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Sample records for advanced supersonic cruise

  1. An economic study of an advanced technology supersonic cruise vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. L.; Williams, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of the methods used and the results of an economic study of an advanced technology supersonic cruise vehicle. This vehicle was designed for a maximum range of 4000 n.mi. at a cruise speed of Mach 2.7 and carrying 292 passengers. The economic study includes the estimation of aircraft unit cost, operating cost, and idealized cash flow and discounted cash flow return on investment. In addition, it includes a sensitivity study on the effects of unit cost, manufacturing cost, production quantity, average trip length, fuel cost, load factor, and fare on the aircraft's economic feasibility.

  2. Performance and benefits of an advanced technology supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzsimmons, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    The results of four years research on technology are synthesized in an advanced supersonic cruise aircraft design. Comparisons are presented with the former United States SST and the British-French Concorde, including aerodynamic efficiency, propulsion efficiency, weight efficiency, and community noise. Selected trade study results are presented on the subjects of design cruise Mach number, engine cycle selection, and noise suppression. The critical issue of program timing is addressed and some observations made regarding the impact that timing has on engine selection and minimization of program risk.

  3. Status of noise technology for advanced supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. R.; Gutierrez, O. A.

    1980-01-01

    Developments in acoustic technology applicable to advanced supersonic cruise aircraft, particularly those which relate to jet noise and its suppression are reviewed. The noise reducing potential of high radius ratio, inverted velocity profile coannular jets is demonstrated by model scale results from a wide range of nozzle geometries, including some simulated flight cases. These results were verified statistically at large scale on a variable cycle engine (VCE) testbed. A preliminary assessment of potential VCE noise sources such as fan and core noise is made, based on the testbed data. Recent advances in the understanding of flight effects are reviewed. The status of component noise prediction methods is assessed on the basis of recent test data, and the remaining problem areas are outlined.

  4. Progress in supersonic cruise technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, C.

    1983-01-01

    The Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) program identified significant improvements in the technology areas of aerodynamics, structures, propulsion, noise reduction, takeoff and landing procedures, and advanced configuration concepts. These improvements, when combined in a large supersonic cruise vehicle, offer a far greater technology advance than generally realized. They offer the promise of an advanced commercial family of aircraft which are environmentally acceptable, have flexible range-payload capability, and are economically viable. These same areas of technology have direct application to smaller advanced military aircraft and to supersonic executive aircraft. Several possible applications will be addressed.

  5. Advanced structures technology applied to a supersonic cruise arrow-wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Davis, G. W.

    1976-01-01

    The application of advanced technology to a promising aerodynamic configuration was explored to investigate the improved payload range characteristics over the configuration postulated during the National SST Program. The results of an analytical study performed to determine the best structural approach for design of a Mach number 2.7 arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft are highlighted. The data conducted under the auspices of the Structures Directorate of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Langley Research Center, established firm technical bases from which further trend studies were conducted to quantitatively assess the benefits and feasibility of using advanced structures technology to arrive at a viable advanced supersonic cruise aircraft.

  6. Supersonic Cruise Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, F. Edward

    1985-01-01

    The history and status of supersonic cruise research is covered. The early research efforts of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and efforts during the B-70 and SST phase are included. Technological progress made during the NASA Supersonic Cruise Research and Variable Cycle Engine programs are presented. While emphasis is on NASA's contributions to supersonic cruise research in the U.S., also noted are developments in England, France, and Russia. Written in nontechnical language, this book presents the most critical technology issues and research findings.

  7. Application of an advanced computerized structural design system to an arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. C.; Yates, E. C., Jr.; Turner, M. J.; Grande, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    A structural design study of an arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft has been made using the integrated design system, ATLAS, and a relatively large analytical finite-element model containing 8500 degrees of freedom. This paper focuses on structural design methods developed and used in support of the study with emphasis on aeroelasticity. The use of ATLAS permitted (1) automatic resizing of the wing structure for multiple load conditions, (2) rapid evaluation of aeroelastic effects, and (3) an iterative approach to the correction of flutter deficiencies. The significant results of the study are discussed along with the advantages derived from the use of an advanced structural design system in preliminary design studies.

  8. Study of advanced composite structural design concepts for an arrow wing supersonic cruise configuration, task 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A structural design study was conducted to assess the relative merits of structural concepts using advanced composite materials for an advanced supersonic aircraft cruising at Mach 2.7. The configuration and structural arrangement developed during Task I and II of the study, was used as the baseline configuration. Allowable stresses and strains were established for boron and advanced graphite fibers based on projected fiber properties available in the next decade. Structural concepts were designed and analyzed using graphite polyimide and boron polyimide, applied to stiffened panels and conventional sandwich panels. The conventional sandwich panels were selected as the structural concept to be used on the wing structure. The upper and lower surface panels of the Task I arrow wing were redesigned using high-strength graphite polyimide sandwich panels over the titanium spars and ribs. The ATLAS computer system was used as the basis for stress analysis and resizing the surface panels using the loads from the Task II study, without adjustment for change in aeroelastic deformation. The flutter analysis indicated a decrease in the flutter speed compared to the baseline titanium wing design. The flutter analysis indicated a decrease in the flutter speed compared to the baseline titanium wing design. The flutter speed was increased to that of the titanium wing, with a weight penalty less than that of the metallic airplane.

  9. Systems integration studies for supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mascitti, V. R.

    1975-01-01

    Technical progress in each of the disciplinary research areas affecting the design of supersonic cruise aircraft is discussed. The NASA AST/SCAR Program supported the integration of these technical advances into supersonic cruise aircraft configuration concepts. While the baseline concepts reflect differing design philosophy, all reflect a level of economic performance considerably above the current foreign aircraft as well as the former U.S. SST. Range-payload characteristics of the study configurating show significant improvement, while meeting environmental goals such as takeoff and landing noise and upper atmospheric pollution.

  10. Supersonic Cruise Research 1979, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Aerodynamics, stability and control, propulsion, and environmental factors of the supersonic cruise aircraft are discussed. Other topics include airframe structures and materials, systems integration, and economics.

  11. Overview of NASA's Supersonic Cruise Efficiency - Propulsion Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBonis, James R.

    2009-01-01

    The research in Supersonic Cruise Efficiency Propulsion (SCE-P) Technical Challenge area of NASA's Supersonics project is discussed. The research in SCE-P is being performed to enable efficient supersonic flight over land. Research elements in this area include: Advance Inlet Concepts, High Performance/Wider Operability Fan and Compressor, Advanced Nozzle Concepts, and Intelligent Sensors/Actuators. The research under each of these elements is briefly discussed.

  12. Titanium and advanced composite structures for a supersonic cruise arrow wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. J.; Hoy, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Structural design studies were made, based on current technology and on an estimate of technology to be available in the mid 1980's, to assess the relative merits of structural concepts and materials for an advanced arrow wing configuration cruising at Mach 2.7. Preliminary studies were made to insure compliance of the configuration with general design criteria, integrate the propulsion system with the airframe, and define an efficient structural arrangement. Material and concept selection, detailed structural analysis, structural design and airplane mass analysis were completed based on current technology. Based on estimated future technology, structural sizing for strength and a preliminary assessment of the flutter of a strength designed composite structure were completed. An advanced computerized structural design system was used, in conjunction with a relatively complex finite element model, for detailed analysis and sizing of structural members.

  13. Inlet design studies for a Mach 2.2 advanced supersonic cruise vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimabukuro, K. M.; Welge, H. R.; Lee, A. C.

    1979-01-01

    Various inlet-engine combinations have been studied to find a preferred inlet concept for integration with an advanced technology Mach 2.2 cruise vehicle having a cruise lift-to-drag ratio of 9.6. For the purposes of this study, the range capability for a fixed takeoff gross weight was used to assess the various inlet-engine combinations. Inlet concept selection studies are described which indicated that an axisymmetric, mixed compression inlet was preferred. This study considered four inlet and three engine cycle combinations where the engine airflow was tailored to the inlet airflow delivery capability. Detailed design studies of two mixed compression inlet types are discussed. These were a translating centerbody inlet and a collapsing centerbody bicone inlet. The aerodynamic and mechanical design of each inlet is described. These inlets were also matched to different engine cycles tailored to the inlet airflow capability. The range increments favored the bicone inlet concept primarily because of lighter weight, reduced bleed air, and greater transonic airflow/thrust capability.

  14. Effect of advanced technology and fuel efficient engine on a supersonic-cruise executive jet with a small cabin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beissner, F. L., Jr.; Lovell, W. A.; Robins, A. W.; Swanson, E. E.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical study of a supersonic-cruise, executive, jet aircraft indicated the effects of using advanced technology. The twin-engine, arrow-wing vehicle was configured with a cabin of minimum practical size to hold one pilot, eight passengers, and their baggage. The primary differences between this configuration that of a previous report were the reduction in cabin size and the use of engines that are more fuel-efficient. Both conceptual vehicles are capable of forming the same mission. The current vehicle has a range of 3,350 nautical miles at Mach 2.3 cruise and 2,700 nautical miles at Mach 0.9. The concept description includes configuration definition, aerodynamic and propulsion-system characteristics, and mass properties. Performance analyses are documented for intercontinental and transcontinental flight profiles. In the latter case, a reduction in sonic-boom overpressure from 1.3 to 1.0 pounds per square foot was achieved by varying the flight profile slightly from that for optimum performance.

  15. Advanced supersonic propulsion study, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howlett, R. A.; Johnson, J.; Sabatella, J.; Sewall, T.

    1976-01-01

    The variable stream control engine is determined to be the most promising propulsion system concept for advanced supersonic cruise aircraft. This concept uses variable geometry components and a unique throttle schedule for independent control of two flow streams to provide low jet noise at takeoff and high performance at both subsonic and supersonic cruise. The advanced technology offers a 25% improvement in airplane range and an 8 decibel reduction in takeoff noise, relative to first generation supersonic turbojet engines.

  16. Supersonic cruise aircraft research: An annotated bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    This bibliography, with abstracts, consists of 69 publications arranged in chronological order. The material may be useful to those interested in supersonic cruise fighter/penetrator/interceptor airplanes. Two pertinent conferences on military supercruise aircraft are considered as single items; one contains 37 papers and the other 29 papers. In addition, several related bibliographies are included which cover supersonic civil aircraft and military aircraft studies at the Langley Research Center. There is also an author index.

  17. Study of advanced composite structural design concepts for an arrow wing supersonic cruise configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. J.; Grande, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Based on estimated graphite and boron fiber properties, allowable stresses and strains were established for advanced composite materials. Stiffened panel and conventional sandwich panel concepts were designed and analyzed, using graphite/polyimide and boron/polyimide materials. The conventional sandwich panel was elected as the structural concept for the modified wing structure. Upper and lower surface panels of the arrow wing structure were then redesigned, using high strength graphite/polyimide sandwich panels, retaining the titanium spars and ribs from the prior study. The ATLAS integrated analysis and design system was used for stress analysis and automated resizing of surface panels. Flutter analysis of the hybrid structure showed a significant decrease in flutter speed relative to the titanium wing design. The flutter speed was increased to that of the titanium design by selective increase in laminate thickness and by using graphite fibers with properties intermediate between high strength and high modulus values.

  18. Low-speed wind-tunnel tests of a 1/10-scale model of an advanced arrow-wing supersonic cruise configuration designed for cruise at Mach 2.2. [Langley Full Scale Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yip, L. P.

    1979-01-01

    The low-speed longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics of a scale model of an advanced arrow-wing supersonic cruise configuration were investigated in tests conducted at a Reynolds number of 4.19 x 10 to the 6th power based on the mean aerodynamic chord, with an angle of attack range from - 6 deg to 23 deg and sideslip angle range from -15 deg to 20 deg. The effects of segmented leading-edge flaps, slotted trailing-edge flaps, horizontal and vertical tails, and ailerons and spoilers were determined. Extensive pressure data and flow visualization pictures with non-intrusive fluorescent mini-tufts were obtained.

  19. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics from wind-tunnel tests of a large-scale advanced arrow-wing supersonic-cruise transport concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. M.

    1978-01-01

    Tests have been conducted to extend the existing low speed aerodynamic data base of advanced supersonic-cruise arrow wing configurations. Principle configuration variables included wing leading-edge flap deflection, wing trailing-edge flap deflection, horizontal tail effectiveness, and fuselage forebody strakes. A limited investigation was also conducted to determine the low speed aerodynamic effects due to slotted training-edge flaps. Results of this investigation demonstrate that deflecting the wing leading-edge flaps downward to suppress the wing apex vortices provides improved static longitudinal stability; however, it also results in significantly reduced static directional stability. The use of a selected fuselage forebody strakes is found to be effective in increasing the level of positive static directional stability. Drooping the fuselage nose, which is required for low-speed pilot vision, significantly improves the later-directional trim characteristics.

  20. Engine/airframe compatibility studies for supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Technology assessment studies were conducted to provide an updated technology base from which an advanced supersonic cruise aircraft can be produced with a high probability of success. An assessment of the gains available through the application of advanced technologies in aerodynamics, propulsion, acoustics, structures, materials, and active controls is developed. The potential market and range requirements as well as economic factors including payload, speed, airline operating costs, and airline profitability are analyzed. The conceptual design of the baseline aircraft to be used in assessing the technology requirements is described.

  1. Structural concept trends for commercial supersonic cruise aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakat, I. F.; Davis, G. W.; Saelman, B.

    1980-01-01

    Structural concept trends for future commercial supersonic transport aircraft are considered. Highlights, including the more important design conditions and requirements, of two studies are discussed. Knowledge of these design parameters, as determined through studies involving the application of flexible mathematical models, enabled inclusion of aeroelastic considerations in the structural-material concepts evaluation. The design trends and weight data of the previous contractual study of Mach 2.7 cruise aircraft were used as the basis for incorporating advanced materials and manufacturing approaches to the airframe for reduced weight and cost. Structural studies of design concepts employing advanced aluminum alloys, advanced composites, and advanced titanium alloy and manufacturing techniques are compared for a Mach 2.0 arrow-wing configuration concept. Appraisals of the impact of these new materials and manufacturing concepts to the airframe design are shown and compared. The research and development to validate the potential sources of weight and cost reduction identified as necessary to attain a viable advanced commercial supersonic transport are discussed.

