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Sample records for advanced structural ceramic

  1. Structural Ceramics Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Structural Ceramics Database (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.

  2. Application of scanning acoustic microscopy to advanced structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex; Klima, Stanley J.

    1987-01-01

    A review is presentod of research investigations of several acoustic microscopy techniques for application to structural ceramics for advanced heat engines. Results obtained with scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM), scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM), scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM), and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) are compared. The techniques were evaluated on research samples of green and sintered monolithic silicon nitrides and silicon carbides in the form of modulus-of-rupture bars containing deliberately introduced flaws. Strengths and limitations of the techniques are described with emphasis on statistics of detectability of flaws that constitute potential fracture origins.

  3. Probabilistic Evaluation of Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abumeri, Galib H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this report is to summarize the deterministic and probabilistic structural evaluation results of two structures made with advanced ceramic composites (CMC): internally pressurized tube and uniformly loaded flange. The deterministic structural evaluation includes stress, displacement, and buckling analyses. It is carried out using the finite element code MHOST, developed for the 3-D inelastic analysis of structures that are made with advanced materials. The probabilistic evaluation is performed using the integrated probabilistic assessment of composite structures computer code IPACS. The affects of uncertainties in primitive variables related to the material, fabrication process, and loadings on the material property and structural response behavior are quantified. The primitive variables considered are: thermo-mechanical properties of fiber and matrix, fiber and void volume ratios, use temperature, and pressure. The probabilistic structural analysis and probabilistic strength results are used by IPACS to perform reliability and risk evaluation of the two structures. The results will show that the sensitivity information obtained for the two composite structures from the computational simulation can be used to alter the design process to meet desired service requirements. In addition to detailed probabilistic analysis of the two structures, the following were performed specifically on the CMC tube: (1) predicted the failure load and the buckling load, (2) performed coupled non-deterministic multi-disciplinary structural analysis, and (3) demonstrated that probabilistic sensitivities can be used to select a reduced set of design variables for optimization.

  4. Fracture Toughness of Advanced Structural Ceramics: Applying ASTM C1421

    DOE PAGES

    Swab, Jeffrey J.; Tice, Jason; Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Kraft, Reuben H.

    2014-11-03

    The three methods of determining the quasi-static Mode I fracture toughness (KIc) (surface crack in flexure – SC, single-edge precracked beam – PB, and chevron notched beam – VB) found in ASTM C1421 were applied to a variety of advanced ceramic materials. All three methods produced valid and comparable KIc values for the Al2O3, SiC, Si3N4 and SiAlON ceramics examined. However, not all methods could successfully be applied to B4C, ZrO2 and WC ceramics due to a variety of material factors. The coarse-grained microstructure of one B4C hindered the ability to observe and measure the precracks generated in the SCmore » and PB methods while the transformation toughening in the ZrO2 prevented the formation of the SC and PB precracks and thus made it impossible to use either method on this ceramic. The high strength and elastic modulus of the WC made it impossible to achieve stable crack growth using the VB method because the specimen stored a tremendous amount of energy prior to fracture. Even though these methods have passed the rigors of the standardization process there are still some issues to be resolved when the methods are applied to certain classes of ceramics. We recommend that at least two of these methods be employed to determine the KIc, especially when a new or unfamiliar ceramic is being evaluated.« less

  5. Fracture Toughness of Advanced Structural Ceramics: Applying ASTM C1421

    SciTech Connect

    Swab, Jeffrey J.; Tice, Jason; Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Kraft, Reuben H.

    2014-11-03

    The three methods of determining the quasi-static Mode I fracture toughness (KIc) (surface crack in flexure – SC, single-edge precracked beam – PB, and chevron notched beam – VB) found in ASTM C1421 were applied to a variety of advanced ceramic materials. All three methods produced valid and comparable KIc values for the Al2O3, SiC, Si3N4 and SiAlON ceramics examined. However, not all methods could successfully be applied to B4C, ZrO2 and WC ceramics due to a variety of material factors. The coarse-grained microstructure of one B4C hindered the ability to observe and measure the precracks generated in the SC and PB methods while the transformation toughening in the ZrO2 prevented the formation of the SC and PB precracks and thus made it impossible to use either method on this ceramic. The high strength and elastic modulus of the WC made it impossible to achieve stable crack growth using the VB method because the specimen stored a tremendous amount of energy prior to fracture. Even though these methods have passed the rigors of the standardization process there are still some issues to be resolved when the methods are applied to certain classes of ceramics. We recommend that at least two of these methods be employed to determine the KIc, especially when a new or unfamiliar ceramic is being evaluated.

  6. Structural Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of abstracts and slides of papers presented at the NASA Lewis Structural Ceramics Workshop. Collectively, these papers depict the scope of NASA Lewis' structural ceramics program. The technical areas include monolithic SiC and Si3N4 development, ceramic matrix composites, tribology, design methodology, nondestructive evaluation (NDE), fracture mechanics, and corrosion.

  7. Nondestructive evaluation of advanced ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, Stanley J.; Kautz, Harold E.

    1988-01-01

    A review is presented of Lewis Research Center efforts to develop nondestructive evaluation techniques for characterizing advanced ceramic materials. Various approaches involved the use of analytical ultrasonics to characterize monolythic ceramic microstructures, acousto-ultrasonics for characterizing ceramic matrix composites, damage monitoring in impact specimens by microfocus X-ray radiography and scanning ultrasonics, and high resolution computed X-ray tomography to identify structural features in fiber reinforced ceramics.

  8. Structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Douglas F.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation gives a brief history of the field of materials sciences and goes on to expound the advantages of the fastest growing area in that field, namely ceramics. Since ceramics are moving to fill the demand for lighter, stronger, more corrosion resistant materials, advancements will rely more on processing and modeling from the atomic scale up which is made possible by advanced analytical, computer, and processing techniques. All information is presented in viewgraph format.

  9. Process for producing advanced ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Kwong, Kyei-Sing

    1996-01-01

    A process for the synthesis of homogeneous advanced ceramics such as SiC+AlN, SiAlON, SiC+Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, and Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 +AlN from natural clays such as kaolin, halloysite and montmorillonite by an intercalation and heat treatment method. Included are the steps of refining clays, intercalating organic compounds into the layered structure of clays, drying the intercalated mixture, firing the treated atmospheres and grinding the loosely agglomerated structure. Advanced ceramics produced by this procedure have the advantages of homogeneity, cost effectiveness, simplicity of manufacture, ease of grind and a short process time. Advanced ceramics produced by this process can be used for refractory, wear part and structure ceramics.

  10. PREFACE: Symposium 1: Advanced Structure Analysis and Characterization of Ceramic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashima, Masatomo

    2011-05-01

    Preface to Symposium 1 (Advanced Structure Analysis and Characterization of Ceramic Materials) of the International Congress of Ceramics III, held 14-18 November 2010 in Osaka, Japan Remarkable developments have been made recently in the structural analysis and characterization of inorganic crystalline and amorphous materials, such as x-ray, neutron, synchrotron and electron diffraction, x-ray/neutron scattering, IR/Raman scattering, NMR, XAFS, first-principle calculations, computer simulations, Rietveld analysis, the maximum-entropy method, in situ measurements at high temperatures/pressures and electron/nuclear density analysis. These techniques enable scientists to study not only static and long-range periodic structures but also dynamic and short-/intermediate-range structures. Multi-scale characterization from the electron to micrometer levels is becoming increasingly important as a means of understanding phenomena at the interfaces, grain boundaries and surfaces of ceramic materials. This symposium has discussed the structures and structure/property relationships of various ceramic materials (electro, magnetic and optical ceramics; energy and environment related ceramics; bio-ceramics; ceramics for reliability secure society; traditional ceramics) through 38 oral presentations including 8 invited lectures and 49 posters. Best poster awards were given to six excellent poster presentations (Y-C Chen, Tokyo Institute of Technology; C-Y Chung, Tohoku University; T Stawski, University of Twente; Y Hirano, Nagoya Institute of Technology; B Bittova, Charles University Prague; Y Onodera, Kyoto University). I have enjoyed working with my friends in the ICC3 conference. I would like to express special thanks to other organizers: Professor Scott T Misture, Alfred University, USA, Professor Xiaolong Chen, Institute of Physics, CAS, China, Professor Takashi Ida, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Japan, Professor Isao Tanaka, Kyoto University, Japan. I also acknowledge the

  11. "Ultra"-Fast Fracture Strength of Advanced Structural Ceramic Materials Studied at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1999-01-01

    The accurate determination of inert strength is important in reliable life prediction of structural ceramic components. At ambient temperature, the inert strength of a brittle material is typically regarded as free of the effects of slow crack growth due to stress corrosion. Therefore, the inert strength can be determined either by eliminating active species, especially moisture, with an appropriate inert medium, or by using a very high test rate. However, at elevated temperatures, the concept or definition of the inert strength of brittle ceramic materials is not clear, since temperature itself is a degrading environment, resulting in strength degradation through slow crack growth and/or creep. Since the mechanism to control strength is rate-dependent viscous flow, the only conceivable way to determine the inert strength at elevated temperatures is to utilize a very fast test rate that either minimizes the time for or eliminates slow crack growth. Few experimental studies have measured the elevated-temperature, inert (or "ultra"-fast fracture) strength of advanced ceramics. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, an experimental study was initiated to better understand the "ultra"-fast fracture strength behavior of advanced ceramics at elevated temperatures. Fourteen advanced ceramics - one alumina, eleven silicon nitrides, and two silicon carbides - have been tested using constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing in flexure with a series of stress rates including the "ultra"-fast stress rate of 33 000 MPa/sec with digitally controlled test frames. The results for these 14 advanced ceramics indicate that, notwithstanding possible changes in flaw populations as well as flaw configurations because of elevated temperatures, the strength at 33 000 MPa/sec approached the room-temperature strength or reached a higher value than that determined at the conventional test rate of 30 MPa/sec. On the basis of the experimental data, it can be stated that the elevated

  12. Advanced Ceramics Property Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the "what, how, how not, and why" for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committee's inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of standards in one volume.

  13. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    The Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic hearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  14. Power Law Versus Exponential Form of Slow Crack Growth of Advanced Structural Ceramics: Dynamic Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The life prediction analysis based on an exponential crack velocity formulation was examined using a variety of experimental data on glass and advanced structural ceramics in constant stress-rate ("dynamic fatigue") and preload testing at ambient and elevated temperatures. The data fit to the strength versus In (stress rate) relation was found to be very reasonable for most of the materials. It was also found that preloading technique was equally applicable for the case of slow crack growth (SCG) parameter n > 30. The major limitation in the exponential crack velocity formulation, however, was that an inert strength of a material must be known priori to evaluate the important SCG parameter n, a significant drawback as compared to the conventional power-law crack velocity formulation.

  15. Ceramic technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1991-07-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and database and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. This project is managed by ORNL for the Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Transportation Materials, and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DOD, and industry.

  16. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate ('dynamic fatigue') testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rate in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  17. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rates in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  18. Advanced Ceramic Materials for Future Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    With growing trend toward higher temperature capabilities, lightweight, and multifunctionality, significant advances in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be required for future aerospace applications. The presentation will provide an overview of material requirements for future aerospace missions, and the role of ceramics and CMCs in meeting those requirements. Aerospace applications will include gas turbine engines, aircraft structure, hypersonic and access to space vehicles, space power and propulsion, and space communication.

  19. Task 8.9 - Advanced ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-30

    Advanced ceramic materials such as Continuous Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites (CFCCs) have had promising results on the companion program entitled ``Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine`` (CSGT). In particular, CFCCs have outperformed monolithic tiles in structural integrity as a combustor liner. Also, CFCCs have provided the higher temperature operation and improved emissions performance that is required for the ATS combustor. The demonstrated advantages on CSGT justified work to explore the use of advanced ceramic composite materials in other gas turbine components. Sub-tasks include development of a practical, cost effective component fabrication process, development of finite element stress analysis to assure 30,000 hours of component life, and fabrication of a demonstration article.

  20. Development of Advanced Ceramic Manufacturing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pujari, V.K.

    2001-04-05

    Advanced structural ceramics are enabling materials for new transportation engine systems that have the potential for significantly reducing energy consumption and pollution in automobiles and heavy vehicles. Ceramic component reliability and performance have been demonstrated in previous U.S. DOE initiatives, but high manufacturing cost was recognized as a major barrier to commercialization. Norton Advanced Ceramics (NAC), a division of Saint-Gobain Industrial Ceramics, Inc. (SGIC), was selected to perform a major Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing Technology (ACMT) Program. The overall objectives of NAC's program were to design, develop, and demonstrate advanced manufacturing technology for the production of ceramic exhaust valves for diesel engines. The specific objectives were (1) to reduce the manufacturing cost by an order of magnitude, (2) to develop and demonstrate process capability and reproducibility, and (3) to validate ceramic valve performance, durability, and reliability. The program was divided into four major tasks: Component Design and Specification, Component Manufacturing Technology Development, Inspection and Testing, and Process Demonstration. A high-power diesel engine valve for the DDC Series 149 engine was chosen as the demonstration part for this program. This was determined to be an ideal component type to demonstrate cost-effective process enhancements, the beneficial impact of advanced ceramics on transportation systems, and near-term commercialization potential. The baseline valve material was NAC's NT451 SiAION. It was replaced, later in the program, by an alternate silicon nitride composition (NT551), which utilized a lower cost raw material and a simplified powder-processing approach. The material specifications were defined based on DDC's engine requirements, and the initial and final component design tasks were completed.

  1. FOREWORD: Focus on Advanced Ceramics Focus on Advanced Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Naoki

    2011-06-01

    Much research has been devoted recently to developing technologies for renewable energy and improving the efficiency of the processes and devices used in industry and everyday life. Efficient solutions have been found using novel materials such as platinum and palladium-based catalysts for car exhaust systems, samarium-cobalt and neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets for electrical motors, and so on. However, their realization has resulted in an increasing demand for rare elements and in their deficit, the development of new materials based on more abundant elements and new functionalities of traditional materials. Moreover, increasing environmental and health concerns demand substitution of toxic or hazardous substances with nature-friendly alternatives. In this context, this focus issue on advanced ceramics aims to review current trends in ceramics science and technology. It is related to the International Conference on Science and Technology of Advanced Ceramics (STAC) held annually to discuss the emerging issues in the field of ceramics. An important direction of ceramic science is the collaboration between experimental and theoretical sciences. Recent developments in density functional theory and computer technology have enabled the prediction of physical and chemical properties of ceramics, thereby assisting the design of new materials. Therefore, this focus issue includes articles devoted to theory and advanced characterization techniques. As mentioned above, the potential shortage of rare elements is becoming critical to the industry and has resulted in a Japanese government initiative called the 'Ubiquitous Element Strategy'. This focus issue also includes articles related to this strategy and to the associated topics of energy conversion, such as phosphors for high-efficiency lighting and photocatalysts for solar-energy harvesting. We hope that this focus issue will provide a timely overview of current trends and problems in ceramics science and

  2. Interdisciplinary research and development on the effects of the nature and properties of ceramic materials in the design of advanced structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    An educational development and supportive research program on ceramic materials established to advance design methodology, improve materials, and develop engineers knowledgable in design with and use of high performance ceramic materials is described. Emphasis is on the structures and related materials problems in a ceramic turbine engine, but applications in coal gasification, solar conversion, and magnetohydrodynamic technologies are considered. Progress of various research projects in the areas of new materials, processing, characterization, and nondestructive testing is reported. Fracture toughness determination, extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements, and grain boundary effects in beta-alumina are among the topics covered.

  3. Deformation mechanisms in advanced structural ceramics due to indentation and scratch processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Dipankar

    Plasma pressure compaction technique was used to develop boron carbide (B4C) and zirconium diboride-silicon carbide (ZrB2-SiC) composite. B4C ceramics are extensively used as body armor in military and civilian applications, and ZrB2-SiC composite has been recognized as a potential candidate for high-temperature aerospace applications. In this dissertation, processing parameters, quasistatic and high-strain rate mechanical response, and fundamental deformation mechanisms of these materials have been investigated. In the case of B4C, the rate sensitivity of indentation hardness was determined using a dynamic indentation hardness tester that can deliver loads in 100 micros. By comparing dynamic hardness with the static hardness, it was found that B4C exhibits a lower hardness at high-strain rate, contrary to known behavior in many structural ceramics. However, these results are consistent with the ballistic testing of B4C armors as reported in recent literature. This behavior was further investigated using a series of spectroscopic techniques such as visible and UV micro-Raman, photoluminescence and infrared. These studies not only confirmed that structural transformation occurred during indentation experiments similar to that in ballistic testing of B4C but also suggested a greater degree of structural changes under dynamic loading compared to static loading. Due to the potential application as external heat shields in supersonic vehicles, scratch studies were conducted on the ZrB2-SiC composite. These studies revealed metal-like slip-line patterns which are indeed an unusual in brittle solids at room-temperature. Utilizing classical stress field solutions under combined normal and tangential loads, a rationale was developed for understanding the formation of scratch-induced deformation features. Also, an analytical framework was developed, combining the concept of 'blister field' and the 'secular equation' relating Raman peaks to strain, to measure scratch

  4. Ceramics for advanced O2/H2 application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Ceramics are prime candidate materials for advanced rocket engines because they possess high-temperature capability, a tolerance for aggressive environments, and low density. A program was conducted to assess the applicability of structural ceramics to advanced versions of the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME). Operating conditions of ceramic turbine components were defined and each component in the hot-gas path was assessed in regard to materials selection, manufacturing process and feasibility, and relative structural reliability. The conclusion is that ceramic components would be viable in advanced SSME turbopumps.

  5. Verification of Ceramic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar-Lafenetre, Stephanie; Cornillon, Laurence; Rancurel, Michael; De Graaf, Dennis; Hartmann, Peter; Coe, Graham; Laine, Benoit

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the “Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures” contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and instrument structures. It has been written in order to be applicable to most types of ceramic or glass-ceramic materials - typically Cesic®, HBCesic®, Silicon Nitride, Silicon Carbide and ZERODUR®. The proposed guideline describes the activities to be performed at material level in order to cover all the specific aspects of ceramics (Weibull distribution, brittle behaviour, sub-critical crack growth). Elementary tests and their post-processing methods are described, and recommendations for optimization of the test plan are given in order to have a consistent database. The application of this method is shown on an example in a dedicated article [7]. Then the verification activities to be performed at system level are described. This includes classical verification activities based on relevant standard (ECSS Verification [4]), plus specific analytical, testing and inspection features. The analysis methodology takes into account the specific behaviour of ceramic materials, especially the statistical distribution of failures (Weibull) and the method to transfer it from elementary data to a full-scale structure. The demonstration of the efficiency of this method is described in a dedicated article [8]. The verification is completed by classical full-scale testing activities. Indications about proof testing, case of use and implementation are given and specific inspection and protection measures are described. These additional activities are necessary to ensure the required reliability. The aim of the guideline is to describe how to reach the same reliability level as for structures made of more classical materials (metals, composites).

  6. Integral Textile Ceramic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, David B.; Cox, Brian N.

    2008-08-01

    A new paradigm for ceramic composite structural components enables functionality in heat exchange, transpiration, detailed shape, and thermal strain management that significantly exceeds the prior art. The paradigm is based on the use of three-dimensional fiber reinforcement that is tailored to the specific shape, stress, and thermal requirements of a structural application and therefore generally requires innovative textile methods for each realization. Key features include the attainment of thin skins (less than 1 mm) that are nevertheless structurally robust, transpiration holes formed without cutting fibers, double curvature, compliant integral attachment to other structures that avoids thermal stress buildup, and microcomposite ceramic matrices that minimize spalling and allow the formation of smooth surfaces. All these features can be combined into structures of very varied gross shape and function, using a wide range of materials such as all-oxide systems and SiC and carbon fibers in SiC matrices. Illustrations are drawn from rocket nozzles, thermal protection systems, and gas turbine engines. The new design challenges that arise for such material/structure systems are being met by specialized computational modeling that departs significantly in the representation of materials behavior from that used in conventional finite element methods.

  7. Tribological properties of structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Miyoshi, K.

    1985-01-01

    The tribological and lubricated behavior of both oxide and nonoxide ceramics are reviewed in this chapter. Ceramics are examined in contact with themselves, other harder materials and metals. Elastic, plastic and fracture behavior of ceramics in solid state contact is discussed. The contact load necessary to initiate fracture in ceramics is shown to be appreciably reduced with tangential motion. Both friction and wear of ceramics are anisotropic and relate to crystal structure as has been observed with metals. Grit size effects in two and three body abrasive wear are observed for ceramics. Both free energy of oxide formation and the d valence bond character of metals are related to the friction and wear characteristics for metals in contact with ceramics. Surface contaminants affect friction and adhesive wear. For example, carbon on silicon carbide and chlorine on aluminum oxide reduce friction while oxygen on metal surfaces in contact with ceramics increases friction. Lubrication increases the critical load necessary to initiate fracture of ceramics both in indentation and with sliding or rubbing. Ceramics compositions both as coatings and in composites are described for the high temperature lubrication of both alloys and ceramics.

  8. Cost effective machining and inspection of structural ceramic components for advanced high temperature application. Final CRADA report for CRADA number Y-1292-0151

    SciTech Connect

    Abbatiello, L.A.; Haselkorn, M.

    1996-11-29

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was a mutual research and development (R and D) effort among the participants to investigate a range of advanced manufacturing technologies for two silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic materials. The general objective was to identify the most cost-effective part manufacturing processes for the ceramic materials of interest. The focus was determining the relationship between material removal rates, surface quality, and the structural characteristics of each ceramic resulting from three innovative processes. These innovated machining processes were studied using silicon nitride advanced materials. The particular (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) materials of interest were sintered GS-44 from the Norton Company, and reaction-bonded Ceraloy 147-3. The processes studied included the following activities: (1) direct laser machining; (2) rotary ultrasonic machining; and (3) diamond abrasive grinding, including both resinoid and vitreous-bonded grinding wheels. Both friable and non-friable diamond types were included within the abrasive grinding study. The task also conducted a comprehensive survey of European experience in use of ceramic materials, principally aluminum oxide. Originally, the effort of this task was to extend through a prototype manufacturing demonstration of selected engine components. During the execution of this program, however changes were made to the scope of the project, altering the goals. The Program goal became only the development of assessment of their impacts on product strength and surface condition.

  9. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Advanced Structural Ceramics Under Combined Loading Conditions: Damage Assessment in Life Prediction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2000-01-01

    Slow crack growth analysis was performed with three different loading histories including constant stress-rate/constant stress-rate testing (Case I loading), constant stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case II loading), and cyclic stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case III loading). Strength degradation due to slow crack growth arid/or damage accumulation was determined numerically as a Function of percentage of interruption time between the two loading sequences for a given loading history. The numerical solutions were examined with the experimental data determined at elevated temperatures using four different advanced ceramic materials, two silicon nitrides, one silicon carbide and one alumina for the Case I loading history, and alumina for the Case II loading history. The numerical solutions were in reasonable agreement with the experimental data, indicating that notwithstanding some degree of creep deformation presented for some test materials slow crack growth was a governing mechanism associated with failure for all the test material&

  10. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Advanced Structural Ceramics Under Combined Loading Conditions: Damage Assessment in Life Prediction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. R.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Slow crack growth analysis was performed with three different loading histories including constant stress- rate/constant stress-rate testing (Case I loading), constant stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case II loading), and cyclic stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case III loading). Strength degradation due to slow crack growth and/or damage accumulation was determined numerically as a function of percentage of interruption time between the two loading sequences for a given loading history. The numerical solutions were examined with the experimental data determined at elevated temperatures using four different advanced ceramic materials, two silicon nitrides, one silicon carbide and one alumina for the Case I loading history, and alumina for the Case II loading history. The numerical solutions were in reasonable agreement with the experimental data, indicating that notwithstanding some degree of creep deformation presented for some test materials slow crack growth was a governing mechanism associated with failure for all the rest materials.

  11. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Advanced Structural Ceramics Under Combined Loading Conditions: Damage Assessment in Life Prediction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2000-01-01

    Slow crack growth analysis was performed with three different loading histories including constant stress-rate/constant stress-rate testing (Case 1 loading), constant stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case 2 loading), and cyclic stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case 2 loading). Strength degradation due to slow crack growth and/or damage accumulation was determined numerically as a function of percentage of interruption time between the two loading sequences for a given loading history. The numerical solutions were examined with the experimental data determined at elevated temperatures using four different advanced ceramic materials, two silicon nitrides, one silicon carbide and one alumina for the Case 1 loading history, and alumina for the Case 3 loading history. The numerical solutions were in reasonable agreement with the experimental data, indicating that notwithstanding some degree of creep deformation presented for some test materials slow crack growth was a governing mechanism associated with failure for all the test materials.

  12. Advanced Ceramics Property and Performance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Michael; Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the what, how, how not, and why for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committees inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of all of the standards in one volume.

  13. High Temperature Wear of Advanced Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.

    2005-01-01

    It was initially hypothesized that advanced ceramics would exhibit favorable high te- friction and wear properties because of their high hot hardness and low achievable surface roughness welding observed in metals does not occur in ceramics. More recent tribological studies of many nitride, carbide, oxide and composite ceramics, however, have revealed that ceramics often exhibit high friction and wear in non-lubricated, high temperature sliding contacts. A summary is given to measure friction and wear factor coefficients for a variety of ceramics from self mated ceramic pin-on-disk tests at temperatures from 25 to up to 1200 C. Observed steady state friction coefficients range from about 0.5 to 1.0 or above. Wear factor coefficients are also very high and range from about to 10(exp -5) to 10(exp -2) cubic millimeters per N-m. By comparison, oil lubricated steel sliding results in friction coefficients of 0.1 or less and wear factors less than 10(exp -9) cubic millimeters per N-m.

  14. Development in laser peening of advanced ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Pratik; Smith, Graham C.; Waugh, David G.; Lawrence, Jonathan

    2015-07-01

    Laser peening is a well-known process applicable to surface treat metals and alloys in various industrial sectors. Research in the area of laser peening of ceramics is still scarce and a complete laser-ceramic interaction is still unreported. This paper focuses on laser peening of SiC ceramics employed for cutting tools, armor plating, dental and biomedical implants, with a view to elucidate the unreported work. A detailed investigation was conducted with 1064nm Nd:YAG ns pulse laser to first understand the surface effects, namely: the topography, hardness, KIc and the microstructure of SiC advanced ceramics. The results showed changes in surface roughness and microstructural modification after laser peening. An increase in surface hardness was found by almost 2 folds, as the diamond footprints and its flaws sizes were considerably reduced, thus, enhancing the resistance of SiC to better withstand mechanical impact. This inherently led to an enhancement in the KIc by about 42%. This is attributed to an induction of compressive residual stress and phase transformation. This work is a first-step towards the development of a 3-dimensional laser peening technique to surface treat many advanced ceramic components. This work has shown that upon tailoring the laser peening parameters may directly control ceramic topography, microstructure, hardness and the KIc. This is useful for increasing the performance of ceramics used for demanding applications particularly where it matters such as in military. Upon successful peening of bullet proof vests could result to higher ballistic strength and resistance against higher sonic velocity, which would not only prevent serious injuries, but could also help to save lives of soldiers on the battle fields.

  15. Nondestructive evaluation of structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, Stanley J.; Baaklini, George Y.; Abel, Phillip B.

    1987-01-01

    A review is presented on research and development of techniques for nondestructive evaluation and characterization of advanced ceramics for heat engine applications. Highlighted in this review are Lewis Research Center efforts in microfocus radiography, scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM), scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM), scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM), and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). The techniques were evaluated by applying them to research samples of green and sintered silicon nitride and silicon carbide in the form of modulus-of-rupture bars containing seeded voids. Probabilities of detection of voids were determined for diameters as small as 20 microns for microfucus radiography, SLAM, and SAM. Strengths and limitations of the techniques for ceramic applications are identified. Application of ultrasonics for characterizing ceramic microstructures is also discussed.

  16. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTT's automotive technology programs. This project is managed by ORNL and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DoD, and industry. Research is discussed under the following topics; Turbomilling of SiC Whiskers; microwave sintering of silicon nitride; and milling characterization; processing of monolithics; silicon nitride matrix; oxide matrix; silicate matrix; thermal and wear coatings; joining; design; contact interfaces; time-dependent behavior; environmental effects; fracture mechanics; nondestructive evaluation; and technology transfer. References, figures, and tables are included with each topic.

  17. Fine-structured TiO2 ceramic patterns on the ceramic surface fabricated by replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. D.; Nakayama, T.; Hong, B. J.; Imaki, K.; Yoshimura, T.; Suzuki, T.; Suematsu, H.; Lee, S. W.; Fu, Z.; Niihara, K.

    2011-03-01

    The ability to fabricate high precision micro- to nanoscale structure in a wide variety of materials is of crucial importance for the advancement of microtechnology, nanotechnology and nanoscience. Also, the ability to create micrometer and sub-micrometer architecture for functional ceramics is a prerequisite of exploring the rich field of ceramic nanotechnology. In this work we fabricated three-dimensional oxide ceramic materials with fine-structure over multiple length scales by combining replication patterning technique, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), oxide ceramic material (TiO2) nano-sized particles. Our study is based on the idea that PVA can be easily detached from a mold by peeling. We confirmed that micron and sub-micron-sized fine-structured oxide ceramic patterns containing nano-sized pores could be fabricated using this procedure. The results presented demonstrate the compositional and structural diversities that are possible with a facile approach and simple method.

  18. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Development Project, ceramic component developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teneyck, M. O.; Macbeth, J. W.; Sweeting, T. B.

    1987-01-01

    The ceramic component technology development activity conducted by Standard Oil Engineered Materials Company while performing as a principal subcontractor to the Garrett Auxiliary Power Division for the Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Development Project (NASA Contract DEN3-167) is summarized. The report covers the period October 1979 through July 1987, and includes information concerning ceramic technology work categorized as common and unique. The former pertains to ceramic development applicable to two parallel AGT projects established by NASA contracts DEN3-168 (AGT100) and DEN3-167 (AGT101), whereas the unique work solely pertains to Garrett directed activity under the latter contract. The AGT101 Technology Development Project is sponsored by DOE and administered by NASA-Lewis. Standard Oil directed its efforts toward the development of ceramic materials in the silicon-carbide family. Various shape forming and fabrication methods, and nondestructive evaluation techniques were explored to produce the static structural components for the ceramic engine. This permitted engine testing to proceed without program slippage.

  19. Preparation of a dense, polycrystalline ceramic structure

    DOEpatents

    Cooley, Jason; Chen, Ching-Fong; Alexander, David

    2010-12-07

    Ceramic nanopowder was sealed inside a metal container under a vacuum. The sealed evacuated container was forced through a severe deformation channel at an elevated temperature below the melting point of the ceramic nanopowder. The result was a dense nanocrystalline ceramic structure inside the metal container.

  20. Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, 11th, Cocoa Beach, FL, Jan. 18-23, 1987, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    The present conference on advanced ceramic materials discusses topics in the fields of NDE, coating/joining/tribology techniques, fracture and interface phenomena, whisker- and particulate-reinforced composites, fiber and whisker properties, SiC and Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/, glass/glass-ceramic matrix composites, alumina-matrix composites, ceramic materials for space structures, and SiC- and Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/-matrix composites. Attention is given to ceramic characterization by thermal wave imaging, an advanced ceramic-to-metal joining process, the fracture modes of brittle-matrix unidirectional composites, the oxidation of SiC-containing composites, particulate matter in SiC whiskers, corrosion reactions in SiC ceramics, melt-infiltrated ceramic-matrix composites, environmental effects in toughened ceramics, and a ceramic composite heat exchanger.

  1. Ultrasonic characterization of structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, S. J.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1986-01-01

    Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements were used to characterize density and microstructure in monolithic silicon nitride and silicon carbide. Research samples of these structural ceramics exhibited a wide range of density and microstructural variations. It was shown that bulk density variations correlate with and can be estimated by velocity measurements. Variations in microstructural features such as grain size or shape and pore morphology had a minor effect on velocity. However, these features had a pronounced effect on ultrasonic attenuation. The ultrasonic results are supplemented by low-energy radiography and scanning laser acoustic microscopy.

  2. Ceramic applications in the advanced Stirling automotive engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomazic, W. A.; Cairelli, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    The ideal cycle, its application to a practical machine, and the specific advantages of high efficiency, low emissions, multi-fuel capability, and low noise of the stirling engine are discussed. Certain portions of the Stirling engine must operate continuously at high temperature. Ceramics offer the potential of cost reduction and efficiency improvement for advanced engine applications. Potential applications for ceramics in Stirling engines, and some of the special problems pertinent to using ceramics in the Stirling engine are described. The research and technology program in ceramics which is planned to support the development of advanced Stirling engines is outlined.

  3. ADVANCED SECOND GENERATION CERAMIC CANDLE FILTERS

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Alvin

    2002-01-31

    Through sponsorship from the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), development and manufacture of advanced second generation candle filters was undertaken in the early 1990's. Efforts were primarily focused on the manufacture of fracture toughened, 1.5 m, continuous fiber ceramic composite (CFCC) and filament wound candle filters by 3M, McDermott, DuPont Lanxide Composites, and Techniweave. In order to demonstrate long-term thermal, chemical, and mechanical stability of the advanced second generation candle filter materials, Siemens Westinghouse initiated high temperature, bench-scale, corrosion testing of 3M's CVI-SiC and DuPont's PRD-66 mini-candles, and DuPont's CFCC SiC-SiC and IF&P Fibrosic{sup TM} coupons under simulated, pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) conditions. This effort was followed by an evaluation of the mechanical and filtration performance of the advanced second generation filter elements in Siemens Westinghouse's bench-scale PFBC test facility in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Arrays of 1.4-1.5 m 3M CVI-SiC, DuPont PRD-66, DuPont SiC-SiC, and IF&P Fibrosic{sup TM} candles were subjected to steady state process operating conditions, increased severity thermal transients, and accelerated pulse cycling test campaigns which represented {approx}1760 hours of equivalent filter operating life. Siemens Westinghouse subsequently participated in early material surveillance programs which marked entry of the 3M CVI-SiC and DuPont PRD-66 candle filters in Siemens Westinghouse Advanced Particulate Filtration (APF) system at the American Electric Power (AEP) Tidd Demonstration Plant in Brilliant, Ohio. Siemens Westinghouse then conducted an extended, accelerated life, qualification program, evaluating the performance of the 3M, McDermott, and Techniweave oxide-based CFCC filter elements, modified DuPont PRD-66 elements, and the Blasch, Scapa Cerafil{sup TM}, and Specific Surface monolithic candles for use in the APF

  4. AGT 101: Ceramic component development: Advanced Gas Turbine Program: Topical report, October 1979-July 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Ten Eyck, M.O.; MacBeth, J.W.; Sweeting, T.B.

    1987-11-01

    This topical report summarizes the ceramic component technology development activity conducted by Standard Oil Engineered Materials Company. Standard Oil, acting as a principal subcontractor and supplier of ceramic components, directed its efforts toward the development of ceramic materials in the silicon-carbide family. Various shape forming and fabrication methods, and non-destructive evaluation techniques were explored to produce the static structural components for the ceramic engine. This enabled engine testing to proceed without program slippage, and developed the approaches for producing low-cost, production quantity processes. Standard Oil contributed to the acceptance of ceramics as a viable approach for automotive gas turbine engines and to the advancement of this vital ceramic technology. 174 figs., 33 tabs.

  5. Recent advances in ALON optical ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Joseph M.; Hartnett, Thomas M.; Goldman, Lee M.; Twedt, Richard; Warner, Charles

    2005-05-01

    Aluminum Oxynitride (ALONTM Optical Ceramic) is a transparent ceramic material which combines transparency from the UV to the MWIR with excellent mechanical properties. ALON"s optical and mechanical properties are isotropic by virtue of its cubic crystalline structure. Consequently, ALON is transparent in its polycrystalline form and can be made by conventional powder processing techniques. This combination of properties and manufacturability make ALON suitable for a range of applications from IR windows, domes and lenses to transparent armor. The technology for producing transparent ALON was developed at Raytheon and has been transferred to Surmet Corporation where it is currently in production. Surmet is currently selling ALON into a number of military (e.g., windows and domes) and commercial (e.g., supermarket scanner windows) applications. The capability to manufacture large ALON windows for both sensor window and armor applications is in place. ALON windows up to 20x30 inches have been fabricated. In addition, the capability to shape and polish these large and curved windows is being developed and demonstrated at Surmet. Complex shapes, both hyper-hemispherical and conformal, are also under development and will be described.

  6. Ceramic applications in the advanced Stirling automotive engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomazic, W. A.; Cairelli, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    The requirements of the ideal Stirling cycle, as well as basic types of practical engines are described. Advantages, disadvantages, and problem areas of these Stirling engines are discussed. The potential for ceramic components is also considered. Currently ceramics are used in only two areas, the air preheater and insulating tiles between the burner and the heater head. For the advanced Stirling engine to achieve high efficiency and low cost, the principal components are expected to be made from ceramic materials, including the heater head, air preheater, regenerator, the burner and the power piston. Supporting research and technology programs for ceramic component development are briefly described.

  7. High temperature ceramic/metal joint structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  8. Insulating Structural Ceramics Program, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Mark J.; Tandon, Raj; Ott, Eric; Hind, Abi Akar; Long, Mike; Jensen, Robert; Wheat, Leonard; Cusac, Dave; Lin, H. T.; Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Ferber, Mattison K.; Lee, Sun Kun; Yoon, Hyung K.; Moreti, James; Park, Paul; Rockwood, Jill; Boyer, Carrie; Ragle, Christie; Balmer-Millar, Marilou; Aardahl, Chris; Habeger, Craig; Rappe, Ken; Tran, Diana; Koshkarian, Kent; Readey, Michael

    2005-11-22

    New materials and corresponding manufacturing processes are likely candidates for diesel engine components as society and customers demand lower emission engines without sacrificing power and fuel efficiency. Strategies for improving thermal efficiency directly compete with methodologies for reducing emissions, and so the technical challenge becomes an optimization of controlling parameters to achieve both goals. Approaches being considered to increase overall thermal efficiency are to insulate certain diesel engine components in the combustion chamber, thereby increasing the brake mean effective pressure ratings (BMEP). Achieving higher BMEP rating by insulating the combustion chamber, in turn, requires advances in material technologies for engine components such as pistons, port liners, valves, and cylinder heads. A series of characterization tests were performed to establish the material properties of ceramic powder. Mechanical chacterizations were also obtained from the selected materials as a function of temperature utilizing ASTM standards: fast fracture strength, fatique resistance, corrosion resistance, thermal shock, and fracture toughness. All ceramic materials examined showed excellent wear properties and resistance to the corrosive diesel engine environments. The study concluded that the ceramics examined did not meet all of the cylinder head insert structural design requirements. Therefore we do not recommend at this time their use for this application. The potential for increased stresses and temperatures in the hot section of the diesel engine combined with the highly corrosive combustion products and residues has driven the need for expanded materials capability for hot section engine components. Corrosion and strength requirements necessitate the examination of more advanced high temperture alloys. Alloy developments and the understanding of processing, structure, and properties of supperalloy materials have been driven, in large part, by the gas

  9. Advanced ceramic cladding for water reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Feinroth, H.

    2000-07-01

    Under the US Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiatives (NERI) program, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are being developed as cladding for water reactor fuel elements. The purpose is to substantially increase the passive safety of water reactors. A development effort was initiated in 1991 to fabricate CFCC-clad tubes using commercially available fibers and a sol-gel process developed by McDermott Technologies. Two small-diameter CFCC tubes were fabricated using pure alumina and alumina-zirconia fibers in an alumina matrix. Densities of {approximately}60% of theoretical were achieved. Higher densities are required to guarantee fission gas containment. This NERI work has just begun, and only preliminary results are presented herein. Should the work prove successful, further development is required to evaluate CFCC cladding and performance, including in-pile tests containing fuel and exploring a marriage of CFCC cladding materials with suitable advanced fuel and core designs. The possibility of much higher temperature core designs, possibly cooled with supercritical water, and achievement of plant efficiencies {ge}50% would be examined.

  10. Life prediction methodology for ceramic components of advanced heat engines. Phase 1: Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This volume presents the following appendices: ceramic test specimen drawings and schematics, mixed-mode and biaxial stress fracture of structural ceramics for advanced vehicular heat engines (U. Utah), mode I/mode II fracture toughness and tension/torsion fracture strength of NT154 Si nitride (Brown U.), summary of strength test results and fractography, fractography photographs, derivations of statistical models, Weibull strength plots for fast fracture test specimens, and size functions.

  11. Fine crystal structure of porous corundum ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M. V.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2011-05-01

    The microstructure of corundum ceramics based on powders with a varying grain size has been investigated. Both commercial alumina powders and those fabricated by denitration of aluminum salts in a high-frequency discharge plasma were used. An increase in the plasma-chemical Al2O3 powder content in the sample was found to change the pore structure of the corundum ceramics from a high-porosity ceramic skeleton with a well-developed system of channel-forming pores to ceramics with isolated pores. The change in the pore structure was observed for 50% porosity and caused an increase in the level of crystal lattice microdistortions. An increase in the sintering temperature from 1200 to 1650°C is shown to be responsible for a two-fold increase in the average crystallite size and for annealing of lattice defects along grain boundaries.

  12. Environment Conscious Ceramics (Ecoceramics): An Eco-Friendly Route to Advanced Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.

    2001-01-01

    Environment conscious ceramics (Ecoceramics) are a new class of materials, which can be produced with renewable natural resources (wood) or wood wastes (wood sawdust). This technology provides an eco-friendly route to advanced ceramic materials. Ecoceramics have tailorable properties and behave like ceramic materials manufactured by conventional approaches. Silicon carbide-based ecoceramics have been fabricated by reactive infiltration of carbonaceous preforms by molten silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloys. The fabrication approach, microstructure, and mechanical properties of SiC-based ecoceramics are presented.

  13. Microcellular ceramic foams for radar absorbing structures

    SciTech Connect

    Huling, J.; Phillips, D.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project is to develop a lightweight, semi-structural, radar-absorbing ceramic foam that can be incorporated into aircraft exhaust systems to replace many of the currently used dense ceramic parts and thereby improve the radar cross section. Although the conventional processes for producing ceramic foams have not been able to provide materials that meet the design specifications for high strength at low density, we have developed and demonstrated a novel sol-gel emulsion process for preparing microcellular ceramic foams in which compositional and microstructural control is expected to provide the requisite high-temperature radar-absorption, strength-to-weight ratio, and thermal insulative properties.

  14. DoE Advanced Ceramic Microturbine

    SciTech Connect

    IR Energy Systems

    2004-05-31

    In July 2001, Ingersoll-Rand began work on this program. Its objective was to introduce ceramic hot section components into the IR family of microturbines to permit higher operating temperatures and hence improved efficiency. The IR microturbine product line combines a novel application of industrial turbocharger equipment, our commercially successful recuperator, and proven industrial gas turbine design practices. The objective of the joint development program is to combine the high production success of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} turbocharger rotors, largely from Japan, with the IR turbocharger-based microturbines. The IR 'Ceramic Microturbine' (CMT) program has been configured to use the most practical ceramic rotor, considering size, geometry, proven manufacturing methods, and physical material limitations Performance predictions indicate that 36% LHV electric conversion efficiency could be attained at a Turbine Inlet Temperature (TIT) of nominally 1000 C. The initial 72kW engine is being designed to have comparable life and costs to our current product The package power rating is expandable to 100kW with this equipment by slightly increasing pressure ratio flow and TIT. This program was initially planned as five major tasks In Task 1 a comprehensive analysis of the state of the art ceramics and their applicability to microturbines was performed Milestone I was achieved with the joint DoE/IR decision to concentrate on our 70kW microturbine, with elevated turbine inlet temperature and pressure ratio,. This preserved the ability of the engine to utilize the standard IR recuperator and the majority of the microturbine subassemblies, A commercialization report, projecting the market size, was also completed as part of this task. Task 2's detailed design of the special hot-section components has been completed,. The two critical milestones, No.3 and No.4, associated with the detailed design of the monolithic silicon nitride turbine rotor and the release of the purchase

  15. Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications, Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pujari, V.K.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.; Paille, N.I.; Pelletier, P.J.; Sales, L.C.; Wilkens, C.A.; Yeckley, R.L.

    1993-08-01

    The program goals were to develop and demonstrate significant improvements in processing methods, process controls and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1,370{degrees}C. The program focused on a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-4% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} high temperature ceramic composition and hot-isostatic-pressing as the method of densification. Stage I had as major objectives: (1) comparing injection molding and colloidal consolidation process routes, and selecting one route for subsequent optimization, (2) comparing the performance of water milled and alcohol milled powder and selecting one on the basis of performance data, and (3) adapting several NDE methods to the needs of ceramic processing. The NDE methods considered were microfocus X-ray radiography, computed tomography, ultrasonics, NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopy, fluorescent liquid dye penetrant and X-ray diffraction residual stress analysis. The colloidal consolidation process route was selected and approved as the forming technique for the remainder of the program. The material produced by the final Stage II optimized process has been given the designation NCX 5102 silicon nitride. According to plan, a large number of specimens were produced and tested during Stage III to establish a statistically robust room temperature tensile strength database for this material. Highlights of the Stage III process demonstration and resultant database are included in the main text of the report, along with a synopsis of the NCX-5102 aqueous based colloidal process. The R and D accomplishments for Stage I are discussed in Appendices 1--4, while the tensile strength-fractography database for the Stage III NCX-5102 process demonstration is provided in Appendix 5. 4 refs., 108 figs., 23 tabs.

  16. Advanced lightweight ceramic candle filter module

    SciTech Connect

    Zievers, J.F.; Eggerstedt, P.

    1992-01-01

    To determine the economic effect of light weight ceramics, several sizes of filters were cost estimated for operation at 217.5 psi (15 bar) based on the use of all light weight ceramics (Fibro/Fibro) vs. the use of cooled alloy (RA300) tubesheets and silicon carbide candles (Alloy/SiC). A jet pulse delivery system was included in both estimates. The Fibro/Fibro system was estimated with the plenum design while the Alloy/SiC system was based on header/nozzle design. Battery limits were the filters and jet pulse delivery systems, Ex-works, with no main valves or dust removal systems. It was found that the cost of Fibro/Fibro components were consistently lower than the cost of the Alloy/SiC components; this comparison is illustrated in Figure 8.

  17. Advanced lightweight ceramic candle filter module

    SciTech Connect

    Zievers, J.F.; Eggerstedt, P.

    1992-11-01

    To determine the economic effect of light weight ceramics, several sizes of filters were cost estimated for operation at 217.5 psi (15 bar) based on the use of all light weight ceramics (Fibro/Fibro) vs. the use of cooled alloy (RA300) tubesheets and silicon carbide candles (Alloy/SiC). A jet pulse delivery system was included in both estimates. The Fibro/Fibro system was estimated with the plenum design while the Alloy/SiC system was based on header/nozzle design. Battery limits were the filters and jet pulse delivery systems, Ex-works, with no main valves or dust removal systems. It was found that the cost of Fibro/Fibro components were consistently lower than the cost of the Alloy/SiC components; this comparison is illustrated in Figure 8.

  18. Fracture Toughness in Advanced Monolithic Ceramics - SEPB Versus SEVENB Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. R.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.

    2005-01-01

    Fracture toughness of a total of 13 advanced monolithic ceramics including silicon nitrides, silicon carbide, aluminas, and glass ceramic was determined at ambient temperature by using both single edge precracked beam (SEPB) and single edge v-notched beam (SEVNB) methods. Relatively good agreement in fracture toughness between the two methods was observed for advanced ceramics with flat R-curves; whereas, poor agreement in fracture toughness was seen for materials with rising R-curves. The discrepancy in fracture toughness between the two methods was due to stable crack growth with crack closure forces acting in the wake region of cracks even in SEVNB test specimens. The effect of discrepancy in fracture toughness was analyzed in terms of microstructural feature (grain size and shape), toughening exponent, and stable crack growth determined using back-face strain gaging.

  19. Microstructurally tailored ceramics for advanced energy applications by thermoreversible gelcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanti, Noah Omar

    Thermoreversible gelcasting (TRG) is an advantageous technique for rapidly producing bulk, net-shape ceramics and laminates. In this method, ceramic powder is suspended in warm acrylate triblock copolymer/alcohol solutions that reversibly gel upon cooling by the formation of endblock aggregates, to produce slurries which are cast into molds. Gel properties can be tailored by controlling the endblock and midblock lengths of the copolymer network-former and selecting an appropriate alcohol solvent. This research focuses on expanding and improving TRG techniques, focusing specifically on advanced energy applications including the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Rapid drying of filled gels can lead to warping and cracking caused by high differential capillary stresses. A new drying technique using concentrated, alcohol-based solutions as liquid desiccants (LDs) to greatly reduce warping is introduced. The optimal LD is a poly(tert-butyl acrylate)/isopropyl alcohol solution with 5 mol% tert-butyl acrylate units. Alcohol emissions during drying are completely eliminated by combining initial drying in an LD with final stage drying in a vacuum oven having an in-line solvent trap. Porous ceramics are important structures for many applications, including SOFCs. Pore network geometries are tailored by the addition of fugitive fillers to TRG slurries. Uniform spherical, bimodal spherical and uniform fibrous fillers are used. Three-dimensional pore structures are visualized by X-ray computed tomography, allowing for direct measurements of physical parameters such as concentration and morphology as well as transport properties such as tortuosity. Tortuosity values as low as 1.52 are achieved when 60 vol% of solids are uniform spherical filler. Functionally graded laminates with layers ranging from 10 mum to > 1 mm thick are produced with a new technique that combines TRG with tape casting. Gels used for bulk casting are not suitable for use with tape casting, and appropriate base

  20. Strength and flexibility properties of advanced ceramic fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Tran, H. K.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanical properties of four advanced ceramic fabrics are measured at a temperature range of 23 C to 1200 C. The fabrics evaluated are silica, high-and low-boria content aluminoborosilicate, and silicon carbide. Properties studied include fabric break strengths from room temperature to 1200 C, and bending durability after temperature conditioning at 1200 C and 1400 C. The interaction of the fabric and ceramic insulation is also studied for shrinkage, appearance, bend resistance, and fabric-to-insulation bonding. Based on these tests, the low-boria content aluminoborosilicate fabric retains more strength and fabric durability than the other fabrics studied at high temperature.

  1. Advances in resonance based NDT for ceramic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, L. J.; Jauriqui, L. M.; Gatewood, G. D.; Sisneros, R.

    2012-05-01

    The application of resonance based non-destructive testing methods has been providing benefit to manufacturers of metal components in the automotive and aerospace industries for many years. Recent developments in resonance based technologies are now allowing the application of resonance NDT to ceramic components including turbine engine components, armor, and hybrid bearing rolling elements. Application of higher frequencies and advanced signal interpretation are now allowing Process Compensated Resonance Testing to detect both internal material defects and surface breaking cracks in a variety of ceramic components. Resonance techniques can also be applied to determine material properties of coupons and to evaluate process capability for new manufacturing methods.

  2. Polymer, metal and ceramic matrix composites for advanced aircraft engine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdanels, D. L.; Serafini, T. T.; Dicarlo, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced aircraft engine research within NASA Lewis is being focused on propulsion systems for subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic aircraft. Each of these flight regimes requires different types of engines, but all require advanced materials to meet their goals of performance, thrust-to-weight ratio, and fuel efficiency. The high strength/weight and stiffness/weight properties of resin, metal, and ceramic matrix composites will play an increasingly key role in meeting these performance requirements. At NASA Lewis, research is ongoing to apply graphite/polyimide composites to engine components and to develop polymer matrices with higher operating temperature capabilities. Metal matrix composites, using magnesium, aluminum, titanium, and superalloy matrices, are being developed for application to static and rotating engine components, as well as for space applications, over a broad temperature range. Ceramic matrix composites are also being examined to increase the toughness and reliability of ceramics for application to high-temperature engine structures and components.

  3. Polymer, metal, and ceramic matrix composites for advanced aircraft engine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Daniels, D.L.; Serafini, T.T.; Di Carlo, J.A.

    1986-06-01

    Advanced aircraft engine research within NASA Lewis focuses on propulsion systems for subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic aircraft. Each of these flight regimes requires different types of engines, but all require advanced materials to meet their goals of performance, thrust-to-weight ratio, and fuel efficiency. The high strength/weight and stiffness/weight properties of resin, metal, and ceramic matrix composites will play an increasingly key role in meeting these performance requirements. At NASA Lewis, research is ongoing to apply graphite/polyimide composites to engine components and to develop polymer matrices with higher operating temperature capabilities. Metal matrix composites, using magnesium, aluminum, titanium, and superalloy matrices, are being developed for application to static and rotating engine components, as well as for space applications, over a broad temperature range. Ceramic matrix composites are also being examined to increase the toughness and reliability of ceramics for application to high-temperature engine structures and components.

  4. Sintering of advanced ceramics using a 30-GHz, 10-kW, CW industrial gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Link, G.; Feher, L.; Boehme, R.; Weisenburger, A. ); Thumm, M. Univ. of Karlsruhe . Inst. of Microwaves and Electronics); Ritzhaupt-Kleissl, H.J. )

    1999-04-01

    At the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany, a compact gyrotron system was established in 1994 to investigate technological applications in the field of high-temperature materials processing by means of millimeter-wave (mm-wave) radiation. Besides the improvement of the system design, research activities are mainly engaged in studies on debindering and sintering of various types of advanced structural and functional ceramics. Due to volumetric heating and enhanced sintering kinetics, the application of microwaves allows one to shorten the processing rime and therefore reduce energy consumption. Besides these effects, microwave technology gives the unique possibility of influencing the microstructure and physical properties of the ceramic materials. This paper will discuss the benefits of the mm-wave technology with respect to sintering of structural ceramics, such as TiO[sub 2]-ZrO[sub 2]-MgO multicomponent ceramics, nanocrystalline oxide ceramics, and Si[sub 3]N[sub 4], as well as lead-zirconate-titanate piezoceramics as one of the most interesting classes of functional ceramics.

  5. Advanced ceramic materials for next-generation nuclear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, John

    2011-10-01

    The nuclear industry is at the eye of a 'perfect storm' with fuel oil and natural gas prices near record highs, worldwide energy demands increasing at an alarming rate, and increased concerns about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that have caused many to look negatively at long-term use of fossil fuels. This convergence of factors has led to a growing interest in revitalization of the nuclear power industry within the United States and across the globe. Many are surprised to learn that nuclear power provides approximately 20% of the electrical power in the US and approximately 16% of the world-wide electric power. With the above factors in mind, world-wide over 130 new reactor projects are being considered with approximately 25 new permit applications in the US. Materials have long played a very important role in the nuclear industry with applications throughout the entire fuel cycle; from fuel fabrication to waste stabilization. As the international community begins to look at advanced reactor systems and fuel cycles that minimize waste and increase proliferation resistance, materials will play an even larger role. Many of the advanced reactor concepts being evaluated operate at high-temperature requiring the use of durable, heat-resistant materials. Advanced metallic and ceramic fuels are being investigated for a variety of Generation IV reactor concepts. These include the traditional TRISO-coated particles, advanced alloy fuels for 'deep-burn' applications, as well as advanced inert-matrix fuels. In order to minimize wastes and legacy materials, a number of fuel reprocessing operations are being investigated. Advanced materials continue to provide a vital contribution in 'closing the fuel cycle' by stabilization of associated low-level and high-level wastes in highly durable cements, ceramics, and glasses. Beyond this fission energy application, fusion energy will demand advanced materials capable of withstanding the extreme environments of high

  6. Advanced Materials Development Program: Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines program plan, 1983--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of the Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) Project is the development of an industrial technology base capable of providing reliable and cost-effective high temperature ceramic components for application in advanced heat engines. There is a deliberate emphasis on industrial'' in the purpose statement. The project is intended to support the US ceramic and engine industries by providing the needed ceramic materials technology. The heat engine programs have goals of component development and proof-of-concept. The CTAHE Project is aimed at developing generic basic ceramic technology and does not involve specific engine designs and components. The materials research and development efforts in the CTAHE Project are focused on the needs and general requirements of the advanced gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The CTAHE Project supports the DOE Office of Transportation Systems' heat engine programs, Advanced Turbine Technology Applications (ATTAP) and Heavy Duty Transport (HDT) by providing the basic technology required for development of reliable and cost-effective ceramic components. The heat engine programs provide the iterative component design, fabrication, and test development logic. 103 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. Laser ceramics with disordered crystalline structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagayev, S. N.; Osipov, V. V.; Pestryakov, E. V.; Solomonov, V. I.; Shitov, V. A.; Maksimov, R. N.; Orlov, A. N.; Petrov, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    New ceramic materials based on yttrium oxide Y2O3 with isovalent (Yb2O3, Nd2 O3, and Lu2O3) and heterovalent (ZrO2 and HfO2) components are synthesized, and their spectroscopic properties are investigated. Possible channels of losses in the gain of stimulated radiation in the radiative transitions of Nd3+ and Yb3+ ions in ceramics with heterovalent additives are studied. The results of measurements of Y2O3 ceramics doped with zirconium and hafnium ions, the emission bandwidth and the lifetimes of the 4F3/2 and 2F5/2 levels of Nd3+ and Yb3+ ions, respectively, are presented. It is shown that the nonradiative population of the 4F3/2 levels of neodymium ions is due to their dipole-dipole interaction with Zr3+ and Hf3+ ions. Laser generation in [(Yb0.01Lu0.24Y0.75)2O3]0.88(ZrO2)0.12 ceramics with disordered crystalline structure was achieved at a wavelength of 1034 nm with a differential efficiency of 29%.

