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Sample records for advanced strained-superlattice photocathodes

  1. Advanced Strained-Superlattice Photocathodes for Polarized Electron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Aaron Moy

    2005-01-31

    limited band splitting; and (2) a relaxation of the strain in the epilayer since the 10-nm critical thickness for maintaining perfect strain is exceeded for a 1 % lattice-mismatch [6]. Strained superlattice structures, consisting of very thin quantum well layers alternating with lattice-mismatched barrier layers are excellent candidates for higher polarization. Due to the difference in the effective mass of the heavy- and light-holes, a superlattice exhibits a natural splitting of the valence band, which adds to the strain-induced splitting. In addition, each of the SL layers is thinner than the critical thickness. Polarized photoemission from strained InGaAs/GaAs [7], InGaAdAlGaAs [8], and GaAs/GaAsP [9,10] superlattice structures have been reported in the literature. For this Phase II program, SVT Associates worked with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and University of Wisconsin at Madison to create photocathodes with improved polarization by employing GaAs/GaAsP superlattices. These superlattices consist of alternating thin layers of GaAs and GaAsP. The thicknesses and alloy compositions are designed to create a strained GaAs photoemission layer. Under strain, the heavy-hole and light-hole valence bands in GaAs split, removing degeneracy and allowing high polarization, theoretically 100%. This final report discusses the efforts and results achieved, comparing the device performance of newly created superlattice photocathodes grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with the devices created by other fabrication technologies, and efforts to optimize and improve the device operation.

  2. Polarization Possibilities of Small Spin-Orbit Interaction in Strained-Superlattice Photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-08-25

    Strained-superlattice photocathodes based on InGaP/GaAs were investigated. The photocathode performance is found highly dependent on the superlattice parameters. The electron confinement energy in superlattice appears important. The strained-superlattice structure based on GaAsP/GaAs, with a maximum polarization as high as 90% and more than 1% quantum efficiency, is presently the prime candidate for the ILC polarized electron photocathodes. A recent systematic study shows, however, that the peak polarization seems saturated even though the heavy-hole (HH) and light-hole (LH) band splitting is increased significantly, indicating that there is a material specific spin relaxation mechanism. It is widely accepted that the D'yakonov-Perel mechanism is the dominant spin relaxation mechanism in the III-V compound superlattice structures with a low p-doping ({le} 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}), and that the spin relaxation may be reduced by choosing a material with a smaller spin-orbit interaction. As the spin-orbit interaction in phosphides is much smaller than in arsenides, strained-superlattice structure based on InGaP/GaAs were investigated. The computer code SPECCODE developed by Subashiev and Gerchikov has been used for calculating the band structures in superlattice.

  3. Observation of Significant Quantum Efficiency Enhancement from a Polarized Photocathode with Distributed Bragg Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shukui; Poelker, Matthew; Stutzman, Marcy L.; Chen, Yiqiao; Moy, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    Polarized photocathodes with higher Quantum efficiency (QE) would help to reduce the technological challenge associated with producing polarized beams at milliampere levels, because less laser light would be required, which simplifies photocathode cooling requirements. And for a given amount of available laser power, higher QE would extend the photogun operating lifetime. The distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) concept was proposed to enhance the QE of strained-superlattice photocathodes by increasing the absorption of the incident photons using a Fabry-Perot cavity formed between the front surface of the photocathode and the substrate that includes a DBR, without compromising electron polarization. Here we present recent results showing QE enhancement of a GaAs/GaAsP strained-superlattice photocathode made with a DBR structure. Typically, a GaAs/GaAsP strained-superlattice photocathode without DBR provides a QE of 1%, at a laser wavelength corresponding to peak polarization. In comparison, the GaAs/GaAsP strained-superlattice photocathodes with DBR exhibited an enhancement of over 2 when the incident laser wavelength was tuned to meet the resonant condition for the Fabry-Perot resonator.

  4. Lifetime Measurements of High Polarization Strained-Superlattice Gallium Arsenide at Beam Current > 1 Milliamp using a New 100kV Load Lock Photogun

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Grames; P. A. Adderley; J. Brittian; J. Clark; J. Hansknecht; D. Machie; M. Poelker; M. L. Stutzman; R. Suleiman; K. E. L. Surles-Law

    2007-08-01

    A new 100 kV GaAs DC Load Lock Photogun has been constructed at Jefferson Laboratory, with improvements for photocathode preparation and for operation in a high voltage, ultra-high vacuum environment. Although difficult to gauge directly, we believe that the new gun design has better vacuum conditions compared to the previous gun design, as evidenced by longer photocathode lifetime, that is, the amount of charge extracted before the quantum efficiency of the photocathode drops by 1/e of the initial value via the ion back-bombardment mechanism. Photocathode lifetime measurements at DC beam intensity of up to 10 mA have been performed to benchmark operation of the new gun and for fundamental studies of the use of GaAs photocathodes at high average current*. These measurements demonstrate photocathode lifetime longer than one million Coulombs per square centimeter at a beam intensity higher than 1 mA. The photogun has been reconfigured with a high polarization strained superlattice photocathode (GaAs/GaAsP) and a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser operating near band-gap. Photocathode lifetime measurements at beam intensity greater than 1 mA are measured and presented for comparison.

  5. High Brightness and high polarization electron source using transmission photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Naoto; Jin Xiuguang; Ujihara, Toru; Takeda, Yoshikazu; Mano, Atsushi; Nakagawa, Yasuhide; Nakanishi, Tsutomu; Okumi, Shoji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Konomi, Taro; Ohshima, Takashi; Saka, Takashi; Kato, Toshihiro; Horinaka, Hiromichi; Yasue, Tsuneo; Koshikawa, Takanori

    2009-08-04

    A transmission photocathode was fabricated based on GaAs-GaAsP strained superlattice layers on a GaP substrate and a 20 kV-gun was built to generate the polarized electron beams with the diameter of a few micro-meter. As the results, the reduced brightness of 1.3x10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}/sr and the polarization of 90% were achieved.

  6. Continuous 300-K laser operation of strained superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Ludowise, M.J.; Dietze, W.T.; Lewis, C.R.; Camras, M.D.; Holonyak, N. Jr.; Fuller, B.K.; Nixon, M.A.

    1983-03-15

    Continuous (cw) 300-K laser operation of a 66-period lower energy GaAs-In/sub x/Ga/sub 1-x/As (xapprox.0.2) strained superlattice (SL) and a higher energy 128-period GaAs/sub 1-x/P/sub x/-GaAs (xapprox.0.25) strained SL is demonstrated. The strained SL's are grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) or metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with higher gap quaternary confining layers and L/sub B/ approx.75 A barriers and L/sub z/ approx.75 A quantum wells. These SL's are unstable during high level excitation, failing in 2--20 min when operated cw at 300 K as photopumped lasers.

  7. Effects of atomic hydrogen and deuterium exposure on high polarization GaAs photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    M. Baylac; P. Adderley; J. Brittian; J. Clark; T. Day; J. Grames; J. Hansknecht; M. Poelker; M. Stutzman; A. T. Wu; A. S. Terekhov

    2005-12-01

    Strained-layer GaAs and strained-superlattice GaAs photocathodes are used at Jefferson Laboratory to create high average current beams of highly spin-polarized electrons. High electron yield, or quantum efficiency (QE), is obtained only when the photocathode surface is atomically clean. For years, exposure to atomic hydrogen or deuterium has been the photocathode cleaning technique employed at Jefferson Laboratory. This work demonstrates that atomic hydrogen cleaning is not necessary when precautions are taken to ensure that clean photocathode material from the vendor is not inadvertently dirtied while samples are prepared for installation inside photoemission guns. Moreover, this work demonstrates that QE and beam polarization can be significantly reduced when clean high-polarization photocathode material is exposed to atomic hydrogen from an rf dissociator-style atomic hydrogen source. Surface analysis provides some insight into the mechanisms that degrade QE and polarization due to atomic hydrogen cleaning.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of cesium telluride photocathodes: A promising electron source for the Los Alamos Advanced FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, S.H.; Nuguyen, D.C.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sherwood, B.A.

    1994-09-01

    The Advanced FEL at Los Alamos embodies a Y{sub 2}CsSb photocathode as an electron source. The photocathode consists of a K{sub 2}CsSb film deposited on a molybdenum plug that can be inserted into the linac of the FEL. However, because K{sub 2}CsSb is easily contaminated and has a half-life of less than a day when in use, switching to a more rugged high quantum efficiency (QE) material such as Cs{sub 2}Te is considered as a means to lengthen the beam time. Cs{sub 2}Te films were deposited on molybdenum plugs in an ultrahigh-vacuum research chamber. Several Cs{sub 2}Te films were measured in-situ for their spectral responses with a bias voltage of 90V; the resulting QEs were 12-18% at a wavelength of 254 nm, 0.2-1.2% at 334 nm, 10{sup {minus}4}-10{sup {minus}3} at 365 nm, and 10{sup {minus}7}-10{sup {minus}5} at 546 nm. For this cathode to be useful, the authors need to frequency quadruple the 1052 mn line of the Nd:YLF laser to achieve a wavelength of 263 mm. Initial studies showed that the 251-nm QE of Cs{sub 2}Te is much less sensitive to contamination than the 526-nm QE of K{sub 2}CsSb. The authors exposed Cs{sub 2}Te photocathodes to air at 10{sup {minus}4} torr for five minutes. As a result, the QEs dropped from 16-18% to 1-2% at 254 mn. However, heating the cathode to 165{degrees}C revived the QE to about 10%. They conclude that Cs{sub 2}Te is a very rugged photocathode material for use in an rf photoelectron source.

  9. Surface science analysis of GaAs photocathodes following sustained electron beam delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos Hernandez-Garcia, Fay Hannon, Marcy Stutzman, V. Shutthanandan, Z. Zhu, M. Nandasri, S. V. Kuchibhatla, S. Thevuthasan, W. P. Hess

    2012-06-01

    Degradation of the photocathode materials employed in photoinjectors represents a challenge for sustained operation of nuclear physics accelerators and high power Free Electron Lasers (FEL). Photocathode quantum efficiency (QE) degradation is due to residual gasses in the electron source vacuum system being ionized and accelerated back to the photocathode. These investigations are a first attempt to characterize the nature of the photocathode degradation, and employ multiple surface and bulk analysis techniques to investigate damage mechanisms including sputtering of the Cs-oxidant surface monolayer, other surface chemistry effects, and ion implantation. Surface and bulk analysis studies were conducted on two GaAs photocathodes, which were removed from the JLab FEL DC photoemission gun after delivering electron beam, and two control samples. The analysis techniques include Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). In addition, two high-polarization strained superlattice GaAs photocathode samples, one removed from the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) photoinjector and one unused, were also analyzed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and SIMS. It was found that heat cleaning the FEL GaAs wafer introduces surface roughness, which seems to be reduced by prolonged use. The bulk GaAs samples retained a fairly well organized crystalline structure after delivering beam but shows evidence of Cs depletion on the surface. Within the precision of the SIMS and RBS measurements the data showed no indication of hydrogen implantation or lattice damage from ion back bombardment in the bulk GaAs wafers. In contrast, SIMS and TEM measurements of the strained superlattice photocathode show clear crystal damage in the wafer from ion back bombardment.

  10. RF Conditioning of the Photo-Cathode RF Gun at the Advanced Photon Source - NWA RF Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T. L.; DiMonte, N.; Nassiri, A.; Sun, Y.; Zholents, A.

    2015-01-01

    A new S-band Photo-cathode (PC) gun was recently installed and RF conditioned at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) Injector Test-stand (ITS) at Argonne National Lab (ANL). The APS PC gun is a LCLS type gun fabricated at SLAC [1]. The PC gun was delivered to the APS in October 2013 and installed in the APS ITS in December 2013. At ANL, we developed a new method of fast detection and mitigation of the guns internal arcs during the RF conditioning process to protect the gun from arc damage and to RF condition more efficiently. Here, we report the results of RF measurements for the PC gun and an Auto-Restart method for high power RF conditioning.

  11. A Masked Photocathode in Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji

    2010-12-14

    In this paper, we propose a masked photocathode inside the photoinjector for generating high brightness election beam. Instead of mounting the photocathode onto an electrode, an electrode with small hole is used as a mask to shield the photocathode from the accelerating vacuum chamber. Using such a masked photocathode will make the replacement of photocathode material easy by rotating the photocathode behind the electrode into the hole. Furthermore, this helps reduce the dark current or secondary electron emission from the photocathode material. The masked photocathode also provides transverse cut-off to a Gaussian laser beam that reduces electron beam emittance growth from nonlinear space-charge effects.

  12. Piezoelectrically Enhanced Photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Robert A.; Nikzad, Shouleh; Bell, Lloyd Douglas; Strittmatter, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Doping of photocathodes with materials that have large piezoelectric coefficients has been proposed as an alternative means of increasing the desired photoemission of electrons. Treating cathode materials to increase emission of electrons is called "activation" in the art. It has been common practice to activate photocathodes by depositing thin layers of suitable metals (usually, cesium). Because cesium is unstable in air, fabrication of cesiated photocathodes and devices that contain them must be performed in sealed tubes under vacuum. It is difficult and costly to perform fabrication processes in enclosed, evacuated spaces. The proposed piezoelectrically enhanced photocathodes would have electron-emission properties similar to those of cesiated photocathodes but would be stable in air, and therefore could be fabricated more easily and at lower cost. Candidate photocathodes include nitrides of elements in column III of the periodic table . especially compounds of the general formula Al(x)Ga(1.x)N (where 0< or = x < or =.1). These compounds have high piezoelectric coefficients and are suitable for obtaining response to ultraviolet light. Fabrication of a photocathode according to the proposal would include inducement of strain in cathode layers during growth of the layers on a substrate. The strain would be induced by exploiting structural mismatches among the various constituent materials of the cathode. Because of the piezoelectric effect in this material, the strain would give rise to strong electric fields that, in turn, would give rise to a high concentration of charge near the surface. Examples of devices in which piezoelectrically enhanced photocathodes could be used include microchannel plates, electron- bombarded charge-coupled devices, image tubes, and night-vision goggles. Piezoelectrically enhanced photocathode materials could also be used in making highly efficient monolithic photodetectors. Highly efficient and stable piezoelectrically enhanced

  13. Acicular photomultiplier photocathode structure

    DOEpatents

    Craig, Richard A.; Bliss, Mary

    2003-09-30

    A method and apparatus for increasing the quantum efficiency of a photomultiplier tube by providing a photocathode with an increased surface-to-volume ratio. The photocathode includes a transparent substrate, upon one major side of which is formed one or more large aspect-ratio structures, such as needles, cones, fibers, prisms, or pyramids. The large aspect-ratio structures are at least partially composed of a photoelectron emitting material, i.e., a material that emits a photoelectron upon absorption of an optical photon. The large aspect-ratio structures may be substantially composed of the photoelectron emitting material (i.e., formed as such upon the surface of a relatively flat substrate) or be only partially composed of a photoelectron emitting material (i.e., the photoelectron emitting material is coated over large aspect-ratio structures formed from the substrate material itself.) The large aspect-ratio nature of the photocathode surface allows for an effective increase in the thickness of the photocathode relative the absorption of optical photons, thereby increasing the absorption rate of incident photons, without substantially increasing the effective thickness of the photocathode relative the escape incidence of the photoelectrons.

  14. Metamorphic InAlAs/InGaAs/InAlAs/GaAs HEMT heterostructures containing strained superlattices and inverse steps in the metamorphic buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiev, G. B.; Vasil'evskii, I. S.; Pushkarev, S. S.; Klimov, Е. А.; Imamov, R. M.; Buffat, P. A.; Dwir, B.; Suvorova, Е. I.

    2013-03-01

    Metamorphic InхAl1-хAs buffer design features influence on electrophysical and structural properties of the heterostructures was investigated. Two types of MHEMT heterostructures In0.70Al0.30As/In0.76Ga0.24As with novel design contained inverse steps or strained superlattices were grown by MBE on GaAs substrates. Electrophysical properties of the heterostructures were characterized by Hall measurements, while the structural features were described with the help of different transmission electron microscopy techniques. The metamorphic HEMT with strained superlattices inserted in the metamorphic buffer had the smoother surface and more defect-free crystal structure, as well as a higher Hall mobility, than metamorphic HEMT with inverse steps within the metamorphic buffer.

  15. Piezoelectrically enhanced photocathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Robert A. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Strittmatter, Robert P. (Inventor); Bell, Lloyd Douglas (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A photocathode, for generating electrons in response to incident photons in a photodetector, includes a base layer having a first lattice structure and an active layer having a second lattice structure and epitaxially formed on the base layer, the first and second lattice structures being sufficiently different to create a strain in the active layer with a corresponding piezoelectrically induced polarization field in the active layer, the active layer having a band gap energy corresponding to a desired photon energy.

  16. Advanced Code for Photocathode Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, Robert Lawrence; Jensen, Kevin; Montgomery, Eric; Bui, Thuc

    2015-12-15

    The Phase I activity demonstrated that PhotoQE could be upgraded and modified to allow input using a graphical user interface. Specific calls to platform-dependent (e.g. IMSL) function calls were removed, and Fortran77 components were rewritten for Fortran95 compliance. The subroutines, specifically the common block structures and shared data parameters, were reworked to allow the GUI to update material parameter data, and the system was targeted for desktop personal computer operation. The new structures overcomes the previous rigid and unmodifiable library structures by implementing new, materials library data sets and repositioning the library values to external files. Material data may originate from published literature or experimental measurements. Further optimization and restructuring would allow custom and specific emission models for beam codes that rely on parameterized photoemission algorithms. These would be based on simplified and parametric representations updated and extended from previous versions (e.g., Modified Fowler-Dubridge, Modified Three-Step, etc.).

  17. DIAMOND AMPLIFIED PHOTOCATHODES.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY,J.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BOHON, J.; CHANG, X.; GROVER, R.; ISAKOVIC, A.; RAO, T.; WU, Q.

    2007-11-26

    High-average-current linear electron accelerators require photoinjectors capable of delivering tens to hundreds of mA average current, with peak currents of hundreds of amps. Standard photocathodes face significant challenges in meeting these requirements, and often have short operational lifetimes in an accelerator environment. We report on recent progress toward development of secondary emission amplifiers for photocathodes, which are intended to increase the achievable average current while protecting the cathode from the accelerator. The amplifier is a thin diamond wafer which converts energetic (few keV) primary electrons into hundreds of electron-hole pairs via secondary electron emission. The electrons drift through the diamond under an external bias and are emitted into vacuum via a hydrogen-terminated surface with negative electron affinity (NEA). Secondary emission gain of over 200 has been achieved. Two methods of patterning diamond, laser ablation and reactive-ion etching (RIE), are being developed to produce the required geometry. A variety of diagnostic techniques, including FTIR, SEM and AFM, have been used to characterize the diamonds.

  18. DIAMOND AMPLIFIER FOR PHOTOCATHODES.

    SciTech Connect

    RAO,T.; BEN-ZVI,I.; BURRILL,A.; CHANG,X.; HULBERT,S.; JOHNSON,P.D.; KEWISCH,J.

    2004-06-21

    We report a new approach to the generation of high-current, high-brightness electron beams. Primary electrons are produced by a photocathode (or other means) and are accelerated to a few thousand electron-volts, then strike a specially prepared diamond window. The large Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) provides a multiplication of the number of electrons by about two orders of magnitude. The secondary electrons drift through the diamond under an electric field and emerge into the accelerating proper of the ''gun'' through a Negative Electron Affinity surface of the diamond. The advantages of the new approach include the following: (1) Reduction of the number of primary electrons by the large SEY, i.e. a very low laser power in a photocathode producing the primaries. (2) Low thermal emittance due to the NEA surface and the rapid thermalization of the electrons. (3) Protection of the cathode from possible contamination from the gun, allowing the use of large quantum efficiency but sensitive cathodes. (4) Protection of the gun from possible contamination by the cathode, allowing the use of superconducting gun cavities. (5) Production of high average currents, up to ampere class. (6) Encapsulated design, making the ''load-lock'' systems unnecessary. This paper presents the criteria that need to be taken into account in designing the amplifier.

  19. Infrared-sensitive photocathode

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Cooper, Gregory A.

    1995-01-01

    A single-crystal, multi-layer device incorporating an IR absorbing layer that is compositionally different from the Ga.sub.x Al.sub.1-x Sb layer which acts as the electron emitter. Many different IR absorbing layers can be envisioned for use in this embodiment, limited only by the ability to grow quality material on a chosen substrate. A non-exclusive list of possible IR absorbing layers would include GaSb, InAs and InAs/Ga.sub.w In.sub.y Al.sub.1-y-w Sb superlattices. The absorption of the IR photon excites an electron into the conduction band of the IR absorber. An externally applied electric field then transports electrons from the conduction band of the absorber into the conduction band of the Ga.sub.x Al.sub.1-x Sb, from which they are ejected into vacuum. Because the band alignments of Ga.sub.x Al.sub.1-x Sb can be made the same as that of GaAs, emitting efficiencies comparable to GaAs photocathodes are obtainable. The present invention provides a photocathode that is responsive to wavelengths within the range of 0.9 .mu.m to at least 10 .mu.m.

  20. Infrared-sensitive photocathode

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, R.P. Jr.; Cooper, G.A.

    1995-04-04

    A single-crystal, multi-layer device is described incorporating an IR absorbing layer that is compositionally different from the Ga{sub x}Al{sub 1{minus}x}Sb layer which acts as the electron emitter. Many different IR absorbing layers can be envisioned for use in this embodiment, limited only by the ability to grow quality material on a chosen substrate. A non-exclusive list of possible IR absorbing layers would include GaSb, InAs and InAs/Ga{sub w}In{sub y}Al{sub 1{minus}y{minus}w}Sb superlattices. The absorption of the IR photon excites an electron into the conduction band of the IR absorber. An externally applied electric field then transports electrons from the conduction band of the absorber into the conduction band of the Ga{sub x}Al{sub 1{minus}x}Sb, from which they are ejected into vacuum. Because the band alignments of Ga{sub x}Al{sub 1{minus}x}Sb can be made the same as that of GaAs, emitting efficiencies comparable to GaAs photocathodes are obtainable. The present invention provides a photocathode that is responsive to wavelengths within the range of 0.9 {mu}m to at least 10 {mu}m. 9 figures.

  1. TRIZ theory in NEA photocathode preparation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jianliang; Huang, Dayong; Li, Xiangjiang; Gao, Youtang

    2016-09-01

    The solutions to the engineering problems were provided according to the innovation principle based on the theory of TRIZ. The ultra high vacuum test and evaluation system for the preparation of negative electron affinity (NEA) photocathode has the characteristics of complex structure and powerful functions. Segmentation principle, advance function principle, curved surface principle, dynamic characteristics principle and nested principle adopted by the design of ultra high vacuum test and evaluation system for cathode preparation were analyzed. The applications of the physical contradiction and the substance-field analysis method of the theory of TRIZ in the cathode preparation ultra high vacuum test and evaluation system were discussed.

  2. Recent Progress toward Robust Photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Mulhollan, G. A.; Bierman, J. C.

    2009-08-04

    RF photoinjectors for next generation spin-polarized electron accelerators require photo-cathodes capable of surviving RF gun operation. Free electron laser photoinjectors can benefit from more robust visible light excited photoemitters. A negative electron affinity gallium arsenide activation recipe has been found that diminishes its background gas susceptibility without any loss of near bandgap photoyield. The highest degree of immunity to carbon dioxide exposure was achieved with a combination of cesium and lithium. Activated amorphous silicon photocathodes evince advantageous properties for high current photoinjectors including low cost, substrate flexibility, visible light excitation and greatly reduced gas reactivity compared to gallium arsenide.

  3. Sources of Emittance in RF Photocathode Injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, David

    2016-12-11

    Advances in electron beam technology have been central to creating the current generation of x-ray free electron lasers and ultra-fast electron microscopes. These once exotic devices have become essential tools for basic research and applied science. One important beam technology for both is the electron source which, for many of these instruments, is the photocathode RF gun. The invention of the photocathode gun and the concepts of emittance compensation and beam matching in the presence of space charge and RF forces have made these high-quality beams possible. Achieving even brighter beams requires a taking a finer resolution view of the electron dynamics near the cathode during photoemission and the initial acceleration of the beam. In addition, the high brightness beam is more sensitive to degradation by the optical aberrations of the gun’s RF and magnetic lenses. This paper discusses these topics including the beam properties due to fundamental photoemission physics, space charge effects close to the cathode, and optical distortions introduced by the RF and solenoid fields. Analytic relations for these phenomena are derived and compared with numerical simulations.

  4. Stable Solar-Blind Ultraviolet III-Nitride Photocathode for Astronomy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Lloyd

    opaque mode. This work will build on the success of our previous APRA-funded effort. In that effort, we demonstrated III-nitride photocathode activation without the use of cesium and stable response with respect to time. These accomplishments already represent major improvements to the state-of-the-art for photocathode technologies. Our proposed effort directly responds to the recommendations of NASA's UV-Visible Detectors Working Group. Future UV astrophysics missions will require significant detector advances, particularly in quantum efficiency, resolution, and pixel count, in order to produce major new scientific results. The proposed technology is specifically designed to address these future needs.

  5. Intrinsic emittance reduction in transmission mode photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeri; Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    High quantum efficiency (QE) and low emittance electron beams provided by multi-alkali photocathodes make them of great interest for next generation high brightness photoinjectors. Spicer's three-step model well describes the photoemission process; however, some photocathode characteristics such as their thickness have not yet been completely exploited to further improve the brightness of the generated electron beams. In this work, we report on the emittance and QE of a multi-alkali photocathode grown onto a glass substrate operated in transmission and reflection modes at different photon energies. We observed a 20% reduction in the intrinsic emittance from the reflection to the transmission mode operation. This observation can be explained by inelastic electron-phonon scattering during electrons' transit towards the cathode surface. Due to this effect, we predict that thicker photocathode layers will further reduce the intrinsic emittance of electron beams generated by photocathodes operated in transmission mode.

  6. Performance of cesium telluride photocathodes as an electron source for the Los Alamos FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, S.H.; Kinross-Wright, J.; Nuguyen, D.C.; Sheffield, R.L.; Weber, M.E.

    1994-09-01

    The Los Alamos Advanced FEL was successfully operated with a Cs{sub 2}Te photocathode driven by a frequency quadrupled Nd:YLF laser as the electron source. Lasing was achieved at 5-6 microns. Cs{sub 2}Te photocathodes with quantum efficiencies of 12-18% at 254 nm were fabricated in an ultrahigh-vacuum chamber and transferred under high vacuum to the FEL. 263 mn light from the drive laser was focused to an 8 mm spot on the center of the photocathode. The authors estimated the operational life time of Cs{sub 2}Te photocathodes to be at least 20 times that for K{sub 2}CsSb photocathodes. The measured dark current of 0.3 mA in an electric field of 22-24 MV/m is well within the acceptable level. The maximum amount of charge extracted was observed to be limited by space charge to about 3.5 nC per micropulse. The emittance of the beam was estimated by fitting the data from a quadrupole scan. The authors measured an emittance that is comparable with the emittance measured with a K{sub 2}CsSb photocathode in their system. A pulse length of 9.3 {+-} 2 ps for 1.3 {+-} 0.2 nC electron micropulses and a pulse length of 7.1 {+-} 0.7 ps for the laser pulses were measured with a streak camera. Therefore, the response of the Cs{sub 2}Te photocathode to the laser pulse is sufficiently fast for FEL applications.

  7. PHOTOCATHODES FOR THE ENERGY RECOVERY LINACS.

    SciTech Connect

    RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.Y.; SMEDLEY, J.; ET AL.

    2005-03-19

    This paper presents an overview of existing and emerging technologies on electron sources that can service various Energy Recovering Linacs under consideration. Photocathodes that can deliver average currents from 1 mA to 1 A, the pros and cons associated with these cathodes are addressed. Status of emerging technologies such as secondary emitters, cesiated dispenser cathodes, field and photon assisted field emitters and super lattice photocathodes are also reviewed.

  8. Photocathodes for the energy recovery linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, T; Burrill, A; Chang, X Y; Smedley, J; Nishitani, T; Garcia, C Hernandez; Poelker, M; Seddon, E; Hannon, F E; Sinclair, C K; Lewellen, J; Feldman, D

    2005-03-19

    This paper presents an overview of existing and emerging technologies on electron sources that can service various Energy Recovering Linacs under consideration. Photocathodes that can deliver average currents from 1 mA to 1 A, the pros and cons associated with these cathodes are addressed. Status of emerging technologies such as secondary emitters, cesiated dispenser cathodes, field and photon assisted field emitters and super lattice photocathodes are also reviewed.

  9. High efficiency, long-life photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Lawrence; Montgomery, Eric; Jensen, Kevin; Collins, George; Marsden, David; Karimov, Rasul; Falce, Lou

    2017-03-01

    Research and development on high efficiency, robust, long-life photocathodes is in progress for accelerator, light source, and other commercial applications. The research is investigating detailed physics of photoemission and developing a computational capability to predict performance. Reservoir technology will significantly increase lifetime and allow recovery from many poisoning events. Better understanding of the physics will impact fabrication techniques to optimize performance. A production facility is under construction to provide improved photocathodes to users.

  10. Gallium nitride photocathodes for imaging photon counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Hull, Jeffrey S.; Tremsin, Anton S.; McPhate, Jason B.; Dabiran, Amir M.

    2010-07-01

    Gallium nitride opaque and semitransparent photocathodes provide high ultraviolet quantum efficiencies from 100 nm to a long wavelength cutoff at ~380 nm. P (Mg) doped GaN photocathode layers ~100 nm thick with a barrier layer of AlN (22 nm) on sapphire substrates also have low out of band response, and are highly robust. Opaque GaN photocathodes are relatively easy to optimize, and consistently provide high quantum efficiency (70% at 120 nm) provided the surface cleaning and activation (Cs) processes are well established. We have used two dimensional photon counting imaging microchannel plate detectors, with an active area of 25 mm diameter, to investigate the imaging characteristics of semitransparent GaN photocathodes. These can be produced with high (20%) efficiency, but the thickness and conductivity of the GaN must be carefully optimized. High spatial resolution of ~50 μm with low intrinsic background (~7 events sec-1 cm-2) and good image uniformity have been achieved. Selectively patterned deposited GaN photocathodes have also been used to allow quick diagnostics of optimization parameters. GaN photocathodes of both types show great promise for future detector applications in ultraviolet Astrophysical instruments.

  11. Optical fiber-based photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cǎsǎndruc, Albert; Bücker, Robert; Kassier, Günther; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2016-08-01

    We present the design of a back-illuminated photocathode for electron diffraction experiments based on an optical fiber, and experimental characterization of emitted electron bunches. Excitation light is guided through the fiber into the experimental vacuum chamber, eliminating typical alignment difficulties between the emitter metal and the optical trigger and position instabilities, as well as providing reliable control of the laser spot size and profile. The in-vacuum fiber end is polished and coated with a 30 nm gold (Au) layer on top of 3 nm of chromium (Cr), which emits electrons by means of single-photon photoemission when femtosecond pulses in the near ultraviolet (257 nm) are fed into the fiber on the air side. The emission area can be adjusted to any value between a few nanometers (using tapered fibers) and the size of a multi-mode fiber core (100 μm or larger). In this proof-of-principle experiment, two different types of fibers were tested, with emission spot diameters of 50 μm and 100 μm, respectively. The normalized thermal electron beam emittance (TE) was measured by means of the aperture scan technique, and a TE of 4.0 π nm was measured for the smaller spot diameter. Straightforward enhancements to the concept allowed to demonstrate operation in an electric field environment of up to 7 MV/m.

  12. RF Gun Photocathode Research at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Jongewaard, E.; Akre, R.; Brachmann, A.; Corbett, J.; Gilevich, S.; Grouev, K.; Hering, P.; P.Krejcik,; Lewandowski, J.; Loos, H.; Montagne, T.; Sheppard, J.C.; Stefan, P.; Vlieks, A.; Weathersby, S.; Zhou, F.; /SLAC

    2012-05-16

    LCLS is presently operating with a third copper photocathode in the original rf gun, with a quantum efficiency (QE) of {approx}1 x 10{sup -4} and projected emittance {gamma}{var_epsilon}{sub x,y} = 0.45 {micro}m at 250 pC bunch charge. The spare LCLS gun is installed in the SLAC Accelerator Structure Test Area (ASTA), fully processed to high rf power. As part of a wider photocathode R and D program, a UV laser system and additional gun diagnostics are being installed at ASTA to measure QE, QE lifetime, and electron beam emittance under a variety of operating conditions. The near-term goals are to test and verify the spare photocathode production/installation sequence, including transfer from the final holding chamber to the rf gun. Mid- and longer-term goals include development of a rigorous understanding of plasma and laser-assisted surface conditioning and investigation of new, high-QE photocathode materials. In parallel, an x-ray photoemission spectroscopy station is nearing completion, to analyze Cu photocathode surface chemistry. In this paper we review the status and anticipated operating parameters of ASTA and the spectroscopy test chamber.

  13. Gallium nitride photocathode development for imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; McPhate, Jason B.; Hull, Jeffrey S.; Malloy, James; Dabiran, Amir M.

    2008-07-01

    Recent progress in Gallium Nitride (GaN, AlGaN, InGaN) photocathodes show great promise for future detector applications in Astrophysical instruments. Efforts with opaque GaN photocathodes have yielded quantum efficiencies up to 70% at 120 nm and cutoffs at ~380 nm, with low out of band response, and high stability. Previous work with semitransparent GaN photocathodes produced relatively low quantum efficiencies in transmission mode (4%). We now have preliminary data showing that quantum efficiency improvements of a factor of 5 can be achieved. We have also performed two dimensional photon counting imaging with 25mm diameter semitransparent GaN photocathodes in close proximity to a microchannel plate stack and a cross delay line readout. The imaging performance achieves spatial resolution of ~50μm with low intrinsic background (below 1 event sec-1 cm-2) and reasonable image uniformity. GaN photocathodes with significant quantum efficiency have been fabricated on ceramic MCP substrates. In addition GaN has been deposited at low temperature onto quartz substrates, also achieving substantial quantum efficiency.

  14. Photocathode device that replenishes photoemissive coating

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, Nathan A.; Lizon, David C.

    2016-06-14

    A photocathode device may replenish its photoemissive coating to replace coating material that desorbs/evaporates during photoemission. A linear actuator system may regulate the release of a replenishment material vapor, such as an alkali metal, from a chamber inside the photocathode device to a porous cathode substrate. The replenishment material deposits on the inner surface of a porous membrane and effuses through the membrane to the outer surface, where it replenishes the photoemissive coating. The rate of replenishment of the photoemissive coating may be adjusted using the linear actuator system to regulate performance of the photocathode device during photoemission. Alternatively, the linear actuator system may adjust a plasma discharge gap between a cartridge containing replenishment material and a metal grid. A potential is applied between the cartridge and the grid, resulting in ejection of metal ions from the cartridge that similarly replenish the photoemissive coating.

  15. SSRL photocathode RF gun test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, M.; Baltay, M.; Boyce, A.

    1995-12-31

    A photocathode RF gun test stand designed for the production and study of high brightness electron beams will be constructed at SSRL. The beam will be generated from a laser driven third generation photocathode RF gun being developed in collaboration with BNL, LBL, and UCLA. The 3-5 [MeV] beam from the gun will be accelerated using a SLAC three meter S-band accelerator section, in order to achieve the desired low emittance beam, emittance compensation with solenoidal focusing will be employed.

  16. Graphene shield enhanced photocathodes and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Moody, Nathan Andrew

    2014-09-02

    Disclosed are graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, such as high QE photocathodes. In certain embodiments, a monolayer graphene shield membrane ruggedizes a high quantum efficiency photoemission electron source by protecting a photosensitive film of the photocathode, extending operational lifetime and simplifying its integration in practical electron sources. In certain embodiments of the disclosed graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, the graphene serves as a transparent shield that does not inhibit photon or electron transmission but isolates the photosensitive film of the photocathode from reactive gas species, preventing contamination and yielding longer lifetime.

  17. Activation Layer Stabilization of High Polarization Photocathodes in Sub-Optimal RF Gun Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory A. Mulhollan

    2010-11-16

    Specific activation recipes for bulk, 100 nm thick MBE grown and high polarization III-V photocathode material have been developed which mitigate the effects of exposure to background gasses. Lifetime data using four representative gasses were acquired for bulk GaAs, 100 nm unstrained GaAs and strained superlattice GaAs/GaAsP, all activated both with Cs and then Cs and Li (bi-alkali). Each photoemitter showed marked resilience improvement when activated using the bi-alkali recipe compared to the standard single alkali recipe. A dual alkali activation system at SLAC was constructed, baked and commissioned with the purpose of performing spin-polarization measurements on electrons emitted from the bi-alkali activated surfaces. An end station at SSRL was configured with the required sources for energy resolved photoemission measurements on the bi-alkali activated and CO2 dosed surfaces. The bi-alkali recipes were successfully implemented at SLAC/SSRL. Measurements at SLAC of the photoelectron spin-polarization from the modified activation surface showed no sign of a change in value compared to the standard activated material, i.e., no ill effects. Analysis of photoemission data indicates that the addition of Li to the activation layer results in a multi-layer structure. The presence of Li in the activation layer also acts as an inhibitor to CO2 absorption, hence better lifetimes in worse vacuum were achieved. The bi-alkali activation has been tested on O2 activated GaAs for comparison with NF3 activated surfaces. Comparable resilience to CO2 exposure was achieved for the O2 activated surface. An RF PECVD amorphous silicon growth system was modified to allow high temperature heat cleaning of GaAs substrates prior to film deposition. Growth versus thickness data were collected. Very thin amorphous silicon germanium layers were optimized to exhibit good behavior as an electron emitter. Growth of the amorphous silicon germanium films on the above substrates was fine tuned

  18. Wire ageing with the TEA photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1996-06-01

    Recently several RICH protypes successfully tested a gaseous TEA photocathode. However, its wire ageing behavior is unknown. In principle, TEA is a more strongly bonded molecule than TMAE, and, as a result, one would expect better wire ageing behavior. This paper explores this question.

  19. A Summary of the 2010 Photocathode Physics for Photoinjectors Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Bazarov, I; Dowell, D; Hannon, Fay; Harkay, K; Garcia, C H; Padmore, H; Rao, T; Smedley, J

    2010-10-01

    This contribution contains a summary and some highlights from the Photocathode Physics for Photoinjectors (P3) Workshop [1]. This workshop, held at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Ocotber of 2010, was aimed at bringing the photocathode community together to discuss and explore the current state of the art in accelerator photocathodes, from both a theoretical and a materials science perspective. All types of photocathode materials were discussed, including metals, NEA and PEA semiconductors, and "designer" photocathodes with bespoke properties. Topics of the workshop included: Current status of photocathodes for accelerator applications Current fabrication methods Applications of modern materials science to the growth and analysis of cathodes Photoemission spectroscopy as a diagnostic of cathode performance Utilization of modern user facilities Photoemission theory Novel ideas in cathode development Discussion forum on future collaboration for cathode growth, analysis and testing

  20. Single layer graphene protective gas barrier for copper photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangze; Moody, Nathan A.; Jensen, Kevin L.; Pavlenko, Vitaly; Narvaez Villarrubia, Claudia W.; Mohite, Aditya D.; Gupta, Gautam

    2017-01-01

    Photocathodes can benefit from a thin protection layer and attain long-term stability. Graphene is potentially a good candidate for such application. We report direct growth of single-layer graphene on single crystal Cu(110) photocathodes using chemical vapor deposition and the effective protection of copper photocathodes with graphene against degradation under atmospheric conditions. Due to the interaction and charge transfer between graphene and copper, the graphene-protected cathodes have 0.25 eV lower work function and 17% higher quantum efficiency at 250 nm compared with bare Cu cathodes. The graphene coating can protect copper photocathodes from degradation for more than 20 min in an exposure to 200 Torr of air. The validation of graphene-photocathode compatibility opens a new route to the lifetime-extension for photocathodes.

  1. Development of High Quantum Efficiency UV/Blue Photocathode Epitaxial Semiconductor Heterostructures for Scintillation and Cherenkov Radiation Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leopold, Daniel J.

    2002-01-01

    The primary goal of this research project was to further extend the use of advanced heteroepitaxial-semiconductor crystal growth techniques such as molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and to demonstrate significant gains in UV/blue photonic detection by designing and fabricating atomically-tailored heteroepitaxial GaAlN/GaInN photocathode device structures. This NASA Explorer technology research program has focused on the development of photocathodes for Cherenkov and scintillation radiation detection. Support from the program allowed us to enhance our MBE system to include a nitrogen plasma source and a magnetic bearing turbomolecular pump for delivery and removal of high purity atomic nitrogen during GaAlN/GaInN film growth. Under this program we have also designed, built and incorporated a cesium activation stage. In addition, a connected UHV chamber with photocathode transfer/positioner components as well as a hybrid phototube stage was designed and built to make in-situ quantum efficiency measurements without ever having to remove the photocathodes from UHV conditions. Thus we have constructed a system with the capability to couple atomically-tailored MBE-grown photocathode heterostructures with real high gain readout devices for single photon detection evaluation.

  2. Basic Studies of High Performance Multialkali Photocathodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-05

    Optical Properties of Solids ", F. Abeles (Editor), Hocuh Holland (1972). 48. W. E. Spicer, in " Optical Properties ...Photoemission Spectroscopy of the Cesium Antimonide Photocathode". A shortened version of this work is being revised for publication in the journal, Thin Solid ...hexagonal Na 3 Sb - Structure FLg. 6.1 Band diagram for Na2KSb Fig. 6.2 Band diagram for Na 2 KSb(Cs) Table 1.1 Summary of properties of Akaii’.nrij.vniu

  3. Negative affinity X-ray photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanspeybroeck, L.; Kellogg, E.; Murray, S.; Duckett, S.

    1974-01-01

    A new X-ray image intensifier is described. The device should eventually have a quantum efficiency which is an order of magnitude greater than that of presently available high spatial resolution X-ray detectors, such as microchannel plates. The new intesifier is based upon a GaAs crystal photocathode which is activated to achieve negative electron affinity. Details concerning the detector concept are discussed together with the theoretical relations involved, X-ray data, and optical data.

  4. Kinetics of alkali-based photocathode degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, Vitaly; Liu, Fangze; Hoffbauer, Mark A.; Moody, Nathan A.; Batista, Enrique R.

    2016-11-01

    We report on a kinetic model that describes the degradation of the quantum efficiency (QE) of Cs3Sb and negative electron affinity (NEA) GaAs photocathodes under UHV conditions. In addition to the generally accepted irreversible chemical change of a photocathode's surface due to reactions with residual gases, such as O2, CO2, and H2O, the model incorporates an intermediate reversible physisorption step, similar to Langmuir adsorption. This intermediate step is needed to satisfactorily describe the strongly non-exponential QE degradation curves for two distinctly different classes of photocathodes -surface-activated and "bulk," indicating that in both systems the QE degradation results from surface damage. The recovery of the QE upon improvement of vacuum conditions is also accurately predicted by this model with three parameters (rates of gas adsorption, desorption, and irreversible chemical reaction with the surface) comprising metrics to better characterize the lifetime of the cathodes, instead of time-pressure exposure expressed in Langmuir units.

  5. Surface characterization of semiconductor photocathode structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi

    The need for a high performance photocathode in the electron beam lithography and microscopy is well established. Previous research demonstrated high brightness (1 x 108 A/cm2-sr at 3 KeV), and an energy spread as low as 50meV at room temperature for a GaAs based negative electron affinity (NEA) cathode in a sealed-off tube. However the GaAs cathodes suffer rapid decay in an open vacuum system. Achieving a clean, stoichiometric and repeatable GaAs(100) surface was the first step in this study. Based on the knowledge obtained from synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy, we successfully developed and optimized a reliable surface cleaning technique for our GaAs photocathodes. The fully activated photocathode and its decay under different vacuum conditions were investigated. The NEA activation layer is about 1 nm thick and was very vulnerable to oxygen in the system. A revised double dipole structural model was proposed to explain how the Cs/O co-deposition could produce a NEA surface. We found the chemical changes of oxygen species in the activation layer caused the initial quantum yield (QY) decay of the cathode. Further exposure to oxygen oxidized the substrate and permanently reduced the QY to zero. Energy distribution curve measurements of GaAs(100) and GaN(0001) NEA surfaces were performed under laser illumination. We found that the main contribution to the total emitted current of NEA GaAs and GaN surfaces was due to the electrons that were lost an average 140meV and 310 meV respectively in the near surface region prior to emission into vacuum. This energy loss is due not to the scattering through Cs or Cs/O layer; In GaN, it is probably due to a Gunn-like effect involving inter-valley phonon scattering within the band-bending region. We observed a highly directional emission profile from GaAs cathodes (electrons emitted within a semi-angle of 15° relative to the surface normal). In practice, it is expected that the highly directional photoemission

  6. Development of Polarized Photocathodes for the Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Prepost

    2009-12-22

    In prior years a Wisconsin-SLAC collaboration developed polarized photocathodes which were used for the SLAC SLD and fixed target programs. Currently, the R&D program goal is the development of a polarized electron source (PES) which meets the ILC requirements for polarization, charge, lifetime, and pulse structure. There are two parts to this program. One part is the continued improvement of photocathode structures with higher polarization. The second part is the design and development of the laser system used to drive the photocathode. The long pulse train for the ILC introduces new challenges for the PES. More reliable and stable operation of the PES may be achievable if appropriate R&D is carried out for higher voltage operation and for a simpler photocathode load-lock system. The collaboration with SLAC is through the Polarized Photocathode Research Collaboration (PPRC). Senior SLAC personnel include T. Maruyama, J. Clendenin, R. Kirby, and A. Brachmann.

  7. Silver nanorod arrays for photocathode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilayurganapathy, Subramanian; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Varga, Tamas; Coffey, Greg; Schwenzer, Birgit; Pandey, Archana; Kayani, Asghar; Hess, Wayne P.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2013-10-01

    We explore the use of plasmonic Ag nanorod arrays featuring enhanced photoemission as high-brightness photocathode material. Silver nanorod arrays are synthesized by the direct current electrodeposition method and their dimensionality, uniformity, crystallinity, and oxide/impurity content are characterized. The yielded arrays exhibit greatly enhanced two-photon photoemission under 400 nm femtosecond pulsed laser excitation. Plasmonic field enhancement in the array produces photoemission hot spots that are mapped using photoemission electron microscopy. The relative photoemission enhancement of nanorod hot spots relative to that of a flat Ag thin film is found to range between 102 and 3 × 103.

  8. Photocathode lifetime improvement by using a pulsed high voltage on the photocathode gun of the polarized electron source at NIKHEF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Putte, M. J. J.; de Jager, C. W.; Militsyn, B. L.; Shatunov, Yu. M.; Tokarev, Yu. F.

    1998-02-01

    The first result on a dramatic improvement of the photocathode lifetime of the polarized electron source at NIKHEF is presented. The improvement was obtained after replacing the original DC power supply with a pulsed power supply for the photocathode gun high voltage. The pulsed high voltage power supply provides a negative Gauss-like pulse, with an amplitude of 100 kV, and a full-width of 600 μs, with repetition rates up to 10 Hz. Contrary to using DC high voltage, no deterioration of the vacuum in the acceleration chamber is observed. A photocathode lifetime of 180 h has been measured, using a strained layer InGaAsP photocathode. The lifetime is independent of whether or not the photocathode gun is operated at the pulsing rate of 1 Hz.

  9. Performance of photocathode rf gun electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-07-01

    In Photo-Injectors (PI) electron guns, electrons are emitted from a photocathode by a short laser pulse and then accelerated by intense rf fields in a resonant cavity. The best known advantage of this technique is the high peak current with a good emittance (high brightness). This is important for short wavelength Free-Electron Lasers and linear colliders. PIs are in operation in many electron accelerator facilities and a large number of new guns are under construction. Some applications have emerged, providing, for example, very high pulse charges. PIs have been operated over a wide range of frequencies, from 144 to 3000 MHz (a 17 GHz gun is being developed). An exciting new possibility is the development of superconducting PIs. A significant body of experimental and theoretical work exists by now, indicating the criticality of the accelerator elements that follow the gun for the preservation of the PI`s performance as well as possible avenues of improvements in brightness. Considerable research is being done on the laser and photocathode material of the PI, and improvement is expected in this area.

  10. Performance of photocathode rf gun electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-01-01

    In Photo-Injectors (PI) electron guns, electrons are emitted from a photocathode by a short laser pulse and then accelerated by intense rf fields in a resonant cavity. The best known advantage of this technique is the high peak current with a good emittance (high brightness). This is important for short wavelength Free-Electron Lasers and linear colliders. PIs are in operation in many electron accelerator facilities and a large number of new guns are under construction. Some applications have emerged, providing, for example, very high pulse charges. PIs have been operated over a wide range of frequencies, from 144 to 3000 MHz (a 17 GHz gun is being developed). An exciting new possibility is the development of superconducting PIs. A significant body of experimental and theoretical work exists by now, indicating the criticality of the accelerator elements that follow the gun for the preservation of the PI's performance as well as possible avenues of improvements in brightness. Considerable research is being done on the laser and photocathode material of the PI, and improvement is expected in this area.

  11. Modeling Photoemission of Spin-Polarized Electrons from NEA GaAs Photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubenko, Oksana; Afanasev, Andrei

    2015-04-01

    At present, photoemission from strained GaAs activated to negative electron affinity (NEA) is a main source of polarized electrons for modern nuclear-physics and particle-physics facilities. Future experiments at advanced electron colliders will require high-current polarized electron beams, which could provide high polarization and luminosity. This sets new requirements for photocathodes in terms of high quantum efficiency (QE) (>>1%) and spin polarization (~85%). Detailed simulation and modeling of physics processes in photocathodes is important for optimization of their design in order to achieve high QE and reduce depolarization mechanisms. The purpose of the present work was to develop a semi-phenomenological model, which could predict photoemission and electron spin polarization from NEA GaAs photocathodes. Effect of the presence of nanostructures was also studied. Simulation results were compared to the experimental results obtained by the polarized electron source group at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Work supported by Thomas Jefferson Accelerator Facility and George Washington University.

  12. Research on quantum efficiency of GaN wire photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Sihao; Liu, Lei; Diao, Yu; Kong, Yike

    2017-02-01

    On the basis of three-dimensional continuity equation in semiconductors and finite difference method, the carrier concentration and the quantum efficiency of GaN wire photocathode as a function of incident photon energy are achieved. Results show that the quantum efficiency of the wire photocathode is largely enhanced compared with the conventional planar photocathode. The superiority of the wire photocathode is reflected in its structure with surrounding surfaces. The quantum efficiency of the wire photocathode largely depends on the wire width, surface reflectivity, surface escape probability and incident angle of light. The back interface recombination rate, however, has little influences on the quantum efficiency of the wire photocathode. The simulation results suggest that the optimal width for photoemission is 150-200 nm. Besides, the quantum efficiency increases and decreases linearly with increasing surface escape probability and surface reflectivity, respectively. With increasing ratio of wire spacing to wire height, the optimal incident angle of light is reduced. These simulations are expected to guide the preparation of a better performing GaN wire photocathode.

  13. Photocathodes for High Repetition Rate Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2014-04-20

    This proposal brought together teams at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Stony Brook University (SBU) to study photocathodes for high repetition rate light sources such as Free Electron Lasers (FEL) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). Below details the Principal Investigators and contact information. Each PI submits separately for a budget through his corresponding institute. The work done under this grant comprises a comprehensive program on critical aspects of the production of the electron beams needed for future user facilities. Our program pioneered in situ and in operando diagnostics for alkali antimonide growth. The focus is on development of photocathodes for high repetition rate Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs), including testing SRF photoguns, both normal-­conducting and superconducting. Teams from BNL, LBNL and Stony Brook University (SBU) led this research, and coordinated their work over a range of topics. The work leveraged a robust infrastructure of existing facilities and the support was used for carrying out the research at these facilities. The program concentrated in three areas: a) Physics and chemistry of alkali-­antimonide cathodes (BNL – LBNL) b) Development and testing of a diamond amplifier for photocathodes (SBU -­ BNL) c) Tests of both cathodes in superconducting RF photoguns (SBU) and copper RF photoguns (LBNL) Our work made extensive use of synchrotron radiation materials science techniques, such as powder-­ and single-­crystal diffraction, x-­ray fluorescence, EXAFS and variable energy XPS. BNL and LBNL have many complementary facilities at the two light sources associated with these laboratories (NSLS and ALS, respectively); use of these will be a major thrust of our program and bring our understanding of these complex materials to a new level. In addition, CHESS at Cornell will be used to continue seamlessly throughout the NSLS dark period and

  14. High energy photocathodes for laser fusion diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Halvorson, C; Houck, T; Macphee, A; Opachich, Y P; Lahowe, D; Copsey, B

    2010-10-01

    Laser fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility require time-resolved x-ray images of the ignition target self-emission. The photon energies are expected to be greater than 10 keV. Photoemission quantum yield measurement data and photoelectron energy spectrum data are presently unavailable in this photon energy range, but are essential in the design of x-ray imaging diagnostics. We developed an apparatus to measure the quantum efficiency of primary and secondary photoelectron emission and to estimate the energy spectrum of the secondary photoelectrons. The apparatus has been tested using photon energies less than 10 keV to allow comparisons with prior work. A method for preparing photocathodes with geometrically enhanced photoefficiency has been developed.

  15. High gradient rf gun studies of CsBr photocathodes

    DOE PAGES

    Vecchione, Theodore; Maldonado, Juan R.; Gierman, Stephen; ...

    2015-04-03

    CsBr photocathodes have 10 times higher quantum efficiency with only 3 times larger intrinsic transverse emittance than copper. They are robust and can withstand 80 MV/m fields without breaking down or emitting dark current. They can operate in 2×10⁻⁹ torr vacuum and survive exposure to air. They are well suited for generating high pulse charge in rf guns without a photocathode transfer system.