  2. A study of altitude-constrained supersonic cruise transport concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tice, David C.; Martin, Glenn L.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of restricting maximum cruise altitude on the mission performance of two supersonic transport concepts across a selection of cruise Mach numbers is studied. Results indicate that a trapezoidal wing concept can be competitive with an arrow wing depending on the altitude and Mach number constraints imposed. The higher wing loading of trapezoidal wing configurations gives them an appreciably lower average cruise altitude than the lower wing loading of the arrow wing configurations, and this advantage increases as the maximum allowable cruise altitude is reduced.

  3. Preliminary design of a supersonic cruise aircraft high-pressure turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aceto, L. D.; Calderbank, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    Development of the supersonic cruise aircraft engine continued in this National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsored Pratt and Whitney program for the Preliminary Design of an Advanced High-Pressure Turbine. Airfoil cooling concepts and the technology required to implement these concepts received particular emphasis. Previous supersonic cruise aircraft mission studies were reviewed and the Variable Stream Control Engine (VSCE) was chosen as the candidate or the preliminary turbine design. The design was evaluated for the supersonic cruise mission. The advanced technology to be generated from these designs showed benefits in the supersonic cruise application and subsonic cruise application. The preliminary design incorporates advanced single crystal materials, thermal barrier coatings, and oxidation resistant coatings for both the vane and blade. The 1990 technology vane and blade designs have cooled turbine efficiency of 92.3 percent, 8.05 percent Wae cooling and a 10,000 hour life. An alternate design with 1986 technology has 91.9 percent efficiency and 12.43 percent Wae cooling at the same life. To achieve these performance and life results, technology programs must be pursued to provide the 1990's technology assumed for this study.

  4. Some design considerations for supersonic cruise mixed compression inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowditch, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    A mixed compression inlet designed for supersonic cruise has very demanding requirements for high total pressure recovery and low bleed and cowl drag. However, since the optimum inlet for supersonic cruise performance may have other undesirable characteristics, it is necessary to establish trade-offs between inlet performance and other inlet characteristics. Some of these trade-offs between the amount of internal compression, aerodynamic performance and angle-of-attack tolerance are reviewed. Techniques for analysis of boundary layer control and subsonic diffuser flow are discussed.

  5. Supersonic Cruise Research 1979, part 2. [airframe structures and materials, systems integration, economic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Advances in airframe structure and materials technology for supersonic cruise aircraft are reported with emphasis on titanium and composite structures. The operation of the Concorde is examined as a baseline for projections into the future. A market survey of U.S. passenger attitudes and preferences, the impact of advanced air transport technology and the integration of systems for the advanced SST and for a smaller research/business jet vehicle are also discussed.

  6. Toward a second generation fuel efficient supersonic cruise aircraft performance characteristics and benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vachal, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    The need for greatly improved fuel efficiency and off-design subsonic characteristics is discussed. Engine-airframe matching studies are presented which show the benefits of a configuration designed for much lower supersonic drag levels (blended wing-fuselage) and how well this airframe matches with the new advanced variable-cycle engines. The benefits of advanced takeoff procedures and systems together with the co-annular noise effect in achieving low noise levels with a small cruise-sized engine are discussed. It is concluded that the technology advances when carefully integrated through detailed engine-airframe matching studies on a validated baseline airplane lead to a much improved supersonic cruise aircraft, i.e., more range, less fuel consumption, noise flexibility and satisfactory off-design characteristics.

  7. Minimum energy, liquid hydrogen supersonic cruise vehicle study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The potential was examined of hydrogen-fueled supersonic vehicles designed for cruise at Mach 2.7 and at Mach 2.2. The aerodynamic, weight, and propulsion characteristics of a previously established design of a LH2 fueled, Mach 2.7 supersonic cruise vehicle (SCV) were critically reviewed and updated. The design of a Mach 2.2 SCV was established on a corresponding basis. These baseline designs were then studied to determine the potential of minimizing energy expenditure in performing their design mission, and to explore the effect of fuel price and noise restriction on their design and operating performance. The baseline designs of LH2 fueled aircraft were than compared with equivalent designs of jet A (conventional hydrocarbon) fueled SCV's. Use of liquid hydrogen for fuel for the subject aircraft provides significant advantages in performance, cost, noise, pollution, sonic boom, and energy utilization.

  8. Fundamental Aeronautics Program: Overview of Project Work in Supersonic Cruise Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    The Supersonics Project, part of NASA?s Fundamental Aeronautics Program, contains a number of technical challenge areas which include sonic boom community response, airport noise, high altitude emissions, cruise efficiency, light weight durable engines/airframes, and integrated multi-discipline system design. This presentation provides an overview of the current (2011) activities in the supersonic cruise efficiency technical challenge, and is focused specifically on propulsion technologies. The intent is to develop and validate high-performance supersonic inlet and nozzle technologies. Additional work is planned for design and analysis tools for highly-integrated low-noise, low-boom applications. If successful, the payoffs include improved technologies and tools for optimized propulsion systems, propulsion technologies for a minimized sonic boom signature, and a balanced approach to meeting efficiency and community noise goals. In this propulsion area, the work is divided into advanced supersonic inlet concepts, advanced supersonic nozzle concepts, low fidelity computational tool development, high fidelity computational tools, and improved sensors and measurement capability. The current work in each area is summarized.

  9. Fundamental Aeronautics Program: Overview of Propulsion Work in the Supersonic Cruise Efficiency Technical Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Ray

    2012-01-01

    The Supersonics Project, part of NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program, contains a number of technical challenge areas which include sonic boom community response, airport noise, high altitude emissions, cruise efficiency, light weight durable engines/airframes, and integrated multi-discipline system design. This presentation provides an overview of the current (2012) activities in the supersonic cruise efficiency technical challenge, and is focused specifically on propulsion technologies. The intent is to develop and validate high-performance supersonic inlet and nozzle technologies. Additional work is planned for design and analysis tools for highly-integrated low-noise, low-boom applications. If successful, the payoffs include improved technologies and tools for optimized propulsion systems, propulsion technologies for a minimized sonic boom signature, and a balanced approach to meeting efficiency and community noise goals. In this propulsion area, the work is divided into advanced supersonic inlet concepts, advanced supersonic nozzle concepts, low fidelity computational tool development, high fidelity computational tools, and improved sensors and measurement capability. The current work in each area is summarized.

  10. Structural design of supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischler, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The major efforts leading to an efficient structural design include: (1) the analysis methods used to improve the structural model optimization and compare the structural concepts, (2) the analysis and description of the fail-safe, crack growth, and residual strength studies and tests, (3) baseline structural trade studies to determine optimum structural weights including effects of geometry changes, strength, fail-safety, aeroelastics and flutter, 6AL-4V annealed titanium in structural efficiency after 70,000 hours at temperature, (5) the study of three structural models for aircraft at 2.0 Mach, 2.2 Mach, and 2.4 Mach cruise speeds, (6) the study of many structural concepts to determine their weight efficiencies; and (7) the determination of the requirements for large-scale structural development testing.

  11. Flying qualities design criteria applicable to supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chalk, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive set of flying qualities design criteria was prepared for use in the supersonic cruise research program. The framework for stating the design criteria is established and design criteria are included which address specific failures, approach to dangerous flight conditions, flight at high angle of attack, longitudinal and lateral directional stability and control, the primary flight control system, and secondary flight controls. Examples are given of lateral directional design criteria limiting lateral accelerations at the cockpit, time to roll through 30 deg of bank, and time delay in the pilot's command path. Flight test data from the Concorde certification program are used to substantiate a number of the proposed design criteria.

  12. Exhaust Nozzles for Propulsion Systems with Emphasis on Supersonic Cruise Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stitt, Leonard E.

    1990-01-01

    This compendium summarizes the contributions of the NASA-Lewis and its contractors to supersonic exhaust nozzle research from 1963 to 1985. Two major research and technology efforts sponsored this nozzle research work; the U.S. Supersonic Transport (SST) Program and the follow-on Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) Program. They account for two generations of nozzle technology: the first from 1963 to 1971, and the second from 1971 to 1985. First, the equations used to calculate nozzle thrust are introduced. Then the general types of nozzles are presented, followed by a discussion of those types proposed for supersonic aircraft. Next, the first-generation nozzles designed specifically for the Boeing SST and the second-generation nozzles designed under the SCR program are separately reviewed and then compared. A chapter on throttle-dependent afterbody drag is included, since drag has a major effect on the off-design performance of supersonic nozzles. A chapter on the performance of supersonic dash nozzles follows, since these nozzles have similar design problems, Finally, the nozzle test facilities used at NASA-Lewis during this nozzle research effort are identified and discussed. These facilities include static test stands, a transonic wind tunnel, and a flying testbed aircraft. A concluding section points to the future: a third generation of nozzles designed for a new era of high speed civil transports to produce even greater advances in performance, to meet new noise rules, and to ensure the continuity of over two decades of NASA research.

  13. Bibliography of Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) program from 1980 to 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, S.

    1984-01-01

    A bibliography for the Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) and Variable Cycle Engine (VCE) Programs is presented. An annotated bibliography for the last 123 formal reports and a listing of titles for 44 articles and presentations is included. The studies identifies technologies for producing efficient supersonic commercial jet transports for cruise Mach numbers from 2.0 to 2.7.

  14. Advanced supersonic technology and its implications for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, C.

    1979-01-01

    A brief overview of the NASA Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) program is presented. The SCR program has identified significant improvements in the areas of aerodynamics, structures, propulsion, noise reduction, takeoff and landing procedures, and advanced configuration concepts. These improvements tend to overcome most of the problems which led to the cancellation of the National SST program. They offer the promise of an advanced SST family of aircraft which are environmentally acceptable, have flexible range-payload capability, and are economically viable. The areas of technology addressed by the SCR program have direct application to advanced military aircraft and to supersonic executive aircraft.

  15. Structural design studies of a supersonic cruise arrow wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski, J.; Mccullers, L. A.; Ricketts, R. H.; Santoro, N. J.; Beskenis, S. D.; Kurtze, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    Structural member cross sections were sized with a system of integrated computer programs to satisfy strength and flutter design requirements for several variants of the arrow wing supersonic cruise vehicle. The resulting structural weights provide a measure of the structural efficiency of the planform geometry, structural layout, type of construction, and type of material including composites. The material distribution was determined for a baseline metallic structure and the results indicate that an approximate fatigue constraint has an important effect on the structural weight required for strength but, in all cases, additional material had to be added to satisfy flutter requirements with lighter mass engines with minimum fuel onboard. The use of composite materials on the baseline configuration was explored and indicated increased structural efficiency. In the strength sizing, the all-composite construction provided a lower weight design than the hybrid construction which contained composites only in the wing cover skins. Subsequent flutter analyses indicated a corresponding lower flutter speed.

  16. Arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft structural design concepts evaluation. Volume 2: Sections 7 through 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Davis, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The materials and advanced producibility methods that offer potential structural mass savings in the design of the primary structure for a supersonic cruise aircraft are identified and reported. A summary of the materials and fabrication techniques selected for this analytical effort is presented. Both metallic and composite material systems were selected for application to a near-term start-of-design technology aircraft. Selective reinforcement of the basic metallic structure was considered as the appropriate level of composite application for the near-term design.

  17. Arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft structural design concepts evaluation. Volume 1: Sections 1 through 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Davis, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The structural approach best suited for the design of a Mach 2.7 arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft was investigated. Results, procedures, and principal justification of results are presented. Detailed substantiation data are given. In general, each major analysis is presented sequentially in separate sections to provide continuity in the flow of the design concepts analysis effort. In addition to the design concepts evaluation and the detailed engineering design analyses, supporting tasks encompassing: (1) the controls system development; (2) the propulsion-airframe integration study; and (3) the advanced technology assessment are presented.

  18. Arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft structural design concepts evaluation. Volume 4: Sections 15 through 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Davis, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The analyses performed to provide structural mass estimates for the arrow wing supersonic cruise aircraft are presented. To realize the full potential for structural mass reduction, a spectrum of approaches for the wing and fuselage primary structure design were investigated. The objective was: (1) to assess the relative merits of various structural arrangements, concepts, and materials; (2) to select the structural approach best suited for the Mach 2.7 environment; and (3) to provide construction details and structural mass estimates based on in-depth structural design studies. Production costs, propulsion-airframe integration, and advanced technology assessment are included.

  19. Variable stream control engine concept for advanced supersonic aircraft: Features and benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howlett, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    The Variable Stream Control Engine is studied for advanced supersonic cruise aircraft. Significant environmental and performance improvements relative to first generation supersonic turbojet engines are cited. Two separate flow streams, each with independent burner and nozzle systems are incorporated within the engine. By unique control of the exhaust temperatures and velocities in two coannular streams, significant reduction in jet noise is obtained.

  20. Preliminary performance of a vertical-attitude takeoff and landing, supersonic cruise aircraft concept having thrust vectoring integrated into the flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robins, A. W.; Beissner, F. L., Jr.; Domack, C. S.; Swanson, E. E.

    1985-01-01

    A performance study was made of a vertical attitude takeoff and landing (VATOL), supersonic cruise aircraft concept having thrust vectoring integrated into the flight control system. Those characteristics considered were aerodynamics, weight, balance, and performance. Preliminary results indicate that high levels of supersonic aerodynamic performance can be achieved. Further, with the assumption of an advanced (1985 technology readiness) low bypass ratio turbofan engine and advanced structures, excellent mission performance capability is indicated.

  1. Investigation of a supersonic cruise fighter model flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reubush, D. E.; Bare, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to survey the flow field around a model of a supersonic cruise fighter configuration. Local values of angle of attack, side flow, Mach number, and total pressure ratio were measured with a single multi-holed probe in three survey areas on a model previously used for nacelle/nozzle integration investigations. The investigation was conducted at Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2, and at angles of attack from 0 deg to 10 deg. The purpose of the investigation was to provide a base of experimental data with which theoretically determined data can be compared. To that end the data are presented in tables as well as graphically, and a complete description of the model geometry is included as fuselage cross sections and wing span stations. Measured local angles of attack were generally greater than free stream angle of attack above the wing and generally smaller below. There were large spanwise local angle-of-attack and side flow gradients above the wing at the higher free stream angles of attack.