  8. Development of sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, William H.; Cyr, M. A.; Strange, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The 'Development of Sensors for Ceramics Components in Advanced Propulsion Systems' program was divided into two phases. The objectives of Phase 1 were to analyze, evaluate and recommend sensor concepts for the measurement of surface temperature, strain and heat flux on ceramic components for advanced propulsion systems. The results of this effort were previously published in NASA CR-182111. As a result of Phase 1, three approaches were recommended for further development: pyrometry, thin-film sensors, and thermographic phosphors. The objectives of Phase 2 were to fabricate and conduct laboratory demonstration tests of these systems. A summary report of the Phase 2 effort, together with conclusions and recommendations for each of the categories evaluated, has been submitted to NASA. Emittance tests were performed on six materials furnished by NASA Lewis Research Center. Measurements were made of various surfaces at high temperature using a Thermogage emissometer. This report describes the emittance test program and presents a summary of the results.

  9. Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a final report for the period of 12/1/03 through 11/30/04 for NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3-776, entitled "Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials." During this final period, major efforts were focused on both the determination of mechanical properties of advanced ceramic materials and the development of mechanical test methodologies under several different programs of the NASA-Glenn. The important research activities made during this period are: 1. Mechanical properties evaluation of two gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides. 2) Mechanical testing for fuel-cell seal materials. 3) Mechanical properties evaluation of thermal barrier coatings and CFCCs and 4) Foreign object damage (FOD) testing.

  10. Fracture toughness of advanced ceramics at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, George D.; Salem, Jonathan; Bar-On, Isa; Cho, Kyu; Foley, Michael; Fang, HO

    1992-01-01

    Results of round-robin fracture toughness tests on advanced ceramics are reported. A gas-pressure silicon nitride and a zirconia-toughened alumina were tested using three test methods: indentation fracture, indentation strength, and single-edge precracked beam. The latter two methods have produced consistent results. The interpretation of fracture toughness test results for the zirconia alumina composite is shown to be complicated by R-curve and environmentally assisted crack growth phenomena.

  11. Test Standard Developed for Determining the Slow Crack Growth of Advanced Ceramics at Ambient Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1998-01-01

    The service life of structural ceramic components is often limited by the process of slow crack growth. Therefore, it is important to develop an appropriate testing methodology for accurately determining the slow crack growth design parameters necessary for component life prediction. In addition, an appropriate test methodology can be used to determine the influences of component processing variables and composition on the slow crack growth and strength behavior of newly developed materials, thus allowing the component process to be tailored and optimized to specific needs. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, work to develop a standard test method to determine the slow crack growth parameters of advanced ceramics was initiated by the authors in early 1994 in the C 28 (Advanced Ceramics) committee of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). After about 2 years of required balloting, the draft written by the authors was approved and established as a new ASTM test standard: ASTM C 1368-97, Standard Test Method for Determination of Slow Crack Growth Parameters of Advanced Ceramics by Constant Stress-Rate Flexural Testing at Ambient Temperature. Briefly, the test method uses constant stress-rate testing to determine strengths as a function of stress rate at ambient temperature. Strengths are measured in a routine manner at four or more stress rates by applying constant displacement or loading rates. The slow crack growth parameters required for design are then estimated from a relationship between strength and stress rate. This new standard will be published in the Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Vol. 15.01, in 1998. Currently, a companion draft ASTM standard for determination of the slow crack growth parameters of advanced ceramics at elevated temperatures is being prepared by the authors and will be presented to the committee by the middle of 1998. Consequently, Lewis will maintain an active leadership role in advanced ceramics standardization within ASTM

  12. Parametric Weight Comparison of Advanced Metallic, Ceramic Tile, and Ceramic Blanket Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, David E.; Martin, Carl J.; Blosser, Max L.

    2000-01-01

    A parametric weight assessment of advanced metallic panel, ceramic blanket, and ceramic tile thermal protection systems (TPS) was conducted using an implicit, one-dimensional (I-D) finite element sizing code. This sizing code contained models to account for coatings fasteners, adhesives, and strain isolation pads. Atmospheric entry heating profiles for two vehicles, the Access to Space (ATS) vehicle and a proposed Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), were used to ensure that the trends were not unique to a certain trajectory. Ten TPS concepts were compared for a range of applied heat loads and substructural heat capacities to identify general trends. This study found the blanket TPS concepts have the lightest weights over the majority of their applicable ranges, and current technology ceramic tiles and metallic TPS concepts have similar weights. A proposed, state-of-the-art metallic system which uses a higher temperature alloy and efficient multilayer insulation was predicted to be significantly lighter than the ceramic tile stems and approaches blanket TPS weights for higher integrated heat loads.

  13. Advanced Ceramics for NASA's Current and Future Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.

    2006-01-01

    Ceramic composites and monolithics are widely recognized by NASA as enabling materials for a variety of aerospace applications. Compared to traditional materials, ceramic materials offer higher specific strength which can enable lighter weight vehicle and engine concepts, increased payloads, and increased operational margins. Additionally, the higher temperature capabilities of these materials allows for increased operating temperatures within the engine and on the vehicle surfaces which can lead to improved engine efficiency and vehicle performance. To meet the requirements of the next generation of both rocket and air-breathing engines, NASA is actively pursuing the development and maturation of a variety of ceramic materials. Anticipated applications for carbide, nitride and oxide-based ceramics will be presented. The current status of these materials and needs for future goals will be outlined. NASA also understands the importance of teaming with other government agencies and industry to optimize these materials and advance them to the level of maturation needed for eventual vehicle and engine demonstrations. A number of successful partnering efforts with NASA and industry will be highlighted.

  14. Ceramic Integration Technologies for Advanced Energy Systems: Critical Needs, Technical Challenges, and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    2010-01-01

    Advanced ceramic integration technologies dramatically impact the energy landscape due to wide scale application of ceramics in all aspects of alternative energy production, storage, distribution, conservation, and efficiency. Examples include fuel cells, thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, gas turbine propulsion systems, distribution and transmission systems based on superconductors, nuclear power generation and waste disposal. Ceramic integration technologies play a key role in fabrication and manufacturing of large and complex shaped parts with multifunctional properties. However, the development of robust and reliable integrated systems with optimum performance requires the understanding of many thermochemical and thermomechanical factors, particularly for high temperature applications. In this presentation, various needs, challenges, and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing of integrated similar (ceramic ceramic) and dissimilar (ceramic metal) material www.nasa.gov 45 ceramic-ceramic-systems have been discussed. Experimental results for bonding and integration of SiC based Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) LDI fuel injector and advanced ceramics and composites for gas turbine applications are presented.

  15. Combustion synthesis of advanced ceramic and ceramic-metal composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, H.

    1994-01-01

    The combustion synthesis of ceramic-metal composites using an in-situ liquid infiltration technique is described and used to produce various ceramic and ceramic-metal composites. The structure and properties of the synthesized composites are strongly dependent upon the reaction parameters of the combustion reaction, and the effect of varying the reactants and their stoichiometry to provide a range of reactant and product species i.e. solids, liquids and gases, with varying physical properties, e.g., thermal conductivity, on the microstructure and morphology of synthesized products is discussed with reference to this effect on the fundamental thermochemistry of these exothermic reactions, and different mechanisms are proposed to explain the results. A model exothermic reaction is used to demonstrate the application of simultaneous combustion synthesis, conducted under a consolidating pressure, as an affordable (low cost), in-situ synthesis technique for the production of dense, interpenetrating phase ceramic and ceramic-metal composites. The effects of the important process parameters, e. g., reaction stoichiometry and diluents, green density, pressure and temperature, on microstructure and mechanical properties of these high performance composites are discussed. An examination and critical application of the important processing parameters in combustion synthesis reactions have been used to produce a model ceramic-metal-intermetallic functionally graded material (FGM). Although the FGM produced is, essentially, a model system, the investigation has demonstrated how the combustion synthesis reaction and processing parameters can be controlled to produce a dense FGM composite with a required microstructure in a simple one-step, affordable process.

  16. Nondestructive evaluation of advanced ceramic composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, L.A.; Kunerth, D.C.; Walter, J.B.

    1991-09-01

    Nondestructive evaluation techniques were developed to characterize performance degrading conditions in continuous fiber-reinforced silicon carbide/silicon carbide composites. Porosity, fiber-matrix interface bond strength, and physical damage were among the conditions studied. The material studied is formed by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of the matrix material into a preform of woven reinforcing fibers. Acoustic, ultrasonic, and vibration response techniques were studied. Porosity was investigated because of its inherent presence in the CVI process and of the resultant degradation of material strength. Correlations between porosity and ultrasonic attenuation and velocity were clearly demonstrated. The ability of ultrasonic transmission scanning techniques to map variations in porosity in a single sample was also demonstrated. The fiber-matrix interface bond was studied because of its importance in determining the fracture toughness of the material. Correlations between interface bonding and acoustic and ultrasonic properties were observed. These results are presented along with those obtained form acoustic and vibration response measurements on material samples subjected to mechanical impact damage. This is the final report on research sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program. 10 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Next generation grinding spindle for cost-effective manufacture of advanced ceramic components

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, J.A.; Laurich, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Finish grinding of advanced structural ceramics has generally been considered an extremely slow and costly process. Recently, however, results from the High-Speed, Low-Damage (HSLD) program have clearly demonstrated that numerous finish-process performance benefits can be realized by grinding silicon nitride at high wheel speeds. A new, single-step, roughing-process capable of producing high-quality silicon nitride parts at high material removal rates while dramatically reducing finishing costs has been developed.

  18. Structural ceramics containing electric arc furnace dust.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, V N; Papandreou, A; Kanellopoulou, D; Stournaras, C J

    2013-11-15

    In the present work the stabilization of electric arc furnace dust EAFD waste in structural clay ceramics was investigated. EAFD was collected over eleven production days. The collected waste was characterized for its chemical composition by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. By powder XRD the crystal structure was studied while the fineness of the material was determined by a laser particle size analyzer. The environmental characterization was carried out by testing the dust according to EN12457 standard. Zn, Pb and Cd were leaching from the sample in significant amounts. The objective of this study is to investigate the stabilization properties of EAFD/clay ceramic structures and the potential of EAFD utilization into structural ceramics production (blocks). Mixtures of clay with 2.5% and 5% EAFD content were studied by TG/DTA, XRD, SEM, EN12457 standard leaching and mechanical properties as a function of firing temperature at 850, 900 and 950 °C. All laboratory facilities maintained 20 ± 1 °C. Consequently, a pilot-scale experiment was conducted with an addition of 2.5% and 5% EAFD to the extrusion mixture for the production of blocks. During blocks manufacturing, the firing step reached 950 °C in a tunnel kiln. Laboratory heating/cooling gradients were similar to pilot scale production firing. The as produced blocks were then subjected to quality control tests, i.e. dimensions according to EN772-17, water absorbance according to EN772-6, and compressive strength according to EN772-1 standard, in laboratory facilities certified under EN17025. The data obtained showed that the incorporation of EAFD resulted in an increase of mechanical strength. Moreover, leaching tests performed according to the Europeans standards on the EAFD-block samples showed that the quantities of heavy metals leached from crushed blocks were within the regulatory limits. Thus the EAFD-blocks can be regarded as material of no environmental concern.

  19. Structural ceramics containing electric arc furnace dust.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, V N; Papandreou, A; Kanellopoulou, D; Stournaras, C J

    2013-11-15

    In the present work the stabilization of electric arc furnace dust EAFD waste in structural clay ceramics was investigated. EAFD was collected over eleven production days. The collected waste was characterized for its chemical composition by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. By powder XRD the crystal structure was studied while the fineness of the material was determined by a laser particle size analyzer. The environmental characterization was carried out by testing the dust according to EN12457 standard. Zn, Pb and Cd were leaching from the sample in significant amounts. The objective of this study is to investigate the stabilization properties of EAFD/clay ceramic structures and the potential of EAFD utilization into structural ceramics production (blocks). Mixtures of clay with 2.5% and 5% EAFD content were studied by TG/DTA, XRD, SEM, EN12457 standard leaching and mechanical properties as a function of firing temperature at 850, 900 and 950 °C. All laboratory facilities maintained 20 ± 1 °C. Consequently, a pilot-scale experiment was conducted with an addition of 2.5% and 5% EAFD to the extrusion mixture for the production of blocks. During blocks manufacturing, the firing step reached 950 °C in a tunnel kiln. Laboratory heating/cooling gradients were similar to pilot scale production firing. The as produced blocks were then subjected to quality control tests, i.e. dimensions according to EN772-17, water absorbance according to EN772-6, and compressive strength according to EN772-1 standard, in laboratory facilities certified under EN17025. The data obtained showed that the incorporation of EAFD resulted in an increase of mechanical strength. Moreover, leaching tests performed according to the Europeans standards on the EAFD-block samples showed that the quantities of heavy metals leached from crushed blocks were within the regulatory limits. Thus the EAFD-blocks can be regarded as material of no environmental concern. PMID:24012962

  20. Novel structures in ceramic interconnect technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Kenneth Allen; Rohde, Steven Barney; Casias, Adrian Luther; Stokes, Robert Neal; Turner, Timothy Shawn

    2003-02-01

    Ceramic interconnect technology has been adapted to new structures. In particular, the ability to customize processing order and material choices in Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) has enabled new features to be constructed, which address needs in MEMS packaging as well as other novel structures. Unique shapes in LTCC permit the simplification of complete systems, as in the case of a miniature ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). In this case, a rolled tube has been employed to provide hermetic external contacts to electrodes and structures internal to the tube. Integral windows in LTCC have been fabricated for use in both lids and circuits where either a short term need for observation or a long-term need for functionality exists. These windows are fabricated without adhesive, are fully compatible with LTCC processing, and remain optically clear. Both vented and encapsulated functional volumes have been fabricated using a sacrificial material technique. These hold promise for self-assembly of systems, as well as complex internal structures in cavities, micro fluidic and optical channels, and multilevel integration techniques. Separation of the burnout and firing cycles has permitted custom internal environments to be established. Existing commercial High Temperature Cofired Ceramic (HTCC) and LTCC systems can also be rendered to have improved properties. A rapid prototyping technique for patterned HTCC packages has permitted prototypes to be realized in a few days, and has further applications to micro fluidics, heat pipes, and MEMS, among others. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. New advanced surface modification technique: titanium oxide ceramic surface implants: long-term clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Gyorgy; Kovacs, Lajos; Barabas, Jozsef; Nemeth, Zsolt; Maironna, Carlo

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the background to advanced surface modification technologies and to present a new technique, involving the formation of a titanium oxide ceramic coating, with relatively long-term results of its clinical utilization. Three general techniques are used to modify surfaces: the addition or removal of material and the change of material already present. Surface properties can also be changed without the addition or removal of material, through the laser or electron beam thermal treatment. The new technique outlined in this paper relates to the production of a corrosion-resistant 2000-2500 A thick, ceramic oxide layer with a coherent crystalline structure on the surface of titanium implants. The layer is grown electrochemically from the bulk of the metal and is modified by heat treatment. Such oxide ceramic-coated implants have a number of advantageous properties relative to implants covered with various other coatings: a higher external hardness, a greater force of adherence between the titanium and the oxide ceramic coating, a virtually perfect insulation between the organism and the metal (no possibility of metal allergy), etc. The coated implants were subjected to various physical, chemical, electronmicroscopic, etc. tests for a qualitative characterization. Finally, these implants (plates, screws for maxillofacial osteosynthesis and dental root implants) were applied in surgical practice for a period of 10 years. Tests and the experience acquired demonstrated the good properties of the titanium oxide ceramic-coated implants.

  2. Functionally Graded Materials using Plasma Spray with Nano Structured Ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sioh, E. L.; Tok, A. I. Y.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, nano structured FGM was fabricated using DC plasma spray technique. Nano structured and micro structured powder were used as the feeding powder with steel substrate. The spray parameters was optimized and characterisation of nano-ceramic FGM and micro-ceramic FGM were done using bending test and micro-hardness test. Experimental results have shown that the nano-structured FGM exhibit 20% improvement flexure strength and 10% in hardness. A comparison was made between sintered micro ceramic tile and nano ceramic FGM using simple drop test method.

  3. NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION (NDE) OF DAMAGED STRUCTURAL CERAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, R. E.; Green, W. H.; Sands, J. M.; Yu, J. H.

    2009-03-03

    A combination of destructive and nondestructive testing methods was utilized to evaluate the impact velocity and energy conditions that caused fracture in alumina structural ceramics. Drop tower testing was used for low velocity impact with a high mass indenter and fragment simulating projectile testing was used for high velocity impact with a low mass projectile. The damaged samples were nondestructively evaluated using digital radiography and ultrasound C-scan imaging. The bulk damage detected by these techniques was compared to surface damage observed by visual inspection.

  4. In-process EDM truing to generate complex contours on metal-bond, superabrasive grinding wheels for precision grinding structural ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Piscotty, M.A.; Davis, P.J.; Saito, T.T.; Blaedel, K.L.; Griffith, L.

    1997-08-01

    The demand and use of precision grinding of structural ceramics continue to increase as the worldwide advanced ceramic industry surpasses $20 billion is sales. Included in this industry are engineering structural ceramics, electronic ceramics, bioceramics and others. These materials are used in applications such as engine components, casting and extrusion dies, bearings, medical implants, nozzles, thermal insulators, and more. Along with the variety of ceramic applications comes a broad range of precision requirements, which in turn leads to various required processes to accommodate a spectrum of specifications. A process for grinding ceramic components to micrometer tolerances was employed and further developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for two separate grinding projects.

  5. Ultrasonic and radiographic evaluation of advanced aerospace materials: Ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1990-01-01

    Two conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques were used to evaluate advanced ceramic composite materials. It was shown that neither ultrasonic C-scan nor radiographic imaging can individually provide sufficient data for an accurate nondestructive evaluation. Both ultrasonic C-scan and conventional radiographic imaging are required for preliminary evaluation of these complex systems. The material variations that were identified by these two techniques are porosity, delaminations, bond quality between laminae, fiber alignment, fiber registration, fiber parallelism, and processing density flaws. The degree of bonding between fiber and matrix cannot be determined by either of these methods. An alternative ultrasonic technique, angular power spectrum scanning (APSS) is recommended for quantification of this interfacial bond.

  6. Advanced ceramic material for high temperature turbine tip seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, N. G.; Vogan, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Ceramic material systems are being considered for potential use as turbine blade tip gas path seals at temperatures up to 1370 1/4 C. Silicon carbide and silicon nitride structures were selected for study since an initial analysis of the problem gave these materials the greatest potential for development into a successful materials system. Segments of silicon nitride and silicon carbide materials over a range of densities, processed by various methods, a honeycomb structure of silicon nitride and ceramic blade tip inserts fabricated from both materials by hot pressing were tested singly and in combination. The evaluations included wear under simulated engine blade tip rub conditions, thermal stability, impact resistance, machinability, hot gas erosion and feasibility of fabrication into engine components. The silicon nitride honeycomb and low-density silicon carbide using a selected grain size distribution gave the most promising results as rub-tolerant shroud liners. Ceramic blade tip inserts made from hot-pressed silicon nitride gave excellent test results. Their behavior closely simulated metal tips. Wear was similar to that of metals but reduced by a factor of six.

  7. Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Development for Si-Based Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, R. Sung; Robinson, Raymond C.; Lee, Kang N.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coating concepts based on multi-component HfO2 (ZrO2) and modified mullite systems are developed for monolithic Si3N4 and SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) applications. Comprehensive testing approaches were established using the water vapor cyclic furnace, high pressure burner rig and laser heat flux steam rig to evaluate the coating water vapor stability, cyclic durability, radiation and erosion resistance under simulated engine environments. Test results demonstrated the feasibility and durability of the environmental barrier coating systems for 2700 to 3000 F monolithic Si3N4 and SiC/SiC CMC component applications. The high-temperature-capable environmental barrier coating systems are being further developed and optimized in collaboration with engine companies for advanced turbine engine applications.

  8. Interfacial chemistry and structure in ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Saenz, N.T.; Schilling, C.H.

    1990-09-01

    The interfacial chemistry and structure of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) play a major role in the properties of these materials. Fiber-matrix interfaces chemistries are vitally important in the fracture strength, fracture toughness, and fracture resistance of ceramic composites because they influence fiber loading and fiber pullout. Elevated-temperature properties are also linked to the interfacial characteristics through the chemical stability of the interface in corrosive environments and the creep/pullout behavior of the interface. Physical properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity are also dependent on the interface. Fiber-matrix interfaces containing a 1-{mu}m-thick multilayered interface with amorphous and graphitic C to a 1-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layer can result from sintering operations for some composite systems. Fibers coated with C, BN, C/BC/BN, and Si are also used to produce controlled interface chemistries and structures. Growth interfaces within the matrix resulting from processing of CMCs can also be crucial to the behavior of these materials. Evaluation of the interfacial chemistry and structure of CMCs requires the use of a variety of analytical tools, including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. A review of the interfacial chemistry and structure of SiC whisker- and fiber-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC/SiC materials is presented. Where possible, correlations with fracture properties and high-temperature stability are made. 94 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Boundary film for structural ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O.O.; Erdemir, A.; Hsieh, J.H.; Erck, R.A.; Fenske, G.R.; Nichols, F.A.

    1992-05-01

    Structural ceramic materials, like metals, will require lubrication if they are to be used extensively for tribological applications. The use of thin soft metallic coatings (specifically Ag) as a boundary film during mineral oil lubrication of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) and zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) ceramic materials was investigated in this study. With a pin-on-flat contact configuration in reciprocating sliding, the steady friction coefficient was reduced by a factor of 2 (0.14 {minus}0.16 vs. 0.06--0.07) when the flats were coated with Ag. Also, with Ag coatings the wear of pins was reduced to an unmeasurable level, whereas, in the absence of Ag coatings specific wear rates of {approx}2 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} -- 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} mm{sup 3}/Nm and {approx}7 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} -- 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} mm{sup 3}/Nm were measured for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and ZrO{sub 2} pins respectively. In addition to preventing direct contact between pins and flats, thereby reducing wear, the Ag coatings also act as a solid lubricant, help dissipate flash heating, and accelerate modification of the {lambda} ratio.

  10. Boundary film for structural ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O.O.; Erdemir, A.; Hsieh, J.H.; Erck, R.A.; Fenske, G.R.; Nichols, F.A.

    1992-05-01

    Structural ceramic materials, like metals, will require lubrication if they are to be used extensively for tribological applications. The use of thin soft metallic coatings (specifically Ag) as a boundary film during mineral oil lubrication of silicon nitride (Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]) and zirconia (ZrO[sub 2]) ceramic materials was investigated in this study. With a pin-on-flat contact configuration in reciprocating sliding, the steady friction coefficient was reduced by a factor of 2 (0.14 [minus]0.16 vs. 0.06--0.07) when the flats were coated with Ag. Also, with Ag coatings the wear of pins was reduced to an unmeasurable level, whereas, in the absence of Ag coatings specific wear rates of [approx]2 [times] 10[sup [minus]9] -- 4 [times] 10[sup [minus]8] mm[sup 3]/Nm and [approx]7 [times] 10[sup [minus]8] -- 2 [times] 10[sup [minus]7] mm[sup 3]/Nm were measured for Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] and ZrO[sub 2] pins respectively. In addition to preventing direct contact between pins and flats, thereby reducing wear, the Ag coatings also act as a solid lubricant, help dissipate flash heating, and accelerate modification of the [lambda] ratio.

  11. Ceramic Replaces Metal In High Performance Optomechanical Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter; Fox, Robert L.; Sandford, Stephen P.

    1995-01-01

    Recently developed ceramic materials and fabrication techniques integrated by Langley Research Center workers to produce superior optomechanical structures for spacecraft and aircraft instrumentation. Basic features of these novel supports, such as dimensional stability, low cost, and ease of fabrication, also make them ideal for many commerical optical systems as well. Ceramic supports for optical components and benches offer important advantages over usual metal parts. Ceramic materials expand and contract only slightly with changes in temperature. Moreover, they are relatively inexpensive and lightweight.

  12. The investigation of the matrix structure of ceramic brick made from carbonaceous mudstone tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolboushkin, A.; Fomina, O.; Fomin, A.

    2016-04-01

    The study of the matrix structure of ceramic brick made from carbonaceous mudstone tailings of Korkinsky coal opened pit mine is presented in the current paper. This study includes a thin sections analysis by the polarizing microscope, X-ray, SEM and infrared spectra investigations. It has been discovered that processes of solid- and liquid-phase sintering with the formation of new mineral phases occur inside and on the surfaces of granules during firing. It is shown that a liquid phase is formed in the matrix. It fills inter-grain gaps and connects mineral particles between themselves. It has been found that the advanced physical and mechanical properties of ceramic bricks obtained by creation of the matrix ceramic crock structure, intensive forming of a glass phase on the boundary of the section medium of ceramic composite and temperature reduction of the processes of solid-phase sintering.

  13. Flight-vehicle materials, structures, and dynamics - Assessment and future directions. Vol. 3 - Ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Stanley R. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present volume discusses ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites in prospective aerospace systems, monolithic ceramics, transformation-toughened and whisker-reinforced ceramic composites, glass-ceramic matrix composites, reaction-bonded Si3N4 and SiC composites, and chemical vapor-infiltrated composites. Also discussed are the sol-gel-processing of ceramic composites, the fabrication and properties of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites with directed metal oxidation, the fracture behavior of ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs), the fatigue of fiber-reinforced CMCs, creep and rupture of CMCs, structural design methodologies for ceramic-based materials systems, the joining of ceramics and CMCs, and carbon-carbon composites.

  14. High power laser beam machining of structural ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, R. F.; Vesely, E. J., Jr.

    Machining fully dense, structural ceramics to final dimensions using diamond abrasives is a slow and expensive process that weakens the ceramic. The objective of this research program was to investigate the feasibility of laser beam machining (LBM) to final dimensions without incurring loss of strength. The ceramics studied were all candidates for heat engine applications: reaction sintered silicon nitride; hot pressed silicon carbide; and sintered, partially magnesia-stabilized zirconia (PSZ). These fully dense ceramics are very hard; silicon carbide is close to diamond in hardness. In addition, a refractory grade, clay-bonded porous silicon carbide was machined during preliminary investigations.

  15. Liquid-assisted laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Giron, A.; Sola, D.; Peña, J. I.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, results obtained by laser ablation of advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials assisted by liquids are reported. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with pulse-width in the nanosecond range was used to machine the materials, which were immersed in water and ethylene glycol. Variation in geometrical parameters, morphology, and ablation yields were studied by using the same laser working conditions. It was observed that machined depth and removed volume depended on the thermal, optical, and mechanical features of the processed materials as well as on the properties of the surrounding medium in which the laser processing was carried out. Variation in ablation yields was studied in function of the liquid used to assist the laser process and related to refractive index and viscosity. Material features and working conditions were also related to the obtained results in order to correlate ablation parameters with respect to the hardness of the processed materials.

  16. An educational program on structural design with brittle /ceramic/ materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, J. I.

    1978-01-01

    The organization of a proposed ceramic structural materials program is described, and a suggested course sequence for college-level and graduate-level courses is presented. The course work on ceramics and brittle fracture are intended to lead to a brittle material design project and a brittle material design problem. Criteria for the selection of appropriate projects/problems are considered.

  17. Robust Joining and Integration of Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Challenges, Opportunities, and Realities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    2006-01-01

    Advanced ceramics and fiber reinforced composites are under active consideration for use in a wide variety of high temperature applications within the aeronautics, space transportation, energy, and nuclear industries. The engineering designs of ceramic and composite components require fabrication and manufacturing of large and complex shaped parts of various thicknesses. In many instances, it is more economical to build up complex shapes by joining simple geometrical shapes. In addition, these components have to be joined or assembled with metallic sub-components. Thus, joining and attachment have been recognized as enabling technologies for successful utilization of ceramic components in various demanding applications. In this presentation, various challenges and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing of high temperature joints in advanced ceramics and ceramic matrix composites will be presented. Silicon carbide based advanced ceramics and fiber reinforced composites in different shapes and sizes, have been joined using an affordable, robust ceramic joining technology. In addition, some examples of metal-ceramic brazing will also be presented. Microstructure and high temperature mechanical properties of joints in silicon carbide ceramics and composites will be reported. Various joint design philosophies and design issues in joining of ceramics and composites will be discussed.

  18. Test model designs for advanced refractory ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy Kim

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of space vehicles will be subjected to severe aerothermal loads and will require an improved thermal protection system (TPS) and other advanced vehicle components. In order to ensure the satisfactory performance system (TPS) and other advanced vehicle materials and components, testing is to be performed in environments similar to space flight. The design and fabrication of the test models should be fairly simple but still accomplish test objectives. In the Advanced Refractory Ceramic Materials test series, the models and model holders will need to withstand the required heat fluxes of 340 to 817 W/sq cm or surface temperatures in the range of 2700 K to 3000 K. The model holders should provide one dimensional (1-D) heat transfer to the samples and the appropriate flow field without compromising the primary test objectives. The optical properties such as the effective emissivity, catalytic efficiency coefficients, thermal properties, and mass loss measurements are also taken into consideration in the design process. Therefore, it is the intent of this paper to demonstrate the design schemes for different models and model holders that would accommodate these test requirements and ensure the safe operation in a typical arc jet facility.

  19. Advanced low-activation materials. Fibre-reinforced ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenici, P.; Scholz, H. W.

    1994-09-01

    A serious safety and environmental concern for thermonuclear fusion reactor development regards the induced radioactivity of the first wall and structural components. The use of low-activation materials (LAM) in a demonstration reactor would reduce considerably its potential risk and facilitate its maintenance. Moreover, decommissioning and waste management including disposal or even recycling of structural materials would be simplified. Ceramic fibre-reinforced SiC materials offer highly appreciable low activation characteristics in combination with good thermomechanical properties. This class of materials is now under experimental investigation for structural application in future fusion reactors. An overview on the recent results is given, covering coolant leak rates, thermophysical properties, compatibility with tritium breeder materials, irradiation effects, and LAM-consistent purity. SiC/SiC materials present characteristics likely to be optimised in order to meet the fusion application challenge. The scope is to put into practice the enormous potential of inherent safety with fusion energy.

  20. Toughness Increase in Biomimetic Ceramic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keat, William; Ganti, Surya; Sarrafinour, Reza; Sharma, Pradeep

    2004-03-01

    It is well known that organized microstructures like those found in seashells, e.g. nacre and conch shell, result in a dramatic increase (100X to 1000X) in fracture resistance compared to the base material. In this study, using cohesive zone and statistical lattice models, we address damage evolution in model brick-and-mortar ceramic systems that emulate a natural shell architecture. Bricks in the lattice were connected to their surrounding elements through shear and tensile springs. The traction versus separation laws for these interfacial springs were assumed to be bilinear, with the initial linear elastic regime being followed by progressive damage, until at maximum separation when the traction is reduced to zero. Results for the single hierarchy structure suggest that for appropriate choices of material and geometry, damage can be delocalized. The mechanism for this is the sequenced failure of the tensile and shear bonds. Results also indicate that the shape of the stress-strain curve can be controlled through manipulation of various dimensionless groupings. Use of self-similar hierarchical structures further enhanced ductility, as this allowed a significant number of shear bonds to damage locally without causing global failure.

  1. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Ceramics with Pore Gradient Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Lianmeng; Chen Fei; Shen Qiang; Yan Faqiang

    2008-02-15

    In the present study, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics with pore gradient structure were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. Silicon nitride ceramics with different controlled porosities were prepared by using ZrP{sub 2}O{sub 7} as a binder material and heat treated at 1100 deg. C in a pressureless nitrogen atmosphere. Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics with controlled porosity of 34-47% were obtained. The distribution of porous structure was homogenous. Fully dense Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics could be sintered at 1400{approx}1600 deg. C by using MgO and alumina Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the sintering aids. Pore gradient structure was formed by laminating the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} porous ceramics and powder mixture was used to obtain fully dense ceramics, and then sintering at 1400-1600 deg. C. Microstructure of sintered samples was observed by scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and the change of phase compositions was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that these samples exhibited a good porous graded structure with a highly porous layer and a dense surface layer. The major phase of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics was still {alpha} phase.

  2. Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, 9th, Cocoa Beach, FL, January 20-23, 1985, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    The present conference discusses testing methods for ceramic matrix composites, developments in ceramic fibers, space transportation systems thermal protection materials, ceramics for heat engines and other severe environments, thermal sprayed coatings, the development status of ceramic tribology, and the fabrication of ceramics and hard metals. Specific attention is given to the mechanical characterization of ceramic and glass matrix composites, the application of fracture mechanics to fiber composites, the degradation properties of Nicalon SiC fibers, ceramic matrix toughening, SiC/glass composite phases, ceramic composite manufacture by infiltration, and ceramic coatings for the Space Shuttle's surface insulation. Also treated are design principles for anisotropic brittle materials, ceramics for intense radiant heat applications, ceramic-coated tip seals for turbojet engines, composite production by low pressure plasma deposition, tribology in military systems, lubrication for ceramics, a systems approach to the grinding of structural ceramics, and the fabrication of inorganic foams by microwave irradiation.

  3. Advanced Ceramic Materials for Sharp Hot Structures: Material Development and On-Ground Arc-Jet Qualification Testing on Scaled Demonstrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scatteia, L.; Tomassetti, G.; Rufolo, G.; De Filippis, F.; Marino, G.

    2005-02-01

    This paper describes the work performed by the Italian Aerospace Research Centre (C.I.R.A. S.c.P.A.) in a technology project focused on the applicability of modified diboride compounds structures to the manufacturing of high performance and slender shaped hot structures for reusable launch vehicles. A prototypal multi-material structure, which couple reinforced diborides to a C/SiC frame, has been built with the aim to demonstrate the applicability of an innovative concept of nose cap to the fabrication of real parts to be installed ant subsequently tested on the flying test bed currently under development at CIRA. Particular relevance is given to the on-ground qualification test of the nose-cap scaled demonstrator which is underway at CIRA Arc-Jet facility SCIROCCO. Considering the specific typology of materials investigated, up to date, a consistent tests campaign at laboratory level has been performed and concluded in order to create a complete materials data base. The measured materials properties have been then used as input for the design phase that also used as inputs the aero-thermal loads associated with a reference re-entry mission. Our major preliminary findings indicate that the structure is thermally fully compliant with the environment requirements and shows local mechanical criticalities in specific areas such as the materials interfaces and hot/cold joining parts.

  4. Research on chemical vapor deposition processes for advanced ceramic coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.

    1993-01-01

    Our interdisciplinary background and fundamentally-oriented studies of the laws governing multi-component chemical vapor deposition (VD), particle deposition (PD), and their interactions, put the Yale University HTCRE Laboratory in a unique position to significantly advance the 'state-of-the-art' of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) R&D. With NASA-Lewis RC financial support, we initiated a program in March of 1988 that has led to the advances described in this report (Section 2) in predicting chemical vapor transport in high temperature systems relevant to the fabrication of refractory ceramic coatings for turbine engine components. This Final Report covers our principal results and activities for the total NASA grant of $190,000. over the 4.67 year period: 1 March 1988-1 November 1992. Since our methods and the technical details are contained in the publications listed (9 Abstracts are given as Appendices) our emphasis here is on broad conclusions/implications and administrative data, including personnel, talks, interactions with industry, and some known applications of our work.

  5. Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pujari, V.J.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.

    1996-02-01

    The research program had as goals the development and demonstration of significant improvements in processing methods, process controls, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1370{degrees}C. In Phase I of the program a process was developed that resulted in a silicon nitride - 4 w% yttria HIP`ed material (NCX 5102) that displayed unprecedented strength and reliability. An average tensile strength of 1 GPa and a strength distribution following a 3-parameter Weibull distribution were demonstrated by testing several hundred buttonhead tensile specimens. The Phase II program focused on the development of methodology for colloidal consolidation producing green microstructure which minimizes downstream process problems such as drying, shrinkage, cracking, and part distortion during densification. Furthermore, the program focused on the extension of the process to gas pressure sinterable (GPS) compositions. Excellent results were obtained for the HIP composition processed for minimal density gradients, both with respect to room-temperature strength and high-temperature creep resistance. Complex component fabricability of this material was demonstrated by producing engine-vane prototypes. Strength data for the GPS material (NCX-5400) suggest that it ranks very high relative to other silicon nitride materials in terms of tensile/flexure strength ratio, a measure of volume quality. This high quality was derived from the closed-loop colloidal process employed in the program.

  6. CARES - CERAMICS ANALYSIS AND RELIABILITY EVALUATION OF STRUCTURES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, N. N.

    1994-01-01

    The beneficial properties of structural ceramics include their high-temperature strength, light weight, hardness, and corrosion and oxidation resistance. For advanced heat engines, ceramics have demonstrated functional abilities at temperatures well beyond the operational limits of metals. This is offset by the fact that ceramic materials tend to be brittle. When a load is applied, their lack of significant plastic deformation causes the material to crack at microscopic flaws, destroying the component. CARES calculates the fast-fracture reliability or failure probability of macroscopically isotropic ceramic components. These components may be subjected to complex thermomechanical loadings. The program uses results from a commercial structural analysis program (MSC/NASTRAN or ANSYS) to evaluate component reliability due to inherent surface and/or volume type flaws. A multiple material capability allows the finite element model reliability to be a function of many different ceramic material statistical characterizations. The reliability analysis uses element stress, temperature, area, and volume output, which are obtained from two dimensional shell and three dimensional solid isoparametric or axisymmetric finite elements. CARES utilizes the Batdorf model and the two-parameter Weibull cumulative distribution function to describe the effects of multi-axial stress states on material strength. The shear-sensitive Batdorf model requires a user-selected flaw geometry and a mixed-mode fracture criterion. Flaws intersecting the surface and imperfections embedded in the volume can be modeled. The total strain energy release rate theory is used as a mixed mode fracture criterion for co-planar crack extension. Out-of-plane crack extension criteria are approximated by a simple equation with a semi-empirical constant that can model the maximum tangential stress theory, the minimum strain energy density criterion, the maximum strain energy release rate theory, or experimental

  7. CARES/PC - CERAMICS ANALYSIS AND RELIABILITY EVALUATION OF STRUCTURES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatmary, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    The beneficial properties of structural ceramics include their high-temperature strength, light weight, hardness, and corrosion and oxidation resistance. For advanced heat engines, ceramics have demonstrated functional abilities at temperatures well beyond the operational limits of metals. This is offset by the fact that ceramic materials tend to be brittle. When a load is applied, their lack of significant plastic deformation causes the material to crack at microscopic flaws, destroying the component. CARES/PC performs statistical analysis of data obtained from the fracture of simple, uniaxial tensile or flexural specimens and estimates the Weibull and Batdorf material parameters from this data. CARES/PC is a subset of the program CARES (COSMIC program number LEW-15168) which calculates the fast-fracture reliability or failure probability of ceramic components utilizing the Batdorf and Weibull models to describe the effects of multi-axial stress states on material strength. CARES additionally requires that the ceramic structure be modeled by a finite element program such as MSC/NASTRAN or ANSYS. The more limited CARES/PC does not perform fast-fracture reliability estimation of components. CARES/PC estimates ceramic material properties from uniaxial tensile or from three- and four-point bend bar data. In general, the parameters are obtained from the fracture stresses of many specimens (30 or more are recommended) whose geometry and loading configurations are held constant. Parameter estimation can be performed for single or multiple failure modes by using the least-squares analysis or the maximum likelihood method. Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Anderson-Darling goodness-of-fit tests measure the accuracy of the hypothesis that the fracture data comes from a population with a distribution specified by the estimated Weibull parameters. Ninety-percent confidence intervals on the Weibull parameters and the unbiased value of the shape parameter for complete samples are provided

  8. Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, 10th, Cocoa Beach, FL, January 19-24, 1986, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    The structures, performance characteristics, applications, and processing technology of ceramics, ceramic-matrix composites, and ceramic coatings are discussed in reviews and reports. Topics examined include ceramic-metal systems and self-propagating high-temperature synthesis, ceramics for heat engines and high performance, SiC-fiber and SiC-whisker composites, coatings, ceramic tribology, and cutting and grinding methods. Micrographs, graphs, photographs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  9. Small, short and long fatigue crack growth in an advanced silicon nitride ceramic material

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.H.; Edwards, L.

    1996-05-15

    In metallic materials, a number of workers have reported that the growth rates of small fatigue cracks cannot be correlated with the stress intensity factor range, {Delta}K. Small cracks normally exhibit faster growth rates than long cracks and often show growth rate minima. This anomalous behavior has been attributed to the failure of the linear elastic fracture mechanics parameter {Delta}K to characterize small, or short fatigue crack growth. Ceramic materials combine a lack of dislocation deformation and a very small grain size and thus the reasons for any observed anomalous small or short crack growth effect are less clear. Previous work on small or short fatigue crack growth in ceramics is limited, and work on silicon nitride which is one of the most promising structural ceramics is particularly sparse. As the majority of the fatigue lifetime of any silicon nitride component will be controlled by the propagation of a preexisting small flaw to a critical size, the presence of any short or small crack effect in this material is of engineering importance. Thus, the objective of the work presented here is to investigate the small, short and long crack growth in an advanced silicon nitride material.

  10. Life prediction methodology for ceramic components of advanced heat engines. Phase 1: Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cuccio, J.C.; Brehm, P.; Fang, H.T.

    1995-03-01

    Emphasis of this program is to develop and demonstrate ceramics life prediction methods, including fast fracture, stress rupture, creep, oxidation, and nondestructive evaluation. Significant advancements were made in these methods and their predictive capabilities successfully demonstrated.

  11. Advances in Ceramic Matrix Composite Blade Damping Characteristics for Aerospace Turbomachinery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Harris, Donald L.; Ting, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    For advanced aerospace propulsion systems, development of ceramic matrix composite integrally-bladed turbine disk technology is attractive for a number of reasons. The high strength-to-weight ratio of ceramic composites helps to reduce engine weight and the one-piece construction of a blisk will result in fewer parts count, which should translate into reduced operational costs. One shortcoming with blisk construction, however, is that blisks may be prone to high cycle fatigue due to their structural response to high vibration environments. Use of ceramic composites is expected to provide some internal damping to reduce the vibratory stresses encountered due to unsteady flow loads through the bladed turbine regions. A goal of our research was to characterize the vibration viscous damping behavior of C/SiC composites. The vibration damping properties were measured and calculated. Damping appeared to decrease with an increase in the natural frequency. While the critical damping amount of approximately 2% is required for typical aerospace turbomachinery engines, the C/SiC damping at high frequencies was less than 0.2% from our study. The advanced high-performance aerospace propulsion systems almost certainly will require even more damping than what current vehicles require. A purpose of this paper is to review some work on C/SiC vibration damping by the authors for the NASA CMC turbine blisk development program and address an importance of the further investigation of the blade vibration damping characteristics on candidate CMC materials for the NASA s advanced aerospace turbomachinery engine systems.

  12. All ceramic structure for molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Kucera, Eugenia H.

    1992-01-01

    An all-ceramic molten carbonate fuel cell having a composition formed of a multivalent metal oxide or oxygenate such as an alkali metal, transition metal oxygenate. The structure includes an anode and cathode separated by an electronically conductive interconnect. The electrodes and interconnect are compositions ceramic materials. Various combinations of ceramic compositions for the anode, cathode and interconnect are disclosed. The fuel cell exhibits stability in the fuel gas and oxidizing environments. It presents reduced sealing and expansion problems in fabrication and has improved long-term corrosion resistance.

  13. Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are enabling materials for a number of demanding applications in aerospace, energy, and nuclear industries. In the aerospace systems, these materials are being considered for applications in hot sections of jet engines such as the combustor liner, vanes, nozzle components, nose cones, leading edges of reentry vehicles, and space propulsion components. Applications in the energy and environmental industries include radiant heater tubes, heat exchangers, heat recuperators, gas and diesel particulate filters, and components for land based turbines for power generation. These materials are also being considered for use in the first wall and blanket components of fusion reactors. In the last few years, a number of CMC components have been developed and successfully tested for various aerospace and ground based applications. However, a number of challenges still remain slowing the wide scale implementation of these materials. They include robust fabrication and manufacturing, assembly and integration, coatings, property modeling and life prediction, design codes and databases, repair and refurbishment, and cost. Fabrication of net and complex shape components with high density and tailorable matrix properties is quite expensive, and even then various desirable properties are not achievable. In this presentation, a number of examples of successful CMC component development and testing will be provided. In addition, critical need for robust manufacturing, joining and assembly technologies in successful implementation of these systems will be discussed.

  14. Advanced ceramic coating development for industrial/utility gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogan, J. W.; Stetson, A. R.

    1982-01-01

    A program was conducted with the objective of developing advanced thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems. Coating application was by plasma spray. Duplex, triplex and graded coatings were tested. Coating systems incorporated both NiCrAly and CoCrAly bond coats. Four ceramic overlays were tested: ZrO2.82O3; CaO.TiO2; 2CaO.SiO2; and MgO.Al2O3. The best overall results were obtained with a CaO.TiO2 coating applied to a NiCrAly bond coat. This coating was less sensitive than the ZrO2.8Y2O3 coating to process variables and part geometry. Testing with fuels contaminated with compounds containing sulfur, phosphorus and alkali metals showed the zirconia coatings were destabilized. The calcium titanate coatings were not affected by these contaminants. However, when fuels were used containing 50 ppm of vanadium and 150 ppm of magnesium, heavy deposits were formed on the test specimens and combustor components that required frequent cleaning of the test rig. During the program Mars engine first-stage turbine blades were coated and installed for an engine cyclic endurance run with the zirconia, calcium titanate, and calcium silicate coatings. Heavy spalling developed with the calcium silicate system. The zirconia and calcium titanate systems survived the full test duration. It was concluded that these two TBC's showed potential for application in gas turbines.

  15. Fracture behavior of advanced ceramic hot gas filters: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.P.; Majumdar, S.; Sutaria, M.; Bielke, W.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents the results of mechanical/microstructural evaluation, thermal shock/fatigue testing, and stress analyses of advanced hot-gas filters obtained from different manufacturers. These filters were fabricated from both monolithic ceramics and composites. The composite filters, made of both oxide and nonoxide materials, were in both as-fabricated and exposed conditions, whereas the monolithic filters were made only of nonoxide materials. Mechanical property measurement of composite filters included diametral compression testing with O-ring specimens and burst-testing of short filter segments with rubber plugs. In-situ strength of fibers in the composite filters was evaluated by microscopic technique. Thermal shock/fatigue resistance was estimated by measuring the strengths of filter specimens before and after thermal cycling from an air environment at elevated temperatures to a room temperature oil bath. Filter performance during mechanical and thermal shock/fatigue loadings was correlated with microstructural observations. Micromechanical models were developed to derive properties of composite filter constituents on the basis of measured mechanical properties of the filters. Subsequently, these properties were used to analytically predict the performance of composite filters during thermal shock loading.

  16. Degradation of structural ceramics by erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J.L.

    1994-12-01

    Materials wastage by solid-particle erosion can be severe and can limit lifetimes. This paper will review the theoretical description of solid-particle erosion in brittle materials, which is well-developed for monolithic ceramics. The models can usually account for effects from the principal projectile properties of size, impact velocity, and impact angle. Materials parameters such as fracture toughness and hardness can be included. Steady-state erosion measurements on a wide variety of ceramics, ranging from Si single crystals to SiC-whisker-reinforced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, are reviewed and compared with the models. It is believed that R-curve behavior and/or particle fragmentation is responsible for discrepancies between theory and experimental results for composite ceramics. In addition, the theories make no attempt to describe threshold or incubation effects.

  17. Innovative grinding wheel design for cost-effective machining of advanced ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, R.H.; Kuo, P.; Liu, S.; Murphy, D.; Picone, J.W.; Ramanath, S.

    2000-05-01

    This Final Report covers the Phase II Innovative Grinding Wheel (IGW) program in which Norton Company successfully developed a novel grinding wheel for cost-effective cylindrical grinding of advanced ceramics. In 1995, Norton Company successfully completed the 16-month Phase I technical effort to define requirements, design, develop, and evaluate a next-generation grinding wheel for cost-effective cylindrical grinding of advanced ceramics using small prototype wheels. The Phase II program was initiated to scale-up the new superabrasive wheel specification to larger diameters, 305-mm to 406-mm, required for most production grinding of cylindrical ceramic parts, and to perform in-house and independent validation grinding tests.

  18. Advanced Measurements of Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Farhad Farzbod; Stephen J. Reese; Zilong Hua; Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2012-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered as a fuel cladding material for accident tolerant fuel under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Division of the Department of Energy. Silicon carbide has many potential advantages over traditional zirconium based cladding systems. These include high melting point, low susceptibility to corrosion, and low degradation of mechanical properties under neutron irradiation. In addition, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) made from SiC have high mechanical toughness enabling these materials to withstand thermal and mechanical shock loading. However, many of the fundamental mechanical and thermal properties of SiC CMCs depend strongly on the fabrication process. As a result, extrapolating current materials science databases for these materials to nuclear applications is not possible. The “Advanced Measurements” work package under the LWRS fuels pathway is tasked with the development of measurement techniques that can characterize fundamental thermal and mechanical properties of SiC CMCs. An emphasis is being placed on development of characterization tools that can used for examination of fresh as well as irradiated samples. The work discuss in this report can be divided into two broad categories. The first involves the development of laser ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic and yield properties and the second involves the development of laser-based techniques to measurement thermal transport properties. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of SiC CMCs in regards to thermal and mechanical properties. The material properties characterized within this work package will be used as validation of advanced materials physics models of SiC CMCs developed under the LWRS fuels pathway. In addition, it is envisioned that similar measurement techniques can be used to provide process control and quality assurance as well as measurement of

  19. Advanced-functional Metal and Ceramics on Polymorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yasuzo

    Advanced-functional meatl andceramics sholed be progressed and created on the basis of cahracteristic length such as the Fermi wave length, the mean free path, the coherent length etc. These lengthes have themselves for each material. In this paper, needs diversification, reconsideration of conductivity, carbon polymorphisms, nano-structure in superconductivity will be reviewed and forecasted.

  20. Standardization Efforts for Mechanical Testing and Design of Advanced Ceramic Materials and Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Jenkins, Michael G.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced aerospace systems occasionally require the use of very brittle materials such as sapphire and ultra-high temperature ceramics. Although great progress has been made in the development of methods and standards for machining, testing and design of component from these materials, additional development and dissemination of standard practices is needed. ASTM Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics and ISO TC 206 have taken a lead role in the standardization of testing for ceramics, and recent efforts and needs in standards development by Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics will be summarized. In some cases, the engineers, etc. involved are unaware of the latest developments, and traditional approaches applicable to other material systems are applied. Two examples of flight hardware failures that might have been prevented via education and standardization will be presented.

  1. Joining and Assembly of Silicon Carbide-based Advanced Ceramics and Composites for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.

    2004-01-01

    Silicon carbide based advanced ceramics and fiber reinforced composites are under active consideration for use in wide variety of high temperature applications within the aeronautics, space transportation, energy, and nuclear industries. The engineering designs of ceramic and composite component require fabrication and manufacturing of large and complex shaped parts of various thicknesses. In many instances, it is more economical to build up complex shapes by joining simple geometrical shapes. In addition these components have to be joined or assembled with metallic sub-components. Thus, joining and attachment have been recognized as enabling technologies for successful utilization of ceramic components in various demanding applications. In this presentation, various challenges and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing o high temperature joints in ceramic matrix composites will be presented. Silicon carbide based advanced ceramics (CVD and hot pressed), and C/SiC and SiC/SiC composites, in different shapes and sizes, have been joined using an affordable, robust ceramic joining technology (ARCJoinT). Microstructure and high temperature mechanical properties of joints in silicon carbide ceramics and CVI and melt infiltrated SiC matrix composites will,be reported. Various joint design philosophies and design issues in joining of ceramics and composites well be discussed.

  2. Ceramic ware waste as coarse aggregate for structural concrete production.

    PubMed

    García-González, Julia; Rodríguez-Robles, Desirée; Juan-Valdés, Andrés; Morán-Del Pozo, Julia M; Guerra-Romero, M Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The manufacture of any kind of product inevitably entails the production of waste. The quantity of waste generated by the ceramic industry, a very important sector in Spain, is between 5% and 8% of the final output and it is therefore necessary to find an effective waste recovery method. The aim of the study reported in the present article was to seek a sustainable means of managing waste from the ceramic industry through the incorporation of this type of waste in the total replacement of conventional aggregate (gravel) used in structural concrete. Having verified that the recycled ceramic aggregates met all the technical requirements imposed by current Spanish legislation, established in the Code on Structural Concrete (EHE-08), then it is prepared a control concrete mix and the recycled concrete mix using 100% recycled ceramic aggregate instead of coarse natural aggregate. The concretes obtained were subjected to the appropriate tests in order to conduct a comparison of their mechanical properties. The results show that the concretes made using ceramic sanitary ware aggregate possessed the same mechanical properties as those made with conventional aggregate. It is therefore possible to conclude that the reuse of recycled ceramic aggregate to produce recycled concrete is a feasible alternative for the sustainable management of this waste. PMID:25188783

  3. Synthesis, Structures, and Multiferroic Properties of Strontium Hexaferrite Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Guolong; Chen, Xiuna

    2013-05-01

    Simultaneous occurrence of large ferroelectricity and strong ferromagnetism has been observed in strontium hexaferrite (SrFe12O19) ceramics. Strontium hexaferrite powders with hexagonal crystal structures have been successfully synthesized through the co-precipitation precursor method using strontium nitrate and ferric nitrate as starting materials. The powders were pressed into pellets and then sintered into ceramics at a temperature range of at 1000°C to 1100°C for 1 h. The structure and morphology of the ceramics were determined using x-ray diffraction and field-emission scanning electron microscopy techniques. Clear ferroelectric hysteresis loops demonstrated large spontaneous polarization in the SrFe12O19 ceramics at room temperature. The maximum remnant polarization of the SrFe12O19 ceramic was estimated to be approximately 15 μC/cm2. The FeO6 octahedron in its perovskite-like hexagonal unit cell and the displacement of Fe3+ off the center of the octahedron are proposed to be the origin of electric polarization in SrFe12O19. In our experimental observations, the SrFe12O19 ceramic also revealed strong ferromagnetism at room temperature.

  4. Ceramic ware waste as coarse aggregate for structural concrete production.

    PubMed

    García-González, Julia; Rodríguez-Robles, Desirée; Juan-Valdés, Andrés; Morán-Del Pozo, Julia M; Guerra-Romero, M Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The manufacture of any kind of product inevitably entails the production of waste. The quantity of waste generated by the ceramic industry, a very important sector in Spain, is between 5% and 8% of the final output and it is therefore necessary to find an effective waste recovery method. The aim of the study reported in the present article was to seek a sustainable means of managing waste from the ceramic industry through the incorporation of this type of waste in the total replacement of conventional aggregate (gravel) used in structural concrete. Having verified that the recycled ceramic aggregates met all the technical requirements imposed by current Spanish legislation, established in the Code on Structural Concrete (EHE-08), then it is prepared a control concrete mix and the recycled concrete mix using 100% recycled ceramic aggregate instead of coarse natural aggregate. The concretes obtained were subjected to the appropriate tests in order to conduct a comparison of their mechanical properties. The results show that the concretes made using ceramic sanitary ware aggregate possessed the same mechanical properties as those made with conventional aggregate. It is therefore possible to conclude that the reuse of recycled ceramic aggregate to produce recycled concrete is a feasible alternative for the sustainable management of this waste.

  5. Advanced Ceramic Technology for Space Applications at NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alim, Mohammad A.

    2003-01-01

    The ceramic processing technology using conventional methods is applied to the making of the state-of-the-art ceramics known as smart ceramics or intelligent ceramics or electroceramics. The sol-gel and wet chemical processing routes are excluded in this investigation considering economic aspect and proportionate benefit of the resulting product. The use of ceramic ingredients in making coatings or devices employing vacuum coating unit is also excluded in this investigation. Based on the present information it is anticipated that the conventional processing methods provide identical performing ceramics when compared to that processed by the chemical routes. This is possible when sintering temperature, heating and cooling ramps, peak temperature (sintering temperature), soak-time (hold-time), etc. are considered as variable parameters. In addition, optional calcination step prior to the sintering operation remains as a vital variable parameter. These variable parameters constitute a sintering profile to obtain a sintered product. Also it is possible to obtain identical products for more than one sintering profile attributing to the calcination step in conjunction with the variables of the sintering profile. Overall, the state-of-the-art ceramic technology is evaluated for potential thermal and electrical insulation coatings, microelectronics and integrated circuits, discrete and integrated devices, etc. applications in the space program.

  6. Integration Science and Technology of Advanced Ceramics for Energy and Environmental Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of new and innovative materials has been known to culminate in major turning points in human history. The transformative impact and functional manifestation of new materials have been demonstrated in every historical era by their integration into new products, systems, assemblies, and devices. In modern times, the integration of new materials into usable products has a special relevance for the technological development and economic competitiveness of industrial societies. Advanced ceramic technologies dramatically impact the energy and environmental landscape due to potential wide scale applications in all aspects of energy production, storage, distribution, conservation, and efficiency. Examples include gas turbine propulsion systems, fuel cells, thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, distribution and transmission systems based on superconductors, nuclear power generation, and waste disposal. Robust ceramic integration technologies enable hierarchical design and manufacturing of intricate ceramic components starting with geometrically simpler units that are subsequently joined to themselves and/or to metals to create components with progressively higher levels of complexity and functionality. However, for the development of robust and reliable integrated systems with optimum performance under different operating conditions, the detailed understanding of various thermochemical and thermomechanical factors is critical. Different approaches are required for the integration of ceramic-metal and ceramic-ceramic systems across length scales (macro to nano). In this presentation, a few examples of integration of ceramic to metals and ceramic to ceramic systems will be presented. Various challenges and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing of integrated similar (ceramic-ceramic) and dissimilar (ceramic-metal) material systems will be discussed. Potential opportunities and need for the development of innovative design philosophies, approaches, and

  7. High speed low damage grinding of advanced ceramics, Phase II final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, J.A.; Malkin, S.

    2000-05-01

    In the manufacture of structural ceramic components, grinding costs can comprise up to 80% of the entire manufacturing cost. As a result, one of the most challenging tasks faced by manufacturing process engineers is the development of a ceramic finishing process to maximize part throughput while minimizing costs associated scrap levels.