  16. R&D ERL: Photocathode Deposition and Transport System

    SciTech Connect

    Pate, D.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Burrill, R.; Todd, R.; Smedley, J.; Holmes, D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the photocathode deposition and transport system is to (1) produce a robust, high yield multialkali photocathode and (2) have a method of transporting the multialkali photocathode for insertion into a super conducting RF electron gun. This process is only successful if a sufficient quantum efficiency lifetime of the cathode, which is inserted in the SRF electron gun, is maintained. One important element in producing a multialkali photocathode is the strict vacuum requirements of 10{sup -11} torr to assure success in the production of longlived photocathodes that will not have their QE or lifetime depleted due to residual gas poisoning in a poor vacuum. A cutaway view of our third generation deposition system is shown in figure 1. There are certain design criteria and principles required. One must be able to install, remove, rejuvenate and replace a cathode without exposing the source or cathode to atmosphere. The system must allow one to deposit Cs, K, and Sb on a cathode tip surface at pressures in the 10{sup -10} to 10{sup -9} torr range. The cathode needs to be heated to as high as 850 C for cleaning and maintained at 130 C to 150 C during deposition. There should also be the capability for in-situ QE measurements. In addition the preparation of dispenser photocathodes must be accounted for, thus requiring an ion source for cathode cleaning. Finally the transport cart must be mobile and be able to negotiate the ERL facility labyrinth.

  17. Low temperature multi-alkali photocathode processing technique for sealed intensified CCD tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doliber, D. L.; Dozier, E. E.; Wenzel, H.; Beaver, E. A.; Hier, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    A low temperature photocathode process has been used to fabricate an intensified CCD visual photocathode image tube, by incorporating a thinned, backside-illumined CCD as the target anode of a digicon tube of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) design. The CCD digicon tube employs the HST's sodium bialkali photocathode and MgF2 substrate, thereby allowing a direct photocathode quantum efficiency comparison between photocathodes produced by the presently employed low temperature process and those of the conventional high temperature process. Attention is given to the processing chamber used, as well as the details of gas desorption and photocathode processing.

  18. Progress on diamond amplified photo-cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Kewisch, J.; Chang, X.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wu, Q.; Muller, E.; Xin, T.

    2011-03-28

    Two years ago, we obtained an emission gain of 40 from the Diamond Amplifier Cathode (DAC) in our test system. In our current systematic study of hydrogenation, the highest gain we registered in emission scanning was 178. We proved that our treatments for improving the diamond amplifiers are reproducible. Upcoming tests planned include testing DAC in a RF cavity. Already, we have designed a system for these tests using our 112 MHz superconducting cavity, wherein we will measure DAC parameters, such as the limit, if any, on emission current density, the bunch charge, and the bunch length. The diamond-amplified photocathode, that promises to support a high average current, low emittance, and a highly stable electron beam with a long lifetime, is under development for an electron source. The diamond, functioning as a secondary emitter amplifies the primary current, with a few KeV energy, that comes from the traditional cathode. Earlier, our group recorded a maximum gain of 40 in the secondary electron emission from a diamond amplifier. In this article, we detail our optimization of the hydrogenation process for a diamond amplifier that resulted in a stable emission gain of 140. We proved that these characteristics are reproducible. We now are designing a system to test the diamond amplifier cathode using an 112MHz SRF gun to measure the limits of the emission current's density, and on the bunch charge and bunch length.

  19. Funneling electron beams from gallium arsenide photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Omer Habib

    Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) is the most widely used source of polarized electrons around the world. Electrons are extracted from a GaAs surface, terminated by a cesium-oxygen layer. The electrons are accelerated to form a beam by a DC electric field. This beam can ionize residual gas in the chamber, and the DC field accelerates the resulting ions into the cathode surface, damaging the Cesium- Oxygen layer. This process, called Ion Back Bombardment, is the dominant mechanism for limiting photocathode lifetime. As a result, high average current operation yields charge lifetimes too low to be used in a collider design. One idea to extend the charge lifetime is to funnel the beams from multiple cathodes using a rotating magnetic field-if operation of one cathode does not affect the operation of another cathode in the same chamber, then the source's lifetime can be extended by simply adding more cathodes. This dissertation presents the design, construction and commissioning of a unique electron gun capable of operating twenty cathodes. Results of funneling two electron beams with a rotating magnetic field are also presented. For average currents at 175 nA and 350 nA, the charge lifetimes for individual cathodes and two-cathode operation were measured, showing that the charge lifetime for two beam funneling is the sum of the individual ion back bombardment charge lifetimes. The addition of charge lifetime implies that beam funneling can be used to increase charge lifetime by an order of magnitude.

  20. Photocathode Optimization for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P; Flom, Z; Heinselman, K; Nguyen, T; Tung, S; Haskell, R; Reed, B W; LaGrange, T

    2011-08-04

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) team at Harvey Mudd College has been sponsored by LLNL to design and build a test setup for optimizing the performance of the DTEM's electron source. Unlike a traditional TEM, the DTEM achieves much faster exposure times by using photoemission from a photocathode to produce electrons for imaging. The DTEM team's work is motivated by the need to improve the coherence and current density of the electron cloud produced by the electron gun in order to increase the image resolution and contrast achievable by DTEM. The photoemission test setup is nearly complete and the team will soon complete baseline tests of electron gun performance. The photoemission laser and high voltage power supply have been repaired; the optics path for relaying the laser to the photocathode has been finalized, assembled, and aligned; the internal setup of the vacuum chamber has been finalized and mostly implemented; and system control, synchronization, and data acquisition has been implemented in LabVIEW. Immediate future work includes determining a consistent alignment procedure to place the laser waist on the photocathode, and taking baseline performance measurements of the tantalum photocathode. Future research will examine the performance of the electron gun as a function of the photoemission laser profile, the photocathode material, and the geometry and voltages of the accelerating and focusing components in the electron gun. This report presents the team's progress and outlines the work that remains.

  1. Photoemission characteristics of thin GaAs-based heterojunction photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Cheng; Zhang, Yijun Qian, Yunsheng; Shi, Feng; Zou, Jijun; Zeng, Yugang

    2015-01-14

    To better understand the different photoemission mechanism of thin heterojunction photocathodes, the quantum efficiency models of reflection-mode and transmission-mode GaAs-based heterojunction photocathodes are revised based on one-dimensional continuity equations, wherein photoelectrons generated from both the emission layer and buffer layer are taken into account. By comparison of simulated results between the revised and conventional models, it is found that the electron contribution from the buffer layer to shortwave quantum efficiency is closely related to some factors, such as the thicknesses of emission layer and buffer layer and the interface recombination velocity. Besides, the experimental quantum efficiency data of reflection-mode and transmission-mode AlGaAs/GaAs photocathodes are well fitted to the revised models, which confirm the applicability of the revised quantum efficiency models.

  2. Development of GaN photocathodes for UV detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Vallerga, J.; McPhate, J.; Malloy, J.; Tremsin, A.; Martin, A.; Ulmer, M.; Wessels, B.

    2006-11-01

    We have made substantial progress in the development of GaN photocathodes, including crystalline and polycrystalline GaN and InGaN coatings grown by chemical vapor deposition or molecular beam epitaxy on sapphire substrates. GaN and InGaN photocathodes have been developed with efficiencies up to 70% and cutoffs at ˜380 nm with low out of band response, and high stability and longevity. Samples have been processed and tested at ultra high vacuum to establish cathode process parameters, and some have been integrated into sealed tubes for long-term evaluation.

  3. Emission properties of body-centered cubic elemental metal photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tuo; Rickman, Benjamin L. Schroeder, W. Andreas

    2015-04-07

    A first principles analysis of photoemission is developed to explain the lower than expected rms transverse electron momentum measured using the solenoid scan technique for the body-centered cubic Group Vb (V, Nb, and Ta) and Group VIb (Cr, Mo, and W) metallic photocathodes. The density functional theory based analysis elucidates the fundamental role that the electronic band structure (and its dispersion) plays in determining the emission properties of solid-state photocathodes and includes evaluation of work function anisotropy using a thin-slab method.

  4. Analysis of Slice Transverse Emittance Evolution ina Photocathode RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Ding, Y.; Qiang, J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-10-17

    The slice transverse emittance of an electron beam is of critical significance for an x-ray FEL. In a photocathode RF gun, the slice transverse emittance is not only determined by the emission process, but also influenced strongly by the non-linear space charge effect. In this paper, we study the slice transverse emittance evolution in a photocathode RF gun using a simple model that includes effects of RF acceleration, focusing, and space charge force. The results are compared with IMPACT-T space charge simulations and may be used to understand the development of the slice emittance in an RF gun.

  5. Modeling of the BNL photocathode gun with the code PARMELA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsa, Zohreh; Young, Lloyd

    1992-07-01

    We present an analysis of the electron beam emitted from the BNL laser driven photocathode injector operating at 2856 MHz. An analysis of the beam transported through the transport line to the entrance of the linac is also presented. Recent measurements of the photocathode laser shows that the pulse length has a sigma of ±5 ps and a transverse size of 1.25 mm. A Gaussian shape is assumed for the distribution in both the radial and time dependence of the laser beam. This is compared with the original design parameters of ±2 ps and 3 mm.

  6. Use of non evaporable getter pumps to ensure long term performances of high quantum efficiency photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sertore, Daniele Michelato, Paolo; Monaco, Laura; Manini, Paolo; Siviero, Fabrizio

    2014-05-15

    High quantum efficiency photocathodes are routinely used as laser triggered emitters in the advanced high brightness electron sources based on radio frequency guns. The sensitivity of “semiconductor” type photocathodes to vacuum levels and gas composition requires special care during preparation and handling. This paper will discuss the results obtained using a novel pumping approach based on coupling a 20 l s{sup −1} sputter ion getter pump with a CapaciTorr® D100 non evaporable getter (NEG) pump. A pressure of 8⋅10{sup −8} Pa was achieved using only a sputter ion pump after a 6 day bake-out. With the addition of a NEG pump, a pressure of 2⋅10{sup −9} Pa was achieved after a 2 day bake-out. These pressure values were maintained without power due to the ability of the NEG to pump gases by chemical reaction. Long term monitoring of cathodes quantum efficiencies was also carried out at different photon wavelengths for more than two years, showing no degradation of the photoemissive film properties.

  7. New Photocathode materials for electron-ion-colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Lukaszew, Rosa A.

    2015-02-25

    Our aim has been to explore new photocathode materials and schemes to develop strategies and technologies for next generation nuclear physics accelerator capabilities, particularly for Electron Ion Colliders (EIC). Thus, we investigated thin film deposition and ensuing properties for several adequate magnetic materials applicable to spin-polarized photocathodes. We also implemented a full experimental setup for light incidence at an acute angle onto the photocathode surface in order to excite surface Plasmon resonance hence increasing light absorption by a metallic surface. We successfully tested the setup with a thermionic cathode as well as Plasmonic silver-MgO samples and obtained very encouraging results. Our first results are very encouraging since the photocurrent measured on this preliminary plasmonic Ag-MgO sample under low power (~ 1mW) cw red light from a HeNe laser was 256 pA, thus two orders magnitude larger than that reported by others following also plasmonic approaches. We extended our studies to shorter wavelengths and we also started preliminary work on chemically ordered MnAl thin films –a component of the tertiary Ag-Mn-Al (silmanal) alloy in order to develop spin-polarized photocathodes capable of sustaining surface Plasmon resonance. It is worthwhile mentioning that a graduate student has been directly involved during this project ensuring the training of next generation of scientists in this area of research.

  8. SUPPRESSION OF AFTERPULSING IN PHOTOMULTIPLIERS BY GATING THE PHOTOCATHODE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of gating schemes to minimize the long-term afterpulse signal in photomultipliers have been evaluated. Blocking the excitation pulse by gating the photocathode was found to reduce the gate-on afterpulse background by a factor of 230 over that for nongated operation. Thi...

  9. Metal-Insulator Photocathode Heterojunction for Directed Electron Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Droubay, Timothy C.; Chambers, Scott A.; Joly, Alan G.; Hess, Wayne P.; Nemeth, Karoly; Harkay, Katherine C.; Spentzouris, Linda

    2014-02-14

    New photocathode materials capable of producing intense and directed electron pulses are needed for development of next generation light sources and dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Ideal photocathodes should have high photoemission quantum efficiency (QE) and be capable of delivering collimated and well-shaped pulses of consistent charge under high-field operating conditions. High-brightness and low-intrinsic emittance electron pulses have been predicted for hybrid metal-insulator photocathode designs constructed from three to four monolayer MgO films on atomically flat silver. Here we use angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy to confirm directional photoemission and a large increase in QE under ultraviolet laser excitation of an ultrathin MgO film on Ag(001). We observe new low-binding energy photoemission, not seen for Ag(001), and greater electron emission in the normal direction. Under 4.66 eV laser excitation, the photoemission quantum efficiency of the MgO/Ag(001) hybrid photocathode is a factor of seven greater than that for clean Ag(001).

  10. A photocathode RF gun for x-ray FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.J.; Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1995-12-31

    A 1.6 cell photocathode RF gun was developed by a BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration for X-ray FEL and other applications. The objective of the collaboration is to develop a cost effective and more reliable photocathode RF gun based on the operational experience of the original BNL gun. The new photocathode RF gun is cable of producing 1 mm-mrad normalized rms emittance photocurrent with a peak current of 100 A. The half-cell length of the new RF gun was lengthened to reduce the peak field on the cavity surface, the side-coupled scheme for cavity and waveguide coupling was replaced by a symmetrized coupling to the full-cell. The cavity aperture was increased to improve the coupling between two cells and for flat beam application. The experimental results of cold testing the RF gun will be presented. We will also present an injector design based on the new photocathode RF gun and emittance compensation technique.

  11. High quantum efficiency ultraviolet/blue AlGaN /InGaN photocathodes grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leopold, D. J.; Buckley, J. H.; Rebillot, P.

    2005-08-01

    Enormous technological breakthroughs have been made in optoelectronic devices through the use of advanced heteroepitaxial-semiconductor crystal-growth techniques. This technology is being extended toward enhanced ultraviolet/blue single-photon detection through the design and fabrication of atomically tailored heteroepitaxial GaAlN /GaInN photocathode device structures. The AlGaN /InGaN system is ideal because the band gap can be tailored over an energy range from 0.8 to 6.2 eV and epitaxial thin-film layers can be grown directly on optically transparent sapphire substrates. Although a single p-type GaN layer activated with cesium can produce reasonably high quantum efficiency in the ultraviolet wave band, a more complex design is necessary to achieve high levels extending into the blue region. In the present work, band-gap engineering concepts have been utilized to design heterostructure photocathodes. The increased level of sophistication offered by this approach has been exploited in an attempt to precisely control photoelectron transport to the photocathode surface. Thin heterostructure layers designed for transmission-mode detection were fabricated by molecular-beam epitaxy. A quantum efficiency of 40% at 250 nm was achieved using a thin, compositionally graded GaN /InGaN layer, epitaxially grown on a sapphire substrate. Further improvements are anticipated through continued optimization, defect reduction, and more complex photocathode designs.

  12. Quantum efficiencies of imaging detectors with alkali halide photocathodes. I - Microchannel plates with separate and integral CsI photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements and comparisons have been made of the quantum efficiencies of microchannel plate (MCP) detectors in the far-UV (below 2000-A) wavelength range using CsI photocathodes (a) deposited on the front surfaces of microchannel plates and (b) deposited on solid substrates as opaque photocathodes with the resulting photoelectrons input to microchannel plates. The efficiences were measured in both pulse-counting and photodiode modes of operation. Typical efficiencies are about 15 percent at 1216 A for a CsI-coated MCP compared with 65 percent for an opaque CsI photocathode MCP detector. Special processing has yielded an efficiency as high as 20 percent for a CsI-coated MCP. This may possibly be further improved by optimization of the tilt angle of the MCP channels relative to the front face of the MCP and incident radiation. However, at present there still remains a factor of at least 3 quantum efficiency advantage in the separate opaque CsI photocathode configuration.

  13. Differences in stability and repeatability between GaAs and GaAlAs photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuan; Zhang, Yijun; Feng, Cheng; Shi, Feng; Zou, Jijun; Chen, Xinlong; Chang, Benkang

    2016-12-01

    For the applications in vacuum photodetectors and photoinjectors, a crucial limiting factor for conventional GaAs photocathodes is the limited lifetime, depending on the Cs-O activation layer vulnerable to the harmful residual gases. In order to develop a type of GaAs-based photocathode with good stability and repeatability, Cs/O activation and multiple recesiation experiments under the same preparation condition were performed on reflection-mode exponential-doped GaAs and GaAlAs photocathodes grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy, and quantum efficiency and photocurrent decay were measured after activation and recesiation. The experimental results show that the photoemission characteristics on cathode degradation and repeatability are different between GaAs and GaAlAs photocathodes. In an unsatisfactory vacuum system, the operational lifetime for GaAlAs photocathode is nearly twice longer than that for GaAs photocathode after Cs/O activation under a high intensity illumination. After multiple recesiations, the quantum efficiency and operational lifetime for GaAlAs photocathode remain nearly unchanged, while those for GaAs photocathode become lower and lower with the increase of recesiation cycles, which reflects the superiority in stability and repeatability for GaAlAs photocathode in contrast to GaAs photocathode operating in the poor vacuum environment.

  14. The effect of surface cleaning on quantum efficiency in AlGaN photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Guanghui; Zhang, Yijun; Jin, Muchun; Feng, Cheng; Chen, Xinlong; Chang, Benkang

    2015-01-01

    To improve the quantum efficiency of AlGaN photocathode, various surfaces cleaning techniques for the removal of alumina and carbon from AlGaN photocathode surface were investigated. The atomic compositions of AlGaN photocathode structure and surface were measured by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Ar+ ion sputtering. It is found that the boiling KOH solution and the mixture of sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide, coupled with the thermal cleaning at 850 °C can effectively remove the alumina and carbon from the AlGaN photocathode surface. The quantum efficiency of AlGaN photocathode is improved to 35.1% at 240 nm, an increase of 50% over the AlGaN photocathode chemically cleaned by only the mixed solution of sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide and thermally cleaned at 710 °C.

  15. Effects of ion bombardment on bulk GaAs photocathodes with different surface-cleavage planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Shukui; Stutzman, Marcy; Poelker, Matt

    2016-10-01

    Bulk GaAs samples with different surface cleave planes were implanted with 100 and 10 000 V hydrogen ions inside an ultrahigh vacuum test apparatus to simulate ion back-bombardment of the photocathode inside a DC high voltage photogun. The photocathode yield, or quantum efficiency, could easily be recovered following implantation with 100 V hydrogen ions but not for 10 000 V ions. Moreover, the implantation damage with 10 000 V hydrogen ions was more pronounced for GaAs photocathode samples with (100) and (111A) cleave planes, compared to the photocathode with (110) cleave plane. This result is consistent with enhanced ion channeling for the (110) cleave plane compared to the other cleave planes, with ions penetrating deeper into the photocathode material beyond the absorption depth of the laser light and beyond the region of the photocathode where the photoemitted electrons originate.

  16. Preliminary Results from a superconducting photocathode sample cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Kneisel; Jacek Sekutowicz; R. Lefferts; A. Lipski

    2005-05-01

    Pure niobium has been proposed as a photocathode material to extract directly photo-currents from the surface of a RF-gun cavity [1]. However, the quantum efficiency of niobium is {approx}3 {center_dot} 10{sup -4}, whereas electro- or vacuum deposited lead has an {approx} 10 times higher quantum efficiency. We have designed and tested a photo-injector niobium cavity, which can be used to insert photo-cathodes made of different materials in the high electric field region of the cavity. Experiments have been conducted with niobium and lead, which show that neither the Q- values of the cavity nor the obtainable surface fields are significantly lowered. This paper reports about the results from these tests.

  17. Extreme ultraviolet quantum detection efficiency of rubidium bromide opaque photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Gaines, Geoffrey A.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the quantum detection efficiency (QDE) of three samples of RbBr photocathode layers over the 44-150-A wavelength range. The QDE of RbBr-coated microchannel plate (MCP) was measured using a back-to-back Z-stack MCP configuration in a detector with a wedge and strip position-sensitive anode, of the type described by Siegmund et al. (1984). To assess the stability of RbBr layer, the RbBr photocathode was exposed to air at about 30 percent humidity for 20 hr. It was found that the QDE values for the aged cathode were within the QDE measurement errors of the original values. A simple QDE model was developed, and it was found that its predictions are in accord with the QDE measurements.

  18. The Quantum Efficiency and Thermal Emittance of Metal Photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, David H.; Schmerge, John F.; /SLAC

    2009-03-04

    Modern electron beams have demonstrated the brilliance needed to drive free electron lasers at x-ray wavelengths, with the principle improvements occurring since the invention of the photocathode gun. The state-of-the-art normalized emittance electron beams are now becoming limited by the thermal emittance of the cathode. In both DC and RF photocathode guns, details of the cathode emission physics strongly influence the quantum efficiency and the thermal emittance. Therefore improving cathode performance is essential to increasing the brightness of beams. It is especially important to understand the fundamentals of cathode quantum efficiency and thermal emittance. This paper investigates the relationship between the quantum efficiency and the thermal emittance of metal cathodes using the Fermi-Dirac model for the electron distribution. We derive the thermal emittance and its relationship to the quantum efficiency, and compare our results to those of others.

  19. Low-workfunction photocathodes based on acetylide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Terdik, Joseph Z; Spentzouris, Linda; Terry, Jr., Jeffrey H; Harkay, Katherine C; Nemeth, Karoly; Srajer, George

    2014-05-20

    A low-workfunction photocathode includes a photoemissive material employed as a coating on the photocathode. The photoemissive material includes A.sub.nMC.sub.2, where A is a first metal element, the first element is an alkali metal, an alkali-earth element or the element Al; n is an integer that is 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4; M is a second metal element, the second metal element is a transition metal or a metal stand-in; and C.sub.2 is the acetylide ion C.sub.2.sup.2-. The photoemissive material includes a crystalline structure or non-crystalline structure of rod-like or curvy 1-dimensional polymeric substructures with MC.sub.2 repeating units embedded in a matrix of A.

  20. DC photogun vacuum characterization through photocathode lifetime studies

    SciTech Connect

    Marcy Stutzman; Joseph Grames; Matt Poelker; Kenneth Surles-Law; Philip Adderley

    2007-07-02

    Excellent vacuum is essential for long photocathode lifetimes in DC high voltage photoelectron guns. Vacuum Research at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has focused on characterizing the existing vacuum systems at the CEBAF polarized photoinjector and on quantifying improvements for new systems. Vacuum chamber preprocessing, full activation of NEG pumps and NEG coating the chamber walls should improve the vacuum within the electron gun, however, pressure measurement is difficult at pressures approaching the extreme-high-vacuum (XHV) region and extractor gauge readings are not significantly different between the improved and original systems. The ultimate test of vacuum in a DC high voltage photogun is the photocathode lifetime, which is limited by the ionization and back-bombardment of residual gasses. Discussion will include our new load-locked gun design as well as lifetime measurements in both our operational and new photo-guns, and the correlations between measured vacuum and lifetimes will be investigated.

  1. Quantum Efficiency Enhancement in CsI/Metal Photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Lingmei; Joly, Alan G.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2015-02-01

    High quantum efficiency enhancement is found for hybrid metal-insulator photocathodes consisting of thin films of CsI deposited on Cu(100), Ag(100), Au(111) and Au films irradiated by 266 nm laser pulses. Low work functions (near or below 2 eV) are observed following ultraviolet laser activation. Work functions are reduced by roughly 3 eV from that of clean metal surfaces. We discuss various mechanisms of quantum efficiency enhancement for alkali halide/metal photocathode systems and conclude that the large change in work function, due to Cs accumulation of Cs metal at the metal-alkali halide interface, is the dominant mechanism for quantum efficiency enhancement

  2. Correlation of CsK2Sb photocathode lifetime with antimony thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, M. A.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Poelker, M.; Elmustafa, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    CsK2Sb photocathodes with quantum efficiency on the order of 10% at 532 nm, and lifetime greater than 90 days at low voltage, were successfully manufactured via co-deposition of alkali species emanating from an effusion source. Photocathodes were characterized as a function of antimony layer thickness and alkali consumption, inside a vacuum chamber that was initially baked, but frequently vented without re-baking. Photocathode lifetime measured at low voltage is correlated with the antimony layer thickness. Photocathodes manufactured with comparatively thick antimony layers exhibited the best lifetime. We speculate that the antimony layer serves as a reservoir, or sponge, for the alkali.

  3. Correlation of CsK{sub 2}Sb photocathode lifetime with antimony thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, M. A. Elmustafa, A. A.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Poelker, M.

    2015-06-01

    CsK{sub 2}Sb photocathodes with quantum efficiency on the order of 10% at 532 nm, and lifetime greater than 90 days at low voltage, were successfully manufactured via co-deposition of alkali species emanating from an effusion source. Photocathodes were characterized as a function of antimony layer thickness and alkali consumption, inside a vacuum chamber that was initially baked, but frequently vented without re-baking. Photocathode lifetime measured at low voltage is correlated with the antimony layer thickness. Photocathodes manufactured with comparatively thick antimony layers exhibited the best lifetime. We speculate that the antimony layer serves as a reservoir, or sponge, for the alkali.

  4. Thermal emittance measurements of a cesium potassium antimonide photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazarov, Ivan; Cultrera, Luca; Bartnik, Adam; Dunham, Bruce; Karkare, Siddharth; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; Maxson, Jared; Roussel, William

    2011-05-01

    Thermal emittance measurements of a CsK2Sb photocathode at several laser wavelengths are presented. The emittance is obtained with a solenoid scan technique using a high voltage dc photoemission gun. The thermal emittance is 0.56±0.03 mm mrad/mm(rms) at 532 nm wavelength. The results are compared with a simple photoemission model and found to be in a good agreement.

  5. Quantum Efficiency as a Function of Temperature in Metal Photocathodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    off center, part of the laser might touch the 39 diode mount or the sample retaining ring , producing electrons from these materials and effectively...photoelectric effect, are the principal electron sources for many linear accelerators and Free Electron Lasers (FELs). There is an increasing interest in the...between the number of incoming laser photons and outgoing electrons. The objective of this thesis is to measure the QE of metal photocathodes as a

  6. Robust activation method for negative electron affinity photocathodes

    DOEpatents

    Mulhollan, Gregory A.; Bierman, John C.

    2011-09-13

    A method by which photocathodes(201), single crystal, amorphous, or otherwise ordered, can be surface modified to a robust state of lowered and in best cases negative, electron affinity has been discovered. Conventional methods employ the use of Cs(203) and an oxidizing agent(207), typically carried by diatomic oxygen or by more complex molecules, for example nitrogen trifluoride, to achieve a lowered electron affinity(404). In the improved activation method, a second alkali, other than Cs(205), is introduced onto the surface during the activation process, either by co-deposition, yo-yo, or sporadic or intermittent application. Best effect for GaAs photocathodes has been found through the use of Li(402) as the second alkali, though nearly the same effect can be found by employing Na(406). Suitable photocathodes are those which are grown, cut from boules, implanted, rolled, deposited or otherwise fabricated in a fashion and shape desired for test or manufacture independently supported or atop a support structure or within a framework or otherwise affixed or suspended in the place and position required for use.

  7. Performance of Au transmission photocathode on a microchannel plate detector.

    PubMed

    Lowenstern, M E; Harding, E C; Huntington, C M; Visco, A J; Rathore, G; Drake, R P

    2008-10-01

    X-ray framing cameras, employing microchannel plates (MCPs) for detection and signal amplification, play a key role in research in high-energy-density physics. These instruments convert radiographic x-rays into electrons produced by plasma during such experiments into electrons that are amplified in the channels and then detected by a phosphor material. The separation of detection from signal amplification offers potential improvements in sensitivity and noise properties. We have implemented a suspended Au transmission photocathode (160 A thick) on a MCP and are evaluating it using a 1.5 keV Al K alpha x-ray source. We find an approximately twofold increase in the ratio of detected events to incident photons when the photocathode-to-MCP voltage difference is sufficiently large. Our calculations indicate that this increase is probably caused by a combination of signal produced by the photocathode and an increase in the efficiency of detection of x-rays that reach the MCP surface through modification of the local electric field.

  8. Double-Layer Graphene Outperforming Monolayer as Catalyst on Silicon Photocathode for Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Sim, Uk; Moon, Joonhee; Lee, Joohee; An, Junghyun; Ahn, Hyo-Yong; Kim, Dong Jin; Jo, Insu; Jeon, Cheolho; Han, Seungwu; Hong, Byung Hee; Nam, Ki Tae

    2017-02-01

    Photoelectrochemical cells are used to split hydrogen and oxygen from water molecules to generate chemical fuels to satisfy our ever-increasing energy demands. However, it is a major challenge to design efficient catalysts to use in the photoelectochemical process. Recently, research has focused on carbon-based catalysts, as they are nonprecious and environmentally benign. Interesting advances have also been made in controlling nanostructure interfaces and in introducing new materials as catalysts in the photoelectrochemical cell. However, these catalysts have as yet unresolved issues involving kinetics and light-transmittance. In this work, we introduce high-transmittance graphene onto a planar p-Si photocathode to produce a hydrogen evolution reaction to dramatically enhance photon-to-current efficiency. Interestingly, double-layer graphene/Si exhibits noticeably improved photon-to-current efficiency and modifies the band structure of the graphene/Si photocathode. On the basis of in-depth electrochemical and electrical analyses, the band structure of graphene/Si was shown to result in a much lower work function than Si, accelerating the electron-to-hydrogen production potential. Specifically, plasma-treated double-layer graphene exhibited the best performance and the lowest work function. We electrochemically analyzed the mechanism at work in the graphene-assisted photoelectrode. Atomistic calculations based on the density functional theory were also carried out to more fully understand our experimental observations. We believe that investigation of the underlying mechanism in this high-performance electrode is an important contribution to efforts to develop high-efficiency metal-free carbon-based catalysts for photoelectrochemical cell hydrogen production.

  9. Comparison of degradation and recaesiation between GaAs and AlGaAs photocathodes in an unbaked vacuum system.

    PubMed

    Feng, Cheng; Zhang, Yijun; Shi, Feng; Qian, Yunsheng; Cheng, Hongchang; Zhang, Junju; Liu, Xinxin; Zhang, Xiang

    2017-03-20

    The lifetime and reliability of a photocathode during operation are always raised problems and the photocathode performance depends on the vacuum condition. With the purpose of investigating the stability and reliability of a GaAs-based photocathode in a harsher vacuum environment, reflection-mode exponential-doped GaAs and AlGaAs photocathodes are metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxial grown and then (Cs, O) activated inside an unbaked vacuum chamber. The degraded photocurrents are compared after activation and recaesiations between GaAs and AlGaAs photocathdoes under illumination with an equal initial photocurrent and an equal optical flux, respectively. It is found that the performance on degradation and recaesiations between GaAs and AlGaAs photocathodes are different. In the unbaked vacuum system, the stability of an AlGaAs photocathode after (Cs, O) activation is always better than that of a GaAs photocathode. After multiple recaesiations, the photocurrent decay curves of the AlGaAs photocathode are nearly coincident, which means a nearly constant operational lifetime. Moreover, operational lifetime of an AlGaAs photocathode is longer than that of a GaAs photocathode, which further illuminates that AlGaAs photocathodes are superior to GaAs photocathodes in stability and repeatability under markedly harsher vacuum conditions.

  10. The Boeing photocathode accelerator magnetic pulse compression and energy recovery experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Adamski, J.L.; Hayward, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    An 18 MeV, photocathode accelerator operating at 433 MHz is being commissioned for FEL applications. The accelerator consists of a two-cell RF photocathode imjector followed by four new multicell cavities. The two cell injector has previously been operated at a micropulse repetition frequency of 27 MHz, a micropulse charge of 5 nC and 25% duty factor.

  11. Amorphous Si thin film based photocathodes with high photovoltage for efficient hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yongjing; Battaglia, Corsin; Boccard, Mathieu; Hettick, Mark; Yu, Zhibin; Ballif, Christophe; Ager, Joel W; Javey, Ali

    2013-01-01

    An amorphous Si thin film with TiO2 encapsulation layer is demonstrated as a highly promising and stable photocathode for solar hydrogen production. With platinum as prototypical cocatalyst, a photocurrent onset potential of 0.93 V vs RHE and saturation photocurrent of 11.6 mA/cm(2) are measured. Importantly, the a-Si photocathodes exhibit impressive photocurrent of ~6.1 mA/cm(2) at a large positive bias of 0.8 V vs RHE, which is the highest for all reported photocathodes at such positive potential. Ni-Mo alloy is demonstrated as an alternative low-cost catalyst with onset potential and saturation current similar to those obtained with platinum. This low-cost photocathode with high photovoltage and current is a highly promising photocathode for solar hydrogen production.

  12. Mean transverse energy and response time measurements of GaInP based photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Xiuguang; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Miyajima, Tsukasa; Honda, Yosuke; Uchiyama, Takashi; Tabuchi, Masao; Takeda, Yoshikazu

    2014-08-14

    GaInP, which has a wider band gap than GaAs, is introduced as a photocathode for energy recovery linac (ERL). The wide band gap of material is expected to reduce the heating effect in the thermal relaxation process after high energy excitation. GaInP photocathodes exhibited higher quantum efficiency than GaAs and low thermal emittance as the same as GaAs photocathodes under green laser light irradiation. A short picosecond electron pulse was also achieved with the GaInP photocathode under 532 nm pulse laser irradiation. These experimental results demonstrate that the GaInP photocathode is an important candidate for ERL.

  13. A mechanism of Cu work function reduction in CsBr/Cu photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Halliday, M. T. E.; Hess, W. P.; Shluger, A. L.

    2016-02-15

    Thin films of CsBr deposited on Cu(100) have been proposed as next-generation photocathode materials for applications in particle accelerators and free-electron lasers. However, the mechanisms underlying an improved photocathode performance remain poorly understood. We present density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations of the work function reduction following the application of CsBr thin film coatings to Cu photocathodes. The effects of structure and van der Waals forces are examined. Calculations suggest that CsBr films can reduce the work function by around 1.5 eV, which would explain the exponential increase in quantum efficiency (QE) of coated vs. uncoated photocathodes. In conclusion, a model explaining experimentally observed laser activation of photocathode is provided whereby the photo-induced creation of di-vacancies at the surface, and their subsequent diffusion throughout the lattice and segregation at the interface leads to a further increase in QE after a period of laser irradiation.

  14. Polarization and charge limit studies of strained GaAs photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Saez, P.J.

    1997-03-01

    This thesis presents studies on the polarization and charge limit behavior of electron beams produced by strained GaAs photocathodes. These photocathodes are the source of high-intensity, high-polarization electron beams used for a variety of high-energy physics experiments at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Recent developments on P-type, biaxially-strained GaAs photocathodes have produced longitudinal polarization in excess of 80% while yielding beam intensities of {approximately} 2.5 A/cm{sup 2} at an operating voltage of 120 kV. The SLAC Gun Test Laboratory, which has a replica of the SLAC injector, was upgraded with a Mott polarimeter to study the polarization properties of photocathodes operating in a high-voltage DC gun. Both the maximum beam polarization and the maximum charge obtainable from these photocathodes have shown a strong dependence on the wavelength of illumination, on the doping concentration, and on the negative electron affinity levels. The experiments performed for this thesis included studying the effects of temperature, cesiation, quantum efficiency, and laser intensity on the polarization of high-intensity beams. It was found that, although low temperatures have been shown to reduce the spin relaxation rate in bulk semiconductors, they don`t have a large impact on the polarization of thin photocathodes. It seems that the short active region in thin photocathodes does not allow spin relaxation mechanisms enough time to cause depolarization. Previous observations that lower QE areas on the photocathode yield higher polarization beams were confirmed. In addition, high-intensity, small-area laser pulses were shown to produce lower polarization beams. Based on these results, together with some findings in the existing literature, a new proposal for a high-intensity, high-polarization photocathode is given. It is hoped that the results of this thesis will promote further investigation on the properties of GaAs photocathodes.

  15. Comparative research on activation technique for GaAs photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang; Qian, Yunsheng; Chang, Benkang; Chen, Xinlong; Yang, Rui

    2012-03-01

    The properties of GaAs photocathodes mainly depend on the material design and activation technique. In early researches, high-low temperature two-step activation has been proved to get more quantum efficiency than high-temperature single-step activation. But the variations of surface barriers for two activation techniques have not been well studied, thus the best activation temperature, best Cs-O ratio and best activation time for two-step activation technique have not been well found. Because the surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS) before activation is only in connection with the body parameters for GaAs photocathode such as electron diffusion length and the spectral response current (SRC) after activation is in connection with not only body parameters but also surface barriers, thus the surface escape probability (SEP) can be well fitted through the comparative research between SPS before activation and SEP after activation. Through deduction for the tunneling process of surface barriers by Schrödinger equation, the width and height for surface barrier I and II can be well fitted through the curves of SEP. The fitting results were well proved and analyzed by quantitative analysis of angle-dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ADXPS) which can also study the surface chemical compositions, atomic concentration percentage and layer thickness for GaAs photocathodes. This comparative research method for fitting parameters of surface barriers through SPS before activation and SRC after activation shows a better real-time in system method for the researches of activation techniques.

  16. Thermal limit to the intrinsic emittance from metal photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Jun Nasiatka, J.; Wan, Weishi; Karkare, Siddharth; Padmore, Howard A.; Smedley, John

    2015-09-28

    Measurements of the intrinsic emittance and transverse momentum distributions obtained from a metal (antimony thin film) photocathode near and below the photoemission threshold are presented. Measurements show that the intrinsic emittance is limited by the lattice temperature of the cathode as the incident photon energy approaches the photoemission threshold. A theoretical model to calculate the transverse momentum distributions near this photoemission threshold is presented. An excellent match between the experimental measurements and the theoretical calculations is demonstrated. These measurements are relevant to low emittance electron sources for Free Electron Lasers and Ultrafast Electron Diffraction experiments.

  17. Thermal emittance and response time of a cesium antimonide photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan; Bartnik, Adam; Dunham, Bruce; Karkare, Siddharth; Merluzzi, Richard; Nichols, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of the intrinsic emittance and response time of a Cs3Sb photocathode are presented. The emittance is obtained with a solenoid scan technique using a high voltage dc photoemission gun. Photoemission response time is evaluated using a RF deflecting cavity synchronized to a picosecond laser pulse train. We find that Cs3Sb has both small mean transverse energy, 160 ± 10 meV at 532 nm laser wavelength, and a prompt response time (below the resolution of our measurement) making it a suitable material for high brightness electron photoinjectors.

  18. High voltage switch triggered by a laser-photocathode subsystem

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Ping; Lundquist, Martin L.; Yu, David U. L.

    2013-01-08

    A spark gap switch for controlling the output of a high voltage pulse from a high voltage source, for example, a capacitor bank or a pulse forming network, to an external load such as a high gradient electron gun, laser, pulsed power accelerator or wide band radar. The combination of a UV laser and a high vacuum quartz cell, in which a photocathode and an anode are installed, is utilized as triggering devices to switch the spark gap from a non-conducting state to a conducting state with low delay and low jitter.

  19. Near atomically smooth alkali antimonide photocathode thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jun; Karkare, Siddharth; Nasiatka, James; Schubert, Susanne; Smedley, John; Padmore, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Nano-roughness is one of the major factors degrading the emittance of electron beams that can be generated by high efficiency photocathodes, such as the thermally reacted alkali antimonide thin films. In this paper, we demonstrate a co-deposition based method for producing alkali antimonide cathodes that produce near atomic smoothness with high reproducibility. We calculate the effect of the surface roughness on the emittance and show that such smooth cathode surfaces are essential for operation of alkali antimonide cathodes in high field, low emittance radio frequency electron guns and to obtain ultracold electrons for ultrafast electron diffraction applications.

  20. High power testing of a 17 GHz photocathode RF gun

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.C.; Danly, B.G.; Gonichon, J.

    1995-12-31

    The physics and technological issues involved in high gradient particle acceleration at high microwave (RF) frequencies are under study at MIT. The 17 GHz photocathode RF gun has a 1 1/2 cell ({pi} mode) room temperature cooper cavity. High power tests have been conducted at 5-10 MW levels with 100 ns pulses. A maximum surface electric field of 250 MV/m was achieved. This corresponds to an average on-axis gradient of 150 MeV/m. The gradient was also verified by a preliminary electron beam energy measurement. Even high gradients are expected in our next cavity design.

  1. RECENT PROGRESS ON THE DIAMOND AMPLIFIED PHOTO-CATHODE EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    CHANG,X.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BURRILL, A.; GRIMES, J.; RAO, T.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.; WU, Q.

    2007-06-25

    We report recent progress on the Diamond Amplified Photo-cathode (DAP). The use of a pulsed electron gun provides detailed information about the DAP physics. The secondary electron gain has been measured under various electric fields. We have achieved gains of a few hundred in the transmission mode and observed evidence of emission of electrons from the surface. A model based on recombination of electrons and holes during generation well describes the field dependence of the gain. The emittance measurement system for the DAP has been designed, constructed and is ready for use. The capsule design of the DAP is also being studied in parallel.

  2. Enhanced photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from silicon nanowire array photocathode.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ilwhan; Kye, Joohong; Hwang, Seongpil

    2012-01-11

    Herein we report that silicon nanowires (SiNWs) fabricated via metal-catalyzed electroless etching yielded a photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation performance superior to that of a planar Si, which is attributed to a lower kinetic overpotential due to a higher surface roughness, favorable shift in the flat-band potential, and light-trapping effects of the SiNW surface. The SiNW photocathode yielded a photovoltage of 0.42 V, one of the highest values ever reported for hydrogen generation on p-type Si/electrolyte interfaces.

  3. A Stable, Non-Cesiated III-Nitride Photocathode for Ultraviolet Astronomy Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Lloyd

    In this effort, we propose to develop a new type of cesium-free photocathode using III-nitride (III-N) materials (GaN, AlN, and their alloys) and to achieve highly efficient, solar blind, and stable UV response. Currently, detectors used in UV instruments utilize a photocathode to convert UV photons into electrons that are subsequently detected by microchannel plate or CCD. The performance of these detectors critically depends on the efficiency and stability of their photocathodes. In particular, photocathode instability is responsible for many of the fabrication difficulties commonly experienced with this class of detectors. In recent years, III-N (in particular GaN) photocathodes have been demonstrated with very high QE (>50%) in parts of UV spectral range. Moreover, due to the wide bandgaps of III-nitride materials, photocathode response can be tailored to be intrinsically solar-blind. However, these photocathodes still rely on cesiation for activation, necessitating all-vacuum fabrication and sealed-tube operation. The proposed photocathode structure will achieve activation through methods for band structure engineering such as delta-doping and polarization field engineering. Compared to the current state-of-the-art in flight-ready microchannel plate sealed tubes, photocathodes based on III-N materials will yield high QE and significantly enhance both fabrication yield and reliability, since they do not require cesium or other highly reactive materials for activation. This performance will enable a ~4 meter medium class UV spectroscopic and imaging mission that is of high scientific priority for NASA. This work will build on the success of our previous APRA-funded effort. In that work, we demonstrated III-nitride photocathode operation without the use of cesium and stable response with respect to time. These accomplishments represent major improvements to the state-of-the-art for photocathode technologies. In the proposed effort, we will implement III

  4. Highly active oxide photocathode for photoelectrochemical water reduction.

    PubMed

    Paracchino, Adriana; Laporte, Vincent; Sivula, Kevin; Grätzel, Michael; Thimsen, Elijah

    2011-06-01

    A clean and efficient way to overcome the limited supply of fossil fuels and the greenhouse effect is the production of hydrogen fuel from sunlight and water through the semiconductor/water junction of a photoelectrochemical cell, where energy collection and water electrolysis are combined into a single semiconductor electrode. We present a highly active photocathode for solar H(2) production, consisting of electrodeposited cuprous oxide, which was protected against photocathodic decomposition in water by nanolayers of Al-doped zinc oxide and titanium oxide and activated for hydrogen evolution with electrodeposited Pt nanoparticles. The roles of the different surface protection components were investigated, and in the best case electrodes showed photocurrents of up to -7.6 mA cm(-2) at a potential of 0 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode at mild pH. The electrodes remained active after 1 h of testing, cuprous oxide was found to be stable during the water reduction reaction and the Faradaic efficiency was estimated to be close to 100%.

  5. Highly active oxide photocathode for photoelectrochemical water reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paracchino, Adriana; Laporte, Vincent; Sivula, Kevin; Grätzel, Michael; Thimsen, Elijah

    2011-06-01

    A clean and efficient way to overcome the limited supply of fossil fuels and the greenhouse effect is the production of hydrogen fuel from sunlight and water through the semiconductor/water junction of a photoelectrochemical cell, where energy collection and water electrolysis are combined into a single semiconductor electrode. We present a highly active photocathode for solar H2 production, consisting of electrodeposited cuprous oxide, which was protected against photocathodic decomposition in water by nanolayers of Al-doped zinc oxide and titanium oxide and activated for hydrogen evolution with electrodeposited Pt nanoparticles. The roles of the different surface protection components were investigated, and in the best case electrodes showed photocurrents of up to -7.6 mA cm-2 at a potential of 0 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode at mild pH. The electrodes remained active after 1 h of testing, cuprous oxide was found to be stable during the water reduction reaction and the Faradaic efficiency was estimated to be close to 100%.

  6. AlGaN/InGaN Photocathode Development

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, J. H.; Leopold, D. J.

    2008-12-24

    An increase in quantum efficiency in photodetectors could result in a proportional reduction in the area of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes and an even larger reduction in cost. We report on the development of high quantum efficiency, high gain, UV/blue photon-counting detectors based on AlGaN/InGaN photocathode heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. This research could eventually result in nearly ideal light detectors with a number of distinct advantages over existing technologies for numerous applications in high-energy physics and particle astrophysics. Potential advantages include much lower noise detection, better stability and radiation resistance than other cathode structures, high VUV sensitivity and very low radioactive background levels for deep underground experiments, and high detection efficiency for the detection of individual VUV-visible photons. We are also developing photocathodes with intrinsic gain, initially improving the detection efficiency of hybrid semiconductor-vacuum tube devices and eventually leading to a new type of all-solid-state photomultiplier device.

  7. A high average current DC GaAs photocathode gun for ERLs and FELs

    SciTech Connect

    C. Hernandez-Garcia; T. Siggins; S. Benson; D. Bullard; H. F. Dylla; K. Jordan; C. Murray; G. R. Neil; Michelle D. Shinn; R. Walker

    2005-05-01

    The Jefferson Lab (JLab) 10 kW IR Upgrade FEL DC GaAs photocathode gun is presently the highest average current electron source operational in the U.S., delivering a record 9.1 mA CW, 350 kV electron beam with 122 pC/bunch at 75 MHz rep rate. Pulsed operation has also been demonstrated with 8 mA per pulse (110 pC/bunch) in 16 ms-long pulses at 2 Hz rep rate. Routinely the gun delivers 5 mA CW and pulse current at 135 pC/bunch for FEL operations. The Upgrade DC photocathode gun is a direct evolution of the DC photocathode gun used in the previous JLab 1 kW IR Demo FEL. Improvements in the vacuum conditions, incorporation of two UHV motion mechanisms (a retractable cathode and a photocathode shield door) and a new way to add cesium to the GaAs photocathode surface have extended its lifetime to over 450 Coulombs delivered between re-cesiations (quantum efficiency replenishment). With each photocathode activation quantum efficiencies above 6% are routinely achieved. The photocathode activation and performance will be described in detail.

  8. Ion back-bombardment of GaAs photocathodes inside dc high voltage electron guns

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Grames; Philip Adderley; Joshua Brittian; Daniel Charles; James Clark; John Hansknecht; Benard Poelker; Marcy Stutzman; Kenneth Surles-law

    2005-05-01

    DC high voltage GaAs photoguns are key components at accelerator facilities worldwide. New experiments and new accelerator facilities demand improved performance from these guns, in particular higher current operation and longer photocathode operating lifetime. This conference submission explores bulk GaAs photocathode lifetime as a function of beam current, active photocathode area, laser spot size and the vacuum of the gun and beam line. Lifetime measurements were made at 100 microamps, a beam current relevant for accelerators like CEBAF, and at beam currents of 1 milliamps and 5 milliamps, a regime that is interesting for high current Free Electron Laser (FEL) and Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) operation.

  9. A novel system for measurement of the transverse electron momentum distribution from photocathodes.

    PubMed

    Feng, J; Nasiatka, J; Wan, W; Vecchione, T; Padmore, H A

    2015-01-01

    The transverse momentum of electrons produced by a photocathode contributes significantly to the performance of several different types of accelerator-based light sources, such as Free Electron Lasers, as well as systems designed for ultrafast electron diffraction and dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Minimization of the transverse emittance from photocathodes is the subject of intensive research, and therefore measurement of this parameter is of great importance. Here, we describe a simple system that offers real time measurements of transverse emittance and can be easily integrated into the photocathode fabrication process.

  10. Performance of the 8-in. R5912 photomultiplier tube with super bialkali photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Qian, S.; Xia, J.; Ning, Z.; Cheng, Y.; Qi, M.; Heng, Y.; Wang, Z.; Li, X.; Liu, S.; Lei, X.

    2015-08-01

    An enhanced R5912 family photomultiplier (8-inch.) model with super bialkali photocathode was developed by Hamamatsu. The spectral responses of the standard and enhanced photocathode were compared and a relative increase of 39% at 400 nm was found for the enhanced one. Additional measurements on the relative detection efficiency at a gain of 1E7 showed a consistent improvement of the quantum efficiency. Good uniformity was observed on the super bialkali photocathode. Additional tests proved that both the charge resolution and time properties were not affected by the new cathode technology. Dark count rate and dark current values were found larger in the super bialkali model compared to the standard one.

  11. New photocathode using ZnSe substrates with GaAs active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiuguang; Takeda, Yoshikazu; Fuchi, Shingo

    2017-03-01

    GaAs active layers were successfully fabricated on ZnSe substrates using a metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy system. As a photocathode, a GaAs active layer shows a high quantum efficiency (QE) of 9% at 532 nm laser light illumination, which is comparable to a QE of 11% from GaAs bulk. In addition, a photoemission current of 10 µA was obtained from this photocathode. One more important point is that this photocathode could realize back-side illumination of 532 nm laser light, and thus its widespread applications are expected in microscopy and accelerator fields.

  12. Photogeneration of hydrogen from water by a robust dye-sensitized photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, B.; Das, A. K.; Marquard, S.; Farnum, B. H.; Wang, D.; Bullock, R. M.; Meyer, T. J.

    2016-11-15

    We report here on a novel photocathode with a “donor-dye-catalyst” assembly structure for water reduction. The photoelectrocatalytic performance of the photocathode under mild conditions, with a photocurrent of -56 μA/cm2 and a Faradaic yield of 53%, is superior relative to other reported photocathodes with surface attached molecular catalysts. Detailed electron transfer analyses, based on transient absorption measurements, show that the successful application of this photocathode originates mainly from the slow back electron transfer following light excitation. The results also demonstrate that addition of the long-chain assembly to the macro-mesoporous electrode surface plays a fundamental role in providing sufficient catalyst for water reduction.

  13. Towards a Robust, Efficient Dispenser Photocathode: the Effect of Recesiation on Quantum Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Eric J.; Pan Zhigang; Leung, Jessica; Feldman, Donald W.; O'Shea, Patrick G.; Jensen, Kevin L.

    2009-01-22

    Future electron accelerators and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) require high brightness electron sources; photocathodes for such devices are challenged to maintain long life and high electron emission efficiency (high quantum efficiency, or QE). The UMD dispenser photocathode design addresses this tradeoff of robustness and QE. In such a dispenser, a cesium-based surface layer is deposited on a porous substrate. The surface layer can be replenished from a subsurface cesium reservoir under gentle heating, allowing cesium to diffuse controllably to the surface and providing demonstrably more robust photocathodes. In support of the premise that recesiation is able to restore contaminated photocathodes, we here report controlled contamination of cesium-based surface layers with subsequent recesiation and the resulting effect on QE. Contaminant gases investigated include examples known from the vacuum environment of typical electron guns.

  14. A statistically-designed experiment for assessing cesium-potassium-antimonide photocathode fabrication parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ternes, R. L.; Bethel, S. Z.; Janky, D. G.

    1992-07-01

    A vapor-phase deposition process for fabricating cesium-potassium-antimonide photocathodes is investigated. A 3×24-1 fractional factorial statistical experimental design was created to simultaneously determine the effects of five processing variables on photocathode performance based on quantum efficiency (QE) measurements of nascent photocathodes. The five processing variables are antimony thickness, potassium thickness, source temperature, cesium temperature rampdown, and substrate temperature. Thirty-five combinations of the five variables were performed (resulting in 35 cathodes): 24 combinations were unique and 11 were replicates. A twelve-run complementary phase followed the amin experiment, for a total of 47 photocathodes. This statistical approach enables independent estimation of the main effects and interaction effects of the five variables. Statistically significant effects are separated from nonsignificant effects. The fabrication process will be used on the Average Power Laser Experiment (APLE) conducted at Boeing.

  15. MULTI-ALKALI PHOTOCATHODE DEVELOPMENT AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LAB FOR APPLICATION IN SUPERCONDUCTING PHOTOINJECTORS. KICKERS.

    SciTech Connect

    BURRILL, A.; BEN-ZVI, I.; RAO, T.; PATE, D.; SEGALOV, Z.

    2005-05-16

    The development of a suitable photocathode for use in a high average current photoinjector at temperatures ranging from 273 K down to 2 K is a subject of considerable interest, and active research. The choice of photocathode material is often a trade-off made based on the quantum efficiency of the cathode material, the tolerance to adverse vacuum conditions, and the laser wavelength needed to produce photoelectrons. In this paper an overview of the BNL work to date on CsK{sub 2}Sb photocathodes on a variety of substrates, irradiated at multiple wavelengths, and at temperatures down to 170 K will be discussed. The application of this photocathode material into a SRF photoinjector will also be discussed.

  16. Multi-Alkali Photocathode Development at Brookhaven National Lab for Application in Superconducting Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Burrill, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Pate, D.; Rao, T.; Segalov, Z.; Dowell, D.; /SLAC

    2006-02-15

    The development of a suitable photocathode for use in a high average current photoinjector at temperatures ranging from 273 K down to 2 K is a subject of considerable interest, and active research. The choice of photocathode material is often a trade-off made based on the quantum efficiency of the cathode material, the tolerance to adverse vacuum conditions, and the laser wavelength needed to produce photoelectrons. In this paper an overview of the BNL work to date on CsK{sub 2}Sb photocathodes on a variety of substrates, irradiated at multiple wavelengths, and at temperatures down to 170 K will be discussed. The application of this photocathode material into a SRF photoinjector will also be discussed.