  2. Study of metallic structural design concepts for an arrow wing supersonic cruise configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. J.; Grande, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    A structural design study was made, to assess the relative merits of various metallic structural concepts and materials for an advanced supersonic aircraft cruising at Mach 2.7. Preliminary studies were made to ensure compliance of the configuration with general design criteria, integrate the propulsion system with the airframe, select structural concepts and materials, and define an efficient structural arrangement. An advanced computerized structural design system was used, in conjunction with a relatively large, complex finite element model, for detailed analysis and sizing of structural members to satisfy strength and flutter criteria. A baseline aircraft design was developed for assessment of current technology. Criteria, analysis methods, and results are presented. The effect on design methods of using the computerized structural design system was appraised, and recommendations are presented concerning further development of design tools, development of materials and structural concepts, and research on basic technology.

  3. Fabrication methods for YF-12 wing panels for the Supersonic Cruise Aircraft Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, E. L.; Payne, L.; Carter, A. L.

    1975-01-01

    Advanced fabrication and joining processes for titanium and composite materials are being investigated by NASA to develop technology for the Supersonic Cruise Aircraft Research (SCAR) Program. With Lockheed-ADP as the prime contractor, full-scale structural panels are being designed and fabricated to replace an existing integrally stiffened shear panel on the upper wing surface of the NASA YF-12 aircraft. The program involves ground testing and Mach 3 flight testing of full-scale structural panels and laboratory testing of representative structural element specimens. Fabrication methods and test results for weldbrazed and Rohrbond titanium panels are discussed. The fabrication methods being developed for boron/aluminum, Borsic/aluminum, and graphite/polyimide panels are also presented.

  4. Advanced supersonic technology propulsion system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szeliga, R.; Allan, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    This study had the objectives of determining the most promising conventional and variable cycle engine types; the effect of design cruise Mach number (2.2, 2.7 and 3.2) on a commercial supersonic transport; effect of advanced engine technology on the choice of engine cycle; and effect of utilizing hydrogen as the engine fuel. The technology required for the engines was defined, and the levels of development to ensure availability of this technology in advanced aircraft propulsion systems were assessed. No clearcut best conventional or variable cycle engine was identified. The dry bypass turbojet and the duct burning turbofans were initially selected as the best conventional engines, but later results, utilizing augmentation at takeoff, added the mixed-flow augmented turbofan as a promising contender. The modulating air flow, three-rotor variable cycle engine identified the performance features desired from VCE concepts (elimination of inlet drag and reduction in afterbody drag), but was a very heavy and complex engine.

  5. Advanced Supersonic Technology Study: Engine Program Summary. Supersonic Propulsion: 1971 to 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, J. N.

    1976-01-01

    Sustained supersonic cruise propulsion systems for military applications are studied. The J79-5 in the Mach 2 B-58; YJ93 in the Mach 3.0 B-70 and the current F101 in the B-1, are all examples of military propulsion systems and airplanes operated at sustained supersonic cruise speeds. The Mach 2.7 B2707 transport powered by GE4 turbojet engines was the only non-military, sustained supersonic cruise vehicle intended for commercial passenger service.

  6. Advanced supersonic propulsion study, phases 3 and 4. [variable cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, R. D.; Joy, W.

    1977-01-01

    An evaluation of various advanced propulsion concepts for supersonic cruise aircraft resulted in the identification of the double-bypass variable cycle engine as the most promising concept. This engine design utilizes special variable geometry components and an annular exhaust nozzle to provide high take-off thrust and low jet noise. The engine also provides good performance at both supersonic cruise and subsonic cruise. Emission characteristics are excellent. The advanced technology double-bypass variable cycle engine offers an improvement in aircraft range performance relative to earlier supersonic jet engine designs and yet at a lower level of engine noise. Research and technology programs required in certain design areas for this engine concept to realize its potential benefits include refined parametric analysis of selected variable cycle engines, screening of additional unconventional concepts, and engine preliminary design studies. Required critical technology programs are summarized.

  7. Effect of emerging technology on a convertible, business/interceptor, supersonic-cruise jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beissner, F. L., Jr.; Lovell, W. A.; Robins, A. W.; Swanson, E. E.

    1986-01-01

    This study was initiated to assess the feasibility of an eight-passenger, supersonic-cruise long range business jet aircraft that could be converted into a military missile carrying interceptor. The baseline passenger version has a flight crew of two with cabin space for four rows of two passenger seats plus baggage and lavatory room in the aft cabin. The ramp weight is 61,600 pounds with an internal fuel capacity of 30,904 pounds. Utilizing an improved version of a current technology low-bypass ratio turbofan engine, range is 3,622 nautical miles at Mach 2.0 cruise and standard day operating conditions. Balanced field takeoff distance is 6,600 feet and landing distance is 5,170 feet at 44,737 pounds. The passenger section from aft of the flight crew station to the aft pressure bulkhead in the cabin was modified for the interceptor version. Bomb bay type doors were added and volume is sufficient for four advanced air-to-air missiles mounted on a rotary launcher. Missile volume was based on a Phoenix type missile with a weight of 910 pounds per missile for a total payload weight of 3,640 pounds. Structural and equipment weights were adjusted and result in a ramp weight of 63,246 pounds with a fuel load of 30,938 pounds. Based on a typical intercept mission flight profile, the resulting radius is 1,609 nautical miles at a cruise Mach number of 2.0.

  8. Feasibility and benefits of laminar flow control on supersonic cruise airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, A. G.; Agrawal, S.; Lacey, T. R.

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation was made of the applicability and benefits of laminar flow control (LFC) technology to supersonic cruise airplanes. Ancillary objectives were to identify the technical issues critical to supersonic LFC application, and to determine how those issues can be addressed through flight and wind-tunnel testing. Vehicle types studied include a Mach 2.2 supersonic transport configuration, a Mach 4.0 transport, and two Mach 2-class fighter concepts. Laminar flow control methodologies developed for subsonic and transonic wing laminarization were extended and applied. No intractible aerodynamic problems were found in applying LFC to airplanes of the Mach 2 class, even ones of large size. Improvements of 12 to 17 percent in lift-drag ratios were found. Several key technical issues, such as contamination avoidance and excresence criteria were identified. Recommendations are made for their resolution. A need for an inverse supersonic wing design methodology is indicated.

  9. Control of propulsion systems for supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiller, K. W.; Drain, D. I.

    1976-01-01

    The propulsion control requirements of supersonic aircraft are presented. Integration of inlet, engine, and airframe controls is discussed. The application of recent control theory developments to propulsion control design is described. Control component designs for achieving reliable, responsive propulsion control are also discussed.

  10. Evaluation of structural design concepts for an arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Davis, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical study was performed to determine the best structural approach for design of primary wing and fuselage structure of a Mach 2.7 arrow wing supersonic cruise aircraft. Concepts were evaluated considering near term start of design. Emphasis was placed on the complex interactions between thermal stress, static aeroelasticity, flutter, fatigue and fail safe design, static and dynamic loads, and the effects of variations in structural arrangements, concepts and materials on these interactions. Results indicate that a hybrid wing structure incorporating low profile convex beaded and honeycomb sandwich surface panels of titanium alloy 6Al-4V were the most efficient. The substructure includes titanium alloy spar caps reinforced with boron polyimide composites. The fuselage shell consists of hat stiffened skin and frame construction of titanium alloy 6Al-4V. A summary of the study effort is presented, and a discussion of the overall logic, design philosophy and interaction between the analytical methods for supersonic cruise aircraft design are included.

  11. Variable cycle engines for advanced supersonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howlett, R. A.; Kozlowski, H.

    1975-01-01

    Variable Cycle Engines being studied for advanced commercial supersonic transports show potential for significant environmental and economic improvements relative to 1st generation SST engines. The two most promising concepts are: a Variable Stream Control Engine and a Variable Cycle Engine with a rear flow-control valve. Each concept utilizes variable components and separate burners to provide independent temperature and velocity control for two coannular flow streams. Unique fuel control techniques are combined with cycle characteristics that provide low fuel consumption, similar to a turbojet engine, for supersonic operation. This is accomplished while retaining the good subsonic performance features of a turbofan engine. A two-stream coannular nozzle shows potential to reduce jet noise to below FAR Part 36 without suppressors. Advanced burner concepts have the potential for significant reductions in exhaust emissions. In total, these unique engine concepts have the potential for significant overall improvements to the environmental and economic characteristics of advanced supersonic transports.

  12. Bibliography of Supersonic Cruise Aircraft Research (SCAR) Program from 1972 to Mid-1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, S.

    1977-01-01

    This bibliography documents publications of the supersonic cruise aircraft research (SCAR) program that were generated during the first 5 years of effort. The reports are arranged according to systems studies and five SCAR disciplines: propulsion, stratospheric emissions impact, structures and materials, aerodynamic performance, and stability and control. The specific objectives of each discipline are summarized. Annotation is included for all NASA inhouse and low-number contractor reports. There are 444 papers and articles included.

  13. Calculation of vertical and ramp-assisted takeoffs for supersonic cruise fighters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, G. C.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure that allows rapid preliminary evaluations of the vertical, short, and normal takeoff performance of supersonic cruise aircraft concepts was developed into a numerical computer program. The program is used to determine the effects on takeoff performance of various parameters, such as thrust-weight ratio, wing loading, thrust vector angle, and flap setting. Ramp-assisted takeoffs for overloaded configurations typical of a ground-attack mission are included. The effects of wind on the takeoff performance are also considered.

  14. Variable-cycle engines for supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, E.

    1976-01-01

    Progress and the current status of the Variable Cycle Engine (VCE) study are reviewed with emphasis placed on the impact of technology advancements and design specifications. A large variety of VCE concepts are also examined.

  15. Bibliography of Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) program from 1977 to mid-1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, S.

    1980-01-01

    The supersonic cruise research (SCR) program, initiated in July 1972, includes system studies and the following disciplines: propulsion, stratospheric emission impact, structures and materials, aerodynamic performance, and stability and control. In a coordinated effort to provide a sound basis for any future consideration that may be given by the United States to the development of an acceptable commercial supersonic transport, integration of the technical disciplines was undertaken, analytical tools were developed, and wind tunnel, flight, and laboratory investigations were conducted. The present bibliography covers the time period from 1977 to mid-1980. It is arranged according to system studies and the above five SCR disciplines. There are 306 NASA reports and 135 articles, meeting papers, and company reports cited.

  16. Fatigue of titanium alloys in a supersonic-cruise airplane environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imig, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    The test programs conducted by several aerospace companies and NASA, summarized in this paper, studied several titanium materials previously identified as having high potential for application to supersonic cruise airplane structures. These studies demonstrate that the temperature (560 K) by itself produced no significant degradation of the materials. However, the fatigue resistance of titanium-alloy structures, in which thermal and loading effects are combined, has been studied insufficiently. The predominant topic for future study of fatigue problems in Mach 3 structures should be the influences of thermal stress particularly, the effects of thermal stress on failure location.

  17. Charts for determining potential minimum sonic-boom overpressures for supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    Charts which give an estimation of minimum achievable sonic-boom levels for supersonic cruise aircraft are presented. A minimization method based on modified linear theory was analyzed. Results show several combinations of Mach number, altitude, and aircraft length and weight. Overpressure and impulse values are given for two types of sonic boom signatures for each of these conditions: (1) a flat top or minimum overpressure signature which has a pressure plateau behind the initial shock, and (2) a minimum shock signature which allows a pressure rise after the initial shock. Results are given for the effects of nose shape.

  18. Computer-aided methods for analysis and synthesis of supersonic cruise aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Computer-aided methods are reviewed which are being developed by Langley Research Center in-house work and by related grants and contracts. Synthesis methods to size structural members to meet strength and stiffness (flutter) requirements are emphasized and described. Because of the strong interaction among the aerodynamic loads, structural stiffness, and member sizes of supersonic cruise aircraft structures, these methods are combined into systems of computer programs to perform design studies. The approaches used in organizing these systems to provide efficiency, flexibility of use in an iterative process, and ease of system modification are discussed.

  19. Arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft structural design concepts evaluation. Volume 3: Sections 12 through 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Davis, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The design of an economically viable supersonic cruise aircraft requires the lowest attainable structural-mass fraction commensurate with the selected near-term structural material technology. To achieve this goal of minimum structural-mass fraction, various combinations of promising wing and fuselage primary structure were analyzed for the load-temperature environment applicable to the arrow wing configuration. This analysis was conducted in accordance with the design criteria specified and included extensive use of computer-aided analytical methods to screen the candidate concepts and select the most promising concepts for the in-depth structural analysis.

  20. Thermal design study of an air-cooled plug-nozzle system for a supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, J. S.; Lieberman, A.

    1972-01-01

    A heat-transfer design analysis has been made of an air-cooled plug-nozzle system for a supersonic-cruise aircraft engine. The proposed 10deg half-angle conical plug is sting supported from the turbine frame. Plug cooling is accomplished by convection and film cooling. The flight profile studied includes maximum afterburning from takeoff to Mach 2.7 and supersonic cruise at Mach 2.7 with a low afterburner setting. The calculations indicate that, for maximum afterburning, about 2 percent of the engine primary flow, removed after the second stage of the nine-stage compressor, will adequately cool the plug and sting support. Ram air may be used for cooling during supersonic-cruise operations, however. Therefore, the cycle efficiency penalty paid for air cooling the plug and sting support should be low.

  1. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. [Lewis 8 by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to evaluate the aerodynamic performance of a coannular exhaust nozzle for a proposed variable stream control supersonic propulsion system. Tests were conducted with two simulated configurations differing primarily in the fan duct flowpaths: a short flap mechanism for fan stream control with an isentropic contoured flow splitter, and an iris fan nozzle with a conical flow splitter. Both designs feature a translating primary plug and an auxiliary inlet ejector. Tests were conducted at takeoff and simulated cruise conditions. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0, 0.36, 0.9, and 2.0 for a wide range of nozzle operating conditions. At simulated supersonic cruise, both configurations demonstrated good performance, comparable to levels assumed in earlier advanced supersonic propulsion studies. However, at subsonic cruise, both configurations exhibited performance that was 6 to 7.5 percent less than the study assumptions. At take off conditions, the iris configuration performance approached the assumed levels, while the short flap design was 4 to 6 percent less.

  2. Supersonic cruise research aircraft structural studies: Methods and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.; Gross, D.; Kurtze, W.; Newsom, J.; Wrenn, G.; Greene, W.

