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Sample records for advanced subsonic civil

  1. Formal representation of the requirements for an Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT) flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frincke, Deborah; Wolber, Dave; Fisher, Gene; Cohen, Gerald C.; Mclees, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    A partial requirement specification for an Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT) Flight Control System is described. The example was adopted from requirements given in a NASA Contractor report. The language used to describe the requirements, Requirements Specification Language (RSL), is described in a companion document.

  2. An example of requirements for Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT) flight control system using structured techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclees, Robert E.; Cohen, Gerald C.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements are presented for an Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT) flight control system generated using structured techniques. The requirements definition starts from initially performing a mission analysis to identify the high level control system requirements and functions necessary to satisfy the mission flight. The result of the study is an example set of control system requirements partially represented using a derivative of Yourdon's structured techniques. Also provided is a research focus for studying structured design methodologies and in particular design-for-validation philosophies.

  3. Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming

    1998-01-01

    Researchers from the NASA Lewis Research Center have obtained the first combustion/emissions data under extreme future engine operating conditions. In Lewis' new world-class 60-atm combustor research facility--the Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig (ASCR)--a flametube was used to conduct combustion experiments in environments as extreme as 900 psia and 3400 F. The greatest challenge for combustion researchers is the uncertainty of the effects of pressure on the formation of nitrogen oxides (NOx). Consequently, U.S. engine manufacturers are using these data to guide their future combustor designs. The flametube's metal housing has an inside diameter of 12 in. and a length of 10.5 in. The flametube can be used with a variety of different flow paths. Each flow path is lined with a high-temperature, castable refractory material (alumina) to minimize heat loss. Upstream of the flametube is the injector section, which has an inside diameter of 13 in. and a length of 0.5-in. It was designed to provide for quick changeovers. This flametube is being used to provide all U.S. engine manufacturers early assessments of advanced combustion concepts at full power conditions prior to engine production. To date, seven concepts from engine manufacturers have been evaluated and improved. This collaborated development can potentially give U.S. engine manufacturers the competitive advantage of being first in the market with advanced low-emission technologies.

  4. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage...

  5. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage...

  6. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage...

  7. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage...

  8. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage...

  9. Propulsion technology for an advanced subsonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, M. A.; Antl, R. J.; Povolny, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Engine design studies for future subsonic commercial transport aircraft were conducted in parallel with airframe studies. These studies surveyed a broad distribution of design variables, including aircraft configuration, payload, range, and speed, with particular emphasis on reducing noise and exhaust emissions without severe economic and performance penalties. The results indicated that an engine for an advanced transport would be similar to the currently emerging turbofan engines. Application of current technology in the areas of noise suppression and combustors imposed severe performance and economic penalties.

  10. Advanced Subsonic Airplane Design and Economic Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebeck, Robert H.; Andrastek, Donald A.; Chau, Johnny; Girvin, Raquel; Lyon, Roger; Rawdon, Blaine K.; Scott, Paul W.; Wright, Robert A.

    1995-01-01

    A study was made to examine the effect of advanced technology engines on the performance of subsonic airplanes and provide a vision of the potential which these advanced engines offered. The year 2005 was selected as the entry-into-service (EIS) date for engine/airframe combination. A set of four airplane classes (passenger and design range combinations) that were envisioned to span the needs for the 2005 EIS period were defined. The airframes for all classes were designed and sized using 2005 EIS advanced technology. Two airplanes were designed and sized for each class: one using current technology (1995) engines to provide a baseline, and one using advanced technology (2005) engines. The resulting engine/airframe combinations were compared and evaluated on the basis on sensitivity to basic engine performance parameters (e.g. SFC and engine weight) as well as DOC+I. The advanced technology engines provided significant reductions in fuel burn, weight, and wing area. Average values were as follows: reduction in fuel burn = 18%, reduction in wing area = 7%, and reduction in TOGW = 9%. Average DOC+I reduction was 3.5% using the pricing model based on payload-range index and 5% using the pricing model based on airframe weight. Noise and emissions were not considered.

  11. Design Methodology for Multi-Element High-Lift Systems on Subsonic Civil Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, R. S.; vanDam, C. P.

    1996-01-01

    The choice of a high-lift system is crucial in the preliminary design process of a subsonic civil transport aircraft. Its purpose is to increase the allowable aircraft weight or decrease the aircraft's wing area for a given takeoff and landing performance. However, the implementation of a high-lift system into a design must be done carefully, for it can improve the aerodynamic performance of an aircraft but may also drastically increase the aircraft empty weight. If designed properly, a high-lift system can improve the cost effectiveness of an aircraft by increasing the payload weight for a given takeoff and landing performance. This is why the design methodology for a high-lift system should incorporate aerodynamic performance, weight, and cost. The airframe industry has experienced rapid technological growth in recent years which has led to significant advances in high-lift systems. For this reason many existing design methodologies have become obsolete since they are based on outdated low Reynolds number wind-tunnel data and can no longer accurately predict the aerodynamic characteristics or weight of current multi-element wings. Therefore, a new design methodology has been created that reflects current aerodynamic, weight, and cost data and provides enough flexibility to allow incorporation of new data when it becomes available.

  12. Follow-On Technology Requirement Study for Advanced Subsonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendus, Bruce E.; Stark, Donald F.; Holler, Richard P.; Funkhouser, Merle E.

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted to define and assess the critical or enabling technologies required for a year 2005 entry into service (EIS) engine for subsonic commercial aircraft, with NASA Advanced Subsonic Transport goals used as benchmarks. The year 2005 EIS advanced technology engine is an Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP) engine. Performance analysis showed that the ADP design offered many advantages compared to a baseline turbofan engine. An airplane/ engine simulation study using a long range quad aircraft quantified the effects of the ADP engine on the economics of typical airline operation. Results of the economic analysis show the ADP propulsion system provides a 6% reduction in direct operating cost plus interest, with half the reduction resulting from reduced fuel consumption. Critical and enabling technologies for the year 2005 EIS ADP were identified and prioritized.

  13. Advanced surface paneling method for subsonic and supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, L. L.; Johnson, F. T.; Ehlers, F. E.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical results illustrating the capabilities of an advanced aerodynamic surface paneling method are presented. The method is applicable to both subsonic and supersonic flow, as represented by linearized potential flow theory. The method is based on linearly varying sources and quadratically varying doublets which are distributed over flat or curved panels. These panels are applied to the true surface geometry of arbitrarily shaped three dimensional aerodynamic configurations.

  14. User's manual: Subsonic/supersonic advanced panel pilot code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, J.; Tinoco, E. N.; Johnson, F. T.

    1978-01-01

    Sufficient instructions for running the subsonic/supersonic advanced panel pilot code were developed. This software was developed as a vehicle for numerical experimentation and it should not be construed to represent a finished production program. The pilot code is based on a higher order panel method using linearly varying source and quadratically varying doublet distributions for computing both linearized supersonic and subsonic flow over arbitrary wings and bodies. This user's manual contains complete input and output descriptions. A brief description of the method is given as well as practical instructions for proper configurations modeling. Computed results are also included to demonstrate some of the capabilities of the pilot code. The computer program is written in FORTRAN IV for the SCOPE 3.4.4 operations system of the Ames CDC 7600 computer. The program uses overlay structure and thirteen disk files, and it requires approximately 132000 (Octal) central memory words.

  15. Advanced Low Emissions Subsonic Combustor Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Reid

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in commercial and military aircraft gas turbines have yielded significant improvements in fuel efficiency and thrust-to-weight ratio, due in large part to increased combustor operating pressures and temperatures. However, the higher operating conditions have increased the emission of oxides of nitrogen (NOx), which is a pollutant with adverse impact on the atmosphere and environment. Since commercial and military aircraft are the only important direct source of NOx emissions at high altitudes, there is a growing consensus that considerably more stringent limits on NOx emissions will be required in the future for all aircraft. In fact, the regulatory communities have recently agreed to reduce NOx limits by 20 percent from current requirements effective in 1996. Further reductions at low altitude, together with introduction of limits on NOx at altitude, are virtual certainties. In addition, the U.S. Government recently conducted hearings on the introduction of federal fees on the local emission of pollutants from all sources, including aircraft. While no action was taken regarding aircraft in this instance, the threat of future action clearly remains. In these times of intense and growing international competition, the U.S. le-ad in aerospace can only be maintained through a clear technological dominance that leads to a product line of maximum value to the global airline customer. Development of a very low NOx combustor will be essential to meet the future needs of both the commercial and military transport markets, if additional economic burdens and/or operational restrictions are to be avoided. In this report, Pratt & Whitney (P&W) presents the study results with the following specific objectives: Development of low-emissions combustor technologies for advances engines that will enter into service circa 2005, while producing a goal of 70 percent lower NOx emissions, compared to 1996 regulatory levels. Identification of solution approaches to

  16. Analysis of an advanced technology subsonic turbofan incorporating revolutionary materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knip, Gerald, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Successful implementation of revolutionary composite materials in an advanced turbofan offers the possibility of further improvements in engine performance and thrust-to-weight ratio relative to current metallic materials. The present analysis determines the approximate engine cycle and configuration for an early 21st century subsonic turbofan incorporating all composite materials. The advanced engine is evaluated relative to a current technology baseline engine in terms of its potential fuel savings for an intercontinental quadjet having a design range of 5500 nmi and a payload of 500 passengers. The resultant near optimum, uncooled, two-spool, advanced engine has an overall pressure ratio of 87, a bypass ratio of 18, a geared fan, and a turbine rotor inlet temperature of 3085 R. Improvements result in a 33-percent fuel saving for the specified misssion. Various advanced composite materials are used throughout the engine. For example, advanced polymer composite materials are used for the fan and the low pressure compressor (LPC).

  17. Subsonic Aerodynamic Assessment of Vortex Flow Management Devices on a High-Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Applin, Zachary T.; Kemmerly, Guy T.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of leading-edge vortex management devices on the subsonic performance of a high-speed civil transport (HSCT) configuration was conducted in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.14 to 0.27, with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 3.08 x 10 (sup 6) to 5.47 x 10 (sup 6). The test model was designed for a cruise Mach number of 2.7. During the subsonic high-lift phase of flight, vortical flow dominates the upper surface flow structure, and during vortex breakdown, this flow causes adverse pitch-up and a reduction of usable lift. The experimental results showed that the beneficial effects of small leading-edge vortex management devices located near the model reference center were insufficient to substantially affect the resulting aerodynamic forces and moments. However, devices located at or near the wiring apex region demonstrated potential for pitch control with little effect on overall lift.

  18. Application of advanced technologies to very large subsonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, Dennis W.; Mcgraw, Marvin E., Jr.; Arcara, Philip C., Jr.; Geiselhart, Karl A.

    1992-01-01

    A NASA-Langley study has used the interdisciplinary Flight Optimization System to examine the impact of advanced technologies on the performance and plausible size of large, long-range subsonic transport aircraft. The baseline, four-engine configuration studied would carry 412 passengers over 7300 n. mi.; the technologies evaluated encompass high aspect ratio supercritical-airfoil wings, a composite wing structure, an all-composite primary structure, and hybrid laminar flow control. The results obtained indicate that 600-passenger transports, whose takeoff gross weight is no greater than that of the 412-passenger baseline, are made possible by the new technologies.

  19. Evaluation of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program Noise Reduction Benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Robert A.; Rawls, John W., Jr.; Russell, James W.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents a detailed evaluation of the aircraft noise reduction technology concepts developed during the course of the NASA/FAA Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program. In 1992, NASA and the FAA initiated a cosponsored, multi-year program with the U.S. aircraft industry focused on achieving significant advances in aircraft noise reduction. The program achieved success through a systematic development and validation of noise reduction technology. Using the NASA Aircraft Noise Prediction Program, the noise reduction benefit of the technologies that reached a NASA technology readiness level of 5 or 6 were applied to each of four classes of aircraft which included a large four engine aircraft, a large twin engine aircraft, a small twin engine aircraft and a business jet. Total aircraft noise reductions resulting from the implementation of the appropriate technologies for each class of aircraft are presented and compared to the AST program goals.

  20. Advanced Configurations for Very Large Subsonic Transport Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMasters, John H.; Paisley, David J.; Hubert, Richard J.; Kroo, Ilan; Bofah, Kwasi K.; Sullivan, John P.; Drela, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Recent aerospace industry interest in developing a subsonic commercial transport airplane with 50 percent greater passenger capacity than the largest existing aircraft in this category (the Boeing 747-400 with approximately 400-450 seats) has generated a range of proposals based largely on the configuration paradigm established nearly 50 years ago with the Boeing B-47 bomber. While this basic configuration paradigm has come to dominate subsonic commercial airplane development since the advent of the Boeing 707/Douglas DC-8 in the mid-1950's, its extrapolation to the size required to carry more than 600-700 passengers raises several questions. To explore these and a number of related issues, a team of Boeing, university, and NASA engineers was formed under the auspices of the NASA Advanced Concepts Program. The results of a Research Analysis focused on a large, unconventional transport airplane configuration for which Boeing has applied for a patent are the subject of this report. It should be noted here that this study has been conducted independently of the Boeing New Large Airplane (NLA) program, and with the exception of some generic analysis tools which may be common to this effort and the NLA (as will be described later), no explicit Boeing NLA data other than that published in the open literature has been used in the conduct of the study reported here.

  1. Atmospheric Effects of Subsonic Aircraft: Interim Assessment Report of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedl, Randall R. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This first interim assessment of the subsonic assessment (SASS) project attempts to summarize concisely the status of our knowledge concerning the impacts of present and future subsonic aircraft fleets. It also highlights the major areas of scientific uncertainty, through review of existing data bases and model-based sensitivity studies. In view of the need for substantial improvements in both model formulations and experimental databases, this interim assessment cannot provide confident numerical predictions of aviation impacts. However, a number of quantitative estimates are presented, which provide some guidance to policy makers.

  2. Unique Systems Analysis Task 7, Advanced Subsonic Technologies Evaluation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenberg, Joseph D. (Technical Monitor); Bettner, J. L.; Stratton, S.

    2004-01-01

    To retain a preeminent U.S. position in the aircraft industry, aircraft passenger mile costs must be reduced while at the same time, meeting anticipated more stringent environmental regulations. A significant portion of these improvements will come from the propulsion system. A technology evaluation and system analysis was accomplished under this task, including areas such as aerodynamics and materials and improved methods for obtaining low noise and emissions. Previous subsonic evaluation analyses have identified key technologies in selected components for propulsion systems for year 2015 and beyond. Based on the current economic and competitive environment, it is clear that studies with nearer turn focus that have a direct impact on the propulsion industry s next generation product are required. This study will emphasize the year 2005 entry into service time period. The objective of this study was to determine which technologies and materials offer the greatest opportunities for improving propulsion systems. The goals are twofold. The first goal is to determine an acceptable compromise between the thermodynamic operating conditions for A) best performance, and B) acceptable noise and chemical emissions. The second goal is the evaluation of performance, weight and cost of advanced materials and concepts on the direct operating cost of an advanced regional transport of comparable technology level.

  3. Analysis of an advanced ducted propeller subsonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iek, Chanthy; Boldman, Donald R.; Ibrahim, Mounir

    1992-01-01

    A time marching Navier-Stokes code called PARC (PARC2D for 2-D/axisymmetric and PARC3D for 3-D flow simulations) was validated for an advanced ducted propeller (ADP) subsonic inlet. The code validation for an advanced ducted propeller (ADP) subsonic inlet. The code validation was implemented for a non-separated flow condition associated with the inlet operating at angles-of-attack of 0 and 25 degrees. The inlet test data were obtained in the 9 x 15 ft Low Speed Wind Tunnel at NASA Lewis Research Center as part of a cooperative study with Pratt and Whitney. The experimental study focused on the ADP inlet performance for take-off and approach conditions. The inlet was tested at a free stream Mach number of 0.2, at angles-of-attack between O and 35 degrees, and at a maximum propeller speed of 12,000 RPM which induced a corrected air flow rate of about 46 lb/sec based on standard day conditions. The computational grid and flow boundary conditions (BC) were based on the actual inlet geometry and the funnel flow conditions. At the propeller face, two types of BC's were applied: a mass flow BC and a fixed flow properties BC. The fixed flow properties BC was based on a combination of data obtained from the experiment and calculations using a potential flow code. Comparison of the computational results with the test data indicates that the PARC code with the propeller face fixed flow properties BC provided a better prediction of the inlet surface static pressures than the predictions when the mass flow BC was used. For an angle-of-attack of 0 degrees, the PARC2D code with the propeller face mass flow BC provided a good prediction of inlet static pressures except in the region of high pressure gradient. With the propeller face fixed flow properties BC, the PARC2D code provided a good prediction of the inlet static pressures. For an angle-of-attack of 25 degrees with the mass flow BC, the PARC3D code predicted statis pressures which deviated significantly from the test data

  4. Expanding Advanced Civilizations in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gros, C.

    The 1950 lunch-table remark by Enrico Fermi `Where is everybody' has started intensive scientific and philosophical discussions about what we call nowadays the `Fermi paradox': If there had been ever a single advanced civilization in the cosmological history of our galaxy, dedicated to expansion, it would have had plenty of time to colonize the entire galaxy via exponential growth. No evidence of present or past alien visits to earth are known to us, leading to the standard conclusion that no advanced expanding civilization has ever existed in the milky-way. This conclusion rest fundamentally on the ad-hoc assumption, that any alien civilizations dedicated to expansion at one time would remain dedicated to expansions forever. Considering our limited knowledge about alien civilizations we need however to relax this basic assumption. Here we show that a substantial and stable population of expanding advanced civilization might consequently exist in our galaxy.

  5. On the detectivity of advanced galactic civilizations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.

    1973-01-01

    Even with slow rates of technological advance, extraterrestrial civilizations substantially in our future will have technologies and laws of nature currently inaccessible to us, and will probably have minimal interest in communicating with us. If this communication horizon is about 1000 years in our future, other crude estimates previously published imply that only about .0001 of the technical civilizations in the Galaxy are accessible to us. The mean distance to the nearest such society is then about 10,000 light years. Radio detection of extraterrestrial intelligence seems to imply either (1) much larger telescopes or antenna arrays for the detection of civilizations within our Galaxy than now exist; or (2) attention to the nearer extragalactic systems, with smaller radio telescopes, to detect the very small fraction of very advanced societies which may choose to make their presence known to emerging civilizations via antique communication modes.

  6. Power-by-Wire Development and Demonstration for Subsonic Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    During the last decade, three significant studies by the Lockheed Martin Corporation, the NASA Lewis Research Center, and McDonnell Douglas Corporation have clearly shown operational, weight, and cost advantages for commercial subsonic transport aircraft that use all-electric or more-electric technologies in the secondary electric power systems. Even though these studies were completed on different aircraft, used different criteria, and applied a variety of technologies, all three have shown large benefits to the aircraft industry and to the nation's competitive position. The Power-by-Wire (PBW) program is part of the highly reliable Fly-By-Light/Power-By-Wire (FBL/PBW) Technology Program, whose goal is to develop the technology base for confident application of integrated FBL/PBW systems for transport aircraft. This program is part of the NASA aeronautics strategic thrust in subsonic aircraft/national airspace (Thrust 1) to "develop selected high-leverage technologies and explore new means to ensure the competitiveness of U.S. subsonic aircraft and to enhance the safety and productivity of the national aviation system" (The Aeronautics Strategic Plan). Specifically, this program is an initiative under Thrust 1, Key Objective 2, to "develop, in cooperation with U.S. industry, selected high-payoff technologies that can enable significant improvements in aircraft efficiency and cost."

  7. Subsonic Investigation of a Leading-Edge Boundary Layer Control Suction System on a High-Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Applin, Zachary T.; Kemmerly, Guy T.; Coe, Paul L., Jr.; Owens, D. Bruce; Gile, Brenda E.; Parikh, Pradip G.; Smith, Don

    1999-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of a leading edge boundary layer control system was conducted on a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.08 to 0.27, with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 1.79 x 10(exp 6) to 5.76 x 10(exp 6). Variations in the amount of suction, as well as the size and location of the suction area, were tested with outboard leading edge flaps deflected 0 and 30 deg and trailing-edge flaps deflected 0 and 20 deg. The longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic data are presented without analysis. A complete tabulated data listing is also presented herein.

  8. Computational methods in the prediction of advanced subsonic and supersonic propeller induced noise: ASSPIN users' manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, M. H.; Tarkenton, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the computational aspects of propeller noise prediction in the time domain and the use of high speed propeller noise prediction program ASSPIN (Advanced Subsonic and Supersonic Propeller Induced Noise). These formulations are valid in both the near and far fields. Two formulations are utilized by ASSPIN: (1) one is used for subsonic portions of the propeller blade; and (2) the second is used for transonic and supersonic regions on the blade. Switching between the two formulations is done automatically. ASSPIN incorporates advanced blade geometry and surface pressure modelling, adaptive observer time grid strategies, and contains enhanced numerical algorithms that result in reduced computational time. In addition, the ability to treat the nonaxial inflow case has been included.

  9. Advanced subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Element Separate Flow Nozzle Tests for Engine Noise Reduction Sub-Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiyed, Naseem H.

    2000-01-01

    Contents of this presentation include: Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) goals and general information; Nozzle nomenclature; Nozzle schematics; Photograph of all baselines; Configurations tests and types of data acquired; and Engine cycle and plug geometry impact on EPNL.

  10. Comparison of all-electric secondary power systems for civil subsonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, David D.

    1992-01-01

    Three separate studies have shown operational, weight, and cost advantages for commercial subsonic transport aircraft using an all-electric secondary power system. The first study in 1982 showed that all-electric secondary power systems produced the second largest benefit compared to four other technology upgrades. The second study in 1985 showed a 10 percent weight and fuel savings using an all-electric high frequency (20 kHz) secondary power system. The last study in 1991 showed a 2 percent weight savings using today's technology (400 Hz) in an all-electric secondary power system. This paper will compare the 20 kHz and 400 Hz studies, analyze the 2 to 10 percent difference in weight savings and comment on the common benefits of the all-electric secondary power system.

  11. Energy and Economic Trade Offs for Advanced Technology Subsonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.; Wagner, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Changes in future aircraft technology which conserve energy are studied, along with the effect of these changes on economic performance. Among the new technologies considered are laminar-flow control, composite materials with and without laminar-flow control, and advanced airfoils. Aircraft design features studied include high-aspect-ratio wings, thickness ratio, and range. Engine technology is held constant at the JT9D level. It is concluded that wing aspect ratios of future aircraft are likely to significantly increase as a result of new technology and the push of higher fuel prices. Composite materials may raise aspect radio to about 11 to 12 and practical laminar flow-control systems may further increase aspect ratio to 14 or more. Advanced technology provides significant reductions in aircraft take-off gross weight, energy consumption, and direct operating cost.

  12. Analysis of an advanced ducted propeller subsonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iek, Chanthy; Boldman, Donald R.; Ibrahim, Mounir

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that a time marching Navier-Stokes code called PARC can be utilized to provide a reasonable prediction of the flow field within an inlet for an advanced ducted propeller. The code validation was implemented for a nonseparated flow condition associated with the inlet functioning at angles-of-attack of zero and 25 deg. Comparison of the computational results with the test data shows that the PARC code with the propeller face fixed flow properties boundary conditions (BC) provided a better prediction of the inlet surface static pressures than the prediction when the mass flow BC was employed.

  13. Energy and economic trade offs for advanced technology subsonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.; Wagner, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Changes in future aircraft technology which conserve energy are studied, along with the effect of these changes on economic performance. Among the new technologies considered are laminar-flow control, composite materials with and without laminar-flow control, and advanced airfoils. Aircraft design features studied include high-aspect-ratio wings, thickness ratio, and range. Engine technology is held constant at the JT9D level. It is concluded that wing aspect ratios of future aircraft are likely to significantly increase as a result of new technology and the push of higher fuel prices. Whereas current airplanes have been designed for AR = 7, supercritical technology and much higher fuel prices will drive aspect ratio to the AR = 9-10 range. Composite materials may raise aspect ratio to about 11-12 and practical laminar flow-control systems may further increase aspect ratio to 14 or more. Advanced technology provides significant reductions in aircraft take-off gross weight, energy consumption, and direct operating cost.

  14. Advanced subsonic long-haul transport terminal area compatibility study. Volume 1: Compatibility assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An analysis was made to identify airplane research and technology necessary to ensure advanced transport aircraft the capability of accommodating forecast traffic without adverse impact on airport communities. Projections were made of the delay, noise, and emissions impact of future aircraft fleets on typical large urban airport. Design requirements, based on these projections, were developed for an advanced technology, long-haul, subsonic transport. A baseline aircraft was modified to fulfill the design requirements for terminal area compatibility. Technical and economic comparisons were made between these and other aircraft configured to support the study.

  15. Engine Seal Technology Requirements to Meet NASA's Advanced Subsonic Technology Program Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    1994-01-01

    Cycle studies have shown the benefits of increasing engine pressure ratios and cycle temperatures to decrease engine weight and improve performance of commercial turbine engines. NASA is working with industry to define technology requirements of advanced engines and engine technology to meet the goals of NASA's Advanced Subsonic Technology Initiative. As engine operating conditions become more severe and customers demand lower operating costs, NASA and engine manufacturers are investigating methods of improving engine efficiency and reducing operating costs. A number of new technologies are being examined that will allow next generation engines to operate at higher pressures and temperatures. Improving seal performance - reducing leakage and increasing service life while operating under more demanding conditions - will play an important role in meeting overall program goals of reducing specific fuel consumption and ultimately reducing direct operating costs. This paper provides an overview of the Advanced Subsonic Technology program goals, discusses the motivation for advanced seal development, and highlights seal technology requirements to meet future engine performance goals.

  16. Analysis of a high speed civil transport configuration at subsonic flow conditions using a Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Victor R.

    1993-01-01

    Computations of three dimensional vortical flows over a generic High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration with an aspect ratio of 3.04 are performed using a thin-layer Navier-Stokes solver. The HSCT cruise configuration is modeled without leading or trailing edge flap deflections and without engine nacelles. The flow conditions, which correspond to tests done in the NASA Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel (TPT), are a subsonic Mach number of 0.3 and Reynolds number of 4.4 million for a range-of-attack (-.23 deg to 17.78 deg). The effects of the farfield boundary location with respect to the body are investigated. The boundary layer is assumed turbulent and simulated using an algebraic turbulence model. The key features of the vortices and their interactions are captured. Grid distribution in the vortex regions is critical for predicting the correct induced lift. Computed forces and surface pressures compare reasonably well with the experimental TPT data.

  17. Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research Phase II: N+4 Advanced Concept Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Marty K.; Droney, Christopher K.

    2012-01-01

    This final report documents the work of the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) team on Task 1 of the Phase II effort. The team consisted of Boeing Research and Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, General Electric, and Georgia Tech. Using a quantitative workshop process, the following technologies, appropriate to aircraft operational in the N+4 2040 timeframe, were identified: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), Hydrogen, fuel cell hybrids, battery electric hybrids, Low Energy Nuclear (LENR), boundary layer ingestion propulsion (BLI), unducted fans and advanced propellers, and combinations. Technology development plans were developed.

  18. Optical Fiber Sensors for Advanced Civil Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Marten Johannes Cornelius

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this dissertation is to develop, analyze, and implement optical fiber-based sensors for the nondestructive quantitative evaluation of advanced civil structures. Based on a comparative evaluation of optical fiber sensors that may be used to obtain quantitative information related to physical perturbations in the civil structure, the extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFPI) optical fiber sensor is selected as the most attractive sensor. The operation of the EFPI sensor is explained using the Kirchhoff diffraction approach. As is shown in this dissertation, this approach better predicts the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of gap length than methods employed previously. The performance of the optical fiber sensor is demonstrated in three different implementations. In the first implementation, performed with researchers in the Civil Engineering Department at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, optical fiber sensors were used to obtain quantitative strain information from reinforced concrete interior and exterior column-to-beam connections. The second implementation, performed in cooperation with researchers at the United States Bureau of Mines in Spokane, Washington, used optical fiber sensors to monitor the performance of roof bolts used in mines. The last implementation, performed in cooperation with researchers at the Turner-Fairbanks Federal Highway Administration Research Center in McLean, Virginia, used optical fiber sensors, attached to composite prestressing strands used for reinforcing concrete, to obtain absolute strain information. Multiplexing techniques including time, frequency and wavelength division multiplexing are briefly discussed, whereas the principles of operation of spread spectrum and optical time domain reflectometery (OTDR) are discussed in greater detail. Results demonstrating that spread spectrum and OTDR techniques can be used to multiplex optical fiber sensors are presented. Finally, practical

  19. Advanced subsonic transport approach noise: The relative contribution of airframe noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, William L., Jr.; Garber, Donald P.

    1992-01-01

    With current engine technology, airframe noise is a contributing source for large commercial aircraft on approach, but not the major contributor. With the promise of much quieter jet engines with the planned new generation of high-by-pass turbofan engines, airframe noise has become a topic of interest in the advanced subsonic transport research program. The objective of this paper is to assess the contribution of airframe noise relative to the other aircraft noise sources on approach. The assessment will be made for a current technology large commercial transport aircraft and for an envisioned advanced technology aircraft. NASA's Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) will be used to make total aircraft noise predictions for these two aircraft types. Predicted noise levels and areas of noise contours will be used to determine the relative importance of the contributing approach noise sources. The actual set-up decks used to make the ANOPP runs for the two aircraft types are included in appendixes.

  20. The development and evaluation of advanced technology laminar-flow-control subsonic transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturgeon, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of applying laminar flow control (LFC) to the wings and empennage of long-range subsonic transport aircraft for initial operation in 1985. For a design mission range of 5500 n mi, advanced technology LFC and turbulent-flow aircraft were developed for a 200-passenger payload, and compared on the basis of production costs, direct operating costs, and fuel efficiency. Parametric analyses were conducted to establish optimum geometry, advanced system concepts were evaluated, and configuration variations maximizing the effectiveness of LFC were developed. The final comparisons include consideation of maintenance costs and procedures, manufacturing costs and procedures, and operational considerations peculiar to LFC aircraft.

  1. A Full Navier-Stokes Analysis of Subsonic Diffuser of a Bifurcated 70/30 Supersonic Inlet for High Speed Civil Transport Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A full Navier-Stokes analysis was performed to evaluate the performance of the subsonic diffuser of a NASA Lewis Research Center 70/30 mixed-compression bifurcated supersonic inlet for high speed civil transport application. The PARC3D code was used in the present study. The computations were also performed when approximately 2.5 percent of the engine mass flow was allowed to bypass through the engine bypass doors. The computational results were compared with the available experimental data which consisted of detailed Mach number and total pressure distribution along the entire length of the subsonic diffuser. The total pressure recovery, flow distortion, and crossflow velocity at the engine face were also calculated. The computed surface ramp and cowl pressure distributions were compared with experiments. Overall, the computational results compared well with experimental data. The present CFD analysis demonstrated that the bypass flow improves the total pressure recovery and lessens flow distortions at the engine face.

  2. Advanced panel-type influence coefficient methods applied to subsonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, F. T.; Rubbert, P. E.

    1975-01-01

    An advanced technique for solving the linear integral equations of three-dimensional subsonic potential flows (steady, inviscid, irrotational and incompressible) about arbitrary configurations is presented. It involves assembling select, logically consistent networks whose construction comprises four tasks, which are described in detail: surface geometry definition; singularity strength definition; control point and boundary condition specification; and calculation of induced potential or velocity. The technique is applied to seven wing examples approached by four network types: source/analysis, doublet/analysis, source/design, and doublet/design. The results demonstrate the forgiveness of the model to irregular paneling and the practicality of combined analysis/design boundary conditions. The appearance of doublet strength mismatch is a valuable indicator of locally inadequate paneling.

  3. Advanced Civil Transport Simulator Cockpit View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Civil Transport Simulator (ACTS) is a futuristic aircraft cockpit simulator designed to provide full-mission capabilities for researching issues that will affect future transport aircraft flight stations and crews. The objective is to heighten the pilots situation awareness through improved information availability and ease of interpretation in order to reduce the possibility of misinterpreted data. The simulators five 13-inch Cathode Ray Tubes are designed to display flight information in a logical easy-to-see format. Two color flat panel Control Display Units with touch sensitive screens provide monitoring and modification of aircraft parameters, flight plans, flight computers, and aircraft position. Three collimated visual display units have been installed to provide out-the-window scenes via the Computer Generated Image system. The major research objectives are to examine needs for transfer of information to and from the flight crew; study the use of advanced controls and displays for all-weather flying; explore ideas for using computers to help the crew in decision making; study visual scanning and reach behavior under different conditions with various levels of automation and flight deck-arrangements.

  4. Propulsion system studies for an advanced high subsonic, long range jet commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Propulsion system characteristics for a long range, high subsonic (Mach 0.90 - 0.98), jet commercial transport aircraft are studied to identify the most desirable cycle and engine configuration and to assess the payoff of advanced engine technologies applicable to the time frame of the late 1970s to the mid 1980s. An engine parametric study phase examines major cycle trends on the basis of aircraft economics. This is followed by the preliminary design of two advanced mixed exhaust turbofan engines pointed at two different technology levels (1970 and 1985 commercial certification for engines No. 1 and No. 2, respectively). The economic penalties of environmental constraints - noise and exhaust emissions - are assessed. The highest specific thrust engine (lowest bypass ratio for a given core technology) achievable with a single-stage fan yields the best economics for a Mach 0.95 - 0.98 aircraft and can meet the noise objectives specified, but with significant economic penalties. Advanced technologies which would allow high temperature and cycle pressure ratios to be used effectively are shown to provide significant improvement in mission performance which can partially offset the economic penalties incurred to meet lower noise goals. Advanced technology needs are identified; and, in particular, the initiation of an integrated fan and inlet aero/acoustic program is recommended.

  5. Medical advances during the Civil War.

    PubMed

    Blaisdell, F W

    1988-09-01

    The contributions to medical care that developed during the Civil War have not been fully appreciated, probably because the quality of care administered was compared against modern standards rather than the standards of the time. The specific accomplishments that constituted major advances were as follows. 1. Accumulation of adequate records and detailed reports for the first time permitted a complete military medical history. This led to the publication of the Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion, which was identified in Europe as the first major academic accomplishment by US medicine. 2. Development of a system of managing mass casualties, including aid stations, field hospitals, and general hospitals, set the pattern for management of the wounded in World War I, World War II, and the Korean War. 3. The pavilion-style general hospitals, which were well ventilated and clean, were copied in the design of large civilian hospitals over the next 75 years. 4. The importance of immediate, definitive treatment of wounds and fractures was demonstrated and it was shown that major operative procedures, such as amputation, were optimally carried out in the first 24 hours after wounding. 5. The importance of sanitation and hygiene in preventing infection, disease, and death among the troops in the field was demonstrated. 6. Female nurses were introduced to hospital care and Catholic orders entered the hospital business. 7. The experience and training of thousands of physicians were upgraded and they were introduced to new ideas and standards of care. These included familiarity with prevention and treatment of infectious disease, with anesthetic agents, and with surgical principles that rapidly advanced the overall quality of American medical practice. 8. The Sanitary Commission was formed, a civilian-organized soldier's relief society that set the pattern for the development of the American Red Cross. PMID:3046560

  6. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Program review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology to an Advanced Subsonic Transport Project, established as one element of the NASA/Boeing Energy Efficient Transport Technology Program. The performance assessment showed that incorporating ACT into an airplane designed to fly approximately 200 passengers approximately 2,000 nmi could yield block fuel savings from 6 to 10 percent at the design range. The principal risks associated with incorporating these active control functions into a commercial airplane are those involved with the ACT system implementation. The Test and Evaluation phase of the IAAC Project focused on the design, fabrication, and test of a system that implemented pitch axis fly-by-wire, pitch axis augmentation, and wing load alleviation. The system was built to be flight worthy, and was planned to be experimentally flown on the 757. The system was installed in the Boeing Digital Avionics Flight Controls Laboratory (DAFCL), where open loop hardware and software tests, and a brief examination of a direct drive valve (DDV) actuation concept were accomplished. The IAAC Project has shown that ACT can be beneficially incorporated into a commercial transport airplane. Based on the results achieved during the testing phase, there appears to be no fundamental reason(s) that would preclude the commercial application of ACT, assuming an appropriate development effort is included.

  7. Globular Clusters as Cradles of Life and Advanced Civilizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, R.; Ray, A.

    2016-08-01

    Globular clusters are ancient stellar populations in compact dense ellipsoids. There is no star formation and there are no core-collapse supernovae, but several lines of evidence suggest that globular clusters are rich in planets. If so, and if advanced civilizations can develop there, then the distances between these civilizations and other stars would be far smaller than typical distances between stars in the Galactic disk, facilitating interstellar communication and travel. The potent combination of long-term stability and high stellar densities provides a globular cluster opportunity. Yet the very proximity that promotes interstellar travel also brings danger, as stellar interactions can destroy planetary systems. We find, however, that large portions of many globular clusters are “sweet spots,” where habitable-zone planetary orbits are stable for long times. Globular clusters in our own and other galaxies are, therefore, among the best targets for searches for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI). We use the Drake equation to compare the likelihood of advanced civilizations in globular clusters to that in the Galactic disk. We also consider free-floating planets, since wide-orbit planets can be ejected to travel through the cluster. Civilizations spawned in globular clusters may be able to establish self-sustaining outposts, reducing the probability that a single catastrophic event will destroy the civilization. Although individual civilizations may follow different evolutionary paths, or even be destroyed, the cluster may continue to host advanced civilizations once a small number have jumped across interstellar space. Civilizations residing in globular clusters could therefore, in a sense, be immortal.

  8. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, G. W.; Shomber, H. A.; Dethman, H. A.; Gratzer, L. B.; Maeshiro, A.; Gangsaas, D.; Blight, J. D.; Buchan, S. M.; Crumb, C. B.; Dorwart, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The current status of the Active Controls Technology (ACT) for the advanced subsonic transport project is investigated through analysis of the systems technical data. Control systems technologies under examination include computerized reliability analysis, pitch axis fly by wire actuator, flaperon actuation system design trade study, control law synthesis and analysis, flutter mode control and gust load alleviation analysis, and implementation of alternative ACT systems. Extensive analysis of the computer techniques involved in each system is included.

  9. 15 CFR 971.1007 - Advance notice of civil actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advance notice of civil actions. 971.1007 Section 971.1007 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP...

  10. 15 CFR 971.1007 - Advance notice of civil actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advance notice of civil actions. 971.1007 Section 971.1007 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP...