  17. Towards a Robust, Efficient Dispenser Photocathode: the Effect of Recesiation on Quantum Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Eric J.; Pan, Zhigang; Leung, Jessica; Feldman, Donald W.; O'Shea, Patrick G.; Jensen, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    Future electron accelerators and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) require high brightness electron sources; photocathodes for such devices are challenged to maintain long life and high electron emission efficiency (high quantum efficiency, or QE). The UMD dispenser photocathode design addresses this tradeoff of robustness and QE. In such a dispenser, a cesium-based surface layer is deposited on a porous substrate. The surface layer can be replenished from a subsurface cesium reservoir under gentle heating, allowing cesium to diffuse controllably to the surface and providing demonstrably more robust photocathodes. In support of the premise that recesiation is able to restore contaminated photocathodes, we here report controlled contamination of cesium-based surface layers with subsequent recesiation and the resulting effect on QE. Contaminant gases investigated include examples known from the vacuum environment of typical electron guns.

  18. Reproducible, rugged, and inexpensive photocathode x-ray diode

    SciTech Connect

    Idzorek, G. C.; Tierney, T. E.; Lockard, T. E.; Moy, K. J.; Keister, J. W.

    2008-10-15

    The photoemissive cathode type of x-ray diode (XRD) is popular for measuring time and spectrally resolved output of pulsed power experiments. Vitreous carbon XRDs currently used on the Sandia National Laboratories Z-machine were designed in the early 1980s and use materials and processes no longer available. Additionally cathodes used in the high x-ray flux and dirty vacuum environment of a machine such as Z suffer from response changes requiring recalibration. In searching for a suitable replacement cathode, we discovered very high purity vitreous-carbon planchets are commercially available for use as biological substrates in scanning electron microscope (SEM) work. After simplifying the photocathode mounting to use commercially available components, we constructed a set of 20 XRDs using SEM planchets that were then calibrated at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We present comparisons of the reproducibility and absolute calibrations between the current vitreous-carbon XRDs and our new design.

  19. Enhanced Quantum Efficiency From Hybrid Cesium Halide/Copper Photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Lingmei; Joly, Alan G.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Gong, Yu; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-04-28

    The quantum efficiency of Cu is found to increase dramatically when coated by a CsI film and then irradiated by a UV laser. Over three orders of magnitude quantum efficiency enhancement at 266 nm is observed in CsI/Cu(100), indicating potential application in future photocathode devices. Upon laser irradiation, a large work function reduction to a value less than 2 eV is also observed, significantly greater than for similarly treated CsBr/Cu(100). The initial QE enhancement, prior to laser irradiation, is attributed to interface interaction, surface cleanliness and the intrinsic properties of the Cs halide film. Further QE enhancement following activation is attributed to formation of inter-band states and Cs metal accumulation at the interface induced by laser irradiation.

  20. Photocathode transfer and storage techniques using alkali vapor feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, R. W.; Cameron, B. J.

    1991-12-01

    Photocathodes of quantum efficiency above 1 percent at the doubled YAG frequency of 532 nM are very sensitive to the local vacuum environment. These cathodes must have a band gap of less than 2.3 eV, and a work function that is also on the order of approximately 2 volts or less. As such, these surfaces are very reactive as they provide many surface states for the residual gases that have positive electron affinities such as oxygen and omnipotent water. Attendant to this problem is that the optimal operating point for some of these cesium based cathodes is unstable. Three of the cesium series were tried, the Cs-Ag-Bi-O, the Cs3Sb and the K2CsSb. The most stable material found is the K2CsSb. The vacuum conditions can be met by a variety of pumping schemes. The vacuum is achieved by using sputter ion diode pumps, and baking at 250 C or less for whatever time is required to reduce the pump currents to below 1 uA at room temperature. To obtain the required partial pressure of cesium, a simple very sensitive diagnostic gauge has been developed that can discriminate between free alkali and other gases present. This Pressure Alkali Monitor (PAM) can be used on cesium sources to provide a low partial pressure using standard feedback techniques. Photocathodes of arbitrary composition have been transferred to a separate vacuum system and preserved for over 10 days with less than a 25 percent loss to the QE at 543.5 nM.

  1. Photocathode transfer and storage techniques using alkali vapor feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, R.W.; Cameron, B.J.

    1991-12-20

    Photocathodes of quantum efficiency above 1% at the doubled YAG frequency of 532 nM are very sensitive to the local vacuum environment. These cathodes must have a band gap of less than 2.3 eV, and a work function that is also on the order of {approximately}2 volts or less. As such, these surfaces are very reactive as they provide many surface states for the residual gases that have positive electron affinities such as oxygen and omnipotent water. Attendant to this problem is that the optimal operating point for some of these cesium based cathodes is unstable. Three of the cesium series were tried, the Cs-Ag-Bi-O, the Cs{sub 3}Sb and the K{sub 2}CsSb. The most stable material found is the K{sub 2}CsSb. The vacuum conditions can be met by a variety of pumping schemes. The vacuum is achieved by using sputter ion diode pumps, and baking at 250{degrees}C or less for whatever time is required to reduce the pump currents to below 1 uA at room temperature. To obtain the required partial pressure of cesium, a simple very sensitive diagnostic gauge has been developed that can discriminate between free alkali and other gases present. This Pressure Alkali Monitor (PAM) can be used cesium sources to provide a low partial pressure using standard feedback techniques. Photocathodes of arbitrary composition have been transferred to a separate vacuum system and preserved for over 10 days with less than a 25% loss to the QE at 543.5 nM.

  2. Variation of spectral response curves of GaAs photocathodes in activation chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jijun; Chang, Benkang; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Hui; Gao, Pin

    2006-09-01

    The spectral response curves of reflection-mode GaAs (100) photocathodes are measured in activation chamber by multi-information measurement system at RT, and by applying quantum efficiency formula, the variation of spectral response curves have been studied. Reflection-mode GaAs photocathodes materials are grown over GaAs wafer (100) by MBE with p-type beryllium doping, doping concentration is 1×10 19 cm -3 and the active layer thickness is 1.6μm. During the high-temperature activation process, the spectral response curves varied with activation time are measured. After the low-temperature activation, the photocathode is illuminated by a white light source, and the spectral response curves varied with illumination time are measured every other hour. Experimental results of both high-temperature and low-temperature activations show that the spectral response curve shape of photocathodes is a function of time. We use traditional quantum efficiency formulas of photocathodes, in which only the Γ photoemission is considered, to fit experimental spectral response curves, and find the theoretical curves are not in agreement with the experimental curves, the reason is other valley and hot-electron yields are necessary to be included in yields of reflection-mode photocathodes. Based on the two-minima diffusion model and the fit of escape probability, we modified the quantum efficiency formula of reflection-mode photocathodes, the modified formula can be used to explain the variation of yield curves of reflection-mode photocathodes very well.

  3. Activation Layer Stabilization of High Polarization Photocathodes in Sub-Optimal RF Gun Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Mulhollan, Gregory; /SLAC /Saxed Surface Science, Austin, TX

    2010-08-25

    We have developed an activation procedure by which the reactivity to CO{sub 2}, a principal cause of yield decay for GaAs photocathodes, is greatly reduced. The use of a second alkali in the activation process is responsible for the increased immunity of the activated surface. The best immunity was obtained by using a combination of Cs and Li without any loss in near bandgap yield. Optimally activated photocathodes have nearly equal quantities of both alkalis.

  4. Resolution characteristics of graded band-gap reflection-mode AlGaAs/GaAs photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wenjuan; Zhang, Daoli; Zou, Jijun; Peng, Xincun; Wang, Weilu; Zhang, Yijun; Chang, Benkang

    2015-12-01

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) of graded band-gap AlGaAs/GaAs reflection-mode photocathodes was determined using two-dimensional Poisson and continuity equations through numerical method. Based on the MTF model, we calculated the theoretical MTF of graded and uniform band-gap reflection-mode photocathodes. We then analyzed the effects of Al composition, wavelength of incident photon, and thicknesses of AlGaAs and GaAs layer on the resolution. Calculation results show that graded band-gap structures can increase the resolution of reflection-mode photocathodes. When the spatial frequency is 800 lp/mm and wavelength is 600 nm, the resolution of graded band-gap photocathodes generally increases by 15.4-29.6%. The resolution improvement of graded band-gap photocathodes is attributed to the fact that the built-in electric field in graded band-gap photocathodes reduces the lateral diffusion distance of photoelectrons.

  5. [Comparative study of uniform-doping and gradient-doping negative electron affinity GaN photocathodes].

    PubMed

    Li, Biao; Chang, Ben-Kang; Xu, Yuan; Du, Xiao-Qing; Du, Yu-Jie; Fu, Xiao-Qian; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Jun-Ju

    2011-08-01

    High temperature annealing and Cs/O activation are external incentives, while the property of GaN material is internal factor in the preparation of negative electron affinity GaN photocathode. The similarities and differences of the performance of the two structure photocathodes are analysed based on the difference of the structure between uniform-doping and gradient-doping negative electron affinity GaN photocathodes and the changes in photocurrents in activation and the quantum yield after successfully activated of GaN photocathodes. Experiments show that: the photocurrent growth rate is slower in activation, activation time is longer and quantum efficiency is higher after successfully activated of gradient-doping GaN photocathode than those of uniform-doping photocathode respectively. The field-assisted photocathode emission model can explain the differences between the two, built-in electric field of gradient-doping structure creates additional electronic drift to the photocathode surface, and the probability of electrons to reach the photocathode surface is improved correspondingly.

  6. Indium phosphide negative electron affinity photocathodes: Surface cleaning and activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yun

    InP(100) is a very important semi-conductor for many applications. When activated by Cs and oxygen, the InP surface achieves the state of Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) making the Cs+O/InP system a very efficient electron source. Despite many years of study, the chemical cleaning and activation of InP are still not well understood. In our work, we have established an understanding of the basic physics and chemistry for the chemical cleaning and activation of the InP(100) surface. Synchrotron Radiation Photoelectron Spectroscopy is the main technique used in this study because of its high surface sensitivity and ability to identify chemical species present on the surface at each stage of our process. A clean, stoichiometric InP(100) surface is crucial for obtaining high performance of NEA photocathodes. Therefore, the first part of our study focused on the chemical cleaning of InP(100). We found that hydrogen peroxide based solutions alone, originally developed to clean GaAs(100) surfaces and widely used for InP(100), do not result in clean InP(I00) surfaces because oxide is left on the surface. A second cleaning step, which uses acid solutions like HCl or H2SO4, can remove all the oxide and leave a 0.4 ML protective layer of elemental phosphorous on the surface. The elemental phosphorous can be removed by annealing at 330°C and a clean InP(100) surface can be obtained. Cs deposition on InP(100) surface shows clear charge transfer from the Cs ad-atoms to the substrate. When the Cs/InP(100) surface is dosed with oxygen, the charge transfer from the Cs to substrate is reduced and substrate is oxidized. The activation of InP as a NEA photocathode is carried out by an alternating series of steps consisting of Cs deposition and Cs+O co-deposition. Two types of oxygen are found after activation. The first is dissociated oxygen and the other is a di-oxygen species (peroxide or superoxide). The decay of quantum-yield with time and with annealing is studied and changes in

  7. Impact of the spatial laser distribution on photocathode gun operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feng; Brachmann, Axel; Emma, Paul; Gilevich, Sasha; Huang, Zhirong

    2012-09-01

    It is widely believed that a drive laser with uniform temporal and spatial laser profiles is required to generate the lowest emittance beam at the photoinjector. However, for a given 3 ps smooth-Gaussian laser temporal profile, our recent simulations indicate that a truncated-Gaussian laser spatial profile produces an electron beam with smaller emittance. The simulation results are qualitatively confirmed by later analytical calculation, and also confirmed by measurements: emittance reduction of ˜25% was observed at the linac coherent light source (LCLS) injector with a truncated-Gaussian laser spatial profile at the nominal operating bunch charge of 150 pC. There was a significant secondary benefit—laser transmission through the iris for the truncated-Gaussian profile was about twice that compared to the nearly uniform distribution, which significantly loosens the laser power and quantum efficiency requirements for drive laser system and photocathode. Since February 9, 2012, the drive laser with the truncated-Gaussian spatial distribution has been used for LCLS routine user operations and the corresponding free electron laser power is at least the same as the one when using the nearly uniform spatial profile.

  8. A cesium bromide photocathode excited by 405 nm radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, J. R.; Cheng, Y. T.; Pianetta, P.; Pease, Fabian W.; Hesselink, L.

    2014-07-01

    In several applications, such as electron beam lithography and X-ray differential phase contrast imaging, there is a need for a free electron source with a current density at least 10 A/cm2 yet can be shaped with a resolution down to 20 nm and pulsed. Additional requirements are that the source must operate in a practical demountable vacuum (>1e-9 Torr) and be reasonably compact. In prior work, a photocathode comprising a film of CsBr on metal film on a sapphire substrate met the requirements except it was bulky because it required a beam (>10 W/cm2) of 257 nm radiation. Here, we describe an approach using a 405 nm laser which is far less bulky. The 405 nm laser, however, is not energetic enough to create color centers in CsBr films. The key to our approach is to bombard the CsBr film with a flood beam of about 1 keV electrons prior to operation. Photoelectron efficiencies in the range of 100-1000 nA/mW were demonstrated with lifetimes exceeding 50 h between electron bombardments. We suspect that the electron bombardment creates intraband color centers whence electrons can be excited by the 405 nm photons into the conduction band and thence into the vacuum.

  9. Oxidatively Stable Nanoporous Silicon Photocathodes for Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Neale, Nathan R.; Zhao, Yixin; Zhu, Kai; Oh, Jihun; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Yuan, Hao-Chih; Branz, Howard M.

    2014-06-02

    Stable and high-performance nanoporous 'black silicon' photoelectrodes with electrolessly deposited Pt nanoparticle (NP) catalysts are made with two metal-assisted etching steps. Doubly etched samples exhibit >20 mA/cm2 photocurrent density at +0.2 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) for photoelectrochemical hydrogen evolution under 1 sun illumination. We find that the photocurrent onset voltage of black Si photocathodes prepared from single-crystal planar Si wafers increases in oxidative environments (e.g., aqueous electrolyte) owing to a positive flat-band potential shift caused by surface oxidation. However, this beneficial oxide layer becomes a kinetic barrier to proton reduction that inhibits hydrogen production after just 24 h. To mitigate this problem, we developed a novel second Pt-assisted etch process that buries the Pt NPs deeper into the nanoporous Si surface. This second etch shifts the onset voltage positively, from +0.25 V to +0.4 V vs. RHE, and reduces the charge-transfer resistance with no performance decrease seen for at least two months.

  10. Experiments for improving fabrication, recovery and surface-protection of Cs3Sb photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimoto, Takayoshi; Arai, Yoshihiro; Nagayama, Kuniak

    2017-01-01

    We examined 1) the photocurrent from Cs3Sb photocathode as a function of anode voltage below 200 V, 2) the relationship between the quantum efficiency of photoemission and the conditions for fabrication by the sandwich method, 3) recovery of the photoemission by additional Cs deposition, and 4) the effects of surface protection of Cs3Sb photocathodes by WO3 and Cr2O3 films in the passive state. The photocurrent had a maximum at approximately 68 V except when we increased the anode voltage extraordinarily slowly. Cs3Sb photocathodes were fabricated by increasing the temperature of sandwiched layers of Sb, Cs and Sb deposited on the fine tips of eight cathodes at less than -12 °C. Cs3Sb photocathodes having higher quantum efficiency were fabricated by smoothly increasing the temperature of the layers quickly after we deposited the second Sb layer. The photocurrent from the Cs3Sb photocathodes was significantly higher when Cs was deposited at temperatures of 50-70 °C. Deposition of a one- to three- atomic-layer W or Cr film extended the photoemission lifetime after the layers were oxidized to WO3 or Cr2O3 in the passive state due to oxidation. The WO3 or Cr2O3 in the passive state provided more surface protection as their thickness increased.

  11. Direct deposition of GaN-based photocathodes on microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiran, Amir M.; Wowchak, Andrew M.; Chow, Peter P.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Hull, Jeffrey S.; Malloy, James; Tremsin, Anton S.

    2009-02-01

    Epitaxial growth of p-type GaN-based UV photocathode by RF plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on sapphire, fused silica, and alumina substrates was investigated. The electrical measurements indicted the growth of highly p-type GaN films as thin as 0.1 μm on c-plane sapphire with a thin AlN nucleation layer. Polycrystalline p-type GaN was obtained for growth on fused silica and alumina. Negative electron affinity (NEA) photocathodes were fabricated by cesium activation of the p-type GaN films in vacuum. Quantum efficiency for UV detection on different substrates was then characterized. To study the integration of UV photocathodes with MCPs, direct deposition of p-type GaN films on glass MCPs were done at low growth temperatures by MBE. The detection efficiency of polycrystalline p- GaN photocathodes in reflection mode was much less than the high quality p-type GaN films on sapphire, however, it was comparable to the detection efficiency of the latter measured in the semitransparent mode. This indicates the potential for fabrication of improved photocathodes with higher gain and better spatial and temporal resolutions.

  12. Spectral response variation of a negative-electron-affinity photocathode in the preparation process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Du, Yujie; Chang, Benkang; Yunsheng, Qian

    2006-08-20

    In order to research the spectral response variation of a negative electron affinity (NEA) photocathode in the preparation process, we have done two experiments on a transmission-type GaAs photocathode. First, an automatic spectral response recording system is described, which is used to take spectral response curves during the activation procedure of the photocathode. By this system, the spectral response curves of a GaAs:Cs-O photocathode measured in situ are presented. Then, after the cathode is sealed with a microchannel plate and a fluorescence screen into the image tube, we measure the spectral response of the tube by another measurement instrument. By way of comparing and analyzing these curves, we can find the typical variation in spectral-responses. The reasons for the variation are discussed. Based on these curves, spectral matching factors of a GaAs cathode for green vegetation and rough concrete are calculated. The visual ranges of night-vision goggles under specific circumstances are estimated. The results show that the spectral response of the NEA photocathode degraded in the sealing process, especially at long wavelengths. The variation has also influenced the whole performance of the intensifier tube.

  13. Spectral response variation of a negative-electron-affinity photocathode in the preparation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Du, Yujie; Chang, Benkang; Yunsheng, Qian

    2006-08-01

    In order to research the spectral response variation of a negative electron affinity (NEA) photocathode in the preparation process, we have done two experiments on a transmission-type GaAs photocathode. First, an automatic spectral response recording system is described, which is used to take spectral response curves during the activation procedure of the photocathode. By this system, the spectral response curves of a GaAs:Cs-O photocathode measured in situ are presented. Then, after the cathode is sealed with a microchannel plate and a fluorescence screen into the image tube, we measure the spectral response of the tube by another measurement instrument. By way of comparing and analyzing these curves, we can find the typical variation in spectral-responses. The reasons for the variation are discussed. Based on these curves, spectral matching factors of a GaAs cathode for green vegetation and rough concrete are calculated. The visual ranges of night-vision goggles under specific circumstances are estimated. The results show that the spectral response of the NEA photocathode degraded in the sealing process, especially at long wavelengths. The variation has also influenced the whole performance of the intensifier tube.

  14. A mechanism of Cu work function reduction in CsBr/Cu photocathodes

    DOE PAGES

    Halliday, M. T. E.; Hess, W. P.; Shluger, A. L.

    2016-02-15

    Thin films of CsBr deposited on Cu(100) have been proposed as next-generation photocathode materials for applications in particle accelerators and free-electron lasers. However, the mechanisms underlying an improved photocathode performance remain poorly understood. We present density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations of the work function reduction following the application of CsBr thin film coatings to Cu photocathodes. The effects of structure and van der Waals forces are examined. Calculations suggest that CsBr films can reduce the work function by around 1.5 eV, which would explain the exponential increase in quantum efficiency (QE) of coated vs. uncoated photocathodes. In conclusion, a modelmore » explaining experimentally observed laser activation of photocathode is provided whereby the photo-induced creation of di-vacancies at the surface, and their subsequent diffusion throughout the lattice and segregation at the interface leads to a further increase in QE after a period of laser irradiation.« less

  15. Photoemission of reflection-mode InGaAs photocathodes after Cs,O activation and recaesiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mingzhu; Jin, Muchun

    2016-12-01

    In order to study the photoemission performance of InGaAs photocathodes, experiments of Cs,O activation, multiple recaesiation, and degradation are performed on a reflection-mode InGaAs photocathode. The photocurrent curves during Cs,O activation, recaesiation, and degradation are measured and analyzed. Based on the quantum efficiency formula of InGaAs photocathodes, the critical performance parameters were obtained by fitting the experimental curves. Results show that Cs-only activation results in a positive electron affinity surface and Cs,O activation leads the surface to a negative electron affinity. Recaesiations can make the degraded InGaAs photocathode recover to a good level. Meanwhile, the spectral response and life time of InGaAs photocathode become smaller and smaller as the recaesiation times increase.

  16. Effect of Sb thickness on the performance of bialkali-antimonide photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, Md Abdullah A.; Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A.; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Mammei, Russell; Poelker, Matthew

    2016-01-06

    The alkali species Cs and K were codeposited using an effusion source, onto relatively thick layers of Sb (50 nm to ~7 μm) grown on GaAs and Ta substrates inside a vacuum chamber that was baked and not-vented, and also baked and vented with clean dry nitrogen but not rebaked. The characteristics of the Sb films, including sticking probability, surface roughness, grain size, and crystal properties were very different for these conditions, yet comparable values of photocathode yield [or quantum efficiency (QE)] at 284 V were obtained following codeposition of the alkali materials. Photocathodes manufactured with comparatively thick Sb layers exhibited the highest QE and the best 1/e lifetime. As last, the authors speculate that the alkali codeposition enabled optimized stoichiometry for photocathodes manufactured using thick Sb layers, which could serve as a reservoir for the alkali materials.

  17. High quantum efficiency photocathode simulation for the investigation of novel structured designs

    DOE PAGES

    MacPhee, A. G.; Nagel, S. R.; Bell, P. M.; ...

    2014-09-02

    A computer model in CST Studio Suite has been developed to evaluate several novel geometrically enhanced photocathode designs. This work was aimed at identifying a structure that would increase the total electron yield by a factor of two or greater in the 1–30 keV range. The modeling software was used to simulate the electric field and generate particle tracking for several potential structures. The final photocathode structure has been tailored to meet a set of detector performance requirements, namely, a spatial resolution of <40 μm and a temporal spread of 1–10 ps. As a result, we present the details ofmore » the geometrically enhanced photocathode model and resulting static field and electron emission characteristics.« less

  18. High quantum efficiency photocathode simulation for the investigation of novel structured designs

    SciTech Connect

    MacPhee, A. G.; Nagel, S. R.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Landen, O. L.; Opachich, Y. P.; Ross, P. W.; Huffman, E.; Koch, J. A.; Hilsabeck, T. J.

    2014-09-02

    A computer model in CST Studio Suite has been developed to evaluate several novel geometrically enhanced photocathode designs. This work was aimed at identifying a structure that would increase the total electron yield by a factor of two or greater in the 1–30 keV range. The modeling software was used to simulate the electric field and generate particle tracking for several potential structures. The final photocathode structure has been tailored to meet a set of detector performance requirements, namely, a spatial resolution of <40 μm and a temporal spread of 1–10 ps. As a result, we present the details of the geometrically enhanced photocathode model and resulting static field and electron emission characteristics.

  19. Characterizing and Optimizing Photocathode Laser Distributions for Ultra-low Emittance Electron Beam Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, F.; Bohler, D.; Ding, Y.; Gilevich, S.; Huang, Z.; Loos, H.; Ratner, D.; Vetter, S.

    2015-12-07

    Photocathode RF gun has been widely used for generation of high-brightness electron beams for many different applications. We found that the drive laser distributions in such RF guns play important roles in minimizing the electron beam emittance. Characterizing the laser distributions with measurable parameters and optimizing beam emittance versus the laser distribution parameters in both spatial and temporal directions are highly desired for high-brightness electron beam operation. In this paper, we report systematic measurements and simulations of emittance dependence on the measurable parameters represented for spatial and temporal laser distributions at the photocathode RF gun systems of Linac Coherent Light Source. The tolerable parameter ranges for photocathode drive laser distributions in both directions are presented for ultra-low emittance beam operations.

  20. Experimental studies of the charge limit phenomenon in GaAs photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, H.; Alley, R.; Aoyagi, H.; Clendenin, J.; Saez, P.; Schultz, D.; Turner, J.

    1993-10-01

    GaAs photocathodes have been in use for generating high intensity polarized electron beams (up to a peak current of 6 A in 2 ns pulses) for the SLC high energy physics program. If the quantum efficiency (measured at low light intensities) of a GaAs photocathode is below a certain level, the maximum photoemitted charge is found to be limited by the intrinsic properties of the cathode instead of by the space charge limit. We have studied this charge limit phenomenon in a variety of GaAs photocathodes. The effects of the quantum efficiency, excitation laser wavelength, and extraction electric field on the charge limit have been examined. The temporal behavior of the charge limit as manifested in both intrapulse and interpulse effects has also been studied. These results will be discussed in light of possible mechanisms.

  1. Polarization studies of strained GaAs photocathodes at the SLAC Gun Test Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Saez, P.; Alley, R.; Clendenin, J.; Frisch, J.; Kirby, R.; Mair, R.; Maruyama, T.; Miller, R.; Mulhollan, G.; Prescott, C.

    1995-08-01

    The SLAC Gun Test Laboratory apparatus, the first two meters of which is a replica of the SLAC injector, is used to study the production of intense, highly-polarized electron beams required for the Stanford Linear Collider and future linear colliders. The facility has been upgraded with a Mott polarimeter in order to characterize the electron polarization from photocathodes operating in a DC gun. In particular, SLAC utilizes p-type, biaxially strained GaAs photocathodes which have produced longitudinal electron polarizations greater than 80% while yielding pulses of 5 A/sq cm at an operating voltage of 120 kV. Among the experiments performed include studying the influences of the active layer thickness, temperature, quantum efficiency and cessation on the polarization. The results might help to develop strained photocathodes with higher polarization.

  2. Prevention of electron field emission from molybdenum substrates for photocathodes by the native oxide layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagotzky, Stefan; Barday, Roman; Jankowiak, Andreas; Kamps, Thorsten; Klimm, Carola; Knobloch, Jens; Müller, Günter; Senkovskiy, Boris; Siewert, Frank

    2015-05-01

    Comprehensive investigations of the electron field emission (FE) properties of annealed single crystal and polycrystalline molybdenum plugs, which are used as substrates for actual alkali-based photocathodes were performed with a FE scanning microscope. Well-polished and dry-ice cleaned Mo samples with native oxide did not show parasitic FE up to a field level of 50 MV/m required for photoinjector cavities. In situ heat treatments (HT) above 400 °C, which are usual before photocathode deposition, activated field emission at lower field strength. Oxygen loading into the Mo surface, however, partially weakened these emitters. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of comparable Mo samples showed the dissolution of the native oxide during such heat treatments. These results reveal the suppression of field emission by native Mo oxides. Possible improvements for the photocathode preparation will be discussed.

  3. {Ni4O4} Cluster Complex to Enhance the Reductive Photocurrent Response on Silicon Nanowire Photocathodes

    PubMed Central

    Mange, Yatin J.; Chandrasekaran, Soundarrajan; Hollingsworth, Nathan; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Parkin, Ivan P.; Nann, Thomas; Macdonald, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    Metal organic {Ni4O4} clusters, known oxidation catalysts, have been shown to provide a valuable route in increasing the photocurrent response on silicon nanowire (SiNW) photocathodes. {Ni4O4} clusters have been paired with SiNWs to form a new photocathode composite for water splitting. Under AM1.5 conditions, the combination of {Ni4O4} clusters with SiNWs gave a current density of −16 mA/cm2, which corresponds to an increase in current density of 60% when compared to bare SiNWs. The composite electrode was fully characterised and shown to be an efficient and stable photocathode for water splitting. PMID:28336866

  4. Temporal resolution limit estimation of x-ray streak cameras using a CsI photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiang; Gu, Li; Zong, Fangke; Zhang, Jingjin; Yang, Qinlao

    2015-08-28

    A Monte Carlo model is developed and implemented to calculate the characteristics of x-ray induced secondary electron (SE) emission from a CsI photocathode used in an x-ray streak camera. Time distributions of emitted SEs are investigated with an incident x-ray energy range from 1 to 30 keV and a CsI thickness range from 100 to 1000 nm. Simulation results indicate that SE time distribution curves have little dependence on the incident x-ray energy and CsI thickness. The calculated time dispersion within the CsI photocathode is about 70 fs, which should be the temporal resolution limit of x-ray streak cameras that use CsI as the photocathode material.

  5. Effect of Sb thickness on the performance of bialkali-antimonide photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, Md Abdullah A. Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A.; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Mammei, Russell; Poelker, Matthew

    2016-03-15

    The alkali species Cs and K were codeposited using an effusion source, onto relatively thick layers of Sb (50 nm to ∼7 μm) grown on GaAs and Ta substrates inside a vacuum chamber that was baked and not-vented, and also baked and vented with clean dry nitrogen but not rebaked. The characteristics of the Sb films, including sticking probability, surface roughness, grain size, and crystal properties were very different for these conditions, yet comparable values of photocathode yield [or quantum efficiency (QE)] at 284 V were obtained following codeposition of the alkali materials. Photocathodes manufactured with comparatively thick Sb layers exhibited the highest QE and the best 1/e lifetime. The authors speculate that the alkali codeposition enabled optimized stoichiometry for photocathodes manufactured using thick Sb layers, which could serve as a reservoir for the alkali materials.

  6. Significant Broadband Photocurrent Enhancement by Au-CZTS Core-Shell Nanostructured Photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuemei; Wu, Xu; Centeno, Anthony; Ryan, Mary P.; Alford, Neil M.; Riley, D. Jason; Xie, Fang

    2016-03-01

    Copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS) is a promising material for harvesting solar energy due to its abundance and non-toxicity. However, its poor performance hinders their wide application. In this paper gold (Au) nanoparticles are successfully incorporated into CZTS to form Au@CZTS core-shell nanostructures. The photocathode of Au@CZTS nanostructures exhibits enhanced optical absorption characteristics and improved incident photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE) performance. It is demonstrated that using this photocathode there is a significant increase of the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of a photoelectrochemical solar cell of 100% compared to using a CZTS without Au core. More importantly, the PCE of Au@CZTS photocathode improved by 15.8% compared to standard platinum (Pt) counter electrode. The increased efficiency is attributed to plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) between the Au nanoparticle core and the CZTS shell at wavelengths shorter than the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peak of the Au and the semiconductor bandgap.

  7. Effect of Sb thickness on the performance of bialkali-antimonide photocathodes

    DOE PAGES

    Mamun, Md Abdullah A.; Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A.; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; ...

    2016-01-06

    The alkali species Cs and K were codeposited using an effusion source, onto relatively thick layers of Sb (50 nm to ~7 μm) grown on GaAs and Ta substrates inside a vacuum chamber that was baked and not-vented, and also baked and vented with clean dry nitrogen but not rebaked. The characteristics of the Sb films, including sticking probability, surface roughness, grain size, and crystal properties were very different for these conditions, yet comparable values of photocathode yield [or quantum efficiency (QE)] at 284 V were obtained following codeposition of the alkali materials. Photocathodes manufactured with comparatively thick Sb layersmore » exhibited the highest QE and the best 1/e lifetime. As last, the authors speculate that the alkali codeposition enabled optimized stoichiometry for photocathodes manufactured using thick Sb layers, which could serve as a reservoir for the alkali materials.« less

  8. Spin-polarized electron transport and emission from strained superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamaev, Yuri A.; Subashiev, Arsen V.; Yashin, Yuri P.; Ambrajei, Anton N.; Roschansky, Alexander V.

    2000-02-01

    We report the results on polarized electron emission from a new strained wide-gap AlxInyGa1-x-yAs/AlzGa1- zAs SL with tunable position of polarization maximum. These SL's were optimized to have a minimal conduction-band offset which comes from the band line-up between the semiconductor layers of the SL. The In layer content was chosen to give minimal conduction-band offset with large strain splitting of the V-band. Simultaneous changing of Al content in both SL layers provides variation of the structure band gap. We demonstrate that tuning of the SL to the excitation energy can be achieved without loss of the electron polarization. The polarization of up to 84% was measured at room temperature.

  9. Spin-polarized electron transport and emission from strained superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamaev, Yuri A.; Subashiev, Arsen V.; Yashin, Yuri P.; Ambrajei, Anton N.; Roschansky, Alexander V.

    2001-02-01

    We report the results on polarized electron emission from a new strained wide-gap AlxInyGa1-x-yAs/AlzGa1- zAs SL with tunable position of polarization maximum. These SL's were optimized to have a minimal conduction-band offset which comes from the band line-up between the semiconductor layers of the SL. The In layer content was chosen to give minimal conduction-band offset with large strain splitting of the V-band. Simultaneous changing of Al content in both SL layers provides variation of the structure band gap. We demonstrate that tuning of the SL to the excitation energy can be achieved without loss of the electron polarization. The polarization of up to 84% was measured at room temperature.

  10. SRRC/ANL high current l-band single cell photocathode rf gun.

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C. H.

    1998-07-16

    A high current L-band photocathode rf gun is under development at SRRC (Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Taiwan) in collaboration with ANL (Argonne National Laboratory, USA). The goal is to produce up to 100 nC charge with the surface field gradient of over 90 MV/m at the center of the photocathode. In this report, they present the detailed design and initial test results. If successful, this gun will be used as the future AWA (Argonne Wakefield Accelerator)[1] high current gun.

  11. An in-situ photocathode loading system for the SLC Polarized Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, R.E.; Collet, G.J.; Skarpaas, K.

    1992-12-01

    An ultra-high vacuum loadlock system capable of operating at high voltage has been added to the SLC Polarized Electron Gun. The unit incorporates facilities for heat cleaning, activating and measuring the quantum efficiency of photocathodes. A tray of up to four photocathodes can be exchanged without bringing the activation unit or gun up to atmosphere. Low voltage quantum efficiencies of 20% have been obtained for bulk GaAs at 633 nm and 6% for a 0.3 micron GaAs layer at 755 nm. Results for other cathodes as well as operational characteristics are discussed.

  12. III-V photocathode with nitrogen doping for increased quantum efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, L. W. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An increase in the quantum efficiency of a 3-5 photocathode is achieved by doping its semiconductor material with an acceptor and nitrogen, a column-5 isoelectronic element, that introduces a spatially localized energy level just below the conduction band similar to a donor level to which optical transitions can occur. This increases the absorption coefficient, alpha without compensation of the acceptor dopant. A layer of a suitable 1-5, 1-6 or 1-7 compound is included as an activation layer on the electron emission side to lower the work function of the photocathode.

  13. Record-level quantum efficiency from a high polarization strained GaAs/GaAsP superlattice photocathode with distributed Bragg reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Yiqiao; Lu, Wentao; Moy, Aaron; Poelker, Matthew; Stutzman, Marcy; Zhang, Shukui

    2016-12-01

    Photocathodes that provide high electron-spin polarization (ESP) and high quantum efficiency (QE) can significantly enhance the physics capabilities of electron accelerators. We report record-level QE from a high-polarization strained GaAs/GaAsP superlattice photocathode fabricated with a Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR). The DBR photocathode technique enhances the absorption of incident laser light thereby enhancing QE, but as literature suggests, it is very challenging to optimize all of the parameters associated with the fabrication of complicated photocathode structures composed of many distinct layers. Past reports of DBR photocathodes describe high polarization but typically QE of only ˜1%, which is comparable to QE of high polarization photocathodes grown without a DBR structure. This work describes a strained GaAs/GaAsP superlattice DBR photocathode exhibiting a high polarization of 84% and significantly enhanced QE of 6.4%.

  14. Record-level quantum efficiency from a high polarization strained GaAs/GaAsP superlattice photocathode with distributed Bragg reflector

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Yiqiao; Lu, Wentao; ...

    2016-12-19

    Photocathodes that provide high polarization and high quantum efficiency (QE) can significantly enhance the physics capabilities of electron accelerators. We report record-level QE from a high-polarization strained GaAs/GaAsP superlattice photocathode fabricated with a Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR). The DBR photocathode technique enhances the absorption of incident laser light thereby enhancing QE, but as literature suggests, it is very challenging to optimize all of the parameters associated with the fabrication of complicated photocathode structures composed of many distinct layers. Past reports of DBR photocathodes describe high polarization but typically QE of only ~ 1%, which is comparable to QE of highmore » polarization photocathodes grown without a DBR structure. As a result, this work describes a new strained GaAs/GaAsP superlattice DBR photocathode exhibiting polarization of 84% and QE of 6.4%.« less

  15. Record-level quantum efficiency from a high polarization strained GaAs/GaAsP superlattice photocathode with distributed Bragg reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Yiqiao; Lu, Wentao; Moy, Aaron; Poelker, Matthew; Stutzman, Marcy; Zhang, Shukui

    2016-12-19

    Photocathodes that provide high polarization and high quantum efficiency (QE) can significantly enhance the physics capabilities of electron accelerators. We report record-level QE from a high-polarization strained GaAs/GaAsP superlattice photocathode fabricated with a Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR). The DBR photocathode technique enhances the absorption of incident laser light thereby enhancing QE, but as literature suggests, it is very challenging to optimize all of the parameters associated with the fabrication of complicated photocathode structures composed of many distinct layers. Past reports of DBR photocathodes describe high polarization but typically QE of only ~ 1%, which is comparable to QE of high polarization photocathodes grown without a DBR structure. As a result, this work describes a new strained GaAs/GaAsP superlattice DBR photocathode exhibiting polarization of 84% and QE of 6.4%.

  16. Engineering MoSx/Ti/InP Hybrid Photocathode for Improved Solar Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Zheng, Maojun; Zhong, Miao; Ma, Liguo; Wang, Faze; Ma, Li; Shen, Wenzhong

    2016-07-19

    Due to its direct band gap of ~1.35 eV, appropriate energy band-edge positions, and low surface-recombination velocity, p-type InP has attracted considerable attention as a promising photocathode material for solar hydrogen generation. However, challenges remain with p-type InP for achieving high and stable photoelectrochemical (PEC) performances. Here, we demonstrate that surface modifications of InP photocathodes with Ti thin layers and amorphous MoSx nanoparticles can remarkably improve their PEC performances. A high photocurrent density with an improved PEC onset potential is obtained. Electrochemical impedance analyses reveal that the largely improved PEC performance of MoSx/Ti/InP is attributed to the reduced charge-transfer resistance and the increased band bending at the MoSx/Ti/InP/electrolyte interface. In addition, the MoSx/Ti/InP photocathodes function stably for PEC water reduction under continuous light illumination over 2 h. Our study demonstrates an effective approach to develop high-PEC-performance InP photocathodes towards stable solar hydrogen production.

  17. Engineering MoSx/Ti/InP Hybrid Photocathode for Improved Solar Hydrogen Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Zheng, Maojun; Zhong, Miao; Ma, Liguo; Wang, Faze; Ma, Li; Shen, Wenzhong

    2016-07-01

    Due to its direct band gap of ~1.35 eV, appropriate energy band-edge positions, and low surface-recombination velocity, p-type InP has attracted considerable attention as a promising photocathode material for solar hydrogen generation. However, challenges remain with p-type InP for achieving high and stable photoelectrochemical (PEC) performances. Here, we demonstrate that surface modifications of InP photocathodes with Ti thin layers and amorphous MoSx nanoparticles can remarkably improve their PEC performances. A high photocurrent density with an improved PEC onset potential is obtained. Electrochemical impedance analyses reveal that the largely improved PEC performance of MoSx/Ti/InP is attributed to the reduced charge-transfer resistance and the increased band bending at the MoSx/Ti/InP/electrolyte interface. In addition, the MoSx/Ti/InP photocathodes function stably for PEC water reduction under continuous light illumination over 2 h. Our study demonstrates an effective approach to develop high-PEC-performance InP photocathodes towards stable solar hydrogen production.

  18. Measurement of charge limit in a strained lattice GaAs photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Saez, P.; Alley, R.; Aoyagi, H.

    1993-04-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) Polarized Electron Source (PES) photocathodes have shown a charge saturation when illuminated with a high intensity laser pulse. This charge limit in the cesium-activated GaAs crystal seems to be strongly dependent on its surface condition and on the incident light wavelength. Charge limit studies with highly polarized strained lattice GaAs materials are presented.

  19. Engineering MoSx/Ti/InP Hybrid Photocathode for Improved Solar Hydrogen Production

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Zheng, Maojun; Zhong, Miao; Ma, Liguo; Wang, Faze; Ma, Li; Shen, Wenzhong

    2016-01-01

    Due to its direct band gap of ~1.35 eV, appropriate energy band-edge positions, and low surface-recombination velocity, p-type InP has attracted considerable attention as a promising photocathode material for solar hydrogen generation. However, challenges remain with p-type InP for achieving high and stable photoelectrochemical (PEC) performances. Here, we demonstrate that surface modifications of InP photocathodes with Ti thin layers and amorphous MoSx nanoparticles can remarkably improve their PEC performances. A high photocurrent density with an improved PEC onset potential is obtained. Electrochemical impedance analyses reveal that the largely improved PEC performance of MoSx/Ti/InP is attributed to the reduced charge-transfer resistance and the increased band bending at the MoSx/Ti/InP/electrolyte interface. In addition, the MoSx/Ti/InP photocathodes function stably for PEC water reduction under continuous light illumination over 2 h. Our study demonstrates an effective approach to develop high-PEC-performance InP photocathodes towards stable solar hydrogen production. PMID:27431993

  20. Spectral response variation of a negative-electron-affinity photocathode in the preparation process

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Lei; Du Yujie; Chang Benkang; Yunsheng Qian

    2006-08-20

    In order to research the spectral response variation of a negative electron affinity (NEA) photocathode in the preparation process, we have done two experiments on a transmission-type GaAs photocathode.First, an automatic spectral response recording system is described, which is used to take spectral response curves during the activation procedure of the photocathode. By this system, the spectral response curves of a GaAs:Cs-Ophotocathode measured in situ are presented. Then, after the cathode is sealed with a microchannel plate and a fluorescence screen into the image tube, we measure the spectral response of the tube by another measurement instrument. By way of comparing and analyzing these curves, we can find the typical variation in spectral-responses.The reasons for the variation are discussed. Based on these curves, spectral matching factors of a GaAs cathode for green vegetation and rough concrete are calculated. The visual ranges of night-vision goggles under specific circumstances are estimated. The results show that the spectral response of the NEA photocathode degraded in the sealing process, especially at long wavelengths. The variation has also influenced the whole performance of the intensifier tube.

  1. NREL Improves Hole Transport in Sensitized CdS-NiO Nanoparticle Photocathodes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-01-01

    Significantly improved charge-collection efficiencies result from a general chemical approach to synthesizing photocathodes. It has been reported that a dye-sensitized nickel oxide (NiO) photocathode, when coupled to a dye-sensitized photoanode, could significantly increase overall solar conversion efficiency. However, the conversion efficiencies of these cells are still low. There has been much effort to improve the conversion efficiency by fabricating films with improved properties and developing more effective sensitizing dyes for p-type NiO. One of the factors limiting the use of NiO for solar cell application is the low hole conductivity in p-NiO. A team of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a general chemical approach to synthesize NiO-cadmium sulfide (CdS) core-shell nanoparticle films as photocathodes for p-type semiconductor-sensitized solar cells. Compared to dye-sensitized NiO photocathodes, the CdS-sensitized NiO cathodes exhibited two orders of magnitude faster hole transport (attributable to the passivation of surface traps by the CdS) and almost 100% charge-collection efficiencies.

  2. Enhanced Raman scattering from cesium suboxides on silver particles and the structure of S-1 photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, C. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An explanation is given for the results of recent enhanced Raman scattering studies of photomultiplier tubes with S-1 photocathode surfaces which indicated the presence of Cs11O3 but not Cs2O. The reason for the discrepancy between the currently accepted model of the S-1 and this recent result is discussed.

  3. Study of bi-alkali photocathode growth on glass by X-ray techniques for fast timing response photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Junqi; Demarteau, Marcel; Wagner, Robert; Ruiz-Oses, Miguel; Liang, Xue; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Attenkofer, Klaus; Schubert, Susanne; Smedley, John; Wong, Jared; Padmore, Howard; Woll, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    Bi-alkali antimonide photocathode is an essential component in fast timing response photomultipliers. Real-time in-situ grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and post-growth x-ray reflectivity measurement were performed to study the photocathode deposition process on glass substrate. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction patterns show the formation of Sb crystalline, dissolution of crystalline phase Sb by the application of K vapor and reformation of refined crystal textures. XRR result exhibits that the film thickness increases ~ 4.5 times after K diffusion and almost have no change after Cs diffusion. Further investigation is expected to understand the photocathode growth process and provide guidelines for photocathode development.

  4. Observation of two-photon photoemission from cesium telluride photocathodes excited by a near-infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panuganti, H.; Piot, P.

    2017-02-01

    We explore the nonlinear photoemission in cesium telluride (Cs2Te) photocathodes where an ultrashort (˜100 fs full width at half max) 800-nm infrared laser is used as the drive-laser in lieu of the typical ˜266-nm ultraviolet laser. An important figure of merit for photocathodes, the quantum efficiency, we define here for nonlinear photoemission processes in order to compare with linear photoemission. The charge against drive-laser (infrared) energy is studied for different laser energy and intensity values and cross-compared with previously performed similar studies on copper [P. Musumeci et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 084801 (2010)], a metallic photocathode. We particularly observe two-photon photoemission in Cs2Te using the infrared laser in contrast to the anticipated three-photon process as observed for metallic photocathodes.

  5. Rb based alkali antimonide high quantum efficiency photocathodes for bright electron beam sources and photon detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cultrera, L.; Gulliford, C.; Bartnik, A.; Lee, H.; Bazarov, I.

    2017-02-01

    High quantum efficiency alkali antimonide photocathodes have been grown over both stainless steel and glass substrates using sequential evaporation of Sb, K, Rb, and Cs. Quantum efficiencies well above 25% have been measured at 400 nm. A bi-alkali Rb-K-Sb photocathode grown on a stainless steel substrate has been installed in a high voltage DC gun at Cornell University and the intrinsic electron beam emittance was measured at different photon energies.

  6. Towards efficient solar-to-hydrogen conversion: Fundamentals and recent progress in copper-based chalcogenide photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yubin; Feng, Xiaoyang; Liu, Maochang; Su, Jinzhan; Shen, Shaohua

    2016-09-01

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting for hydrogen generation has been considered as a promising route to convert and store solar energy into chemical fuels. In terms of its large-scale application, seeking semiconductor photoelectrodes with high efficiency and good stability should be essential. Although an enormous number of materials have been explored for solar water splitting in the last several decades, challenges still remain for the practical application. P-type copper-based chalcogenides, such as Cu(In, Ga)Se2 and Cu2ZnSnS4, have shown impressive performance in photovoltaics due to narrow bandgaps, high absorption coefficients, and good carrier transport properties. The obtained high efficiencies in photovoltaics have promoted the utilization of these materials into the field of PEC water splitting. A comprehensive review on copper-based chalcogenides for solar-to-hydrogen conversion would help advance the research in this expanding area. This review will cover the physicochemical properties of copper-based chalco-genides, developments of various photocathodes, strategies to enhance the PEC activity and stability, introductions of tandem PEC cells, and finally, prospects on their potential for the practical solar-to-hydrogen conversion. We believe this review article can provide some insights of fundamentals and applications of copper-based chalco-genide thin films for PEC water splitting.

  7. Tests of photocathodes for high repetition rate x-ray FELs at the APEX facility at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannibale, Fernando; Filippetto, Daniele; Qian, Houjun; Papadopoulos, Christos F.; Wells, Russell; Kramasz, Toby; Padmore, Howard; Feng, Jun; Nasiatka, James; Huang, Ruixuan; Zolotorev, Max; Staples, John W.

    2015-05-01

    After the formidable results of X-ray 4th generation light sources based on free electron lasers around the world, a new revolutionary step is undergoing to extend the FEL performance from the present few hundred Hz to MHz-class repetition rates. In such facilities, temporally equi-spaced pulses will allow for a wide range of previously non-accessible experiments. The Advanced Photo-injector EXperiment (APEX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), is devoted to test the capability of a novel scheme electron source, the VHF-Gun, to generate the required electron beam brightness at MHz repetition rates. In linac-based FELs, the ultimate performance in terms of brightness is defined at the injector, and in particular, cathodes play a major role in the game. Part of the APEX program consists in testing high quantum efficiency photocathodes capable to operate at the conditions required by such challenging machines. Results and status of these tests at LBNL are presented.

  8. Experimental studies of the charge limit phenomenon in NEA GaAs photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, H.; Alley, R.K.; Aoyagi, H.; Clendenin, J.E.; Frisch, J.C.; Mulhollan, G.A.; Saez, P.J.; Schultz, D.C.; Turner, J.L.

    1994-06-01

    Negative electron affinity GaAs photocathodes have been in continuous use at SLAC for generating polarized electron beams since early 1992. If the quantum efficiency of a GaAs cathode is below a critical value, the maximum photoemitted charge with photons of energies close to the band gap in a 2-ns pulse is found to be limited by the intrinsic properties of the cathode instead of by the space charge limit. We have studied this novel charge limit phenomenon in a variety of GaAs photocathodes of different structures and doping densities. We find that the charge limit is strongly dependent on the cathode`s quantum efficiency and the extraction electric field, and to a lesser degree on the excitation laser wavelength. In addition, we show that the temporal behavior of the charge limit depends critically on the doping density.

  9. Ultraviolet quantum detection efficiency of potassium bromide as an opaque photocathode applied to microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Everman, E.; Vallerga, J. V.; Sokolowski, J.; Lampton, M.

    1987-01-01

    The quantum detection efficiency (QDE) of potassium bromide as a photocathode applied directly to the surface of a microchannel plate over the 250-1600 A wavelength range has been measured. The contributions of the photocathode material in the channels and on the interchannel web to the QDE have been determined. Two broad peaks in the QDE centered at about 450 and about 1050 A are apparent, the former with about 50 percent peak QDE and the latter with about 40 percent peak QDE. The photoelectric threshold is observed at about 1600 A, and there is a narrow QDE minimum at about 750 A which correlates with 2X the band gap energy for KBr. The angular variation of the QDE from 0 to 40 deg to the channnel axis has also been examined. The stability of Kbr with time is shown to be good with no significant degradation of QDE at wavelengths below 1216 A over a 15-day period in air.

  10. A High-Gradient CW R Photo-Cathode Electron Gun for High Current Injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer

    2005-05-01

    The paper describes the analysis and preliminary design of a high-gradient photo-cathode RF gun optimized for high current CW operation. The gun cell shape is optimized to provide maximum acceleration for the newly emitted beam while minimizing wall losses in the structure. The design is intended for use in future high-current high-power CW FELs but the shape optimization for low wall losses may be advantageous for other applications such as XFELs or Linear Colliders using high peak power low duty factor guns where pulse heating is a limitation. The concept allows for DC bias on the photocathode in order to repel ions and improve cathode lifetime.

  11. Structural and morphological properties of metallic thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition for photocathode application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorusso, A.; Gontad, F.; Caricato, A. P.; Chiadroni, E.; Broitman, E.; Perrone, A.

    2016-03-01

    In this work yttrium and lead thin films have been deposited by pulsed laser deposition technique and characterized by ex situ different diagnostic methods. All the films were adherent to the substrates and revealed a polycrystalline structure. Y films were uniform with a very low roughness and droplet density, while Pb thin films were characterized by a grain morphology with a relatively high roughness and droplet density. Such metallic materials are studied because they are proposed as a good alternative to copper and niobium photocathodes which are generally used in radiofrequency and superconducting radiofrequency guns, respectively. The photoemission performances of the photocathodes based on Y and Pb thin films have been also studied and discussed.

  12. Planar Field Emitters and High Efficiency Photocathodes Based on Ultrananocrystalline Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumant, Anirudha V. (Inventor); Baryshev, Sergey V. (Inventor); Antipov, Sergey P. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method of forming a field emitter comprises disposing a first layer on a substrate. The first layer is seeded with nanodiamond particles. The substrate with the first layer disposed thereon is maintained at a first temperature and a first pressure in a mixture of gases which includes nitrogen. The first layer is exposed to a microwave plasma to form a nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film on the first layer, which has a percentage of nitrogen in the range of about 0.05 atom % to about 0.5 atom %. The field emitter has about 10.sup.12 to about 10.sup.14 emitting sites per cm.sup.2. A photocathode can also be formed similarly by forming a nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film on a substrate similar to the field emitter, and then hydrogen terminating the film. The photocathode is responsive to near ultraviolet light as well as to visible light.

  13. Planar field emitters and high efficiency photocathodes based on ultrananocrystalline diamond

    DOEpatents

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Baryshev, Sergey V.; Antipov, Sergey P.

    2016-08-16

    A method of forming a field emitter comprises disposing a first layer on a substrate. The first layer is seeded with nanodiamond particles. The substrate with the first layer disposed thereon is maintained at a first temperature and a first pressure in a mixture of gases which includes nitrogen. The first layer is exposed to a microwave plasma to form a nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film on the first layer, which has a percentage of nitrogen in the range of about 0.05 atom % to about 0.5 atom %. The field emitter has about 10.sup.12 to about 10.sup.14 emitting sites per cm.sup.2. A photocathode can also be formed similarly by forming a nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film on a substrate similar to the field emitter, and then hydrogen terminating the film. The photocathode is responsive to near ultraviolet light as well as to visible light.

  14. Method for resurrecting negative electron affinity photocathodes after exposure to an oxidizing gas

    DOEpatents

    Mulhollan, Gregory A; Bierman, John C

    2012-10-30

    A method by which negative electron affinity photocathodes (201), single crystal, amorphous, or otherwise ordered, can be made to recover their quantum yield following exposure to an oxidizing gas has been discovered. Conventional recovery methods employ the use of cesium as a positive acting agent (104). In the improved recovery method, an electron beam (205), sufficiently energetic to generate a secondary electron cloud (207), is applied to the photocathode in need of recovery. The energetic beam, through the high secondary electron yield of the negative electron affinity surface (203), creates sufficient numbers of low energy electrons which act on the reduced-yield surface so as to negate the effects of absorbed oxidizing atoms thereby recovering the quantum yield to a pre-decay value.