  8. Machining and inspection of structural ceramic components. CRADA final report for CRADA number Y-1292-0078

    SciTech Connect

    Counts, R.W.; Albright, S.; Ritland, M.

    1996-09-30

    This document is the final report of the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) and the Coors Ceramics Company (Coors). The purpose of this CRADA was to develop advanced technology and manufacturing practices for machining and inspecting ceramic components. Specific CRADA objectives were accomplished through the completion of six projects at four separate Coors facilities. The projects included the development of an analytical model to simulate the mechanics of a powder rolling process, development and testing of a microwave-based system for measuring the density of conveyed ceramic material, and the development and testing of four machine vision inspection systems. This CRADA benefited the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities associated with advanced heat engines, enhanced critical manufacturing skills within the DOE complex for fabricating precision, high quality workpieces from difficult-to-machine materials, and enabled U.S. industry to maintain a position of leadership in the structural ceramics field.

  9. Advanced Ceramics for Use as Fuel Element Materials in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentine, Peter G.; Allen, Lee R.; Shapiro, Alan P.

    2012-01-01

    With the recent start (October 2011) of the joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Program, there is renewed interest in developing advanced ceramics for use as fuel element materials in nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems. Three classes of fuel element materials are being considered under the NCPS Program: (a) graphite composites - consisting of coated graphite elements containing uranium carbide (or mixed carbide), (b) cermets (ceramic/metallic composites) - consisting of refractory metal elements containing uranium oxide, and (c) advanced carbides consisting of ceramic elements fabricated from uranium carbide and one or more refractory metal carbides [1]. The current development effort aims to advance the technology originally developed and demonstrated under Project Rover (1955-1973) for the NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) [2].

  10. Structural design methodologies for ceramic-based material systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Chulya, Abhisak; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1991-01-01

    One of the primary pacing items for realizing the full potential of ceramic-based structural components is the development of new design methods and protocols. The focus here is on low temperature, fast-fracture analysis of monolithic, whisker-toughened, laminated, and woven ceramic composites. A number of design models and criteria are highlighted. Public domain computer algorithms, which aid engineers in predicting the fast-fracture reliability of structural components, are mentioned. Emphasis is not placed on evaluating the models, but instead is focused on the issues relevant to the current state of the art.

  11. Structural design methodologies for ceramic-based material systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Chulya, Abhisak; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1992-01-01

    One of the primary pacing items for realizing the full potential of ceramic-based structural components is the development of new design methods and protocols. The focus here is on low temperature, fast-fracture analysis of monolithic, whisker-toughened, laminated, and woven ceramic composites. A number of design models and criteria are highlighted. Public domain computer algorithms, which aid engineers in predicting the fast-fracture reliability of structural components, are mentioned. Emphasis is not placed on evaluating the models, but instead is focused on the issues relevant to the current state of the art.

  12. High efficiency tantalum-based ceramic composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A. (Inventor); Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); DiFiore, Robert R. (Inventor); Katvala, Victor W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Tantalum-based ceramics are suitable for use in thermal protection systems. These composite structures have high efficiency surfaces (low catalytic efficiency and high emittance), thereby reducing heat flux to a spacecraft during planetary re-entry. These ceramics contain tantalum disilicide, molybdenum disilicide and borosilicate glass. The components are milled, along with a processing aid, then applied to a surface of a porous substrate, such as a fibrous silica or carbon substrate. Following application, the coating is then sintered on the substrate. The composite structure is substantially impervious to hot gas penetration and capable of surviving high heat fluxes at temperatures approaching 3000.degree. F. and above.

  13. Forming of superplastic ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.; Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-05-01

    Superplasticity in ceramics has now advanced to the stage that technologically viable superplastic deformation processing can be performed. In this paper, examples of superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of ceramic components are given. Recent work in biaxial gas-pressure forming of several ceramics is provided. These include yttria-stabilized, tetragonal zirconia (YTZP), a 20% alumina/YTZP composite, and silicon. In addition, the concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of a hybrid ceramic-metal structure are presented. These forming processes offer technological advantages of greater dimensional control and increased variety and complexity of shapes than is possible with conventional ceramic shaping technology.

  14. Structural Ceramic Composites for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    William Windes; P.A. Lessing; Y. Katoh; L. L. Snead; E. Lara-Curzio; J. Klett; C. Henager, Jr.; R. J. Shinavski

    2005-08-01

    A research program has been established to investigate fiber reinforced ceramic composites to be used as control rod components within a Very High Temperature Reactor. Two candidate systems have been identified, carbon fiber reinforced carbon (Cf/C) and silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites. Initial irradiation stability studies to determine the maximum dose for each composite type have been initiated within the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Test samples exposed to 10 dpa irradiation dose have been completed with future samples to dose levels of 20 and 30 dpa scheduled for completion in following years. Mechanical and environmental testing is being conducted concurrently at the Idaho National Laboratory and at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. High temperature test equipment, testing methodologies, and test samples for high temperature (up to 1600º C) tensile strength and long duration creep studies have been established. Specific attention was paid to the architectural fiber preform design as well as the materials used in construction of the composites. Actual testing of both tubular and flat, "dog-bone" shaped tensile composite specimens will begin next year. Since there is no precedence for using ceramic composites within a nuclear reactor, ASTM standard test procedures will be established from these mechanical and environmental tests. Close collaborations between the U.S. national laboratories and international collaborators (i.e. France and Japan) are being forged to establish both national and international test standards to be used to qualify ceramic composites for nuclear reactor applications.

  15. Recent Advances in Materials for All-Ceramic Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Jason A.

    2010-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The past three years of research on materials for all-ceramic veneers, inlays, onlays, single-unit crowns, and multi-unit restorations are reviewed. The primary changes in the field were the proliferation of zirconia-based frameworks and computer-aided fabrication of prostheses, as well as, a trend toward more clinically relevant in vitro test methods. This report includes an overview of ceramic fabrication methods, suggestions for critical assessment of material property data, and a summary of clinical longevity for prostheses constructed of various materials. PMID:17586152

  16. Advanced ceramic material for high temperature turbine tip seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogan, J. W.; Solomon, N. G.; Stetson, A. R.

    1980-01-01

    Forty-one material systems were evaluated for potential use in turbine blade tip seal applications at 1370 C. Both ceramic blade tip inserts and abradable ceramic tip shoes were tested. Hot gas erosion, impact resistance, thermal stability, and dynamic rub performance were the criteria used in rating the various materials. Silicon carbide and silicon nitride were used, both as blade tips and abradables. The blade tip inserts were fabricated by hot pressing while low density and honeycomb abradables were sintered or reaction bonded.

  17. Additive manufacturing of ceramic structures by laser engineered net shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Fangyong; Wu, Dongjiang; Ma, Guangyi; Zhang, Bi

    2015-11-01

    Ceramic is an important material with outstanding physical properties whereas impurities and porosities generated by traditional manufacturing methods limits its further industrial applications. In order to solve this problem, direct fabrication of Al2O3 ceramic structures is conducted by laser engineered net shaping system and pure ceramic powders. Grain refinement strengthening method by doping ZrO2 and dispersion strengthening method by doping SiC are proposed to suppress cracks in fabricating Al2O3 structure. Phase compositions, microstructures as well as mechanical properties of fabricated specimens are then analyzed. The results show that the proposed two methods are effective in suppressing cracks and structures of single-bead wall, arc and cylinder ring are successfully deposited. Stable phase of α-Al2O3 and t-ZrO2 are obtained in the fabricated specimens. Micro-hardness higher than 1700 HV are also achieved for both Al2O3 and Al2O3/ZrO2, which are resulted from fine directional crystals generated by the melting-solidification process. Results presented indicate that additive manufacturing is a very attractive technique for the production of high-performance ceramic structures in a single step.

  18. International Standards for Properties and Performance of Advanced Ceramics - 30 years of Excellence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Michael G.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George D.; Gonczy, Stephen T.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties/performance of brittle bodies (e.g., advanced ceramics and glasses) can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. For three decades, ASTM Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics, has developed numerous full-consensus standards (e.g., test methods, practices, guides, terminology) to measure various properties and performance of a monolithic and composite ceramics and coatings that, in some cases, may be applicable to glasses. These standards give the "what, how, how not, why, why not, etc." for many mechanical, physical, thermal, properties and performance of advanced ceramics. Use of these standards provides accurate, reliable, repeatable and complete data. Involvement in ASTM Committee C28 has included users, producers, researchers, designers, academicians, etc. who write, continually update, and validate through round robin test programmes, more than 45 standards in the 30 years since the Committee's inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the ASTM Committee C28 standards and how to obtain them either as i) individual copies with full details or ii) a complete collection in one volume. A listing of other ASTM committees of interest is included. In addition, some examples of the tangible benefits of standards for advanced ceramics are employed to demonstrate their practical application.

  19. Challenges and Opportunities in Reactive Processing and Applications of Advanced Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    2003-01-01

    Recently, there has been a great deal of interest in the research, development, and commercialization of innovative synthesis and processing technologies for advanced ceramics and composite materials. Reactive processing approaches have been actively considered due to their robustness, flexibility, and affordability. A wide variety of silicon carbide-based advanced ceramics and composites are currently being fabricated using the processing approaches involving reactive infiltration of liquid and gaseous species into engineered fibrous or microporous carbon performs. The microporous carbon performs have been fabricated using the temperature induced phase separation and pyrolysis of two phase organic (resin-pore former) mixtures and fiber reinforcement of carbon and ceramic particulate bodies. In addition, pyrolyzed native plant cellulose tissues also provide unique carbon templates for manufacturing of non-oxide and oxide ceramics. In spite of great interest in this technology due to their affordability and robustness, there is a lack of scientific basis for process understanding and many technical challenges still remain. The influence of perform properties and other parameters on the resulting microstructure and properties of final material is not well understood. In this presentation, mechanism of silicon-carbon reaction in various systems and the effect of perform microstructure on the mechanical properties of advanced silicon carbide based materials will be discussed. Various examples of applications of reactively processed advanced silicon carbide ceramics and composite materials will be presented.

  20. Structure and properties of porous ceramics obtained from aluminum hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levkov, R.; Kulkov, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the study of porous ceramics obtained from aluminum hydroxide with gibbsite modification is presented. The dependence of porosity and mechanical characteristics of the material sintered at different temperatures was studied. It was shown that compressive strength of alumina ceramics increases by 40 times with decreasing the pore volume from 65 to 15%. It was shown that aluminum hydroxide may be used for pore formation and pore volume in the sintered ceramics can be controlled by varying the aluminum hydroxide concentration and sintering temperature. Based on these results one can conclude that the obtained structure is very close to inorganic bone matrix and can be used as promising material for bone implants production.

  1. Advanced Metal and Ceramics for Clean Energy Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yasuzo

    In line with the Kyoto Protocol, an effective development for the clean energy technologies and related materials is very significant. Especially, an importance of metal and ceramics using the fuel cell, the solar cell and the rechargeable battery for renewable electricity generation, efficient energy conversion and energy storage technologies is much talked about.

  2. Recent advances in the field of ceramic fibers and ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naslain, R.

    2005-03-01

    Progress achieved during the last decade in the field of ceramic fibers and related ceramic matrix composites is reviewed. Both SiC-based and alumina-based fine fibers have been improved in terms of thermal stability and creep resistance with temperature limit of about 1400 and 1200 ° C, respectively. Two concepts for achieving damage-tolerant ceramic matrix composites have been identified : (i) that of non-oxide composites with a dense matrix in which matrix cracks formed under load are deflected and arrested in a weak fiber coating referred to as the interphase and (ii) that of all-oxide composites with a highly porous matrix with no need of any fiber coating. The lifetime under load of non-oxide composites in oxidizing atmospheres, is improved through the use of multilayered self-healing interphases and matrices deposited from gaseous precursors by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). Lifetime ranging from 1000 to 10,000 hours at 1200 ° C under cyclic loading in air are foreseen. Alumina-based composites although attractive for long term exposures in oxidizing atmospheres up to ≈1200 ° C, are still experimental materials.

  3. Recent advances in aluminum oxynitride (ALON) optical ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Lee M.; Hartnett, Thomas M.; Wahl, Joseph M.; Ondercin, Robert J.; Olson, Karen R.

    2001-09-01

    Aluminum Oxynitride or ALON optical ceramic is transparent material, developed and patented by Raytheon, which is very similar to sapphire, being comprised mostly of Al2O3 with a small amount of additional nitrogen. This nitrogen addition has the effect of producing a cubic material whose optical and mechanical properties are isotropic. Importantly, this means that it can be produced by powder processing methods, which are scalable to larger sizes, and at lower prices than can be achieved by the single crystal growth techniques that are used to grow sapphire. Furthermore, its isotropic properties make it much easier to grind and polish than sapphire. Recently, the interest in ALON optical ceramic has grown substantially following impressive results in ballistic testing. Ballistic laminates, containing ALON layers, have demonstrated protection against armor piercing rounds, at half the areal density and thickness of conventional ballistic laminates. ALON plates as large as 14x20in are being produced, under Air Force funding, for evaluation as IR windows and transparent armor, using conventional powder processing techniques. The production processes themselves are now being scaled to produce large pieces and large quantities of ALON optical ceramic.

  4. Utilization of advanced metal-ceramic technology: clinical and laboratory procedures for a lower-fusing porcelain.

    PubMed

    McLaren, E A

    1998-09-01

    Metal-ceramic restorations remain the most widely accepted type of indirect restorative modality, and have been applied successfully for years. Recent advances in material science have resulted in the development of a new class of metal-ceramic materials that have been termed lower-fusing ceramics. Following proper procedures for preparation and metal framework design, these metal-ceramic porcelains achieve the aesthetics normally demonstrated by conventional all-ceramic restorations. This article provides an overview of the clinical and laboratory processes utilizing these materials and is illustrated by two case presentations.

  5. Multiaxial deformation and life prediction model and experimental data for advanced silicon nitride ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, J.L.; Liu, K.C.; Brinkman, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    This paper summarizes recent experimental results on creep and creep rupture behavior of a commercial grade of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic in the temperature range of 1150 to 1300C obtained at ORNL; and introduces a tentative multiaxial deformation and life prediction model for ceramic materials under general thermomechanical loadings. Issues related to the possible standardization of the data analysis methodology and possible future research needs for high temperature structural ceramics in the area of development of data base and life prediction methodology are also discussed.

  6. Advanced technology composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Walker, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    Work performed during the 25th month on NAS1-18889, Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures, is summarized. The main objective of this program is to develop an integrated technology and demonstrate a confidence level that permits the cost- and weight-effective use of advanced composite materials in primary structures of future aircraft with the emphasis on pressurized fuselages. The period from 1-31 May 1991 is covered.

  7. Innovative grinding wheel design for cost-effective machining of advanced ceramics. Phase I, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, R.H.; Ramanath, S.; Simpson, M.; Lilley, E.

    1996-02-01

    Norton Company successfully completed the 16-month Phase I technical effort to define requirements, design, develop, and evaluate a next-generation grinding wheel for cost-effective cylindrical grinding of advanced ceramics. This program was a cooperative effort involving three Norton groups representing a superabrasive grinding wheel manufacturer, a diamond film manufacturing division and a ceramic research center. The program was divided into two technical tasks, Task 1, Analysis of Required Grinding Wheel Characteristics, and Task 2, Design and Prototype Development. In Task 1 we performed a parallel path approach with Superabrasive metal-bond development and the higher technical risk, CVD diamond wheel development. For the Superabrasive approach, Task 1 included bond wear and strength tests to engineer bond-wear characteristics. This task culminated in a small-wheel screening test plunge grinding sialon disks. In Task 2, an improved Superabrasive metal-bond specification for low-cost machining of ceramics in external cylindrical grinding mode was identified. The experimental wheel successfully ground three types of advanced ceramics without the need for wheel dressing. The spindle power consumed by this wheel during test grinding of NC-520 sialon is as much as to 30% lower compared to a standard resin bonded wheel with 100 diamond concentration. The wheel wear with this improved metal bond was an order of magnitude lower than the resin-bonded wheel, which would significantly reduce ceramic grinding costs through fewer wheel changes for retruing and replacements. Evaluation of ceramic specimens from both Tasks 1 and 2 tests for all three ceramic materials did not show evidence of unusual grinding damage. The novel CVD-diamond-wheel approach was incorporated in this program as part of Task 1. The important factors affecting the grinding performance of diamond wheels made by CVD coating preforms were determined.

  8. Reliability and life prediction of ceramic composite structures at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1994-01-01

    Methods are highlighted that ascertain the structural reliability of components fabricated of composites with ceramic matrices reinforced with ceramic fibers or whiskers and subject to quasi-static load conditions at elevated temperatures. Each method focuses on a particular composite microstructure: whisker-toughened ceramics, laminated ceramic matrix composites, and fabric reinforced ceramic matrix composites. In addition, since elevated service temperatures usually involve time-dependent effects, a section dealing with reliability degradation as a function of load history has been included. A recurring theme throughout this chapter is that even though component failure is controlled by a sequence of many microfailure events, failure of ceramic composites will be modeled using macrovariables.

  9. Thermal and structural analysis of a filter vessel ceramic tubesheet

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett, R.H.; Swindeman, R.W.; Zievers, J.F.

    1995-08-01

    A ceramic tubesheet assembly for a hot gas filter vessel is analyzed using the finite element method to determine stresses under differential pressure loading. The stresses include local concentration effects. Selection of the stress measures for evaluation of structural integrity is discussed. Specification of stress limits based upon limited data is considered. Stress results from this ongoing design analysis technology project are shown for one design concept.

  10. Optimal glass-ceramic structures: Components of giant mirror telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eschenauer, Hans A.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed investigations are carried out on optimal glass-ceramic mirror structures of terrestrial space technology (optical telescopes). In order to find an optimum design, a nonlinear multi-criteria optimization problem is formulated. 'Minimum deformation' at 'minimum weight' are selected as contradictory objectives, and a set of further constraints (quilting effect, optical faults etc.) is defined and included. A special result of the investigations is described.

  11. Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, 12th, Cocoa Beach, FL, Jan. 17-22, 1988, Proceedings. Parts 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    The present conference discusses topics in the development status of advanced ceramics, the engineering applications of ceramic-matrix composites, modeling and theoretical considerations of engineering ceramics, the role of interfaces in ceramic-matrix composites, and polycrystalline oxide-matrix composites. Also discussed are glass- and glass-ceramic-matrix composites, carbide- and nitride-matrix composites, the synthesis methods as well as the properties and applications of ceramic matrix-reinforcing whiskers, fibers, and powders, and various SDI-related advanced ceramic materials for use in orbital systems.

  12. Investigation of hierarchical structure formation in ceramics with invar effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedova, Elena S.; Shadrin, Vladimir S.; Shutilova, Ekaterina S.; Kulkov, Sergei N.

    2015-10-01

    The structure, phase composition and thermal properties of (Al2O3-20 wt % ZrO2)-ZrW2O8 ceramic composites obtained using nanosized, finely dispersed and coarse-grained initial powders were investigated. On the polished surface of composites homogeneously distributed white particles were observed. The chemical composition of the particles was determined. The phase composition of the composites was represented with corundum, monoclinic ZrO2 and two modifications of ZrW2O8 (tetragonal and cubic) regardless of initial powders morphology. Crystal structure parameters of the material obtained were determined. Linear thermal expansion coefficient values of the composites were determined and compared with those calculated using the mixture rule. The experimental data correlated well with the calculated values of CTE for Al2O3-20 wt % ZrO2 ceramics. The difference in thermal expansion values for composites obtained using initial components with different morphology may be attributed to phase transformations, features of hierarchical structures, internal stresses due to thermal expansion mismatch, which contribute significantly to thermal expansion of the ceramic composites.

  13. Crack Branching and Fracture Mirror Data of Glasses and Advanced Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1998-01-01

    The fracture mirror and crack branching constants were determined from three glasses and nine advanced ceramics tested under various loading and specimen configurations in an attempt to use the constants as a data base for fractography. The ratios of fracture mirror or crack branching constant to fracture toughness were found to be approximately two for most ceramic materials tested. A demonstration of how to use the two constants as a tool for verifying stress measurements was presented for silicon nitride disk specimens subjected to high-temperature, constant stress-rate biaxial flexure testing.

  14. Sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koller, A. C.; Bennethum, W. H.; Burkholder, S. D.; Brackett, R. R.; Harris, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    This report includes: (1) a survey of the current methods for the measurement of surface temperature of ceramic materials suitable for use as hot section flowpath components in aircraft gas turbine engines; (2) analysis and selection of three sensing techniques with potential to extend surface temperature measurement capability beyond current limits; and (3) design, manufacture, and evaluation of the three selected techniques which include the following: platinum rhodium thin film thermocouple on alumina and mullite substrates; doped silicon carbide thin film thermocouple on silicon carbide, silicon nitride, and aluminum nitride substrates; and long and short wavelength radiation pyrometry on the substrates listed above plus yttria stabilized zirconia. Measurement of surface emittance of these materials at elevated temperature was included as part of this effort.

  15. Award-Winning CARES/Life Ceramics Durability Evaluation Software Is Making Advanced Technology Accessible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Products made from advanced ceramics show great promise for revolutionizing aerospace and terrestrial propulsion and power generation. However, ceramic components are difficult to design because brittle materials in general have widely varying strength values. The CARES/Life software developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center eases this by providing a tool that uses probabilistic reliability analysis techniques to optimize the design and manufacture of brittle material components. CARES/Life is an integrated package that predicts the probability of a monolithic ceramic component's failure as a function of its time in service. It couples commercial finite element programs--which resolve a component's temperature and stress distribution - with reliability evaluation and fracture mechanics routines for modeling strength - limiting defects. These routines are based on calculations of the probabilistic nature of the brittle material's strength.

  16. ESA initiatives to improve mechanical design and verification methods for ceramic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Graham; Behar-Lafenetre, Stéphanie; Cornillon, Laurence; Rancurel, Michaël.; Denaux, David; Ballhause, Dirk; Lucarelli, Stefano

    2013-09-01

    Current and future space missions demanding ever more stringent stability and precision requirements are driving the need for (ultra) stable and lightweight structures. Materials best suited to meeting these needs in a passive structural design, centre around ceramic materials or specifically tailored CFRP composite. Ceramic materials have essential properties (very low CTE, high stiffness), but also unfavorable properties (low fracture toughness). Ceramic structures feature in a number of current and planned ESA missions. These missions benefit from the superior stiffness and thermo-elastic stability properties of ceramics, but suffer the penalties inherent to the brittle nature of these materials. Current practice in designing and sizing ceramic structures is to treat ceramic materials in a deterministic manner similar to conventional materials but with larger safety factors and conservatively derived material strength properties. This approach is convenient, but can be penalising in mass and in practice does not arrive at an equivalent structural reliability compared to metallic components. There is also no standardised approach for the design and verification of ceramic structures in Europe. To improve this situation, ESA placed two parallel study contracts with Astrium and Thales Alenia Space with the objective to define design and verification methodology for ceramic structures, with the further goal to establish a common `handbook' for design and verification approach. This paper presents an overview of ceramic structures used in current and future ESA missions and summarises the activities to date in the frame of improving and standardising design and verification methods for ceramic structures.

  17. Advances in Understanding of Swift Heavy-Ion Tracks in Complex Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Maik; Devanathan, Ram; Toulemonde, Marcel; Trautmann, Christina

    2015-02-01

    Tracks produced by swift heavy ions in ceramics are of interest for fundamental science as well as for applications covering different fields such as nanotechnology or fission-track dating of minerals. In the case of pyrochlores with general formula A2B2O7, the track structure and radiation sensitivity shows a clear dependence on the composition. Ion irradiated Gd2Zr2O7, e.g., retains its crystallinity while amorphous tracks are produced in Gd2Ti2O7. Tracks in Ti-containing compositions have a complex morphology consisting of an amorphous core surrounded by a shell of a disordered, defect-fluorite phase. The size of the amorphous core decreases with decreasing energy loss and with increasing Zr content, while the shell thickness seems to be similar over a wide range of energy loss values. The large data set and the complex track structure has made pyrochlore an interesting model system for a general theoretical description of track formation including thermal spike calculations (providing the spatial and temporal evolution of temperature around the ion trajectory) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (describing the response of the atomic system).Recent MD advances consider the sudden temperature increase by inserting data from the thermal spike. The combination allows the reproduction of the core-shell track characteristic and sheds light on the early stages of track formation including recrystallization of the molten material produced by the thermal spike.

  18. Subsurface detection and characterization of Hertzian cracks in advanced ceramic materials using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkansky, Mark; Reintjes, John F.

    2002-06-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an active optical imaging technique that is capable of three-dimensional resolution better than 10 microns in all dimensions. OCT was originally developed as a non-invasive technique in biomedical field. It also found uses in the NDE of various materials including ceramics, plastics and composites. In various ceramics OCT can be used to detect microscopic, subsurface defects at depths approaching hundreds of microns. The depth of penetration depends on the material and on the wavelength of light. Here we demonstrate an application of OCT to the subsurface imaging in various materials and, in particular, to the detection of a surface-penetrating Hertzian crack in a Si3N4 ceramic ball. We present measured subsurface trajectory of the crack and compare it to theoretical predictions. These cracks represent one of the most important failure mechanisms in advanced ceramic materials. The ability to map subsurface trajectories of cracks is a valuable tool in the evaluation of different existing theories. Better theoretical understanding of various properties of crack initiation and propagation can lead to engineering of improved ceramic materials.

  19. Development of Thin Film Thermocouples on Ceramic Materials for Advanced Propulsion System Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, R.

    1992-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples have been developed for use on metal parts in jet engines to 1000 c. However, advanced propulsion systems are being developed that will use ceramic materials and reach higher temperatures. The purpose of this work is to develop thin film thermocouples for use on ceramic materials. The new thin film thermocouples are Pt13Rh/Pt fabricated by the sputtering process. Lead wires are attached using the parallel-gap welding process. The ceramic materials tested are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and mullite. Both steady state and thermal cycling furnace tests were performed in the temperature range to 1500 C. High-heating-rate tests were performed in an arc lamp heat-flux-calibration facility. The fabrication of the thin film thermocouples is described. The thin film thermocouple output was compared to a reference wire thermocouple. Drift of the thin film thermocouples was determined, and causes of drift are discussed. The results of high heating rate tests up to 2500 C/sec are presented. The stability of the ceramic materials is examined. It is concluded that Pt13Rh/Pt thin film thermocouples are capable of meeting lifetime goals of 50 hours or more up to temperature of 1500 C depending on the stability of the particular ceramic substrate.

  20. Development of thin film thermocouples on ceramic materials for advanced propulsion system applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond

    1993-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples were developed for use on metal parts in jet engines to 1000 C. However, advanced propulsion systems are being developed that will use ceramic materials and reach higher temperatures. The purpose is to develop thin film thermocouples for use on ceramic materials. The new thin film thermocouples are Pt13Rh/Pt fabricated by the sputtering process. Lead wires are attached using the parallel-gap welding process. The ceramic materials tested are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and mullite. Both steady state and thermal cycling furnace tests were performed in the temperature range to 1500 C. High-heating-rate tests were performed in an arc lamp heat-flux-calibration facility. The fabrication of the thin film thermocouples is described. The thin film thermocouple output was compared to a reference wire thermocouple. Drift of the thin film thermocouples was determined, and causes of drift are discussed. The results of high heating rate tests up to 2500 C/sec are presented. The stability of the ceramic materials is examined. It is concluded that Pt13Rh/Pt thin film thermocouples are capable of meeting lifetime goals of 50 hr or more up to temperatures of 1500 C depending on the stability of the particular ceramic substrate.

  1. ZERODUR glass ceramics: design of structures with high mechanical stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nattermann, Kurt; Hartmann, Peter; Kling, Guenther; Gath, Peter; Lucarelli, Stefano; Messerschmidt, Boris

    2008-07-01

    Designing highly mechanically loaded structures made of the zero expansion glass ceramic material ZERODUR® means to analyze the stress for the whole loaded surface, considering changes of the stress state occurring over the total lifetime. Strength data are obtained from specimens with small size and relatively short loading duration, making them not directly applicable to the much larger areas that occur in practical cases. This publication gives guidelines for calculating a fracture probability for mirrors and structures on the basis of existing strength data.

  2. Error identified as hysteresis in flexure testing of advanced ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, S.R.; Salem, J.A.

    1996-08-15

    Flexure testing has been widely used to determine the strength, fracture toughness, fatigue and creep behavior of brittle ceramic materials at both ambient and elevated temperatures. The sources of error have been identified in detail by several investigators. A previous study by the present authors showed that friction between the support-rollers of a four-point flexure fixture and the specimen surface resulted in a well-defined hysteresis in the load (stress) versus strain cycle when the rollers were fixed. Based on the previous finding that hysteresis is a measure of stress error, a particular attempt was made in this study to establish a quantitative correlation between hysteresis and stress error for the four-point, fixed-roller fixture system. For this purpose, friction between support rollers and specimen surface was arbitrarily changed by using five different mediums at the contact points: air, distilled water, silicon oil, solid lubricant, and Teflon tape. The stress error thus obtained was correlated in terms of a hysteresis index that quantifies the degree of hysteresis. The frictional effect of various contact mediums was determined by loading a strain gaged silicon nitride specimen in a SiC, four-point flexure fixture with SiC rollers that were fixed in V-grooves.

  3. Development of Sensors for Ceramic Components in Advanced Propulsion Systems. Phase 2; Temperature Sensor Systems Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Cyr, M. A.; Strange, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The 'development of sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems' program is divided into two phases. The objectives of Phase 1 were to analyze, evaluate and recommend sensor concepts for the measurement of surface temperature, strain and heat flux on ceramic components for advanced propulsion systems. The results of this effort were previously published in NASA CR-182111. As a result of Phase 1, three approaches were recommended for further development: pyrometry, thin-film sensors, and thermographic phosphors. The objective of Phase 2 were to fabricate and conduct laboratory demonstration tests of these systems. Six materials, mutually agreed upon by NASA and Pratt & Whitney, were investigated under this program. This report summarizes the Phase 2 effort and provides conclusions and recommendations for each of the categories evaluated.

  4. Fracture behavior of advanced ceramic hot-gas filters

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.P.; Majumdar, S.; Sutaria, M.; Bielke, W.

    1996-05-01

    We have evaluated the microstructural/mechanical, and thermal shock/fatigue behavior and have conducted stress analyses of hot-gas candle filters made by various manufacturers. These filters include both monolithic and composite ceramics. Mechanical-property measurement of the composite filters included diametral compression testing with O-ring specimens and burst testing of short filter segments using rubber plug. In general, strength values obtained by burst testing were lower than those obtained by O-ring compression testing. During single-cycle thermal-shock tests, the composite filters showed little or no strength degradation when quenched from temperatures between 900 and 1000{degrees}C. At higher quenching temperatures, slow strength degradation was observed. The monolithic SiC filters showed no strength degradation when quenched from temperatures of up to {approx}700-900{degrees}C, but displayed decreased strength at a relatively sharp rate when quenched from higher temperatures. On the other hand, a recrystallized monolithic SiC filter showed higher initial strength and retained this strength to higher quenching temperatures than did regular SiC filters. This may be related to the difference in strength of grain boundary phases in the two cases. In thermal cycles between room temperature and 800- 1000{degrees}C, both monolithic and composite filters show a small strength degradation up to three cycles, beyond which the strength remained unchanged. Results of rubber-plug burst testing on composite filters were analyzed to determine the anisotropic elastic constants of the composite in the hoop direction. When these results are combined with axial elastic constants determined from axial tensile tests, the composite can be analyzed for stress due to mechanical (e. g., internal pressure) or thermal loading (thermal shock during pulse cleaning). The stresses can be compared with the strength of the composite to predict filter performance.

  5. Advanced textile applications for primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Anthony C.; Barrie, Ronald E.; Shah, Bharat M.; Shukla, Jay G.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced composite primary structural concepts were evaluated for low cost, damage tolerant structures. Development of advanced textile preforms for fuselage structural applications with resin transfer molding and powder epoxy materials are now under development.

  6. Advanced textile applications for primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Anthony C.; Barrie, Ronald E.; Shah, Bharat M.; Shukla, Jay G.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced composite primary structural concepts have been evaluated for low cost, damage tolerant structures. Development of advanced textile preforms for fuselage structural applications with resin transfer molding and powder epoxy material is now under development.

  7. Robust Joining and Integration Technologies for Advanced Metallic, Ceramic, and Composite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, Tarah; Morscher, Gregory N.; Halbig, Michael H.; Asthana, Rajiv

    2006-01-01

    Robust integration and assembly technologies are critical for the successful implementation of advanced metallic, ceramic, carbon-carbon, and ceramic matrix composite components in a wide variety of aerospace, space exploration, and ground based systems. Typically, the operating temperature of these components varies from few hundred to few thousand Kelvin with different working times (few minutes to years). The wide ranging system performance requirements necessitate the use of different integration technologies which includes adhesive bonding, low temperature soldering, active metal brazing, diffusion bonding, ARCJoinT, and ultra high temperature joining technologies. In this presentation, a number of joining examples and test results will be provided related to the adhesive bonding and active metal brazing of titanium to C/C composites, diffusion bonding of silicon carbide to silicon carbide using titanium interlayer, titanium and hastelloy brazing to silicon carbide matrix composites, and ARCJoinT joining of SiC ceramics and SiC matrix composites. Various issues in the joining of metal-ceramic systems including thermal expansion mismatch and resulting residual stresses generated during joining will be discussed. In addition, joint design and testing issues for a wide variety of joints will be presented.

  8. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husband, P.; Bartošová, I.; Slugeň, V.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics.

  9. Advanced Structures: 2000-2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This custom bibliography from the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Program lists a sampling of records found in the NASA Aeronautics and Space Database. The scope of this topic includes technologies for extremely lightweight, multi-function structures with modular interfaces - the building-block technology for advanced spacecraft. This area of focus is one of the enabling technologies as defined by NASA s Report of the President s Commission on Implementation of United States Space Exploration Policy, published in June 2004.

  10. Ceramic Fiber Structures for Cryogenic Load-Bearing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Eckel, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    This invention is intended for use as a load-bearing device under cryogenic temperatures and/or abrasive conditions (i.e., during missions to the Moon). The innovation consists of small-diameter, ceramic fibers that are woven or braided into devices like ropes, belts, tracks, or cables. The fibers can be formed from a variety of ceramic materials like silicon carbide, carbon, aluminosilicate, or aluminum oxide. The fiber architecture of the weave or braid is determined by both the fiber properties and the mechanical requirements of the application. A variety of weave or braid architectures is possible for this application. Thickness of load-bearing devices can be achieved by using either a 3D woven structure, or a layered, 2D structure. For the prototype device, a belt approximately 0.10 in. (0.25 cm) thick, and 3.0 in. (7.6 cm) wide was formed by layering and stitching a 2D aluminosilicate fiber weave.

  11. Engineering novel infrared glass ceramics for advanced optical solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, K.; Buff, A.; Smith, C.; Sisken, L.; Musgraves, J. David; Wachtel, P.; Mayer, T.; Swisher, A.; Pogrebnyakov, A.; Kang, M.; Pantano, C.; Werner, D.; Kirk, A.; Aiken, S.; Rivero-Baleine, C.

    2016-05-01

    Advanced photonic devices require novel optical materials that serve specified optical function but also possess attributes which can be tailored to accommodate specific optical design, manufacturing or component/device integration constraints. Multi-component chalcogenide glass (ChG) materials have been developed which exhibit broad spectral transparency with a range of physical properties that can be tuned to vary with composition, material microstructure and form. Specific tradeoffs that highlight the impact of material morphology and optical properties including transmission, loss and refractive index, are presented. This paper reports property evolution in a representative 20 GeSe2-60 As2Se3-20 PbSe glass material including a demonstration of a 1D GRIN profile through the use of controlled crystallization.

  12. Lifetime Reliability Prediction of Ceramic Structures Under Transient Thermomechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Jadaan, Osama J.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2005-01-01

    An analytical methodology is developed to predict the probability of survival (reliability) of ceramic components subjected to harsh thermomechanical loads that can vary with time (transient reliability analysis). This capability enables more accurate prediction of ceramic component integrity against fracture in situations such as turbine startup and shutdown, operational vibrations, atmospheric reentry, or other rapid heating or cooling situations (thermal shock). The transient reliability analysis methodology developed herein incorporates the following features: fast-fracture transient analysis (reliability analysis without slow crack growth, SCG); transient analysis with SCG (reliability analysis with time-dependent damage due to SCG); a computationally efficient algorithm to compute the reliability for components subjected to repeated transient loading (block loading); cyclic fatigue modeling using a combined SCG and Walker fatigue law; proof testing for transient loads; and Weibull and fatigue parameters that are allowed to vary with temperature or time. Component-to-component variation in strength (stochastic strength response) is accounted for with the Weibull distribution, and either the principle of independent action or the Batdorf theory is used to predict the effect of multiaxial stresses on reliability. The reliability analysis can be performed either as a function of the component surface (for surface-distributed flaws) or component volume (for volume-distributed flaws). The transient reliability analysis capability has been added to the NASA CARES/ Life (Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Life) code. CARES/Life was also updated to interface with commercially available finite element analysis software, such as ANSYS, when used to model the effects of transient load histories. Examples are provided to demonstrate the features of the methodology as implemented in the CARES/Life program.

  13. High-speed, low-damage grinding of advanced ceramics Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, J.A.; Malkin, S.

    1995-03-01

    In manufacture of structural ceramic components, grinding costs can comprise up to 80% of the entire manufacturing cost. Most of these costs arise from the conventional multi-step grinding process with numerous grinding wheels and additional capital equipment, perishable dressing tools, and labor. In an attempt to reduce structural ceramic grinding costs, a feasibility investigation was undertaken to develop a single step, roughing-finishing process suitable for producing high-quality silicon nitride ceramic parts at high material removal rates at lower cost than traditional, multi-stage grinding. This feasibility study employed combined use of laboratory grinding tests, mathematical grinding models, and characterization of resultant material surface condition. More specifically, this Phase 1 final report provides a technical overview of High-Speed, Low-Damage (HSLD) ceramic grinding and the conditions necessary to achieve the small grain depths of cut necessary for low damage grinding while operating at relatively high material removal rates. Particular issues addressed include determining effects of wheel speed and material removal rate on resulting mode of material removal (ductile or brittle fracture), limiting grinding forces, calculation of approximate grinding zone temperatures developed during HSLD grinding, and developing the experimental systems necessary for determining HSLD grinding energy partition relationships. In addition, practical considerations for production utilization of the HSLD process are also discussed.

  14. Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  15. Development of ASTM standards in support of advanced ceramics -- continuing efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, C.R.

    1998-02-01

    An update is presented of the activities of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Committee C-28 on Advanced Ceramics. Since its inception in 1986, this committee, which has five standard producing subcommittees, has written and published over 32 consensus standards. These standards are concerned with mechanical testing of monolithic and composite ceramics, nondestructive examination, statistical analysis and design, powder characterization, quantitative microscopy, fractography, and terminology. These standards ensure optimum material behavior with physical and mechanical property reproducibility, component reliability, and well-defined methods of data treatment and material analysis for both monolithic and composite materials. Committee C-28 continues to sponsor technical symposia and to cooperate in the development of international standards. An update of recent and current activities as well as possible new areas of standardization work will be presented.

  16. Structural and Electrical Properties of Nb5+ Substituted PZT Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, O. P.; Prakash, Chandra

    The effect of niobium doping on the structure and electrical properties with the following compositions Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)1-5X/4NbXO3 with 0ceramic technique using high purity raw materials. Disc-shaped samples of each compositions were sintered at 1250°C for 3 hours. The sample structure was determined by X-ray diffractometry. The average grain size, the maximum dielectric permittivity and the remnant polarization first increases up to x = 0.005 concentration of Nb5+ and then decreases with higher concentration of niobium, while the coercive field does not show any variation. The transition temperature decreases with the increase in niobium concentration.

  17. Advances in spinel ceramic technology for large windows and domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepulveda, Juan L.; Loutfy, Raouf O.; Chang, Sekyung; Ibrahim, Sharly; Traggis, Nick

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes MER's recent advances on the development of high strength, transparent magnesium aluminum spinel technology for large IR windows and domes. The novel spinel material exhibits high optical and IR transparency in the 0.2 - 5.5 μm wavelength, is very resistant to abrasion, with density higher than 99.9% of theoretical, with very fine and uniform grain size, and flexural strength of 300 MPa. Spinel domes technology has been scaled up to produce hemispherical 180° aperture domes in sizes up to 7" in diameter using freeze casting technology to produce the green dome preforms. MER is also pursuing the production of large size spinel windows by either producing monolithic large single windows or by edge bonding several smaller size windows. Both approaches present challenges. Production of monolithic large size windows is limited by equipment size, availability, and investment capital while the edge bonding approach requires perfect transparency and strength at the bonded edge. MER together with Precision Photonics Corp. are developing high strength, edge bonded, transparent magnesium aluminum spinel windows for next generation aircraft and other defense armor applications which require windows as large as 30"x30"x0.5" at an affordable cost. MER has further improved strength of the spinel by accurate control of the average grain size and grain size scatter while remarkable transmission is obtained by elimination of the intergrain/intragrain porosity, and by eliminating all possible contamination. The spinel bonding technology under development consists of chemically activated direct bonding (CADB®), an epoxy-free solution-assisted optical-contacting process developed by Precision Photonics Corporation (PPC).

  18. Recent advances in understanding the reinforcing ability and mechanism of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estili, Mehdi; Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), commonly referred to as ultimate reinforcement, the main purpose for fabricating CNT-ceramic matrix composites has been mainly to improve the fracture toughness and strength of the ceramic matrix materials. However, there have been many studies reporting marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties. On the other hand, those studies claiming noticeable toughening measured using indentation, which is an indirect/unreliable characterization method, have not demonstrated the responsible mechanisms applicable to the nanoscale, flexible CNTs; instead, those studies proposed those classical methods applicable to microscale fiber/whisker reinforced ceramics without showing any convincing evidence of load transfer to the CNTs. Therefore, the ability of CNTs to directly improve the macroscopic mechanical properties of structural ceramics has been strongly questioned and debated in the last ten years. In order to properly discuss the reinforcing ability (and possible mechanisms) of CNTs in a ceramic host material, there are three fundamental questions to our knowledge at both the nanoscale and macroscale levels that need to be addressed: (1) does the intrinsic load-bearing ability of CNTs change when embedded in a ceramic host matrix?; (2) when there is an intimate atomic-level interface without any chemical reaction with the matrix, could one expect any load transfer to the CNTs along with effective load bearing by them during crack propagation?; and (3) considering their nanometer-scale dimensions, flexibility and radial softness, are the CNTs able to improve the mechanical properties of the host ceramic matrix at the macroscale when individually, intimately and uniformly dispersed? If so, how? Also, what is the effect of CNT concentration in such a defect-free composite system? Here, we briefly review the recent studies addressing the above fundamental questions. In particular, we discuss the new

  19. Advanced composite combustor structural concepts program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sattar, M. A.; Lohmann, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to assess the feasibility of and benefits derived from the use of high temperature composite materials in aircraft turbine engine combustor liners. The study included a survey and screening of the properties of three candidate composite materials including tungsten reinforced superalloys, carbon-carbon and silicon carbide (SiC) fibers reinforcing a ceramic matrix of lithium aluminosilicate (LAS). The SiC-LAS material was selected as offering the greatest near term potential primarily on the basis of high temperature capability. A limited experimental investigation was conducted to quantify some of the more critical mechanical properties of the SiC-LAS composite having a multidirection 0/45/-45/90 deg fiber orientation favored for the combustor linear application. Rigorous cyclic thermal tests demonstrated that SiC-LAS was extremely resistant to the thermal fatigue mechanisms that usually limit the life of metallic combustor liners. A thermal design study led to the definition of a composite liner concept that incorporated film cooled SiC-LAS shingles mounted on a Hastelloy X shell. With coolant fluxes consistent with the most advanced metallic liner technology, the calculated hot surface temperatures of the shingles were within the apparent near term capability of the material. Structural analyses indicated that the stresses in the composite panels were low, primarily because of the low coefficient of expansion of the material and it was concluded that the dominant failure mode of the liner would be an as yet unidentified deterioration of the composite from prolonged exposure to high temperature. An economic study, based on a medium thrust size commercial aircraft engine, indicated that the SiC-LAS combustor liner would weigh 22.8N (11.27 lb) less and cost less to manufacture than advanced metallic liner concepts intended for use in the late 1980's.

  20. Advanced Porous Coating for Low-Density Ceramic Insulation Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B.; Churchward, Rex; Katvala, Victor; Stewart, David; Balter, Aliza

    1988-01-01

    The need for improved coatings on low-density reusable surface insulation (RSI) materials used on the space shuttle has stimulated research into developing tougher coatings. The processing of a new porous composite "coating" for RST called toughened unipiece fibrous insulation Is discussed. Characteristics including performance in a simulated high-speed atmospheric entry, morphological structure before and after this exposure, resistance to Impact, and thermal response to a typical heat pulse are described. It is shown that this coating has improved impact resistance while maintaining optical and thermal properties comparable to the previously available reaction-cured glass coating.

  1. ADVANCED CERAMIC MATERIALS FOR NEXT-GENERATION NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J.

    2010-09-29

    proliferation), the worldwide community is working to develop and deploy new nuclear energy systems and advanced fuel cycles. These new nuclear systems address the key challenges and include: (1) extracting the full energy value of the nuclear fuel; (2) creating waste solutions with improved long term safety; (3) minimizing the potential for the misuse of the technology and materials for weapons; (4) continually improving the safety of nuclear energy systems; and (5) keeping the cost of energy affordable.

  2. Advanced ceramic matrix composite materials for current and future propulsion technology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, S.; Beyer, S.; Knabe, H.; Immich, H.; Meistring, R.; Gessler, A.

    2004-08-01

    Current rocket engines, due to their method of construction, the materials used and the extreme loads to which they are subjected, feature a limited number of load cycles. Various technology programmes in Europe are concerned, besides developing reliable and rugged, low cost, throwaway equipment, with preparing for future reusable propulsion technologies. One of the key roles for realizing reusable engine components is the use of modern and innovative materials. One of the key technologies which concern various engine manufacturers worldwide is the development of fibre-reinforced ceramics—ceramic matrix composites. The advantages for the developers are obvious—the low specific weight, the high specific strength over a large temperature range, and their great damage tolerance compared to monolithic ceramics make this material class extremely interesting as a construction material. Over the past years, the Astrium company (formerly DASA) has, together with various partners, worked intensively on developing components for hypersonic engines and liquid rocket propulsion systems. In the year 2000, various hot-firing tests with subscale (scale 1:5) and full-scale nozzle extensions were conducted. In this year, a further decisive milestone was achieved in the sector of small thrusters, and long-term tests served to demonstrate the extraordinary stability of the C/SiC material. Besides developing and testing radiation-cooled nozzle components and small-thruster combustion chambers, Astrium worked on the preliminary development of actively cooled structures for future reusable propulsion systems. In order to get one step nearer to this objective, the development of a new fibre composite was commenced within the framework of a regionally sponsored programme. The objective here is to create multidirectional (3D) textile structures combined with a cost-effective infiltration process. Besides material and process development, the project also encompasses the development of

  3. Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, 13th, Cocoa Beach, FL, Jan. 15-18, 1989, Collection of Papers. Parts 1 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    The present conference on advanced ceramics discusses topics in matrix-infiltration and processing techniques, the failure analysis of monolithic ceramics, the processing of polycrystalline oxide-matrix ceramic composites, the processing and properties of monolithic ceramics, ceramic composite interface phenomena, and ceramic NDE and characterization. Attention is given to chemical vapor infiltration for composites, dense ceramics via controlled melt oxidation, supertough silicon nitride, the properties of pressureless-sintered alumina-matrix/30 vol pct SiC composites, and toughening in metal particulate/glass-ceramic composites. Also discussed are the joining of silicon nitride for heat-engine applications, nitridation mechanisms in silicon powder compacts, the synthesis and properties of ceramic fibers, a technique for interfacial bond strength measurement, the degradation of SiC whiskers at elevated temperatures, and the correlation of NDE and fractography in Si3N4.

  4. Structure of ceramic surfaces modified by ion-beam techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McHargue, C.J.; Naramoto, H.; White, C.W.; Williams, J.M.; Appleton, B.R.; Sklad, P.S.; Angelini, P.

    1982-01-01

    A wide variety of structures are produced by ion implantation in ceramics. Random (substitutional and interstitial site occupancy) solid solutions with concentrations of solute that exceed the solubility limit can be produced in Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The changes that occur during annealing are complex and sometimes unpredictable. Silicon carbide becomes amorphous in a manner analogous to Si for ion fluences that produce more than 0.2 dpa damage. Light (N) and heavy (Cr) ions produce similar results if the fluence is scaled to damage energy deposited. Because of mass differences in the ions, two damage regions are developed in TiB/sub 2/. The structure remains crystalline to very high damage levels. These structural alterations cause changes in the surface mechanical properties. Since virtually any chemical species can be implanted, one can independently control structural damage and chemical effects. When coupled with selective annealing, this technique has the potential for producing a wide range of surface structures and properties. 8 figures.

  5. Structure and Relaxor Behaviour of Ba2+ Substituted NBT Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. Sambasiva; Tilak, B.; Rajulu, K. Ch. Varada; Swathi, A.; Workineh, Haileeyesus; Ganagadharudu, D.

    2011-11-01

    In the course of search for environmental-friendly lead-free relaxor ferroelectrics, (Bi,Na)TiO3-(NBT) based ceramics show very good physical properties among several lead-free compositions. The NBT composition exhibits a strong ferroelectricity and high Curie temperature, and considered to be a good candidate for lead-free ceramics as a substitute for lead-based materials (e.g., PZT). In the present communication barium substituted NBT, (Na0.5Bi0.5)0.912Ba0.088TiO3-0.088BNBT composition has been prepared by conventional solid-state reaction process. The tolerance factor has been estimated and found to be 0.819, indicating the stability of the perovskite structure. The XRD analysis of the material revealed a pure perovskite with tetragonal structure. The average grain size as observed from SEM, was found to be 1.04μm. Detailed studies exhibit a relaxor behaviour with diffuse phase transition. The diffuseness parameter has been established to be 1.97. The dielectric relaxation obeyed the Vogel-Fulcher (V-F) relation. From the V-F plot, the obtained values are Tf = 305°C, Ea = 0.0131eV and νo = 2.95×105Hz, which provide the evidence of relaxor behaviour. The electrical behaviour has been probed through complex impedance spectroscopy. The frequency-dependent conductivity spectra obey the power law in the frequency range of 45Hz-5MHz and temperature range of 35 °C-60 °C.

  6. Dynamic Fragmentation of an Advanced Ceramic during High-Speed Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, James; Farbaniec, Lukasz; Mallick, Debjoy; McCauley, James W.; Ramesh, K. T.; Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    The development of the next generation of light-weight protection materials requires an improved understanding of impact-induced fragmentation of advanced ceramics. We investigate the impact behavior of a hot-pressed boron carbide for impact velocities between 200 and 1000 m/s, and study the response in the context of the material properties, microstructure, and boundary conditions (e.g., confinement). We use measurements of fragment size and shapes to inform us about the mechanisms that are activated during dynamic failure. The fragment measurements are linked with physical evidence of failure processes obtained using scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  7. Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Helvey, Gregg

    2010-05-01

    For more than 30 years, Compendium has provided its readers with university-based continuing education and editorial, demonstrating the latest advances in clinical procedures and techniques. Using the same peer-reviewed format and influence/direction from Compendium's distinguished editorial board, Special Report provides insight on the latest advances in product technologies and the resulting benefits to both you and your patients. A discussion by the author on new clinical/laboratory research and product development strategies, as well as what the results could mean for dental treatment, also is included. Focusing on one product category per issue provides a detailed review of the category and a comprehensive resource to help guide your treatment planning process.

  8. Uses of Advanced Ceramic Composites in the Thermal Protection Systems of Future Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasky, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Current ceramic composites being developed and characterized for use in the thermal protection systems (TPS) of future space vehicles are reviewed. The composites discussed include new tough, low density ceramic insulation's, both rigid and flexible; ultra-high temperature ceramic composites; nano-ceramics; as well as new hybrid ceramic/metallic and ceramic/organic systems. Application and advantage of these new composites to the thermal protection systems of future reusable access to space vehicles and small spacecraft is reviewed.

  9. Computer simulation of low-temperature ceramics with a hierarchical structure synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitsin, Vladimir; Ponomarev, Sergey; Dmitrieva, Maria

    2015-10-01

    Low-temperature ceramics has been widely used in modern materials production, especially radio engineering and medical supplies. Creation of a comprehensive computer model of the processes of low-temperature ceramics synthesis allows to investigate the kinetics of sintering processes and get the forecast of structural and geometric characteristics.

  10. Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis on Ceramic Monolith-Structured Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Wei

    2009-04-19

    This paper reports recent research results about impact of different catalyst bed configurations on FT reaction product distribution. A CoRe/γ-alumina catalyst is prepared in bulk particle form and tested in the packed bed reactor at a size of 60 to 100 mesh. The same catalyst is ball milled and coated on a ceramic monolith support structure of channel size about 1mm. The monolith catalyst module is tested in two different ways, as a whole piece and as well-defined channels. Steady-state reaction conversion is measured at various temperatures under constant H2/CO feed ratio of 2 and reactor pressure of 25 bar. Detailed product analysis is performed. Significant formation of wax is evident with the packed particle bed and with the monolith catalyst that is improperly packed. By contrast, the wax formation is not detected in the liquid product by confining the reactions inside the monolith channel. This study presents an important finding about the structured catalyst/reactor system that the product distribution highly depends on the way how the structured reactor is set up. Even if the same catalyst and same reaction conditions (T, P, H2/oil ratio) are used, hydrodynamics (or flow conditions) inside a structured channel can have a significant impact on the product distribution.

  11. Structural materials challenges for advanced reactor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yvon, P.; Carré, F.

    2009-03-01

    Key technologies for advanced nuclear systems encompass high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistant core materials, and specific reactor and power conversion technologies (intermediate heat exchanger, turbo-machinery, high temperature electrolytic or thermo-chemical water splitting processes, etc.). The main requirements for the materials to be used in these reactor systems are dimensional stability under irradiation, whether under stress (irradiation creep or relaxation) or without stress (swelling, growth), an acceptable evolution under ageing of the mechanical properties (tensile strength, ductility, creep resistance, fracture toughness, resilience) and a good behavior in corrosive environments (reactor coolant or process fluid). Other criteria for the materials are their cost to fabricate and to assemble, and their composition could be optimized in order for instance to present low-activation (or rapid desactivation) features which facilitate maintenance and disposal. These requirements have to be met under normal operating conditions, as well as in incidental and accidental conditions. These challenging requirements imply that in most cases, the use of conventional nuclear materials is excluded, even after optimization and a new range of materials has to be developed and qualified for nuclear use. This paper gives a brief overview of various materials that are essential to establish advanced systems feasibility and performance for in pile and out of pile applications, such as ferritic/martensitic steels (9-12% Cr), nickel based alloys (Haynes 230, Inconel 617, etc.), oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels, and ceramics (SiC, TiC, etc.). This article gives also an insight into the various natures of R&D needed on advanced materials, including fundamental research to investigate basic physical and chemical phenomena occurring in normal and accidental operating conditions, lab-scale tests to characterize candidate materials

  12. Ceramics for engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiser, James D.; Levine, Stanley R.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1987-01-01

    Structural ceramics were under nearly continuous development for various heat engine applications since the early 1970s. These efforts were sustained by the properties that ceramics offer in the areas of high-temperature strength, environmental resistance, and low density and the large benefits in system efficiency and performance that can result. The promise of ceramics was not realized because their brittle nature results in high sensitivity to microscopic flaws and catastrophic fracture behavior. This translated into low reliability for ceramic components and thus limited their application in engines. For structural ceramics to successfully make inroads into the terrestrial heat engine market requires further advances in low cost, net shape fabrication of high reliability components, and improvements in properties such as toughness, and strength. These advances will lead to very limited use of ceramics in noncritical applications in aerospace engines. For critical aerospace applications, an additional requirement is that the components display markedly improved toughness and noncatastrophic or graceful fracture. Thus the major emphasis is on fiber-reinforced ceramics.

  13. Aluminum- and boron-co-doped ZnO ceramics: structural, morphological and electrical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shimin; Liu, Jindong; Jiang, Weiwei; Liu, Chaoqian; Ding, Wanyu; Wang, Hualin; Wang, Nan

    2016-10-01

    Highly dense and electrically conductive aluminum- and boron-co-doped ZnO (ABZO) ceramics were prepared by traditional pressureless sintering process. Single aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO) ceramics were synthesized with similar process and characterized for comparison. The densification behavior, crystal structure, morphology, composition and electrical properties of the ceramics were studied. Results indicated that AZO ceramics with the maximum relative density of 99.01 % were obtained only at 1350 °C for 4 h, which, however, was accompanied by electrical conductivity deterioration because of the increased insulated ZnAl2O4 phase formed in ceramics. Interestingly, the ABZO ceramics reached the maximum relative density of 98.84 % at 1100 °C, which was 250 °C lower compared with that of AZO ceramics. Moreover, the electrical conductivity of ABZO ceramics improved significantly with the increased sintering temperature and increased insulated ZnAl2O4 phase, which should be ascribed to the decreased grain boundaries and the resultant reduced carrier scattering in ceramics overcoming the influence of increased ZnAl2O4 phase due to boron doping effect.

