beside the basic experiment in vitro. The nude mouse developed stomach cancer, due to intra

  12. Induction of chromosome instability and stomach cancer by altering the expression pattern of mitotic checkpoint genes in mice exposed to areca-nut

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There are strong indications for a causal association between areca-nut consumption and cancers. In Meghalaya, India, the variety of areca-nut is used as raw and unprocessed form whose chemical composition and pharmacological actions have been reported. Yet we know little on the initial pathway involved in areca-nut associated carcinogenesis since it is difficult to assess its effects on genetic alterations without interference of other compounding factors. Therefore, present study was undertaken in mice to verify the ability of raw areca-nut (RAN) to induce cancer and to monitor the expression of certain genes involved in carcinogenesis. This study was not intended to isolate any active ingredients from the RAN and to look its action. Methods Three groups of mice (n = 25 in each) were taken and used at different time-points for different experimental analysis. The other three groups of mice (n = 15 in each) were considered for tumor induction studies. In each set, two groups were administered RAN-extract ad libitum in drinking water with or without lime. The expression of certain genes was assessed by conventional RT-PCR and immunoblotting. The mice were given the whole RAN-extract with and without lime in order to mimic the human consumption style of RAN. Results Histological preparation of stomach tissue revealed that RAN induced stomach cancer. A gradual increase in the frequency of precocious anaphase and aneuploid cells was observed in the bone marrow cells with a greater increment following RAN + lime administeration. Levels of p53, Bax, Securin and p65 in esophageal and stomach cells were elevated during early days of RAN exposure while those of different mitotic checkpoint proteins were downregulated. Apoptotic cell death was detected in non-cancerous stomach cells but not in tumor cells which showed overexpression of Bax and absence of PARP. Conclusion Present study suggested (a) RAN induces stomach cancer, however, presence of lime

  13. Induction of chromosome instability and stomach cancer by altering the expression pattern of mitotic checkpoint genes in mice exposed to areca-nut.

    PubMed

    Kurkalang, Sillarine; Banerjee, Atanu; Ghoshal, Nitin; Dkhar, Hughbert; Chatterjee, Anupam

    2013-06-28

    There are strong indications for a causal association between areca-nut consumption and cancers. In Meghalaya, India, the variety of areca-nut is used as raw and unprocessed form whose chemical composition and pharmacological actions have been reported. Yet we know little on the initial pathway involved in areca-nut associated carcinogenesis since it is difficult to assess its effects on genetic alterations without interference of other compounding factors. Therefore, present study was undertaken in mice to verify the ability of raw areca-nut (RAN) to induce cancer and to monitor the expression of certain genes involved in carcinogenesis. This study was not intended to isolate any active ingredients from the RAN and to look its action. Three groups of mice (n = 25 in each) were taken and used at different time-points for different experimental analysis. The other three groups of mice (n = 15 in each) were considered for tumor induction studies. In each set, two groups were administered RAN-extract ad libitum in drinking water with or without lime. The expression of certain genes was assessed by conventional RT-PCR and immunoblotting. The mice were given the whole RAN-extract with and without lime in order to mimic the human consumption style of RAN. Histological preparation of stomach tissue revealed that RAN induced stomach cancer. A gradual increase in the frequency of precocious anaphase and aneuploid cells was observed in the bone marrow cells with a greater increment following RAN + lime administeration. Levels of p53, Bax, Securin and p65 in esophageal and stomach cells were elevated during early days of RAN exposure while those of different mitotic checkpoint proteins were downregulated. Apoptotic cell death was detected in non-cancerous stomach cells but not in tumor cells which showed overexpression of Bax and absence of PARP. Present study suggested (a) RAN induces stomach cancer, however, presence of lime promoted higher cell transformation

  14. Gastric cancer arising from the remnant stomach after distal gastrectomy: a review.

    PubMed

    Takeno, Shinsuke; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Maki, Kenji; Shibata, Ryosuke; Shiwaku, Hironari; Yamana, Ippei; Yamashita, Risako; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2014-10-14

    Gastric stump carcinoma was initially reported by Balfore in 1922, and many reports of this disease have since been published. We herein review previous reports of gastric stump carcinoma with respect to epidemiology, carcinogenesis, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, Epstein-Barr virus infection, clinicopathologic characteristics and endoscopic treatment. In particular, it is noteworthy that no prognostic differences are observed between gastric stump carcinoma and primary upper third gastric cancer. In addition, endoscopic submucosal dissection has recently been used to treat gastric stump carcinoma in the early stage. In contrast, many issues concerning gastric stump carcinoma remain to be clarified, including molecular biological characteristics and the carcinogenesis of H. pylori infection. We herein review the previous pertinent literature and summarize the characteristics of gastric stump carcinoma reported to date.

  15. Gastric cancer arising from the remnant stomach after distal gastrectomy: A review

    PubMed Central

    Takeno, Shinsuke; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Maki, Kenji; Shibata, Ryosuke; Shiwaku, Hironari; Yamana, Ippei; Yamashita, Risako; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Gastric stump carcinoma was initially reported by Balfore in 1922, and many reports of this disease have since been published. We herein review previous reports of gastric stump carcinoma with respect to epidemiology, carcinogenesis, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, Epstein-Barr virus infection, clinicopathologic characteristics and endoscopic treatment. In particular, it is noteworthy that no prognostic differences are observed between gastric stump carcinoma and primary upper third gastric cancer. In addition, endoscopic submucosal dissection has recently been used to treat gastric stump carcinoma in the early stage. In contrast, many issues concerning gastric stump carcinoma remain to be clarified, including molecular biological characteristics and the carcinogenesis of H. pylori infection. We herein review the previous pertinent literature and summarize the characteristics of gastric stump carcinoma reported to date. PMID:25320511

  16. Palbociclib for Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An interim analysis of the PALOMA3 trial shows that women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer who received palbociclib plus fulvestrant had longer progression-free survival rates than women who received a placebo plus fulvestrant.

  17. [Clinical profile and anesthesia during radical operations in patients with burn strictures and the esophagus and stomach cancer (literature review)].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    In the review basic problems bound with preoperative period of patients with stenosing diseases of an esophagus and a stomach are consecrated. The history of development of domestic and foreign surgery of esophagus and stomach is short state, features of a preoperative conditions of patients, there preoperative for an operative measure are shown. Various techniques of currying out of anesthesia and intraoperative monitoring of these patients a current of the early postoperative period, structure and character of postoperative complications are described.

  18. A Case of Advanced Gastric Cancer with Para-Aortic Lymph Node Metastasis from Co-Occurring Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miyeong; Lee, Young-Joon; Park, Ji-Ho; Choi, Sang-Kyung; Hong, Soon-Chan; Jung, Eun-Jung; Ju, Young-tae; Jeong, Chi-Young; Lee, Jeong-Hee; Ha, Woo-Song

    2017-01-01

    An 84-year-old man was diagnosed with two synchronous adenocarcinomas, a Borrmann type IV advanced gastric adenocarcinoma in his antrum and a well-differentiated Borrmann type I carcinoma on the anterior wall of the higher body of his stomach. Pre-operatively, computed tomography of the abdomen revealed the presence of advanced gastric cancer with peri-gastric and para-aortic lymph node (LN) metastasis. He planned for palliative total gastrectomy owing to the risk of obstruction by the antral lesion. We performed a frozen biopsy of a para-aortic LN during surgery and found that the origin of the para-aortic LN metastasis was from undiagnosed prostate cancer. Thus, we performed radical total gastrectomy and D2 LN dissection. Post-operatively, his total prostate-specific antigen levels were high (227 ng/mL) and he was discharged 8 days after surgery without any complications. PMID:28337367

  19. Photodynamic Cancer Therapy - Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahamse, Heidi

    2011-09-22

    The basic principle of the photodynamic effect was discovered over a hundred years ago leading to the pioneering work on PDT in Europe. It was only during the 1980s, however, when 'photoradiation therapy' was investigated as a possible treatment modality for cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a photochemotherapeutic process which requires the use of a photosensitizer (PS) that, upon entry into a cancer cell is targeted by laser irradiation to initiate a series of events that contribute to cell death. PSs are light-sensitive dyes activated by a light source at a specific wavelength and can be classified as first or second generation PSs based on its origin and synthetic pathway. The principle of PS activation lies in a photochemical reaction resulting from excitation of the PS producing singlet oxygen which in turn reacts and damages cell organelles and biomolecules required for cell function and ultimately leading to cell destruction. Several first and second generation PSs have been studied in several different cancer types in the quest to optimize treatment. PSs including haematoporphyrin derivative (HpD), aminolevulinic acid (ALA), chlorins, bacteriochlorins, phthalocyanines, naphthalocyanines, pheophorbiedes and purpurins all require selective uptake and retention by cancer cells prior to activation by a light source and subsequent cell death induction. Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is based on the fluorescence effect exhibited by PSs upon irradiation and is often used concurrently with PDT to detect and locate tumours. Both laser and light emitting diodes (LED) have been used for PDT depending on the location of the tumour. Internal cancers more often require the use of laser light delivery using fibre optics as delivery system while external PDT often make use of LEDs. Normal cells have a lower uptake of the PS in comparison to tumour cells, however the acute cytotoxic effect of the compound on the recovery rate of normal cells is not known. Subcellular

  20. Study on trace elements behaviour in cancerous and healthy tissues of colon, breast and stomach: Total reflection X-ray fluorescence applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, T.; Carvalho, M. L.; Von Bohlen, A.; Becker, M.

    2010-06-01

    In this work Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to analyse healthy and cancerous tissues of the same individual along several contiguous thin sections of each tissue. Thirty two samples (16 pairs) of breast tissue, 30 samples (15 pairs) of intestine tissue and 10 samples (5 pairs) of stomach tissue were analysed. The samples were obtained in Civil Hospitals of Germany (Dortmund) and Portugal (Lisbon). The elemental distribution of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Br, Rb, Sr and Pb in these samples was studied. Descriptive statistics based on bar graphics and hypotheses tests and also an automatic classification based on hierarchical grouping analysis was used for the several analysed tissues. It was shown that the behaviour of the elements is tissue dependent. Some elements, like P and K exhibit the same behaviour in all the analysed tissue types. They have increased concentrations in all cancerous tissues. Unlike, other elements like Br show completely different behaviour depending on the tissue: similar concentration in healthy and cancerous stomach, decreased levels in colon cancerous tissues and enhanced concentrations in breast was observed. Moreover cancer tissues present decreased Se concentrations on colon and increased on breast.

  1. Computer-assisted lesion detection system for stomach screening using stomach shape and appearance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midoh, Y.; Nakamura, M.; Takashima, M.; Nakamae, K.; Fujioka, H.

    2007-03-01

    In Japan, stomach cancer is one of the three most common causes of death from cancer. Since periodic health checks of stomach X-rays have become more widely carried out, the physicians' burdens have been increasing in the mass screening to detect initial symptoms of a disease. For the purpose of automatic diagnosis, we try to develop a computer-assisted lesion detection system for stomach screening. The proposed system has two databases. One is the stomach shape database that consists of the computer graphics stomach 3D models based on biomechanics simulation and their projected 2D images. The other is the normal appearance database that is constructed by learning patterns in a normal patient training set. The stomach contour is extracted from an X-ray image including a barium filled region by the following steps. Firstly, the approximated stomach region is obtained by nonrigid registration based on mutual information. We define nonrigid transformation as one that includes translations, rotations, scaling, air-barium interface and weights of eigenvectors determined by principal components analysis in the stomach shape database. Secondly, the accurate stomach contour is extracted from the gradient of an image by using the Dynamic Programming. After then, stomach lesions are detected by inspecting whether the Mahalanobis distance from the mean in the normal appearance database is longer than a suitable value on the extracted stomach contour. We applied our system to 75 X-ray images of barium-filled stomach to show its validity.

  2. Strategies for advancing cancer nanomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Vikash P.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2013-11-01

    Cancer nanomedicines approved so far minimize toxicity, but their efficacy is often limited by physiological barriers posed by the tumour microenvironment. Here, we discuss how these barriers can be overcome through innovative nanomedicine design and through creative manipulation of the tumour microenvironment.

  3. Advances in Breast Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    Background Verified Anne Wallace, MD University of California San Diego/ Moores Cancer Center Clinical Trials Office 3855 Health Sciences Dr., MC...Requirements Received and Accepted • Contract Review at Site Pending • Federalwide Assurance Verified • Research Integrity Background Verified Agustin ...of Pittsburgh, University of California San Diego and University of Southern California). The process has taken more than 3 months and comments

  4. Development of gastric cancer in nonatrophic stomach with highly active inflammation identified by serum levels of pepsinogen and Helicobacter pylori antibody together with endoscopic rugal hyperplastic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Mika; Kato, Jun; Inoue, Izumi; Yoshimura, Noriko; Yoshida, Takeichi; Mukoubayashi, Chizu; Deguchi, Hisanobu; Enomoto, Shotaro; Ueda, Kazuki; Maekita, Takao; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Tamai, Hideyuki; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Iwane, Masataka; Tekeshita, Tatsuya; Mohara, Osamu; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Ichinose, Masao

    2012-12-01

    This study aimed to elucidate groups at high risk of developing cancer among patients with serologically identified Helicobacter pylori infection and nonatrophic stomach. Annual endoscopy was performed for a mean of 5.4 years in 496 asymptomatic middle-aged men who were H. pylori antibody-positive and pepsinogen (PG) test-negative. Subjects were stratified according to the activity of H. pylori-associated gastritis measured by serum levels of PG and H. pylori antibody, and/or by endoscopic findings of rugal hyperplastic gastritis (RHG), and cancer development was investigated. During the study period, seven cases of cancer developed in the cohort (incidence rate, 261/100,000 person-years), with 85.7% developing in the group showing a PGI/II ratio ≤ 3.0, reflecting active inflammation-based high PGII levels. Cancer incidence was significantly higher in this group (750/100,000 person-years) than in groups with less active gastritis. Furthermore, cancer incidence for this group was significantly higher in the subgroup with high H. pylori antibody titers than in the low-titer subgroup. Meanwhile, endoscopic findings revealed that 11.7% of subjects showed RHG reflecting localized highly active inflammation, and cancer risk was significantly higher in patients with RHG than in patients without. Combining the two serum tests and endoscopic examination for RHG allowed identification of subjects with more active gastritis and higher cancer risk. No cancer development was observed in these high-risk subjects after H. pylori eradication. Subjects with highly active gastritis identified by the two serological tests and endoscopic RHG constitute a group at high risk of cancer development with H. pylori-infected nonatrophic stomach. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  5. Advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Obstein, Keith L; Valdastri, Pietro

    2013-01-28

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Diagnosing colorectal has been increasingly successful due to advances in technology. Flexible endoscopy is considered to be an effective method for early diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancer, making it a popular choice for screening programs. However, millions of people who may benefit from endoscopic colorectal cancer screening fail to have the procedure performed. Main reasons include psychological barriers due to the indignity of the procedure, fear of procedure related pain, bowel preparation discomfort, and potential need for sedation. Therefore, an urgent need for new technologies addressing these issues clearly exists. In this review, we discuss a set of advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening that are either already available or close to clinical trial. In particular, we focus on visual-inspection-only advanced flexible colonoscopes, interventional colonoscopes with alternative propulsion mechanisms, wireless capsule colonoscopy, and technologies for intraprocedural bowel cleansing. Many of these devices have the potential to reduce exam related patient discomfort, obviate the need for sedation, increase diagnostic yield, reduce learning curves, improve access to screening, and possibly avert the need for a bowel preparation.

  6. Advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Obstein, Keith L; Valdastri, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Diagnosing colorectal has been increasingly successful due to advances in technology. Flexible endoscopy is considered to be an effective method for early diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancer, making it a popular choice for screening programs. However, millions of people who may benefit from endoscopic colorectal cancer screening fail to have the procedure performed. Main reasons include psychological barriers due to the indignity of the procedure, fear of procedure related pain, bowel preparation discomfort, and potential need for sedation. Therefore, an urgent need for new technologies addressing these issues clearly exists. In this review, we discuss a set of advanced endoscopic technologies for colorectal cancer screening that are either already available or close to clinical trial. In particular, we focus on visual-inspection-only advanced flexible colonoscopes, interventional colonoscopes with alternative propulsion mechanisms, wireless capsule colonoscopy, and technologies for intraprocedural bowel cleansing. Many of these devices have the potential to reduce exam related patient discomfort, obviate the need for sedation, increase diagnostic yield, reduce learning curves, improve access to screening, and possibly avert the need for a bowel preparation. PMID:23382621

  7. Determination of strains of Helicobacter pylori and of polymorphism in the interleukin-8 gene in patients with stomach cancer.

    PubMed

    Vinagre, Ruth Maria Dias Ferreira; Corvelo, Tereza Cristina de Oliveira; Arnaud, Vanda Catão; Leite, Ana Claudia Klautau; Barile, Katarine Antonia Dos Santos; Martins, Luisa Caricio

    2011-01-01

    Gastric neoplasia is the second most common cause of death by cancer in the world and H. pylori is classified as a type I human carcinogen by the World Health Organization. However, despite the high prevalence of infection by H. pylori around the world, less than 3% of individuals carrying the bacteria develop gastric neoplasias. Such a fact indicates that evolution towards malignancy may be associated with bacterial factors in the host and the environment. To investigate the association between polymorphism in the region promoting the IL-8 (-251) gene and the H. pylori genotype, based on the vacA alleles and the presence of the cagA gene, using clinical and histopathological data. In a prospective study, a total of 102 patients with stomach cancer and 103 healthy volunteers were analysed. Polymorphism in interleukin 8 (-251) was determined by the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism reaction and sequencing. PCR was used for genotyping the vacA alleles and the cagA in the bacterial strains PCR. Gastric biopsies were histologically assessed. The H. pylori serology was positive for 101 (99%) of all patients analysed, and 98 (97%) of them were colonized by only one strain. In patients with monoinfection, 82 (84%) of the bacterial strains observed had the s1b/m1 genotype. The cagA gene was detected in 74 (73%) of patients infected by H. pylori. The presence of the cagA gene was demonstrated as associated with the presence of the s1b/m1 genotype of the vacA gene (P = 0.002). As for polymorphism in the interleukin 8 (-251) gene we observed that the AA (P = 0.026) and AT (P = 0.005) genotypes were most frequent in the group of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. By comparing the different types of isolated bacterial strains with the interleukin -8 (-251) and the histopathological data we observed that carriers of the A allele (AT and AA) infected by virulent strains (m1s1 cagA+) demonstrated a greater risk of presenting a degree of inflammation (OR = 24.75 CI 95

  8. Advances and Challenges in Treatment of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Joshua; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Dramatic improvements in the outcomes of patients with rectal cancer have occurred over the past 30 years. Advances in surgical pathology, refinements in surgical techniques and instrumentation, new imaging modalities, and the widespread use of neoadjuvant therapy have all contributed to these improvements. Several questions emerge as we learn of the benefits or lack thereof for components of the current multimodality treatment in subgroups of patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). What is the optimal surgical technique for distal rectal cancers? Do all patients need postoperative chemotherapy? Do all patients need radiation? Do all patients need surgery, or is a nonoperative, organ-preserving approach warranted in selected patients? Answering these questions will lead to more precise treatment regimens, based on patient and tumor characteristics, that will improve outcomes while preserving quality of life. However, the idea of shifting the treatment paradigm (chemoradiotherapy, total mesorectal excision, and adjuvant therapy) currently applied to all patients with LARC to a more individually tailored approach is controversial. The paradigm shift toward organ preservation in highly selected patients whose tumors demonstrate clinical complete response to neoadjuvant treatment is also controversial. Herein, we highlight many of the advances and resultant controversies that are likely to dominate the research agenda for LARC in the modern era. PMID:25918296

  9. Breast cancer. Part 3: advanced cancer and psychological implications.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Victoria

    This is the last article in this 3-part series on breast cancer. The previous two articles have outlined the principles behind breast awareness and breast health, detailing common benign breast diseases, types of breast cancer and staging, and treatment for breast cancer, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and endocrine treatment. The series concludes by giving information on advanced disease, including when a patient presents late with a fungating breast lesion, or if the disease has metastasized from the breast to other organs. Lymphoedema is also described and discussed, and the latter half of this article discusses psychological implications of breast cancer, from diagnosis through the individual treatments.

  10. Recent advances in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chessum, Nicola; Jones, Keith; Pasqua, Elisa; Tucker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the past 20 years, cancer therapeutics has undergone a paradigm shift away from the traditional cytotoxic drugs towards the targeting of proteins intimately involved in driving the cancer phenotype. The poster child for this alternative approach to the treatment of cancer is imatinib, a small-molecule kinase inhibitor designed to target chronic myeloid leukaemia driven by the BCR-ABL translocation in a defined patient population. The improvement in survival achieved by treatment of this patient cohort with imatinib is impressive. Thus, the aim is to provide efficacy but with low toxicity. The role of the medicinal chemist in oncology drug discovery is now closely aligned with the role in most other therapeutic areas with high-throughput and/or fragment-based screening, structure-based design, selectivity, pharmacokinetic optimisation and pharmacodynamic biomarker modulation, all playing a familiar part in the process. In this chapter, we selected four areas in which compounds are either approved drugs or in clinical trials. These are chaperone inhibitors, kinase inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors and inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. Even within these areas, we have been selective, particularly for kinase inhibitors, and our aim has been to exemplify newer approaches and novel aspects of medicinal chemistry.

  11. Major Advances in the Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Burney, Ikram A; Al-Moundhri, Mansour S

    2008-01-01

    The last few years have seen major advances in the management of cancers. Since it is not possible for the non-oncologist to keep abreast with the latest developments in the field of oncology, this review summarises the most significant advances in the area of treatment of various cancers over the past four years. In some areas, a paradigm shift has occurred setting new standards of care, for example, the use of targeted therapy (trastuzumab) in adjuvant treatment of breast cancer; the use of monoclonal antibodies (rituximab), with or without chemotherapy, in the treatment and maintenance of indolent lymphoma; the use of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, imatinib, in the adjuvant setting in resected gastrointestinal stromal tumours. In other areas, new treatments have emerged, such as, the use of targeted therapies in hepatocellular carcinoma (sorafenib) and renal cell carcinoma (sunitinib, sorafenib, temsirolimus, bevacizumab). In some other cancers, the addition of targeted therapies has improved survival rates, for example, in colon cancer (bevacizumab, cetuximb, panitumumab), head and neck cancers (cetuximab), and pancreatic adenocarcinoma (erlotinib). In yet another group, new targeted therapies have emerged where resistance was previously observed with the existing targeted therapies, for example, breast cancer (lapatinib), chronic myeloid leukemia (dasatinib). Finally, the addition of chemotherapeutic agents has improved survival in some forms of cancer, for example, oxaliplatin in adjuvant treatment of colon cancer, temozolamide in glioblastoma multiforme, and adjuvant chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer. The information summarized here may provide useful for the busy physician needing an update in the field of oncology. PMID:21748051

  12. Further Studies on Induction of Stomach Cancer in Hamsters by N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine*

    PubMed Central

    Kogure, K.; Sasadaira, H.; Kawachi, T.; Shimosato, Y.; Tokunaga, A.; Fujimura, S.; Sugimura, T.