  11. 15 CFR 971.1007 - Advance notice of civil actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advance notice of civil actions. 971.1007 Section 971.1007 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP...

  12. 15 CFR 971.1007 - Advance notice of civil actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advance notice of civil actions. 971.1007 Section 971.1007 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP...

  13. Preliminary Sizing of 120-Passenger Advanced Civil Rotorcraft Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanAken, Johannes M.; Sinsay, Jeffrey D.

    2006-01-01

    The results of a preliminary sizing study of advanced civil rotorcraft concepts that are capable of carrying 120 passengers over a range of 1,200 nautical miles are presented. The cruise altitude of these rotorcraft is 30,000 ft and the cruise velocity is 350 knots. The mission requires a hover capability, creating a runway independent solution, which might aid in reducing strain on the existing airport infrastructure. Concepts studied are a tiltrotor, a tandem rotor compound, and an advancing blade concept. The first objective of the study is to determine the relative merits of these designs in terms of mission gross weight, engine size, fuel weight, aircraft purchase price, and direct operating cost. The second objective is to identify the enabling technology for these advanced heavy lift civil rotorcraft.

  14. Subsonic Investigation of Leading-Edge Flaps Designed for Vortex- and Attached-Flow on a High-Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Kemmerly, Guy T.; Kjerstad, Kevin J.; Lessard, Victor R.

    1999-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of two separate leading-edge flaps, designed for vortex and attached-flow, respectively, were conducted on a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.12 to 0.27, with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 2.50 x 10 (sup 6) to 5.50 x 10 (sup 6). Variations of the leading-edge flap deflection angle were tested with outboard leading-edge flaps deflected 0 deg. and 26.4 deg. Trailing-edge flaps were deflected 0 deg., 10 deg., 12.9 deg., and 20 deg. The longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic data are presented without analysis. A complete tabulated data listing is also presented herein. The data associated with each deflected leading-edge flap indicate L/D improvements over the undeflected configuration. These improvements may be instrumental in providing the necessary lift augmentation required by an actual HSCT during the climb-out and landing phases of the flight envelope. However, further tests will have to be done to assess their full potential.

  15. High-lift flow-physics flight experiments on a subsonic civil transport aircraft (B737-100)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, Cornelis P.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the subsonic transport high-lift program, flight experiments are being conducted using NASA Langley's B737-100 to measure the flow characteristics of the multi-element high-lift system at full-scale high-Reynolds-number conditions. The instrumentation consists of hot-film anemometers to measure boundary-layer states, an infra-red camera to detect transition from laminar to turbulent flow, Preston tubes to measure wall shear stress, boundary-layer rakes to measure off-surface velocity profiles, and pressure orifices to measure surface pressure distributions. The initial phase of this research project was recently concluded with two flights on July 14. This phase consisted of a total of twenty flights over a period of about ten weeks. In the coming months the data obtained in this initial set of flight experiments will be analyzed and the results will be used to finalize the instrumentation layout for the next set of flight experiments scheduled for Winter and Spring of 1995. The main goal of these upcoming flights will be: (1) to measure more detailed surface pressure distributions across the wing for a range of flight conditions and flap settings; (2) to visualize the surface flows across the multi-element wing at high-lift conditions using fluorescent mini tufts; and (3) to measure in more detail the changes in boundary-layer state on the various flap elements as a result of changes in flight condition and flap deflection. These flight measured results are being correlated with experimental data measured in ground-based facilities as well as with computational data calculated with methods based on the Navier-Stokes equations or a reduced set of these equations. Also these results provide insight into the extent of laminar flow that exists on actual multi-element lifting surfaces at full-scale high-life conditions. Preliminary results indicate that depending on the deflection angle, the slat and flap elements have significant regions of laminar flow over

  16. Takeoff certification considerations for large subsonic and supersonic transport airplanes using the Ames flight simulator for advanced aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, C. T.; Drinkwater, F. J., III; Fry, E. B.; Forrest, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    Data for use in development of takeoff airworthiness standards for new aircraft designs such as the supersonic transport (SST) and the large wide-body subsonic jet transport are provided. An advanced motion simulator was used to compare the performance and handling characteristics of three representative large jet transports during specific flight certification tasks. Existing regulatory constraints and methods for determining rotation speed were reviewed, and the effects on takeoff performance of variations in rotation speed, pitch attitude, and pitch attitude rate during the rotation maneuver were analyzed. A limited quantity of refused takeoff information was obtained. The aerodynamics, wing loading, and thrust-to-weight ratio of the subject SST resulted in takeoff speeds limited by climb (rather than lift-off) considerations. Take-off speeds based on U.S. subsonic transport requirements were found unacceptable because of the criticality of rotation-abuse effects on one-engine-inoperative climb performance. Adequate safety margin was provided by takeoff speeds based on proposed Anglo-French supersonic transport (TSS) criteria, with the limiting criterion being that takeoff safety speed be at least 1.15 times the one-engine-inoperative zero-rate-of-climb speed. Various observations related to SST certification are presented.

  17. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. ACT/Control/Guidance System study. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport is reported. Supplementary technical data on the following topics are included: (1) 1990's avionics technology assessment; (2) function criticality assessment; (3) flight deck system for total control and functional features list; (4) criticality and reliability assessment of units; (5) crew procedural function task analysis; and (6) recommendations for simulation mechanization.

  18. NASA Glenn's Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig Supported the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology Project's Emissions Reduction Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beltran, Luis R.

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Subsonic Combustor Rig (ASCR) is NASA Glenn Research Center's unique high-pressure, high-temperature combustor facility supporting the emissions reduction element of the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Project. The facility can simulate combustor inlet test conditions up to a pressure of 900 psig and a temperature of 1200 F (non-vitiated). ASCR completed three sector tests in fiscal year 2003 for General Electric, Pratt & Whitney, and Rolls-Royce North America. This will provide NASA and U.S. engine manufacturers the information necessary to develop future low-emission combustors and will help them to better understand durability and operability at these high pressures and temperatures.

  19. Pressure distributions from subsonic tests of an advanced laminar-flow-control wing with leading- and trailing-edge flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Zachary T.; Gentry, Garl L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An unswept, semispan wing model equipped with full-span leading- and trailing-edge flaps was tested in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel to determine the effect of high-lift components on the aerodynamics of an advanced laminar-flow-control (LFC) airfoil section. Chordwise pressure distributions near the midsemispan were measured for four configurations: cruise, trailing-edge flap only, and trailing-edge flap with a leading-edge Krueger flap of either 0.10 or 0.12 chord. Part 1 of this report (under separate cover) presents a representative sample of the plotted pressure distribution data for each configuration tested. Part 2 presents the entire set of plotted and tabulated pressure distribution data. The data are presented without analysis.

  20. Advanced cockpit technology for future civil transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Jack J.; Parrish, Russell V.

    1990-01-01

    A review is presented of advanced cockpit technology for future civil transport aircraft, covering the present state-of-the-art and major technologies, including flat-panel displays, graphics and pictorial displays. Pilot aiding/automation/human-centered design and imaging sensor/flight systems technology (for low-visibility operations) are also presented. NASA Langley Research Center's recent results in pictorial displays and on future developments in large-screen display technologies are discussed. Major characteristics foreseen for the future high-speed civil transport include fault-tolerant digital avionics and controls/displays with extensive human-centered automation, and unusually clean, uncluttered interface with natural crew interaction via touch, voice/tactile means.

  1. Globular Clusters as Cradles of Life and Advanced Civilizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, Rosanne; Ray, Alak

    2016-01-01

    Globular clusters are bound groups of about a million stars and stellar remnants. They are old, largely isolated, and very dense. We consider what each of these special features can mean for the development of life, the evolution of intelligent life, and the long-term survival of technological civilizations. We find that, if they house planets, globular clusters provide ideal environments for advanced civilizations that can survive over long times. We therefore propose methods to search for planets in globular clusters. If planets are found and if our arguments are correct, searches for intelligent life are most likely to succeed when directed toward globular clusters. Globular clusters may be the first places in which distant life is identified in our own or in external galaxies.

  2. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology to an Advanced Subsonic Transport: Project Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The state of the art of active controls technology (ACT) and a recommended ACT development program plan are reviewed. The performance benefits and cost of ownership of an integrated application of ACT to civil transport aircraft is to be assessed along with the risk and laboratory and/or flight experiments designed to reduce the technical risks to a commercially acceptable level.

  3. Subsonic aerodynamic characteristic of semispan commercial transport model with wing-mounted advanced ducted propeller operating in reverse thrust. [conducted in the Langley 14 by 22 foot subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Zachary T.; Jones, Kenneth M.; Gile, Brenda E.; Quinto, P. Frank

    1994-01-01

    A test was conducted in the Langley 14 by 22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel to determine the effect of the reverse-thrust flow field of a wing-mounted advanced ducted propeller on the aerodynamic characteristics of a semispan subsonic high-lift transport model. The advanced ducted propeller (ADP) model was mounted separately in position alongside the wing so that only the aerodynamic interference of the propeller and nacelle affected the aerodynamic performance of the transport model. Mach numbers ranged from 0.14 to 0.26; corresponding Reynolds numbers ranged from 2.2 to 3.9 x 10(exp 6). The reverse-thrust flow field of the ADP shielded a portion of the wing from the free-stream airflow and reduced both lift and drag. The reduction in lift and drag was a function of ADP rotational speed and free-stream velocity. Test results included ground effects data for the transport model and ADP configuration. The ground plane caused a beneficial increase in drag and an undesirable slight increase in lift. The ADP and transport model performance in ground effect was similar to performance trends observed for out of ground effect. The test results form a comprehensive data set that supports the application of the ADP engine and airplane concept on the next generation of advanced subsonic transports. Before this investigation, the engine application was predicted to have detrimental ground effect characteristics. Ground effect test measurements indicated no critical problems and were the first step in proving the viability of this engine and airplane configuration.

  4. Study of the application of advanced technologies to laminar flow control systems for subsonic transports. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturgeon, R. F.; Bennett, J. A.; Etchberger, F. R.; Ferrill, R. S.; Meade, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of applying laminar flow control to the wings and empennage of long-range subsonic transport aircraft compatible with initial operation in 1985. For a design mission range of 10,186 km (5500 n mi), advanced technology laminar-flow-control (LFC) and turbulent-flow (TF) aircraft were developed for both 200 and 400-passenger payloads, and compared on the basis of production costs, direct operating costs, and fuel efficiency. Parametric analyses were conducted to establish the optimum geometry for LFC and TF aircraft, advanced LFC system concepts and arrangements were evaluated, and configuration variations maximizing the effectiveness of LFC were developed. For the final LFC aircraft, analyses were conducted to define maintenance costs and procedures, manufacturing costs and procedures, and operational considerations peculiar to LFC aircraft. Compared to the corresponding advanced technology TF transports, the 200- and 400-passenger LFC aircraft realized reductions in fuel consumption up to 28.2%, reductions in direct operating costs up to 8.4%, and improvements in fuel efficiency, in ssm/lb of fuel, up to 39.4%. Compared to current commercial transports at the design range, the LFC study aircraft demonstrate improvements in fuel efficiency up to 131%. Research and technology requirements requisite to the development of LFC transport aircraft were identified.

  5. Assessment of the application of advanced technologies to subsonic CTOL transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graef, J. D.; Sallee, G. P.; Verges, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Design studies of the application of advanced technologies to future transport aircraft were conducted. These studies were reviewed from the perspective of an air carrier. A fundamental study of the elements of airplane operating cost was performed, and the advanced technologies were ranked in order of potential profit impact. Recommendations for future study areas are given.

  6. 3-D viscous flow CFD analysis of the propeller effect on an advanced ducted propeller subsonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iek, Chanthy; Boldman, Donald R.; Ibrahim, Mounir

    1993-01-01

    The time-marching Navier-Stokes code PARC3D was used to study the 3D viscous flow associated with an advanced ducted propeller subsonic inlet at take-off operating conditions. At a free stream Mach number of 0.2, experimental data for the inlet-with-propeller test model indicated that the airflow was attached on the cowl windward lip at an angle of attack of 25 deg became unstable at 29 deg, and separated at 30 deg. An experimental study with a similar inlet and without propeller (through-flow) indicated that flow separation occurred at an angle of attack a few degrees below the value observed when the inlet was tested with the propeller, indicating the propeller's favorable effect on inlet performance. In the present numerical study, flow blockage analogous to the propeller was modeled via a PARC3D computational boundary condition (BC), the 'screen BC', based on 1-1/2 dimension actuator disk theory. The application of the screen BC in this numerical study provided results similar to those of past experimental efforts in which either the blockage device or the propeller was used.

  7. Civil benefits of the JVX. [Joint Services Advanced Lift Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1984-01-01

    The inherently high productivity, VTOL capability, and low noise and vibration features of a civil version of the Joint Services Advanced Vertical Lift Aircraft, or 'JVX', are recommended for commercial exploitation. This tilt-rotor vehicle can provide ground and air traffic congestion relief through direct, city center-to-city center service, economically transporting 30 passengers for distances of up to 600 miles. Additional commercial opportunities emerge in the JVX's servicing of offshore, remote and infrastructureless areas. It is noted that Alaska, more than any other American state, would benefit from the JVX's VTOL access to natural resources and otherwise isolated settlements. The civilian development of the JVX could lead to the development of commercial tilt rotor aircraft for other size classes.

  8. Preemption of the Galaxy by the first advanced civilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracewell, R.

    The progress of intelligent life in the Galaxy is discussed in terms of life's propensity to inhabit every suitable niche, and consideration is given to the human role. It is shown that an advanced civilization could communicate either by radio, interstellar probe, or by other means than have yet to be identified. However, contact has not been observed, except for human efforts. Furthermore, terrestrial history demonstrates that the advent of one tool-capable and traveling population results in that species' expansion to all viable territories. The spread of the population occurs in much shorter time than does the evolution of the species, indicating that, perhaps, humans are the first intelligent species in the Galaxy, and may be the future population of the Galaxy.

  9. A study of rapid engine response systems for an advanced high subsonic, long range commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, J. H.; Bennett, G. W.; Derosier, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    A dynamic model representing the characteristics of an advanced technology study engine (1985 certification time period) was constructed and programmed on an analogue/digital computer. This model was then exercised to study and evaluate a large number of techniques, singly and in combination, to improve engine response. Several effective methods to reduce engine accelerating time are identified.

  10. The 3-D viscous flow CFD analysis of the propeller effect on an advanced ducted propeller subsonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iek, Chanthy; Boldman, Donald R.; Ibrahim, Mounir

    1993-01-01

    A time marching Navier-Stokes code called PARC3D was used to study the 3-D viscous flow associated with an advanced ducted propeller (ADP) subsonic inlet at take-off operating conditions. At a free stream Mach number of 0.2, experimental data for the inlet-with-propeller test model indicated that the airflow was attached on the cowl windward lip at an angle of attack of 25 degrees became unstable at 29 degrees, and separated at 30 degrees. An experimental study with a similar inlet and with no propeller (through-flow) indicated that flow separation occurred at an angle of attack a few degrees below the value observed when the inlet was tested with the propeller. This tends to indicate that the propeller exerts a favorable effect on the inlet performance. During the through-flow experiment a stationary blockage device was used to successfully simulate the propeller effect on the inlet flow field at angles of attack. In the present numerical study, this flow blockage was modeled via a PARC3D computational boundary condition (BC) called the screen BC. The principle formulation of this BC was based on the one-and-half dimension actuator disk theory. This screen BC was applied at the inlet propeller face station of the computational grid. Numerical results were obtained with and without the screen BC. The application of the screen BC in this numerical study provided results which are similar to the results of past experimental efforts in which either the blockage device or the propeller was used.

  11. A study of engine variable geometry systems for an advanced high subsonic long range commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compagnon, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    Several variable geometry high Mach inlet concepts, aimed at meeting a system noise objective of 15 EPNdB below FAR part 36, for a long range, Mach 0.9 advanced commercial transport are assessed and compared to a fixed geometry inlet with multiple splitters. The effects of a variable exhaust nozzle (mixed exhaust engine) on noise, inlet geometry requirements, and economics are also presented. The best variable geometry inlet configuration identified is a variable cowl design which relies on a high throat Mach number for additional inlet noise suppression only at takeoff, and depends entirely on inlet wall treatment for noise suppression at approach power. Relative economic penalties as a function of noise level are also presented.

  12. Subsonic aerodynamic characteristics of a proposed advanced manned launch system orbiter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ware, George M.; Fox, Charles H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Manned Launch System is a proposed near-term technology, two-stage, fully reusable launch system that consists of an unmanned glide-back booster and a manned orbiter. An orbiter model that featured a large fuselage and an aft delta wing with tip fins was tested in the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High-Speed Tunnel. A crew cabin, large payload fairing, and crew access tunnel were mounted on the upper body. The results of the investigation indicated that the configuration was longitudinally stable to an angle of attack of about 6 deg about a center-of-gravity position of 0.7 body length. The model had an untrimmed lift-drag ratio of 6.6, but could not be trimmed at positive lift. The orbiter model was also directionally unstable. The payload fairing was responsible for about half the instability. The tip-fin controllers, which are designed as active controls to produce artificial directional stability, were effective in producing yawing moment, but sizable adverse rolling moment occurred at angles of attack above 6 deg. Differential deflection of the elevon surfaces was effective in producing rolling moment with only small values of adverse yawing moment.

  13. Improved NASA-ANOPP Noise Prediction Computer Code for Advanced Subsonic Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kontos, K. B.; Janardan, B. A.; Gliebe, P. R.

    1996-01-01

    Recent experience using ANOPP to predict turbofan engine flyover noise suggests that it over-predicts overall EPNL by a significant amount. An improvement in this prediction method is desired for system optimization and assessment studies of advanced UHB engines. An assessment of the ANOPP fan inlet, fan exhaust, jet, combustor, and turbine noise prediction methods is made using static engine component noise data from the CF6-8OC2, E(3), and QCSEE turbofan engines. It is shown that the ANOPP prediction results are generally higher than the measured GE data, and that the inlet noise prediction method (Heidmann method) is the most significant source of this overprediction. Fan noise spectral comparisons show that improvements to the fan tone, broadband, and combination tone noise models are required to yield results that more closely simulate the GE data. Suggested changes that yield improved fan noise predictions but preserve the Heidmann model structure are identified and described. These changes are based on the sets of engine data mentioned, as well as some CFM56 engine data that was used to expand the combination tone noise database. It should be noted that the recommended changes are based on an analysis of engines that are limited to single stage fans with design tip relative Mach numbers greater than one.

  14. Advanced Technology Subsonic Transport Study: N+3 Technologies and Design Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymer, Daniel P.; Wilson, Jack; Perkins, H. Douglas; Rizzi, Arthur; Zhang, Mengmeng; RamirezPuentes, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Conceptual Research Corporation, the Science of the Possible, has completed a two-year study of concepts and technologies for future airliners in the 180-passenger class. This NASA-funded contract was primarily focused on the ambitious goal of a 70 percent reduction in fuel consumption versus the market-dominating Boeing 737-800. The study is related to the N+3 contracts awarded in 2008 by NASA s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate to teams led by Boeing, GE Aviation, MIT, and Northrop Grumman, but with more modest goals and funding. CRC s contract featured a predominant emphasis on propulsion and fuel consumption, but since fuel consumption depends upon air vehicle design as much as on propulsion technology, the study included notional vehicle design, analysis, and parametric studies. Other NASA goals including NOx and noise reduction are of long-standing interest but were not highlighted in this study, other than their inclusion in the propulsion system provided to CRC by NASA. The B-737-800 was used as a benchmark, parametric tool, and design point of departure. It was modeled in the RDS-Professional aircraft design software then subjected to extensive parametric variations of parasitic drag, drag-due-to-lift, specific fuel consumption, and unsized empty weight. These studies indicated that the goal of a 70 percent reduction in fuel consumption could be attained with roughly a 30 percent improvement in all four parameters. The results were then fit to a Response Surface and coded for ease of use in subsequent trade studies. Potential technologies to obtain such savings were identified and discussed. More than 16 advanced concept designs were then prepared, attempting to investigate almost every possible emerging concept for application to this class airliner. A preliminary assessment of these concepts was done based on their total wetted area after design normalization of trimmed maximum lift. This assessment points towards a Tailless Airliner concept which

  15. Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) 22-Inch Low Noise Research Fan Rig Preliminary Design of ADP-Type Fan 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeracki, Robert J. (Technical Monitor); Topol, David A.; Ingram, Clint L.; Larkin, Michael J.; Roche, Charles H.; Thulin, Robert D.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents results of the work completed on the preliminary design of Fan 3 of NASA s 22-inch Fan Low Noise Research project. Fan 3 was intended to build on the experience gained from Fans 1 and 2 by demonstrating noise reduction technology that surpasses 1992 levels by 6 dB. The work was performed as part of NASA s Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) program. Work on this task was conducted in the areas of CFD code validation, acoustic prediction and validation, rotor parametric studies, and fan exit guide vane (FEGV) studies up to the time when a NASA decision was made to cancel the design, fabrication and testing phases of the work. The scope of the program changed accordingly to concentrate on two subtasks: (1) Rig data analysis and CFD code validation and (2) Fan and FEGV optimization studies. The results of the CFD code validation work showed that this tool predicts 3D flowfield features well from the blade trailing edge to about a chord downstream. The CFD tool loses accuracy as the distance from the trailing edge increases beyond a blade chord. The comparisons of noise predictions to rig test data showed that both the tone noise tool and the broadband noise tool demonstrated reasonable agreement with the data to the degree that these tools can reliably be used for design work. The section on rig airflow and inlet separation analysis describes the method used to determine total fan airflow, shows the good agreement of predicted boundary layer profiles to measured profiles, and shows separation angles of attack ranging from 29.5 to 27deg for the range of airflows tested. The results of the rotor parametric studies were significant in leading to the decision not to pursue a new rotor design for Fan 3 and resulted in recommendations to concentrate efforts on FEGV stator designs. The ensuing parametric study on FEGV designs showed the potential for 8 to 10 EPNdB noise reduction relative to the baseline.

  16. A review of NASA's propulsion programs for civil aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, W. L.; Johnson, H. W.; Weber, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Five NASA engine-oriented propulsion programs of major importance to civil aviation are presented and discussed. Included are programs directed at exploring propulsion-system concepts for (1) energy-conservative subsonic aircraft (improved current turbofans, advanced turbofans, and advanced turboprops), (2) supersonic cruise aircraft (variable-cycle engines), (3) general aviation aircraft (improved reciprocating engines and small gas turbines), (4) powered-lift aircraft (advanced turbofans), and (5) advanced rotorcraft. These programs reflect the opportunities still existing for significant improvements in civil aviation through the application of advanced propulsion concepts

  17. Improved blade profile loss and deviation angle models for advanced transonic compressor bladings. Part 1: A model for subsonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, W.M.; Hennecke, D.K.; Fottner, L.

    1996-01-01

    New blading concepts as used in modern transonic axial-flow compressors require improved loss and deviation angle correlations. The new model presented in this paper incorporates several elements and treats blade-row flows having subsonic and supersonic inlet conditions separately. In the first part of this paper two proved and well-established profile loss correlations for subsonic flows are extended to quasi-two-dimensional conditions and to custom-tailored blade designs. Instead of a deviation angle correlation, a simple method based on singularities is utilized. The comparison between the new model and a recently published model demonstrates the improved accuracy in prediction of cascade performance achieved by the new model.

  18. 75 FR 26343 - Request for Expedited Certification and Type Approval of Amtrak Advanced Civil Speed Enforcement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration Request for Expedited Certification and Type Approval of Amtrak Advanced Civil Speed Enforcement System (ACSES) In accordance with Part 211 of Title 49 Code of...

  19. Advanced e-Infrastructures for Civil Protection applications: the CYCLOPS Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzetti, P.; Nativi, S.; Verlato, M.; Ayral, P. A.; Fiorucci, P.; Pina, A.; Oliveira, J.; Sorani, R.

    2009-04-01

    During the full cycle of the emergency management, Civil Protection operative procedures involve many actors belonging to several institutions (civil protection agencies, public administrations, research centers, etc.) playing different roles (decision-makers, data and service providers, emergency squads, etc.). In this context the sharing of information is a vital requirement to make correct and effective decisions. Therefore a European-wide technological infrastructure providing a distributed and coordinated access to different kinds of resources (data, information, services, expertise, etc.) could enhance existing Civil Protection applications and even enable new ones. Such European Civil Protection e-Infrastructure should be designed taking into account the specific requirements of Civil Protection applications and the state-of-the-art in the scientific and technological disciplines which could make the emergency management more effective. In the recent years Grid technologies have reached a mature state providing a platform for secure and coordinated resource sharing between the participants collected in the so-called Virtual Organizations. Moreover the Earth and Space Sciences Informatics provide the conceptual tools for modeling the geospatial information shared in Civil Protection applications during its entire lifecycle. Therefore a European Civil Protection e-infrastructure might be based on a Grid platform enhanced with Earth Sciences services. In the context of the 6th Framework Programme the EU co-funded Project CYCLOPS (CYber-infrastructure for CiviL protection Operative ProcedureS), ended in December 2008, has addressed the problem of defining the requirements and identifying the research strategies and innovation guidelines towards an advanced e-Infrastructure for Civil Protection. Starting from the requirement analysis CYCLOPS has proposed an architectural framework for a European Civil Protection e-Infrastructure. This architectural framework has

  20. High-speed civil transport - Advanced flight deck challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swink, Jay R.; Goins, Richard T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a nine month study of the HSCT flight deck challenges and assessment of its benefits. Operational requirements are discussed and the most significant findings for specified advanced concepts are highlighted. These concepts are a no nose-droop configuration, a far forward cockpit location and advanced crew monitoring and control of complex systems. Results indicate that the no nose-droop configuration is critically dependent on the design and development of a safe, reliable and certifiable synthetic vision system (SVS). This configuration would cause significant weight, performance and cost penalties. A far forward cockpit configuration with a tandem seating arrangement allows either an increase in additional payload or potential downsizing of the vehicle leading to increased performance efficiency and reductions in emissions. The technologies enabling such capabilities, which provide for Category III all-weather opreations on every flight represent a benefit multiplier in a 20005 ATM network in terms of enhanced economic viability and environmental acceptability.

  1. An Analytical Assessment of NASA's N+1 Subsonic Fixed Wing Project Noise Goal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Envia, Edmane; Burley, Casey L.

    2009-01-01

    The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project of NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program has adopted a noise reduction goal for new, subsonic, single-aisle, civil aircraft expected to replace current 737 and A320 airplanes. These so-called 'N+1' aircraft - designated in NASA vernacular as such since they will follow the current, in-service, 'N' airplanes - are hoped to achieve certification noise goal levels of 32 cumulative EPNdB under current Stage 4 noise regulations. A notional, N+1, single-aisle, twinjet transport with ultrahigh bypass ratio turbofan engines is analyzed in this study using NASA software and methods. Several advanced noise-reduction technologies are analytically applied to the propulsion system and airframe. Certification noise levels are predicted and compared with the NASA goal.

  2. An Analytical Assessment of NASA's N(+)1 Subsonic Fixed Wing Project Noise Goal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Envia, Edmane; Burley, Casey L.

    2010-01-01

    The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project of NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program has adopted a noise reduction goal for new, subsonic, single-aisle, civil aircraft expected to replace current 737 and A320 airplanes. These so-called "N+1" aircraft--designated in NASA vernacular as such since they will follow the current, in-service, "N" airplanes--are hoped to achieve certification noise goal levels of 32 cumulative EPNdB under current Stage 4 noise regulations. A notional, N+1, single-aisle, twinjet transport with ultrahigh bypass ratio turbofan engines is analyzed in this study using NASA software and methods. Several advanced noise-reduction technologies are empirically applied to the propulsion system and airframe. Certification noise levels are predicted and compared with the NASA goal.

  3. The transcension hypothesis: Sufficiently advanced civilizations invariably leave our universe, and implications for METI and SETI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, John M.

    2012-09-01

    The emerging science of evolutionary developmental ("evo devo") biology can aid us in thinking about our universe as both an evolutionary system, where most processes are unpredictable and creative, and a developmental system, where a special few processes are predictable and constrained to produce far-future-specific emergent order, just as we see in the common developmental processes in two stars of an identical population type, or in two genetically identical twins in biology. The transcension hypothesis proposes that a universal process of evolutionary development guides all sufficiently advanced civilizations into what may be called "inner space," a computationally optimal domain of increasingly dense, productive, miniaturized, and efficient scales of space, time, energy, and matter, and eventually, to a black-hole-like destination. Transcension as a developmental destiny might also contribute to the solution to the Fermi paradox, the question of why we have not seen evidence of or received beacons from intelligent civilizations. A few potential evolutionary, developmental, and information theoretic reasons, mechanisms, and models for constrained transcension of advanced intelligence are briefly considered. In particular, we introduce arguments that black holes may be a developmental destiny and standard attractor for all higher intelligence, as they appear to some to be ideal computing, learning, forward time travel, energy harvesting, civilization merger, natural selection, and universe replication devices. In the transcension hypothesis, simpler civilizations that succeed in resisting transcension by staying in outer (normal) space would be developmental failures, which are statistically very rare late in the life cycle of any biological developing system. If transcension is a developmental process, we may expect brief broadcasts or subtle forms of galactic engineering to occur in small portions of a few galaxies, the handiwork of young and immature

  4. Aeronautical fuel conservation possibilities for advanced subsonic transports. [application of aeronautical technology for drag and weight reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braslow, A. L.; Whitehead, A. H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The anticipated growth of air transportation is in danger of being constrained by increased prices and insecure sources of petroleum-based fuel. Fuel-conservation possibilities attainable through the application of advances in aeronautical technology to aircraft design are identified with the intent of stimulating NASA R and T and systems-study activities in the various disciplinary areas. The material includes drag reduction; weight reduction; increased efficiency of main and auxiliary power systems; unconventional air transport of cargo; and operational changes.

  5. Research Data Acquired in World-Class, 60-atm Subsonic Combustion Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming; Wey, Changlie

    1999-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's new, world-class, 60-atmosphere (atm) combustor research facility, the Advanced Subsonic Combustion Rig (ASCR), is in operation and producing highly unique research data. Specifically, data were acquired at high pressures and temperatures representative of future subsonic engines from a fundamental flametube configuration with an advanced fuel injector. The data acquired include exhaust emissions as well as pressure and temperature distributions. Results to date represent an improved understanding of nitrous oxide (NOx) formation at high pressures and temperatures and include an NOx emissions reduction greater than 70 percent with an advanced fuel injector at operating pressures to 800 pounds per square inch absolute (psia). ASCR research is an integral part of the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Propulsion Program. This program is developing critical low-emission combustion technology that will result in the next generation of gas turbine engines producing 50 to 70 percent less NOx emissions in comparison to 1996 International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) limits. The results to date indicate that the AST low-emission combustor goals of reducing NOx emissions by 50 to 70 percent are feasible. U.S. gas turbine manufacturers have started testing the low-emissions combustors at the ASCR. This collaborative testing will enable the industry to develop low-emission combustors at the high pressure and temperature conditions of future subsonic engines. The first stage of the flametube testing has been implemented. Four GE Aircraft Engines low-emissions fuel injector concepts, three Pratt & Whitney concepts, and two Allison concepts have been tested at Lewis ASCR facility. Subsequently, the flametube was removed from the test stand, and the sector combustor was installed. The testing of low emissions sector has begun. Low-emission combustors developed as a result of ASCR research will enable U.S. engine manufacturers to compete on a

  6. Integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. Conventional baseline configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Characteristics of the U.S. domestic fleet were evaluated to determine the mission characteristics that would have the most impact on U. S. transport fuel use in the future. This resulted in selection of a 197-passenger (plus cargo), about 3710-km (2000 nmi) mission. The existing data base was reviewed and additional analysis was conducted as necessary to complete the technical descriptions. The resulting baseline configuration utilizes a double-lobe, but nearly circular, body with seven-abreast seating. External characteristics feature an 8.71 aspect ratio, 31.5-degree sweep wing, a T-tail empennage, and a dual CF6-6D2, wing-mounted engine arrangement. It provides for 22 LD-2 or 11 LD-3 containers plus bulk cargo in the lower lobe. Passenger/cargo loading, servicing provisions, taxi/takeoff speeds, and field length characteristics are all compatible with accepted airline operations and regulatory provisions. The baseline configuration construction uses conventional aluminum structure except for advanced aluminum alloys and a limited amount of graphite epoxy secondary structure. Modern systems are used, including advanced guidance, navigation, and controls which emphasize application of digital electronics and advanced displays.

  7. The G-HAT Search for Advanced Extraterrestrial Civilizations: The Reddest Extended WISE Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Jessica; Povich, Matthew S.; Wright, Jason; Griffith, Roger; Sigurdsson, Steinn; Mullan, Brendan L.

    2015-01-01

    Freeman Dyson (1960) theorized how to identify possible signatures of advanced extra-terrestrial civilizations by their waste heat, an inevitable byproduct of a civilization using a significant fraction of the luminosity from their host star. If a civilizations could tap the starlight throughout their host galaxy their waste heat would be easily detectable by recent infrared surveys. The Glimpsing Heat from Alien Technologies (G-HAT) pilot project aims to place limits on the existence of extraterrestrial civilizations at pan-galactic scales. We present results from the G-HAT cleaned catalog of 563 extremely red, extended high Galactic latitude (|b| ≥ 10) sources from the WISE All-Sky Catalog. Our catalog includes sources new to the scientific literature along with well-studied objects (e.g. starburst galaxies, AGN, and planetary nebulae) that exemplify extreme WISE colors. Objects of particular interest include a supergiant Be star (48 Librae) surrounded by a resolved, mid-infrared nebula, possibly indicating dust in the stellar wind ejecta, and a curious cluster of seven extremely red WISE sources (associated with IRAS 04287+6444) that have no optical counterparts.

  8. Some recent advances of intelligent health monitoring systems for civil infrastructures in HIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Jinping

    2005-06-01

    The intelligent health monitoring systems more and more become a technique for ensuring the health and safety of civil infrastructures and also an important approach for research of the damage accumulation or even disaster evolving characteristics of civil infrastructures, and attracts prodigious research interests and active development interests of scientists and engineers since a great number of civil infrastructures are planning and building each year in mainland China. In this paper, some recent advances on research, development nad implementation of intelligent health monitoring systems for civil infrastructuresin mainland China, especially in Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT), P.R.China. The main contents include smart sensors such as optical fiber Bragg grating (OFBG) and polivinyllidene fluoride (PVDF) sensors, fatigue life gauges, self-sensing mortar and carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP), wireless sensor networks and their implementation in practical infrastructures such as offshore platform structures, hydraulic engineering structures, large span bridges and large space structures. Finally, the relative research projects supported by the national foundation agencies of China are briefly introduced.

  9. Changing the Landscape of Civil Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russo, Carol J.

    1997-01-01

    NASA is undertaking several bold new initiatives to develop revolutionary technologies for civil aviation. These technologies span the civil aviation fleet from general aviation to large subsonic and supersonic aircraft and promise to bring a new era of new aircraft, lower operation costs, faster more direct flight capabilities, more environmentally friendly aircraft, and safer airline operations. These initiatives have specific quantified goals that require technologies well beyond those currently being developed creating a bold new vision for aeronautics. Revolutionary propulsion systems are enabling for these advancements. This paper gives an overview of the new national aeronautics goals and explores for a selected subset of goals some of the revolutionary technologies will be required to meet some of these goals. The focus of the paper is on the pivotal role propulsion and icing technologies will play in changing the landscape of civil aviation.

  10. Hydrogen fueled subsonic aircraft - A prospective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witcofski, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    The performance characteristics of hydrogen-fueled subsonic transport aircraft are compared with those of aircraft using conventional aviation kerosene. Results of the Cryogenically Fueled Aircraft Technology Program sponsored by NASA indicate that liquid hydrogen may be particularly efficient for subsonic transport craft when ranges of 4000 km or more are involved; however, development of advanced cryogenic tanks for liquid hydrogen fuel is required. The NASA-sponsored program also found no major technical obstacles for international airports converting the liquid hydrogen fueling systems. Resource utilization efficiency and fuel production costs for hydrogen produced by coal gasification or for liquid methane or synthetic aviation kerosene are also assessed.

  11. Long range view of materials research for civil transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.; Waters, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    The impact of various material technology advancements on the economics of civil transport aircraft is investigated. Benefits of advances in both airframe and engine materials are considered. Benefits are measured primarily by improvements in return on investment for an operator. Materials research and development programs which lead to the greatest benefits are assessed with regards to cost, risk, and commonality with other programs. Emphasis of the paper is on advanced technology subsonic/transonic transports (ATT type aircraft) since these are likely to be the next generation of commercial transports.

  12. Long range view of materials research for civil transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.; Waters, M. H.

    1974-01-01

    The impact of various material technology advancements on the economics of civil transport aircraft is investigated. Benefits of advances in both airframe and engine materials are considered. Benefits are measured primarily by improvements in return on investment for an operator. Materials research and development programs which lead to the greatest benefits are assessed with regards to cost, risk, and commonality with other programs. Emphasis of the paper is on advanced technology subsonic/transonic transports (ATT type aircraft) since these are likely to be the next generation of commercial transports.

  13. The transcension hypothesis: Sufficiently advanced civilizations invariably leave our universe, and implications for METI and SETI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, John M.