  14. Integrated nitrogen removal biofilter system with ceramic membrane for advanced post-treatment of municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Son, Dong-Jin; Yun, Chan-Young; Kim, Woo-Yeol; Zhang, Xing-Ya; Kim, Dae-Gun; Chang, Duk; Sunwoo, Young; Hong, Ki-Ho

    2016-12-01

    The pre-denitrification biofilm process for nitrogen removal was combined with ceramic membrane with pore sizes of 0.05-0.1 µm as a system for advanced post-treatment of municipal wastewater. The system was operated under an empty bed hydraulic retention time of 7.8 h, recirculation ratio of 3, and transmembrane pressure of 0.47 bar. The system showed average removals of organics, total nitrogen, and solids as high as 93%, 80%, and 100%, respectively. Rapid nitrification could be achieved and denitrification was performed in the anoxic filter without external carbon supplements. The residual particulate organics and nitrogen in effluent from biofilm process could be also removed successfully through membrane filtration and the removal of total coliform was noticeably improved after membrane filtration. Thus, a system composed of the pre-denitrification biofilm process with ceramic membrane would be a compact and flexible option for advanced post-treatment of municipal wastewater. PMID:27108849

  15. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

    2011-01-07

    This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

  16. Optimizing the Advanced Ceramic Material (ACM) for Diesel Particulate Filter Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, Heather E.; Stewart, Mark L.; Maupin, Gary D.; Gallant, Thomas R.; Li, Cheng; Mao, Frank H.; Pyzik, Aleksander J.; Ramanathan, Ravi

    2006-10-02

    This paper describes the application of pore-scale filtration simulations to the ‘Advanced Ceramic Material’ (ACM) developed by Dow Automotive for use in advanced diesel particulate filters. The application required the generation of a three dimensional substrate geometry to provide the boundary conditions for the flow model. An innovative stochastic modeling technique was applied matching chord length distribution and the porosity profile of the material. Additional experimental validation was provided by the single channel experimental apparatus. Results show that the stochastic reconstruction techniques provide flexibility and appropriate accuracy for the modeling efforts. Early optimization efforts imply that needle length may provide a mechanism for adjusting performance of the ACM for DPF applications. New techniques have been developed to visualize soot deposition in both traditional and new DPF substrate materials. Loading experiments have been conducted on a variety of single channel DPF substrates to develop a deeper understanding of soot penetration, soot deposition characteristics, and to confirm modeling results.

  17. Structures and properties of alumina-based ceramic for reconstructive oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M. V.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2016-08-01

    The microstructure of alumina ceramics based on powders with a varying grain size has been investigated. Both commercial alumina powders and those fabricated by denitration of aluminum salts in high-frequency discharge plasma were used. It is shown that the variation of the sintering temperature and morphology of the initial powders of the particles leads to a change of the pore structure of ceramics from pore isolated clusters to a structure consisting of a ceramic skeleton and a large pore space. Changing the type of pore structure occurs at about 50% of porosity. The ceramic pore size distribution is bimodal. Dependencies final density vs initial density are linear; at the same time with increasing temperature, inclination of changes from positive to negative, indicating the change of sealing mechanisms. Extrapolation of these curves showed that they intersect with the values of density of about 2 g/cm3, which indicates the possibility of producing non-shrink ceramics. It is shown that the strength increases with increasing nanocrystalline alumina content in powder mixture. A change in the character the pore structure is accompanied by a sharp decrease in strength, which corresponds to the percolation transition in ceramics. These results showed that it is possible to obtain ceramic materials with the structure and properties similar to natural bone.

  18. High speed low damage grinding of advanced ceramics - Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, J.A.; Malkin, S.

    2000-02-01

    In the manufacture of structural ceramic components, grinding costs can comprise up to 80% of the entire manufacturing cost. As a result, one of the most challenging tasks faced by manufacturing process engineers is the development of a ceramic finishing process to maximize part throughput while minimizing costs and associated scrap levels. The efforts summarized in this report represent the second phase of a program whose overall objective was to develop a single-step, roughing-finishing process suitable for producing high-quality silicon nitride parts at high material removal rates and at substantially lower cost than traditional, multi-stage grinding processes. More specifically, this report provides a technical overview of High-Speed, Low-Damage (HSLD) ceramic grinding which employs elevated wheel speeds to achieve the small grain depths of cut necessary for low-damage grinding while operating at relatively high material removal rates. The study employed the combined use of laboratory grinding tests, mathematical grinding models, and characterization of the resultant surface condition. A single-step, roughing-finishing process operating at high removal rates was developed and demonstrated.

  19. Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure and method of processing

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Jr., Jesse J.; Hirschfeld, Deidre A.; Li, Tingkai

    1993-12-07

    Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure are created using sol-gel processes. The processes have particular application in creating calcium magnesium zirconium phosphate, CMZP, coatings and foams.

  20. Ceramic Processing

    SciTech Connect

    EWSUK,KEVIN G.

    1999-11-24

    Ceramics represent a unique class of materials that are distinguished from common metals and plastics by their: (1) high hardness, stiffness, and good wear properties (i.e., abrasion resistance); (2) ability to withstand high temperatures (i.e., refractoriness); (3) chemical durability; and (4) electrical properties that allow them to be electrical insulators, semiconductors, or ionic conductors. Ceramics can be broken down into two general categories, traditional and advanced ceramics. Traditional ceramics include common household products such as clay pots, tiles, pipe, and bricks, porcelain china, sinks, and electrical insulators, and thermally insulating refractory bricks for ovens and fireplaces. Advanced ceramics, also referred to as ''high-tech'' ceramics, include products such as spark plug bodies, piston rings, catalyst supports, and water pump seals for automobiles, thermally insulating tiles for the space shuttle, sodium vapor lamp tubes in streetlights, and the capacitors, resistors, transducers, and varistors in the solid-state electronics we use daily. The major differences between traditional and advanced ceramics are in the processing tolerances and cost. Traditional ceramics are manufactured with inexpensive raw materials, are relatively tolerant of minor process deviations, and are relatively inexpensive. Advanced ceramics are typically made with more refined raw materials and processing to optimize a given property or combination of properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, dielectric, optical, thermal, physical, and/or magnetic) for a given application. Advanced ceramics generally have improved performance and reliability over traditional ceramics, but are typically more expensive. Additionally, advanced ceramics are typically more sensitive to the chemical and physical defects present in the starting raw materials, or those that are introduced during manufacturing.

  1. Ceramic planar waveguide structures for amplifiers and lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Konyushkin, V A; Nakladov, A N; Konyushkin, D V; Doroshenko, Maxim E; Osiko, Vyacheslav V; Karasik, Aleksandr Ya

    2013-01-31

    Ceramic and crystalline weakly guiding optical fibres with the core - cladding refractive index difference of 10{sup -2} - 10{sup -4} are fabricated by a hot pressing method. The waveguides with one or several cores for operation in the spectral range 0.2 - 5 {mu}m are produced. The waveguides are based on CaF{sub 2}, SrF{sub 2}, and BaF{sub 2} ceramics and crystals and their solid solutions doped with trivalent Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy, Yb, Ho, Er, and Tm ions, as well as on LiF ceramics and crystals with colour centres. The first results of investigation of the lasing properties of ceramic SrF{sub 2} : NdF waveguides under diode pumping are presented, and the prospects of further investigation are discussed. (lasers)

  2. Sediment management and renewability of floodplain clay for structural ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meulen, M. J.; Wiersma, A. P.; Middelkoop, H.; van der Perk, M.; Bakker, M.; Maljers, D.; Hobo, N.; Makaske, B.

    2009-04-01

    The Netherlands have vast resources of clay that are exploited for the fabrication of structural ceramic products such as bricks and roof tiles. The extraction of clay creates land surface lowerings of about 1.5 m, of which the majority are located in the embanked floodplains of the rivers Rhine and Meuse. At these surface lowerings, clay is replenished within several decades. This study explores to which extent the clay can be regarded as a renewable resource, with potential for sustainable use. For this purpose, first the current and past clay consumption is calculated. Subsequently, clay deposition in the floodplains is estimated from literature data on clay accumulation using sediment traps, heavy metal and radionuclide distribution in soil profiles, and from morphological modelling studies. These estimates of clay-deposition and consumption are then compared following three approaches that consider various temporal and spatial scales of clay deposition. This allows us to establish the extent to which man determines sedimentary processes in the Dutch floodplains. Consequently, using the sediment response to the land surface lowering resulting from clay extraction, we explore sediment management options for the Dutch Rhine and Meuse. Altogether we argue that clay has been, probably is, and certainly can be managed as a renewable mineral resource.

  3. Structure recognition from high resolution images of ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ushizima, Daniela; Perciano, Talita; Krishnan, Harinarayan; Loring, Burlen; Bale, Hrishikesh; Parkinson, Dilworth; Sethian, James

    2015-01-05

    Fibers provide exceptional strength-to-weight ratio capabilities when woven into ceramic composites, transforming them into materials with exceptional resistance to high temperature, and high strength combined with improved fracture toughness. Microcracks are inevitable when the material is under strain, which can be imaged using synchrotron X-ray computed micro-tomography (mu-CT) for assessment of material mechanical toughness variation. An important part of this analysis is to recognize fibrillar features. This paper presents algorithms for detecting and quantifying composite cracks and fiber breaks from high-resolution image stacks. First, we propose recognition algorithms to identify the different structures of the composite, including matrix cracks and fibers breaks. Second, we introduce our package F3D for fast filtering of large 3D imagery, implemented in OpenCL to take advantage of graphic cards. Results show that our algorithms automatically identify micro-damage and that the GPU-based implementation introduced here takes minutes, being 17x faster than similar tools on a typical image file.

  4. Structural characteristics of the shuttle orbiter ceramic thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    The thermal protection system (TPS) of the Space Shuttle Orbiter is described as well as the results of dynamic reponse studies conducted in support of the efforts to certify the TPS for flight. The ceramic Thermal Protection System consists of ceramic tiles bonded to felt pads which are in turn bonded to the Orbiter substructure to protect the aluminum substructure from the heat of reentry.

  5. Plasma Processed Nanosized-Powders of Refractory Compounds for Obtaining Fine-Grained Advanced Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    I, Zalite; J, Grabis; E, Palcevskis; M, Herrmann

    2011-10-01

    One of the ways for the production of ceramic materials with a fine-grained structure is the use of nanopowders. Different methods are used for the production of nanopowders. One of them is the method of plasmachemical synthesis. Different nanopowders of refractory materials can be obtained by this method. The preparation of nanosized powders of nitrides and oxides and their composites by the method of plasmachemical synthesis, the possibilities to receive nanopowders with different particle size and the potential advantages of nanopowders were investigated.

  6. Studio in Sculpture, Ceramics, Jewelry. Advanced Elective Courses in Art for Grades 10, 11, or 12: Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This is the second volume in a series that includes the syllabi for the advanced elective courses in the New York state art program for grades 10, 11, and 12. The first volume is described in ED 100 747. The guide consists of the following three sections: (1) Studio in Ceramics, (2) Studio in Sculpture, and (3) Studio in Jewelry and…

  7. ENERGY EFFICIENCY CHALLENGES ADDRESSED THROUGH THE USE OF ADVANCED REFRACTORY CERAMIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Hemrick, James Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Refractory ceramics can play a critical role in improving the energy efficiency of traditional industrial processes through increased furnace efficiency brought about by the employment of novel refractory systems and techniques. Examples of advances in refractory materials related to aluminum, gasification, glass, and lime are highlighted. Energy savings are realized based on reduction of chemical reactions, elimination of mechanical degradation caused by the service environment, reduction of temperature limitations of materials, and elimination of costly installation and repair needs. Key results of projects resulting from US Department of Energy (DOE) funded research programs are discussed with emphasis on applicability of these results to high temperature furnace applications and needed research directions for the future.

  8. Monolithic ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, Thomas P.; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    A development history and current development status evaluation are presented for SiC and Si3N4 monolithic ceramics. In the absence of widely sought improvements in these materials' toughness, and associated reliability in structural applications, uses will remain restricted to components in noncritical, nonman-rated aerospace applications such as cruise missile and drone gas turbine engine components. In such high temperature engine-section components, projected costs lie below those associated with superalloy-based short-life/expendable engines. Advancements are required in processing technology for the sake of fewer and smaller microstructural flaws.

  9. In situ hydroxyapatite nanofiber growth on calcium borate silicate ceramics in SBF and its structural characteristics.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yinfu; Huang, Yanlin; Qi, Shuyun; Chen, Cuili; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2015-10-01

    A novel calcium silicate borate Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramic was firstly prepared by the conventional solid-state reaction. In vitro hydroxyapatite mineralization was investigated by soaking the ceramics in simulated body fluid (SBF) solutions at body temperature (37 °C) for various time periods. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) measurements were applied to investigate the samples before and after the immersion of ceramics in SBF solution. The elemental compositions of a hydroxyapatite layer on the ceramics during the mineralization were confirmed by X-ray energy-dispersive spectra (EDS). Meanwhile, the bending strength and elastic modulus of Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramics were also measured, which indicate that the biomaterials based on Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramics possess bioactivity and might be a potential candidate as biomaterials for hard tissue repair. The bioactive mineralization ability was evaluated on the base of its crystal structural characteristics, i.e., silanol (Si-OH) and B-OH groups can be easily induced on the surface of Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramics soaked in SBF solutions.

  10. New Knowledge about Zirconium-Ceramic as a Structural Material in Fixed Prosthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Špehar, Davor

    2015-01-01

    Dental ceramics represents a major structural material in fixed prosthodontics. Increasing demands for esthetics led to development of new ceramic materials in order to eliminate the use of metal framework and for all ceramic restorations with mechanical properties to withstand high occlusal forces. Out of all the present ceramic materials, zirconium-ceramic has the best mechanical properties, and is the only material that can be used for longer span fixed dental restorations. Despite its excellent mechanical properties, to achieve great esthetics, due to absence of translucency, zirconium-dioxide cannot be used as a single material and needs veneering with more esthetic ceramic. When introduced in dental medicine, it was considered an almost ideal material for fixed prosthodontics, but clinical use and in vivo and in vitro studies showed many problems which still persist despite the improvements.
This review aims to reveal new developments in zirconium-ceramics and technical procedures which could increase clinical performance and longevity of these restorations. PMID:27688396

  11. New Knowledge about Zirconium-Ceramic as a Structural Material in Fixed Prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Špehar, Davor; Jakovac, Marko

    2015-06-01

    Dental ceramics represents a major structural material in fixed prosthodontics. Increasing demands for esthetics led to development of new ceramic materials in order to eliminate the use of metal framework and for all ceramic restorations with mechanical properties to withstand high occlusal forces. Out of all the present ceramic materials, zirconium-ceramic has the best mechanical properties, and is the only material that can be used for longer span fixed dental restorations. Despite its excellent mechanical properties, to achieve great esthetics, due to absence of translucency, zirconium-dioxide cannot be used as a single material and needs veneering with more esthetic ceramic. When introduced in dental medicine, it was considered an almost ideal material for fixed prosthodontics, but clinical use and in vivo and in vitro studies showed many problems which still persist despite the improvements.
This review aims to reveal new developments in zirconium-ceramics and technical procedures which could increase clinical performance and longevity of these restorations.

  12. New Knowledge about Zirconium-Ceramic as a Structural Material in Fixed Prosthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Špehar, Davor

    2015-01-01

    Dental ceramics represents a major structural material in fixed prosthodontics. Increasing demands for esthetics led to development of new ceramic materials in order to eliminate the use of metal framework and for all ceramic restorations with mechanical properties to withstand high occlusal forces. Out of all the present ceramic materials, zirconium-ceramic has the best mechanical properties, and is the only material that can be used for longer span fixed dental restorations. Despite its excellent mechanical properties, to achieve great esthetics, due to absence of translucency, zirconium-dioxide cannot be used as a single material and needs veneering with more esthetic ceramic. When introduced in dental medicine, it was considered an almost ideal material for fixed prosthodontics, but clinical use and in vivo and in vitro studies showed many problems which still persist despite the improvements.
This review aims to reveal new developments in zirconium-ceramics and technical procedures which could increase clinical performance and longevity of these restorations.

  13. In situ hydroxyapatite nanofiber growth on calcium borate silicate ceramics in SBF and its structural characteristics.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yinfu; Huang, Yanlin; Qi, Shuyun; Chen, Cuili; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2015-10-01

    A novel calcium silicate borate Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramic was firstly prepared by the conventional solid-state reaction. In vitro hydroxyapatite mineralization was investigated by soaking the ceramics in simulated body fluid (SBF) solutions at body temperature (37 °C) for various time periods. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) measurements were applied to investigate the samples before and after the immersion of ceramics in SBF solution. The elemental compositions of a hydroxyapatite layer on the ceramics during the mineralization were confirmed by X-ray energy-dispersive spectra (EDS). Meanwhile, the bending strength and elastic modulus of Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramics were also measured, which indicate that the biomaterials based on Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramics possess bioactivity and might be a potential candidate as biomaterials for hard tissue repair. The bioactive mineralization ability was evaluated on the base of its crystal structural characteristics, i.e., silanol (Si-OH) and B-OH groups can be easily induced on the surface of Ca11Si4B2O22 ceramics soaked in SBF solutions. PMID:26117746

  14. Highly integrated hybrid process with ceramic ultrafiltration-membrane for advanced treatment of drinking water: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianning; Wang, Lingyun; Zhu, Jia; Zhang, Jianguo; Sheng, Deyang; Zhang, Xihui

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a highly integrated hybrid process for the advanced treatment of drinking water in dealing with the micro-polluted raw water. A flat sheet ceramic membrane with the pore size of 50∼60 nm for ultrafiltration (UF) is used to integrate coagulation and ozonation together. At the same time, biological activated carbon filtration (BAC) is used to remove the ammonia and organic pollutants in raw water. A pilot study in the scale of 120 m(3)/d has been conducted in Southern China. The mainly-analyzed parameters include turbidity, particle counts, ammonia, total organic carbon (TOC), UV254, biological dissolved organic carbon (BDOC), dissolved oxygen (DO) as well as trans-membrane pressure (TMP). The experiments demonstrated that ceramic UF-membrane was able to remove most of turbidity and suspended particulate matters. The final effluent turbidity reached to 0.14 NTU on average. BAC was effective in removing ammonia and organic matters. Dissolved oxygen (DO) is necessary for the biodegradation of ammonia at high concentration. The removal efficiencies reached to 90% for ammonia with the initial concentration of 3.6 mg/L and 76% for TOC with the initial concentration of 3.8 mg/L. Ozonation can alter the molecular structure of organics in terms of UV254, reduce membrane fouling, and extend the operation circle. It is believed the hybrid treatment process developed in this article can achieve high performance with less land occupation and lower cost compared with the conventional processes. It is especially suitable for the developing countries in order to obtain high-quality drinking water in a cost-effective way.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF CRYSTALLINE CERAMICS FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF ADVANCED FUEL CYCLE REPROCESSING WASTES

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Brinkman, K.

    2011-09-22

    its stability may be rate dependent, therefore limiting the activity of the waste for which it can be employed. Overall, these preliminary results indicate good radiation damage tolerance for the crystalline ceramic materials. The PCT results showed that, for all of the waste forms tested, the normalized release values for most of the elements measured, including all of the lanthanides and noble metals, were either very small or below the instrument detection limits. Elevated normalized release values were measured only for Cs, Mo, and Rb. It is difficult to draw further conclusions from these data until a benchmark material is developed for the PCT with this type of waste form. Calcined, simulated CS/LN/TM High Mo waste without additives had relatively low normalized release values for Cs, Mo, and Rb. A review of the chemical composition data for this sample showed that these elements were well retained after the calcination. Therefore, it will be useful to further characterize the calcined material to determine what form these elements are in after calcining. This, along with single phase studies on Cs containing crystal structures such as hollandite, should provide insight into the most ideal phases to incorporate these elements to produce a durable waste form.

  16. Life prediction methodology for ceramic components of advanced vehicular heat engines: Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Khandelwal, P.K.; Provenzano, N.J.; Schneider, W.E.

    1996-02-01

    One of the major challenges involved in the use of ceramic materials is ensuring adequate strength and durability. This activity has developed methodology which can be used during the design phase to predict the structural behavior of ceramic components. The effort involved the characterization of injection molded and hot isostatic pressed (HIPed) PY-6 silicon nitride, the development of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technology, and the development of analytical life prediction methodology. Four failure modes are addressed: fast fracture, slow crack growth, creep, and oxidation. The techniques deal with failures initiating at the surface as well as internal to the component. The life prediction methodology for fast fracture and slow crack growth have been verified using a variety of confirmatory tests. The verification tests were conducted at room and elevated temperatures up to a maximum of 1371 {degrees}C. The tests involved (1) flat circular disks subjected to bending stresses and (2) high speed rotating spin disks. Reasonable correlation was achieved for a variety of test conditions and failure mechanisms. The predictions associated with surface failures proved to be optimistic, requiring re-evaluation of the components` initial fast fracture strengths. Correlation was achieved for the spin disks which failed in fast fracture from internal flaws. Time dependent elevated temperature slow crack growth spin disk failures were also successfully predicted.

  17. Development of sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems: Survey and evaluation of measurement techniques for temperature, strain and heat flux for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Cyr, M. A.; Strange, R. R.

    1988-01-01

    The report presents the final results of Tasks 1 and 2, Development of Sensors for Ceramic Components in Advanced Propulsion Systems (NASA program NAS3-25141). During Task 1, an extensive survey was conducted of sensor concepts which have the potential for measuring surface temperature, strain and heat flux on ceramic components for advanced propulsion systems. Each sensor concept was analyzed and evaluated under Task 2; sensor concepts were then recommended for further development. For temperature measurement, both pyrometry and thermographic phosphors are recommended for measurements up to and beyond the melting point of ceramic materials. For lower temperature test programs, the thin-film techniques offer advantages in the installation of temperature sensors. Optical strain measurement techniques are recommended because they offer the possibility of being useful at very high temperature levels. Techniques for the measurement of heat flux are recommended for development based on both a surface mounted sensor and the measurement of the temperature differential across a portion of a ceramic component or metallic substrate.

  18. Oxidation resistant filler metals for direct brazing of structural ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1986-01-01

    A method of joining ceramics and metals to themselves and to one another is described using essentially pure trinickel aluminide and trinickel aluminide containing small amounts of carbon. This method produces strong joints that can withstand high service temperatures and oxidizing environments.

  19. A role of BNLT compound addition on structure and properties of PZT ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaita, P.; Watcharapasorn, A.; Jiansirisomboon, S.

    2010-09-01

    In this research, effects of lead-free bismuth sodium lanthanum titanate (BNLT) addition on structure and properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics were investigated. PZT ceramics with addition of 0.1-3.0 wt%BNLT were fabricated by a solid-state mixed oxide method and sintering at 1050-1200 °C for 2 h to obtain dense ceramics with at least 96% of theoretical density. X-ray diffraction indicated that complete solid solution occurred for all compositions. Phase identification showed both tetragonal and rhombohedral perovskite structure of PZT with no BNLT phase detected. Scanning electron micrographs of fractured PZT/BNLT ceramics showed equiaxed grain shape with both transgranular and intergranular fracture modes. Addition of BNLT was also found to reduce densification and effectively limited grain growth of PZT ceramic. Optimum Hv and KIC values were found to be 4.85 GPa and 1.56 MPa.m 1/2 for PZT/0.5 wt%BNLT sample. Among PZT/BNLT samples, room temperature dielectric constant seemed to be improved with increasing BNLT content. The maximum piezoelectric coefficient values were observed in pure PZT ceramic and were slightly decreased in BNLT-added samples. Small reduction of remanent polarization and coercive field in hysteresis loops was observed in BNLT-added samples, indicating a slightly suppressed ferroelectric interaction in this material system.

  20. Influence of the material removal mechanisms on hole integrity in ultrasonic machining of structural ceramics.

    PubMed

    Nath, Chandra; Lim, G C; Zheng, H Y

    2012-07-01

    Micro-chipping via micro-cracks, due to rapid mechanical indentations by abrasive grits, is the fundamental mechanism of material removal during ultrasonic machining (USM) of hard-brittle materials like ceramics and glass. This study aims mainly to investigate the adverse effects of this inherent removal phenomena on the hole integrity such as entrance chipping, wall roughness and subsurface damage. It also presents the material removal mechanism happens in the gap between the tool periphery and the hole wall (called 'lateral gap'). To do so, experiments were conducted for drilling holes on three advanced structural ceramics, namely, silicon carbide, zirconia, and alumina. Earlier published basic studies on the initiation of different crack modes and their growth characteristics are employed to explain the experimental findings in this USM study. It is realized that the radial and the lateral cracks formed due to adjacent abrasives, which are under the tool face, extends towards radial direction of the hole resulting in entrance chipping. Additionally, the angle penetration and the rolling actions of the abrasives, which are at the periphery of the tool, contribute to the entrance chipping. Later on, in the 'lateral gap', the sliding (or abrasion) and the rolling mechanisms by the larger abrasives take part to material removal. However, they unfavorably produce micro-cracks in the radial direction resulting in surface and subsurface damages, which are ultimately responsible for higher wall-surface roughness. Since the size of micro-cracks in brittle materials is grit size dependent according to the earlier studied physics, it is realized that such nature of the hole integrity during USM can only be minimized by employing smaller grit size, but cannot fully be eliminated.

  1. Melt processed crystalline ceramic waste forms for advanced nuclear fuel cycles: CRP T21027 1813: Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms, task 17208: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Amoroso, J. W.; Marra, J. C.

    2015-08-26

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multi-phase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing. This report summarizes results from three years of work on the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on “Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms” (T21027), and specific task “Melt Processed Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles” (17208).

  2. Melt processed crystalline ceramic waste forms for advanced nuclear fuel cycles: CRP T21027 1813: Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms, Task 17208: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Amoroso, J. W.; Marra, J. C.

    2015-08-26

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multi-phase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing. This report summarizes results from three years of work on the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on “Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms” (T21027), and specific task “Melt Processed Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles” (17208).

  3. High-temperature ceramic receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, P. O.

    1980-01-01

    An advanced ceramic dome cavity receiver is discussed which heats pressurized gas to temperatures above 1800/sup 0/F (1000/sup 0/C) for use in solar Brayton power systems of the dispersed receiver/dish or central receiver type. Optical, heat transfer, structural, and ceramic material design aspects of the receiver are reported and the development and experimental demonstration of a high-temperature seal between the pressurized gas and the high-temperature silicon carbide dome material is described.

  4. Utilization of fly ash in structural and decorative ceramic products

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.E.; Dreher, G.B.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Moore, D.M.; DeMaris, P.J.

    1996-10-01

    In this research, fly ash from coal combustion is used in fired-clay products such as bricks and related fired-clay products. Our research includes: (1) plant-scale tests of firing fly ash-brick clay mixtures; (2) laboratory-scale {open_quotes}optimization{close_quotes} of firing these mixtures; and (3) preliminary evaluations of the environmental and economic costs/benefits of ceramics made with fly ash, Bricks and feed materials were tested for compliance with market specifications and for leachability of pollutants. X-ray diffraction and chemical step-dissolution were used to determine the mineralogical composition of feed materials and products. By using mineral content, improved predictions of the firing of fly ash-clay mixtures will result. Also, estimates of coal ash fusion will improve, because testing methods and melting mechanisms for ceramics and coal ash are identical. This project could convert waste fly ash into a valuable resource.

  5. Structural application of high strength, high temperature ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    The operation of rocket engine turbine pumps is limited by the temperature restrictions of metallic components used in the systems. Mechanical strength and stability of these metallic components decrease drastically at elevated temperatures. Ceramic materials that retain high strength at high temperatures appear to be a feasible alternate material for use in the hot end of the turbopumps. This project identified and defined the processing parameters that affected the properties of Si3N4, one of candidate ceramic materials. Apparatus was assembled and put into operation to hot press Si3N4 powders into bulk material for in house evaluation. A work statement was completed to seek outside contract services to design, manufacture, and evaluate Si3N4 components in the service environments that exists in SSME turbopumps.

  6. Structure, nanohardness and photoluminescence of ZnO ceramics based on nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muktepavela, Faina; Grigorjeva, Larisa; Kundzins, Karlis; Gorokhova, Elena; Rodnyi, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    ZnO ceramics obtained from grained powders with different grain size by hot pressing and ceramics from tetrapods nanopowders obtained by press-less sintering have been investigated under identical conditions. Ceramics obtained by hot pressing were optically transparent but were composed of large inhomogeneous grains (d = 8-35 μm) exhibiting a substructure. Decreased values of elastic modulus within a grain and a wide defect-associated (‘green’) photoluminescence (PL) band at 2.2-2.8 eV in conjunction with a weak excitonic band indicate a high concentration of residual point defects in hot pressed ZnO ceramics. Utilization of more small-grained powders contributes to the formation of more uniform microstructure (d = 5-15 μm) and extraction of point defects. This reflects as a substantially decreased defect PL band and increased excitonic band. Ceramics obtained by press-less sintering from tetrapods had fine-grained structure (d = 1-4 μm) with no signs of a substructure. PL spectrum has a narrow excitonic band with phonon replicas (1LO_ExD0), whereas the defect ‘green’ luminescence is negligible. The effects of powders morphologies have been explained in terms of a hereditary influence of interaction processes between initial particles on the formation of a microstructure and kinetic of defect distribution on the grain growth stages during the sintering of ZnO ceramics.

  7. Structural and electrical characteristics of dysprosium-doped barium stannate titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shijie; Tan, Tai Aik; Lai, Man On; Lu, Li

    2010-03-15

    Effects of dysprosium (Dy) amphoteric doping on the structural, dielectric and electric properties of barium stannate titanate (BTS) ceramics have been studied. X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that all Dy-doped BTS ceramics exhibit cubic perovskite structure until to 1 mol%. Dy doping at the A site shows lower solubility than that at the B site. SEM surface morphologies display that the Dy B site doping is beneficial for the compact and homogeneous grain distribution. The dielectric constant and loss tangent are reduced with increase of the doping levels. Impedance spectroscopy investigation demonstrates that all samples are insulating at room temperature. Doping alters the full resistive regions of pure BTS ceramics to Doped BTS with insulating grain boundaries and semiconducting bulk regions, but the doping contents has little effect on changing the electric structures.

  8. Using laser radiation for the formation of capillary structure in flat ceramic heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaenko, Yu. E.; Rotner, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    The possibility of using laser radiation with a wavelength of 1.064 μm for the formation of a capillary structure in the evaporation zone of flat ceramic heat pipes has been experimentally confirmed. Using a technological regime with established parameters, a capillary structure was formed in AlN and Al2O3 ceramic plates with a thickness of 1-2 mm and lateral dimensions of 48 × 60 and 100 × 100 mm, which ensured absorption of heat-transfer fluids (distilled water, ethyl alcohol, acetone) to a height of 100 mm against gravity forces. The thermal resistance of flat ceramic heat pipes with this capillary structure reaches 0.07°C/W, which is quite acceptable for their use as heat sinks in systems of thermal regime control for electronic components and as heat exchange plates for large-size thermoelectric conversion units.

  9. Development of nondestructive evaluation methods for structural ceramics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W. A.

    1998-08-19

    During the past year, the focus of our work on nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods was on the development and application of these methods to technologies such as ceramic matrix composite (CMC) hot-gas filters, CMC high-temperature heat exchangers, and CMC ceramic/ceramic joining. Such technologies are critical to the ''Vision 21 Energy-Plex Fleet'' of modular, high-efficiency, low-emission power systems. Specifically, our NDE work has continued toward faster, higher sensitivity, volumetric X-ray computed tomographic imaging with new amorphous silicon detectors to detect and measure axial and radial density variations in hot-gas filters and heat exchangers; explored the potential use of high-speed focal-plane-array infrared imaging technology to detect delaminations and variations in the thermal properties of SiC/SiC heat exchangers; and explored various NDE methods to characterize CMC joints in cooperation with various industrial partners. Work this year also addressed support of Southern Companies Services Inc., Power Systems Development Facility, where NDE is needed to assess the condition of hot-gas candle filters. This paper presents the results of these efforts.

  10. Structure, Stoichiometry and Stability in Magnetoplumbite and {beta}-Alumina Structured Type Ceramics. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cormack, A. N.

    2004-03-01

    Work has been completed on the atomistic simulation of hexa-aluminate ceramics with the magnetoplumbite and beta-alumina type structures. In this report, three aspects of the work are highlighted. One is the simulation of surface structures. The second concerns details of the interstitially mechanisms observed in molecular dynamics simulations. The novel result here is the observation that the lattice ion always leaves its Beevers-Ross site before the aBR interstitial begins to move towards the lattice site. It is also found that, as expected, the interstitial mechanism is the most common mechanism in the heavily disordered nonstoichiometric structure, as well as in the stoichiometric material. Finally, the disposition of trivalent europium in the phosphor material BAM has been elucidated.

  11. Advanced Aircraft Structures program: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Juergen; Schroeder, H. W.; Dittrich, Kay W.; Bauer, E. J.; Zippold, H.

    1999-07-01

    Requirements of future military aircraft structures are constantly increasing with advancing technological progress. While performance is still the main focus, costs have become a major issue in military aircraft procurement.In order to efficiently support its technological base oriented on the future demands of the market Daimler Chrysler Aerospace/Military Aircraft Division has inaugurated the Advanced Aircraft Structures Program, a collaborative research effort together with the German Aerospace Center and Daimler Chrysler Research and Technology, the corporate research division of Daimler Benz. The two key technologies to be pursued within the framework of this program are cost- effective composite structures and smart materials. This paper will give an overview of the Advanced Aircraft Structures Program with particular emphasis on smart structures technology as applied to active vibration damping, vibration isolation of equipment and composite health monitoring.

  12. Dental ceramics: An update.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Arvind; Shenoy, Nina

    2010-10-01

    In the last few decades, there have been tremendous advances in the mechanical properties and methods of fabrication of ceramic materials. While porcelain-based materials are still a major component of the market, there have been moves to replace metal ceramics systems with all ceramic systems. Advances in bonding techniques have increased the range and scope for use of ceramics in dentistry. In this brief review, we will discuss advances in ceramic materials and fabrication techniques. Examples of the microstructure property relationships for these ceramic materials will also be addressed.

  13. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Rorabaugh, Michael; Shorey, Mark

    2002-10-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 pound payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs.

  14. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Rorabaugh, Michael; Shorey, Mark

    2002-01-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 pound payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs.

  15. ZERODUR glass ceramics: strength data for the design of structures with high mechanical stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter; Nattermann, Kurt; Döhring, Thorsten; Kuhr, Markus; Thomas, Peter; Kling, Guenther; Gath, Peter; Lucarelli, Stefano

    2008-07-01

    With an increasing number of applications mirrors and support structures made of the zero expansion glass ceramic material ZERODUR® has to endure high mechanical loads, e.g. rocket launches or controlled deformations for optical image correction. Like for other glassy materials, the strength of glass ceramics is dominated by its surface condition. Test specimens have been ground with fine grain tools (e.g. D64 diamond grains) and / or subsequently etched. The strength data basis for the design of highly stressed structures has been extended and new information has been derived for the extrapolation to low failure probabilities.

  16. Thermal Conductivity of Advanced Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings Determined by a Steady-state Laser Heat-flux Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    The development of low conductivity and high temperature capable thermal barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity under future high-performance and low-emission engine heat-flux conditions. In this paper, a unique steady-state CO2 laser (wavelength 10.6 microns) heat-flux approach is described for determining the thermal conductivity and conductivity deduced cyclic durability of ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coating systems at very high temperatures (up to 1700 C) under large thermal gradients. The thermal conductivity behavior of advanced thermal and environmental barrier coatings for metallic and Si-based ceramic matrix composite (CMC) component applications has also been investigated using the laser conductivity approach. The relationships between the lattice and radiation conductivities as a function of heat flux and thermal gradient at high temperatures have been examined for the ceramic coating systems. The steady-state laser heat-flux conductivity approach has been demonstrated as a viable means for the development and life prediction of advanced thermal barrier coatings for future turbine engine applications.

  17. Prototype Development of Remote Operated Hot Uniaxial Press (ROHUP) to Fabricate Advanced Tc-99 Bearing Ceramic Waste Forms - 13381

    SciTech Connect

    Alaniz, Ariana J.; Delgado, Luc R.; Werbick, Brett M.; Hartmann, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this senior student project is to design and build a prototype construction of a machine that simultaneously provides the proper pressure and temperature parameters to sinter ceramic powders in-situ to create pellets of rather high densities of above 90% (theoretical). This ROHUP (Remote Operated Hot Uniaxial Press) device is designed specifically to fabricate advanced ceramic Tc-99 bearing waste forms and therefore radiological barriers have been included in the system. The HUP features electronic control and feedback systems to set and monitor pressure, load, and temperature parameters. This device operates wirelessly via portable computer using Bluetooth{sup R} technology. The HUP device is designed to fit in a standard atmosphere controlled glove box to further allow sintering under inert conditions (e.g. under Ar, He, N{sub 2}). This will further allow utilizing this HUP for other potential applications, including radioactive samples, novel ceramic waste forms, advanced oxide fuels, air-sensitive samples, metallic systems, advanced powder metallurgy, diffusion experiments and more. (authors)

  18. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Shorey, Mark W.; Steinetz, Bruce (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 lb payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs. During the first phase of this program the existing launch vehicle control surface sealing concepts were reviewed, the aerothermal environment for a high temperature seal design was analyzed and a mock up of an arc-jet test fixture for evaluating seal concepts was fabricated.

  19. Structural and electrical properties of microwave processed Ag modified KNN-LS ceramics.

    PubMed

    Palei, Prakash; Kumar, Pawan; Agrawal, Dinesh K

    2012-01-01

    Microwave processing steps of 0.95[(K0.5Na0.5)0.94Ag0.06NbO3]-0.05[LiSbO3]/(KNAN-LS) lead free ferroelectric ceramics were optimized for better densification and electrical properties. Calcination temperature and time for single perovskite phase formation were optimized and found to be 850 degrees C for 60 min., respectively. Crystal structural study revealed the presence of mixed structure in the microwave processed (MWP) KNAN-LS ceramics. The sintering of the KNAN-LS ceramics was carried out at 1080 degrees C for 10 min, 20 min and 30 min, respectively, and the sample sintered for 20 min exhibited best properties.

  20. Advances and trends in computational structural mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Recent developments in computational structural mechanics are reviewed with reference to computational needs for future structures technology, advances in computational models for material behavior, discrete element technology, assessment and control of numerical simulations of structural response, hybrid analysis, and techniques for large-scale optimization. Research areas in computational structural mechanics which have high potential for meeting future technological needs are identified. These include prediction and analysis of the failure of structural components made of new materials, development of computational strategies and solution methodologies for large-scale structural calculations, and assessment of reliability and adaptive improvement of response predictions.

  1. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, N. A. S. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk Correia, T. M. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk; Rokosz, M. K. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk

    2014-07-28

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  2. Rapidly solidified ceramics: Processing, structure, and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kalonji, G.M.; O'Handley, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Since its initiation in September 1984, work under this contract has progressed in two areas: construction of a gas atomizer for rapid solidification of ceramics; and characterization of rapidly solidified materials in the SrO-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, BaO-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiO{sub 2}, and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiO{sub 2} systems. This report summarize this work.

  3. Tribology of ceramics: Report of the Committee on Tribology of Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The current state of knowledge of ceramic surface structures, composition, and reactivity is reviewed. The tribological requirements of advanced mechanical systems now being deployed (in particular, heat engines) exceed the capabilities of traditional metallic-based materials because of the high temperatures encountered. Advanced ceramic materials for such applications are receiving intense scrutiny, but there is a lack of understanding of the properties and behavior of ceramic surfaces and the influence of processing on the properties of ceramics is described. The adequacy of models, ranging form atomic to macro, to describe and to predict ceramic friction and wear are discussed, as well as what is known about lubrication at elevated temperatures. From this analysis, recommendations are made for coordination, research, and development that will lead to better performance of ceramic materials in tribological systems.

  4. Ceramic burner

    SciTech Connect

    Laux, W.; Hebel, R.; Artelt, P.; Esfeld, G.; Jacob, A.

    1981-03-31

    Improvements in the mixing body and supporting structure of a molded-ceramic-brick burner enable the burner to withstand the vibrations induced during its operation. Designed for the combustion chambers of air heaters, the burner has a mixing body composed of layers of shaped ceramic bricks that interlock and are held together vertically by a ceramic holding bar. The mixing body is shaped like a mushroom - the upper layers have a larger radius than the lower ones.

  5. Sliding contact fatigue damage in layered ceramic structures.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-W; Kim, J-H; Thompson, V P; Zhang, Y

    2007-11-01

    Porcelain-veneered restorations often chip and fracture from repeated occlusal loading, making fatigue studies relevant. Most fatigue studies are limited to uni-axial loading without sliding motion. We hypothesized that bi-axial loading (contact-load-slide-liftoff, simulating a masticatory cycle), as compared with uni-axial loading, accelerates the fatigue of layered ceramics. Monolithic glass plates were epoxy-joined to polycarbonate substrates as a transparent model for an all-ceramic crown on dentin. Uni-and bi-axial cyclic contact was applied through a hard sphere in water, by means of a mouth-motion simulator apparatus. The uni-axial (contact-load-hold-liftoff) and traditional R-ratio fatigue (indenter never leaves the specimen surface) produced similar lifespans, while bi-axial fatigue was more severe. The accelerated crack growth rate in bi-axial fatigue is attributed to enhanced tensile stresses at the trailing edges of a moving indenter. Fracture mechanics descriptions for damage evolution in brittle materials loaded repeatedly with a sliding sphere are provided. Clinical relevance is addressed.

  6. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, April 1992--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-07-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the DOE Office of Transportation Systems` automotive technology programs. Significant progress in fabricating ceramic components for DOE, NASA, and DOE advanced heat engine programs show that operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engines is feasible; however, addition research is needed in materials and processing, design, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base for producing reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A 5-yr project plan was developed, with focus on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  7. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report for October 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. Focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. The work is organized into the following elements: materials and processing (monolithics [SiC, SiN], ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining), materials design methodology, data base and life prediction (structural qualification, time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, NDE), and technology transfer. Individual abstracts were prepared for the individual contributions.

  8. Advances and trends in computational structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Venneri, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The major goals of computational structures technology (CST) are outlined, and recent advances in CST are examined. These include computational material modeling, stochastic-based modeling, computational methods for articulated structural dynamics, strategies and numerical algorithms for new computing systems, multidisciplinary analysis and optimization. The role of CST in the future development of structures technology and the multidisciplinary design of future flight vehicles is addressed, and the future directions of CST research in the prediction of failures of structural components, the solution of large-scale structural problems, and quality assessment and control of numerical simulations are discussed.

  9. Synthesis of ceramic-based porous gradient structures for applications in energy conversion and related fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graule, Thomas; Ozog, Paulina; Durif, Caroline; Wilkens-Heinecke, Judit; Kata, Dariusz

    2016-06-01

    Porous, graded ceramic structures are of high relevance in the field of energy conversion as well as in catalysis, and additionally in filtration technology and in biomedical applications. Among different technologies for the tailored design for such structures we demonstrate here a new environmental friendly UV curing-based concept to prepare laminated structures with pore sizes ranging from a few microns up to 50 microns in diameter and with porosities ranging from 10% up to 75 vol.% porosity.

  10. Effects of fluorine on crystallization, structure and performances of lithium aluminosilcate glass ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Xingzhong . E-mail: gxzh_zju@163.com; Yang Hui

    2006-02-02

    The effects of fluorine on the nucleation, crystallization, structure and performances of low-expansion lithium aluminosilcate glass ceramic are investigated by the differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and other measuring technologies. The introduction of fluorine promotes the nucleation and crystallization of LAS glass, lowers the crystallizing temperature, allows a direct formation of {beta}-spodumene without the transformation from {beta}-quartz into {beta}-spodumene and as a result, refines the microstructure and improves the physical and mechanical properties of the glass ceramics.

  11. Mechanical Properties of Sialic Foamed Ceramic and Applications in Defense Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xu-Yang; Li, Yong-Chi; Zhao, Kai; Gao, Guang-Fa

    2014-08-01

    Mechanical properties of a closed-cellular sialic foamed ceramic are investigated by compressive tests. The sialic foamed ceramic under uniaxial stress compression shows brittleness and the flow stress increases with the strain rate. The engineering stress-engineering strain curve under uniaxial strain compression could be divided into three stages: linear elasticity, collapsed plateau and densification. The unloading elastic modulus, Poisson ratio and energy absorption ability are discussed. Shelly cellular material made by sialic foamed ceramic is applied into the stress distribution layer in the defense structure. Field explosion experiments are performed for the sand based stress distribution layer and shelly cellular material based layer. Compared with sand, the shelly cellular material reduces the peak stress of the blast wave.

  12. Structural, spectral-luminescent, and lasing properties of nanostructured Tm : CaF{sub 2} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabochkina, P A; Lyapin, A A; Osiko, Vyacheslav V; Fedorov, Pavel P; Ushakov, S N; Kruglova, M V; Sakharov, N V; Garibin, E A; Gusev, P E; Krutov, M A

    2012-09-30

    The structure and the spectral-luminescent properties of CaF{sub 2} - TmF{sub 3} fluoride ceramics and single crystals are studied. AFM investigations revealed a layered nanostructure of grains, which was not observed in reference samples of single crystals. It is found that the spectral-luminescent properties of CaF{sub 2} - TmF{sub 3} ceramics and single crystals are similar. Lasing at the {sup 3}F{sub 4} {yields} {sup 3}H{sub 6} transition of Tm{sup 3+} ions in CaF{sub 2} - TmF{sub 3} ceramics (wavelength 1898 nm) under diode pimping is obtained for the first time. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  13. Recent developments of advanced structures for space optics at Astrium, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stute, Thomas; Wulz, Georg; Scheulen, Dietmar

    2003-12-01

    The mechanical division of EADS Astrium GmbH, Friedrichshafen Germany, the former Dornier Satellitensystem GmbH is currently engaged with the development, manufacturing and testing of three different advanced dimensionally stable composite and ceramic material structures for satellite borne optics: -CFRP Camera Structure -Planck Telescope Reflectors -NIRSpec Optical Bench Breadboard for James Web Space Telescope The paper gives an overview over the requirements and the main structural features how these requirements are met. Special production aspects and available test results are reported.

  14. Utilization of fly ash in structural and decorative ceramic products

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.E.; Dreher, G.B.; Rostam-Abadi, R.

    1996-12-31

    The main objective of this study is to promote the use of fly ash from electric power plants in Illinois in the manufacture of bricks. Fly ash that is produced during the burning of coal represents a continuing disposal problem and thus a disincentive to coal`s use. Each year, approximately 5 X 10{sup 6} metric tons of fly ash are produced from burning Illinois coals. Use of brick clays for ceramic products in the Illinois area amounted to about 0.5 X 10{sup 6} metric tons in 1994. If significant amounts of fly ash were used in the manufacture of fired-clay products such as brick, the fly ash disposal problem would be reduced, a valuable construction product would be created, and mining of brick clays would be slowed. Furthermore, the clay minerals in the green bricks are dehydroxylated during the firing process. Fly ash already has been through dehydrox1yation, therefore this energy for dehydroxylation is {open_quotes}saved{close_quotes} during brick manufacture. Six tasks were defined to meet our objectives: (1) manufacture bricks that contain 20 wt% or more of fly ash under normal plant-scale conditions; (2) measure the firing characteristics of mixtures created by using extremes in chemical composition of Illinois fly ashes and brick clays and shales; (3) from those measurements, derive equations that predict the firing characteristics of any mixture of clay and fly ash; (4) optimize mixtures of brick clays with sources of fly ash near existing ceramic plants; (5) perform tests to determine the leachability of toxic constituents, if any, from the bricks; and (6) integrate the results of tasks 1 and 2 with preliminary engineering and market assessments to evaluate the feasibility of large-scale use of fly ash in fired-clay products.

  15. Ceramic-metal seals for advanced battery systems. [sodium sulfur and lithium sulfur batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, L.

    1978-01-01

    The search for materials which are electrochemically compatible with the lithium sulfur and sodium sulfur systems is discussed. The use liquid or braze alloys, titanium hydrite coatings, and tungsten yttria for bonding beryllium with ceramic is examined.

  16. An Harmonic Smile Resulted from the Use of Ceramic Prosthesis with Zirconia Structure: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tavarez, Rudys Rodolfo de Jesus; Goncalves, Leticia Machado; Dias, Ana Paula; Dias, Anna Claudia Pereira; Malheiros, Adriana Santos; Silva, Alice Carvalho; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho

    2014-01-01

    The rehabilitation of patients requiring an esthetic smile demands a multidisciplinary approach. This clinical report describes a treatment plan for recovery aesthetics’ smile of anterior teeth using ceramic prosthesis with zirconia structure. Initially, a review of aesthetic parameters, diagnostic waxing, mock-up and provisional restorations was performed. A contextual assessment of aesthetic, proportion and shape of teeth was done to recreate a natural looking for teeth in consonance with the smile line. Subsequently, based on these parameters, fixed prostheses of the upper anterior teeth using ceramic restorations with zirconia infrastructures were performed. The use of ceramic restorations with zirconia structures associated with a careful treatment plan allows the professional to integrate esthetic and function for satisfactory clinical results. How to cite the article: Tavarez RR, Gonçalves LM, Dias AP, Dias AC, Malheiros AS, Silva AC, Bandeca MC. An harmonic smile resulted from the use of ceramic prosthesis with zirconia structure: A case report. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):90-2. PMID:25083040

  17. Preparation of Silicon Nitride Multilayer Ceramic Radome Material and Optimal Design of the Wall Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Fei; Shen Qiang; Zhang Lianmeng

    2008-02-15

    A study of silicon nitride ceramic radomes, which includes preparation of the material and optimal design of the radome wall structure, is presented in this paper. Multilayer radome wall structure with high dielectric constant skins and a low dielectric constant core layer is used for broadband application. As a candidate material for both the skins and core layer, silicon nitride ceramics of controlled dielectric constant in the range 3.0{approx}7.5 were prepared by adding different content of sintering aids such as magnesia, alumina, silica and zirconium phosphate binder and choosing suitable sintering methods. A computer aided design (CAD) for the wall structure of silicon nitride multilayer ceramic radome based on microwave equivalent network method is carried out according to design requirements. By optimizing the thickness of skins and core layer, the power transmission efficiency of such a multilayer Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramic radome is calculated. The calculated results suggest that when the dielectric constant of skins lies in the range 6{approx}7.5 and core layer in the range 3.5{approx}4, the power transmission efficiency is above 85% with frequency of 2{approx}18 GHz while the thickness of skins is less than 0.03{lambda} and the thickness ratio of skins to core layer is less than 1:15.

  18. Synthesis of high performance ceramic fibers by chemical vapor deposition for advanced metallics reinforcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revankar, Vithal; Hlavacek, Vladimir

    1991-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesis of fibers capable of effectively reinforcing intermetallic matrices at elevated temperatures which can be used for potential applications in high temperature composite materials is described. This process was used due to its advantage over other fiber synthesis processes. It is extremely important to produce these fibers with good reproducible and controlled growth rates. However, the complex interplay of mass and energy transfer, blended with the fluid dynamics makes this a formidable task. The design and development of CVD reactor assembly and system to synthesize TiB2, CrB, B4C, and TiC fibers was performed. Residual thermal analysis for estimating stresses arising form thermal expansion mismatch were determined. Various techniques to improve the mechanical properties were also performed. Various techniques for improving the fiber properties were elaborated. The crystal structure and its orientation for TiB2 fiber is discussed. An overall view of the CVD process to develop CrB2, TiB2, and other high performance ceramic fibers is presented.

  19. Advanced ceramics for land-based gas turbine applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.; Ludeman, E.; Sabol, S.M.

    1997-05-23

    In order to increase the efficiency of land-based gas turbines, inlet gas temperatures have to be increased, and the amount of air which cools the turbine vanes has to be reduced, to the maximum extent possible. Presently, thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) are the state of the art in achieving these goals. However, since TBC`s are very thin (typically 100 {mu}m), they have clearly limitations. Since all-ceramic turbine vanes would be a very large and risky development step, Westinghouse is considering to protect the leading edges of turbine vanes with high-performance ceramics. This might be done by either replacing the leading edge with a suitably shaped ceramic part, or by modifying the vanes such that they can accommodate ceramic inserts. Among the most important criteria for the success of ceramics in such applications are (a) thermodynamic compatibility with the turbine vane alloy, (b) sufficient thermal shock resistance to survive the thermal cycling during operation and in particular during emergency shut-down, and a design considering the thermal expansion mismatch of the metallic and ceramic components. This paper presents results of work performed on SiC, SiN, and aluminas.

  20. Effect of Yttrium Doping in Barium Zirconium Titanate Ceramics: A Structural, Impedance, and Modulus Spectroscopy Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badapanda, Tanmaya; Cavalcante, Laécio Santos; da Luz, Geraldo Eduardo; Batista, Nouga Cardoso; Anwar, Shahid; Longo, Elson

    2013-09-01

    In the current article, we studied the effect of yttrium [Y3+] ions' substitution on the structure and electric behavior of barium zirconate titanate (BZT) ceramics with a general formula [Ba1- x Y2 x/3](Zr0.25Ti0.75)O3 (BYZT) with [ x = 0, 0.025, and 0.05] which were prepared by the solid-state reaction method. X-ray diffraction patterns indicate that these ceramics have a single phase with a perovskite-type cubic structure. Rietveld refinement data confirmed [BaO12], [ZrO6], [TiO6], and [YO6] clusters in the cubic lattice. The Y3+ ions' effects on the electric conductivity behavior of BZT ceramics as a function of temperature and frequency are described, which are based on impedance spectroscopy analyses. The complex impedance plots display a double semicircle which highlights the influences of grain and grain boundary on the ceramics. Impedance analyses showed that the resistance decreased with the increasing temperature and resulted in a negative temperature coefficient of the resistance property in all compositions. Modulus plots represent a non-Debye-type dielectric relaxation which is related to the grain and grain boundary as well as temperature-dependent electric relaxation phenomenon and an enhancement in the mobility barrier by Y3+ ions. Moreover, the electric conductivity increases with the replacement of Ba2+ by Y3+ ions may be due to the rise in oxygen vacancies.

  1. Nondestructive evaluation of structural ceramics by photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, Pramod K.

    1987-01-01

    A photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) digital imaging system was developed and utilized to characterize silicon nitride material at the various stages of the ceramic fabrication process. Correlation studies revealed that photoacoustic microscopy detected failure initiating defects in substantially more specimens than microradiography and ultrasonic techniques. Photoacoustic microscopy detected 10 to 100 micron size surface and subsurface pores and inclusions, respectively, up to 80 microns below the interrogating surface in machined sintered silicon nitride. Microradiography detected 50 micron diameter fracture controlling pores and inclusions. Subsurface holes were detected up to a depth of 570 microns and 1.00 mm in sintered silicon nitride and silicon carbide, respectively. Seeded voids of 20 to 30 micron diameters at the surface and 50 microns below the interrogating surface were detected by photoacoustic microscopy and microradiography with 1 percent X-ray thickness sensitivity. Tight surface cracks of 96 micron length x 48 micron depth were detected by photoacoustic microscopy. PAM volatilized and removed material in the green state which resulted in linear shallow microcracks after sintering. This significantly limits the use of PAM as an in-process NDE technique.

  2. Optimizing structure and electrical properties of high-Curie temperature PMN-PHT piezoelectric ceramics via tailoring sintering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Rongfeng; Yin, Ying; Fang, Bijun; Chen, Zhihui; Zhang, Shuai; Ding, Jianning; Zhao, Xiangyong; Luo, Haosu

    2016-06-01

    Pseudo-ternary high-Curie temperature 0.15Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.4PbHfO3-0.45PbTiO3 (PMN-PHT) piezoelectric ceramics were prepared by the conventional ceramic processing via the columbite precursor method. The influences of sintering temperature and sintering time on structure and electrical properties of the PMN-PHT ceramics were investigated in order to tailor their performance further. The sintered PMN-PHT ceramics exhibit pure perovskite structure with composition locating at the rhombohedral side around the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) of the PMN-PHT system. The PMN-PHT ceramics sintered at 1260 °C for 2 h exhibit the best dielectric, ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties. The high piezoelectric response of the PMN-PHT ceramics is considered as relating to the MPB effect and their dense microstructure obtained via tailoring sintering conditions. The sintered PMN-PHT ceramics exhibit good thermal stability of piezoelectricity and ferroelectricity within the common usage temperatures, indicating that such ceramics are promising candidates for piezoelectric devices at elevated temperatures.

  3. Development of nondestructive evaluation methods for structural ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W.A.; Koehl, R.D.; Stuckey, J.B.; Sun, J.G.; Engel, H.P.; Smith, R.G.

    1997-06-01

    Development of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for application to fossil energy systems continues in three areas: (a) mapping axial and radial density gradients in hot gas filters, (b) characterization of the quality of continuous fiber ceramic matrix composite (CFCC) joints and (c) characterization and detection of defects in thermal barrier coatings. In this work, X-ray computed tomographic imaging was further developed and used to map variations in the axial and radial density of two full length (2.3-m) hot gas filters. The two filters differed in through wall density because of the thickness of the coating on the continuous fibers. Differences in axial and through wall density were clearly detected. Through transmission infrared imaging with a highly sensitivity focal plane array camera was used to assess joint quality in two sets of SiC/SiC CFCC joints. High frame rate data capture suggests that the infrared imaging method holds potential for the characterization of CFCC joints. Work to develop NDE methods that can be used to evaluate electron beam physical vapor deposited coatings with platinum-aluminide (Pt-Al) bonds was undertaken. Coatings of Zirconia with thicknesses of 125 {micro}m (0.005 in.), 190 {micro}m (0.0075 in.), and 254 {micro}m (0.010 in.) with a Pt-Al bond coat on Rene N5 Ni-based superalloy were studied by infrared imaging. Currently, it appears that thickness variation, as well as thermal properties, can be assessed by infrared technology.

  4. Effects of flaws on fracture behavior of structural ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.P.; Singh, D.; Sutaria, M.