    1974-01-01

    Oral administration of N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) to hamsters at a concentration of 50-83 μg/ml in the drinking water resulted in a high incidence of tumours in the glandular stomach. Short-term administration of MNNG for 4-6 months resulted in more adenocarcinomata in the glandular stomach than long-term administration for 7-8 months. One case of metastasis of an adenocarcinoma of the glandular stomach to the liver and 2 cases of metastasis to the regional lymph nodes were found. Spindle cell sarcomata in the glandular stomach and adenocarcinomata in the duodenum were also often produced. Oral administration of MNNG at the very high concentration of 500-2000 μg/ml induced a hepatic cell carcinoma, intrahepatic bile duct carcinomata, bile duct cystadenomata and cystic dilatation, and a haemangioma in the liver but no tumour in the glandular stomach. Sequential morphological studies on the glandular stomach of hamsters receiving 50 μg/ml of MNNG in the drinking water showed 3 stages of change of the mucosa. The mucosa became atrophic and eroded in the first 16 weeks. Irregular atypical glands developed at the margins of erosions and proliferation of spindle cells in the submucosa were found after 18 weeks. Spindle cell sarcomata developed in animals after 20 weeks. Adenocarcinomata developed between 25 and 32 weeks. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12 PMID:4830138

  13. New Treatment in Advanced Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrida, Dario; Prestifilippo, Angela; Scarfia, Alessia; Martino, Daniela; Marchisotta, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine tumor. Thyroidectomy, radioactive iodine, and TSH suppression represent the standard treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer. Since chemotherapy has been shown to be unsuccessful in case of advanced thyroid carcinomas, the research for new therapies is fundamental. In this paper, we reviewed the recent literature reports (pubmed, medline, EMBASE database, and abstracts published in meeting proceedings) on new treatments in advanced nonmedullary and medullary thyroid carcinomas. Studies of many tyrosine kinase inhibitors as well as antiangiogenic inhibitors suggest that patients with thyroid cancer could have an advantage with new target therapy. We summarized both the results obtained and the toxic effects associated with these treatments reported in clinical trials. Reported data in this paper are encouraging, but further trials are necessary to obtain a more effective result in thyroid carcinoma treatment. PMID:23133451

  14. Ablation Strategies for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Linecker, Michael; Pfammatter, Thomas; Kambakamba, Patryk; DeOliveira, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of novel and somewhat effective chemotherapy against pancreas cancer, several groups developed a new interest on locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Unresectable tumors constitute up to 80% of pancreatic cancer (PC) at the time of diagnosis and are associated with a 5-year overall survival of less than 5%. To control those tumors locally, with perhaps improved patients survival, significant advances were made over the last 2 decades in the development of ablation methods including cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, high intensity focused ultrasound and irreversible electroporation (IRE). Many suggested a call for caution for possible severe or lethal complications in using such techniques on the pancreas. Most fears were on the heating or freezing of the pancreas, while non-thermal ablation (IRE) could offer safer approaches. The multimodal therapies along with high-resolution imaging guidance have created some enthusiasm toward ablation for LAPC. The impact of ablation techniques on primarily non-resectable PC remains, however, unclear.

  15. Treatment of advanced esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsen, D.

    1982-12-01

    When radiation therapy is used for palliation of obstruction in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma, an improvement in dysphagia can be expected in approximately 50% of patients. Major objective responses have rarely been quantitied but, in one study, were seen in 33% patients. Recurrence of dysphagia is usually seen within 2-6 months of treatment. Radiation toxicities and complications, even when used with palliative intent, can be substantial and include esophagitis, tracheoesophageal or esophageal-aortic fistula, mediastinitis, hemorrhage, pneumonitis, and myelosuppression. (JMT)

  16. Recent advances in cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Lippman, S M; Hittelman, W N; Lotan, R; Pastorino, U; Hong, W K

    1991-02-01

    The CCPC 90 conference and workshop included presentations by basic scientists describing the key in vitro and in vivo model systems used to study epithelial carcinogenesis and its associated biochemical and molecular alterations. A major conference theme was the identification of markers identifying specific carcinogenic stages. Current work focuses on defining the biology of preneoplasia, the critical specific molecular events in multistep carcinogenesis, and the dynamic interplay between viral, behavioral, dietary, and genetic factors in human carcinogenesis. Studies of molecular epidemiology and genetic susceptibility are identifying new risk groups and contributing to preventive strategies. Another major theme of the conference was the concept of field carcinogenesis and the study of carcinogen-exposed tissue "at risk" for the development of cancer. A specific example discussed by several investigators was the issue of SPT development in head and neck and lung cancers. Novel studies of biologic markers for use in early detection and as intermediate end points were described. The latter application, if validated in human trials, may allow short-term screening of chemopreventive agents and determinations of optimal doses/schedules for phase III chemoprevention trials. These biomarker trials may serve as a bridge between preclinical work and full-scale randomized trials. The status of the major phase III clinical trials was presented. Major problems in chemoprevention trials include (1) selection of agents, doses, and schedules, (2) lack of pharmacologic and pharma quality control, (5) adherence (drop-out and drop-in), and (6) trial-specific feasibility/recruitment, issues.

  17. Bevacizumab Treatment for Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guarneri, Valentina; Icli, Fikri; Johnston, Stephen; Khayat, David; Loibl, Sibylle; Martin, Miguel; Zielinski, Christoph; Conte, PierFranco; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.

    2011-01-01

    Significant advances in the treatment of patients with breast cancer have been made in the past 10 years. The current systemic treatment of breast cancer is characterized by the discovery of multiple cancer targets leading to treatments that are more sophisticated and specific than conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy. Two classes of compounds that have helped improve clinical outcomes are small molecules and monoclonal antibodies targeting specific tyrosine kinase receptors. Many novel targets have been discovered, and parallel multiple approaches to anticancer therapy have recently emerged from the literature. One promising strategy is targeting the proangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs), either by ligand sequestration (preventing VEGF receptor binding) or inhibiting downstream receptor signaling. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody directed against VEGF, has been shown to improve the efficacy of taxanes in frontline treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer. This review outlines the most promising breast cancer studies using bevacizumab combined with traditional cytotoxic agents in advanced breast cancer. In addition, we discuss the current indications reviewed by the Oncologic Drug Advisory Committee and define our vision of how the benefit of patient clinical trials should be measured. PMID:21976315

  18. In vitro and in vivo studies on antitumor effects of gossypol on human stomach adenocarcinoma (AGS) cell line and MNNG induced experimental gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gunassekaran, G.R.; Kalpana Deepa Priya, D.; Gayathri, R.; Sakthisekaran, D.

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Gossypol is a well known polyphenolic compound used for anticancer studies but we are the first to report that gossypol has antitumor effect on MNNG induced gastric cancer in experimental animal models. {yields} Our study shows that gossypol inhibits the proliferation of AGS (human gastric adenocarcinoma) cell line. {yields} In animal models, gossypol extends the survival of cancer bearing animals and also protects the cells from carcinogenic effect. {yields} So we suggest that gossypol would be a potential chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agent for gastric cancer. -- Abstract: The present study has evaluated the chemopreventive effects of gossypol on N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-induced gastric carcinogenesis and on human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cell line. Gossypol, C{sub 30}H{sub 30}O{sub 8}, is a polyphenolic compound that has anti proliferative effect and induces apoptosis in various cancer cells. The aim of this work was to delineate in vivo and in vitro anti-initiating mechanisms of orally administered gossypol in target (stomach) tissues and in human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cell line. In vitro results prove that gossypol has potent cytotoxic effect and inhibit the proliferation of adenocarcinoma (AGS) cell line. In vivo results prove gossypol to be successful in prolonging the survival of MNNG induced cancer bearing animals and in delaying the onset of tumor in animals administrated with gossypol and MNNG simultaneously. Examination of the target (stomach) tissues in sacrificed experimental animals shows that administration of gossypol significantly reduces the level of tumor marker enzyme (carcino embryonic antigen) and pepsin. The level of Nucleic acid contents (DNA and RNA) significantly reduces, and the membrane damage of glycoprotein subsides, in the target tissues of cancer bearing animals, with the administration of gossypol. These data suggest that gossypol may create a beneficial effect in patients

  19. Paradoxes in cancer patients' advance care planning.

    PubMed

    Lamont, E B; Siegler, M

    2000-01-01

    To determine the frequency of advance care planning (ACP) in hospitalized cancer patients and to assess their reactions to a proposed policy in which medical housestaff would offer to discuss ACP at the time of hospital admission. Structured interviews with 111 consecutively admitted cancer patients on the oncology inpatient service of a tertiary care medical center. We found that 69% (77/111) of patients had discussed their advance care preferences with someone, usually a family member, and 33% (37/111) had completed at least one formal advance directive (e.g., a living will or durable power of attorney for health care); 32% (36/111) had done both; and 30% (33/111) had done neither. However, only 9% (10/111) of patients reported having discussed their advance care preferences with their clinic oncologists and only 23% (23/101) of the remaining patients stated that they wished to do so. By contrast, 58% (64/110) of patients supported a policy in which medical housestaff would offer to discuss these advance care preferences as a part of the admission history. Our data suggest that while oncology inpatients frequently have ACPs that they discuss with family and/or document in formal advance directives, they rarely discuss or wish to discuss these ACPs with clinic oncologists. We also show that most of the reticent patients would nevertheless consider discussing the same ACPs with admitting housestaff on the day of hospital admission.

  20. [Interactions between lifestyle, methylanetetrahydrofolate reductase gene and polymorphisms in thymidylate synthase gene with risk of stomach cancer].

    PubMed

    Gao, Chang-ming; Wu, Jian-zhong; Liu, Yan-ting; Ding, Jian-hua; Li, Su-ping; Su, Ping; Hu, Xu; Kai, Hai-tao; Toshiro, Takezaki; Kazuo, Tajima

    2003-07-01

    To evaluate interactions between lifestyle, methylanetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) and polymorphisms in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the thymidylate synthase gene (TS) with reference to development of stomach cancer (SC). We conducted a case-control study with 107 cases of SC and 200 population-based controls in Huaian city of Jiangsu province, China. TS genotypes were identified by polymerase chain reaction. (1) The frequencies of TS genotypes (+6 bp/+6 bp, +6 bp/-6 bp and -6 bp/-6 bp) among the cases were 5.6%, 47.7% and 46.7% and among the controls were 9.0%, 54.0% and 37.0%, respectively. Individuals identified as -6 bp/-6 bp genotype had a slightly higher risk for SC than those individuals with +6 bp alleles (the crude OR = 1.49, 95% CI: 0.90 - 2.47; adjusted OR = 1.36, 95% CI: 1.00 - 1.78, P = 0.047). (2) Individuals having TS -6 bp/-6 bp genotype and having smoking habit were at a significantly higher risk of developing SC (adjusted OR = 2.79, 95% CI: 1.51 - 5.18) compared with those who had +6 bp alleles with no smoking habit. Individuals having TS -6 bp/-6 bp genotype and habit of frequent alcohol drinking were at an increased risk of developing SC (adjusted OR = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.07 - 2.90) compared with those with +6 bp alleles and low consumption of alcohol. As compared with individuals with +6 bp alleles and who had habit of tea drinking, individuals who had TS -6 bp/-6 bp genotype and but without habit of tea drinking had an increased risk of developing SC (adjusted OR = 2.34, 95% CI: 1.43 - 3.82). (3) Individuals with TS -6 bp/-6 bp genotype and with MTHFR T alleles had an increased risk of developing SC (adjusted OR = 2.67, 95% CI: 1.07 - 6.70) compared with those with +6 bp alleles and with MTHRF C/C genotype. Results in the present study suggested that there was a combined effect between lifestyle, MTHFR C/T or T/T genotype and TS -6 bp/-6 bp genotype in the development of SC.

  1. Afatinib in Advanced Refractory Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-06

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Urethral Cancer; Ureter Cancer

  2. Respiratory problems in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, Carla; Fusco, Flavio

    2002-04-01

    Respiratory problems are an important issue in the palliative care setting, not only from a diagnostic and therapeutic point of view but also from emotion-related aspects involving both the patients and their families and also caregivers. In this paper we consider some of the most common respiratory problems, such as dyspnea, infections, hemoptysis, hiccup. A review of the literature was performed with reference to the frequency, diagnosis and management of the above respiratory problems in patients in advanced and terminal stages of the disease. Particular emphasis was given to the importance of communication with the patients and their families, which is considered a crucial point in the care and the cure of such patients.

  3. PALLIATIVE CARE FOR PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Alan; Ezzat, Adnan

    1997-01-01

    The increasing life expectancy in Saudi Arabia will be accompanied by an alteration of the patterns of disease similar to that in Western countries. One of these will be cancer, the second leading cause of death in the west at present, where 1:3 people develop cancer during their lifetime and 1:4 die of it. Cancer deaths are rarely easy. The distress particularly the pain it can cause is legendary. Palliative care is the care and study of patients with active progressive far advanced disease, where cure is impossible, the prognosis predictably short, and the focus of care is the patient's quality of life. A Palliative Care Program has been developed at KFSH&RC, since 1991. This has broadened the spectrum of health services available to cancer patients. Palliative care needs to be more widely available in the kingdom to relieve an important cause of human suffering. PMID:23008572

  4. Trends of stomach cancer mortality in Eastern Asia in 1950-2004: comparative study of Japan, Hong Kong and Singapore using age, period and cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masahiro; Ma, Enbo; Tanaka, Hideo; Ioka, Akiko; Nakahara, Toshitaka; Takahashi, Hideto

    2012-02-15

    To characterize the temporal trends of stomach cancer mortality in Eastern Asia and to better interpret the causes of the trends, we performed age, period and cohort analysis (APC analysis) on the mortality rates in Japan, Hong Kong and Singapore during 1950-2004, as well as the rates in the US as a control population. For the APC analysis, Holford's approach was used to avoid the identification problem. Age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) decreased consistently in all four areas during the observation period in both males and females. Japan had the highest ASMR in both sexes, followed by Singapore, Hong Kong and the US, but the differences in ASMR among the four areas diminished with time. The results of APC analysis suggested that the decreasing mortality rates in Eastern Asia were caused by the combination of decreasing cohort effect since the end of the 1800s and decreasing period effect from the 1950s. The US showed similar results, but its decreases in the period and cohort effect preceded those of Eastern Asia. Possible causes for the decrease in the cohort effect include improvement in the socioeconomic conditions during childhood and a decrease in the prevalence of H. pylori infection, while possible causes for the decrease in the period effect include a decrease in dietary salt intake and improvements in cancer detection and treatment. These findings may help us to predict future changes in the mortality rates of stomach cancer.

  5. Important drugs for cough in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Homsi, J; Walsh, D; Nelson, K A

    2001-11-01

    Cough is a defense mechanism that prevents the entry of noxious materials into the respiratory system and clears foreign materials and excess secretions from the lungs and respiratory tract. In advanced cancer, it is a common symptom that interferes with the patient's daily activity and quality of life. Empiric treatment with antitussive agents is often needed. Two classes of antitussive drugs are available: (1) centrally acting: (a) opioids and (b) non-opioids; (2) peripherally acting: (a) directly and (b) indirectly. Antitussive availability varies widely around the world. Many antitussives, such as benzonatate, codeine, hydrocodone, and dextromethorphan, were extensively studied in the acute and chronic cough settings and showed relatively high efficacy and safety profiles. Benzonatate, clobutinol, dihydrocodeine, hydrocodone, and levodropropizine were the only antitussives specifically studied in cancer and advanced cancer cough. They all have shown to be effective and safe in recommended daily dose for cough. In advanced cancer the patient's current medications, previous antitussive use, the availability of routes of administration, any history of drug abuse, the presence of other symptoms and other factors, all have a role in the selection of antitussives for prescription. A good knowledge of the pharmacokinetics, dosage, efficacy, and side effects of the available antitussives provides for better management.

  6. Responses to advanced cancer: Chinese-Australians.

    PubMed

    Chui, Ying-Yu; Donoghue, Judith; Chenoweth, Lynn

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes a study identifying the impact of key aspects of Chinese culture on the responses of mid-aged Chinese-Australians to their advanced cancer in order to make recommendations about their care within the health system. Studies conducted in the 1960s and 1970s focused on understanding people's psychological responses to their experiences of terminal illness, but the issue of culture was not addressed. In recent years, a few studies have been conducted with Chinese-Australians, but were limited to issues related to their information needs and the disclosure of a cancer diagnosis. There is a lack of understanding of the impact of Chinese culture on the experiences of these patients. A grounded theory approach was used to generate a substantive theory to explain how mid-aged Chinese-Australians respond to advancing cancer. Eleven participants were recruited and data were collected from face-to-face interviews, telephone contacts, observation and researcher field notes. Data generation occurred between 1997 and 1999. Four modes of response to advanced cancer were identified: acute crisis, combat, despondency and waiting for death. This paper deals particularly with the combat mode which incorporated five culturally specific strategies used by participants in their struggle against advanced cancer. These were traditional Chinese medicine, traditional Chinese beliefs on the use of food for health maintenance, qi gong (a form of exercise), feng shui (which involves paying attention to spatial organization) and the worship of ancestors and gods. Deeply entrenched within these responses is the influence of Chinese culture, rooted in the beliefs and practices of traditional Chinese medicine and the philosophy of harmony and balance of yin and yang and qi. Health care professionals need to be aware of the cultural practices and beliefs of the different ethnic groups for whom they care, and of the importance of accommodation to and negotiation about these

  7. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kokelaar, RF; Evans, MD; Davies, M; Harris, DA; Beynon, J

    2016-01-01

    Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer). Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0) resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. PMID:27785074

  8. New advances in targeted gastric cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lazăr, Daniela Cornelia; Tăban, Sorina; Cornianu, Marioara; Faur, Alexandra; Goldiş, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Despite a decrease in incidence over past decades, gastric cancer remains a major global health problem. In the more recent period, survival has shown only minor improvement, despite significant advances in diagnostic techniques, surgical and chemotherapeutic approaches, the development of novel therapeutic agents and treatment by multidisciplinary teams. Because multiple genetic mutations, epigenetic alterations, and aberrant molecular signalling pathways are involved in the development of gastric cancers, recent research has attempted to determine the molecular heterogeneity responsible for the processes of carcinogenesis, spread and metastasis. Currently, some novel agents targeting a part of these dysfunctional molecular signalling pathways have already been integrated into the standard treatment of gastric cancer, whereas others remain in phases of investigation within clinical trials. It is essential to identify the unique molecular patterns of tumours and specific biomarkers to develop treatments targeted to the individual tumour behaviour. This review analyses the global impact of gastric cancer, as well as the role of Helicobacter pylori infection and the efficacy of bacterial eradication in preventing gastric cancer development. Furthermore, the paper discusses the currently available targeted treatments and future directions of research using promising novel classes of molecular agents for advanced tumours. PMID:27570417

  9. Chemotherapeutic management of advanced ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Alan N; Butler, Julie

    2003-08-01

    To review current treatment strategies for patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Factors for treatment selection are discussed. Research articles and textbooks. Research efforts continue to identify novel agents and/or combination therapies that can effect a cure or prolong survival. Several agents offer similar efficacy outcomes but vary in safety aspects and administration requirements. Numerous clinical trials have defined the efficacy and safety of chemotherapy in patients with ovarian cancer. Oncology nurses can prepare patients to make treatment decisions; educate them about treatment-related side effects; and develop an ongoing relationship as patient advocates to ensure quality of life.

  10. Hyperthermia for locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zagar, Timothy M; Oleson, James R; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Dewhirst, Mark W; Craciunescu, Oana I; Blackwell, Kimberly L; Prosnitz, Leonard R; Jones, Ellen L

    2010-01-01

    Hyperthermia (HT) has a proven benefit for treating superficial malignancies, particularly chest wall recurrences of breast cancer. There has been less research utilising HT in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), but available data are promising. HT has been combined with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in the neoadjuvant, definitive and adjuvant setting, albeit in series with small numbers of patients. There is only one phase III trial that examines hyperthermia in LABC, also with relatively small numbers of patients. The goal of this review is to highlight important research utilising HT in patients with LABC as well as to suggest future directions for its use.

  11. Hyperthermia for locally advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zagar, Timothy M.; Oleson, James R.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Craciunescu, Oana I.; Blackwell, Kimberly L.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Jones, Ellen L.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperthermia (HT) has a proven benefit for treating superficial malignancies, particularly chest wall recurrences of breast cancer. There has been less research utilising HT in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), but available data are promising. HT has been combined with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in the neoadjuvant, definitive and adjuvant setting, albeit in series with small numbers of patients. There is only one phase III trial that examines hyperthermia in LABC, also with relatively small numbers of patients. The goal of this review is to highlight important research utilising HT in patients with LABC as well as to suggest future directions for its use. PMID:20849257

  12. Advances in the treatment of testicular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Margel, David; Lubin, Marc Alan; Baniel, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCT) are relatively uncommon, accounting for only 1% of male malignancies in the United States. It has become an important oncological disease for several reasons. It is the most common malignancy in young men 15-35 years old. GCTs are among a unique numbers of neoplasms where biochemical markers play a critical role. Finally, it is a model of curable cancer. In this review we discuss cancer epidemiology, genetics, and therapeutic principles. Recent advances in the management of stage I GCT and controversies in the management of post chemotherapy residual mass are presented. PMID:26816836

  13. Management of dysphagia in advanced oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Penner, Jamie L; McClement, Susan E; Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V

    2007-05-01

    Individuals with advanced oropharyngeal cancer often experience dysphagia as a result of their illness and its treatment. Research consistently demonstrates that dysphagia and difficulty with oral intake have many implications, including a negative impact on quality of life. Nurses are in a key position to provide support and initiate appropriate interventions for individuals with dysphagia. Using the Human Response to Illness model (Mitchell et al, 1991) as an organising framework, this paper presents a critical review of the empirical literature regarding dysphagia in individuals with advanced oropharyngeal cancer that will: i) provide the reader with a comprehensive understanding of dysphagia; ii) identify current gaps in our knowledge; and iii) establish the foundation for appropriate evidence-based interventions to optimise functioning and quality of life in this patient population.

  14. Advances for Studying Clonal Evolution in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Benjamin J.; Chen, Feng; Wendl, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The “clonal evolution” model of cancer emerged and “evolved” amid ongoing advances in technology, especially in recent years during which next generation sequencing instruments have provided ever higher resolution pictures of the genetic changes in cancer cells and heterogeneity in tumors. It has become increasingly clear that clonal evolution is not a single sequential process, but instead frequently involves simultaneous evolution of multiple subclones that co-exist because they are of similar fitness or are spatially separated. Co-evolution of subclones also occurs when they complement each other’s survival advantages. Recent studies have also shown that clonal evolution is highly heterogeneous: different individual tumors of the same type may undergo very different paths of clonal evolution. New methodological advancements, including deep digital sequencing of a mixed tumor population, single cell sequencing, and the development of more sophisticated computational tools, will continue to shape and reshape the models of clonal evolution. In turn, these will provide both an improved framework for the understanding of cancer progression and a guide for treatment strategies aimed at the elimination of all, rather than just some, of the cancer cells within a patient. PMID:23353056

  15. "Stomach Flu" (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? "Stomach Flu" KidsHealth > For Kids > "Stomach Flu" A A A en español "El virus estomacal" Many people talk about the "stomach flu" when they're feeling sick to their ...