  15. Characterization and control of the electronic properties of a NiO based dye sensitized photocathode.

    PubMed

    Hod, Idan; Tachan, Zion; Shalom, Menny; Zaban, Arie

    2013-05-07

    One compartment tandem DSSCs are based on two photoactive electrodes which are mediated by a redox electrolyte. Electron accumulation in the photoanode (n-type DSSC) alongside hole accumulation in the photocathode (p-type DSSC) should generate high photovoltage using different parts of the solar spectrum. While impressive efficiencies are reported for n-type DSSCs, the performance of the p-type analogue is very low due to insufficient understanding and a lack of materials. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the p-type DSSC reveals that hole transport within the NiO mesoporous photocathode is the performance limiting factor. Modification of the NiO electrode with molecular dipoles significantly increases the cell photovoltage but has no significant effect on the photocurrent of the p-DSSC. Consequently, the development of better hole conducting materials in conjunction with surface dipole modification can lead to high photovoltage, high photocurrent p-DSSCs and thus to efficient tandem DSSCs.

  16. Tight comparison of Mg and Y thin film photocathodes obtained by the pulsed laser deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorusso, A.; Gontad, F.; Solombrino, L.; Chiadroni, E.; Broitman, E.; Perrone, A.

    2016-11-01

    In this work Magnesium (Mg) and Yttrium (Y) thin films have been deposited on Copper (Cu) polycrystalline substrates by the pulsed laser ablation technique for photocathode application. Such metallic materials are studied for their interesting photoemission properties and are proposed as a good alternative to the Cu photocathode, which is generally used in radio-frequency guns. Mg and Y films were uniform with no substantial differences in morphology; a polycrystalline structure was found for both of them. Photoemission measurements of such cathodes based on thin films were performed, revealing a quantum efficiency higher than Cu bulk. Photoemission theory according to the three-step model of Spicer is invoked to explain the superior photoemission performance of Mg with respect to Y.

  17. In Situ observation of dark current emission in a high gradient rf photocathode gun

    DOE PAGES

    Shao, Jiahang; Shi, Jiaru; Antipov, Sergey P.; ...

    2016-08-15

    Undesirable electron field emission (also known as dark current) in high gradient rf photocathode guns deteriorates the quality of the photoemission current and limits the operational gradient. To improve the understanding of dark current emission, a high-resolution (~100 μm) dark current imaging experiment has been performed in an L-band photocathode gun operating at ~100 MV/m of surface gradient. Scattered strong emission areas with high current have been observed on the cathode. The field enhancement factor β of selected regions on the cathode has been measured. Finally, the postexaminations with scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry reveal the origins ofmore » ~75% strong emission areas overlap with the spots where rf breakdown has occurred.« less

  18. Photoemission Studies of Metallic Photocathodes Prepared by Pulsed Laser Ablation Deposition Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fasano, V.; Lorusso, A.; Perrone, A.; De Rosa, H.; Cultrera, L.

    2010-11-10

    We present the results of our investigation on metallic films as suitable photocathodes for the production of intense electron beams in RF photoinjector guns. Pulsed laser ablation deposition technique was used for growing Mg and Y thin films onto Si and Cu substrates in high vacuum and at room temperature.Different diagnostic methods were used to characterize the thin films deposited on Si with the aim to optimize the deposition process. Photoelectron performances were investigated on samples deposited on Cu substrate in an ultra high vacuum photodiode chamber at 10{sup -7} Pa. Relatively high quantum efficiencies have been obtained for the deposited films, comparable to those of corresponding bulks. Samples could stay for several months in humid open air before being tested in a photodiode cell. The deposition process and the role of the photocathode surface contamination and its influence on the photoelectron performances are presented and discussed.

  19. Activation processes on GaAs photocathode by different currents of oxygen source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Zhuang; Shi, Feng; Cheng, Hongchang; Wang, Shufei; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Chang

    2015-04-01

    In order to know the influence of activation processes on GaAs photocathodes, three GaAs samples were activated by a fixed current of cesium source and different currents of oxygen source. The current of caesium source is same during activation to ensure initial adsorption of caesium quantum is similar, which is the base to show the difference during alternation activation of caesium and oxygen. Analysed with the activation data, it is indicated that Cs-to-O current ratio of 1.07 is the optimum ratio to obtain higher sensitivity and better stability. According to double dipole model, stable and uniform double dipole layers of GaAs-O-Cs:Cs-O-Cs are formed and negative electron affinity is achieved on GaAs surface by activation with cesium and oxygen. The analytical result is just coincident with the model. Thus there is an efficient technological method to improve sensitivity and stability of GaAs photocathode.

  20. Detection of soft X-rays with NEA III-V photocathodes. [Negative Electron Affinity X-ray detector for astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardas, D.; Kellogg, E.; Murray, S.; Enck, R., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of the results of tests on an X-ray photomultiplier containing a negative electron affinity (NEA) photocathode. This device makes it possible to investigate the response of the NEA photocathode to X-rays of various energies. The obtained data provide a basis for the determination of the photoelectron yield and energy resolution of the considered photocathode as a function of energy in the range from 0.8 to 3 keV. The investigation demonstrates the feasibility of using an NEA III-V photocathode for the detection of soft X-rays.

  1. Characterization of Quantum Efficiency and Robustness of Cesium-Based Photocathodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    being an elemen- tal metal, such as copper, magnesium, lead, niobium , etc. Some cathodes are more suit- able for room temperature operation (Cu, Mg...res- onance) niobium cavities are also an engineering challenge. Nevertheless, high duty fac- tor/high gradient is a compelling combination that...photocathode [49]. Superconducting guns have investigated niobium [50] and lead Chapter 2: Historical Context 46 [51] because of the simplicity of having a

  2. Porous copper zinc tin sulfide thin film as photocathode for double junction photoelectrochemical solar cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Pengcheng; Zhang, Guan; Chen, Yuncheng; Jiang, Hechun; Feng, Zhenyu; Lin, Zhaojun; Zhan, Jinhua

    2012-03-21

    Porous copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS) thin film was prepared via a solvothermal approach. Compared with conventional dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), double junction photoelectrochemical cells using dye-sensitized n-type TiO(2) (DS-TiO(2)) as the photoanode and porous p-type CZTS film as the photocathode shows an increased short circuit current, external quantum efficiency and power conversion efficiency.

  3. Modeling the resupply, diffusion, and evaporation of cesium on the surface of controlled porosity dispenser photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhigang; Jensen, Kevin L.; Montgomery, Eric J.

    2013-09-01

    A controlled porosity dispenser (CPD) photocathode is currently being explored and developed to replace the Cs during operation and increase photocathode lifetime. Experimental results from cesium (Cs) emission of a sintered-wire tungsten CPD are presented and are used to inform a theoretical model of Cs resupply, diffusion, and evaporation on the surface of the photocathode. The evaporation of Cs from a tungsten surface is modeled using an effective one-dimensional potential well representation of the binding energy. The model accounts for both local and global interactions of Cs with the surface metal as well as with other Cs atoms. It is found that for typical activation temperatures within the range of 500 K-750 K, differences of less than 5% between the quantum efficiency (QE) maximum and minimum over ideal homogenous surfaces occur, even when variations to mimic surface non-uniformity due to pore blockage are included. The theoretical evaporation rates of sub-monolayer surface coverage of Cs compare well to the data of Taylor and Langmuir [I. Langmuir and J. B. Taylor, Phys. Rev. 40, 463-464 (1932)] and reproduce the nonlinear behavior of evaporation with varying coverage and temperature.

  4. Channel electron multipliers - Detection efficiencies with opaque MgF2 photocathodes at XUV wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapson, L. B.; Timothy, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    Detection efficiencies of channel electron multipliers (CEM) with opaque MgF2 photocathodes obtained in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV), 44 A to 990 A, are reported. A stable highly efficient response is reported for that interval, with no adverse effects on CEM performance. Efficiencies twice those of uncoated CEMs are obtained for 50 A to 350 A. The Mullard B419BL and Galileo 4510WL single-stage cone-cathode CEMs were used in the experiments. A rare-gas double ionization chamber was employed as absolute standard detector for 406 A to 990 A, and a flow Geiger counter filled with 96% argon and 4% isobutane for 44 A to 256 A. Absolute detection efficiencies are 10% higher from 67 A to 990 A when photocathodes are illuminated at an angle of incidence 45 deg. The photocathodes suffered no loss of response in storage (in vacuum or air) after an initial aging period. Effects of scattered UV radiation are greatly reduced when MgF2-coated CEMs are used in the XUV.

  5. Bi-alkali antimonide photocathode growth: An X-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, Susanne; Wong, Jared; Feng, Jun; Karkare, Siddharth; Padmore, Howard; Ruiz-Osés, Miguel; Smedley, John; Muller, Erik; Ding, Zihao; Gaowei, Mengjia; Attenkofer, Klaus; Liang, Xue; Xie, Junqi; Kühn, Julius

    2016-07-21

    Bi-alkali antimonide photocathodes are one of the best known sources of electrons for high current and/or high bunch charge applications like Energy Recovery Linacs or Free Electron Lasers. Despite their high quantum efficiency in visible light and low intrinsic emittance, the surface roughness of these photocathodes prohibits their use as low emittance cathodes in high accelerating gradient superconducting and normal conducting radio frequency photoguns and limits the minimum possible intrinsic emittance near the threshold. Also, the growth process for these materials is largely based on recipes obtained by trial and error and is very unreliable. In this paper, using X-ray diffraction, we investigate the different structural and chemical changes that take place during the growth process of the bi-alkali antimonide material K2CsSb. Our measurements give us a deeper understanding of the growth process of alkali-antimonide photocathodes allowing us to optimize it with the goal of minimizing the surface roughness to preserve the intrinsic emittance at high electric fields and increasing its reproducibility.

  6. Bi-alkali antimonide photocathode growth: An X-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, Susanne; Wong, Jared; Feng, Jun; Karkare, Siddharth; Padmore, Howard; Ruiz-Osés, Miguel; Smedley, John; Muller, Erik; Ding, Zihao; Gaowei, Mengjia; Attenkofer, Klaus; Liang, Xue; Xie, Junqi; Kühn, Julius

    2016-07-21

    Bi-alkali antimonide photocathodes are one of the best known sources of electrons for high current and/or high bunch charge applications like Energy Recovery Linacs or Free Electron Lasers. Despite their high quantum efficiency in visible light and low intrinsic emittance, the surface roughness of these photocathodes prohibits their use as low emittance cathodes in high accelerating gradient superconducting and normal conducting radio frequency photoguns and limits the minimum possible intrinsic emittance near the threshold. Also, the growth process for these materials is largely based on recipes obtained by trial and error and is very unreliable. In this paper, using X-ray diffraction, we investigate the different structural and chemical changes that take place during the growth process of the bi-alkali antimonide material K2CsSb. Our measurements give us a deeper understanding of the growth process of alkali-antimonide photocathodes allowing us to optimize it with the goal of minimizing the surface roughness to preserve the intrinsic emittance at high electric fields and increasing its reproducibility.

  7. Nonlinear response of the photocathode of an x-ray streak camera to UV light

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrala, G.A.; Oro, D.M.; Studebaker, J.K.; Wood, W.M.; Schappert, G.T.; Watts, S.; Fulton, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    We have found that a potassium-iodide photocathode of an x-ray streak camera responds to UV light at {lambda}=308 nm. The photocathode surface work function, 6.5 eV, is larger than the 4 eV energy of the UV photon, hence the source of the response is interesting. We will present results on the response of a transmission type potassium-iodide photocathode to the UV light from a {lambda}308 nm, subpicosecond XeCl laser and from a {lambda}=326 nm HeCd laser. We will test for the nonlinearity of the yield to measure of the number of photons that are needed to be absorbed before a signal is recorded. We will present data on the effect of the UV irradiance on the yield, as well as on the temporal width of the recorded signal. We will give an explanation of the observation and its effect on the dynamic-range response of the streak-camera. We will show that the response is linear with the incident irradiance, up to an incident irradiance of 10{sup 8} W/cm{sup 2} and we will explain the observation.

  8. Significant Broadband Photocurrent Enhancement by Au-CZTS Core-Shell Nanostructured Photocathodes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuemei; Wu, Xu; Centeno, Anthony; Ryan, Mary P.; Alford, Neil M.; Riley, D. Jason; Xie, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS) is a promising material for harvesting solar energy due to its abundance and non-toxicity. However, its poor performance hinders their wide application. In this paper gold (Au) nanoparticles are successfully incorporated into CZTS to form Au@CZTS core-shell nanostructures. The photocathode of Au@CZTS nanostructures exhibits enhanced optical absorption characteristics and improved incident photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE) performance. It is demonstrated that using this photocathode there is a significant increase of the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of a photoelectrochemical solar cell of 100% compared to using a CZTS without Au core. More importantly, the PCE of Au@CZTS photocathode improved by 15.8% compared to standard platinum (Pt) counter electrode. The increased efficiency is attributed to plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) between the Au nanoparticle core and the CZTS shell at wavelengths shorter than the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peak of the Au and the semiconductor bandgap. PMID:26997140

  9. Long term operation of high quantum efficiency GaAs(Cs,O) photocathodes using multiple recleaning by atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, D. A.; Krantz, C.; Wolf, A.; Jaroshevich, A. S.; Kosolobov, S. N.; Scheibler, H. E.; Terekhov, A. S.

    2009-09-01

    Atomic hydrogen, produced by thermal dissociation of H2 molecules inside a hot tungsten capillary, is shown to be an efficient tool for multiple recleaning of degraded surfaces of high quantum efficiency transmission-mode GaAs photocathodes within an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) multichamber photoelectron gun. Ultraviolet quantum yield photoemission spectroscopy has been used to study the removal of surface pollutants and the degraded (Cs,O)-activation layer during the cleaning procedure. For photocathodes grown by the liquid-phase epitaxy technique, the quantum efficiency is found to be stable at about 20% over a large number of atomic hydrogen cleaning cycles. A slow degradation of the quantum efficiency is observed for photocathodes grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, although they reached a higher initial quantum efficiency of about 30%-35%. Study of the spatial distributions of photoluminescence intensity on these photocathodes proved that this overall degradation is likely due to insertion of a dislocation network into the mechanically strained photocathode heterostructures during multiple heating cycles and is not due to the atomic hydrogen treatment itself.

  10. Enhancement of Charge Separation and Hydrogen Evolution on Particulate La5Ti2CuS5O7 Photocathodes by Surface Modification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyuan; Hisatomi, Takashi; Murthy, Dharmapura H K; Zhong, Miao; Nakabayashi, Mamiko; Higashi, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Yohichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Seki, Kazuhiko; Furube, Akihiro; Shibata, Naoya; Katayama, Masao; Minegishi, Tsutomu; Domen, Kazunari

    2017-01-19

    Particulate La5Ti2CuS5O7 (LTC) photocathodes prepared by particle transfer show a positive onset potential of 0.9 V vs RHE for the photocathodic current in photoelectrochemical (PEC) H2 evolution. However, the low photocathodic current imposes a ceiling on the solar-to-hydrogen energy conversion efficiency of PEC cells based on LTC photocathodes. To improve the photocurrent, in this work, the surface of Mg-doped LTC photocathodes was modified with TiO2, Nb2O5, and Ta2O5 by radio frequency reactive magnetron sputtering. The photocurrent of the modified Mg-doped LTC photocathodes was doubled because these oxides formed type-II heterojunctions and extended the lifetimes of photogenerated charge carriers. The enhanced photocathodic current was attributed to hydrogen evolution at a positive potential of +0.7 V vs RHE. This work opens up possibilities for improving PEC hydrogen evolution on particulate photocathodes based on surface oxide modifications and also highlights the importance of the band gap alignment.

  11. A DFT study on NEA GaN photocathode with an ultrathin n-type Si-doped GaN cap layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Sihao; Liu, Lei; Kong, Yike; Diao, Yu

    2016-10-01

    Due to the drawbacks of conventional negative electron affinity (NEA) GaN photocathodes activated by Cs or Cs/O, a new-type NEA GaN photocathodes with heterojunction surface dispense with Cs activation are proposed. This structure can be obtained through the coverage of an ultrathin n-type Si-doped GaN cap layer on the p-type Mg-doped GaN emission layer. The influences of the cap layer on the photocathode are calculated using DFT. This study indicates that the n-type cap layer can promote the photoemission characteristics of GaN photocathode and demonstrates the probability of the preparation of a NEA GaN photocathode with an n-type cap layer.

  12. Direct observation of bi-alkali antimonide photocathodes growth via in operando x-ray diffraction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Osés, M.; Schubert, S.; Attenkofer, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Liang, X.; Muller, E.; Padmore, H.; Rao, T.; Vecchione, T.; Wong, J.; Xie, J.; Smedley, J.

    2014-12-01

    Alkali antimonides have a long history as visible-light-sensitive photocathodes. This work focuses on the process of fabrication of the bi-alkali photocathodes, K2CsSb. In-situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction and photoresponse measurements were used to monitor phase evolution during sequential photocathode growth mode on Si(100) substrates. The amorphous-to-crystalline transition for the initial antimony layer was observed at a film thickness of 40 Å . The antimony crystalline structure dissolved upon potassium deposition, eventually recrystallizing upon further deposition into K-Sb crystalline modifications. This transition, as well as the conversion of potassium antimonide to K2CsSb upon cesium deposition, is correlated with changes in the quantum efficiency.

  13. Direct observation of bi-alkali antimonide photocathodes growth via in operando x-ray diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Osés, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Liang, X.; Muller, E.; Schubert, S.; Attenkofer, K.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Padmore, H.; Vecchione, T.; Wong, J.; Xie, J.

    2014-12-01

    Alkali antimonides have a long history as visible-light-sensitive photocathodes. This work focuses on the process of fabrication of the bi-alkali photocathodes, K{sub 2}CsSb. In-situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction and photoresponse measurements were used to monitor phase evolution during sequential photocathode growth mode on Si(100) substrates. The amorphous-to-crystalline transition for the initial antimony layer was observed at a film thickness of 40 Å . The antimony crystalline structure dissolved upon potassium deposition, eventually recrystallizing upon further deposition into K-Sb crystalline modifications. This transition, as well as the conversion of potassium antimonide to K{sub 2}CsSb upon cesium deposition, is correlated with changes in the quantum efficiency.

  14. Evaluation of the amperex 56 TVP photomultiplier. [characteristics: photoelectron time spread, anode pulse amplitude and photocathode sensing area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, C. C.; Leskovar, B.

    1976-01-01

    Characteristics were measured for the Amperex 56 TVP 42 mm-diameter photomultiplier. Some typical photomultiplier characteristics-such as gain, dark current, transit and rise times-are compared with data provided. Photomultiplier characteristics generally not available such as the single photoelectron time spread, the relative collection efficiency, the relative anode pulse amplitude as a function of the voltage between the photocathode and focusing electrode, and the position of the photocathode sensing area were measured and are discussed for two 56 TVP's. The single photoelectron time spread, the relative collection efficiency, and the transit time difference as a function of the voltage between photocathode and focusing electrode were also measured and are discussed, particularly with respect to the optimization of photomultiplier operating conditions for timing applications.

  15. A polarized photoluminescence study of strained layer GaAs photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Mair, R.A.

    1996-07-01

    Photoluminescence measurements have been made on a set of epitaxially grown strained GaAs photocathode structures. The photocathodes are designed to exhibit a strain-induced enhancement of the electron spin polarization obtainable by optical pumping with circularly polarized radiation of near band gap energy. For the case of non-strained GaAs, the degree of spin polarization is limited to 50% by crystal symmetry. Under an appropriate uniaxial compression or tension, however, the valence band structure near the gap minimum is modified such that a spin polarization of 100% is theoretically possible. A total of nine samples with biaxial compressive strains ranging from zero to {approximately}0.8% are studied. X-ray diffraction analysis, utilizing Bragg reflections, is used to determine the crystal lattice structure of the samples. Luminescence spectra and luminescence circular polarization data are obtained at room temperature, {approx}78 K and {approx}12 K. The degree of luminescence circular polarization is used as a relative measure of the photo-excited electron spin polarization. The room temperature luminescence circular polarization data is compared with the measured electron spin polarization when the samples are used as electron photo-emitters with a negative electron affinity surface preparation. The luminescence data is also analyzed in conjunction with the crystal structure data with the goal of understanding the strain dependent valence band structure, optical pumping characteristics and spin depolarization mechanisms of the photocathode structures. A simple model is used to describe the luminescence data, obtained for the set of samples. Within the assumptions of the model, the deformation potentials a, b and d for GaAs are determined. The measured values are a = -10.16{+-}.21 eV, b = -2.00{+-}.05 eV and d = -4.87{+-}.29 eV. Good agreement with published values of the deformation potentials provides support for the model used to describe the data.

  16. Slice emittance measurement for photocathode RF gun with solenoid scanning and RF deflecting cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chen; Huang, WenHui; Du, YingChao; Yan, LiXin; Tang, ChuanXiang

    2011-12-01

    The radiation of high-gain short-wavelength free-electron laser depends on the slice transverse emittance of the electron bunch. This essay introduces the method of slice emittance measurement, and shows the brief setup of this experiment using the solenoid scanning and RF deflecting cavity at Tsinghua University. The preliminary experimental results show that the slice rms emittance of the electron bunch generated by photocathode RF gun has considerable variations along the bunch and is typically less than 0.55 mm mrad for the laser rms radius of 0.4 mm.

  17. Noble metal-free hydrogen-evolving photocathodes based on small molecule organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozan, A.; Bourgeteau, T.; Tondelier, D.; Geffroy, B.; Jousselme, B.; Artero, V.

    2016-09-01

    Organic semiconductors have great potential for producing hydrogen in a sustainable and economically-viable manner because they rely on readily available materials with highly tunable properties. We demonstrate here the relevance of heterojunctions to the construction of H2-evolving photocathodes, exclusively based on earth-abundant elements. Boron subnaphthalocyanine chloride proved a very promising acceptor in that perspective. It absorbs a part of the solar spectrum complementary to α-sexithiophene as a donor, thus generating large photocurrents and providing a record onset potential for light-driven H2 evolution under acidic aqueous conditions using a nanoparticulate amorphous molybdenum sulfide catalyst.

  18. Design of a high charge CW photocathode injector test stand at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Lliu, H.; Kehne, D.; Benson, S.

    1996-08-01

    A 10 MeV high-charge CW electron injector test stand has been designed for the CEBAF UV FEL driver accelerator. It consists of a 500 kV DC photocathode gun, a 1500 MHz room-temperature buncher, a modified CEBAF cryounit (quarter cryomodule) with an SRF accelerating gradient of {approximately}10 MV/m, two solenoids in the 500 kV region and an achromatic, non-isochronous injection transport line delivering 10 MeV beam to the driver accelerator. Experimental work is in progress toward establishing design system performance. 21 refs. , 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Quantum Efficiency and Topography of Heated and Plasma-Cleaned Copper Photocathode Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Dennis T.; Kirby, R.E.; King, F.K.; /SLAC

    2005-08-04

    We present measurements of photoemission quantum efficiency (QE) for copper photocathodes heated and cleaned by low energy argon and hydrogen ion plasma. The QE and surface roughness parameters were measured before and after processing and surface chemical composition was tracked in-situ with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thermal annealing at 230 C was sufficient to improve the QE by 3-4 orders of magnitude, depending on the initial QE. Exposure to residual gas slowly reduced the QE but it was easily restored by argon ion cleaning for a few minutes. XPS showed that the annealing or ion bombardment removed surface water and hydrocarbons.

  20. Extreme ultraviolet quantum efficiency of opaque alkali halide photocathodes on microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Everman, E.; Vallerga, J. V.; Lampton, M.

    1988-01-01

    Comprehensive measurements are presented for the quantum detection efficiency (QDE) of the microchannel plate materials CsI, KBr, KCl, and MgF2, over the 44-1800 A wavelength range. QDEs in excess of 40 percent are achieved by several materials in specific wavelength regions of the EUV. Structure is noted in the wavelength dependence of the QDE that is directly related to the valence-band/conduction-band gap energy and the onset of atomic-like resonant transitions. A simple photocathode model allows interpretation of these features, together with the QDE efficiency variation, as a function of illumination angle.

  1. A Monolithically Integrated Gallium Nitride Nanowire/Silicon Solar Cell Photocathode for Selective Carbon Dioxide Reduction to Methane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yichen; Fan, Shizhao; AlOtaibi, Bandar; Wang, Yongjie; Li, Lu; Mi, Zetian

    2016-06-20

    A gallium nitride nanowire/silicon solar cell photocathode for the photoreduction of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) is demonstrated. Such a monolithically integrated nanowire/solar cell photocathode offers several unique advantages, including the absorption of a large part of the solar spectrum and highly efficient carrier extraction. With the incorporation of copper as the co-catalyst, the devices exhibit a Faradaic efficiency of about 19 % for the 8e(-) photoreduction to CH4 at -1.4 V vs Ag/AgCl, a value that is more than thirty times higher than that for the 2e(-) reduced CO (ca. 0.6 %).

  2. Heat load of a P-doped GaAs photocathode in SRF electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; Burrill, A.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Jain, A.; Gupta, R.; Holmes, D.

    2010-05-23

    Many efforts were made over the last decades to develop a better polarized electron source for the high energy physics. Several laboratories operate DC guns with the Gallium-Arsenide photo-cathode, which yield a highly polarized electron beam. However, the beam's emittance might well be improved using a Superconducting RF electron gun, which delivers beams of higher brightness than DC guns does, because the field gradient at the cathode is higher. SRF guns with metal cathodes and CsTe cathodes have been tested successfully. To produce polarized electrons, a Gallium-Arsenide photo-cathode must be used: an experiment to do so in a superconducting RF gun is under way at BNL. Since the cathode will be normal conducting, the problem about the heat load stemming from the cathode arises. We present our measurements of the electrical resistance of GaAs at cryogenic temperatures, a prediction of the heat load and the verification by measuring the quality factor of the gun with and without cathode.

  3. Transmission photocathodes based on stainless steel mesh coated with deuterated diamond like carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huran, J.; Balalykin, N. I.; Feshchenko, A. A.; Kobzev, A. P.; Kleinová, A.; Sasinková, V.; Hrubčín, L.

    2014-07-01

    In this study we report on the dependence of electron emission properties on the transmission photocathodes DC gun based on stainless steel mesh coated with diamond like carbon films prepared at various technological conditions. Diamond like carbon films were deposited on the stainless steel mesh and silicon substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from gas mixtures CH4+D2+Ar, CH4+H2+Ar and reactive magnetron sputtering using a carbon target and gas mixtures Ar+D2, Ar+H2. The concentration of elements in films was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and elastic recoil detection (ERD) analytical methods simultaneously. Chemical compositions were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Raman spectroscopy at visible excitation wavelength was used for the intensity ratio determination of Gaussian fit D-peak and G-peak of Raman spectra. The quantum efficiency was calculated from the measured laser energy and the measured cathode charge. The quantum efficiency of a prepared transmission photocathode was increased with increasing intensity ratio of D-peak and G-peak, which was increased by adding deuterium to the gas mixture and using technology reactive magnetron sputtering.

  4. Hydrogen evolution from a copper(I) oxide photocathode coated with an amorphous molybdenum sulphide catalyst.

    PubMed

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Tilley, S David; Vrubel, Heron; Grätzel, Michael; Hu, Xile

    2014-01-01

    Concerns over climate change resulting from accumulation of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the uncertainty in the amount of recoverable fossil fuel reserves are driving forces for the development of renewable, carbon-neutral energy technologies. A promising clean solution is photoelectrochemical water splitting to produce hydrogen using abundant solar energy. Here we present a simple and scalable technique for the deposition of amorphous molybdenum sulphide films as hydrogen evolution catalyst onto protected copper(I) oxide films. The efficient extraction of excited electrons by the conformal catalyst film leads to photocurrents of up to -5.7 mA cm(-2) at 0 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode (pH 1.0) under simulated AM 1.5 solar illumination. Furthermore, the photocathode exhibits enhanced stability under acidic environments, whereas photocathodes with platinum nanoparticles as catalyst deactivate more rapidly under identical conditions. The work demonstrates the potential of earth-abundant light-harvesting material and catalysts for solar hydrogen production.

  5. Enhanced Photocurrent of Transparent CuFeO2 Photocathodes by Self-Light-Harvesting Architecture.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yunjung; Yang, Wooseok; Kim, Jimin; Jeong, Sunho; Moon, Jooho

    2017-04-13

    Efficient sunlight-driven water-splitting devices can be achieved by using an optically and energetically well-matched pair of photoelectrodes in a tandem configuration. The key for maximizing the photoelectrochemical efficiency is the use of a highly transparent front photoelectrode with a band gap below 2.0 eV. Herein, we propose two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PC) structures consisting of a CuFeO2-decorated microsphere monolayer, which serve as self-light-harvesting architectures allowing for amplified light absorption and high transparency. The photocurrent densities are evaluated for three CuFeO2 2D PC-based photoelectrodes with microspheres of different sizes. The optical analysis confirmed the presence of a photonic stop band that generates slow light and at the same time amplifies the absorption of light. The 410 nm sized CuFeO2-decorated microsphere 2D PC photocathode shows an exceptionally high visible light transmittance of 76.4% and a relatively high photocurrent of 0.2 mA cm(-2) at 0.6 V vs a reversible hydrogen electrode. The effect of the microsphere size on the carrier collection efficiency was analyzed by in situ conductive atomic force microscopy observation under illumination. Our novel synthetic method to produce self-light-harvesting nanostructures provides a promising approach for the effective use of solar energy by highly transparent photocathodes.

  6. Improved Ion Resistance for III-V Photocathodes in High Current Guns

    SciTech Connect

    Mulhollan, Gregory, A.

    2012-11-16

    The two photocathode test systems were modified, baked and recommissioned. The first system was dedicated to ion studies and the second to electron stimulated recovery (ESR) work. The demonstration system for the electron beam rejuvenation was set up, tested and demonstrated to one of the SSRL team (Dr. Kirby) during a site visit. The requisite subsystems were transferred to SSRL, installed and photoemission studies conducted on activated surfaces following electron beam exposure. Little surface chemistry change was detected in the photoemission spectra following the ESR process. The yield mapping system for the ion (and later, the electron beam rejuvenation) studies was implemented and use made routine. Ion species and flux measurements were performed for H, He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe ions at energies of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 kV. Gas induced photoyield measurements followed each ion exposure measurement. These data permit the extraction of photoyield induced change per ion (by species) at the measured energies. Electron beam induced rejuvenation was first demonstrated in the second chamber with primary electron beam energy and dependency investigations following. A Hiden quadrupole mass spectrometer for the electron stimulated desorption (ESD) measurements was procured. The UHV test systems needed for subsequent measurements were configured, baked, commissioned and utilized for their intended purposes. Measurements characterizing the desorption products from the ESD process and secondary electron (SE) yield at the surfaces of negative electron affinity GaAs photocathodes have been performed. One US Utility Patent was granted covering the ESR process.

  7. Hydrogen evolution from a copper(I) oxide photocathode coated with an amorphous molybdenum sulphide catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G.; Tilley, S. David; Vrubel, Heron; Grätzel, Michael; Hu, Xile

    2014-01-01

    Concerns over climate change resulting from accumulation of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the uncertainty in the amount of recoverable fossil fuel reserves are driving forces for the development of renewable, carbon-neutral energy technologies. A promising clean solution is photoelectrochemical water splitting to produce hydrogen using abundant solar energy. Here we present a simple and scalable technique for the deposition of amorphous molybdenum sulphide films as hydrogen evolution catalyst onto protected copper(I) oxide films. The efficient extraction of excited electrons by the conformal catalyst film leads to photocurrents of up to -5.7mAcm-2 at 0V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode (pH 1.0) under simulated AM 1.5 solar illumination. Furthermore, the photocathode exhibits enhanced stability under acidic environments, whereas photocathodes with platinum nanoparticles as catalyst deactivate more rapidly under identical conditions. The work demonstrates the potential of earth-abundant light-harvesting material and catalysts for solar hydrogen production.

  8. Theoretical study for heterojunction surface of NEA GaN photocathode dispensed with Cs activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Sihao; Liu, Lei; Wang, Honggang; Wang, Meishan; Kong, Yike

    2016-09-01

    For the disadvantages of conventional negative electron affinity (NEA) GaN photocathodes activated by Cs or Cs/O, new-type NEA GaN photocathodes with heterojunction surface dispensed with Cs activation are investigated based on first-principle study with density functional theory. Through the growth of an ultrathin n-type GaN cap layer on p-type GaN emission layer, a p-n heterojunction is formed on the surface. According to the calculation results, it is found that Si atoms tend to replace Ga atoms to result in an n-type doped cap layer which contributes to the decreasing of work function. After the growth of n-type GaN cap layer, the atom structure near the p-type emission layer is changed while that away from the surface has no obvious variations. By analyzing the E-Mulliken charge distribution of emission surface with and without cap layer, it is found that the positive charge of Ga and Mg atoms in the emission layer decrease caused by the cap layer, while the negative charge of N atom increases. The conduction band moves downwards after the growth of cap layer. Si atom produces donor levels around the valence band maximum. The absorption coefficient of GaN emission layer decreases and the reflectivity increases caused by n-type GaN cap layer.

  9. Soft X-ray and extreme utraviolet quantum detection efficiency of potassium chloride photocathode layers on microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Everman, Elaine; Hull, Jeff; Vallerga, John V.; Lampton, Michael

    1988-01-01

    The quantum detection efficiency (QDE) of KCl photocathodes in the 44-1460 A range was investigated. An opaque layer of KCl, about 15,000-A-thick, was evaporated and applied the surface of a microchannel plate (MCP), and the contribution of the photocathode material in the channels (and on the interchannel web) to the QDE was measured using a Z stack MCP detector. It is shown that KCl is a relatively stable photocathode material, with the QDE equal to 30-40 percent in the EUV. At wavelengths above 200 A, the QDE is slightly better than the QDE of CsI, as reported by Siegmund et al. (1986). While the shape of the QDE curve as a function of wavelength is similar to those reported for CsI and KBr, KCl was found to lack the high QDE peak found in the curves of CsI and KBr at about 100 A. A simple QDE model is described, the predictions of which were found to agree with the measurements on the KCl photocathode.

  10. Numerical simulation study on quantum efficiency characteristics of InP/InGaAs/InP infrared photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Junkai; Xu, Xiangyan; Tian, Jinshou; Luo, Duan; Hui, Dandan

    2016-10-01

    The quantum efficiency characteristics of InP/In0.53Ga0.47As/InP photocathode which is one of the field-assisted negative electron affinity photocathodes with III-V compound semiconductor and works at transmission mode with a wide1 spectral response range from 1.0-1.7 μm were studied in this paper. Under certain field-assisted bias voltage, internal quantum efficiency at different wavelength versus structure parameters and doping concentration of the photocathode was simulated by the APSYS program. Results show that: First, internal quantum efficiency of the photocathode rises with the increasing of the field-assisted bias voltage. Second, the internal quantum efficiency gradually increases to a maximum at thickness=0.2um of P-InGaAs photo-absorbing layer and then reduces with the increasing of thickness. However, doping concentration of P-InGaAs photo-absorbing layer has little influence on it. Third, the internal quantum efficiency reduces with the increasing of thickness and doping concentration of P-InP photoelectron-emitting layer. The optimization results show that when the thickness of the photo-absorbing layer and the photoelectron-emitting layer are both 0.2 μm, and the doping concentration of the photo-absorbing layer and the photoelectron-emitting layer are about 1.5×1015 cm-3 and 1.0×1016 cm-3 respectively, under a certain field-assisted bias voltage, the line of the external quantum efficiency versus wavelength is ideal. Besides, the response time of photocathode can be reduced to less than 50 ps.

  11. Molybdenum Disulfide as a Protection Layer and Catalyst for Gallium Indium Phosphide Solar Water Splitting Photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Britto, Reuben J.; Benck, Jesse D.; Young, James L.; Hahn, Christopher; Deutsch, Todd G.; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2016-06-02

    Gallium indium phosphide (GaInP2) is a semiconductor with promising optical and electronic properties for solar water splitting, but its surface stability is problematic as it undergoes significant chemical and electrochemical corrosion in aqueous electrolytes. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanomaterials are promising to both protect GaInP2 and to improve catalysis since MoS2 is resistant to corrosion and also possesses high activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this work, we demonstrate that GaInP2 photocathodes coated with thin MoS2 surface protecting layers exhibit excellent activity and stability for solar hydrogen production, with no loss in performance (photocurrent onset potential, fill factor, and light limited current density) after 60 hours of operation. This represents a five-hundred fold increase in stability compared to bare p-GaInP2 samples tested in identical conditions.

  12. Biopolymer-Activated Graphitic Carbon Nitride towards a Sustainable Photocathode Material

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanjian; Schnepp, Zoë; Cao, Junyu; Ouyang, Shuxin; Li, Ying; Ye, Jinhua; Liu, Songqin

    2013-01-01

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) conversion of solar light into chemical fuels is one of the most promising solutions to the challenge of sustainable energy. Graphitic carbon (IV) nitride polymer (g-CN) is an interesting sustainable photocathode material due to low-cost, visible-light sensitivity, and chemical stability up to 500°C in air. However, grain boundary effects and limited active sites greatly hamper g-CN activity. Here, we demonstrate biopolymer-activation of g-CN through simultaneous soft-templating of a sponge-like structure and incorporation of active carbon-dopant sites. This facile approach results in an almost 300% increase in the cathodic PEC activity of g-CN under simulated solar-irradiation. PMID:23831846

  13. Polarization sensitivity of x-ray photocathodes in the 60-200eV band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, George W.; Pain, M. D.; Pearson, James F.; Lees, John E.; Binns, C. R.; Shaw, Ping S.; Fleischman, Judith R.

    1991-11-01

    In this paper, we briefly describe measurements of the 60 - 200 eV photoemission from Caesium Iodide, Gold, and Aluminum photocathodes made on beamline 6.1 of the SERC Daresbury synchrotron radiation source (SRS). Measurements were made near grazing incidence using both s- (electric vector perpendicular to the plane of incidence) and p- polarized (electric vector parallel to the plane of incidence) radiation. Our data supports the existence of an 'x-ray vectorial effect'--a pronounced linear polarization dependence of the photoyield--observed in earlier experiments at Leicester and Columbia Universities and elsewhere. For CsI, novel measurements are also reported of: radiation damage and annealing, and the temperature dependence of the photoyield.

  14. Assessment of an optically stimulated infrared emission from image intensifier tube photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wales, Jesse G.; Marasco, Peter L.

    2005-05-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggested that bright, night-vision imaging system (NVIS) compatible, green cockpit displays could cause a veiling luminance in night-vision goggles (NVGs) and degrade visual performance. The mechanism suspected of causing this veiling luminance was an infrared emission from the image intensifier tube photocathode stimulated by visible, NVIS compatible light. This paper describes an effort to measure this stimulated infrared emission from three different image intensifier tubes. Measurements of the emission were analyzed with respect to tube age, the wavelength of incident illumination, and illumination angle of incidence. The emission was found during certain combinations of light wavelengths, angles, and intensities. However, results suggest that this phenomenon is not sufficiently strong to cause observable veiling luminance in NVGs.

  15. Image dissector photocathode solar damage test program. [solar radiation shielding using a fast optical lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Image dissector sensors of the same type which will be used in the NASA shuttle star tracker were used in a series of tests directed towards obtaining solar radiation/time damage criteria. Data were evaluated to determine the predicted level of operability of the star tracker if tube damage became a reality. During the test series a technique for reducing the solar damage effect was conceived and verified. The damage concepts are outlined and the test methods and data obtained which were used for verification of the technique's feasibility are presented. The ability to operate an image dissector sensor with the solar image focussed on the photocathode by a fast optical lens under certain conditions is feasible and the elimination of a mechanical protection device is possible.

  16. Experimental results from a DC photocathode electron gun for an IR FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Kehne, D.; Engwall, D.; Legg, R.; Shinn, M.

    1997-10-01

    A 350 keV DC photocathode gun capable of delivering the high-brightness CW electron beam necessary for Jefferson Lab`s infrared free-electron laser is described. The gun is to be used with a superconducting radiofrequency linac operating at 1.497 GHz and is mode-locked to the 40th subharmonic of the fundamental using a Nd:YLF drive laser. The gun provides 20--25 ps bunches at up to 135 pC/bunch. Experimental measurements of transverse and longitudinal beam properties are presented. Transverse emittance is measured using a slit-wire scanner emittance meter, and energy spread is measured using the slit and a spectrometer magnet. Longitudinal emittance is measured using a combination of sampling aperture, kicker cavity, slit and spectrometer. Measurements for bunch charges of 135 pC are described and compared with simulations.

  17. Measurements of the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator's low charge, 4 MeV RF photocathode witness beam.

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J.

    1998-04-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator's (AWA) witness RF photocathode gun produced its first electron beam in April of 1996. We have characterized the charge, energy, emittance and bunch length of the witness beam over the last several months. The emittance Was measured by both a quad scan that fitted for space charge using an in house developed Mathematica routine and a pepper pot technique. The bunch length was measured by imaging Cherenkov light from a quartz plate to a Hamamatsu streak camera with 2 psec resolution. A beam energy of 3.9 Mev was measured with a 6 inch round pole spectrometer while a beam charge was measured with both an ICT and a Faraday Cup. Although the gun will normally be run at 100 pC it has produced charges from 10 pC to 4 nc. All results of the measurements to date are presented here.

  18. An Approximate Analytic Expression for the Flux Density of Scintillation Light at the Photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Braverman, Joshua B; Harrison, Mark J; Ziock, Klaus-Peter

    2012-01-01

    The flux density of light exiting scintillator crystals is an important factor affecting the performance of radiation detectors, and is of particular importance for position sensitive instruments. Recent work by T. Woldemichael developed an analytic expression for the shape of the light spot at the bottom of a single crystal [1]. However, the results are of limited utility because there is generally a light pipe and photomultiplier entrance window between the bottom of the crystal and the photocathode. In this study, we expand Woldemichael s theory to include materials each with different indices of refraction and compare the adjusted light spot shape theory to GEANT 4 simulations [2]. Additionally, light reflection losses from index of refraction changes were also taken into account. We found that the simulations closely agree with the adjusted theory.

  19. Low energy Mott polarimetry of electrons from negative electron affinity photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ciccacci, F.; De Rossi, S.; Campbell, D.M.

    1995-08-01

    We present data on the spin polarization {ital P} and quantum yield {ital Y} of electrons photoemitted from negative electron affinity semiconductors, including GaAs(100), GaAsP(100) alloy, and strained GaAs layer epitaxially grown on a GaAsP(100) buffer. Near photothreshold the following values for {ital P}({ital Y}) are, respectively, obtained: 26% (2.5{times}10{sup {minus}2}), 40% (1{times}10{sup {minus}3}), and 60% (1.5{times}10{sup {minus}4}). We describe in detail the apparatus used containing a low energy (10--25 keV) Mott polarimeter. The system, completely fitted in a small volume ({similar_to}10{sup 4} cm{sup 3}) ultrahigh vacuum chamber, is intended as a test facility for characterizing candidate photocathode materials for spin polarized electron sources. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  20. Molybdenum Disulfide as a Protection Layer and Catalyst for Gallium Indium Phosphide Solar Water Splitting Photocathodes.

    PubMed

    Britto, Reuben J; Benck, Jesse D; Young, James L; Hahn, Christopher; Deutsch, Todd G; Jaramillo, Thomas F

    2016-06-02

    Gallium indium phosphide (GaInP2) is a semiconductor with promising optical and electronic properties for solar water splitting, but its surface stability is problematic as it undergoes significant chemical and electrochemical corrosion in aqueous electrolytes. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanomaterials are promising to both protect GaInP2 and to improve catalysis because MoS2 is resistant to corrosion and also possesses high activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this work, we demonstrate that GaInP2 photocathodes coated with thin MoS2 surface protecting layers exhibit excellent activity and stability for solar hydrogen production, with no loss in performance (photocurrent onset potential, fill factor, and light-limited current density) after 60 h of operation. This represents a 500-fold increase in stability compared to bare p-GaInP2 samples tested in identical conditions.

  1. Gaseous photomultipliers with solid photocathodes for the detection of sparks, flames and dangerous gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, P.; Francke, T.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Peskov, V.

    2003-06-01

    In many applications, it is necessary to detect sparks or flames in daylight conditions or in illuminated areas. Most flames emit strongly in the ultraviolet spectrum (180-280 nm), and this property can be used for reliable identification of flames. We have developed new spark and flame detectors based on gaseous photomultipliers with CsI, CuI or CsTe photocathodes. A modified version of the detector can also detect smoke and dangerous vapors. These detectors are able to perform complex monitoring and detection functions. Some of their advantages are: low cost, high sensitivity, large output signal and operation under battery power. Gaseous photomultipliers can be position sensitive and, if necessary, be used in combination with various optical systems, for example for monitoring flames from space.

  2. Femtosecond precision measurement of laser-rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Libing; Zhao, Lingrong; Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao

    2017-03-01

    We report on the measurement of the laser-rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun with femtosecond precision. In this experiment four laser pulses with equal separation are used to produce electron bunch trains; then the laser-rf phase jitter is obtained by measuring the variations of the electron bunch spacing with an rf deflector. Furthermore, we show that when the gun and the deflector are powered by the same rf source, it is possible to obtain the laser-rf phase jitter in the gun through measurement of the beam-rf phase jitter in the deflector. Based on these measurements, we propose an effective time-stamping method that may be applied in MeV ultrafast electron diffraction facilities to enhance the temporal resolution.

  3. Dye sensitised solar cells with nickel oxide photocathodes prepared via scalable microwave sintering.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Elizabeth A; Awais, Muhammad; Dini, Danilo; Dowling, Denis P; Pryce, Mary T; Vos, Johannes G; Boschloo, Gerrit; Hagfeldt, Anders

    2013-02-21

    Photoactive NiO electrodes for cathodic dye-sensitised solar cells (p-DSCs) have been prepared with thicknesses ranging between 0.4 and 3.0 μm by spray-depositing pre-formed NiO nanoparticles on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass substrates. The larger thicknesses were obtained in sequential sintering steps using a conventional furnace (CS) and a newly developed rapid discharge sintering (RDS) method. The latter procedure is employed for the first time for the preparation of p-DSCs. In particular, RDS represents a scalable procedure that is based on microwave-assisted plasma formation that allows the production in series of mesoporous NiO electrodes with large surface areas for p-type cell photocathodes. RDS possesses the unique feature of transmitting heat from the bulk of the system towards its outer interfaces with controlled confinement of the heating zone. The use of RDS results in a drastic reduction of processing times with respect to other deposition methods that involve heating/calcination steps with associated reduced costs in terms of energy. P1-dye sensitized NiO electrodes obtained via the RDS procedure have been tested in DSC devices and their performances have been analysed and compared with those of cathodic DSCs derived from CS-deposited samples. The largest conversion efficiencies (0.12%) and incident photon-to-current conversion efficiencies, IPCEs (50%), were obtained with sintered NiO electrodes having thicknesses of ~1.5-2.0 μm. In all the devices, the photogenerated holes in NiO live significantly longer (τ(h) ~ 1 s) than have previously been reported for P1-sensitized NiO photocathodes. In addition, P1-sensitised sintered electrodes give rise to relatively high photovoltages (up to 135 mV) when the triiodide-iodide redox couple is used.

  4. In-situ synchrotron x-ray characterization of K2CsSb photocathode grown by ternary co-evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Z.; Gaowei, M.; Sinsheimer, J.; Xie, J.; Schubert, S.; Padmore, H.; Muller, E.; Smedley, J.

    2017-02-01

    K2CsSb is a promising photocathode candidate to serve as an electron source in next-generation light sources such as Free Electron Lasers (FEL) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). As the traditional recipe for creation of K2CsSb photocathodes typically results in a rough surface that deteriorates electron beam quality, significant effort has been made to explore novel growth methods for K2CsSb photocathodes. In this paper, a method of ternary co-evaporation of K, Cs, and Sb is described. By using in-situ synchrotron X-ray techniques, the quality of the photocathode is characterized during and after the growth. K2CsSb photocathodes grown by this method on Si (100) and MgO (001) substrates show strong (222) texture, and the two photocathodes exhibit 1.7% and 3.4% quantum efficiencies at a wavelength of 530 nm, with a rms surface roughness of about 2-4 nm. This represents an order of magnitude reduction in roughness compared to typical sequential deposition and should result in a significant improvement in the brightness of the generated electron beam.

  5. Graphdiyne: A Metal-Free Material as Hole Transfer Layer To Fabricate Quantum Dot-Sensitized Photocathodes for Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Gao, Xin; Liu, Bin; Feng, Qingliang; Li, Xu-Bing; Huang, Mao-Yong; Liu, Zhongfan; Zhang, Jin; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wu, Li-Zhu

    2016-03-30

    Graphdiyne (GDY), a novel large π-conjugated carbon material, for the first time, is introduced as the hole transfer layer into a photoelectrochemical water splitting cell (PEC). Raman and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopic studies indicate the existence of relatively strong π-π interactions between GDY and 4-mercaptopyridine surface-functionalized CdSe quantum dots, beneficial to the hole transportation and enhancement of the photocurrent performance. Upon exposure to a Xe lamp, the integrated photocathode produces a current density of nearly -70 μA cm(-2) at a potential of 0 V vs NHE in neutral aqueous solution. Simultaneously, the photocathode evolves H2 with 90 ± 5% faradic efficiency over three times and exhibits good stability within 12 h. All of the results indicate that GDY is a promising hole transfer material to fabricate a PEC device for water splitting by solar energy.

  6. Measurement of the tradeoff between intrinsic emittance and quantum efficiency from a NaKSb photocathode near threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Maxson, Jared Cultrera, Luca; Gulliford, Colwyn; Bazarov, Ivan

    2015-06-08

    We measure the tradeoff between the quantum efficiency and intrinsic emittance from a NaKSb photocathode at three increasing wavelengths (635, 650, and 690 nm) at or below the energy of the bandgap plus the electron affinity, hν≤E{sub g}+E{sub a}. These measurements were performed using a high voltage dc gun for varied photocathode surface fields of 1.4−4.4 MV/m. Measurements of intrinsic emittance are performed using two different methods and were found to agree. At the longest wavelength available, 690 nm, the intrinsic emittance was 0.26 μm/mm-rms with a quantum efficiency of ∼10{sup −4}. The suitability of NaKSb emitting at threshold for various low emittance applications is discussed.

  7. In Situ observation of dark current emission in a high gradient rf photocathode gun

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Jiahang; Shi, Jiaru; Antipov, Sergey P.; Baryshev, Sergey V.; Chen, Huaibi; Conde, Manoel; Gai, Wei; Ha, Gwanghui; Jing, Chunguang; Wang, Faya; Wisniewski, Eric

    2016-08-15

    Undesirable electron field emission (also known as dark current) in high gradient rf photocathode guns deteriorates the quality of the photoemission current and limits the operational gradient. To improve the understanding of dark current emission, a high-resolution (~100 μm) dark current imaging experiment has been performed in an L-band photocathode gun operating at ~100 MV/m of surface gradient. Scattered strong emission areas with high current have been observed on the cathode. The field enhancement factor β of selected regions on the cathode has been measured. Finally, the postexaminations with scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry reveal the origins of ~75% strong emission areas overlap with the spots where rf breakdown has occurred.

  8. Measurement of the tradeoff between intrinsic emittance and quantum efficiency from a NaKSb photocathode near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxson, Jared; Cultrera, Luca; Gulliford, Colwyn; Bazarov, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    We measure the tradeoff between the quantum efficiency and intrinsic emittance from a NaKSb photocathode at three increasing wavelengths (635, 650, and 690 nm) at or below the energy of the bandgap plus the electron affinity, h ν≤Eg+Ea . These measurements were performed using a high voltage dc gun for varied photocathode surface fields of 1.4 -4.4 MV/m. Measurements of intrinsic emittance are performed using two different methods and were found to agree. At the longest wavelength available, 690 nm, the intrinsic emittance was 0.26 μm/mm-rms with a quantum efficiency of ˜10-4 . The suitability of NaKSb emitting at threshold for various low emittance applications is discussed.

  9. A Systematic Cathode Study-Activation of a Thermionic Cathode, and Measuring Cesium Evaporation from a Dispenser Photocathode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    This principle is demonstrated in Figure 2. Figure 2. FEL Injector, Wiggler, and Beam Dump (From: [ 6 ]) 4 . Optical Resonator Not all FELs...DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Systematic Cathode Study⎯Activation of a Thermionic Cathode, and Measuring Cesium...Evaporation from a Dispenser Photocathode 6 . AUTHOR(S) Justin C. Jimenez 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval

  10. TMAE vapour of CsI layers as photocathodes in a multiwire proportional counter working at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerard, B.; Bruyndonckx, P.; Tavernier, S.; Shuping, Zhang

    1991-12-01

    A multiwire proportional counter (MWPC) coupled to a BaF 2 crystal has been tested at atmospheric pressure for the detection of 511 keV photons. If TMAE is used as a photosensitive agent, we found that addition of H 2O vapour to the chamber gas is very well suited for the detection of single-photoelectrons. Encouraging first results were also obtained with caesium iodide photocathodes.