    1996-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of fiber coating thickness, fiber orientation, and elevated temperature on flaw morphology and mechanical properties of Nicalon-fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites with fiber cloth lay-up sequences of 0{degree}/45{degrees}, 0{degree}/20{degrees}/60{degrees}, and 0{degree}/40{degrees}/60{degrees} and fiber coating thicknesses of 0. 2 and 0.4{mu}m. For the three fiber cloth lay-up sequences (0{degree}/45{degrees}, 0{degree}/20{degrees}/60{degrees}, and 0{degree}/40{degrees}/60{degrees}), mechanical property (first matrix cracking stress, ultimate stress, and work of fracture) initially increase with coating thickness and reach peak values at a coating thickness of 0.2{mu}m. A further increase in coating thickness does not result in further improvements in mechanical properties; this is related to the role of coatings in protecting fibers from damage during composite processing. Measured values of strength and work-of- fracture of the above composites at elevated temperatures increased with temperature up to 1200{degrees}C, but decreased at higher temperatures. This decrease is correlated to in-situ fiber strength and fiber/matrix interface degradation. Correlations between model prediction and measured room-temperature ultimate strength of composites with 0{degree}45{degrees} and 0{degree}/40{degrees}/60{degrees} lay-up sequences were established by using in-situ fiber strength characteristics. The failure modes and degradation mechanisms in hot-gas filters and ceramic composite joints are being characterized by the mechanical and fractographic evaluation techniques established thus far. Correlations of these results with those of nondestructive evaluation can provide critical information for improved quality control.

  5. Reliability analysis of structural ceramics subjected to biaxial flexure

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Luen-Yuan.

    1993-01-01

    Two weakest-link fracture statistics formulations for multiaxial loading, Batdorf's flaw density and orientation distribution approach and Evans' elemental strength approach, were compared for identical fracture criteria and flaw-size distribution function. Despite some fundamental differences in the methodology used in calculating fracture probabilities for multiaxial loading, the two approaches gave identical predictions. A recent contradictory conclusion reported in the literature is shown to be incorrect. Fracture stresses of a sintered alumina and silicon nitride were assessed in qualified uniaxial (three-point and four-point) and biaxial (uniform-pressure-on-disk) flexure tests in inert conditions. The size and stress-state effects on the inert fracture stress of alumina were explained by a reliability analysis based on randomly oriented surface flaws and a mixed-mode fracture criterion. Fracture stresses of silicon nitride were in accord with a reliability analysis based on volume flaws with preferred orientation (crack plane normal to the maximum principal stress) and a normal stress fracture criterion. The preferred orientation of the flaws in silicon nitride resulted from stress-induced nucleation of cracks around pores. Alumina ceramic was also tested in deionized water at a low stressing rate (1 MPa/s). The decreased fracture stresses measured in both uniaxial and biaxial flexure tests in water as compared to the inert fracture stresses were consistent with subcritical crack growth behavior inferred from dynamic fatigue tests in water. The analysis of the size and stress-state effects on and time-dependent degradation of fracture stresses included consideration of the statistical uncertainties (90 percent confidence intervals) of the estimated Weibull (Weibull modulus, m, and characteristic strength, sigma[sub theta]) and slow-crack-growth (stress-intensity exponent, N, and critical crack growth rate, V[sub C]) parameters.

  6. Graded Yb:YAG ceramic structures: design, fabrication and characterization of the laser performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toci, Guido; Lapucci, Antonio; Ciofini, Marco; Esposito, Laura; Hostaša, Jan; Piancastelli, Andreana; Gizzi, Leonida A.; Labate, Luca; Ferrara, Paolo; Pirri, Angela; Vannini, Matteo

    2015-05-01

    Significant improvements in efficiency in high power, high repetition rate laser systems should come from the use of ceramic laser active elements suitably designed to mitigate the thermal and thermo-mechanical effects (TEs and TMEs) deriving from the laser pumping process. Laser active media exhibiting a controlled and gradual distribution of the active element(s) could therefore find useful applications in the laser-driven inertial confinement fusion systems, which are considered among the most promising energy source of the future (ultraintense laser pulses), and in medical applications (ultrashort laser pulses) The present work explores the flexibility of the ceramic process for the construction of YAG (Y3Al5O12) ceramic laser elements with a controlled distribution of the Yb doping, in view of the realization of structures modelled to respond to specific application. Two processing techniques are presented to prepare layered structures with a tailored modulation of the doping level, with the goal of reducing the peak temperature, the temperature gradients and also the thermally-induced deformation of the laser material, thus mitigating the overall thermal effects. Tape casting in combination with thermal compression of ceramic tapes with a varying doping level is one of the presented techniques. To make this process as more adaptable as possible, commercial micrometric ceramic powders have been used. The results are compared with those obtained using nanometric powders and a shaping process based on the subsequent pressing of spray dried powders with a different doping level. Laser performance has been characterized in a longitudinally diode pumped laser cavity. The laser efficiency under high thermal load conditions has been compared to those obtained from samples with uniform doping, and for samples obtained with press shaping and tape casting, under the same conditions.

  7. Influence of the supporting die structures on the fracture strength of all-ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Munir Tolga; Yondem, Isa; Aykent, Filiz; Eraslan, Oğuz

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of the elastic modulus of supporting dies on the fracture strengths of all-ceramic materials used in dental crowns. Four different types of supporting die materials (dentin, epoxy resin, brass, and stainless steel) (24 per group) were prepared using a milling machine to simulate a mandibular molar all-ceramic core preparation. A total number of 96 zirconia cores were fabricated using a CAD/CAM system. The specimens were divided into two groups. In the first group, cores were cemented to substructures using a dual-cure resin cement. In the second group, cores were not cemented to the supporting dies. The specimens were loaded using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture occurred. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests (α = 0.05). The geometric models of cores and supporting die materials were developed using finite element method to obtain the stress distribution of the forces. Cemented groups showed statistically higher fracture strength values than non-cemented groups. While ceramic cores on stainless steel dies showed the highest fracture strength values, ceramic cores on dentin dies showed the lowest fracture strength values among the groups. The elastic modulus of the supporting die structure is a significant factor in determining the fracture resistance of all-ceramic crowns. Using supporting die structures that have a low elastic modulus may be suitable for fracture strength tests, in order to accurately reflect clinical conditions. PMID:21845404

  8. Influence of the supporting die structures on the fracture strength of all-ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Munir Tolga; Yondem, Isa; Aykent, Filiz; Eraslan, Oğuz

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of the elastic modulus of supporting dies on the fracture strengths of all-ceramic materials used in dental crowns. Four different types of supporting die materials (dentin, epoxy resin, brass, and stainless steel) (24 per group) were prepared using a milling machine to simulate a mandibular molar all-ceramic core preparation. A total number of 96 zirconia cores were fabricated using a CAD/CAM system. The specimens were divided into two groups. In the first group, cores were cemented to substructures using a dual-cure resin cement. In the second group, cores were not cemented to the supporting dies. The specimens were loaded using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture occurred. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests (α = 0.05). The geometric models of cores and supporting die materials were developed using finite element method to obtain the stress distribution of the forces. Cemented groups showed statistically higher fracture strength values than non-cemented groups. While ceramic cores on stainless steel dies showed the highest fracture strength values, ceramic cores on dentin dies showed the lowest fracture strength values among the groups. The elastic modulus of the supporting die structure is a significant factor in determining the fracture resistance of all-ceramic crowns. Using supporting die structures that have a low elastic modulus may be suitable for fracture strength tests, in order to accurately reflect clinical conditions.

  9. Silicon-Based Ceramic-Matrix Composites for Advanced Turbine Engines: Some Degradation Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Ogbuji, Linus U. J.

    2000-01-01

    SiC/BN/SiC composites are designed to take advantage of the high specific strengths and moduli of non-oxide ceramics, and their excellent resistance to creep, chemical attack, and oxidation, while circumventing the brittleness inherent in ceramics. Hence, these composites have the potential to take turbine engines of the future to higher operating temperatures than is achievable with metal alloys. However, these composites remain developmental and more work needs to be done to optimize processing techniques. This paper highlights the lingering issue of pest degradation in these materials and shows that it results from vestiges of processing steps and can thus be minimized or eliminated.

  10. Design, synthesis and characterization of the advanced tritium breeder: Li4+xSi1-xAlxO4 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Linjie; Long, Xinggui; Chen, Xiaojun; Xiao, Chengjian; Gong, Yu; Guan, Qiushi; Li, Jiamao; Xie, Lei; Chen, Xiping; Peng, Shuming

    2015-12-01

    Li4+xSi1-xAlxO4 solid solutions which were designed as the advanced tritium breeder were obtained by solid state reactions. Samples were systematically characterized by various techniques. XRD, neutron diffraction and Raman results showed that the Aluminum substituted silicon into the Li4SiO4 lattice and Li+ interstitials formed as a result of charge compensation. Rietveld refinements of neutron diffraction showed that the crystalline structure had been expanded as Al-doped. Moreover, the lithium atom density, thermal conductivity and the mechanical property of the Li4+xSi1-xAlxO4 ceramics were improved relative to the Li4SiO4.

  11. Stochastic-Strength-Based Damage Simulation Tool for Ceramic Matrix and Polymer Matrix Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pineda, Evan J.; Walton, Owen J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic-based, discrete-event progressive damage simulations of ceramic-matrix composite and polymer matrix composite material structures have been enabled through the development of a unique multiscale modeling tool. This effort involves coupling three independently developed software programs: (1) the Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC), (2) the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life Prediction Program (CARES/ Life), and (3) the Abaqus finite element analysis (FEA) program. MAC/GMC contributes multiscale modeling capabilities and micromechanics relations to determine stresses and deformations at the microscale of the composite material repeating unit cell (RUC). CARES/Life contributes statistical multiaxial failure criteria that can be applied to the individual brittle-material constituents of the RUC. Abaqus is used at the global scale to model the overall composite structure. An Abaqus user-defined material (UMAT) interface, referred to here as "FEAMAC/CARES," was developed that enables MAC/GMC and CARES/Life to operate seamlessly with the Abaqus FEA code. For each FEAMAC/CARES simulation trial, the stochastic nature of brittle material strength results in random, discrete damage events, which incrementally progress and lead to ultimate structural failure. This report describes the FEAMAC/CARES methodology and discusses examples that illustrate the performance of the tool. A comprehensive example problem, simulating the progressive damage of laminated ceramic matrix composites under various off-axis loading conditions and including a double notched tensile specimen geometry, is described in a separate report.

  12. XRD and FTIR structural investigation of gadolinium-zinc-borate glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Borodi, G.; Pascuta, P.; Dan, V.; Pop, V.; Stefan, R.; Radulescu, D.

    2013-11-13

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements have been employed to investigate the (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub x}⋅(B{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub (60−x)}⋅(ZnO){sub 40} glass ceramics system, with 0 ≤ x ≤ 15 mol%. After heat treatment applied at 860 °C for 2 h, some structural changes were observed and new crystalline phases appeared in the structure of the samples. In these glass ceramics four crystalline phases were identified using powder diffraction files (PDF 2), namely ZnB{sub 4}O{sub 7}, Zn{sub 4}O(B{sub 6}O{sub 12}), Zn{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} and GdBO{sub 3}. From the XRD data, the average unit-cell parameter and the quantitative ratio of the crystallographic phases in the studied samples were evaluated. FTIR data revealed that the BO{sub 3}, BO{sub 4} and ZnO{sub 4} are the main structural units of these glass ceramics network. The compositional dependence of the different structural units which appear in the studied samples was followed.

  13. Advanced fiber placement of composite fuselage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert L.; Grant, Carroll G.

    1991-01-01

    The Hercules/NASA Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) program will demonstrate the low cost potential of the automated fiber placement process. The Hercules fiber placement machine was developed for cost effective production of composite aircraft structures. The process uses a low cost prepreg tow material form and achieves equivalent laminate properties to structures fabricated with prepreg tape layup. Fiber placement demonstrations planned for the Hercules/NASA program include fabrication of stiffened test panels which represent crown, keel, and window belt segments of a typical transport aircraft fuselage.

  14. Structural And Electrical Analysis Of Lead Free BZT-xBCT Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Chandan; Kumar, Ashvani; Kaur, Davinder

    2010-12-01

    A comparative study of structural and electric properties of a recently discovered lead free electroceramic, Ba(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3-x(Ba0.7Ca0.3)TiO3 or BZT-xBCT, was conducted in the entire range from x = 0 to x = 1. This novel ceramic composite is being seen as a genuine understudy for commercially one of the most widely used piezoelectric ceramic, PZT, which is facing worldwide criticism due to its lead toxicity. The new system can be very extensively used like PZT in transduction applications as sensor, actuator and ultrasonic devices apart from numerous other utilities. The XRD, SEM and Ferroelectric studies establish the structural transition and different phases as function of Zr /Ti and Ba /Ca ratios.

  15. Structural And Electrical Analysis Of Lead Free BZT-xBCT Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Bhardwaj, Chandan; Kumar, Ashvani; Kaur, Davinder

    2010-12-01

    A comparative study of structural and electric properties of a recently discovered lead free electroceramic, Ba(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3}-x(Ba{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3})TiO{sub 3} or BZT-xBCT, was conducted in the entire range from x = 0 to x = 1. This novel ceramic composite is being seen as a genuine understudy for commercially one of the most widely used piezoelectric ceramic, PZT, which is facing worldwide criticism due to its lead toxicity. The new system can be very extensively used like PZT in transduction applications as sensor, actuator and ultrasonic devices apart from numerous other utilities. The XRD, SEM and Ferroelectric studies establish the structural transition and different phases as function of Zr /Ti and Ba /Ca ratios.

  16. Advances in Homology Protein Structure Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Zhexin

    2007-01-01

    Homology modeling plays a central role in determining protein structure in the structural genomics project. The importance of homology modeling has been steadily increasing because of the large gap that exists between the overwhelming number of available protein sequences and experimentally solved protein structures, and also, more importantly, because of the increasing reliability and accuracy of the method. In fact, a protein sequence with over 30% identity to a known structure can often be predicted with an accuracy equivalent to a low-resolution X-ray structure. The recent advances in homology modeling, especially in detecting distant homologues, aligning sequences with template structures, modeling of loops and side chains, as well as detecting errors in a model, have contributed to reliable prediction of protein structure, which was not possible even several years ago. The ongoing efforts in solving protein structures, which can be time-consuming and often difficult, will continue to spur the development of a host of new computational methods that can fill in the gap and further contribute to understanding the relationship between protein structure and function. PMID:16787261

  17. Structural Integrity and Microstructure of NA^+ Conducting Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipinska, Kristina; Kalita, Patricia; Hemmers, Oliver; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Shebanova, Olga; Yang, Wenge; Mariotto, Gino

    2010-03-01

    Oxides with the general formula of Na1+x Zr2 Six P3-x O12 , known as Nasicon, are fast Na+ ion-conducting materials with important electrochemical applications and many functional properties, often attributed to their unique structural features. Comparative, in situ studies of the limits of structural integrity were performed for selected Nasicon materials, using synchrotron x-ray diffraction and diamond anvil cell technology. We show how different processing conditions produce crystalline structures with specific morphology. We discuss the bulk modulus, the compressibility and the influence of the volume fraction of primary and secondary crystalline phases on the overall Nasicon structural integrity.

  18. Approaches to the design of structural ceramics incorporating whiskers and particulate phases

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, P.F.; Lin, H.T.; Hsueh, C.H.; Alexander, K.B.; Warwick, W.H.; Waters, S.B.

    1994-09-01

    Advances in the technologically and commercially important areas of energy production and conversion, transportation, chemical processing, manufacturing, electronics, and communications are predicted upon the development of materials with greatly improved performance. Many of these components will be exposed to tensile stresses, and possibly quite high temperatures, which will require that the materials be designed to (1) achieve greater fracture resistance, (2) resist deformation at elevated temperatures, and (3) achieve the main component function. Here, theoretical modeling and observations of crack propagation in ceramics and composites are combined to identify and characterize mechanisms that contribute to fracture resistance and strength. Materials processing studies can then be employed to (1) develop the microstructural features suggested by the models and (2) understand the mechanisms involved in the generation of such microstructures. In this paper, the authors address how these various aspects can be used to enhance the mechanical performance of zirconia toughened ceramics (specifically involving transformation toughening) and whisker-reinforced ceramics with comments on other composites incorporating other discontinuous phases.

  19. Advances in Structures for Large Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith

    2004-01-01

    The development of structural systems for scientific remote sensing and space exploration has been underway for four decades. The seminal work from 1960 to 1980 provided the basis for many of the design principles of modern space systems. From 1980- 2000 advances in active materials and structures and the maturing of composites technology led to high precision active systems such those used in the Space Interferometry Mission. Recently, thin-film membrane or gossamer structures are being investigated for use in large area space systems because of their low mass and high packaging efficiency. Various classes of Large Space Systems (LSS) are defined in order to describe the goals and system challenges in structures and materials technologies. With an appreciation of both past and current technology developments, future technology challenges are used to develop a list of technology investments that can have significant impacts on LSS development.

  20. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Spear, K.E.

    1996-08-01

    A vertical flow-through furnace has been built to study the effect of corrosion on the morphology and mechanical properties of ceramic hot gas filters. Sections of 3M Type 203 and DuPont Lanxide SiC-SiC filter tubes were sealed at one end and suspended in the furnace while being subjected to a simulated coal combustion environment at 870{degrees}C. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy is used to identify phase and morphology changes due to corrosion while burst testing determines the loss of mechanical strength after exposure to the combustion gases. Additionally, a thermodynamic database of gaseous silicon compounds is currently being established so that calculations can be made to predict important products of the reaction of the environment with the ceramics. These thermodynamic calculations provide useful information concerning the regimes where the ceramic may be degraded by material vaporization. To verify the durability and predict lifetime performance of ceramic heat exchangers in coal combustion environments, long-term exposure testing of stressed (internally pressurized) tubes must be performed in actual coal combustion environments. The authors have designed a system that will internally pressurize 2 inch OD by 48 inch long ceramic heat exchanger tubes to a maximum pressure of 200 psi while exposing the outer surface of the tubes to coal combustion gas at the Combustion and Environmental Research Facility (CERF) at the Pittsburgh Energy and Technology Center. Water-cooled, internal o-ring pressure seals were designed to accommodate the existing 6 inch by 6 inch access panels of the CERF. Tubes will be exposed for up to a maximum of 500 hours at temperatures of 2500 and 2600{degrees}F with an internal pressure of 200 psi. If the tubes survive, their retained strength will be measured using the high temperature tube burst test facility at Penn State University. Fractographic analysis will be performed to identify the failure source(s) for the tubes.

  1. Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Ceramics and Ceramic Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuo

    1995-01-01

    Advanced ceramics and ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) have great potential for structural application in combustion engines and other energy generating equipment since the required high operating temperatures in such environments have driven traditional metals and superalloys to their limits due to their melting points. As promising substitutes, ceramics and ceramic matrix composites not only significantly increase service temperature, but also have other salient features, such as low density, good chemical stability, and excellent hardness, which offer additional potential for extending performance limits beyond those offered by metallic materials. Dynamic mechanical properties are significant properties for structural materials which subject to dynamic loading. Because of the challenge of high temperature and vibratory environments in advanced combustion engines and energy generating systems, ceramics and ceramic composites also should have good dynamic properties so as to increase durability, reliability, and reduce noise and vibration levels. But, unfortunately, knowledge regarding dynamic mechanical properties of ceramics and ceramic composites at elevated temperatures is limited. This research has focused on the dynamic mechanical properties of silicon nitride based ceramics and composites reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers. These ceramic materials have been considered to be the most attractive structural materials for engine applications. By conducting experiments up to 1100^circC, this research systematically investigates the damping and elastic behavior, explores the possible mechanisms which dominate the damping properties of these materials, and examines the effects of simulated thermal cycling loads on dynamic mechanical properties and microstructures of these promising high temperature structural materials. This research also studies the experimental methods for dynamic testing of ceramic materials, compares experimental results with some

  2. Open pore structure analysis of lithium bearing ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbel, H.

    1988-07-01

    The analysis of the open pore structure includes mercury porosimetry, helium stereopycnometry, gas permeability and specific surface area measurements. These methods were used in the analysis of different types of Li 2SiO 3 and Li 4SiO 4 specimens whose behaviour is tested under operation conditions in various irradiation experiments. Mercury porosimetry yielded density of the specimens, size distribution of the channels and amount of the open porosity. The correlation between mercury pressure and channel diameter was approximated by the Washburn equation. Density determinations by means of helium stereopycnometry demonstrated the existence of open pore volume below the mercury porosimetry detection. Additional information about the structure of open porosity was obtained by gas permeability measurements evaluated using the Carman relation, which is a generalization of the Hagen-Poiseuille law. This approach correlates structure parameters of the open porosity with permeability coefficients. The specific surface area was determined by applying the BET theory to volumetric nitrogen gas adsorption.

  3. CARES/LIFE Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life Prediction Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Powers, Lynn M.; Janosik, Lesley A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2003-01-01

    This manual describes the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life Prediction (CARES/LIFE) computer program. The program calculates the time-dependent reliability of monolithic ceramic components subjected to thermomechanical and/or proof test loading. CARES/LIFE is an extension of the CARES (Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) computer program. The program uses results from MSC/NASTRAN, ABAQUS, and ANSYS finite element analysis programs to evaluate component reliability due to inherent surface and/or volume type flaws. CARES/LIFE accounts for the phenomenon of subcritical crack growth (SCG) by utilizing the power law, Paris law, or Walker law. The two-parameter Weibull cumulative distribution function is used to characterize the variation in component strength. The effects of multiaxial stresses are modeled by using either the principle of independent action (PIA), the Weibull normal stress averaging method (NSA), or the Batdorf theory. Inert strength and fatigue parameters are estimated from rupture strength data of naturally flawed specimens loaded in static, dynamic, or cyclic fatigue. The probabilistic time-dependent theories used in CARES/LIFE, along with the input and output for CARES/LIFE, are described. Example problems to demonstrate various features of the program are also included.

  4. High-temperature corrosion resistance of ceramics and ceramic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-06-01

    Ceramics and ceramic composites offer the potential to operate fossil energy systems at the higher temperatures necessary for improved energy efficiency and better environmental control. However, because many fossil fuel-derived processes contain sulfur, chlorine, and carbon, as well as oxygen, degradation from high-temperature corrosion and environmental effects arising from reactions of solids with gases and condensable products is a common life-determining factor in operating systems. Ceramic-based products are not immune to such degradation; adequate corrosion resistance must be assured to exploit the technical and economic potential of such materials. This is normally accomplished by using stable, sound oxides that exist in their bulk form, that naturally grow as surface layers upon exposure to an oxidizing environment, or that are deposited as a coating on a susceptible material. It is therefore important to examine the critical issues with respect to more environmental stability of ceramics that have the potential to be corrosion resistant in particular fossil environments. Key aspects include not only chemical compatibility, but the influence of the environment on the mechanical behavior of the ceramic materials. In addition, for coatings, the mechanical reliability of the ceramic is a key issue in that an otherwise corrosion-resistant surface layer must remain sound and adherent in order to provide protection to the underlying substrate. The purpose of this work is to support the development of advanced ceramics and ceramic composites for applications in fossil environments by examining critical issues related to high-temperature corrosion resistance. More specifically, the overall objective of this task is to examine the chemical compatibility and reliability of potentially corrosion-resistant ceramics being developed as protective overcoats and/or structural materials as parts of other work elements funded by the AR&TD Program.

  5. Lifetime Reliability Evaluation of Structural Ceramic Parts with the CARES/LIFE Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Powers, Lynn M.; Janosik, Lesley A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1993-01-01

    The computer program CARES/LIFE calculates the time-dependent reliability of monolithic ceramic components subjected to thermomechanical and/or proof test loading. This program is an extension of the CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) computer program. CARES/LIFE accounts for the phenomenon of subcritical crack growth (SCG) by utilizing the power law, Paris law, or Walker equation. The two-parameter Weibull cumulative distribution function is used to characterize the variation in component strength. The effects of multiaxial stresses are modeled using either the principle of independent action (PIA), Weibull's normal stress averaging method (NSA), or Batdorf's theory. Inert strength and fatigue parameters are estimated from rupture strength data of naturally flawed specimens loaded in static, dynamic, or cyclic fatigue. Two example problems demonstrating cyclic fatigue parameter estimation and component reliability analysis with proof testing are included.

  6. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage-Structural Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, T. H.; Minguet, P. J.; Flynn, B. W.; Carbery, D. J.; Swanson, G. D.; Ilcewicz, L. B.

    1997-01-01

    Boeing is studying the technologies associated with the application of composite materials to commercial transport fuselage structure under the NASA-sponsored contracts for Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) and Materials Development Omnibus Contract (MDOC). This report addresses the program activities related to structural performance of the selected concepts, including both the design development and subsequent detailed evaluation. Design criteria were developed to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements and typical company objectives. Accurate analysis methods were selected and/or developed where practical, and conservative approaches were used where significant approximations were necessary. Design sizing activities supported subsequent development by providing representative design configurations for structural evaluation and by identifying the critical performance issues. Significant program efforts were directed towards assessing structural performance predictive capability. The structural database collected to perform this assessment was intimately linked to the manufacturing scale-up activities to ensure inclusion of manufacturing-induced performance traits. Mechanical tests were conducted to support the development and critical evaluation of analysis methods addressing internal loads, stability, ultimate strength, attachment and splice strength, and damage tolerance. Unresolved aspects of these performance issues were identified as part of the assessments, providing direction for future development.

  7. Task 6.3/6.7.4 - Engineering Performance of Advanced Structural Materials

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Hurley; John P. Kay

    1998-11-16

    Future energy systems will be required to fire low-grade fuels and meet higher energy conversion efficiencies than today's systems. The steam cycle used at present is-limited to a maximum temperature of 550C, because above that the stainless steel tubes deform and corrode excessively. However, to boost efficiency significantly, much higher working fluid temperatures are required. Although high-temperature alloys will suffice for the construction of these components in the near term, the greatest efficiency increases can only be reached with the use of advanced structural ceramics

  8. Study on Coloration Mechanism of Chinese Ancient Ceramics by X-ray Absorption Near-edge Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Y. H.; Xie, Z.; He, J. F.; Liu, Q. H.; Pan, Z. Y.; Cheng, W. R.; Wei, S. Q.

    2013-04-01

    The Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra of a series of ceramic shards were measured by fluorescence mode to reveal the color-generating techniques of Chinese porcelain. The analysis disclosed relationships among the chemical form of the iron, the firing conditions and the colors of the ceramics. The results indicate that the coloration for different ceramics depend on the valence states of iron as the main color element in glaze and the proportion of Fe2+ and Fe3+ was attributed to the baking technology. The findings provide important information for archaeologist on the coloration researches.

  9. Structural Tailoring of Advanced Turboprops (STAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Kenneth W.

    1988-01-01

    This interim report describes the progress achieved in the structural Tailoring of Advanced Turboprops (STAT) program which was developed to perform numerical optimizations on highly swept propfan blades. The optimization procedure seeks to minimize an objective function, defined as either direct operating cost or aeroelastic differences between a blade and its scaled model, by tuning internal and external geometry variables that must satisfy realistic blade design constraints. This report provides a detailed description of the input, optimization procedures, approximate analyses and refined analyses, as well as validation test cases for the STAT program. In addition, conclusions and recommendations are summarized.

  10. Structure and properties of sodium bismuth titanate ferroelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksel, Elena

    Piezoelectric materials are commonly used in sensor and actuator technologies due to their unique ability to couple electrical and mechanical displacements. Applications of piezoelectric materials range from diesel engine fuel injectors, sonar, ultrasound, and nanopositioners in scanning microscopes. Changing environmental regulations and policies have led to a recent surge in the research of lead-free piezoelectric materials. One such system currently under investigation is sodium bismuth titanate (Na0.5Bi0.5 TiO3) or NBT. It has recently been investigated with the addition of chemical modifiers as well as part of various solid solutions with other compounds. However, research into the structure and properties of NBT is still in its infancy. The aim of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive understanding of the crystal structure and property relationships in NBT. First, the formation of the NBT phase during solid state processing was examined using in situ X-ray diffraction. It was determined that NBT forms through a particle conversion mechanism of the Bi2O 3 particle. The average and local room temperature structure of calcined and sintered NBT were examined using both high resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction techniques. It was determined that the room temperature average structure of this material is best modeled using the monoclinic Cc space group rather than the previously accepted rhombohedral R3c space group. A combined high resolution XRD and neutron diffraction Rietveld refinement provided refined lattice parameters, atomic positions, and displacement parameters. The departure of the local structure of NBT from the average structure was examined through the Pair Distribution Function analysis. It was determined that Na+ and Bi3+, which share the A-site, have differing bonding environments with their surrounding O2- ions. In order to understand the origin of the piezoelectric depolarization behavior of NBT, crystal

  11. Advance in friction welding and ultrasonic welding of ceramics to metals

    SciTech Connect

    Greitmann, M.J.; Weib, R.

    1997-11-01

    The authors have joined four different ceramic materials (MgO-PSZ, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} cylinders 10 mm in diameter and 50 mm in length) to the aluminum alloy Al-Si1MgMn by friction welding. Process parameters such as friction speed, axial force, burn-off and torque have been recorded continuously. For some specimens the authors recorded the temperature at the interface using thermocouples. The joints obtained were tested in tension. Fracture occurred either in the ceramic or at the interface. Heat conduction calculations to estimate the temperature distribution during welding have been conducted by the Finite Element Method (FEM), using experimental data for input. Afterwards, residual stresses introduced through thermal expansion mismatch and stresses introduced through a tensile test have been determined by FEM. Applying multiaxial Weibull statistics to the ceramic specimen, tensile strength for different geometries of the joint and different material combinations was estimated. Ultrasonic welded joints of MgO-PSZ and Steel X 4 CrNi 18-10 according to DIN EN (comparable to the US-steel AISI No. 304) could be realized using aluminum interlayers. In addition to a conventional ultrasonic welding equipment for metal welding a new molecular coldwelding technique (ultrasonic torsional welding system) was tested. In comparison to friction welding the ultrasonic welding technique results in limited deformation of the ceramic-metal joint parts and in a decreased welding time. Nevertheless a special solution must be found to the problem of tool wear and the vibration conditions.

  12. Recent advancements in transparent ceramics and crystal fibers for high power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Baker, C.; Villalobos, G.; Florea, C.; Gibson, D.; Shaw, L. B.; Bowman, S.; Bayya, S.; Sadowski, B.; Hunt, M.; Askins, C.; Peele, J.; Aggarwal, I. D.; Sanghera, J. S.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present our recent progress in the development of rare-earth (Yb3+ or Ho3+) doped Lu2O3 and Y2O3 sesquioxides for high power solid state lasers. We have fabricated high quality transparent ceramics using nano-powders synthesized by a co-precipitation method. This was accomplished by developments in high purity powder synthesis and low temperature scalable sintering technology developed at NRL. The optical, spectral and morphological properties as well as the lasing performance from our highly transparent ceramics are presented. In the second part of the paper, we discuss our recent research effort in developing cladded-single crystal fibers for high power single frequency fiber lasers has the potential to significantly exceed the capabilities of existing silica fiber based lasers. Single crystal fiber cores with diameters as small as 35μm have been drawn using high purity rare earth doped ceramic or single crystal feed rods by the Laser Heated Pedestal Growth (LHPG) process. Our recent results on the development of suitable claddings on the crystal fiber core are discussed.

  13. Advanced ceramic coating development for industrial/utility gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, C. A.; Lau, S. K.; Bratton, R. J.; Lee, S. Y.; Rieke, K. L.; Allen, J.; Munson, K. E.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of ceramic coatings on the lifetimes of metal turbine components and on the performance of a utility turbine, as well as of the turbine operational cycle on the ceramic coatings were determined. When operating the turbine under conditions of constant cooling flow, the first row blades run 55K cooler, and as a result, have 10 times the creep rupture life, 10 times the low cycle fatigue life and twice the corrosion life with only slight decreases in both specific power and efficiency. When operating the turbine at constant metal temperature and reduced cooling flow, both specific power and efficiency increases, with no change in component lifetime. The most severe thermal transient of the turbine causes the coating bond stresses to approach 60% of the bond strengths. Ceramic coating failures was studied. Analytic models based on fracture mechanics theories, combined with measured properties quantitatively assessed both single and multiple thermal cycle failures which allowed the prediction of coating lifetime. Qualitative models for corrosion failures are also presented.

  14. Improved Fabrication of Ceramic Matrix Composite/Foam Core Integrated Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    2009-01-01

    The use of hybridized carbon/silicon carbide (C/SiC) fabric to reinforce ceramic matrix composite face sheets and the integration of such face sheets with a foam core creates a sandwich structure capable of withstanding high-heatflux environments (150 W/cm2) in which the core provides a temperature drop of 1,000 C between the surface and the back face without cracking or delamination of the structure. The composite face sheet exhibits a bilinear response, which results from the SiC matrix not being cracked on fabrication. In addition, the structure exhibits damage tolerance under impact with projectiles, showing no penetration to the back face sheet. These attributes make the composite ideal for leading edge structures and control surfaces in aerospace vehicles, as well as for acreage thermal protection systems and in high-temperature, lightweight stiffened structures. By tailoring the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of a carbon fiber containing ceramic matrix composite (CMC) face sheet to match that of a ceramic foam core, the face sheet and the core can be integrally fabricated without any delamination. Carbon and SiC are woven together in the reinforcing fabric. Integral densification of the CMC and the foam core is accomplished with chemical vapor deposition, eliminating the need for bond-line adhesive. This means there is no need to separately fabricate the core and the face sheet, or to bond the two elements together, risking edge delamination during use. Fibers of two or more types are woven together on a loom. The carbon and ceramic fibers are pulled into the same pick location during the weaving process. Tow spacing may be varied to accommodate the increased volume of the combined fiber tows while maintaining a target fiber volume fraction in the composite. Foam pore size, strut thickness, and ratio of face sheet to core thickness can be used to tailor thermal and mechanical properties. The anticipated CTE for the hybridized composite is managed by

  15. Shock-Induced Structural Phase Transition, Plasticity, and Brittle Cracks in Aluminum Nitride Ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Branicio, Paulo S.; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2006-02-17

    Atomistic mechanisms of fracture accompanying structural phase transformation (SPT) in AlN ceramic under hypervelocity impact are investigated using a 209x10{sup 6} atom molecular-dynamics simulation. The shock wave generated by the impact splits into an elastic wave and a slower SPT wave that transforms the wurtzite structure into the rocksalt phase. The interaction between the reflected elastic wave and the SPT wave front generates nanovoids and dislocations into the wurtzite phase. Nanovoids coalesce into mode I cracks while dislocations give rise to kink bands and mode II cracking.

  16. New high boron content polyborane precursors to advanced ceramic materials: New syntheses, new applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guron, Marta

    There is a need for new synthetic routes to high boron content materials for applications as polymeric precursors to ceramics, as well as in neutron shielding and potential medical applications. To this end, new ruthenium-catalyzed olefin metathesis routes have been devised to form new complex polyboranes and polymeric species. Metathesis of di-alkenyl substituted o-carboranes allowed the synthesis of ring-closed products fused to the carborane cage, many of which are new compounds and one that offers a superior synthetic method to one previously published. Acyclic diene metathesis of di-alkenyl substituted m-carboranes resulted in the formation of new main-chain carborane-containing polymers of modest molecular weights. Due to their extremely low char yields, and in order to explore other metathesis routes, ring opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) was used to generate the first examples of poly(norbornenyl- o-carboranes). Monomer synthesis was achieved via a two-step process, incorporating Ti-catalyzed hydroboration to make 6-(5-norbornenyl)-decaborane, followed by alkyne insertion in ionic liquid media to achieve 1,2-R2 -3-norbornenyl o-carborane species. The monomers were then polymerized using ROMP to afford several examples of poly(norbornenyl- o-carboranes) with relatively high molecular weights. One such polymer, [1-Ph, 3-(=CH2-C5H7-CH2=)-1,2-C 2B10H10]n, had a char yield very close to the theoretical char yield of 44%. Upon random copolymerization with poly(6-(5-norbornenyl) decaborane), char yields significantly increased to 80%, but this number was well above the theoretical value implicating the formation of a boron-carbide/carbon ceramic. Finally, applications of polyboranes were explored via polymer blends toward the synthesis of ceramic composites and the use of polymer precursors as reagents for potential ultra high temperature ceramic applications. Upon pyrolysis, polymer blends of poly(6-(5-norbornenyl)-decaborane) and poly

  17. Advances in Hot-Structure Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin; Glass, David E.

    2006-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has actively participated in the development of hot structures technology for application to hypersonic flight systems. Hot structures have been developed for vehicles including the X-43A, X-37, and the Space Shuttle. These trans-atmospheric and atmospheric entry flight systems that incorporate hot-structures technology are lighter weight and require less maintenance than those that incorporate parasitic, thermal-protection materials that attach to warm or cool substructure. The development of hot structures requires a thorough understanding of material performance in an extreme environment, boundary conditions and load interactions, structural joint performance, and thermal and mechanical performance of integrated structural systems that operate at temperatures ranging from 1500 C to 3000 C, depending on the application. This paper will present recent advances in the development of hot structures, including development of environmentally durable, high temperature leading edges and control surfaces, integrated thermal protection systems, and repair technologies. The X-43A Mach-10 vehicle utilized carbon/carbon (C/C) leading edges on the nose, horizontal control surface, and vertical tail. The nose and vertical and horizontal tail leading edges were fabricated out of a 3:1 biased, high thermal conductivity C/C. The leading edges were coated with a three-layer coating comprised of a SiC conversion of the C/C, followed by a CVD layer of SiC, followed by a thin CVD layer of HfC. Work has also been performed on the development of an integrated structure and was focused on both hot and warm (insulated) structures and integrated fuselage/tank/TPS systems. The objective was to develop integrated multifunctional airframe structures that eliminate fragile external thermal-protection systems and incorporate the insulating function within the structure. The approach taken to achieve this goal was to develop candidate hypersonic

  18. Recycling non-hazardous industrial wastes and petroleum contaminated soils into structural clay ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    MacRunnels, Z.D.; Miller, H.B. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    Cherokee Environmental Group (CEG)--a subsidiary of the Cherokee Sanford Group, Inc. (CSG)--has developed a system to beneficially reuse non-hazardous industrial wastes and petroleum contaminated soils into the recycling process of CSG`s structural clay ceramics manufacturing operation. The wastes and soils are processed, screened, and blended with brickmaking raw materials. The resulting material is formed and fired in such a way that the bricks still exceed American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) quality standards. Prior to usage, recycled materials are rigorously tested for ceramic compatibility and environmental compliance. Ceramic testing includes strength, shrinkage, and aesthetics. Environmental compliance is insured by testing for both organic and inorganic constituents. This recycling process has been fully permitted by all required state regulatory agencies in North Carolina, Maryland, and South Carolina where facilities are located. This inter-industrial synergy has eliminated landfill reliance and liability for many companies and property owners. The recycling volume of wastes and soils is high because CSG is one of the largest brick manufacturers in the nation. Together, CEG and CSG have eliminated more than 1 billion pounds of material from landfills by beneficially reusing the non-hazardous wastes.

  19. Effect of host glass matrix on structural and optical behavior of glass-ceramic nanocomposite scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke Barta, M.; Nadler, Jason H.; Kang, Zhitao; Wagner, Brent K.; Rosson, Robert; Kahn, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    Composite scintillator systems have received increased attention in recent years due to their promise for merging the radioisotope discrimination capabilities of single crystal scintillators with the high throughput scanning capabilities of portal monitors. However, producing the high light yield required for good energy resolution has proven challenging as scintillation photons are often scattered by variations in refractive index and agglomerated scintillator crystals within the composite. This investigation sought to mitigate these common problems by using glass-ceramic nanocomposite materials systems in which nanoscale scintillating crystallites are precipitated in a controlled manner from a transparent glass matrix. Precipitating crystallites in situ precludes nanoparticle agglomeration, and limiting crystallite size to 50 nm or less mitigates the effect of refractive index mismatch between the crystals and host glass. Cerium-doped gadolinium bromide (GdBr3(Ce)) scintillating crystals were incorporated into sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) and alumino-borosilicate (ABS) host glass matrices, and the resulting glass-ceramic structures and luminescence behavior were characterized. The as-cast glass from the ABS system displayed a highly ordered microstructure that produced the highest luminescence intensity (light yield) of the samples studied. However, heat treating to form the glass-ceramic precipitated rare-earth oxide crystallites rather than rare-earth halides. This degraded light yield relative to the unaged sample.

  20. Probabilistic design of advanced composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, P. M.; Riskalla, M. G.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced composite technology offers potentials for sizable improvements in many areas: weight savings, maintainability, durability, and reliability. However, there are a number of inhibitors to these improvements. One of the biggest inhibitors is the imposition of traditional metallic approaches to design of composite structure. This is especially detrimental in composites because new materials technology demands new design approaches. Of particular importance are the decisions made regarding structural criteria. Significant changes cannot be implemented without careful consideration and exploration. This new approach is to implement changes on a controlled, verifiable basis. Probabilistic design is the methodology and the process to accomplish this. Its foundation is to base design criteria and objectives on reliability targets instead of arbitrary factors carried over from metallic structural history. The background is discussed of probabilistic design and the results are presented of a side-by-side comparison to generic aircraft structure designed the 'old' way and the 'new'. Activities are also defined that need to be undertaken to evolve available approaches to probabilistic design followed by summary and recommendations.

  1. The effect of silane applied to glass ceramics on surface structure and bonding strength at different temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Eraslan, Oguz

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effect of various surface treatments on the surface structure and shear bond strength (SBS) of different ceramics. MATERIALS AND METHODS 288 specimens (lithium-disilicate, leucite-reinforced, and glass infiltrated zirconia) were first divided into two groups according to the resin cement used, and were later divided into four groups according to the given surface treatments: G1 (hydrofluoric acid (HF)+silane), G2 (silane alone-no heat-treatment), G3 (silane alone-then dried with 60℃ heat-treatment), and G4 (silane alone-then dried with 100℃ heat-treatment). Two different adhesive luting systems were applied onto the ceramic discs in all groups. SBS (in MPa) was calculated from the failure load per bonded area (in N/mm2). Subsequently, one specimen from each group was prepared for SEM evaluation of the separated-resin–ceramic interface. RESULTS SBS values of G1 were significantly higher than those of the other groups in the lithium disilicate ceramic and leucite reinforced ceramic, and the SBS values of G4 and G1 were significantly higher than those of G2 and G3 in glass infiltrated zirconia. The three-way ANOVA revealed that the SBS values were significantly affected by the type of resin cement (P<.001). FIN ceramics had the highest rate of cohesive failure on the ceramic surfaces than other ceramic groups. AFM images showed that the surface treatment groups exhibited similar topographies, except the group treated with HF. CONCLUSION The heat treatment was not sufficient to achieve high SBS values as compared with HF acid etching. The surface topography of ceramics was affected by surface treatments. PMID:27141250

  2. A technique to achieve uniform stress distribution in compressive creep testing of advanced ceramics at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.C.; Stevens, C.O.; Brinkman, C.R.; Holshauser, N.E.

    1996-05-01

    A technique to achieve stable and uniform uniaxial compression is offered for creep testing of advanced ceramic materials at elevated temperatures, using an innovative self-aligning load-train assembly. Excellent load-train alignment is attributed to the inherent ability of a unique hydraulic universal coupler to maintain self-aligning. Details of key elements, design concept, and pricniples of operation of the self-aligning coupler are described. A method of alignment verification using a strain-gaged specimen is then discussed. Results of verification tests indicate that bending below 1.5% is routinely achievable usin the load-train system. A successful compression creep test is demonstrated using a dumbbell-shpaed Si nitride specimen tested at 1300 C for over 4000 h.

  3. Crystalline SiCO: Implication on structure and thermochemistry of ternary silicon oxycarbide ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodiford, Nelli

    The need for innovative refractory materials---materials that can sustain extreme temperatures---has been constantly growing within the modern industries. Basic requirements for usage at ultra-high-temperatures have been considered such as high melting point, high structural strength, exceptional resistance to oxidation, zero or almost zero creep. Monolithic ceramics alone cannot provide these properties, therefore, composite materials are sought to fulfill the demand. For example, silicon nitride and silicon carbide based ceramics have long been leading contenders for structural use in gas turbine engines. In the course of this work we are investigating amorphous SiCO formed via polymer-to-ceramic route. Previously a considerable amount of work has been done on structures of stoichiometric amorphous SiCO and a "perfect" random network was obtained (experimentally as well as supported by computational work) up to the phase content of 33 mol-% SiC. By "perfect" one assumes to have four fold coordinated Si atoms bonded to C and O; C atoms bond to Si atoms only and O is two fold connected to Si. Beyond 33 mol-% SiC within SiCO phase the structural imperfections and defects start to develop. Aside from the stoichiometric form of SiCO, the polymer-to-ceramic route allows for the incorporation of high molar amounts of carbon to create SiCO ceramic with excess carbon. The incorporation of carbon into silica glass improves high-temperature mechanical properties and increases resistance to crystallization of the amorphous material. The amount of 'free carbon' can be controlled through the choice of precursors used during synthesis. There were no ternary crystalline phases of SiCO observed. However, in systems such as MgO-SiO2, Na2O-Al2O 3-SiO2 there are ternary crystalline compounds (MgSiO 3, Mg2SiO4, NaAlSiO4, NaAlSi3 O8) that are of a greater energetic stability than glasses of the same composition. What makes the SiCO system different? In the approach proposed in this

  4. Advanced Chemoembolization by Anti-angiogenic Calcium-Phosphate Ceramic Microspheres Targeting the Vascular Heterogeneity of Cancer Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Emoto, Makoto; Yoshihisa, Hajime; Yano, Kyoko; Choijamts, Batsuren; Tsugu, Hitoshi; Tachibana, Katsuro; Aizawa, Mamoru

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop an advanced method of anti-angiogenic chemoembolization to target morphological vascular heterogeneity in tumors and further the therapeutic efficacy of cancer treatment. This new chemoembolization approach was designed using resorbable calcium-phosphate ceramic microspheres (CPMs), in a mixture of three different sizes, which were loaded with an anti-angiogenic agent to target the tumor vasculature in highly angiogenic solid tumors in humans in vivo. The human uterine carcinosarcoma cell line, FU-MMT-3, was used in this study because the tumor is highly aggressive and exhibits a poor response to radiotherapy and chemotherapeutic agents that are in current use. CPMs loaded with TNP-470, an anti-angiogenic agent, were injected into FU-MMT-3 xenografts in nude mice three times per week for 8 weeks. The treatment with TNP-470-loaded CPMs of three different diameters achieved a greater suppression of tumor growth in comparison to treatment with single-size TNP-470-loaded CPMs alone, and the control. Severe loss of body weight was not observed in any mice treated with any size of TNP-470-loaded CPMs. These results suggest that treatment with a mixture of differently-sized anti-angiogenic CPMs might be more effective than treatment with CPMs of a single size. This advanced chemoembolization method, which incorporated an anti-angiogenic agent to target the morphological vascular heterogeneity of tumors may contribute to effective treatment of locally advanced or recurrent solid tumors.

  5. Durability and CMAS Resistance of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Systems for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2015-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures with improved efficiency, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. This paper will emphasize advanced environmental barrier coating developments for SiCSiC turbine airfoil components, by using advanced coating compositions and processing, in conjunction with mechanical and environment testing and durability validations. The coating-CMC degradations and durability in the laboratory simulated engine fatigue-creep and complex operating environments are being addressed. The effects of Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) from road sand or volcano-ash deposits on the degradation mechanisms of the environmental barrier coating systems will be discussed. The results help understand the advanced EBC-CMC system performance, aiming at the durability improvements of more robust, prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings for successful applications of the component technologies and lifing methodologies.

  6. The production of advanced glass ceramic HLW forms using cold crucible induction melter

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, V.J.; Maio, V.

    2013-07-01

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIM) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in a near future. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHM) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIM offers unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. It is concluded that glass ceramic waste forms that are tailored to immobilize fission products of HLW can be can be made from the HLW processed with the CCIM. The advantageous higher temperatures reached with the CCIM and unachievable with JHM allows the lanthanides, alkali, alkaline earths, and molybdenum to dissolve into a molten glass. Upon controlled cooling they go into targeted crystalline phases to form a glass ceramic waste form with higher waste loadings than achievable with borosilicate glass waste forms. Natural cooling proves to be too fast for the formation of all targeted crystalline phases.

  7. The Production of Advanced Glass Ceramic HLW Forms using Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Veronica J Rutledge; Vince Maio

    2013-10-01

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIMs) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in the 21st century. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHMs) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIMs offer unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. This paper discusses advantageous features of the CCIM, with emphasis on features that overcome the historical issues with the JHMs presently utilized, as well as the benefits of glass ceramic waste forms over borosilicate glass waste forms. These advantages are then validated based on recent INL testing to demonstrate a first-of-a-kind formulation of a non-radioactive ceramic-based waste form utilizing a CCIM.

  8. Structures Formation on the Y-TZP-AI2O3 Ceramic Composites Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkov, Sergei; Sevostyanova, Irina; Sablina, Tatiana; Buyakova, Svetlana; Pshenichnyy, Artem; Savchenko, Nickolai

    2016-07-01

    The paper discusses the structure of Y-TZP-Al2O3 ceramics produced from nanopowders and friction surface, wear resistance, friction coefficient of Y-TZP-AEO3 composites rubbed against a steel disk counterface at a pressure of 5 MPa in a range of sliding speeds from 0.2 to 47 m/s. Analysis by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy showed that the high wear resistance of Y-TZP-Al2O3 composites at high sliding speeds is due to high-temperature phase transitions and protective film formation on the friction surface.

  9. Structural contribution to the ferroelectric fatigue in lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinterstein, M.; Rouquette, J.; Haines, J.; Papet, Ph.; Glaum, J.; Knapp, M.; Eckert, J.; Hoffman, M.

    2014-09-01

    Many ferroelectric devices are based on doped lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics with compositions near the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB), at which the relevant material's properties approach their maximum. Based on a synchrotron x-ray diffraction study of MPB PZT, bulk fatigue is unambiguously found to arise from a less effective field induced tetragonal-to-monoclinic transformation, at which the degradation of the polarization flipping is detected by a less intense and more diffuse anomaly in the atomic displacement parameter of lead. The time dependence of the ferroelectric response on a structural level down to 250 μs confirms this interpretation in the time scale of the piezolectric strain response.

  10. Static-fatigue behavior of structural ceramics in a corrosive environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Swab, J.J.; Leatherman, G.L.

    1990-06-01

    Flexure testing was used to determine the effects of sodium sulfate induced corrosion on the static fatigue behavior of several structural ceramics between 800 C and 1200 C. The results showed that the static fatigue behavior of a high purity, full-dense alumina and a Ce-TZP are unaffected by this corrosive environment. However, the static fatigue behavior of a MgO-doped Si3N4 and, to a lesser degree, a Y-TZP are affected by the introduction of sodium sulfate.

  11. Task 6.3 -- Engineering performance of advanced structural materials. Semi-annual report, January 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.P.; Kay, J.; Nowok, J.W.; Schuster, M.

    1997-08-01

    SiC sublimes without melting at temperatures over 2,000 C. This makes SiC difficult to use in the fabrication of large structures, because pieces made from SiC cannot be joined together in the same way that metals can be welded. Therefore, the size of the monolithic ceramic structures that can be manufactured are limited by the size of the sintering furnaces (approximately 10 feet for sintered alpha silicon carbide). In order to make larger objects such as heat exchangers, many small ceramic pieces must be fused or joined. In addition, repair of the objects will require the use of field joining techniques. At present, no joining techniques for high-temperature structural ceramics are routinely available. The objective of this work at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is to develop a patentable technique for joining large silicon based advanced ceramics in the field. The key to developing a successful technique will be the use of reactive joining compounds to lower the joining temperature but without leaving continuous channels of unreacted compounds that can weaken the joint or be conduits for corrosion at temperatures over 1,400 C. Special efforts will be made in this project to transfer the developed technologies to the materials industry via licensing agreements through the EERC Foundation.

  12. PRELIMINARY STUDY OF CERAMICS FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF ADVANCED FUEL CYCLE REPROCESSING WASTES

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Billings, A.; Brinkman, K.; Marra, J.

    2010-09-22

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a series of ceramic waste forms for the immobilization of Cesium/Lanthanide (CS/LN) and Cesium/Lanthanide/Transition Metal (CS/LN/TM) waste streams anticipated to result from nuclear fuel reprocessing. Simple raw materials, including Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO, and TiO{sub 2} were combined with simulated waste components to produce multiphase ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites (particularly BaTiO{sub 3}), pyrochlores, zirconolite, and other minor metal titanate phases. Identification of excess Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} via X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) in the first series of compositions led to a Phase II study, with significantly reduced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations and increased waste loadings. Three fabrication methodologies were used, including melting and crystallizing, pressing and sintering, and Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS), with the intent of studying phase evolution under various sintering conditions. XRD and SEM/EDS results showed that the partitioning of the waste elements in the sintered materials was very similar, despite varying stoichiometry of the phases formed. The Phase II compositions generally contained a reduced amount of unreacted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as identified by XRD, and had phase assemblages that were closer to the initial targets. Chemical composition measurements showed no significant issues with meeting the target compositions. However, volatilization of Cs and Mo was identified, particularly during melting, since sintering of the pressed pellets and SPS were performed at lower temperatures. Partitioning of some of the waste components was difficult to determine via XRD. SEM/EDS mapping showed that those elements, which were generally present in small concentrations, were well distributed throughout the waste forms. Initial studies of radiation damage tolerance using ion beam irradiation at Los

  13. Advanced Metal Foam Structures for Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanan, Jay; Johnson, William; Peker, Atakan

    2005-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to use advanced materials especially bulk metallic glass (BMG) foams in structural components of spacecraft, lunar habitats, and the like. BMG foams, which are already used on Earth in some consumer products, are superior to conventional metal foams: BMG foams have exceptionally low mass densities and high strength-to-weight ratios and are more readily processable into strong, lightweight objects of various sizes and shapes. These and other attractive properties of BMG foams would be exploited, according to the proposal, to enable in situ processing of BMG foams for erecting and repairing panels, shells, containers, and other objects. The in situ processing could include (1) generation of BMG foams inside prefabricated deployable skins that would define the sizes and shapes of the objects thus formed and (2) thermoplastic deformation of BMG foams. Typically, the generation of BMG foams would involve mixtures of precursor chemicals that would be subjected to suitable pressure and temperature schedules. In addition to serving as structural components, objects containing or consisting of BMG foams could perform such functions as thermal management, shielding against radiation, and shielding against hypervelocity impacts of micrometeors and small debris particles.

  14. Advanced Ceramic Composites for Improved Thermal Management in Molten Aluminum Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Klaus-Markus; Cravens, Robert; Hemrick, James Gordon

    2009-01-01

    Degradation of refractories in molten aluminum applications leads to energy inefficiencies, both in terms of increased energy consumption during use as well as due to frequent and premature production shutdowns. Therefore, the ability to enhance and extend the performance of refractory systems will improve the energy efficiency through out the service life. TCON ceramic composite materials are being produced via a collaboration between Fireline TCON, Inc. and Rex Materials Group. These materials were found to be extremely resistant to erosion and corrosion by molten aluminum alloys during an evaluation funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and it was concluded that they positively impact the performance of refractory systems. These findings were subsequently verified by field tests. Data will be presented on how TCON shapes are used to significantly improve the thermal management of molten aluminum contact applications and extend the performance of such refractory systems.

  15. Ceramic automotive Stirling engine program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program evaluated the application of advanced ceramic materials to an automotive Stirling engine. The objective of the program was to evaluate the technical feasibility of utilizing advanced ceramics to increase peak engine operating temperature, and to evaluate the performance benefits of such an increase. Manufacturing cost estimates were also developed for various ceramic engine components and compared with conventional metallic engine component costs.

  16. Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    The Ceramic Automotive Stirling Engine Program evaluated the application of advanced ceramic materials to an automotive Stirling engine. The objective of the program was to evaluate the technical feasibility of utilizing advanced ceramics to increase peak engine operating temperature, and to evaluate the performance benefits of such an increase. Manufacturing cost estimates were also developed for various ceramic engine components and compared with conventional metallic engine component costs.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC WASTE FORMS FOR AN ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J.; Billings, A.; Brinkman, K.; Fox, K.

    2010-11-30

    A series of ceramic waste forms were developed and characterized for the immobilization of a Cesium/Lanthanide (CS/LN) waste stream anticipated to result from nuclear fuel reprocessing. Simple raw materials, including Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} were combined with simulated waste components to produce multiphase ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites (particularly BaTiO{sub 3}), pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. Three fabrication methodologies were used, including melting and crystallizing, pressing and sintering, and Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS), with the intent of studying phase evolution under various sintering conditions. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) results showed that the partitioning of the waste elements in the sintered materials was very similar, despite varying stoichiometry of the phases formed. Identification of excess Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} via XRD and SEM/EDS in the first series of compositions led to a Phase II study, with significantly reduced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations and increased waste loadings. The Phase II compositions generally contained a reduced amount of unreacted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as identified by XRD. Chemical composition measurements showed no significant issues with meeting the target compositions. However, volatilization of Cs and Mo was identified, particularly during melting, since sintering of the pressed pellets and SPS were performed at lower temperatures. Partitioning of some of the waste components was difficult to determine via XRD. SEM/EDS mapping showed that those elements, which were generally present in small concentrations, were well distributed throughout the waste forms.

  18. Structural properties of fluorozirconate-based glass ceramics doped with multivalent europium

    SciTech Connect

    PaBlick, C.; Müller, O.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.; Johnson, J.A.; Schweizer, S.

    2012-10-10

    The structure/property relationships of fluorochlorozirconate glass ceramics as a function of divalent and trivalent europium (Eu) co-doping and thermal processing have been investigated; the influence of doping ratio on the formation of barium chloride (BaCl2) nanocrystals therein was elucidated. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy shows that the post-thermal annealing changes the Eu valence of the as-poured glass slightly, but during the melting process Eu3+ is more strongly reduced to Eu2+, in particular, when doped as a chloride instead of fluoride compound. The Eu2+-to-Eu3+ doping ratio also plays a significant role in chemical equilibrium in the melt. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that a higher Eu2+ fraction leads to a BaCl2 phase transition from hexagonal to orthorhombic structure at a lower temperature.