    1981-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center SCAR in-house structural studies are reviewed. In methods development, advances include a new system of integrated computer programs called ISSYS, progress in determining aerodynamic loads and aerodynamically induced structural loads (including those due to gusts), flutter optimization for composite and metal airframe configurations using refined and simplified mathematical models, and synthesis of active controls. Results given address several aspects of various SCR configurations. These results include flutter penalties on composite wing, flutter suppression using active controls, roll control effectiveness, wing tip ground clearance, tail size effect on flutter, engine weight and mass distribution influence on flutter, and strength and flutter optimization of new configurations. The ISSYS system of integrated programs performed well in all the applications illustrated by the results, the diversity of which attests to ISSYS' versatility.

  3. Cold-flow performance of several variations of a ram-air-cooled plug nozzle for supersonic-cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, D. E.; Nosek, S. M.; Straight, D. M.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental data were obtained with a 21.59 cm (8.5 in.) diameter cold-flow model in a static altitude facility to determine the thrust and pumping characteristics of several variations of a ram-air-cooled plug nozzle. Tests were conducted over a range of nozzle pressure ratios simulating supersonic cruise and takeoff conditions. Primary throat area was also varied to simulate afterburner on and off. Effect of plug size, outer shroud length, primary nozzle geometry, and varying amounts of secondary flow were investigated. At a supersonic cruise pressure ratio of 27, nozzle efficiencies were 99.7 percent for the best configurations.

  4. Design study of structural concepts for an arrow-wing supersonic-cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Davis, G. W.; Robinson, J. C.; Yates, E. C., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical study was performed to determine the best structural approach for design of primary wing and fuselage structure of a Mach number 2.7 arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft. Concepts were evaluated considering near-term start-of-design. Emphasis was placed on the complex interactions between thermal stress, static aeroelasticity, flutter, fatigue and fail-safe design, static and dynamic loads, and the effects of variations in structural arrangements, concepts and materials on these interactions. Results indicate that a hybrid wing structure incorporating low-profile convex-beaded and honeycomb sandwich surface panels of titanium alloy 6Al-4V were the most efficient. The substructure includes titanium alloy spar caps reinforced with Boron-polyimide composites. The fuselage shell is a closed-hat stiffened skin and frame construction of titanium alloy 6Al-4V. This paper presents an executive summary of the study effort, and includes a discussion of the overall study logic, design philosophy and interaction between the analytical methods for supersonic cruise aircraft design.

  5. Benefits of advanced propulsion technology for the advanced supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, R. W.; Sabatella, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Future supersonic transports will have to provide improvement in the areas of economics, range, and emissions relative to the present generation of supersonic transports, as well as meeting or improving upon FAR 36 noise goals. This paper covers the promising propulsion systems including variable-cycle engine concepts for long-range supersonic commercial transport application. The benefits of applying advanced propulsion technology to solve the economic and environmental problems are reviewed. The advanced propulsion technologies covered are in the areas of structures, materials, cooling techniques, aerodynamics, variable engine geometry, jet noise suppressors, acoustic treatment, and low-emission burners. The results of applying the advanced propulsion technology are presented in terms of improvement in overall system takeoff gross weight and return on investment.

  6. Advanced supersonic propulsion study, phase 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howlett, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Installation characteristics for a Variable Stream Control Engine (VSCE) were studied for three advanced supersonic airplane designs. Sensitivity of the VSCE concept to change in technology projections was evaluated in terms of impact on overall installed performance. Based on these sensitivity results, critical technology requirements were reviewed, resulting in the reaffirmation of the following requirements: low-noise nozzle system; a high performance, low emissions duct burner and main burner; hot section technology; variable geometry components; and propulsion integration features, including an integrated electronic control system.

  7. Subsonic and supersonic aerodynamic characteristics of a supersonic cruise fighter model with a twisted and cambered wing with 74 deg sweep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, O. A.

    1977-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation has been conducted to determine the longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic characteristics of a model of a supersonic cruise fighter configuration with a design Mach number of 2.60. The configuration is characterized by a highly swept arrow wing twisted and cambered to minimize supersonic drag due to lift, twin wing mounted vertical tails, and an aft mounted integral underslung duel-engine pod. The investigation also included tests of the configuration with larger outboard vertical tails and with small nose strakes.

  8. Insulation systems for liquid methane fuel tanks for supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, H. F.; Delduca, D.

    1972-01-01

    Two insulation systems for tanks containing liquid methane in supersonic cruise-type aircraft were designed and tested after an extensive materials investigation. One system is an external insulation and the other is an internal wet-type insulation system. Tank volume was maximized by making the tank shape approach a rectangular parallelopiped. One tank was designed to use the external insulation and the other tank to use the internal insulation. Performance of the external insulation system was evaluated on a full-scale tank under the temperature environment of -320 F to 700 F and ambient pressures of ground-level atmospheric to 1 psia. Problems with installing the internal insulation on the test tank prevented full-scale evaluation of performance; however, small-scale testing verified thermal conductivity, temperature capability, and installed density.

  9. Nacelle Integration to Reduce the Sonic Boom of Aircraft Designed to Cruise at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    An empirical method for integrating the engine nacelles on a wing-fuselage-fin(s) configuration has been described. This method is based on Whitham theory and Seebass and George sonic-boom minimization theory, With it, both reduced sonic-boom as well as high aerodynamic efficiency methods can be applied to the conceptual design of a supersonic-cruise aircraft. Two high-speed civil transport concepts were used as examples to illustrate the application of this engine-nacelle integration methodology: (1) a concept with engine nacelles mounted on the aft-fuselage, the HSCT-1OB; and (2) a concept with engine nacelles mounted under an extended-wing center section, the HSCT-11E. In both cases, the key to a significant reduction in the sonic-boom contribution from the engine nacelles was to use the F-function shape of the concept as a guide to move the nacelles further aft on the configuration.

  10. Accounting for Laminar Run & Trip Drag in Supersonic Cruise Performance Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodsell, Aga M.; Kennelly, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    An improved laminar run and trip drag correction methodology for supersonic cruise performance testing was derived. This method required more careful analysis of the flow visualization images which revealed delayed transition particularly on the inboard upper surface, even for the largest trip disks. In addition, a new code was developed to estimate the laminar run correction. Once the data were corrected for laminar run, the correct approach to the analysis of the trip drag became evident. Although the data originally appeared confusing, the corrected data are consistent with previous results. Furthermore, the modified approach, which was described in this presentation, extends prior historical work by taking into account the delayed transition caused by the blunt leading edges.

  11. Advanced supersonic technology concept study: Hydrogen fueled configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.

    1974-01-01

    Conceptual designs of hydrogen fueled supersonic transport configurations for the 1990 time period were developed and compared with equivalent technology Jet A-1 fueled vehicles to determine the economic and performance potential of liquid hydrogen as an alternate fuel. Parametric evaluations of supersonic cruise vehicles with varying design and transport mission characteristics established the basis for selecting a preferred configuration which was then studied in greater detail. An assessment was made of the general viability of the selected concept including an evaluation of costs and environmental considerations, i.e., exhaust emissions and sonic boom characteristics. Technology development requirements and suggested implementation schedules are presented.

  12. Advanced supersonic technology concept study: Hydrogen fueled configuration, summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    Conceptual designs of hydrogen fueled supersonic transport configurations for the 1990 time period were developed and compared with equivalent technology Jet A-1 fueled vehicles to determine the economic and performance potential of liquid hydrogen as an alternate fuel. Parametric evaluations of supersonic cruise vehicles with varying design and transport mission characteristics established the basis for selecting a preferred configuration. An assessment was made of the general viability of the selected concept including an evaluation of costs and environmental considerations, i.e., exhaust emissions and sonic boom characteristics. Technology development requirements and suggested implementation schedules are presented.

  13. Noise and economic characteristics of an advanced blended supersonic transport concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molloy, J. K.; Grantham, W. D.; Neubauer, M. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Noise and economic characteristics were obtained for an advanced supersonic transport concept that utilized wing body blending, a double bypass variable cycle engine, superplastically formed and diffusion bonded titanium in both the primary and secondary structures, and an alternative interior arrangement that provides increased seating capacity. The configuration has a cruise Mach number of 2.62, provisions for 290 passengers, a mission range of 8.19 Mm (4423 n.mi.), and an average operating cruise lift drag ratio of 9.23. Advanced operating procedures, which have the potential to reduce airport community noise, were explored by using a simulator. Traded jet noise levels of 105.7 and 103.4 EPNdB were obtained by using standard and advanced takeoff operational procedures, respectively. A new method for predicting lateral attenuation was utilized in obtaining these jet noise levels.

  14. Technology for controlling emissions of oxides of nitrogen from supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reck, G. M.; Rudey, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Various experiments are sponsored and conducted by NASA to explore the potential of advanced combustion techniques for controlling aircraft engine emissions into the upper atmosphere. Of particular concern are the oxide of nitrogen (NOx) emissions into the stratosphere. The experiments utilize a wide variety of approaches varying from advanced combustor concepts to fundamental flame tube experiments. Results are presented which indicate that substantial reductions in cruise NOx emissions should be achievable in future aircraft engines. A major NASA program is described which focuses the many fundamental experiments into a planned evolution and demonstration of the prevaporized-premixed combustion technique in a full-scale engine.

  15. Theoretical and experimental flow fields for a supersonic cruise fighter forebody

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaros, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    The capability of two numerical methods to predict the flow field about a representative supersonic cruise aircraft was examined. The two codes were a small-disturbance transonic program of Boppe and a conservative form full-potential transonic program of Shankar and Szema. For the former code, comparisons were made with wind-tunnel data at Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2 and angles of attack of 0 deg, 5 deg, and 10 deg (7.5 deg instead of 10 deg at a Mach number of 1.2). Predictions from the two codes were compared at a Mach number of 1.2 and an angle of attack of 7.5 deg. The comparison criteria were contours of local angle of attack, local angle of sideslip, and local Mach number. The comparisons indicated that both codes may be considered useful for design applications, depending on the degree of accuracy required by the user's solution. Both solutions show an inaccuracy in their predictions, particularly as Mach number and/or angle of attack increases, because of their lack of viscous effects and any mechanisms to predict vortex development.

  16. Transonic Investigation of Two-Dimensional Nozzles Designed for Supersonic Cruise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Deere, Karen A.

    2001-01-01

    An experimental and computational investigation has been conducted to determine the off-design uninstalled drag characteristics a of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle designed for a supersonic cruise civil transport. The main objective of this investigation was to determine the effects of varying nozzle external flap curvature and sidewall boattail angle and curvature on nozzle drag The experimental investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.80 to 1.20 at nozzle pressure ratios up to nine. Three-dimensional simulations of nozzle performance were obtained with the computational fluid dynamics code PAB using turbulence closure and nonlinear Reynolds stress modeling. The results of this investigation indicate that excellent correlation between experimental and predicted results was obtained for the nozzle with a moderate amount of boattail curvature. The nozzle with an external flap having a sharp shoulder (no curvature) had the lowest nozzle pressure drag. At a Mach number of 1.2, sidewall pressure drag doubled as sidewall boattail angle was increased from 4 to 8 deg. Reducing the height of the sidewall caused large decreases in both the sidewall and flap pressure drags.

  17. Transonic Investigation of Two-Dimensional Nozzles Designed for Supersonic Cruise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Deere, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental and computational investigation has been conducted to determine the off-design uninstalled drag characteristics of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle designed for a supersonic cruise civil transport. The overall objectives were to: (1) determine the effects of nozzle external flap curvature and sidewall boattail variations on boattail drag; (2) develop an experimental data base for 2D nozzles with long divergent flaps and small boattail angles and (3) provide data for correlating computational fluid dynamic predictions of nozzle boattail drag. The experimental investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.80 to 1.20 at nozzle pressure ratios up to 9. Three-dimensional simulations of nozzle performance were obtained with the computational fluid dynamics code PAB3D using turbulence closure and nonlinear Reynolds stress modeling. The results of this investigation indicate that excellent correlation between experimental and predicted results was obtained for the nozzle with a moderate amount of boattail curvature. The nozzle with an external flap having a sharp shoulder (no curvature) had the lowest nozzle pressure drag. At a Mach number of 1.2, sidewall pressure drag doubled as sidewall boattail angle was increased from 4deg to 8deg. Reducing the height of the sidewall caused large decreases in both the sidewall and flap pressure drags. Summary

  18. A simulator study for the development and evaluation of operating procedures on a supersonic cruise research transport to minimize airport-community noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, W. D.; Smith, P. M.; Deal, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    Piloted-simulator studies were conducted to determine takeoff and landing operating procedures for a supersonic cruise research transport concept that result in predicted noise levels which meet current Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification standards. With the use of standard FAA noise certification test procedures, the subject simulated aircraft did not meet the FAA traded-noise-level standards during takeoff and landing. However, with the use of advanced procedures, this aircraft meets the traded-noise-level standards for flight crews with average skills. The advanced takeoff procedures developed involved violating some of the current Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR), but it was not necessary to violate any FAR noise-test conditions during landing approach. Noise contours were also determined for some of the simulated takeoffs and landings in order to indicate the noise-reduction advantages of using operational procedures other than standard.

  19. Analytical screening of low emissions, high performance duct burners for supersonic cruise aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohmann, R. A.; Riecke, G. T.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical screening study was conducted to identify duct burner concepts capable of providing low emissions and high performance in advanced supersonic engines. Duct burner configurations ranging from current augmenter technology to advanced concepts such as premix-prevaporized burners were defined. Aerothermal and mechanical design studies provided the basis for screening these configurations using the criteria of emissions, performance, engine compatibility, cost, weight and relative risk. Technology levels derived from recently defined experimental low emissions main burners are required to achieve both low emissions and high performance goals. A configuration based on the Vorbix (Vortex burning and mixing) combustor concept was analytically determined to meet the performance goals and is consistent with the fan duct envelope of a variable cycle engine. The duct burner configuration has a moderate risk level compatible with the schedule of anticipated experimental programs.