  11. 10-fs-level synchronization of photocathode laser with RF-oscillator for ultrafast electron and X-ray sources

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Heewon; Han, Byungheon; Shin, Junho; Hou, Dong; Chung, Hayun; Baek, In Hyung; Jeong, Young Uk; Kim, Jungwon

    2017-01-01

    Ultrafast electron-based coherent radiation sources, such as free-electron lasers (FELs), ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and Thomson-scattering sources, are becoming more important sources in today’s ultrafast science. Photocathode laser is an indispensable common subsystem in these sources that generates ultrafast electron pulses. To fully exploit the potentials of these sources, especially for pump-probe experiments, it is important to achieve high-precision synchronization between the photocathode laser and radio-frequency (RF) sources that manipulate electron pulses. So far, most of precision laser-RF synchronization has been achieved by using specially designed low-noise Er-fibre lasers at telecommunication wavelength. Here we show a modular method that achieves long-term (>1 day) stable 10-fs-level synchronization between a commercial 79.33-MHz Ti:sapphire laser oscillator and an S-band (2.856-GHz) RF oscillator. This is an important first step toward a photocathode laser-based femtosecond RF timing and synchronization system that is suitable for various small- to mid-scale ultrafast X-ray and electron sources. PMID:28067288

  12. Detection of fast BaF[sub 2] scintillations with a CsI photocathode coupled to a MWPC

    SciTech Connect

    Staric, M. Univ. of Ljubljana ); Stanovnik, A. . Faculty for Electrical Engineering); Korpar, S. . Technical Faculty)

    1994-08-01

    CsI photocathodes coupled to wire chambers offer the position sensitive detection of UV photons with very good timing resolution. Such photocathodes have been considered as a possibility for detection of the fast components of BaF[sub 2] scintillations in calorimeters at the future high energy colliders. The authors have investigated the efficiency of a CsI photocathode in a MWPC for detection of the fast BaF[sub 2] scintillation component, the variation of this efficiency over a period of two months and it's behavior under an elevated radiation level. They find an extrapolated initial yield of 13 photoelectrons per MeV of energy deposited in the scintillator. This yield decreased exponentially with two decay constants. During the first three weeks the decay constant amounted to 5% daily and then it reduced to 1% per day. No noticeable change in the photoelectron yield or it's rate of decrease was observed after a 3 day irradiation amounting to a collected charge of 0.3 mC/cm[sup 2].

  13. A Si Photocathode Protected and Activated with a Ti and Ni Composite Film for Solar Hydrogen Production

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yi-Hsuan; Park, Hyun S; Zhang, Jenny Z; Matthews, Peter D; Wright, Dominic S; Reisner, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    An efficient, stable and scalable hybrid photoelectrode for visible-light-driven H2 generation in an aqueous pH 9.2 electrolyte solution is reported. The photocathode consists of a p-type Si substrate layered with a Ti and Ni-containing composite film, which acts as both a protection and electrocatalyst layer on the Si substrate. The film is prepared by the simple drop casting of the molecular single-source precursor, [{Ti2(OEt)9(NiCl)}2] (TiNipre), onto the p-Si surface at room temperature, followed by cathodic in situ activation to form the catalytically active TiNi film (TiNicat). The p-Si|TiNicat photocathode exhibits prolonged hydrogen generation with a stable photocurrent of approximately −5 mA cm−2 at 0 V vs. RHE in an aqueous pH 9.2 borate solution for several hours, and serves as a benchmark non-noble photocathode for solar H2 evolution that operates efficiently under neutral–alkaline conditions. PMID:25650832

  14. Cu2O/CuO Bilayered Composite as a High-Efficiency Photocathode for Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Xu, Di; Wu, Qingyong; Diao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Solar powered hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is one of the key reactions in solar-to-chemical energy conversion. It is desirable to develop photocathodic materials that exhibit high activity toward photoelectrochemical (PEC) HER at more positive potentials because a higher potential means a lower overpotential for HER. In this work, the Cu2O/CuO bilayered composites were prepared by a facile method that involved an electrodeposition and a subsequent thermal oxidation. The resulting Cu2O/CuO bilayered composites exhibited a surprisingly high activity and good stability toward PEC HER, expecially at high potentials in alkaline solution. The photocurrent density for HER was 3.15 mA·cm−2 at the potential of 0.40 V vs. RHE, which was one of the two highest reported at the same potential on copper-oxide-based photocathode. The high photoactivity of the bilayered composite was ascribed to the following three advantages of the Cu2O/CuO heterojunction: (1) the broadened light absorption band that made more efficient use of solar energy, (2) the large space-charge-region potential that enabled a high efficiency for electron-hole separation, and (3) the high majority carrier density that ensured a faster charge transportation rate. This work reveals the potential of the Cu2O/CuO bilayered composite as a promising photocathodic material for solar water splitting. PMID:27748380

  15. Cu2O/CuO Bilayered Composite as a High-Efficiency Photocathode for Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Xu, Di; Wu, Qingyong; Diao, Peng

    2016-10-01

    Solar powered hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is one of the key reactions in solar-to-chemical energy conversion. It is desirable to develop photocathodic materials that exhibit high activity toward photoelectrochemical (PEC) HER at more positive potentials because a higher potential means a lower overpotential for HER. In this work, the Cu2O/CuO bilayered composites were prepared by a facile method that involved an electrodeposition and a subsequent thermal oxidation. The resulting Cu2O/CuO bilayered composites exhibited a surprisingly high activity and good stability toward PEC HER, expecially at high potentials in alkaline solution. The photocurrent density for HER was 3.15 mA·cm‑2 at the potential of 0.40 V vs. RHE, which was one of the two highest reported at the same potential on copper-oxide-based photocathode. The high photoactivity of the bilayered composite was ascribed to the following three advantages of the Cu2O/CuO heterojunction: (1) the broadened light absorption band that made more efficient use of solar energy, (2) the large space-charge-region potential that enabled a high efficiency for electron-hole separation, and (3) the high majority carrier density that ensured a faster charge transportation rate. This work reveals the potential of the Cu2O/CuO bilayered composite as a promising photocathodic material for solar water splitting.

  16. Elucidating the sole contribution from electromagnetic near-fields in plasmon-enhanced Cu2O photocathodes

    DOE PAGES

    DuChene, Joseph S.; Williams, Benjamin P.; Johnston-Peck, Aaron C.; ...

    2015-11-05

    Despite many promising reports of plasmon-enhanced photocatalysis, the inability to identify the individual contributions from multiple enhancement mechanisms has delayed the development of general design rules for engineering efficient plasmonic photocatalysts. Herein, we construct a plasmonic photocathode comprised of Au@SiO2 (core@shell) nanoparticles embedded within a Cu2O nanowire network to exclusively examine the contribution from one such mechanism: electromagnetic near-field enhancement. The influence of the local electromagnetic field intensity is correlated with the overall light-harvesting efficiency of the device through variation of the SiO2 shell thickness (5—22 nm) to systematically tailor the distance between the plasmonic Au nanoparticles and the Cu2Omore » nanowires. A three-fold increase in device photocurrent is achieved upon integrating the Au@SiO2 nanoparticles into the Cu2O nanowire network, further enabling a ~40% reduction in semiconductor film thickness while maintaining photocathode performance. Photoelectrochemical results are further correlated with photoluminescence studies and optical simulations to confirm that the near-field enhancement is the sole mechanism responsible for increased light absorption in the plasmonic photocathode.« less

  17. Photocathodic Protection of 304 Stainless Steel by Bi2S3/TiO2 Nanotube Films Under Visible Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong; Wang, Xiutong; Wei, Qinyi; Hou, Baorong

    2017-01-01

    We report the preparation of TiO2 nanotubes coupled with a narrow bandgap semiconductor, i.e., Bi2S3, to improve the photocathodic protection property of TiO2 for metals under visible light. Bi2S3/TiO2 nanotube films were successfully synthesized using the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The morphology and structure of the composite films were studied by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectra were recorded to analyze the optical absorption property of the composite films. In addition, the influence of Bi2S3 deposition cycles on the photoelectrochemical and photocathodic protection properties of the composite films was also studied. Results revealed that the heterostructure comprised crystalline anatase TiO2 and orthorhombic Bi2S3 and exhibited a high visible light response. The photocurrent density of Bi2S3/TiO2 was significantly higher than that of pure TiO2 under visible light. The sensitization of Bi2S3 enhanced the separation efficiency of the photogenerated charges and photocathodic protection properties of TiO2. The Bi2S3/TiO2 nanotubes prepared by SILAR deposition with 20 cycles exhibited the optimal photogenerated cathodic protection performance on the 304 stainless steel under visible light.

  18. 10-fs-level synchronization of photocathode laser with RF-oscillator for ultrafast electron and X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Heewon; Han, Byungheon; Shin, Junho; Hou, Dong; Chung, Hayun; Baek, In Hyung; Jeong, Young Uk; Kim, Jungwon

    2017-01-01

    Ultrafast electron-based coherent radiation sources, such as free-electron lasers (FELs), ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and Thomson-scattering sources, are becoming more important sources in today’s ultrafast science. Photocathode laser is an indispensable common subsystem in these sources that generates ultrafast electron pulses. To fully exploit the potentials of these sources, especially for pump-probe experiments, it is important to achieve high-precision synchronization between the photocathode laser and radio-frequency (RF) sources that manipulate electron pulses. So far, most of precision laser-RF synchronization has been achieved by using specially designed low-noise Er-fibre lasers at telecommunication wavelength. Here we show a modular method that achieves long-term (>1 day) stable 10-fs-level synchronization between a commercial 79.33-MHz Ti:sapphire laser oscillator and an S-band (2.856-GHz) RF oscillator. This is an important first step toward a photocathode laser-based femtosecond RF timing and synchronization system that is suitable for various small- to mid-scale ultrafast X-ray and electron sources.

  19. A Si photocathode protected and activated with a Ti and Ni composite film for solar hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Hsuan; Park, Hyun S; Zhang, Jenny Z; Matthews, Peter D; Wright, Dominic S; Reisner, Erwin

    2015-03-02

    An efficient, stable and scalable hybrid photoelectrode for visible-light-driven H2 generation in an aqueous pH 9.2 electrolyte solution is reported. The photocathode consists of a p-type Si substrate layered with a Ti and Ni-containing composite film, which acts as both a protection and electrocatalyst layer on the Si substrate. The film is prepared by the simple drop casting of the molecular single-source precursor, [{Ti2(OEt)9(NiCl)}2] (TiNipre), onto the p-Si surface at room temperature, followed by cathodic in situ activation to form the catalytically active TiNi film (TiNicat). The p-Si|TiNicat photocathode exhibits prolonged hydrogen generation with a stable photocurrent of approximately -5 mA cm(-2) at 0 V vs. RHE in an aqueous pH 9.2 borate solution for several hours, and serves as a benchmark non-noble photocathode for solar H2 evolution that operates efficiently under neutral-alkaline conditions.

  20. Photocathodic Protection of 304 Stainless Steel by Bi2S3/TiO2 Nanotube Films Under Visible Light.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Wang, Xiutong; Wei, Qinyi; Hou, Baorong

    2017-12-01

    We report the preparation of TiO2 nanotubes coupled with a narrow bandgap semiconductor, i.e., Bi2S3, to improve the photocathodic protection property of TiO2 for metals under visible light. Bi2S3/TiO2 nanotube films were successfully synthesized using the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The morphology and structure of the composite films were studied by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectra were recorded to analyze the optical absorption property of the composite films. In addition, the influence of Bi2S3 deposition cycles on the photoelectrochemical and photocathodic protection properties of the composite films was also studied. Results revealed that the heterostructure comprised crystalline anatase TiO2 and orthorhombic Bi2S3 and exhibited a high visible light response. The photocurrent density of Bi2S3/TiO2 was significantly higher than that of pure TiO2 under visible light. The sensitization of Bi2S3 enhanced the separation efficiency of the photogenerated charges and photocathodic protection properties of TiO2. The Bi2S3/TiO2 nanotubes prepared by SILAR deposition with 20 cycles exhibited the optimal photogenerated cathodic protection performance on the 304 stainless steel under visible light.

  1. Simultaneous enhancement of photovoltage and charge transfer in Cu2O-based photocathode using buffer and protective layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changli; Hisatomi, Takashi; Watanabe, Osamu; Nakabayashi, Mamiko; Shibata, Naoya; Domen, Kazunari; Delaunay, Jean-Jacques

    2016-07-01

    Coating n-type buffer and protective layers on Cu2O may be an effective means to improve the photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting performance of Cu2O-based photocathodes. In this letter, the functions of the buffer layer and protective layer on Cu2O are examined. It is found that a Ga2O3 buffer layer can form a buried junction with Cu2O, which inhibits Cu2O self-reduction as well as increases the photovoltage through a small conduction band offset between the two semiconductors. The introduction of a TiO2 thin protective layer not only improves the stability of the photocathode but also enhances the electron transfer from the photocathode surface into the electrolyte, thus resulting in an increase in photocurrent at positive potentials. These results show that the selection of overlayers with appropriate conduction band positions provides an effective strategy for obtaining a high photovoltage and high photocurrent in PEC systems.

  2. Efficient and Stable Silicon Photocathodes Coated with Vertically Standing Nano-MoS2 Films for Solar Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ronglei; Mao, Jie; Yin, Zhihao; Jie, Jiansheng; Dong, Wen; Fang, Liang; Zheng, Fengang; Shen, Mingrong

    2017-02-22

    Water splitting in a photoelectrochemical cell, which converts sunlight into hydrogen energy, has recently received intense research. Silicon is suitable as a viable light-harvesting material for constructing such cell; however, there is a need to improve its stability and explore a cheap and efficient cocatalyst. Here we fabricate highly efficient and stable photocathodes by integrating crystalline MoS2 catalyst with ∼2 nm Al2O3 protected n(+)p-Si. Al2O3 acts as a protective and passivative layer of the Si surface, while the sputtering method using a MoS2 target along with a postannealing leads to a vertically standing, conformal, and crystalline nano-MoS2 layer on Al2O3/n(+)p-Si photocathode. Efficient (0.4 V vs RHE onset potential and 35.6 mA/cm(2) saturated photocurrent measured under 100 mA/cm(2) Xe lamp illumination) and stable (above 120 h continuous water splitting) photocathode was obtained, which opens the door for the MoS2 catalyst to be applied in photoelectrochemical hydrogen evolution in a facile and scalable way.

  3. Tailoring Photoelectrochemical Performance and Stability of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Photocathode via TiO2-Coupled Buffer Layers.

    PubMed

    Koo, Bonhyeong; Nam, Sung-Wook; Haight, Richard; Kim, Suncheul; Oh, Seungtaeg; Cho, Minhyung; Oh, Jihun; Lee, Jeong Yong; Ahn, Byung Tae; Shin, Byungha

    2017-02-15

    We report on the photoelectrochemical (PEC) performance and stability of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS)-based photocathodes for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution from water. Various functional overlayers, such as CdS, TiO2, ZnxSnyOz, and a combination of the aforementioned, were applied on the CIGS to improve the performance and stability. We identified that the insertion of TiO2 overlayer on p-CIGS/n-buffer layers significantly improves the PEC performance. A multilayered photocathode consisting of CIGS/CdS/TiO2/Pt exhibited the best current-potential characteristics among the tested photocathodes, which demonstrates a power-saved efficiency of 2.63%. However, repeated linear sweep voltammetry resulted in degradation of performance. In this regard, we focused on the PEC durability issues through in-depth chemical characterization that revealed the degradation was attributed to atomic redistribution of elements constituting the photocathode, namely, in-diffusion of Pt catalysts, out-diffusion of elements from the CIGS, and removal of the metal-oxide layers; the best-performing CIGS/CdS/TiO2/Pt photocathode retained its initial performance until the TiO2 overlayer was removed. It was also found that the durability of CIGS photocathodes with a TiO2-coated metal-oxide buffer layer such as ZnxSnyOz was better than those with a TiO2-coated CdS, and the degradation mechanism was different, suggesting that the stability of a CIGS-based photocathode can be improved by careful design of the structure.

  4. Design of a high repetition rate S-band photocathode gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jang-Hui; Cox, Matthew; Huang, Houcheng; Pande, Shivaji

    2011-08-01

    Photocathode RF guns have been developed in many laboratories for generating high quality electron beams for free-electron lasers based on linear accelerators. Such guns can generate electron beams with an exceptionally high peak current as well as a small transverse emittance. Their applications have been recently expanded for ultrafast electron diffraction, coherent terahertz radiation, and X-ray or γ-ray radiation by Compton scattering. In this paper, we design an S-band normal-conducting gun with capabilities of high quality beam generation and high repetition rate operation. The RF design and thermal analysis of the gun cavity and coupler are introduced. Optimal position of the gun focusing solenoid for low emittance beam generation is found by performing particle tracking simulations. Then, the gun system is designed to be able to afford the optimal solenoid position. The cooling-water channel surrounding the gun cavity and coupler is designed and analyzed numerically. The pressure in the gun is simulated with a vacuum model containing the detailed inner structure of the gun. An injector for a free-electron laser application is designed by using this gun and the beam dynamics simulation is shown. A cold test with a prototype gun for confirmation of the RF design is reported.

  5. A graded catalytic-protective layer for an efficient and stable water-splitting photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jing; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Ferrere, Suzanne; Steirer, K. Xerxes; Yan, Yong; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Young, James L.; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Neale, Nathan R.; Turner, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Achieving solar-to-hydrogen efficiencies above 15% is key for the commercial success of photoelectrochemical water-splitting devices. While tandem cells can reach those efficiencies, increasing the catalytic activity and long-term stability remains a significant challenge. Here we show that annealing a bilayer of amorphous titanium dioxide (TiOx) and molybdenum sulfide (MoSx) deposited onto GaInP2 results in a photocathode with high catalytic activity (current density of 11 mA cm‑2 at 0 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode under 1 sun illumination) and stability (retention of 80% of initial photocurrent density over a 20 h durability test) for the hydrogen evolution reaction. Microscopy and spectroscopy reveal that annealing results in a graded MoSx/MoOx/TiO2 layer that retains much of the high catalytic activity of amorphous MoSx but with stability similar to crystalline MoS2. Our findings demonstrate the potential of utilizing a hybridized, heterogeneous surface layer as a cost-effective catalytic and protective interface for solar hydrogen production.

  6. Covalent Surface Modification of Gallium Arsenide Photocathodes for Water Splitting in Highly Acidic Electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Garner, Logan E; Steirer, K Xerxes; Young, James L; Anderson, Nicholas C; Miller, Elisa M; Tinkham, Jonathan S; Deutsch, Todd G; Sellinger, Alan; Turner, John A; Neale, Nathan R

    2017-02-22

    Efficient water splitting using light as the only energy input requires stable semiconductor electrodes with favorable energetics for the water-oxidation and proton-reduction reactions. Strategies to tune electrode potentials using molecular dipoles adsorbed to the semiconductor surface have been pursued for decades but are often based on weak interactions and quickly react to desorb the molecule under conditions relevant to sustained photoelectrolysis. Here, we show that covalent attachment of fluorinated, aromatic molecules to p-GaAs(1 0 0) surfaces can be employed to tune the photocurrent onset potentials of p-GaAs(1 0 0) photocathodes and reduce the external energy required for water splitting. Results indicate that initial photocurrent onset potentials can be shifted by nearly 150 mV in pH -0.5 electrolyte under 1 Sun (1000 W m(-2) ) illumination resulting from the covalently bound surface dipole. Though X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis reveals that the covalent molecular dipole attachment is not robust under extended 50 h photoelectrolysis, the modified surface delays arsenic oxide formation that results in a p-GaAs(1 0 0) photoelectrode operating at a sustained photocurrent density of -20.5 mA cm(-2) within -0.5 V of the reversible hydrogen electrode.

  7. Stable hybrid organic/inorganic photocathodes for hydrogen evolution with amorphous WO3 hole selective contacts.

    PubMed

    Mezzetti, Alessandro; Fumagalli, Francesco; Alfano, Antonio; Iadicicco, Daniele; Antognazza, Maria Rosa; di Fonzo, Fabio

    2017-03-08

    Photoelectrochemical H2 production through hybrid organic/inorganic interfaces exploits the capability of polymeric absorbers to drive photo-induced electron transfer to an electrocatalyst in a water environment. Photoelectrode architectures based on solution-processed organic semiconductors are now emerging as low-cost alternatives to crystalline inorganic semiconductors based on Si, oxides and III-V alloys. In this work, we demonstrate that the stability of a hybrid organic/inorganic photocathode, employing a P3HT:PCBM blend as photoactive material, can be considerably improved by introducing an electrochemically stable WO3 hole selective layer, paired with a TiO2 electron selective layer. This hybrid photoelectrode exhibits a photocurrent of 2.48 mA cm(-2) at 0 VRHE, +0.56 VRHE onset potential and a state-of the art operational activity of more than 10 hours. This work gives the perspective that photoelectrodes based on organic semiconductors, coupled with proper inorganic selective contacts, represent a sound new option for the efficient and durable photoelectrochemical conversion of solar energy into fuels.

  8. Revealing the semiconductor–catalyst interface in buried platinum black silicon photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Anderson, Nicholas C.; Neale, Nathan R.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoporous 'black' silicon semiconductors interfaced with buried platinum nanoparticle catalysts have exhibited stable activity for photoelectrochemical hydrogen evolution even after months of exposure to ambient conditions. The mechanism behind this stability has not been explained in detail, but is thought to involve a Pt/Si interface free from SiOx layer that would adversely affect interfacial charge transfer kinetics. In this paper, we resolve the chemical composition and structure of buried Pt/Si interfaces in black silicon photocathodes from a micron to sub-nanometer level using aberration corrected analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy. Through a controlled electrodeposition of copper on samples aged for one month in ambient conditions, we demonstrate that the main active catalytic sites are the buried Pt nanoparticles located below the 400-800 nm thick nanoporous SiOx layer. Though hydrogen production performance degrades over 100 h under photoelectrochemical operating conditions, this burying strategy preserves an atomically clean catalyst/Si interface free of oxide or other phases under air exposure and provides an example of a potential method for stabilizing silicon photoelectrodes from oxidative degradation in photoelectrochemical applications.

  9. Cathodic electrodeposition of p-CuSCN nanorod and its dye-sensitized photocathodic property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lina; Ichinose, Keigo; Sekiya, Tomohiro; Sugiura, Takashi; Yoshida, Tsukasa

    Mechanism of cathodic electrodeposition of CuSCN from ethanolic solutions containing Cu2+ and SCN- was studied in detail. Job's plot for the absorption spectra of mixed solution in various Cu2+: SCN- ratios have revealed the presence of [Cu(SCN)2]0 as a soluble species responsible to the electrode process in SCN- rich solutions. From Levich analysis of diffusion limited current employing a rotating disc electrode (RDE), diffusion coefficients of 5.2 × 10-6 cm2 s-1 and 3.0 × 10-6 cm2 s-1 in ethanol at 298 K were determined for [Cu(SCN)2]0 and [Cu(SCN)]+, respectively. Morphology as well as crystallographic orientation of the product films significantly changed by the composition of the electrolytic baths. When the bath contains excess of Cu2+ and mixed solvent up to 50% ethanol content to water was used, strong anisotropic crystal growth along the c-axis was observed. When electrolysis was carried out under stationary conditions, the nanorod structures in high aspect ratios could be obtained, due to the limited transport of the active species to the tip of the rods. When rhodamine B was adsorbed onto such CuSCN as a sensitizer, dye-sensitized photocathodic current was observed with an incident photon to current conversion efficiency (IPCE) of 4.4% at the absorption maximum, suggesting its usefulness as the hole conducting electrode in construction of nanostructured solar cells.

  10. Results From Cs Activated GaN Photocathode Development for MCP Detector Systems at GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, Tim; Woodgate, Bruce; Stock, Joe; Hilton, George; Ulmer, Mel; Aslam, Shahid; Vispute, R. D.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the development of high quantum efficiency W photocathodes for use in large area two dimensional microchannel plate based detector arrays to enable new W space astronomy missions. Future W missions will require improvements in detector sensitivity, which has the most leverage for cost-effective improvements in overall telescope/instrument sensitivity. We use new materials such as p-doped GaN, AIGaN, ZnMgO, Sic and diamond. We have currently obtained QE values > 40 % at 185 nm with Cesiated GaN, and hope to demonstrate higher values in the future. By using controlled internal fields and nano-structuring of the surfaces, we plan to provide field emission assistance for photoelectrons while maintaining their energy distinction from dark noise electrons. We will transfer these methods from GaN to ZnMgO, a new family of wide band-gap materials more compatible with microchannel plates. We also are exploring technical parameters such as doping profiles, internal and external field strengths, angle of incidence, field emission assistance, surface preparation, etc.

  11. Cu2O Nanowire Photocathodes for Efficient and Durable Solar Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jingshan; Steier, Ludmilla; Son, Min-Kyu; Schreier, Marcel; Mayer, Matthew T; Grätzel, Michael

    2016-03-09

    Due to its abundance, scalability, and nontoxicity, Cu2O has attracted extensive attention toward solar energy conversion, and it is the best performing metal oxide material. Until now, the high efficiency devices are all planar in structure, and their photocurrent densities still fall well below the theoretical value of 14.5 mA cm(-2) due to the incompatible light absorption and charge carrier diffusion lengths. Nanowire structures have been considered as a rational and promising approach to solve this issue, but due to various challenges, performance improvements through the use of nanowires have rarely been achieved. In this work, we develop a new synthetic method to grow Cu2O nanowire arrays on conductive fluorine-doped tin oxide substrates with well-controlled phase and excellent electronic and photonic properties. Also, we introduce an innovative blocking layer strategy to enable high performance. Further, through material engineering by combining a conformal nanoscale p-n junction, durable protective overlayer, and uniform catalyst decoration, we have successfully fabricated Cu2O nanowire array photocathodes for hydrogen generation from solar water splitting delivering unprecedentedly high photocurrent densities of 10 mA cm(-2) and stable operation beyond 50 h, establishing a new benchmark for metal oxide based photoelectrodes.

  12. Plasmon-enhanced photocathode for high brightness and high repetition rate x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, Aleksandr; Senft, Christoph; Thompson, K. F.; Feng, J.; Cabrini, S.; Schuck, P. J.; Padmore, Howard; Peppernick, Samuel J.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-02-11

    High brightness electron sources are at the heart of anew generation of x-ray sources based on the Free ElectronLaser (FEL) as well as in Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) sources.The source of electrons consists of a photoinjector, comprised of a laser-driven photocathode in a high gradient electric field produced by an rf cavity. The function of the rf cavity is to provide a field sufficient for acceleration of electrons to relativistic velocity over a small distance, thus minimizing effects of the space-charge. Even so, the dense electron beam required for high brightness suffers from a space charge field that chirps and reshapes the electron pulse increasing beam emittance and thus reducing the overall brightness. This emittance growth can be avoided if the initial distribution of electrons is pancake shaped, with a semicircular transverse intensity profile. In this case, the electron distribution develops under its space charge field from a pancake into a uniformly filled ellipsoidal beam. This condition, referred to as the blowout regime, requires ultrashort pulses less than 100 fs long and has been successfully demonstrated recently in a high gradient photoinjector.

  13. Emittance measurement & optimization for the photocathode RF gun with laser profile shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sheng-Guang; Masafumi, Fukuda; Sakae, Araki; Nobuhiro, Terunuma; Junji, Urakawa

    2010-05-01

    The Laser Undulator Compact X-ray source (LUCX) is a test bench for a compact high brightness X-ray generator, based on inverse Compton Scattering at KEK, which requires high intensity multi-bunch trains with low transverse emittance. A photocathode RF gun with emittance compensation solenoid is used as an electron source. Much endeavor has been made to increase the beam intensity in the multi-bunch trains. The cavity of the RF gun is tuned into an unbalanced field in order to reduce space charge effects, so that the field gradient on the cathode surface is relatively higher when the forward RF power into gun cavity is not high enough. A laser profile shaper is employed to convert the driving laser profile from Gaussian into uniform. In this research we seek to find the optimized operational conditions for the decrease of the transverse emittance. With the uniform driving laser and the unbalanced RF gun, the RMS transverse emittance of a 1 nC bunch has been improved effectively from 5.46 μmm · mrad to 3.66 μmm · mrad.

  14. Non-conventional photocathodes based on Cu thin films deposited on Y substrate by sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, A.; D'Elia, M.; Gontad, F.; Di Giulio, M.; Maruccio, G.; Cola, A.; Stankova, N. E.; Kovacheva, D. G.; Broitman, E.

    2014-07-01

    Copper (Cu) thin films were deposited on yttrium (Y) substrate by sputtering. During the deposition, a small central area of the Y substrate was shielded to avoid the film deposition and was successively used to study its photoemissive properties. This configuration has two advantages: the cathode presents (i) the quantum efficiency and the work function of Y and (ii) high electrical compatibility when inserted into the conventional radio-frequency gun built with Cu bulk. The photocathode was investigated by scanning electron microscopy to determine surface morphology. X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy studies were performed to compare the structure and surface properties of the deposited film. The measured electrical resistivity value of the Cu film was similar to that of high purity Cu bulk. Film to substrate adhesion was also evaluated using the Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C adhesion test method. Finally, the photoelectron performance in terms of quantum efficiency was obtained in a high vacuum photodiode cell before and after laser cleaning procedures. A comparison with the results obtained with a twin sample prepared by pulsed laser deposition is presented and discussed.

  15. Tailoring the emissive properties of photocathodes through materials engineering: Ultra-thin multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez, Daniel; Seibert, Rachel; Ganegoda, Hasitha; Olive, Daniel; Rice, Amy; Logan, Kevin; Yusof, Zikri; Spentzouris, Linda; Terry, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We report on an experimental verification that emission properties of photocathodes can be manipulated through the engineering of the surface electronic structure. Ultrathin multilayered MgO/Ag(0 0 1)/MgO films were grown by pulsed laser deposition, tuning the thickness n of the flanking MgO layers to 0, 2, 3, and 4 monolayers. We observed an increase in quantum efficiency and simultaneous decrease in work function with layer thickness. The scale and trend direction of measurements are in good but not excellent agreement with theory. Angle resolved photoemission data for the multilayered sample n = 3 showed that the emission profile has a metallic-like momentum dispersion. Deviations from theoretical predictions [K. Németh et al., PRL 104, 046801 (2010)] are attributed to imperfections of real surfaces in contrast with the ideal surfaces of the calculation. Photoemissive properties of cathodes are critical for electron beam applications such as photoinjectors for Free Electron Lasers (FEL) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). An ideal photoemitter has a high quantum efficiency, low work function, low intrinsic emittance and long lifetime. It has been demonstrated here that emission properties may be systematically tailored by control of layer thickness in ultrathin multilayered structures. The reproducibility of the emission parameters under specific growth conditions is excellent, even though the interfaces themselves have varying degrees of roughness.

  16. Experimental Studies with Spatial Gaussian-Cut Laser for the LCLS Photocathode Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, F.; Brachmann, A.; Emma, P.; Gilevich, S.; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    To simplify the LCLS operation and further enhance the injector performances, we are evaluating the various parameters including the photocathode drive laser system. Extensive simulations show that both the projected and time-sliced emittances with spatial Gaussian profiles having reasonable tail-cut are better than those with uniform one. The simulated results are also supported by theoretical analyses. In the LCLS, the spatial uniform or Gaussian-cut laser profiles are conveniently obtained by adjusting the optics of the telescope upstream of an iris, used to define laser size on the cathode. Preliminary beam studies at the LCLS injector show that both the projected and time-sliced emittances with spatial Gaussian-cut laser are almost as good as, although not better than, those with uniform one. In addition, the laser transmission through the iris with the Gaussian-cut profile is twice with uniform one, which can significantly ease LCLS copper cathode/laser operations and thus improve the LCLS operation efficiency. More beam studies are planned to measure FEL performances with the Gaussian-cut in comparison with the uniform one. All simulations and measurements are presented in the paper.

  17. A cesium bromide photocathode excited by 405 nm radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, J. R.; Cheng, Y. T.; Pease, Fabian W.; Hesselink, L.; Pianetta, P.

    2014-07-14

    In several applications, such as electron beam lithography and X-ray differential phase contrast imaging, there is a need for a free electron source with a current density at least 10 A/cm{sup 2} yet can be shaped with a resolution down to 20 nm and pulsed. Additional requirements are that the source must operate in a practical demountable vacuum (>1e-9 Torr) and be reasonably compact. In prior work, a photocathode comprising a film of CsBr on metal film on a sapphire substrate met the requirements except it was bulky because it required a beam (>10 W/cm{sup 2}) of 257 nm radiation. Here, we describe an approach using a 405 nm laser which is far less bulky. The 405 nm laser, however, is not energetic enough to create color centers in CsBr films. The key to our approach is to bombard the CsBr film with a flood beam of about 1 keV electrons prior to operation. Photoelectron efficiencies in the range of 100–1000 nA/mW were demonstrated with lifetimes exceeding 50 h between electron bombardments. We suspect that the electron bombardment creates intraband color centers whence electrons can be excited by the 405 nm photons into the conduction band and thence into the vacuum.

  18. A low-voltage retarding-field Mott polarimeter for photocathode characterization

    SciTech Connect

    McCarter, J. L.; Stutzman, M. L.; Trantham, K. W.; Anderson, T. G.; Cook, A. M.; Gay, T. J.

    2010-02-26

    Nuclear physics experiments at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's CEBAF rely on high polarization electron beams. We describe a recently commissioned system for prequalifying and studying photocathodes for CEBAF with a load-locked, low-voltage polarized electron source coupled to a compact retarding-field Mott polarimeter. The polarimeter uses simplified electrode structures and operates from 5 to 30 kV. The effective Sherman function for this device has been calibrated by comparison with the CEBAF 5 MeV Mott polarimeter. For elastic scattering from a thick gold target at 20 keV, the effective Sherman function is 0.201(5). Its maximum efficiency at 20 keV, defined as the detected count rate divided by the incident particle current, is 5.4(2)×10-4, yielding a figure-of-merit, or analyzing power squared times efficiency, of 1.0(1)×10-5. The operating parameters of this new polarimeter design are compared to previously published data for other compact Mott polarimeters of the retarding-field type.

  19. A low-voltage retarding-field Mott polarimeter for photocathode characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarter, J. L.; Stutzman, M. L.; Trantham, K. W.; Anderson, T. G.; Cook, A. M.; Gay, T. J.

    2010-06-01

    Nuclear physics experiments at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's CEBAF rely on high polarization electron beams. We describe a recently commissioned system for prequalifying and studying photocathodes for CEBAF with a load-locked, low-voltage polarized electron source coupled to a compact retarding-field Mott polarimeter. The polarimeter uses simplified electrode structures and operates from 5 to 30 kV. The effective Sherman function for this device has been calibrated by comparison with the CEBAF 5 MeV Mott polarimeter. For elastic scattering from a thick gold target at 20 keV, the effective Sherman function is 0.201(5). Its maximum efficiency at 20 keV, defined as the detected count rate divided by the incident particle current, is 5.4(2)×10 -4, yielding a figure-of-merit, or analyzing power squared times efficiency, of 1.0(1)×10 -5. The operating parameters of this new polarimeter design are compared to previously published data for other compact Mott polarimeters of the retarding-field type.

  20. Protected, back-illuminated silicon photocathodes or photoanodes for water splitting tandem stacks (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesborg, Peter C.; Bae, Dowon; Seger, Brian J.; Chorkendorff, Ib; Hansen, Ole; Pedersen, Thomas; Mei, Bastian; Frydendal, Rasmus

    2016-10-01

    Silicon is a promising contender in the race for low-bandgap absorbers for use in a solar driven monolithic water splitting cell (PEC). However, given its role as the low-bandgap material the silicon must sit behind the corresponding high-bandgap material and as such, it will be exposed to (red) light from the dry back-side - not from the wet front side, where the electrochemistry takes place.[1,2] Depending on the configuration of the selective contacts (junctions) this may lead to compromises between high absorption and low recombination.[2,3] We discuss the tradeoffs and compare modeling results to measurements. Regardless of configuration, the wet surface of the silicon is prone to passivation or corrosion and must therefore be carefully protected in service in order to remain active. We demonstrate the use of TiO2 as an effective protection layer for both photoanodes and photocathodes in acid electrolyte [4] and NiCoOx for photoanodes in alkaline electrolyte. [3] References: [1]: B. Seger et alia, Energ. Environ. Sci., 7 (8), 2397-2413 (2014), DOI:10.1039/c4ee01335b [2]: D. Bae et alia, Energ. Environ. Sci., 8 (2), 650-660 (2015), DOI: 10.1039/c4ee03723e [3]: D. Bae et alia, submitted, (2016) [4]: B. Mei et alia, J. Phys. Chem. C., 119 (27), 15019-15027 (2015), DOI: 10.1021/acs.jpcc.5b04407

  1. Efficient and stable MoS2 catalyst integrated on Si photocathodes by photoreduction and post-annealing for water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jungui; Dai, Song; Dong, Wen; Su, Xiaodong; Fang, Liang; Zheng, Fengang; Wang, Xiongdong; Shen, Mingrong

    2016-05-01

    MoS2 has been studied as an efficient and cheap hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalyst; however, its effective integration with a photocathode remains a challenge. Here, crystalline MoS2 catalyst was deposited on top of a ˜2 nm Al2O3 protected n+p-Si photocathode using a simple photoreduction method following a post-annealing. The amount of MoS2 is optimized for HER of the photocathode, balanced between its catalytic effect and light absorption. High efficiency with 0.35 V onset potential vs. reversible hydrogen electrode and 34.5 mA/cm2 saturated photocurrent and high stability after 2 min ultrasonication or under 40 h continuous HER were observed. Such properties are much superior to the corresponding photocathodes coated by the traditional electrodeposited amorphous MoS2. Furthermore, the MoS2 layer is also an effective support for Pt nanoparticles with considerable reduction in the Pt amount while keeping the photoelectrochemical reactivity. This study indicates that the cheap-made MoS2 can be an efficient and stable HER catalyst for the Si photocathode.

  2. Experimental measurements and theoretical model of the cryogenic performance of bialkali photocathode and characterization with Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Huamu; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Rao, Triveni; Xin, Tianmu; Wang, Erdong

    2016-10-01

    High-average-current, high-brightness electron sources have important applications, such as in high-repetition-rate free-electron lasers, or in the electron cooling of hadrons. Bialkali photocathodes are promising high-quantum-efficiency (QE) cathode materials, while superconducting rf (SRF) electron guns offer continuous-mode operation at high acceleration, as is needed for high-brightness electron sources. Thus, we must have a comprehensive understanding of the performance of bialkali photocathode at cryogenic temperatures when they are to be used in SRF guns. To remove the heat produced by the radio-frequency field in these guns, the cathode should be cooled to cryogenic temperatures. We recorded an 80% reduction of the QE upon cooling the K2CsSb cathode from room temperature down to the temperature of liquid nitrogen in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)'s 704 MHz SRF gun. We conducted several experiments to identify the underlying mechanism in this reduction. The change in the spectral response of the bialkali photocathode, when cooled from room temperature (300 K) to 166 K, suggests that a change in the ionization energy (defined as the energy gap from the top of the valence band to vacuum level) is the main reason for this reduction. We developed an analytical model of the process, based on Spicer's three-step model. The change in ionization energy, with falling temperature, gives a simplified description of the QE's temperature dependence. We also developed a 2D Monte Carlo code to simulate photoemission that accounts for the wavelength-dependent photon absorption in the first step, the scattering and diffusion in the second step, and the momentum conservation in the emission step. From this simulation, we established a correlation between ionization energy and reduction in the QE. The simulation yielded results comparable to those from the analytical model. The simulation offers us additional capabilities such as calculation of the intrinsic emittance

  3. Perovskite BiFeO3 thin film photocathode performance with visible light activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, P.; Yeo, D.; Chang, H.; Loh, L.; Dunn, S.

    2016-08-01

    Perovskite materials are now an important class of materials in the application areas of photovoltaics and photocatalysis. Inorganic perovskites such as BiFeO3 (BFO) are promising photocatalyst materials with visible light activity and inherent stability. Here we report the large area sol-gel synthesis of BFO films for solar stimulated water photo oxidation. By modifying the sol-gel synthesis process we have produced a perovskite material that has p-type behaviour and a flat band potential of ˜1.15 V (versus NHE). The photocathode produces a density of -0.004 mA cm-2 at 0 V versus NHE under AM1.5 G illumination. We further show that 0.6 μmol h-1 of O2 was produced at an external bias of -0.5 V versus Ag/AgCl. The addition of a non-percolating conducting network of Ag increases the photocurrent to -0.07 mA cm-2 at 0 V versus NHE (at 2% Ag loading) with an increase to 2.7 μmol h-1 for O2 production. We attribute the enhancement in photoelectrochemical performance to increased light absorption due light scattering by the incorporated Ag particles, improved charge transfer kinetics at the Ag/BFO interface and reduced over potential losses. We support these claims by an observed shift in flat band and onset potentials after Ag modification through UV-vis spectroscopy, Mott-Schottky plots and j-v curve analysis.

  4. Design of the fundamental power coupler and photocathode inserts for the 112MHz superconducting electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, T.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Belomestnykh, S.; Chang, X.; Rao, T.; Skaritka, J.; Wu, Q.; Wang, E.; Liang, X.

    2011-07-25

    A 112 MHz superconducting quarter-wave resonator electron gun will be used as the injector of the Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC) proof-of-principle experiment at BNL. Furthermore, this electron gun can be the testing cavity for various photocathodes. In this paper, we present the design of the cathode stalks and a Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC) designated to the future experiments. Two types of cathode stalks are discussed. Special shape of the stalk is applied in order to minimize the RF power loss. The location of cathode plane is also optimized to enable the extraction of low emittance beam. The coaxial waveguide structure FPC has the properties of tunable coupling factor and small interference to the electron beam output. The optimization of the coupling factor and the location of the FPC are discussed in detail. Based on the transmission line theory, we designed a half wavelength cathode stalk which significantly brings down the voltage drop between the cavity and the stalk from more than 5.6 kV to 0.1 kV. The transverse field distribution on cathode has been optimized by carefully choosing the position of cathode stalk inside the cavity. Moreover, in order to decrease the RF power loss, a variable diameter design of cathode stalk has been applied. Compared to the uniform shape of stalk, this design gives us much smaller power losses in important locations. Besides that, we also proposed a fundamental power coupler based on the designed beam parameters for the future proof-of-principle CEC experiment. This FPC should give a strong enough coupling which has the Q external range from 1.5e7 to 2.6e8.

  5. Quantum efficiency of opaque CsI photocathodes with channel electron multiplier arrays in the extreme and far ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C.; Bowyer, S.

    1982-01-01

    The arrays are overcoated with a CsI photocathode in the VUV. The measurements are part of the development program for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer. Monochromatic light from a hollow cathode discharge source passing through a McPherson grazing incidence monochromator is used to illuminate the CsI photocathode. The beam diameter is kept small (approximately 2 mm) to confine it within the individual thickness strips. A bias grid is used to produce a 50-V/mm electric field to guarantee collection of all photoelectrons emitted by the CEMA (channel electron multiplier array) webbing. The CEMAs are operated with a gain of 2-3 x 10 to the 6th and are moderately saturated. A channeltron secondary transfer standard is used to determine the absolute QE in the EUV, whereas an NBS calibrated windowed photodiode is used to measure the FUV absolute QE. It is noted that the CsI gives a factor of 3 increase in the QE in the EUV and a factor of 50-5000 in the FUV.

  6. Engineering of Sub-Nanometer SiOx Thickness in Si Photocathodes for Optimized Open Circuit Potential.

    PubMed

    Das, Chittaranjan; Kot, Malgorzata; Henkel, Karsten; Schmeisser, Dieter

    2016-09-08

    Silicon is one of the most promising materials to be used for tandem-cell water-splitting devices. However, the electrochemical instability of bare Si makes it difficult to be used for stable devices. Besides that, the photovoltage loss in Si, caused by several factors (e.g., metal oxide protection layer and/or SiO2 /Si or catalyst/Si interface), limits its use in these devices. In this work, we present that an optimized open circuit potential (OCP) of Si can be obtained by controlling the SiOx thickness in sub-nanometer range. It can be done by means of a simple and cost-effective way using the combination of a wet chemical etching and the low temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiO2 . We have found that a certain thickness of the native SiOx is necessary to prevent further oxidation of the Si photocathode during the ALD growth of TiO2 . Moreover, covering the Si photocathode with an ALD TiO2 layer enhances its stability.

  7. Influence of the substrate surface texture on the photon-sensitivity stability of CsI thin film photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitti, M. A.; Tinti, A.; Valentini, A.; Nappi, E.; Acquafredda, P.; Fanizza, E.; Ingrosso, C.; Pistillo, B. R.; Sardella, E.

    2009-10-01

    A study on the influence of the substrate morphology on the photoemission properties of caesium iodide (CsI) thin film photocathodes, in the range 150-200 nm, has been performed. Various types of conductive substrates, patterned by colloidal lithography, have been compared to the standard printed circuit board (PCB), used for the ALICE experiment at CERN [M.A. Nitti, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 523 (2004) 323.]. A correlation between the substrate surface texture and the photoemission stability of the films has been demonstrated. The combination of colloidal lithography and plasma etching, or physical evaporation, allows to create on substrates arrays of nanostructures whose shape and pitch can be controlled by changing some parameters during the patterning process. In order to be comparable with the CsI photoelectron escape length and to preserve the substrate morphology in the film, a layer of 20 nm has been deposited on all the samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations of the colloidal lithography patterned (CLP) substrates have been performed. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) topographic images of the CsI thin film evaporated on PCB and CLP substrates have also been acquired and compared, showing a clear difference in the surface texture. An ageing test, consisting of an air exposure with a relative humidity of about 45% for 24 h, resulted in a higher quantum efficiency stability of textured CsI thin film photocathodes evaporated on nanostructured substrates with respect to those grown on standard PCB ones.

  8. Surface passivation and protection of Pt loaded multicrystalline pn+ silicon photocathodes by atmospheric plasma oxidation for improved solar water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Ronglei; Tang, Chengshuang; Xin, Yu; Su, Xiaodong; Wang, Xiaodong; Shen, Mingrong

    2016-12-01

    In the traditional methods such as atomic layer deposition and sputtering, a thin metal oxide layer was usually deposited before the loading of catalysts to protect Si photoelectrodes from oxidation during solar water splitting, and this often results in the transfer of photogenerated carriers from Si to electrolyte more or less inhibited. We here use an atmospheric plasma oxidation method to improve this. A SiO2 protective layer, also an effective passivation layer of Si to increase the life time of carriers, is fabricated on Pt loaded multicrystalline pn+-Si photocathodes. Compared with the un-protected one, the energy conversion efficiency of the plasma-treated Pt/pn+-Si photocathode increases from 6.2% to 8.9% under 100 mW/cm2 Xe lamp, and its stability improves from less than 1-22 h under continuous H2 production. This research provides a conceptual strategy to ensure the direct contact among the Si/Pt/electrolyte and protect and passivate the other part of Si simultaneously.

  9. Fe(III) doped and grafted PbTiO{sub 3} film photocathode with enhanced photoactivity for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yuxiang; Dong, Wen; Zheng, Fengang; Fang, Liang; Shen, Mingrong

    2014-08-25

    The photoelectrochemical activity of the PbTiO{sub 3} film photocathode deposited on indium tin oxide-coated quartz substrate was significantly improved through modifying the film surface by both the Fe(III) doping and grafting. Doping the PbTiO{sub 3} with Fe(III) ions narrows its band gap thus increases the visible light utilization, while the surface-grafted Fe(III) ions on the doped PbTiO{sub 3} surface are helpful to improve the charge transfer on the photocathode/electrolyte interface. Consequently, the photocurrent was increased from 38 μA/cm{sup 2} to 220 μA/cm{sup 2} under the irradiation of 100 mW/cm{sup 2} Xe lamp by using 0.1M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} as an electrolyte and zero-potential versus saturated calomel as a reference electrode. The corresponding increase in open circuit voltage was 0.95–1.11 V.

  10. Enhanced Photocurrents with ZnS Passivated Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 Photocathodes Synthesized Using a Nonvacuum Process for Solar Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Chae, Sang Youn; Park, Se Jin; Han, Sung Gyu; Jung, Hyejin; Kim, Chae-Woong; Jeong, Chaehwan; Joo, Oh-Shim; Min, Byoung Koun; Hwang, Yun Jeong

    2016-12-07

    Chalcopyrite Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 (CIGS) semiconductors are potential candidates for use in photoelectrochemical (PEC) hydrogen generation due to their excellent optical absorption properties and high conduction band edge position. In the present research, CIGS thin film was successfully prepared on a transparent substrate (F:SnO2 glass) using a solution-based process and applied for a photocathode in solar water splitting, which shows control of the surface state associated with sulfurization/selenization process significantly influences on the PEC activity. A ZnS passivation surface layer was introduced, which effectively suppresses charge recombination by surface states of CIGS. The CIGS/ZnS/Pt photocathode exhibited highly enhanced PEC activity (∼24 mA·cm(-2) at -0.3 V vs RHE). The performances of our CIGS photocathode on the transparent substrate were also characterized under front/back light illumination, and the incident photon to current conversion efficiency (IPCE) drastically changed depending on the illumination directions showing decreased IPCE especially under UV region with back illumination. The slow minority carrier (electron) transportation is suggested as a limiting factor for the PEC activity of the CIGS photocathode.

  11. Comparison of blue-green response between transmission-mode GaAsP- and GaAs-based photocathodes grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang-Cheng, Jiao; Zheng-Tang, Liu; Hui, Guo; Yi-Jun, Zhang

    2016-04-01

    In order to develop the photodetector for effective blue-green response, the 18-mm-diameter vacuum image tube combined with the transmission-mode Al0.7Ga0.3As0.9 P 0.1/GaAs0.9 P 0.1 photocathode grown by molecular beam epitaxy is tentatively fabricated. A comparison of photoelectric property, spectral characteristic and performance parameter between the transmission-mode GaAsP-based and blue-extended GaAs-based photocathodes shows that the GaAsP-based photocathode possesses better absorption and higher quantum efficiency in the blue-green waveband, combined with a larger surface electron escape probability. Especially, the quantum efficiency at 532 nm for the GaAsP-based photocathode achieves as high as 59%, nearly twice that for the blue-extended GaAs-based one, which would be more conducive to the underwater range-gated imaging based on laser illumination. Moreover, the simulation results show that the favorable blue-green response can be achieved by optimizing the emission-layer thickness in a range of 0.4 μm-0.6 μm. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61301023) and the Science and Technology on Low-Light-Level Night Vision Laboratory Foundation, China (Grant No. BJ2014001).

  12. Visible-light responsive photocatalytic fuel cell based on WO(3)/W photoanode and Cu(2)O/Cu photocathode for simultaneous wastewater treatment and electricity generation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quanpeng; Li, Jinhua; Li, Xuejin; Huang, Ke; Zhou, Baoxue; Cai, Weimin; Shangguan, Wenfeng

    2012-10-16

    A visible-light driven photocatalytic fuel cell (PFC) system comprised of WO(3)/W photoanode and Cu(2)O/Cu photocathode was established for organic compounds degradation with simultaneous electricity generation. The central idea for its operation is the mismatched Fermi levels between the two photoelectrodes. Under light illumination, the Fermi level of WO(3)/W photoanode is higher than that of Cu(2)O/Cu photocathode. An interior bias can be produced based on which the electrons of WO(3)/W photoanode can transfer from the external circuit to combine with the holes of Cu(2)O/Cu photocathode then generates the electricity. In this manner, the electron/hole pairs separations at two photoelectrodes are facilitated to release the holes of WO(3)/W photoanode and electrons of Cu(2)O/Cu photocathode. Organic compounds can be decomposed by the holes of WO(3)/W photoanode due to its high oxidation power (+3.1-3.2 V(NHE)). The results demonstrated that various model compounds including phenol, Rhodamine B, and Congo red can be successfully decomposed in this PFC system, with the degradation rate after 5 h operation were obtained to be 58%, 63%, and 74%, respectively. The consistent operation for continuous water treatment with the electricity generation at a long time scale was also confirmed from the result. The proposed PFC system provides a self-sustained and energy-saving way for simultaneous wastewater treatment and energy recovery.

  13. Modulation of sulfur partial pressure in sulfurization to significantly improve the photoelectrochemical performance over the Cu2ZnSnS4 photocathode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanfang; Ouyang, Shuxin; Yu, Qing; Li, Peng; Ye, Jinhua

    2015-09-25

    Cu2ZnSnS4 photocathodes with excellent photoelectrochemical properties were fabricated via a facile method of adjusting the sulfur partial pressure in a semi-closed system, which achieved a maximum photocurrent-density of 1.8 mA cm(-2) under irradiation of a solar simulator which is 9-fold larger than that synthesized in an open system.

  14. Structural and optical investigation of InAsxP1-x/InP strained superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberti, C.; Bordiga, S.; Boscherini, F.; Mobilio, S.; Pascarelli, S.; Gastaldi, L.; Madella, M.; Papuzza, C.; Rigo, C.; Soldani, D.; Ferrari, C.; Lazzarini, L.; Salviati, G.

    1998-01-01

    We report a complete characterization of InAsxP1-x/InP (0.05

  15. High quality single shot ultrafast MeV electron diffraction from a photocathode radio-frequency gun

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Feichao; Liu, Shengguang; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao Zhang, Jie; Cao, Jianming

    2014-08-15

    A compact ultrafast electron diffractometer, consisting of an s-band 1.6 cell photocathode radio-frequency gun, a multi-function changeable sample chamber, and a sensitive relativistic electron detector, was built at Shanghai Jiao Tong University. High-quality single-shot transmission electron diffraction patterns have been recorded by scattering 2.5 MeV electrons off single crystalline gold and polycrystalline aluminum samples. The high quality diffraction pattern indicates an excellent spatial resolution, with the ratio of the diffraction ring radius over the ring rms width beyond 10. The electron pulse width is estimated to be about 300 fs. The high temporal and spatial resolution may open new opportunities in various areas of sciences.

  16. Enhanced Photoelectrochemical Solar Water Splitting Using a Platinum-Decorated CIGS/CdS/ZnO Photocathode.

    PubMed

    Mali, Mukund G; Yoon, Hyun; Joshi, Bhavana N; Park, Hyunwoong; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Lim, Dong Chan; Ahn, SeJin; Nervi, Carlo; Yoon, Sam S

    2015-09-30

    A Cu(InGa)Se2 film was modified with CdS/ZnO for application to solar water splitting. Platinum was electrodeposited on the ZnO layer as a hydrogen evolution catalyst. The effects of the electroplating time and acidity level of the electrolyte on the photocurrent density were studied. The highest photocurrent density of -32.5 mA/cm(2) under 1.5 AM illumination was achieved with an electroplating time of 30 min at a pH of 9. This photocurrent density is higher than those reported in previous studies. The markedly high performance of the CIGS/CdS/ZnO photocathode was rationalized in terms of its type II cascade structure that facilitated efficient charge separation at the interface junction.