  19. Analysis of a ceramic filled bio-plastic composite sandwich structure

    SciTech Connect

    Habib Ullah, M.; Islam, M. T.

    2013-11-25

    Design and analysis of a ceramic-filled bio-plastic composite sandwich structure is presented. This proposed high-dielectric structure is used as a substrate for patch antennas. A meandered-strip line-fed fractal-shape patch antenna is designed and fabricated on a copper-laminated sandwich-structured substrate. Measurement results of this antenna show 44% and 20% of bandwidths with maximum gains of 3.45 dBi and 5.87 dBi for the lower and upper bands, respectively. The half-power beam widths of 104° and 78° have been observed from the measured radiation pattern at the two resonance frequencies 0.9 GHz and 2.5 GHz.

  20. Analysis of a ceramic filled bio-plastic composite sandwich structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib Ullah, M.; Islam, M. T.

    2013-11-01

    Design and analysis of a ceramic-filled bio-plastic composite sandwich structure is presented. This proposed high-dielectric structure is used as a substrate for patch antennas. A meandered-strip line-fed fractal-shape patch antenna is designed and fabricated on a copper-laminated sandwich-structured substrate. Measurement results of this antenna show 44% and 20% of bandwidths with maximum gains of 3.45 dBi and 5.87 dBi for the lower and upper bands, respectively. The half-power beam widths of 104° and 78° have been observed from the measured radiation pattern at the two resonance frequencies 0.9 GHz and 2.5 GHz.

  1. Structural properties of fluorozirconate-based glass ceramics doped with multivalent europium

    SciTech Connect

    Passlick, C.; Mueller, O.; Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.; Johnson, J. A.; Schweizer, S.

    2011-12-01

    The structure/property relationships of fluorochlorozirconate glass ceramics as a function of divalent and trivalent europium (Eu) co-doping and thermal processing have been investigated; the influence of doping ratio on the formation of barium chloride (BaCl{sub 2}) nanocrystals therein was elucidated. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy shows that the post-thermal annealing changes the Eu valence of the as-poured glass slightly, but during the melting process Eu{sup 3+} is more strongly reduced to Eu{sup 2+}, in particular, when doped as a chloride instead of fluoride compound. The Eu{sup 2+}-to-Eu{sup 3+} doping ratio also plays a significant role in chemical equilibrium in the melt. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that a higher Eu{sup 2+} fraction leads to a BaCl{sub 2} phase transition from hexagonal to orthorhombic structure at a lower temperature.

  2. Raman spectroscopic characterization of the core-rim structure in reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Jannotti, Phillip; Subhash, Ghatu; Zheng, James Q.; Halls, Virginia; Karandikar, Prashant G.; Salamone, S.; Aghajanian, Michael K.

    2015-01-26

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the microstructure of reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics. Compositional and structural gradation in the silicon-doped boron carbide phase (rim), which develops around the parent boron carbide region (core) due to the reaction between silicon and boron carbide, was evaluated using changes in Raman peak position and intensity. Peak shifting and intensity variation from the core to the rim region was attributed to changes in the boron carbide crystal structure based on experimental Raman observations and ab initio calculations reported in literature. The results were consistent with compositional analysis determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The Raman analysis revealed the substitution of silicon atoms first into the linear 3-atom chain, and then into icosahedral units of the boron carbide structure. Thus, micro-Raman spectroscopy provided a non-destructive means of identifying the preferential positions of Si atoms in the boron carbide lattice.

  3. Optical Fiber Sensors for Advanced Civil Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Marten Johannes Cornelius

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this dissertation is to develop, analyze, and implement optical fiber-based sensors for the nondestructive quantitative evaluation of advanced civil structures. Based on a comparative evaluation of optical fiber sensors that may be used to obtain quantitative information related to physical perturbations in the civil structure, the extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFPI) optical fiber sensor is selected as the most attractive sensor. The operation of the EFPI sensor is explained using the Kirchhoff diffraction approach. As is shown in this dissertation, this approach better predicts the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of gap length than methods employed previously. The performance of the optical fiber sensor is demonstrated in three different implementations. In the first implementation, performed with researchers in the Civil Engineering Department at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, optical fiber sensors were used to obtain quantitative strain information from reinforced concrete interior and exterior column-to-beam connections. The second implementation, performed in cooperation with researchers at the United States Bureau of Mines in Spokane, Washington, used optical fiber sensors to monitor the performance of roof bolts used in mines. The last implementation, performed in cooperation with researchers at the Turner-Fairbanks Federal Highway Administration Research Center in McLean, Virginia, used optical fiber sensors, attached to composite prestressing strands used for reinforcing concrete, to obtain absolute strain information. Multiplexing techniques including time, frequency and wavelength division multiplexing are briefly discussed, whereas the principles of operation of spread spectrum and optical time domain reflectometery (OTDR) are discussed in greater detail. Results demonstrating that spread spectrum and OTDR techniques can be used to multiplex optical fiber sensors are presented. Finally, practical

  4. Brittleness of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroupa, F.

    1984-01-01

    The main characteristics of mechanical properties of ceramics are summarized and the causes of their brittleness, especially the limited mobility of dislocations, are discussed. The possibility of improving the fracture toughness of ceramics and the basic research needs relating to technology, structure and mechanical properties of ceramics are stressed in connection with their possible applications in engineering at high temperature.

  5. Optimum placement of piezoelectric ceramic modules for vibration suppression of highly constrained structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloli, Alberto; Ermanni, Paolo

    2007-10-01

    The vibration suppression efficiency of so-called shunted piezoelectric systems is decisively influenced by the number, shape, dimensions and position of the piezoelectric ceramic elements integrated into the structure. This paper presents a procedure based on evolutionary algorithms for optimum placement of piezoelectric ceramic modules on highly constrained lightweight structures. The optimization loop includes the CAD software CATIA V5, the FE package ANSYS and DynOPS, a proprietary software tool able to connect the Evolving Object library with any simulation software that can be started in batch mode. A user-defined piezoelectric shell element is integrated into ANSYS 9.0. The generalized electromechanical coupling coefficient is used as the optimization objective. Position, dimensions, orientation, embedding location in the composite lay-up and wiring of customized patches are determined for optimum vibration suppression under consideration of operational and manufacturing constraints, such as added mass, maximum strain and requirements on the control circuit. A rear wing of a racing car is investigated as the test object for complex, highly constrained geometries.

  6. Structural, Dielectric, and Optical Properties of Ni-Doped Barium Cadmium Tantalate Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongxue; Liu, Shaojun; Zenou, Victor Y.; Beach, Cameron; Newman, Nathan

    2006-12-01

    We report the effect of Ni-doping on the structural, dielectric and optical properties of Ba(Cd1/3Ta2/3)O3 (BCT) ceramics. Rietveld analysis of the X-ray diffraction (XRD) data indicates that the BCT structure is similar to other Ba(B'1/3B''2/3)O3 perovskites, although the Ta-O-Cd is distorted to an angle of ˜173°; very close to our earlier theoretical prediction of 172°. The XRD analysis also indicates that Ni doping significantly enhances the extent of Cd-Ta ordering in BCT. The temperature coefficient of resonant frequency decreases with Ni concentration up to 2 wt %. While the loss tangent of BCT is reduced at small levels of Ni doping (up to 0.5 wt %), it increases abruptly at higher concentrations. We found a correlation between the loss tangent of Ni-doped BCT samples and the intensity of a continuous absorption background in the optical spectra. This optical activity results from the presence of optically active point defects and is suggestive that these defects play an important role in the microwave loss in BCT ceramics.

  7. Environmental Barrier Coating Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Recent Advances and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    This presentation briefly reviews the SiC/SiC major environmental and environment-fatigue degradations encountered in simulated turbine combustion environments, and thus NASA environmental barrier coating system evolution for protecting the SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites for meeting the engine performance requirements. The presentation will review several generations of NASA EBC materials systems, EBC-CMC component system technologies for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite combustors and turbine airfoils, highlighting the temperature capability and durability improvements in simulated engine high heat flux, high pressure, high velocity, and with mechanical creep and fatigue loading conditions. This paper will also focus on the performance requirements and design considerations of environmental barrier coatings for next generation turbine engine applications. The current development emphasis is placed on advanced NASA candidate environmental barrier coating systems for SiC/SiC CMCs, their performance benefits and design limitations in long-term operation and combustion environments. The efforts have been also directed to developing prime-reliant, self-healing 2700F EBC bond coat; and high stability, lower thermal conductivity, and durable EBC top coats. Major technical barriers in developing environmental barrier coating systems, the coating integrations with next generation CMCs having the improved environmental stability, erosion-impact resistance, and long-term fatigue-environment system durability performance will be described. The research and development opportunities for turbine engine environmental barrier coating systems by utilizing improved compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and simulated environment testing and durability modeling will be briefly discussed.

  8. Polymer Assisted Functional Ceramic Nanofibrous Structures for Potential Optoelectronic and Photocatalytic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aykut, Yakup

    The use of fossil fuels adversely effects the environment and hence increases global warming. On the other hand the lack of fuel reservoirs triggers people to find environmentally friendly new energy sources. Solar cell technology is one of the developing energy production technologies in green productions. Currently, many solar cells are made of highly purified silicon crystals. However silicon based solar cells have high energy conversion efficiency, they are highly brittle, expensive, and time consuming during the fabrication process. Organic and metal oxide based photovoltaic materials are a more cost-effective alternative to silicon based solar cells. In ceramic materials, Titanium dioxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO) and magnesium zinc oxide (MgxZn 1-xO) have intensive research interest owing to their optoelectronic and photocatalytic properties, and they have been used in dye sensitized solar cells as electron acceptor layer due to their high band gap properties and having low conduction band levels than electron donor dye molecules or quantum dots. On the other hand, energy band levels of the ceramic materials are considerable affected by their crystal microstructures, shapes and doping materials. Because of their high surface to volume ratio, nanofibers are suitable as active energy conversions layers in organic and dye sensitized solar cells. Using nanofibrous ceramic structure instead of film provides higher energy conversion efficiency since the high surface areas of the electrospun mats may accommodate a greater concentration of dye molecules or quantum dots, which could result in greater efficiency of electron transfer within the material, as compared to traditional film-based technologies. Also, the continuous structure of nanofibers may allow for effective electron transfer as a result of the direct conduction pathway of the photoelectrons along the fibers. Moreover, 3D structures of nanofibrous mat allow scattering and absorbing the photons multiple

  9. Synthesis and structural studies of multi-component strontium zinc silicate glass-ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Babita; Pandey, M.; Kothiyal, G. P.; Gadkari, S. C.

    2013-02-05

    Glass having composition 40SrO-10ZnO-40SiO{sub 2}-2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-2Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-2TiO{sub 2}-2Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-2Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, (mol %) was prepared by melt-quench technique and converted into glass-ceramics by subjecting it to varying heat treatments. Thermal properties were measured by thermo-mechanical analyzer and differential thermal analyzer. The XRD revealed that initially Sr{sub 2}ZnSi{sub 2}O{sub 7} phase at lower temperature and later SrSiO{sub 3}/Sr{sub 3}Si{sub 3}O{sub 9} phase crystallized. The structural elucidation by Raman spectroscopy shows the presence of mainly Q{sup 1} structural units along with Q{sup 2} and Q{sup 0} units in the base glass. Raman spectra revealed that during crystallization initially crystalline phase having Q{sup 1} structural units (corresponding to Sr{sub 2}ZnSi{sub 2}O{sub 7} phase) are formed and later crystalline phase having Q{sup 2} structural units with 3 member ring type structure crystallizes. Thus, Raman spectroscopy and XRD together confirm that in early stage of crystallization, Sr{sub 2}ZnSi{sub 2}O{sub 7} phase and later Sr{sub 3}Si{sub 3}O{sub 9} phase formed in the glass-ceramics.

  10. Advances in joining newer structural materials; Proceedings of the International Conference, Montreal, Canada, July 23-25, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The present conference on advances in joining novel structural materials encompasses such material types as ceramics, plastics and composites, and new metallic materials. Specific issues addressed include the use of conductor electric explosion to join ceramics, the effects of brazing temperature on joint properties of SiC-fiber-reinforced Al-alloy-matrix composites, the in situ structure control of composite materials, and the weldability of polymeric materials that are heterogeneous as to chemical nature from the standpoint of morphology. Also addressed are the joining of the Al-Li alloy 8090, diffusion bonding of a creep-resistant Fe-ODS alloy, the adhesive bonding of zinc-coated steel sheets, welds in thermoplastic composite materials, and hot-melt joints for carbon-fiber-reinforced composites.

  11. Structural Design of Glass and Ceramic Components for Space System Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Karen S.

    2007-01-01

    Manned space flight programs will always have windows as part of the structural shell of the crew compartment. Astronauts and cosmonauts need to and enjoy looking out of the spacecraft windows at Earth, at approaching vehicles, at scientific objectives and at the stars. With few exceptions spacecraft windows have been made of glass, and the lessons learned over forty years of manned space flight have resulted in a well-defined approach for using this brittle, unforgiving material in NASA's vehicles, in windows and other structural applications. This chapter will outline the best practices that have developed at NASA for designing, verifying and accepting glass (and ceramic) windows and other components for safe and reliable use in any space system.

  12. Design method for distillation columns filled with metallic, ceramic, or plastic structured packings

    SciTech Connect

    Gualito, J.J.; Cerino, F.J.; Cardenas, J.C.; Rocha, J.A.

    1997-05-01

    This work is a continuation and refinement of a general model developed at the Separations Research Program at The University of Texas at Austin (SRP II model) for the prediction of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate and pressure drop for distillation columns filled with metallic structured packings. It contains three parts. In the first part, the general model is briefly described and the participating equations are summarized. In the main part, the parameters needed for applying the general model for structured packings made of ceramic and plastic are presented and discussed. In the third part, the authors try to correct the model in order to get good predictions at low and high pressures.

  13. Investigation on the structural and photoluminescent properties of chromium-doped ceramics cordierite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, M. A. F. M.; Pedro, S. S.; López, A.; Sosman, L. P.

    2016-10-01

    This work presents the investigation about the structural and optical properties of a doped-chromium system containing cordierite (Mg2Al4Si5O18) as main phase. The sample composition and the structural data were obtained from X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements and the results were analyzed by Rietveld method. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra under several excitation wavelengths and photoluminescence excitation (PLE) measurements were performed. The obtained results from PL and PLE experiments are evidences that Cr3+ occupies octahedral sites in this ceramic system. By correlating the optical results, the crystal field parameter (Dq) and Racah interelectronic repulsion parameters (B and C) were calculated and discussed according to the Tanabe-Sugano (TS) theory for d3 transition metals in octahedral sites.

  14. Theoretical Studies on the Electronic Structures and Properties of Complex Ceramic Crystals and Novel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, Wai-Yim

    2012-01-14

    This project is a continuation of a long program supported by the Office of Basic Energy Science in the Office of Science of DOE for many years. The final three-year continuation started on November 1, 2005 with additional 1 year extension to October 30, 2009. The project was then granted a two-year No Cost Extension which officially ended on October 30, 2011. This report covers the activities within this six year period with emphasis on the work completed within the last 3 years. A total of 44 papers with acknowledgement to this grant were published or submitted. The overall objectives of this project are as follows. These objectives have been evolved over the six year period: (1) To use the state-of-the-art computational methods to investigate the electronic structures of complex ceramics and other novel crystals. (2) To further investigate the defects, surfaces/interfaces and microstructures in complex materials using large scale modeling. (3) To extend the study on ceramic materials to more complex bioceramic crystals. (4) To initiate the study on soft condensed matters including water and biomolecules. (5) To focus on the spectroscopic studies of different materials especially on the ELNES and XANES spectral calculations and their applications related to experimental techniques. (6) To develop and refine computational methods to be effectively executed on DOE supercomputers. (7) To evaluate mechanical properties of different crystals and those containing defects and relate them to the fundamental electronic structures. (8) To promote and publicize the first-principles OLCAO method developed by the PI (under DOE support for many years) for applications to large complex material systems. (9) To train a new generation of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in modern computational materials science and condensed matter physics. (10) To establish effective international and domestic collaborations with both experimentalists and theorists in materials

  15. Triblock copolymer gels - structure, fracture behavior and application in ceramic processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, Michelle E.

    Acrylic triblock copolymer gels transition rapidly from free-flowing liquids to elastic solids and their nanoscale self-assembly leads to reproducible structure and properties. They are an ideal model system for understanding the link between gel structure and the deformation and fracture behavior of soft, self-assembled materials. While a basic understanding of gel structure and linear viscoelastic response exists, this research aims to extend this understanding to include the nonlinear mechanical response and fracture behavior as well as the effect of gel concentration, block length, endblock fraction, and homopolymer solubilization. This expanded understanding will be applied to optimize triblock design for the thermoreversible gelcasting of ceramics. Gel structure was characterized using small angle scattering and self-consistent field theory simulations while mechanical properties were studied using a combination of rheology, swelling, indentation, uniaxial compression, and fracture experiments. Birefringence and shear alignment were used to differentiate between spherical and cylindrical micelle morphologies. An effective energy barrier of 550 kJ/mol describes gels relaxation behavior over a 40°C temperature range where the relaxation times vary by a factor of 1010. At high endblock contents, gels exhibit greater permanent deformation and moduli over an order of magnitude larger than would be expected from rubber elasticity alone due to a transition from spherical to cylindrical micelles. The rate dependence of a gels energy release rate, G , is independent of the gel concentration when G is normalized by the small strain Young's modulus, E. The gels exhibit a transition from rough, slow crack propagation to smooth, fast crack propagation for a well-defined value of the characteristic length, G /E. Crack tip stresses become highly anisotropic at stress values below the failure strength of the gels and are poorly described using linear elastic fracture

  16. Atomistic Structure, Strength, and Kinetic Properties of Intergranular Films in Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Garofalini, Stephen H

    2015-01-08

    Intergranular films (IGFs) present in polycrystalline oxide and nitride ceramics provide an excellent example of nanoconfined glasses that occupy only a small volume percentage of the bulk ceramic, but can significantly influence various mechanical, thermal, chemical, and optical properties. By employing molecular dynamics computer simulations, we have been able to predict structures and the locations of atoms at the crystal/IGF interface that were subsequently verified with the newest electron microscopies. Modification of the chemistry of the crystal surface in the simulations provided the necessary mechanism for adsorption of specific rare earth ions from the IGF in the liquid state to the crystal surface. Such results had eluded other computational approaches such as ab-initio calculations because of the need to include not only the modified chemistry of the crystal surfaces but also an accurate description of the adjoining glassy IGF. This segregation of certain ions from the IGF to the crystal caused changes in the local chemistry of the IGF that affected fracture behavior in the simulations. Additional work with the rare earth ions La and Lu in the silicon oxynitride IGFs showed the mechanisms for their different affects on crystal growth, even though both types of ions are seen adhering to a bounding crystal surface that would normally imply equivalent affects on grain growth.

  17. Structural properties of a bone-ceramic composite as a promising material in spinal surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilova, I. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Podorozhnaya, V. T.; Taranov, O. S.; Klinkov, S. V.; Kosarev, V. F.; Shatskaya, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    The paper describes the results of in vitro tests of composite bone-ceramic implants and procedures for modifying implant surfaces to enhance osteogenesis. Analysis of CBCI ESs demonstrated that they have a porous structure with the mean longitudinal pore size of 70 µm and the mean transverse pore size of 46 µm; surface pores are open, while inner pores are closed. Elemental analysis of the CBCI surface demonstrates that CBCIs are composed of aluminum and zirconium oxides and contain HA inclusions. Profilometry of the CBCI ES surface revealed the following deviations: the maximum deviation of the profile in the sample center is 15 µm and 16 µm on the periphery, while the arithmetical mean and mean square deviations of the profile are 2.65 and 3.4 µm, respectively. In addition, CBCI biodegradation products were pre-examined; a 0.9% NaCl solution was used as a comparison group. Potentially toxic and tissue accumulated elements, such as cadmium, cobalt, mercury, and lead, are present only in trace amounts and have no statistically significant differences with the comparison group, which precludes their potential toxic effects on the macroorganism. Ceramic-based CBCI may be effective and useful in medicine for restoration of the anatomic integrity and functions of the bone tissue.

  18. Structural properties of a bone-ceramic composite as a promising material in spinal surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Kirilova, I. A. Sadovoy, M. A.; Podorozhnaya, V. T. Taranov, O. S.; Klinkov, S. V.; Kosarev, V. F.; Shatskaya, S. S.

    2015-11-17

    The paper describes the results of in vitro tests of composite bone-ceramic implants and procedures for modifying implant surfaces to enhance osteogenesis. Analysis of CBCI ESs demonstrated that they have a porous structure with the mean longitudinal pore size of 70 µm and the mean transverse pore size of 46 µm; surface pores are open, while inner pores are closed. Elemental analysis of the CBCI surface demonstrates that CBCIs are composed of aluminum and zirconium oxides and contain HA inclusions. Profilometry of the CBCI ES surface revealed the following deviations: the maximum deviation of the profile in the sample center is 15 µm and 16 µm on the periphery, while the arithmetical mean and mean square deviations of the profile are 2.65 and 3.4 µm, respectively. In addition, CBCI biodegradation products were pre-examined; a 0.9% NaCl solution was used as a comparison group. Potentially toxic and tissue accumulated elements, such as cadmium, cobalt, mercury, and lead, are present only in trace amounts and have no statistically significant differences with the comparison group, which precludes their potential toxic effects on the macroorganism. Ceramic-based CBCI may be effective and useful in medicine for restoration of the anatomic integrity and functions of the bone tissue.

  19. Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures (CARES). Users and programmers manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Manderscheid, Jane M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1990-01-01

    This manual describes how to use the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures (CARES) computer program. The primary function of the code is to calculate the fast fracture reliability or failure probability of macroscopically isotropic ceramic components. These components may be subjected to complex thermomechanical loadings, such as those found in heat engine applications. The program uses results from MSC/NASTRAN or ANSYS finite element analysis programs to evaluate component reliability due to inherent surface and/or volume type flaws. CARES utilizes the Batdorf model and the two-parameter Weibull cumulative distribution function to describe the effect of multiaxial stress states on material strength. The principle of independent action (PIA) and the Weibull normal stress averaging models are also included. Weibull material strength parameters, the Batdorf crack density coefficient, and other related statistical quantities are estimated from four-point bend bar or unifrom uniaxial tensile specimen fracture strength data. Parameter estimation can be performed for single or multiple failure modes by using the least-square analysis or the maximum likelihood method. Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Anderson-Darling goodness-of-fit tests, ninety percent confidence intervals on the Weibull parameters, and Kanofsky-Srinivasan ninety percent confidence band values are also provided. The probabilistic fast-fracture theories used in CARES, along with the input and output for CARES, are described. Example problems to demonstrate various feature of the program are also included. This manual describes the MSC/NASTRAN version of the CARES program.

  20. Structural analysis of Fe–Mn–O nanoparticles in glass ceramics by small angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Raghuwanshi, Vikram Singh; Harizanova, Ruzha; Tatchev, Dragomir; Hoell, Armin; Rüssel, Christian

    2015-02-15

    Magnetic nanocrystals containing Fe and Mn were obtained by annealing of silicate glasses with the composition 13.6Na{sub 2}O–62.9SiO{sub 2}–8.5MnO–15.0Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3−x} (mol%) at 580 °C for different periods of time. Here, we present Small Angle Neutron Scattering using Polarized neutrons (SANSPOL) and Anomalous Small Angle X-ray Scattering (ASAXS) investigation on these glass ceramic samples. Analysis of scattering data from both methods reveals the formation of spherical core–shell type of nanoparticles with mean sizes between 10 nm and 100 nm. ASAXS investigation shows the particles have higher concentration of iron atoms and the shell like region surrounding the particles is enriched in SiO{sub 2}. SANSPOL investigation shows the particles are found to be magnetic and are surrounded by a non-magnetic shell-like region. - Graphical abstract: Magnetic spherical core–shell nanoparticles in glass ceramics: SANSPOL and ASAXS investigations. - Highlights: • Formation and growth mechanisms of magnetic nanoparticles in silicate glass. • SANSPOL and ASAXS methods employed to evaluate quantitative information. • Analyses showed formation of nanoparticles with spherical core–shell structures. • Core of the particle is magnetic and surrounded by weak magnetic shell like region.

  1. In situ plasma fabrication of ceramic-like structure on polymeric implant with enhanced surface hardness, cytocompatibility and antibacterial capability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Haigang; Yang, Kun; Wang, Gexia; Wang, Pingli; Ji, Junhui; Chu, Paul K

    2016-05-01

    Polymeric materials are commonly found in orthopedic implants due to their unique mechanical properties and biocompatibility but the poor surface hardness and bacterial infection hamper many biomedical applications. In this study, a ceramic-like surface structure doped with silver is produced by successive plasma implantation of silicon (Si) and silver (Ag) into the polyamine 66 (PA66) substrate. Not only the surface hardness and elastic modulus are greatly enhanced due to the partial surface carbonization and the ceramic-like structure produced by the reaction between energetic Si and the carbon chain of PA66, but also the antibacterial activity is improved because of the combined effects rendered by Ag and SiC structure. Furthermore, the modified materials which exhibit good cytocompatibility upregulate bone-related genes and proteins expressions of the contacted bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). For the first time, it explores out that BMSCs osteogenesis on the antibacterial ceramic-like structure is mediated via the iNOS and nNOS signal pathways. The results reveal that in situ plasma fabrication of an antibacterial ceramic-like structure can endow PA66 with excellent surface hardness, cytocompatibility, as well as antibacterial capability. PMID:26825052

  2. Structural performance of cylindrical pressure housings of different ceramic compositions under external pressure loading. Part 4. Silicon carbide particulate reinforced alumina ceramic. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Kurchubasche, R.R.; Johnson, R.P.; Stachiw, J.D.; Johnson, T.A.

    1993-12-01

    Twelve 12-inch-OD by 18-inch-long by 0.412-inch-thick silicon-carbide particulate reinforced alumina-ceramic cylinders were fabricated, assembled, and pressure tested to determine their suitability for use as external pressure-resistant housings for underwater applications. The material, designated 90-X-089, is made by Lanxide Corporation (Newark, DE) by a proprietary directed metal oxidation (DIMOX) (TM) process. The primary advantages of this material are its high compressive strength, high elastic modulus, high fracture toughness, low specific gravity, and ability to be cast in near net shapes, eliminating the need for expensive diamond grinding. Pressure test results are presented along with strain gage data, cyclic fatigue-life data, and acoustic emissions. Conclusions regarding the suitability of the material for application to pressure housings for underwater applications are presented along with a comparison to WESGO's AL-600 96-percent alumina ceramic, which was chosen as a base of comparison for various advanced materials being evaluated under the same program. Recommendations for design implementation, nondestructive evaluation, and further research are made.

  3. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Advanced Turbine Technology Application Project (ATTAP) activities during the past year were highlighted by test-bed engine design and development activities; ceramic component design; materials and component characterization; ceramic component process development and fabrication; component rig testing; and test-bed engine fabrication and testing. Although substantial technical challenges remain, all areas exhibited progress. Test-bed engine design and development activity included engine mechanical design, power turbine flow-path design and mechanical layout, and engine system integration aimed at upgrading the AGT-5 from a 1038 C metal engine to a durable 1371 C structural ceramic component test-bed engine. ATTAP-defined ceramic and associated ceramic/metal component design activities include: the ceramic combustor body, the ceramic gasifier turbine static structure, the ceramic gasifier turbine rotor, the ceramic/metal power turbine static structure, and the ceramic power turbine rotors. The materials and component characterization efforts included the testing and evaluation of several candidate ceramic materials and components being developed for use in the ATTAP. Ceramic component process development and fabrication activities are being conducted for the gasifier turbine rotor, gasifier turbine vanes, gasifier turbine scroll, extruded regenerator disks, and thermal insulation. Component rig testing activities include the development of the necessary test procedures and conduction of rig testing of the ceramic components and assemblies. Four-hundred hours of hot gasifier rig test time were accumulated with turbine inlet temperatures exceeding 1204 C at 100 percent design gasifier speed. A total of 348.6 test hours were achieved on a single ceramic rotor without failure and a second ceramic rotor was retired in engine-ready condition at 364.9 test hours. Test-bed engine fabrication, testing, and development supported improvements in ceramic component technology

  4. NASA/CARES dual-use ceramic technology spinoff applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Lynn M.; Janosik, Lesley A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Nemeth, Noel N.

    1994-01-01

    NASA has developed software that enables American industry to establish the reliability and life of ceramic structures in a wide variety of 21st Century applications. Designing ceramic components to survive at higher temperatures than the capability of most metals and in severe loading environments involves the disciplines of statistics and fracture mechanics. Successful application of advanced ceramics material properties and the use of a probabilistic brittle material design methodology. The NASA program, known as CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures), is a comprehensive general purpose design tool that predicts the probability of failure of a ceramic component as a function of its time in service. The latest version of this software, CARESALIFE, is coupled to several commercially available finite element analysis programs (ANSYS, MSC/NASTRAN, ABAQUS, COSMOS/N4, MARC), resulting in an advanced integrated design tool which is adapted to the computing environment of the user. The NASA-developed CARES software has been successfully used by industrial, government, and academic organizations to design and optimize ceramic components for many demanding applications. Industrial sectors impacted by this program include aerospace, automotive, electronic, medical, and energy applications. Dual-use applications include engine components, graphite and ceramic high temperature valves, TV picture tubes, ceramic bearings, electronic chips, glass building panels, infrared windows, radiant heater tubes, heat exchangers, and artificial hips, knee caps, and teeth.

  5. Fracture Toughness and Reliability in High-Temperature Structural Ceramics and Composites: Prospects and Challenges for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Sunil

    1999-01-01

    The importance of high fracture toughness and reliability in Si3N4, and SiC-based structural ceramics and ceramic matrix composites is reviewed. The potential of these ceramics and ceramic matrix composites for high temperature applications in defense and aerospace applications such as gas turbine engines, radomes, and other energy conversion hardware have been well recognized. Numerous investigations were pursued to improve fracture toughness and reliability by incorporating various reinforcements such as particulate-, whisker-, and continuous fiber into Si3N4 and SiC matrices. All toughening mechanisms, e.g. crack deflection, crack branching, crack bridging, etc., essentially redistribute stresses at the crack tip and increase the energy needed to propagate a crack through the composite material, thereby resulting in improved fracture toughness and reliability. Because of flaw insensitivity, continuous fiber reinforced ceramic composite (CFCC) was found to have the highest potential for higher operating temperature and longer service conditions. However, the ceramic fibers should display sufficient high temperature strength and creep resistance at service temperatures above 1000 'C. The greatest challenge to date is the development of high quality ceramic fibers with associate coatings able to maintain their high strength in oxidizing environment at high temperature. In the area of processing, critical issues are, preparation of optimum matrix precursors, precursor infiltration into fiber array, and matrix densification at a temperature, where grain crystallization and fiber degradation do not occur. A broad scope of effort is required for improved processing and properties with a better understanding of all candidate composite systems.

  6. Ceramic turbochargers: a case study of a near-term application of high-strength ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.P.; Johnson, L.R.

    1984-08-01

    The most likely near-term, high-volume application of structural ceramics in heat engines is in turbocharger rotors. These will be the first mass-produced ceramic components applicable to both gasoline and diesel engines. The principal objective of this study is to estimate relative costs of ceramic turbocharger rotors vs conventional metal rotors. Thus the focus is on the economics, manufacturing, marketing strategies, and benefits related to the introduction and use of ceramic turbochargers, rather than on the detailed technical issues surrounding the microstructure and processing aspects of the new ceramic technologies. The use of ceramics first in rotors and later in other turbocharger components will have significant impacts on cost, size, performance, and overall market growth of turbos. The Japanese appear to have the lead in developing and producing ceramic turbo components, and the implications for continued US competitiveness are clear: the nation that attains the ultimate lead will dominate in the worldwide development and production of advanced ceramics for many industrial and commercial applications.

  7. Theoretical studies on the electronic structure and properties of complex ceramic crystals and glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, Wai-Yim.

    1991-01-10

    This progress report summarizes the research activities for the period July 1, 1990--June 30, 1991, the first year of a three-year renewal. The major accomplishments for the current year are: study of electronic structures and optical properties of several important ceramic crystals such as Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, ZrO{sub 2},V{sub 2}O{sub 3}, V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and all polycrystalline forms of SiO{sub 2}; theoretical study on superconducting oxides; first-principles calculation of total energies and structural phase transitions in oxides and nitrides; basic study on metallic glasses including calculation of transport properties; and theory of rare-earth and transition metal compounds. The major thrust for the next year's effort will be concentrating on the following: continuation of electronic and optical studies of important ceramic systems. Particular emphasis will be on the total energy calculations on complex crystals such as various polymorphic forms of SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}; fundamental studies on the structure and properties of different phases of Boron and B-related compounds; and further development of the OLCAO method such as application of self-interaction correction to wide gap insulators, spin-polarized calculations on the magnetic glasses and extraction of effective interatomic pair potentials for simulational studies.

  8. Ceramic Technology Project. Semiannual progress report, April 1991--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  9. Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support (HVTE-TS) ceramic design manual

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    This ceramic component design manual was an element of the Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP). The ATTAP was intended to advance the technological readiness of the ceramic automotive gas turbine engine as a primary power plant. Of the several technologies requiring development before such an engine could become a commercial reality, structural ceramic components represented the greatest technical challenge, and was the prime focus of the program. HVTE-TS, which was created to support the Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) program, continued the efforts begun in ATTAP to develop ceramic components for an automotive gas turbine engine. In HVTE-TS, the program focus was extended to make this technology applicable to the automotive gas turbine engines that form the basis of hybrid automotive propulsion systems consisting of combined batteries, electric drives, and on-board power generators as well as a primary power source. The purpose of the ceramic design manual is to document the process by which ceramic components are designed, analyzed, fabricated, assembled, and tested in a gas turbine engine. Interaction with ceramic component vendors is also emphasized. The main elements of the ceramic design manual are: an overview of design methodology; design process for the AGT-5 ceramic gasifier turbine rotor; and references. Some reference also is made to the design of turbine static structure components to show methods of attaching static hot section ceramic components to supporting metallic structures.

  10. Ceramic technology for solar thermal receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudirka, A. A.; Smoak, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The high-temperature capability, resistance to corrosive environments and non-strategic nature of ceramics have prompted applications in the solar thermal field whose advantages over metallic devices of comparable performance may begin to be assessed. It is shown by a survey of point-focusing receiver designs employing a variety of ceramic compositions and fabrication methods that the state-of-the-art in structural ceramics is not sufficiently advanced to fully realize the promised benefits of higher temperature capabilities at lower cost than metallic alternatives. The ceramics considered include alumina, berylia, magnesia, stabilized zirconia, fused silica, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, mullite and cordierite, processed by such methods as isostatic pressing, dry pressing, slip casting, extrusion, calendaring and injection molding.

  11. Advanced methods of structural and trajectory analysis for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, Mark D.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the efforts in two areas: (1) development of advanced methods of structural weight estimation, and (2) development of advanced methods of trajectory optimization. The majority of the effort was spent in the structural weight area. A draft of 'Analytical Fuselage and Wing Weight Estimation of Transport Aircraft', resulting from this research, is included as an appendix.

  12. Three-dimensional coherent x-ray diffraction imaging of a ceramic nanofoam: determination of structural deformation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Barty, A; Marchesini, S; Chapman, H N; Cui, C; Howells, M R; Shapiro, D A; Minor, A M; Spence, J C H; Weierstall, U; Ilavsky, J; Noy, A; Hau-Riege, S P; Artyukhin, A B; Baumann, T; Willey, T; Stolken, J; van Buuren, T; Kinney, J H

    2008-08-01

    Ultralow density polymers, metals, and ceramic nanofoams are valued for their high strength-to-weight ratio, high surface area, and insulating properties ascribed to their structural geometry. We obtain the labrynthine internal structure of a tantalum oxide nanofoam by x-ray diffractive imaging. Finite-element analysis from the structure reveals mechanical properties consistent with bulk samples and with a diffusion-limited cluster aggregation model, while excess mass on the nodes discounts the dangling fragments hypothesis of percolation theory.

  13. Effects of chemicothermal treatment of aluminum nitride powders on the structure and properties of the resulting hot-pressed ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Tkachenko, Yu.G.; Morozova, R.A.; Yurchenko, D.Z.

    1995-07-01

    Preliminary treatment in hydrogen for aluminum nitride powders (before hot pressing) affects the strengthening and structuring of the ceramic. There is a positive effect from the gas heat treatment on account of recrystallization during sintering and increase in plasticity of the aluminum nitride due to the hydrogen dissolved in the lattice.

  14. Solutions able to reproduce in vivo surface-structure changes in bioactive glass-ceramic A-W.

    PubMed

    Kokubo, T; Kushitani, H; Sakka, S; Kitsugi, T; Yamamuro, T

    1990-06-01

    High-strength bioactive glass-ceramic A-W was soaked in various acellular aqueous solutions different in ion concentrations and pH. After soaking for 7 and 30 days, surface structural changes of the glass-ceramic were investigated by means of Fourier transform infrared reflection spectroscopy, thin-film x-ray diffraction, and scanning electronmicroscopic observations, in comparison with in vivo surface structural changes. So-called Tris buffer solution, pure water buffered with trishydroxymethyl-aminomethane, which had been used by various workers as a "simulated body fluid," did not reproduce the in vivo surface structural changes, i.e., apatite formation on the surface. A solution, ion concentrations and pH of which are almost equal to those of the human blood plasma--i.e., Na+ 142.0, K+ 5.0, Mg2+ 1.5, Ca2+ 2.5, Cl- 148.8, HCO3- 4.2 and PO4(2-) 1.0 mM and buffered at pH 7.25 with the trishydroxymethyl-aminomethane--most precisely reproduced in vivo surface structure change. This shows that careful selection of simulated body fluid is required for in vitro experiments. The results also support the concept that the apatite phase on the surface of glass-ceramic A-W is formed by a chemical reaction of the glass-ceramic with the Ca2+, HPO4(2-), and OH- ions in the body fluid.

  15. Modeling the mechanical behavior of ceramic and heterophase structures manufactured using selective laser sintering and spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Vladimir A.; Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.; Skripnyak, Vladimir V.; Vaganova, Irina K.

    A model for predicting mechanical properties of ultra-high temperature ceramics and composites manufactured by selective laser sintering (SLS) and spark plasma sintering (SPS) under shock loading is presented. The model takes into account the porous structure, the specific volume and average sizes of phases, and the temperature of sintering. Residual stresses in ceramic composites reinforced with particles of refractory borides, carbides and nitrides after SLS or SPS were calculated. It is shown that the spall strength of diboride-zirconium matrix composites can be increased by the decreasing of porosity and the introduction of inclusions of specially selected refractory strengthening phases.

  16. Thermal, structural and spectroscopic properties of heavy metal oxide glass and glass-ceramics doped with Er3+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragin, Tomasz; Zmojda, Jacek; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Miluski, Piotr; Jelen, Piotr; Sitarz, Maciej; Dorosz, Dominik

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, bismuth-germanate oxide glass doped with erbium ions has been synthesized. Composition of the glass has been chosen in terms of the low phonon energy and good transparency in the infrared region. Transparent glass-ceramics sample has been prepared by controlled crystallization process. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been used to determinate structural properties of samples. The absorption coefficient, the luminescence intensity in visible and infrared region and the differential scanning calorimetry have been examined. Difference in the emission intensity and shape of the luminescence bands indicates the presence of crystalline phases in obtained glass-ceramics sample.

  17. Studies of dynamic contact of ceramics and alloys for advanced heat engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gaydos, P.A.; Dufrane, K.F.

    1993-06-01

    Advanced materials and coatings for low heat rejection engines have been investigated for almost a decade. Much of the work has concentrated on the critical wear interface between the piston ring and cylinder liner. Simplified bench tests have identified families of coatings with high temperature wear performance that could meet or exceed that of conventional engine materials at today`s operating temperatures. More recently, engine manufacturers have begun to optimize material combinations and manufacturing processes so that the materials not only have promising friction and wear performance but are practical replacements for current materials from a materials and manufacturing cost standpoint. In this study, the advanced materials supplied by major diesel engine manufacturers were evaluated in an experimental apparatus that simulates many of the in-cylinder conditions of a low heat rejection diesel engine. Results include ring wear factors and average dynamic friction coefficients measured at intervals during the test. These results are compared with other advanced materials tested in the past as well as the baseline wear of current engines. Both fabricated specimens and sections of actual ring and cylinder liners were used in the testing. Observations and relative friction and wear performance of the individual materials are provided.

  18. Reliability of void detection in structural ceramics by use of scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Klima, S. J.; Kiser, J. D.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting surface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. Specimens of sintered silicon nitride and sintered silicon carbide, seeded with surface voids, were examined by SLAM at an ultrasonic frequency of 100 MHz in the as fired condition and after surface polishing. It was observed that polishing substantially increased void detectability. Voids as small as 100 micrometers in diameter were detected in polished specimens with 0.90 probability at a 0.95 confidence level. In addition, inspection times were reduced up to a factor of 10 after polishing. The applicability of the SLAM technique for detection of naturally occurring flaws of similar dimensions to the seeded voids is discussed. A FORTRAN program listing is given for calculating and plotting flaw detection statistics.

  19. Reliability of void detection in structural ceramics using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Klima, S. J.; Kiser, J. D.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting surface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. Specimens of sintered silicon nitride and sintered silicon carbide, seeded with surface voids, were examined by SLAM at an ultrasonic frequency of 100 MHz in the as fired condition and after surface polishing. It was observed that polishing substantially increased void detectability. Voids as small as 100 micrometers in diameter were detected in polished specimens with 0.90 probability at a 0.95 confidence level. In addition, inspection times were reduced up to a factor of 10 after polishing. The applicability of the SLAM technique for detection of naturally occurring flaws of similar dimensions to the seeded voids is discussed. A FORTRAN program listing is given for calculating and plotting flaw detection statistics.

  20. Reliability of void detection in structural ceramics by use of scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, D.J.; Klima, S.J.; Kiser, J.D.; Baaklini, G.Y.

    1986-05-01

    The reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting surface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. Specimens of sintered silicon nitride and sintered silicon carbide, seeded with surface voids, were examined by SLAM at an ultrasonic frequency of 100 MHz in the as fired condition and after surface polishing. It was observed that polishing substantially increased void detectability. Voids as small as 100 micrometers in diameter were detected in polished specimens with 0.90 probability at a 0.95 confidence level. In addition, inspection times were reduced up to a factor of 10 after polishing. The applicability of the SLAM technique for detection of naturally occurring flaws of similar dimensions to the seeded voids is discussed. A FORTRAN program listing is given for calculating and plotting flaw detection statistics. 20 references.

  1. Holographic nondestructive tests performed on composite samples of ceramic-epoxy-fiberglass sandwich structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L.; Liu, H. K.

    1974-01-01

    When a hologram storing more than one wave is illuminated with coherent light, the reconstructed wave fronts interfere with each other or with any other phase-related wave front derived from the illuminating source. This multiple wave front comparison is called holographic interferometry, and its application is called holographic nondestructive testing (HNDT). The theoretical aspects of HNDT techniques and the sensitivity of the holographic system to the geometrical placement of the optical components are briefly discussed. A unique HNDT system which is mobile and possesses variable sensitivity to stress amplitude is discribed, the experimental evidence of the application of this system to the testing of the hidden debonds in a ceramic-epoxy-fiberglass structure used for sample testing of the radome of the Pershing missile system is presented.

  2. Rare earth-doped lead borate glasses and transparent glass-ceramics: structure-property relationship.

    PubMed

    Pisarski, W A; Pisarska, J; Mączka, M; Lisiecki, R; Grobelny, Ł; Goryczka, T; Dominiak-Dzik, G; Ryba-Romanowski, W

    2011-08-15

    Correlation between structure and optical properties of rare earth ions in lead borate glasses and glass-ceramics was evidenced by X-ray-diffraction, Raman, FT-IR and luminescence spectroscopy. The rare earths were limited to Eu(3+) and Er(3+) ions. The observed BO(3)↔BO(4) conversion strongly depends on the relative PbO/B(2)O(3) ratios in glass composition, giving important contribution to the luminescence intensities associated to (5)D(0)-(7)F(2) and (5)D(0)-(7)F(1) transitions of Eu(3+). The near-infrared luminescence and up-conversion spectra for Er(3+) ions in lead borate glasses before and after heat treatment were measured. The more intense and narrowing luminescence lines suggest partial incorporation of Er(3+) ions into the orthorhombic PbF(2) crystalline phase, which was identified using X-ray diffraction analysis. PMID:21093353

  3. High dense structure boosts stability of antiferroelectric phase of NaNbO3 polycrystalline ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Lumen; Hou, Yudong; Zheng, Mupeng; Zhu, Mankang

    2016-05-01

    For NaNbO3, its intrinsic phase transition sequence is still controversial in literature. In this paper, high-densified NaNbO3 ceramics derived from mechanochemical nanostructures presented a stabilized antiferroelectric characteristic. In addition to the Tc of 360 °C, another diffuse dielectric anomaly appeared around 100 °C, which did not vanish after O2 annealing treatment. The fine structure analysis indicated that this dielectric anomaly belongs to first order phase transition from P phase to Q phase. Moreover, even exerting the strong electric field close to breakdown value, the normal ferroelectric loops cannot be induced, proving the large free energy difference between these two phases.

  4. Fine structuration of low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) microreactors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Haber, Julien; Renken, Albert; Muralt, Paul; Kiwi-Minsker, Lioubov; Maeder, Thomas

    2015-01-21

    The development of microreactors that operate under harsh conditions is always of great interest for many applications. Here we present a microfabrication process based on low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology for producing microreactors which are able to perform chemical processes at elevated temperature (>400 °C) and against concentrated harsh chemicals such as sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and hydrochloric acid. Various micro-scale cavities and/or fluidic channels were successfully fabricated in these microreactors using a set of combined and optimized LTCC manufacturing processes. Among them, it has been found that laser micromachining and multi-step low-pressure lamination are particularly critical to the fabrication and quality of these microreactors. Demonstration of LTCC microreactors with various embedded fluidic structures is illustrated with a number of examples, including micro-mixers for studies of exothermic reactions, multiple-injection microreactors for ionone production, and high-temperature microreactors for portable hydrogen generation.

  5. Atomic Structures of Oxygen-associated Defects in Sintered Aluminum Nitride Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Yan; Pennycook; Terauchi; Tanaka

    1999-09-01

    : Convergent-beam electron diffraction and Z-contrast imaging are used to study oxygen-associated defects, flat inversion domain boundaries, dislocations, and interfaces in sintered AlN ceramics. The structures of these defects are directly derived from atomic-resolution Z-contrast images. The flat inversion domain boundaries contain a single Al-O octahedral layer and have a stacking sequence of.bAaB-bAc-CaAc., where -cAb- indicates the single octahedral layer. The expansion at the flat inversion domain boundaries is measured to be 0.06 (+/-0.02) nm. The interfaces between 2H- and polytypoid-AlN are found to be also inversion domain boundaries but their stacking sequence differs from that of the flat inversion domain boundaries. PMID:10473680

  6. Probability of detection of internal voids in structural ceramics using microfocus radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, G. Y.; Roth, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The reliability of microfocus x-radiography for detecting subsurface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. The microfocus system was operated in the projection mode using low X-ray photon energies (20 keV) and a 10 micro m focal spot. The statistics were developed for implanted subsurface voids in green and sintered silicon carbide and silicon nitride test specimens. These statistics were compared with previously-obtained statistics for implanted surface voids in similar specimens. Problems associated with void implantation are discussed. Statistical results are given as probability-of-detection curves at a 95 percent confidence level for voids ranging in size from 20 to 528 micro m in diameter.

  7. Probability of detection of internal voids in structural ceramics using microfocus radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, G. Y.; Roth, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The reliability of microfocous X-radiography for detecting subsurface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. The microfocus system was operated in the projection mode using low X-ray photon energies (20 keV) and a 10 micro m focal spot. The statistics were developed for implanted subsurface voids in green and sintered silicon carbide and silicon nitride test specimens. These statistics were compared with previously-obtained statistics for implanted surface voids in similar specimens. Problems associated with void implantation are discussed. Statistical results are given as probability-of-detection curves at a 95 precent confidence level for voids ranging in size from 20 to 528 micro m in diameter.

  8. Smart structures for application in ceramic barrier filter technology. Final report, August 1991--August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, S.J.; Lippert, T.E

    1994-12-01

    High temperature optical fiber sensors were developed to measure the in-service stressing that occurs in ceramic barrier filter systems. The optical fiber sensors were based on improvements to the sensor design developed under the DOE/METC Smart Structures for Fossil Energy Applications contract no. DE-AC21-89MC25159. In-house application testing of these sensors on both candle and cross-flow filters were performed in the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center High-Temperature, High-Pressure Filter Test Facility and the results analyzed. This report summarizes the sensor developments, methods to apply the sensors to the filters for in-situ testing, and the test results from the four in-house tests that were performed.

  9. Fine structuration of low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) microreactors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Haber, Julien; Renken, Albert; Muralt, Paul; Kiwi-Minsker, Lioubov; Maeder, Thomas

    2015-01-21

    The development of microreactors that operate under harsh conditions is always of great interest for many applications. Here we present a microfabrication process based on low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology for producing microreactors which are able to perform chemical processes at elevated temperature (>400 °C) and against concentrated harsh chemicals such as sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and hydrochloric acid. Various micro-scale cavities and/or fluidic channels were successfully fabricated in these microreactors using a set of combined and optimized LTCC manufacturing processes. Among them, it has been found that laser micromachining and multi-step low-pressure lamination are particularly critical to the fabrication and quality of these microreactors. Demonstration of LTCC microreactors with various embedded fluidic structures is illustrated with a number of examples, including micro-mixers for studies of exothermic reactions, multiple-injection microreactors for ionone production, and high-temperature microreactors for portable hydrogen generation. PMID:25422101

  10. Improving flexural strength of dental restorative ceramics using laser interference direct structuring

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Claus; Drummond, James; Giordano, Russell A.

    2008-01-01

    Zirconia and alumina ceramics restorative materials were treated with laser interference direct structuring using the third harmonic of a short pulse Nd:YAG and tested in a three-point bending test to measure the flexural strength. The surface was restructured in a periodic line like pattern with controlled surface porosity and a surface composite pattern. The composite consist of two different defect states rather than different phase compositions. The resulting mechanical properties are a function of the number of laser pulses, laser energy, and angle in between the laser beams defining the periodic feature distance. This composite effect is comparable with a laminate showing increasing stiffness with decreasing layer thickness. The material s fracture strength could be controlled through the three mentioned laser parameters and in an initial study significantly improved by up to 50% from initial 422 MPa to 630 MPa for alumina and 833 MPa to 1250 MPa for zirconia.

  11. Advances in experimental mechanics for advanced aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Eddie W.

    1997-03-01

    The industrial requirement for higher efficiency, lean performance, airframe structures to form the basis of more cost effective Commercial Aircraft has encouraged developments in all aspects of aeronautical design and manufacture. Until recently the main emphasis has been in the area of computer and numerical analysis, however new developments in experimental mechanics are emerging as very powerful tools for use in the validation of numerical analyses and for primary stress analysis data. The developments described have been forced by economic drivers that address more efficient analysis techniques with respect to cost, specific weight and expended time for analysis.

  12. Use of glass ceramic as a structural material for a high-precision space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juranek, Hans J.; Kleer, G.; Doell, W.

    1994-09-01

    SILEX is the acronym for Satellite InterLink EXperiment. By this experiment ESA (European Space Agency) starts the optical communication technique in space. Similar to the usual RF-communication technique the optical technique requires antennas for transmitting and receiving signals. Such antennas are telescopes. For Silex a two mirror telescope of an aperture of 250 mm was specified. To gain the benefits of optical communication such a telescope must fulfil extreme optical performances, especially concerning the wavefront quality which is strongly governed by the stability of the telescope structure. Thus the structure of SILEX telescope must guarantee a stability of +/- 2 microns over 320 mm in length. This figure must be maintained for 10 years under extreme environmental conditions, this especially concerns temperature, irradiation, ageing and above all launch loads. Looking at this area the glass ceramic ZERODUR was a very promising material to be used as a structural material provided one overcomes the justified concern on its mechanical reliability due to the fact that it is a brittle material similar to glass. This contribution presents solutions of the basic problems in structural design, the means of material and process qualification, and final qualification against launch loads of the critical structural item.

  13. Structural Transformations in Ceramics: Perovskite-like Oxides and Group III, IV, and V Nitrides”

    SciTech Connect

    James P. Lewis , Dorian M. Hatch , and Harold T. Stokes

    2006-12-31

    1 Overview of Results and their Significance Ceramic perovskite-like oxides with the general formula (A. A0. ...)(B. B0. ...)O3and titanium-based oxides are of great technological interest because of their large piezoelectric and dielectric response characteristics.[1] In doped and nanoengineered forms, titantium dioxide finds increasing application as an organic and hydrolytic photocatalyst. The binary main-group-metal nitride compounds have undergone recent advancements of in-situ heating technology in diamond anvil cells leading to a burst of experimental and theoretical interest. In our DOE proposal, we discussed our unique theoretical approach which applies ab initio electronic calculations in conjunction with systematic group-theoretical analysis of lattice distortions to study two representative phase transitions in ceramic materials: (1) displacive phase transitions in primarily titanium-based perovskite-like oxide ceramics, and (2) reconstructive phase transitions in main-group nitride ceramics. A sub area which we have explored in depth is doped titanium dioxide electrical/optical properties.

  14. Textured and hierarchically structured calcium phosphate ceramic blocks through hydrothermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Galea, Laetitia; Alexeev, Dmitriy; Bohner, Marc; Doebelin, Nicola; Studart, André R; Aneziris, Christos G; Graule, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Synthetic calcium phosphate bone graft substitutes are widely recognized for their biocompatibility and resorption characteristics in the treatment of large bone defects. However, due to their inherent brittleness, applications in load-bearing situations always require reinforcement by additional metallic implants. Improved mechanical stability would eliminate the need for non-resorbable metallic implants. In this context a new approach to obtain calcium phosphate scaffolds with improved mechanical stability by texturing the material in specific crystal orientations was evaluated. Texture and reduction of crystal size was achieved by recrystallizing α-TCP blocks into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) under hydrothermal conditions. SEM and XRD analysis revealed the formation of fine CDHA needles (diameter ≈ 0.1-0.5 μm), aligned over several hundreds of micrometers. The obtained microstructures were remarkably similar to the microstructures of the prismatic layer of mollusk shells or enamel, also showing organization at 5 hierarchical structure levels. Brazilian disc tests were used to determine the diametral tensile strength, σdts, and the work-of-fracture, WOF, of the textured materials. Hydrothermal incubation significantly increased σdts and WOF of the ceramic blocks as compared to sintered blocks. These improvements were attributed to the fine and entangled crystal structure obtained after incubation, which reduces the size of strength-determining critical defects and also leads to tortuous crack propagation. Rupture surfaces revealed intergranular tortuous crack paths, which dissipate much more energy than transgranular cracks as observed in the sintered samples. Hence, the refined and textured microstructure achieved through the proposed processing route is an effective way to improve the strength and particularly the toughness of calcium phosphate-based ceramics.

  15. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  16. Investigation of properties and performance of ceramic composite components. Final report on Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, W.A.; Reifsnider, K.L.; Oleksuk, L.L.S.; Stinchcomb, W.W.

    1994-10-31

    The purpose of Phase 2 of the Investigation of Properties and Performance of Ceramic Composite Components has been to build on and extend the work completed during Phase 1 to further advance the transition from properties of ceramic composite materials to performance of ceramic composite components used in fossil energy environments. The specific tasks of Phase 2 were: (1) develop and validate reliable and accurate high temperature, biaxial mechanical tests methods for structural ceramic composite components; (2) test and evaluate ceramic composite components, specifically tubes; (3) characterize long-term, mechanical performance of ceramic composite tubes at high temperatures; (4) develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanical degradation and performance limitations of ceramic composite components under service conditions; (5) develop predictive models for damage tolerance and reliability; and (6) relate component performance to microstructure and, thereby, provide feedback to the associated process-development effort, to improve performance. Accomplishments for each task are given.

  17. Influence of Zr{sup 4+} doping on structural and electrical properties of SrBi{sub 4}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 15} ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, P. Panigrahi, S.; Badapanda, T.

    2015-06-24

    This article reports a systematic study of doping effects on the structural and electrical properties of layer structured strontium bismuth titanate ceramic. In this study monophasic SrBi{sub 4}Ti{sub 4-x}Zr{sub x}O{sub 15} with x=0.00, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25 ceramics were synthesized from the solid-state reaction route. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the Zr-modified SBT ceramics have a pure four-layer Aurivillius phase structure. Dielectric properties revealed that the diffuseness of phase transition increases where as corresponding permittivity value decrease with increasing Zr content. Piezoelectric properties of SBTZ ceramics were improved by the modification of Zirconium ion. Moreover, the reason behind for improvement of piezoelectric properties of modified SBTZ ceramics was also discussed.