  16. Chemopreventive Activity of MGN-3/Biobran Against Chemical Induction of Glandular Stomach Carcinogenesis in Rats and Its Apoptotic Effect in Gastric Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Badr El-Din, Nariman K; Abdel Fattah, Salma M; Pan, Deyu; Tolentino, Lucilene; Ghoneum, Mamdooh

    2016-12-01

    In the current study, we investigated the chemopreventive activity of arabinoxylan rice bran, MGN-3/Biobran, against chemical induction of glandular stomach carcinogenesis in rats. Gastric cancer was induced by carcinogen methylnitronitrosoguanidine (MNNG), and rats received MNNG alone or MNNG plus Biobran (40 mg/kg body weight) for a total of 8 months. Averaged results from 2 separate readings showed that exposure to MNNG plus Biobran caused gastric dysplasia and cancer (adenocarcinoma) in 4.5/12 rats (9/24 readings, 37.5%), with 3.5/12 rats (7/24 readings, 29.2%) showing dysplasia and 1/12 rats (8.3%) developing adenocarcinoma. In contrast, in rats treated with MNNG alone, 8/10 (80%) developed dysplasia and adenocarcinoma, with 6/10 rats (60%) showing dysplasia and 2/10 rats (20%) developing adenocarcinoma. The effect of combining both agents was also associated with significant suppression of the expression of the tumor marker Ki-67 and remarkable induction in the apoptotic gastric cancer cells via mitochondrial-dependent pathway as indicated by the upregulation in p53 expression, Bax expression, downregulation in Bcl-2 expression, an increase in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and an activation of caspase-3. In addition, Biobran treatment induced cell-cycle arrest in the subG1 phase, where the hypodiploid cell population was markedly increased. Moreover, Biobran treatment protected rats against MNNG-induced significant decrease in lymphocyte levels. We conclude that Biobran provides protection against chemical induction of glandular stomach carcinogenesis in rats and may be useful for the treatment of human patients with gastric cancer.

  17. The Role of Three-Dimensional Multidetector CT Gastrography in the Preoperative Imaging of Stomach Cancer: Emphasis on Detection and Localization of the Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Woong; Heo, Suk Hee; Lim, Hyo Soon; Lim, Nam Yeol; Park, Young Kyu; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2015-01-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) gastrography has been regarded as a promising technique for the preoperative imaging of gastric cancer. It has the ability to produce various three-dimensional (3D) images. Because 3D reconstruction images are more effective and intuitive for recognizing abnormal changes in the gastric folds and subtle mucosal nodularity than two-dimensional images, 3D MDCT gastrography can enhance the detection rate of early gastric cancer, which, in turn, contributes to the improvement of the accuracy of preoperative tumor (T) staging. In addition, shaded surface display and tissue transition projection images provide a global view of the stomach, with the exact location of gastric cancer, which may replace the need for barium studies. In this article, we discuss technical factors in producing high-quality MDCT gastrographic images and present cases demonstrating the usefulness of MDCT gastrography for the detection and T staging of gastric cancer while emphasizing the significance of preoperative localization of gastric cancer in terms of surgical margin. PMID:25598676

  18. Surgery for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Neville F; Rao, Archana

    2017-05-01

    Cytoreductive surgery for patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer has been practised since the pioneering work of Tom Griffiths in 1975. Further research has demonstrated the prognostic significance of the extent of metastatic disease pre-operatively, and of complete cytoreduction post-operatively. Patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer should be referred to high volume cancer units, and managed by multidisciplinary teams. The role of thoracoscopy and resection of intrathoracic disease is presently investigational. In recent years, there has been increasing use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and interval cytoreductive surgery in patients with poor performance status, which is usually due to large volume ascites and/or large pleural effusions. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy reduces the post-operative morbidity, but if the tumour responds well to the chemotherapy, the inflammatory response makes the surgery more difficult. Post-operative morbidity is generally tolerable, but increases in older patients, and in those having multiple, aggressive surgical procedures, such as bowel resection or diaphragmatic stripping. Primary cytoreductive surgery should be regarded as the gold standard for most patients until a test is developed which would allow the prediction of platinum resistance pre-operatively. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Novel imaging in advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Hanan; Hamilton, Robert J

    2017-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer and second leading cause of death in men. Imaging evaluation of PCa is challenging because of the prostate's deep pelvic location, its complex zonal anatomy and its multifocal nature. Novel imaging modalities are needed to improve detection, reassessment in biochemical relapse, and disease progression in advanced metastatic stages. Current imaging modalities have distinct strengths. However, all lack the ability to diagnose micrometastases, differentiate high from low-grade disease and diagnose advanced disease, especially at low prostate specific antigen values. There is a need to combine the existing imaging methods with concepts utilizing tumor biology to differentiate biologically aggressive from indolent tumors. PET imaging with novel tracers facilitate improved imaging of PCa, but also usher in new compounds that could be useful for directing treatment as well. Most tracers have limited sensitivity, with the exception of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeting tracers, that offer relatively higher sensitivity and specificity. PSMA-PET appears promising in improving the imaging yield particularly in recurrent and advanced disease states. Incorporating PSMA-PET in these settings could open or prolong windows along the trajectory of the disease that could allow new treatments or more effective use of currently existing treatments. Prospective studies focusing on novel imaging enhancement and integration with therapeutic applications are needed.

  20. [A case of elder gastric cancer patient who relapsed at the local stomach wall and the regional lymph node at the time of six months after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD)].

    PubMed

    Nasu, Keiichi; Maeshiro, Tsuyoshi; Shida, Dai; Miyamoto, Sachio; Inoue, Satoru; Umekita, Nobutaka; Ara, Kuniyoshi

    2009-11-01

    A case is a woman of 81-year-old. She was admitted to our hospital for a close examination of anemia from her family doctor. Gastroscopy revealed a 15 mm diameter of the type 0-IIa+IIc lesion at the posterior wall to the lesser curvature of the gastric body. And the biopsy of the lesion revealed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma (tub2). In consideration of the gastrectomy at this point, but firstly, an endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was planned to perform for gaining the total pathological diagnosis of the lesion. Pathological findings revealed that the cancer cell invaded massively to submucosa (sm2), and that lymphatic permeation and venous permeation were also presented (ly2, v2). We explained it to the patient about the necessity of additional gastric resection, but she rejected the operation. So we had no choice but to observe the patient closely. Two months after the ESD, gastroscopy revealed no recurrent signs. But six months after the ESD, the local area of the stomach was revealed type 2 advanced gastric cancer, and computed tomography (CT) revealed a lymphoid swelling at the side of lesser curvature. We performed distal gastrectomy and D2 lymphoid dissection at this point. The final pathological diagnosis was T2 (ss) N2H0P0M0, Stage IIIA, based on the Japanese classification of gastric cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy (oral fluoropylimidine) was interrupted in short period because of the side effects such as nausea, appetite loss, and diarrhea. There has been no recurrence for 1 year and six months since the operation. ESD is a minimally invasive technique and it is safe, convenient, and efficacious from the gastric functional point of view. However, the therapeutic strategies of the early gastric cancer, especially submucosally invasive gastric cancer, must be decided carefully and individually, considering the risk factors and the postoperative quality of life (QOL).

  1. Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care, a 2010 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  2. Stomach development, stem cells and disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Shivdasani, Ramesh A

    2016-02-15

    The stomach, an organ derived from foregut endoderm, secretes acid and enzymes and plays a key role in digestion. During development, mesenchymal-epithelial interactions drive stomach specification, patterning, differentiation and growth through selected signaling pathways and transcription factors. After birth, the gastric epithelium is maintained by the activity of stem cells. Developmental signals are aberrantly activated and stem cell functions are disrupted in gastric cancer and other disorders. Therefore, a better understanding of stomach development and stem cells can inform approaches to treating these conditions. This Review highlights the molecular mechanisms of stomach development and discusses recent findings regarding stomach stem cells and organoid cultures, and their roles in investigating disease mechanisms. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Stomach development, stem cells and disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Shivdasani, Ramesh A.

    2016-01-01

    The stomach, an organ derived from foregut endoderm, secretes acid and enzymes and plays a key role in digestion. During development, mesenchymal-epithelial interactions drive stomach specification, patterning, differentiation and growth through selected signaling pathways and transcription factors. After birth, the gastric epithelium is maintained by the activity of stem cells. Developmental signals are aberrantly activated and stem cell functions are disrupted in gastric cancer and other disorders. Therefore, a better understanding of stomach development and stem cells can inform approaches to treating these conditions. This Review highlights the molecular mechanisms of stomach development and discusses recent findings regarding stomach stem cells and organoid cultures, and their roles in investigating disease mechanisms. PMID:26884394

  4. Epigenetics Advancing Personalized Nanomedicine in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shujun

    2012-01-01

    Personalized medicine aims to deliver the right drug to a right patient at the right time. It offers unique opportunities to integrate new technologies and concepts to disease prognosis, diagnosis and therapeutics. While selective personalized therapies are conceptually impressive, the majority of cancer therapies have dismal outcome. Such therapeutic failure could result from no response, drug resistance, disease relapse or severe side effect from improper drug delivery. Nanomedicine, the application of nanotechnology in medicine, has a potential to advance the identification of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and the delivery of right drug to disease sites. Epigenetic aberrations dynamically contribute to cancer pathogenesis. Given the individualized traits of epigenetic biomarkers, epigenetic considerations would significantly refine personalized nanomedicine. This review aims to dissect the interface of personalized medicine with nanomedicine and epigenetics. I will outline the progress and highlight challenges and areas that can be further explored perfecting the personalized health care. PMID:22921595

  5. Absence of point mutation in the 12th codon of transformed c-Ha-rasl genes of human cancer of the breast, stomach, melanoma, and neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Knyazev, P.G.; Schafer, R.; Willecke, K.V.; Seitz, I.F.

    1985-11-01

    In the authors' previous investigations, they established that the tumorous cell lines SK-BR-3 (breast cancer), LAN-1 (neuroblastoma), and a heterotransplant of malignant melanoma Jal contain transforming genes of Ha-ras type. Now, the authors report their results using restriction endonucleases of MspI and HpaII restriction to study nucleotide sequences 5'-CCGGC-3' and 3'GGCCG-5', which contain the 12th codon of GGC for the amino acid glycine in the normal allele of c-Ha-rasl in the three tumors listed above, in addition to human adenocarcinoma of the stomach (CaVSt) and normal cells corresponding to them. For hybridization of MspI/HpaII, fragments of chromosomal DNA isolated from cell lines SK-BR-3, and LAN-1, Ja-1 heterotransplant, and stomach adenocarcinoma CaVSt, the XmaI section of EJ oncogene, c-Ha-rasl (plasmid pEJ 6.6), labeled with /sup 32/P was used in down-translation reaction. Hybridization was performed in 3 x SSC buffer containing 5x Deinhardt's reagent and 10% dextran sulfate at 68/sup 0/C for 16-18 h. Washing of filters was conducted under rigid conditions. For autoradiography, Kodak XR-5 x-ray film in cartridges with reinforcing shields was used at -70/sup 0/C, exposure time of four to six days.

  6. Reconstruction after proximal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer in the upper third of the stomach: an analysis of our 13-year experience.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masaki; Nakamori, Mikihito; Ojima, Toshiyasu; Katsuda, Masahiro; Iida, Takeshi; Hayata, Keiji; Matsumura, Shuuichi; Kato, Tomoya; Kitadani, Junya; Iwahashi, Makoto; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2014-07-01

    Fundoplication during esophagogastrostomy (EG) after proximal gastrectomy (PG) is a useful procedure to prevent reflux esophagitis, but it is unclear how much of the remnant stomach should be wrapped around the esophagus. We analyzed data from 101 patients who underwent PG for upper third early gastric cancer between 1999 and 2011. In all, 64 patients underwent EG, 25 underwent jejunal interposition (JI), and 12 underwent jejunal pouch interposition (JPI). We compared intraoperative details and postoperative outcomes, and investigated the relationships between the degree of the fundoplication during EG and endoscopic findings. The length of the operation was significantly shorter in the EG group than in the other 2 groups (P < .05), and the intraoperative blood loss was significantly less in the EG group (P < .05). The JI and the JPI groups had significantly greater rates of early complications than did the EG group (P = .01). Reflux esophagitis was present in 22% of patients in the EG group, 8% in the JPI group, and none in the JI group. In the EG group, reflux esophagitis was significantly less common in patients with a >180° wrap of the remnant stomach around the esophagus than in patients with a smaller wrap (P = .0008). The rate of body weight loss was significantly less in the EG group compared with the other 2 groups (P < .05). Considering the low invasiveness of the procedure and postoperative outcomes, we consider that EG with a >180° wrap as the optimal reconstructive procedure. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Reconstruction after proximal gastrectomy for gastric cancer in the upper third of the stomach: a review of the literature published from 2000 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masaki; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2016-05-01

    Proximal gastrectomy (PG) is occasionally performed to preserve the physiological function of the remnant stomach with the aim of maintaining a gastric reservoir for patients with early gastric cancer in the upper third of the stomach. Many reconstructive procedures after PG have been reported, including esophagogastrostomy (EG), jejunal interposition, jejunal pouch interposition, and double tract. However, no general agreement exists regarding the optimal reconstructive procedure. This article reviews the current reconstructive procedures available for PG. We examined the surgical outcomes, postoperative complications, endoscopic findings, and quality of life (QOL) according to the reconstructive procedures. We found no significant difference in anastomotic leakage and anastomotic stricture among the procedures. The frequency of reflux esophagitis was higher with simple EG compared with the other reconstructive procedures. Some additional procedures, such as fundoplication, the use of a narrow gastric conduit, and placement of a gastric tube in the lower mediastinum on EG, could decrease the frequency of reflux esophagitis and reflux symptoms. These additional procedures may improve the QOL; however, the previous studies were small and could not adequately compare the reconstructive procedures. Prospective randomized controlled trials that involve a longer trial period and more institutions are needed to clarify the optimal reconstructive procedures after PG.

  8. Parental hope for children with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamihara, Junne; Nyborn, Justin A; Olcese, Maura E; Nickerson, Taylor; Mack, Jennifer W

    2015-05-01

    Previous work suggests that parents of children with cancer can remain hopeful despite receiving prognostic information, but we know little about what hope means to such parents, or the extent to which parents can feel hopeful even while facing the child's impending death. We audiotaped conversations between clinicians and parents of 32 children with relapsed or refractory cancer, and then interviewed parents about their hopes and expectations for their child. Parent statements about prognosis in interviews mirrored those made by clinicians during discussions about the child's diagnosis with refractory or relapsed cancer. Clinicians used language referring to hope during these conversations but did not ask parents directly about their hopes. Parents expressed a range of hopes for their children, from hopes related to cure or treatment response, to quality of life, normalcy, and love and relationships for the child. For most parents, expectations about prognosis were not aligned with their hopes for the child; for example, many parents hoped for a cure and also reported that they did not believe cure was possible. Many parents were able to acknowledge this incongruence. Parents accurately conveyed the reality of their child's serious condition in the setting of advanced cancer, and yet maintained hope. Hopes were not limited to hope for cure/treatment response. Clinicians should be encouraged to engage in direct conversations about hope with parents as a means to elicit realistic hopes that can help to focus the most meaningful plans for the child and family. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Advances in Radiotherapy Management of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vivek; Moreno, Amy C.; Lin, Steven H.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) as part of multidisciplinary oncologic care has been marked by profound advancements over the past decades. As part of multimodality therapy for esophageal cancer (EC), a prime goal of RT is to minimize not only treatment toxicities, but also postoperative complications and hospitalizations. Herein, discussion commences with the historical approaches to treating EC, including seminal trials supporting multimodality therapy. Subsequently, the impact of RT techniques, including three-dimensional conformal RT, intensity-modulated RT, and proton beam therapy, is examined through available data. We further discuss existing data and the potential for further development in the future, with an appraisal of the future outlook of technological advancements of RT for EC. PMID:27775643

  10. Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chun, Stephen G; Skinner, Heath D; Minsky, Bruce D

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer is controversial. For patients who are candidates for surgical resection, multiple prospective clinical trials have demonstrated the advantages of neoadjuvant chemoradiation. For patients who are medically inoperable, definitive chemoradiation is an alternative approach with survival rates comparable to trimodality therapy. Although trials of dose escalation are ongoing, the standard radiation dose remains 50.4 Gy. Modern radiotherapy techniques such as image-guided radiation therapy with motion management and intensity-modulated radiation therapy are strongly encouraged with a planning objective to maximize conformity to the intended target volume while reducing dose delivered to uninvolved normal tissues.

  11. Radiation therapy for advanced gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukiyama, I.; Akine, Y.; Kajiura, Y.; Ogino, T.; Yamashita, K.; Egawa, S.; Hijikata, J.; Kitagawa, T.

    1988-07-01

    A retrospective study of 75 patients with advanced inoperable gastric cancers, referred to the National Cancer Center Hospital between 1962 and 1982, was performed. According to the Borrmann classification based on X ray findings, Type 1 was found in 3 patients, Type 2 in 5, Type 3 in 40, and Type 4 in 15. Twelve patients could not be classified. The histological type was papillary adenocarcinoma in 7 patients, tubular adenocarcinoma in 23, mucinous carcinoma in 6, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in 14, signet ring cell carcinoma in 12 and others in 13. The site of remote metastasis in 19 patients was Virchow's lymph node in 8 patients, Douglas pouch in 3, liver and lung in 2 each and others in 4. All patients were treated by a either telecobalt 60 unit or a linear accelerator using 6 Mv photon and the total dose to primary lesion was 4000 cGy in 5 weeks to 7000 cGy in 8-9 weeks. Complete response (CR) was achieved in 6 patients or 8.0%, partial response (PR) in 46 or 61.3%, and no change (NC) in 23 or 30.7%. The response rate based on the sum of CR and PR was about 70%. The 50% survival period in months was 26.5, 7.3, and 3.2, respectively for patients with CR, PR, and NC. For the response of advanced gastric cancer to chemotherapy in the National Cancer Center Hospital, the combined use of UFT and Mitomycin C gave the highest rate, 46%. As for as local response is concerned, the response rate to radiation was 70%, a better result than that of chemotherapy alone.

  12. Endoscopic palliation of advanced esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mocanu, A; Bârla, R; Hoara, P; Constantinoiu, S

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer represents one of the most aggressive digestive tumors, with a survival rate at 5 years of only 10%. Globally, during the last three decades, there has been an increasing incidence of the esophageal cancer, approx. 400,000 new esophageal cancers being currently diagnosed annually. This represents the eighth leading cause of cancer incidence and the sixth leading cause of cancer death overall. Taking into account the population’s global aging and thus, the increase in the number of patients who will not bear surgery, PCT and radiation, or the fact that they do not want it especially because of deficiencies and associated pathology, the endoscopic ablative techniques with palliation purposes represent the alternative. If we refer to the Western Europe countries and North America, we notice an increase of esophageal adenocarcinoma rate versus squamous cancer. As for the Asian region, referring in particular to China and Japan, 9 out of 10 esophageal cancers are squamous cell carcinomas. For at least half of the patients with EC (esophageal cancer) there is no hope of healing because of the advanced regional malignant invasion (T3-4, N+, M+) with no chemo and radiotherapy response, poor preoperative patients’ conditions or systemic metastasis. The low life expectancy does not justify the risky medical procedures, the goal of the therapy consisting in the improvement of the quality of life by eliminating dysphagia (reestablishing oral feeding) which represents the most common complication of EC, the respiratory tract complication caused by eso-tracheal fistulas or by eliminating chest pain. To treat dysphagia, which is the main target of palliation, combined methods like endoscopic, chemo and radio-therapy, can be used, each one with indications, benefits and risks. Abbreviations: SEPS = self expanding plastic stent, SREMS = self expanding metal stent, EBRT = Endoscopic brachy radiotherapy, EUS = Ultra sound endoscopy, CT = Computer tomograph, UGE

  13. [Markers of prostate cancer stem cells: research advances].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shun-Qi; Huang, Sheng-Song

    2013-12-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most seriously malignant diseases threatening men's health, and the mechanisms of its initiation and progression are not yet completely understood. Recent years have witnessed distinct advances in researches on prostate cancer stem cells in many aspects using different sources of materials, such as human prostate cancer tissues, human prostate cancer cell lines, and mouse models of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer stem cell study offers a new insight into the mechanisms of the initiation and progression of prostate cancer and contributes positively to its treatment. This article presents an overview on the prostate cancer stem cell markers utilized in the isolation and identification of prostate cancer stem cells.

  14. Recent Advances in Understanding, Diagnosing, and Treating Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Kathryn; Fuh, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    Ovarian cancer, a term that encompasses ovarian, fallopian, and peritoneal cancers, is the leading cause of gynecologic cancer mortality. To improve patient outcomes, the field is currently focused on defining the mechanisms of cancer formation and spread, early diagnosis and prevention, and developing novel therapeutic options. This review summarizes recent advances in these areas. PMID:28184293

  15. Dietary intake of advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T D; Bowman, K B; Jackson, G P

    1983-02-01

    A state registered dietitian assessed the voluntary dietary intake of 13 advanced cancer inpatients on one ward of St. Christopher's Hospice for five consecutive days. There were 11 females, two males; median age 74 years (range 56 to 83). Two patients died on the fourth day of the study. A partially individualised weighed technique was used. Standard sized scoops and spoons were used to serve the food in small, medium or large standard portions (depending on appetite) and were weighed as served. Individual plate waste (by weight) was subtracted to give estimated individual intake. Foods provided by visitors was not included. The median and range of individual mean daily intakes (estimated) were: energy 5760 (938-8945) kJ, 1376 (224-2137) kcal; protein 44 (11-86) g; fat 52 (9-93) g; carbohydrate 169 (21-194) g; calcium 748 (268-1457) mg; iron 4.8 (0.5-21.0) mg; dietary fibre 5.0 (0.5-21.0) g. Compared to recommended amounts, energy, iron and dietary fibre intakes were low; calcium intake was high. Nutritional status may affect prognosis and/or subjective well-being in advanced cancer. The value of nutritional supplementation and the role of appetite stimulants in improving nutritional status needs investigation.

  16. Adjuvant chemotherapy for advanced endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Galaal, Khadra; Al Moundhri, Mansour; Bryant, Andrew; Lopes, Alberto D; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2014-05-15

    Approximately 13% of women diagnosed with endometrial cancer present with advanced stage disease (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage III/IV). The standard treatment of advanced endometrial cancer consists of cytoreductive surgery followed by radiation therapy, or chemotherapy, or both. There is currently little agreement about which adjuvant treatment is the safest and most effective. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of adjuvant chemotherapy compared with radiotherapy or chemoradiation, and to determine which chemotherapy agents are most effective in women presenting with advanced endometrial cancer (FIGO stage III/IV). We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Collaborative Review Group's Trial Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 10 2013), MEDLINE and EMBASE up to November 2013. Also we searched electronic clinical trial registries for ongoing trials. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of adjuvant chemotherapy compared with radiotherapy or chemoradiation in women with FIGO stage III and IV endometrial cancer. Two review authors selected trials, extracted data, and assessed trials for risk of bias. Where necessary, we contacted trial investigators for relevant, unpublished data. We pooled data using the random-effects model in Review Manager (RevMan) software. We included four multicentre RCTs involving 1269 women with primary FIGO stage III/IV endometrial cancer. We considered the trials to be at low to moderate risk of bias. All participants received primary cytoreductive surgery. Two trials, evaluating 620 women (83% stage III, 17% stage IV), compared adjuvant chemotherapy with adjuvant radiotherapy; one trial evaluating 552 women (88% stage III, 12% stage IV) compared two chemotherapy regimens (cisplatin/doxorubicin/paclitaxel (CDP) versus cisplatin/doxorubicin (CD) treatment) in women who had all undergone adjuvant radiotherapy; and one trial contributed no data

  17. Risk of Gastric Cancer Among Patients With Intestinal Metaplasia of the Stomach in a US Integrated Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Kavya M; Chang, Jonathan I; Shi, Jiaxiao M; Wu, Bechien U

    2016-10-01

    Gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM) is a common finding from routine endoscopies. Although GIM is an early step in gastric carcinogenesis, there is controversy regarding routine surveillance of patients with GIM in regions with a low prevalence of gastric cancer. We aimed to determine the incidence of gastric cancer among patients with GIM and risk factors for gastric cancer. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients from the Kaiser Permanente Southern California region diagnosed with GIM from 2000 through 2011. GIM was identified by a keyword search of pathology reports; gastric cancer cases were identified by cross-reference with an internal cancer registry. The incidence of gastric cancer in patients with GIM (n = 923; median age at diagnosis, 68 y) was compared with that of an age- and sex-matched reference population (controls). Risk factors such as ethnicity, smoking status, history of Helicobacter pylori infection, and family history of gastric cancer were evaluated by individual Cox proportional hazards regression. We then performed a second case-cohort study to evaluate the risk of gastric cancer based on the location and extent of GIM. The median duration of follow-up evaluation was 4.6 years (interquartile range, 3.0-6.7 y). We identified 25 patients with GIM who developed gastric cancers. Seventeen cases of cancer were diagnosed at the same time as the diagnosis of GIM. Eight cases of cancer were identified within a median time period of 4.6 years after a diagnosis of GIM (interquartile range, 2-5.7 y). The overall incidence rate for the cohort was 1.72 (95% confidence interval, 0.74-3.39). Among the risk factors evaluated, only family history (hazard ratio, 3.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-9.7; P = .012) and extent of GIM (odds ratio, 9.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-50.4) increased the risk for gastric cancer. The incidence rate for gastric cancer in patients with a positive family history was 8.12 (95% confidence interval, 1

  18. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation for advanced primary vulvar cancer.