  20. Application of advanced computational codes in the design of an experiment for a supersonic throughflow fan rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Jerry R.; Schmidt, James F.; Steinke, Ronald J.; Chima, Rodrick V.; Kunik, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Increased emphasis on sustained supersonic or hypersonic cruise has revived interest in the supersonic throughflow fan as a possible component in advanced propulsion systems. Use of a fan that can operate with a supersonic inlet axial Mach number is attractive from the standpoint of reducing the inlet losses incurred in diffusing the flow from a supersonic flight Mach number to a subsonic one at the fan face. The design of the experiment using advanced computational codes to calculate the components required is described. The rotor was designed using existing turbomachinery design and analysis codes modified to handle fully supersonic axial flow through the rotor. A two-dimensional axisymmetric throughflow design code plus a blade element code were used to generate fan rotor velocity diagrams and blade shapes. A quasi-three-dimensional, thin shear layer Navier-Stokes code was used to assess the performance of the fan rotor blade shapes. The final design was stacked and checked for three-dimensional effects using a three-dimensional Euler code interactively coupled with a two-dimensional boundary layer code. The nozzle design in the expansion region was analyzed with a three-dimensional parabolized viscous code which corroborated the results from the Euler code. A translating supersonic diffuser was designed using these same codes.

  1. Additional F-Functions Useful for Preliminary Design of Shaped-Signature, Low-Boom, Supersonic-Cruise Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Two additional low-boom F-functions have been described for use in designing low-boom, shaped-pressure-signature, supersonic-cruise aircraft. Based on the minimization studies of Seebass and George, the drag-nose shock strength trade-off modification of Darden, and the practical modification of Haglund, their use can aid in the design of conceptual low-boom aircraft, provide additional flexibility in the shaping of the low-boom aircraft nose section, and extend the applicability of shaped-pressure-signature methodology.

  2. Advanced technology payoffs for future rotorcraft, commuter aircraft, cruise missile, and APU propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turk, M. A.; Zeiner, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    In connection with the significant advances made regarding the performance of larger gas turbines, challenges arise concerning the improvement of small gas turbine engines in the 250 to 1000 horsepower range. In response to these challenges, the NASA/Army-sponsored Small Engine Component Technology (SECT) study was undertaken with the objective to identify the engine cycle, configuration, and component technology requirements for the substantial performance improvements desired in year-2000 small gas turbine engines. In the context of this objective, an American turbine engine company evaluated engines for four year-2000 applications, including a rotorcraft, a commuter aircraft, a supersonic cruise missile, and an auxiliary power unit (APU). Attention is given to reference missions, reference engines, reference aircraft, year-2000 technology projections, cycle studies, advanced engine selections, and a technology evaluation.

  3. Real-time testing of titanium sheet and extrusion coupon specimens subjected to Mach 2.7 supersonic cruise aircraft wing stresses and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunde, T.

    1977-01-01

    The accuracy of three accelerated flight-by-flight test methods for material selection, and fatigue substantiation of supersonic cruise aircraft structure was studied. The real time stresses and temperatures applied to the specimens were representative of the service conditions in the lower surface of a Mach 2.7 supersonic cruise aircraft wing root structure. Each real time flight lasted about 65 minutes, including about one hour at (500 F) in the cruise condition. Center notched coupon specimens from six titanium materials were tested: mill-annealed, duplex-annealed, and triplex-annealed Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V sheets; mill-annealed Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V extrusion; mill-annealed Ti-6Al-4V sheet; and solution-treated and aged Ti-6Al-4V extrusion. For duplex-annealed Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V sheet, specimens with single spotweld were also tested. The test results were studied in conjunction with other related data from the literature for: material selection, structural fabrication, fatigue resistance of supersonic cruise aircraft structure, and fatigue test acceleration procedures for supersonic cruise aircraft.

  4. Contracts, grants and funding summary of supersonic cruise research and variable-cycle engine technology programs, 1972 - 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, S.; Varholic, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    NASA-SCAR (AST) program was initiated in 1972 at the direct request of the Executive Office of the White House and Congress following termination of the U.S. SST program. The purpose of SCR was to conduct a focused research and technology program on those technology programs which contributed to the SST termination and, also, to provide an expanded data base for future civil and military supersonic transport aircraft. Funding for the Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) Program was initiated in fiscal year 1973 and terminated in fiscal year 1981. The program was implemented through contracts and grants with industry, universities, and by in-house investigations at the NASA/OAST centers. The studies included system studies and five disciplines: propulsion, stratospheric emissions impact, materials and structures, aerodynamic performance, and stability and control. The NASA/Lewis Variable-Cycle Engine (VCE) Component Program was initiated in 1976 to augment the SCR program in the area of propulsion. After about 2 years, the title was changed to VCE Technology program. The total number of contractors and grantees on record at the AST office in 1982 was 101 for SCR and 4 for VCE. This paper presents a compilation of all the contracts and grants as well as the funding summaries for both programs.

  5. Advanced surface paneling method for subsonic and supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, L. L.; Johnson, F. T.; Ehlers, F. E.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical results illustrating the capabilities of an advanced aerodynamic surface paneling method are presented. The method is applicable to both subsonic and supersonic flow, as represented by linearized potential flow theory. The method is based on linearly varying sources and quadratically varying doublets which are distributed over flat or curved panels. These panels are applied to the true surface geometry of arbitrarily shaped three dimensional aerodynamic configurations.

  6. Conceptual study of an advanced supersonic technology transport (AST-107) for transpacific range using low-bypass-ratio turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, S. J., Jr.; Foss, W. E., Jr.; Neubauer, M. J., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    An advanced supersonic technology configuration concept designated the AST-107, using a low bypass ratio turbofan engine, is described and analyzed. The aircraft had provisions for 273 passengers arranged five abreast. The cruise Mach number was 2.62. The mission range for the AST-107 was 8.48 Mm (4576 n.mi.) and an average lift drag ratio of 9.15 during cruise was achieved. The available lateral control was not sufficient for the required 15.4 m/s (30 kt) crosswind landing condition, and a crosswind landing gear or a significant reduction in dihedral effect would be necessary to meet this requirement. The lowest computed noise levels, including a mechanical suppressor noise reduction of 3 EPNdB at the flyover and sideline monitoring stations, were 110.3 EPNdB (sideline noise), 113.1 EPNdB (centerline noise) and 110.5 EPNdB (approach noise).

  7. User's manual: Subsonic/supersonic advanced panel pilot code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, J.; Tinoco, E. N.; Johnson, F. T.

    1978-01-01

    Sufficient instructions for running the subsonic/supersonic advanced panel pilot code were developed. This software was developed as a vehicle for numerical experimentation and it should not be construed to represent a finished production program. The pilot code is based on a higher order panel method using linearly varying source and quadratically varying doublet distributions for computing both linearized supersonic and subsonic flow over arbitrary wings and bodies. This user's manual contains complete input and output descriptions. A brief description of the method is given as well as practical instructions for proper configurations modeling. Computed results are also included to demonstrate some of the capabilities of the pilot code. The computer program is written in FORTRAN IV for the SCOPE 3.4.4 operations system of the Ames CDC 7600 computer. The program uses overlay structure and thirteen disk files, and it requires approximately 132000 (Octal) central memory words.

  8. Advanced Supersonic Technology concept AST-100 characteristics developed in a baseline-update study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baber, H. T., Jr.; Swanson, E. E.

    1976-01-01

    The advanced supersonic technology configuration, AST-100, is described. The combination of wing thickness reduction, nacelle recontouring for minimum drag at cruise, and the use of the horizontal tail to produce lift during climb and cruise resulted in an increase in maximum lift-to-drag ratio. Lighter engines and lower fuel weight associated with this resizing result in a six percent reduction in takeoff gross weight. The AST-100 takeoff maximum effective perceived noise at the runway centerline and sideline measurement stations was 114.4 decibels. Since 1.5-decibels tradeoff is available from the approach noise, the required engine noise supression is 4.9 decibels. The AST-100 largest maximum overpressure would occur during transonic climb acceleration when the aircraft was at relatively low altitude. Calculated standard +8 C day range of the AST-100, with a 292 passenger payload, is 7348 km (3968 n.mi). Fuel price is the largest contributor to direct operating cost. However, if the AST-100 were flown subsonically (M = 0.9), direct operating costs would increase approximately 50 percent because of time related costs.

  9. An investigation of vortex-induced aerodynamic characteristics of supersonic cruise configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    The linear lifting surface theory which predicts the life in supersonic flow, even though the drag is usually underpredicted, is described. A method for calculating the nonlinear wave drag was developed to remedy this deficiency. The calculated sectional drag is modified by adding the difference between the exact two dimensional (2-D) and the linear 2-D wave drag at the calculated sectional lift coefficient. Improvement in the supersonic drag prediction is shown. The VORCAM code was modified for the FORTRAN 77 language and its input stream was rearranged. The Boeing code was adapted to the computer system. All CDC special features in the code are replaced with standard FORTRAN algorithms. It is suggested that because of the nonlinearity the solution appears to be nonunique crowding of two vortices, a mechanism of vortex asymmetry, is investigated.

  10. The Trojan. [supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Trojan is the culmination of thousands of engineering person-hours by the Cones of Silence Design Team. The goal was to design an economically and technologically viable supersonic transport. The Trojan is the embodiment of the latest engineering tools and technology necessary for such an advanced aircraft. The efficient design of the Trojan allows for supersonic cruise of Mach 2.0 for 5,200 nautical miles, carrying 250 passengers. The per aircraft price is placed at $200 million, making the Trojan a very realistic solution for tomorrows transportation needs. The following is a detailed study of the driving factors that determined the Trojan's super design.

  11. The common case study: Lockheed design of a supersonic cruise vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauss, J. S., Jr.; Hays, A. P.; Wilson, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The objective was to compare the characteristics of SSTs designed for the same mission by Lockheed, McDonnell Douglas, British Aerospace (U.K.), Aerospatiale (France), and the USSR. This comparison was to be used to calibrate parametric design studies of the tradeoff between SST direct operating cost (DOC) and noise levels at the FAR 36 certification points. The guidelines for this common case study were to design an aircraft with the following mission: payload 23 247 kg (51 250 lbm), range - 7000 km (3780 n. mi.), and cruise Mach number - 2.2. Field length was constrained to 3505 m (11 500 ft). Other airfield constraints and fuel reserves were also specified, but no noise constraints were applied.

  12. Variable stream control engine for advanced supersonic aircraft design update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, R. B.; Howlett, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The updating of the engine concept for a second-generation supersonic transport, the variable stream control engine (VSCE), in terms of mechanical design definition and estimated performance is discussed. The design definition reflects technology advancements that improve system efficiency, durability and environments were established. The components unique to the VSCE concept, a high performance duct burner and a low noise coannular nozzle, and the high temperature components are identified as critical technologies. Technology advances for the high temperature components (main combustor and turbines) are also discussed. To address the requirements in this area, the technical approach for undertaking a high temperature validation program is defined. The multi-phased effort would include assorted rig and laboratory tests, then culminate with the demonstration of a flight-type main combustor and single-stage high pressure turbine at operating conditions envisioned for a VSCE.

  13. Jet noise of an augmentor wing-advanced supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franciscus, L.

    1972-01-01

    A preliminary mission study was made of the range and jet noise of an advanced supersonic transport (AST) employing an augmentor wing and four duct burning turbofan engines. The airplane weight and aerodynamic characteristics of the Boeing 2707-300 airplane with a gross weight of 750,000 pounds and 234 passengers was used for the study. Engine thrust was fixed at 58,000 pounds per engine and engine size was increased to obtain the required thrust at reduced power settings for jet noise reduction. Turbofan engine core noise was reduced to FAR 36 noise levels and lower by proper selection of turbine inlet temperature, bypass ratio and fan pressure ratio. The study showed that an augmentor wing can reduce the bypass jet noise sufficiently so that total noise levels below FAR 36 can be attained without significant range penalties if the augmentor wing can be designed without severe weight and performance penalties.

  14. Aerodynamic characteristics at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 2.16 of a supersonic cruise fighter configuration with a design Mach number of 1.8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrout, B. L.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was made in the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel and the Langley Unitary Plan wind tunnel, over a Mach number range of 0.6 to 2.16, to determine the static longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic characteristics of a model of a supersonic-cruise fighter. The configuration, which is designed for efficient cruise at Mach number 1.8, is a twin-engine tailless arrow-wing concept with a single rectangular inlet beneath the fuselage and outboard vertical tails and ventral fins. It had untrimmed values of lift-drage ratio ranging from 10 at subsonic speeds to 6.4 at the design Mach number. The configuration was statically stable both longitudinally and laterally.

  15. Toward a second generation fuel efficient supersonic cruise aircraft structural design for efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoy, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The unique challenge of this concept to the structural designer is discussed. The potential of the application of advanced structural design concepts and new titanium fabrication processes is emphasized. Highlighted are the results of a detailed structural analysis, including weight and flutter, showing successful use of the ATLAS structural design and analysis system. It is concluded that blending of the structure may not have an adverse impact on structural efficiency, weight, and manufacturing complexity.

  16. Final Report for the Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transports Entering Service in the 2030 to 2035 Period, N+3 Supersonic Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgenstern, John; Norstrud, Nicole; Stelmack, Marc; Skoch, Craig

    2010-01-01

    The N+3 Final Report documents the work and progress made by Lockheed Martin Aeronautics in response to the NASA sponsored program "N+3 NRA Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transports Entering Service in the 2030 to 2035 Period." The key technical objective of this effort was to generate promising supersonic concepts for the 2030 to 2035 timeframe and to develop plans for maturing the technologies required to make those concepts a reality. The N+3 program is aligned with NASA's Supersonic Project and is focused on providing alternative system-level solutions capable of overcoming the efficiency, environmental, and performance barriers to practical supersonic flight

  17. Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transports Entering Service in the 2018 to 2020 Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgenstern, John; Norstrud, Nicole; Sokhey, Jack; Martens, Steve; Alonso, Juan J.

    2013-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company (LM), working in conjunction with General Electric Global Research (GE GR), Rolls-Royce Liberty Works (RRLW), and Stanford University, herein presents results from the "N+2 Supersonic Validations" contract s initial 22 month phase, addressing the NASA solicitation "Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transports Entering Service in the 2018 to 2020 Period." This report version adds documentation of an additional three month low boom test task. The key technical objective of this effort was to validate integrated airframe and propulsion technologies and design methodologies. These capabilities aspired to produce a viable supersonic vehicle design with environmental and performance characteristics. Supersonic testing of both airframe and propulsion technologies (including LM3: 97-023 low boom testing and April-June nozzle acoustic testing) verified LM s supersonic low-boom design methodologies and both GE and RRLW's nozzle technologies for future implementation. The N+2 program is aligned with NASA s Supersonic Project and is focused on providing system-level solutions capable of overcoming the environmental and performance/efficiency barriers to practical supersonic flight. NASA proposed "Initial Environmental Targets and Performance Goals for Future Supersonic Civil Aircraft". The LM N+2 studies are built upon LM s prior N+3 100 passenger design studies. The LM N+2 program addresses low boom design and methodology validations with wind tunnel testing, performance and efficiency goals with system level analysis, and low noise validations with two nozzle (GE and RRLW) acoustic tests.