  18. Structural and Chemical Analysis of the Zirconia-Veneering Ceramic Interface.

    PubMed

    Inokoshi, M; Yoshihara, K; Nagaoka, N; Nakanishi, M; De Munck, J; Minakuchi, S; Vanmeensel, K; Zhang, F; Yoshida, Y; Vleugels, J; Naert, I; Van Meerbeek, B

    2016-01-01

    The interfacial interaction of veneering ceramic with zirconia is still not fully understood. This study aimed to characterize morphologically and chemically the zirconia-veneering ceramic interface. Three zirconia-veneering conditions were investigated: 1) zirconia-veneering ceramic fired on sandblasted zirconia, 2) zirconia-veneering ceramic on as-sintered zirconia, and 3) alumina-veneering ceramic (lower coefficient of thermal expansion [CTE]) on as-sintered zirconia. Polished cross-sectioned ceramic-veneered zirconia specimens were examined using field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (Feg-SEM). In addition, argon-ion thinned zirconia-veneering ceramic interface cross sections were examined using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) at high resolution. Finally, the zirconia-veneering ceramic interface was quantitatively analyzed for tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation and residual stress using micro-Raman spectroscopy (µRaman). Feg-SEM revealed tight interfaces for all 3 veneering conditions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) disclosed an approximately 1.0-µm transformed zone at sandblasted zirconia, in which distinct zirconia grains were no longer observable. Straight grain boundaries and angular grain corners were detected up to the interface of zirconia- and alumina-veneering ceramic with as-sintered zirconia. EDS mapping disclosed within the zirconia-veneering ceramic a few nanometers thick calcium/aluminum-rich layer, touching the as-sintered zirconia base, with an equally thick silicon-rich/aluminum-poor layer on top. µRaman revealed t-ZrO2-to-m-ZrO2 phase transformation and residual compressive stress at the sandblasted zirconia surface. The difference in CTE between zirconia- and the alumina-veneering ceramic resulted in residual tensile stress within the zirconia immediately adjacent to its interface with the veneering ceramic. The rather minor chemical

  19. Theoretical studies on the electronic structure and properties of complex ceramic crystals and glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, Wai-Yim.

    1991-01-24

    This progress report summarizes the accomplishment of the DOE-support research program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City for the period July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992. This is the second year of a three-year renewal. The major accomplishments for the year are: (a) Initiation of fundamental studies on the electronic properties of C{sub 60} and related crystals; (b) study of electronic structures and optical properties of several important ceramic crystals, especially on AlN, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}; (c) first-principles calculation of total energies and structural phase transitions in oxides, nitrides, and borides; (d) theory of magnetism in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B permanent magnetic alloy. The major focus for the next year's effort will be on the following areas: (1) Continuation of the fundamental studies on the buckminsterfullerene system with particular emphasis on the alkali-doped superconducting fullerides. (2) Fundamental studies on the structure and properties of Boron and B-related compounds. (3) Basic studies on the structural and electronic properties of metallic glasses with particular emphasis on the magnetic glasses. (4) Further development of the first-principles OLCAO method for applications to super-complex systems.

  20. Advanced Fuels for LWRs: Fully-Ceramic Microencapsulated and Related Concepts FY 2012 Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. Sonat Sen; Brian Boer; John D. Bess; Michael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2012-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress in the Deep Burn project at Idaho National Laboratory during the first half of fiscal year 2012 (FY2012). The current focus of this work is on Fully-Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuel containing low-enriched uranium (LEU) uranium nitride (UN) fuel kernels. UO2 fuel kernels have not been ruled out, and will be examined as later work in FY2012. Reactor physics calculations confirmed that the FCM fuel containing 500 mm diameter kernels of UN fuel has positive MTC with a conventional fuel pellet radius of 4.1 mm. The methodology was put into place and validated against MCNP to perform whole-core calculations using DONJON, which can interpolate cross sections from a library generated using DRAGON. Comparisons to MCNP were performed on the whole core to confirm the accuracy of the DRAGON/DONJON schemes. A thermal fluid coupling scheme was also developed and implemented with DONJON. This is currently able to iterate between diffusion calculations and thermal fluid calculations in order to update fuel temperatures and cross sections in whole-core calculations. Now that the DRAGON/DONJON calculation capability is in place and has been validated against MCNP results, and a thermal-hydraulic capability has been implemented in the DONJON methodology, the work will proceed to more realistic reactor calculations. MTC calculations at the lattice level without the correct burnable poison are inadequate to guarantee zero or negative values in a realistic mode of operation. Using the DONJON calculation methodology described in this report, a startup core with enrichment zoning and burnable poisons will be designed. Larger fuel pins will be evaluated for their ability to (1) alleviate the problem of positive MTC and (2) increase reactivity-limited burnup. Once the critical boron concentration of the startup core is determined, MTC will be calculated to verify a non-positive value. If the value is positive, the design will be changed to require

  1. Fine structure analysis of biocompatible ceramic materials based hydroxyapatite and metallic biomaterials 316L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghelina, F. V.; Ungureanu, D. N.; Bratu, V.; Popescu, I. N.; Rusanescu, C. O.

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to obtain and characterize (surface morphology and fine structure) two types of materials: Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 hydroxyapatite powder (HAp) as biocompatible ceramic materials and AISI 316L austenitic stainless steels as metallic biomaterials, which are the components of the metal-ceramic composites used for medical implants in reconstructive surgery and prosthetic treatment. The HAp was synthesized by coprecipitation method, heat treated at 200 °C, 800 °C and 1200 °C for 4 h, analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The stainless steel 316L type was made by casting, annealing and machined with a low speed (100 mm/s) in order to obtain a smooth surface and after that has been studied from residual stresses point of view in three polishing regimes conditions: at low speed polishing (150 rpm), at high speed polishing (1500 rpm) and high speed-vibration contact polishing (1500 rpm) using wide angle X-ray diffractions (WAXD). The chemical compositions of AISI 316 steel samples were measured using a Foundry Master Spectrometer equipped with CCD detector for spectral lines and the sparking spots of AISI 316L samples were analyzed using SEM. By XRD the phases of HAp powders have been identified and also the degree of crystallinity and average size of crystallites, and with SEM, we studied the morphology of the HAp. It has been found from XRD analysis that we obtained HAp with a high degree of crystallinity at 800 °C and 1200 °C, no presence of impurity and from SEM analysis we noticed the influence of heat treatment on the ceramic particles morphology. From the study of residual stress profiles of 316L samples were observed that it differs substantially for different machining regimes and from the SEM analysis of sparking spots we revealed the rough surfaces of stainless steel rods necessary for a better adhesion of HAp on it.

  2. Predicting Career Advancement with Structural Equation Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimler, Ronald; Rosenberg, Stuart; Morote, Elsa-Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to use the authors' prior findings concerning basic employability skills in order to determine which skills best predict career advancement potential. Design/methodology/approach: Utilizing survey responses of human resource managers, the employability skills showing the largest relationships to career…

  3. Influence of a cellulosic ether carrier on the structure of biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic particles in an injectable composite material.

    PubMed

    Dupraz, A; Nguyen, T P; Richard, M; Daculsi, G; Passuti, N

    1999-04-01

    An injectable composite material based on biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) and a nonionic cellulose ether has been elaborated for use in percutaneous surgery for spine fusion. This paper reports the characterization results of this material by spectroscopic techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) fitted with an energy dispersive X-Ray analysis system and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). From FTIR and XPS results, it was observed that the adhesion between the polymer and the ceramic might be insured by oxygen bridging developed through an ionic bonding between calcium ions and (C-O) groups of the polymer. Moreover, XPS showed attraction of Ca2+ ions in the polymer matrix, while the ceramic surface was modified in a HPO4(2-) -rich layer. These results suggest a possible dissolution/precipitation process at the interface ceramic/polymer. HR-TEM observations supported this hypothesis, showing a light contrasted fringe at the surface of the ceramic grains in the composite paste. As well, changes in the XRD spectra could indicate a small decrease in the crystal size of the BCP powder through the contact to polymer solution. In addition, SEM observation showed a decrease of the initial BCP granulometry. Aggregates of 80-200 microm seemed to be mostly dissociated in micrograins. The ceramic grains were coated with and bonded between each other by the polymer matrix, which acted as spacer in between the ceramic grains, creating a macroporous-like material structure. PMID:10208409

  4. Crystal structure and electrical properties of bismuth sodium titanate zirconate ceramics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Lead-free bismuth sodium titanate zirconate (Bi0.5Na0.5Ti1-xZrxO3 where x = 0.20, 0.35, 0.40, 0.45, 0.60, and 0.80 mole fraction) [BNTZ] ceramics were successfully prepared using the conventional mixed-oxide method. The samples were sintered for 2 h at temperatures lower than 1,000°C. The density of the BNTZ samples was at least 95% of the theoretical values. The scanning electron microscopy micrographs showed that small grains were embedded between large grains, causing a relatively wide grain size distribution. The density and grain size increased with increasing Zr concentration. A peak shift in X-ray diffraction patterns as well as the disappearance of several hkl reflections indicated some significant crystal-structure changes in these materials. Preliminary crystal-structure analysis indicated the existence of phase transition from a rhombohedral to an orthorhombic structure. The dielectric and ferroelectric properties were also found to correlate well with the observed phase transition. PMID:22221595

  5. Ceramic susceptor for induction bonding of metals, ceramics, and plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L.; Buckley, John D.

    1991-01-01

    A thin (.005) flexible ceramic susceptor (carbon) was discovered. It was developed to join ceramics, plastics, metals, and combinations of these materials using a unique induction heating process. Bonding times for laboratory specimens comparing state of the art technology to induction bonding were cut by a factor of 10 to 100 times. This novel type of carbon susceptor allows for applying heat directly and only to the bondline without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. The ceramic (carbon film) susceptor produces molten adhesive or matrix material at the bond interface. This molten material flows through the perforated susceptor producing a fusion between the two parts to be joined, which in many instances has proven to be stronger than the parent material. Bonding can be accomplished in 2 minutes on areas submitted to the inductive heating. Because a carbon susceptor is used in bonding carbon fiber reinforced plastics and ceramics, there is no radar signature or return making it an ideal process for joining advanced aerospace composite structures.

  6. Estimation of Slow Crack Growth Parameters for Constant Stress-Rate Test Data of Advanced Ceramics and Glass by the Individual Data and Arithmetic Mean Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Holland, Frederic A.

    1997-01-01

    The two estimation methods, individual data and arithmetic mean methods, were used to determine the slow crack growth (SCG) parameters (n and D) of advanced ceramics and glass from a large number of room- and elevated-temperature constant stress-rate ('dynamic fatigue') test data. For ceramic materials with Weibull modulus greater than 10, the difference in the SCG parameters between the two estimation methods was negligible; whereas, for glass specimens exhibiting Weibull modulus of about 3, the difference was amplified, resulting in a maximum difference of 16 and 13 %, respectively, in n and D. Of the two SCG parameters, the parameter n was more sensitive to the estimation method than the other. The coefficient of variation in n was found to be somewhat greater in the individual data method than in the arithmetic mean method.

  7. Multiscale Modeling of Advanced Materials for Damage Prediction and Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Luke

    Advanced aerospace materials, including fiber reinforced polymer and ceramic matrix composites, are increasingly being used in critical and demanding applications, challenging the current damage prediction, detection, and quantification methodologies. Multiscale computational models offer key advantages over traditional analysis techniques and can provide the necessary capabilities for the development of a comprehensive virtual structural health monitoring (SHM) framework. Virtual SHM has the potential to drastically improve the design and analysis of aerospace components through coupling the complementary capabilities of models able to predict the initiation and propagation of damage under a wide range of loading and environmental scenarios, simulate interrogation methods for damage detection and quantification, and assess the health of a structure. A major component of the virtual SHM framework involves having micromechanics-based multiscale composite models that can provide the elastic, inelastic, and damage behavior of composite material systems under mechanical and thermal loading conditions and in the presence of microstructural complexity and variability. Quantification of the role geometric and architectural variability in the composite microstructure plays in the local and global composite behavior is essential to the development of appropriate scale-dependent unit cells and boundary conditions for the multiscale model. Once the composite behavior is predicted and variability effects assessed, wave-based SHM simulation models serve to provide knowledge on the probability of detection and characterization accuracy of damage present in the composite. The research presented in this dissertation provides the foundation for a comprehensive SHM framework for advanced aerospace materials. The developed models enhance the prediction of damage formation as a result of ceramic matrix composite processing, improve the understanding of the effects of architectural and

  8. Joining advanced materials into hybrid structures using pressurized combustion synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Messler, R.W. Jr.; Orling, T.T.

    1994-12-31

    Demanding design requirements frequently call for the use and joining of combinations of oxide and nonoxide ceramics, intermetallics, and metals in virtually every imaginable combination in both monolithic and reinforced forms, resulting in hybrid structures. Such new, nontraditional materials and structures can be expected to require new, nontraditional joining processes. One attractive, but embryonic option, is pressurized combustion synthesis, a form of exothermic welding or brazing. Pressurized combustion synthesis or self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) joining is being systematically studied to understand the mechanism(s) of joint formation, understand the role of processing parameters, evaluate and optimize joint properties, and develop a process model for use in joint design, parameter selection, property prediction, and intelligent process control. This paper presents the results of a study on a model system of 3Ni + Al > Ni{sub 3}Al filler or intermediate between nickel-base superalloy end elements. A Gleeble thermal-mechanical simulator was used to investigate the effects of reaction temperature, hold time, applied pressure, reactant composition, and heating rate, and good insight has been gained to enable more intensive studies of process fundamentals and of techniques for producing more complex, functional gradient material (FGM) joints between dissimilar combinations of ceramics, intermetallics and metals.

  9. Advanced Standing and Bridge Courses: Structures and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GlenMaye, Linnea F.; Lause, Timothy W.; Bolin, Brien L.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the issue of advanced standing in MSW programs in light of the new Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS). Advanced standing structures of MSW programs were studied using a purposive sample consisting of 203 MSW program directors with a response rate of 28% (N=58). The results indicate that slightly more than 15%…

  10. Advanced Data Structure and Geographic Information Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peuquet, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    The current state of the art in specified areas of Geographic Information Systems GIS technology is examined. Study of the question of very large, efficient, heterogeneous spatial databases is required in order to explore the potential application of remotely sensed data for studying the long term habitability of the Earth. Research includes a review of spatial data structures and storage, development of operations required by GIS, and preparation of a testbed system to compare Vaster data structure with NASA's Topological Raster Structure.

  11. Deterministic and Probabilistic Creep and Creep Rupture Enhancement to CARES/Creep: Multiaxial Creep Life Prediction of Ceramic Structures Using Continuum Damage Mechanics and the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadaan, Osama M.; Powers, Lynn M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1998-01-01

    High temperature and long duration applications of monolithic ceramics can place their failure mode in the creep rupture regime. A previous model advanced by the authors described a methodology by which the creep rupture life of a loaded component can be predicted. That model was based on the life fraction damage accumulation rule in association with the modified Monkman-Grant creep ripture criterion However, that model did not take into account the deteriorating state of the material due to creep damage (e.g., cavitation) as time elapsed. In addition, the material creep parameters used in that life prediction methodology, were based on uniaxial creep curves displaying primary and secondary creep behavior, with no tertiary regime. The objective of this paper is to present a creep life prediction methodology based on a modified form of the Kachanov-Rabotnov continuum damage mechanics (CDM) theory. In this theory, the uniaxial creep rate is described in terms of stress, temperature, time, and the current state of material damage. This scalar damage state parameter is basically an abstract measure of the current state of material damage due to creep deformation. The damage rate is assumed to vary with stress, temperature, time, and the current state of damage itself. Multiaxial creep and creep rupture formulations of the CDM approach are presented in this paper. Parameter estimation methodologies based on nonlinear regression analysis are also described for both, isothermal constant stress states and anisothermal variable stress conditions This creep life prediction methodology was preliminarily added to the integrated design code CARES/Creep (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Creep), which is a postprocessor program to commercially available finite element analysis (FEA) packages. Two examples, showing comparisons between experimental and predicted creep lives of ceramic specimens, are used to demonstrate the viability of this methodology and

  12. Advances in structure-based vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Kulp, Daniel W; Schief, William R

    2014-01-01

    Despite the tremendous successes of current vaccines, infectious diseases still take a heavy toll on the global population, and that provides strong rationale for broadening our vaccine development repertoire. Structural vaccinology, in which protein structure information is utilized to design immunogens, has promise to provide new vaccines against traditionally difficult targets. Crystal structures of antigens containing one or more protection epitopes, especially when in complex with a protective antibody, are the launching point for immunogen design. Integrating structure and sequence information for families of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) has recently enabled the creation of germline-targeting immunogens that bind and activate germline B-cells in order to initiate the elicitation of such antibodies. The contacts between antigen and neutralizing antibody define a structural epitope, and methods have been developed to transplant epitopes to scaffold proteins for structural stabilization, and to design minimized antigens that retain one or more key epitopes while eliminating other potentially distracting or unnecessary features. To develop vaccines that protect against antigenically variable pathogens, pioneering structure-based work demonstrated that multiple strain-specific epitopes could be engineered onto a single immunogen. We review these recent structural vaccinology efforts to engineer germline-targeting, epitope-specific, and/or broad coverage immunogens. PMID:23806515

  13. Advances in structure-based vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Kulp, Daniel W; Schief, William R

    2013-06-01

    Despite the tremendous successes of current vaccines, infectious diseases still take a heavy toll on the global population, and that provides strong rationale for broadening our vaccine development repertoire. Structural vaccinology, in which protein structure information is utilized to design immunogens, has promise to provide new vaccines against traditionally difficult targets. Crystal structures of antigens containing one or more protection epitopes, especially when in complex with a protective antibody, are the launching point for immunogen design. Integrating structure and sequence information for families of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) has recently enabled the creation of germline-targeting immunogens that bind and activate germline B-cells in order to initiate the elicitation of such antibodies. The contacts between antigen and neutralizing antibody define a structural epitope, and methods have been developed to transplant epitopes to scaffold proteins for structural stabilization, and to design minimized antigens that retain one or more key epitopes while eliminating other potentially distracting or unnecessary features. To develop vaccines that protect against antigenically variable pathogens, pioneering structure-based work demonstrated that multiple strain-specific epitopes could be engineered onto a single immunogen. We review these recent structural vaccinology efforts to engineer germline-targeting, epitope-specific, and/or broad coverage immunogens.

  14. Advanced Structural and Inflatable Hybrid Spacecraft Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C. (Inventor); delaFuente, Horacio M. (Inventor); Edeen, Gregg A. (Inventor); Kennedy, Kriss J. (Inventor); Lester, James D. (Inventor); Gupta, Shalini (Inventor); Hess, Linda F. (Inventor); Lin, Chin H. (Inventor); Malecki, Richard H. (Inventor); Raboin, Jasen L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An inflatable module comprising a structural core and an inflatable shell, wherein the inflatable shell is sealingly attached to the structural core. In its launch configuration, the wall thickness of the inflatable shell is collapsed by vacuum. Also in this configuration, the inflatable shell is collapsed and efficiently folded around the structural core. Upon deployment, the wall thickness of the inflatable shell is inflated; whereby the inflatable shell itself, is thereby inflated around the structural core, defining therein a large enclosed volume. A plurality of removable shelves are arranged interior to the structural core in the launch configuration. The structural core also includes at least one longeron that, in conjunction with the shelves, primarily constitute the rigid, strong, and lightweight load-bearing structure of the module during launch. The removable shelves are detachable from their arrangement in the launch configuration so that, when the module is in its deployed configuration and launch loads no longer exist, the shelves can be rearranged to provide a module interior arrangement suitable for human habitation and work. In the preferred embodiment, to provide efficiency in structural load paths and attachments, the shape of the inflatable shell is a cylinder with semi-toroidal ends.

  15. Materials and light thermal structures research for advanced space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1991-01-01

    The Light Thermal Structures Center at the University of Virginia sponsors educational and research programs focused on the development of reliable, lightweight structures to function in hostile thermal environments. Technology advances in materials and design methodology for light thermal structures will contribute to improved space vehicle design concepts with attendant weight savings. This paper highlights current research activities in three areas relevant to space exploration: low density, high temperature aluminum alloys, composite materials, and structures with thermal gradients. Advances in the development of new aluminum-lithium alloys and mechanically alloyed aluminum alloys are described. Material properties and design features of advanced composites are highlighted. Research studies in thermal structures with temperature gradients include inelastic panel buckling and thermally induced unstable oscillations. Current and future research is focused on the integration of new materials with applications to structural components with thermal gradients.

  16. Structure, mechanical and thermal behaviour of mixtures of polyester resin and dental ceramic waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Rodríguez, G.; Martínez Maldonado, L.; Dulce Moreno, H. J.

    2016-02-01

    The tensile strength and bending strength, structure and thermal behaviour of mixtures of polyester resin (P-2000) and powders (ASTM sieve 200, <75μm) of dental ceramic wastes (dentals impressions, alginate and gypsum) was reported. The samples consisted of mixtures with percentage weights of 50-50%, 60-40%, 70-30%, 80-20%, 90-10%, where the resin was the majority phase, the Mekc (4% wt) was used as catalyst. The structure was studied using SEM and XRD, the thermal behaviour using DSC, TGA and DMA, while the mechanical strength was tested using standards ASTM D790 and D638. Irregular morphology and presence of small agglomerations was observed, with particle sizes between 29.63 and 38.67μm, the presence of different phases of calcium sulphate was found, and that to the increasing the concentration of the powder, the materials becomes more crystalline, increasing its density. An average service temperature of 69.15±4.60°C was found. Vickers hardness values are reported in ranges from 18.65 to 27.96. Considering the elastic modules was established that the materials become more rigid by having more powder concentration.

  17. Material Development and Processing of Multiscale Structured Ceramics for SOFC-Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukam, M.; Pannerselvam, M.; Willert-Porada, M.

    2008-02-01

    NiO-ZrO2-cermets are used as anode material in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells. A sub-structured cermet consisting aligned lamella of NiO and 8Y-ZrO2 is obtained by melt processing of a eutectic powder mixture. Direct co-firing of such cermet powders with the ceramic electrolyte layer requires sintering temperatures above 1600 °C and leads to redistribution of NiO. Sintering with AlN as reactive component for in-situ formation of cubic ZrxOyNz, promotes joining of the sub-structured anode material with the solid electrolyte via the ionic conductive 8Y-ZrO2-grains at 1400-1550 °C. By decomposition of the Zr-oxynitride upon cooling, new porosity and the desired connectivity between the anode and the solid electrolyte is formed. A graded composite is obtained at an interface, which consists of e.g., ZrO2, Zr7O9.5N3, β-ZrAlON, NiAl2O4 and Ni, depending upon the sintering temperature.

  18. Structural, Ferroelectric, and Electrical Properties of NiTiO3 Ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Truptimayee; Choudhary, R. N. P.

    2015-01-01

    The solid-state reaction route was used to prepare polycrystalline samples of NiTiO3. Basic x-ray structural analysis confirmed the formation of a single-phase compound with rhombohedral crystal structure. Study of surface morphology showed that the sample had well-defined grains with uniform distribution throughout the surface. The permittivity, tangent loss, electrical modulus, conductivity, and impedance of the material were obtained over wide ranges of temperature (25°C to 500°C) and frequency (1 kHz to 1 MHz). Strong correlation between the electrical parameters and microstructure (bulk, grain boundary, nature of charge carrier, etc.) of the material has been established. The dielectric parameters are found to be independent of temperature in both low and medium temperature ranges. The temperature-dependent bulk resistance and I- V characteristics exhibit negative temperature coefficient of resistance behavior of the material similar to that of semiconductors. The magnetic hysteresis loop revealed that the NiTiO3 ceramic displays antiferromagnetic behavior with weak ferromagnetism at room temperature. The frequency dependence of the electrical modulus and impedance of the material shows deviation from ideal Debye-type relaxation. The frequency and temperature dependence of the alternating-current (AC) conductivity and activation energy of the system obey Jonscher's universal power law with non-Debye type of relaxation. The nature of the hysteresis loop shows that the material has ferroelectric characteristics at room temperature.

  19. Study of structural, electrical, and dielectric properties of phosphate-borate glasses and glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, B. M. G.; Graça, M. P. F.; Prezas, P. R.; Valente, M. A.; Almeida, A. F.; Freire, F. N. A.; Bih, L.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, phosphate-borate based glasses with molar composition 20.7P2O5-17.2Nb2O5-13.8WO3-34.5A2O-13.8B2O3, where A = Li, Na, and K, were prepared by the melt quenching technique. The as-prepared glasses were heat-treated in air at 800 °C for 4 h, which led to the formation of glass-ceramics. These high chemical and thermal stability glasses are good candidates for several applications such as fast ionic conductors, semiconductors, photonic materials, electrolytes, hermetic seals, rare-earth ion host solid lasers, and biomedical materials. The present work endorses the analysis of the electrical conductivity of the as-grown samples, and also the electrical, dielectric, and structural changes established by the heat-treatment process. The structure of the samples was analyzed using X-Ray powder Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and density measurements. Both XRD and Raman analysis confirmed crystals formation through the heat-treatment process. The electrical ac and dc conductivities, σac and σdc, respectively, and impedance spectroscopy measurements as function of the temperature, varying from 200 to 380 K, were investigated for the as-grown and heat-treated samples. The impedance spectroscopy was measured in the frequency range of 100 Hz-1 MHz.

  20. Structure and electrical properties of intergrowth bismuth layer-structured Bi4Ti3O12-CaBi4Ti4O15 ferroelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Gi Ppeum; Cho, Sam Yeon; Bu, Sang Don

    2016-09-01

    Pb-free ferroelectric Bi4Ti3O12-CaBi4Ti4O15 (BIT-CBT) ceramics were manufactured using a solid-state reaction method. Structural analysis by using X-ray diffraction confirmed the presence of a second phase of Bi2Ti2O7, and the surface depth X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that this phase existed only on the surface. This second phase appears to have been caused by the volatilization of Bi ions at high sintering temperatures. For resolution of the issue of volatilization of Bi ions and manufacture of BIT-CBT ceramics with a single phase, Bi2O3 powder was added to the BIT-CBT mixture, and a powder-bed method, in which pellets were covered with BIT-CBT powder, was used to manufacture the ceramic. The piezoelectric coefficient of the single-phase BIT-CBT ceramics was 12.4 pC/N while the residual polarization and the coercive electric field were 11.3 μC/cm2, and 125 kV/cm, respectively. The results suggest that single-phase BIT-CBT ceramics are suitable for the manufacture of elements incorporating these electrical characteristics.

  1. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  2. The structure and properties of boron carbide ceramics modified by high-current pulsed electron-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yuri; Tolkachev, Oleg; Petyukevich, Maria; Teresov, Anton; Ivanova, Olga; Ikonnikova, Irina; Polisadova, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    The present work is devoted to numerical simulation of temperature fields and the analysis of structural and strength properties of the samples surface layer of boron carbide ceramics treated by the high-current pulsed electron-beam of the submillisecond duration. The samples made of sintered boron carbide ceramics are used in these investigations. The problem of calculating the temperature field is reduced to solving the thermal conductivity equation. The electron beam density ranges between 8…30 J/cm2, while the pulse durations are 100…200 μs in numerical modelling. The results of modelling the temperature field allowed ascertaining the threshold parameters of the electron beam, such as energy density and pulse duration. The electron beam irradiation is accompanied by the structural modification of the surface layer of boron carbide ceramics either in the single-phase (liquid or solid) or two-phase (solid-liquid) states. The sample surface of boron carbide ceramics is treated under the two-phase state (solid-liquid) conditions of the structural modification. The surface layer is modified by the high-current pulsed electron-beam produced by SOLO installation at the Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia. The elemental composition and the defect structure of the modified surface layer are analyzed by the optical instrument, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Mechanical properties of the modified layer are determined measuring its hardness and crack resistance. Research results show that the melting and subsequent rapid solidification of the surface layer lead to such phenomena as fragmentation due to a crack network, grain size reduction, formation of the sub-grained structure due to mechanical twinning, and increase of hardness and crack resistance.

  3. Role of structure gradient region on dielectric properties in Ba(Zr,Ti)O3-KNbO3 nanocomposite ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magome, Eisuke; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Ueno, Shintaro; Nakashima, Kouichi; Wada, Satoshi

    2015-10-01

    Crystal structures of KNbO3 (KN)/BaZrxTi1-xO3 [BZT, (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 1)] nanocomposite ceramics have been investigated using synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction, where BZT nanoparticles thinly coated with KN crystals through the heteroepitaxial interface are sintered. The Rietveld analysis based on the multicomponent model reveals that the ceramic grain has the core/multishell structure consisting of a BZT core, distorted BZT and KN multishells. The variations of the volume ratio of the distorted BZT shell region corresponding to the structure gradient interface region and the dielectric property of the ceramics show similar trends as a function of x. From these results, we propose that the structure gradient region is electrically soft, and provides a crucial contribution to the dielectric properties of the nanocomposite ceramics.

  4. Materials and structural aspects of advanced gas-turbine helicopter engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Acurio, J.

    1979-01-01

    Advances in materials, coatings, turbine cooling technology, structural and design concepts, and component-life prediction of helicopter gas-turbine-engine components are presented. Stationary parts including the inlet particle separator, the front frame, rotor tip seals, vanes and combustors and rotating components - compressor blades, disks, and turbine blades - are discussed. Advanced composite materials are considered for the front frame and compressor blades, prealloyed powder superalloys will increase strength and reduce costs of disks, the oxide dispersion strengthened alloys will have 100C higher use temperature in combustors and vanes than conventional superalloys, ceramics will provide the highest use temperature of 1400C for stator vanes and 1370C for turbine blades, and directionally solidified eutectics will afford up to 50C temperature advantage at turbine blade operating conditions. Coatings for surface protection at higher surface temperatures and design trends in turbine cooling technology are discussed. New analytical methods of life prediction such as strain gage partitioning for high temperature prediction, fatigue life, computerized prediction of oxidation resistance, and advanced techniques for estimating coating life are described.

  5. Advanced control evaluation for structures (ACES) programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Jerome; Waites, Henry

    1988-01-01

    The ACES programs are a series of past, present, and future activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Ground facility for Large Space Structure Control Verification (GF/LSSCV). The main objectives of the ACES programs are to implement control techniques on a series of complex dynamical systems, to determine the control/structure interaction for the control techniques, and to provide a national facility in which dynamics and control verification can be effected. The focus is on these objectives and how they are implemented under various engineering and economic constraints. Future plans that will be effected in upcoming ACES programs are considered.

  6. Advanced beaded and tubular structural panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrove, M. D.; Greene, B. E.

    1975-01-01

    A program to develop lightweight beaded and tubular structural panels is described. Applications include external surfaces, where aerodynamically acceptable, and primary structure protected by heat shields. The design configurations were optimized and selected with a computer code which iterates geometric parameters to satisfy strength, stability, and weight constraints. Methods of fabricating these configurations are discussed. Nondestructive testing produced extensive combined compression, shear, and bending test data on local buckling specimens and large panels. The optimized design concepts offer 25 to 30% weight savings compared to conventional stiffened sheet construction.

  7. Study of dynamic structure and heat and mass transfer of a vertical ceramic tiles dryer using CFD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriaa, Wassim; Bejaoui, Salma; Mhiri, Hatem; Le Palec, Georges; Bournot, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we developed a two-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to simulate dynamic structure and heat and mass transfer of a vertical ceramic tiles dryer (EVA 702). The carrier's motion imposed the choice of a dynamic mesh based on two methods: "spring based smoothing" and "local remeshing". The dryer airflow is considered as turbulent ( Re = 1.09 × 105 at the dryer inlet), therefore the Re-Normalization Group model with Enhanced Wall Treatment was used as a turbulence model. The resolution of the governing equation was performed with Fluent 6.3 whose capacities do not allow the direct resolution of drying problems. Thus, a user defined scalar equation was inserted in the CFD code to model moisture content diffusion into tiles. User-defined functions were implemented to define carriers' motion, thermo-physical properties… etc. We adopted also a "two-step" simulation method: in the first step, we follow the heat transfer coefficient evolution (Hc). In the second step, we determine the mass transfer coefficient (Hm) and the features fields of drying air and ceramic tiles. The found results in mixed convection mode (Fr = 5.39 at the dryer inlet) were used to describe dynamic and thermal fields of airflow and heat and mass transfer close to the ceramic tiles. The response of ceramic tiles to heat and mass transfer was studied based on Biot numbers. The evolutions of averages temperature and moisture content of ceramic tiles were analyzed. Lastly, comparison between experimental and numerical results showed a good agreement.

  8. Effect of phase inversion on microporous structure development of Al 2O 3/poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene)-based ceramic composite separators for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyun-Seok; Kim, Dong-Won; Jeong, Yeon Uk; Lee, Sang-Young

    To improve the thermal shrinkage of the separators that are essential to securing the electrical isolation between electrodes in lithium-ion batteries, we develop a new separator based on a ceramic composite membrane. Introduction of microporous, ceramic coating layers onto both sides of a polyethylene (PE) separator allows such a progress. The ceramic coating layers consist of nano-sized alumina (Al 2O 3) powders and polymeric binders (PVdF-HFP). The microporous structure of the ceramic coating layers is observed to be crucial to governing the thermal shrinkage as well as the ionic transport of the ceramic composite separators. This microporous structure is determined by controlling the phase inversion, more specifically, nonsolvent (water) contents in the coating solutions. To provide a theoretical basis for this approach, a pre-investigation on the phase diagram for a ternary mixture comprising PVdF-HFP, acetone, and water is conducted. On the basis of this observation, the effect of phase inversion on the morphology and air permeability (i.e. Gurley value) of ceramic coating layers is systematically discussed. In addition, to explore the application of ceramic composite separators to lithium-ion batteries, the influence of the structural change in the coating layers on the thermal shrinkage and electrochemical performance of the separators is quantitatively identified.

  9. ULTRASOUND AND X-RAY CHARACTERIZATION OF DAMAGE IN ALUMINA STRUCTURAL CERAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, R. E.; Green, W. H.; Sands, J. M.

    2010-02-22

    A combination of destructive and nondestructive testing methods was utilized to evaluate the impact velocity and energy conditions that caused fracture in alumina structural ceramics. Incremental damage was produced in aluminum-backed Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tiles using drop tower testing for low velocity impact with a high mass indenter. The majority of damage in the fractured samples consisted of radial and cone cracking. The samples were nondestructively evaluated using digital radiography, x-ray computed tomography, and ultrasound C-scan imaging. Bulk damage detected by these techniques was compared to surface damage observed by visual inspection. Qualitative evaluation of surface and bulk cracks and quantitative percent damage assessment were used to compare the integrity of the nondestructive techniques. While all three methods were able to detect surface cracks, C-scan imaging was more effective at detecting internal damage in the alumina samples and x-ray computed tomography was more effective at producing three-dimensional images of the crack patterns.

  10. A ceramic radial insulation structure for a relativistic electron beam vacuum diode.

    PubMed

    Xun, Tao; Yang, Hanwu; Zhang, Jiande; Liu, Zhenxiang; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Yansong

    2008-06-01

    For one kind of a high current diode composed of a small disk-type alumina ceramic insulator water/vacuum interface, the insulation structure was designed and experimentally investigated. According to the theories of vacuum flashover and the rules for radial insulators, a "cone-column" anode outline and the cathode shielding rings were adopted. The electrostatic field along the insulator surface was obtained by finite element analysis simulating. By adjusting the outline of the anode and reshaping the shielding rings, the electric fields were well distributed and the field around the cathode triple junction was effectively controlled. Area weighted statistical method was applied to estimate the surface breakdown field. In addition, the operating process of an accelerator based on a spiral pulse forming line (PFL) was simulated through the PSPICE software to get the waveform of charging and diode voltage. The high voltage test was carried out on a water dielectric spiral PFL accelerator with long pulse duration, and results show that the diode can work stably in 420 kV, 200 ns conditions. The experimental results agree with the theoretical and simulated results.

  11. Investigation into the morphology, composition, structure and dry tribological behavior of rice husk ceramic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Enzhu; Hu, Kunhong; Xu, Zeyin; Hu, Xianguo; Dearn, Karl David; Xu, Yong; Xu, Yufu; Xu, Le

    2016-03-01

    To expand the application of rice husk (RH) resource, this study developed carbon-based RH ceramic (RHC) particles using a common high-temperature carbonization method. The morphology, composition, and structure of the RHC particles were characterized with a series of modern analysis technologies and were then compared with those of the initial RH powder and carbonized RH (CRH) particles. The dry tribological behavior of RHC particle adobes (RHAs) was also investigated. Results showed the sheet-shaped morphology of the RHC particles. The graphitization degree of the RHC particles was lower than that of the CRH particles possibly because the phenolic resin (PR) filled the micro-pores of the RH particles, thereby prompting the formation of amorphous carbon in the RHC particles as a result of high-temperature carbonization. The appearance of a hydroxy function group (sbnd OH) on the surface of the RHC particles was ascribed to the decomposition of PR at 900 °C. The friction coefficients and mass loss rates of the RHAs almost increased with the rise in load and velocity. In addition, the friction coefficients of the RHAs decreased at high load (5 N) and velocity (0.261 m/s) conditions. Such outcome indicated that the variation of contact area between steel ball and RHA at high load and velocity conditions resulted in the abrasive wear or catastrophic wear.

  12. Three-dimensional coherent x-ray diffraction imaging of a ceramic nanofoam: determination of structural deformation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Barty, A; Marchesini, S; Chapman, H N; Cui, C; Howells, M R; Shapiro, D A; Minor, A M; Spence, J C H; Weierstall, U; Ilavsky, J; Noy, A; Hau-Riege, S P; Artyukhin, A B; Baumann, T; Willey, T; Stolken, J; van Buuren, T; Kinney, J H

    2008-08-01

    Ultralow density polymers, metals, and ceramic nanofoams are valued for their high strength-to-weight ratio, high surface area, and insulating properties ascribed to their structural geometry. We obtain the labrynthine internal structure of a tantalum oxide nanofoam by x-ray diffractive imaging. Finite-element analysis from the structure reveals mechanical properties consistent with bulk samples and with a diffusion-limited cluster aggregation model, while excess mass on the nodes discounts the dangling fragments hypothesis of percolation theory. PMID:18764404

  13. Advances in Computational Stability Analysis of Composite Aerospace Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, R.; Araujo, F. C. de

    2010-09-30

    European aircraft industry demands for reduced development and operating costs. Structural weight reduction by exploitation of structural reserves in composite aerospace structures contributes to this aim, however, it requires accurate and experimentally validated stability analysis of real structures under realistic loading conditions. This paper presents different advances from the area of computational stability analysis of composite aerospace structures which contribute to that field. For stringer stiffened panels main results of the finished EU project COCOMAT are given. It investigated the exploitation of reserves in primary fibre composite fuselage structures through an accurate and reliable simulation of postbuckling and collapse. For unstiffened cylindrical composite shells a proposal for a new design method is presented.

  14. Advanced organic composite materials for aircraft structures: Future program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Revolutionary advances in structural materials have been responsible for revolutionary changes in all fields of engineering. These advances have had and are still having a significant impact on aircraft design and performance. Composites are engineered materials. Their properties are tailored through the use of a mix or blend of different constituents to maximize selected properties of strength and/or stiffness at reduced weights. More than 20 years have passed since the potentials of filamentary composite materials were identified. During the 1970s much lower cost carbon filaments became a reality and gradually designers turned from boron to carbon composites. Despite progress in this field, filamentary composites still have significant unfulfilled potential for increasing aircraft productivity; the rendering of advanced organic composite materials into production aircraft structures was disappointingly slow. Why this is and research and technology development actions that will assist in accelerating the application of advanced organic composites to production aircraft is discussed.

  15. Effect of neodymium substitution on structural and ferroelectric properties of BNT ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Vijayeta; Dwivedi, R.K.; Thakur, O.P.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • First time, we synthesized (Bi{sub 1−x}Nd{sub x}){sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3} system by semi wet technique. • Grain size reduced with doping and Nd acts as an inhibitor in the grain growth. • Specimen with x = 0.02 exhibits excellent ferroelectric properties at RT. • P–E loops show the co-existence of polar and non polar regions around ‘T{sub d}’. - Abstract: Polycrystalline specimens of (Bi{sub 1−x}Nd{sub x}){sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3} (BNNT) ceramic system with compositions x ≤ 0.04 were synthesized by semi-wet technique using ethylene glycol precursor. Structural and electrical properties were investigated in detail to observe the effect of neodymium (Nd) substitution in BNT system. XRD patterns for all the specimens showed single phase formation with rhombohedral structure. Field emission scanning electron micrographs (FE-SEM) revealed that the grain growth was inhibited significantly with Nd content. The temperature dependence behaviour of dielectric constant revealed that the depolarisation temperature ‘T{sub d}’ decreases whereas temperature of maximum dielectric constant ‘T{sub m}’ increases with Nd concentration. The piezoelectric charge coefficient (d{sub 33}) showed maxima at x = 0.02 and well defined ferroelectric behaviour was observed for all the samples.

  16. X-ray absorption fine structure of aged, Pu-doped glass and ceramic waste forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, N. J.; Weber, W. J.; Conradson, S. D.

    1998-04-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) studies were performed on three compositionally identical, Pu-doped, borosilicate glasses prepared 15 years ago at different α-activities by varying the 239Pu/ 238Pu isotopic ratio. The resulting α-activities ranged from 1.9×10 7 to 4.2×10 9 Bq/g and have current, accumulated doses between 8.8×10 15 to 1.9×10 18 α-decays/g. Two ceramic, polycrystalline zircon (ZrSiO 4) samples prepared 16 years ago with 10.0 wt% Pu was also investigated. Varying the 239Pu/ 238Pu isotopic ratio in these samples resulted in α-activities of 2.5×10 8 and 5.6×10 10 Bq/g and current, accumulated doses of 1.2×10 17 and 2.8×10 19 α-decays/g. The multicomponent composition of the waste forms permitted XAS investigations at six absorption edges for the borosilicate glass and at three absorption edges for the polycrystalline zircons. For both waste forms, analysis of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra indicates that the local environment around the cations exhibits different degrees of disorder as a result of the accumulated α-decay dose. In general, cations with short cation-oxygen bonds show little effect from self-radiation whereas cations with long cation-oxygen bonds show a greater degree of disorder with accumulated α-decay dose.

  17. Phase Structure, Piezoelectric and Multiferroic Properties of SmCoO3-Modified BiFeO3-BaTiO3 Lead-Free Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Na; Tian, Mijie; Luo, Lingling; Zheng, Qiaoji; Shi, Dongliang; Lam, Kwok Ho; Xu, Chenggang; Lin, Dunmin

    2016-01-01

    (0.75- x)BiFeO3-0.25BaTiO3- xSmCoO3 + 1 mol.% MnO2 lead-free multiferroic ceramics were synthesized by a conventional ceramic fabrication technique. The effects of SmCoO3 on phase structure, piezoelectricity and multiferroicity of the ceramics were studied. All the ceramics can be well sintered at a low sintering temperature of 960°C. The crystalline structure of the ceramics is transformed from rhombohedral to tetragonal symmetry with increasing the amount of SmCoO3. A morphotropic phase boundary of rhombohedral and tetragonal phases is formed at x = 0.01-0.04. A small amount of SmCoO3 is shown to improve the ferroelectric, piezoelectric and magnetoelectric properties of the ceramics. For the ceramics with x = 0.01-0.03, enhanced resistivity ( R ˜ 1.2 × 109 Ω cm to 2.1 × 109 Ω cm), piezoelectricity ( d 33 ˜ 65 pC/N to 106 pC/N) and ferroelectricity ( P r ˜ 6.38 μC/cm2 to 22.89 μC/cm2) are obtained. The ferromagnetism of the materials is greatly enhanced by the doping of SmCoO3 such that a very high magnetoelectric coefficient of ˜742 mV/(cm Oe) is obtained at x = 0.01, suggesting a promising potential in multiferroic devices.

  18. Study of the structure, dielectric and ferroelectric behavior of BaBi4+δTi4O15 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhar, Anita; Goyal, Parveen K.; Thakur, O. P.; Sreenivas, K.

    2016-05-01

    The structure and ferroelectric properties of excess bismuth doped barium bismuth titanate BaBi4+δTi4O15 (δ = 2 - 10 wt.%)) ceramics prepared by solid-state reaction method have been investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms the formation of a single phase material with a change in the orthorhombic distortion with varying excess of bismuth content. There is no change in the phase transition temperature (Tm) while the relaxor behaviour has been modified significantly with excess of bismuth doping. Saturated hysteresis loops with high remnant polarization (Pr ~ 12.5 µC/cm2), low coercive fields (Ec ~ 26 kV/cm) are measured and a high piezoelectric coefficient (d33 ~ 29 pC/N) is achieved in poled BaBi4Ti4O15 ceramics prepared with up to 8 wt.% of excess bismuth oxide. The improvement in the ferroelectric properties with increase in the excess bismuth content in BaBi4Ti4O15 ceramics has been explained in terms of changing oxygen vacancy concentration and structural relaxation. Tunable ferroelectric materials can be obtained by manipulating the doping amount of excess bismuth.

  19. An advanced structural analysis/synthesis capability - ACCESS 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmit, L. A.; Miura, H.

    1976-01-01

    An advanced automated design procedure for minimum-weight design of structures (ACCESS 2) is reported. Design variable linking, constraint deletion, and explicit constraint approximation are used to combine effectively finite-element and nonlinear mathematical programming techniques. The approximation-concepts approach to structural synthesis is extended to problems involving fiber composite structure, thermal effects, and natural frequency constraints in addition to the usual static stress and displacement limitations. Sample results illustrating these features are given.

  20. An advanced structural analysis/synthesis capability - ACCESS 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmit, L. A.; Miura, H.

    1978-01-01

    An advanced automated design procedure for minimum weight design of structures (ACCESS 2) is reported. Design variable linking, constraint deletion, and explicit constraint approximation are used to effectively combine finite element and nonlinear mathematical programming techniques. The approximation concepts approach to structural synthesis is extended to problems involving fiber composite structure, thermal effects and natural frequency constraints in addition to the usual static stress and displacement limitations. Sample results illustrating these new features are given.

  1. Recent advancement in optical fiber sensing for aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Takeda, Nobuo

    2013-12-01

    Optical fiber sensors have attracted considerable attention in health monitoring of aerospace composite structures. This paper briefly reviews our recent advancement mainly in Brillouin-based distributed sensing. Damage detection, life cycle monitoring and shape reconstruction systems applicable to large-scale composite structures are presented, and new technical concepts, "smart crack arrester" and "hierarchical sensing system", are described as well, highlighting the great potential of optical fiber sensors for the structural health monitoring (SHM) field.

  2. Doping and defect structure of mixed-conducting ceramics for gas separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Chendong

    A worldwide energy crisis and increasing environmental concerns are strong incentives for using hydrogen as a sustainable and clean energy source. "Hydrogen economy" has been around since 1970s, but it started to look practicable only in recent years. The trend in the future is to switch from using hydrogen as the basic raw material in the chemical industry to the energy carrier in the transportation and distributed energy industries. To meet the expected rising demand, hydrogen has to be generated in a more cost-effective manner. As one of the most important operation units in the hydrogen production, a high performance hydrogen separation membrane system is essential to the coming hydrogen economy. The project of hydrogen separation membrane based on Mixed ionic and electronic conductor (MIEC) composite was initiated by DoE years ago, and the MIEC membrane has been developed in Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for several years. The goal at ANL is to develop a dense, ceramic-based MIEC membrane that is highly selective, chemical stable in practical environments at operative temperatures up to ≈900°C, and can separate hydrogen from mixed gases at commercially significant fluxes under industrially relevant operating conditions, without the need for electrodes or electrical circuitry. The effort at ANL initially focused on BCY20 (BaCe0.8Y 0.2O3). BCY20 forms the matrix of ANL-1a and -2a ceramic-metal composite membranes (40-50 vol.% of a metal is dispersed in a ceramic matrix) and its bulk transport properties, including ionic transfer number, ionic and electronic conductivity, and chemical and mechanical stability have been systematically studied. However, exposure to CO2 and H2O-containing atmospheres, as would be present in a practical environment, will degrade the material as it reacts to form insulating barium carbonate (BaCO3 ) and cerium oxide (CeO2). This decomposition greatly limits its applicability in hydrogen separation, despite the promising

  3. Advanced fabrication techniques for cooled engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchmann, O. A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved design for regeneratively cooled engine structures was identified. This design uses photochemically machined (PCM) coolant passages. It permits the braze joint to be placed in a relatively cool area, remote from the critical hot face sheet. The geometry of the passages at the face sheet also minimizes stress concentration and, therefore, enhances the low cycle fatigue performance. The two most promising alloys identified for this application are Inconel 617 and Nickel 201. Inconel 617 was selected because it has excellent creep rupture properties, while Nickel 201 was selected because of its predicted good performance under low cycle fatigue loading. The fabrication of the PCM coolant passages in both Inconel 617 and Nickel 201 was successfully developed. During fabrication of Inconel 617, undesirable characteristics were observed in the braze joints. A development program to resolve this condition was undertaken and led to definition of an isothermal solidification process for joining Inconel 617 panels. This process produced joints which approach parent metal strength and homogeneity.

  4. Deformation and Damage Studies for Advanced Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Advancements made in understanding deformation and damage of advanced structural materials have enabled the development of new technologies including the attainment of a nationally significant NASA Level 1 Milestone and the provision of expertise to the Shuttle Return to Flight effort. During this collaborative agreement multiple theoretical and experimental research programs, facilitating safe durable high temperature structures using advanced materials, have been conceived, planned, executed. Over 26 publications, independent assessments of structures and materials in hostile environments, were published within this agreement. This attainment has been recognized by 2002 Space Flight Awareness Team Award, 2004 NASA Group Achievement Award and 2003 and 2004 OAI Service Awards. Accomplishments in the individual research efforts are described as follows.

  5. Structural, dielectric and ferroelectric study of (1-ϕ)(NBT-KNN)-ϕSBexT ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Sridevi; Kumar, Pawan

    2016-11-01

    (1-ϕ)(0.93 Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3-0.07K0.5Na0.5NbO3)-ϕSr0.8Bi2.15Ta2O9/(1-ϕ)(NBT-KNN)-ϕSBexT (ϕ=0, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 wt%) ceramic samples were synthesized by conventional solid state reaction route. Secondary phases started developing for higher SBexT content in the (1-ϕ)(NBT-KNN)-ϕSBexT ceramic samples. Decrease of transition temperature (Tm) with the increase of SBexT content in (1-ϕ)(NBT-KNN)-ϕSBexT ceramics was attributed to the increase of internal stress. Remnant polarization (Pr), leakage current density and polarization degradation values reduced with the increase of SBexT content in (1-ϕ)(NBT-KNN)-ϕSBexT ceramic samples. Retention of good ferroelectric properties and enhancement of fatigue-free behavior with the incorporation of SBexT phase in (1-ϕ)(NBT-KNN)-ϕSBexT ceramic samples suggested their usefulness for ferroelectric memory applications.

  6. Structure of amorphous oxide ceramics by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diefenbacher, Jason Ross

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to study the structure and dynamics of sodium tetrasilicate (Na2Si4O9 ) liquid as a function of pressure, ranging from I atmosphere to 100 GPa, at a temperature of 6000 K. The calculated self-diffusivity of the ions increases with increasing pressure, up to a maximum of approximately 10--15 GPa. Above this pressure, the O2- diffusivity decreases slightly with increasing pressure. The results of the simulations allow the distinction of two different mechanisms for the pressure-induced coordination change of silicon. The first, occurring at lower pressures, involves the formation of V-coordinated silicon, via reaction with non-bridging oxygens. The high pressure mechanism involves a reaction of bridging oxygens, which results in the formation of III-coordinated oxygen. MD simulations were carried out in order to investigate the structure and transport properties of boron oxide melt, as a function of pressure. The simulations show a rapid initial increase in the diffusion coefficients of boron and oxygen ions to ˜5--7 GPa, followed by a slower increase from 7--14 GPa. The increase in ion diffusivities is correlated with an increase in the proportion of BO4 to BO3 units. These results can be used to help rationalize an increase in growth rate of boron suboxide (B6O) crystals, observed from B2O3-B 6O melts in the 0--4 GPa pressure range. Structural characterization has also been carried out on a decomposed alumina ceramic precursor material, which is synthesized via thermal decomposition of an aluminum nitrate, nanohydrate [Al(NO3)3·9H 2O] salt to yield an x-ray amorphous, water-soluble precursor. Characterization of the solid precursor is presented, along with an in-depth study on the aluminum speciation in solution. Although the solid precursor contains entirely VI-coordinated aluminum, the solution phase contains IV-, V-, and VI-coordinated aluminum, whose relative abundance does not change with increasing thermal

  7. The features of ceramic materials structure formation when using hard-melting wastes of thermal power stations in charge stock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnikova, Nelli; Yuriev, Ivan; Lutsenko, Alexander; Litvinova, Viktoriya

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the analysis of aluminum silicate waste generated by thermal power station of the city of Seversk, Tomsk region, Russia. The chemical compositions of aluminum silicate waste are detected and the efficient mixture compositions with the addition of aluminum silicate waste are suggested herein. Ceramic brick structure formation is studied in this paper using X-ray phase and SEM analyses. It is identified that the formed vitreous phase facilitates such strengthening structural modifications as sintering out of pores and shrinkage of unmelted aluminum silicate particles with the following formation of a monolithic product.

  8. Mechanistic Studies of Combustion and Structure Formation During Synthesis of Advanced Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, A.; Lau, C.; Mukasyan, A. S.

    2001-01-01

    Combustion in a variety of heterogeneous systems, leading to the synthesis of advanced materials, is characterized by high temperatures (2000-3500 K) and heating rates (up to 10(exp 6) K/s) at and ahead of the reaction front. These high temperatures generate liquids and gases which are subject to gravity-driven flow. The removal of such gravitational effects is likely to provide increased control of the reaction front, with a consequent improvement in control of the microstructure of the synthesized products. Thus, microgravity (mu-g) experiments lead to major advances in the understanding of fundamental aspects of combustion and structure formation under the extreme conditions of the combustion synthesis (CS) wave. In addition, the specific features of microgravity environment allow one to produce unique materials, which cannot be obtained under terrestrial conditions. The current research is a logic continuation of our previous work on investigations of the fundamental phenomena of combustion and structure formation that occur at the high temperatures achieved in a CS wave. Our research is being conducted in three main directions: 1) Microstructural Transformations during Combustion Synthesis of Metal-Ceramic Composites. The studies are devoted to the investigation of particle growth during CS of intermetallic-ceramic composites, synthesized from nickel, aluminum, titanium, and boron metal reactants. To determine the mechanisms of particle growth, the investigation varies the relative amount of components in the initial mixture to yield combustion wave products with different ratios of solid and liquid phases, under 1g and mu-g conditions; 2) Mechanisms of Heat Transfer during Reactions in Heterogeneous Media. Specifically, new phenomena of gasless combustion wave propagation in heterogeneous media with porosity higher than that achievable in normal gravity conditions, are being studied. Two types of mixtures are investigated: clad powders, where contact between

  9. Recent advances in structural dynamics of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Larry D.

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in the area of structural dynamics of large space structures is reviewed. Topics include system identification, large angle slewing of flexible structures, definition of scaling limitations in structural models, and recent results on a tension-stabilized antenna concept known as the hoop-column. Increasingly complex laboratory experiments guide most of the activities leading to realistic technological developments. Theoretical progress in system identification based on system realization theory resulting in unification of several methods is reviewed. Experimental results from implementation of a theoretical large-angle slewing control approach are shown. Status and results of the development of a research computer program for analysis of the transient dynamics of large angle motion of flexible structures are presented. Correlation of results from analysis and vibration tests of the hoop-column antenna concept are summarized.

  10. Recent advances in structural dynamics of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Larry D.

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in the area of structural dynamics of large space structures is reviewed. Topics include system identification, large angle slewing of flexible structures, definition of scaling limitations in structural models, and recent results on a tension-stabilized antenna concept known as the hoop-column. Increasingly complex laboratory experiments guide most of the activities leading to realistic technological developments. Theoretical progress in system identification based on system realization theory resulting in unification of several methods is reviewed. Experimental results from implementation of a theoretical large-angle slewing control approach are shown. Status and results of the development of a research computer program for analysis of the transient dynamics of large angle motion of flexible structures are presented. Correlation of results from analysis and vibration tests of the hoop-column antenna concepts are summarized.

  11. Integrated computational and experimental approach to control physical texture during laser machining of structural ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Hitesh D.

    The high energy lasers are emerging as an innovative material processing tool to effectively fabricate complex shapes on the hard and brittle structural ceramics, which previously had been near impossible to be machined effectively using various conventional machining techniques. In addition, the in-situ measurement of the thermo-physical properties in the severe laser machining conditions (high temperature, short time duration, and small interaction volume) is an extremely difficult task. As a consequence, it is extremely challenging to investigate the evolution of surface topography through experimental analyses. To address this issue, an integrated experimental and computational (multistep and multiphysics based finite-element modeling) approach was employed to understand the influence of laser processing parameters to effectively control the various thermo-physical effects (recoil pressure, Marangoni convection, and surface tension) during transient physical processes (melting, vaporization) for controlled surface topography (surface finish). The results indicated that the material lost due to evaporation causes an increase in crater depth of machined cavity, whereas liquid expulsion created by the recoil pressure increases the material pileup height around the lip of machined cavity, the major attributes of surface topography (roughness). Also, it was found that the surface roughness increased with increase in laser energy density and pulse rate (from 10 to 50Hz), and with the decrease in distance between two pulses (from 0.6 to 0.1mm) or the increase in lateral and transverse overlap (0, 17, 33, 50, 67, and 83%). The results of the computational model are also validated by experimental observations with reasonably close agreement.

  12. The influence of granulated powder temporary organics composition on ceramic structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselov, S.; Belousova, N.; Zamyatina, A.; Sokolov, I.; Felofyanova, A.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of granulated powder binder/plasticizer ratio on epy microstructure and properties of sintered ceramic specimens is shown using submicron alumina. The fracture mode, microstructure and properties analyses of a green part and sintered samples obtained with different organic ratio contained in granulated powder are presented. It was stated that the usage of PVA (grade 16/1) and PEG 400 at an equal ratio results in a uniform distribution of granulated powder in a die and high green density. It is also shown that an addition of 2 wt. % of PVA and 2 wt. % of PEG400 into granules of ceramic press powder allows obtaining A1203 ceramic with apparent density of about 3,91 g/cm3 and bending strength of up to 410 MPa.