    2012-09-01

    The emerging science of evolutionary developmental ("evo devo") biology can aid us in thinking about our universe as both an evolutionary system, where most processes are unpredictable and creative, and a developmental system, where a special few processes are predictable and constrained to produce far-future-specific emergent order, just as we see in the common developmental processes in two stars of an identical population type, or in two genetically identical twins in biology. The transcension hypothesis proposes that a universal process of evolutionary development guides all sufficiently advanced civilizations into what may be called "inner space," a computationally optimal domain of increasingly dense, productive, miniaturized, and efficient scales of space, time, energy, and matter, and eventually, to a black-hole-like destination. Transcension as a developmental destiny might also contribute to the solution to the Fermi paradox, the question of why we have not seen evidence of or received beacons from intelligent civilizations. A few potential evolutionary, developmental, and information theoretic reasons, mechanisms, and models for constrained transcension of advanced intelligence are briefly considered. In particular, we introduce arguments that black holes may be a developmental destiny and standard attractor for all higher intelligence, as they appear to some to be ideal computing, learning, forward time travel, energy harvesting, civilization merger, natural selection, and universe replication devices. In the transcension hypothesis, simpler civilizations that succeed in resisting transcension by staying in outer (normal) space would be developmental failures, which are statistically very rare late in the life cycle of any biological developing system. If transcension is a developmental process, we may expect brief broadcasts or subtle forms of galactic engineering to occur in small portions of a few galaxies, the handiwork of young and immature

  14. Subsonic Aircraft Safety Icing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Sharon Monica; Reveley, Mary S.; Evans, Joni K.; Barrientos, Francesca A.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) Project is one of four projects within the agency s Aviation Safety Program (AvSafe) in the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD). The IRAC Project, which was redesigned in the first half of 2007, conducts research to advance the state of the art in aircraft control design tools and techniques. A "Key Decision Point" was established for fiscal year 2007 with the following expected outcomes: document the most currently available statistical/prognostic data associated with icing for subsonic transport, summarize reports by subject matter experts in icing research on current knowledge of icing effects on control parameters and establish future requirements for icing research for subsonic transports including the appropriate alignment. This study contains: (1) statistical analyses of accident and incident data conducted by NASA researchers for this "Key Decision Point", (2) an examination of icing in other recent statistically based studies, (3) a summary of aviation safety priority lists that have been developed by various subject-matter experts, including the significance of aircraft icing research in these lists and (4) suggested future requirements for NASA icing research. The review of several studies by subject-matter experts was summarized into four high-priority icing research areas. Based on the Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) Project goals and objectives, the IRAC project was encouraged to conduct work in all of the high-priority icing research areas that were identified, with the exception of the developing of methods to sense and document actual icing conditions.

  15. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: current and advanced act control system definition study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    The Current and Advanced Technology ACT control system definition tasks of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program are summarized. The systems mechanize six active control functions: (1) pitch augmented stability (2) angle of attack limiting (3) lateral/directional augmented stability (4) gust load alleviation (5) maneuver load control and (6) flutter mode control. The redundant digital control systems meet all function requirements with required reliability and declining weight and cost as advanced technology is introduced.

  16. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Current and Advanced Technology ACT control system definition tasks of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program are summarized. The systems mechanize six active control functions: (1) pitch augmented stability; (2) angle of attack limiting; (3) lateral/directional augmented stability; (4) gust load alleviation; (5) maneuver load control; and (6) flutter mode control. The redundant digital control systems meet all function requirements with required reliability and declining weight and cost as advanced technology is introduced.

  17. Exploring Advanced Technology Gas Turbine Engine Design and Performance for the Large Civil Tiltrotor (LCTR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    A Large Civil Tiltrotor (LCTR) conceptual design was developed as part of the NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Systems Investigation in order to establish a consistent basis for evaluating the benefits of advanced technology for large tiltrotors. The concept has since evolved into the second-generation LCTR2, designed to carry 90 passengers for 1,000 nautical miles at 300 knots, with vertical takeoff and landing capability. This paper explores gas turbine component performance and cycle parameters to quantify performance gains possible for additional improvements in component and material performance beyond those identified in previous LCTR2 propulsion studies and to identify additional research areas. The vehicle-level characteristics from this advanced technology generation 2 propulsion architecture will help set performance levels as additional propulsion and power systems are conceived to meet ever-increasing requirements for mobility and comfort, while reducing energy use, cost, noise and emissions. The Large Civil Tiltrotor vehicle and mission will be discussed as a starting point for this effort. A few, relevant engine and component technology studies, including previous LCTR2 engine study results will be summarized to help orient the reader on gas turbine engine architecture, performance and limitations. Study assumptions and methodology used to explore engine design and performance, as well as assess vehicle sizing and mission performance will then be discussed. Individual performance for present and advanced engines, as well as engine performance effects on overall vehicle size and mission fuel usage, will be given. All results will be summarized to facilitate understanding the importance and interaction of various component and system performance on overall vehicle characteristics.

  18. Applications of advanced V/STOL aircraft concepts to civil utility missions, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The suitability of advanced V/STOL aircraft to civil utility applications was assessed for offshore oil support, forest fire support, transport, and humanitarian missions. The aircraft concepts considered were a lift fan aircraft, a tilt rotor aircraft, and an advanced helicopter. All the aircraft had a design payload of 2,268 kg. (5,000 lb.) with the maximum range varying from 2,224 km. (1,800 nm) for the lift fan STOL to 1,482 km (800 nm) for the advanced helicopter. The analysis of these missions considered such factors as aircraft performance, annual utilization, initial cost, and operating cost. It is concluded that all the advanced V/STOL aircraft concepts generally performed these missions better than contemporary aircraft. The lift fan aircraft and the tilt rotor aircraft were found to be effective for the offshore oil and the forest fire support missions. The lift fan aircraft in the VTOL mode was also found to be very attractive for the executive transport mission where the passenger time value was $30/hr. or more.

  19. Performance potential of an advanced technology Mach 3 turbojet engine installed on a conceptual high-speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Shelby J., Jr.; Geiselhart, Karl A.; Coen, Peter G.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of an advanced technology conceptual turbojet optimized for a high-speed civil aircraft is presented. This information represents an estimate of performance of a Mach 3 Brayton (gas turbine) cycle engine optimized for minimum fuel burned at supersonic cruise. This conceptual engine had no noise or environmental constraints imposed upon it. The purpose of this data is to define an upper boundary on the propulsion performance for a conceptual commercial Mach 3 transport design. A comparison is presented demonstrating the impact of the technology proposed for this conceptual engine on the weight and other characteristics of a proposed high-speed civil transport. This comparison indicates that the advanced technology turbojet described could reduce the gross weight of a hypothetical Mach 3 high-speed civil transport design from about 714,000 pounds to about 545,000 pounds. The aircraft with the baseline engine and the aircraft with the advanced technology engine are described.

  20. A Psychoacoustic Evaluation of Noise Signatures from Advanced Civil Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Christian, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation project has been successful in developing and demonstrating technologies for integrated aircraft systems that can simultaneously meet aggressive goals for fuel burn, noise and emissions. Some of the resulting systems substantially differ from the familiar tube and wing designs constituting the current civil transport fleet. This study attempts to explore whether or not the effective perceived noise level metric used in the NASA noise goal accurately reflects human subject response across the range of vehicles considered. Further, it seeks to determine, in a quantitative manner, if the sounds associated with the advanced aircraft are more or less preferable to the reference vehicles beyond any differences revealed by the metric. These explorations are made through psychoacoustic tests in a controlled laboratory environment using simulated stimuli developed from auralizations of selected vehicles based on systems noise assessments.

  1. Holographic subsonic flow visualization.

    PubMed

    Reinheimer, C J; Wiswall, C E; Schmiege, R A; Harris, R J; Dueker, J E

    1970-09-01

    A pulsed ruby laser holographic interferometer was used to detect density gradients in the airflow around an airfoil at subsonic speeds in a low speed wind tunnel. These experiments proved that vibration of the optical components or object between exposures of the interferometric hologram does not destroy the detection of density gradients but actually can aid in the flow visualization. The density gradients determined from the fringe pattern analysis are consistent with the anticipated flow pattern. PMID:20094197

  2. Aeropropulsion 1987. Session 5: Subsonic Propulsion Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    NASA is conducting aeropropulsion research over a broad range of Mach numbers. In addition to the high-speed propulsion research described, major progress was recorded in research aimed at the subsonic flight regimes of interest to many commercial and military users. Recent progress and future directions in such areas as small engine technology, rotorcraft transmissions, icing, Hot Section Technology (HOST) and the Advanced Turboprop Program (ATP) are covered.

  3. Advanced spatio-temporal filtering techniques for photogrammetric image sequence analysis in civil engineering material testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebold, F.; Maas, H.-G.

    2016-01-01

    The paper shows advanced spatial, temporal and spatio-temporal filtering techniques which may be used to reduce noise effects in photogrammetric image sequence analysis tasks and tools. As a practical example, the techniques are validated in a photogrammetric spatio-temporal crack detection and analysis tool applied in load tests in civil engineering material testing. The load test technique is based on monocular image sequences of a test object under varying load conditions. The first image of a sequence is defined as a reference image under zero load, wherein interest points are determined and connected in a triangular irregular network structure. For each epoch, these triangles are compared to the reference image triangles to search for deformations. The result of the feature point tracking and triangle comparison process is a spatio-temporally resolved strain value field, wherein cracks can be detected, located and measured via local discrepancies. The strains can be visualized as a color-coded map. In order to improve the measuring system and to reduce noise, the strain values of each triangle must be treated in a filtering process. The paper shows the results of various filter techniques in the spatial and in the temporal domain as well as spatio-temporal filtering techniques applied to these data. The best results were obtained by a bilateral filter in the spatial domain and by a spatio-temporal EOF (empirical orthogonal function) filtering technique.

  4. Towards an advanced e-Infrastructure for Civil Protection applications: Research Strategies and Innovation Guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzetti, P.; Nativi, S.; Verlato, M.; Angelini, V.

    2009-04-01

    In the context of the EU co-funded project CYCLOPS (http://www.cyclops-project.eu) the problem of designing an advanced e-Infrastructure for Civil Protection (CP) applications has been addressed. As a preliminary step, some studies about European CP systems and operational applications were performed in order to define their specific system requirements. At a higher level it was verified that CP applications are usually conceived to map CP Business Processes involving different levels of processing including data access, data processing, and output visualization. At their core they usually run one or more Earth Science models for information extraction. The traditional approach based on the development of monolithic applications presents some limitations related to flexibility (e.g. the possibility of running the same models with different input data sources, or different models with the same data sources) and scalability (e.g. launching several runs for different scenarios, or implementing more accurate and computing-demanding models). Flexibility can be addressed adopting a modular design based on a SOA and standard services and models, such as OWS and ISO for geospatial services. Distributed computing and storage solutions could improve scalability. Basing on such considerations an architectural framework has been defined. It is made of a Web Service layer providing advanced services for CP applications (e.g. standard geospatial data sharing and processing services) working on the underlying Grid platform. This framework has been tested through the development of prototypes as proof-of-concept. These theoretical studies and proof-of-concept demonstrated that although Grid and geospatial technologies would be able to provide significant benefits to CP applications in terms of scalability and flexibility, current platforms are designed taking into account requirements different from CP. In particular CP applications have strict requirements in terms of: a) Real

  5. Overview of the Langley subsonic research effort on SCR configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, P. L., Jr.; Thomas, J. D.; Huffman, J. K.; Weston, R. P.; Schoonover, W. E., Jr.; Gentry, C. L., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Recent advances achieved in the subsonic aerodynamics of low aspect ratio, highly swept wing designs are summarized. The most significant of these advances was the development of leading edge deflection concepts which effectively reduce leading edge flow separation. The improved flow attachment results in substantial improvements in low speed performance, significant delay of longitudinal pitch up, increased trailing edge flap effectiveness, and increased lateral control capability. Various additional theoretical and/or experimental studies are considered which, in conjunction with the leading edge deflection studies, form the basis for future subsonic research effort.

  6. Carrying on the Good Fight: Summary Paper from Think Tank 2000--Advancing the Civil and Human Rights of People with Disabilities from Diverse Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, Washington, DC.

    This paper summarizes a May 2000 conference about advancing the civil and human rights of people with disabilities from diverse cultures. The conference included people with disabilities from diverse cultures and members of national civil rights organizations. The conference identified five priority areas for attention: (1) cultivating leadership…

  7. Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Marty K.; Droney, Christopher K.

    2011-01-01

    This Final Report summarizes the work accomplished by the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) team in Phase 1, which includes the time period of October 2008 through March 2010. The team consisted of Boeing Research and Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, General Electric, and Georgia Tech. The team completed the development of a comprehensive future scenario for world-wide commercial aviation, selected baseline and advanced configurations for detailed study, generated technology suites for each configuration, conducted detailed performance analysis, calculated noise and emissions, assessed technology risks, and developed technology roadmaps. Five concepts were evaluated in detail: 2008 baseline, N+3 reference, N+3 high span strut braced wing, N+3 gas turbine battery electric concept, and N+3 hybrid wing body. A wide portfolio of technologies was identified to address the NASA N+3 goals. Significant improvements in air traffic management, aerodynamics, materials and structures, aircraft systems, propulsion, and acoustics are needed. Recommendations for Phase 2 concept and technology projects have been identified.

  8. The requirements for a new full scale subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. W.; Mckinney, M. O.; Luidens, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Justification and requirements are presented for a large subsonic wind tunnel capable of testing full scale aircraft, rotor systems, and advanced V/STOL propulsion systems. The design considerations and constraints for such a facility are reviewed, and the trades between facility test capability and costs are discussed.

  9. Second-order subsonic airfoil theory including edge effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyke, Milton D

    1956-01-01

    Several recent advances in plane subsonic flow theory are combined into a unified second-order theory for airfoil sections of arbitrary shape. The solution is reached in three steps: the incompressible result is found by integration, it is converted into the corresponding subsonic compressible result by means of the second-order compressibility rule, and it is rendered uniformly valid near stagnation points by further rules. Solutions for a number of airfoils are given and are compared with the results of other theories and of experiment. A straight-forward computing scheme is outlined for calculating the surface velocities and pressures on any airfoil at any angle of attack

  10. High-Speed Civil Transport Will Revolutionize Air Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA is developing advanced technologies that will allow industry to build a high-speed civil transport that will revolutionize overseas air travel. The technology challenges include developing low-cost materials and structural concepts as well as supersonic engines that can meet stringent noise and emissions standards. NASA's goal is to provide enabling technologies that will reduce the travel time to the Far East by 50 percent within 25 years, and do so at today's subsonic ticket prices. This research is part of NASA's Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology (ASTT) Enterprise's strategy to sustain U.S. leadership in aeronautics and space. The Enterprise has set bold goals that are grouped into Three Pillars: Global Civil Aviation, Revolutionary Technology Leaps and Access to Space.

  11. Civil Rights Laws as Tools to Advance Health in the Twenty-First Century.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Angela K; Lee, Mary M; Meneses, Cristina M; Perkins, Jane; Youdelman, Mara

    2016-01-01

    To improve health in the twenty-first century, to promote both access to and quality of health care services and delivery, and to address significant health disparities, legal and policy approaches, specifically those focused on civil rights, could be used more intentionally and strategically. This review describes how civil rights laws, and their implementation and enforcement, help to encourage health in the United States, and it provides examples for peers around the world. The review uses a broad lens to define health for both classes of individuals and their communities--places where people live, learn, work, and play. Suggestions are offered for improving health and equity broadly, especially within societal groups and marginalized populations. These recommendations include multisectorial approaches that focus on the social determinants of health. PMID:26789383

  12. Robust, Optimal Subsonic Airfoil Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2014-01-01

    A method has been developed to create an airfoil robust enough to operate satisfactorily in different environments. This method determines a robust, optimal, subsonic airfoil shape, beginning with an arbitrary initial airfoil shape, and imposes the necessary constraints on the design. Also, this method is flexible and extendible to a larger class of requirements and changes in constraints imposed.

  13. Technology benefits for very large subsonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arcara, Philip C., Jr.; Bartlett, Dennis W.; Mcgraw, Marvin E., Jr.; Geiselhart, Karl A.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented for a study conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center which examined the effects of advanced technologies on the performance and size of very large, long-range subsonic transports. The study was performed using the Flight Optimization System (FLOPS). a multidisciplinary system of computer programs for conceptual and preliminary design and evaluation of advanced aircraft concepts. A four-engine, baseline configuration representative of existing transport technology was defined having a payload of 412 passengers plus baggage and a design range of 7300 nmi. New 600, 800 and 1000-passenger advanced transport concepts were then developed and compared to the baseline configuration. The technologies examined include 1995 entry-into-service (ELS) engines, high aspect ratio supercritical wings, composite materials for the wing, fuselage and empennage, and hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC). All operational and regulatory requirements and constraints, such as fuel reserves, balanced field length, and second segment climb gradient were satisfied during the design process. The effect of the advanced technologies on the size, weight and performance of the advanced transport concepts are presented. In addition, the sensitivity of the takeoff gross weight of the advanced transport concepts to increases in design range and payload, and designing for stretch capability are also discussed.

  14. Civil applications of high speed rotorcraft and powered lift aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, James A.; Zuk, John

    1988-01-01

    Advanced subsonic vertical and short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) aircraft configurations offer new transportation options for civil applications. Described is a range of vehicles from low-disk to high-disk loading aircraft, including high-speed rotorcraft, V/STOL aircraft, and short takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft. The status and advantages of the various configurations are described. Some of these show promise for relieving congestion in high population-density regions and providing transportation opportunities for low population-density regions.

  15. Civil applications of high-speed rotorcraft and powered-lift aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, James A.; Zuk, John

    1987-01-01

    Advanced subsonic vertical and short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) aircraft configurations offer new transportation options for civil applications. Described is a range of vehicles from low-disk to high-disk loading aircraft, including high-speed rotorcraft, V/STOL aircraft, and short takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft. The status and advantages of the various configurations are described. Some of these show promise for relieving congestion in high population-density regions and providing transportation opportunities for low population-density regions.

  16. High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This computer generated animation depicts a conceptual simulation of the flight of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). As envisioned, the HSCT is a next-generation supersonic (faster than the speed of sound) passenger jet that would fly 300 passengers at more than 1,500 miles per hour -- more than twice the speed of sound. It will cross the Pacific or Atlantic in less than half the time of modern subsonic jets, and at a ticket price less than 20 percent above comparable, slower flights.

  17. A Probabilistic Assessment of NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technologies for a Large Subsonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Michael T.; Jones, Scott M.; Arcara, Philip C., Jr.; Haller, William J.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program features advanced aeropropulsion technologies that include highly loaded turbomachinery, an advanced low-NOx combustor, high-temperature materials, intelligent propulsion controls, aspirated seal technology, and an advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) design tool to help reduce airplane drag. A probabilistic system assessment is performed to evaluate the impact of these technologies on aircraft fuel burn and NOx reductions. A 300-passenger aircraft, with two 396-kN thrust (85,000-pound) engines is chosen for the study. The results show that a large subsonic aircraft equipped with the UEET technologies has a very high probability of meeting the UEET Program goals for fuel-burn (or equivalent CO2) reduction (15% from the baseline) and LTO (landing and takeoff) NOx reductions (70% relative to the 1996 International Civil Aviation Organization rule). These results are used to provide guidance for developing a robust UEET technology portfolio, and to prioritize the most promising technologies required to achieve UEET program goals for the fuel-burn and NOx reductions.

  18. Medical management of the traumatic consequences of civil unrest incidents: causation, clinical approaches, needs and advanced planning criteria.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    In the context of this review, civil unrest is defined as disharmony, expressive dissatisfaction and/or disagreement between members of a community, which leads to a situation of competitive aggression that may find expression as disruption of organisation, conflicts, damage to property and injuries. Such a breakdown of harmonious relationships, which may result in property damage and human injuries that may be threatening to life, varies in magnitude from participation of a very few individuals up to the involvement of large crowds of people, which may evolve into a full-scale riot. It is the latter situation often involving demonstrators, opposing groups and law enforcement personnel that can result in multiple casualties and present a very significant challenge to the resources of local healthcare institutions. The causation of civil unrest incidents is multifactorial and has generic, specific and potentiating elements. With the current national and international societal, political and discriminatory problems, it is likely that civil unrest incidents on both small and large scales will continue to occur at a high and possibly increasing rate on a worldwide basis, and for these not infrequent incidents, the medical community should be in a state of informed preparation. The circumstances of civil unrest incidents are very variable with respect to causation, overall magnitude, frequency, timing, geographical location, numbers of persons involved, demographics of participants, influence of extremists, confrontation with opposing groups and control measures used by law enforcement agencies. Methods used by police and security forces for the control of civil unrest incidents, if advanced negotiations with organisers and verbal warnings have failed, fall basically into two categories: physical and chemical measures. Physical methods include restraint holds, truncheons, batons, mounted horses, projectiles (such as bean bags, plastic and rubber bullets), water cannons

  19. Robust, optimal subsonic airfoil shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Method system, and product from application of the method, for design of a subsonic airfoil shape, beginning with an arbitrary initial airfoil shape and incorporating one or more constraints on the airfoil geometric parameters and flow characteristics. The resulting design is robust against variations in airfoil dimensions and local airfoil shape introduced in the airfoil manufacturing process. A perturbation procedure provides a class of airfoil shapes, beginning with an initial airfoil shape.

  20. Advanced crew station concepts, displays, and input/output technology for civil aircraft of the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, J. J.; Robertson, J. B.; Batson, V. M.

    1979-01-01

    Current efforts on a new Cockpit Avionics Research program are described. The major thrusts of the program presented include: a comparative analysis of advanced display media and development of promising selected media, development of flight display generation techniques, and identification and development of promising I/O technology. In addition, the advanced integrated display concepts described include a 'tunnel in the sky' display and a traffic situation display with associated keyboard. Finally, the Cockpit Avionics Research program is summarized, future research plans are presented, and the need for an expanded program is discussed.

  1. Advanced Earth-to-orbit propulsion technology program overview: Impact of civil space technology initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, Frank W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Earth-to-Orbit (ETO) Propulsion Technology Program is dedicated to advancing rocket engine technologies for the development of fully reusable engine systems that will enable space transportation systems to achieve low cost, routine access to space. The program addresses technology advancements in the areas of engine life extension/prediction, performance enhancements, reduced ground operations costs, and in-flight fault tolerant engine operations. The primary objective is to acquire increased knowledge and understanding of rocket engine chemical and physical processes in order to evolve more realistic analytical simulations of engine internal environments, to derive more accurate predictions of steady and unsteady loads, and using improved structural analyses, to more accurately predict component life and performance, and finally to identify and verify more durable advanced design concepts. In addition, efforts were focused on engine diagnostic needs and advances that would allow integrated health monitoring systems to be developed for enhanced maintainability, automated servicing, inspection, and checkout, and ultimately, in-flight fault tolerant engine operations.

  2. Applications of advanced V/STOL aircraft concepts to civil utility missions. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The linear performance definition curves for the lift fan aircraft, tilt rotor aircraft, and advanced helicopter are given. The computer program written to perform the mission analysis for this study is also documented, and examples of its use are shown. Methods used to derive the performance coefficients for use in the mission analysis of the lift fan aircraft are described.

  3. Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar Recent Advances @ the ELEDIA Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salucci, Marco; Tenuti, Lorenza; Nardin, Cristina; Oliveri, Giacomo; Viani, Federico; Rocca, Paolo; Massa, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    The application of non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT/NDE) methodologies in civil engineering has raised a growing interest during the last years because of its potential impact in several different scenarios. As a consequence, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) technologies have been widely adopted as an instrument for the inspection of the structural stability of buildings and for the detection of cracks and voids. In this framework, the development and validation of GPR algorithms and methodologies represents one of the most active research areas within the ELEDIA Research Center of the University of Trento. More in detail, great efforts have been devoted towards the development of inversion techniques based on the integration of deterministic and stochastic search algorithms with multi-focusing strategies. These approaches proved to be effective in mitigating the effects of both nonlinearity and ill-posedness of microwave imaging problems, which represent the well-known issues arising in GPR inverse scattering formulations. More in detail, a regularized multi-resolution approach based on the Inexact Newton Method (INM) has been recently applied to subsurface prospecting, showing a remarkable advantage over a single-resolution implementation [1]. Moreover, the use of multi-frequency or frequency-hopping strategies to exploit the information coming from GPR data collected in time domain and transformed into its frequency components has been proposed as well. In this framework, the effectiveness of the multi-resolution multi-frequency techniques has been proven on synthetic data generated with numerical models such as GprMax [2]. The application of inversion algorithms based on Bayesian Compressive Sampling (BCS) [3][4] to GPR is currently under investigation, as well, in order to exploit their capability to provide satisfactory reconstructions in presence of single and multiple sparse scatterers [3][4]. Furthermore, multi-scaling approaches exploiting level

  4. Application of advanced high speed turboprop technology to future civil short-haul transport aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlon, J. A.; Bowles, J. V.

    1978-01-01

    With an overall goal of defining the needs and requirements for short-haul transport aircraft research and development, the objective of this paper is to determine the performance and noise impact of short-haul transport aircraft designed with an advanced turboprop propulsion system. This propulsion system features high-speed propellers that have more blades and reduced diameters. Aircraft are designed for short and medium field lengths; mission block fuel and direct operating costs (DOC) are used as performance measures. The propeller diameter was optimized to minimize DOC. Two methods are employed to estimate the weight of the acoustic treatment needed to reduce interior noise to an acceptable level. Results show decreasing gross weight, block fuel, DOC, engine size, and optimum propfan diameter with increasing field length. The choice of acoustic treatment method has a significant effect on the aircraft design.

  5. Benefits associated with advanced technologies applied to a high-speed civil transport concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozoroski, L. P.; Shields, E. W.; Fenbert, J. W.; Mcelroy, M. O.

    1993-01-01

    Results of a first-order assessment of the mission performance benefits associated with the technology improvements and goals of the Phase II High-Speed Research (HSR) Program are presented. A breakdown of the four major disciplines resulted in the following estimated TOGW savings from the 1990 vehicle: propulsion at 14.3 percent, structures at 11.7 percent, flight-deck systems at 4.0 percent, and aerodynamics at 15.0 percent. Based on 100 percent success of the HSR Phase II proposed technology advancements, the overall combined impact is estimated to result in a 45 percent reduction in TOGW from a 1990 entry-into-service (EIS) date, which could result in a viable 2005 EIS vehicle with an acceptable TOGW that meets Stage III community noise restrictions. Through supersonic laminar flow control and the possible reduction in reserve fuel requirements resulting from synthetic vision capability, the potential exists for an additional 9.6 percent reduction in TOGW.

  6. Aircraft System Analysis of Technology Benefits to Civil Transport Rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, Joseph B.; Smith, Roger L.

    2008-01-01

    sized for a representative civil passenger transport mission, using current technology. Individual advanced technologies are quantified and applied to resize the aircraft, thereby quantifying the net benefit of that technology to the rotorcraft. Estimates of development cost, production cost and operating and support costs are made with a commercial cost estimating program, calibrated to Boeing products with adjustments for future civil production processes. A cost metric of cash direct operating cost per available seat-mile (DOC ASM) is used to compare the cost benefit of the technologies. The same metric is used to compare results with turboprop operating costs. Reduced engine SFC was the most advantageous advanced technology for both rotorcraft concepts. Structural weight reduction was the second most beneficial technology, followed by advanced drive systems and then by technology for rotorcraft performance. Most of the technologies evaluated in this report should apply similarly to conventional helicopters. The implicit assumption is that resources will become available to mature the technologies for fullscale production aircraft. That assumption is certainly the weak link in any forecast of future possibilities. The analysis serves the purpose of identifying which technologies offer the most potential benefit, and thus the ones that should receive the highest priority for continued development. This study directly addressed the following NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing (SRW) subtopics: SR W.4.8.I.J Establish capability for rotorcraft system analysis and SRW. 4.8.I.4 Conduct limited technology benefit assessment on baseline rotorcraft configurations.

  7. NASA's Subsonic Jet Transport Noise Reduction Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Clemans A.; Preisser, John S.

    2000-01-01

    Although new jet transport airplanes in today s fleet are considerably quieter than the first jet transports introduced about 40 years ago, airport community noise continues to be an important environmental issue. NASA s Advanced Subsonic Transport (AST) Noise Reduction program was begun in 1994 as a seven-year effort to develop technology to reduce jet transport noise 10 dB relative to 1992 technology. This program provides for reductions in engine source noise, improvements in nacelle acoustic treatments, reductions in the noise generated by the airframe, and improvements in the way airplanes are operated in the airport environs. These noise reduction efforts will terminate at the end of 2001 and it appears that the objective will be met. However, because of an anticipated 3-8% growth in passenger and cargo operations well into the 21st Century and the slow introduction of new the noise reduction technology into the fleet, world aircraft noise impact will remain essentially constant until about 2020 to 2030 and thereafter begin to rise. Therefore NASA has begun planning with the Federal Aviation Administration, industry, universities and environmental interest groups in the USA for a new noise reduction initiative to provide technology for significant further reductions.

  8. The future of very large subsonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justice, R. Steven; Hays, Anthony P.; Parrott, Ed L.

    1996-01-01

    modular design. The VLST will encounter severe restrictions on weight, ground flotation, span, length, and door height to operate at current airports/bases, gates, and cargo loading systems. One option under consideration is for a sea-based VLST, either a conventional seaplane or Wing-In-Ground effect (WIG) vehicle, which would allow greater operational flexibility, while introducing other design challenges such as water impact loads and salt-water corrosion. Lockheed Martin is currently developing a floatplane version of the C-130 Hercules which will provide experience with a modern sea-based aircraft. In addition to its own ongoing research activities, Lockheed Martin is also participating in the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology, High Speed Research (HSR), and other programs which address some of the technologies needed for the VLST. The VLST will require NASA and US aerospace companies to work together to develop new capabilities and technologies for make the VLST a viable part of transportation beyond 2000.

  9. Minimizing life cycle cost for subsonic commercial aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, V.S. )

    1990-02-01

    A methodology is presented which facilitates the identification of that aircraft design concept which will incur the lowest life-cycle costs (LCCs) while meeting mission requirements. The methodology consists of an LCC module whose constituent elements calculate the costs associated with R D, testing, evaluation, and production, as well as direct and indirect operating costs, in conjunction with the Flight Optimization System conceptual design/analysis code. Provision is made in the methodology for sensitivities to advanced technologies for the subsonic commercial aircraft in question, which are optimized with respect to minimum gross weight, fuel consumption, acquisition cost, and direct operating cost. 12 refs.

  10. Minimizing life cycle cost for subsonic commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Vicki S.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology is presented which facilitates the identification of that aircraft design concept which will incur the lowest life-cycle costs (LCCs) while meeting mission requirements. The methodology consists of an LCC module whose constituent elements calculate the costs associated with R&D, testing, evaluation, and production, as well as direct and indirect operating costs, in conjunction with the 'Flight Optimization System' conceptual design/analysis code. Provision is made in the methodology for sensitivities to advanced technologies for the subsonic commercial aircraft in question, which are optimized with respect to minimum gross weight, fuel consumption, acquisition cost, and direct operating cost.

  11. Superplane! High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). This light-hearted promotional piece explains what the HSCT 'Superplane' is and what advantages it will have over current aircraft. As envisioned, the HSCT is a next-generation supersonic (faster than the speed of sound) passenger jet that would fly 300 passengers at more than 1,500 miles per hour -- more than twice the speed of sound. It will cross the Pacific or Atlantic in less than half the time of modern subsonic jets, and at a ticket price less than 20 percent above comparable, slower flights

  12. Directions in civil aviation 1980-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, L.

    1977-01-01

    The following future directions in civil aviation are considered: (1) greater economy and efficiency in passenger and cargo air service at subsonic speeds, and improved utility and safety for general aviation, (2) greatly improved short haul air transportation using turbofan or turboprop aircraft, and subsequently, rotorcraft and V/STOL aircraft, and (3) supersonic, and ultimately hypersonic, air transportation for transoceanic long range flight. Attention is also given to new directions in research and technology.

  13. High-speed civil transport study: Special factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Studies relating to environmental factors associated with high speed civil transports were conducted. Projected total engine emissions for year 2015 fleets of several subsonic/supersonic transport fleet scenarios, discussion of sonic boom reduction methods, discussion of community noise level requirements, fuels considerations, and air traffic control impact are presented.

  14. Unsteady Aerodynamics - Subsonic Compressible Inviscid Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A. V.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a new analytical treatment of Unsteady Aerodynamics - the linear theory covering the subsonic compressible (inviscid) case - drawing on some recent work in Operator Theory and Functional Analysis. The specific new results are: (a) An existence and uniqueness proof for the Laplace transform version of the Possio integral equation as well as a new closed form solution approximation thereof. (b) A new representation for the time-domain solution of the subsonic compressible aerodynamic equations emphasizing in particular the role of the initial conditions.

  15. Far-Field Turbulent Vortex-Wake/Exhaust Plume Interaction for Subsonic and HSCT Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Adam, Ihab; Wong, Tin-Chee

    1996-01-01

    Computational study of the far-field turbulent vortex-wake/exhaust plume interaction for subsonic and high speed civil transport (HSCT) airplanes is carried out. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are solved using the implicit, upwind, Roe-flux-differencing, finite-volume scheme. The two-equation shear stress transport model of Menter is implemented with the NS solver for turbulent-flow calculation. For the far-field study, the computations of vortex-wake interaction with the exhaust plume of a single engine of a Boeing 727 wing in a holding condition and two engines of an HSCT in a cruise condition are carried out using overlapping zonal method for several miles downstream. These results are obtained using the computer code FTNS3D. The results of the subsonic flow of this code are compared with those of a parabolized NS solver known as the UNIWAKE code.

  16. 14 CFR 91.805 - Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. 91... § 91.805 Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in §§ 91.809 and 91.811, on and after January 1, 1985, no person may operate to or from an airport in the United States any subsonic...

  17. 14 CFR 91.805 - Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. 91... § 91.805 Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in §§ 91.809 and 91.811, on and after January 1, 1985, no person may operate to or from an airport in the United States any subsonic...

  18. 14 CFR 91.805 - Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. 91... § 91.805 Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in §§ 91.809 and 91.811, on and after January 1, 1985, no person may operate to or from an airport in the United States any subsonic...

  19. 14 CFR 91.805 - Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. 91... § 91.805 Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in §§ 91.809 and 91.811, on and after January 1, 1985, no person may operate to or from an airport in the United States any subsonic...

  20. 14 CFR 91.805 - Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. 91... § 91.805 Final compliance: Subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in §§ 91.809 and 91.811, on and after January 1, 1985, no person may operate to or from an airport in the United States any subsonic...

  1. NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation will outline the rationale for, and the initial results of, a contractor study being performed by a SAIC-led team of Bell Helicopter Textron, Sensis, and Optimal Synthesis. Together, this team represents an extensive body of subject matter expertise as related to rotorcraft technologies and design, airspace demand modeling simulation, and terminal area operations and flight path planning. The initial conceptual design results of a fleet of civil tiltrotor aircraft ranging in size from 10 to 120 passengers is a key highlight of the work to be presented. The intent of this presentation is to begin to provide the general community of rotorcraft researchers, manufacturers, and end-users an appreciation of the criticality of interjecting rotorcraft-specific technology and concepts of operation issues into Next Gen airspace requirements

  2. NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Project-Multidisciplinary Analysis and Technology Development: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Gloria K.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the objectives of the Multidisciplinary Analysis and Technology Development (MDATD) in the Subsonic Rotary Wing project. The objectives are to integrate technologies and analyses to enable advanced rotorcraft and provide a roadmap to guide Level 1 and 2 research. The MDATD objectives will be met by conducting assessments of advanced technology benefits, developing new or enhanced design tools, and integrating Level 2 discipline technologies to develop and enable system-level analyses and demonstrations.

  3. Tunnel Correction for Compressible Subsonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranoff, A. V.

    1947-01-01

    This report presents a treatment of the effects of the tunnel walls on the flow velocity and direction in a compressible medium at subsonic speed by an approximate method. Calculations are given for the rotationally symmetric and two- dimensionl problems of the flow past bodies, as well for the downwash effect in the tunnel with circular cross section.

  4. Airfoil shape for flight at subsonic speeds

    DOEpatents

    Whitcomb, Richard T.

    1976-01-01

    An airfoil having an upper surface shaped to control flow accelerations and pressure distribution over the upper surface and to prevent separation of the boundary layer due to shock wave formulation at high subsonic speeds well above the critical Mach number. A highly cambered trailing edge section improves overall airfoil lifting efficiency.

  5. The transition from subsonic to supersonic cracks

    PubMed Central

    Behn, Chris; Marder, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the full analytical solution for steady-state in-plane crack motion in a brittle triangular lattice. This allows quick numerical evaluation of solutions for very large systems, facilitating comparisons with continuum fracture theory. Cracks that propagate faster than the Rayleigh wave speed have been thought to be forbidden in the continuum theory, but clearly exist in lattice systems. Using our analytical methods, we examine in detail the motion of atoms around a crack tip as crack speed changes from subsonic to supersonic. Subsonic cracks feature displacement fields consistent with a stress intensity factor. For supersonic cracks, the stress intensity factor disappears. Subsonic cracks are characterized by small-amplitude, high-frequency oscillations in the vertical displacement of an atom along the crack line, while supersonic cracks have large-amplitude, low-frequency oscillations. Thus, while supersonic cracks are no less physical than subsonic cracks, the connection between microscopic and macroscopic behaviour must be made in a different way. This is one reason supersonic cracks in tension had been thought not to exist. PMID:25713443

  6. Statistical theories of Langmuir turbulence. II - Subsonic to sonic transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, D. F.; Rose, H. A.; Nicholson, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The subsonic limit of the quadratic direct interaction approximation (DIA) applied to the Zakharov equations is compared with the cubic DIA applied to the nonlinear Schroedinger equation, which is the subsonic limit of the Zakharov equations. Comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations of a truncated system show that the first theory more accurately describes the regime of stationary turbulence, while the second theory more accurately describes the subsonic evolution of the modulational instability. The weak turbulence limits of the two theories describe the sonic and subsonic regimes, respectively. The addition of vertex corrections to the DIA leads to a hybrid weak turbulence theory that smoothly interpolates between the sonic and subsonic regimes.

  7. Civil air transport: A fresh look at power-by-wire and fly-by-light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    1990-05-01

    Power-by-wire (PBW) is a key element under subsonic transport flight systems technology with potential savings of over 10 percent in gross take-off-weight and in fuel consumption compared to today's transport aircraft. The PBW technology substitutes electrical actuation in place of centralized hydraulics, uses internal starter-motor/generators and eliminates the need for variable engine bleed air to supply cabin comfort. The application of advanced fiber optics to the electrical power system controls, to built-in-test (BITE) equipment, and to fly-by-light (FBL) flight controls provides additional benefits in lightning and high energy radio frequency (HERF) immunity over existing mechanical or even fly-by-wire controls. The program plan is reviewed and a snapshot is given of the key technologies and their benefits to all future aircraft, both civil and military.