  18. Wide range operation of advanced low NOx combustors for supersonic high-altitude aircraft gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, P. B.; Fiorito, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    An initial rig program tested the Jet Induced Circulation (JIC) and Vortex Air Blast (VAB) systems in small can combustor configurations for NOx emissions at a simulated high altitude, supersonic cruise condition. The VAB combustor demonstrated the capability of meeting the NOx goal of 1.0 g NO2/kg fuel at the cruise condition. In addition, the program served to demonstrate the limited low-emissions range available from the lean, premixed combustor. A follow-on effort was concerned with the problem of operating these lean, premixed combustors with acceptable emissions at simulated engine idle conditions. Various techniques have been demonstrated that allow satisfactory operation on both the JIC and VAB combustors at idle with CO emissions below 20 g/kg fuel. The VAB combustor was limited by flashback/autoignition phenomena at the cruise conditions to a pressure of 8 atmospheres. The JIC combustor was operated up to the full design cruise pressure of 14 atmospheres without encountering an autoignition limitation although the NOx levels, in the 2-3 g NO2/kg fuel range, exceeded the program goal.

  19. The Edge supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosta, Roxana; Bilbija, Dushan; Deutsch, Marc; Gallant, David; Rose, Don; Shreve, Gene; Smario, David; Suffredini, Brian

    1992-01-01

    As intercontinental business and tourism volumes continue their rapid expansion, the need to reduce travel times becomes increasingly acute. The Edge Supersonic Transport Aircraft is designed to meet this demand by the year 2015. With a maximum range of 5750 nm, a payload of 294 passengers and a cruising speed of M = 2.4, The Edge will cut current international flight durations in half, while maintaining competitive first class, business class, and economy class comfort levels. Moreover, this transport will render a minimal impact upon the environment, and will meet all Federal Aviation Administration Part 36, Stage III noise requirements. The cornerstone of The Edge's superior flight performance is its aerodynamically efficient, dual-configuration design incorporating variable-geometry wingtips. This arrangement combines the benefits of a high aspect ratio wing at takeoff and low cruising speeds with the high performance of an arrow-wing in supersonic cruise. And while the structural weight concerns relating to swinging wingtips are substantial, The Edge looks to ever-advancing material technologies to further increase its viability. Heeding well the lessons of the past, The Edge design holds economic feasibility as its primary focus. Therefore, in addition to its inherently superior aerodynamic performance, The Edge uses a lightweight, largely windowless configuration, relying on a synthetic vision system for outside viewing by both pilot and passengers. Additionally, a fly-by-light flight control system is incorporated to address aircraft supersonic cruise instability. The Edge will be produced at an estimated volume of 400 aircraft and will be offered to airlines in 2015 at $167 million per transport (1992 dollars).

  20. Unstructured Grid Euler Method Assessment for Longitudinal and Lateral/Directional Aerodynamic Performance Analysis of the HSR Technology Concept Airplane at Supersonic Cruise Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, Farhad

    1999-01-01

    Unstructured grid Euler computations, performed at supersonic cruise speed, are presented for a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration, designated as the Technology Concept Airplane (TCA) within the High Speed Research (HSR) Program. The numerical results are obtained for the complete TCA cruise configuration which includes the wing, fuselage, empennage, diverters, and flow through nacelles at M (sub infinity) = 2.4 for a range of angles-of-attack and sideslip. Although all the present computations are performed for the complete TCA configuration, appropriate assumptions derived from the fundamental supersonic aerodynamic principles have been made to extract aerodynamic predictions to complement the experimental data obtained from a 1.675%-scaled truncated (aft fuselage/empennage components removed) TCA model. The validity of the computational results, derived from the latter assumptions, are thoroughly addressed and discussed in detail. The computed surface and off-surface flow characteristics are analyzed and the pressure coefficient contours on the wing lower surface are shown to correlate reasonably well with the available pressure sensitive paint results, particularly, for the complex flow structures around the nacelles. The predicted longitudinal and lateral/directional performance characteristics for the truncated TCA configuration are shown to correlate very well with the corresponding wind-tunnel data across the examined range of angles-of-attack and sideslip. The complementary computational results for the longitudinal and lateral/directional performance characteristics for the complete TCA configuration are also presented along with the aerodynamic effects due to empennage components. Results are also presented to assess the computational method performance, solution sensitivity to grid refinement, and solution convergence characteristics.

  1. Jet aircraft emissions during cruise: Present and future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    Forecasts of engine exhaust emissions that may be practicably achievable for future commercial aircraft operating at high altitude cruise conditions are compared to cruise emission for present day aircraft. The forecasts are based on: (1) knowledge of emission characteristics of combustors and augmentors; (2) combustion research in emission reduction technology, and (3) trends in projected engine designs for advanced subsonic or supersonic commercial aircraft. Recent progress that was made in the evolution of emissions reduction technology is discussed.

  2. Model aerodynamic test results for a refined actuated inlet ejector nozzle at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    Wind tunnel model tests were conducted to demonstrate the aerodynamic performance improvements of a refined actuated inlet ejector nozzle. Models of approximately one-tenth scale were configured to simulate nozzle operation at takeoff, subsonic cruise, transonic cruise and supersonic cruise. Variations of model components provided a performance evaluation of ejector inlet and exit area, forebody boattail angle and ejector inlet operation in the open and closed mode. Approximately 700 data points were acquired at Mach numbers of 0, 0.36, 0.9, 1.2, and 2.0 for a wide range of nozzle flow conditions. Results show that relative to two ejector nozzles previously tested performance was improved significantly at takeoff and subsonic cruise performance, a C sub f of 0.982, was attained equal to the high performance of the previous tests. The established advanced supersonic transport propulsion study performance goals were met or closely approached at takeoff and supersonic cruise.

  3. Performance potential of air turbo-ramjet employing supersonic through-flow fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepler, C. E.; Champagne, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the performance potential of a supersonic through-flow fan in an advanced engine designed to power a Mach-5 cruise vehicle. It included a preliminary evaluation of fan performance requirements and the desirability of supersonic versus subsonic combustion, the design and performance of supersonic fans, and the conceptual design of a single-pass air-turbo-rocket/ramjet engine for a Mach 5 cruise vehicle. The study results showed that such an engine could provide high thrust over the entire speed range from sea-level takeoff to Mach 5 cruise, especially over the transonic speed range, and high fuel specific impulse at the Mach 5 cruise condition, with the fan windmilling.

  4. Developments in steady and unsteady aerodynamics for use in aeroelastic analysis and design. [for supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, E. C., Jr.; Bland, S. R.

    1976-01-01

    A review is given of seven research projects which are aimed at improving the generality, accuracy, and computational efficiency of steady and unsteady aerodynamic theory for use in aeroelastic analysis and design. These projects indicate three major thrusts of current research efforts: (1) more realistic representation of steady and unsteady subsonic and supersonic loads on aircraft configurations of general shape with emphasis on structural-design applications, (2) unsteady aerodynamics for application in active-controls analyses, and (3) unsteady aerodynamics for the frequently critical transonic speed range. The review of each project includes theoretical background, description of capabilities, results of application, current status, and plans for further development and use.

  5. Three-dimensional viscous design methodology for advanced technology aircraft supersonic inlet systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. H.

    1983-01-01

    A broad program to develop advanced, reliable, and user oriented three-dimensional viscous design techniques for supersonic inlet systems, and encourage their transfer into the general user community is discussed. Features of the program include: (1) develop effective methods of computing three-dimensional flows within a zonal modeling methodology; (2) ensure reasonable agreement between said analysis and selective sets of benchmark validation data; (3) develop user orientation into said analysis; and (4) explore and develop advanced numerical methodology.

  6. Flight calibration of compensated and uncompensated pitot-static airspeed probes and application of the probes to supersonic cruise vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, L. D.; Washington, H. P.

    1972-01-01

    Static pressure position error calibrations for a compensated and an uncompensated XB-70 nose boom pitot static probe were obtained in flight. The methods (Pacer, acceleration-deceleration, and total temperature) used to obtain the position errors over a Mach number range from 0.5 to 3.0 and an altitude range from 25,000 feet to 70,000 feet are discussed. The error calibrations are compared with the position error determined from wind tunnel tests, theoretical analysis, and a standard NACA pitot static probe. Factors which influence position errors, such as angle of attack, Reynolds number, probe tip geometry, static orifice location, and probe shape, are discussed. Also included are examples showing how the uncertainties caused by position errors can affect the inlet controls and vertical altitude separation of a supersonic transport.

  7. Advanced Supersonic Nozzle Concepts: Experimental Flow Visualization Results Paired With LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Matthew; Magstadt, Andrew; Stack, Cory; Gaitonde, Datta; Glauser, Mark; Syracuse University Team; The Ohio State University Team

    2015-11-01

    Advanced supersonic nozzle concepts are currently under investigation, utilizing multiple bypass streams and airframe integration to bolster performance and efficiency. This work focuses on the parametric study of a supersonic, multi-stream jet with aft deck. The single plane of symmetry, rectangular nozzle, displays very complex and unique flow characteristics. Flow visualization techniques in the form of PIV and schlieren capture flow features at various deck lengths and Mach numbers. LES is compared to the experimental results to both validate the computational model and identify limitations of the simulation. By comparing experimental results to LES, this study will help create a foundation of knowledge for advanced nozzle designs in future aircraft. SBIR Phase II with Spectral Energies, LLC under direction of Barry Kiel.

  8. Computational methods in the prediction of advanced subsonic and supersonic propeller induced noise: ASSPIN users' manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, M. H.; Tarkenton, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the computational aspects of propeller noise prediction in the time domain and the use of high speed propeller noise prediction program ASSPIN (Advanced Subsonic and Supersonic Propeller Induced Noise). These formulations are valid in both the near and far fields. Two formulations are utilized by ASSPIN: (1) one is used for subsonic portions of the propeller blade; and (2) the second is used for transonic and supersonic regions on the blade. Switching between the two formulations is done automatically. ASSPIN incorporates advanced blade geometry and surface pressure modelling, adaptive observer time grid strategies, and contains enhanced numerical algorithms that result in reduced computational time. In addition, the ability to treat the nonaxial inflow case has been included.

  9. Advanced supersonic propulsion study, phase 2. [propulsion system performance, design analysis and technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howlett, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A continuation of the NASA/P and WA study to evaluate various types of propulsion systems for advanced commercial supersonic transports has resulted in the identification of two very promising engine concepts. They are the Variable Stream Control Engine which provides independent temperature and velocity control for two coannular exhaust streams, and a derivative of this engine, a Variable Cycle Engine that employs a rear flow-inverter valve to vary the bypass ratio of the cycle. Both concepts are based on advanced engine technology and have the potential for significant improvements in jet noise, exhaust emissions and economic characteristics relative to current technology supersonic engines. Extensive research and technology programs are required in several critical areas that are unique to these supersonic Variable Cycle Engines to realize these potential improvements. Parametric cycle and integration studies of conventional and Variable Cycle Engines are reviewed, features of the two most promising engine concepts are described, and critical technology requirements and required programs are summarized.

  10. Three-dimensional viscous design methodology for advanced technology aircraft supersonic inlet systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. H.

    1984-01-01

    A broad program to develop advanced, reliable, and user oriented three-dimensional viscous design techniques for supersonic inlet systems, and encourage their transfer into the general user community is discussed. Features of the program include: (1) develop effective methods of computing three-dimensional flows within a zonal modeling methodology; (2) ensure reasonable agreement between said analysis and selective sets of benchmark validation data; (3) develop user orientation into said analysis; and (4) explore and develop advanced numerical methodology. Previously announced in STAR as N84-13190

  11. Supersonic aerodynamic characteristics of an advanced F-16 derivative aircraft configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Mike C.; Forrest, Dana K.

    1993-01-01

    A supersonic wind tunnel investigation was conducted in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel on an advanced derivative configuration of the United States Air Force F-16 fighter. Longitudinal and lateral directional force and moment data were obtained at Mach numbers of 1.60 to 2.16 to evaluate basic performance parameters and control effectiveness. The aerodynamic characteristics for the F-16 derivative model were compared with the data obtained for the F-16C model and also with a previously tested generic wing model that features an identical plan form shape and similar twist distribution.

  12. Aerodynamic Design Opportunities for Future Supersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.

    2002-01-01

    A discussion of a diverse set of aerodynamic opportunities to improve the aerodynamic performance of future supersonic aircraft has been presented and discussed. These ideas are offered to the community in a hope that future supersonic vehicle development activities will not be hindered by past efforts. A number of nonlinear flow based drag reduction technologies are presented and discussed. The subject technologies are related to the areas of interference flows, vehicle concepts, vortex flows, wing design, advanced control effectors, and planform design. The authors also discussed the importance of improving the aerodynamic design environment to allow creativity and knowledge greater influence. A review of all of the data presented show that pressure drag reductions on the order of 50 to 60 counts are achievable, compared to a conventional supersonic cruise vehicle, with the application of several of the discussed technologies. These drag reductions would correlate to a 30 to 40% increase in cruise L/D (lift-to-drag ratio) for a commercial supersonic transport.

  13. Sensitivity of transport aircraft performance and economics to advanced technology and cruise Mach number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.

    1974-01-01

    Sensitivity data for advanced technology transports has been systematically collected. This data has been generated in two separate studies. In the first of these, three nominal, or base point, vehicles designed to cruise at Mach numbers .85, .93, and .98, respectively, were defined. The effects on performance and economics of perturbations to basic parameters in the areas of structures, aerodynamics, and propulsion were then determined. In all cases, aircraft were sized to meet the same payload and range as the nominals. This sensitivity data may be used to assess the relative effects of technology changes. The second study was an assessment of the effect of cruise Mach number. Three families of aircraft were investigated in the Mach number range 0.70 to 0.98: straight wing aircraft from 0.70 to 0.80; sweptwing, non-area ruled aircraft from 0.80 to 0.95; and area ruled aircraft from 0.90 to 0.98. At each Mach number, the values of wing loading, aspect ratio, and bypass ratio which resulted in minimum gross takeoff weight were used. As part of the Mach number study, an assessment of the effect of increased fuel costs was made.