    PubMed

    van Doorn, H C; Ansink, A; Verhaar-Langereis, M; Stalpers, L

    2006-07-19

    In advanced stage primary vulvar cancer, treatment is tailored to individual patient needs. Combined treatment modalities have been developed, using chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery. To determine whether the combined treatment strategy using concurrent neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy followed by surgery is effective and safe in vulvar cancer patients with advanced primary disease. Main outcomes of interest were: types of surgical intervention following chemoradiation and survival, recurrence and complication rates. We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Review Group Specialised Register. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, CANCERLIT, other databases and reference lists of articles. The latest search was conducted on 12 March 2005. Studies of curative treatment of patients with advanced, primary squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva were included. Treatment included concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy, followed by surgery. Twenty-eight abstracts and papers were selected either by the search strategy or by checking the cross references. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were not available. Five studies met the inclusion criteria. (Eifel 1995; Landoni 1996; Montana 2000; Moore 1998; Scheistroen 1993). Two authors (HCvD, MV-L) independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Study authors were contacted for additional information. Adverse effects information was collected from the trials. Chemotherapy was given uniformly within each of the five selected studies. However, four different chemoradiation schedules were applied. Radiotherapy dose fractionation techniques, fields and target definitions varied. Skin toxicity was observed in nearly all patients. Wound breakdown, infection, lymphedema, lymphorrhea and lymphoceles were also common. Operability was achieved in 63 to 92% of cases in the four studies using 5FU and CDDP or 5FU and MMC. In contrast, only 20% of

  19. Palbociclib and Letrozole in Advanced Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Finn, Richard S; Martin, Miguel; Rugo, Hope S; Jones, Stephen; Im, Seock-Ah; Gelmon, Karen; Harbeck, Nadia; Lipatov, Oleg N; Walshe, Janice M; Moulder, Stacy; Gauthier, Eric; Lu, Dongrui R; Randolph, Sophia; Diéras, Véronique; Slamon, Dennis J

    2016-11-17

    Background A phase 2 study showed that progression-free survival was longer with palbociclib plus letrozole than with letrozole alone in the initial treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative advanced breast cancer. We performed a phase 3 study that was designed to confirm and expand the efficacy and safety data for palbociclib plus letrozole for this indication. Methods In this double-blind study, we randomly assigned, in a 2:1 ratio, 666 postmenopausal women with ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer, who had not had prior treatment for advanced disease, to receive palbociclib plus letrozole or placebo plus letrozole. The primary end point was progression-free survival, as assessed by the investigators; secondary end points were overall survival, objective response, clinical benefit response, patient-reported outcomes, pharmacokinetic effects, and safety. Results The median progression-free survival was 24.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 22.1 to not estimable) in the palbociclib-letrozole group, as compared with 14.5 months (95% CI, 12.9 to 17.1) in the placebo-letrozole group (hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.46 to 0.72; P<0.001). The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were neutropenia (occurring in 66.4% of the patients in the palbociclib-letrozole group vs. 1.4% in the placebo-letrozole group), leukopenia (24.8% vs. 0%), anemia (5.4% vs. 1.8%), and fatigue (1.8% vs. 0.5%). Febrile neutropenia was reported in 1.8% of patients in the palbociclib-letrozole group and in none of the patients in the placebo-letrozole group. Permanent discontinuation of any study treatment as a result of adverse events occurred in 43 patients (9.7%) in the palbociclib-letrozole group and in 13 patients (5.9%) in the placebo-letrozole group. Conclusions Among patients with previously untreated ER-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer, palbociclib

  20. Carcinoma of the stomach: A review of epidemiology, pathogenesis, molecular genetics and chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Nagini, Siddavaram

    2012-01-01

    Carcinoma of the stomach is still the second most common cause of cancer death worldwide, although the incidence and mortality have fallen dramatically over the last 50 years in many regions. The incidence of gastric cancer varies in different parts of the world and among various ethnic groups. Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment, the 5-year survival rate of stomach cancer is only 20 per cent. Stomach cancer can be classified into intestinal and diffuse types based on epidemiological and clinicopathological features. The etiology of gastric cancer is multifactorial and includes both dietary and nondietary factors. The major diet-related risk factors implicated in stomach cancer development include high content of nitrates and high salt intake. Accumulating evidence has implicated the role of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. The development of gastric cancer is a complex, multistep process involving multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, DNA repair genes, cell cycle regulators, and signaling molecules. A plausible program for gastric cancer prevention involves intake of a balanced diet containing fruits and vegetables, improved sanitation and hygiene, screening and treatment of H. pylori infection, and follow-up of precancerous lesions. The fact that diet plays an important role in the etiology of gastric cancer offers scope for nutritional chemoprevention. Animal models have been extensively used to analyze the stepwise evolution of gastric carcinogenesis and to test dietary chemopreventive agents. Development of multitargeted preventive and therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer is a major challenge for the future. PMID:22844547

  1. Fatigue in advanced cancer: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Katherine; Walsh, Declan; Rybicki, Lisa A; Davis, Mellar P; Seyidova-Khoshknabi, Dilara

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue is a common advanced cancer symptom. Clinical features are not well known. The authors surveyed consecutive patients admitted to a palliative medicine program to identify clinical correlates of fatigue. Data collected included age, sex, performance status, primary site, prior chemotherapy/radiation therapy, and blood transfusions. Visual analogue scales assessed fatigue, quality of life, and ability to perform daily activities. Weight change was estimated. Laboratory results including lactate dehydrogenase and hemoglobin were recorded. Fatigue severity was associated with brain metastases, poor performance status, poor quality of life, and reduced ability to perform activities. Prior radiation therapy was associated with less severe fatigue. Age, sex, and hemoglobin level were not associated with fatigue. Fatigue was universal on referral. Brain metastases and poor quality of life independently predicted severity. Hemoglobin level did not predict fatigue. Further studies are necessary to define the clinical features and relationships of fatigue.

  2. Interfractional dose variations in the stomach and the bowels during breathhold intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer: Implications for a dose-escalation strategy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akira; Shibuya, Keiko; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Nakata, Manabu; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2013-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate the interfractional dose variations in the organs-at-risk (OARs) during pancreatic breathhold intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and to assess the impacts of "planning organs-at-risk volume" (POV) structures generated by isotropically expanding the dose-limiting OARs, based on the comparison of the interfractional doses to the OARs between IMRT plans and conventional three-dimensional-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plans. Thirty repeat CT scans were acquired from ten consecutive patients who were receiving chemoradiotherapy for pancreatic cancer. Six IMRT plans for each patient with two levels of prescription (45 and 51 Gy in 15 fractions) and 3 POV margin sizes (5, 7, and 10 mm) were generated based on the initial CT scan under predetermined constraints. Two 3D-CRT plans (39 and 42 Gy in 15 fractions) were simultaneously generated. The dose distribution of all of the treatment plans was recalculated with the repeat CT scans. The interfractional dose variations in the three OARs (stomach, duodenum, and small intestine) were evaluated, and the absolute volumes ≥39 Gy (V39Gy) of the OARs in the IMRT plans were compared to those in the 3D-CRT plans. Regression analyses were performed to assess the relative impact of the factors of interest on the interfractional dose variations of the OARs. Substantial dose excesses to the three OARs were observed at all of the prescription dose levels and the POV margin sizes on the repeat CT scans. The safety threshold based on the mean stomach V39Gy on the recalculated 39 Gy-3D-CRT plans was 1.9 ml. Statistically significant and marginally insignificant mean V39Gy values above the safety thresholds were observed in the stomach in the 51 Gy-IMRT plans (2.6 and 2.1 ml with the 5- and 7-mm PRV margins, respectively (P = 0.015 and 0.085)). Only in the case of the 10-mm POV margin did the metric fall below the safety threshold to 1.5 ml (P = 0.634). The duodenum and the small intestine did not violate

  3. "Stomach Flu" (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading 7 Videos: Kids Talk About Life Video: Am I Normal? (Girls ... Puberty Train Your Temper "Stomach Flu" KidsHealth > For Kids > "Stomach Flu" Print A A A Many people ...

  4. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour (mEq/ ...

  5. Effects of Qi therapy (external Qigong) on symptoms of advanced cancer: a single case study.

    PubMed

    Lee, M S; Yang, S H; Lee, K K; Moon, S-R

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of Qi therapy (external Qigong) in the management of symptoms of advanced cancer in a man. We used a single case study design to evaluate the effectiveness of Qi therapy (external Qigong) in a 35-year-old man with advanced cancer (Stage IV) involving metastases in the stomach, lung and bone (Karnofsky performance scale: KPS, 40: requires special care and assistance, disabled). Treatment involved six days of pre-assessment, eight treatment sessions on alternate days over 16 days, and a two-week follow-up phase. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to assess the patient's self-reported symptoms of cancer over the intervention and follow-up periods. Following treatment, VAS scores' analysis revealed beneficial effects on pain, vomiting, dyspnoea, fatigue, anorexia, insomnia, daily activity and psychological calmness. These improvements were maintained over the two-week follow-up phase. After the first Qi therapy session, the patient discontinued medication and could sit by himself; after the fourth session, the patient was able to walk and use the toilet without assistance (improvement in KPS: 70: care for self, unable to perform normal activity or to do active work). Although limited by the single case study approach, our results support previous studies on this topic and provide reasons to conduct controlled clinical trials.

  6. Laparoscopic Cytoreduction for Primary Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hojat, Rod; Johnson, Jil; Fenton, Bradford

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluated the feasibility of laparoscopic cytoreduction for primary advanced ovarian cancer. Methods: All patients with presumed stage 3/4 primary ovarian cancer underwent attempted laparoscopic cytoreduction. All patients had CT evidence of omental metastasis and ascites. A 5-port (5-mm) transperitoneal approach was used. A bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, supracervical hysterectomy, and omentectomy were performed with PlasmaKinetic (PK) cutting forceps. A laparoscopic 5-mm Argon-Beam Coagulator was used to coagulate tumor in the pelvis, abdominal peritoneum, intestinal mesentery, and diaphragm. Results: Nine of 11 cases (82%) were successfully de-bulked laparoscopically without conversion to laparotomy. Median operative time was 2.5 hours, and median blood loss was 275 mL. All tumors were debulked to <2 cm and 45% had no residual disease. Stages were 1–3B, 7–3C, and 1–4. Median length of stay was one day. Median VAS pain score was 4 (discomforting). Two of 11 patients (18%) had postoperative complications. Conclusion: Laparoscopic cytoreduction was successful and resulted in minimal morbidity. Because of our small sample size, additional studies are needed. PMID:20529532

  7. Laparoscopic cytoreduction for primary advanced ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Fanning, James; Hojat, Rod; Johnson, Jil; Fenton, Bradford

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of laparoscopic cytoreduction for primary advanced ovarian cancer. All patients with presumed stage 3/4 primary ovarian cancer underwent attempted laparoscopic cytoreduction. All patients had CT evidence of omental metastasis and ascites. A 5-port (5-mm) transperitoneal approach was used. A bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, supracervical hysterectomy, and omentectomy were performed with PlasmaKinetic (PK) cutting forceps. A laparoscopic 5-mm Argon-Beam Coagulator was used to coagulate tumor in the pelvis, abdominal peritoneum, intestinal mesentery, and diaphragm. Nine of 11 cases (82%) were successfully debulked laparoscopically without conversion to laparotomy. Median operative time was 2.5 hours, and median blood loss was 275 mL. All tumors were debulked to <2 cm and 45% had no residual disease. Stages were 1-3B, 7-3C, and 1-4. Median length of stay was one day. Median VAS pain score was 4 (discomforting). Two of 11 patients (18%) had postoperative complications. Laparoscopic cytoreduction was successful and resulted in minimal morbidity. Because of our small sample size, additional studies are needed.

  8. [Functional activity of metal contained enzymes with antioxidant activity in blood of patients with stomach cancer and during the use of anticancer autovaccine].

    PubMed

    P'iatchanina, T V; Rozumiĭ, D O; Mel'nykov, O R; Momot, V Ia; Chornyĭ, V O; Sydoryk, Ie P

    2007-01-01

    The authors presented in the article results of assessment of metal contained enzymes with antioxidant activity, ceruloplasmin (CP) in plasma blood, Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase in red blood cells of patients with I-IV stage stomach cancer during surgical treatment and application of anticancer autovaccine (AAV) to prevent relapses and methastases. It was revealed compared with the donors that at stages of the treatment, before operation and after resuscitation, the level of activity of CP was higher in 1,3 times and in 3 times was higher the level of SOD. The change of catalase activity was within the limits of physiological values. Discrepancy in levels of activity of enzymes- synergists in relation to the elimination of radical forms testifies about the disbalance in functioning of the antioxidant system protection and is one of the signs of the manifestation of oxidant stress. The presence of wide ranges of changes in activity of metal contained enzymes before surgical operation and after resuscitation may depict the presence of significant tension in the functioning of antioxidant system in patients and may demand to carry out an analysis of each parameter. Normalization or stabilization of the level of activity of metal contained enzymes at the stage of surgical treatment or during the use of AAV reflects an availability of adaptation and compensatory mechanisms and it may be considered as a favorable prognostic factor of the treatment. The use of AAV in a complex treatment of patients with not local stomach canser lead to 3 years survival by 22% in comparison with surgical treatment of the patients.

  9. Advanced Gastric Cancer Perforation Mimicking Abdominal Wall Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jinbeom; Park, Ilyoung; Lee, Dosang; Sung, Kiyoung; Baek, Jongmin

    2015-01-01

    Surgeons occasionally encounter a patient with a gastric cancer invading an adjacent organ, such as the pancreas, liver, or transverse colon. Although there is no established guideline for treatment of invasive gastric cancer, combined resection with radical gastrectomy is conventionally performed for curative purposes. We recently treated a patient with a large gastric cancer invading the abdominal wall, which was initially diagnosed as a simple abdominal wall abscess. Computed tomography showed that an abscess had formed adjacent to the greater curvature of the stomach. During surgery, we made an incision on the abdominal wall to drain the abscess, and performed curative total gastrectomy with partial excision of the involved abdominal wall. The patient received intensive treatment and wound management postoperatively with no surgery-related adverse events. However, the patient could not receive adjuvant chemotherapy and expired on the 82nd postoperative day. PMID:26468420

  10. Advances in Cancer Immunotherapy in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Smitha; Shin, Sarah; Dy, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is heralded as one of the most important advances in oncology. Until recently, only limited immunotherapeutic options were available in selected immunogenic cancers like melanoma and renal cell carcinomas. Nowadays, there is an improved understanding that anti-tumor immunity is controlled by a delicate balance in the tumor microenvironment between immune stimulatory and immune inhibitory pathways. Either by blocking the inhibitory pathways or stimulating the activating pathways that regulate cytotoxic lymphocytes, anti-tumor immunity can be enhanced leading to durable anti-tumor responses. Drugs which block the immune regulatory checkpoints namely the PD-1/PDL1 and CTLA 4 pathway have shown tremendous promise in a wide spectrum of solid and hematological malignancies, significantly improving overall survival in newly diagnosed and heavily pretreated patients alike. Hence there is renewed enthusiasm in the field of immune oncology with current research focused on augmenting responses to checkpoint inhibitors by combination therapy as well as studies looking at other immune modulators and adoptive T cell therapy. In this article, we highlight the key clinical advances and concepts in immunotherapy with particular emphasis on checkpoint inhibition as well as the future direction in this field. PMID:27886124

  11. Bioactive hyaluronan fragment (hexasaccharide) detects specific hexa-binding proteins in human breast and stomach cancer: possible role in tumorogenesis.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Prashanth; Kollapalli, Srinivas Prasad; Thomas, Anil; Mortha, Karuna Kumar; Banerjee, Shib Das

    2012-08-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a component of extracellular matrix that influences cell-proliferation, migration, development, regeneration, normal tissue remodeling, tissues undergoing malignancy and tumor cell interaction. The widespread occurrence of HA binding proteins, their involvement in tissue organization and the control of cellular behavior are well documented. The low molecular mass HA fragments can also induce a variety of biological events, including chemokine gene expression, transcription factor expression and angiogenesis. It is believed that these fragments are more potent in cellular activities than high molecular mass HA. In this study, we isolated the various fragments by gel permeation chromatography of hyaluronidase digested HA and characterized by fluoro assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis (FACE) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization analysis (MALDI). Detection and distribution of cellular receptors in invasive tumor tissues for HA polymer and HA fragments were determined both by Western blot and histochemistry. The study demonstrated the overexpression of HA-hexa binding protein in human tumors of breast and stomach and its involvement in tumorogenesis.

  12. GATA-4/-6 and HNF-1/-4 families of transcription factors control the transcriptional regulation of the murine Muc5ac mucin during stomach development and in epithelial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jonckheere, Nicolas; Vincent, Audrey; Franquet-Ansart, Hélène; Witte-Bouma, Janneke; Korteland-van Male, Anita; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Renes, Ingrid B; Van Seuningen, Isabelle

    2012-08-01

    During human embryonic and fetal development of the gastrointestinal tract, the gene encoding the MUC5AC mucin has a spatio-temporal pattern of expression restricted to the stomach. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for this restricted pattern of expression, we have studied Muc5ac expression in the developing stomach of the mouse and correlated it to that of transcription factors known to be involved in cell differentiation programs during development. Our results indicate that GATA-6 and HNF-4α expression increased concomitantly with the induction of Muc5ac expression in embryonic stomach. We then studied Muc5ac transcriptional regulation by these transcription factors and showed that they all transactivate Muc5ac promoter. We also identified several active GATA-4/-5/-6 and HNF-1/-4 cis-elements using gel shift assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation and site-directed mutagenesis. Among all Muc5ac regulators, only GATA-6 and HNF-4a expression was concomitant to that of Muc5ac in the developing stomach. This is thus in favor of an important role for these two transcription factors as regulators of expression of the Muc5ac mucin during stomach development and in epithelial cancer cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Prediction of Helicobacter pylori status by conventional endoscopy, narrow-band imaging magnifying endoscopy in stomach after endoscopic resection of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Kazuyoshi; Saka, Akiko; Nozawa, Yujiro; Nakamura, Atsuo

    2014-04-01

    To reduce the incidence of metachronous gastric carcinoma after endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer, Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy has been endorsed. It is not unusual for such patients to be H. pylori negative after eradication or for other reasons. If it were possible to predict H. pylori status using endoscopy alone, it would be very useful in clinical practice. To clarify the accuracy of endoscopic judgment of H. pylori status, we evaluated it in the stomach after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) of gastric cancer. Fifty-six patients treated by ESD were enrolled. The diagnostic criteria for H. pylori status by conventional endoscopy and narrow-band imaging (NBI)-magnifying endoscopy were decided, and H. pylori status was judged by two endoscopists. Based on the H. pylori stool antigen test as a diagnostic gold standard, conventional endoscopy and NBI-magnifying endoscopy were compared for their sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV). Interobserver agreement was assessed in terms of κ value. Interobserver agreement was moderate (0.56) for conventional endoscopy and substantial (0.77) for NBI-magnifying endoscopy. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 0.79, 0.52, 0.70, and 0.63 for conventional endoscopy and 0.91, 0.83, 0.88, and 0.86 for NBI-magnifying endoscopy, respectively. Prediction of H. pylori status using NBI-magnifying endoscopy is practical, and interobserver agreement is substantial. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Oxaliplatin, Fluorouracil, Erlotinib Hydrochloride, and Radiation Therapy Before Surgery and Erlotinib Hydrochloride After Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Cancer of the Esophagus or Gastroesophageal Junction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage II Esophageal Cancer; Stage II Gastric Cancer; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer

  15. [Perspectives of the stomach cancer treatment: the introduction of molecular targeted therapy and the hope for cure].

    PubMed

    Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Jae Kwang

    2013-03-25

    The overall survival of patients with gastric cancer has increased markedly in Korea, even higher than those of developed nations in Western world. It is due to the virtue of Korean National Cancer Screening Program and nowadays more than half of patients are diagnosed at the early stage of gastric cancer. However, for patients with unresectable gastric cancer, the outcomes of traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens stay at a median survival of 9-11 months. The knowledge of cancer biology and the data from gene expression profiling has explosively expanded. Alternations in the expression of receptor tyrosine kinases pathways including Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), phosphatydyl inositol 3 kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/mTOR), hepatocyte growth factor receptor (HGFR/MET), and fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) were proved to be critical in cancer cell survival and biological agents targeting those altered receptor tyrosine kinases, their ligands and downstream effector molecules are developed for anti-cancer purpose. Until now, only trastuzumab succeeded to significantly increase overall survival of patients with HER2 overexpressing gastric cancer. Other agents including bevacizumab, gefitinib, erlotinib, and lapatinib failed to achieve the efficacy in survival gain over standard chemotherapy. Insights about the variations between regions, races, and individuals call for the effort to find reliable predictive biomarkers for drug efficacy and to design finely stratified clinical trials. Compared to current treatment paradigms, it is hoped that molecularly targeted treatment along with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy will lead to significant gains in survival.

  16. Targeted Approach to Overcoming Treatment Resistance in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    therapy -­‐resistant   prostate   cancer  cells  and  in  combination   therapy  (SOW...treatment resistance in advanced prostate cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Karin Scarpinato CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Georgia Southern...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to determine if rescinnamine is effective against prostate cancer and

  17. Analysis of Relationships between Altitude and Distance from Volcano with Stomach Cancer Incidence Using a Geographic Information System.