  8. Civil air transport - A fresh look at power-by-wire and fly-by-light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    1990-01-01

    Power-by-wire (PBW) is a key element under subsonic transport flight systems technology, with potential savings of over 10 percent in gross take off weight and in fuel consumption compared to today's transport aircraft. The PBW technology substitutes electrical actuation in place of centralized hydraulics, uses internal starter-motor/generators, and eliminates the need for variable engine bleed air to supply cabin comfort. The application of advanced fiber optics to the electrical power system controls, to built-in-test (BITE) equipment, and to fly-by-light (FBL) flight controls provides additional benefits in lightning and high-energy radio frequency (HERF) immunity over existing mechanical or even fly-by-wire controls. The program plan is reviewed and a snapshot is given of the key technologies and their benefits to future aircraft, both civil and military.

  9. Civil air transport: A fresh look at power-by-wire and fly-by-light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    1990-01-01

    Power-by-wire (PBW) is a key element under subsonic transport flight systems technology with potential savings of over 10 percent in gross take-off-weight and in fuel consumption compared to today's transport aircraft. The PBW technology substitutes electrical actuation in place of centralized hydraulics, uses internal starter-motor/generators and eliminates the need for variable engine bleed air to supply cabin comfort. The application of advanced fiber optics to the electrical power system controls, to built-in-test (BITE) equipment, and to fly-by-light (FBL) flight controls provides additional benefits in lightning and high energy radio frequency (HERF) immunity over existing mechanical or even fly-by-wire controls. The program plan is reviewed and a snapshot is given of the key technologies and their benefits to all future aircraft, both civil and military.

  10. Civil air transport: A fresh look at power-by-wire and fly-by-light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    1991-01-01

    Power-by-wire (PBW) is a key element under subsonic transport flight systems technology with potential savings of over 10 percent in operating empty weight and in fuel consumption compared to today's transport aircraft. The PBW technology substitutes electrical actuation in place of centralized hydraulics, uses internal starter-motor/generators and eliminates the need for variable engine bleed air to supply cabin comfort. The application of advanced fiber optics to the electrical power system controls, to built-in-test (BIT) equipment, and to fly-by-light (FBL) flight controls provides additional benefits in lightning and high energy radio frequency (HERF) immunity over existing mechanical or even fly-by-wire controls. The program plan is reviewed and a snapshot is given of the key technologies and their benefits to all future aircraft, both civil and military.

  11. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    The design requirements of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) are discussed. The following design concerns are presented: (1) environmental impact (emissions and noise); (2) critical components (the high temperature combustor and the lightweight exhaust nozzle); and (3) advanced materials (high temperature ceramic matrix composites (CMC's)/intermetallic matrix composites (IMC's)/metal matrix composites (MMC's)).

  12. A crew-centered flight deck design philosophy for High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Michael T.; Rogers, William H.; Press, Hayes N.; Latorella, Kara A.; Abbott, Terence S.

    1995-01-01

    Past flight deck design practices used within the U.S. commercial transport aircraft industry have been highly successful in producing safe and efficient aircraft. However, recent advances in automation have changed the way pilots operate aircraft, and these changes make it necessary to reconsider overall flight deck design. The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) mission will likely add new information requirements, such as those for sonic boom management and supersonic/subsonic speed management. Consequently, whether one is concerned with the design of the HSCT, or a next generation subsonic aircraft that will include technological leaps in automated systems, basic issues in human usability of complex systems will be magnified. These concerns must be addressed, in part, with an explicit, written design philosophy focusing on human performance and systems operability in the context of the overall flight crew/flight deck system (i.e., a crew-centered philosophy). This document provides such a philosophy, expressed as a set of guiding design principles, and accompanied by information that will help focus attention on flight crew issues earlier and iteratively within the design process. This document is part 1 of a two-part set.

  13. Searching for extraterrestrial civilizations.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, T B; Morris, M

    1977-05-01

    We have argued that planning for a search for extraterrestrial intelligence should involve a minimum number of assumptions. In view of the feasibility (at our present level of understanding) of using nuclear fusion to effect interstellar travel at a speed of 0.1c, it appears unwarranted (at this time) to assume that it would not occur for at least some technologically advanced civilizations. One cannot even conclude that humans would not attempt this within the next few centuries. On the contrary, the most likely future situation, given the maintenance of technological growth and the absence of extraterrestrial interference, is that our civilization will explore and colonize our galactic neighborhood. A comparison of the time scales of galactic evolution and interstellar travel leads to the conclusion that the galaxy is either essentially empty with respect to technological civilizations or extensively colonized. In the former instance, a SETI would be unproductive. In the latter, a SETI could be fruitful if a signal has been deliberately directed at the earth or at an alien outpost, probe, or communication relay station in our solar system. In the former case, an existing antenna would probably be sufficient to detect the signal. In the latter case, success would depend on the way in which the communications were coded. Failure to detect a signal could permit any of the following conclusions: (i) the galaxy is devoid of technological civilizations, advanced beyond our own, (ii) such civilizations exist, but cannot (for some reason which is presently beyond our ken) engage in interstellar colonization, or (iii) such civilizations are not attempting overt contact with terrestrial civilizations and their intercommunications, if present, are not coded in a simple way. To plan at this time for a high-cost, large-array SETI based on the last two possibilities appears to be rather premature. PMID:17760037

  14. Operation of the ISL transonic shock tube in a high subsonic flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, F.; Havermann, M.; Boller, F.; Mangold, P.; Takayama, K.

    The transonic flow regime plays an important role in experimental aerodynamic research. Modern civil aircraft fly up to a Mach number of M ≈ 0.9 in the high subsonic speed regime, as, for example, the Boeing or Airbus passenger aircraft. Nearly sonic Mach numbers are foreseen for innovative airplane concepts like the sonic cruiser by Boeing. In the military domain, guided missiles like the cruise missile also fly in the high subsonic flow regime. For testing purposes, transonic wind tunnels are mainly used for sub- as well as supersonic design applications. These wind tunnels have normally very large dimensions, which makes their operation quite expensive. If only small scale tests are required, a cheap working facility turns out to be more beneficial. For this purpose, a conventional shock tube operated at transonic flow conditions has been put into operation at the ISL. In the transonic flow regime, however, the reduction of the tube cross section by the model can produce severe distortions followed by a choking of the shock tube flow in the test section. Extensive experimental investigations were performed to determine the subsonic choking Mach number as a function of the model size. These results are compared with theoretical estimations and, more in detail, with CFD calculations.

  15. Full scale subsonic wind tunnel requirements and design studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. W.; Mort, K. W.; Hickey, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The justification and requirements are summarized for a large subsonic wind tunnel capable of testing full-scale aircraft, rotor systems, and advanced V/STOL aircraft propulsion systems. The design considerations and constraints for such a facility are reviewed, and the trades between facility test capability and costs are discussed. The design studies showed that the structural cost of this facility is the most important cost factor. For this reason (and other considerations such as requirements for engine exhaust gas purging) an open-return wind tunnel having two test sections was selected. The major technical problem in the design of an open-return wind tunnel is maintaining good test section flow quality in the presence of external winds. This problem has been studied extensively, and inlet and exhaust systems which provide satisfactory attenuation of the effects of external winds on test section flow quality were developed.

  16. Flow quality measurements in compressible subsonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stainback, P. Calvin; Johnson, Charles B.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose is to re-examine the heat transfer from a hot-wire probe in the compressible subsonic flow regime; describe the three-wire hot-wire probe calibration and data reduction techniques used to measure the velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuation; and present flow quality results obtained in the Langley 0.3 meter Transonic Cryogenic Wind Tunnel and in flight with the NASA JetStar from the same three-wire hot-wire probe.

  17. Ancient Civilizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Web Feet K-8, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This subject guide includes Web sites and other resources on ancient civilizations with age levels and appropriate subject disciplines specified. Also includes CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, audios, magazines, professional resources, and a sample student assignment. (LRW)

  18. Searching for extraterrestrial civilizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Morris, M.

    1977-01-01

    Three interrelated assumptions are critically examined in an attempt to outline a productive strategy for a search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Questions concerning the feasibility of interstellar travel are investigated. It is concluded that the probability of interstellar travel is high enough that, given a modest number of advanced civilizations, at least one of them will engage in interstellar voyages and colonize the galaxy. Assuming, however, that technological civilizations are rare the galaxy would be essentially unpopulated. Attention is given to the present lack of contact with extraterrestrial beings and frequencies for interstellar beacons.

  19. 24 CFR 4.28 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... civil money penalty on the employee in accordance with the provisions of 24 CFR part 30. ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Civil penalties. 4.28 Section 4.28... REFORM ACT Prohibition of Advance Disclosure of Funding Decisions § 4.28 Civil penalties. Whenever...

  20. 24 CFR 4.28 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... civil money penalty on the employee in accordance with the provisions of 24 CFR part 30. ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Civil penalties. 4.28 Section 4.28... REFORM ACT Prohibition of Advance Disclosure of Funding Decisions § 4.28 Civil penalties. Whenever...

  1. 24 CFR 4.28 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... civil money penalty on the employee in accordance with the provisions of 24 CFR part 30. ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Civil penalties. 4.28 Section 4.28... REFORM ACT Prohibition of Advance Disclosure of Funding Decisions § 4.28 Civil penalties. Whenever...

  2. 24 CFR 4.28 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... civil money penalty on the employee in accordance with the provisions of 24 CFR part 30. ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Civil penalties. 4.28 Section 4.28... REFORM ACT Prohibition of Advance Disclosure of Funding Decisions § 4.28 Civil penalties. Whenever...

  3. Materials and Structures Research for Gas Turbine Applications Within the NASA Subsonic Fixed Wing Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Janet

    2011-01-01

    A brief overview is presented of the current materials and structures research geared toward propulsion applications for NASA s Subsonic Fixed Wing Project one of four projects within the Fundamental Aeronautics Program of the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate. The Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project has selected challenging goals which anticipate an increasing emphasis on aviation s impact upon the global issue of environmental responsibility. These goals are greatly reduced noise, reduced emissions and reduced fuel consumption and address 25 to 30 years of technology development. Successful implementation of these demanding goals will require development of new materials and structural approaches within gas turbine propulsion technology. The Materials and Structures discipline, within the SFW project, comprise cross-cutting technologies ranging from basic investigations to component validation in laboratory environments. Material advances are teamed with innovative designs in a multidisciplinary approach with the resulting technology advances directed to promote the goals of reduced noise and emissions along with improved performance.

  4. Experimental investigation of subsonic combustion driven MHD generator performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClaine, A. W.; Swallom, D. W.; Kessler, R.

    1984-01-01

    Future mature combined cycle MHD/steam electrical power plants may use subsonic flow trains. To provide a data base of subsonic generator design and operating experience an experimental program was begun in 1977 at the Avco Everett Research Laboratory. During this program an MHD generator was operated with a subsonic flow train under both Faraday and diagonal loads. This paper reviews the work performed under this program and the results obtained.

  5. Future Civil Aircraft and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, J.; Zuk, J.

    1989-01-01

    New aircraft technologies are presented that have the potential to expand the air transportation system and reduce congestion through new operating capabilities while also providing greater levels of safety and environmental compatibility. These new capabilities will result from current and planned civil aeronautics technology at the NASA Ames, Lewis, and Langley Research Centers and will cover the complete spectrum of current aircraft and new vehicle concepts including rotorcraft (helicopters and tilt rotors), vertical and short takeoff and landing (V/STOL), and short takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft, subsonic transports, high-speed transports, and hypersonic/transatmospheric vehicles. New technologies will improve efficiency, affordability, safety, and environmental compatibility of current aircraft and will enable the development of new transportation system. The new capabilities of vehicles could lead to substantial market opportunities and economic growth and could improve the competitive position of the U.S. aerospace industry.

  6. Analysis of supersonic combustion flow fields with embedded subsonic regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S.; Delguidice, P.

    1972-01-01

    The viscous characteristic analysis for supersonic chemically reacting flows was extended to include provisions for analyzing embedded subsonic regions. The numerical method developed to analyze this mixed subsonic-supersonic flow fields is described. The boundary conditions are discussed related to the supersonic-subsonic and subsonic-supersonic transition, as well as a heuristic description of several other numerical schemes for analyzing this problem. An analysis of shock waves generated either by pressure mismatch between the injected fluid and surrounding flow or by chemical heat release is also described.

  7. Superplane!High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). This light-hearted promotional piece explains what the HSCT 'Superplane' is and what advantages it will have over current aircraft. As envisioned, the HSCT is a next-generation supersonic (faster than the speed of sound) passenger jet that would fly 300 passengers at more than 1,500 miles per hour -- more than twice the speed of sound. It will cross the Pacific or Atlantic in less than half the time of modern subsonic jets, and at a ticket price less than 20 percent above comparable, slower flights

  8. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1990-01-01

    Flow field measurements of three subsonic rectangular cold air jets are presented. The three cases had aspect ratios of 1x2, 1x4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1x2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. The data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data are presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made.

  9. Our Sky Now and Then: Searches for Lost Stars and Impossible Effects as Probes of Advanced Extraterrestrial Civilizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarroel, Beatriz; Imaz, Inigo; Bergstedt, Josefine

    2016-09-01

    Searches for extraterrestrial intelligence using large survey data often look for possible signatures of astroengineering. We propose searching for physically impossible effects caused by highly advanced technology by carrying out a search for disappearing galaxies and Milky Way stars. We select ∼10 million objects from USNO-B1.0 with low proper motions (μ < 20 mas yr‑1) imaged on the sky in two epochs. We search for objects not found at the expected positions in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) by visually examining images of ∼290,000 USNO-B1.0 objects with no counterpart in the SDSS. We identify some spurious targets in the USNO-B1.0. We find one candidate of interest for follow-up photometry, although it is very uncertain. If the candidate eventually is found, it defines the probability of observing a disappearing-object event in the last decade to less than one in one million in the given samples. Nevertheless, because the complete USNO-B1.0 data set is 100 times larger than any of our samples, we propose an easily accessible citizen science project in search of USNO-B1.0 objects that have disappeared from the SDSS.

  10. Civil Disobedience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton

    2000-01-01

    This theme issue looks at three historical and recent instances of civil disobedience. The first article examines the Free Speech Movement, which arose on the Berkeley campus of the University of California in the 1960s. The second article recounts the struggle of Mahatma Gandhi to free India from the British Empire. The final article explores the…

  11. FPGA development for high altitude subsonic parachute testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, James E.; Gromov, Konstantin G.; Konefat, Edward H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a rapid, top down requirements-driven design of a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) used in an Earth qualification test program for a new Mars subsonic parachute. The FPGA is used to process and control storage of telemetry data from multiple sensors throughout launch, ascent, deployment and descent phases of the subsonic parachute test.

  12. FPGA development for high altitude subsonic parachute testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, James E.; Konefat, Edward H.; Gromovt, Konstantin

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a rapid, top down requirements-driven design of an FPGA used in an Earth qualification test program for a new Mars subsonic parachute. The FPGA is used to process and store data from multiple sensors at multiple rates during launch, ascent, deployment and descent phases of the subsonic parachute test.

  13. High altitude subsonic parachute field programmable gate array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, James E.; Gromov, Konstantin; Konefat, Edward H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a rapid, top down requirements-driven design of an FPGA used in an Earth qualification test program for a new Mars subsonic parachute. The FPGA is used to process and control storage of telemetry data from multiple sensors throughout; launch, ascent, deployment and descent phases of the subsonic parachute test.

  14. Atmospheric Effects of Aviation: First Report of the Subsonic Assessment Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M. (Editor); Friedl, Randall R. (Editor); Wesoky, Howard L. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This document is the first report from the Office of Aeronautics Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Program's Subsonic Assessment (SASS) Project. This effort, initiated in late 1993, has as its objective the assessment of the atmospheric effects of the current and predicted future aviation fleet. The two areas of impact are ozone (stratospheric and tropospheric) and radiative forcing. These are driven, respectively, by possible perturbations from aircraft emissions of NOX and soot and/or sulfur-containing particles. The report presents the major questions to which project assessments will be directed (Introduction) and the status of six programmatic elements: Emissions Scenarios, Exhaust Characterization, Near-Field Interactions, Kinetics and Laboratory Studies, Global Modeling, and Atmospheric Observations (field studies).

  15. Vortex Wakes of Subsonic Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A historical overview will be presented of the research conducted on the structure and modification of the vortices generated by the lifting surfaces of subsonic transport aircraft. The seminar will describe the three areas of vortex research; namely, the magnitude of the hazard posed, efforts to reduce the hazard to an acceptable level, and efforts to develop a systematic means for avoiding vortex wakes. It is first pointed out that the characteristics of lift-generated vortices are related to the aerodynamic shapes that produce them and that various arrangements of surfaces can be used to produce different vortex structures. The largest portion of the research conducted to date has been directed at finding ways to reduce the hazard potential of lift-generated vortices shed by subsonic transport aircraft in the vicinity of airports during landing and takeoff operations. It is stressed that lift-generated vortex wakes are so complex that progress towards a solution requires application of a combined theoretical and experimental research program because either alone often leads to incorrect conclusions. It is concluded that a satisfactory aerodynamic solution to the wake-vortex problem at airports has not yet been found but a reduction in the impact of the wake-vortex hazard on airport capacity may become available in the foreseeable future through wake-vortex avoidance concepts currently under study. The material to be presented in this overview is drawn from articles published in aerospace journals that are available publicly.

  16. Study of the application of hydrogen fuel to long-range subsonic transport aircraft, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.; Lange, R. H.; Moore, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility, practicability, and potential advantages/disadvantages of using liquid hydrogen as fuel in long range, subsonic transport aircraft of advanced design were studied. Both passenger and cargo-type aircraft were investigated. To provide a valid basis for comparison, conventional hydrocarbon (Jet A) fueled aircraft were designed to perform identical missions using the same advanced technology and meeting the same operational constraints. The liquid hydrogen and Jet A fueled aircraft were compared on the basis of weight, size, energy utilization, cost, noise, emissions, safety, and operational characteristics. A program of technology development was formulated.

  17. Investigating Aeroacoustic Sources in a Subsonic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachtor, Adam J.; Jordan, Peter; George, William K.

    2007-11-01

    George, W"anstr"om, and Jordan (2007) suggested an alternative approach to identifying aeroacoustic sources. Through this method, contributions to the pressure field are effectively separated into three separate terms. One term is unique in that it present only in compressible flows. This compressible term has been argued to be the only term that can radiate acoustically. An investigation into this approach is presented in the specific case of a subsonic jet. Particular attention is paid to the compressible term and its interaction with the mechanism that is responsible for the hydrodynamic pressure in an incompressible flow. We extend our thanks to Jonathan B. Freund for access to data from his DNS jet simulation.

  18. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1989-01-01

    Flow field measurements are presented of 3 subsonic rectangular cold air jets. The 3 cases presented had aspect ratios of 1 x 2, 1 x 4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1 x 2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemoneter system. The presented data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data is presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made. All tabular data are available in ASCII format on MS-DOS compatible disks.

  19. Subsonic Glideback Rocket Demonstrator Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeTurris, Dianne J.; Foster, Trevor J.; Barthel, Paul E.; Macy, Daniel J.; Droney, Christopher K.; Talay, Theodore A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For the past two years, Cal Poly's rocket program has been aggressively exploring the concept of remotely controlled, fixed wing, flyable rocket boosters. This program, embodied by a group of student engineers known as Cal Poly Space Systems, has successfully demonstrated the idea of a rocket design that incorporates a vertical launch pattern followed by a horizontal return flight and landing. Though the design is meant for supersonic flight, CPSS demonstrators are deployed at a subsonic speed. Many steps have been taken by the club that allowed the evolution of the StarBooster prototype to reach its current size: a ten-foot tall, one-foot diameter, composite material rocket. Progress is currently being made that involves multiple boosters along with a second stage, third rocket.

  20. On the stability of subsonic thermal fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez S, Miguel H.; Shchekinov, Yuri; Bessega L, Maria C.

    2005-08-15

    The stability of subsonic thermal fronts against corrugation is analyzed and an exact dispersion relation is obtained taking into account the compressibility of the gas. For heat fronts, this dispersion equation has an unstable root ({omega}{sub ex}) corresponding to the Landau-Darrieus unstable mode ({omega}{sub 0}) modified by the compressional effects. In particular, the exact solution shows a conspicuous maximum very close to the value of the intake Mach number M{sub 1} at which a Chapman-Jouguet deflagration wave behind the heat front is formed. Cooling fronts are stable for corrugation-like disturbances. A maximum damping as well as a maximum in the frequency occur at a value of M{sub 1} depending on the value of the normalized cooling q.

  1. Power spectral density of subsonic jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Yu, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The power-spectrum density (PSD) of the far-field noise of a subsonic unheated axisymmetric jet is investigated by analysis of about 80 sets of published noise spectra and of spectra obtained using 12.7 and 25.4-mm-diameter compressed-air jets at exit velocities 66 and 104 m/s and 67 and 91 m/s, respectively, in the NASA Langley anechoic flow facility. The results are presented in tables and graphs and characterized in detail. Findings reported include Strouhal-number scaling of the PSD at theta = 30 deg or more, scaling with the product of the Helmholtz number and the Doppler factor at theta less than 30 deg, best collapse at source convection Mach number 0.5, variation of PSD amplitude as U to the 6.5th at theta = 90 deg, and no sharp PSD-amplitude variation at any critical Reynolds number.

  2. Dynamics of a flexible cylinder in subsonic axial flow

    SciTech Connect

    Paidoussis, M.P.; Ostoja-Starzewski, M.

    1981-11-01

    This paper examines the dynamics of a flexible cylinder with pinned ends immersed in axial subsonic flow, either bounded or unconfined. The problem proves to be surprisingly resistant to exact solution, as compared to the incompressible flow case, because of difficulties in determining precisely the inviscid aerodynamic forces. This paper presents a number of distinct formulations of these forces, involving different approximations: (1) a slender-body approximation; (2) an approximate three-dimensional formulation where, in the determination of the aerodynamic forces, the axial shape is prescribed in advance; and (3) an exact integral formulation of the generalized aerodynamic forces. In each case, Galerkin-type solutions yield the system eigenfrequencies which describe the dynamical behavior of the system. It is found that for sufficiently high flow velocities, divergence and flutter are possible. The different methods yield similar, but not quantitatively identical results. Interestingly, dependence of the dynamical characteristics on Mach number is shown to be weak for slender cylinders; for nonslender ones, it is stronger. Finally, a brief discussion of wave propagation in an unconstrained cylinder indicates the existence of a cutoff flow velocity for backward propagating waves, followed by wave amplification at higher flow, which is closely related to loss of stability in the constrained system.

  3. An Overview of NASA's Subsonic Research Aircraft Testbed (SCRAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, Ethan; Hernandez, Joe; Ruhf, John C.

    2013-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center acquired a Gulfstream III (GIII) aircraft to serve as a testbed for aeronautics flight research experiments. The aircraft is referred to as SCRAT, which stands for SubsoniC Research Aircraft Testbed. The aircraft's mission is to perform aeronautics research; more specifically raising the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of advanced technologies through flight demonstrations and gathering high-quality research data suitable for verifying the technologies, and validating design and analysis tools. The SCRAT has the ability to conduct a range of flight research experiments throughout a transport class aircraft's flight envelope. Experiments ranging from flight-testing of a new aircraft system or sensor to those requiring structural and aerodynamic modifications to the aircraft can be accomplished. The aircraft has been modified to include an instrumentation system and sensors necessary to conduct flight research experiments along with a telemetry capability. An instrumentation power distribution system was installed to accommodate the instrumentation system and future experiments. An engineering simulation of the SCRAT has been developed to aid in integrating research experiments. A series of baseline aircraft characterization flights has been flown that gathered flight data to aid in developing and integrating future research experiments. This paper describes the SCRAT's research systems and capabilities.

  4. 1. VIEW SOUTHWEST OF SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING AND TRANSONIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW SOUTHWEST OF SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING AND TRANSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Bounded by Clara Barton Parkway & McArthur Boulevard, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  5. 7. VIEW NORTHWEST OF SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING TO TRANSONIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW NORTHWEST OF SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING TO TRANSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Bounded by Clara Barton Parkway & McArthur Boulevard, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  6. 5. VIEW NORTHWEST OF SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING TO TRANSONIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW NORTHWEST OF SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING TO TRANSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Bounded by Clara Barton Parkway & McArthur Boulevard, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  7. 3. VIEW SOUTHEAST OF TRANSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING TO SUBSONIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW SOUTHEAST OF TRANSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING TO SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Bounded by Clara Barton Parkway & McArthur Boulevard, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  8. The role of freestream turbulence scale in subsonic flow separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. L.; Seebaugh, W. R.; Barnett, R. J.; Gokhale, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    The ojective of this work is the clarification of the role of freestream turbulence scale in determining the location of boundary layer separation. An airfoil in subsonic wind tunnel flow is the specific case studied. Hot-film and hot-wire anemometry, liquid-film visualization and pressure measurements are the principal diagnostic techniques in use. The Vanderbilt University subsonic wind tunnel is the flow facility being used.

  9. Computation of subsonic flow around airfoil systems with multiple separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, K.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical method for computing the subsonic flow around multi-element airfoil systems was developed, allowing for flow separation at one or more elements. Besides multiple rear separation also sort bubbles on the upper surface and cove bubbles can approximately be taken into account. Also, compressibility effects for pure subsonic flow are approximately accounted for. After presentation the method is applied to several examples and improved in some details. Finally, the present limitations and desirable extensions are discussed.

  10. SUBSONIC WIND TUNNEL PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS SOFTWARE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, W. T.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed as an aid in the design and analysis of subsonic wind tunnels. It brings together and refines previously scattered and over-simplified techniques used for the design and loss prediction of the components of subsonic wind tunnels. It implements a system of equations for determining the total pressure losses and provides general guidelines for the design of diffusers, contractions, corners and the inlets and exits of non-return tunnels. The algorithms used in the program are applicable to compressible flow through most closed- or open-throated, single-, double- or non-return wind tunnels or ducts. A comparison between calculated performance and that actually achieved by several existing facilities produced generally good agreement. Any system through which air is flowing which involves turns, fans, contractions etc. (e.g., an HVAC system) may benefit from analysis using this software. This program is an update of ARC-11138 which includes PC compatibility and an improved user interface. The method of loss analysis used by the program is a synthesis of theoretical and empirical techniques. Generally, the algorithms used are those which have been substantiated by experimental test. The basic flow-state parameters used by the program are determined from input information about the reference control section and the test section. These parameters were derived from standard relationships for compressible flow. The local flow conditions, including Mach number, Reynolds number and friction coefficient are determined for each end of each component or section. The loss in total pressure caused by each section is calculated in a form non-dimensionalized by local dynamic pressure. The individual losses are based on the nature of the section, local flow conditions and input geometry and parameter information. The loss forms for typical wind tunnel sections considered by the program include: constant area ducts, open throat ducts, contractions, constant

  11. Evaluation of laminar flow control systems for subsonic commercial transport aircraft: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    An evaluation was made of laminar flow control (LFC) system concepts for subsonic commercial transport aircraft. Configuration design studies, performance analyses, fabrication development, structural testing, wind tunnel testing, and contamination-avoidance techniques were included. As a result of trade studies, a configuration with LFC on the upper wing surface only, utilizing an electron beam-perforated suction surface, and employing a retractable high-lift shield for contamination avoidance, was selected as the most practical LFC system. The LFC aircraft was then compared with an advanced turbulent aircraft designed for the same mission. This comparison indicated significant fuel savings.

  12. Evaluation of laminar flow control systems concepts for subsonic commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    An evaluation was made of laminar flow control (LFC) system concepts for subsonic commercial transport aircraft. Configuration design studies, performance analyses, fabrication development, structural testing, wind tunnel testing, and contamination-avoidance techniques were included. As a result of trade studies, a configuration with LFC on the upper wing surface only, utilizing an electron beam-perforated suction surface, and employing a retractable high-lift shield for contamination avoidance, was selected as the most practical LFC system. The LFC aircraft was then compared with an advanced turbulent aircraft designed for the same mission. This comparison indicated significant fuel savings and reduced direct operating cost benefits would result from using LFC.

  13. The Cylinder and Semicylinder in Subsonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingham, Harry J.; Weimer, David K..; Griffith, Wayland

    1952-01-01

    In studying the diffraction of shock waves around various two-dimensional obstacles we have observed that flow separation and the formation of vortices contributes in an important way to transient loading of the obstacle. The cases of a cylinder and semicylinder are especially interesting because the breakaway point is not clearly defined as it is for objects having sharp corners. Accordingly a number of experiments have been made in the shock tube to observe the influence of Reynolds number and Mach number on the transient flow patterns about a cylinder and about a semicylinder mounted on a smooth plane. Some differences might be anticipated since the plane would impose a symmetry on the flow and produce a viscous boundary layer for which there is no counterpart with the cylinder. In the course of these experiments it was noted that a condition of steady subsonic flow about both the cylinder and semicylinder was approached. Thus a comparison with von Karrnan's theoretical calculation of the drag on a cylinder, from certain characteristics of its wake or "vortex street", was undertaken.

  14. Subsonic-transonic stall flutter study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stardter, H.

    1979-01-01

    The objective of the Subsonic/Transonic Stall Flutter Program was to obtain detailed measurements of both the steady and unsteady flow field surrounding a rotor and the mechanical state of the rotor while it was operating in both steady and flutter modes to provide a basis for future analysis and for development of theories describing the flutter phenomenon. The program revealed that while all blades flutter at the same frequency, they do not flutter at the same amplitude, and their interblade phase angles are not equal. Such a pattern represents the superposition of a number of rotating nodal diameter patterns, each characterized by a different amplitude and different phase indexing, but each rotating at a speed that results in the same flutter frequency as seen in the rotor system. Review of the steady pressure contours indicated that flutter may alter the blade passage pressure distribution. The unsteady pressure amplitude contour maps reveal regions of high unsteady pressure amplitudes near the leading edge, lower amplitudes near the trailing.

  15. SHARP: Subsonic High Altitude Research Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beals, Todd; Burton, Craig; Cabatan, Aileen; Hermano, Christine; Jones, Tom; Lee, Susan; Radloff, Brian

    1991-01-01

    The Universities Space Research Association is sponsoring an undergraduate program which is geared to designing an aircraft that can study the ozone layer at the equator. This aircraft must be able to satisfy four mission profiles. Mission one is a polar mission that ranges from Chile to the South Pole and back to Chile, a total range of 6000 n.mi. at 100,000 ft with a 2500 lb payload. The second mission is also a polar mission, with an altitude of 70,000 ft and an increased payload of 4000 lbs. For the third mission, the aircraft will takeoff at NASA Ames, cruise at 100,000 ft carrying a 2500 lb payload, and land at Puerto Montt, Chile. The final mission requires the aircraft to take off at NASA Ames, cruise at 100,000 ft with a 1000 lb payload, make an excursion to 120,000 ft, and land at Howard AFB, Panama. Three missions require that a subsonic Mach number be maintained due to constraints imposed by the air sampling equipment. The aircraft need not be manned for all four missions. Three aircraft configurations have been determined to be the most suitable for meeting the above requirements. In the event that a requirement cannot be obtained within the given constraints, recommendations for proposal modifications are given.

  16. Technologies and Concepts for Reducing the Fuel Burn of Subsonic Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickol, Craig L.

    2012-01-01

    There are many technologies under development that have the potential to enable large fuel burn reductions in the 2025 timeframe for subsonic transport aircraft relative to the current fleet. This paper identifies a potential technology suite and analyzes the fuel burn reduction potential of these technologies when integrated into advanced subsonic transport concepts. Advanced tube-and-wing concepts are developed in the single aisle and large twin aisle class, and a hybrid-wing-body concept is developed for the large twin aisle class. The resulting fuel burn reductions for the advanced tube-and-wing concepts range from a 42% reduction relative to the 777-200 to a 44% reduction relative to the 737-800. In addition, the hybrid-wingbody design resulted in a 47% fuel burn reduction relative to the 777-200. Of course, to achieve these fuel burn reduction levels, a significant amount of technology and concept maturation is required between now and 2025. A methodology for capturing and tracking concept maturity is also developed and presented in this paper.

  17. Civil Aviation and the Occupational Outlook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Describes the nature of the aerospace industry and the types of occupations available in the industry as well as information on training, advancement opportunities and the employment outlook in the future of civil aviation. (BR)

  18. Aeroelasticity Benchmark Assessment: Subsonic Fixed Wing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florance, Jennifer P.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Wieseman, Carol D.

    2010-01-01

    Aeroelasticity Branch will examine other experimental efforts within the Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) program (such as testing of the NASA Common Research Model (CRM)) and other NASA programs and assess aeroelasticity issues and research topics.

  19. A Lagrangian Simulation of Subsonic Aircraft Exhaust Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, M. R.; Morris, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    To estimate the effect of subsonic and supersonic aircraft exhaust on the stratospheric concentration of NO(y), we employ a trajectory model initialized with air parcels based on the standard release scenarios. The supersonic exhaust simulations are in good agreement with 2D and 3D model results and show a perturbation of about 1-2 ppbv of NO(y) in the stratosphere. The subsonic simulations show that subsonic emissions are almost entirely trapped below the 380 K potential temperature surface. Our subsonic results contradict results from most other models, which show exhaust products penetrating above 380 K, as summarized. The disagreement can likely be attributed to an excessive vertical diffusion in most models of the strong vertical gradient in NO(y) that forms at the boundary between the emission zone and the stratosphere above 380 K. Our results suggest that previous assessments of the impact of subsonic exhaust emission on the stratospheric region above 380 K should be considered to be an upper bound.

  20. Continuous subsonic-sonic flows in a general nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunpeng

    2015-10-01

    This paper concerns continuous subsonic-sonic potential flows in a two dimensional finite nozzle with a general upper wall and a straight lower wall. We give a class of nozzles where continuous subsonic-sonic flows may exist. Consider a continuous subsonic-sonic flow in such a nozzle after rescaling the upper wall in a small scale. It is shown that for a given inlet and a fixed point at the upper wall, there exists uniquely a continuous subsonic-sonic flow whose velocity vector is along the normal direction at the inlet and the sonic curve, which satisfies the slip conditions on the nozzle walls and whose sonic curve intersects the upper wall at the fixed point. Furthermore, the sonic curve of this flow is a free boundary, where the flow is singular in the sense that the speed is only C 1 / 2 Hölder continuous and the acceleration blows up at the sonic state. As the scale tends to zero, the precise convergent rate of the continuous subsonic-sonic flow converging to the sonic state is also determined.

  1. History and Civility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Larry Schaefer's history of civility is a succinct summary of the implicit and evolving definitions of civility over 2500 years of civilization. Beginning with the Romans and the root word "civitas," meaning the rights and duties of citizenship, civility appears in classical literature as integral to the roots of democracy in the context…

  2. Extension of the Blasius force theorem to subsonic speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsony-Nagy, A.

    1985-11-01

    The theorem considered by Blasius (1910) represents a well-known method for calculating the force on a body situated in an incompressible, inviscid two-dimensional flow. The efficiency of the Blasius theorem is due to its quality of expressing the forces with the aid of contour integrals of analytic functions of complex variables. The present note has the objective to deduce an analog of Blasius theorem for the aerodynamic forces in subsonic flow. It is assumed that an approximate velocity potential of the subsonic flow has been calculated by using the Imai-Lamla method. It is pointed out that this method is a variant specially suited for the two-dimensionally flows of the Janzen-Rayleigh expansion method. The derived formula expresses the aerodynamic forces with the aid of contour integrals of analytic complex functions. It can be regarded as the Blasius theorem with first-order compressibility correction for the subsonic speed regime.

  3. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the design and marketability of a next generation supersonic transport. Apogee Aeronautics Corporation has designated its High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT): Supercruiser HS-8. Since the beginning of the Concorde era, the general consensus has been that the proper time for the introduction of a next generation Supersonic Transport (SST) would depend upon the technical advances made in the areas of propulsion (reduction in emissions) and material composites (stronger, lighter materials). It is believed by many in the aerospace industry that these beforementioned technical advances lie on the horizon. With this being the case, this is the proper time to begin the design phase for the next generation HSCT. The design objective for a HSCT was to develop an aircraft that would be capable of transporting at least 250 passengers with baggage at a distance of 5500 nmi. The supersonic Mach number is currently unspecified. In addition, the design had to be marketable, cost effective, and certifiable. To achieve this goal, technical advances in the current SST's must be made, especially in the areas of aerodynamics and propulsion. As a result of these required aerodynamic advances, several different supersonic design concepts were reviewed.

  4. Acoustic mode in numerical calculations of subsonic combustion

    SciTech Connect

    O'Rourke, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    A review is given of the methods for treating the acoustic mode in numerical calculations of subsonic combustion. In numerical calculations of subsonic combustion, treatment of the acoustic mode has been a problem for many researchers. It is widely believed that Mach number and acoustic wave effects are negligible in many subsonic combustion problems. Yet, the equations that are often solved contain the acoustic mode, and many numerical techniques for solving these equations are inefficient when the Mach number is much smaller than one. This paper reviews two general approaches to ameliorating this problem. In the first approach, equations are solved that ignore acoustic waves and Mach number effects. Section II of this paper gives two such formulations which are called the Elliptic Primitive and the Stream and Potential Function formulations. We tell how these formulations are obtained and give some advantages and disadvantages of solving them numerically. In the second approach to the problem of calculating subsonic combustion, the fully compressible equations are solved by numerical methods that are efficient, but treat the acoustic mode inaccurately, in low Mach number calculations. Section III of this paper introduces two of these numerical methods in the context of an analysis of their stability properties when applied to the acoustic wave equations. These are called the ICE and acoustic subcycling methods. It is shown that even though these methods are more efficient than traditional methods for solving subsonic combustion problems, they still can be inefficient when the Mach number is very small. Finally, a method called Pressure Gradient Scaling is described that, when used in conjunction with either the ICE or acoustic subcycling methods, allows for very efficient numerical solution of subsonic combustion problems. 11 refs.

  5. Subsonic flow over thin oblique airfoils at zero lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    The pressure distribution over thin oblique airfoils at subsonic speeds is studied. It is found that the flows again can be obtained by the superposition of elementary conical flow fields. In the case of the sweptback wing the pressure distributions remain qualitatively similar at subsonic and supersonic speeds. Thus a distribution similar to the Ackeret type of distribution appears on the root sections of the sweptback wing at M = 0. The resulting positive pressure drag on the root section is balanced by negative drags on outboard sections.

  6. Aero-Mechanical Design Methodology for Subsonic Civil Transport High-Lift Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanDam, C. P.; Shaw, S. G.; VanderKam, J. C.; Brodeur, R. R.; Rudolph, P. K. C.; Kinney, D.