  14. Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transports Entering Service in the 2018-2020 Period Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgenstern, John; Buonanno, Michael; Yao, Jixian; Murugappan, Mugam; Paliath, Umesh; Cheung, Lawrence; Malcevic, Ivan; Ramakrishnan, Kishore; Pastouchenko, Nikolai; Wood, Trevor; Martens, Steve; Viars, Phil; Tersmette, Trevor; Lee, Jason; Simmons, Ron; Plybon, David; Alonso, Juan; Palacios, Francisco; Lukaczyk, Trent; Carrier, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company (LM), working in conjunction with General Electric Global Research (GE GR) and Stanford University, executed a 19 month program responsive to the NASA sponsored "N+2 Supersonic Validation: Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transports Entering Service in the 2018-2020 Period" contract. The key technical objective of this effort was to validate integrated airframe and propulsion technologies and design methodologies necessary to realize a supersonic vehicle capable of meeting the N+2 environmental and performance goals. The N+2 program is aligned with NASA's Supersonic Project and is focused on providing system level solutions capable of overcoming the efficiency, environmental, and performance barriers to practical supersonic flight. The N+2 environmental and performance goals are outlined in the technical paper, AIAA-2014-2138 (Ref. 1) along with the validated N+2 Phase 2 results. Our Phase 2 efforts built upon our Phase 1 studies (Ref. 2) and successfully demonstrated the ability to design and test realistic configurations capable of shaped sonic booms over the width of the sonic boom carpet. Developing a shaped boom configuration capable of meeting the N+2 shaped boom targets is a key goal for the N+2 program. During the LM Phase 1 effort, LM successfully designed and tested a shaped boom trijet configuration (1021) capable of achieving 85 PLdB under track (forward and aft shock) and up to 28 deg off-track at Mach 1.6. In Phase 2 we developed a refined configuration (1044-2) that extended the under 85 PLdB sonic boom level over the entire carpet of 52 deg off-track at a cruise Mach number of 1.7. Further, the loudness level of the configuration throughout operational conditions calculates to an average of 79 PLdB. These calculations rely on propagation employing Burger's (sBOOM) rounding methodology, and there are indications that the configuration average loudness would actually be 75 PLdB. We also added

  15. Advanced Low NO Sub X Combustors for Supersonic High-Altitude Aircraft Gas Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, P. B.; White, D. J.; Shekleton, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A test rig program was conducted with the objective of evaluating and minimizing the exhaust emissions, in particular NO sub x, of three advanced aircraft combustor concepts at a simulated, high altitude cruise condition. The three combustor designs, all members of the lean reaction, premixed family, are the Jet Induced Circulation (JIC) combustor, the Vortex Air Blast (VAB) combustor, and a catalytic combustor. They were rig tested in the form of reverse flow can combustors in the 0.127 m. (5.0 in.) size range. Various configuration modifications were applied to each of the initial JIC and VAB combustor model designs in an effort to reduce the emissions levels. The VAB combustor demonstrated a NO sub x level of 1.1 gm NO2/kg fuel with essentially 100% combustion efficiency at the simulated cruise combustor condition of 50.7 N/sq cm (5 atm), 833 K (1500 R) inlet pressure and temperature respectively and 1778 K (3200 R) outlet temperature on Jet-A1 fuel. Early tests on the catalytic combustor were unsuccessful due to a catalyst deposition problem and were discontinued in favor of the JIC and VAB tests. In addition emissions data were obtained on the JIC and VAB combustors at low combustor inlet pressure and temperatures that indicate the potential performance at engine off-design conditions.

  16. Advanced low NO/x/ combustors for supersonic high-altitude aircraft gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, P. B.; Shekleton, J. R.; White, D. J.; Butze, H. F.

    1976-01-01

    A test rig program was conducted with the objective of evaluating and minimizing the exhaust emissions, in particular NO(x), of two advanced aircraft combustor concepts at a simulated, high-altitude cruise condition. The two combustor designs, both members of the lean-reaction, pre-mixed family, are known as the Jet Induced Circulation (JIC) combustor and the Vortex Air Blast (VAB) combustor and were rig tested in the form of reverse flow can combustors in the 0.127-m size range. Various configuration modifications were applied to each of the initial JIC and VAB combustor model designs in an effort to reduce the emissions levels. The VAB combustor demonstrated a NO(x) level of 1.1 gm NO2/kg fuel with essentially 100 percent combustion efficiency at the simulated cruise combustor condition of 507 kPa, 833 K inlet pressure and temperature, respectively and 1778 K outlet temperature on Jet-A1 fuel. In addition, emissions data were obtained at low combustor inlet pressure and temperatures that indicate the potential performance at engine off-design conditions.

  17. Time-temperature-stress capabilities of composite materials for advanced supersonic technology application, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, J. R.; Haskins, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Implementation of metal and resin matrix composites into supersonic vehicle usage is contingent upon accelerating the demonstration of service capacity and design technology. Because of the added material complexity and lack of extensive service data, laboratory replication of the flight service will provide the most rapid method of documenting the airworthiness of advanced composite systems. A program in progress to determine the time temperature stress capabilities of several high temperature composite materials includes thermal aging, environmental aging, fatigue, creep, fracture, and tensile tests as well as real time flight simulation exposure. The program has two parts. The first includes all the material property determinations and aging and simulation exposures up through 10,000 hours. The second continues these tests up to 50,000 cumulative hours. Results are presented of the 10,000 hour phase, which has now been completed.

  18. Wind-tunnel/flight correlation study of aerodynamic characteristics of a large flexible supersonic cruise airplane (XB-70-1). 3: A comparison between characteristics predicted from wind-tunnel measurements and those measured in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaiz, H. H.; Peterson, J. B., Jr.; Daugherty, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    A program was undertaken by NASA to evaluate the accuracy of a method for predicting the aerodynamic characteristics of large supersonic cruise airplanes. This program compared predicted and flight-measured lift, drag, angle of attack, and control surface deflection for the XB-70-1 airplane for 14 flight conditions with a Mach number range from 0.76 to 2.56. The predictions were derived from the wind-tunnel test data of a 0.03-scale model of the XB-70-1 airplane fabricated to represent the aeroelastically deformed shape at a 2.5 Mach number cruise condition. Corrections for shape variations at the other Mach numbers were included in the prediction. For most cases, differences between predicted and measured values were within the accuracy of the comparison. However, there were significant differences at transonic Mach numbers. At a Mach number of 1.06 differences were as large as 27 percent in the drag coefficients and 20 deg in the elevator deflections. A brief analysis indicated that a significant part of the difference between drag coefficients was due to the incorrect prediction of the control surface deflection required to trim the airplane.

  19. Wing planform effects at supersonic speeds for an advanced fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, R. M.; Miller, D. S.

    1984-01-01

    Four advanced fighter configurations, which differed in wing planform and airfoil shape, were investigated in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach numbers of 1.60, 1.80, 2.00, and 2.16. Supersonic data were obtained on the four uncambered wings, which were each attached to a single fighter fuselage. The fuselage geometry varied in cross-sectional shape and had two side-mounted, flow-through, half-axisymmetric inlets. Twin vertical tails were attached to the fuselage. The four planforms tested were a 65 deg delta wing, a combination of a 20 deg trapezoidal wing and a 45 deg horizontal tail, a 70 deg/30 deg cranked wing, and a 70 deg/66 deg crank wing, where the angle values refer to the leading-edge sweep angle of the lifting-surface planform. Planform effects on a single fuselage representative of an advanced fighter aircraft were studied. Results show that the highly swept cranked wings exceeded the aerodynamic performance levels, at low lift coefficients, of the 65 deg delta wing and the 20 deg trapezoidal wing at trimmed and untrimmed conditions.

  20. Time-temperature-stress capabilities of composite materials for advanced supersonic technology application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, James R.; Haskins, James F.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced composites will play a key role in the development of the technology for the design and fabrication of future supersonic vehicles. However, incorporating the material into vehicle usage is contingent on accelerating the demonstration of service capacity and design technology. Because of the added material complexity and lack of extensive data, laboratory replication of the flight service will provide the most rapid method to document the airworthiness of advanced composite systems. Consequently, a laboratory program was conducted to determine the time-temperature-stress capabilities of several high temperature composites. Tests included were thermal aging, environmental aging, fatigue, creep, fracture, tensile, and real-time flight simulation exposure. The program had two phases. The first included all the material property determinations and aging and simulation exposures up through 10,000 hours. The second continued these tests up to 50,000 cumulative hours. This report presents the results of the Phase 1 baseline and 10,000-hr aging and flight simulation studies, the Phase 2 50,000-hr aging studies, and the Phase 2 flight simulation tests, some of which extended to almost 40,000 hours.

  1. Supersonic through-flow fan assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepler, C. E.; Champagne, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the performance potential of a supersonic through-flow fan engine for supersonic cruise aircraft. It included a mean-line analysis of fans designed to operate with in-flow velocities ranging from subsonic to high supersonic speeds. The fan performance generated was used to estimate the performance of supersonic fan engines designed for four applications: a Mach 2.3 supersonic transport, a Mach 2.5 fighter, a Mach 3.5 cruise missile, and a Mach 5.0 cruise vehicle. For each application an engine was conceptualized, fan performance and engine performance calculated, weight estimates made, engine installed in a hypothetical vehicle, and mission analysis was conducted.

  2. Use of advanced particle methods in modeling space propulsion and its supersonic expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borner, Arnaud

    This research discusses the use of advanced kinetic particle methods such as Molecular Dynamics (MD) and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) to model space propulsion systems such as electrospray thrusters and their supersonic expansions. MD simulations are performed to model an electrospray thruster for the ionic liquid (IL) EMIM--BF4 using coarse-grained (CG) potentials. The model is initially featuring a constant electric field applied in the longitudinal direction. Two coarse-grained potentials are compared, and the effective-force CG (EFCG) potential is found to predict the formation of the Taylor cone, the cone-jet, and other extrusion modes for similar electric fields and mass flow rates observed in experiments of a IL fed capillary-tip-extractor system better than the simple CG potential. Later, one-dimensional and fully transient three-dimensional electric fields, the latter solving Poisson's equation to take into account the electric field due to space charge at each timestep, are computed by coupling the MD model to a Poisson solver. It is found that the inhomogeneous electric field as well as that of the IL space-charge improve agreement between modeling and experiment. The boundary conditions (BCs) are found to have a substantial impact on the potential and electric field, and the tip BC is introduced and compared to the two previous BCs, named plate and needle, showing good improvement by reducing unrealistically high radial electric fields generated in the vicinity of the capillary tip. The influence of the different boundary condition models on charged species currents as a function of the mass flow rate is studied, and it is found that a constant electric field model gives similar agreement to the more rigorous and computationally expensive tip boundary condition at lower flow rates. However, at higher mass flow rates the MD simulations with the constant electric field produces extruded particles with higher Coulomb energy per ion, consistent with

  3. Development of longitudinal handling qualities criteria for large advanced supersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudderth, R. W.; Bohn, J. G.; Caniff, M. A.; Bennett, G. R.

    1975-01-01

    Longitudinal handling qualities criteria in terms of airplane response characteristics were developed. The criteria cover high speed cruise maneuvering, landing approach, and stall recovery. Data substantiating the study results are reported.

  4. Advancements in Dual-Pump Broadband CARS for Supersonic Combustion Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedder, Sarah Augusta Umberger

    2010-01-01

    Space- and time-resolved measurements of temperature and species mole fractions of nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen were obtained with a dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) system in hydrogen-fueled supersonic combustion free jet flows. These measurements were taken to provide time-resolved fluid properties of turbulent supersonic combustion for use in the creation and verification of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models. CFD models of turbulent supersonic combustion flow currently facilitate the design of air-breathing supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) engines. Measurements were made in supersonic axi-symmetric free jets of two scales. First, the measurement system was tested in a laboratory environment using a laboratory-scale burner (approx.10 mm at nozzle exit). The flow structures of the laboratory-burner were too small to be resolved with the CARS measurements volume, but the composition and temperature of the jet allowed the performance of the system to be evaluated. Subsequently, the system was tested in a burner that was approximately 6 times larger, whose length scales are better resolved by the CARS measurement volume. During both these measurements, weaknesses of the CARS system, such as sensitivity to vibrations and beam steering and inability to measure temperature or species concentrations in hydrogen fuel injection regions were indentified. Solutions were then implemented in improved CARS systems. One of these improved systems is a dual-pump broadband CARS technique called, Width Increased Dual-pump Enhanced CARS (WIDECARS). The two lowest rotational energy levels of hydrogen detectable by WIDECARS are H2 S(3) and H2 S(4). The detection of these lines gives the system the capability to measure temperature and species concentrations in regions of the flow containing pure hydrogen fuel at room temperature. WIDECARS is also designed for measurements of all the major species (except water) in supersonic combustion flows

  5. Advanced missile technology. A review of technology improvement areas for cruise missiles. [including missile design, missile configurations, and aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronvich, L. L.; Liepman, H. P.

    1979-01-01

    Technology assessments in the areas of aerodynamics, propulsion, and structures and materials for cruise missile systems are discussed. The cruise missiles considered cover the full speed, altitude, and target range. The penetrativity, range, and maneuverability of the cruise missiles are examined and evaluated for performance improvements.

  6. Methods for comparative evaluation of propulsion system designs for supersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyson, R. M.; Mairs, R. Y.; Halferty, F. D., Jr.; Moore, B. E.; Chaloff, D.; Knudsen, A. W.

    1976-01-01

    The propulsion system comparative evaluation study was conducted to define a rapid, approximate method for evaluating the effects of propulsion system changes for an advanced supersonic cruise airplane, and to verify the approximate method by comparing its mission performance results with those from a more detailed analysis. A table look up computer program was developed to determine nacelle drag increments for a range of parametric nacelle shapes and sizes. Aircraft sensitivities to propulsion parameters were defined. Nacelle shapes, installed weights, and installed performance was determined for four study engines selected from the NASA supersonic cruise aircraft research (SCAR) engine studies program. Both rapid evaluation method (using sensitivities) and traditional preliminary design methods were then used to assess the four engines. The method was found to compare well with the more detailed analyses.