    PubMed

    Amani, F; Ahari, S Sadeghieh; Barzegari, S; Hassanlouei, B; Sadrkabir, M; Farzaneh, Esmaeil

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world, with a wide variation in incidence rates across different geographical areas. In Iran GC is the most common cancer in males and it is reported to be the third most prevalent after breast and colorectal in females. A geographical information system (GIS) allows investigation of the geographical distribution of diseases. The purpose of the present study was to explore the relationship between gastric cancer and effective climatic factors using GIS. The dispersion distribution and the relationship between environmental factors effective on cancer were measured using Arc GIS. Of all cases, 672 (73.8%) were in males with a sex ratio of 3 to 1. The highest incidence by cities was seen in Namin with 137.5 per 100,000. The results of this study showed that the distribution of GC around the Sabalan volcanic mountain was significantly higher than other places in the same province. These results can be considered as a window to future comprehensive research on gastric cancer.

  18. Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with AdvancedProstate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    biosignatures. The projects under way are largely, but not exclusively focused on non-small cell lung cancer . Specific Aims: Same as above Role...AWARD NUMBERS: W81XWH-14-1-0555 TITLE: Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...21/2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER N/A Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT

  19. 3rd Pavia international symposium on advanced kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Porta, Camillo; Bracarda, Sergio

    2012-02-01

    Kidney cancers' natural history has radically changed in the past few years, due to the development of novel targeted agents. Despite these improvements, several unanswered questions still remain on the table, regarding the best first-line treatment, the ideal sequence of treatments, the management of specific subgroups of patients (e.g., elderly patients or those with comorbidities) and the relevance of prognostic factors, among many others. To foster discussions among clinicians and investigators working in this field, and to exchange different viewpoints concerning the newest advances in kidney cancer pathogenesis and treatment, the 3rd Pavia International Symposium on Advanced Kidney cancer was held in Pavia (Italy) between 30 June and 1 July 2011. The aim of this report is to summarize the most significant advances in the different disciplines applied to advanced kidney cancer, which were presented and discussed during the meeting, and how these advances will be changing the perspective of patients with this disease.

  20. Laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy with jejunal interposition for gastric cancer in the proximal third of the stomach: a retrospective comparison with open surgery.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Takahiro; Gotohda, Naoto; Kato, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Konishi, Masaru; Kinoshita, Taira

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of cancer in the proximal third of the stomach is increasing. Laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy (LPG) seems an attractive option for the treatment of early-stage proximal gastric cancer but has not gained wide acceptance because of technical difficulties, including the prevention of severe reflux. In this study, we describe our technique for LPG with jejunal interposition (LPG-IP) and evaluate its safety and feasibility. In this retrospective analysis, we reviewed the data of patients with proximal gastric cancer who underwent LPG-IP (n = 22) or the same procedure with open surgery (OPG-IP; n = 68) between January 2008 and September 2011. Short-term surgical variables and outcomes were compared between the groups. The reconstruction method was the same in both groups, with creation of a 15 cm, single-loop, jejunal interposition for anastomosis. There were no differences in patient or tumor characteristics between the groups. Operation time was longer in the LGP-IP group (233 vs. 201 min, p = 0.0002) and estimated blood loss was significantly less (20 vs. 242 g, p < 0.0001). The average number of harvested lymph nodes did not differ between the two groups (17 vs. 20). There also were no differences in the incidence of leakage at the esophagojejunostomy anastomosis (9.1 vs. 7.4%) or other postoperative complications (27 vs. 32%). The number of times additional postoperative analgesia was required was significantly less in the LPG-IP group compared with the OPG-IP group (2 vs. 4, p < 0.0001). LPG-IP has equivalent safety and curability compared with OPG-IP. Our results imply that LPG-IP may lead to faster recovery, better cosmesis, and improved quality of life in the short-term compared with OPG-IP. Because of the limitations of retrospective analysis, a further study should be conducted to obtain definitive conclusions.

  1. Tomatine-Containing Green Tomato Extracts Inhibit Growth of Human Breast, Colon, Liver, and Stomach Cancer Cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum) synthesize the glycoalkaloids dehydrotomatine and a–tomatine, possibly as a defense against bacteria, fungi, viruses, and insects. We investigated six green and three red tomato extracts for their ability to induce cell death in human cancer and normal cells ...

  2. Phase II Study of Oxaliplatin, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Advanced Gastric/Gastroesophageal Junction Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  3. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2015

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, fourteen topics were selected as major research advances in gynecologic oncology. For ovarian cancer, high-level evidence for annual screening with multimodal strategy which could reduce ovarian cancer deaths was reported. The best preventive strategies with current status of evidence level were also summarized. Final report of chemotherapy or upfront surgery (CHORUS) trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced stage ovarian cancer and individualized therapy based on gene characteristics followed. There was no sign of abating in great interest in immunotherapy as well as targeted therapies in various gynecologic cancers. The fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference which was held in November 7–9 in Tokyo was briefly introduced. For cervical cancer, update of human papillomavirus vaccines regarding two-dose regimen, 9-valent vaccine, and therapeutic vaccine was reviewed. For corpus cancer, the safety concern of power morcellation in presumed fibroids was explored again with regard to age and prevalence of corpus malignancy. Hormone therapy and endometrial cancer risk, trabectedin as an option for leiomyosarcoma, endometrial cancer and Lynch syndrome, and the radiation therapy guidelines were also discussed. In addition, adjuvant therapy in vulvar cancer and the updated of targeted therapy in gynecologic cancer were addressed. For breast cancer, palbociclib in hormone-receptor-positive advanced disease, oncotype DX Recurrence Score in low-risk patients, regional nodal irradiation to internal mammary, supraclavicular, and axillary lymph nodes, and cavity shave margins were summarized as the last topics covered in this review. PMID:27775259

  4. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2015.

    PubMed

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Miseon; Kim, Hak Jae; Lee, Kyung Hun; Kim, Jae Weon

    2016-11-01

    In 2015, fourteen topics were selected as major research advances in gynecologic oncology. For ovarian cancer, high-level evidence for annual screening with multimodal strategy which could reduce ovarian cancer deaths was reported. The best preventive strategies with current status of evidence level were also summarized. Final report of chemotherapy or upfront surgery (CHORUS) trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced stage ovarian cancer and individualized therapy based on gene characteristics followed. There was no sign of abating in great interest in immunotherapy as well as targeted therapies in various gynecologic cancers. The fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference which was held in November 7-9 in Tokyo was briefly introduced. For cervical cancer, update of human papillomavirus vaccines regarding two-dose regimen, 9-valent vaccine, and therapeutic vaccine was reviewed. For corpus cancer, the safety concern of power morcellation in presumed fibroids was explored again with regard to age and prevalence of corpus malignancy. Hormone therapy and endometrial cancer risk, trabectedin as an option for leiomyosarcoma, endometrial cancer and Lynch syndrome, and the radiation therapy guidelines were also discussed. In addition, adjuvant therapy in vulvar cancer and the updated of targeted therapy in gynecologic cancer were addressed. For breast cancer, palbociclib in hormone-receptor-positive advanced disease, oncotype DX Recurrence Score in low-risk patients, regional nodal irradiation to internal mammary, supraclavicular, and axillary lymph nodes, and cavity shave margins were summarized as the last topics covered in this review.

  5. Improving management of patients with advanced cancer

    PubMed Central

    Drudge-Coates, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Development of bone metastases in patients with advanced cancer is associated with skeletal-related events (SREs) such as pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, the requirement for surgery or palliative radiotherapy to bone, and hypercalcemia of malignancy. Skeletal morbidity may reduce patient mobility, limit functional independence, and impair quality of life (QOL). Proactive management of new or worsening bone pain or motor impairment is crucial because of the potential for rapid progression of symptoms. Administration of bisphosphonate therapy as a monthly infusion to patients with bone metastases prevents or delays the onset and reduces the frequency of SREs and provides clinically meaningful improvements in bone pain and QOL. In addition to administration of therapy, the monthly infusion visit allows a dedicated team of healthcare professionals to regularly assess SREs, response to therapy, adverse events (AEs), QOL, and adherence to oral medications and supplements. The continuity of care that occurs during the monthly infusion visit provides oncology nurses with an opportunity to educate patients about effective strategies to manage SREs and AEs. In addition, regular interaction provides oncology nurses with an opportunity to recognize and proactively address subtle changes in the patients’ medical condition. Using a multidisciplinary medical team also eliminates barriers between the various healthcare professionals involved in patient management. Consequently, the monthly infusion visit can result in effective patient management and improved clinical outcomes in patients with malignant bone disease. PMID:21206517

  6. Nonulcer Stomach Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... and alternative treatments, talk to your doctor about: Herbal supplements. Herbal remedies that may be of some benefit for nonulcer stomach pain include a combination of peppermint and caraway oil. These supplements may relieve some of the symptoms of nonulcer ...

  7. Neoplasms of the Stomach, Liver & Pancreas: Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment among High-Risk Populations | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Agenda - Day 1, September 18, 2015 08:00 am - Registration 08:30 am - Welcome remarks and overview of the Conference Dr. Leslie Ford (NCI) – 5 min Dr. Edgar Colon (RCM and UPRCCC) - 5 min Luz Maria Rodriguez – Conference objectives & structure  Global Cancer Burden: An Overview and State of the Problem Moderators: Dr. Luz Maria Rodriguez and Dr. Victor Jose Carlo (PR Gastroenterology Association) |

  8. Tomatine-containing green tomato extracts inhibit growth of human breast, colon, liver, and stomach cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mendel; Levin, Carol E; Lee, Seung-Un; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Lee, In-Seon; Byun, Jae-Oke; Kozukue, Nobuyuki

    2009-07-08

    Tomato plants ( Lycopersicon esculentum ) synthesize the glycoalkaloids dehydrotomatine and alpha-tomatine, possibly as a defense against bacteria, fungi, viruses, and insects. Six green and three red tomato extracts were investigated for their ability to induce cell death in human cancer and normal cells using a microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay. Compared to untreated controls, the high-tomatine green tomato extracts strongly inhibited the following human cancer cell lines: breast (MCF-7), colon (HT-29), gastric (AGS), and hepatoma (liver) (HepG2), as well as normal human liver cells (Chang). There was little inhibition of the cells by the three low-tomatine red tomato extracts. Cell death induced by the pure glycoalkaloids dehydrotomatine and alpha-tomatine isolated from green tomatoes and characterized by HPLC, GC, and GC-MS, as well as their respective aglycones tomatidenol and tomatidine, was also evaluated. alpha-Tomatine was highly effective in inhibiting all of the cell lines. Dehydrotomatine, tomatidenol, and tomatidine had little, if any, effect on cell inhibition. The results show that the susceptibility to destruction varies with the nature of the alkaloid and plant extract and the type of cancer cell. These findings extend related observations on the anticarcinogenic potential of glycoalkaloids and suggest that consumers may benefit by eating not only high-lycopene red tomatoes but also green tomatoes containing glycoalkaloids. Possible mechanisms of the anticarcinogenic and other beneficial effects and the significance of the cited observations for breeding improved tomatoes and for the human diet are discussed.

  9. Induction of apoptosis by rhapontin having stilbene moiety, a component of rhubarb (Rheum officinale Baillon) in human stomach cancer KATO III cells.

    PubMed

    Hibasami, Hiroshige; Takagi, Keiji; Ishii, Toshiaki; Tsujikawa, Mayumi; Imai, Nami; Honda, Ikumi

    2007-08-01

    We have investigated the effects of rhapontin on proliferation and DNA of human stomach cancer KATO III cells. Growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis by rhapontin were observed in the KATO III cells. Morphological change showing apoptotic bodies was observed in the KATO III cells treated with rhapontin. The fragmentation of DNA by rhapontin to oligonucleosomal-sized fragments that is a characteristic of apoptosis was observed to be concentration- and time-dependent in the KATO III cells. N-acetyl-L-cysteine, an antioxidant, suppressed the DNA fragmentation caused by rhapontin. On the other hand, it was found that resveratrol having stilbene moiety as well as rhapontin induced apoptosis in the KATO III cells. So, it is considered that stilbene moiety in the molecule is essential for the induction of apoptosis. The data of the present study show that the suppression of KATO III cell-growth by rhapontin results from the induction of apoptosis by the compound, and that active oxygen is involved in the inductions of apoptosis caused by rhapontin in the KATO III cells.

  10. Clinical Impact of Stomach-partitioning Gastrojejunostomy with Braun Enteroenterostomy for Patients with Gastric Outlet Obstruction Caused by Unresectable Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Arigami, Takaaki; Uenosono, Yoshikazu; Ishigami, Sumiya; Yanagita, Shigehiro; Okubo, Keishi; Uchikado, Yasuto; Kita, Yoshiaki; Mori, Shinichiro; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Maemura, Kosei; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2016-10-01

    To compare adverse events and post-therapeutic clinical courses between stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy with Braun enteroenterostomy (SPGJ-BEE) and endoscopic metallic stent placement (EMSP) in patients with gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) caused by unresectable gastric cancer and assess the clinical utility of SPGJ-BEE. We retrospectively reviewed clinical data of 16 and 9 patients with GOO undergoing SPGJ-BEE and EMSP, respectively. Re-obstruction caused by tumor overgrowth was identified in 3 (33.3%) out of 9 patients in the EMSP group. The GOO scoring system (GOOSS) revealed that its score after treatments was significantly higher in the SPGJ-BEE group than in the EMSP group (p<0.001). All patients in both groups received chemotherapy after treatments. The median survival times in the SPGJ-BEE and EMSP groups were 414 and 303 days, respectively. Our preliminary results suggest that SPGJ-BEE provides an improved long-term quality of life and the early induction of subsequent chemotherapy related with a better prognosis in patients with GOO. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  11. Adenocarcinoma of the stomach and exposure to occupational dust

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, W.E.; Bernstein, L.; Peters, J.M.; Garabrant, D.H.; Mack, T.M.

    1988-07-01

    The authors studied 1342 cases of adenocarcinoma of the stomach identified by a population-based cancer registry in Los Angeles County, California. The cases were males aged 20-64 years first diagnosed between 1972 and 1982. To determine whether exposure to occupational dust increased the risk of developing stomach cancer, occupational titles were rated for the likelihood of exposure to various kinds of dust. Men who worked in dusty jobs had a risk for developing stomach cancer 1.3 times that of unexposed men. The association of exposure to dust with stomach cancer was stronger at higher levels of exposure. The risk was not uniform throughout the stomach: the highest risk (1.8 times that of unexposed men) was found for the antrum/pylorus. At that site, exposure to mineral dust carried the greatest risk for cancer (3.7 times the risk for unexposed men). The highest risks from dust exposure were observed in blacks. Risk was related to race, socioeconomic status, and immigrant status, but these factors did not entirely explain the association with dust exposure. The observed relation between dust exposure and stomach cancer is consistent with results of previous mortality and case-control studies of cancer in men who worked in dusty occupations. Ingested dust may be one factor in the etiology of adenocarcinoma of the stomach.

  12. Crizotinib for Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III clinical trial that compared crizotinib versus chemotherapy in previously treated patients with advanced lung cancer whose tumors have an EML4-ALK fusion gene.

  13. Combination Therapy Shows Promise for Treating Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Adding the drug everolimus (Afinitor®) to exemestane helped postmenopausal women whose advanced breast cancer had stopped responding to hormonal therapy live about 4 months longer without the disease progressing than women who received exemestane alone.

  14. Bevacizumab improves survival for patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer that was not curable with standard treatment who received the drug bevacizumab (Avastin) lived 3.7 months longer than patients who did not receive the drug, according to an interim analysis

  15. Blocking DNA Repair in Advanced BRCA-Mutated Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with relapsed or refractory advanced cancer and confirmed BRCA mutations who have not previously been treated with a PARP inhibitor will be given BMN 673 by mouth once a day in 28-day cycles.

  16. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  17. Visual disturbances in advanced cancer patients: clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Saita, L; Polastri, D; De Conno, F

    1999-03-01

    Visual disturbances in advanced cancer patients are very rarely signaled, evaluated, or adequately treated. The main causes of sight disturbances are primary eye tumors, ocular metastases, and some paraneoplastic syndromes. Sight alteration can also be associated with asthenia, fatigue, anemia, and hypovitaminosis. These symptoms can be monocular or binocular, and their gravity and evolution can vary. Based on a survey of 156 patients, we estimate the prevalence of visual disturbances to be 12% in advanced cancer patients.

  18. Advanced Lung Cancer Screening: An Individualized Molecular Nanotechnology Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0323 TITLE: Advanced Lung Cancer Screening: An Individualized Molecular Nanotechnology Approach PRINCIPAL... control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE March 2016 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND...SUBTITLE Advanced Lung Cancer Screening: An Individualized Molecular Nanotechnology Approach 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  19. Stomach microbiota composition varies between patients with non-atrophic gastritis and patients with intestinal type of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aviles-Jimenez, Francisco; Vazquez-Jimenez, Flor; Medrano-Guzman, Rafael; Mantilla, Alejandra; Torres, Javier

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to characterize microbiota of the gastric mucosa as it progress to intestinal type of cancer. Study included five patients each of non-atrophic gastritis (NAG), intestinal metaplasia (IM) and intestinal-type gastric cancer (GC). Gastric tissue was obtained and DNA extracted for microbiota analyses using the microarray G3 PhyloChip. Bacterial diversity ranged from 8 to 57, and steadily decreased from NAG to IM to GC (p = 0.004). A significant microbiota difference was observed between NAG and GC based on Unifrac-presence/absence and weighted-Unifrac-abundance metrics of 283 taxa (p < 0.05). HC-AN analyses based on presence/absence of 238 taxa revealed that GC and NAG grouped apart, whereas IM overlapped with both. An ordinated analyses based on weighted-Unifrac distance given abundance of 44 taxa showing significance across categories revealed significant microbiota separation between NAG and GC. This study is the first to show a gradual shift in gastric microbiota profile from NAG to IM to GC. PMID:24569566

  20. Stomach microbiota composition varies between patients with non-atrophic gastritis and patients with intestinal type of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Aviles-Jimenez, Francisco; Vazquez-Jimenez, Flor; Medrano-Guzman, Rafael; Mantilla, Alejandra; Torres, Javier

    2014-02-26

    We aimed to characterize microbiota of the gastric mucosa as it progress to intestinal type of cancer. Study included five patients each of non-atrophic gastritis (NAG), intestinal metaplasia (IM) and intestinal-type gastric cancer (GC). Gastric tissue was obtained and DNA extracted for microbiota analyses using the microarray G3 PhyloChip. Bacterial diversity ranged from 8 to 57, and steadily decreased from NAG to IM to GC (p = 0.004). A significant microbiota difference was observed between NAG and GC based on Unifrac-presence/absence and weighted-Unifrac-abundance metrics of 283 taxa (p < 0.05). HC-AN analyses based on presence/absence of 238 taxa revealed that GC and NAG grouped apart, whereas IM overlapped with both. An ordinated analyses based on weighted-Unifrac distance given abundance of 44 taxa showing significance across categories revealed significant microbiota separation between NAG and GC. This study is the first to show a gradual shift in gastric microbiota profile from NAG to IM to GC.

  1. Chemotherapy in advanced ovarian cancer: an overview of randomised clinical trials. Advanced Ovarian Cancer Trialists Group.

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To consider the role of platinum and the relative merits of single agent and combination chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced ovarian cancer. DESIGN--Formal quantitative overview using updated individual patient data from all available randomised trials (published and unpublished). SUBJECTS--8139 patients (6408 deaths) included in 45 different trials. RESULTS--No firm conclusions could be reached. Nevertheless, the results suggest that in terms of survival immediate platinum based treatment was better than non-platinum regimens (overall relative risk 0.93; 95% confidence interval 0.83 to 1.05); platinum in combination was better than single agent platinum when used in the same dose (overall relative risk 0.85; 0.72 to 1.00); and cisplatin and carboplatin were equally effective (overall relative risk 1.05; 0.94 to 1.18). CONCLUSIONS--In the past, randomised clinical trials of chemotherapy in advanced ovarian cancer have been much too small to detect the degree of benefit which this overview suggests is realistic for currently available chemotherapeutic regimens. Hence a new trial comparing cisplatin, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (CAP) with carboplatin has been launched and plans to accrue 2000 patients. PMID:1834291

  2. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2014.

    PubMed

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Lee, Kyung Hun; Kim, Kidong; Kang, Sokbom; Kim, Jae Weon

    2015-04-01

    In 2014, 9 topics were selected as major advances in clinical research for gynecologic oncology: 2 each in cervical and corpus cancer, 4 in ovarian cancer, and 1 in breast cancer. For cervical cancer, several therapeutic agents showed viable antitumor clinical response in recurrent and metastatic disease: bevacizumab, cediranib, and immunotherapies including human papillomavirus (HPV)-tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and Z-100. The HPV test received FDA approval as the primary screening tool of cervical cancer in women aged 25 and older, based on the results of the ATHENA trial, which suggested that the HPV test was a more sensitive and efficient strategy for cervical cancer screening than methods based solely on cytology. For corpus cancers, results of a phase III Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) 249 study of early-stage endometrial cancer with high-intermediate risk factors are followed by the controversial topic of uterine power morcellation in minimally invasive gynecologic surgery. Promising results of phase II studies regarding the effectiveness of olaparib in various ovarian cancer settings are summarized. After a brief review of results from a phase III study on pazopanib maintenance therapy in advanced ovarian cancer, 2 outstanding 2014 ASCO presentations cover the topic of using molecular subtypes in predicting response to bevacizumab. A review of the use of opportunistic bilateral salpingectomy as an ovarian cancer preventive strategy in the general population is presented. Two remarkable studies that discussed the effectiveness of adjuvant ovarian suppression in premenopausal early breast cancer have been selected as the last topics covered in this review.

  3. Radiotherapy Technical Considerations in the Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: American-French Consensus Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Huguet, Florence; Goodman, Karyn A.; Azria, David; Racadot, Severine; Abrams, Ross A.

    2012-08-01

    Summary: Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose

  4. Drug Response and Resistance in Advanced NF-1-Associated Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    hematologic improvement. Our controlled preclinical trials in Nf1 mutant mice stimulated clinical evaluation of MEK inhibitors for plexiform...spontaneously progress to AML (23). Shannon p. 3 Retroviral insertional mutagenesis (RIM) is a powerful strategy for generating hematologic cancers...executed preclinical trials in accurate mouse models of early stage and advanced hematologic cancers driven by Nf1 inactivation or oncogenic Kras

  5. Complementary and alternative therapies for advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, M R

    2001-06-01

    This article reviews complementary and alternative therapies for advanced prostate cancer. This is not a comprehensive survey of nontraditional therapies for prostate cancer. Rather, this review focuses on alternative and complementary therapies with published studies to evaluate efficacy and safety. Three areas are addressed: alternative forms of hormonal therapy, management of side effects of hormonal therapy, and management of skeletal complications.

  6. Synthetic Lethality as a Targeted Approach to Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    target for therapy of prostate cancer , but approaches aimed at Ras itself, or its critical signaling pathways, which are required in normal tissues...Impact: Current therapies for prostate cancer are inadequate, and aberrant activation of Ras or Ras pathways are common. A novel therapeutic modality...to Advanced Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Douglas V. Faller, PhD, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Trustees of Boston University

  7. Sipuleucel-T for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Frohlich, Mark W

    2012-06-01

    Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cellular immunotherapy designed to stimulate an immune response to prostate cancer that prolongs the overall survival of men with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The clinical development program and key efficacy, safety, and immune response findings from the phase III studies are presented. The integration of sipuleucel-T into the treatment paradigm of advanced prostate cancer and future directions for research are discussed.