    2000-01-01

    In today's highly competitive and economically driven commercial aviation market, the trend is to make aircraft systems simpler and to shorten their design cycle which reduces recurring, non-recurring and operating costs. One such system is the high-lift system. A methodology has been developed which merges aerodynamic data with kinematic analysis of the trailing-edge flap mechanism with minimum mechanism definition required. This methodology provides quick and accurate aerodynamic performance prediction for a given flap deployment mechanism early on in the high-lift system preliminary design stage. Sample analysis results for four different deployment mechanisms are presented as well as descriptions of the aerodynamic and mechanism data required for evaluation. Extensions to interactive design capabilities are also discussed.

  7. The new civil aviation within our grasp.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cortright, E. M.

    1972-01-01

    Noise and congestion present the two main technological constraints on air-transportation growth. Although some of the noise reduction will come with improved flight-path control and steep approaches, the main requirement remains quiet propulsion systems. Higher engine temperatures will compensate for efficiency losses due to noise suppression. Composite structures can reduce structural weight by 20%. New developments in rotorcraft transports are discussed together with advanced subsonic transports of the 1980s and the possibilities for further evolution of the SSTs, leading to a hypersonic aircraft.

  8. Advanced Civilian Aeronautical Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    1996-01-01

    Paper discusses alternatives to currently deployed systems which could provide revolutionary improvements in metrics applicable to civilian aeronautics. Specific missions addressed include subsonic transports, supersonic transports and personal aircraft. These alternative systems and concepts are enabled by recent and envisaged advancements in electronics, communications, computing and Designer Fluid Mechanics in conjunction with a design approach employing extensive synergistic interactions between propulsion, aerodynamics and structures.

  9. 'Superplane!' High Speed Civil Transport (pt 1/5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). This light-hearted promotional piece explains what the HSCT 'Superplane!' is and what advantages it will have over current aircraft. As envisioned, the HSCT is a next-generation supersonic (faster than the speed of sound) passenger jet that would fly 300 passengers at more than 1,500 miles per hour -- more than twice the speed of sound. It will cross the Pacific or Atlantic in less than half the time of modern subsonic jets, and at a ticket price less than 20 percent above comparable, slower flights.

  10. 'Superplane!' High Speed Civil Transport (pt 2/5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). This light-hearted promotional piece explains what the HSCT 'Superplane!' is and what advantages it will have over current aircraft. As envisioned, the HSCT is a next-generation supersonic (faster than the speed of sound) passenger jet that would fly 300 passengers at more than 1,500 miles per hour -- more than twice the speed of sound. It will cross the Pacific or Atlantic in less than half the time of modern subsonic jets, and at a ticket price less than 20 percent above comparable, slower flights

  11. Superplane! High Speed Civil Transport ( pt3/5 )

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). This light-hearted promotional piece explains what the HSCT 'Superplane' is and what advantages it will have over current aircraft. As envisioned, the HSCT is a next-generation supersonic (faster than the speed of sound) passenger jet that would fly 300 passengers at more than 1,500 miles per hour -- more than twice the speed of sound. It will cross the Pacific or Atlantic in less than half the time of modern subsonic jets, and at a ticket price less than 20 percent above comparable, slower flights

  12. CFD Assessment of Aerodynamic Degradation of a Subsonic Transport Due to Airframe Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.; Atkins, Harold L.; Viken, Sally A.; Morrison, Joseph H.

    2010-01-01

    A computational study is presented to assess the utility of two NASA unstructured Navier-Stokes flow solvers for capturing the degradation in static stability and aerodynamic performance of a NASA General Transport Model (GTM) due to airframe damage. The approach is to correlate computational results with a substantial subset of experimental data for the GTM undergoing progressive losses to the wing, vertical tail, and horizontal tail components. The ultimate goal is to advance the probability of inserting computational data into the creation of advanced flight simulation models of damaged subsonic aircraft in order to improve pilot training. Results presented in this paper demonstrate good correlations with slope-derived quantities, such as pitch static margin and static directional stability, and incremental rolling moment due to wing damage. This study further demonstrates that high fidelity Navier-Stokes flow solvers could augment flight simulation models with additional aerodynamic data for various airframe damage scenarios.

  13. Subsonic annular wing theory with application to flow about nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    A method has recently been developed for calculating the flow over a subsonic nacelle at zero angle of attack. The method makes use of annular wing theory and boundary-layer theory and has shown good agreement with both experimental data and more complex theoretical solutions. The method permits variation of the mass flow by changing the size of a center body.

  14. Near-Field Noise Computation for a Subsonic Coannular Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Hultgren, Lennart S.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2008-01-01

    A high-Reynolds-number, subsonic coannular jet is simulated, using a three-dimensional finite-volume LES method, with emphasis on the near field noise. The nozzle geometry used is the NASA Glenn 3BB baseline model. The numerical results are generally in good agreement with existing experimental findings.

  15. 27. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH LABORATORY, BUILDING 25C, WHICH REPLACED THE 10-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  16. 26. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH LABORATORY, BUILDING 25C, WHICH REPLACED THE 10-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  17. 28. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH LABORATORY, BUILDING 25C, WHICH REPLACED THE 10-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  18. Optimum Climb to Cruise Noise Trajectories for the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2003-01-01

    By entraining large quantities of ambient air into advanced ejector nozzles, the jet noise of the proposed High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) is expected to be reduced to levels acceptable for airport-vicinity noise certification. Away from the airport, however, this entrained air is shut off and the engines are powered up from their cutback levels to provide better thrust for the climb to cruise altitude. Unsuppressed jet noise levels propagating to the ground far from the airport are expected to be high. Complicating this problem is the HSCT's relative noise level with respect to the subsonic commercial fleet of 2010, which is expected to be much quieter than it is today after the retirement of older, louder, domestic stage II aircraft by the year 2000. In this study, the classic energy state approximation theory is extended to calculate trajectories that minimize the climb to cruise noise of the HSCT. The optimizer dynamically chooses the optimal altitude velocity trajectory, the engine power setting, and whether the ejector should be stowed or deployed with respect to practical aircraft climb constraints and noise limits.

  19. Civil Law Glossary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Update on Law-Related Education, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Presents a glossary of civil law terms originally compiled for journalists by the American Bar Association. Defines many essential civil law concepts and practices including compensatory damages, jurisdiction, motion to dismiss, discovery, and remedy. (MJP)

  20. Advances in Thin Film Sensor Technologies for Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Martin, Lisa C.; Will, Herbert A.

    1997-01-01

    Advanced thin film sensor techniques that can provide accurate surface strain and temperature measurements are being developed at NASA Lewis Research Center. These sensors are needed to provide minimally intrusive characterization of advanced materials (such as ceramics and composites) and structures (such as components for Space Shuttle Main Engine, High Speed Civil Transport, Advanced Subsonic Transports and General Aviation Aircraft) in hostile, high-temperature environments and for validation of design codes. This paper presents two advanced thin film sensor technologies: strain gauges and thermocouples. These sensors are sputter deposited directly onto the test articles and are only a few micrometers thick; the surface of the test article is not structurally altered and there is minimal disturbance of the gas flow over the surface. The strain gauges are palladium-13% chromium based and the thermocouples are platinum-13% rhodium vs. platinum. The fabrication techniques of these thin film sensors in a class 1000 cleanroom at the NASA Lewis Research Center are described. Their demonstration on a variety of engine materials, including superalloys, ceramics and advanced ceramic matrix composites, in several hostile, high-temperature test environments are discussed.

  1. On an acoustic field generated by subsonic jet at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Arndt, R. E. A.

    1978-01-01

    An acoustic field generated by subsonic jets at low Reynolds numbers was investigated. This work is motivated by the need to increase the fundamental understanding of the jet noise generation mechanism which is essential to the development of further advanced techniques of noise suppression. The scope of this study consists of two major investigation. One is a study of large scale coherent structure in the jet turbulence, and the other is a study of the Reynolds number dependence of jet noise. With this in mind, extensive flow and acoustic measurements in low Reynolds number turbulent jets (8,930 less than or equal to M less than or equal to 220,000) were undertaken using miniature nozzles of the same configuration but different diameters at various exist Mach numbers (0.2 less than or equal to M less than or equal to 0.9).

  2. Evaluation of Laminar Flow Control System Concepts for Subsonic Commercial Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturgeon, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    Alternatives in the design of laminar flow control (LFC) subsonic commerical transport aircraft for opeation in the 1980's period were studied. Analyses were conducted to select mission parameters and define optimum aircraft configurational parameters for the selected mission, defined by a passenger payload of 400 and a design range of 12, 038 km (6500 n mi). The baseline aircraft developed for this mission was used as a vehicle for the evaluation and development of alternative LFC system concepts. Alternatices in the areas of aerodynamics, structures and materials, LFC systems, leading-edge region cleaning, and integration of auxiliary systems were studied. Relative to a similarly-optimized advanced technology turbulent transport, the final LFC configuration is approximately equal in DOC but provides descreases of 8.2% in gross weight and 21.7% in fuel consumption.

  3. Aeroacoustic Data for a High Reynolds Number Axisymmetric Subsonic Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Ukeiley, Lawrence S.; Lee, Sang W.

    1999-01-01

    The near field fluctuating pressure and aerodynamic mean flow characteristics of a cold subsonic jet issuing from a contoured convergent nozzle are presented. The data are presented for nozzle exit Mach numbers of 0.30, 0.60, and 0.85 at a constant jet stagnation temperature of 104 F. The fluctuating pressure measurements were acquired via linear and semi-circular microphone arrays and the presented results include plots of narrowband spectra, contour maps, streamwise/azimuthal spatial correlations for zero time delay, and cross-spectra of the azimuthal correlations. A pitot probe was used to characterize the mean flow velocity by assuming the subsonic flow to be pressure-balanced with the ambient field into which it exhausts. Presented are mean flow profiles and the momentum thickness of the free shear layer as a function of streamwise position.

  4. A study of sound generation in subsonic rotors, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chalupnik, J. D.; Clark, L. T.

    1975-01-01

    Computer programs were developed for use in the analysis of sound generation by subsonic rotors. Program AIRFOIL computes the spectrum of radiated sound from a single airfoil immersed in a laminar flow field. Program ROTOR extends this to a rotating frame, and provides a model for sound generation in subsonic rotors. The program also computes tone sound generation due to steady state forces on the blades. Program TONE uses a moving source analysis to generate a time series for an array of forces moving in a circular path. The resultant time series are than Fourier transformed to render the results in spectral form. Program SDATA is a standard time series analysis package. It reads in two discrete time series and forms auto and cross covariances and normalizes these to form correlations. The program then transforms the covariances to yield auto and cross power spectra by means of a Fourier transformation.

  5. Design of a subsonic airfoil with upstream blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'Inskii, N. B.; Mardanov, R. F.

    2007-10-01

    The problem is solved of designing a symmetric airfoil with upstream blowing opposite to subsonic irrotational steady flow of an inviscid incompressible fluid. The solution relies on Sedov’s idea of a stagnation region developing in the neighborhood of the stagnation point. An iterative solution process is developed, and examples of airfoils are constructed. The numerical results are analyzed, and conclusions are drawn about the effect of blowing parameters on the airfoil geometry and the resultant force acting on the airfoil.

  6. Development of panel methods for subsonic analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Two computer programs, developed for subsonic inviscid analysis and design are described. The first solves arbitrary mixed analysis design problems for multielement airfoils in two dimensional flow. The second calculates the pressure distribution for arbitrary lifting or nonlifting three dimensional configurations. In each program, inviscid flow is modelled by using distributed source doublet singularities on configuration surface panels. Numerical formulations and representative solutions are presented for the programs.

  7. Three dimensional supersonic flows with subsonic axial Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marconi, F.; Moretti, G.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical approach is presented for the computation of flows in which the component of velocity in the selected marching direction is subsonic although the total velocity is supersonic. A local coordinate rotation procedure is employed together with an implicit differencing scheme. Complex coordinate transformations and time-consuming iterations are avoided. The implementation of the described approach is illustrated with the aid of a two-dimensional problem. An application in the case of three-dimensional flows is also discussed.

  8. Subsonic Flow for the Multidimensional Euler-Poisson System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Myoungjean; Duan, Ben; Xie, Chunjing

    2016-04-01

    We establish the existence and stability of subsonic potential flow for the steady Euler-Poisson system in a multidimensional nozzle of a finite length when prescribing the electric potential difference on a non-insulated boundary from a fixed point at the exit, and prescribing the pressure at the exit of the nozzle. The Euler-Poisson system for subsonic potential flow can be reduced to a nonlinear elliptic system of second order. In this paper, we develop a technique to achieve a priori {C^{1,α}} estimates of solutions to a quasi-linear second order elliptic system with mixed boundary conditions in a multidimensional domain enclosed by a Lipschitz continuous boundary. In particular, we discovered a special structure of the Euler-Poisson system which enables us to obtain {C^{1,α}} estimates of the velocity potential and the electric potential functions, and this leads us to establish structural stability of subsonic flows for the Euler-Poisson system under perturbations of various data.

  9. Study of the application of hydrogen fuel to long-range subsonic transport aircraft. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.; Lange, R. H.; Moore, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of using liquid hydrogen as fuel in advanced designs of long range, subsonic transport aircraft is assessed. Both passenger and cargo type aircraft are investigated. Comparisons of physical, performance, and economic parameters of the LH2 fueled designs with conventionally fueled aircraft are presented. Design studies are conducted to determine appropriate characteristics for the hydrogen related systems required on board the aircraft. These studies included consideration of material, structural, and thermodynamic requirements of the cryogenic fuel tanks and fuel systems with the structural support and thermal protection systems.

  10. Test-to-Test Repeatability of Results From a Subsonic Wing-Body Configuration in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Results from three wind tunnel tests in the National Transonic Facility of a model of an advanced-technology, subsonic-transport wing-body configuration have been analyzed to assess the test-to-test repeatability of several aerodynamic parameters. The scatter, as measured by the prediction interval, in the longitudinal force and moment coefficients increases as the Mach number increases. Residual errors with and without the ESP tubes installed suggest a bias leading to lower drag with the tubes installed. Residual errors as well as average values of the longitudinal force and moment coefficients show that there are small bias errors between the different tests.

  11. Aftbody Closure Effects on the Reference H Configuration at Subsonic and Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahls, Richard A.; Owens, Lewis R., Jr.; Londenberg, W. Kelly

    1999-01-01

    Experience with afterbody closure effects and accompanying test techniques issues on a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT)-class configuration is described. An experimental data base has been developed which includes force, moment, and surface pressure data for the High Speed Research (HSR) Reference H configuration with a closed afterbody at subsonic and transonic speeds, and with a cylindrical afterbody at transonic and supersonic speeds. A supporting computational study has been performed using the USM3D unstructured Euler solver for the purposes of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method assessment and model support system interference assessment with a focus on lower blade mount effects on longitudinal data at transonic speeds. Test technique issues related to a lower blade sting mount strategy are described based on experience in the National Transonic Facility (NTF). The assessment and application of the USM3D code to the afterbody/sting interference problem is discussed. Finally, status and plans to address critical test technique issues and for continuation of the computational study are presented.

  12. Understanding the Civil Justice System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirshon, Robert E.; Bolduan, Linda M.

    1997-01-01

    Provides a concise and informative overview of the civil justice system. Examines various components and issues including the federal and state court systems, differences between civil and criminal law, background in common law, types of civil law, civil procedure, and the effect and implementation of civil law in everyday life. (MJP)

  13. Teaching and Learning Civility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Incivility can obstruct constructive public discourse and problem solving. Restoring civility is a task for higher education, but it may require tradeoffs with other democratic values. Civility is one value that matters, but it is not the only value. It is important to understand the tradeoffs and tensions. One way for higher education to…

  14. Schools and Civil Defense.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Civil Defense (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Civil defense is a planned, coordinated action to protect the population during any emergency whether arising from thermonuclear attack or natural disaster. The Federal Government has assumed four responsibilities--(1) to keep track of the nature of the threat which the civil defense program must meet, (2) to prepare and disseminate information…

  15. Apps for Ancient Civilizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    This project incorporates technology and a historical emphasis on science drawn from ancient civilizations to promote a greater understanding of conceptual science. In the Apps for Ancient Civilizations project, students investigate an ancient culture to discover how people might have used science and math smartphone apps to make their lives…

  16. The Measure of Civilizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barry

    2002-01-01

    This article explores whether it is possible to compare civilizations one with another; that is, whether one can construct some neutral and objective framework in terms of which we could establish in what respects one civilization might deserve to be ranked more highly than its competitors. The author states that, in addressing the idea of an…

  17. Study of LH2 fueled subsonic passenger transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The potential of using liquid hydrogen as fuel in subsonic transport aircraft was investigated to explore an expanded matrix of passenger aircraft sizes. Aircraft capable of carrying 130 passengers 2,780 km (1500 n.mi.); 200 passengers 5,560 km (3000 n.mi.); and 400 passengers on a 9,265 km (5000 n.mi.) radius mission, were designed parametrically. Both liquid hydrogen and conventionally fueled versions were generated for each payload/range in order that comparisons could be made. Aircraft in each mission category were compared on the basis of weight, size, cost, energy utilization, and noise.

  18. Finite element analysis of inviscid subsonic boattail flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.; Gerhart, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element code for analysis of inviscid subsonic flows over arbitrary nonlifting planar or axisymmetric bodies is described. The code solves a novel primitive variable formulation of the coupled irrotationality and compressible continuity equations. Results for flow over a cylinder, a sphere, and a NACA 0012 airfoil verify the code. Computed subcritical flows over an axisymmetric boattailed afterbody compare well with finite difference results and experimental data. Interative coupling with an integral turbulent boundary layer code shows strong viscous effects on the inviscid flow. Improvements in code efficiency and extensions to transonic flows are discussed.

  19. Simulation of Atmospheric-Entry Capsules in the Subsonic Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Childs, Robert E.; Garcia, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of Computational Fluid Dynamics predictions of subsonic capsule aerodynamics is examined by comparison against recent NASA wind-tunnel data at high-Reynolds-number flight conditions. Several aspects of numerical and physical modeling are considered, including inviscid numerical scheme, mesh adaptation, rough-wall modeling, rotation and curvature corrections for eddy-viscosity models, and Detached-Eddy Simulations of the unsteady wake. All of these are considered in isolation against relevant data where possible. The results indicate that an improved predictive capability is developed by considering physics-based approaches and validating the results against flight-relevant experimental data.

  20. Acoustic measurement study 40 by 80 foot subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An acoustical study conducted during the period from September 1, 1973 to April 30, 1974 measured sound pressure levels and vibration amplitudes inside and outside of the subsonic tunnel and on the tunnel structure. A discussion of the technical aspects of the study, the field measurement and data reduction procedures, and results are presentd, and conclusions resulting from the study which bear upon near field and far field tunnel noise, upon the tunnel as an acoustical enclosure, and upon the sources of noise within the tunnel drive system are given.

  1. NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Project - Structures and Materials Discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Johnson, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    The Structures & Materials Discipline within the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Project is focused on developing rotorcraft technologies. The technologies being developed are within the task areas of: 5.1.1 Life Prediction Methods for Engine Structures & Components 5.1.2 Erosion Resistant Coatings for Improved Turbine Blade Life 5.2.1 Crashworthiness 5.2.2 Methods for Prediction of Fatigue Damage & Self Healing 5.3.1 Propulsion High Temperature Materials 5.3.2 Lightweight Structures and Noise Integration The presentation will discuss rotorcraft specific technical challenges and needs as well as details of the work being conducted in the six task areas.

  2. Subsonic/transonic stall flutter investigation of a rotating rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutras, R. R.; Fost, R. B.; Chi, R. M.; Beacher, B. F.

    1981-01-01

    Stall flutter is investigated by obtaining detailed quantitative steady and aerodynamic and aeromechanical measurements in a typical fan rotor. The experimental investigation is made with a 31.3 percent scale model of the Quiet Engine Program Fan C rotor system. Both subsonic/transonic (torsional mode) flutter and supersonic (flexural) flutter are investigated. Extensive steady and unsteady data on the blade deformations and aerodynamic properties surrounding the rotor are acquired while operating in both the steady and flutter modes. Analysis of this data shows that while there may be more than one traveling wave present during flutter, they are all forward traveling waves.

  3. Sound radiation from a subsonic rotor subjected to turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevik, M.

    1974-01-01

    The broadband sound radiated by a subsonic rotor subjected to turbulence in the approach stream has been analyzed. The power spectral density of the sound intensity has been found to depend on a characteristic time scale-namely, the integral scale of the turbulence divided by the axial flow velocity-as well as several length-scale ratios. These consist of the ratio of the integral scale to the acoustic wavelength, rotor radius, and blade chord. Due to the simplified model chosen, only a limited number of cascade parameters appear. Limited comparisons with experimental data indicate good agreement with predicted values.

  4. Subsonic flow in the channel of a diagonal MHD generator

    SciTech Connect

    Isakova, N.P.; Medin, S.A.

    1981-05-01

    A numerical study has been made of the local and integral characteristics of the planar subsonic flow in the channel of an MHD generator with diagonal electrode connection. It is shown that the inhomogeneity in the parameter distribution is dependent on the electrical loading, and the largest deviations from homogeneous flow occur on open circuit and short circuit. A comparison is made with a channel of Faraday type as regards the main integral characteristics. The data from two-dimensional analysis are compared with those from a one-dimensional flow model.

  5. Evaluation of viscous drag reduction schemes for subsonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marino, A.; Economos, C.; Howard, F. G.

    1975-01-01

    The results are described of a theoretical study of viscous drag reduction schemes for potential application to the fuselage of a long-haul subsonic transport aircraft. The schemes which were examined included tangential slot injection on the fuselage and various synergetic combinations of tangential slot injection and distributed suction applied to wing and fuselage surfaces. Both passive and mechanical (utilizing turbo-machinery) systems were examined. Overall performance of the selected systems was determined at a fixed subsonic cruise condition corresponding to a flight Mach number of free stream M = 0.8 and an altitude of 11,000 m. The nominal aircraft to which most of the performance data was referenced was a wide-body transport of the Boeing 747 category. Some of the performance results obtained with wing suction are referenced to a Lockheed C-141 Star Lifter wing section. Alternate designs investigated involved combinations of boundary layer suction on the wing surfaces and injection on the fuselage, and suction and injection combinations applied to the fuselage only.

  6. Subsonic Round and Rectangular Twin Jet Flow Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Rick; Wernet, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Subsonic and supersonic aircraft concepts proposed by NASAs Fundamental Aeronautics Program have integrated propulsion systems with asymmetric nozzles. The asymmetry in the exhaust of these propulsion systems creates asymmetric flow and acoustic fields. The flow asymmetries investigated in the current study are from two parallel round, 2:1, and 8:1 aspect ratio rectangular jets at the same nozzle conditions. The flow field was measured with streamwise and cross-stream particle image velocimetry (PIV). A large dataset of single and twin jet flow field measurements was acquired at subsonic jet conditions. The effects of twin jet spacing and forward flight were investigated. For round, 2:1, and 8:1 rectangular twin jets at their closest spacings, turbulence levels between the two jets decreased due to enhanced jet mixing at near static conditions. When the flight Mach number was increased to 0.25, the flow around the twin jet model created a velocity deficit between the two nozzles. This velocity deficit diminished the effect of forward flight causing an increase in turbulent kinetic energy relative to a single jet. Both of these twin jet flow field effects decreased with increasing twin jet spacing relative to a single jet. These variations in turbulent kinetic energy correlate with changes in far-field sound pressure level.

  7. Fourier time spectral method for subsonic and transonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Lei; Liu, Feng; Papamoschou, Dimitri

    2016-06-01

    The time accuracy of the exponentially accurate Fourier time spectral method (TSM) is examined and compared with a conventional 2nd-order backward difference formula (BDF) method for periodic unsteady flows. In particular, detailed error analysis based on numerical computations is performed on the accuracy of resolving the local pressure coefficient and global integrated force coefficients for smooth subsonic and non-smooth transonic flows with moving shock waves on a pitching airfoil. For smooth subsonic flows, the Fourier TSM method offers a significant accuracy advantage over the BDF method for the prediction of both the local pressure coefficient and integrated force coefficients. For transonic flows where the motion of the discontinuous shock wave contributes significant higher-order harmonic contents to the local pressure fluctuations, a sufficient number of modes must be included before the Fourier TSM provides an advantage over the BDF method. The Fourier TSM, however, still offers better accuracy than the BDF method for integrated force coefficients even for transonic flows. A problem of non-symmetric solutions for symmetric periodic flows due to the use of odd numbers of intervals is uncovered and analyzed. A frequency-searching method is proposed for problems where the frequency is not known a priori. The method is tested on the vortex shedding problem of the flow over a circular cylinder.

  8. Subsonic and Supersonic Effects in Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2003-01-01

    A paper presents a theoretical investigation of subsonic and supersonic effects in a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). The BEC is represented by a time-dependent, nonlinear Schroedinger equation that includes terms for an external confining potential term and a weak interatomic repulsive potential proportional to the number density of atoms. From this model are derived Madelung equations, which relate the quantum phase with the number density, and which are used to represent excitations propagating through the BEC. These equations are shown to be analogous to the classical equations of flow of an inviscid, compressible fluid characterized by a speed of sound (g/Po)1/2, where g is the coefficient of the repulsive potential and Po is the unperturbed mass density of the BEC. The equations are used to study the effects of a region of perturbation moving through the BEC. The excitations created by a perturbation moving at subsonic speed are found to be described by a Laplace equation and to propagate at infinite speed. For a supersonically moving perturbation, the excitations are found to be described by a wave equation and to propagate at finite speed inside a Mach cone.

  9. Mitigation of wind tunnel wall interactions in subsonic cavity flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-03-06

    In this study, the flow over an open aircraft bay is often represented in a wind tunnel with a cavity. In flight, this flow is unconfined, though in experiments, the cavity is surrounded by wind tunnel walls. If untreated, wind tunnel wall effects can lead to significant distortions of cavity acoustics in subsonic flows. To understand and mitigate these cavity–tunnel interactions, a parametric approach was taken for flow over an L/D = 7 cavity at Mach numbers 0.6–0.8. With solid tunnel walls, a dominant cavity tone was observed, likely due to an interaction with a tunnel duct mode. Furthermore, anmore » acoustic liner opposite the cavity decreased the amplitude of the dominant mode and its harmonics, a result observed by previous researchers. Acoustic dampeners were also placed in the tunnel sidewalls, which further decreased the dominant mode amplitudes and peak amplitudes associated with nonlinear interactions between cavity modes. This then indicates that cavity resonance can be altered by tunnel sidewalls and that spanwise coupling should be addressed when conducting subsonic cavity experiments. Though mechanisms for dominant modes and nonlinear interactions likely exist in unconfined cavity flows, these effects can be amplified by the wind tunnel walls.« less

  10. A model of unsteady subsonic flow with acoustics excluded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorchenko, A. T.

    1997-03-01

    Diverse subsonic initial-boundary-value problems (flows in a closed volume initiated by blowing or suction through permeable walls, flows with continuously distributed sources, viscous flows with substantial heat fluxes, etc.) are considered, to show that they cannot be solved by using the classical theory of incompressible fluid motion which involves the equation div u = 0. Application of the most general theory of compressible fluid flow may not be best in such cases, because then we encounter difficulties in accurately resolving the complex acoustic phenomena as well as in assigning the proper boundary conditions. With this in mind a new non-local mathematical model, where div u [not equal] 0 in the general case, is proposed for the simulation of unsteady subsonic flows in a bounded domain with continuously distributed sources of mass, momentum and entropy, also taking into account the effects of viscosity and heat conductivity when necessary. The exclusion of sound waves is one of the most important features of this model which represents a fundamental extension of the conventional model of incompressible fluid flow. The model has been built up by modifying both the general system of equations for the motion of compressible fluid (viscous or inviscid as required) and the appropriate set of boundary conditions. Some particular cases of this model are discussed. A series of exact time-dependent solutions, one- and two-dimensional, is presented to illustrate the model.

  11. Fourier time spectral method for subsonic and transonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Lei; Liu, Feng; Papamoschou, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    The time accuracy of the exponentially accurate Fourier time spectral method (TSM) is examined and compared with a conventional 2nd-order backward difference formula (BDF) method for periodic unsteady flows. In particular, detailed error analysis based on numerical computations is performed on the accuracy of resolving the local pressure coefficient and global integrated force coefficients for smooth subsonic and non-smooth transonic flows with moving shock waves on a pitching airfoil. For smooth subsonic flows, the Fourier TSM method offers a significant accuracy advantage over the BDF method for the prediction of both the local pressure coefficient and integrated force coefficients. For transonic flows where the motion of the discontinuous shock wave contributes significant higher-order harmonic contents to the local pressure fluctuations, a sufficient number of modes must be included before the Fourier TSM provides an advantage over the BDF method. The Fourier TSM, however, still offers better accuracy than the BDF method for integrated force coefficients even for transonic flows. A problem of non-symmetric solutions for symmetric periodic flows due to the use of odd numbers of intervals is uncovered and analyzed. A frequency-searching method is proposed for problems where the frequency is not known a priori. The method is tested on the vortex shedding problem of the flow over a circular cylinder.

  12. Mitigation of wind tunnel wall interactions in subsonic cavity flows

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-03-06

    In this study, the flow over an open aircraft bay is often represented in a wind tunnel with a cavity. In flight, this flow is unconfined, though in experiments, the cavity is surrounded by wind tunnel walls. If untreated, wind tunnel wall effects can lead to significant distortions of cavity acoustics in subsonic flows. To understand and mitigate these cavity–tunnel interactions, a parametric approach was taken for flow over an L/D = 7 cavity at Mach numbers 0.6–0.8. With solid tunnel walls, a dominant cavity tone was observed, likely due to an interaction with a tunnel duct mode. Furthermore, an acoustic liner opposite the cavity decreased the amplitude of the dominant mode and its harmonics, a result observed by previous researchers. Acoustic dampeners were also placed in the tunnel sidewalls, which further decreased the dominant mode amplitudes and peak amplitudes associated with nonlinear interactions between cavity modes. This then indicates that cavity resonance can be altered by tunnel sidewalls and that spanwise coupling should be addressed when conducting subsonic cavity experiments. Though mechanisms for dominant modes and nonlinear interactions likely exist in unconfined cavity flows, these effects can be amplified by the wind tunnel walls.

  13. A second-generation high speed civil transport: Stingray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engdahl, Sean; Lopes, Kevin; Ngan, Angelen; Perrin, Joseph; Phipps, Marcus; Westman, Blake; Yeo, Urn

    1992-01-01

    The Stingray is the second-generation High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) designed for the 21st Century. This aircraft is designed to be economically viable and environmentally sound transportation competitive in markets currently dominated by subsonic aircraft such as the Boeing 747 and upcoming McDonnell Douglas MD-12. With the Stringray coming into service in 2005, a ticket price of 21 percent over current subsonic airlines will cover operational costs with a 10 percent return on investment. The cost per aircraft will be $202 million with the Direct Operating Cost equal to $0.072 per mile per seat. This aircraft has been designed to be a realistic aircraft that can be built within the next ten to fifteen years. There was only one main technological improvement factor used in the design, that being for the engine specific fuel consumption. The Stingray, therefore, does not rely on technology that does not exist. The Stingray will be powered by four mixed flow turbofans that meet both nitrous oxide emissions and FAR 36 Stage 3 noise regulations. It will carry 250 passengers a distance of 5200 nautical miles at a speed of Mach 2.4. The shape of the Stingray, while optimized for supersonic flight, is compatible with all current airline facilities in airports around the world. As the demand for economical, high-speed flight increases, the Stingray will be ready and able to meet those demands.

  14. Civil Rights: Progress Report, 1970

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Robert A., Ed.; Alligood, Arlene, Ed.

    Contents of this comprehensive review of civil rights developments from 1968 to 1970 include: Introduction--civil rights 1970: progress continues, priority wanes; Legislative Background--20 years of civil rights; Commission Report--civil rights enforcement; a promise unfulfilled; Supreme Court Decision--key decision on busing, racial balance…

  15. Summary of the Large Civil Tiltrotor (LCTR2) Engine Gearbox Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Christopher A.; Robuck, Mark; Wilkerson, Joseph; Nordstrom, Carl

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program, Subsonic Rotary Wing Project, NASA is continuing to study the Large Civil Tiltrotor (LCTR) concept to help define/refine vehicle, system and subsystem attributes. These attributes can then be used to define performance requirements and identify new or advanced technologies to achieve an operational vehicle class. As part of this goal, NASA contracted with The Boeing Company and its subcontractor Rolls-Royce to perform an investigation of different combinations of engine and gearbox variability to achieve a maximum of 50 percent rotor tip speed reduction from hover to cruise conditions. Previous NASA studies identified the 50 percent rotor speed reduction minimized vehicle gross weight and fuel burn. The LCTR2 (LCTR-iteration 2) was the contracted study baseline for initial sizing. Rotor tip speed ratios (cruise to hover) of 100, 77, and 54 percent were analyzed for each combination of engine and gearbox speed reduction to achieve the chosen rotor tip speed ratio. Three different engine and gearbox technology levels were assumed; commercial off-the-shelf (COTS), entry-in-service (EIS) in 2025 and EIS in 2035. These technology levels were applied to determine each particular effect on vehicle gross weight and fuel burn, while other vehicle technologies were assumed constant. This report summarizes the work performed that is being put together into a comprehensive NASA contractor report. Some background on the LCTR concept and baseline vehicle will be given and then a discussion concerning the technical approach utilized. Major study assumptions and results will be presented and discussed. Finally conclusions will be drawn as well as suggestions provided for future efforts.

  16. Phoenix: Preliminary design of a high speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, Joseph; Davis, Steven; Jett, Brian; Ringo, Leslie; Stob, John; Wood, Bill

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the Phoenix Design Project was to develop a second generation high speed civil transport (HSCT) that will meet the needs of the traveler and airline industry beginning in the 21st century. The primary emphasis of the HSCT is to take advantage of the growing needs of the Pacific Basin and the passengers who are involved in that growth. A passenger load of 150 persons, a mission range of 5150 nautical miles, and a cruise speed of Mach 2.5 constitutes the primary design points of this HSCT. The design concept is made possible with the use of a well designed double delta wing and four mixed flow engines. Passenger comfort, compatibility with existing airport infrastructure, and cost competitive with current subsonic aircraft make the Phoenix a viable aircraft for the future.

  17. The evolution of the high-speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. Leroy

    1994-01-01

    Current research directed toward the technology requirements for a high-speed civil transport (HSCT) airplane is an outgrowth of many years of activity related to air transportation. The purpose was to review some of the events that provided the background upon which current research programs are built. The review will include the subsonic era of transport aircraft and some events of the supersonic era that are related to the development of commercial supersonic transport aircraft. These events include the early NASA in-house studies and industry evaluations, the U.S. Supersonic Transport (SST) Program, the follow-on NASA supersonic cruise research programs, and the issuance of the National Aeronautical Research and Development (R&D) goals. Observations are made concerning some of the factors, both technical and nontechnical, that have had an impact on HSCT studies.

  18. The prediction of noise and installation effects of high-subsonic dual-stream jets in flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Swati

    Both military and civil aircraft in service generate high levels of noise. One of the major contributors to this noise generated from the aircraft is the jet engine exhaust. This makes the study of jet noise and methods to reduce jet noise an active research area with the aim of designing quieter military and commercial aircraft. The current stringent aircraft noise regulations imposed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and other international agencies, have further raised the need to perform accurate jet noise calculations for more reliable estimation of the jet noise sources. The main aim of the present research is to perform jet noise simulations of single and dual-stream jets with engineering accuracy and assess forward flight effects on the jet noise. Installation effects such as caused by the pylon are also studied using a simplified pylon nozzle configuration. Due to advances in computational power, it has become possible to perform turbulent flow simulations of high speed jets, which leads to more accurate noise predictions. In the present research, a hybrid unsteady RANS-LES parallel multi-block structured grid solver called EAGLEJet is written to perform the nozzle flow calculations. The far-field noise calculation is performed using solutions to the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation. The present calculations use meshes with 5 to 11 million grid points and require about three weeks of computing time with about 100 processors. A baseline single stream convergent nozzle and a dual-stream coaxial convergent nozzle are used for the flow and noise analysis. Calculations for the convergent nozzle are performed at a high subsonic jet Mach number of Mj = 0.9, which is similar to the operating conditions for commercial aircraft engines. A parallel flow gives the flight effect, which is simulated with a co-flow Mach number, Mcf varying from 0.0 to 0.28. The grid resolution effects, statistical properties of the turbulence and the heated jet effects

  19. Study of Subsonic Flow Over a TOW 2B Missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Koorosh; Jamali, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to study the subsonic flow over a missile. In this paper, a model of TOW 2B missile is studied. Two computational approaches are being explored, namely solutions based on the Reynolds-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes equations and solutions based on the inviscid flow (small disturbance theory). The simulations are performed at the Mach number of 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9 and 1.0 at four angles of attack of 2, 4, 6 and 8 degree. Results obtained from analytical simulation are compared with numerical data. It is found that lift and drag coefficients would go up by increasing of the angle of attack and the Mach number. Trend of changes of the results that obtained from the small disturbance theory is roughly as same as the numeric solution.

  20. Subsonic Static and Dynamic Aerodynamics of Blunt Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Fremaux, Charles M.; Yates, Leslie A.

    1999-01-01

    The incompressible subsonic aerodynamics of four entry-vehicle shapes with variable c.g. locations are examined in the Langley 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel. The shapes examined are spherically-blunted cones with half-cone angles of 30, 45, and 60 deg. The nose bluntness varies between 0.25 and 0.5 times the base diameter. The Reynolds number based on model diameter for these tests is near 500,000. Quantitative data on attitude and location are collected using a video-based data acquisition system and reduced with a six deg-of-freedom inverse method. All of the shapes examined suffered from strong dynamic instabilities which could produced limit cycles with sufficient amplitudes to overcome static stability of the configuration. Increasing cone half-angle or nose bluntness increases drag but decreases static and dynamic stability.