  17. Low-emittance electron-beam generation with laser pulse shaping in photocathode radio-frequency gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Sakai, F.; Yanagida, T.; Yorozu, M.; Okada, Y.; Takasago, K.; Endo, A.; Yada, A.; Washio, M.

    2002-08-01

    A technique of laser-pulse shaping was developed for low-emittance electron-beam generation in a photocathode radio-frequency (rf) gun. The emittance growth due to space charge and rf effects in the rf gun was experimentally investigated with square and gaussian temporal pulse shapes. It was found that the square pulse shaping was a useful tool for both the reduction of nonlinear space-charge force and the correction of linear space charge. The normalized transverse rms emittance at 1 nC was obtained to be 1.20 pimm-mrad for the square pulse shape with pulse length of 9 ps full width at half maximum. The emittance was measured as a function of the electron bunch charge and the laser-pulse length.

  18. Temporal Laser Pulse Shaping for RF Photocathode Guns: The Cheap and Easy way using UV Birefringent Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Power, John G.; Jing Chunguang

    2009-01-22

    We report experimental investigations into a new technique for achieving temporal laser pulse shaping for RF photocathode gun applications using inexpensive UV birefringent crystals. Exploiting the group velocity mismatch between the two different polarizations of a birefringent crystal, a stack of UV pulses can be assembled into the desired temporal pulse shape. The scheme is capable of generating a variety of temporal pulse shapes including: (i) flat-top pulses with fast rise-time and variable pulse duration. (ii) microbunch trains, and (iii) ramped pulse generation. We will consider two applications for beam generation at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) including a flat-top laser pulse for low emittance production and matched bunch length for enhanced transformer ratio production. Streak camera measurements of the temporal profiles generated with a 2-crystal set and a 4-crystal set are presented.

  19. Temporal laser pulse shaping for RF photocathode guns : the cheap and easy way using UV birefringent crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J. G.; Jing, C.; High Energy Physics; Euclid Techlabs, LLC

    2009-01-01

    We report experimental investigations into a new technique for achieving temporal laser pulse shaping for RF photocathode gun applications using inexpensive UV birefringent crystals. Exploiting the group velocity mismatch between the two different polarizations of a birefringent crystal, a stack of UV pulses can be assembled into the desired temporal pulse shape. The scheme is capable of generating a variety of temporal pulse shapes including: (i) flat-top pulses with fast rise-time and variable pulse duration. (ii) microbunch trains, and (iii) ramped pulse generation. We will consider two applications for beam generation at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) including a flat-top laser pulse for low emittance production and matched bunch length for enhanced transformer ratio production. Streak camera measurements of the temporal profiles generated with a 2-crystal set and a 4-crystal set are presented.

  20. High quality single shot ultrafast MeV electron diffraction from a photocathode radio-frequency gun.

    PubMed

    Fu, Feichao; Liu, Shengguang; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao; Zhang, Jie; Cao, Jianming

    2014-08-01

    A compact ultrafast electron diffractometer, consisting of an s-band 1.6 cell photocathode radio-frequency gun, a multi-function changeable sample chamber, and a sensitive relativistic electron detector, was built at Shanghai Jiao Tong University. High-quality single-shot transmission electron diffraction patterns have been recorded by scattering 2.5 MeV electrons off single crystalline gold and polycrystalline aluminum samples. The high quality diffraction pattern indicates an excellent spatial resolution, with the ratio of the diffraction ring radius over the ring rms width beyond 10. The electron pulse width is estimated to be about 300 fs. The high temporal and spatial resolution may open new opportunities in various areas of sciences.

  1. Femtosecond timing-jitter between photo-cathode laser and ultra-short electron bunches by means of hybrid compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompili, R.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagioni, A.; Castorina, G.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Croia, M.; Di Giovenale, D.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Gallo, A.; Gatti, G.; Giorgianni, F.; Giribono, A.; Li, W.; Lupi, S.; Mostacci, A.; Petrarca, M.; Piersanti, L.; Di Pirro, G.; Romeo, S.; Scifo, J.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.

    2016-08-01

    The generation of ultra-short electron bunches with ultra-low timing-jitter relative to the photo-cathode (PC) laser has been experimentally proved for the first time at the SPARC_LAB test-facility (INFN-LNF, Frascati) exploiting a two-stage hybrid compression scheme. The first stage employs RF-based compression (velocity-bunching), which shortens the bunch and imprints an energy chirp on it. The second stage is performed in a non-isochronous dogleg line, where the compression is completed resulting in a final bunch duration below 90 fs (rms). At the same time, the beam arrival timing-jitter with respect to the PC laser has been measured to be lower than 20 fs (rms). The reported results have been validated with numerical simulations.

  2. Measurements and Studies of Secondary Electron Emission of Diamond Amplified Photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu,Q.

    2008-10-01

    The Diamond Amplified Photocathode (DAP) is a novel approach to generating electrons. By following the primary electron beam, which is generated by traditional electron sources, with an amplifier, the electron beam available to the eventual application is increased by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude in current. Diamond has a very wide band gap of 5.47eV which allows for a good negative electron affinity with simple hydrogenation, diamond can hold more than 2000MV/m field before breakdown. Diamond also provides the best rigidity among all materials. These two characters offer the capability of applying high voltage across very thin diamond film to achieve high SEY and desired emission phase. The diamond amplifier also is capable of handling a large heat load by conduction and sub-nanosecond pulse input. The preparation of the diamond amplifier includes thinning and polishing, cleaning with acid etching, metallization, and hydrogenation. The best mechanical polishing available can provide high purity single crystal diamond films with no less than 100 {micro}m thickness and <15 nm Ra surface roughness. The ideal thickness for 700MHz beam is {approx}30 {micro}m, which requires further thinning with RIE or laser ablation. RIE can achieve atomic layer removal precision and roughness eventually, but the time consumption for this procedure is very significant. Laser ablation proved that with <266nm ps laser beam, the ablation process on the diamond can easily achieve removing a few microns per hour from the surface and <100nm roughness. For amplifier application, laser ablation is an adequate and efficient process to make ultra thin diamond wafers following mechanical polishing. Hydrogenation will terminate the diamond surface with monolayer of hydrogen, and form NEA so that secondary electrons in the conduction band can escape into the vacuum. The method is using hydrogen cracker to strike hydrogen atoms onto the bare diamond surface to form H-C bonds. Two independent

  3. Photon counting performance measurements of transfer electron InGaAsP photocathode hybrid photomultiplier tubes at 1064 nm wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Krainak, Michael A.; Hasselbrack, William B.; La Rue, Ross A.

    2007-05-01

    We report the test results of a hybrid photomultiplier tube (HPMT) with a transfer electron (TE) InGaAsP photocathode and GaAs Schottky avalanche photodiode (APD) anode. Unlike Geiger mode InGaAsP APDs, these HPMTs (also known as intensified photodiode (IPD), vacuum APD, or hybrid photodetector) operate in linear mode without the need for quenching and gating. Their greatest advantages are wide dynamic range, high speed, large photosensitive area, and potential for photon counting and analog detection dual mode operation. The photon detection efficiency we measured was 25% at 1064 nm wavelength with a dark count rate of 60,000/s at -22 degrees Celsius. The output pulse width in response to a single photon detection is about 0.9 ns. The maximum count rate was 90 Mcts/s and was limited solely by the speed of the discriminator used in the measurement (10 ns dead time). The spectral response of these devices extended from 900 to 1300 nm. We also measured the HPMT response to 60 ps laser pulses. The average output pulse amplitude increased monotonically with the input pulse energy, which suggested that we can resolve photon number in an incident pulse. The jitter of the HPMT output was found to be about 0.5 ns standard deviation and depended on bias voltage applied to the TE photocathode. To our knowledge, these HPMTs are the most sensitive non gating photon detectors at 1064 nm wavelength, and they will have many applications in laser altimeters, atmospheric lidars, and free space laser communication systems.

  4. Tuning the Photoelectrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution of Pt-Decorated Silicon Photocathodes by the Temperature and Time of Electroless Pt Deposition.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Bruno; Li, Gaozeng; Gouttefangeas, Francis; Joanny, Loic; Loget, Gabriel

    2016-11-15

    The electroless deposition of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) on hydrogen-terminated silicon (H-Si) surfaces is studied as a function of the temperature and the immersion time. It is demonstrated that isolated Pt structures can be produced at all investigated temperatures (between 22 and 75 °C) for short deposition times, typically within 1-10 min if the temperature is 45 °C or less than 5 min at 75 °C. For longer times, dendritic metal structures start to grow, ultimately leading to highly rough interconnected Pt networks. Upon increasing the temperature from 22 to 75 °C and for an immersion time of 5 min, the average size of the observed Pt NPs monotonously increases from 120 to 250 nm, and their number density calculated using scanning electron microscopy decreases from (4.5 ± 1.0) × 10(8) to (2.0 ± 0.5) × 10(8) Pt NPs cm(-2). The impact of both the morphology and the distribution of the Pt NPs on the photoelectrocatalytic activity of the resulting metallized photocathodes is then analyzed. Pt deposited at 45 °C for 5 min yields photocathodes with the best electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction. Under illumination at 33 mW cm(-2), this optimized photoelectrode shows a fill factor of 45%, an efficiency (η) of 9.7%, and a short-circuit current density (|Jsc|) at 0 V versus a reversible hydrogen electrode of 15.5 mA cm(-2).

  5. Design of a high charge (10 - 100 nC) and short pulse (2 - 5 ps) rf photocathode gun for wakefield acceleration.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.

    1998-07-16

    In this paper we present a design report on a 1-1/2 cell, L Band RF photocathode gun that is capable of generating and accelerating electron beams with peak currents >10 kA. We have performed simulation for bunch intensities in the range of 10-100 nC with peak axial electrical field at the photocathode of 30-100 MV/m. Unlike conventional short electron pulse generation, this design does not require magnetic pulse compression. Based on numerical simulations using SUPERFISH and PARMELA, this design will produce 20-100 nC beam at 18 MeV with rms bunch length 0.6-1.25 mm and normalized transverse emittance 30-108 mm mrad. Applications of this beam for wakefield acceleration is also discussed.

  6. Effects of a high energy particle environment on the quantum efficiency of spectrally selective photocathodes for the middle and vacuum ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Heath, D F; McElaney, J H

    1968-10-01

    The quantum efficiences of spectrally selective photocathodes for the middle and vacuum uv (semitransparent depositions of CsI, CuI, and CsTe on Al(2)O(3) windows, a solid tungsten photocathode behind a MgF(2) window) were measured before their use as detectors in a rocket experiment, one year later, and after irradiation by high energy electrons. Only the CsI photodiode showed any change in quantum efficiency, a notable increase after irradiation. Two additional CsI diodes were then irradiated, one with high energy electrons, the other with gamma rays. However, these diodes showed no change in quantum efficiency. The quantum efficiencies of all the photodiodes appear stable with time. The CuI and CsTe diodes also remain stable under irradiation, while the CsI diode may exhibit an increase in quantum efficiency after irradiation.

  7. Angular Dependence of the Photoelectron Energy Distribution of InP(100) and GaAs(100) Negative Electron Affinity Photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Ick; Sun, Yun; Lu, Zhi; Sun, Shiyu; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-10-15

    Energy distribution of the photoelectrons from InP(100) photocathodes are investigated with a photon energy range from 0.62eV to 2.76eV. When the photon energy is less than 1.8eV, only electrons emitted from the Gamma valley are observed in the energy distribution curves (EDC). At higher photon energies, electrons from the L valley are observed. The angular dependence of the electron energy distributions of InP and GaAs photocathodes are studied and compared. The electrons emitted from the L valley have a larger angular spread than the ones from the Gamma valley due to the larger effective mass of the L valley minimum.

  8. Characterization and performance of a high-power solid-state laser for a high-current photo-cathode injector

    SciTech Connect

    Shukui Zhang; David Hardy; George Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2005-08-21

    We report the characterization and performance of a diode-pumped, high-power, picosecond laser system designed for high-current photo-cathode accelerator injector at repetition rates of both 75MHz and 750MHz. The characterization includes measurement of the amplification gain, thermally induced beam mode variation, harmonic conversion efficiency, system's amplitude stability, beam pointing stability, beam profile, and pulse width for both frequencies.

  9. Unbiased Sunlight-Driven Artificial Photosynthesis of Carbon Monoxide from CO2 Using a ZnTe-Based Photocathode and a Perovskite Solar Cell in Tandem.

    PubMed

    Jang, Youn Jeong; Jeong, Inyoung; Lee, Jaehyuk; Lee, Jinwoo; Ko, Min Jae; Lee, Jae Sung

    2016-07-26

    Solar fuel production, mimicking natural photosynthesis of converting CO2 into useful fuels and storing solar energy as chemical energy, has received great attention in recent years. Practical large-scale fuel production needs a unique device capable of CO2 reduction using only solar energy and water as an electron source. Here we report such a system composed of a gold-decorated triple-layered ZnO@ZnTe@CdTe core-shell nanorod array photocathode and a CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cell in tandem. The assembly allows effective light harvesting of higher energy photons (>2.14 eV) from the front-side photocathode and lower energy photons (>1.5 eV) from the back-side-positioned perovskite solar cell in a single-photon excitation. This system represents an example of a photocathode-photovoltaic tandem device operating under sunlight without external bias for selective CO2 conversion. It exhibited a steady solar-to-CO conversion efficiency over 0.35% and a solar-to-fuel conversion efficiency exceeding 0.43% including H2 as a minor product.

  10. Transmission photocathodes based on stainless steel mesh and quartz glass coated with N-doped DLC thin films prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balalykin, N. I.; Huran, J.; Nozdrin, M. A.; Feshchenko, A. A.; Kobzev, A. P.; Arbet, J.

    2016-03-01

    The influence was investigated of N-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC) films properties on the quantum efficiency of a prepared transmission photocathode. N-doped DLC thin films were deposited on a silicon substrate, a stainless steel mesh and quartz glass (coated with 5 nm thick Cr adhesion film) by reactive magnetron sputtering using a carbon target and gas mixture Ar, 90%N2+10%H2. The elements' concentration in the films was determined by RBS and ERD. The quantum efficiency was calculated from the measured laser energy and the measured cathode charge. For the study of the vectorial photoelectric effect, the quartz type photocathode was irradiated by intensive laser pulses to form pin-holes in the DLC film. The quantum efficiency (QE), calculated at a laser energy of 0.4 mJ, rose as the nitrogen concentration in the DLC films was increased and rose dramatically after the micron-size perforation in the quartz type photocathodes.

  11. Elucidating the sole contribution from electromagnetic near-fields in plasmon-enhanced Cu2O photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    DuChene, Joseph S.; Williams, Benjamin P.; Johnston-Peck, Aaron C.; Qiu, Jingjing; Gomes, Mathieu; Amilhau, Maxime; Bejleri, Donald; Weng, Jiena; Su, Dong; Huo, Fengwei; Stach, Eric A.; Wei, Wei David

    2015-11-05

    Despite many promising reports of plasmon-enhanced photocatalysis, the inability to identify the individual contributions from multiple enhancement mechanisms has delayed the development of general design rules for engineering efficient plasmonic photocatalysts. Herein, we construct a plasmonic photocathode comprised of Au@SiO2 (core@shell) nanoparticles embedded within a Cu2O nanowire network to exclusively examine the contribution from one such mechanism: electromagnetic near-field enhancement. The influence of the local electromagnetic field intensity is correlated with the overall light-harvesting efficiency of the device through variation of the SiO2 shell thickness (5—22 nm) to systematically tailor the distance between the plasmonic Au nanoparticles and the Cu2O nanowires. A three-fold increase in device photocurrent is achieved upon integrating the Au@SiO2 nanoparticles into the Cu2O nanowire network, further enabling a ~40% reduction in semiconductor film thickness while maintaining photocathode performance. Photoelectrochemical results are further correlated with photoluminescence studies and optical simulations to confirm that the near-field enhancement is the sole mechanism responsible for increased light absorption in the plasmonic photocathode.

  12. The status of gallium arsenide photoemission guns at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    M. Poelker; P. Adderley; M. Baylac; J. Brittian; D. Charles; J. Clark; J. Grames; J. Hansknecht; R. Kazimi; M. Stutzman; K. Surles-Law

    2004-10-07

    Highlights of the polarized beam program at CEBAF at Jefferson Lab will be presented. These include successful completion of portions of parity violation experiments G0 Forward Angle and HAPPex II. Experience with commercial modelocked Ti-Sapphire lasers and high polarization strained superlattice GaAs photocathodes will be discussed. Finally, gun charge lifetime measurements made over the course of many years following charge extraction of nearly 3000 C will be presented.

  13. Brazing of photocathode RF gun structures in Hydrogen atmosphere: Process qualification, effect of brazing on RF properties and vacuum compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kak, Ajay; Kulshreshtha, P.; Lal, Shankar; Kaul, Rakesh; Ganesh, P.; Pant, K. K.; Abhinandan, Lala

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we report on the development of a brazing process for an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible photocathode RF gun structure developed at our Centre. The choice of brazing alloy and its form, brazing clearance between parts to be joined and the brazing cycle adopted have been qualified through metallographic examination of identical joints on an OFE copper prototype that was cut open after brazing. The quality of brazed joint not only affects the UHV compatibility of the gun, but also influences the RF parameters finally achieved. A 2-D electromagnetic code, SUPERFISH, was used to predict the variation in RF parameters before and after brazing considering actual brazing clearances provided between the parts to be joined. Results obtained from low power RF measurements on the brazed gun structure confirm the integrity of the brazed joints and show good agreement with those predicted by electromagnetic simulations. The brazed gun structure has been leak-tested and pumped down to a vacuum level limited by the vacuum compatibility of the flange-fittings employed in the setup.

  14. CoSe2 Embedded in C3N4: An Efficient Photocathode for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Basu, Mrinmoyee; Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Chen, Chih-Jung; Lu, Tzu-Hsiang; Hu, Shu-Fen; Liu, Ru-Shi

    2016-10-12

    An efficient H2 evolution catalyst is developed by grafting CoSe2 nanorods into C3N4 nanosheets. The as-obtained C3N4-CoSe2 heterostructure can show excellent performance in H2 evolution with outstanding durability. To generate phatocathode for photoelectrochemical water splitting CoSe2 grafted in C3N4 was decorated on the top of p-Si microwires (MWs). p-Si/C3N4-CoSe2 heterostructure can work as an efficient photocathode material for solar H2 production in PEC water splitting. In 0.5 M H2SO4, p-Si/C3N4-CoSe2 can afford photocurrent density -4.89 mA/cm(2) at "0" V vs RHE and it can efficiently work for 3.5 h under visible light. Superior activity of C3N4-CoSe2 compared to CoSe2 toward H2 evolution is explained with the help of impedance spectroscopy.

  15. Generation of Picosecond Electron-Bunch Trains with Variable Spacing Using a Multi-Pulse Photocathode Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M.; Gai, W.; Jing, C.; Konecny, R.; Liu, W.; Mihalcea, D.; Piot, P.; Power, J.G.; Rihaoui, M.; Yusof, Z.; /Argonne

    2012-07-08

    We demonstrate the generation of a train of electron bunches with variable spacing at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The photocathode ultraviolet laser pulse consists of a train of four pulses produced via polarization splitting using two alpha-BBO crystals. The photoemitted electron bunches are then manipulated in a horizontally-bending dogleg with variable longitudinal dispersion. A downstream vertically-deflecting cavity is then used to diagnose the temporal profile of the electron beam. The generation of a train composed of four bunches with tunable spacing is demonstrated. Such a train of bunch could have application to, e.g., the resonant excitation of wakefield in dielectric-lined structures. We have presented preliminary measurements on a simple technique to generate a train of electron bunches with variable separation. In the initial experiment appreciable density modulation down to wavelengths of {approx}1.8 mm (corresponding to a temporal separation of {approx}6 ps) were achieved for a total charge of 0.5 nC. Finding ways to reach smaller separations is being explored with the help of numerical simulations and will be presented elsewhere.

  16. Growth of poly-crystalline Cu films on Y substrates by picosecond pulsed laser deposition for photocathode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontad, F.; Lorusso, A.; Klini, A.; Manousaki, A.; Perrone, A.; Fotakis, C.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the deposition of Cu thin films on Y substrates for photocathode applications by pulsed laser deposition employing picosecond laser pulses is reported and compared with the use of nanosecond pulses. The influence of power density (6-50 GW/cm2) on the ablation of the target material, as well as on the properties of the resulting film, is discussed. The material transfer from the target to the substrate surface was found to be rather efficient, in comparison to nanosecond ablation, leading to the growth of films with high thickness. Scanning electron microscope analysis indicated a quasi-continuous film morphology, at low power density values, becoming granular with increasing power density. The structural investigation, through X-ray diffraction, revealed the poly-crystalline nature of the films, with a preferential growth along the (111) crystallographic orientation of Cu cubic network. Finally, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed a low contamination level of the grown films, demonstrating the potential of a PLD technique for the fabrication of Cu/Y patterned structures, with applications in radiofrequency electron gun technology.

  17. Cu2O Photocathode for Low Bias Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting Enabled by NiFe-Layered Double Hydroxide Co-Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Huan; Wolfe, Jonathan; Fichou, Denis; Chen, Zhong

    2016-08-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) are bimetallic hydroxides that currently attract considerable attention as co-catalysts in photoelectrochemical (PEC) systems in view of water splitting under solar light. A wide spectrum of LDHs can be easily prepared on demand by tuning their chemical composition and structural morphology. We describe here the electrochemical growth of NiFe-LDH overlayers on Cu2O electrodes and study their PEC behavior. By using the modified Cu2O/NiFe-LDH electrodes we observe a remarkable seven-fold increase of the photocurrent intensity under an applied voltage as low as ‑0.2 V vs Ag/AgCl. The origin of such a pronounced effect is the improved electron transfer towards the electrolyte brought by the NiFe-LDH overlayer due to an appropriate energy level alignment. Long-term photostability tests reveal that Cu2O/NiFe-LDH photocathodes show no photocurrent loss after 40 hours of operation under light at ‑0.2 V vs Ag/AgCl low bias condition. These improved performances make Cu2O/NiFe-LDH a suitable photocathode material for low voltage H2 production. Indeed, after 8 hours of H2 production under ‑0.2 V vs Ag/AgCl the PEC cell delivers a 78% faradaic efficiency. This unprecedented use of Cu2O/NiFe-LDH as an efficient photocathode opens new perspectives in view of low biasd or self-biased PEC water splitting under sunlight illumination.

  18. Cu2O Photocathode for Low Bias Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting Enabled by NiFe-Layered Double Hydroxide Co-Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Huan; Wolfe, Jonathan; Fichou, Denis; Chen, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) are bimetallic hydroxides that currently attract considerable attention as co-catalysts in photoelectrochemical (PEC) systems in view of water splitting under solar light. A wide spectrum of LDHs can be easily prepared on demand by tuning their chemical composition and structural morphology. We describe here the electrochemical growth of NiFe-LDH overlayers on Cu2O electrodes and study their PEC behavior. By using the modified Cu2O/NiFe-LDH electrodes we observe a remarkable seven-fold increase of the photocurrent intensity under an applied voltage as low as −0.2 V vs Ag/AgCl. The origin of such a pronounced effect is the improved electron transfer towards the electrolyte brought by the NiFe-LDH overlayer due to an appropriate energy level alignment. Long-term photostability tests reveal that Cu2O/NiFe-LDH photocathodes show no photocurrent loss after 40 hours of operation under light at −0.2 V vs Ag/AgCl low bias condition. These improved performances make Cu2O/NiFe-LDH a suitable photocathode material for low voltage H2 production. Indeed, after 8 hours of H2 production under −0.2 V vs Ag/AgCl the PEC cell delivers a 78% faradaic efficiency. This unprecedented use of Cu2O/NiFe-LDH as an efficient photocathode opens new perspectives in view of low biasd or self-biased PEC water splitting under sunlight illumination. PMID:27487918

  19. Performance evaluation of a depth-of-interaction detector by use of position-sensitive PMT with a super-bialkali photocathode.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Nitta, Munetaka; Inadama, Naoko; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Eiji; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-01-01

    Our purpose in this work was to evaluate the performance of a 4-layer depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector composed of GSO crystals by use of a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PMT) with a super-bialkali photocathode (SBA) by comparing it with a standard bialkali photocathode (BA) regarding the ability to identify the scintillating crystals, energy resolution, and timing resolution. The 4-layer DOI detector was composed of a 16 × 16 array of 2.9 × 2.9 × 7.5 mm(3) GSO crystals for each layer and an 8 × 8 multi-anode array type position-sensitive PMT. The DOI was achieved by a reflector control method, and the Anger method was used for calculating interacting points. The energy resolution in full width at half-maximum (FWHM) at 511 keV energy for the top layer (the farthest from the PMT) was improved and was 12.0% for the SBA compared with the energy resolution of 12.7% for the BA. As indicators of crystal identification ability, the peak-to-valley ratio and distance-to-width ratio were calculated; the latter was defined as the average of the distance between peaks per the average of the peak width. For both metrics, improvement of several percent was obtained; for example, the peak-to-valley ratio was increased from 1.78 (BA) to 1.86 (SBA), and the distance-to-width ratio was increased from 1.47 (BA) to 1.57 (SBA). The timing resolution (FWHM) in the bottom layer was improved slightly and was 2.4 ns (SBA) compared with 2.5 ns (BA). Better performance of the DOI detector is expected by use of a super bialkali photocathode.

  20. A silicon-based photocathode for water reduction with an epitaxial SrTiO3 protection layer and a nanostructured catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Li; McDaniel, Martin D.; Wang, Shijun; Posadas, Agham B.; Li, Xiaohan; Huang, Haiyu; Lee, Jack C.; Demkov, Alexander A.; Bard, Allen J.; Ekerdt, John G.; Yu, Edward T.

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly increasing global demand for energy combined with the environmental impact of fossil fuels has spurred the search for alternative sources of clean energy. One promising approach is to convert solar energy into hydrogen fuel using photoelectrochemical cells. However, the semiconducting photoelectrodes used in these cells typically have low efficiencies and/or stabilities. Here we show that a silicon-based photocathode with a capping epitaxial oxide layer can provide efficient and stable hydrogen production from water. In particular, a thin epitaxial layer of strontium titanate (SrTiO3) was grown directly on Si(001) by molecular beam epitaxy. Photogenerated electrons can be transported easily through this layer because of the conduction-band alignment and lattice match between single-crystalline SrTiO3 and silicon. The approach was used to create a metal-insulator-semiconductor photocathode that, under a broad-spectrum illumination at 100 mW cm-2, exhibits a maximum photocurrent density of 35 mA cm-2 and an open circuit potential of 450 mV there was no observable decrease in performance after 35 hours of operation in 0.5 M H2SO4. The performance of the photocathode was also found to be highly dependent on the size and spacing of the structured metal catalyst. Therefore, mesh-like Ti/Pt nanostructured catalysts were created using a nanosphere lithography lift-off process and an applied-bias photon-to-current efficiency of 4.9% was achieved.

  1. Low energy electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy studies of Cs-O activation layer on p-type GaAs photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Xiuguang; Cotta, Alexandre A. C.; Chen, Gong; N'Diaye, Alpha T.; Schmid, Andreas K.; Yamamoto, Naoto

    2014-11-07

    Work function, photoemission yield, and Auger electron spectra were measured on (001) p-type GaAs during negative electron affinity (NEA) surface preparation, surface degradation, and heating processes. The emission current sensitively depends on work function change and its dependence allows us to determine that the shape of the vacuum barrier was close to double triangular. Regarding the NEA surface degradation during photoemission, we discuss the importance of residual gas components the oxygen and hydrogen. We also found that gentle annealing (≤100 °C) of aged photocathodes results in a lower work function and may offer a patch to reverse the performance degradation.

  2. Double junction photoelectrochemical solar cells based on Cu2ZnSnS4/Cu2ZnSnSe4 thin film as composite photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Qiang, Y. H.; Zhao, Y. L.; Gu, X. Q.

    2014-02-01

    A solvothermal method was used to synthesize Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) and Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) nanoparticles. CZTS/CZTSe bilayer films have been fabricated via a layer-by-layer blade coating process on the fluorine dope tin oxide (FTO) substrates. We converted conventional dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) into double junction photoelectrochemical solar cells with the replacement of the Pt-coated counter electrode with the as-prepared films as composite photocathodes. Compared with conventional DSSCs, the cells show an increased short circuit current and power conversion efficiency.

  3. Highly Effective Polarized Electron Sources Based on Strained Semiconductor Superlattice with Distributed Bragg Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Gerchikov, L.G.; Aulenbacher, K.; Clendenin, J.E.; Kuz'michev, V.V.; Mamaev, Yu.A.; Maruyama, T.; Mikhrin, V.S.; Roberts, J.S.; Utstinov, V.M.; Vasiliev, D.A.; Vasiliev, A.P.; Yashin, Yu.P.; Zhukov, A.E.; /St. Petersburg Polytechnic Inst. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /SLAC /Ioffe Phys. Tech. Inst. /Sheffield U.

    2007-11-28

    Resonance enhancement of the quantum efficiency of new polarized electron photocathodes based on a short-period strained superlattice structures is reported. The superlattice is a part of an integrated Fabry-Perot optical cavity. We demonstrate that the Fabry-Perot resonator enhances the quantum efficiency by the order of magnitude in the wavelength region of the main polarization maximum. The high structural quality implied by these results points to the very promising application of these photocathodes for spin-polarized electron sources.

  4. Highly Effective Polarized Electron Sources Based on Strained Semiconductor Superlattice with Distributed Bragg Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Gerchikov, L. G.; Kuz'michev, V. V.; Mamaev, Yu. A.; Vasiliev, D. A.; Yashin, Yu. P.; Aulenbacher, K.; Clendenin, J. E.; Maruyama, T.; Mikhrin, V. S.; Ustinov, V. M.; Vasiliev, A. P.; Zhukov, A. E.; Roberts, J. S.

    2008-02-06

    Resonance enhancement of the quantum efficiency of new polarized electron photocathodes based on a short-period strained superlattice structures is reported. The superlattice is a part of an integrated Fabry-Perot optical cavity. We demonstrate that the Fabry-Perot resonator enhances the quantum efficiency by the order of magnitude in the wavelength region of the main polarization maximum. The high structural quality implied by these results points to the very promising application of these photocathodes for spin-polarized electron sources.

  5. An Efficient CuxO Photocathode for Hydrogen Production at Neutral pH: New Insights from Combined Spectroscopy and Electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Baran, Tomasz; Wojtyła, Szymon; Lenardi, Cristina; Vertova, Alberto; Ghigna, Paolo; Achilli, Elisabetta; Fracchia, Martina; Rondinini, Sandra; Minguzzi, Alessandro

    2016-08-24

    Light-driven water splitting is one of the most promising approaches for using solar energy in light of more sustainable development. In this paper, a highly efficient p-type copper(II) oxide photocathode is studied. The material, prepared by thermal treatment of CuI nanoparticles, is initially partially reduced upon working conditions and soon reaches a stable form. Upon visible-light illumination, the material yields a photocurrent of 1.3 mA cm(-2) at a potential of 0.2 V vs a reversible hydrogen electrode at mild pH under illumination by AM 1.5 G and retains 30% of its photoactivity after 6 h. This represents an unprecedented result for a nonprotected Cu oxide photocathode at neutral pH. The photocurrent efficiency as a function of the applied potential was determined using scanning electrochemical microscopy. The material was characterized in terms of photoelectrochemical features; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near-edge structure, fixed-energy X-ray absorption voltammetry, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analyses were carried out on pristine and used samples, which were used to explain the photoelectrochemical behavior. The optical features of the oxide are evidenced by direct reflectance spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy, and Mott-Schottky analysis at different pH values explains the exceptional activity at neutral pH.

  6. Carbon-shell-decorated p-semiconductor PbMoO4 nanocrystals for efficient and stable photocathode of photoelectrochemical water reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ligang; Tang, Hanqin; Tian, Yang

    2016-07-01

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting using semiconductors is a promising method for the future scalable production of renewable hydrogen fuels. The critical issues in PEC water splitting include the development of the photoelectrode materials with high efficiency and long-term stability, especially for p-type semiconductor photocathodes. Herein, we report the use of citric acid (CA) pyrolysis to prepare carbon-shell-decorated PbMoO4 (C@PbMoO4) nanocrystals via a simple solvothermal method. Different carbon shell thicknesses below 10 nm were generated by varying the amount of CA in the precursor solution. In contrast, without using CA, bare PbMoO4 nanocrystals were obtained. The PEC experiments showed that 2-nm carbon shell could preferably improve the water splitting performance of PbMoO4: the photocurrent density of 2-nm C@PbMoO4 is nearly 2-fold high as that of bare PbMoO4 at 0 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE). The surface charge transfer efficiency of 2-nm C@PbMoO4 in the PEC process was tested to increase from 83% to 90.4%, the charge separation efficiency enhanced 56%, and the PEC stability also greatly increased compared to those of the bare PbMoO4 nanocrystals. This strategy could be applied to other p-type semiconducting photocathodes for low-cost solar-fuel-generation devices.

  7. Interfacial band-edge engineered TiO2 protection layer on Cu2O photocathodes for efficient water reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaesuk; Song, Jun Tae; Jang, Ho Seong; Choi, Min-Jae; Sim, Dong Min; Yim, Soonmin; Lim, Hunhee; Jung, Yeon Sik; Oh, Jihun

    2017-01-01

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting has emerged as a potential pathway to produce sustainable and renewable chemical fuels. Here, we present a highly active Cu2O/TiO2 photocathode for H2 production by enhancing the interfacial band-edge energetics of the TiO2 layer, which is realized by controlling the fixed charge density of the TiO2 protection layer. The band-edge engineered Cu2O/TiO2 (where TiO2 was grown at 80 °C via atomic layer deposition) enhances the photocurrent density up to -2.04 mA/cm2 at 0 V vs. RHE under 1 sun illumination, corresponding to about a 1,200% enhancement compared to the photocurrent density of the photocathode protected with TiO2 grown at 150 °C. Moreover, band-edge engineering of the TiO2 protection layer prevents electron accumulation at the TiO2 layer and enhances both the Faraday efficiency and the stability for hydrogen production during the PEC water reduction reaction. This facile control over the TiO2/electrolyte interface will also provide new insight for designing highly efficient and stable protection layers for various other photoelectrodes such as Si, InP, and GaAs. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Comparison of multialkali and GaAs photocathode detectors for Joint European Torus edge light detection and ranging Thomson scattering profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempenaars, M.; Nielsen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Gowers, C.; Beurskens, M.

    2004-10-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak has two light detection and ranging (LIDAR) Thomson scattering systems, one for the core and one dedicated to the edge Te and ne profiles. The LIDAR scheme is unique to JET and is envisaged for use on ITER. The system's spatial resolution is defined by the convolution product of its components: laser pulse duration, detector response time, and digitizer speed. The original multialkali photocathode microchannel plate photomultipliers dictated the response time, resulting in a 12 cm spatial resolution along the line of sight. In the edge LIDAR system, this is improved by aligning the line of sight with the flux surfaces, thus improving the effective spatial resolution to 2 cm depending on the plasma configuration. To meet demands for better edge gradient resolution, an upgrade to higher quantum efficiency detectors was proposed. Four GaAs photocathode detectors have been procured, two of which surpass expectations. These detectors are shown to have a more than two times higher effective quantum efficiency and their response time is at least twice as fast as the multialkali detectors. Combined with a fast digitizer this improves the spatial resolution by a factor of two, down to one centimeter effective, depending on plasma configuration.

  9. Enhanced photocathodic behaviors of Pb(Zr{sub 0.20}Ti{sub 0.80})O{sub 3} films on Si substrates for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xiaorong; Dong, Wen; Zheng, Fengang; Fang, Liang; Shen, Mingrong

    2015-06-15

    Wide bandgap ferroelectric Pb(Zr{sub 0.20}Ti{sub 0.80})O{sub 3} films were deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated Si-pn{sup +} substrates with an intention to form efficient Si-pn{sup +}/ITO/Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} (PZT) photocathode for hydrogen production. Depolarization electric field generated in PZT film due to poling can drive the photogenerated electrons from Si-pn{sup +} junction to PZT film, resulting in enhanced photoelectrochemical activity of the photocathode. Comparing the electrode with as-prepared PZT film, the photocurrent increased from −100 μA cm{sup −2} to −1.2 mA cm{sup −2} at 0 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) and the onset potential from 0.36 V to 0.7 V vs. RHE under 100 mW cm{sup −2} illumination, manifesting the great advantage of depolarization electric field in driving the photogenerated carriers not only in the ferroelectric film but also on the interface of different semiconductors.

  10. Nanomechanical and electrical properties of Nb thin films deposited on Pb substrates by pulsed laser deposition as a new concept photocathode for superconductor cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontad, F.; Lorusso, A.; Panareo, M.; Monteduro, A. G.; Maruccio, G.; Broitman, E.; Perrone, A.

    2015-12-01

    We report a design of photocathode, which combines the good photoemissive properties of lead (Pb) and the advantages of superconducting performance of niobium (Nb) when installed into a superconducting radio-frequency gun. The new configuration is obtained by a coating of Nb thin film grown on a disk of Pb via pulsed laser deposition. The central emitting area of Pb is masked by a shield to avoid the Nb deposition. The nanomechanical properties of the Nb film, obtained through nanoindentation measurements, reveal a hardness of 2.8±0.3 GPa, while the study of the electrical resistivity of the film shows the appearance of the superconducting transitions at 9.3 K and 7.3 K for Nb and Pb, respectively, very close to the bulk material values. Additionally, morphological, structural and contamination studies of Nb thin film expose a very low droplet density on the substrate surface, a small polycrystalline orientation of the films and a low contamination level. These results, together with the acceptable Pb quantum efficiency of 2×10-5 found at 266 nm, demonstrate the potentiality of the new concept photocathode.

  11. A new approach to light up the application of semiconductor nanomaterials for photoelectrochemical biosensors: using self-operating photocathode as a highly selective enzyme sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Li; Liu, Kang-Li; Dong, Yu-Ming; Wu, Xiu-Ming; Li, Zai-Jun; Zhang, Chi

    2014-12-15

    Due to the intrinsic hole oxidation reaction occurred on the photoanode surface, currently developed photoelectrochemical biosensors suffer from the interference from coexisting reductive species (acting as electron donor) and a novel design strategy of photoelectrode for photoelectrochemical detection is urgently required. In this paper, a self-operating photocathode based on CdS quantum dots sensitized three-dimensional (3D) nanoporous NiO was designed and created, which showed highly selective and reversible response to dissolved oxygen (acting as electron acceptor) in the electrolyte solution. Using glucose oxidase (GOD) as a biocatalyst, a novel photoelectrochemical sensor for glucose was developed. The commonly encountered interferents such as H2O2, ascorbic acid (AA), cysteine (Cys), dopamine (DA), etc., almost had no effect for the cathodic photocurrent of the 3D NiO/CdS electrode, though these substances were proved to greatly influence the photocurrent of photoanodes, which indicated greatly improved selectivity of the method. The method was applied to detect glucose in real samples including serum and glucose injections with satisfactory results. This study could provide a new train of thought on designing of self-operating photocathode in photoelectrochemical sensing, promoting the application of semiconductor nanomaterials in photoelectrochemistry.

  12. Comparison of multialkali and GaAs photocathode detectors for Joint European Torus edge light detection and ranging Thomson scattering profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kempenaars, M.; Nielsen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Gowers, C.; Beurskens, M.

    2004-10-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak has two light detection and ranging (LIDAR) Thomson scattering systems, one for the core and one dedicated to the edge T{sub e} and n{sub e} profiles. The LIDAR scheme is unique to JET and is envisaged for use on ITER. The system's spatial resolution is defined by the convolution product of its components: laser pulse duration, detector response time, and digitizer speed. The original multialkali photocathode microchannel plate photomultipliers dictated the response time, resulting in a 12 cm spatial resolution along the line of sight. In the edge LIDAR system, this is improved by aligning the line of sight with the flux surfaces, thus improving the effective spatial resolution to 2 cm depending on the plasma configuration. To meet demands for better edge gradient resolution, an upgrade to higher quantum efficiency detectors was proposed. Four GaAs photocathode detectors have been procured, two of which surpass expectations. These detectors are shown to have a more than two times higher effective quantum efficiency and their response time is at least twice as fast as the multialkali detectors. Combined with a fast digitizer this improves the spatial resolution by a factor of two, down to one centimeter effective, depending on plasma configuration.

  13. The possibly important role played by Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} during the activation of GaN photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Xiaoqian E-mail: 214808748@qq.com; Wang, Honggang; Zhang, Junju; Li, Zhiming; Cui, Shiyao; Zhang, Lejuan

    2015-08-14

    Three different chemical solutions are used to remove the possible contamination on GaN surface, while Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} is still found at the surface. After thermal annealing at 710 °C in the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber and activated with Cs/O, all the GaN samples are successfully activated to the effective negative electron affinity (NEA) photocathodes. Among all samples, the GaN sample with the highest content of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} after chemical cleaning obtains the highest quantum efficiency. By analyzing the property of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the surface processing results, and electron affinity variations during Cs and Cs/O{sub 2} deposition on GaN of other groups, it is suggested that before the adsorption of Cs, Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} is not completely removed from GaN surface in our samples, which will combine with Cs and lead to a large decrease in electron affinity. Furthermore, the effective NEA is formed for GaN photocathode, along with the surface downward band bending. Based on this assumption, a new dipole model Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Cs is suggested, and the experimental effects are explained and discussed.

  14. High efficiency solar-to-hydrogen conversion on a monolithically integrated InGaN/GaN/Si adaptive tunnel junction photocathode.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shizhao; AlOtaibi, Bandar; Woo, Steffi Y; Wang, Yongjie; Botton, Gianluigi A; Mi, Zetian

    2015-04-08

    H2 generation under sunlight offers great potential for a sustainable fuel production system. To achieve high efficiency solar-to-hydrogen conversion, multijunction photoelectrodes have been commonly employed to absorb a large portion of the solar spectrum and to provide energetic charge carriers for water splitting. However, the design and performance of such tandem devices has been fundamentally limited by the current matching between various absorbing layers. Here, by exploiting the lateral carrier extraction scheme of one-dimensional nanowire structures, we have demonstrated that a dual absorber photocathode, consisting of p-InGaN/tunnel junction/n-GaN nanowire arrays and a Si solar cell wafer, can operate efficiently without the strict current matching requirement. The monolithically integrated photocathode exhibits an applied bias photon-to-current efficiency of 8.7% at a potential of 0.33 V versus normal hydrogen electrode and nearly unity Faradaic efficiency for H2 generation. Such an adaptive multijunction architecture can surpass the design and performance restrictions of conventional tandem photoelectrodes.

  15. Enhancing the Charge Separation in Nanocrystalline Cu2ZnSnS4 Photocathodes for Photoelectrochemical Application: The Role of Surface Modifications.

    PubMed

    Guijarro, Néstor; Prévot, Mathieu S; Sivula, Kevin

    2014-11-06

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) colloidal inks were employed to prepare thin-film photocathodes that served as a model system to interrogate the effect of different surface treatments, viz. CdS, CdSe, and ZnSe buffer layers along with methylviologen (MV) adsorption, on the photoelectrochemical (PEC) performance using aqueous Eu(3+) redox electrolyte. PEC experiments revealed that ZnSe and CdSe overlayers outperform traditional CdS, and the additional surface modification with MV was found to further boost the charge extraction. By analyzing the photocurrent onset behavior and measuring the open circuit photopotentials, insights are gained into the nature of the observed improvements. While a more favorable conduction band offset rationalizes the improvement offered by CdSe, charge transfer through midgap states is invoked for ZnSe. Improvement offered by MV treatment is clearly caused by both the shifting of the flat-band potential and a charge-transfer mediation effect. Overall, this work suggests promising alternative surface treatments for CZTS photocathodes for PEC energy conversion.

  16. New Developments in the Simulation of Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Benjamin M.; Paul, Kevin; Mullowney, Paul J.; Messmer, Peter; Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Esarey, Eric; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Leemans, Wim; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-22

    Improved computational methods are essential to the diverse and rapidly developing field of advanced accelerator concepts. We present an overview of some computational algorithms for laser-plasma concepts and high-brightness photocathode electron sources. In particular, we discuss algorithms for reduced laser-plasma models that can be orders of magnitude faster than their higher-fidelity counterparts, as well as important on-going efforts to include relevant additional physics that has been previously neglected. As an example of the former, we present 2D laser wakefield accelerator simulations in an optimal Lorentz frame, demonstrating >10 GeV energy gain of externally injected electrons over a 2 m interaction length, showing good agreement with predictions from scaled simulations and theory, with a speedup factor of {approx}2,000 as compared to standard particle-in-cell.

  17. New Developments in the Simulation of Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, K.; Cary, J.R.; Cowan, B.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Mullowney, P.J.; Messmer, P.; Esarey, E.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Vay, J.-L.

    2008-09-10

    Improved computational methods are essential to the diverse and rapidly developing field of advanced accelerator concepts. We present an overview of some computational algorithms for laser-plasma concepts and high-brightness photocathode electron sources. In particular, we discuss algorithms for reduced laser-plasma models that can be orders of magnitude faster than their higher-fidelity counterparts, as well as important on-going efforts to include relevant additional physics that has been previously neglected. As an example of the former, we present 2D laser wakefield accelerator simulations in an optimal Lorentz frame, demonstrating>10 GeV energy gain of externally injected electrons over a 2 m interaction length, showing good agreement with predictions from scaled simulations and theory, with a speedup factor of ~;;2,000 as compared to standard particle-in-cell.

  18. Near Infrared (NIR) Imaging Techniques Using Lasers and Nonlinear Crystal Optical Parametric Oscillator/Amplifier (OPO/OPA) Imaging and Transferred Electron (TE) Photocathode Image Intensifiers

    SciTech Connect

    YATES,GEORGE J.; MCDONALD,THOMAS E. JR.; BLISS,DAVID E.; CAMERON,STEWART M.; GREIVES,KENNETH H.; ZUTAVERN,FRED J.

    2000-12-20

    Laboratory experiments utilizing different near-infrared (NIR) sensitive imaging techniques for LADAR range gated imaging at eye-safe wavelengths are presented. An OPO/OPA configuration incorporating a nonlinear crystal for wavelength conversion of 1.56 micron probe or broadcast laser light to 807 nm light by utilizing a second pump laser at 532 nm for gating and gain, was evaluated for sensitivity, resolution, and general image quality. These data are presented with similar test results obtained from an image intensifier based upon a transferred electron (TE) photocathode with high quantum efficiency (QE) in the 1-2 micron range, with a P-20 phosphor output screen. Data presented include range-gated imaging performance in a cloud chamber with varying optical attenuation of laser reflectance images.

  19. Near IR Photocathode Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Electron Photoemission from InP", Appl. Phys. Letters, Vol. 25, No. 11, pp. 645 - 646, (1974). 11 J.S. Escher , R.L. Bell, P.E. Gregory, S.B. Hyder, T.J...Photomultiplier with Fast Time Response”, SPIE Vol. 2022, pp. 64 - 73, (1993). 14 J.S. Escher and R. Sankaran, "Transferred-electron Photoemission to 1.4 µm

  20. Nano-scale characterization of GaAsP/GaAs strained superlattice structure by nano-beam electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Xiuguang; Nakahara, Hirotaka; Saitoh, Koh; Tanaka, Nobuo; Takeda, Yoshikazu

    2014-03-17

    Distribution of lattice strain in a GaAsP/GaAs superlattice with a periodicity of 10 nm thickness, deposited on a 100 nm GaAs basal layer has been measured by nano-beam electron diffraction. The superlattice on the (001) plane of the basal GaAs layer shows a constant lattice strain from the bottom to the top layers, whereas the superlattice on the basal GaAs surface sloped by 16° from the (001) plane shows a variation of the lattice strain and crystal orientation. The difference of the strain distributions was discussed from the viewpoint of average strain. This tilt was explained by an atomistic model.

  1. Fiber-Based, Spatially and Temporally Shaped Picosecond UV Laser for Advanced RF Gun Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Anderson, S G; Betts, S M; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Hernandez, J E; Johnson, M; Jovanovic, I; Messerly, M; Pruet, J; Tremaine, A M; McNabb, D P; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2007-06-08

    The fiber-based, spatially and temporally shaped, picosecond UV laser system described here has been specifically designed for advanced rf gun applications, with a special emphasis on the production of high-brightness electron beams for free-electron lasers and Compton scattering light sources. The laser pulse can be shaped to a flat-top in both space and time with a duration of 10 ps at full width of half-maximum (FWHM) and rise and fall times under 1 ps. The expected pulse energy is 50 {micro}J at 261.75 nm and the spot size diameter of the beam at the photocathode is 2 mm. A fiber oscillator and amplifier system generates a chirped pump pulse at 1047 nm; stretching is achieved in a chirped fiber Bragg grating. A single multi-layer dielectric grating based compressor recompresses the input pulse to 250 fs FWHM and a two stage harmonic converter frequency quadruples the beam. Temporal shaping is achieved with a Michelson-based ultrafast pulse stacking device with nearly 100% throughput. Spatial shaping is achieved by truncating the beam at the 20% energy level with an iris and relay-imaging the resulting beam profile onto the photocathode. The integration of the system, as well as preliminary laser measurements will be presented.

  2. Comparison of the Performance of CoP-Coated and Pt-Coated Radial Junction n(+)p-Silicon Microwire-Array Photocathodes for the Sunlight-Driven Reduction of Water to H2(g).

    PubMed

    Roske, Christopher W; Popczun, Eric J; Seger, Brian; Read, Carlos G; Pedersen, Thomas; Hansen, Ole; Vesborg, Peter C K; Brunschwig, Bruce S; Schaak, Raymond E; Chorkendorff, Ib; Gray, Harry B; Lewis, Nathan S

    2015-05-07

    The electrocatalytic performance for hydrogen evolution has been evaluated for radial-junction n(+)p-Si microwire (MW) arrays with Pt or cobalt phosphide, CoP, nanoparticulate catalysts in contact with 0.50 M H2SO4(aq). The CoP-coated (2.0 mg cm(-2)) n(+)p-Si MW photocathodes were stable for over 12 h of continuous operation and produced an open-circuit photovoltage (Voc) of 0.48 V, a light-limited photocurrent density (Jph) of 17 mA cm(-2), a fill factor (ff) of 0.24, and an ideal regenerative cell efficiency (ηIRC) of 1.9% under simulated 1 Sun illumination. Pt-coated (0.5 mg cm(-2)) n(+)p-Si MW-array photocathodes produced Voc = 0.44 V, Jph = 14 mA cm(-2), ff = 0.46, and η = 2.9% under identical conditions. Thus, the MW geometry allows the fabrication of photocathodes entirely comprised of earth-abundant materials that exhibit performance comparable to that of devices that contain Pt.

  3. CuInGaS2 photocathodes treated with SbX3 (X  =  Cl, I): the effect of the halide on solar water splitting performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guijarro, Néstor; Prévot, Mathieu S.; Johnson, Melissa; Yu, Xiaoyun; Bourée, Wiktor S.; Jeanbourquin, Xavier A.; Bornoz, Pauline; Le Formal, Florian; Sivula, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    The realization of photoelectrochemical tandem cells for efficient solar-to-hydrogen energy conversion is currently impeded by the lack of inexpensive, stable, and efficient photocathodes. The family of sulfide chalcopyrites (CuIn x Ga1-x S2) has recently demonstrated a remarkable stability and performance even when prepared by solution-based routes that potentially lower the cost of fabrication. However, the photovoltage delivered by the photocathodes is still well-below the attainable values, a classical limitation linked to a large density of surface states in these materials. In the present work, we show that the identity of halide present during the growth of the solution-processed CuIn0.3Ga0.7S2 (CIGS) thin-films governs the overall performance by directing the crystal growth and the passivation of surface states. Replacing chlorine by iodine leads to CIGS photocathodes that deliver photocurrents of 5 mA cm-2 (at 0 V versus RHE) and a turn-on voltage of 0.5 V versus RHE without charge extracting overlayer nor any sign of deterioration during stability test.

  4. Photoelectrochemical Reduction of CO2 Coupled to Water Oxidation Using a Photocathode With a Ru(II)-Re(I) Complex Photocatalyst and a CoOx/TaON Photoanode.

    PubMed

    Sahara, Go; Kumagai, Hiromu; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Kaeffer, Nicolas; Artero, Vincent; Higashi, Masanobu; Abe, Ryu; Ishitani, Osamu

    2016-10-02

    Photoelectrochemical CO2 reduction activity of a hybrid photocathode, based on a Ru(II)-Re(I) supramolecular metal complex photocatalyst immobilized on a NiO electrode (NiO-RuRe) was confirmed in an aqueous electrolyte solution. Under half-reaction conditions, the NiO-RuRe photocathode generated CO with high selectivity, and its turnover number for CO formation reached 32 based on the amount of immobilized RuRe. A photoelectrochemical cell comprising a NiO-RuRe photocathode and a CoOx/TaON photoanode showed activity for visible-light-driven CO2 reduction using water as a reductant to generate CO and O2, with the assistance of an external electrical (0.3 V) and chemical bias (0.10 V) produced by a pH difference. This is the first example of a molecular and semiconductor photocatalyst hybrid-constructed photoelectrochemical cell for visibl-light-driven CO2 reduction using water as a reductant.

  5. Preparation of porous TiO2/ZnO composite film and its photocathodic protection properties for 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongmei; Liu, Wei; Cao, Lixin; Su, Ge; Duan, Ruijing

    2014-05-01

    TiO2/ZnO composite films with porous structure were prepared on the 304 stainless steel (304SS) by the sol-gel method and heating treatment. The crystalline phase and morphology of as-prepared TiO2/ZnO composite films were characterized systematically by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, respectively. The influences of Ti/Zn molar ratio and the annealing temperature on the photoelectric property of the samples have been investigated and their photocathodic protection performances for 304 stainless steel under dark and UV conditions have also been evaluated in 3.0% NaCl solution by the electrochemical measurements. The results indicate that porous TiO2/ZnO composite film has a great enhancement of the light absorption and photoelectric property under UV illumination. This can be ascribed to the mutual effect of TiO2/ZnO heterojunctions and the porous structures in the composite films, which provide a better photogenerated cathodic protection for 304SS.