  8. Anti-angiogenic therapies for advanced esophago-gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Elisa; Sclafani, Francesco; Cunningham, David

    2014-01-01

    Neo-vascularization is a vital process for tumor growth and development which involves the interaction between tumor cells and stromal endothelial cells through several growth factors and membranous receptors which ultimately activate pro-angiogenic intracellular signaling pathways. Inhibition of angiogenesis has become a standard treatment option for several tumor types including colorectal cancer, glioblastoma and ovarian cancer. In gastric cancer, the therapeutic role of anti-angiogenic agents is more controversial. Bevacizumab and ramucirumab, two monoclonal antibodies, which target vascular endothelial growth factor-A and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, respectively, have been demonstrated antitumor activity in patients with tumors of the stomach or esophagogastric junction. However, especially for bevacizumab, this antitumor activity has not consistently translated into a survival advantage over standard treatment in randomized trials. In this article, we provide an overview of the role of angiogenesis in gastric cancer and discuss the results of clinical trials that investigated safety and effectiveness of antiangiogenic therapies in this disease. A review of the literature has been done using PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov website and the ASCO Annual Meeting Library. PMID:25538401

  9. Laparoscopic ischemic conditioning of the stomach increases neovascularization of the gastric conduit in patients undergoing esophagectomy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thai H; Melton, Shelby D; McLaren, Patrick J; Mokdad, Ali A; Huerta, Sergio; Wang, David H; Perry, Kyle A; Hardaker, Hope L; Dolan, James P

    2017-09-01

    Gastric ischemic preconditioning has been proposed to improve blood flow and reduce the incidence of anastomotic complications following esophagectomy with gastric pull-up. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of prolonged ischemic preconditioning on the degree of neovascularization in the distal gastric conduit at the time of esophagectomy. A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database identified 30 patients who underwent esophagectomy. The patients were divided into three groups: control (no preconditioning, n = 9), partial (short gastric vessel ligation only, n = 8), and complete ischemic preconditioning (left and short gastric vessel ligation, n = 13). Microvessel counts were assessed, using immunohistologic analysis to determine the degree of neovascularization at the distal gastric margin. The groups did not differ in age, gender, BMI, pathologic stage, or cancer subtype. Ischemic preconditioning durations were 163 ± 156 days for partial ischemic preconditioning, compared to 95 ± 50 days for complete ischemic preconditioning (P = 0.2). Immunohistologic analysis demonstrated an increase in microvessel counts of 29% following partial ischemic preconditioning (P = 0.3) and 67% after complete ischemic preconditioning (P < 0.0001), compared to controls. Our study indicates that prolonged ischemic preconditioning is safe and does not interfere with subsequent esophagectomy. Complete ischemic preconditioning increased neovascularization in the distal gastric conduit. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Attenuating effect of bromocriptine on cysteamine anticarcinogenesis of stomach cancers induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsuta, M.; Iishi, H.; Baba, M.; Ichii, M.; Nakaizumi, A.; Uehara, H.; Taniguchi, H. )

    1990-09-01

    The effect of bromocriptine on inhibition by cysteamine of gastric carcinogenesis induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine was investigated in inbred Wistar rats. After 25 weeks of p.o. treatment with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, rats were given injections every other day: cysteamine (50 mg/kg body weight); cysteamine (50 mg/kg body weight) plus bromocriptine (0.5 or 0.25 mg/kg body weight); or bromocriptine (0.5 or 0.25 mg/kg body weight). In week 52, the group treated with cysteamine showed a significantly decreased incidence of gastric cancers. Concomitant treatment with bromocriptine at 0.5 but not at 0.25 mg/kg body weight significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of cysteamine on gastric carcinogenesis. Administration of bromocriptine alone at either dosage had no influence on gastric carcinogenesis. The labeling index of the antral mucosa was significantly reduced in rats treated with cysteamine and significantly higher in those treated concomitantly with bromocriptine at 0.5 mg/kg body weight than in those treated with cysteamine alone. These findings indicate that cysteamine suppressed gastric carcinogenesis and that bromocriptine at high dosage attenuated this inhibition. These findings also suggest that dopamine is involved in the mechanism of inhibition of gastric carcinogenesis by cysteamine.

  11. The relationship between nutritional status and the Glasgow prognostic score in patients with cancer of the esophagus and stomach.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jacqueline Braga; Maurício, Sílvia Fernandes; Bering, Tatiana; Correia, Maria Isabel T D

    2013-01-01

    A relationship between weight loss and inflammation has been described in patients with cancer. In the present study, the relationship between subjective global assessment (SGA) and the severity of inflammation, as defined by Glasgow prognostic score (GPS), as well as the relationship of both of these measures with the presence of complications and survival time, was assessed. In addition, we compared the diagnosis given by SGA with parameters of nutritional assessment, such as body mass index, triceps skinfold, midarm circumference (MAC), midarm muscle circumference (MAMC), phase angle (PA), adductor pollicis muscle thickness (APMT), and handgrip strength (HGS). According to the SGA, the nutritional status was associated with the GPS (P < 0.05), and both the SGA and GPS were associated with the presence of complications. However, the GPS [area under the curve (AUC): 0.77, P < 0.05, confidence interval (CI) = 0.580, 0.956] seems to be more accurate in identifying complications than the SGA (AUC: 0.679, P < 0.05, CI = 0.426, 0.931). Only GPS was associated with survival time. Comparing the different nutritional assessment methods with the SGA suggested that the MAC, MAMC, APMT, PA, and HGS parameters may be helpful in differentiating between nourished and malnourished patients, if new cutoffs are adopted.

  12. A population-based case-control study for examining early life influences on geographical variation in adult mortality in England and Wales using stomach cancer and stroke as examples.

    PubMed

    Maheswaran, Ravi; Strachan, David P; Dodgeon, Brian; Best, Nicola G

    2002-04-01

    Geographical variation in mortality is influenced by factors operating in early life and in adulthood. The relative contributions of these factors may be examined by comparing the extent to which adult mortality is related to places of residence in early life and at death. We describe a population-based case-control design, in which all deaths are used as cases and the Office for National Statistics (ONS) Longitudinal Study (LS) survivors are used as controls. Cases were all deaths from stomach cancer and stroke in England and Wales 1993-1995 amongst people born between January 1930 and September 1939 and for whom place of enumeration in 1939 could be imputed from the first three characters of their National Health Service number. Controls were all LS members born in the same period, enumerated in the 1991 census, resident in England and Wales in mid-1994 and for whom place of enumeration in 1939 could be similarly imputed. Logistic regression was used, adjusting for birth year, sex and social class. A previous mapping exercise by ONS generated comparable geographical units (counties) for 1939 enumeration and area of residence in 1991 or at death. 'Non-migrant' (i.e. 1939 'county' the same as county in 1991 or at death) case:control ratios were calculated to indicate background mortality risk in counties, with adjustment for imprecision using Bayesian smoothing methods. These ratios were then used in modelling risk for inter-county migrants. There were 2590 stomach cancer and 7778 stroke deaths and 28,400 men and 28,180 women as controls. For men, 64%, 61% and 67% of stomach cancer deaths, stroke deaths and controls respectively could be assigned a county of enumeration in 1939. The corresponding percentages for women were 76%, 72% and 75%. For stomach cancer, after adjustment for county of enumeration in 1939, a significant association with the non-migrant case:control ratio for county of residence in 1991 or at death was observed (P= 0.010), indicating an

  13. Drug discovery in advanced prostate cancer: translating biology into therapy.

    PubMed

    Yap, Timothy A; Smith, Alan D; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Al-Lazikani, Bissan; Workman, Paul; de Bono, Johann S

    2016-10-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is associated with a poor prognosis and poses considerable therapeutic challenges. Recent genetic and technological advances have provided insights into prostate cancer biology and have enabled the identification of novel drug targets and potent molecularly targeted therapeutics for this disease. In this article, we review recent advances in prostate cancer target identification for drug discovery and discuss their promise and associated challenges. We review the evolving therapeutic landscape of CRPC and discuss issues associated with precision medicine as well as challenges encountered with immunotherapy for this disease. Finally, we envision the future management of CRPC, highlighting the use of circulating biomarkers and modern clinical trial designs.

  14. Advances in the Management of Biliary Tract Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ciombor, Kristen Keon; Goff, Laura Williams

    2013-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTC), though uncommon, are highly fatal malignancies, and current treatments fail to cure or control the majority of tumors. Given the complexity of the anatomy and often aggressive nature of the disease, multidisciplinary treatment, including palliation, is often required. However, systemic therapy with cytotoxics and/or targeted agents are routinely the mainstay of treatment for patients with advanced biliary tract cancers, and new targets and agents provide hope for this disease. This article focuses on recent advances in the management of biliary tract cancers, with a special focus on the molecular basis for current therapeutic investigation in this disease. PMID:23416860

  15. Advances of Cancer Therapy by Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Wang, Yiqing; Chen, Zhuo Georgia

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in nanotechnology offer researchers opportunities to significantly transform cancer therapeutics. This technology has enabled the manipulation of the biological and physicochemical properties of nanomaterials to facilitate more efficient drug targeting and delivery. Clinical investigations suggest that therapeutic nanoparticles can enhance efficacy and reduced side effects compared with conventional cancer therapeutic drugs. Encouraged by rapid and promising progress in cancer nanotechnology, researchers continue to develop novel and efficacious nanoparticles for drug delivery. The use of therapeutic nanoparticles as unique drug delivery systems will be a significant addition to current cancer therapeutics. PMID:19688065

  16. Pyroxamide in Treating Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Precancerous Condition; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  17. Advancing Breast Cancer Survivorship among African American Women

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, Steven S.; Yoo, Wonsuk; Whitehead, Mary S.; Smith, Selina A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Advances have occurred in breast cancer survivorship but, for many African American women, challenges and gaps in relevant information remain. Methods This article identifies opportunities to address disparities in breast cancer survival and quality of life, and thereby to increase breast cancer survivorship among African American women. Results For breast cancer survivors, common side effects, lasting for long periods after cancer treatment, include fatigue, loss of strength, difficulty sleeping, and sexual dysfunction. For addressing physical and mental health concerns, a variety of interventions have been evaluated, including exercise and weight training, dietary interventions, yoga and mindfulness-based stress reduction, and support groups or group therapy. Obesity has been associated with breast cancer recurrence and poorer survival. Relative to white survivors, African American breast cancer survivors are more likely to be obese and less likely to engage in physical activity, although exercise improves overall quality of life and cancer-related fatigue. Considerable information exists about the effectiveness of such interventions for alleviating distress and improving quality of life among breast cancer survivors, but few studies have focused specifically on African American women with a breast cancer diagnosis. Studies have identified a number of personal factors that are associated with resilience, increased quality of life, and positive adaptation to a breast cancer diagnosis. Conclusions There is a need for a better understanding of breast cancer survivorship among African American women. Additional evaluations of interventions for improving the quality of life and survival of African American breast cancer survivors are desirable. PMID:26303657

  18. Advancing breast cancer survivorship among African-American women.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Steven S; Yoo, Wonsuk; Whitehead, Mary S; Smith, Selina A

    2015-09-01

    Advances have occurred in breast cancer survivorship but, for many African-American women, challenges and gaps in relevant information remain. This article identifies opportunities to address disparities in breast cancer survival and quality of life, and thereby to increase breast cancer survivorship among African-American women. For breast cancer survivors, common side effects, lasting for long periods after cancer treatment, include fatigue, loss of strength, difficulty sleeping, and sexual dysfunction. For addressing physical and mental health concerns, a variety of interventions have been evaluated, including exercise and weight training, dietary interventions, yoga and mindfulness-based stress reduction, and support groups or group therapy. Obesity has been associated with breast cancer recurrence and poorer survival. Relative to white survivors, African-American breast cancer survivors are more likely to be obese and less likely to engage in physical activity, although exercise improves overall quality of life and cancer-related fatigue. Considerable information exists about the effectiveness of such interventions for alleviating distress and improving quality of life among breast cancer survivors, but few studies have focused specifically on African-American women with a breast cancer diagnosis. Studies have identified a number of personal factors that are associated with resilience, increased quality of life, and positive adaptation to a breast cancer diagnosis. There is a need for a better understanding of breast cancer survivorship among African-American women. Additional evaluations of interventions for improving the quality of life and survival of African-American breast cancer survivors are desirable.

  19. Localization of thymidine phosphorylase in advanced gastric and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michiya; Okamoto, Ken; Akimori, Toyokazu; Tochika, Naoshige; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Sugimoto, Takeki; Araki, Keijiro

    2004-01-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is known to be more concentrated in human cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissue based on findings using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry. However, the ultrastructural localization of TP in cancer tissues has not previously been demonstrated. We investigated the localization of TP in gastric cancer and colorectal cancer tissue by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Between April 1997 and May 2000, we obtained surgically resected specimens from 42, 46, and 36 cases of advanced gastric, colon, and rectal cancer, respectively. ELISA demonstrated that the TP level was higher in cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissue. Immunohistochemically, cancer cells were positive for the enzyme in some cases. However, in a number of cases immunopositive inflammatory cells were also present in cancerous tissues. At the electron microscope level, TP was diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm of cancer cells and in the mitochondria of the neutrophil in gastric cancer tissue. In rectal cancer tissues, cytoplasmic granules in macrophages in cancer tissues were immunoreactive for the TP. These findings suggest that TP is produced by macrophages and exists in neutrophils and cancer cells.

  20. Lung Cancer Clinical Trials: Advances in Immunotherapy

    Cancer.gov

    New treatments for lung cancer and aspects of joining a clinical trial are discussed in this 30-minute Facebook Live event, hosted by NCI’s Dr. Shakun Malik, head of thoracic oncology therapeutics, and Janet Freeman-Daily, lung cancer patient activist and founding member of #LCSM.

  1. Recent advances in lung cancer biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides an overview of carcinogenesis, especially as related to lung cancers. Various growth factors and their mutated forms as oncogenes are discussed with respect to gene location and their role in the oncogenic process. Finally the data is related to lung cancer induction in uranium miners and exposure to radon.

  2. H. pylori infection is associated with DNA damage of Lgr5-positive epithelial stem cells in the stomach of patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Takeshi; Ma, Deqin; Yao, Yuan; Lynch, John P; Morales, Knashawn; Ziober, Amy; Feldman, Michael; Ota, Hiroyoshi; Sepulveda, Antonia R

    2013-01-01

    H. pylori (Hp) infection is a major risk factor in gastric carcinogenesis leading to epithelial mutagenesis, and may affect gastric epithelial stem cells. To characterize the expression of Lgr5, a marker of epithelial stem cells in human gastric mucosa, to determine whether Hp infection affects Lgr5-positive epithelial cells (LPECs) and whether LPECs are susceptible to DNA damage associated with Hp infection. Lgr5 expression was characterized in non-neoplastic gastric mucosa from 52 patients (34 with and 18 without gastric cancer (GC); 21 Hp-positive (Hp+) and 31 Hp-negative (Hp-)) by immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence staining. To determine the extent of DNA damage in LPECs, nuclear 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8OHdG), a marker of DNA damage associated with oxidative stress, was measured by quantitative spectral image analysis. LPECs were primarily present in gastric antrum. Higher numbers of LPECs were seen in Hp+ than in Hp- non-neoplastic mucosa of GC patients, P = .006, but not in patients without GC. 8OHdG levels in LPECs were significantly higher than in Lgr5-negative epithelial cells in Hp+ GC patients (P = .012) but not in Hp- cases (P = .414), whereas no difference was seen between Hp+ and Hp- mucosa of patients without GC. The Lgr5-positive epithelial stem cell pool is expanded in Hp-associated gastritis in the antrum of patients with GC. In GC patients with active Hp infection, LPECs may be more susceptible to DNA damage than Lgr5-negative epithelial cells, suggesting that Hp infection may contribute to GC risk by affecting epithelial stem cells in the human stomach.

  3. Turning left or right? A comparative analysis in adenocarcinomas of the esophagogastric junction according to the seventh AJCC TNM classification for cancers of the esophagus and stomach: experience in a Chinese single institution.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Enhao; Ling, Tianlong; Xu, Jia; Zhao, Gang; Cao, Hui; Giacopuzzi, Simone; Bencivenga, Maria; de Manzoni, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The seventh AJCC TNM classification defines rules for classifying adenocarcinomas of esophagogastric junction (AEG II and III) as a part of esophageal cancer. But there are still many controversies over the classification system. The study aims to evaluate and compare whether AEG should be classified as cancers of esophagus or stomach. A single-center cohort of patients with AEG or proximal third gastric adenocarcinoma underwent surgical resection with curative intent in Shanghai from November 2004 to July 2011. We compared the clinicopathologic features between AEG (n=291) and proximal third gastric adenocarcinoma (n=176) and analyzed overall survival probabilities of AEG using the latest seventh AJCC TNM classification for cancers. Patients with AEG not only show more advanced diseases, but also have a significantly worse 5-year survival rate than those with proximal third gastric adenocarcinoma (P=0.027). In 291 patients with AEG, the gastric T classification is monotone but indistinct except for pT2 versus pT3 (P=0.001) and pT4a versus pT4b (P=0.012). The esophageal T classification is neither monotone nor distinct. For the N classification, both schemes are monotone and distinct. The gastric scheme is indistinctive for stages IA versus IB (P=0.428), for IIA versus IIB (P=0.376), for IIB versus IIIA (P=0.086), for IIIA versus IIIB (P=0.087), and for IIIC versus IV (P=0.928). The esophageal scheme is indistinct only except for IIIB versus IIIC (P=0.002). The gastric scheme includes one heterogeneous stage group (stage IIIC, P<0.001), whereas all stage groups are homogeneous in the esophageal scheme. Although AEG shows different clinicopathological features and surgical outcomes of patients, the current seventh AJCC TNM classification which stages the AEG in the esophageal scheme does not demonstrate the advantages in the assessment of the patient prognosis. We propose a revised staging system to clarify the AEG with esophageal invasion.

  4. Turning left or right? A comparative analysis in adenocarcinomas of the esophagogastric junction according to the seventh AJCC TNM classification for cancers of the esophagus and stomach: experience in a Chinese single institution

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Enhao; Ling, Tianlong; Xu, Jia; Zhao, Gang; Cao, Hui; Giacopuzzi, Simone; Bencivenga, Maria; de Manzoni, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The seventh AJCC TNM classification defines rules for classifying adenocarcinomas of esophagogastric junction (AEG II and III) as a part of esophageal cancer. But there are still many controversies over the classification system. The study aims to evaluate and compare whether AEG should be classified as cancers of esophagus or stomach. A single-center cohort of patients with AEG or proximal third gastric adenocarcinoma underwent surgical resection with curative intent in Shanghai from November 2004 to July 2011. We compared the clinicopathologic features between AEG (n=291) and proximal third gastric adenocarcinoma (n=176) and analyzed overall survival probabilities of AEG using the latest seventh AJCC TNM classification for cancers. Patients with AEG not only show more advanced diseases, but also have a significantly worse 5-year survival rate than those with proximal third gastric adenocarcinoma (P=0.027). In 291 patients with AEG, the gastric T classification is monotone but indistinct except for pT2 versus pT3 (P=0.001) and pT4a versus pT4b (P=0.012). The esophageal T classification is neither monotone nor distinct. For the N classification, both schemes are monotone and distinct. The gastric scheme is indistinctive for stages IA versus IB (P=0.428), for IIA versus IIB (P=0.376), for IIB versus IIIA (P=0.086), for IIIA versus IIIB (P=0.087), and for IIIC versus IV (P=0.928). The esophageal scheme is indistinct only except for IIIB versus IIIC (P=0.002). The gastric scheme includes one heterogeneous stage group (stage IIIC, P<0.001), whereas all stage groups are homogeneous in the esophageal scheme. Although AEG shows different clinicopathological features and surgical outcomes of patients, the current seventh AJCC TNM classification which stages the AEG in the esophageal scheme does not demonstrate the advantages in the assessment of the patient prognosis. We propose a revised staging system to clarify the AEG with esophageal invasion. PMID:26379858

  5. Current advances in T-cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingjun; Yin, Bingnan; Wang, Helen Y; Wang, Rong-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide; due to the lack of ideal cancer biomarkers for early detection or diagnosis, most patients present with late-stage disease at the time of diagnosis, thus limiting the potential for successful treatment. Traditional cancer treatments, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, have demonstrated very limited efficacy for patients with late-stage disease. Therefore, innovative and effective cancer treatments are urgently needed for cancer patients with late-stage and refractory disease. Cancer immunotherapy, particularly adoptive cell transfer, has shown great promise in the treatment of patients with late-stage disease, including those who are refractory to standard therapies. In this review, we will highlight recent advances and discuss future directions in adoptive cell transfer based cancer immunotherapy.

  6. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  7. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice.

  8. Cancer and Radiation Therapy: Current Advances and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Baskar, Rajamanickam; Lee, Kuo Ann; Yeo, Richard; Yeoh, Kheng-Wei

    2012-01-01

    In recent years remarkable progress has been made towards the understanding of proposed hallmarks of cancer development and treatment. However with its increasing incidence, the clinical management of cancer continues to be a challenge for the 21st century. Treatment modalities comprise of radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy. Radiation therapy remains an important component of cancer treatment with approximately 50% of all cancer patients receiving radiation therapy during their course of illness; it contributes towards 40% of curative treatment for cancer. The main goal of radiation therapy is to deprive cancer cells of their multiplication (cell division) potential. Celebrating a century of advances since Marie Curie won her second Nobel Prize for her research into radium, 2011 has been designated the Year of Radiation therapy in the UK. Over the last 100 years, ongoing advances in the techniques of radiation treatment and progress made in understanding the biology of cancer cell responses to radiation will endeavor to increase the survival and reduce treatment side effects for cancer patients. In this review, principles, application and advances in radiation therapy with their biological end points are discussed. PMID:22408567

  9. Increased rates of advanced thyroid cancer in California.

    PubMed

    Harari, Avital; Singh, Rasnik K

    2016-03-01

    We have noted an unusually high rate of advanced thyroid cancers presenting from across California. We examined the rates of thyroid cancer presentation throughout California for potential geographic clustering. A total of 26,983 patients with a new diagnosis of thyroid cancer (1999-2008) were abstracted from the California Cancer Registry and the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development registry. Percentages of advanced thyroid cancer rates were calculated within each county (defined as those with distant metastatic stage; regional and/or distant metastatic stage [RM]) as well as those with well-differentiated thyroid cancer diagnosed before age 30. National averages were taken from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data. There was no obvious clustering of advanced cases within certain regions in California; however, on average, the entire state of California had significantly higher rates of distant metastatic thyroid cancer (6.73%) and RM (34.92%) than the national SEER averages (4%, 29%, respectively, P < 0.001). Of the 47 California counties, 20 had significantly higher percentages of distant metastatic thyroid cancer than the national SEER average (range, 6%-13% versus 4%, P < 0.05), and 20 had a higher percentage of RM than the national SEER average (range, 35%-48% versus 29%, P < 0.05). Two California counties had higher rates of young patients with well-differentiated thyroid cancer (range, 14.29%-17.9%) than the national SEER average (12%). California exhibits more advanced thyroid cancers than the national SEER population average. Further studies are warranted to better understand etiologies for these disparities, which may include environmental impacts and/or delays in diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Conceptualizing prognostic awareness in advanced cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Applebaum, Allison J; Kolva, Elissa A; Kulikowski, Julia R; Jacobs, Jordana D; DeRosa, Antonio; Lichtenthal, Wendy G; Olden, Megan E; Rosenfeld, Barry; Breitbart, William

    2014-09-01

    This systematic review synthesizes the complex literature on prognostic awareness in cancer. A total of 37 studies examining cancer patients' understanding of their prognosis were included. Prognostic awareness definitions and assessment methods were inconsistent across studies. A surprisingly high percentage of patients (up to 75%) were unaware of their poor prognosis, and in several studies, even their cancer diagnosis (up to 96%), particularly in studies conducted outside of North America. This review highlights surprisingly low rates of prognostic awareness in patients with advanced cancer as well as discrepancies in prognostic awareness assessment, suggesting the need for empirically validated measures of prognostic awareness.