  1. Inviscid and Viscous Interactions in Subsonic Corner Flows

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kung-Ming; Chang, Po-Hsiung; Chang, Keh-Chin

    2013-01-01

    A flap can be used as a high-lift device, in which a downward deflection results in a gain in lift at a given geometric angle of attack. To characterize the aerodynamic performance of a deflected surface in compressible flows, the present study examines a naturally developed turbulent boundary layer past the convex and concave corners. This investigation involves the analysis of mean and fluctuating pressure distributions. The results obtained indicate strong inviscid-viscous interactions. There are upstream expansion and downstream compression for the convex-corner flows, while the opposite trend is observed for the concave-corner flows. A combined flow similarity parameter, based on the small perturbation theory, is proposed to scale the flow characteristics in both subsonic convex- and concave-corner flows. PMID:23935440

  2. Subsonic Dynamic Stability Tests of a Sample Return Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fremaux, C. Michael; Johnson, R. Keith

    2006-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the NASA Langley 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel (VST) to determine the subsonic dynamic stability characteristics of a proposed atmospheric entry vehicle for sample return missions. In particular, the effects of changes in aft-body geometry on stability were examined. Freeflying tests of a dynamically scaled model with various geometric features were conducted, including cases in which the model was perturbed to measure dynamic response. Both perturbed and non-perturbed runs were recorded as motion time histories using the VST optical data acquisition system and reduced for post-test analysis. In addition, preliminary results from a static force and moment test of a similar model in the Langley 12-Foot Low Speed Tunnel are presented. Results indicate that the configuration is dynamically stable for the baseline geometry, but exhibits degraded dynamic behavior for the geometry modifications tested.

  3. Subsonic drag reduction of the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammad Javed; Ahmed, Anwar; Varela-Rodriguez, Edmundo

    1995-01-01

    Various near-wake flow-modifying devices were experimentally evaluated for their effectiveness in increasing base pressure of the Space Shuttle Orbiter at low subsonic speed. The results confirmed the strong three-dimensional character of the orbiter near wake. A base cavity was found to be the most effective mechanism for increasing base pressure. However, for this mechanism to be effective, the cavity had to be longer than the main engine nozzles. Surface characteristics of the base cavity exposed to freestream had a strong influence on the base pressure. The trapped-vortex mechanism due to a back step was found to be effective in increasing the base pressure only in the region of the orbital-maneuvering-system pods. A combination of base-cavity and trapped-vortex mechanisms increased the base pressure by 25%, and the reduction in total drag was approximately 6%.

  4. Zero-length inlets for subsonic V/STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, E. R.; Beck, W. E.; Woollett, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Zero-length inlet performance and associated fan blade stresses were determined during model tests in the NASA-LeRC 9-by 15-foot low-speed wind tunnel. The inlet models, which were installed on a 20-inch diameter fan unit, had different inlet lip contraction ratios as well as unslotted, slotted, and double slotted inlet lips. The inlet angle-of-attack boundaries for onset of flow separation were identified and compared to the operating requirements of several generically different subsonic V/STOL aircraft. The zero-length inlets, especially those with slotted lips, were able to satisfy these requirements without compromising the maximum cowl forebody radius. As an aid to the inlet design process, a unique relationship was established between the maximum surface Mach number associated with the separation boundary and the maximum-to-throat surface velocity ratio.

  5. Subsonic Wing Optimization for Handling Qualities Using ACSYNT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soban, Danielle Suzanne

    1996-01-01

    The capability to accurately and rapidly predict aircraft stability derivatives using one comprehensive analysis tool has been created. The PREDAVOR tool has the following capabilities: rapid estimation of stability derivatives using a vortex lattice method, calculation of a longitudinal handling qualities metric, and inherent methodology to optimize a given aircraft configuration for longitudinal handling qualities, including an intuitive graphical interface. The PREDAVOR tool may be applied to both subsonic and supersonic designs, as well as conventional and unconventional, symmetric and asymmetric configurations. The workstation-based tool uses as its model a three-dimensional model of the configuration generated using a computer aided design (CAD) package. The PREDAVOR tool was applied to a Lear Jet Model 23 and the North American XB-70 Valkyrie.

  6. Sub-sonic thermal explosions investigated by radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Smilowitz, Laura B; Henson, Bryan F; Romero, Jerry J; Asay, Blaine W

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the past 5 years of experiments utilizing radiographic techniques to study defiagration in thermal explosions in HMX based formulations. Details of triggering and timing synchronization are given. Radiographic images collected using both protons and x-rays are presented. Comparisons of experiments with varying size, case confinement, binder, and synchronization are presented. Techniques for quantifying the data in the images are presented and a mechanism for post-ignition burn propagation in a thermal explosion is discussed. From these experiments, we have observed a mechanism for sub-sonic defiagration with both gas phase convective and solid phase conductive burning. The convective front velocity is directly measured from the radiographic images and consumes only a small fraction of the HE. It lights the HE as it passes beginning the slower solid state conductive burn process. This mechanism is used to create a model to simulate the radiographic results and a comparison will be shown.

  7. Review of Propulsion Technologies for N+3 Subsonic Vehicle Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashcraft, Scott W.; Padron, Andres S.; Pascioni, Kyle A.; Stout, Gary W., Jr.; Huff, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    NASA has set aggressive fuel burn, noise, and emission reduction goals for a new generation (N+3) of aircraft targeting concepts that could be viable in the 2035 timeframe. Several N+3 concepts have been formulated, where the term "N+3" indicate aircraft three generations later than current state-of-the-art aircraft, "N". Dramatic improvements need to be made in the airframe, propulsion systems, mission design, and the air transportation system in order to meet these N+3 goals. The propulsion system is a key element to achieving these goals due to its major role with reducing emissions, fuel burn, and noise. This report provides an in-depth description and assessment of propulsion systems and technologies considered in the N+3 subsonic vehicle concepts. Recommendations for technologies that merit further research and development are presented based upon their impact on the N+3 goals and likelihood of being operational by 2035.

  8. An Impact-Location Estimation Algorithm for Subsonic Uninhabited Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey E.; Teets, Edward

    1997-01-01

    An impact-location estimation algorithm is being used at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center to support range safety for uninhabited aerial vehicle flight tests. The algorithm computes an impact location based on the descent rate, mass, and altitude of the vehicle and current wind information. The predicted impact location is continuously displayed on the range safety officer's moving map display so that the flightpath of the vehicle can be routed to avoid ground assets if the flight must be terminated. The algorithm easily adapts to different vehicle termination techniques and has been shown to be accurate to the extent required to support range safety for subsonic uninhabited aerial vehicles. This paper describes how the algorithm functions, how the algorithm is used at NASA Dryden, and how various termination techniques are handled by the algorithm. Other approaches to predicting the impact location and the reasons why they were not selected for real-time implementation are also discussed.

  9. Prediction of subsonic vortex shedding from forebodies with chines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, Michael R.; Lesieutre, Daniel J.

    1990-01-01

    An engineering prediction method and associated computer code VTXCHN to predict nose vortex shedding from circular and noncircular forebodies with sharp chine edges in subsonic flow at angles of attack and roll are presented. Axisymmetric bodies are represented by point sources and doublets, and noncircular cross sections are transformed to a circle by either analytical or numerical conformal transformations. The lee side vortex wake is modeled by discrete vortices in crossflow planes along the body; thus the three-dimensional steady flow problem is reduced to a two-dimensional, unsteady, separated flow problem for solution. Comparison of measured and predicted surface pressure distributions, flow field surveys, and aerodynamic characteristics are presented for noncircular bodies alone and forebodies with sharp chines.

  10. Anode effect elimination by subsonic and sonic vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karahan, Tuba; Duman, Ismail; Marsoglu, Muzeyyen

    2009-11-01

    The only method so far used industrially to produce primary aluminum is the combination of the Bayer process with the Hall-Héroult process. The production process of aluminum which was patented by Charles Martin Hall and Paul Louis Toussaint Héroult in 1886, has long been important in our daily lives and that importance is likely to increase year by year. In this study, different subsonic and sonic vibrations, which were obtained from a 0.30 kW, 1,400 rpm three-phase motor, also a 0.55 kW, 2,800 rpm three-phase motor and 0.75 kW frequency converter, were applied to a laboratory-type aluminum electrolysis cell and the possibility of eliminating the anode effect was investigated.

  11. Estimation of Rotary Stability Derivatives at Subsonic and Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobak, Murray; Lessing, Henry C.

    1961-01-01

    The first part of this paper pertains to the estimation of subsonic rotary stability derivatives of wings. The unsteady potential flow problem is solved by a superposition of steady flow solutions. Numerical results for the damping coefficients of triangular wings are presented as functions of aspect ratio and Mach number, and are compared with experimental results over the Mach number range 0 to 1. In the second part, experimental results are used. to point out a close correlation between the nonlinear variations with angle of attack of the static pitching-moment curve slope and the damping-in-pitch coefficient. The underlying basis for the correlation is found as a result of an analysis in which the indicial function concept and. the principle of super-position are adapted to apply to the nonlinear problem. The form of the result suggests a method of estimating nonlinear damping coefficients from results of static wind-tunnel measurements.

  12. Subsonic jet pressure fluctuation characterization by tomographic laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martarelli, Milena; Castellini, Paolo; Tomasini, Enrico Primo

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the application of a nonconventional experimental technique based on optical interferometry for the characterization of aeroacoustic sources. The specific test case studied is a turbulent subsonic jet. Traditional experimental methods exploited for the measurement of aerodynamic velocity fields are laser Doppler anemometer and particle image velocimetry which have an important drawback due to the fact that they can measure only if the flow is seeded with tracer particles. The technique proposed, by exploiting a laser Doppler interferometer and a tomographic algorithm for 3D field reconstruction, overcomes the problem of the flow seeding since it allows directly measuring the flow pressure fluctuation due to the flow turbulence. A laser Doppler interferometer indeed is sensitive to the density oscillation within the medium traversed by the laser beam even though it integrates the density oscillation along the entire path traveled by the laser. Consequently, the 3D distribution of the flow density fluctuation can be recovered only by exploiting a tomographic reconstruction algorithm applied to several projections. Finally, the flow pressure fluctuation can be inferred from the flow density measured, which comprehends both the aerodynamic pressure related to the turbulence and the sound pressure due to the propagation of the acoustic waves into the far field. In relation to the test case studied in this paper, e.g., the turbulent subsonic jet, the method allows a complete aeroacoustic characterization of the flow field since it measures both the aerodynamic "cause" of the noise, such as the vortex shedding, and the acoustic "effect" of it, i.e., the sound propagation in the 3D space. The performances and the uncertainty have been evaluated and discussed, and the technique has been experimentally validated.

  13. Aeroelastic characteristics of a cascade of mistuned blades in subsonic and supersonic flows. [turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielb, R. E.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of mistuning on flutter and forced response of a cascade in subsonic in subsonic and supersonic flow were investigated. The aerodynamic and structural coupling between the bending and torsional motions and the aerodynamic coupling between the blades were studied. It is shown that frequency mistuning always has a beneficial effect on flutter. For the cascade considered, the potential for raising flutter speed is greater in subsonic than in supersonic flow. Preliminary results for structural damping mistuning show that there are no additional benefits over adding damping mistuning may have either a beneficial or an adverse effect on forced response, depending on the engine order of the excitation and Mach number.

  14. High speed civil transport in 14x22 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    NASA technician Michael E. Ramsey inspects a high speed civil transport model between wind tunnel tests at NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Aerodynamic tests of the 19-foot (5.7 meters) model in the 14x22 foot subsonic tunnel simulate takeoff and landing of a 300 passenger supersonic commercial transport that would cruise at Mach 2.4 (approximately 1,600 mph/2,560kph). Designated Reference H, the concept was designed by Boeing and presently serves as a common configuration for government-industry technology studies.

  15. Optimized aerodynamic design process for subsonic transport wing fitted with winglets. [wind tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of a wind-tunnel model of a wing representative of that of a subsonic jet transport aircraft, fitted with winglets, was performed using two recently developed optimal wing-design computer programs. Both potential flow codes use a vortex lattice representation of the near-field of the aerodynamic surfaces for determination of the required mean camber surfaces for minimum induced drag, and both codes use far-field induced drag minimization procedures to obtain the required spanloads. One code uses a discrete vortex wake model for this far-field drag computation, while the second uses a 2-D advanced panel wake model. Wing camber shapes for the two codes are very similar, but the resulting winglet camber shapes differ widely. Design techniques and considerations for these two wind-tunnel models are detailed, including a description of the necessary modifications of the design geometry to format it for use by a numerically controlled machine for the actual model construction.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Subsonic and Transonic Propeller Flow. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Aaron

    1988-01-01

    The numerical simulation of 3-D transonic flow about a system of propeller blades is investigated. In particular, it is shown that the use of helical coordinates significantly simplifies the form of the governing equation when the propeller system is assumed to be surrounded by an irrotational flow field of an inviscid fluid. The unsteady small disturbance equation, valid for lightly loaded blades and expressed in helical coordinates, is derived from the general blade-fixed potential equation, given for an arbitrary coordinate system. The use of a coordinate system which inherently adapts to the mean flow results in a disturbance equation requiring relatively few terms to accurately model the physics of the flow. Furthermore, the helical coordinate system presented here is novel in that it is periodic in the circumferential direction while, simultaneously, maintaining orthogonal properties at the mean blade locations. The periodic characteristic allows a complete cascade of blades to be treated, and the orthogonality property affords straightforward treatment of blade boundary conditions. An ADI numerical scheme is used to compute the solution of the steady flow as an asymptotic limit of an unsteady flow. As an example of the method, solutions are presented for subsonic and transonic flow about a 5 percent thick bicircular arc blade of an 8-bladed cascade. Both high and low advance ratio cases are computed and include a lifting as well as nonlifting cases. The nonlifting solutions obtained are compared to solutions from a Euler code.

  17. Evaluation of laminar flow control system concepts for subsonic commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate alternatives in the design of laminar flow control (LFC) subsonic commercial transport aircraft for operation in the 1980's period. Analyses were conducted to select mission parameters and define optimum aircraft configurational parameters for the selected mission, defined by a passenger payload of 400 and a design range of 12,038 km (6500 n mi). The baseline aircraft developed for this mission was used as a vehicle for the evaluation and development of alternative LFC system concepts. Alternatives were evaluated in the areas of aerodynamics structures, materials, LFC systems, leading-edge region cleaning and integration of auxiliary systems. Based on these evaluations, concept in each area were selected for further development and testing and ultimate incorporation in the final study aircraft. Relative to a similarly-optimized advanced technology turbulent transport, the final LFC configuration is approximately equal in direct operating cost but provides decreases of 8.2% in gross weight and 21.7% in fuel consumption.

  18. Subsonic semi-infinite crack with a finite friction zone in a bimaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, Y. A.

    2009-12-01

    Propagation of a semi-infinite crack along the interface between an elastic half-plane and a rigid half-plane is analyzed. The crack advances at constant subsonic speed. It is assumed that, ahead of the crack, there is a finite segment where the conditions of Coulomb friction law are satisfied. The contact zone of unknown a priori length propagates with the same speed as the crack. The problem reduces to a vector Riemann-Hilbert problem with a piece-wise constant matrix coefficient discontinuous at three points, 0, 1, and ∞. The problem is solved exactly in terms of Kummer's solutions of the associated hypergeometric differential equation. Numerical results are reported for the length of the contact friction zone, the stress singularity factor, the normal displacement u2, and the dynamic energy release rate G. It is found that in the case of frictionless contact for both the sub-Rayleigh and super-Rayleigh regimes, G is positive and the stress intensity factor KII does not vanish. In the sub-Rayleigh case, the normal displacement is positive everywhere in the opening zone. In the super-Rayleigh regime, there is a small neighborhood of the ending point of the open zone where the normal displacement is negative.

  19. An Overview of NASA's SubsoniC Research Aircraft Testbed (SCRAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, Ethan; Hernandez, Joe; Ruhf, John

    2013-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center acquired a Gulfstream III (GIII) aircraft to serve as a testbed for aeronautics flight research experiments. The aircraft is referred to as SCRAT, which stands for SubsoniC Research Aircraft Testbed. The aircraft’s mission is to perform aeronautics research; more specifically raising the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of advanced technologies through flight demonstrations and gathering high-quality research data suitable for verifying the technologies, and validating design and analysis tools. The SCRAT has the ability to conduct a range of flight research experiments throughout a transport class aircraft’s flight envelope. Experiments ranging from flight-testing of a new aircraft system or sensor to those requiring structural and aerodynamic modifications to the aircraft can be accomplished. The aircraft has been modified to include an instrumentation system and sensors necessary to conduct flight research experiments along with a telemetry capability. An instrumentation power distribution system was installed to accommodate the instrumentation system and future experiments. An engineering simulation of the SCRAT has been developed to aid in integrating research experiments. A series of baseline aircraft characterization flights has been flown that gathered flight data to aid in developing and integrating future research experiments. This paper describes the SCRAT’s research systems and capabilities

  20. Refined methods of aeroelastic analysis and optimization. [swept wings, propeller theory, and subsonic flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, H.

    1984-01-01

    Graduate research activity in the following areas is reported: the divergence of laminated composite lifting surfaces, subsonic propeller theory and aeroelastic analysis, and cross sectional resonances in wind tunnels.

  1. What Is Western Civilization?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birken, Lawrence

    1992-01-01

    Discusses opposing tendencies in the interpretation of Western Civilization. Describes the expanded definition that includes Byzantine and Islamic cultures as heirs of the Greco-Roman cultures. Suggests that a limited definition of Western culture will facilitate a problems approach, emphasize diversity among cultures, and integrate the classical…

  2. Civil Law: 12 Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresbach, Debra

    These learning activities on civil law are intended to supplement the secondary level Scholastic materials "Living Law." Case studies, simulations, and role-play activities are included. Information provided for each activity includes a brief overview, background information, teacher instructions and a description of each activity. Activities…

  3. CIVIL RIGHTS AND MINORITIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HARTMAN, PAUL

    A MAJOR INTENT OF THE CONSTITUTION AND ITS AMENDMENTS, TO GUARANTEE EQUAL RIGHTS TO ALL CITIZENS REGARDLESS OF RACE, CREED, OR COLOR, HAS BEEN REINFORCED BY THE CIVIL RIGHTS STATUTES OF MANY STATES. IN SOME STATES SUCH LAWS HAVE BEEN ON RECORD FOR THREE-QUARTERS OF A CENTURY. IN OTHER STATES THE SAME CONSTITUTIONAL INTENT HAS BEEN DENIED BY…

  4. Creative Ventures: Ancient Civilizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Rebecca

    The open-ended activities in this book are designed to extend the imagination and creativity of students and encourage students to examine their feelings and values about historic eras. Civilizations addressed include ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome, Mayan, Stonehenge, and Mesopotamia. The activities focus upon the cognitive and affective pupil…

  5. European Civilization. Teacher's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leppert, Ella C.; Halac, Dennis

    The instructional materials in this teaching guide for Course II, Unit IV, follow and build upon a previous sequential course described in SO 003 169 offering ninth grade students a study on the development of Western European Civilization. Focus is upon four periods of high development: The High Middle Ages (12th Century), The Renaissance (15th…

  6. NASA technology program for future civil air transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, H. T.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment is undertaken of the development status of technology, applicable to future civil air transport design, which is currently undergoing conceptual study or testing at NASA facilities. The NASA civil air transport effort emphasizes advanced aerodynamic computational capabilities, fuel-efficient engines, advanced turboprops, composite primary structure materials, advanced aerodynamic concepts in boundary layer laminarization and aircraft configuration, refined control, guidance and flight management systems, and the integration of all these design elements into optimal systems. Attention is given to such novel transport aircraft design concepts as forward swept wings, twin fuselages, sandwich composite structures, and swept blade propfans.

  7. Civil partnerships five years on.

    PubMed

    Ross, Helen; Gask, Karen; Berrington, Ann

    2011-01-01

    The Civil Partnership Act 2004, which came into force in December 2005 allowing same-sex couples in the UK to register their relationship for the first time, celebrated its fifth anniversary in December 2010. This article examines civil partnership in England and Wales, five years on from its introduction. The characteristics of those forming civil partnerships between 2005 and 2010 including age, sex and previous marital/civil partnership status are examined. These are then compared with the characteristics of those marrying over the same period. Further comparisons are also made between civil partnership dissolutions and divorce. The article presents estimates of the number of people currently in civil partnerships and children of civil partners. Finally the article examines attitudes towards same-sex and civil partner couples both in the UK and in other countries across Europe. PMID:21987019

  8. Subsonic Aircraft With Regression and Neural-Network Approximators Designed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    2004-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, NASA Langley Research Center's Flight Optimization System (FLOPS) and the design optimization testbed COMETBOARDS with regression and neural-network-analysis approximators have been coupled to obtain a preliminary aircraft design methodology. For a subsonic aircraft, the optimal design, that is the airframe-engine combination, is obtained by the simulation. The aircraft is powered by two high-bypass-ratio engines with a nominal thrust of about 35,000 lbf. It is to carry 150 passengers at a cruise speed of Mach 0.8 over a range of 3000 n mi and to operate on a 6000-ft runway. The aircraft design utilized a neural network and a regression-approximations-based analysis tool, along with a multioptimizer cascade algorithm that uses sequential linear programming, sequential quadratic programming, the method of feasible directions, and then sequential quadratic programming again. Optimal aircraft weight versus the number of design iterations is shown. The central processing unit (CPU) time to solution is given. It is shown that the regression-method-based analyzer exhibited a smoother convergence pattern than the FLOPS code. The optimum weight obtained by the approximation technique and the FLOPS code differed by 1.3 percent. Prediction by the approximation technique exhibited no error for the aircraft wing area and turbine entry temperature, whereas it was within 2 percent for most other parameters. Cascade strategy was required by FLOPS as well as the approximators. The regression method had a tendency to hug the data points, whereas the neural network exhibited a propensity to follow a mean path. The performance of the neural network and regression methods was considered adequate. It was at about the same level for small, standard, and large models with redundancy ratios (defined as the number of input-output pairs to the number of unknown coefficients) of 14, 28, and 57, respectively. In an SGI octane workstation (Silicon Graphics

  9. Quasispherical subsonic accretion in X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakura, Nikolai I.; Postnov, Konstantin A.; Kochetkova, A. Yu; Hjalmarsdotter, L.

    2013-04-01

    A theoretical model is considered for quasispherical subsonic accretion onto slowly rotating magnetized neutron stars. In this regime, the accreting matter settles down subsonically onto the rotating magnetosphere, forming an extended quasistatic shell. Angular momentum transfer in the shell occurs via large-scale convective motions resulting, for observed pulsars, in an almost iso-angular-momentum \\omega \\sim 1/R^2 rotation law inside the shell. The accretion rate through the shell is determined by the ability of the plasma to enter the magnetosphere due to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, with allowance for cooling. A settling accretion regime is possible for moderate accretion rates \\dot M \\lesssim \\dot M_* \\simeq 4\\times 10^{16} g s ^{-1}. At higher accretion rates, a free-fall gap above the neutron star magnetosphere appears due to rapid Compton cooling, and the accretion becomes highly nonstationary. Observations of spin-up/spin-down rates of quasispherically wind accreting equilibrium X-ray pulsars with known orbital periods (e.g., GX 301-2 and Vela X-1) enable us to determine the main dimensionless parameters of the model, as well as to estimate surface magnetic field of the neutron star. For equilibrium pulsars, the independent measurements of the neutron star magnetic field allow for an estimate of the stellar wind velocity of the optical companion without using complicated spectroscopic measurements. For nonequilibrium pulsars, a maximum value is shown to exist for the spin-down rate of the accreting neutron star. From observations of the spin-down rate and the X-ray luminosity in such pulsars (e.g., GX 1+4, SXP 1062, and 4U 2206+54), a lower limit can be put on the neutron star magnetic field, which in all cases turns out to be close to the standard value and which agrees with cyclotron line measurements. Furthermore, both explains the spin-up/spin-down of the pulsar frequency on large time-scales and also accounts for the irregular short

  10. Three-dimensional subsonic diffuser design optimization and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei-Li

    A novel methodology is developed to integrate state-of-the-art CFD analysis, the Non-uniform Rational B-Spline technique (NURBS) and optimization theory to reduce total pressure distortion and sustain or improve total pressure recovery within a curved three dimensional subsonic diffuser. Diffusing S-shaped ducts are representative of curved subsonic diffusers and are characterized by the S-shaped curvature of the duct's centerline and their increasing cross-sectional area. For aircraft inlet applications the measure of duct aerodynamic performance is the ability to decelerate the flow to the desired velocity while maintaining high total pressure recovery and flow near-uniformity. Reduced total pressure recovery lowers propulsion efficiency, whereas nonuniform flow conditions at the engine face lower engine stall and surge limits. Three degrees of freedom are employed as the number of independent design variables. The change of the surface shape is assumed to be Gaussian. The design variables are the location of the flow separation, the width and height of the Gaussian change. The General Aerodynamic Simulation Program (GASP) with the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model is employed for the flow field prediction and proved to give good agreement with the experimental results for the baseline diffuser geometry. With the automatic change of the design variables, the configuration of the diffuser surface shape is able to be changed while keeping the entrance and exit of the diffuser unchanged in order to meet the specification of the engine and inlet. A trade study was performed which analyzed more than 10 configurations of the modified diffuser. Surface static pressure, surface flow visualization, and exit plane total pressure and transverse velocity data were acquired. The aerodynamic performance of each configuration was assessed by calculating total pressure recovery and spatial distortion elements. The automated design optimization is performed with a gradient

  11. Civility in Classes and Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumpkin, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Civility is a polite or courteous act, expression, or standard of conduct, including the display of respect and tolerance to everyone. Teaching and modeling civility in classes and with sport teams is essential so students and athletes can learn the importance of and demonstrate civility in their interactions with others. Teachers and coaches…

  12. High frequency flow-structural interaction in dense subsonic fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Baw-Lin; Ofarrell, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Prediction of the detailed dynamic behavior in rocket propellant feed systems and engines and other such high-energy fluid systems requires precise analysis to assure structural performance. Designs sometimes require placement of bluff bodies in a flow passage. Additionally, there are flexibilities in ducts, liners, and piping systems. A design handbook and interactive data base have been developed for assessing flow/structural interactions to be used as a tool in design and development, to evaluate applicable geometries before problems develop, or to eliminate or minimize problems with existing hardware. This is a compilation of analytical/empirical data and techniques to evaluate detailed dynamic characteristics of both the fluid and structures. These techniques have direct applicability to rocket engine internal flow passages, hot gas drive systems, and vehicle propellant feed systems. Organization of the handbook is by basic geometries for estimating Strouhal numbers, added mass effects, mode shapes for various end constraints, critical onset flow conditions, and possible structural response amplitudes. Emphasis is on dense fluids and high structural loading potential for fatigue at low subsonic flow speeds where high-frequency excitations are possible. Avoidance and corrective measure illustrations are presented together with analytical curve fits for predictions compiled from a comprehensive data base.

  13. Transition prediction and control in subsonic flow over a hump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masad, Jamal A.; Iyer, Venkit

    1993-01-01

    The influence of a surface roughness element in the form of a two-dimensional hump on the transition location in a two-dimensional subsonic flow with a free-stream Mach number up to 0.8 is evaluated. Linear stability theory, coupled with the N-factor transition criterion, is used in the evaluation. The mean flow over the hump is calculated by solving the interacting boundary-layer equations; the viscous-inviscid coupling is taken into consideration, and the flow is solved within the separation bubble. The effects of hump height, length, location, and shape; unit Reynolds number; free-stream Mach number, continuous suction level; location of a suction strip; continuous cooling level; and location of a heating strip on the transition location are evaluated. The N-factor criterion predictions agree well with the experimental correlation of Fage; in addition, the N-factor criterion is more general and powerful than experimental correlations. The theoretically predicted effects of the hump's parameters and flow conditions on transition location are consistent and in agreement with both wind-tunnel and flight observations.

  14. Supersonic Jet Exhaust Noise at High Subsonic Flight Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norum, Thomas D.; Garber, Donald P.; Golub, Robert A.; Santa Maria, Odilyn L.; Orme, John S.

    2004-01-01

    An empirical model to predict the effects of flight on the noise from a supersonic transport is developed. This model is based on an analysis of the exhaust jet noise from high subsonic flights of the F-15 ACTIVE Aircraft. Acoustic comparisons previously attainable only in a wind tunnel were accomplished through the control of both flight operations and exhaust nozzle exit diameter. Independent parametric variations of both flight and exhaust jet Mach numbers at given supersonic nozzle pressure ratios enabled excellent correlations to be made for both jet broadband shock noise and jet mixing noise at flight speeds up to Mach 0.8. Shock noise correlated with flight speed and emission angle through a Doppler factor exponent of about 2.6. Mixing noise at all downstream angles was found to correlate well with a jet relative velocity exponent of about 7.3, with deviations from this behavior only at supersonic eddy convection speeds and at very high flight Mach numbers. The acoustic database from the flight test is also provided.

  15. Cavity Unsteady-Pressure Measurements at Subsonic and Transonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tracy, Maureen B.; Plentovich, E. B.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel to determine the flow characteristics of rectangular cavities with varying relative dimensions at subsonic and transonic speeds. Cavities were tested with width-to-depth ratios of 1, 4, 8, and 16 for length-to-depth ratios l/h of 1 through 17.5. The maximum cavity depth was 2.4 in., and the turbulent boundary layer approaching the cavity was approximately 0.5 in. thick. Unsteady- and mean static-pressure measurements were made at free-stream Mach numbers from 0.20 to 0.95 at a unit Reynolds number per foot of approximately 3 x 10(exp 6); however, only unsteady-pressure results are presented in this paper. Results indicate that as l/h increases, cavity flows changed from resonant to nonresonant with resonant amplitudes decreasing gradually. Resonant spectra are obtained largely in cavities with mean static-pressure distributions characteristic of open and transitional flows. Resonance sometimes occurred for closed flow. Increasing cavity width or decreasing cavity depth while holding l/h fixed had the effect of increasing resonant amplitudes and sometimes induced resonance. The effects due to changes in width are more pronounced. Decreasing Mach number has the effect of broadening the resonances.

  16. Experimental characterization of turbulent subsonic transitional-open cavity flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokita, T.; Elimelech, Y.; Arieli, R.; Levy, Y.; Greenberg, J. B.

    2016-04-01

    Turbulent subsonic "transitional-open" cavity flow was investigated by wind-tunnel tests. The investigated cavity configuration had a length-to-depth ratio of 6.25 and a width-to-depth ratio of 2. The cavity was exposed to a free-stream Mach number of 0.40 and a Reynolds number (based on cavity depth) of 1.6× 10^6, with a turbulent incoming boundary layer. Measurements of velocity and wall pressures were taken simultaneously, which enabled the analysis of velocity-pressure cross-correlations. Special attention is paid to the shear layer that develops over the cavity and an emphasis is placed on the analysis of its characteristics and its stability. Application of linear hydrodynamic stability theory, together with examining velocity-pressure cross correlations, revealed that the behavior of the cavity shear layer is analogous to a free shear layer, approximately up to mid-length of the cavity, where further downstream nonlinear interactions occur.

  17. Planar Velocimetry of a Supersonic Jet in Subsonic Compressible Crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresh, Steven; Henfling, John; Erven, Rocky; Spillers, Russell

    2004-11-01

    A stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV) instrument has been constructed for a transonic wind tunnel to study the interaction created by a supersonic axisymmetric jet exhausting from a flat plate into a subsonic compressible crossflow. Data have been acquired in the crossplane of the interaction at a single station in the farfield, in which the bulk particle motion is aligned with the out-of-plane velocity component. The resulting vector fields distinctly show the strength and location of the induced counter-rotating vortex pair as well as the remnant of the horseshoe vortex that wraps around the jet plume as it first exhausts from the nozzle. The vortices are visible from the in-plane vorticity as well as a deficit in the streamwise velocity component. Data taken for four different values of the jet-to-freestream dynamic pressure ratio reveal that the vortex strength, size, and distance from the wall all increase with jet pressure. An uncertainty analysis also is provided.

  18. An Analytical Study for Subsonic Oblique Wing Transport Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, E. S.; Honrath, J.; Tomlin, K. H.; Swift, G.; Shumpert, P.; Warnock, W.

    1976-01-01

    The oblique wing concept has been investigated for subsonic transport application for a cruise Mach number of 0.95. Three different mission applications were considered and the concept analyzed against the selected mission requirements. Configuration studies determined the best area of applicability to be a commercial passenger transport mission. The critical parameter for the oblique wing concept was found to be aspect ratio which was limited to a value of 6.0 due to aeroelastic divergence. Comparison of the concept final configuration was made with fixed winged configurations designed to cruise at Mach 0.85 and 0.95. The crossover Mach number for the oblique wing concept was found to be Mach 0.91 for takeoff gross weight and direct operating cost. Benefits include reduced takeoff distance, installed thrust and mission block fuel and improved community noise characteristics. The variable geometry feature enables the final configuration to increase range by 10% at Mach 0.712 and to increase endurance by as much as 44%.

  19. Isom's thickness noise for axial and centrifugal subsonic fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelladi, S.; Kouidri, S.; Rey, R.

    2008-06-01

    The thickness noise predicted by the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings (FW&H) equation depends on the normal velocity vn which is very sensitive to the meshing size. Isom showed that in a far field a monopolar source is equivalent to a dipolar source induced by a uniform distribution of the load on the entire moving surface. Consequently, the calculation of the thickness noise becomes completely independent of the normal velocity vn. Its expression, as suggested by Farassat, is for any moving surface. The main objective of this work is to determine a specific expression of Isom's thickness noise in time and frequency domains for axial and centrifugal subsonic fans. The proposed form of the thickness noise enables to highlight the effect of each geometrical parameter of the fan on the overall thickness noise, on the one hand, and presents a fast computational mean and low memory storage capability since the acoustic pressure in the frequency domain is calculated for only one blade, on the other.

  20. Response of High Subsonic Jet to Nonaxisymmetric Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.

    1997-01-01

    A model of sound generated in a high subsonic (Mach 0.9) circular jet is solved numerically in cylindrical coordinates for nonaxisymmetric disturbances. The jet is excited by transient mass injection by a finite duration pulse via a modulated ring source. The nonaxisymmetric solution is computed for long times after the initial disturbance has exited the computational domain. The long time behavior of the jet is dominated by vorticity and pressure disturbances generated at the nozzle lip and growing as they convect down-stream in the jet. These disturbances generate sound as they propagate. The primary non-axisymmetric effect that we simulate is that of a flapping mode where regions of high and low pressure alternate on opposite sides of the jet. The predominant feature of this mode is the appearance of relatively large deviations of the pressure from the ambient pressure on opposite sides of the jet and the convection of these regions downstream. We illustrate flow field, near field and far field data. Important nonaxisymmetric characteristics of the near and flow field disturbances include roughly periodic pressure elevations and depressions at opposite values of the azimuthal angle psi. These correspond to pressure disturbances propagating in the axial direction. The azimuthal velocity exhibits a sinusoidal dependence on psi with similar roughly periodic disturbances. For every azimuthal angle psi, the jet radiation peaks about 30 deg. from the jet axis, however there is now a pronounced dependence of the far field radiation pattern on psi.

  1. The Impact of Subsonic Twin Jets on Airport Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard, F.

    2012-01-01

    Subsonic and supersonic aircraft concepts proposed through NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program have multiple engines mounted near one another. Engine configurations with multiple jets introduce an asymmetry to the azimuthal directivity of the jet noise. Current system noise predictions add the jet noise from each jet incoherently, therefore, twin jets are estimated by adding 3 EPNdB to the far-field noise radiated from a single jet. Twin jet effects have the ability to increase or decrease the radiated noise to different azimuthal observation locations. Experiments have shown that twin jet effects are reduced with forward flight and increasing spacings. The current experiment investigates the impact of spacing, and flight effects on airport noise for twin jets. Estimating the jet noise radiated from twin jets as that of a single jet plus 3 EPNdB may be sufficient for horizontal twin jets with an s/d of 4.4 and 5.5, where s is the center-to-center spacing and d is the jet diameter. However, up to a 3 EPNdB error could be present for jet spacings with an s/d of 2.6 and 3.2.

  2. Chaos control for the plates subjected to subsonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi, Hamed; Younesian, Davood

    2016-07-01

    The suppression of chaotic motion in viscoelastic plates driven by external subsonic air flow is studied. Nonlinear oscillation of the plate is modeled by the von-Kármán plate theory. The fluid-solid interaction is taken into account. Galerkin's approach is employed to transform the partial differential equations of the system into the time domain. The corresponding homoclinic orbits of the unperturbed Hamiltonian system are obtained. In order to study the chaotic behavior of the plate, Melnikov's integral is analytically applied and the threshold of the excitation amplitude and frequency for the occurrence of chaos is presented. It is found that adding a parametric perturbation to the system in terms of an excitation with the same frequency of the external force can lead to eliminate chaos. Variations of the Lyapunov exponent and bifurcation diagrams are provided to analyze the chaotic and periodic responses. Two perturbation-based control strategies are proposed. In the first scenario, the amplitude of control forces reads a constant value that should be precisely determined. In the second strategy, this amplitude can be proportional to the deflection of the plate. The performance of each controller is investigated and it is found that the second scenario would be more efficient.

  3. Computational Study of Separating Flow in a Planar Subsonic Diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DalBello, Teryn; Dippold, Vance, III; Georgiadis, Nicholas J.

    2005-01-01

    A computational study of the separated flow through a 2-D asymmetric subsonic diffuser has been performed. The Wind Computational Fluid Dynamics code is used to predict the separation and reattachment behavior for an incompressible diffuser flow. The diffuser inlet flow is a two-dimensional, turbulent, and fully-developed channel flow with a Reynolds number of 20,000 based on the centerline velocity and the channel height. Wind solutions computed with the Menter SST, Chien k-epsilon, Spalart-Allmaras and Explicit Algebraic Reynolds Stress turbulence models are compared with experimentally measured velocity profiles and skin friction along the upper and lower walls. In addition to the turbulence model study, the effects of grid resolution and use of wall functions were investigated. The grid studies varied the number of grid points across the diffuser and varied the initial wall spacing from y(sup +) = 0.2 to 60. The wall function study assessed the applicability of wall functions for analysis of separated flow. The SST and Explicit Algebraic Stress models provide the best agreement with experimental data, and it is recommended wall functions should only be used with a high level of caution.