  6. Direct Water Splitting under Visible Light with Nanostructured Hematite and WO3 Photoanodes and a GaInP2 Photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Deutsch, T.; Turner, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    A p-GaInP{sub 2} photocathode was paired with nanostructured hematite and tungsten trioxide photoanodes to investigate the utility of these systems for direct water splitting under visible light illumination. For the hematite system, under illumination at open-circuit conditions, the potential of hematite shifts cathodically and that of the GaInP{sub 2} shifts anodically. Under short-circuit condition and visible light illumination, the combination of the two photoelectrodes can split water, though with a very low rate of a few {micro}A/cm{sup 2} even at an intensity of 1 W/cm{sup 2}. It was determined that the very low photocurrent from the hematite nanorod photoelectrode limits the short-circuit current of the two-photoelectrode combination. Similar potential shifts were observed with the nanostructured WO{sub 3}/GaInP{sub 2} combination. However, at light intensities below 0.2 W/cm{sup 2}, the short-circuited combination would not split water due to an insufficient potential difference. Above 0.2 W/cm{sup 2}, the combination can split water under visible light, with {approx}20 {micro}A/cm{sup 2} obtained at 1 W/cm{sup 2}. A linear photocurrent-light intensity relationship was observed and was attributed to efficient charge transfer and a low recombination of the charge carriers. The bandgap and the associated absorption limit of WO{sub 3} remain a challenge for a higher efficiency system.

  7. Electrochemical Self-Assembly of Nanostructured CuSCN/Rhodamine B Hybrid Thin Film and Its Dye-Sensitized Photocathodic Properties.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Takuya; Ogawa, Yuta; Sun, Lina; White, Matthew Schuette; Glowacki, Eric Daniel; Scharber, Markus Clark; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar; Manseki, Kazuhiro; Sugiura, Takashi; Yoshida, Tsukasa

    2014-07-31

    Nanostructured hybrid thin films of CuSCN and rhodamine B (RB) are electrochemically self-assembled (ESA) by cathodic electrolysis in an ethanol/water mixture containing Cu(2+), SCN(-), and RB. By selecting the solvent, Cu(2+)/SCN(-) ratio, and the concentration of RB, we demonstrate several control parameters in the film formation. High loading of RB into the film has been achieved to reach a CuSCN:RB volume ratio of approximately 2:1. The RB solid could almost completely be extracted from the hybrid film by soaking the film in dimethylacetamide (DMA), leading to a large increase of the surface area. The crystallographic orientation of the nanostructure with respect to the substrate can be controlled. Efficient quenching of fluorescence of RB has been observed for the CuSCN/RB hybrid film, implying hole injection from RB excited state to CuSCN. Photoelectrochemical study on the porous crystalline CuSCN obtained after the DMA treatment and sensitized with RB revealed sensitized photocathodic action under visible light illumination, indicating the potential usefulness of the porous CuSCN electrodes for construction of tandem dye-sensitized solar cells.

  8. Low-temperature growth of AlN and GaN by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy for polarization engineered water splitting photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Akihiro; Suzuki, Michihiro; Fujii, Katsushi; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Masakazu

    2017-04-01

    Crystal properties of low-temperature grown AlN (LT-AlN) combined with low temperature GaN (LT-GaN) grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) were investigated to obtain a high quality GaN/AlN/GaN structure with a few-nm-thick AlN layer. LT-AlN suppresses unintentional Ga incorporation and can be pseudomorphically grown on GaN with a relatively smooth surface morphology. The lattice of LT-AlN coherent to GaN, however, was found to relax after reactor conditions were changed to grow the subsequent GaN layer at higher temperature. The top GaN layer grown on the relaxed LT-AlN, thus, exhibited a rough surface morphology and a threading dislocation density (TDD) higher than 109 cm-2 estimated from an X-ray diffraction measurement. An LT-GaN capping layer was found to be highly effective for avoiding such lattice relaxation of LT-AlN. The combination of LT-AlN and LT-GaN enables us to obtain a GaN/AlN/GaN junction with high Al content, a low TDD, and abrupt interfaces. As a result, introducing an LT-GaN layer improved the photoelectrochemical (PEC) property of a polarization engineered un-doped GaN/AlN/n-type GaN (u-GaN/AlN/n-GaN) photocathode for water splitting.

  9. Beam Dynamics Enhancement due to Accelerating Field Symmetrization in the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell S-Band Photocathode RF Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, D. T.; Wang, X. J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Miller, R. H.

    1997-05-01

    A 1.6 cell photocathode S-Band gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is now in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). One of the main features of this RF gun is the symmetrization of the RF coupling iris with a identical vacuum pumping port located in the full cell. The effects of the asymmetry caused by the RF coupling iris were experimentally investigated by positioning a metallic plunger at the back wall of the vacuum port iris. The higher order modes produced were studied using electron beamlets with n-fold symmetry. The n-fold beamlets were produced by masking the laser beam. These experimental results indicate that the integrated electrical center and the geometrical center of the gun are within 175 μm. Which is within the laser alignment tolerance of 250 μm. Comparing these results to previous generations of BNL type RF guns, there has been an order of magnitude decrease in the dipole field components of the longitudinal accelerating field E_z. Low power RF cold tests measurements of the guns full cell are consistent with the experimental beam dynamics transport studies.

  10. Electrochemical Self-Assembly of Nanostructured CuSCN/Rhodamine B Hybrid Thin Film and Its Dye-Sensitized Photocathodic Properties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured hybrid thin films of CuSCN and rhodamine B (RB) are electrochemically self-assembled (ESA) by cathodic electrolysis in an ethanol/water mixture containing Cu2+, SCN–, and RB. By selecting the solvent, Cu2+/SCN– ratio, and the concentration of RB, we demonstrate several control parameters in the film formation. High loading of RB into the film has been achieved to reach a CuSCN:RB volume ratio of approximately 2:1. The RB solid could almost completely be extracted from the hybrid film by soaking the film in dimethylacetamide (DMA), leading to a large increase of the surface area. The crystallographic orientation of the nanostructure with respect to the substrate can be controlled. Efficient quenching of fluorescence of RB has been observed for the CuSCN/RB hybrid film, implying hole injection from RB excited state to CuSCN. Photoelectrochemical study on the porous crystalline CuSCN obtained after the DMA treatment and sensitized with RB revealed sensitized photocathodic action under visible light illumination, indicating the potential usefulness of the porous CuSCN electrodes for construction of tandem dye-sensitized solar cells. PMID:25101148

  11. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Baca, D.M.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cheairs, R.B.; Fortgang, C.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Johnson, W.J.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Kinross-Wright, J.; McCann, S.W.; Meier, K.L.; Plato, J.G.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sherwood, B.A.; Sigler, F.E.; Timmer, C.A.; Warren, R.W.; Weber, M.E.; Wilson, W.L.

    1992-09-01

    We report recent results on the high-brightness electron linac and initial performance of the Advanced FEL at Los Alamos. The design and construction of the Advanced FEL beamline are based upon integration of advanced technologies such as high-brightness photoinjector, high-gradient compact linac, and permanent-magnet beamline components. With the use of microwiggler, both permanent magnet and pulsed electromagnet, and compact optical resonator, the Advanced FEL will be the first of its kind small enough to be mounted on an optical table and yet capable of providing highpower optical output spanning the near-ir and visible regions. A schematic of the Advanced FEL is shown in. The source of high-current electron pulses is a laser-gated photoelectron injector which forms-an integral part of a high-gradient 1.2-m long rf linear accelerator. The latter is capable of accelerating electrons up to 20 MeV with room temperature operation and 25 MeV at 77K. The electrons are produced in 10-ps pulses with peak currents as high as 300 A. These electron pulses are transported in a brightness-preserving beamline consisting of permanent magnet dipoles and quadrupoles. The beamline has three 30{degrees} bends. The first bend allows for the photocathode drive laser input; the second allows for the FEL output and the third turns the electron beam into the floor for safety reasons. Additional information on the design physics of the Advanced FEL can be found elsewhere.

  12. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Baca, D.M.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cheairs, R.B.; Fortgang, C.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Johnson, W.J.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Kinross-Wright, J.; McCann, S.W.; Meier, K.L.; Plato, J.G.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sherwood, B.A.; Sigler, F.E.; Timmer, C.A.; Warren, R.W.; Weber, M.E.; Wilson, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    We report recent results on the high-brightness electron linac and initial performance of the Advanced FEL at Los Alamos. The design and construction of the Advanced FEL beamline are based upon integration of advanced technologies such as high-brightness photoinjector, high-gradient compact linac, and permanent-magnet beamline components. With the use of microwiggler, both permanent magnet and pulsed electromagnet, and compact optical resonator, the Advanced FEL will be the first of its kind small enough to be mounted on an optical table and yet capable of providing highpower optical output spanning the near-ir and visible regions. A schematic of the Advanced FEL is shown in. The source of high-current electron pulses is a laser-gated photoelectron injector which forms-an integral part of a high-gradient 1.2-m long rf linear accelerator. The latter is capable of accelerating electrons up to 20 MeV with room temperature operation and 25 MeV at 77K. The electrons are produced in 10-ps pulses with peak currents as high as 300 A. These electron pulses are transported in a brightness-preserving beamline consisting of permanent magnet dipoles and quadrupoles. The beamline has three 30{degrees} bends. The first bend allows for the photocathode drive laser input; the second allows for the FEL output and the third turns the electron beam into the floor for safety reasons. Additional information on the design physics of the Advanced FEL can be found elsewhere.

  13. Advanced Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles, Mike; Nelms, Rick

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study that explores the depth and breadth of scientific facts, principles, and procedures which are required in the Advanced General National Vocational Qualifications (GNVQ) science through comparison with GCE Advanced level. The final report takes account of the updated 1996 version of GNVQ science. (DDR)

  14. Ultracold electron bunch generation via plasma photocathode emission and acceleration in a beam-driven plasma blowout.

    PubMed

    Hidding, B; Pretzler, G; Rosenzweig, J B; Königstein, T; Schiller, D; Bruhwiler, D L

    2012-01-20

    Beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration using low-ionization-threshold gas such as Li is combined with laser-controlled electron injection via ionization of high-ionization-threshold gas such as He. The He electrons are released with low transverse momentum in the focus of the copropagating, nonrelativistic-intensity laser pulse directly inside the accelerating or focusing phase of the Li blowout. This concept paves the way for the generation of sub-μm-size, ultralow-emittance, highly tunable electron bunches, thus enabling a flexible new class of an advanced free electron laser capable high-field accelerator.

  15. Calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet grazing incident spectrometer at the Advanced Light Source.

    PubMed

    Bakeman, M S; van Tilborg, J; Sokollik, T; Baum, D; Ybarrolaza, N; Duarte, R; Toth, C; Leemans, W P

    2010-10-01

    We present the design and calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet spectrometer. Calibration was performed at the Advance Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This spectrometer will be used to record the single shot spectrum of radiation emitted by the tapered hybrid undulator (THUNDER) undulator installed at the LOASIS GeV-class laser-plasma-accelerator. The spectrometer uses an aberration-corrected concave grating with 1200 lines/mm covering 11-62 nm and a microchannel plate detector with a CsI coated photocathode for increased quantum efficiency in the extreme ultraviolet. A touch screen interface controls the grating angle, aperture size, and placement of the detector in vacuum, allowing for high-resolution measurements over the entire spectral range.

  16. Calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet grazing incident spectrometer at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Bakeman, M. S.; Tilborg, J. van; Sokollik, T.; Baum, D.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Duarte, R.; Toth, C.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-10-15

    We present the design and calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet spectrometer. Calibration was performed at the Advance Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This spectrometer will be used to record the single shot spectrum of radiation emitted by the tapered hybrid undulator (THUNDER) undulator installed at the LOASIS GeV-class laser-plasma-accelerator. The spectrometer uses an aberration-corrected concave grating with 1200 lines/mm covering 11-62 nm and a microchannel plate detector with a CsI coated photocathode for increased quantum efficiency in the extreme ultraviolet. A touch screen interface controls the grating angle, aperture size, and placement of the detector in vacuum, allowing for high-resolution measurements over the entire spectral range.

  17. Research relative to high resolution camera on the advanced X-ray astrophysics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The HRC (High Resolution Camera) is a photon counting instrument to be flown on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). It is a large field of view, high angular resolution, detector for the x-ray telescope. The HRC consists of a CsI coated microchannel plate (MCP) acting as a soft x-ray photocathode, followed by a second MCP for high electronic gain. The MCPs are readout by a crossed grid of resistively coupled wires to provide high spatial resolution along with timing and pulse height data. The instrument will be used in two modes, as a direct imaging detector with a limiting sensitivity of 10 to the -15 ergs sq cm sec in a 10 to the 5th second exposure, and as a readout for an objective transmission grating providing spectral resolution of several hundreds to thousands.

  18. Advanced Microsensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This video looks at a spinoff application of the technology from advanced microsensors -- those that monitor and determine conditions of spacecraft like the Space Shuttle. The application featured is concerned with the monitoring of the health of premature babies.

  19. Boosting the photocurrent density of p-type solar cells based on organometal halide perovskite-sensitized mesoporous NiO photocathodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Zeng, Xianwei; Huang, Zhanfeng; Zhang, Wenjun; Qiao, Xianfeng; Hu, Bin; Zou, Xiaoping; Wang, Mingkui; Cheng, Yi-Bing; Chen, Wei

    2014-08-13

    The p-n tandem design of a sensitized solar cell is a novel concept holding the potential to overcome the efficiency limitation of conventional single-junction sensitized solar cells. Significant improvement of the photocurrent density (Jsc) of the p-type half-cell is a prerequisite for the realization of a highly efficient p-n tandem cell in the future. This study has demonstrated effective photocathodes based on novel organometal halide perovskite-sensitized mesoporous NiO in liquid-electrolyte-based p-type solar cells. An acceptably high Jsc up to 9.47 mA cm(-2) and efficiency up to 0.71% have been achieved on the basis of the CH3NH3PbI3/NiO solar cell at 100 mW cm(-2) light intensity, which are significantly higher than those of any previously reported liquid-electrolyte-based p-type solar cells based on sensitizers of organic dyes or inorganic quantum dots. The dense blocking layer made by spray pyrolysis of nickel acetylacetonate holds the key to determining the current flow direction of the solar cells. High hole injection efficiency at the perovskite/NiO interface and high hole collection efficiency through the mesoporous NiO network have been proved by time-resolved photoluminescence and transient photocurrent/photovoltage decay measurements. The limitation of these p-type solar cells primarily rests with the adverse light absorption by the NiO mesoporous film; the secondary limitation arises from the highly viscous ethyl acetate-based electrolyte, which is helpful for the solar cell stability but hinders fluent diffusion into the pore channels, giving rise to a nonlinear dependence of Jsc on the light intensity.

  20. Enhancing the performances of P3HT:PCBM – MoS3 based H2-evolving photocathodes with interfacial layers

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeteau, Tiphaine; Tondelier, Denis; Geffroy, Bernard; Brisse, Romain; Cornut, Renaud; Artero, Vincent; Jousselme, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Organic semiconductors have great potential for producing hydrogen in a durable and economically viable manner, as they rely on readily available materials and can be solution-processed over large areas. With the objective of building efficient hybrid organic-inorganic photo-electrochemical cells, we combined a noble metal-free and solution-processable catalyst for proton reduction, MoS3, and a poly-(3-hexylthiophene):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) bulk heterojunction (BHJ). Different interfacial layers were investigated to improve the charge transfer between P3HT:PCBM and MoS3. Metallic Al\\Ti interfacial layers led to an increase of the photocurrent up to 8 mA cm−2 at reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) potential with a 0.6 V anodic shift of the HER onset potential, a value close to the open circuit potential of the P3HT:PCBM solar cell. A 50 nm thick C60 layer also works as interfacial layer, with current density reaching 1 mA cm−2 at RHE potential. Moreover, two recently highlighted1 figures-of-merit, measuring the ratio of power saved, Φsaved,ideal and Φsaved,NPAC, were evaluated and discussed to compare the performances of various photocathodes assessed in a three-electrode configuration. Φsaved,ideal and Φsaved,NPAC use the RHE and a non-photoactive electrode with identical catalyst as dark electrode, respectively. They provide different information especially for the differentiation of the role of the photogenerating layer and the role of the catalyst. Best results were obtained with the Al\\Ti metallic interlayer, with Φsaved,ideal and Φsaved,NPAC reaching 0.64 % and 2.05 % respectively. PMID:26151685

  1. Pt/In2S3/CdS/Cu2ZnSnS4 Thin Film as an Efficient and Stable Photocathode for Water Reduction under Sunlight Radiation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Gunawan; Harada, Takashi; Kuang, Yongbo; Minegishi, Tsutomu; Domen, Kazunari; Ikeda, Shigeru

    2015-10-28

    An electrodeposited Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) compact thin film modified with an In2S3/CdS double layer and Pt deposits (Pt/In2S3/CdS/CZTS) was used as a photocathode for water splitting of hydrogen production under simulated sunlight (AM 1.5G) radiation. Compared to platinized electrodes based on a bare CZTS film (Pt/CZTS) and a CZTS film modified with a CdS single layer (Pt/CdS/CZTS), the Pt/In2S3/CdS/CZTS electrode exhibited a significantly high cathodic photocurrent. Moreover, the coverage of the In2S3 layer was found to be effective for stabilization against degradation induced by photocorrosion of the CdS layer. Bias-free water splitting with a power conversion efficiency of 0.28% was achieved by using a simple two-electrode cell consisting of the Pt/In2S3/CdS/CZTS photocathode and a BiVO4 photoanode.

  2. Advancing Reflectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-21

    transmissions, was first demonstrated using Global Navigation Satellite System ( GNSS ) reflections. Recently, reflectometry has been extended to digital... GNSS +R workshop provided an opportunity for engineers and Earth scientists to assess the state of the art, demonstrate new applications, and discuss...18 Eos, Vol. 94, No. 21, 21 May 2013 MEETING -.~ Advancing Reflectometry Workshop on Renectometry Using GNSS and Other Signals of Opportunity

  3. Technological Advancements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The influx of technology has brought significant improvements to school facilities. Many of those advancements can be found in classrooms, but when students head down the hall to use the washrooms, they are likely to find a host of technological innovations that have improved conditions in that part of the building. This article describes modern…

  4. Research Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2004-01-01

    Research advances, a new feature in Journal of Chemical Engineering that brings information about innovations in current areas of research to high school and college science faculty with an intent to provide educators with timely descriptions of latest progress in research that can be integrated into existing courses to update course content and…

  5. Advanced High-Speed Framing Camera Development for Fast, Visible Imaging Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Amy Lewis, Stuart Baker, Brian Cox, Abel Diaz, David Glass, Matthew Martin

    2011-05-11

    The advances in high-voltage switching developed in this project allow a camera user to rapidly vary the number of output frames from 1 to 25. A high-voltage, variable-amplitude pulse train shifts the deflection location to the new frame location during the interlude between frames, making multiple frame counts and locations possible. The final deflection circuit deflects to five different frame positions per axis, including the center position, making for a total of 25 frames. To create the preset voltages, electronically adjustable {+-}500 V power supplies were chosen. Digital-to-analog converters provide digital control of the supplies. The power supplies are clamped to {+-}400 V so as not to exceed the voltage ratings of the transistors. A field-programmable gated array (FPGA) receives the trigger signal and calculates the combination of plate voltages for each frame. The interframe time and number of frames are specified by the user, but are limited by the camera electronics. The variable-frame circuit shifts the plate voltages of the first frame to those of the second frame during the user-specified interframe time. Designed around an electrostatic image tube, a framing camera images the light present during each frame (at the photocathode) onto the tube’s phosphor. The phosphor persistence allows the camera to display multiple frames on the phosphor at one time. During this persistence, a CCD camera is triggered and the analog image is collected digitally. The tube functions by converting photons to electrons at the negatively charged photocathode. The electrons move quickly toward the more positive charge of the phosphor. Two sets of deflection plates skew the electron’s path in horizontal and vertical (x axis and y axis, respectively) directions. Hence, each frame’s electrons bombard the phosphor surface at a controlled location defined by the voltages on the deflection plates. To prevent the phosphor from being exposed between frames, the image tube

  6. Characterization and Suppression of the Electromagnetic Interference Induced Phase Shift in the JLab FEL Photo - Injector Advanced Drive Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    F. G. Wilson, D. Sexton, S. Zhang

    2011-09-01

    The drive laser for the photo-cathode gun used in the JLab Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility had been experiencing various phase shifts on the order of tens of degrees (>20{sup o} at 1497 MHz or >40ps) when changing the Advanced Drive Laser (ADL) [2][3][4] micro-pulse frequencies. These phase shifts introduced multiple complications when trying to setup the accelerator for operation, ultimately inhibiting the robustness and overall performance of the FEL. Through rigorous phase measurements and systematic characterizations, we determined that the phase shifts could be attributed to electromagnetic interference (EMI) coupling into the ADL phase control loop, and subsequently resolved the issue of phase shift to within tenths of a degree (<0.5{sup o} at 1497 MHz or <1ps). The diagnostic method developed and the knowledge gained through the entire process will prove to be invaluable for future designs of similar systems.

  7. Advanced Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  8. Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Behnke, B.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Biwer, C.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, Sukanta; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Buonanno, A.; Cadonati, L.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chen, Y.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Collette, C.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; D´ıaz, M.; Di Palma, I.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferreira, E. C.; Fisher, R. P.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gaonkar, S.; Gehrels, N.; Gergely, L. Á.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Hee, S.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lormand, M.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macarthur, J.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meadors, G. D.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Miller, A.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moore, B.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Pai, S.; Palashov, O.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Patrick, Z.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Post, A.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quiroga, G.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K.; Raymond, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V.; Romano, J. D.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sawadsky, A.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sutton, P. J.; Szczepanczyk, M.; Szeifert, G.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Xie, S.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, Q.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.

    2015-04-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second-generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA, USA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in Initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than Initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid and high frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

  9. Sintered wire cesium dispenser photocathode

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, Eric J; Ives, R. Lawrence; Falce, Louis R

    2014-03-04

    A photoelectric cathode has a work function lowering material such as cesium placed into an enclosure which couples a thermal energy from a heater to the work function lowering material. The enclosure directs the work function lowering material in vapor form through a low diffusion layer, through a free space layer, and through a uniform porosity layer, one side of which also forms a photoelectric cathode surface. The low diffusion layer may be formed from sintered powdered metal, such as tungsten, and the uniform porosity layer may be formed from wires which are sintered together to form pores between the wires which are continuous from the a back surface to a front surface which is also the photoelectric surface.

  10. Advanced Pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Synchrony, developed by St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) is an advanced state-of-the-art implantable pacemaker that closely matches the natural rhythm of the heart. The companion element of the Synchrony Pacemaker System is the Programmer Analyzer APS-II which allows a doctor to reprogram and fine tune the pacemaker to each user's special requirements without surgery. The two-way communications capability that allows the physician to instruct and query the pacemaker is accomplished by bidirectional telemetry. APS-II features 28 pacing functions and thousands of programming combinations to accommodate diverse lifestyles. Microprocessor unit also records and stores pertinent patient data up to a year.

  11. Advanced stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, Arnulf

    1983-03-01

    Toroidal confinement of a plasma by an external magnetic field is not compatible with axisymmetry, in contrast to confinement by the pinch effect of induced electric currents as in a tokomak or by the reversed field pinch configuration. The existence of magnetic surfaces throughout the region in which grad p ≠ 0 is therefore not guaranteed in such configurations, though it is necessary for MHD-equilibrium when the lines of force possess a finite twist (or "rotational transform"). These twisted equilibria are called stellarators. The other type of external confinement requires all lines of force to be closed upon themselves and p to be function of the well defined quantity Q = φ d l/ B only. The resulting "bumpy" tori are sometimes also referred to as being M + S like. By discussing specific examples it is shown that stellarator configurations exist which retain as much as possible the properties of M + S like configurations, combine these with the magnetic well, and with an approximation to the isodynamic requirement of D. Palumbo. These so-called Advanced Stellarators shown an improvement in predicted particle confinement and beta-limit compared to the classical stellarators. They can also be viewed as forming a system of linked stabilized mirrors of small mirror ratio. These fields can be produced by modular coils. A prototype of such a configuration is being designed by the stellarator division of IPP under the name of Wendelstein VII-AS. Expected physical data and technical details of W VII-AS are given.

  12. SCIENCE BRIEF: ADVANCED CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on advanced concepts will evaluate and demonstrate the application of innovative infrastructure designs, management procedures and operational approaches. Advanced concepts go beyond simple asset management. The infusion of these advanced concepts into established wastew...

  13. Efficient p-type dye-sensitized solar cells with all-nano-electrodes: NiCo2S4 mesoporous nanosheet counter electrodes directly converted from NiCo2O4 photocathodes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhiwei; Lu, Hao; Liu, Qiong; Cao, Fengren; Guo, Jun; Deng, Kaimo; Li, Liang

    2014-01-01

    We report the successful growth of NiCo2S4 nanosheet films converted from NiCo2O4 nanosheet films on fluorine-doped tin oxide substrates by a low-temperature solution process. Low-cost NiCo2S4 and NiCo2O4 nanosheet films were directly used for replacing conventional Pt and NiO as counter electrodes and photocathodes, respectively, to construct all-nano p-type dye-sensitized solar cells (p-DSSCs) with high performance. Compared to Pt, NiCo2S4 showed higher catalytic activity towards the I(-)/I3 (-) redox in electrolyte, resulting in an improved photocurrent density up to 2.989 mA/cm(2), which is the highest value in reported p-DSSCs. Present p-DSSCs demonstrated a cell efficiency of 0.248 % that is also comparable with typical NiO-based p-DSSCs.

  14. Efficient p-type dye-sensitized solar cells with all-nano-electrodes: NiCo2S4 mesoporous nanosheet counter electrodes directly converted from NiCo2O4 photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhiwei; Lu, Hao; Liu, Qiong; Cao, Fengren; Guo, Jun; Deng, Kaimo; Li, Liang

    2014-11-01

    We report the successful growth of NiCo2S4 nanosheet films converted from NiCo2O4 nanosheet films on fluorine-doped tin oxide substrates by a low-temperature solution process. Low-cost NiCo2S4 and NiCo2O4 nanosheet films were directly used for replacing conventional Pt and NiO as counter electrodes and photocathodes, respectively, to construct all-nano p-type dye-sensitized solar cells (p-DSSCs) with high performance. Compared to Pt, NiCo2S4 showed higher catalytic activity towards the I-/I3 - redox in electrolyte, resulting in an improved photocurrent density up to 2.989 mA/cm2, which is the highest value in reported p-DSSCs. Present p-DSSCs demonstrated a cell efficiency of 0.248 % that is also comparable with typical NiO-based p-DSSCs.

  15. Efficient p-type dye-sensitized solar cells with all-nano-electrodes: NiCo2S4 mesoporous nanosheet counter electrodes directly converted from NiCo2O4 photocathodes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report the successful growth of NiCo2S4 nanosheet films converted from NiCo2O4 nanosheet films on fluorine-doped tin oxide substrates by a low-temperature solution process. Low-cost NiCo2S4 and NiCo2O4 nanosheet films were directly used for replacing conventional Pt and NiO as counter electrodes and photocathodes, respectively, to construct all-nano p-type dye-sensitized solar cells (p-DSSCs) with high performance. Compared to Pt, NiCo2S4 showed higher catalytic activity towards the I-/I3- redox in electrolyte, resulting in an improved photocurrent density up to 2.989 mA/cm2, which is the highest value in reported p-DSSCs. Present p-DSSCs demonstrated a cell efficiency of 0.248 % that is also comparable with typical NiO-based p-DSSCs. PMID:25489277

  16. Pilot production and advanced development of large-area picosecond photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minot, Michael J.; Adams, Bernhard W.; Aviles, Melvin; Bond, Justin L.; Craven, Christopher A.; Cremer, Till; Foley, Michael R.; Lyashenko, Alexey; Popecki, Mark A.; Stochaj, Michael E.; Worstell, William A.; Mane, Anil U.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Ertley, Camden; Frisch, Henry; Elagin, Andrey

    2016-09-01

    We report pilot production and advanced development performance results achieved for Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors (LAPPD). The LAPPD is a microchannel plate (MCP) based photodetector, capable of imaging with single-photon sensitivity at high spatial and temporal resolutions in a hermetic package with an active area of 400 square centimeters. In December 2015, Incom Inc. completed installation of equipment and facilities for demonstration of early stage pilot production of LAPPD. Initial fabrication trials commenced in January 2016. The "baseline" LAPPD employs an all-glass hermetic package with top and bottom plates and sidewalls made of borosilicate float glass. Signals are generated by a bi-alkali Na2KSb photocathode and amplified with a stacked chevron pair of "next generation" MCPs produced by applying resistive and emissive atomic layer deposition coatings to borosilicate glass capillary array (GCA) substrates. Signals are collected on RF strip-line anodes applied to the bottom plates which exit the detector via pinfree hermetic seals under the side walls. Prior tests show that LAPPDs have electron gains greater than 107, submillimeter space resolution for large pulses and several mm for single photons, time resolutions of 50 picoseconds for single photons, predicted resolution of less than 5 picoseconds for large pulses, high stability versus charge extraction, and good uniformity. LAPPD performance results for product produced during the first half of 2016 will be reviewed. Recent advances in the development of LAPPD will also be reviewed, as the baseline design is adapted to meet the requirements for a wide range of emerging application. These include a novel ceramic package design, ALD coated MCPs optimized to have a low temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) and further advances to adapt the LAPPD for cryogenic applications using Liquid Argon (LAr). These developments will meet the needs for DOE-supported RD for the Deep Underground Neutrino

  17. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of planetary advanced studies and planning support are summarized. The scope of analyses includes cost estimation research, planetary mission performance, penetrator advanced studies, Mercury mission transport requirements, definition of super solar electric propulsion/solar sail mission discriminators, and advanced planning activities.

  18. Advances in forefoot trauma.

    PubMed

    Clements, J Randolph; Schopf, Robert

    2013-07-01

    Forefoot traumas, particularly involving the metatarsals, are commonly occurring injuries. There have been several advances in management of these injuries. These advances include updates in operative technique, internal fixation options, plating constructs, and external fixation. In addition, the advances of soft tissue management have improved outcomes. This article outlines these injuries and provides an update on techniques, principles, and understanding of managing forefoot trauma.

  19. Session: CSP Advanced Systems -- Advanced Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Mehos, M.

    2008-04-01

    The project description is: (1) it supports crosscutting activities, e.g. advanced optical materials, that aren't tied to a single CSP technology and (2) it supports the 'incubation' of new concepts in preliminary stages of investigation.

  20. Advance Care Planning.

    PubMed

    Stallworthy, Elizabeth J

    2013-04-16

    Advance care planning should be available to all patients with chronic kidney disease, including end-stage kidney disease on renal replacement therapy. Advance care planning is a process of patient-centred discussion, ideally involving family/significant others, to assist the patient to understand how their illness might affect them, identify their goals and establish how medical treatment might help them to achieve these. An Advance Care Plan is only one useful outcome from the Advance Care Planning process, the education of patient and family around prognosis and treatment options is likely to be beneficial whether or not a plan is written or the individual loses decision making capacity at the end of life. Facilitating Advance Care Planning discussions requires an understanding of their purpose and communication skills which need to be taught. Advance Care Planning needs to be supported by effective systems to enable the discussions and any resulting Plans to be used to aid subsequent decision making.

  1. Advancing Ethical Neuroscience Research.

    PubMed

    Borah, B Rashmi; Strand, Nicolle K; Chillag, Kata L

    2016-12-01

    As neuroscience research advances, researchers, clinicians, and other stakeholders will face a host of ethical challenges. The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has published two reports that provide recommendations on how to advance research endeavors ethically. The commission addressed, among other issues, how to prioritize different types of neuroscience research and how to include research participants who have impaired consent capacity. The Bioethics Commission's recommendations provide a foundation for ethical guidelines as neuroscience research advances and progresses.

  2. Hydromechanical Advanced Coal Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estus, Jay M.; Summers, David

    1990-01-01

    Water-jet cutting reduces coal dust and its hazards. Advanced mining system utilizes full-face, hydromechanical, continuous miner. Coal excavator uses high-pressure water-jet lances, one in each of cutting heads and one in movable lance, to make cuts across top, bottom and middle height, respectively, of coal face. Wedge-shaped cutting heads advance into lower and upper cuts in turn, thereby breaking coal toward middle cut. Thrust cylinders and walking pads advance excavator toward coal face.

  3. Advanced echocardiographic techniques

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Echocardiography has advanced significantly since its first clinical use. The move towards more accurate imaging and quantification has driven this advancement. In this review, we will briefly focus on three distinct but important recent advances, three‐dimensional (3D) echocardiography, contrast echocardiography and myocardial tissue imaging. The basic principles of these techniques will be discussed as well as current and future clinical applications. PMID:28191159

  4. Advancing the educational agenda.

    PubMed

    Baker, Cynthia

    2010-12-01

    This timely paper provides a thought-provoking analysis of current advanced practice nursing education in Canada. It comes at a critical juncture in the evolution of Canadian healthcare services and the redefinition of nursing roles. Increasingly, multiple sectors of society are calling for more nurses with advanced practice preparation and for a wider range of advanced practice nursing specialties. Advanced practice nurses (APNs) are being proposed as a solution to a financially overburdened national healthcare system, the increasing complexity of healthcare services, and a crisis in access to primary healthcare. Thus, governments seeking greater fiscal efficiency, medical specialists needing sophisticated collaborative support, and healthcare consumers see APNs as the way forward.

  5. Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

    2007-09-21

    KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

  6. Drilling at Advanced Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Doug

    1977-01-01

    Instances where drilling is useful for advanced language are discussed. Several types of drills are recommended, with the philosophy that advanced level drills should have a lighter style and be regarded as a useful, occasional means of practicing individual new items. (CHK)

  7. Advanced Engineering Fibers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edie, Dan D.; Dunham, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Clemson University's Advanced Engineered Fibers Laboratory, which was established to provide national leadership and expertise in developing the processing equipment and advance fibers necessary for the chemical, fiber, and textile industries to enter the composite materials market. Discusses some of the laboratory's activities in…

  8. Advanced Ceramic Armor Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-11

    materials, toughened alumina, fiber -reinforced glass matrix composites, and multilayer-gradient materials for ballistic testing. Fabrication and...material systems: Multilayer advanced armor materials consisting of a hard ceramic faceplate bonded to a graphite fiber -reinforced glass matrix...toughened alumina, and fiber - applied studies of advanced reinforced ceramic matrix glass and glass -ceramic composites for ballistic testing. technologies

  9. Advances in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Vacanti, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 30 years ago, we reported on a concept now known as Tissue Engineering. Here, we report on some of the advances in this now thriving area of research. In particular, significant advances in tissue engineering of skin, liver, spinal cord, blood vessels, and other areas are discussed. PMID:26711689

  10. Advanced Manufacturing Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fikes, John

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT) is developing and maturing innovative and advanced manufacturing technologies that will enable more capable and lower-cost spacecraft, launch vehicles and infrastructure to enable exploration missions. The technologies will utilize cutting edge materials and emerging capabilities including metallic processes, additive manufacturing, composites, and digital manufacturing. The AMT project supports the National Manufacturing Initiative involving collaboration with other government agencies.

  11. Advanced Network Security Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    network. The network observed was the Abilene network of the University Consortium for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID), often known as “ Internet2 ...for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID), often known as “ Internet2 .” This contract was heavily operational in nature, as opposed to a contract

  12. Advances in dental materials.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Garry J P

    2014-05-01

    The dental market is replete with new resorative materials marketed on the basis of novel technological advances in materials chemistry, bonding capability or reduced operator time and/or technique sensitivity. This paper aims to consider advances in current materials, with an emphasis on their role in supporting contemporary clinical practice.

  13. Advanced Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambliss, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Advanced Life Support (ALS) Systems are presented. The topics include: 1) Fundamental Need for Advanced Life Support; 2) ALS organization; 3) Requirements and Rationale; 4) Past Integrated tests; 5) The need for improvements in life support systems; 6) ALS approach to meet exploration goals; 7) ALS Projects showing promise to meet exploration goals; and 9) GRC involvement in ALS.

  14. Advanced Chemical Propulsion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, Gordon; Byers, Dave; Alexander, Leslie A.; Krebsbach, Al

    2004-01-01

    A study was performed of advanced chemical propulsion technology application to space science (Code S) missions. The purpose was to begin the process of selecting chemical propulsion technology advancement activities that would provide greatest benefits to Code S missions. Several missions were selected from Code S planning data, and a range of advanced chemical propulsion options was analyzed to assess capabilities and benefits re these missions. Selected beneficial applications were found for higher-performing bipropellants, gelled propellants, and cryogenic propellants. Technology advancement recommendations included cryocoolers and small turbopump engines for cryogenic propellants; space storable propellants such as LOX-hydrazine; and advanced monopropellants. It was noted that fluorine-bearing oxidizers offer performance gains over more benign oxidizers. Potential benefits were observed for gelled propellants that could be allowed to freeze, then thawed for use.

  15. Advanced electron microscopy for advanced materials.

    PubMed

    Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Bals, Sara; Van Aert, Sandra; Verbeeck, Jo; Van Dyck, Dirk

    2012-11-08

    The idea of this Review is to introduce newly developed possibilities of advanced electron microscopy to the materials science community. Over the last decade, electron microscopy has evolved into a full analytical tool, able to provide atomic scale information on the position, nature, and even the valency atoms. This information is classically obtained in two dimensions (2D), but can now also be obtained in 3D. We show examples of applications in the field of nanoparticles and interfaces.

  16. Advanced biostack experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buecker, H.

    1981-01-01

    The Advanced Biostack Experiment is described. The objectives are: (1) to confirm, complement, and enlarge the information obtained from the previous experiments by applying improved and advanced methods of localization and physical and biological evaluation, performing advanced experiments based on these data, and including additional biological specimens and additional radiation detectors; (2) to determine the biological importance of nuclear disintegration stars; (3) to determine the interference of HZE particle induced effects with those of other space flight factors (e.g., weightlessness); and (4) to determine the distribution of HZE particles and of disintegration stars at different locations inside the module and on the pallet.

  17. Advanced Computer Typography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    ADVANCED COMPUTER TYPOGRAPHY .(U) DEC 81 A V HERSHEY UNCLASSIFIED NPS012-81-005 M MEEEIEEEII IIUJIL15I.4 MICROCQP RE SO.JjI ON ft R NPS012-81-005...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL 0Monterey, California DTIC SELECTEWA APR 5 1982 B ADVANCED COMPUTER TYPOGRAPHY by A. V. HERSHEY December 1981 OApproved for...Subtitle) S. TYPE Or REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Final ADVANCED COMPUTER TYPOGRAPHY Dec 1979 - Dec 1981 S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) S CONTRACT

  18. Advanced Electronic Technology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-15

    It AD AObS 062 MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH LEXINGTON LINCOLN LAB F/S 9/S ADVANCED ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY .(U) NOV 78 A J MCLAUGHLIN. A L MCWHORTER...T I T U T E OF T E C H N O L O G Y L I N C O L N L A B O R A T O R Y ADVANCED ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY QUARTERLY TECKNICAL SUMMAR Y REPORT TO THE AIR...Division 8 (Solid State) on the Advanced Electronic Technology Program. Hi

  19. Advanced information society(7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Toshihiro

    Various threats are hiding in advanced informationalized society. As we see car accident problems in motorization society light aspects necessarily accompy shady ones. Under the changing circumstances of advanced informationalization added values of information has become much higher. It causes computer crime, hacker, computer virus to come to the surface. In addition it can be said that infringement of intellectual property and privacy are threats brought by advanced information. Against these threats legal, institutional and insurance measures have been progressed, and newly security industry has been established. However, they are not adequate individually or totally. The future vision should be clarified, and countermeasures according to the visions have to be considered.

  20. The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The ADvanced SEParation (ADSEP) commercial payload is making use of major advances in separation technology: The Phase Partitioning Experiment (PPE); the Micorencapsulation experiment; and the Hemoglobin Separation Experiment (HSE). Using ADSEP, commercial researchers will attempt to determine the partition coefficients for model particles in a two-phase system. With this information, researchers can develop a higher resolution, more effective cell isolation procedure that can be used for many different types of research and for improved health care. The advanced separation technology is already being made available for use in ground-based laboratories.

  1. Advances in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Maramorosch, K. )

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on advances in cell culture. Topics covered include: Genetic changes in the influenza viruses during growth in cultured cells; The biochemistry and genetics of mosquito cells in culture; and Tree tissue culture applications.

  2. Advanced information society(2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuyama, Keiichi

    Our modern life is full of information and information infiltrates into our daily life. Networking of the telecommunication is extended to society, company, and individual level. Although we have just entered the advanced information society, business world and our daily life have been steadily transformed by the advancement of information network. This advancement of information brings a big influence on economy, and will play they the main role in the expansion of domestic demands. This paper tries to view the image of coming advanced information society, focusing on the transforming businessman's life and the situation of our daily life, which became wealthy by the spread of daily life information and the visual information by satellite system, in the development of the intelligent city.

  3. Advanced Electrochemical Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; McCloy, John S.; Matyas, Josef

    2011-12-01

    This is a brief description of PNNL's efforts in FY2011 towards developing advanced electrochemical waste forms. This is a short section that will become part of a larger document being put together by INL.

  4. Advanced care directives

    MedlinePlus

    ... you want no matter how ill you are. Writing an advance care directive may be hard. You ... wishes usually replace those you made previously in writing. Additional Information Write your living will or health ...

  5. Advance Control Measures & Programs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    As areas develop their path forward or action plan, they should consider a variety of voluntary and mandatory measures and programs. The resources on this page can help, and participants are also encouraged to talk with their EPA Advance contact

  6. Living with Advanced MS

    MedlinePlus

    ... more progressive disease course. Taking these factors into account can help you and your family plan more effectively for the future. Identifying options The key message to anyone living with advanced MS is ...

  7. Advanced Welding Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  8. Advances in Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, David L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Advances in electronics and computer science have enabled industries (pulp/paper, iron/steel, petroleum/chemical) to attain better control of their processes with resulting increases in quality, productivity, profitability, and compliance with government regulations. (JN)

  9. Advanced urology nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Helen

    2014-03-01

    Urology nursing has developed as a specialty over the past few decades in response to several factors, workload demands being a prime reason. Nurses are taking on additional roles and activities including procedures such as cystoscopy and prostate biopsy, and running nurse-led clinics for a variety of urological conditions. Audits of advanced urological nursing practice have shown this care to be of a high standard and investigative procedures performed by these nurses match the diagnostic quality of existing services. Professional urological nursing organizations support the professional needs of these nurses, but the provision of education and training for advanced practice activities remains an unaddressed need. A range of confusing advanced urology nursing titles exists, and uncertainty regarding the roles and scope of practice for these nurses remains a concern. Acceptance and support from medical colleagues is required for the success of advanced urological nursing practice, but opinions on these roles remain divided.

  10. Advanced Welding Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  11. Advanced planetary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Results of planetary advanced studies and planning support provided by Science Applications, Inc. staff members to Earth and Planetary Exploration Division, OSSA/NASA, for the period 1 February 1981 to 30 April 1982 are summarized. The scope of analyses includes cost estimation, planetary missions performance, solar system exploration committee support, Mars program planning, Galilean satellite mission concepts, and advanced propulsion data base. The work covers 80 man-months of research. Study reports and related publications are included in a bibliography section.

  12. Advanced Usability Evaluation Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    tracking in usability evaluation : A practitioner’s guide. In J. Hyönä, R. Radach, & H. Deubel. (Eds.), The mind’s eye: Cognitive and applied...Advanced Usability Evaluation Methods Terence S. Andre, Lt Col, USAF Margaret Schurig, Human Factors Design Specialist, The Boeing Co...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advanced Usability Evaluation Methods 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT

  13. Psychiatric Advance Directives: Getting Started

    MedlinePlus

    ... More... Home Getting Started National Resource Center on Psychiatric Advance Directives - Getting Started Getting Started Psychiatric advance directives (PADs) are relatively new legal instruments ...

  14. Recruit and ADVANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosser, Sue V.

    2007-04-01

    Beginning in 2001, the National Science Foundation launched the ADVANCE Initiative, which has now awarded more than 70 million to some thirty institutions for transformations to advance women. Results of studies on how to attract and retain women students and faculty underpinned our ADVANCE Institutional Transformation grant funded by the NSF for 3.7 million for five years, beginning in 2001. As co-principal investigator on this grant, I insured that this research informed the five major threads of the grant: 1) Four termed ADVANCE professors to mentor junior women faculty in each college; 2) Collection of MIT-Report-like data indicators to assess whether advancement of women really occurs during and after the institutional transformation undertaken through ADVANCE; 3) Family-friendly policies and practices to stop the tenure clock and provide active service, modified duties, lactation stations and day care; 4) Mini-retreats to facilitate access for tenure-track women faculty to male decision-makers and administrators for informal conversations and discussion on topics important to women faculty; 5) Removal of subtle gender, racial, and other biases in promotion and tenure. The dynamic changes resulting from the grant in quality of mentoring, new understanding of promotion and tenure, numbers of women retained and given endowed chairs, and emergence of new family friendly policies gave me hope for genuine diversification of leadership in science and technology. As the grant funding ends, the absence of NSF prestige and monitoring, coupled with a change in academic leadership at the top, provide new challenges for institutionalization, recruitment, and advancement of women into leadership positions in science and engineering.

  15. Do Advance Directives Direct?

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Susan P

    2015-06-01

    Resolution of long-standing debates about the role and impact of advance directives - living wills and powers of attorney for health care - has been hampered by a dearth of appropriate data, in particular data that compare the process and outcomes of end-of-life decision making on behalf of patients with and without advance directives. Drawing on a large ethnographic study of patients in two intensive care units in a large urban teaching hospital, this article compares aspects of the medical decision-making process and outcomes by advance-directive status. Controlling for demographic characteristics and severity of illness, the study finds few significant differences between patients without advance directives and those who claim to have them. Surprisingly, these few differences hold only for those whose directives are in their hospital chart. There are no significant differences between those with no directive and those claiming to have a copy at home or elsewhere. The article considers the implications if directives seemingly must be in hand to show even modest effects. Do advance directives direct? The intensive care unit data provide far more support for the growing body of literature that casts doubt on their impact than studies that promote the use of them.

  16. Silicon Nanowire Photocathodes for Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Soundarrajan; Nann, Thomas; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2016-01-01

    The performance of silicon for water oxidation and hydrogen production can be improved by exploiting the antireflective properties of nanostructured silicon substrates. In this work, silicon nanowires were fabricated by metal-assisted electroless etching of silicon. An enhanced photocurrent density of −17 mA/cm2 was observed for the silicon nanowires coated with an iron sulphur carbonyl catalyst when compared to bare silicon nanowires (−5 mA/cm2). A substantial amount of 315 µmol/h hydrogen gas was produced at low bias potentials for the silicon nanowires coated with an iron sulphur carbonyl catalyst. PMID:28335272

  17. Advanced transmission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, John J.; Bill, Robert C.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command share an interest in advancing the technology for helicopter propulsion systems. In particular, this paper presents highlights from that portion of the program in drive train technology and the related mechanical components. The major goals of the program are to increase the life, reliability, and maintainability; reduce the weight, noise, and vibration; and maintain the relatively high mechanical efficiency of the gear train. The current activity emphasizes noise reduction technology and analytical code development followed by experimental verification. Selected significant advances in technology for transmissions are reviewed, including advanced configurations and new analytical tools. Finally, the plan for future transmission research is presented.

  18. Advanced servomanipulator development

    SciTech Connect

    Kuban, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Servomanipulator (ASM) System consists of three major components: the ASM slave, the dual arm master controller (DAMC) or master, and the control system. The ASM is remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program. This new manipulator addresses requirements of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing with emphasis on force reflection, remote maintainability, reliability, radiation tolerance, and corrosion resistance. The advanced servomanipulator is uniquely subdivided into remotely replaceable modules which will permit in situ manipulator repair by spare module replacement. Manipulator modularization and increased reliability are accomplished through a force transmission system that uses gears and torque tubes. Digital control algorithms and mechanical precision are used to offset the increased backlash, friction, and inertia resulting from the gear drives. This results in the first remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator in the world.

  19. Advanced thermionic energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, E. J.; Fitzpatrick, G. D.; Hansen, L. K.; Rasor, N. S.

    1974-01-01

    Basic analytical and experimental exploration was conducted on several types of advanced thermionic energy converters, and preliminary analysis was performed on systems utilizing advanced converter performance. The Pt--Nb cylindrical diode which exhibited a suppressed arc drop, as described in the preceding report, was reassembled and the existence of the postulated hydrid mode of operation was tentatively confirmed. Initial data obtained on ignited and unignited triode operation in the demountable cesium vapor system essentially confirmed the design principles developed in earlier work, with a few exceptions. Three specific advanced converter concepts were selected as candidates for concentrated basic study and for practical evaluation in fixed-configuration converters. Test vehicles and test stands for these converters and a unique controlled-atmosphere station for converter assembly and processing were designed, and procurement was initiated.

  20. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  1. [Advanced Composites Technology Initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Julian, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    This final report closes out the W02 NASA Grant #NCC5-646. The FY02 grant for advanced technology initiatives through the Advanced Composites Technology Institute in Bridgeport, WV, at the Robert C. Byrd Institute (RCBI) Bridgeport Manufacturing Technology Center, is complete; all funding has been expended. RCBI continued to expand access to technology; develop and implement a workforce-training curriculum; improve material development; and provide prototyping and demonstrations of new and advanced composites technologies for West Virginia composites firms. The FY 02 efforts supported workforce development, technical training and the HST development effort of a super-lightweight composite carrier prototype and expanded the existing technical capabilities of the growing aerospace industry across West Virginia to provide additional support for NASA missions. Additionally, the Composites Technology and Training Center was awarded IS0 9001 - 2000 certification and Cleanroom Class 1000 certification during this report period.

  2. Advanced ramjet concepts program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leingang, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    Uniquely advantageous features, on both the performance and weight sides of the ledger, can be achieved through synergistic design integration of airbreathing and rocket technologies in the development of advanced orbital space transport propulsion systems of the combined cycle type. In the context of well understood advanced airbreathing and liquid rocket propulsion principles and practices, this precept of synergism is advanced mainly through six rather specific examples. These range from the detailed component level to the overall vehicle system level as follows: using jet compression; achieving a high area ratio rocket nozzle; ameliorating gas generator cycle rocket system deficiencies; using the in-duct special rocket thrust chamber assembly as the principal scramjet fuel injection operation; using the unstowed, covered fan as a duct closure for effecting high area ratio rocket mode operation; and creating a unique airbreathing rocket system via the onboard, cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction process.

  3. Advances in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Runge, Val M

    2010-12-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic radiology are discussed on the basis of current publications in Investigative Radiology. Publications in the journal during 2009 and 2010 are reviewed, evaluating developments by modality and anatomic region. Technological advances continue to play a major role in the evolution and clinical practice of diagnostic radiology, and as such constitute a major publication focus. In the past 2 years, this includes advances in both magnetic resonance and computed tomography (in particular, the advent of dual energy computed tomography). An additional major focus of publications concerns contrast media, and in particular continuing research involving nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, its etiology, and differentiation of the gadolinium chelates on the basis of in vivo stability.

  4. Advanced rocket propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, Charles J.

    1993-01-01

    Existing NASA research contracts are supporting development of advanced reinforced polymer and metal matrix composites for use in liquid rocket engines of the future. Advanced rocket propulsion concepts, such as modular platelet engines, dual-fuel dual-expander engines, and variable mixture ratio engines, require advanced materials and structures to reduce overall vehicle weight as well as address specific propulsion system problems related to elevated operating temperatures, new engine components, and unique operating processes. High performance propulsion systems with improved manufacturability and maintainability are needed for single stage to orbit vehicles and other high performance mission applications. One way to satisfy these needs is to develop a small engine which can be clustered in modules to provide required levels of total thrust. This approach should reduce development schedule and cost requirements by lowering hardware lead times and permitting the use of existing test facilities. Modular engines should also reduce operational costs associated with maintenance and parts inventories.

  5. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, John

    2015-09-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratories, Siemens has completed the Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development Program to develop an advanced gas turbine for incorporation into future coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. All the scheduled DOE Milestones were completed and significant technical progress was made in the development of new technologies and concepts. Advanced computer simulations and modeling, as well as subscale, full scale laboratory, rig and engine testing were utilized to evaluate and select concepts for further development. Program Requirements of: A 3 to 5 percentage point improvement in overall plant combined cycle efficiency when compared to the reference baseline plant; 20 to 30 percent reduction in overall plant capital cost when compared to the reference baseline plant; and NOx emissions of 2 PPM out of the stack. were all met. The program was completed on schedule and within the allotted budget

  6. Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.

    SciTech Connect

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

    2009-09-01

    Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

  7. Advanced solar dynamic technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calogeras, James

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs and discussion on Advanced Solar Dynamic Technology Program are presented. Topics covered include: advanced solar dynamic technology program; advanced concentrators; advanced heat receivers; power conversion systems; dished all metal honeycomb sandwich panels; Stirling cavity heat pipe receiver; Brayton solar receiver; and thermal energy storage technology.

  8. Advancing cardiovascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Truskey, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering offers the promise of biologically based repair of injured and damaged blood vessels, valves, and cardiac tissue. Major advances in cardiovascular tissue engineering over the past few years involve improved methods to promote the establishment and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), scaffolds from decellularized tissue that may produce more highly differentiated tissues and advance clinical translation, improved methods to promote vascularization, and novel in vitro microphysiological systems to model normal and diseased tissue function. iPSC technology holds great promise, but robust methods are needed to further promote differentiation. Differentiation can be further enhanced with chemical, electrical, or mechanical stimuli. PMID:27303643

  9. Advances in periodontology.

    PubMed

    Tonetti, M S

    2000-10-01

    Advances in periodontal science and practice over the last decade have radically changed the understanding of periodontal diseases and have opened new, exciting prospects for both medical and surgical therapy of periodontal diseases. Establishment of the aetiology and pathogenesis of periodontitis, understanding of the unique genetic and environmental susceptibility profile of affected subjects, and recognition of the systemic implications of periodontal infections are the key research findings. The use of randomised, controlled, clinical trials has allowed the development of evidence-based periodontology. Adjunctive antimicrobial therapy, regenerative periodontal surgery, periodontal plastic surgery, bone regeneration surgery in the light of implant treatment, and advanced soft tissue management at implant sites have radically changed practice.