  11. Conceptualizing prognostic awareness in advanced cancer: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Applebaum, Allison J; Kolva, Elissa A; Kulikowski, Julia R; Jacobs, Jordana D; DeRosa, Antonio; Lichtenthal, Wendy G; Olden, Megan E; Rosenfeld, Barry; Breitbart, William

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review synthesizes the complex literature on prognostic awareness in cancer. A total of 37 studies examining cancer patients’ understanding of their prognosis were included. Prognostic awareness definitions and assessment methods were inconsistent across studies. A surprisingly high percentage of patients (up to 75%) were unaware of their poor prognosis, and in several studies, even their cancer diagnosis (up to 96%), particularly in studies conducted outside of North America. This review highlights surprisingly low rates of prognostic awareness in patients with advanced cancer as well as discrepancies in prognostic awareness assessment, suggesting the need for empirically validated measures of prognostic awareness. PMID:24157936

  12. Surgical adjuvant treatment of locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, C M; Abston, S; Fish, J C

    1985-01-01

    The reported incidence of local recurrence after mastectomy for locally advanced breast cancer (TNM Stage III and IV) is between 30% and 50%. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of radiation therapy (XRT) followed by total mastectomy on the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Fifty-three patients who presented with locally advanced breast cancer, without distant metastases, were treated with XRT (4500-5000 R) to the breast, chest wall, and regional lymph nodes. Five weeks after completion of XRT, total mastectomy was performed. There were no operative deaths. The complications that occurred in 22 patients after surgery were flap necrosis, wound infection, and seroma. Patients have been followed from 3 to 134 months. Twenty-five patients are alive (3-134 months), 12 free of disease; 28 patients have died with distant metastases (6-67 months). Isolated local recurrence occurred in only two patients. Four patients had local and distant recurrence (total local recurrence is 6/53). The remaining patients all developed distant metastases. We have devised a treatment strategy which significantly decreases the incidence of local recurrence in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. However, the rapid appearance of distant metastases emphasizes the need for systemically active therapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:3994434

  13. Stomach-specific Biomarkers (GastroPanel) Can Predict the Development of Gastric Cancer in a Caucasian Population: A Longitudinal Nested Case-Control Study in Siberia.

    PubMed

    Kurilovich, Svetlana; Belkovets, Anna; Reshetnikov, Oleg; Openko, Tatyana; Malyutina, Sofja; Ragino, Ylija; Scherbakova, Lilija; Leja, Marcis; Paloheimo, Lea; Syrjänen, Kari; Voevoda, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Atrophic gastritis (AG) is the most important risk condition for gastric cancer (GC). A panel of stomach-specific serum biomarkers: pepsinogen (PG) I, pepsinogen (PG) II, gastrin-17 (G-17), and IgG antibodies to H. pylori (HP-Ab) detects the extent and grade of AG. The aim of the present study was to assess the predictive value of this 4-biomarker panel (GastroPanel, Biohit Oyj, Helsinki, Finland) in a case-control setting nested within a cohort of Caucasian population in Western Siberia. Both the cases and controls for the study derived from a population-based cohort of 45-69-year-old subjects (n=9,360) in the HAPIEE (Health, Alcohol and Psychosocial Factors In Eastern Europe) study, enrolled in Novosibirsk, Siberia during 2003-2005. Cases represent all GCs reported to the Cancer Registry until 2012, being matched (1:2) with healthy controls (COs). Altogether 156 (52 GCs and 104 COs) serum samples collected at study entry were available for GastroPanel analysis. Conditional logistic regression models (uni- and multivariate) were used to analyze this matched case-control setting. The biomarker levels below cut-off at baseline predicted the development of GC as follows: PGI (OR=2.9; 95%CI=1.3-6.4), PGII (OR=9.0; 95%CI=1.8-44.3), PGI/PGII (OR=3.3; 95%CI=1.5-7.3); G-17 (OR=1.8; 95%CI=0.7-4.8), and HP-Ab (OR=0.4; 95%CI=0.1-1.3). In the multivariate model adjusted for sex, age, and all GastroPanel markers, PGI/PGII ratio was the most powerful independent predictor of GC (OR=2.9; 95% CI=1.01-8.0). For the first time in a Caucasian population, we demonstrated that PGI, PGII and PGI/PGII ratio are reliable longitudinal predictors of incidence of GC. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Radium-223 for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from a phase III trial that compared radium-223 dichloride plus the best standard of care versus a placebo plus the best standard of care in men with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  15. Recent advances in personalized lung cancer medicine

    PubMed Central

    Okimoto, Ross A; Bivona, Trever G

    2014-01-01

    The identification of molecular subtypes of non-small-cell lung cancer has transformed the clinical management of this disease. This is best exemplified by the clinical success of targeting the EGFR or ALK with tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the front-line setting. Our ability to further improve patient outcomes with biomarker-based targeted therapies will depend on a more comprehensive genetic platform that can rationally interrogate the cancer genome of an individual patient. Novel technologies, including multiplex genotyping and next-generation sequencing are rapidly evolving and will soon challenge the oncologist with a wealth of genetic information for each patient. Although there are many barriers to overcome, the integration of these genetic platforms into clinical care has the potential to transform the management of lung cancer through improved molecular categorization, patient stratification, and drug development, thereby, improving clinical outcomes through personalized lung cancer medicine. PMID:25506379

  16. Sipuleucel-T: immunotherapy for advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Olson, Brian M; McNeel, Douglas G

    2011-05-03

    Prostate cancer continues to be one of the most serious afflictions of men of advanced age, remaining the most commonly diagnosed and second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in American men. The treatment options for patients with incurable metastatic, castrate-resistant disease have long focused on various chemotherapeutic approaches, which provide a slight survival benefit while being associated with potentially significant side effects. However, the recent approval of sipuleucel-T has given patients with advanced disease an additional treatment option that has demonstrated benefit without the side effects associated with chemotherapy. Sipuleucel-T is an antigen-presenting cell-based active immunotherapy that utilizes a patient's own immune cells, presumably to activate an antigen-specific immune response against tumor cells. This review focuses on the development and implementation of sipuleucel-T as a therapy for prostate cancer. Specifically, we present some of the issues associated with the management of advanced prostate cancer, the research and development that led to the approval of sipuleucel-T, how the approval of sipuleucel-T could change the clinical management of prostate cancer, and current and future areas of investigation that are being pursued with regard to sipuleucel-T and other treatments for advanced prostate cancer.

  17. Advanced gastric cancer: Current treatment landscape and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Digklia, Antonia; Wagner, Anna Dorothea

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer currently ranks fourth in cancer-related mortality worldwide. In the western world, it is most often diagnosed at an advanced stage, after becoming metastatic at distant sites. Patients with advanced disease (locally advanced or metastatic) have a somber prognosis, with a median overall survival of 10-12 mo, and palliative chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment. In recent years, novel approaches using inhibition of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have demonstrated significant improvements in progression-free and overall survival, compared with chemotherapy alone, in first-line treatment of patients with overexpression of HER2. In addition, both second-line chemotherapy and treatment with the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-inhibitor ramucirumab demonstrated significant benefits in terms of overall survival, compared with best supportive care, in randomized studies. Moreover, ramucirumab in combination with chemotherapy demonstrated further significant benefits in terms of progression-free and overall survival, compared with chemotherapy alone, in second-line treatment for patients with metastatic gastric cancer. A recently published molecular classification of gastric cancer is expected to improve patient stratification and selection for clinical trials and provide a roadmap for future drug development. Nevertheless, despite these developments the prognosis of patients with advanced gastric cancer remains poor. In this review we discuss current standards of care and outline major topics of drug development in gastric cancer. PMID:26937129

  18. Myofacial Trigger Points in Advanced Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasuo, Hideaki; Ishihara, Tatsuhiko; Kanbara, Kenji; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is started to be recognized as one of important factors of pain in cancer patients. However, no reports on features of myofascial trigger points were found in terminally-ill cancer populations. This time, we encountered 5 patients with myofascial pain syndrome and terminal cancer in whom delirium developed due to increased doses of opioid without a diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome on initial presentation. The delirium subsided with dose reductions of opioid and treatment of myofascial pain syndrome. The common reason for a delayed diagnosis among the patients included an incomplete palpation of the painful sites, which led to unsuccessful myofascial trigger points identification. The features of myofascial trigger points included single onset in the cancer pain management site with opioid and the contralateral abdominal side muscles of the non-common sites. Withdrawal reflexes associated with cancer pain in the supine position, which are increasingly seen in the terminal cancer patients, were considered to have contributed to this siuation. We consider that careful palpation of the painful site is important, in order to obtain greater knowledge and understanding of the features of myofascial trigger points. PMID:26962285

  19. Lapatinib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Biliary Tract or Liver Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  20. Current management of advanced and castration resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gomella, Leonard G; Petrylak, Daniel P; Shayegan, Bobby

    2014-04-01

    Newer approaches to the management of advanced prostate cancer have rapidly evolved. While basic androgen deprivation remains as the first line in newly diagnosed hormone naïve metastatic prostate cancer, the agents used and strategies followed have undergone significant changes. Numerous new agents such as sipuleucel-T, abiraterone, enzalutamide, cabazitaxel and radium 223 have all been approved since 2010 to treat metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). New imaging techniques to detect advanced disease such as F-18 PET, 11 C-choline PET and other modalities are becoming available. The concepts of "bone health" and the management of side effects related to androgen deprivation therapy are also gaining attention as men are being treated with longer courses of androgen deprivation. Understanding the theory behind these new agents and management approaches while focusing on the practical clinical considerations are essential to improve outcomes in advanced prostate cancer. A review of the current state of the art in the management of advanced and castration resistant prostate cancer presented in this Canadian Journal of Urology International supplement was performed. Key findings are summarized and presented along with critical updates based on recent publications and meeting presentations. Key concepts identified in the management of advanced prostate cancer included the new understanding of prostate cancer based on translational discoveries, applications of various hormonally based strategies in advanced disease including traditional and recently approved agents. The use of new imaging modalities to identify metastatic disease, immunotherapy approaches and discussions of sequencing and which new agents are likely to be available in the future in the management of CRPC were identified. Bone targeted strategies are also addressed in the setting of androgen deprivation and metastatic disease. The management of men with advanced prostate cancer has

  1. Photodynamic Cancer Therapy—Recent Advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamse, Heidi

    2011-09-01

    The basic principle of the photodynamic effect was discovered over a hundred years ago leading to the pioneering work on PDT in Europe. It was only during the 1980s, however, when "photoradiation therapy" was investigated as a possible treatment modality for cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a photochemotherapeutic process which requires the use of a photosensitizer (PS) that, upon entry into a cancer cell is targeted by laser irradiation to initiate a series of events that contribute to cell death. PSs are light-sensitive dyes activated by a light source at a specific wavelength and can be classified as first or second generation PSs based on its origin and synthetic pathway. The principle of PS activation lies in a photochemical reaction resulting from excitation of the PS producing singlet oxygen which in turn reacts and damages cell organelles and biomolecules required for cell function and ultimately leading to cell destruction. Several first and second generation PSs have been studied in several different cancer types in the quest to optimize treatment. PSs including haematoporphyrin derivative (HpD), aminolevulinic acid (ALA), chlorins, bacteriochlorins, phthalocyanines, naphthalocyanines, pheophorbiedes and purpurins all require selective uptake and retention by cancer cells prior to activation by a light source and subsequent cell death induction. Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is based on the fluorescence effect exhibited by PSs upon irradiation and is often used concurrently with PDT to detect and locate tumours. Both laser and light emitting diodes (LED) have been used for PDT depending on the location of the tumour. Internal cancers more often require the use of laser light delivery using fibre optics as delivery system while external PDT often make use of LEDs. Normal cells have a lower uptake of the PS in comparison to tumour cells, however the acute cytotoxic effect of the compound on the recovery rate of normal cells is not known. Subcellular

  2. Nanovector-based therapies in advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chang-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Systemic therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer has been largely disappointing owing to the unfavorable pharmacokinetic profile and poor penetration of current chemotherapeutic agents ,as well as the fragile patient population with compromised tolerance to toxic chemotherapies. Nanovectors can provide passive drug delivery through abnormal tumor neo-vasculature microanatomy or active targeting via binding to receptors or macromolecules associated with the tumor. In such a manner, nanovector-based therapy may not only modulate the pharmacokinetics and therapeutic index of chemotherapeutic agents but also provide new treatment options in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. In this article, we present the rationale and currently available clinical results of nanovector-based therapies to highlight the potential use of this class of agent in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:22811849

  3. Assessing spirituality and religiousness in advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Tsilika, Eleni; Parpa, Efi; Smyrnioti, Marilena; Vlahos, Lambros

    The aim of this study was to translate the Spiritual Involvement and Beliefs Scale into the Greek language and validate its psychometric properties in a sample of advanced cancer patients treated in a palliative care unit. The scale was translated into Greek with the "forward-backward" procedure. It was administered twice, with a 3-day interval, to 82 patients with advanced cancer. Patients completed the Spiritual Involvement and Beliefs Scale and the Greek Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The scale had an overall Cronbach alpha of 0.89. Overall test-retest reliability was satisfactory at P<.0005. Satisfactory construct validity was supported between the Spiritual Involvement and Beliefs Scale subscales and Hospital Anxiety and Depression subscales. Interscale and interitem correlations were found satisfactory at P<.0005. These results support that the Spiritual Involvement and Beliefs Scale is an instrument with satisfactory psychometric properties and is a valid research tool for spirituality in advanced cancer patients.

  4. Evolving treatment paradigms for locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Dorff, Tanya B; Quek, Marcus L; Daneshmand, Siamak; Pinski, Jacek

    2006-11-01

    While men with early stage prostate cancer typically enjoy long-term survival after definitive management, for those who present with locally advanced or metastatic disease, survival is compromised. Multimodality therapy can prolong survival in these patients, with state-of-the-art options including intensity-modulated radiation or brachytherapy in conjunction with androgen ablation, adjuvant androgen ablation and/or chemotherapy with radical retropubic prostatectomy. In addition, novel biological therapies are being explored to target the unique molecular changes in prostate cancer cells and their interactions with the microenvironment. With these advances the outlook will undoubtedly improve, even for patients presenting with advanced disease. Careful application of these emerging therapies to a select group of prostate cancer patients most likely to obtain benefit from them is the challenge for urologists, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists for the future.

  5. Nanoparticles for Advanced Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Abrahamse, Heidi; Kruger, Cherie Ann; Kadanyo, Sania; Mishra, Ajay

    2017-09-21

    The world widespread rise in cancer incidence has caused an increase in the demand for effective and safe materials for treatment. One of the most prevalent forms of treatment for cancer is photodynamic therapy (PDT), which is seen as an alternative to radiotherapy, as well as chemotherapy. In more recent years, researchers are exploring new nanotechnology-based strategies to improve the effectiveness of PDT. The objective of this review is to explore the current trends and research findings associated with PDT and the development of nanotechnology as treatment modality for cancer. Nanotechnology commonly deals with nanomaterials, which are well defined by their reduced size (which is <100 nm), allowing these small nanostructured particles to have unique physical, chemical, and biological properties. The unique properties of nanomaterials attribute them to have enormous potential application in many interdisciplinary fields such as medicine, electronics, biomaterials, and so on. This mini-review presents a collection of important works published with focus of nanotechnology and cancer treatment by PDT. Despite significant efforts to develop nanosystems for efficient PDT cancer treatment, it remains a challenge to develop nanostructured drug delivery systems that combine targeted tumor recognition with effective production of reactive singlet oxygen under PDT irradiation.

  6. Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    exclusively focused on non-small cell lung cancer . Specific Aims: Same as above Role: Investigator P50 CA140388-06A1 Title: Time Commitment: Supporting...AWARD NUMBERS: W81XWH-14-1-0554 TITLE: Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Dr. Nora M. Navone (Initiating PI) RECIPIENT: The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Houston, TX 77030 REPORT DATE: TYPE OF

  7. Advanced prostate cancer: Every Voice Matters.

    PubMed

    Payne, Heather; Westcott, Gemma

    2015-01-01

    Heather Payne speaks to Gemma Westcott, Commissioning Editor: Heather Payne was appointed as a consultant in Clinical Oncology at University College Hospital (London, UK) in 1997. Following her training at St Mary's Hospital London Medical School and after qualifying, she spent time working in general medicine in both London and Haiti. Currently, she specializes in the management of urological malignancies, and is actively involved in clinical research as well as being the principal investigator in a number of international multicenter and local studies. She enjoys helping patients with quality of life and decision-making issues with regard to their treatment options. In addition, she is the chairman of the British Uro-oncology Group, and is a member of the Department of Health Prostate Cancer Advisory Group. Further to this, she is a trustee of the Prostate Cancer Research Centre and clinical lead for the National Prostate Cancer Audit.

  8. [Advances in measles virus for cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Duo; Zhao, Zheng-yan

    2015-07-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a novel cancer therapy. Vaccine-attenuated strains of measles virus(MV)is an ideal candidate for oncolytic virotherapy which has an excellent safety record. Vaccine-attenuated MV uses CD46 and Nectin-4 molecule as major entry receptors into cells. Vaccine-attenuated MV can selectively infect and kill a wide variety of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. With the development of molecular cloning, scientists have successfully rescued cDNA of vaccine-attenuated MV and increased its oncolytic efficiency with molecular engineering techniques. Phase I clinical trials of virotherapy for ovarian cancer and multiple myeloma with vaccine-attenuated MV are underway. The preliminary results indicate the promising antitumor potential of vaccine-attenuated MV.

  9. Recent advances in the medical treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vorobiof, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, the systemic therapy of breast cancer (early and advanced) has changed considerably. For the past 40–50 years, and since the discovery and further therapeutic use of tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, breast cancer treatment has become the model for the development and success of tailored medical treatment. Much still needs to be done in improving outcomes for all patients with breast cancer, and especially for those who have advanced breast cancer, a challenging area for medical oncologists. Ongoing international clinical trials are currently evaluating new therapeutic approaches and identifying specific biological subsets that could determine a patient’s ability to respond to particular chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:27990275

  10. Advances in molecular imaging for breast cancer detection and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Advances in our ability to assay molecular processes, including gene expression, protein expression, and molecular and cellular biochemistry, have fueled advances in our understanding of breast cancer biology and have led to the identification of new treatments for patients with breast cancer. The ability to measure biologic processes without perturbing them in vivo allows the opportunity to better characterize tumor biology and to assess how biologic and cytotoxic therapies alter critical pathways of tumor response and resistance. By accurately characterizing tumor properties and biologic processes, molecular imaging plays an increasing role in breast cancer science, clinical care in diagnosis and staging, assessment of therapeutic targets, and evaluation of responses to therapies. This review describes the current role and potential of molecular imaging modalities for detection and characterization of breast cancer and focuses primarily on radionuclide-based methods. PMID:22423895

  11. [New advances in hereditary colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Leticia

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most frequent malignancy in both sexes in Spain. Between 20% and 25% of affected individuals have a family history of the disease, and 5% to 6% have a germ mutation, i.e. the disease develops in the context of a hereditary syndrome. The importance of identifying patients with hereditary syndromes predisposing them to colorectal cancer lies in the possibility of applying preventive measures, screening, and more appropriate management of both patients and their families. The present article outlines the most important studies presented at the congress of the American Gastroenterological Association. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Emerging challenges of advanced squamous cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Chen; Zhou, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SQCLC) is an aggressive type of lung cancer and most are diagnosed at advanced stage. Patients with advanced SQCLC tend to be older, current or former smoker, with central type tumour located near large blood vessels and seldom with druggable genetic alternations. Consequently, progress of targeted therapy and antivascular agents available in lung adenocarcinoma could not be duplicated in this subset of patients. The treatment paradigms have long been dominant by cytotoxic agents and posed many therapeutic challenges. Until recent years, immune checkpoint inhibitors, other monoclonal antibodies and afatinib have been approved for treatment of advanced SQCLC, presenting a novel treatment landscape and initiating the era of precision medicine in this subset of patients. This review will summarise the recent treatment progresses in advanced SQCLC with a focus on checkpoint inhibitors of programmed cell death-1 receptor or its ligand, and discuss the emerging challenges in this new era. PMID:28255454

  13. New Insight into the Treatment of Advanced Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Arash; Vijayasekaran, Aparna; Guerrero, Marlon A.

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) are treated successfully with surgery and radioactive iodine ablation, yet the treatment of advanced cases is frustrating and largely ineffective. Systemic treatment with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy is basically ineffective in most patients with advanced DTC. However, a better understanding of the genetics and biologic basis of thyroid cancers has generated opportunities for innovative therapeutic modalities, resulting in several clinical trials. We aim to delineate the latest knowledge regarding the biologic characteristics of DTC and to describe the available data related to novel targeted therapies that have demonstrated clinical effectiveness. PMID:23326755

  14. Comprehensive Approaches to Managing Delirium in Patients with Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung Hun; Shin, Seong Hoon; Bruera, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Delirium is a frequently under-recognized complication in patients with advanced cancer. Uncontrolled delirium eventually leads to significant distress to patients and their families. However, delirium episodes can be reversed in half of these patients by eliminating precipitating factors and using appropriate interventions. The purpose of this narrative review is to discuss the most recent updates in the literature on the management of delirium in patients with advanced cancer. This article addresses the epidemiology, cause, pathophysiology, clinical characteristics, and assessment of delirium as well as various treatment options, including nonpharmacologic intervention and palliative sedation. PMID:22959227

  15. Immunotherapy and complexity: overcoming barriers to control of advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Lage, Agustin

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in fundamental immunology are changing paradigms for management of advanced cancer, now acknowledged as a chronic disease whose prevalence will increase, and one whose complexity makes it difficult to control. Immunotherapy is emerging as an alternative, with new monoclonal antibodies, therapeutic vaccines and deeper understanding of fundamental phenomena in the interaction between tumor and immune system. These novel insights concern mechanisms of programmed contraction of the immune response, characterization of molecular and cellular markers of immunosenescence, the dual role of inflammation, characterization of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and cancer stem cells, and the phenomena of immunogenic apoptosis and oncogene addiction. Additionally, new data drive a deeper understanding of four barriers to overcome in control of advanced cancer: the complexity of biological systems, tumor heterogeneity, tumor mutation rates, and human genome-environment mismatch. The new landscape points to six main strategies: manage advanced cancer as a chronic disease, find relevant molecular markers for patient stratification, develop a rationale for therapeutic combinations, target regulatory control loops in the immune system, expand mathematical modeling capacity, and evaluate complex health intervention packages in real-world conditions. These transitions in cancer immunotherapy research are illustrated in this paper through description of ongoing projects at Cuba's Molecular Immunology Center.