  4. Propulsion System for Very High Altitude Subsonic Unmanned Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.; Mockler, Ted; Maldonado, Jaime; Harp, James L., Jr.; King, Joseph F.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper explains why a spark ignited gasoline engine, intake pressurized with three cascaded stages of turbocharging, was selected to power NASA's contemplated next generation of high altitude atmospheric science aircraft. Beginning with the most urgent science needs (the atmospheric sampling mission) and tracing through the mission requirements which dictate the unique flight regime in which this aircraft has to operate (subsonic flight at greater then 80 kft) we briefly explore the physical problems and constraints, the available technology options and the cost drivers associated with developing a viable propulsion system for this highly specialized aircraft. The paper presents the two available options (the turbojet and the turbocharged spark ignited engine) which are discussed and compared in the context of the flight regime. We then show how the unique nature of the sampling mission, coupled with the economic considerations pursuant to aero engine development, point to the spark ignited engine as the only cost effective solution available. Surprisingly, this solution compares favorably with the turbojet in the flight regime of interest. Finally, some remarks are made about NASA's present state of development, and future plans to flight demonstrate the three stage turbocharged powerplant.

  5. Galactic-scale civilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.

    1980-01-01

    Evolutionary arguments are presented in favor of the existence of civilization on a galactic scale. Patterns of physical, chemical, biological, social and cultural evolution leading to increasing levels of complexity are pointed out and explained thermodynamically in terms of the maximization of free energy dissipation in the environment of the organized system. The possibility of the evolution of a global and then a galactic human civilization is considered, and probabilities that the galaxy is presently in its colonization state and that life could have evolved to its present state on earth are discussed. Fermi's paradox of the absence of extraterrestrials in light of the probability of their existence is noted, and a variety of possible explanations is indicated. Finally, it is argued that although mankind may be the first occurrence of intelligence in the galaxy, it is unjustified to presume that this is so.

  6. High Speed Civil Transport in 14x22 Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A NASA technician (Michael E. Ramsey) inspects a high-speed civil transport model between wind tunnel tests at NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Aerodynamic tests of the 19-foot (5.7m) model in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel simulate takeoff and landing of a 300-passenger supersonic commercial transport that would cruise at Mach 2.4 (approximately 1,600 mph/2,560 kph). Designated 'Reference H,' the concept was designed by Boeing and presently serves as a common configuration for government-industry technology studies. Langley is NASA's lead center for the agency's High Speed Research program, aimed at developing technology to help U.S. industry compete in the rapidly expanding trans-oceanic transport market. A. U.S. high-speed civil transport is expected to fly in about the year 2010.

  7. Cyber threats within civil aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitner, Kerri A.

    Existing security policies in civil aviation do not adequately protect against evolving cyber threats. Cybersecurity has been recognized as a top priority among some aviation industry leaders. Heightened concerns regarding cyber threats and vulnerabilities surround components utilized in compliance with the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Next Generation Air Transportation (NextGen) implementation. Automated Dependent Surveillance-B (ADS-B) and Electronic Flight Bags (EFB) have both been exploited through the research of experienced computer security professionals. Civil aviation is essential to international infrastructure and if its critical assets were compromised, it could pose a great risk to public safety and financial infrastructure. The purpose of this research was to raise awareness of aircraft system vulnerabilities in order to provoke change among current national and international cybersecurity policies, procedures and standards. Although the education of cyber threats is increasing in the aviation industry, there is not enough urgency when creating cybersecurity policies. This project intended to answer the following questions: What are the cyber threats to ADS-B of an aircraft in-flight? What are the cyber threats to EFB? What is the aviation industry's response to the issue of cybersecurity and in-flight safety? ADS-B remains unencrypted while the FAA's mandate to implement this system is rapidly approaching. The cyber threat of both portable and non-portable EFB's have received increased publicity, however, airlines are not responding quick enough (if at all) to create policies for the use of these devices. Collectively, the aviation industry is not being proactive enough to protect its aircraft or airport network systems. That is not to say there are not leaders in cybersecurity advancement. These proactive organizations must set the standard for the future to better protect society and it's most reliable form of transportation.

  8. Hot-wire calibration in subsonic/transonic flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagabushana, K. A.; Ash, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    A different approach for calibrating hot-wires, which simplifies the calibration procedure and reduces the tunnel run-time by an order of magnitude was sought. In general, it is accepted that the directly measurable quantities in any flow are velocity, density, and total temperature. Very few facilities have the capability of varying the total temperature over an adequate range. However, if the overheat temperature parameter, a(sub w), is used to calibrate the hot-wire then the directly measurable quantity, voltage, will be a function of the flow variables and the overheat parameter i.e., E = f(u,p,a(sub w), T(sub w)) where a(sub w) will contain the needed total temperature information. In this report, various methods of evaluating sensitivities with different dependent and independent variables to calibrate a 3-Wire hot-wire probe using a constant temperature anemometer (CTA) in subsonic/transonic flow regimes is presented. The advantage of using a(sub w) as the independent variable instead of total temperature, t(sub o), or overheat temperature parameter, tau, is that while running a calibration test it is not necessary to know the recovery factor, the coefficients in a wire resistance to temperature relationship for a given probe. It was deduced that the method employing the relationship E = f (u,p,a(sub w)) should result in the most accurate calibration of hot wire probes. Any other method would require additional measurements. Also this method will allow calibration and determination of accurate temperature fluctuation information even in atmospheric wind tunnels where there is no ability to obtain any temperature sensitivity information at present. This technique greatly simplifies the calibration process for hot-wires, provides the required calibration information needed in obtaining temperature fluctuations, and reduces both the tunnel run-time and the test matrix required to calibrate hotwires. Some of the results using the above techniques are presented

  9. Mixing of Multiple Jets With a Confined Subsonic Crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.

    1998-01-01

    Results from a recently completed enhanced mixing program are summarized in the two technical papers. These studies were parts of a High Speed Research (HSR)-supported joint Government/industry/university program that involved, in addition to the NASA Lewis Research Center, researchers at United Technologies Research Center, Allison Engine Company, CFD Research Corporation, and the University of California, Irvine. The studies investigated the mixing of jets injected normal to a confined subsonic mainsteam in both rectangular and cylindrical ducts. Experimental and computational studies were performed in both nonreacting and reacting flows. The orifice geometries and flow conditions were selected as typical of the complex three-dimensional flows in the combustion chambers in low-emission gas turbine engines. The principal conclusion from both the experiments and modeling was that the momentum-flux ratio J and orifice spacing S/H were the most significant flow and geometry variables, respectively. Conserved scalar distributions were similar-independent of reaction, orifice diameter H/d, and shape-when the orifice spacing and the square root of the momentum-flux ratio were inversely proportional. Jet penetration was critical, and penetration decreased as either momentum-flux ratio or orifice spacing decreased. We found that planar averages must be considered in context with the distributions. The mass-flow ratios and the orifices investigated were often very large. The jet-to-mainstream mass-flow ratio was varied from significantly less than 1 to greater than 1. The orifice-area to mainstream-cross-sectional-area was varied from approx. 0 to 0.5, and the axial planes of interest were often just downstream of the orifice trailing edge. Three-dimensional flow was a key part of efficient mixing and was observed for all configurations. As an example of the results, the accompanying figure shows the effects of different rates of mass addition on the opposite walls of a

  10. Computational Investigations of Noise Suppression in Subsonic Round Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. David

    1997-01-01

    NASA Grant NAG1-1802, originally submitted in June 1996 as a two-year proposal, was awarded one-year's funding by NASA LaRC for the period 5 Oct., 1996, through 4 Oct., 1997. Because of the inavailability (from IT at NASA ARC) of sufficient supercomputer time in fiscal 1998 to complete the computational goals of the second year of the original proposal (estimated to be at least 400 Cray C-90 CPU hours), those goals have been appropriately amended, and a new proposal has been submitted to LaRC as a follow-on to NAG1-1802. The current report documents the activities and accomplishments on NAG1-1802 during the one-year period from 5 Oct., 1996, through 4 Oct., 1997. NASA Grant NAG1-1802, and its predecessor, NAG1-1772, have been directed toward adapting the numerical tool of Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) to aeroacoustic applications, with particular focus on noise suppression in subsonic round jets. In LES, the filtered Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically on a relatively coarse computational grid. Residual stresses, generated by scales of motion too small to be resolved on the coarse grid, are modeled. Although most LES incorporate spatial filtering, time-domain filtering affords certain conceptual and computational advantages, particularly for aeroacoustic applications. Consequently, this work has focused on the development of SubGrid-Scale (SGS) models that incorporate time- domain filters. The author is unaware of any previous attempt at purely time-filtered LES; however, Aldama and Dakhoul and Bedford have considered approaches that combine both spatial and temporal filtering. In our view, filtering in both space and time is redundant, because removal of high frequencies effects the removal of small spatial scales and vice versa.

  11. Design Study of Propulsion and Drive Systems for the Large Civil TiltRotor (LCTR2) Rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robuck, Mark; Wilkerson, Joseph; Zhang, Yiyi; Snyder, Christopher A.; Vonderwell, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Boeing, Rolls Royce, and NASA have worked together to complete a parametric sizing study for NASA's Large Civil Tilt Rotor (LCTR2) concept 2nd iteration. Vehicle gross weight and fuel usage were evaluated as propulsion and drive system characteristics were varied to maximize the benefit of reduced rotor tip speed during cruise conditions. The study examined different combinations of engine and gearbox variability to achieve rotor cruise tip speed reductions down to 54% of the hover tip speed. Previous NASA studies identified that a 54% rotor speed reduction in cruise minimizes vehicle gross weight and fuel burn. The LCTR2 was the study baseline for initial sizing. This study included rotor tip speed ratios (cruise to hover) of 100%, 77% and 54% at different combinations of engine RPM and gearbox speed reductions, which were analyzed to achieve the lightest overall vehicle gross weight (GW) at the chosen rotor tip speed ratio. Different engine and gearbox technology levels are applied ranging from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) engines and gearbox technology to entry-in-service (EIS) dates of 2025 and 2035 to assess the benefits of advanced technology on vehicle gross weight and fuel burn. Interim results were previously reported1. This technical paper extends that work and summarizes the final study results including additional engine and drive system study accomplishments. New vehicle sizing data is presented for engine performance at a single operating speed with a multispeed drive system. Modeling details for LCTR2 vehicle sizing and subject engine and drive sub-systems are presented as well. This study was conducted in support of NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program, Subsonic Rotary Wing Project.

  12. Advanced supersonic propulsion study, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howlett, R. A.; Johnson, J.; Sabatella, J.; Sewall, T.

    1976-01-01

    The variable stream control engine is determined to be the most promising propulsion system concept for advanced supersonic cruise aircraft. This concept uses variable geometry components and a unique throttle schedule for independent control of two flow streams to provide low jet noise at takeoff and high performance at both subsonic and supersonic cruise. The advanced technology offers a 25% improvement in airplane range and an 8 decibel reduction in takeoff noise, relative to first generation supersonic turbojet engines.

  13. Fully unsteady subsonic and supersonic potential aerodynamics for complex aircraft configurations with applications to flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, K.; Morino, L.

    1975-01-01

    A general formulation is presented for the analysis of steady and unsteady, subsonic and supersonic aerodynamics for complex aircraft configurations. The theoretical formulation, the numerical procedure, the description of the program SOUSSA (steady, oscillatory and unsteady, subsonic and supersonic aerodynamics) and numerical results are included. In particular, generalized forces for fully unsteady (complex frequency) aerodynamics for a wing-body configuration, AGARD wing-tail interference in both subsonic and supersonic flows as well as flutter analysis results are included. The theoretical formulation is based upon an integral equation, which includes completely arbitrary motion. Steady and oscillatory aerodynamic flows are considered. Here small-amplitude, fully transient response in the time domain is considered. This yields the aerodynamic transfer function (Laplace transform of the fully unsteady operator) for frequency domain analysis. This is particularly convenient for the linear systems analysis of the whole aircraft.

  14. Subsonic and Supersonic shear flows in laser driven high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Gillespie, R. S.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Kuranz, C. C.; Visco, A.; Ditmar, J. R.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Bono, M. J.; Plewa, T.

    2009-05-01

    Shear flows arise in many high-energy-density (HED) and astrophysical systems, yet few laboratory experiments have been carried out to study their evolution in these extreme environments. Fundamentally, shear flows can initiate mixing via the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability and may eventually drive a transition to turbulence. We present two dedicated shear flow experiments that created subsonic and supersonic shear layers in HED plasmas. In the subsonic case the Omega laser was used to drive a shock wave along a rippled plastic interface, which subsequently rolled-upped into large KH vortices. In the supersonic shear experiment the Nike laser was used to drive Al plasma across a low-density foam surface also seeded with a ripple. Unlike the subsonic case, detached shocks developed around the ripples in response to the supersonic Al flow.

  15. Supersonic and subsonic aircraft noise effects on animals: A literature survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kull, Robert C., Jr.; Fisher, Alan D.

    1986-12-01

    We searched the literature concerning the effects of supersonic and subsonic aircraft noise on animals. Our search revealed many review papers of prior research accomplished, but few actual research papers. Out of all the reviews, Dufour's work is the most comprehensive. Many of the papers are anecdotal in nature and add little to our scientific knowledge - strictly circumstantial evidence. The literature reveals few effects on animals due to sonic booms. The effects of subsonic noise, however, needs much more investigation. One of the biggest problems with the research in this area is the lack of controls, lack of standardized ways of recording data and evaluating behaviors, and the number of variables involved. Specific recommendations to fill some of the technological gaps include a sonic boom study on a ground-nesting shorebird, effects of subsonic aircraft noise on endangered species, long term physiological effects causing immunosuppression, and noise versus visual aircraft stimuli effects.

  16. CFD-Based Design Optimization Tool Developed for Subsonic Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The traditional approach to the design of engine inlets for commercial transport aircraft is a tedious process that ends with a less-than-optimum design. With the advent of high-speed computers and the availability of more accurate and reliable computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solvers, numerical optimization processes can effectively be used to design an aerodynamic inlet lip that enhances engine performance. The designers' experience at Boeing Corporation showed that for a peak Mach number on the inlet surface beyond some upper limit, the performance of the engine degrades excessively. Thus, our objective was to optimize efficiency (minimize the peak Mach number) at maximum cruise without compromising performance at other operating conditions. Using a CFD code NPARC, the NASA Lewis Research Center, in collaboration with Boeing, developed an integrated procedure at Lewis to find the optimum shape of a subsonic inlet lip and a numerical optimization code, ADS. We used a GRAPE-based three-dimensional grid generator to help automate the optimization procedure. The inlet lip shape at the crown and the keel was described as a superellipse, and the superellipse exponents and radii ratios were considered as design variables. Three operating conditions: cruise, takeoff, and rolling takeoff, were considered in this study. Three-dimensional Euler computations were carried out to obtain the flow field. At the initial design, the peak Mach numbers for maximum cruise, takeoff, and rolling takeoff conditions were 0.88, 1.772, and 1.61, respectively. The acceptable upper limits on the takeoff and rolling takeoff Mach numbers were 1.55 and 1.45. Since the initial design provided by Boeing was found to be optimum with respect to the maximum cruise condition, the sum of the peak Mach numbers at takeoff and rolling takeoff were minimized in the current study while the maximum cruise Mach number was constrained to be close to that at the existing design. With this objective, the

  17. Low-Speed Stability-and-Control and Ground-Effects Measurements on the Industry Reference High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemmerly, Guy T.; Campbell, Bryan A.; Banks, Daniel W.; Yaros, Steven F.

    1999-01-01

    As a part of a national effort to develop an economically feasible High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), a single configuration has been accepted as the testing baseline by the organizations working in the High Speed Research (HSR) program. The configuration is based on a design developed by the Boeing Company and is referred to as the Reference H (Ref H). The data contained in this report are low-speed stability-and-control and ground-effect measurements obtained on a 0.06 scale model of the Ref H in a subsonic tunnel.

  18. An Integrated Low-Speed Performance and Noise Prediction Methodology for Subsonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, E. D.; Mavris, D. N.

    2000-01-01

    An integrated methodology has been assembled to compute the engine performance, takeoff and landing trajectories, and community noise levels for a subsonic commercial aircraft. Where feasible, physics-based noise analysis methods have been used to make the results more applicable to newer, revolutionary designs and to allow for a more direct evaluation of new technologies. The methodology is intended to be used with approximation methods and risk analysis techniques to allow for the analysis of a greater number of variable combinations while retaining the advantages of physics-based analysis. Details of the methodology are described and limited results are presented for a representative subsonic commercial aircraft.

  19. Fully unsteady subsonic and supersonic potential aerodynamics for complex aircraft configurations for flutter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, K.; Morino, L.

    1975-01-01

    A general theory for study, oscillatory or fully unsteady potential compressible aerodynamics around complex configurations is presented. Using the finite-element method to discretize the space problem, one obtains a set of differential-delay equations in time relating the potential to its normal derivative which is expressed in terms of the generalized coordinates of the structure. For oscillatory flow, the motion consists of sinusoidal oscillations around a steady, subsonic or supersonic flow. For fully unsteady flow, the motion is assumed to consist of constant subsonic or supersonic speed for time t or = 0 and of small perturbations around the steady state for time t 0.

  20. A method for calculating a weakly nonisobaric supersonic turbulent jet in a subsonic slipstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V. E.

    A novel approach for computing weakly nonisobaric turbulent jets in a subsonic slipstream is proposed whereby the flow is divided into a subsonic and a supersonic zone and two different evolutionary systems of equations are used in each of the two zones. The solutions are then joined at the Mach 1 line. Closure of the systems of equations is achieved by using a known one-parameter turbulence model that has been modified to allow for the effect of the Mach number on turbulent mixing. The results obtained are compared against experimental data.

  1. Prediction of vortex flow characteristics of wings at subsonic and supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The leading-edge-suction analogy of Polhamus, which has been successful in the prediction of vortex lift characteristics on wings with pointed tips at subsonic and supersonic speeds, has recently been extended to account for the vortex flow characteristics for wings with side edges. Comparisons of experimental data and other currently used methods with the extended method are made for wings having side edges at subsonic and supersonic speeds. Recent data obtained for a low-aspect-ratio cropped-delta wing with various amounts of asymmetrical tip rake, simulating a roll control device, are also presented.

  2. The Liquid Hydrogen Option for the Subsonic Transport: A status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korycinski, P. F.

    1977-01-01

    Continued subsonic air transport design studies include the option for a liquid hydrogen fuel system as an aircraft fuel conservation measure. Elements of this option discussed include: (1) economical production of hydrogen; (2) efficient liquefaction of hydrogen; (3) materials for long service life LH2 fuel tanks; (4) insulation materials; (5) LH2 fuel service and installations at major air terminals; (6) assessment of LH2 hazards; and (7) the engineering definition of an LH2 fuel system for a large subsonic passenger air transport.

  3. 22 CFR 1508.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Civil judgment. 1508.920 Section 1508.920...) Definitions § 1508.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of... creates a civil liability for the complained of wrongful acts, or a final determination of liability...

  4. 22 CFR 1508.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Civil judgment. 1508.920 Section 1508.920...) Definitions § 1508.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of... creates a civil liability for the complained of wrongful acts, or a final determination of liability...

  5. 22 CFR 1006.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Civil judgment. 1006.920 Section 1006.920...) Definitions § 1006.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of... creates a civil liability for the complained of wrongful acts, or a final determination of liability...

  6. 22 CFR 1006.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Civil judgment. 1006.920 Section 1006.920...) Definitions § 1006.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of... creates a civil liability for the complained of wrongful acts, or a final determination of liability...

  7. 22 CFR 208.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Civil judgment. 208.920 Section 208.920 Foreign...) Definitions § 208.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of... creates a civil liability for the complained of wrongful acts, or a final determination of liability...

  8. 22 CFR 1508.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Civil judgment. 1508.920 Section 1508.920...) Definitions § 1508.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of... creates a civil liability for the complained of wrongful acts, or a final determination of liability...

  9. 22 CFR 1508.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Civil judgment. 1508.920 Section 1508.920...) Definitions § 1508.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of... creates a civil liability for the complained of wrongful acts, or a final determination of liability...

  10. 22 CFR 1006.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Civil judgment. 1006.920 Section 1006.920...) Definitions § 1006.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of... creates a civil liability for the complained of wrongful acts, or a final determination of liability...

  11. 22 CFR 1006.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Civil judgment. 1006.920 Section 1006.920...) Definitions § 1006.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of... creates a civil liability for the complained of wrongful acts, or a final determination of liability...

  12. 22 CFR 1006.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Civil judgment. 1006.920 Section 1006.920...) Definitions § 1006.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of... creates a civil liability for the complained of wrongful acts, or a final determination of liability...

  13. 22 CFR 1508.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Civil judgment. 1508.920 Section 1508.920...) Definitions § 1508.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of... creates a civil liability for the complained of wrongful acts, or a final determination of liability...

  14. 2 CFR 180.915 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil judgment. 180.915 Section 180.915... § 180.915 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of... creates a civil liability for the complained of wrongful acts, or a final determination of liability...

  15. 22 CFR 208.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Civil judgment. 208.920 Section 208.920 Foreign...) Definitions § 208.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of... creates a civil liability for the complained of wrongful acts, or a final determination of liability...

  16. Minimum Climb to Cruise Noise Trajectories Modeled for the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    1998-01-01

    The proposed U.S. High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) will revolutionize commercial air travel by providing economical supersonic passenger service to destinations worldwide. Unlike the high-bypass turbofan engines that propel today's subsonic airliners, HSCT engines will have much higher jet exhaust speeds. Jet noise, caused by the turbulent mixing of high-speed exhaust with the surrounding air, poses a significant challenge for HSCT engine designers. To resolve this challenge, engineers have designed advanced mixer rejector nozzles that reduce HSCT jet noise to airport noise certification levels by entraining and mixing large quantities of ambient air with the engines' jet streams. Although this works well during the first several minutes of flight, far away from the airport, as the HSCT gains speed and climbs, poor ejector inlet recovery and ejector ram drag contribute to poor thrust, making it advantageous to turn off the ejector. Doing so prematurely, however, can cause unacceptable noise levels to propagate to the ground, even when the aircraft is many miles from the airport. This situation lends itself ideally to optimization, where the aircraft trajectory, throttle setting, and ejector setting can be varied (subject to practical aircraft constraints) to minimize the noise propagated to the ground. A method was developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center that employs a variation of the classic energy state approximation: a trajectory analysis technique historically used to minimize climb time or fuel burned in many aircraft problems. To minimize the noise on the ground at any given throttle setting, high aircraft altitudes are desirable; but the HSCT may either climb quickly to high altitudes using a high, noisy throttle setting or climb more slowly at a lower, quieter throttle setting. An optimizer has been programmed into NASA's existing aircraft and noise analysis codes to balance these options by dynamically choosing the best altitude-velocity path and

  17. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogardus, Scott; Loper, Brent; Nauman, Chris; Page, Jeff; Parris, Rusty; Steinbach, Greg

    1990-01-01

    The design process of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) combines existing technology with the expectation of future technology to create a Mach 3.0 transport. The HSCT was designed to have a range in excess of 6000 nautical miles and carry up to 300 passengers. This range will allow the HSCT to service the economically expanding Pacific Basin region. Effort was made in the design to enable the aircraft to use conventional airports with standard 12,000 foot runways. With a takeoff thrust of 250,000 pounds, the four supersonic through-flow engines will accelerate the HSCT to a cruise speed of Mach 3.0. The 679,000 pound (at takeoff) HSCT is designed to cruise at an altitude of 70,000 feet, flying above most atmospheric disturbances.

  18. The rivers of civilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macklin, Mark G.; Lewin, John

    2015-04-01

    The hydromorphic regimes that underpinned Old World river-based civilizations are reviewed in light of recent research. Notable Holocene climatic changes varied from region to region, whilst the dynamics of floodplain environments were equally diverse, with river channel changes significantly affecting human settlement. There were longer-term trends in Holocene hydroclimate and multi-centennial length 'flood-rich' and 'flood-poor' episodes. These impacted on five identified flooding and settlement scenarios: (i) alluvial fans and aprons; (ii) laterally mobile rivers; (iii) rivers with well-developed levees and flood basins; (iv) river systems characterised by avulsions and floodouts; and (v) large river-fed wetlands. This gave a range of changes that were either more or less regular or incremental from year-to-year (and thus potentially manageable) or catastrophic. The latter might be sudden during a flood event or a few seasons (acute), or over longer periods extending over many decades or even centuries (chronic). The geomorphic and environmental impacts of these events on riparian societies were very often irreversible. Contrasts are made between allogenic and autogenic mechanism for imposing environmental stress on riverine communities and a distinction is made between channel avulsion and contraction responses. Floods, droughts and river channel changes can precondition as well as trigger environmental crises and societal collapse. The Nile system currently offers the best set of independently dated Holocene fluvial and archaeological records, and the contrasted effects of changing hydromorphological regimes on floodwater farming are examined. The persistence of civilizations depended essentially on the societies that maintained them, but they were also understandably resilient in some environments (Pharaonic Egypt in the Egyptian Nile), appear to have had more limited windows of opportunity in others (the Kerma Kingdom in the Nubian Nile), or required

  19. 77 FR 55175 - Civil Penalties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ... under the Adjustment Act was published on February 4, 1997. 62 FR 5167. At that time, we codified the... $6,000. 71 FR 28279. At the same time, the agency adjusted the maximum civil penalty for a single... to $16,650,000. 75 FR 5246. Also on February 10, 2010, NHTSA last adjusted the maximum civil...

  20. 75 FR 5244 - Civil Penalties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ...) entitled ``Civil Penalties'' which proposed the adjustment of certain civil penalties for inflation. 74 FR... April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477, 19477-78). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jessica Lang, Office of Chief... 4, 1997. 62 FR 5167. At that time, we codified the penalties under statutes administered by...

  1. Environmental Ethics and Civil Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vesilind, P. Aarne

    1987-01-01

    Traces the development of the civil engineering code of ethics. Points out that the code does have an enforceable provision that addresses the engineer's responsibility toward the environment. Suggests revisions to the code to accommodate the environmental impacts of civil engineering. (TW)

  2. Civil Engineering Technology Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland Community Coll., Farmington, MI. Office of Institutional Planning and Analysis.

    In 1991, a study was conducted by Oakland Community College (OCC) to evaluate the need for a proposed Civil Engineering Technology program. An initial examination of the literature focused on industry needs and the job market for civil engineering technicians. In order to gather information on local area employers' hiring practices and needs, a…

  3. [Psychiatric evaluation in civil law].

    PubMed

    Foerster, K

    1992-03-01

    Aspects of civil law of importance for the psychiatrist as expert witness are those dealing with disability pensions accident insurance, compensation in civil law and rights of the seriously disabled. The legal basis of each is briefly outlined, and some guidelines given for psychiatric court reports. Some outstanding theoretical and practical problems are mentioned. PMID:1579170

  4. Vocational Education and Civil Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office for Civil Rights (ED), Washington, DC.

    This pamphlet discusses the "Guidelines for Eliminating Discrimination and Denial of Services on the Basis of Race, Color, National Origin, Sex, and Handicap in Vocational Education Programs," first issued by the Office for Civil Rights in 1979, and how they relate to the civil rights of students and staff. It also outlines the responsibilities of…

  5. Nine for Equality Under Law: Civil Rights Litigation. A Report to the Ford Foundation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Robert B.

    This report reviews the litigation activities of the nine organizations which received financial assistance from the Ford Foundation to assess the usefulness of litigation as a means of advancing Constitutional civil rights. The litigation activities of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, and the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under…

  6. Linking Academic Integrity and Classroom Civility: Student Attitudes and Institutional Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Troy; Marini, Zopito; Radue, Jon

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the notion that student behaviour regarding academic integrity and classroom civility are linked, and that intervention methods used to resolve classroom incivility may be used as a response to academic dishonesty. We advance the view that academic integrity and classroom civility refer to a student's willingness to respect the…

  7. Rhetorical Perspectivism of Black Congressmen upon the 1875 Civil Rights Bill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, William A.

    In their new roles as congressmen after the Civil War, blacks, for the first time in American history, advanced views of civil rights that reflected black perspectives. One scheme for analyzing black rhetoric suggests that black congressmen did not share the perspective held by many whites--that blacks were inept individuals. Rather, the black…

  8. 76 FR 71431 - Civil Penalty Calculation Methodology

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Civil Penalty Calculation Methodology AGENCY: Federal... Uniform Fine Assessment (UFA) algorithm, which FMCSA currently uses for calculation of civil penalties... methodology for calculation of certain civil penalties. To induce compliance with federal regulations,...

  9. Pressure Distributions About Finite Wedges in Bounded and Unbounded Subsonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoughe, Patrick L; Prasse, Ernst I

    1953-01-01

    An analytical investigation of incompressible flow about wedges was made to determine effects of tunnel-wedge ratio and wedge angle on the wedge pressure distributions. The region of applicability of infinite wedge-type velocity distribution was examined for finite wedges. Theoretical and experimental pressure coefficients for various tunnel-wedge ratios, wedge angles, and subsonic Mach numbers were compared.

  10. The reversibility theorem for thin airfoils in subsonic and supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clinton E

    1950-01-01

    A method introduced by Munk is extended to prove that the light-curve slope of thin wings in either subsonic flow or supersonic flow is the same when the direction of flight of the wing is reversed. It is also shown that the wing reversal does not change the thickness drag, damping-in-roll parameter or the damping-in-pitch parameter.

  11. Data Reduction Functions for the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boney, Andy D.

    2014-01-01

    The Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel's data reduction software utilizes six major functions to compute the acquired data. These functions calculate engineering units, tunnel parameters, flowmeters, jet exhaust measurements, balance loads/model attitudes, and model /wall pressures. The input (required) variables, the output (computed) variables, and the equations and/or subfunction(s) associated with each major function are discussed.

  12. Two Dimensional Subsonic Euler Flows Past a Wall or a Symmetric Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Du, Lili; Xie, Chunjing; Xin, Zhouping

    2016-08-01

    The existence and uniqueness of two dimensional steady compressible Euler flows past a wall or a symmetric body are established. More precisely, given positive convex horizontal velocity in the upstream, there exists a critical value {ρ_cr} such that if the incoming density in the upstream is larger than {ρ_cr}, then there exists a subsonic flow past a wall. Furthermore, {ρ_cr} is critical in the sense that there is no such subsonic flow if the density of the incoming flow is less than {ρ_cr}. The subsonic flows possess large vorticity and positive horizontal velocity above the wall except at the corner points on the boundary. Moreover, the existence and uniqueness of a two dimensional subsonic Euler flow past a symmetric body are also obtained when the incoming velocity field is a general small perturbation of a constant velocity field and the density of the incoming flow is larger than a critical value. The asymptotic behavior of the flows is obtained with the aid of some integral estimates for the difference between the velocity field and its far field states.

  13. The similarity rules for second-order subsonic and supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyke, Milton D

    1958-01-01

    The similarity rules for linearized compressible flow theory (Gothert's rule and its supersonic counterpart) are extended to second order. It is shown that any second-order subsonic flow can be related to "nearly incompressible" flow past the same body, which can be calculated by the Janzen-Rayleigh method.

  14. Method of Making a Composite Panel Having Subsonic Transverse Wave Speed Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L. (Inventor); Klos, Jacob (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of making a composite panel having subsonic transverse wave speed characteristics which has first and second sheets sandwiching a core with at least one of the sheets being attached to the core at first regions thereof and unattached to the core at second regions thereof.

  15. Subsonic Euler Flows with Large Vorticity Through an Infinitely Long Axisymmetric Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Lili; Duan, Ben

    2016-04-01

    This paper is a sequel to the earlier work Du and Duan (J Diff Equ 250:813-847, 2011) on well-posedness of steady subsonic Euler flows through infinitely long three-dimensional axisymmetric nozzles. In Du and Duan (J Diff Equ 250:813-847, 2011), the authors showed the existence and uniqueness of the global subsonic Euler flows through an infinitely long axisymmetric nozzle, when the variation of Bernoulli's function in the upstream is sufficiently small and the mass flux of the incoming flow is less than some critical value. The smallness of the variation of Bernoulli's function in the upstream prevents the attendance of the possible singularity in the nozzles, however, at the same time it also leads that the vorticity of the ideal flow is sufficiently small in the whole nozzle and the flows are indeed adjacent to axisymmetric potential flows. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of the vorticity for the smooth subsonic ideal flows in infinitely long axisymmetric nozzles. We modify the formulation of the problem in the previous work Du and Duan (J Diff Equ 250:813-847, 2011) and the existence and uniqueness results on the smooth subsonic ideal polytropic flows in infinitely long axisymmetric nozzles without the restriction on the smallness of the vorticity are shown in this paper.

  16. 12. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF BUILDING 25C (SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS TEST FACILITY) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF BUILDING 25C (SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS TEST FACILITY) (1992). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  17. Advanced subsonic long-haul transport terminal area compatibility study. Volume 2: Research and technology recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The Terminal Area Compatibility (TAC) study is briefly summarized for background information. The most important research items for the areas of noise congestion, and emissions are identified. Other key research areas are also discussed. The 50 recommended research items are categorized by flight phase, technology, and compatibility benefits. The relationship of the TAC recommendations to the previous ATT recommendations is discussed. The bulk of the document contains the 50 recommended research items. For each item, the potential payoff, state of readiness, recommended action and estimated cost and schedule are given.

  18. Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Area of Interest (AOI) 6: Develop and Validate Aeroelastic Codes for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Kevin D.; Liu, Jong-Shang; Murthy, Durbha V.; Kruse, Marlin J.; James, Darrell

    1999-01-01

    AlliedSignal Engines, in cooperation with NASA GRC (National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center), completed an evaluation of recently-developed aeroelastic computer codes using test cases from the AlliedSignal Engines fan blisk and turbine databases. Test data included strain gage, performance, and steady-state pressure information obtained for conditions where synchronous or flutter vibratory conditions were found to occur. Aeroelastic codes evaluated included quasi 3-D UNSFLO (MIT Developed/AE Modified, Quasi 3-D Aeroelastic Computer Code), 2-D FREPS (NASA-Developed Forced Response Prediction System Aeroelastic Computer Code), and 3-D TURBO-AE (NASA/Mississippi State University Developed 3-D Aeroelastic Computer Code). Unsteady pressure predictions for the turbine test case were used to evaluate the forced response prediction capabilities of each of the three aeroelastic codes. Additionally, one of the fan flutter cases was evaluated using TURBO-AE. The UNSFLO and FREPS evaluation predictions showed good agreement with the experimental test data trends, but quantitative improvements are needed. UNSFLO over-predicted turbine blade response reductions, while FREPS under-predicted them. The inviscid TURBO-AE turbine analysis predicted no discernible blade response reduction, indicating the necessity of including viscous effects for this test case. For the TURBO-AE fan blisk test case, significant effort was expended getting the viscous version of the code to give converged steady flow solutions for the transonic flow conditions. Once converged, the steady solutions provided an excellent match with test data and the calibrated DAWES (AlliedSignal 3-D Viscous Steady Flow CFD Solver). However, efforts expended establishing quality steady-state solutions prevented exercising the unsteady portion of the TURBO-AE code during the present program. AlliedSignal recommends that unsteady pressure measurement data be obtained for both test cases examined for use in aeroelastic code validation.

  19. Technical Civilizations in the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2005-01-01

    Are there other technical civilizations in the galaxy? Past analyses come to different conclusions. Cocconi and Morrison demonstrated in 1959 that interstellar radio communication was possible and Drake conducted the first search for beacons in 1960. The Drake equation estimates the number of galactic civilizations that are transmitting beacons as the product of the rate of star formation in the galaxy, the fraction of stars with planets, their average number of earthlike planets, the fraction with intelligent life and interstellar communication, and the average lifetime of a technical civilization. The Drake model of the galaxy contains many technical civilizations with communication but no interstellar travel. Michael Hart in 1975 strongly challenged this model. Starting with the fact that no extraterrestrials have been observed on Earth, and assuming that interstellar colonization is possible, he concluded that it was very likely that we are the first civilization in our galaxy and that searching or beacons is probably a waste of time and money. The Fermi paradox similarly reasons that if extraterrestrials exist: they should be here, and asks, Where are they? The Hart/Fermi model of the galaxy contains only our civilization and suggests we may colonize the galaxy. A third galactic model is that we are alone but will never develop interstellar travel. The fourth alternate model has many technical civilizations, with interstellar travel and colonization. The possibilities are clear and momentous. Either we are the only technical civilization in the galaxy or there are others. Technical civilizations will colonize the galaxy or not. We have four cosmic conjectures - one or many, colonization or not - but however unlikely they seem based on our limited evidence, one of these four models must be collect.

  20. NASTRAN documentation for flutter analysis of advanced turbopropellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Gallo, A. M.; Skalski, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    An existing capability developed to conduct modal flutter analysis of tuned bladed-shrouded discs was modified to facilitate investigation of the subsonic unstalled flutter characteristics of advanced turbopropellers. The modifications pertain to the inclusion of oscillatory modal aerodynamic loads of blades with large (backward and forward) varying sweep.

  1. On the Importance of Very Light Internally Subsonic AGN Jets in Radio-mode AGN Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai

    2016-07-01

    Radio-mode active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in the evolution of galaxy groups and clusters. Its physical origin lies in the kiloparsec-scale interaction of AGN jets with the intracluster medium. Large-scale jet simulations often initiate light internally supersonic jets with density contrast 0.01 < η < 1. Here we argue for the first time for the importance of very light (η < 0.01) internally subsonic jets. We investigated the shapes of young X-ray cavities produced in a suite of hydrodynamic simulations, and found that bottom-wide cavities are always produced by internally subsonic jets, while internally supersonic jets inflate cylindrical, center-wide, or top-wide cavities. We found examples of real cavities with shapes analogous to those inflated in our simulations by internally subsonic and internally supersonic jets, suggesting a dichotomy of AGN jets according to their internal Mach numbers. We further studied the long-term cavity evolution, and found that old cavities resulted from light jets spread along the jet direction, while those produced by very light jets are significantly elongated along the perpendicular direction. The northwestern ghost cavity in Perseus is pancake shaped, providing tentative evidence for the existence of very light jets. Our simulations show that very light internally subsonic jets decelerate faster and rise much slower in the intracluster medium than light internally supersonic jets, possibly depositing a larger fraction of jet energy to cluster cores and alleviating the problem of low coupling efficiencies found previously. The internal Mach number points to the jet’s energy content, and internally subsonic jets are energetically dominated by non-kinetic energy, such as thermal energy, cosmic rays, or magnetic fields.