  10. Advancing cytometry for immunology.

    PubMed

    Cossarizza, Andrea; Nolan, John; Radbruch, Andreas; Tárnok, Attila

    2012-12-01

    Cytometry is a key technology for immunology. It allows researchers to scrutinize the cells of the immune system in molecular detail, and to assess phenotype and function at the level of individual cells, no matter how rare these cells may be. The International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry, ISAC, by way of its meetings, online resources and publications (e.g. Cytometry Part A and Current Protocols in Cytometry, which are all published by Wiley) track the ever advancing developments regarding cytometry instrumentation and reagents, and the analysis of complex data sets. In June this year in Leipzig, Germany, ISAC held its annual conference "CYTO 2012", a marketplace of innovation in cytometry.

  11. Advanced sensors technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Tommy G.; Costello, David J.; Davis, Jerry G.; Horst, Richard L.; Lessard, Charles S.; Peel, H. Herbert; Tolliver, Robert

    1992-01-01

    This project assesses the state-of-the-art in advanced or 'smart' sensors technology for NASA Life Sciences research applications with an emphasis on those sensors with potential applications on the space station freedom (SSF). The objectives are: (1) to conduct literature reviews on relevant advanced sensor technology; (2) to interview various scientists and engineers in industry, academia, and government who are knowledgeable on this topic; (3) to provide viewpoints and opinions regarding the potential applications of this technology on the SSF; and (4) to provide summary charts of relevant technologies and centers where these technologies are being developed.

  12. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  13. Advanced engine study program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, A. I.; Galler, D. E.; Denman, T. F.; Shied, R. A.; Black, J. R.; Fierstein, A. R.; Clark, G. L.; Branstrom, B. R.

    1993-01-01

    A design and analysis study was conducted to provide advanced engine descriptions and parametric data for space transfer vehicles. The study was based on an advanced oxygen/hydrogen engine in the 7,500 to 50,000 lbf thrust range. Emphasis was placed on defining requirements for high-performance engines capable of achieving reliable and versatile operation in a space environment. Four variations on the expander cycle were compared, and the advantages and disadvantages of each were assessed. Parametric weight, envelope, and performance data were generated over a range of 7,500 to 50,000 lb thrust and a wide range of chamber pressure and nozzle expansion ratio.

  14. Advanced Solar Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, J. H.; Hobgood, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The Advanced Solar Power System (ASPS) concentrator uses a technically sophisticated design and extensive tooling to produce very efficient (80 to 90%) and versatile energy supply equipment which is inexpensive to manufacture and requires little maintenance. The advanced optical design has two 10th order, generalized aspheric surfaces in a Cassegrainian configuration which gives outstanding performance and is relatively insensitive to temperature changes and wind loading. Manufacturing tolerances also have been achieved. The key to the ASPS is the direct absorption of concentrated sunlight in the working fluid by radiative transfers in a black body cavity. The basic ASPS design concepts, efficiency, optical system, and tracking and focusing controls are described.

  15. Advanced Monitoring systems initiative

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Venedam; E.O. Hohman; C.F. Lohrstorfer; S.J. Weeks; J.B. Jones; W.J. Haas

    2004-09-30

    The Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative (AMSI) actively searches for promising technologies and aggressively moves them from the research bench into DOE/NNSA end-user applications. There is a large unfulfilled need for an active element that reaches out to identify and recruit emerging sensor technologies into the test and evaluation function. Sensor research is ubiquitous, with the seeds of many novel concepts originating in the university systems, but at present these novel concepts do not move quickly and efficiently into real test environments. AMSI is a widely recognized, self-sustaining ''business'' accelerating the selection, development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of advanced monitoring systems and components.

  16. Advanced flight software reconfiguraton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porcher, Bryan

    1991-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on advanced flight software reconfiguration. Reconfiguration is defined as identifying mission and configuration specific requirements, controlling mission and configuration specific data, binding this information to the flight software code to perform specific missions, and the release and distribution of the flight software. The objectives are to develop, demonstrate, and validate advanced software reconfiguration tools and techniques; to demonstrate reconfiguration approaches on Space Station Freedom (SSF) onboard systems displays; and to interactively test onboard systems displays, flight software, and flight data.

  17. MR Neurography: Advances

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Zhao, Lianxin; Carrino, John A.; Trueblood, Eo; Koceski, Saso; Shteriev, Filip; Lenkinski, Lionel; Sinclair, Christopher D. J.; Andreisek, Gustav

    2013-01-01

    High resolution and high field magnetic resonance neurography (MR neurography, MRN) is shown to have excellent anatomic capability. There have been considerable advances in the technology in the last few years leading to various feasibility studies using different structural and functional imaging approaches in both clinical and research settings. This paper is intended to be a useful seminar for readers who want to gain knowledge of the advancements in the MRN pulse sequences currently used in clinical practice as well as learn about the other techniques on the horizon aimed at better depiction of nerve anatomy, pathology, and potential noninvasive evaluation of nerve degeneration or regeneration. PMID:23589774

  18. Advanced Neuroimaging of Tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Prashant; Steven, Andrew; Rath, Tanya; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2016-05-01

    Although tinnitus may originate in damage to the peripheral auditory apparatus, its perception and distressing symptomatology are consequences of alterations to auditory, sensory, and limbic neural networks. This has been described in several studies, some using advanced structural MR imaging techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging. An understanding of these complex changes could enable development of targeted treatment. New MR imaging techniques enabling detailed depiction of the labyrinth may be useful when diagnosis of Meniere disease is equivocal. Advances in computed tomography and MR imaging have enabled noninvasive diagnosis of dural arteriovenous fistulae.

  19. Advanced Containment System

    DOEpatents

    Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Kawamura, Hideki; Richardson, John G.; Noda, Masaru

    2005-02-08

    An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. The advanced containment system comprises a plurality of casing sections with each casing section interlocked to an adjacent casing section. Each casing section includes a complementary interlocking structure that interlocks with the complementary interlocking structure on an adjacent casing section. A barrier filler substantially fills the casing sections and may substantially fill the spaces of the complementary interlocking structure to form a substantially impermeable barrier. Some of the casing sections may include sensors so that the casing sections and the zone of interest may be remotely monitored after the casing sections are emplaced in the ground.

  20. Advanced Imaging Tracker

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    document requires that it 1e returncd: ADVANCED IMACINGC TRACKER Dr . L. E. Schmutz Contractor: Adaptive Optics Associates, Inc. Contt-ict Number: F30602-80...Code Number: IE20 Period of Worl: Covered: jun 80 - D’:c 81 Principal Investigator: Dr . Larry Schmut~z Phone: 617 547-2786 Project Engineer: Captaia...yaJPODCVR~ ADVANCED IMAGING TRACKER 10Jun 80 - ’,’ Dec 81 𔄃 PiRFORMiNO7 01G. REPORT NUMBER 7 ATII~(. ONTPA OR GRANTY NUMDERf.) Dr . 1L. E. Schiiut

  1. Advanced Distribution Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avazov, Artur R.; Sobinova, Liubov A.

    2016-02-01

    This article describes the advisability of using advanced distribution management systems in the electricity distribution networks area and considers premises of implementing ADMS within the Smart Grid era. Also, it gives the big picture of ADMS and discusses the ADMS advantages and functionalities.

  2. Rewriting in Advanced Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, William B.

    A college English instructor made an informal comparison of rewriting habits of students in a freshman composition course and two advanced composition courses. Notes kept on student rewriting focused on this central question: given peer and instructor response to their papers and a choice as to what and how to rewrite, what will students decide to…

  3. Advanced Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubal, Robert C.; Helms, Robert F.; Triplett, Suzanne E.

    Leading-edge technologies, integrated with emerging educational methodologies, make the Advanced Learning Environment (ALE) model cost effective and efficient for learning. The ALE integrates virtual reality and other enabling technologies such as natural language processing, animation, video, courseware, sound, projection, CD-ROM, and distance…

  4. Advanced Chemical Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Leslie, Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Advanced Chemical Propulsion (ACP) provides near-term incremental improvements in propulsion system performance and/or cost. It is an evolutionary approach to technology development that produces useful products along the way to meet increasingly more demanding mission requirements while focusing on improving payload mass fraction to yield greater science capability. Current activities are focused on two areas: chemical propulsion component, subsystem, and manufacturing technologies that offer measurable system level benefits; and the evaluation of high-energy storable propellants with enhanced performance for in-space application. To prioritize candidate propulsion technology alternatives, a variety of propulsion/mission analyses and trades have been conducted for SMD missions to yield sufficient data for investment planning. They include: the Advanced Chemical Propulsion Assessment; an Advanced Chemical Propulsion System Model; a LOx-LH2 small pumps conceptual design; a space storables propellant study; a spacecraft cryogenic propulsion study; an advanced pressurization and mixture ratio control study; and a pump-fed vs. pressure-fed study.

  5. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The development and progress of the Advanced Gas Turbine engine program is examined. An analysis of the role of ceramics in the design and major engine components is included. Projected fuel economy, emissions and performance standards, and versatility in fuel use are also discussed.

  6. Cartoons as Advance Organizers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalik, Cindy L.; Williams, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated student reaction to the use of cartoons as advance organizers for online discussions in an online course. A convenience sample of 15 students participated in the study by contributing cartoons, participating in online discussions, and completing a survey. Overall, survey results indicated student reaction to the…

  7. Advanced turbine systems program

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

    1992-12-31

    In accordance with the goals of the DOE program, improvements in the gas turbine are the primary focus of Allison activity during Phase I. To this end Allison conducted a survey of potentially applicable gas turbine cycles and selected the advanced combined cycle as reference system. Extensive analysis of two versions of the advanced combined cycle was performed against the requirement for a 60% thermal efficiency (LHV) utility-sized, natural gas fired system. This analysis resulted in technology requirements for this system. Additional analysis determined emissions potential for the system, established a coal-fueled derivative system and a commercialization plan. This report deals with the technical requirements for a system that meets the thermal efficiency goal. Allison initially investigated four basic thermodynamic cycles: Humid air turbine, intercalate-recuperated systems, advanced combined cycle, chemically recuperated cycle. Our survey and cycle analysis indicated that au had the potential of reaching 60% thermal efficiency. We also concluded that engine hot section technology would be a critical technology regardless of which cycle was chosen. Based on this result Allison chose to concentrate on the advanced combined cycle. This cycle is well known and understood by the utility turbine user community and is therefore likely to be acceptable to users.

  8. Advanced turbine systems program

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, C.; Mukavetz, D.W.; Knickerbocker, T.K.; Ali, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    In accordance with the goals of the DOE program, improvements in the gas turbine are the primary focus of Allison activity during Phase I. To this end Allison conducted a survey of potentially applicable gas turbine cycles and selected the advanced combined cycle as reference system. Extensive analysis of two versions of the advanced combined cycle was performed against the requirement for a 60% thermal efficiency (LHV) utility-sized, natural gas fired system. This analysis resulted in technology requirements for this system. Additional analysis determined emissions potential for the system, established a coal-fueled derivative system and a commercialization plan. This report deals with the technical requirements for a system that meets the thermal efficiency goal. Allison initially investigated four basic thermodynamic cycles: Humid air turbine, intercalate-recuperated systems, advanced combined cycle, chemically recuperated cycle. Our survey and cycle analysis indicated that au had the potential of reaching 60% thermal efficiency. We also concluded that engine hot section technology would be a critical technology regardless of which cycle was chosen. Based on this result Allison chose to concentrate on the advanced combined cycle. This cycle is well known and understood by the utility turbine user community and is therefore likely to be acceptable to users.

  9. Oklahoma's Advanced School Funding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Gary

    A new means of funding school operations known as advanced school funding allows Oklahoma schools financing during the temporary cash shortfalls. The program consists of the Oklahoma Development Authority issuing revenue bonds purchased by E. F. Hutton and Company, Inc., which then sells the tax free bonds to investors throughout the country. A…

  10. Advanced Polymer Network Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Polymer networks and gels are important classes of materials for defense applications . In an effort to......it is no longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. ARL-TR-7612 ● FEB 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Advanced Polymer

  11. ISE advanced technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Barry R.

    1991-01-01

    Information on Space Station Freedom scheduling problems and techniques are presented in viewgraph form. Topics covered include automated scheduling systems, user interface standards, benefits of interactive scheduling systems, incremental scheduling, software engineering, computer graphics interface, distributed resource management, and advanced applications.

  12. Advances in Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains three symposium papers on advances in distance learning. "The Adoption of Computer Technology and Telecommunications: A Case Study" (Larry M. Dooley, Teri Metcalf, Ann Martinez) reports on a study of the possible applications of two theoretical models (Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations model and the Concerns-Based…

  13. Advances in fetal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pedreira, Denise Araujo Lapa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper discusses the main advances in fetal surgical therapy aiming to inform health care professionals about the state-of-the-art techniques and future challenges in this field. We discuss the necessary steps of technical evolution from the initial open fetal surgery approach until the development of minimally invasive techniques of fetal endoscopic surgery (fetoscopy). PMID:27074241

  14. Technological Advances in Joining

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    time required for hardfacing was reduced 50 percent and material costs were reduced as well. Microplasma-Arc Welding. Advances in equipment development...548-555 (1962). (14) Anonymous, "Plasma Arc Saves Hardfacing Time and Dollars", Welding Journal, 59 (2), 51-52 (1980). (15) Liebisch, M

  15. Advances in Qualitative Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains five papers from a symposium on advances in qualitative research in human resource development (HRD). "Case Study and Its Virtuoso Possibilities" (Verna J. Willis) asserts that the case study method is particularly well suited for research in HRD because its creative and investigative possibilities have not yet…

  16. Advanced fossil energy utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhawat, D.; Berry, D.; Spivey, J.; Pennline, H.; Granite, E.

    2010-01-01

    This special issue of Fuel is a selection of papers presented at the symposium ‘Advanced Fossil Energy Utilization’ co-sponsored by the Fuels and Petrochemicals Division and Research and New Technology Committee in the 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Spring National Meeting Tampa, FL, on April 26–30, 2009.

  17. Advanced Concept Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaput, Armand; Johns, Zachary; Hodges, Todd; Selfridge, Justin; Bevirt, Joeben; Ahuja, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Concepts Modeling software validation, analysis, and design. This was a National Institute of Aerospace contract with a lot of pieces. Efforts ranged from software development and validation for structures and aerodynamics, through flight control development, and aeropropulsive analysis, to UAV piloting services.

  18. Advanced proteomic liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Smith, Richard D.; Shen, Yufeng

    2012-10-26

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry is the predominant platform used to analyze proteomics samples consisting of large numbers of proteins and their proteolytic products (e.g., truncated polypeptides) and spanning a wide range of relative concentrations. This review provides an overview of advanced capillary liquid chromatography techniques and methodologies that greatly improve separation resolving power and proteomics analysis coverage, sensitivity, and throughput.

  19. Advances in Planetary Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronow, A. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Advances in Planetary Geology is a new series intended to serve the planetary geology community with a form for quick and thorough communications. There are no set lists of acceptable topics or formats, and submitted manuscripts will not undergo a formal review. All submissions should be in a camera ready form, preferably spaced, and submitted to the editor.

  20. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, Don

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  1. Advanced Cardiac Life Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document contains materials for an advanced college course in cardiac life support developed for the State of Iowa. The course syllabus lists the course title, hours, number, description, prerequisites, learning activities, instructional units, required text, six references, evaluation criteria, course objectives by units, course…

  2. Advancing beyond AP Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Bruce G.

    2009-01-01

    A quiet revolution is picking up steam in the nation's private secondary schools, with broad implications for college admissions and for teaching and learning on both sides of the transition from high school to college. About 50 of the nation's leading college-preparatory schools have opted out of the College Board's Advanced Placement (AP)…

  3. Advanced Plant Habitat (APH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Stephanie E. (Compiler); Levine, Howard G.; Reed, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) hardware will be a large growth volume plant habitat, capable of hosting multigenerational studies, in which environmental variables (e.g., temperature, relative humidity, carbon dioxide level light intensity and spectral quality) can be tracked and controlled in support of whole plant physiological testing and Bio-regenerative Life Support System investigations.

  4. Advanced Civilian Aeronautical Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    1996-01-01

    Paper discusses alternatives to currently deployed systems which could provide revolutionary improvements in metrics applicable to civilian aeronautics. Specific missions addressed include subsonic transports, supersonic transports and personal aircraft. These alternative systems and concepts are enabled by recent and envisaged advancements in electronics, communications, computing and Designer Fluid Mechanics in conjunction with a design approach employing extensive synergistic interactions between propulsion, aerodynamics and structures.

  5. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    ScienceCinema

    Miley, Don

    2016-07-12

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  6. Advancing Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walberg, Herbert J.

    2010-01-01

    For the last half century, higher spending and many modern reforms have failed to raise the achievement of students in the United States to the levels of other economically advanced countries. A possible explanation, says Herbert Walberg, is that much current education theory is ill informed about scientific psychology, often drawing on fads and…

  7. Advanced geometries and regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Bulanov, S. V.; Turchetti, G.; Limpouch, J.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Margarone, D.; Korn, G.

    2013-07-26

    We review and discuss different schemes of laser ion acceleration as well as advanced target geometries in connection with the development of the laser-driven proton source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases, which is a part of the ELIMED project.

  8. Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Feb 9,2017 When heart failure (HF) ... content was last reviewed on 04/06/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  9. Infant Development: Recent Advances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bremner, Gavin, Ed.; Slater, Alan, Ed.; Butterworth, George, Ed.

    Noting that the last 30 years have seen enormous increases in the understanding of infancy, this book examines the current state of knowledge regarding infant development. The book's contents stem from meetings of the British Infancy Research Group. Although the book was intended for advanced undergraduates, it would also be useful for advanced…

  10. Advancement's Sticky Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    The author did not expect to be surprised or disturbed by the data from the latest Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) salary survey; however, she was. CASE has been conducting the survey since 1982, so she assumed the findings would mirror her own salary history and those of her peers. While she suspected that older women…

  11. Los Alamos Advanced Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.C.D.; Kraus, R.H.; Ledford, J.; Meier, K.L.; Meyer, R.E.; Nguyen, D.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sigler, F.L.; Young, L.M.; Wang, T.S.; Wilson, W.L.; Wood, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    At Los Alamos, we are building a free-electron laser (FEL) for industrial, medical, and research applications. This FEL, which will incorporate many of the new technologies developed over the last decade, will be compact in size, robust, and user-friendly. Electrons produced by a photocathode will be accelerated to 20 MeV by a high-brightness accelerator and transported using permanent-magnet quadrupoles and dipoles. They will form an electron beam with an excellent instantaneous beam quality of 10 {pi} mm mrad in transverse emittance and 0.3% in energy spread at a peak current up to 300 A. Including operation at higher harmonics, the laser wavelength extends form 3.7 {mu}m to 0.4 {mu}m. In this paper, we will describe the project and the programs to date. 10 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Labour analgesia: Recent advances.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Sunil T

    2010-09-01

    Advances in the field of labour analgesia have tread a long journey from the days of ether and chloroform in 1847 to the present day practice of comprehensive programme of labour pain management using evidence-based medicine. Newer advances include introduction of newer techniques like combined spinal epidurals, low-dose epidurals facilitating ambulation, pharmacological advances like introduction of remifentanil for patient-controlled intravenous analgesia, introduction of newer local anaesthetics and adjuvants like ropivacaine, levobupivacaine, sufentanil, clonidine and neostigmine, use of inhalational agents like sevoflourane for patient-controlled inhalational analgesia using special vaporizers, all have revolutionized the practice of pain management in labouring parturients. Technological advances like use of ultrasound to localize epidural space in difficult cases minimizes failed epidurals and introduction of novel drug delivery modalities like patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) pumps and computer-integrated drug delivery pumps have improved the overall maternal satisfaction rate and have enabled us to customize a suitable analgesic regimen for each parturient. Recent randomized controlled trials and Cochrane studies have concluded that the association of epidurals with increased caesarean section and long-term backache remains only a myth. Studies have also shown that the newer, low-dose regimes do not have a statistically significant impact on the duration of labour and breast feeding and also that these reduce the instrumental delivery rates thus improving maternal and foetal safety. Advances in medical technology like use of ultrasound for localizing epidural space have helped the clinicians to minimize the failure rates, and many novel drug delivery modalities like PCEA and computer-integrated PCEA have contributed to the overall maternal satisfaction and safety.

  13. Advanced Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, Robert H.

    1996-01-01

    This presentation describes a number of advanced space propulsion technologies with the potential for meeting the need for dramatic reductions in the cost of access to space, and the need for new propulsion capabilities to enable bold new space exploration (and, ultimately, space exploitation) missions of the 21st century. For example, current Earth-to-orbit (e.g., low Earth orbit, LEO) launch costs are extremely high (ca. $10,000/kg); a factor 25 reduction (to ca. $400/kg) will be needed to produce the dramatic increases in space activities in both the civilian and government sectors identified in the Commercial Space Transportation Study (CSTS). Similarly, in the area of space exploration, all of the relatively 'easy' missions (e.g., robotic flybys, inner solar system orbiters and landers; and piloted short-duration Lunar missions) have been done. Ambitious missions of the next century (e.g., robotic outer-planet orbiters/probes, landers, rovers, sample returns; and piloted long-duration Lunar and Mars missions) will require major improvements in propulsion capability. In some cases, advanced propulsion can enable a mission by making it faster or more affordable, and in some cases, by directly enabling the mission (e.g., interstellar missions). As a general rule, advanced propulsion systems are attractive because of their low operating costs (e.g., higher specific impulse, ISD) and typically show the most benefit for relatively 'big' missions (i.e., missions with large payloads or AV, or a large overall mission model). In part, this is due to the intrinsic size of the advanced systems as compared to state-of-the-art (SOTA) chemical propulsion systems. Also, advanced systems often have a large 'infrastructure' cost, either in the form of initial R&D costs or in facilities hardware costs (e.g., laser or microwave transmission ground stations for beamed energy propulsion). These costs must then be amortized over a large mission to be cost-competitive with a SOTA

  14. Advanced life support study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Summary reports on each of the eight tasks undertaken by this contract are given. Discussed here is an evaluation of a Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS), including modeling and analysis of Physical/Chemical Closed Loop Life Support (P/C CLLS); the Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) evolution - Intermodule Ventilation study; advanced technologies interface requirements relative to ECLSS; an ECLSS resupply analysis; the ECLSS module addition relocation systems engineering analysis; an ECLSS cost/benefit analysis to identify rack-level interface requirements of the alternate technologies evaluated in the ventilation study, with a comparison of these with the rack level interface requirements for the baseline technologies; advanced instrumentation - technology database enhancement; and a clean room survey and assessment of various ECLSS evaluation options for different growth scenarios.

  15. Advances in Norovirus Biology

    PubMed Central

    Karst, Stephanie M.; Wobus, Christiane E.; Goodfellow, Ian G.; Green, Kim Y.

    2014-01-01

    Human noroviruses are a major cause of epidemic and sporadic gastroenteritis worldwide, and can chronically infect immunocompromised patients. Efforts to develop effective vaccines and antivirals have been hindered by the uncultivable nature and extreme genetic diversity of human noroviruses. Although they remain a particularly challenging pathogen to study, recent advances in norovirus animal models and in vitro cultivation systems have led to an increased understanding of norovirus molecular biology and replication, pathogenesis, cell tropism, and innate and adaptive immunity. Furthermore, clinical trials of vaccines consisting of nonreplicating virus-like particles have shown promise. In this review, we summarize these recent advances and discuss controversies in the field, which is rapidly progressing towards generation of antiviral agents and increasingly effective vaccines. PMID:24922570

  16. Advanced CCD camera developments

    SciTech Connect

    Condor, A.

    1994-11-15

    Two charge coupled device (CCD) camera systems are introduced and discussed, describing briefly the hardware involved, and the data obtained in their various applications. The Advanced Development Group Defense Sciences Engineering Division has been actively designing, manufacturing, fielding state-of-the-art CCD camera systems for over a decade. These systems were originally developed for the nuclear test program to record data from underground nuclear tests. Today, new and interesting application for these systems have surfaced and development is continuing in the area of advanced CCD camera systems, with the new CCD camera that will allow experimenters to replace film for x-ray imaging at the JANUS, USP, and NOVA laser facilities.

  17. CADC Advanced Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, D. N.

    2012-09-01

    The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre's (CADC) Advanced Search web application is a modern search tool to access data across the CADC archives. It allows searching in different units, and is well averse in wild card characters and numeric operations. Search results are displayed in a sortable and filterable manner allowing quick and accurate access to downloadable data. The Advanced Search interface makes extremely good use of the Astronomical Data Query Language (ADQL) to scour the Common Archive Observation Model (CAOM) Table Access Protocol (TAP) query service and the vast CADC Archive Data (AD) storage system. A new tabular view of the query form and the results data makes it easy to view the query, then return to the query form to make further changes, or, alternatively, filter the data from the paginated table. Results are displayed using a rich, open-source, JavaScript-based VOTable viewer called voview.

  18. Advanced Separation Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    2006-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was formed in 2001 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to conduct fundamental research in advanced separation and to develop technologies that can be used to produce coal and minerals in an efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The CAST consortium consists of seven universities - Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, Montana Tech, University of Utah, University of Nevada-Reno, and New Mexico Tech. The consortium brings together a broad range of expertise to solve problems facing the US coal industry and the mining sector in general. At present, a total of 60 research projects are under way. The article outlines some of these, on topics including innovative dewatering technologies, removal of mercury and other impurities, and modelling of the flotation process. 1 photo.

  19. Advanced far infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E.

    1993-05-01

    Recent advances in photoconductive and bolometric semiconductor detectors for wavelength 1 mm > {lambda} > 50 {mu}m are reviewed. Progress in detector performance in this photon energy range has been stimulated by new and stringent requirements for ground based, high altitude and space-borne telescopes for astronomical and astrophysical observations. The paper consists of chapters dealing with the various types of detectors: Be and Ga doped Ge photoconductors, stressed Ge:Ga devices and neutron transmutation doped Ge thermistors. Advances in the understanding of basic detector physics and the introduction of modern semiconductor device technology have led to predictable and reliable fabrication techniques. Integration of detectors into functional arrays has become feasible and is vigorously pursued by groups worldwide.

  20. Advanced light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sah, R. C.

    1983-03-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a new synchrotron radiation source which was proposed by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The ALS will be a key component in a major new research facility, the National Center for Advanced Materials. The ALS will consist of an electron linear accelerator, a booster synchrotron, a 1.3-GeV electron storage ring, and a number of photon beam lines. Most of all photon beam lines will originate from wiggler and undulator magnets placed in the 12 long straight sections of the ALS. A very low electron beam emittance will provide photon beams of unsurpassed spectral brilliance from specially-designed undulators, and a high radiofrequency will produce very short pulse lengths.

  1. Advanced information society(5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanizawa, Ippei

    Based on the advancement of information network technology information communication forms informationalized society giving significant impact on business activities and life style in it. The information network has been backed up technologically by development of computer technology and has got great contribution by enhanced computer technology and communication equipments. Information is transferred by digital and analog methods. Technical development which has brought out multifunctioned modems of communication equipments in analog mode, and construction of advanced information communication network which has come out by joint work of computer and communication under digital technique, are described. The trend in institutional matter and standardization of electrical communication is also described showing some examples of value-added network (VAN).

  2. Advanced ground station architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zillig, David; Benjamin, Ted

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a new station architecture for NASA's Ground Network (GN). The architecture makes efficient use of emerging technologies to provide dramatic reductions in size, operational complexity, and operational and maintenance costs. The architecture, which is based on recent receiver work sponsored by the Office of Space Communications Advanced Systems Program, allows integration of both GN and Space Network (SN) modes of operation in the same electronics system. It is highly configurable through software and the use of charged coupled device (CCD) technology to provide a wide range of operating modes. Moreover, it affords modularity of features which are optional depending on the application. The resulting system incorporates advanced RF, digital, and remote control technology capable of introducing significant operational, performance, and cost benefits to a variety of NASA communications and tracking applications.

  3. Recent Advances in Voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Kätelhön, Enno; Barnes, Edward O; Compton, Richard G; Laborda, Eduardo; Molina, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in the theory and practice of voltammetry is surveyed and evaluated. The transformation over the last decade of the level of modelling and simulation of experiments has realised major advances such that electrochemical techniques can be fully developed and applied to real chemical problems of distinct complexity. This review focuses on the topic areas of: multistep electrochemical processes, voltammetry in ionic liquids, the development and interpretation of theories of electron transfer (Butler–Volmer and Marcus–Hush), advances in voltammetric pulse techniques, stochastic random walk models of diffusion, the influence of migration under conditions of low support, voltammetry at rough and porous electrodes, and nanoparticle electrochemistry. The review of the latter field encompasses both the study of nanoparticle-modified electrodes, including stripping voltammetry and the new technique of ‘nano-impacts’. PMID:26246984

  4. Recent Advances in Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Kätelhön, Enno; Barnes, Edward O; Compton, Richard G; Laborda, Eduardo; Molina, Angela

    2015-06-01

    Recent progress in the theory and practice of voltammetry is surveyed and evaluated. The transformation over the last decade of the level of modelling and simulation of experiments has realised major advances such that electrochemical techniques can be fully developed and applied to real chemical problems of distinct complexity. This review focuses on the topic areas of: multistep electrochemical processes, voltammetry in ionic liquids, the development and interpretation of theories of electron transfer (Butler-Volmer and Marcus-Hush), advances in voltammetric pulse techniques, stochastic random walk models of diffusion, the influence of migration under conditions of low support, voltammetry at rough and porous electrodes, and nanoparticle electrochemistry. The review of the latter field encompasses both the study of nanoparticle-modified electrodes, including stripping voltammetry and the new technique of 'nano-impacts'.

  5. Advanced Clothing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyan, James; Orndoff, Evelyne

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the Advanced Clothing System (ACS) is to use advanced commercial off-the-shelf fibers and antimicrobial treatments with the goal of directly reducing the mass and volume of a logistics item. The current clothing state-of-the-art on the International Space Station (ISS) is disposable, mostly cotton-based, clothing with no laundry provisions. Each clothing article has varying use periods and will become trash. The goal is to increase the length of wear of the clothing to reduce the logistical mass and volume. The initial focus has been exercise clothing since the use period is lower. Various ground studies and an ISS technology demonstration have been conducted to evaluate clothing preference and length of wear. The analysis indicates that use of ACS selected garments (e.g. wool, modacrylic, polyester) can increase the breakeven point for laundry to 300 days.

  6. Advanced Clothing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlesinger, Thilini; Broyan, James; Orndoff, Evelyne

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the Advanced Clothing System (ACS) is to use advanced commercial off-theshelf fibers and antimicrobial treatments with the goal of directly reducing the mass and volume of a logistics item. The current clothing state-of-the-art on the International Space Station (ISS) is disposable, mostly cotton-based, clothing with no laundry provisions. Each clothing article has varying use periods and will become trash. The goal is to increase the length of wear of the clothing to reduce the logistical mass and volume. The initial focus has been exercise clothing since the use period is lower. Various ground studies and an ISS technology demonstration have been conducted to evaluate clothing preference and length of wear. The analysis indicates that use of ACS selected garments (e.g. wool, modacrylic, polyester) can increase the breakeven point for laundry to 300 days.

  7. [Research advances in dendrochronology].

    PubMed

    Fang, Ke-Yan; Chen, Qiu-Yan; Liu, Chang-Zhi; Cao, Chun-Fu; Chen, Ya-Jun; Zhou, Fei-Fei

    2014-07-01

    Tree-ring studies in China have achieved great advances since the 1990s, particularly for the dendroclimatological studies which have made some influence around the world. However, because of the uneven development, limited attention has been currently paid on the other branches of dendrochronology. We herein briefly compared the advances of dendrochronology in China and of the world and presented suggestions on future dendrochronological studies. Large-scale tree-ring based climate reconstructions in China are highly needed by employing mathematical methods and a high quality tree-ring network of the ring-width, density, stable isotope and wood anatomy. Tree-ring based field climate reconstructions provide potentials on explorations of climate forcings during the reconstructed periods via climate diagnosis and process simulation.

  8. Advanced Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation is planned to be a 10-15 minute "catalytic" focused presentation to be scheduled during one of the working sessions at the TIM. This presentation will focus on Advanced Life Support technologies key to future human Space Exploration as outlined in the Vision, and will include basic requirements, assessment of the state-of-the-art and gaps, and include specific technology metrics. The presentation will be technical in character, lean heavily on data in published ALS documents (such as the Baseline Values and Assumptions Document) but not provide specific technical details or build to information on any technology mentioned (thus the presentation will be benign from an export control and a new technology perspective). The topics presented will be focused on the following elements of Advanced Life Support: air revitalization, water recovery, waste management, thermal control, habitation systems, food systems and bioregenerative life support.

  9. Technical advances power neuroscience

    SciTech Connect

    Barinaga, M.

    1991-01-01

    New techniques are helping researchers study the development of nerve cells in cell cultures and in vivo. These new methods are offering insights into the brain that were not available even a couple of years ago. Among the new advances discussed are imaging technology for evaluating the thinking human brain. One area in which researchers have made recent progress is the quest for ways to create immortal cell lines from specific types of nerve cells. Other projects using genetically engineered retroviruses and tumor-inducing genes, as well as gene regulation are discussed. Recent advances in neuroscience techniques apply not only to neurons, but also to whole brains as well. One example is a high-resulution electroencephalogram (EEG). Although the EEG cannot pin down the actual sites of activity as precisely as static brain imaging methods, it complements them with real-time recording that can keep up with the very rapid pace of brain activity.

  10. G4 Advanced Education.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-29

    Advanced Finance and Economy Edu- cation/Zhao Dongya// Finance and Economy Science(Journal of Sichuan Finance and Economy College)(Chengdu), 1986. 2. 63...67 Preliminary Thoughts on the Reform of Industrial, Enterprising Finance Management Curriculums/Gu Xingsu//Journal of Beijing Foreign Trade College...1985. 4. 71-76 Humble Opinions on Offering Classes in "Construction of Chinese Social- ism"/Zhao Luxin//Theory and Implementation of Finance and

  11. Advances in Strapdown Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    axis laser gyro sensor assembly (1, 24) in a single Zerodur structure using interleaved laser paths to reduce net size/weight. If advances in mirror ...laser gyros, special design considerations - associated with mechanically dithered laaer gyros, the state-of-the-art in magnetic mirror and...from the lasing action of a helium-noon gas discharge within the optical cavity. The reflecting surfaces are die- lectric mirrors designed to

  12. Advanced Environmental Monitoring Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Advanced Environmental Monitoring Technologies are presented. The topics include: 1) Monitoring & Controlling the Environment; 2) Illustrative Example: Canary 3) Ground-based Commercial Technology; 4) High Capability & Low Mass/Power + Autonomy = Key to Future SpaceFlight; 5) Current Practice: in Flight; 6) Current Practice: Post Flight; 7) Miniature Mass Spectrometer for Planetary Exploration and Long Duration Human Flight; 8) Hardware and Data Acquisition System; 9) 16S rDNA Phylogenetic Tree; and 10) Preview of Porter.

  13. Advances in Doppler OCT

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    We review the principle and some recent applications of Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT). The advances of the phase-resolved Doppler OCT method are described. Functional OCT algorithms which are based on an extension of the phase-resolved scheme are also introduced. Recent applications of Doppler OCT for quantification of flow, imaging of microvasculature and vocal fold vibration, and optical coherence elastography are briefly discussed. PMID:24443649

  14. Advanced geothermal technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Whetten, J.T.; Murphy, H.D.; Hanold, R.J.; Myers, C.W.; Dunn, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Research and development in advanced technologies for geothermal energy production continue to increase the energy production options for the Nation. The high-risk investment over the past few years by the US Department of Energy in geopressured, hot dry rock, and magma energy resources is producing new means to lower production costs and to take advantage of these resources. The Nation has far larger and more regionally extensive geothermal resources than heretofore realized. At the end of a short 30-day closed-loop flow test, the manmade hot dry rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was producing 10 MW thermal - and still climbing - proving the technical feasibility of this new technology. The scientific feasibility of magma energy extraction has been demonstrated, and new field tests to evaluate this technology are planned. Analysis and field tests confirm the viability of geopressured-geothermal energy and the prospect that many dry-hole or depleted petroleum wells can be turned into producing geopressured-geothermal wells. Technological advances achieved through hot dry rock, magma, geopressured, and other geothermal research are making these resources and conventional hydrothermal resources more competitive. Noteworthy among these technological advances are techniques in computer simulation of geothermal reservoirs, new means for well stimulation, new high-temperature logging tools and packers, new hard-rock penetration techniques, and new methods for mapping fracture flow paths across large underground areas in reservoirs. In addition, many of these same technological advances can be applied by the petroleum industry to help lower production costs in domestic oil and gas fields. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Polarized advanced fuel reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1987-07-01

    The d-/sup 3/He reaction has the same spin dependence as the d-t reaction. It produces no neutrons, so that if the d-d reactivity could be reduced, it would lead to a neutron-lean reactor. The current understanding of the possible suppression of the d-d reactivity by spin polarization is discussed. The question as to whether a suppression is possible is still unresolved. Other advanced fuel reactions are briefly discussed. 11 refs.

  16. Advanced worker protection system

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, B.; Duncan, P.; Myers, J.

    1995-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the magnitude and diversity of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) obligations at its numerous sites. The DOE believes that existing technologies are inadequate to solve many challenging problems such as how to decontaminate structures and equipment cost effectively, what to do with materials and wastes generated, and how to adequately protect workers and the environment. Preliminary estimates show a tremendous need for effective use of resources over a relatively long period (over 30 years). Several technologies are being investigated which can potentially reduce D&D costs while providing appropriate protection to DOE workers. The DOE recognizes that traditional methods used by the EPA in hazardous waste site clean up activities are insufficient to provide the needed protection and worker productivity demanded by DOE D&D programs. As a consequence, new clothing and equipment which can adequately protect workers while providing increases in worker productivity are being sought for implementation at DOE sites. This project will result in the development of an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS will be built around a life support backpack that uses liquid air to provide cooling as well as breathing gas to the worker. The backpack will be combined with advanced protective garments, advanced liquid cooling garment, respirator, communications, and support equipment to provide improved worker protection, simplified system maintenance, and dramatically improve worker productivity through longer duration work cycles. Phase I of the project has resulted in a full scale prototype Advanced Worker Protection Ensemble (AWPE, everything the worker will wear), with sub-scale support equipment, suitable for integrated testing and preliminary evaluation. Phase II will culminate in a full scale, certified, pre-production AWPS and a site demonstration.

  17. Advances in epilepsy surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nowell, Mark; Miserocchi, Anna; McEvoy, Andrew W; Duncan, John S

    2014-01-01

    This review summarises exciting recent and forthcoming advances that will impact on the surgical management of epilepsy in the near future. This does not cover the current accepted diagnostic methodologies or surgical treatments that are routinely practiced today. The content of this review was derived from a PubMed literature search, using the key words ‘Epilepsy Surgery’, ‘Neuromodulation’, ‘Neuroablation’, ‘Advances’, between 2010 and November 2013. PMID:24719180

  18. Advanced nuclear propulsion technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Cassenti, B.N. )

    1991-01-01

    Advanced nuclear propulsion can take on several forms. Radioactive thrust sheets directly use the decay of radioactive nuclei to provide propulsion. The fissioning of nuclei has been extensively studied for propulsion both analytically and experimentally. Fusion has been analytically examined as a means of providing propulsion during the last few decades. In the last decade, serious attention has been given to the direct annihilation of matter. Each of these technologies is discussed in this paper with the greatest emphasis on antiproton annihilation propulsion.

  19. STIR: Advanced Quantum Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-18

    STIR: Advanced Quantum Sensing Recycling unmeasured photons in a system utilizing weak measurements can substantially improve the signal-to- noise...Quantum Sensing Report Title Recycling unmeasured photons in a system utilizing weak measurements can substantially improve the signal-to-noise ratio. We...Kevin Lyons, Andrew N. Jordan, Trent M. Graham, Paul G. Kwiat. Strengthening weak- value amplification with recycled photons , Physical Review A, (08

  20. Advanced turboprop vibratory characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, A. V.; Fulton, G. B.

    1984-01-01

    The assembly of SR5 advanced turboprop blades to develop a structural dynamic data base for swept props is reported. Steady state blade deformation under centrifugal loading and vibratory characteristics of the rotor assembly were measured. Vibration was induced through a system of piezoelectric crystals attached to the blades. Data reduction procedures are used to provide deformation, mode shape, and frequencies of the assembly at predetermined speeds.

  1. The advanced neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.; Hayter, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new user experimental facility planned to be operational at Oak Ridge in the late 1990's. The centerpiece of the ANS will be a steady-state research reactor of unprecedented thermal neutron flux ({phi}{sub th} {approx} 8 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}2} {center dot}s{sup {minus}1}) accompanied by extensive and comprehensive equipment and facilities for neutron-based research.

  2. The Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new user experimental facility planned to be operational at Oak Ridge in the late 1990's. The centerpiece of the ANS will be a steady-state research reactor of unprecedented thermal neutron flux ({phi}{sub th} {approx} 9{center dot}10{sup 19} m{sup -2}{center dot}s{sup -1}) accompanied by extensive and comprehensive equipment and facilities for neutron-based research. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Advanced Polymer Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Muenchausen, Ross E.

    2012-07-25

    Some conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Radiation-assisted nanotechnology applications will continue to grow; (2) The APPF will provide a unique focus for radiolytic processing of nanomaterials in support of DOE-DP, other DOE and advanced manufacturing initiatives; (3) {gamma}, X-ray, e-beam and ion beam processing will increasingly be applied for 'green' manufacturing of nanomaterials and nanocomposites; and (4) Biomedical science and engineering may ultimately be the biggest application area for radiation-assisted nanotechnology development.

  4. Advanced Triangulation Displacement Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poteet, Wade M.; Cauthen, Harold K.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced optoelectronic triangulation displacement sensors undergoing development. Highly miniaturized, more stable, more accurate, and relatively easy to use. Incorporate wideband electronic circuits suitable for real-time monitoring and control of displacements. Measurements expected to be accurate to within nanometers. In principle, sensors mass-produced at relatively low unit cost. Potential applications numerous. Possible industrial application in measuring runout of rotating shaft or other moving part during fabrication in "zero-defect" manufacturing system, in which measured runout automatically corrected.

  5. Recent advances in dermoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Teresa; Piccolo, Vincenzo; Lallas, Aimilios; Argenziano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The use of dermoscopy has offered a new morphological dimension of skin lesions and has provided an effective diagnostic tool to differentiate melanoma from other benign or malignant skin tumors but also to support the clinical diagnosis in general dermatology. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the most recent and important advances in the rising world of dermoscopy. PMID:26949523

  6. Advanced Doppler tracking experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The Doppler tracking method is currently the only technique available for broadband gravitational wave searches in the approx. 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -1) Hz low frequency band. A brief review is given of the Doppler method, a discussion of the main noise sources, and a review of experience with current spacecraft and the prospects for sensitivity improvements in an advanced Doppler tracking experiment.

  7. Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming

    1998-01-01

    Researchers from the NASA Lewis Research Center have obtained the first combustion/emissions data under extreme future engine operating conditions. In Lewis' new world-class 60-atm combustor research facility--the Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig (ASCR)--a flametube was used to conduct combustion experiments in environments as extreme as 900 psia and 3400 F. The greatest challenge for combustion researchers is the uncertainty of the effects of pressure on the formation of nitrogen oxides (NOx). Consequently, U.S. engine manufacturers are using these data to guide their future combustor designs. The flametube's metal housing has an inside diameter of 12 in. and a length of 10.5 in. The flametube can be used with a variety of different flow paths. Each flow path is lined with a high-temperature, castable refractory material (alumina) to minimize heat loss. Upstream of the flametube is the injector section, which has an inside diameter of 13 in. and a length of 0.5-in. It was designed to provide for quick changeovers. This flametube is being used to provide all U.S. engine manufacturers early assessments of advanced combustion concepts at full power conditions prior to engine production. To date, seven concepts from engine manufacturers have been evaluated and improved. This collaborated development can potentially give U.S. engine manufacturers the competitive advantage of being first in the market with advanced low-emission technologies.

  8. Advances in thermal engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Kitto, J.B.; Fiveland, W.A.; Latham, C.E.; Peterson, G.P.

    1995-03-01

    Heat transfer--more broadly, thermal engineering--is playing an increasingly critical role in the development and successful application of advanced technology in virtually all fields. From space stations to hazardous-waste destruction to high-speed transport, from ozone-protecting refrigerants to ``night vision`` goggles, a vast range of technologies depend on energy management, heat-flow control, and temperature control to successfully meet their design objectives and attain commercial success. Meeting the continually escalating demand for electricity and ``cheap`` process that will remain a challenge. Environmental protection can depend not only on using energy more efficiently, but on changing the energy conversion process to reduce initial pollutant formation. Further advances in electronics, materials processing, and manufacturing will depend in part on more precise energy management and temperature control. The scale of thermal engineering is quite broad, extending from the very large to the near-molecular level, and from very high temperatures of thousands of degrees to very low ones approaching absolute zero. This breadth of application is illustrated by a review of three specific areas: application of advanced numerical modeling to large boiler furnaces (approaching 100 m in height) in order to improve environmental performance; application of microscale ({approximately}100 {micro}) heat pipes to cool high-performance electronic circuits; and a look at some of the manufacturing processes where heat transfer and thermal analysis improve quality, performance and cost.

  9. Are Advanced Potentials Anomalous?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibison, Michael

    2006-10-01

    Advanced electromagnetic potentials are indigenous to the classical Maxwell theory. Generally however they are deemed undesirable and are forcibly excluded, destroying the theory's inherent time-symmetry. We investigate the reason for this, pointing out that it is not necessary and in some cases is counter-productive. We then focus on the direct-action theory in which the advanced and retarded contributions are present symmetrically, with no opportunity supplement the particular integral solution of the wave equation with an arbitrary complementary function. One then requires a plausible explanation for the observed broken symmetry that, commonly, is understood cannot be met by the Wheeler-Feynman mechanism because the necessary boundary condition cannot be satisfied in acceptable cosmologies. We take this opportunity to argue that the boundary condition is already met by all expanding cosmologies simply as a result of cosmological red-shift. A consequence is that the cosmological and thermodynamic arrows of time can be equated, the direct action version of EM is preferred, and that advanced potentials are ubiquitous.

  10. Advanced gearbox technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, N. E.; Cedoz, R. W.; Salama, E. E.; Wagner, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    An advanced 13,000 HP, counterrotating (CR) gearbox was designed and successfully tested to provide a technology base for future designs of geared propfan propulsion systems for both commercial and military aircraft. The advanced technology CR gearbox was designed for high efficiency, low weight, long life, and improved maintainability. The differential planetary CR gearbox features double helical gears, double row cylindrical roller bearings integral with planet gears, tapered roller prop support bearings, and a flexible ring gear and diaphragm to provide load sharing. A new Allison propfan back-to-back gearbox test facility was constructed. Extensive rotating and stationary instrumentation was used to measure temperature, strain, vibration, deflection and efficiency under representative flight operating conditions. The tests verified smooth, efficient gearbox operation. The highly-instrumented advanced CR gearbox was successfully tested to design speed and power (13,000 HP), and to a 115 percent overspeed condition. Measured CR gearbox efficiency was 99.3 percent at the design point based on heat loss to the oil. Tests demonstrated low vibration characteristics of double helical gearing, proper gear tooth load sharing, low stress levels, and the high load capacity of the prop tapered roller bearings. Applied external prop loads did not significantly affect gearbox temperature, vibration, or stress levels. Gearbox hardware was in excellent condition after the tests with no indication of distress.

  11. Advanced scale conditioning agents

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jeff; Battaglia, Philip J.

    2004-06-01

    A technical description of Advanced Scale Conditioning Agents (ASCA) technology was published in the May-June 2003 edition of the Nuclear Plant Journal. That article described the development of programs of advanced scale conditioning agents and specific types to maintain the secondary side of steam generators within a pressurized water reactor free of deposited corrosion products and corrosion-inducing contaminants to ensure their long-term operation. This article describes the first two plant applications of advanced scale conditioning agents implemented at Southern Nuclear Operating Company's Vogtle Units 1 and 2 during their 2002 scheduled outages to minimize tube degradation and maintain full power operation using the most effective techniques while minimizing outage costs. The goal was to remove three to four fuel cycles of deposits from each steam generator so that after future chemical cleaning activities, ASCAs could be used to maintain the cleanliness of the steam generators without the need for additional chemical cleaning efforts. The goal was achieved as well as several other benefits that resulted in cost savings to the plant.

  12. Advances in Irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, W. R.

    This is the first volume of Advances in Irrigation, a new serial publication by the publishers of Advances in Agronomy and Advances in Hydroscience and designed to follow the same format. The editor is a well-known researcher and writer on irrigation and related subjects and has assembled a collection of highly regarded and respected authors for the initial volume. The readership for this volume will probably be mainly specialists and students interested in irrigation and an occasional design engineer.The seven contributions in this volume fall roughly into two classes: research and practice. Three papers (“Conjunctive Use of Rainfall and Irrigation in Semi-arid Regions,” by Stewart and Musik, “Irrigation Scheduling Using Soil Moisture Measurements: Theory and Practice,” by G. S. and M. D. Campbell, and “Use of Solute Transport Models to Estimate Salt Balance Below Irrigated Cropland,” by Jury) cover topics that have been the subject of a number of reviews. The contributions here provide brief, well-written, and authoritative summaries of the chosen topics and serve as good introductions or reviews. They should lend themselves well to classroom use in various ways. They also should be helpful to the nonspecialist interested in getting a sense of the subject without going into great detail.

  13. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect

    James Francfort

    2003-11-01

    The light-duty vehicle transportation sector in the United States depends heavily on imported petroleum as a transportation fuel. The Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is testing advanced technology vehicles to help reduce this dependency, which would contribute to the economic stability and homeland security of the United States. These advanced technology test vehicles include internal combustion engine vehicles operating on 100% hydrogen (H2) and H2CNG (compressed natural gas) blended fuels, hybrid electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, and electric ground support vehicles. The AVTA tests and evaluates these vehicles with closed track and dynamometer testing methods (baseline performance testing) and accelerated reliability testing methods (accumulating lifecycle vehicle miles and operational knowledge within 1 to 1.5 years), and in normal fleet environments. The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and H2-fueled vehicles are demonstrating the feasibility of using H2 as a transportation fuel. Hybrid, neighborhood, and urban electric test vehicles are demonstrating successful applications of electric drive vehicles in various fleet missions. The AVTA is also developing electric ground support equipment (GSE) test procedures, and GSE testing will start during the fall of 2003. All of these activities are intended to support U.S. energy independence. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the AVTA.

  14. Accelerating advanced-materials commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maine, Elicia; Seegopaul, Purnesh

    2016-05-01

    Long commercialization times, high capital costs and sustained uncertainty deter investment in innovation for advanced materials. With appropriate strategies, technology and market uncertainties can be reduced, and the commercialization of advanced materials accelerated.

  15. Advances in ice mechanics - 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J.S.; Hallam, S.D.; Maatanen, M.; Sinha, N.K.; Sodhi, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on the interaction of icebergs with offshore platforms. Topics considered at the symposium included advances in ice mechanics in the United Kingdom, ice mechanics in Finland, recent advances in ice mechanics in Canada, advances in sea ice mechanics in the USA, foundations, monitoring, hazards, risk assessment, and deformation.

  16. TIMSS Advanced 2015 Assessment Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullis, Ina V. S., Ed.; Martin, Michael O., Ed.

    2014-01-01

    The "TIMSS Advanced 2015 Assessment Frameworks" provides the foundation for the two international assessments to take place as part of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement's TIMSS (Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study) Advanced 2015--Advanced Mathematics and Physics. Chapter 1 (Liv…

  17. TIMSS Advanced 2008 Assessment Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garden, Robert A.; Lie, Svein; Robitaille, David F.; Angell, Carl; Martin, Michael O.; Mullis, Ina V.S.; Foy, Pierre; Arora, Alka

    2006-01-01

    Developing the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) Advanced 2008 Assessment Frameworks was a collaborative venture involving mathematics and physics experts from around the world. The document contains two frameworks for implementing TIMSS Advanced 2008--one for advanced mathematics and one for physics. It also contains…

  18. Advanced Optical Fiber Communication Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    Optical Network with Physical Star Topology," Advanced Fiber Communications Technologies , Leonid G. Kazovsky... advances in the performance and capabilities of optical fiber communication systems. While some of these technologies are interrelated (for example...multi gigabit per second hybrid circuit/packet switched lightwave network ," Proc. SPIE Advanced Fiber Communications Technologies , Boston 󈨟, Sept.

  19. Advanced education in prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    McGivney, G P

    1990-09-01

    1. The ADA Council on Dental Education Commission on Accreditation, using the Standards for undergraduate education and current National Board scores, does not believe there has been a deemphasis in prosthodontic knowledge and skill. This opinion is not shared by program Directors or representatives of the laboratory industry. The Council on Dental Education has a mechanism for periodic review in place. State Boards of Dental Examiners did not respond. 2. Teaching experience for residents or graduate students should be encouraged in advanced education programs in prosthodontics as an elective or be limited to no more than 10% of the curriculum time. 3. The American Board of Prosthodontics would not comment on any changes regarding the clinical or didactic knowledge of candidates. 4. Meaningful research is not possible within the current minimum 22-month program duration. 5. Accredited advanced education programs in prosthodontics are currently meeting the standard guidelines for clinical and didactic experiences. 6. Accredited advanced education programs in prosthodontics are currently satisfying the requirements on supervision and faculty; however, the data from the annual reports suggest a marked decrease in staff support and amount of time that program directors are devoting to the program. 7. Expanding the curriculum to include implant prosthodontics will require lengthening the curriculum time. 8. TMJ therapy and geriatric dentistry need to be better defined in the educational guidelines. 9. The criterion-based examination currently given by the American Board of Prosthodontics clearly delineates acceptable, marginal, and unacceptable levels of performance. 10. Program directors desire more "feedback" from the American Board of Prosthodontics on the performance of candidates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).