  16. Hedgehog signaling in the stomach.

    PubMed

    Konstantinou, Daniel; Bertaux-Skeirik, Nina; Zavros, Yana

    2016-12-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway not only plays a key part in controlling embryonic development, but in the adult stomach governs important cellular events such as epithelial cell differentiation, proliferation, gastric disease, and regeneration. In particular, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling has been well studied for its role in gastric physiology and pathophysiology. Shh is secreted from the gastric parietal cells and contributes to the regeneration of the epithelium in response to injury, or the development of gastritis during Helicobacter pylori infection. Dysregulation of the Shh signaling pathway leads to the disruption of gastric differentiation, loss of gastric acid secretion and the development of cancer. In this chapter, we will review the most recent findings that reveal the role of Shh as a regulator of gastric physiology, regeneration, and disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Profile of olaparib in the treatment of advanced ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Chase, Dana M; Patel, Shreya; Shields, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Olaparib is a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor that received accelerated approval from the US Food and Drug Administration as monotherapy for patients with germline BRCA mutations and ovarian cancer treated with three or more prior lines of chemotherapy. This article summarizes the mechanism of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition, therapeutic profile and uses of olaparib, and current and ongoing literature pertaining to olaparib in advanced ovarian cancer.

  18. Advancement in treatment and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer with radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu-Ping; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a major health problem. Conventional imaging modalities show limited accuracy for reliable assessment of the tumor. Recent researches suggest that molecular imaging techniques with tracers provide more biologically relevant information and are benefit for the diagnosis of the cancer. In addition, radiopharmaceuticals also play more important roles in treatment of the disease. This review summaries the advancement of the radiolabeled compounds in the theranostics of PC. PMID:26909131

  19. Systemic therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer: individualising cytotoxic therapy.

    PubMed

    Collins, Dearbhaile Catherine; Morris, Patrick Glyn

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive solid tumour associated with a high risk of local invasion and metastatic spread. In the absence of validated screening approaches, many patients present with advanced, incurable disease. Despite advances in treatment, the prognosis for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer remains poor. The benefits of surgical resection and radiation are unproven in this setting and, as patients generally present with distant metastases, systemic therapy forms the mainstay of treatment. The importance of selecting the optimal cytotoxic therapy remains to be critical to improving outcome and retaining quality of life. This review sets out to compare the current therapies available for advanced pancreatic cancer. This review examines the evolution of the systemic management of advanced pancreatic cancer, with a particular focus on the landmark Phase III trials identified from an extensive PubMed and Google scholar literature search. The article summarises the cytotoxic agents in use and the results of two decades of clinical trials to culminate in an almost doubling of survival in clinical trials. In the concluding expert opinion, the challenges interpreting and translating trial results into clinical practice are discussed, where patients are often older and of worse performance status. In the future, novel biomarkers might be used to tailor therapy.

  20. Modified Devine exclusion with vertical stomach reconstruction for gastric outlet obstruction: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Oida, Takatsugu; Mimatsu, Kenji; Kawasaki, Atsushi; Kano, Hisao; Kuboi, Youichi; Amano, Sadao

    2009-07-01

    A gastroenterostomy is the most commonly performed palliative procedure in patients with gastroduodenal outflow obstruction (GOO) caused by unresectable advanced gastric and pancreatic cancer. We developed a new technique--modified Devine exclusion with vertical stomach reconstruction--and evaluated the efficacy of this procedure. We retrospectively studied 60 patients who underwent gastrojejunostomy for GOO caused by unresectable advanced gastric and pancreatic cancer. These patients were divided into two groups, the conventional gastrojejunostomy group (CGJ group) and the modified Devine exclusion with vertical stomach reconstruction group (MDVSR group). The mean duration of the required nasogastric suction, the number of days after which diet could be initiated and after which oral ingestion of solid food could by safely resumed, and the duration of hospitalization after the surgery were significantly shorter in the MDVSR group. The patients in the MDVSR group had a significantly longer duration of stay at home and survival after the surgery. Moreover, in the MDVSR group, GOO did not recur in any of the patients until the time of death. We consider that our procedure of modified Devine exclusion with vertical stomach reconstruction is an easy and feasible technique for GOO.

  1. Advances in cancer research: Volume 47

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.; Weinhouse, S.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight chapters. Some of the titles are: Genetic Epidemiology of Familial Aggregation of Cancer; Terminal Transferase in Normal and Leukemic Cells; Malignant Metamorphosis: Developmental Genes as Culprits for Oncogenesis in Xiphophorus; and Transcription Activation by Viral and Cellular Oncogenes.

  2. [Circulating tumor cells and advanced prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Murez, Thibaut; Droupy, Stéphane; Rebillard, Xavier; Alix-Panabieres, Catherine

    2012-07-01

    Despite development and widespread of PSA, current tools evaluating prostate cancer still give inconsistent or insufficiently relevant results. As encouraging data raised from circulating tumor cells detection in colon or breast cancer, they were evaluated as a surrogate prostate cancer biomarker. Tumor cells need to leave their surrounding primary environment and to survive in mesenchymal environment before they spill and metastasize. Basic research revealed several mutations required through a complex transition phenomenon, including dormancy steps. Circulating cells detection techniques are based on molecular and immunologic methods. Most of them need an enrichment step to improve sensibility and/or specificity. As of today, Veridex' CellSearch is the only FDA approved technique in the evaluation of castration resistant prostate cancer response to new drugs. Clinical research using other techniques highlighted the need for clinical endpoints, as there's no relevant tool and as techniques' target differ. Further studies are required to improve circulating tumors cells' staging and prognosis value. Cellular characterization may be the way to identify metastasis development potential more than the spillage burden. Those techniques still need improvements before they are included in daily practice decisional trees.

  3. Current advances in esophageal cancer proteomics.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Norihisa; Kondo, Tadashi

    2015-06-01

    We review the current status of proteomics for esophageal cancer (EC) from a clinician's viewpoint. The ultimate goal of cancer proteomics is the improvement of clinical outcome. The proteome as a functional translation of the genome is a straightforward representation of genomic mechanisms that trigger carcinogenesis. Cancer proteomics has identified the mechanisms of carcinogenesis and tumor progression, detected biomarker candidates for early diagnosis, and provided novel therapeutic targets for personalized treatments. Our review focuses on three major topics in EC proteomics: diagnostics, treatment, and molecular mechanisms. We discuss the major histological differences between EC types, i.e., esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, and evaluate the clinical significance of published proteomics studies, including promising diagnostic biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets, which should be further validated prior to launching clinical trials. Multi-disciplinary collaborations between basic scientists, clinicians, and pathologists should be established for inter-institutional validation. In conclusion, EC proteomics has provided significant results, which after thorough validation, should lead to the development of novel clinical tools and improvement of the clinical outcome for esophageal cancer patients. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Medical Proteomics.

  4. Advances in cancer research. Volume 48

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.; Weinhouse, S.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the following five selections: Oncotrophoblast Gene Expression: Placental Alkaline Phosphatase; Cellular Events during Hepatocarcinogenesis in Rats and the Questions of Premalignancy; Human Papillomaviruses and Genital Cancer; Herpes Simplex Type 2 Virus and Cervical Neoplasia; and Transforming Genes and Target Cells of Murine Spleen Focus-Forming Viruses.

  5. Integrative clinical genomics of advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Robinson; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Wu, Yi-Mi; Schultz, Nikolaus; Lonigro, Robert J.; Mosquera, Juan-Miguel; Montgomery, Bruce; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Pritchard, Colin C; Attard, Gerhardt; Beltran, Himisha; Abida, Wassim M.; Bradley, Robert K.; Vinson, Jake; Cao, Xuhong; Vats, Pankaj; Kunju, Lakshmi P.; Hussain, Maha; Feng, Felix Y.; Tomlins, Scott A.; Cooney, Kathleen A.; Smith, David C.; Brennan, Christine; Siddiqui, Javed; Mehra, Rohit; Chen, Yu; Rathkopf, Dana E.; Morris, Michael J.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Durack, Jeremy C.; Reuter, Victor E.; Gopalan, Anuradha; Gao, Jianjiong; Loda, Massimo; Lis, Rosina T.; Bowden, Michaela; Balk, Stephen P.; Gaviola, Glenn; Sougnez, Carrie; Gupta, Manaswi; Yu, Evan Y.; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Cheng, Heather H.; Mulcahy, Hyojeong; True, Lawrence D.; Plymate, Stephen R.; Dvinge, Heidi; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Flohr, Penny; Miranda, Susana; Zafeiriou, Zafeiris; Tunariu, Nina; Mateo, Joaquin; Lopez, Raquel Perez; Demichelis, Francesca; Robinson, Brian D.; Schiffman, Marc A.; Nanus, David M.; Tagawa, Scott T.; Sigaras, Alexandros; Eng, Kenneth W.; Elemento, Olivier; Sboner, Andrea; Heath, Elisabeth I.; Scher, Howard I.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Kantoff, Philip; de Bono, Johann S.; Rubin, Mark A.; Nelson, Peter S.; Garraway, Levi A.; Sawyers, Charles L.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Toward development of a precision medicine framework for metastatic, castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), we established a multi-institutional clinical sequencing infrastructure to conduct prospective whole exome and transcriptome sequencing of bone or soft tissue tumor biopsies from a cohort of 150 mCRPC affected individuals. Aberrations of AR, ETS genes, TP53 and PTEN were frequent (40–60% of cases), with TP53 and AR alterations enriched in mCRPC compared to primary prostate cancer. We identified novel genomic alterations in PIK3CA/B, R-spondin, BRAF/RAF1, APC, β-catenin and ZBTB16/PLZF. Aberrations of BRCA2, BRCA1 and ATM were observed at substantially higher frequencies (19.3% overall) than seen in primary prostate cancers. 89% of affected individuals harbored a clinically actionable aberration including 62.7% with aberrations in AR, 65% in other cancer-related genes, and 8% with actionable pathogenic germline alterations. This cohort study provides evidence that clinical sequencing in mCRPC is feasible and could impact treatment decisions in significant numbers of affected individuals. PMID:26000489

  6. Trichomonas vaginalis infection and risk of advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shui, Irene M; Kolb, Suzanne; Hanson, Christi; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Rider, Jennifer R; Stanford, Janet L

    2016-05-01

    The epidemiologic evidence for an association of Trichomonas vaginalis (Tv) with overall prostate cancer is mixed, but some studies suggest Tv may increase risk of more aggressive disease. The aim of this study was to assess whether Tv serostatus is associated with advanced or fatal prostate cancer. A total of 146 men with advanced (metastatic or fatal) prostate cancer and 181 age-matched controls were selected from two prior population-based, case-control studies. Tv serostatus was determined with the same laboratory methods used in previous epidemiologic studies. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using multivariable logistic regression to compare Tv serostatus in prostate cancer cases and controls adjusted for potential confounders. The seroprevalence of Tv in controls was 23%. Tv serostatus was not associated with an increased risk of metastatic or fatal prostate cancer (ORs < 1). Our study does not support an increased risk of advanced or fatal prostate cancer in men seropositive for Tv. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Medical Advances and Racial/ethnic Disparities in Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Tehranifar, Parisa; Neugut, Alfred I.; Phelan, Jo C.; Link, Bruce G.; Liao, Yuyan; Desai, Manisha; Terry, Mary Beth

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although advances in early detection and treatment of cancer improve overall population survival, these advances may not benefit all population groups equally, and may heighten racial/ethnic (R/E) differences in survival. METHODS We identified cancer cases in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, who were ≥ 20 years and diagnosed with one invasive cancer in 1995–1999 (n=580,225). We used 5-year relative survival rates (5Y-RSR) to measure the degree to which mortality from each cancer is amenable to medical interventions (amenability index). We used Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate survival differences between each R/E minority group relative to whites, by the overall amenability index, and three levels of amenability (non-amenable, partly and mostly amenable cancers, corresponding to cancers with 5Y-RSR <40%, 40–69% and ≥ 70%, respectively), adjusting for gender, age, disease stage and county-level poverty concentration. RESULTS As amenability increased, R/E differences in cancer survival increased for African Americans, American Indians/Native Alaskans and Hispanics relative to whites. For example, the hazard rate ratios (95% confidence intervals) for African Americans vs. whites from non-amenable, partly amenable and mostly amenable cancers were 1.05 (1.03, 1.07), 1.38 (1.34,1.41), and 1.41 (1.37, 1.46), respectively. Asians/Pacific Islanders had similar or longer survival relative to whites across amenability levels; however, several subgroups experienced increasingly poorer survival with increasing amenability. CONCLUSIONS Cancer survival disparities for most R/E minority populations widen as cancers become more amenable to medical interventions. Efforts in developing cancer control measures must be coupled with specific strategies for reducing the expected disparities. PMID:19789367

  8. Cediranib Maleate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Biliary Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-10

    Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Periampullary Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Unresectable Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  9. Recent Advances in Microwave Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Sollip

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease that occurs most often in female cancer patients. Early detection can significantly reduce the mortality rate. Microwave breast imaging, which is noninvasive and harmless to human, offers a promising alternative method to mammography. This paper presents a review of recent advances in microwave imaging for breast cancer detection. We conclude by introducing new research on a microwave imaging system with time-domain measurement that achieves short measurement time and low system cost. In the time-domain measurement system, scan time would take less than 1 sec, and it does not require very expensive equipment such as VNA. PMID:28096808

  10. Recent advances in the field of anti-cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Henrique; Kwok, Hang Fai

    2015-01-01

    Background The main goal of anti-cancer therapy is to specifically inhibit the malignant activity of cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells unaffected. As such, for every proposed therapy, it is important to keep in mind the therapeutic index — the ratio of the toxic dose over the therapeutic dose. The use of immunotherapy has allowed a means to both specifically block protein–protein interaction and deliver cytotoxic events to a tumor-specific antigen. Review scope It is the objective of this review to give an overview on current immunotherapy treatment for cancers using monoclonal antibodies. We demonstrate three exciting targets for immunotherapy, TNF-α Converting Enzyme (TACE), Cathepsin S and Urokinase Plasmogen Activator and go over the advances made with one of the most used monoclonal antibodies in cancer therapy, Rituximab; as well as Herceptin, which is used for breast cancer therapy. Furthermore, we touch on other venues of immunotherapy, such as adaptive cell transfer, the use of nucleic acids and the use of dendritic cells. Finally, we summarize some ongoing studies that spell tentative advancements for anti-cancer immunotherapy. General significance Immunotherapy is at the forefront of anti-cancer therapies, allying both a high degree of specificity to general high effectiveness and fewer side-effects. PMID:26673349

  11. Recent advances and future challenges in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Namiko; Tamada, Koji; Tamura, Hideto

    Remarkable advances have been made in cancer immunotherapy. Recent treatment strategies, especially chimeric antigen receptor-T (CAR-T) cell therapy and immune checkpoint inhibitors, reportedly achieve higher objective responses and better survival rates than previous immunotherapies for patients with treatment-resistant malignancies, creating a paradigm shift in cancer treatment. Several clinical trials of cancer immunotherapy for patients with various malignancies are ongoing. However, those with certain malignancies, such as low-immunogenic cancers, cannot be successfully treated with T-cell immunotherapy, and subsets of immunotherapy-treated patients relapse, meaning that more effective immunotherapeutic strategies are needed for such patients. Furthermore, the safety, convenience, and cost of cancer immunotherapy need to be improved in the near future. Herein, we discuss recent advances and future challenges in cancer immunotherapy, i.e., the identification of neoantigens for the development of individualized immunotherapies, the development of new CAR-T cell therapies, including so-called armored CAR-T cells that can induce greater clinical effects and thereby achieve longer survival, the development of off-the-shelf treatment regimens using non-self cells or cell lines, and effective cancer immunotherapy combinations.

  12. Advances in treatment of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    McCafferty, Michael H

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide the practicing surgeon with an outline of several significant developments in colorectal cancer treatment that have affected the care of patients. This review is not intended to report on every important publication of the past few years nor is it intended to be encyclopedic. The author simply hopes to provide a useful reference for surgeons in their daily practice.

  13. Prostate cancer: 9. Treatment of advanced disease

    PubMed Central

    Gleave, M E; Bruchovsky, N; Moore, M J; Venner, P

    1999-01-01

    A 70-year-old man is referred to a urologist for recommendations on the management of metastatic prostate cancer. His cancer was diagnosed 5 years ago, and he underwent radical prostatectomy at that time. The tumour was confined to the prostate gland (Gleason score 7), and during surgery the lymph nodes were assessed as being clear of cancer. Before the surgery, the patient's prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level had been 8 ng/mL. After the prostatectomy, PSA was at first undetectable, but recently the PSA level rose to 2 ng/mL and then, at the most recent test, to 16 ng/mL. A bone scan was ordered to investigate back discomfort, which has been persistent but easily controlled with acetaminophen. Unfortunately, the bone scan shows several sites of metastatic disease. The man's medical history includes type 2 diabetes, which has developed during the past 3 years and which is controlled by diet, as well as asymptomatic hypertension, which is managed by means of a thiazide diuretic. The patient asks what treatments are available, what impact they are likely to have on his disease and what risks are associated with the therapies. PMID:9951446

  14. Advances in the understanding of cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shore, Neal D

    2015-09-01

    The principal role of the immune system is to prevent and eradicate pathogens and infections. The key characteristics or features of an effective immune response include specificity, trafficking, antigen spread and durability (memory). The immune system is recognised to have a critical role in controlling cancer through a dynamic relationship with tumour cells. Normally, at the early stages of tumour development, the immune system is capable of eliminating tumour cells or keeping tumour growth abated; however, tumour cells may evolve multiple pathways over time to evade immune control. Immunotherapy may be viewed as a treatment designed to boost or restore the ability of the immune system to fight cancer, infections and other diseases. Immunotherapy manifests differently from traditional cancer treatments, eliciting delayed response kinetics and thus may be more effective in patients with lower tumour burden, in whom disease progression may be less rapid, thereby allowing ample time for the immunotherapy to evolve. Because immunotherapies may have a different mechanism of action from traditional cytotoxic or targeted biological agents, immunotherapy techniques have the potential to combine synergistically with traditional therapies.

  15. Advances and challenges in hereditary cancer pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Cascorbi, Ingolf; Werk, Anneke Nina

    2017-01-01

    Cancer pharmacogenetics usually considers tumor-specific targets. However, hereditary genetic variants may interfere with the pharmacokinetics of antimetabolites and other anti-cancer drugs, which may lead to severe adverse events. Areas covered: Here, the impact of hereditary genes considered in drug labels such as thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UTG1A1) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) are discussed with respect to guidelines of the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC). Moreover, the association between genetic variants of drug transporters with the clinical outcome is comprehensively discussed. Expert opinion: Precision therapy in the field of oncology is developing tremendously. There are a number of somatic tumor genetic markers that are indicative for treatment with anti-cancer drugs. By contrast, for some hereditary variants, recommendations have been developed. Although we have vast knowledge on the association between drug transporter variants and clinical outcome, the overall data is inconsistent and the predictability of the related phenotype is low. Further developments in research may lead to the discovery of rare, but functionally relevant single nucleotide polymorphisms and a better understanding of multiple genomic, epigenomic as well as phenotypic factors, contributing to drug response in malignancies.

  16. Hormonal therapy in advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kokka, Fani; Brockbank, Elly; Oram, David; Gallagher, Chris; Bryant, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancer is a cancer of the lining of the womb and worldwide is the seventh most common cancer in women. Treatment with hormones is thought to be beneficial in patients with endometrial cancer. Objectives To assess the indications, effectiveness and safety of hormone therapy for advanced or recurrent epithelial endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE up to May 2009 and and CENTRAL (Issue 2, 2009). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies, and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that studied hormonal therapy in adult women diagnosed with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Comparisons were restricted to single-trial analyses so we did not synthesise data in meta-analyses. Main results We found six trials (542 participants) that met our inclusion criteria. These trials assessed the effectiveness of hormonal therapy in women with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer as a single agent, as part of combination therapy and as low versus high dose. All comparisons were restricted to single-trial analyses, where we found no evidence that hormonal therapy as a single agent or as a combination treatment prolonged overall or five-year disease-free survival of women with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. However, low-dose hormonal therapy may have had a benefit in terms of overall and progression-free survival (PFS) compared to high-dose hormonal therapy (HR 1.31, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.66 and HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.71 for overall and PFS, respectively). Authors’ conclusions We found insufficient evidence that hormonal treatment in any form, dose or as part of combination therapy improves the survival of patients with advanced or

  17. Dysbiotic infection in the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Iizasa, Hisashi; Ishihara, Shyunji; Richardo, Timmy; Kanehiro, Yuichi; Yoshiyama, Hironori

    2015-01-01

    Microbiota in human alimentary tract plays important roles for homeostatic maintenance of the body. Compositional difference of gut microbiota is tightly associated with susceptibility of many diseases, including inflammatory diseases, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cancer, and atherosclerosis. “Dysbiosis” refers to a state of imbalance among the colonies of microorganisms within the body, which brings abnormal increase of specific minor components and decrease in the normally dominant species. Since stomach secrets strong acid for its digestive role, this organ has long been thought a sterile organ. However, the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has changed the concept. This bacterium has proven to cause gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. However, recent cross-sectional studies revealed that H. pylori carriers had a decreased risk of developing immunological diseases, such as asthma. H. pylori coinfection also suppresses inflammatory bowel diseases. This review describes human gastric microbiota by discussing its mutual interaction and pathogenic enrollment. Gastric “dysbiosis” may affect host inflammatory response and play important role for gastric pathogenesis. We will topically discuss enrollment of dysbiosis for genesis of gastric cancer as well as for disruption of immunological homeostasis affecting oncogenic resistance. PMID:26523109

  18. Dysbiotic infection in the stomach.

    PubMed

    Iizasa, Hisashi; Ishihara, Shyunji; Richardo, Timmy; Kanehiro, Yuichi; Yoshiyama, Hironori

    2015-10-28

    Microbiota in human alimentary tract plays important roles for homeostatic maintenance of the body. Compositional difference of gut microbiota is tightly associated with susceptibility of many diseases, including inflammatory diseases, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cancer, and atherosclerosis. "Dysbiosis" refers to a state of imbalance among the colonies of microorganisms within the body, which brings abnormal increase of specific minor components and decrease in the normally dominant species. Since stomach secrets strong acid for its digestive role, this organ has long been thought a sterile organ. However, the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has changed the concept. This bacterium has proven to cause gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. However, recent cross-sectional studies revealed that H. pylori carriers had a decreased risk of developing immunological diseases, such as asthma. H. pylori coinfection also suppresses inflammatory bowel diseases. This review describes human gastric microbiota by discussing its mutual interaction and pathogenic enrollment. Gastric "dysbiosis" may affect host inflammatory response and play important role for gastric pathogenesis. We will topically discuss enrollment of dysbiosis for genesis of gastric cancer as well as for disruption of immunological homeostasis affecting oncogenic resistance.

  19. Chinese Herbal Formulation PHY906 and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced Liver Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-08

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage B Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; BCLC Stage C Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  20. Ixabepilone and Liposomal Doxorubicin in Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-11

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Female Reproductive Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  1. Evolving Approaches to Patients with Advanced Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Steven I.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), defined by clinical characteristics including gross extrathyroidal invasion, distant metastases, radioiodine (RAI) resistance, and avidity for 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (positron emission tomography-positive), is found in approximately 10–20% of patients with DTC. Standard therapy (surgery, RAI, TSH suppression with levothyroxine) is ineffective for many of these patients, as is standard chemotherapy. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to DTC and the transformation to advanced DTC has rapidly evolved over the past 15–20 years. Newer targeted therapy, specifically inhibitors of intracellular kinase signaling pathways, and cooperative multicenter clinical trials have dramatically changed the therapeutic landscape for patients with advanced DTC. In this review focusing on morbidities, molecules, and medici