  2. A Civilization of Explorers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchesne, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The claim that there were "surprising similarities" between the West and the more advanced regions of Asia as late as 1800-1830, and that the Industrial Revolution was the one transformation that set Europe apart from Asia is central to the arguments of multicultural historians such as Kenneth Pomeranz, Bin Wong, Jack Goldstone, John Hobson, and…

  3. Experimental Pressure Distributions over Wing Tips at Mach Number 1.9 I : Wing Tip with Subsonic Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagger, James M; Mirels, Harold

    1949-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at a Mach number of 1.91 to determine spanwise pressure distribution over a wing tip in a region influenced by a sharp subsonic leading edge swept back at 70 degrees. Except for pressure distribution on the top surface in the immediate vicinity of the subsonic leading edge, the maximum difference between linearized theory and experimental data was 2 1/2 percent (of free-stream dynamic pressure) for angles of attack up to 4 degrees and 7 percent for angles of attack up to 8 degrees. Pressures on the top surface nearest the subsonic edge indicated local expansions beyond values predicted by linearized theory.

  4. Job Prospects for Civil Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basta, Nicholas

    1988-01-01

    Discusses civil engineering employment opportunities; indicates that the field is shrinking. Presents national placement and enrollment statistics. Identifies building and construction materials, and public works as areas of current and expanding opportunities. (CW)

  5. Civil Engineering Technology Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the civil engineering program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories: foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning); program…

  6. Teaching Mathematics to Civil Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, J. J.; Moore, E.

    1977-01-01

    This paper outlines a technique for teaching a rigorous course in calculus and differential equations which stresses applicability of the mathematics to problems in civil engineering. The method involves integration of subject matter and team teaching. (SD)

  7. U.S. Commission on Civil Rights' 40th Anniversary: The Road Ahead for Civil Rights. A Civil Rights Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Civil Rights Journal, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This special theme issue of the newly titled "Civil Rights Journal" (previously titled "Perspectives"), commemorates the 40th anniversary of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights by presenting a written symposium that offers a wide range of perspectives on civil rights realities and the future of civil rights. Three context-setting articles…

  8. Communication Needs of Thai Civil Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaewpet, Chamnong

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on an examination of the communication needs of a group of Thai civil engineering students. Twenty-five stakeholders helped identify the communication needs of the students by participating in individual interviews. These included employers, civil engineers, civil engineering lecturers, ex-civil engineering students of the…

  9. 14 CFR 406.9 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Civil penalties. 406.9 Section 406.9... § 406.9 Civil penalties. (a) Civil penalty liability. Under 51 U.S.C. 50917(c), a person found by the... civil penalty of not more than $110,000 for each violation, as adjusted for inflation. A...

  10. 29 CFR 98.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil judgment. 98.920 Section 98.920 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 98.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of competent...

  11. 2 CFR 180.915 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Civil judgment. 180.915 Section 180.915... GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 180.915 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of competent jurisdiction, whether by...

  12. 30 CFR 937.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civil penalties. 937.845 Section 937.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  13. 30 CFR 921.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil penalties. 921.845 Section 921.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MASSACHUSETTS § 921.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  14. 31 CFR 19.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civil judgment. 19.920 Section 19.920... SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 19.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of competent jurisdiction, whether by verdict, decision,...

  15. 30 CFR 912.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil penalties. 912.845 Section 912.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  16. 2 CFR 180.915 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Civil judgment. 180.915 Section 180.915... Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of competent jurisdiction, whether by verdict, decision, settlement, stipulation, other disposition which creates a...

  17. 30 CFR 942.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civil penalties. 942.845 Section 942.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply to the assessment of civil penalties...

  18. 29 CFR 1471.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civil judgment. 1471.920 Section 1471.920 Labor Regulations... SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1471.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of competent jurisdiction, whether by verdict, decision,...

  19. 2 CFR 180.915 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Civil judgment. 180.915 Section 180.915... Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of competent jurisdiction, whether by verdict, decision, settlement, stipulation, other disposition which creates a...

  20. 30 CFR 903.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civil penalties. 903.845 Section 903.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, applies to the assessment of civil penalties for...

  1. 30 CFR 922.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civil penalties. 922.845 Section 922.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MICHIGAN § 922.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  2. 14 CFR 406.9 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Civil penalties. 406.9 Section 406.9... § 406.9 Civil penalties. (a) Civil penalty liability. Under 49 U.S.C. 70115(c), a person found by the... civil penalty of not more than $110,000 for each violation, as adjusted for inflation. A...

  3. 30 CFR 921.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civil penalties. 921.845 Section 921.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MASSACHUSETTS § 921.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  4. 31 CFR 19.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civil judgment. 19.920 Section 19.920... SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 19.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of competent jurisdiction, whether by verdict, decision,...

  5. 30 CFR 912.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civil penalties. 912.845 Section 912.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  6. 7 CFR 2500.056 - Civil rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Closeout § 2500.056 Civil rights. Awardees must comply with the civil rights requirements of 7 CFR part 15, subpart A—USDA implementation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended. In accordance, no... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Civil rights. 2500.056 Section 2500.056...

  7. 30 CFR 921.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civil penalties. 921.845 Section 921.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MASSACHUSETTS § 921.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  8. 10 CFR 2.205 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Civil penalties. 2.205 Section 2.205 Energy NUCLEAR... for Imposing Civil Penalties § 2.205 Civil penalties. (a) Before instituting any proceeding to impose a civil penalty under section 234 of the Act, the Executive Director for Operations or the...

  9. 30 CFR 921.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civil penalties. 921.845 Section 921.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MASSACHUSETTS § 921.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  10. 30 CFR 905.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civil penalties. 905.845 Section 905.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE CALIFORNIA § 905.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply to the assessment of civil penalties...

  11. 7 CFR 2500.056 - Civil rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Closeout § 2500.056 Civil rights. Awardees must comply with the civil rights requirements of 7 CFR part 15, subpart A—USDA implementation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended. In accordance, no... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Civil rights. 2500.056 Section 2500.056...

  12. 30 CFR 933.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civil penalties. 933.845 Section 933.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE NORTH CAROLINA § 933.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chaper, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  13. 30 CFR 947.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil penalties. 947.845 Section 947.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE WASHINGTON § 947.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  14. 5 CFR 919.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Civil judgment. 919.920 Section 919.920 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 919.920 Civil judgment. Civil...

  15. 29 CFR 1471.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civil judgment. 1471.920 Section 1471.920 Labor Regulations... SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1471.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of competent jurisdiction, whether by verdict, decision,...

  16. 50 CFR 697.11 - Civil procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....11 Civil procedures. The civil procedure regulations at 15 CFR part 904 apply to civil penalties... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Civil procedures. 697.11 Section 697.11 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC...

  17. 30 CFR 910.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civil penalties. 910.845 Section 910.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  18. 30 CFR 910.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil penalties. 910.845 Section 910.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  19. 30 CFR 910.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civil penalties. 910.845 Section 910.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  20. 48 CFR 3.807 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Civil penalties. 3.807... Federal Transactions 3.807 Civil penalties. Agencies shall impose and collect civil penalties pursuant to the provisions of the Program Fraud and Civil Remedies Act, 31 U.S.C. 3803 (except subsection...

  1. 30 CFR 922.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civil penalties. 922.845 Section 922.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MICHIGAN § 922.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  2. 30 CFR 937.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil penalties. 937.845 Section 937.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  3. 14 CFR 406.9 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Civil penalties. 406.9 Section 406.9... § 406.9 Civil penalties. (a) Civil penalty liability. Under 51 U.S.C. 50917(c), a person found by the... civil penalty of not more than $110,000 for each violation, as adjusted for inflation. A...

  4. 30 CFR 922.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil penalties. 922.845 Section 922.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MICHIGAN § 922.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  5. 29 CFR 98.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civil judgment. 98.920 Section 98.920 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 98.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of competent...

  6. 31 CFR 19.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civil judgment. 19.920 Section 19.920... SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 19.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of competent jurisdiction, whether by verdict, decision,...

  7. 7 CFR 2500.056 - Civil rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Closeout § 2500.056 Civil rights. Awardees must comply with the civil rights requirements of 7 CFR part 15, subpart A—USDA implementation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended. In accordance, no... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Civil rights. 2500.056 Section 2500.056...

  8. 10 CFR 2.205 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Civil penalties. 2.205 Section 2.205 Energy NUCLEAR... for Modification, Suspension, or Revocation of a License, or for Imposing Civil Penalties § 2.205 Civil penalties. (a) Before instituting any proceeding to impose a civil penalty under section 234...

  9. 50 CFR 697.11 - Civil procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....11 Civil procedures. The civil procedure regulations at 15 CFR part 904 apply to civil penalties... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Civil procedures. 697.11 Section 697.11 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC...

  10. 30 CFR 922.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civil penalties. 922.845 Section 922.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MICHIGAN § 922.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  11. 48 CFR 3.807 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Civil penalties. 3.807... Federal Transactions 3.807 Civil penalties. Agencies shall impose and collect civil penalties pursuant to the provisions of the Program Fraud and Civil Remedies Act, 31 U.S.C. 3803 (except subsection...

  12. 30 CFR 942.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civil penalties. 942.845 Section 942.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply to the assessment of civil penalties...

  13. 48 CFR 3.807 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Civil penalties. 3.807... Federal Transactions 3.807 Civil penalties. Agencies shall impose and collect civil penalties pursuant to the provisions of the Program Fraud and Civil Remedies Act, 31 U.S.C. 3803 (except subsection...

  14. 30 CFR 947.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civil penalties. 947.845 Section 947.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE WASHINGTON § 947.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  15. 50 CFR 697.11 - Civil procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....11 Civil procedures. The civil procedure regulations at 15 CFR part 904 apply to civil penalties... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Civil procedures. 697.11 Section 697.11 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC...

  16. 31 CFR 19.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil judgment. 19.920 Section 19.920... SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 19.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of competent jurisdiction, whether by verdict, decision,...

  17. 30 CFR 912.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civil penalties. 912.845 Section 912.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  18. 30 CFR 903.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civil penalties. 903.845 Section 903.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, applies to the assessment of civil penalties for...

  19. 29 CFR 98.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civil judgment. 98.920 Section 98.920 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 98.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of competent...

  20. 29 CFR 1471.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civil judgment. 1471.920 Section 1471.920 Labor Regulations... SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1471.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of competent jurisdiction, whether by verdict, decision,...

  1. 30 CFR 903.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civil penalties. 903.845 Section 903.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, applies to the assessment of civil penalties for...

  2. 30 CFR 933.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil penalties. 933.845 Section 933.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE NORTH CAROLINA § 933.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chaper, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  3. 30 CFR 933.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civil penalties. 933.845 Section 933.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE NORTH CAROLINA § 933.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chaper, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  4. 30 CFR 942.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civil penalties. 942.845 Section 942.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply to the assessment of civil penalties...

  5. 10 CFR 2.205 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Civil penalties. 2.205 Section 2.205 Energy NUCLEAR... for Modification, Suspension, or Revocation of a License, or for Imposing Civil Penalties § 2.205 Civil penalties. (a) Before instituting any proceeding to impose a civil penalty under section 234...

  6. 29 CFR 1471.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil judgment. 1471.920 Section 1471.920 Labor Regulations... SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1471.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of competent jurisdiction, whether by verdict, decision,...

  7. 30 CFR 905.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil penalties. 905.845 Section 905.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE CALIFORNIA § 905.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply to the assessment of civil penalties...

  8. 48 CFR 3.807 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Civil penalties. 3.807... Federal Transactions 3.807 Civil penalties. Agencies shall impose and collect civil penalties pursuant to the provisions of the Program Fraud and Civil Remedies Act, 31 U.S.C. 3803 (except subsection...

  9. 30 CFR 939.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civil penalties. 939.845 Section 939.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  10. 30 CFR 903.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil penalties. 903.845 Section 903.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, applies to the assessment of civil penalties for...

  11. 30 CFR 942.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil penalties. 942.845 Section 942.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply to the assessment of civil penalties...

  12. 30 CFR 937.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civil penalties. 937.845 Section 937.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  13. 30 CFR 939.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil penalties. 939.845 Section 939.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  14. 30 CFR 939.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civil penalties. 939.845 Section 939.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  15. 30 CFR 910.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civil penalties. 910.845 Section 910.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  16. 30 CFR 912.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civil penalties. 912.845 Section 912.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  17. 14 CFR 406.9 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Civil penalties. 406.9 Section 406.9... § 406.9 Civil penalties. (a) Civil penalty liability. Under 49 U.S.C. 70115(c), a person found by the... civil penalty of not more than $110,000 for each violation, as adjusted for inflation. A...

  18. 30 CFR 937.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civil penalties. 937.845 Section 937.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  19. 50 CFR 697.11 - Civil procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....11 Civil procedures. The civil procedure regulations at 15 CFR part 904 apply to civil penalties... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Civil procedures. 697.11 Section 697.11 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC...

  20. 30 CFR 905.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civil penalties. 905.845 Section 905.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE CALIFORNIA § 905.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply to the assessment of civil penalties...

  1. 29 CFR 98.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Civil judgment. 98.920 Section 98.920 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 98.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of competent...

  2. 5 CFR 919.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Civil judgment. 919.920 Section 919.920 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 919.920 Civil judgment. Civil...

  3. 30 CFR 939.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civil penalties. 939.845 Section 939.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  4. 10 CFR 2.205 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Civil penalties. 2.205 Section 2.205 Energy NUCLEAR... for Imposing Civil Penalties § 2.205 Civil penalties. (a) Before instituting any proceeding to impose a civil penalty under section 234 of the Act, the Executive Director for Operations or the...

  5. 30 CFR 947.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civil penalties. 947.845 Section 947.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE WASHINGTON § 947.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  6. 30 CFR 947.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civil penalties. 947.845 Section 947.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE WASHINGTON § 947.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  7. 5 CFR 919.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Civil judgment. 919.920 Section 919.920 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 919.920 Civil judgment. Civil...

  8. 2 CFR 180.915 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Civil judgment. 180.915 Section 180.915... ON GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 180.915 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of competent jurisdiction,...

  9. 30 CFR 933.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civil penalties. 933.845 Section 933.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE NORTH CAROLINA § 933.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chaper, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  10. 5 CFR 919.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Civil judgment. 919.920 Section 919.920 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 919.920 Civil judgment. Civil...

  11. 30 CFR 905.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Civil penalties. 905.845 Section 905.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE CALIFORNIA § 905.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply to the assessment of civil penalties...

  12. 50 CFR 697.11 - Civil procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....11 Civil procedures. The civil procedure regulations at 15 CFR part 904 apply to civil penalties... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil procedures. 697.11 Section 697.11 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC...

  13. 30 CFR 905.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 905.845 Section 905.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE CALIFORNIA § 905.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply to the assessment of civil penalties...

  14. 30 CFR 912.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 912.845 Section 912.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  15. 30 CFR 942.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 942.845 Section 942.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply to the assessment of civil penalties...

  16. 10 CFR 2.205 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil penalties. 2.205 Section 2.205 Energy NUCLEAR... for Imposing Civil Penalties § 2.205 Civil penalties. (a) Before instituting any proceeding to impose a civil penalty under section 234 of the Act, the Executive Director for Operations or the...

  17. 30 CFR 933.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 933.845 Section 933.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE NORTH CAROLINA § 933.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chaper, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  18. 30 CFR 903.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 903.845 Section 903.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, applies to the assessment of civil penalties for...

  19. 30 CFR 922.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 922.845 Section 922.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MICHIGAN § 922.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  20. 14 CFR 406.9 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil penalties. 406.9 Section 406.9... § 406.9 Civil penalties. (a) Civil penalty liability. Under 49 U.S.C. 70115(c), a person found by the... civil penalty of not more than $100,000 for each violation, as adjusted for inflation. A...

  1. 30 CFR 947.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 947.845 Section 947.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE WASHINGTON § 947.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  2. 29 CFR 98.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Civil judgment. 98.920 Section 98.920 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 98.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of competent...

  3. 29 CFR 1471.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil judgment. 1471.920 Section 1471.920 Labor Regulations... SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1471.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of competent jurisdiction, whether by verdict, decision,...

  4. 48 CFR 3.807 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civil penalties. 3.807... Federal Transactions 3.807 Civil penalties. Agencies shall impose and collect civil penalties pursuant to the provisions of the Program Fraud and Civil Remedies Act, 31 U.S.C. 3803 (except subsection...

  5. 30 CFR 941.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 941.845 Section 941.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH DAKOTA § 941.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  6. 30 CFR 939.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 939.845 Section 939.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  7. 30 CFR 910.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 910.845 Section 910.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  8. 7 CFR 3017.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil judgment. 3017.920 Section 3017.920 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 3017.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of competent jurisdiction,...

  9. 30 CFR 921.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 921.845 Section 921.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MASSACHUSETTS § 921.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed...

  10. 30 CFR 937.845 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil penalties. 937.845 Section 937.845... PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.845 Civil penalties. Part 845 of this chapter, Civil Penalties, shall apply when civil penalties are assessed for...

  11. 5 CFR 919.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil judgment. 919.920 Section 919.920 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 919.920 Civil judgment. Civil...

  12. 31 CFR 19.920 - Civil judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil judgment. 19.920 Section 19.920... SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 19.920 Civil judgment. Civil judgment means the disposition of a civil action by any court of competent jurisdiction, whether by verdict, decision,...

  13. Applying and validating the RANS-3D flow-solver for evaluating a subsonic serpentine diffuser geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Michael J.; Won, Mark J.; Cosentino, Gary B.; Te, Alexander

    1993-01-01

    Subsonic inlet ducts for advanced, high-performance aircraft are evolving towards complex three-dimensional shapes for reasons of overall integration and weight. These factors lead to diffuser geometries that may sacrifice inlet performance, unless careful attention to design details and boundary layer management techniques are employed. The ability of viscous computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis of such geometries to aid the aircraft configurator in this complex design problem is herein examined. The RANS-3D Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solver is applied to model the complex flowfield occurring in a representative diffuser geometry and the solutions are compared to experimental results from a static test of the inlet duct. The computational results are shown to compare very favorably with experimental results over a range of mass flow rates, including those involving large amounts of separation in the diffuser. In addition, a novel grid topology is presented, and two turbulence models are evaluated in this study as part of the RANS-3D code.

  14. Acoustic Data Processing and Transient Signal Analysis for the Hybrid Wing Body 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.; Spalt, Taylor B.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    An advanced vehicle concept, the HWB N2A-EXTE aircraft design, was tested in NASA Langley's 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel to study its acoustic characteristics for var- ious propulsion system installation and airframe con gurations. A signi cant upgrade to existing data processing systems was implemented, with a focus on portability and a re- duction in turnaround time. These requirements were met by updating codes originally written for a cluster environment and transferring them to a local workstation while en- abling GPU computing. Post-test, additional processing of the time series was required to remove transient hydrodynamic gusts from some of the microphone time series. A novel automated procedure was developed to analyze and reject contaminated blocks of data, under the assumption that the desired acoustic signal of interest was a band-limited sta- tionary random process, and of lower variance than the hydrodynamic contamination. The procedure is shown to successfully identify and remove contaminated blocks of data and retain the desired acoustic signal. Additional corrections to the data, mainly background subtraction, shear layer refraction calculations, atmospheric attenuation and microphone directivity corrections, were all necessary for initial analysis and noise assessments. These were implemented for the post-processing of spectral data, and are shown to behave as expected.

  15. Space civil engineering - A new discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadeh, Willy Z.; Criswell, Marvin E.

    1991-01-01

    Space Civil Engineering is an emerging engineering discipline that focuses on extending and expanding the Civil Engineering know-how and practice to the development and maintenance of infrastructure on celestial bodies. Space Civil Engineering is presently being developed as a new discipline within the Department of Civil Engineering at Colorado State University under a recently established NASA Space Grant College Program. Academic programs geared toward creating Space Civil Engineering Options at both undergraduate and graduate levels are being formulated. Basic ideas and concepts of the curriculum in the Space Civil Engineering Option at both undergraduate and graduate levels are presented. The role of Space Civil Engineering in the Space Program is discussed.

  16. Uncertainty in estimates of the number of extraterrestrial civilizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    An estimation of the number N of communicative civilizations is made by means of Drake's formula which involves the combination of several quantities, each of which is to some extent uncertain. It is shown that the uncertainty in any quantity may be represented by a probability distribution function, even if that quantity is itself a probability. The uncertainty of current estimates of N is derived principally from uncertainty in estimates of the lifetime of advanced civilizations. It is argued that this is due primarily to uncertainty concerning the existence of a Galactic Federation which is in turn contingent upon uncertainty about whether the limitations of present-day physics are absolute or (in the event that there exists a yet undiscovered hyperphysics) transient. It is further argued that it is advantageous to consider explicitly these underlying assumptions in order to compare the probable numbers of civilizations operating radio beacons, permitting radio leakage, dispatching probes for radio surveillance for dispatching vehicles for manned surveillance.

  17. Subsonic Wake Characterization of the Orion Capsule Using PIV in the Ames UPWT 11-foot Wind Tunnel (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heineck, James T.; Ross, James C.; Yamauchi, Gloria K.

    2015-01-01

    The subsonic regime of Crew Capsule reentry has a very turbulent waker through which the Drogue Chutes must deploy. This presentation describes the particle image velocimetry measurement campaign used to help retire the risk.

  18. Subsonic-Sonic Limit of Approximate Solutions to Multidimensional Steady Euler Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gui-Qiang; Huang, Fei-Min; Wang, Tian-Yi

    2016-02-01

    A compactness framework is established for approximate solutions to subsonic-sonic flows governed by the steady full Euler equations for compressible fluids in arbitrary dimension. The existing compactness frameworks for the two-dimensional irrotational case do not directly apply for the steady full Euler equations in higher dimensions. The new compactness framework we develop applies for both non-homentropic and rotational flows. One of our main observations is that the compactness can be achieved by using only natural weak estimates for the mass balance and the vorticity, along with the Bernoulli law and the entropy relation, through a more delicate analysis on the phase space. As direct applications, we establish two existence theorems for multidimensional subsonic-sonic full Euler flows through infinitely long nozzles.

  19. Calculation of Turbulent Subsonic Diffuser Flows Using the NPARC Navier-Stokes Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudek, J. C.; Georgiadis, N. J.; Yoder, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    Axisymmetric subsonic diffuser flows were calculated with the NPARC Navier-Stokes code in order to determine the effects various code features have on the flow solutions. The code features examined in this work were turbulence models and boundary conditions. Four turbulence models available in NPARC were used: the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model, the Baldwin-Barth one-equation model, and the Chien kappa-epsilon and Wilcox kappa-omega two-equation models. The three boundary conditions examined were the free boundary, the mass flux boundary and the subsonic outflow with variable static pressure. In addition to boundary condition type, the geometry downstream of the diffuser was varied to see if upstream influences were present. The NPARC results are compared with experimental data and recommendations are given for using NPARC to compute similar flows.

  20. Generalization of the subsonic kernel function in the s-plane, with applications to flutter analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, H. J.; Desmarais, R. N.

    1984-01-01

    A generalized subsonic unsteady aerodynamic kernel function, valid for both growing and decaying oscillatory motions, is developed and applied in a modified flutter analysis computer program to solve the boundaries of constant damping ratio as well as the flutter boundary. Rates of change of damping ratios with respect to dynamic pressure near flutter are substantially lower from the generalized-kernel-function calculations than from the conventional velocity-damping (V-g) calculation. A rational function approximation for aerodynamic forces used in control theory for s-plane analysis gave rather good agreement with kernel-function results, except for strongly damped motion at combinations of high (subsonic) Mach number and reduced frequency.

  1. Design Sensitivity for a Subsonic Aircraft Predicted by Neural Network and Regression Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Dale A.; Patnaik, Surya N.

    2005-01-01

    A preliminary methodology was obtained for the design optimization of a subsonic aircraft by coupling NASA Langley Research Center s Flight Optimization System (FLOPS) with NASA Glenn Research Center s design optimization testbed (COMETBOARDS with regression and neural network analysis approximators). The aircraft modeled can carry 200 passengers at a cruise speed of Mach 0.85 over a range of 2500 n mi and can operate on standard 6000-ft takeoff and landing runways. The design simulation was extended to evaluate the optimal airframe and engine parameters for the subsonic aircraft to operate on nonstandard runways. Regression and neural network approximators were used to examine aircraft operation on runways ranging in length from 4500 to 7500 ft.

  2. Alignment of dust particles by ion drag forces in subsonic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Piel, Alexander

    2011-07-15

    The role of ion drag forces for the alignment of dust particles is studied for subsonic flows. While alignment by wake-field attraction is a well known mechanism for supersonic flows, it is argued here that ion-scattering forces become more important in subsonic ion flows. A model of non-overlapping collisions is introduced and numerical results are discussed. For typical conditions of dusty plasma experiments, alignment by drag forces is found strong enough to overcome the destabilizing force from Coulomb repulsion between dust particles. It turns out that the major contribution to the horizontal restoring force originates from the transverse momentum transfer, which is usually neglected in ion drag force calculations because of an assumed rotational symmetry of the flow.

  3. Aircraft acoustics. I - Exterior noise of subsonic passenger aircraft and helicopters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munin, Anatolii Grigor'evich

    Problems related to the effect of the exterior noise produced by subsonic aircraft and helicopters on the environment and man are examined. The principal sources of noise produced by aircraft and helicopters are identified, and the physical pattern of noise generation is examined. Various method of reducing the noise of aircraft and helicopters are discussed, and methods are presented for predicting the acoustic environment at airports with allowance for the size of the aircraft park and the dynamics of flight operations.

  4. Langley 14- by 22-foot subsonic tunnel test engineer's data acquisition and reduction manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinto, P. Frank; Orie, Nettie M.

    1994-01-01

    The Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel is used to test a large variety of aircraft and nonaircraft models. To support these investigations, a data acquisition system has been developed that has both static and dynamic capabilities. The static data acquisition and reduction system is described; the hardware and software of this system are explained. The theory and equations used to reduce the data obtained in the wind tunnel are presented; the computer code is not included.

  5. The drag force on a subsonic projectile in a fluid complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ivlev, A. V.; Zhukhovitskii, D. I.

    2012-09-15

    The incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is employed to describe a subsonic particle flow induced in complex plasmas by a moving projectile. Drag forces acting on the projectile in different flow regimes are calculated. It is shown that, along with the regular neutral gas drag, there is an additional force exerted on the projectile due to dissipation in the surrounding particle fluid. This additional force provides significant contribution to the total drag.

  6. Unsteady effects of a control surface in two dimensional subsonic and transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenon, R.; Desopper, A.; Sides, J.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental results of steady and unsteady pressure measurements, carried out in subsonic and transonic flow on a 16 percent relative thickness supercritical aerofoil, equipped with a trailing edge flap involving 25 percent of the chord, in a sinusoidal motion are given. These experimental results are compared with those obtained by various methods of steady and unsteady inviscid flow calculations. Some calculation results in which viscous effects have been taken into account, for both steady and unsteady flows, are also presented.

  7. The incorporation of plotting capability into the Unified Subsonic Supersonic Aerodynamic Analysis program, version B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, O. A.

    1980-01-01

    The B01 version of the United Subsonic Supersonic Aerodynamic Analysis program is the result of numerous modifications and additions made to the B00 version. These modifications and additions affect the program input, its computational options, the code readability, and the overlay structure. The following are described: (1) the revised input; (2) the plotting overlay programs which were also modified, and their associated subroutines, (3) the auxillary files used by the program, the revised output data; and (4) the program overlay structure.

  8. Numerical Prediction of Periodic Vortex Shedding in Subsonic and Transonic Turbine Cascade Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensink, C.

    1996-05-01

    Periodic vortex shedding at the trailing edge of a turbine cascade has been investigated numerically for a subsonic and a transonic cascade flow. The numerical investigation was carried out by a finite volume multiblock code, solving the 2D compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations on a set of non-overlapping grid blocks that are connected in a conservative way. Comparisons are made with experimental results previously obtained by Sieverding and Heinemann.

  9. Analysis of boundary conditions for SSME subsonic internal viscous flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    A study was completed of mathematically proper boundary conditions for unique numerical solution of internal, viscous, subsonic flows in the space shuttle main engine. The study has concentrated on well posed considerations, with emphasis on computational efficiency and numerically stable boundary condition statements. The method of implementing the established boundary conditions is applicable to a wide variety of finite difference and finite element codes, as demonstrated.

  10. Automatic computation of Euler-marching and subsonic grids for wing-fuselage configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, Raymond L.; Adams, Mary S.; Krishnan, Ramki R.

    1994-01-01

    Algebraic procedures are described for the automatic generation of structured, single-block flow computation grids for relatively simple configurations (wing, fuselage, and fin). For supersonic flows, a quasi two-dimensional grid for Euler-marching codes is developed, and some sample results in graphical form are included. A type of grid for subsonic flow calculation is also described. The techniques are algebraic and are based on a generalization of the method of transfinite interpolation.

  11. The Performance of a Subsonic Diffuser Designed for High Speed Turbojet-Propelled Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesiadny, Thomas J. (Technical Monitor); Wendt, Bruce J.

    2004-01-01

    An initial-phase subsonic diffuser has been designed for the turbojet flowpath of the hypersonic x43B flight demonstrator vehicle. The diffuser fit into a proposed mixed-compression supersonic inlet system and featured a cross-sectional shape transitioning flowpath (high aspect ratio rectangular throat-to-circular engine face) and a centerline offset. This subsonic diffuser has been fabricated and tested at the W1B internal flow facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. At an operating throat Mach number of 0.79, baseline Pitot pressure recovery was found to be just under 0.9, and DH distortion intensity was about 0.4 percent. The diffuser internal flow stagnated, but did not separate on the offset surface of this initial-phase subsonic diffuser. Small improvements in recovery (+0.4 percent) and DH distortion (-32 percent) were obtained from using vane vortex generator flow control applied just downstream of the diffuser throat. The optimum vortex generator array patterns produced inflow boundary layer divergence (local downwash) on the offset surface centerline of the diffuser, and an inflow boundary layer convergence (local upwash) on the centerline of the opposite surface.

  12. Asymptotic theory of propeller noise. I - Subsonic single-rotation propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, A. B.; Crighton, D. G.

    1989-09-01

    Asymptotic expressions for the harmonic amplitudes and phases of the far-field acoustic pressure generated by a single-rotation propeller operating at subsonic tip relative Mach number are presented. These expressions are found from asymptotic approximations to integrals of the steady-loading distribution and of the blade thickness distribution over the surface of one blade, under the assumption that the number of blades B is large (but the harmonic number m is arbitrary). The asymptotics demonstrate rigorously that in this limit the noise of subsonic propellers is entirely tip generated, and described by very simple formulas giving explicit dependence on harmonic number, Mach number, and radiation angle. Excellent agreements is found between the asymptotic prediction and full numerical evaluation of the acoustic field (and between the latter and experimental data taken by Rolls-Royce in flyovers of a Gannet aircraft). Numerous trends and observations noted in the literature are explained by the asymptotic formulas, which are also extended to predict the acoustic benefit of sweep at subsonic conditions.

  13. Nonlinear evolution of subsonic and supersonic disturbances on a compressible free shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leib, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of a nonlinear-nonequilibrium-viscous critical layer on the spatial evolution of subsonic and supersonic instability modes on a compressible free shear layer is considered. It is shown that the instability wave amplitude is governed by an integrodifferential equation with cubic-type nonlinearity. Numerical and asymptotic solutions to this equation show that the amplitude either ends in a singularity at a finite downstream distance or reaches an equilibrium value, depending on the Prandtl number, viscosity law, viscous parameter and a real parameter which is determined by the linear inviscid stability theory. A necessary condition for the existence of the equilibrium solution is derived, and whether or not this condition is met is determined numerically for a wide range of physical parameters including both subsonic and supersonic disturbances. it is found that no equilibrium solution exists for the subsonic modes unless the temperature ratio of the low-to-high-speed streams exceeds a critical value, while equilibrium solutions for the most rapidly growing supersonic mode exist over most of the parameter range examined.

  14. A NEW DENSITY VARIANCE-MACH NUMBER RELATION FOR SUBSONIC AND SUPERSONIC ISOTHERMAL TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Konstandin, L.; Girichidis, P.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R. S.

    2012-12-20

    The probability density function of the gas density in subsonic and supersonic, isothermal, driven turbulence is analyzed using a systematic set of hydrodynamical grid simulations with resolutions of up to 1024{sup 3} cells. We perform a series of numerical experiments with root-mean-square (rms) Mach number M ranging from the nearly incompressible, subsonic (M=0.1) to the highly compressible, supersonic (M=15) regime. We study the influence of two extreme cases for the driving mechanism by applying a purely solenoidal (divergence-free) and a purely compressive (curl-free) forcing field to drive the turbulence. We find that our measurements fit the linear relation between the rms Mach number and the standard deviation (std. dev.) of the density distribution in a wide range of Mach numbers, where the proportionality constant depends on the type of forcing. In addition, we propose a new linear relation between the std. dev. of the density distribution {sigma}{sub {rho}} and that of the velocity in compressible modes, i.e., the compressible component of the rms Mach number, M{sub comp}. In this relation the influence of the forcing is significantly reduced, suggesting a linear relation between {sigma}{sub {rho}} and M{sub comp}, independent of the forcing, and ranging from the subsonic to the supersonic regime.

  15. Subsonic flight test evaluation of a performance seeking control algorithm on an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, Glenn B.; Orme, John S.

    1992-01-01

    The subsonic flight test evaluation phase of the NASA F-15 (powered by F 100 engines) performance seeking control program was completed for single-engine operation at part- and military-power settings. The subsonic performance seeking control algorithm optimizes the quasi-steady-state performance of the propulsion system for three modes of operation. The minimum fuel flow mode minimizes fuel consumption. The minimum thrust mode maximizes thrust at military power. Decreases in thrust-specific fuel consumption of 1 to 2 percent were measured in the minimum fuel flow mode; these fuel savings are significant, especially for supersonic cruise aircraft. Decreases of up to approximately 100 degree R in fan turbine inlet temperature were measured in the minimum temperature mode. Temperature reductions of this magnitude would more than double turbine life if inlet temperature was the only life factor. Measured thrust increases of up to approximately 15 percent in the maximum thrust mode cause substantial increases in aircraft acceleration. The system dynamics of the closed-loop algorithm operation were good. The subsonic flight phase has validated the performance seeking control technology, which can significantly benefit the next generation of fighter and transport aircraft.

  16. Subsonic Reynolds Number Effects on a Diamond Wing Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.; Ghee, T. A.

    2001-01-01

    An advanced diamond-wing configuration was tested at low speeds in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) in air at chord Reynolds numbers from 4.4 million (typical wind-tunnel conditions) to 24 million (nominal flight value). Extensive variations on high-lift rigging were explored as part of a broad multinational program. The analysis for this study is focused on the cruise and landing settings of the wing high-lift systems. Three flow domains were identified from the data and provide a context for the ensuing data analysis. Reynolds number effects were examined in incremental form based upon attached-flow theory. A similar approach showed very little effect of low-speed compressibility.

  17. Aviation safety and automation technology for subsonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, James A.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed here are aviation safety human factors and air traffic control (ATC) automation research conducted at the NASA Ames Research Center. Research results are given in the areas of flight deck and ATC automations, displays and warning systems, crew coordination, and crew fatigue and jet lag. Accident investigation and an incident reporting system that is used to guide the human factors research is discussed. A design philosophy for human-centered automation is given, along with an evaluation of automation on advanced technology transports. Intelligent error tolerant systems such as electronic checklists are discussed along with design guidelines for reducing procedure errors. The data on evaluation of Crew Resource Management (CRM) training indicates highly significant positive changes in appropriate flight deck behavior and more effective use of available resources for crew members receiving the training.

  18. Advanced High-Temperature Engine Materials Technology Progresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced High Temperature Engine Materials Technology Program (HITEMP) is to generate technology for advanced materials and structural analysis that will increase fuel economy, improve reliability, extend life, and reduce operating costs for 21st century civil propulsion systems. The primary focus is on fan and compressor materials (polymer-matrix composites--PMC's), compressor and turbine materials (superalloys, and metal-matrix and intermetallic-matrix composites--MMC's and IMC's) and turbine materials (ceramic-matrix composites--CMC's). These advanced materials are being developed by in-house researchers and on grants and contracts. NASA considers this program to be a focused materials and structures research effort that builds on our base research programs and supports component-development projects. HITEMP is coordinated with the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Program and the Department of Defense/NASA Integrated High-Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) Program. Advanced materials and structures technologies from HITEMP may be used in these future applications. Recent technical accomplishments have not only improved the state-of-the-art but have wideranging applications to industry. A high-temperature thin-film strain gage was developed to measure both dynamic and static strain up to 1100 C (2000 F). The gage's unique feature is that it is minimally intrusive. This technology, which received a 1995 R&D 100 Award, has been transferred to AlliedSignal Engines, General Electric Company, and Ford Motor Company. Analytical models developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center were used to study Textron Specialty Materials' manufacturing process for titanium-matrix composite rings. Implementation of our recommendations on tooling and processing conditions resulted in the production of defect free rings. In the Lincoln Composites/AlliedSignal/Lewis cooperative program, a composite compressor case is being manufactured with a Lewis

  19. Suggestions for Popularizing Civil Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    The public generally is taking very little interest in the progress of Civil Aviation, and the time has come to educate the public in aeronautics and to make them realize the far-reaching importance of air transport. Briefly, the whole problem resolves itself into discovering and applying means for bringing some of the many aspects and effects of civil aviation into the everyday lives of the public. The report suggests three principal groups of methods: (1) Bring aviation into daily contact with the public. (2) Bring the public into daily contact with aviation. (3) General publicity.

  20. Vehicle for civil helicopter ride quality research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. J.; Schlegel, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    A research aircraft for investigating the factors involved in civil helicopter operations was developed for NASA Langley Research Center. The aircraft is a reconfigured 17000 kg (36000 lb) military transport helicopter. The basic aircraft was reconfigured with advanced acoustic treatment, air-conditioning, and a 16-seat airline cabin. During the spring of 1975, the aircraft was flight tested to measure interior environment characteristics - noise and vibration - and was flown on 60 subjective flight missions with over 600 different subjects. Data flights established noise levels somewhat higher than expected, with a pure tone at 1400 Hz and vertical vibration levels between 0.07g and 0.17g. The noise and vibration levels were documented during subjective flight evaluations as being the primary source of discomfort. The aircraft will be utilized to document in detail the impact of various noise and vibration levels on passenger comfort during typical short-haul missions.