  13. Rapid growth and formation mechanism of ultrafine structural oxide eutectic ceramics by laser direct forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, H. J.; Zhang, J.; Liu, L.; Eckert, J.; Fu, H. Z.

    2011-11-01

    Melt growth of oxide eutectic is an important and fast-growing research topic in the fields of both applied physics and materials science. Rapid one-step fabrication of melt-grown oxide ceramics with large size is developed using laser direct forming. The near 100% density of Al2O3/YAG eutectic ceramic in situ composite free of pore and cracks is rapidly melted/solidified directly from Al2O3-Y2O3 powder without any preforming or sintering. Uniform three-dimensional network of ultrafine nanostructured eutectic microstructure is obtained. The direct experimental evidence of faceted-nonfaceted eutectic transition at high growth rate is presented and the physical model of the microstructural formation based on atom cluster elementary process is proposed. This technology provides a rapid freeform fabrication of high-performance complex shaped ceramics for various applications.

  14. Structural Configuration Systems Analysis for Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Welstead, Jason R.; Quinlan, Jesse R.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Structural configuration analysis of an advanced aircraft fuselage concept is investigated. This concept is characterized by a double-bubble section fuselage with rear mounted engines. Based on lessons learned from structural systems analysis of unconventional aircraft, high-fidelity finite-element models (FEM) are developed for evaluating structural performance of three double-bubble section configurations. Structural sizing and stress analysis are applied for design improvement and weight reduction. Among the three double-bubble configurations, the double-D cross-section fuselage design was found to have a relatively lower structural weight. The structural FEM weights of these three double-bubble fuselage section concepts are also compared with several cylindrical fuselage models. Since these fuselage concepts are different in size, shape and material, the fuselage structural FEM weights are normalized by the corresponding passenger floor area for a relative comparison. This structural systems analysis indicates that an advanced composite double-D section fuselage may have a relative structural weight ratio advantage over a conventional aluminum fuselage. Ten commercial and conceptual aircraft fuselage structural weight estimates, which are empirically derived from the corresponding maximum takeoff gross weight, are also presented and compared with the FEM- based estimates for possible correlation. A conceptual full vehicle FEM model with a double-D fuselage is also developed for preliminary structural analysis and weight estimation.

  15. [Microbial community structure in bio-ceramics and biological activated carbon analyzed by PCR-SSCP technique].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Wen-Jun

    2007-04-01

    Analyses of microbial community structure in bio-ceramics (BC) and biological activated carbon (BAC), which widely used in drinking water treatment were performed by polymerase-chain-reaction-single-strand-conformation-polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) targeted eubacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Microorganisms on bio-ceramics and biological activated carbon were detached by ultrasonic, culturing on R2A and LB agar, respectively, followed by genome DNA extracting. Results show that larger than 10 kb genome DNA could be extracted from all the samples except the BAC samples processed by ultrasonic. However, quantities of the extracted DNA were different. 408 bp gene fragments were observed after PCR using the extracted genome DNA as templates. These gene fragments were digested with lambda exonuclease followed by SSCP electrophoresis. Same SSCP profiles were observed between ultrasonic eluting, R2A and LB agar culturing. The identity of the segment from bio-ceramics with uncultured Pseudomonas sp. Clone FTL201 16S rDNA (GenBank, AF509293.1) fragment was 92%, and identities of the two segments from BAC with Bacillus sp. JH19 16S rDNA (GenBank , DQ232748.1) fragment and Bacterium VA-S-11 16S rDNA (GenBank, AY395279.1) fragment were 100% and 99%, respectively.

  16. Advanced Accelerating Structures and Their Interaction with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Wei

    2009-01-22

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  17. Advanced accelerating structures and their interaction with electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; High Energy Physics

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  18. Advanced actuators for the control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James; Hockney, Richard; Johnson, Bruce; Misovec, Kathleen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop advanced six-degree-of-freedom actuators employing magnetic suspensions suitable for the control of structural vibrations in large space structures. The advanced actuators consist of a magnetically suspended mass that has three-degrees-of-freedom in both translation and rotation. The most promising of these actuators featured a rotating suspended mass providing structural control torques in a manner similar to a control moment gyro (CMG). These actuators employ large-angle-magnetic suspensions that allow gimballing of the suspended mass without mechanical gimbals. Design definitions and sizing algorithms for these CMG type as well as angular reaction mass actuators based on multi-degree-of-freedom magnetic suspensions were developed. The performance of these actuators was analytically compared with conventional reaction mass actuators for a simple space structure model.

  19. Fundamental tribological properties of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Miyoshi, K.

    1985-01-01

    When a ceramic is brought into contact with itself, another ceramic, or a metal, strong bond forces can develop between the materials. Adhesion between a ceramic and itself or another solid are discussed from a theoretical consideration of the nature of the surfaces and experimentally by relating bond forces to the interface resulting from solid state contact. Elastic, plastic, and fracture behavior of ceramics in solid-state contact are discussed as they relate to friction and wear. The contact load necessary to initiate fracture in ceramics is shown to be appreciably reduced with tangential motion. Both friction and wear of ceramics are anisotropic and relate to crystal structure as with metals. Both free energy of oxide formation and the d valence bond character of metals are related to the friction and wear characteristics for metals in contact with ceramics. Lubrication is found to increase the critical load necessary to initiate fracture of ceramics with sliding or rubbing contact.

  20. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramics and Ceramic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.; Fox, Dennis; Eldridge, Jeffrey; Robinson, R. Craig; Bansal, Narottam

    2004-01-01

    One key factor that limits the performance of current gas turbine engines is the temperature capability of hot section structural components. Silicon-based ceramics, such as SiC/SiC composites and monolithic Si3N4, are leading candidates to replace superalloy hot section components in the next generation gas turbine engines due to their excellent high temperature properties. A major stumbling block to realizing Si-based ceramic hot section components is the recession of Si-based ceramics in combustion environments due to the volatilization of silica scale by water vapor. An external environmental barrier coating (EBC) is the most promising approach to preventing the recession. Current EBCs are based on silicon, mullite (3A12O3-2SiO2) and BSAS (barium strontium aluminum silicate with celsian structure). Volatility of BSAS, BSAS-silica chemical reaction, and low melting point of silicon limit the durability and temperature capability of current EBCs. Research is underway to develop EBCs with longer life and enhanced temperature capability. Understanding key issues affecting the performance of current EBCs is necessary for successful development of advanced EBCs. These issues include stress, chemical compatibility, adherence, and water vapor stability. Factors that affect stress are thermal expansion mismatch, phase stability, chemical stability, elastic modulus, etc. The current understanding on these issues will be discussed.

  1. Advanced Composite Structures At NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Eldred's presentation will discuss several NASA efforts to improve and expand the use of composite structures within aerospace vehicles. Topics will include an overview of NASA's Advanced Composites Project (ACP), Space Launch System (SLS) applications, and Langley's ISAAC robotic composites research tool.

  2. Structural tailoring of advanced turboprops (STAT): User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, K. W.

    1991-01-01

    This user's manual describes the Structural Tailoring of Advanced Turboprops program. It contains instructions to prepare the input for optimization, blade geometry and analysis, geometry generation, and finite element program control. In addition, a sample input file is provided as well as a section describing special applications (i.e., non-standard input).

  3. Systems integration and demonstration of advanced reusable structure for ALS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbins, Martin N.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the potential of advanced material to achieve life cycle cost (LCC) benefits for reusable structure on the advanced launch system. Three structural elements were investigated - all components of an Advanced Launch System reusable propulsion/avionics module. Leading aeroshell configurations included sandwich structure using titanium, graphite/polyimide (Gr/PI), or high-temperature aluminum (HTA) face sheets. Thrust structure truss concepts used titanium, graphite/epoxy, or silicon carbide/aluminum struts. Leading aft bulkhead concepts employed graphite epoxy and aluminum. The technical effort focused on the aeroshell because the greatest benefits were expected there. Thermal analyses show the structural temperature profiles during operation. Finite element analyses show stresses during splash-down. Weight statements and manufacturing cost estimates were prepared for calculation of LCC for each design. The Gr/PI aeroshell showed the lowest potential LCC, but the HTA aeroshell was judged to be lower risk. A technology development plan was prepared to validate the applicable structural technology.

  4. Copper-silver-titanium-tin filler metal for direct brazing of structural ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1988-04-05

    A method of joining ceramics and metals to themselves and to one another at about 800.degree. C. is described using a brazing filler metal consisting essentially of 35 to 50 at. % copper, 40 to 50 at. % silver, 1 to 15 at. % titanium, and 2 to 8 at. % tin. This method produces strong joints that can withstand high service temperatures and oxidizing environments.

  5. Copper-silver-titanium filler metal for direct brazing of structural ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1987-01-01

    A method of joining ceramics and metals to themselves and to one another is described using a brazing filler metal consisting essentially of 35 to 50 atomic percent copper, 15 to 50 atomic percent silver and 10 to 45 atomic percent titanium. This method produces strong joints that can withstand high service temperatures and oxidizing environments.

  6. Sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems: Summary of literature survey and concept analysis, task 3 report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennethum, W. H.; Sherwood, L. T.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a literature survey and concept analysis related to sensing techniques for measuring of surface temperature, strain, and heat flux for (non-specific) ceramic materials exposed to elevated temperatures (to 2200 K) are summarized. Concepts capable of functioning in a gas turbine hot section environment are favored but others are reviewed also. Recommendation are made for sensor development in each of the three areas.

  7. [Exposure to ceramic fibers in the occupational environment. I. Production, kinds of ceramic fibers, changes in structure of these fibers, preliminary studies in the working environment].

    PubMed

    Wojtczak, J

    1994-01-01

    The production of fireproof SiO2/Al2O3 ceramic fibres started in the late forties. Primarily, the production was designed entirely for the aircraft industry. In the sixties the application of ceramic fibres became more wider. The first ceramic fibrous materials were characterised by thermal resistance reaching 1200 degrees C. Certain kinds of materials produced currently can be used in the temperature accounting for 1600 degrees C. Aluminosiliceous ceramic fibres recrystallise at high temperature (above 1000 degrees C) and produce mullite and crostobalite. Ceramic fibrous material may become hazardous to workers as a source of respirable fibres. Studies, carried out in plants which manufacture products from aluminosiliceous ceramic fibres, indicated that mean concentrations of respirable fibres ranged from 0.14 to 1.13 f/cm3 while the levels of mean concentrations of total dust accounted for 0.4-13.6 mg/m3. At working posts of plants producing china, where heat-insulating materials were changed mean level of respirable fibre concentration was 0.28-1.65 f/cm3 and concentration of total dust ranged from 7.0 to 17.7 mg/m3.

  8. Report on sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Rink, D.L.; Soppet, W.K.; Listwan, J.T.

    2012-07-09

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials. The report is a deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030403), under the Work Package A-11AN040304, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Structural Materials' performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing corrosion and tensile data from the standpoint of sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. The scope of work involves exposure of advanced structural alloys such as G92, mod.9Cr-1Mo (G91) ferritic-martensitic steels and HT-UPS austenitic stainless steels to a flowing sodium environment with controlled impurity concentrations. The exposed specimens are analyzed for their corrosion performance, microstructural changes, and tensile behavior. Previous reports examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design, fabrication, and construction of a forced convection sodium loop for sodium compatibility studies of advanced materials. This report presents the results on corrosion performance, microstructure, and tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic and austenitic alloys exposed to liquid sodium at 550 C for up to 2700 h and at 650 C for up to 5064 h in the forced convection sodium loop. The oxygen content of sodium was controlled by the cold-trapping method to achieve {approx}1 wppm oxygen level. Four alloys were examined, G92 in the normalized and tempered condition (H1 G92), G92 in the cold-rolled condition (H2 G92), G91 in the normalized and tempered condition, and hot-rolled HT-UPS. G91 was included as a reference to compare with advanced alloy, G92. It was found that all four alloys showed weight loss after sodium exposures at 550 and 650 C. The weight loss of the four

  9. The structure of Er3+-doped oxy-fluoride transparent glass-ceramics studied by Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirov, V. K.; Seddon, A. B.; Ferrari, M.; Montagna, M.; Santos, L. F.; Almeida, R. M.

    2003-11-01

    We show that the structure of transparent oxy-fluoride glass-ceramics formed by heat treatment of glasses of typical composition 32(SiO2):9(AlO1.5):31.5(CdF2):18.5(PbF2): 5.5(ZnF2):3.5(ErF3) mol% consists of ~ 12 nm diameter, Er3+-doped, β-PbF2 nano-crystals embedded in a silica-based glass network and connected to it via non-bridging O and F anions, or fluorine linkages such as Pb-F-Cd and Pb-F-Zn. It is proposed that the glass network structure is mostly chain-like and dominated by Si(O,F)4 tetrahedra with two bridging O and two non-bridging O and/or F atoms (Q2 units). SiO4 tetrahedra with zero and one bridging O (Q0 and Q1 units, respectively) are also present in the glass structure, in the approximate proportion Q0:Q1:Q2 = 1:1:3, a characteristic which appears to be of primary importance. The flexible, chain-like glass-network, with many broken bonds, results in easy accommodation of the Er3+-doped PbF2 nano-crystals, which are grown by heat-treatment of the precursor glass. The boson peak in the Raman spectrum of the precursor glass decreases in intensity upon ceramming and is partly converted to narrow crystalline peaks at lower frequency, consistent with the precipitation of PbF2 crystalline nano-particles. It is suggested that the boson peak involves localized vibrations of broken or stretched Pb-F bonds. The mean free path for these vibrations increases with ceramming, which involves partial crystallization of the glass network, resulting in a shift of the boson peak vibrations to lower-frequency crystalline peaks.

  10. Structural and electromechanical properties of Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3 ceramics produced by different synthesis routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, A.; Maqbool, A.; Malik, R. A.; Kim, M. H.; Song, T. K.; Kim, W. J.

    2016-08-01

    Sodium bismuth titanate, Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3 (NBT) ceramics were produced by three different methods; conventional mixed-oxide (CMO) route, molten salt synthesis (MSS) and topochemical microcrystal conversion (TMC) and then sintered at 1150 oC for 2 h in air atmosphere. The crystal structure, dielectric, ferroelectric and field-induced strain properties were investigated for all samples. All samples showed a single phase perovskite structure without any evidences of unwanted secondary phases. The NBT ceramics synthesized by the TMC method show slightly better dielectric, ferroelectric and field induced strain response as compared with CMO and MSS synthesized ceramics. The room temperature dielectric constant measured at 1 kHz increased from 218 for NBT ceramics synthesized by MSS method to 271 and 330 for CMO and TMC synthesized ceramics, respectively. Similarly, the dynamic piezoelectric coefficient (d 33*) enhanced from 91 pm/V for CMO synthesized to 97 pm/V and 107 pm/V for MSS and TMC synthesized ceramics, respectively.

  11. Structural deformations on fluorophlogopite crystals of a pre-heated and experimentally shocked mica glass-ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Hiltl, M.; Hornemann, U.

    1998-07-10

    Shock experiments with the reflection method were carried out at room (T{sub room})- and pre-shock (T{sub pre}) temperatures of 300 and 600 deg. C at pressures ranging from 30 to 75 GPa to investigate the structural deformation on fluorophlogopite (KMg{sub 3}(Si{sub 3}AlO{sub 10})F{sub 2}) crystals of the Macor glass-ceramic. The recovered samples were examined by means of X-ray diffraction, SEM and TEM with respect to their microstructure. The examination shows that with increasing shock pressures and temperatures the crystals loose their morphology and undergo a transition into an amorphous state.

  12. Er-doped and Er, Yb co-doped oxyfluoride glasses and glass-ceramics, structural and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisiecki, Radosław; Augustyn, Elżbieta; Ryba-Romanowski, Witold; Żelechower, Michał

    2011-09-01

    The selected glasses and glass-ceramics pertinent to following chemical composition in mol%:48%SiO 2-11%Al 2O 3-7%Na 2O-10%CaO-10%PbO-11%PbF 2-3%ErF 3 and 48%SiO 2-11%Al 2O 3-7%Na 2O-10%CaO-10%PbO-10%PbF 2-1%ErF 3-3%YbF 3 have been manufactured from high purity components (Aldrich) at 1450 °C in normal atmosphere. Glass optical fibers were successfully drawn. Subsequently they were subject to the heat-treatment at 700 °C in various time periods. The preceding differential thermal analysis (DTA) studies allowed estimating both the fiber drawing temperature and the controlled crystallization temperature of glass fibers. It has been observed that the controlled heat-treatment of oxyfluoride glass fibers results in the creation of Pb 5Al 3F 19, Er 4F 2O 11Si 3 and Er 3FO 10Si 3 crystalline phases. The identified phases were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and confirmed by selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The fibers consist of mixed amorphous-crystalline microstructure with nano-crystals of size even below 10 nm distributed in the glassy host. Their morphology was investigated applying high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Optical properties and excited state relaxation dynamics of optically active ions (Er 3+, Yb 3+) in glass and glass-ceramics have been studied. Based on absorption spectra the Judd-Ofelt analysis was carried out. The main attention was directed to NIR luminescence at. 1.6 μm related to 4I 13/2 → 4I 15/2 Er 3+ and less effective emission associated with 4I 11/2 → 4I 15/2 Er 3+ and 2F 5/2 → 2F 7/2 Yb 3+ transitions. The dissimilar spectroscopic properties have been revealed for glasses and glass-ceramic samples, respectively. The reduction of emission linewidth at 1.6 and 1.0 μm combined with substantial increase of 4I 13/2 lifetimes of erbium in glass-ceramics appear to be evidences that Er 3+ ions are accommodated in crystalline phases. The structural and optical characteristics of oxyfluoride glass-ceramic

  13. Nonlinear displacement analysis of advanced propeller structures using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, C.; Kielb, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    The steady state displacements of a rotating advanced turboprop are computed using the geometrically nonlinear capabilities of COSMIC NASTRAN Rigid Format 4 and MSC NASTRAN Solution 64. A description of the modified Newton-Raphson algorithm used by Solution 64 and the iterative scheme used by Rigid Format 4 is provided. A representative advanced turboprop, SR3, was used for the study. Displacements for SR3 are computed for rotational speeds up to 10,000 rpm. The results show Solution 64 to be superior for computating displacements of flexible rotating structures. This is attributed to its ability to update the displacement dependent centrifugal force during the solution process.

  14. Some ceramic options

    SciTech Connect

    Zievers, J.F.; Eggerstedt, P.M.; Aguilar, P.C.; Zievers, E.C.

    1993-06-01

    Ceramic candle filters have proven to be an effective means of removing particulates to levels exceeding New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) in high temperature applications. The traditional {open_quotes}hard{close_quotes} ceramic filter elements, typically formed form granules however, have shown to be susceptible to failure from physical shock, thermal stress, and chemical attack. Additionally, these hard, dense candles can be costly and present internal filter design problems due to their relatively high weight. A good deal has been written about to use to porous ceramics in the filtration of high temperature gases for removal of particulate matter. Unlike the dense, granular ceramic filter elements, vacuum formed chopped ceramic fiber (VFCF) filters represent an attractive alternative. Composed of commercially available chopped ceramic fibers and utilizing existing vacuum forming technology, low cost filter elements with excellent physical and thermal shock resistance are now available. The ceramic fiber filter {open_quotes}skeleton{close_quotes} can be {open_quotes}post-treated{close_quotes} with refractory materials to enhance strength and chemical resistance, as well as to change permeability to suit a particular application. Also, because the ceramic fiber skeleton has greater porosity and is composed of low density materials, the final product is significantly lighter in weight than the traditional dense ceramic elements, making overall filter design an easier task. The use of ceramics extends beyond that of filter elements, however. Ceramics in the form of refractory have long been used to protect metal structures from high temperature and abrasion, and an extensive body of literature deals with this subject.

  15. Crystal structure, magnetic properties and advances in hexaferrites: A brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jotania, Rajshree

    2014-10-01

    Hexaferrites are hard magnetic materials and specifically ferri-magnetic oxides with hexagonal magnetoplumbite type crystallographic structure. Hexagonal ferrites are used as permanent magnets, high-density perpendicular and magneto-optical recording media, and microwave devices like resonance isolators, filters, circulators, phase shifters because of their high magnetic permeability, high electrical resistivity and moderable permittivity. In addition to these; hexagonal ferrites have excellent chemical stability, mechanical hardness and low eddy current loss at high frequencies. The preparation of hexaferrites is a complicated process. Various experimental techniques like standard ceramic techniques, solvent free synthesis route, co precipitation, salt-melt, ion exchange, sol-gel, citrate synthesis, hydrothermal synthesis, spray drying, water-in-oil microemulsion, reverse micelle etc are used to prepare hexaferrite materials. Structural, dielectric and magnetic properties, crystallite size of hexaferrites depend upon nature of substituted ions, method of preparation, sintering temperature and time. The recent interest is nanotechnology, the development of hexaferrite fibres and composites with carbon nano tubes (CNT). Magnetic properties of some doped and un-doped hexaferrites are discussed here. Recent advances in hexaferrites also highlighted in present paper.

  16. Ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    LaHaye, P.G.; Rahman, F.H.; Lebeau, T.P.; Severin, B.K.

    1998-06-16

    A tube containment system is disclosed. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture. 6 figs.

  17. Ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    LaHaye, Paul G.; Rahman, Faress H.; Lebeau, Thomas P. E.; Severin, Barbara K.

    1998-01-01

    A tube containment system. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture.

  18. Recent advances in computational structural reliability analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thacker, Ben H.; Wu, Y.-T.; Millwater, Harry R.; Torng, Tony Y.; Riha, David S.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of structural reliability analysis is to determine the probability that the structure will adequately perform its intended function when operating under the given environmental conditions. Thus, the notion of reliability admits the possibility of failure. Given the fact that many different modes of failure are usually possible, achievement of this goal is a formidable task, especially for large, complex structural systems. The traditional (deterministic) design methodology attempts to assure reliability by the application of safety factors and conservative assumptions. However, the safety factor approach lacks a quantitative basis in that the level of reliability is never known and usually results in overly conservative designs because of compounding conservatisms. Furthermore, problem parameters that control the reliability are not identified, nor their importance evaluated. A summary of recent advances in computational structural reliability assessment is presented. A significant level of activity in the research and development community was seen recently, much of which was directed towards the prediction of failure probabilities for single mode failures. The focus is to present some early results and demonstrations of advanced reliability methods applied to structural system problems. This includes structures that can fail as a result of multiple component failures (e.g., a redundant truss), or structural components that may fail due to multiple interacting failure modes (e.g., excessive deflection, resonate vibration, or creep rupture). From these results, some observations and recommendations are made with regard to future research needs.

  19. Crystal structure, optical properties and colouring performance of karrooite MgTi{sub 2}O{sub 5} ceramic pigments

    SciTech Connect

    Matteucci, Francesco Cruciani, Giuseppe; Dondi, Michele; Gasparotto, Giorgio; Tobaldi, David Maria

    2007-11-15

    Karrooite, MgTi{sub 2}O{sub 5}, is a promising ceramic pigment due to its high refractoriness and refractive indices, as well as its ability to host transition metal ions in two crystallographically distinct octahedral sites. The colouring performance was investigated combining X-ray powder diffraction with UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy on karrooite doped with V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co or Ni (M) according to the formula Mg{sub 1-x}Ti{sub 2-x}M{sub 2x}O{sub 5}, with x=0.02 and 0.05. Transition metals solubility in the karrooite lattice is not complete and a second phase is always present (geikielite or rutile). Structural data proved that incorporation of different chromophore ions into the karrooite structure affects unit cell parameters, bond length distances and angles, site occupancies and therefore cation order-disorder. Optical spectra exhibit broad absorbance bands of Co(II), Cr(IV), Fe(III), Mn(II), Mn(III), Ni(II), V(IV) with distinct contributions by cations in the M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} sites. Karrooite pigments have colours ranging from orange to brown-tan (Cr, Fe, Mn, V) to green (Co) and yellow (Ni) that are stable in low-temperature (<1050 deg. C) ceramic glazes and glassy coatings. - Graphical abstract: Karrooite is a promising ceramic pigment for high refractoriness and refractive indices. Incorporation of V(IV), Cr(IV), Mn(II)+Mn(III), Fe(III), Co(II) or Ni(II) in two crystallographically distinct octahedral sites affects unit cell parameters, bond length distances and cation order-disorder, leading also to distinct optical bands from the two different sites, so reducing colour purity.

  20. Computerized structural mechanics for 1990's: Advanced aircraft needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viswanathan, A. V.; Backman, B. F.

    1989-01-01

    The needs for computerized structural mechanics (CSM) as seen from the standpoint of the aircraft industry are discussed. These needs are projected into the 1990's with special focus on the new advanced materials. Preliminary design/analysis, research, and detail design/analysis are identified as major areas. The role of local/global analyses in these different areas is discussed. The lessons learned in the past are used as a basis for the design of a CSM framework that could modify and consolidate existing technology and include future developments in a rational and useful way. A philosophy is stated, and a set of analyses needs driven by the emerging advanced composites is enumerated. The roles of NASA, the universities, and the industry are identified. Finally, a set of rational research targets is recommended based on both the new types of computers and the increased complexity the industry faces. Computerized structural mechanics should be more than new methods in structural mechanics and numerical analyses. It should be a set of engineering applications software products that combines innovations in structural mechanics, numerical analysis, data processing, search and display features, and recent hardware advances and is organized in a framework that directly supports the design process.

  1. Advances in Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics Analyses for Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the advances that have been made in stress analyses of cracked aircraft components, in the understanding of the fatigue and fatigue-crack growth process, and in the prediction of residual strength of complex aircraft structures with widespread fatigue damage. Finite-element analyses of cracked structures are now used to determine accurate stress-intensity factors for cracks at structural details. Observations of small-crack behavior at open and rivet-loaded holes and the development of small-crack theory has lead to the prediction of stress-life behavior for components with stress concentrations under aircraft spectrum loading. Fatigue-crack growth under simulated aircraft spectra can now be predicted with the crack-closure concept. Residual strength of cracked panels with severe out-of-plane deformations (buckling) in the presence of stiffeners and multiple-site damage can be predicted with advanced elastic-plastic finite-element analyses and the critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. These advances are helping to assure continued safety of aircraft structures.

  2. Differently Structured Advance Organizers Lead to Different Initial Schemata and Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurlitt, Johannes; Dummel, Sebastian; Schuster, Silvia; Nuckles, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Does the specific structure of advance organizers influence learning outcomes? In the first experiment, 48 psychology students were randomly assigned to three differently structured advance organizers: a well-structured, a well-structured and key-concept emphasizing, and a less structured advance organizer. These were followed by a sorting task, a…

  3. Dental ceramics: current thinking and trends.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J Robert

    2004-04-01

    Dental ceramics are presented within a simplifying framework allowing for understanding of their composition and development. The meaning of strength and details of the fracture process are explored, and recommendations are given regarding making structural comparisons among ceramics. Assessment of clinical survival data is dealt with, and literature is reviewed on the clinical behavior of metal-ceramic and all-ceramic systems. Practical aspects are presented regarding the choice and use of dental ceramics.

  4. Structural and Magnetic Studies on Nano-crystalline Biocompatible Glass/Glass-ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothiyal, G. P.; Sharma, K.; Dixit, A.; Srinivasan, A.

    2010-12-01

    Ferrimagnetic glass-ceramics have been derived from bulk CaO-P2O5-SiO2-Fe2O3 glass system containing different additives like MgO, ZnO etc. by controlled crystallization. Phase formation and magnetic behaviour of glass-ceramics samples have been studied using XRD and SQUID magnetometer. The microstructure as seen by scanning electron microscopy exhibits nano sized particles. Nanocrystalline hematite and magnetite along with bone mineral phases constitute the major crystalline phases. Saturation magnetization increases with increase in amount of iron oxide since the volume fraction of magnetite has also increased. Addition of ZnO leads to increase in the saturation magnetization. In vitro response in simulated body fluid shows the formation of hydroxyapatite like layer implying the bioactive nature of the samples.

  5. A Proposal for an Experiment in Space: Laser Welding of Ceramics in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favuzza, M.; Camiolo, F.

    2002-01-01

    Ceramics are brittle because of their strong covalent or ionic bonds. Brittleness is not the only limitation of ceramics, also the presence of generally up to 20% porosity and the presence of microcracks (c.a. 25%) make ceramics rarely used for advanced applications. Often metals and composites are preferred for certain applications because of its higher fracture toughness. Nevertheless, there are also many advantages in using ceramics if compared to metals and composites such as high hardness, strength retention over a broad temperature range, wear and acid resistance, thermal shock resistance, possibility to be ground with a very smooth surface to high tolerances and low cost. Hence, during the last years, the ceramics market for engineering applications is to be considered in expansion. By keeping into consideration that today a values of KIC25 MPa m1/2 can be attained for some types of ceramics, one of the main factors that influences the utilisation of ceramics for engineering structures is the strong difficulty in joining its together. Most of the modern "Advanced Ceramics" are, in fact, highly-reactive so that its manufacturing and sintering procedures must be carried out only under controlled atmosphere. All that make the possibility to join advanced ceramics by any heat treatment basically impossible under normal conditions. Today, uses of that kind of ceramics are generally restricted to advanced small structural shapes. Starting from the consideration that a future possibility to join ceramics with a safe joint would be really important for structural applications especially where high wear and acid resistance is necessary, the aim of this paper is to show as, according to our theory, a first step of laser welding of reactive ceramics is possible under microgravity and oxigen deficiency conditions. It is enough to think about a satellite or a part of the ISS made from absolutely fire, chemical and wear proof ceramic parts assembled directly on space by

  6. Thermal stress analysis of ceramic structures with NASTRAN isoparametric solid elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamberson, S. E.; Paul, D. B.

    1978-01-01

    The performance of the NASTRAN level 16.0, twenty node, isoparametric bricks (CIHEX2) at thermal loading was studied. A free ceramic plate was modelled using twenty node bricks of varying thicknesses. The thermal loading for this problem was uniform over the surface with an extremely large gradient through the thickness. No mechanical loading was considered. Temperature-dependent mechanical properties were considered in this analysis. The NASTRAN results were compared to one dimensional stress distributions calculated by direct numerical integration.

  7. An evaluation of the processing conditions, structure, and properties (biaxial flexural strength and antibacterial efficacy) of sintered strontium-zinc-silicate glass ceramics.

    PubMed

    Looney, Mark; Shea, Helen O'; Gunn, Lynda; Crowley, Dolores; Boyd, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    The use of artificial bone grafts has increased in order to satisfy a growing demand for bone replacement materials. Initial mechanical stability of synthetic bone grafts is very advantageous for certain clinical applications. Coupled with the advantage of mechanical strength, a material with inherent antibacterial properties would be very beneficial. A series of strontium-doped zinc silicate (Ca-Sr-Na-Zn-Si) glass ceramics have been characterized in terms of their crystalline structure, biaxial flexural strength and antibacterial efficacy based on the identification of optimum sintering conditions. All three glass ceramics, namely, BT110, BT111, and BT112 were found to be fully crystalline, with BT111 and BT112 comprising of biocompatible crystalline phases. The biaxial flexural strengths of the three glass ceramics ranged from 70 to 149 MPa and were shown to be superior to those of clinically established ceramics in dry conditions and following incubation in simulated physiological conditions. The bacteriostatic effect for each glass ceramic was also established, where BT112 showed an inhibitory effect against three of the most common bacteria found at implantation sites, namely, Enterococcus faecalis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The results of the evaluation suggest that the materials studied offer advantages over current clinical materials and indicate the potential suitability of the glass ceramics as therapeutic bone grafts.

  8. Applications of Isotopes in Advancing Structural & Functional Heparanomics

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Vy M.; Nu Nguyen, Thao Kim; Raman, Karthik; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2011-01-01

    Heparanomics is the study of all the biologically active oligosaccharide domain structures in the entire heparanome and the nature of interactions among these domains and their protein ligands. Structural elucidation of heparan sulfate and heparin oligosaccharides is a major obstacle in advancing structure-function relationships and the study of heparanomics. There are several factors that exacerbate challenges involved in the structural elucidation of heparin and heparan sulfate. Therefore, there is a great interest in developing novel strategies and analytical tools to overcome the barriers in decoding the enigmatic heparanome. This review article focuses on the applications of isotopes, both radioisotopes and stable isotopes, in the structural elucidation of the complex heparanome at the disaccharide or oligosaccharide level using liquid chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. This review article also outlines the utility of isotopes in determining the substrate specificity of biosynthetic enzymes that eventually dictate the emergence of biologically active oligosaccharides. PMID:20838780

  9. Applications of isotopes in advancing structural and functional heparanomics.

    PubMed

    Tran, Vy M; Nguyen, Thao K N; Raman, Karthik; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2011-01-01

    Heparanomics is the study of all the biologically active oligosaccharide domain structures in the entire heparanome and the nature of the interactions among these domains and their protein ligands. Structural elucidation of heparan sulfate and heparin oligosaccharides is a major obstacle in advancing structure-function relationships and heparanomics. There are several factors that exacerbate the challenges involved in the structural elucidation of heparin and heparan sulfate; therefore, there is great interest in developing novel strategies and analytical tools to overcome the barriers in decoding the enigmatic heparanome. This review focuses on the applications of isotopes, both radioisotopes and stable isotopes, in the structural elucidation of the complex heparanome at the disaccharide or oligosaccharide level using liquid chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. This review also outlines the utility of isotopes in determining the substrate specificity of biosynthetic enzymes that eventually dictate the emergence of biologically active oligosaccharides.

  10. Bonded ceramic foams reinforced with fibers for high temperature use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G.; Hendricks, R. C.; Mullen, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    High quality SiC ceramic foams, which have only recently become available, have for the first time made possible the construction of low density ceramic fiber-ceramic foam sandwiches for high temperature applications. This report describes the construction of some ceramic fiber-ceramic foam structures and the preliminary measurement of strength at elevated temperature.

  11. On Ceramics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents four ceramics activities for secondary-level art classes. Included are directions for primitive kiln construction and glaze making. Two ceramics design activities are described in which students make bizarrely-shaped lidded jars, feet, and footwear. (AM)

  12. Development and application of NDE methods for monolithic and continuous fiber ceramic matrix composites.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W. A.

    1999-05-21

    Monolithic structural ceramics and continuous fiber ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are being developed for application in many thermally and chemically aggressive environments where structural reliability is paramount. We have recently developed advanced nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods that can detect distributed ''defects'' such as density gradients and machining-induced damage in monolithic materials, as well as delamination, porosity, and throughwall cracks, in CMC materials. These advanced NDE methods utilize (a) high-resolution, high-sensitivity thermal imaging; (b) high-resolution X-ray imaging; (c) laser-based elastic optical scattering; (d) acoustic resonance; (e) air-coupled ultrasonic methods; and (f) high-sensitivity fluorescent penetrant technology. This paper discusses the development and application of these NDE methods relative to ceramic processing and ceramic components used in large-scale industrial gas turbines and hot gas filters for gas stream particulate cleanup.

  13. Measuring the benefits and costs of ceramic turbochargers: the perspective from the driver's seat

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.P.

    1986-08-01

    The development of high-strength structural ceramics has many implications for advanced engine technology. Turbocharger rotors are an ideal early application of structural ceramics and are already in production in small volumes. Aside from the technical achievement this represents, what are the measurable benefits to empolying this new technology to production vehicles from the manufacturers and drivers point of view. This paper examines the results of a number of back-to-back performance tests of production vehicles equipped with ceramic and conventional turbochargers. The purpose was to more clearly quantify the benefits of this advanced turbocharger technology. A variety of acceleration tests were conducted by both independents and manufacturers. In addition, personal observations are included from more than 20,000 miles and a year of experience driving a production turbocharged car with a ceramic turbocharger. Benefits and costs of using this new technology in turbochargers are discussed, with emphasis on changes in vehicle behavior and related marketing implications.

  14. Processing, Structure and High Temperature Oxidation Properties of Polymer-Derived and Hafnium Oxide Based Ceramic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terauds, Kalvis

    Demands for hypersonic aircraft are driving the development of ultra-high temperature structural materials. These aircraft, envisioned to sustain Mach 5+, are expected to experience continuous temperatures of 1200--1800°C on the aircraft surface and temperatures as high as 2800°C in combustion zones. Breakthroughs in the development of fiber based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are opening the door to a new class of high-tech UHT structures for aerospace applications. One limitation with current carbon fiber or silicon carbide fiber based CMC technology is the inherent problem of material oxidation, requiring new approaches for protective environmental barrier coatings (EBC) in extreme environments. This thesis focuses on the development and characterization of SiCN-HfO2 based ceramic composite EBC systems to be used as a protective layer for silicon carbide fiber based CMCs. The presented work covers three main architectures for protection (i) multilayer films, (ii) polymer-derived HfSiCNO, and (iii) composite SiCN-HfO 2 infiltration. The scope of this thesis covers processing development, material characterization, and high temperature oxidation behavior of these three SiCN-HfO2 based systems. This work shows that the SiCN-HfO 2 composite materials react upon oxidation to form HfSiO4, offering a stable EBC in streaming air and water vapor at 1600°C.

  15. The structural, electrical and magnetoelectric properties of soft-chemically-synthesized SmFeO3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Sushrisangita; Mahapatra, P. K.; Choudhary, R. N. P.

    2016-01-01

    The structural, electrical and magnetoelectric properties of SmFeO3 ceramic samples, synthesized using a soft-chemical method, were studied. A structural analysis of the material was carried out by the Rietveld refinement of room temperature x-ray diffraction data. The temperature dependence of the dielectric peaks was analyzed by fitting them with two Gaussian peaks corresponding to two phase transitions—one being electric, and the other being magnetic in nature. The depression angle of the semicircles in a Nyquist plot representing the grain and grain boundary contributions in the sample was estimated. The grain boundary effect, appearing at temperatures above 75 °C, is explained using the Maxwell-Wagner mechanism. The impedance study reveals a semi-conducting grain with an insulating grain boundary, leading to the formation of surface and internal barrier layer capacitors and resulting in a very high dielectric constant. The effect of dc conductivity on the loss tangent at low frequencies and high temperature has been analyzed. The frequency dependence of ac conductivity in the two different regions can be explained on the basis of correlated barrier hopping and quantum mechanical tunneling models. The material is found to exhibit canted antiferromagnetism and improper ferroelectric characteristics. The value of the magnetoelectric voltage-coupling coefficient (α) of a SmFeO3 ceramic is found to be 2.2 mV cm-1 Oe-1.

  16. Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures are investigated. Constructions of special elements which containing traction-free circular boundaries are investigated. New versions of mixed variational principle and version of hybrid stress elements are formulated. A method is established for suppression of kinematic deformation modes. semiLoof plate and shell elements are constructed by assumed stress hybrid method. An elastic-plastic analysis is conducted by viscoplasticity theory using the mechanical subelement model.

  17. Fluid and structural measurements to advance gas turbine technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    In the present paper, the current status of fluid and structural measurements is reviewed, and some potential improvements in gas turbine machinery, directly associated with the new measuring capability are discussed. Some considerations concerning the impact of the new capability on the methods and approaches that will be used in the further development of advanced technology, in general, and to aeropropulsion gas turbine machinery, in particular, are presented.

  18. A formal structure for advanced automatic flight-control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, G.; Cicolani, L. S.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques were developed for the unified design of multimode, variable authority automatic flight-control systems for powered-lift STOL and VTOL aircraft. A structure for such systems is developed to deal with the strong nonlinearities inherent in this class of aircraft, to admit automatic coupling with advanced air traffic control, and to admit a variety of active control tasks. The aircraft being considered is the augmentor wing jet STOL research aircraft.

  19. Overview of an Advanced Hypersonic Structural Concept Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Craig A.; Hudson, Larry D.; Piazza, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of hypersonics M&S advanced structural concepts development and experimental methods. The discussion on concepts development includes the background, task objectives, test plan, and current status of the C/SiC Ruddervator Subcomponent Test Article (RSTA). The discussion of experimental methods examines instrumentation needs, sensors of interest, and examples of ongoing efforts in the development of extreme environment sensors.

  20. Structural Tailoring of Advanced Turboprops (STAT) programmer's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, K. W.; Harvey, P. R.

    1989-01-01

    The Structural Tailoring of Advanced Turboprops (STAT) computer program was developed to perform numerical optimizations on highly swept propfan blades. This manual describes the functionality of the STAT system from a programmer's viewpoint. It provides a top-down description of module intent and interaction. The purpose of this manual is to familiarize the programmer with the STAT system should he/she wish to enhance or verify the program's function.

  1. Structural response of an advanced combustor liner: Test and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, Paul E.; Thompson, Robert L.; Tong, M.; Higgins, M.

    1987-01-01

    An advanced (segmented) combustor liner supplied by Pratt and Whitney Aircraft was tested in the structural component test rig at Lewis Research Center. It was found that the segmented liner operated at much lower temperatures than the conventional liner (about 400 F lower) for the same heat flux. At the lower temperatures and low thermal gradients, little distortion to the segments was observed. The operating conditions were not severe enough to distort or damage the segmented liner.

  2. Controlling polymorphic structures and investigating electric properties of Ca-doped zirconia using solid state ceramic method

    SciTech Connect

    Emam, W.I.; Mabied, Ahmed F.; Hashem, H.M.; Selim, M.M.; El-Shabiny, A.M.; Ahmed Farag, I.S.

    2015-08-15

    Structural study of Zr{sub 1−x}Ca{sub x}O{sub 2−x} samples with x=0.01–0.15 were prepared using solid state ceramic method. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed a mixture of the high temperature phase and the monoclinic one for the samples with x≤0.05. On the other hand, the formation of a single high temperature cubic phase was observed within a concentration range of x=0.06–0.10. At concentrations higher than 0.10 the calcium zirconate phase was observed besides the dominant high temperature one. Rietveld refinement of the single phase data clearly revealed, that substitution of zirconium by calcium increases both the lattice parameters as well as the tetrahedral bond length. Ionic to electronic conductivity ratio enhanced considerably as Ca-doping level ascends. The dielectric constant shows strong temperature dependence at lower frequencies. The dielectric loss factor increases rapidly with the increase in temperature at lower frequencies, while decreases with the increase in frequency at higher temperatures. The ionic conduction is considered as the dominant process at higher temperatures. - Graphical abstract: Forming a high temperature cubic zirconia phase at 1200 °C using ceramic solid state method and aliovalent cation. - Highlights: • Formation the high temperature cubic polymorph of zirconia using Ca-doping. • Solid state ceramic method was used for preparing the cubic Ca-doped zirconia. • Substitution of zirconium by calcium increases the lattice parameters and the bond length. • Ionic to electronic conductivity ratio enhanced considerably as Ca-doping level increases.

  3. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. The main activity during this granting period was a completion of a detailed comparative analysis of the suite of spectral editing techniques developed in our laboratory for this purpose. The appended report is a manuscript being submitted to the Journal of Magnetic Resonance on this subject.

  4. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. The main activity during this granting period was a detailed comparative analysis of the suite of spectral editing results obtained on the Argonne coals. We have extended our fitting procedure to include carbons of all types in the analysis.

  5. Composite Structure Modeling and Analysis of Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Sorokach, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project and the Boeing Company are collabrating to advance the unitized damage arresting composite airframe technology with application to the Hybrid-Wing-Body (HWB) aircraft. The testing of a HWB fuselage section with Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) construction is presently being conducted at NASA Langley. Based on lessons learned from previous HWB structural design studies, improved finite-element models (FEM) of the HWB multi-bay and bulkhead assembly are developed to evaluate the performance of the PRSEUS construction. In order to assess the comparative weight reduction benefits of the PRSEUS technology, conventional cylindrical skin-stringer-frame models of a cylindrical and a double-bubble section fuselage concepts are developed. Stress analysis with design cabin-pressure load and scenario based case studies are conducted for design improvement in each case. Alternate analysis with stitched composite hat-stringers and C-frames are also presented, in addition to the foam-core sandwich frame and pultruded rod-stringer construction. The FEM structural stress, strain and weights are computed and compared for relative weight/strength benefit assessment. The structural analysis and specific weight comparison of these stitched composite advanced aircraft fuselage concepts demonstrated that the pressurized HWB fuselage section assembly can be structurally as efficient as the conventional cylindrical fuselage section with composite stringer-frame and PRSEUS construction, and significantly better than the conventional aluminum construction and the double-bubble section concept.

  6. Study of nanoscale structural biology using advanced particle beam microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boseman, Adam J.

    This work investigates developmental and structural biology at the nanoscale using current advancements in particle beam microscopy. Typically the examination of micro- and nanoscale features is performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), but in order to decrease surface charging, and increase resolution, an obscuring conductive layer is applied to the sample surface. As magnification increases, this layer begins to limit the ability to identify nanoscale surface structures. A new technology, Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), is used to examine uncoated surface structures on the cuticle of wild type and mutant fruit flies. Corneal nanostructures observed with HIM are further investigated by FIB/SEM to provide detailed three dimensional information about internal events occurring during early structural development. These techniques are also used to reconstruct a mosquito germarium in order to characterize unknown events in early oogenesis. Findings from these studies, and many more like them, will soon unravel many of the mysteries surrounding the world of developmental biology.

  7. Annual Conference on Composites and Advanced Ceramic Materials, 14th, Cocoa Beach, FL, Jan. 14-17, 1990, Collection of Papers. Parts 1 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    Attention is given to such topics as national goals in engineering ceramics, microstructural effects on the mechanical properties of monolithic ceramics, whisker-reinforced composites, and reaction-based processing. Processing-microstructure-property relations in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites are also considered.

  8. Lanthanide (Nd, Gd) compounds with garnet and monazite structures. Powders synthesis by "wet" chemistry to sintering ceramics by Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potanina, Ekaterina; Golovkina, Ludmila; Orlova, Albina; Nokhrin, Aleksey; Boldin, Maksim; Sakharov, Nikita

    2016-05-01

    Complex oxide Y2.5Nd0.5Al5O12 with garnet structure and phosphates NdPO4 and GdPO4 with monazite structure were obtained by using precipitation methods. Ceramics Y2.5Nd0.5Al5O12 and NdPO4 were processed by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). Relative density more 98%, sintering time did not exceed 8 min, sintering temperature 1330-1390 °C. Leaching rates of elements from ceramics were 10-6-10-7 g/(cm2 d). The process of ceramics sintering has two-stage character: the first step of sintering-compaction process is related to the plastic flow of the material, the second step-to the process of grain boundary diffusion and grain growth.

  9. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L.

    2012-05-31

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP) and the

  10. Pyrochlore-structured titanate ceramics for immobilisation of actinides: Hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) and stainless steel/waste form interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Li, Huijun; Moricca, Sam

    2008-07-01

    A pyrochlore-structured titanate ceramic has been studied in respect of its overall feasibility for immobilisation of impure actinide-rich radioactive wastes through the hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) technique. The resultant waste form contains mainly pyrochlore (˜70%), rutile (˜14%) as well as perovskite (˜12%), hollandite (˜2%) and brannerite (˜1%). Optical spectroscopy confirms that uranium (used to simulate Pu) exists mainly in the stable pyrochlore-structured phase as tetravalent ions as designed. The stainless steel/waste form interactions under HIPing conditions (1280 °C/100 MPa/3 h) do not seem to change the actinide-bearing phases and therefore should have no detrimental effect on the waste form.

  11. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Turbine Technologies Application Project (ATTAP) is in the fifth year of a multiyear development program to bring the automotive gas turbine engine to a state at which industry can make commercialization decisions. Activities during the past year included reference powertrain design updates, test-bed engine design and development, ceramic component design, materials and component characterization, ceramic component process development and fabrication, ceramic component rig testing, and test-bed engine fabrication and testing. Engine design and development included mechanical design, combustion system development, alternate aerodynamic flow testing, and controls development. Design activities included development of the ceramic gasifier turbine static structure, the ceramic gasifier rotor, and the ceramic power turbine rotor. Material characterization efforts included the testing and evaluation of five candidate high temperature ceramic materials. Ceramic component process development and fabrication, with the objective of approaching automotive volumes and costs, continued for the gasifier turbine rotor, gasifier turbine scroll, extruded regenerator disks, and thermal insulation. Engine and rig fabrication, testing, and development supported improvements in ceramic component technology. Total test time in 1992 amounted to 599 hours, of which 147 hours were engine testing and 452 were hot rig testing.

  12. Ceramic Technology Project, semiannual progress report for October 1993 through March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1994-09-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990, the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The original objective of the project was to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. During the course of the Ceramic Technology Project, remarkable progress has been made in the development of reliable structural ceramics. The direction of the Ceramic Technology Project is now shifting toward reducing the cost of ceramics to facilitate commercial introduction of ceramic components for near-term engine applications. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported (advanced gas turbine and low-heat-rejection diesel engines) to include near-term (5-10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned.

  13. A-Site (MCe) Substitution Effects on the Structures and Properties of CaBi4Ti4O15 Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Haixue; Li, Chengen; Zhou, Jiaguang; Zhu, Weimin; He, Lianxin; Song, Yuxin

    2000-11-01

    We investigated the effect of A-site compound substitution on the structures and properties of Ca0.8(MCe)0.1Bi4Ti4O15 (M denotes Li, Na and K) ceramics. The samples were prepared by the conventional ceramic technique. Sintering characteristics of Ca0.8(MCe)0.1Bi4Ti4O15 and CaBi4Ti4O15 ceramics were discussed. X-ray powder diffraction patterns of the three modified CBT-based compounds show a single phase of bismuth oxide layer type structure with m=4. The hysteresis loops of polarization versus electric field of the four compounds were also measured. A-site compound substitution improves the piezoelectric properties and the high-temperature resistivity of these materials. A-site (LiCe) and (KCe) substitution not only improves the Curie temperature but also decreases the temperature coefficient of dielectric constant (TK\\varepsilon). Among the three modified ceramics, only the Curie temperature of Ca0.8(NaCe)0.1Bi4Ti4O15 is lower than that of CaBi4Ti4O15; however, its TK\\varepsilon is the lowest. As a result, all the three modified CBT-based ceramics were found to be excellent high-temperature piezoelectric materials.

  14. PREFACE: Symposium 13: Ceramics for Medicine, Biotechnology and Biomimetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuki, Chikara

    2011-10-01

    Preface to Symposium 13 (Ceramics for Medicine, Biotechnology and Biomimetics) of the International Congress on Ceramics III, 14-18 November 2010, Osaka, Japan Ceramic materials are now widely used in biomedical fields, such as applications of artificial bones, joints and teeth. The high potential of ceramics to exhibit biological functionality is expected to produce novel materials supporting biotechnology. These applications are governed by the interactions of materials and biological molecules. So far, 'bioceramics' is a type of biomaterial used for repairing damaged tissues. The orthopaedic application of bioceramics has advanced rapidly since the invention of Bioglass® that was found to encourage direct bonding with living bone. Hydroxyapatite and calcium phosphate ceramics are now popular bioceramics for use in artificial bones. While the bone-bonding behavior of materials was understood phenomenologically, very little has been known about the mechanism of either hard or soft tissue attachment or tissue growth on ceramic-based materials, such as glasses, glass-ceramics, ceramic composites and organic-inorganic hybrids. This symposium discussed the scientific understanding of the interface between biomedical materials and soft/hard tissues, and the design and construction of nanoscopic interfaces. It also involved establishment of biomimetic structures, characterization of natural life-related hard and soft tissues, and their formation mechanisms for a wide range of applications in biotechnology through 45 oral presentations including 5 invited lectures and 45 posters. I wish to express my sincere appreciation to the organizers of this symposium in the ICC3 conference. I am also grateful to the invited speakers, all the participants and organizing committee of the ICC3. It is my great pleasure that this proceedings could be published as the fruit of this symposium's achievement, which includes the contributions in all aspect of scientific understanding and

  15. Rapidly solidified ceramics: Processing, structure, and magnetic properties. Progress report, September 1984--January 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Kalonji, G.M.; O`Handley, R.C.

    1985-12-31

    Since its initiation in September 1984, work under this contract has progressed in two areas: construction of a gas atomizer for rapid solidification of ceramics; and characterization of rapidly solidified materials in the SrO-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, BaO-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiO{sub 2}, and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-SiO{sub 2} systems. This report summarize this work.

  16. Effects of soda-lime-silica waste glass on mullite formation kinetics and micro-structures development in vitreous ceramics.

    PubMed

    Marinoni, Nicoletta; D'Alessio, Daniela; Diella, Valeria; Pavese, Alessandro; Francescon, Ferdinando

    2013-07-30

    The effects of soda-lime waste glass, from the recovery of bottle glass cullet, in partial replacement of Na-feldspar for sanitary-ware ceramic production are discussed. Attention is paid to the mullite growth kinetics and to the macroscopic properties of the final output, the latter ones depending on the developed micro-structures and vitrification grade. Measurements have been performed by in situ high temperature X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermal dilatometry, water absorption and mechanical testing. Glass substituting feldspar from 30 to 50 wt% allows one (i) to accelerate the mullite growth reaction kinetics, and (ii) to achieve macroscopic features of the ceramic output that comply with the latest technical requirements. The introduction of waste glass leads to (i) a general saving of fuel and reduction of the CO2-emissions during the firing stage, (ii) a preservation of mineral resources in terms of feldspars, and (iii) an efficient management of the bottle glass refuse by readdressing a part of it in the sanitary-ware manufacturing.

  17. Optimization of composition, structure and mechanical strength of bioactive 3-D glass-ceramic scaffolds for bone substitution.

    PubMed

    Baino, Francesco; Ferraris, Monica; Bretcanu, Oana; Verné, Enrica; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara

    2013-03-01

    Fabrication of 3-D highly porous, bioactive, and mechanically competent scaffolds represents a significant challenge of bone tissue engineering. In this work, Bioglass®-derived glass-ceramic scaffolds actually fulfilling this complex set of requirements were successfully produced through the sponge replication method. Scaffold processing parameters and sintering treatment were carefully designed in order to obtain final porous bodies with pore content (porosity above 70 %vol), trabecular architecture and mechanical properties (compressive strength up to 3 MPa) analogous to those of the cancellous bone. Influence of the Bioglass® particles size on the structural and mechanical features of the sintered scaffolds was considered and discussed. Relationship between porosity and mechanical strength was investigated and modeled. Three-dimensional architecture, porosity, mechanical strength and in vitro bioactivity of the optimized Bioglass®-derived scaffolds were also compared to those of CEL2-based glass-ceramic scaffolds (CEL2 is an experimental bioactive glass originally developed by the authors at Politecnico di Torino) fabricated by the same processing technique, in an attempt at understanding the role of different bioactive glass composition on the major features of scaffolds prepared by the same method.

  18. Robocasting of Ceramics and Composites Using Fine Particle Suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    CESARANO III,JOSEPH

    1999-10-28

    Solid freeform fabrication is the near-net-shape manufacturing of components by sequentially stacking thin layers of material until complicated three dimensional shapes are produced. The operation is computer controlled and requires no molds. This exciting new field of technology provides engineers with the ability to rapidly produce prototype parts directly from CAD drawings and oftentimes little or no machining is necessary after fabrication. Techniques for freeform fabrication with several types of plastics and metals are already quite advanced and maybe reviewed in references 1 and 2. Very complicated plastic models can be fabricated by stereolithography, selective laser sintering, fused deposition modeling, or three-dimensional ink jet printing. Metals may be freeformed by the LENS{trademark} technique and porous ceramic bodies by three dimensional printing into a porous powder bed. However, methods for freeform fabrication that utilize particulate slurries to build dense ceramics and composites are not as well developed. The techniques that are being developed for the freeform fabrication of dense structural ceramics primarily revolve around the sequential layering of ceramic loaded polymers or waxes. Laminated Object Manufacturing and CAM-LEM processing use controlled stacking and laser cutting of ceramic tapes [2,3]. Similar to fused deposition modeling, ceramic loaded polymer/wax filaments are being used for the fused deposition of ceramics [2,4]. Extrusion freeform fabrication uses high pressure extrusion to deposit layers of ceramic loaded polymer/wax systems[1]. Modified stereolithographic techniques are also being developed using ceramic loaded ultraviolet curable resins [2]. Pre-sintered parts made with any of these techniques typically have 40-55 vol.% polymeric binder. In this regard, these techniques are analogous to powder injection molding of ceramics. Very long and complicated burnout heat treatments are necessary to produce a dense ceramic

  19. Fundamental studies of structure borne noise for advanced turboprop applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, W.; Koval, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    The transmission of sound generated by wing-mounted, advanced turboprop engines into the cabin interior via structural paths is considered. The structural model employed is a beam representation of the wing box carried into the fuselage via a representative frame type of carry through structure. The structure for the cabin cavity is a stiffened shell of rectangular or cylindrical geometry. The structure is modelled using a finite element formulation and the acoustic cavity is modelled using an analytical representation appropriate for the geometry. The structural and acoustic models are coupled by the use of hard wall cavity modes for the interior and vacuum structural modes for the shell. The coupling is accomplished using a combination of analytical and finite element models. The advantage is the substantial reduction in dimensionality achieved by modelling the interior analytically. The mathematical model for the interior noise problem is demonstrated with a simple plate/cavity system which has all of the features of the fuselage interior noise problem.

  20. Current Issues with Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramics and Ceramic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.

    2004-01-01

    The environmental barrier coating (EBC) for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites and Si3N4 ceramics is an emerging field as the application of silicon-based ceramics in the gas turbine engine hot section is on the horizon, both for aero and industrial gas turbines. EBC is an enabling technology for silicon-based ceramics because these materials without an EBC cannot be used in combustion environments due to rapid surface recession. Significant progress in EBC development has been made during the last decade through various government-sponsored programs. Current EBCs are based on silicon, mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2) and BSAS (barium strontium aluminum silicate with celsian structure). Volatility of BSAS, BSAS-silica chemical reaction, and low melting point of silicon limit temperature capability of current EBCs to about 1350 C for long-term applications. There is a need for higher temperature EBCs as the temperature capability of silicon-based ceramics continue to increase. Therefore, research is underway to develop EBCs with improved temperature capability compared to current EBCs. The current status and issues with the advanced EBC development efforts will be discussed.