  7. Takeoff certification considerations for large subsonic and supersonic transport airplanes using the Ames flight simulator for advanced aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, C. T.; Drinkwater, F. J., III; Fry, E. B.; Forrest, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    Data for use in development of takeoff airworthiness standards for new aircraft designs such as the supersonic transport (SST) and the large wide-body subsonic jet transport are provided. An advanced motion simulator was used to compare the performance and handling characteristics of three representative large jet transports during specific flight certification tasks. Existing regulatory constraints and methods for determining rotation speed were reviewed, and the effects on takeoff performance of variations in rotation speed, pitch attitude, and pitch attitude rate during the rotation maneuver were analyzed. A limited quantity of refused takeoff information was obtained. The aerodynamics, wing loading, and thrust-to-weight ratio of the subject SST resulted in takeoff speeds limited by climb (rather than lift-off) considerations. Take-off speeds based on U.S. subsonic transport requirements were found unacceptable because of the criticality of rotation-abuse effects on one-engine-inoperative climb performance. Adequate safety margin was provided by takeoff speeds based on proposed Anglo-French supersonic transport (TSS) criteria, with the limiting criterion being that takeoff safety speed be at least 1.15 times the one-engine-inoperative zero-rate-of-climb speed. Various observations related to SST certification are presented.

  8. Theoretical analysis of linearized acoustics and aerodynamics of advanced supersonic propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.

    1985-01-01

    The derivation of a formula for prediction of the noise of supersonic propellers using time domain analysis is presented. This formula is a solution of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation and does not have the Doppler singularity of some other formulations. The result presented involves some surface integrals over the blade and line integrals over the leading and trailing edges. The blade geometry, motion and surface pressure are needed for noise calculation. To obtain the blade surface pressure, the observer is moved onto the blade surface and a linear singular integral equation is derived which can be solved numerically. Two examples of acoustic calculations using a computer program are currently under development.

  9. Edge localized mode characteristics during edge localized mode mitigation by supersonic molecular beam injection in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. Y.; Hahn, S. H.; Ghim, Y.-C.; Bak, J. G.; Lee, J. H.; Ko, W. H.; Lee, K. D.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, H. H.; Juhn, J.-W.; Kim, H. S.; Yoon, S. W.; Han, H.; Hong, J. H.; Jang, J. H.; Park, J. S.; Choe, Wonho

    2015-12-01

    It has been reported that supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) is an effective means of edge localized mode (ELM) mitigation. This paper newly reports the changes in the ELM, plasma profiles, and fluctuation characteristics during ELM mitigation by SMBI in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. During the mitigated ELM phase, the ELM frequency increased by a factor of 2-3 and the ELM size, which was estimated from the Dα amplitude, the fractional changes in the plasma-stored energy and the line-averaged electron density, and divertor heat flux during an ELM burst, decreased by a factor of 0.34-0.43. Reductions in the electron and ion temperatures rather than in the electron density were observed during the mitigated ELM phase. In the natural ELM phase, frequency chirping of the plasma fluctuations was observed before the ELM bursts; however, the ELM bursts occurred without changes in the plasma fluctuation frequency in the mitigated ELM phase.

  10. Advanced low-NO(x) combustors for supersonic high-altitude gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, P. B.

    1977-01-01

    The impact of gas-turbine-engine-powered aircraft on worldwide pollution was defined within two major areas of contribution. First, the contribution of aircraft to the local air pollution of metropolitan areas and, second, the long-term effects on the chemical balance of the stratosphere of pollutants emitted from future generations of high-altitude, supersonic commercial and military aircraft. Preliminary findings indicate that stratospheric oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions may have to be limited to very low levels if, for example, ozone depletion with concomitant increases in sea-level radiation, are to be avoided. Theoretical considerations suggest that (NOx) levels as low as 1.0 gram per kilogram of fuel and less should be attainable from a idealized premixed type of combustor. Experimental rig studies were intended to explore new combustor concepts designed to minimize the formation of (NOx) in aircraft gas turbines and to define their major operational problems and limitations.

  11. PAN AIR analysis of the NASA/MCAIR 279-3: An advanced supersonic V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madson, Michael D.; Erickson, Larry L.

    1986-01-01

    PAN AIR is a computer program for predicting subsonic or supersonic linear potential flow about arbitrary configurations. The program was applied to a highly complex single-engine-cruise V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft. Complexities include a close-coupled canard/wing, large inlets, and four exhaust nozzles mounted directly under the wing and against the fuselage. Modeling uncertainties involving canard wake location and flow-through approximation through the inlet and the exhaust nozzles were investigated. The recently added streamline capability of the program was utilized to evaluate visually the predicted flow over the model. PAN AIR results for Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.9, and angles of attack of 0, 5, and 10 deg. were compared with data obtained in the Ames 11- by 11-Foot Transonic Wind tunnel, at a Reynolds number of 3.69 x 10 to the 6th power based on c bar.

  12. Status review of a supersonically-biased fighter wing-design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, R. M.; Miller, D. S.; Hahne, D. E.; Niedling, L. G.; Klein, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Results from an ongoing supersonically-biased fighter wing-design study are summarized. The study has been conducted to explore the effects of supersonic aerodynamic performance, transonic maneuvering, low-speed/high angle-of-attack characteristics, and airframe system integration requirements on fighter aircraft wing design. The approach adopted involves the theoretical and experimental investigation of four advanced aircraft configurations which differ only in wing geometry. Supersonic and low-speed/high angle-of-attack wind tunnel results have been obtained for 20 deg trapezoidal, 65 deg delta, 70/30-deg advanced cranked, and 70/66-deg advanced cranked wing configurations. The supersonic data show that the advanced cranked wings outperform the trapezoidal and delta wings at cruise and moderate lift conditions. Low-speed/high angle-of-attack results show that all wings have significant stability problems above an angle of attack of 20 deg. Aircraft sizing analysis results show that the advanced cranked-wing configurations are significantly lighter, based upon take-off gross weight, than either the trapezoidal or the delta wings.

  13. The performance evaluation of a jet flap on an advanced supersonic harrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipera, L. D.; Sandlin, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    The performance concept of a supersonic vertical and short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) fighter, model 279-3, modified to utilize a jet flap was evaluated. Replacing the rear nozzles of the 279-3 with the jet flap favorably alters the pressure distribution over the airfoil and dramatically increases lift. The result is a significant decrease in takeoff distance, an increase in payload, and an improvement in combat performance. To investigate the benefit in increased payload, the 279-3 and the jet flapped 279-3JF were modeled on the NASA Aircraft Synthesis (ACSYNT) computer code and flown on a 250 feet takeoff distance interdiction mission. The increase in payload weight that the 279-3JF could carry was converted into fuel in one case, and in another, converted to bomb load. When the fuel was increased, the 279-3JF penetrated into enemy territory almost four times the distance of 279-3, and therefore increased mission capability. When the bomb load was increased, the 279-3JF carried 14 bombs the same distance the 279-3 carried four. The increase in mission performance and improvements in turning rates was realized with only a small penalty in increased empty weight.

  14. Loads technology for supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    A flight program to measure atmospheric turbulence at high altitudes (long wavelengths) in a variety of meteorological conditions is described and some results obtained in high altitude wind shear are discussed. Results are also presented from wind tunnel test programs to measure fluctuating pressures associated with over-the-wing configurations. A flexible aircraft take off and landing analysis and an active control landing gear analysis, are developed and their capabilities are described. Efforts to validate these analyses with experimental data are also discussed as well as results obtained from parametric studies.

  15. Edge localized mode characteristics during edge localized mode mitigation by supersonic molecular beam injection in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H. Y.; Hong, J. H.; Jang, J. H.; Park, J. S.; Choe, Wonho; Hahn, S. H.; Bak, J. G.; Lee, J. H.; Ko, W. H.; Lee, K. D.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, H. H.; Juhn, J.-W.; Kim, H. S.; Yoon, S. W.; Han, H.; Ghim, Y.-C.

    2015-12-15

    It has been reported that supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) is an effective means of edge localized mode (ELM) mitigation. This paper newly reports the changes in the ELM, plasma profiles, and fluctuation characteristics during ELM mitigation by SMBI in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. During the mitigated ELM phase, the ELM frequency increased by a factor of 2–3 and the ELM size, which was estimated from the D{sub α} amplitude, the fractional changes in the plasma-stored energy and the line-averaged electron density, and divertor heat flux during an ELM burst, decreased by a factor of 0.34–0.43. Reductions in the electron and ion temperatures rather than in the electron density were observed during the mitigated ELM phase. In the natural ELM phase, frequency chirping of the plasma fluctuations was observed before the ELM bursts; however, the ELM bursts occurred without changes in the plasma fluctuation frequency in the mitigated ELM phase.

  16. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. Comprehensive data report. Volume 2: Tabulated aeroynamic data book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Tabulated data from wind tunnel tests conducted to evaluate the aerodynamic performance of an advanced coannular exhaust nozzle for a future supersonic propulsion system are presented. Tests were conducted with two test configurations: (1) a short flap mechanism for fan stream control with an isentropic contoured flow splitter, and (2) an iris fan nozzle with a conical flow splitter. Both designs feature a translating primary plug and an auxiliary inlet ejector. Tests were conducted at takeoff and simulated cruise conditions. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0, 0.36, 0.9, and 2.0 for a wide range of nozzle operating conditions. At simulated supersonic cruise, both configurations demonstrated good performance, comparable to levels assumed in earlier advanced supersonic propulsion studies. However, at subsonic cruise, both configurations exhibited performance that was 6 to 7.5 percent less than the study assumptions. At takeoff conditions, the iris configuration performance approached the assumed levels, while the short flap design was 4 to 6 percent less. Data are provided through test run 25.

  17. Supersonic compressor

    DOEpatents

    Lawlor, Shawn P.; Novaresi, Mark A.; Cornelius, Charles C.

    2008-02-26

    A gas compressor based on the use of a driven rotor having an axially oriented compression ramp traveling at a local supersonic inlet velocity (based on the combination of inlet gas velocity and tangential speed of the ramp) which forms a supersonic shockwave axially, between adjacent strakes. In using this method to compress inlet gas, the supersonic compressor efficiently achieves high compression ratios while utilizing a compact, stabilized gasdynamic flow path. Operated at supersonic speeds, the inlet stabilizes an oblique/normal shock system in the gasdyanamic flow path formed between the gas compression ramp on a strake, the shock capture lip on the adjacent strake, and captures the resultant pressure within the stationary external housing while providing a diffuser downstream of the compression ramp.

  18. Supersonic HLFC: Potential benefits and technology development requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Frank

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of the potential benefits and technology development requirements of supersonic Hybrid Laminar Flow Control (HLFC) are reviewed. For the last three years, Boeing has performed studies on the application of laminar flow control to High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configurations. Large potential net benefits were identified for laminar flow control, even after accounting for the significant implementation penalties. However, the technical risks are high at this time, and an early, aggressive technology development program is required if laminar flow control (LFC) is to be incorporated in a year 2005 HSCT program. The benefits and required development effort are addressed. Of all the aerodynamic advances that are being considered for the HSCT, LFC has the largest potential for improving the supersonic lift drag ratio of a given configuration. The work accomplished to date, sponsored by NASA Langley, is summarized. This work includes studies on HLFC application to HSCT, cruise HLFC/low speed boundary layer control (BLC) compatibility, and impact of M 0.9 HLFC and high lift BLC. Requirements for production committments are listed. The need for a HSCT-HLFC Risk Reduction Program is addressed. Supersonic HLFC development planning and future applications are addressed. Laminar flow/high-lift integration is addressed.

  19. An assessment of the effect of supersonic aircraft operations on the stratospheric ozone content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppoff, I. G.; Whitten, R. C.; Turco, R. P.; Capone, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    An assessment of the potential effect on stratospheric ozone of an advanced supersonic transport operations is presented. This assessment, which was undertaken because of NASA's desire for an up-to-date evaluation to guide programs for the development of supersonic technology and improved aircraft engine designs, uses the most recent chemical reaction rate data. From the results of the present assessment it would appear that realistic fleet sizes should not cause concern with regard to the depletion of the total ozone overburden. For example, the NOx emission of one type designed to cruise at 20 km altitude will cause the ozone overburden to increase by 0.03% to 0.12%, depending upon which vertical transport is used. These ozone changes can be compared with the predictions of a 1.74% ozone decrease (for 100 Large SST's flying at 20 km) made in 1974 by the FAA's Climatic Impact Assessment Program.

  20. Study of the supersonic propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabri, Jean; Siestrunck, Raymond

    1953-01-01

    In this paper a propeller having all sections operating at supersonic speeds is designated a supersonic propeller regardless of flight speed. Analyses assume subsonic flight speeds but very high rotational speeds. A very elementary analysis of the efficiency of a jet-propeller system is presented. A propeller analysis based on conventional vortex blade element theory is presented and reduced to a single point method which leads to an expression for optimum advance ratio in terms of hub-tip diameter ratio and airfoil fineness ratio. An expression for propeller efficiency in terms of advance ratio, hub-tip diameter ratio, and airfoil thickness ratio is also presented. Use is made of theoretical airfoil characteristics at supersonic speeds. A study of blade section interference, blade shock and expansion fields, at supersonic section speeds is presented. An example taken indicates that an efficiency of seventy percent can be obtained with a propeller having a tip Mach number of 2.3.

  1. Supersonic compressor

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, II, William Byron; Lawlor, Shawn P.; Breidenthal, Robert E.

    2016-04-12

    A supersonic compressor including a rotor to deliver a gas at supersonic conditions to a diffuser. The diffuser includes a plurality of aerodynamic ducts that have converging and diverging portions, for deceleration of gas to subsonic conditions and then for expansion of subsonic gas, to change kinetic energy of the gas to static pressure. The aerodynamic ducts include vortex generating structures for controlling boundary layer, and structures for changing the effective contraction ratio to enable starting even when the aerodynamic ducts are designed for high pressure ratios, and structures for boundary layer control. In an embodiment, aerodynamic ducts are provided having an aspect ratio of in excess of two to one, when viewed in cross-section orthogonal to flow direction at an entrance to the aerodynamic duct.

  2. Preliminary noise tradeoff study of a Mach 2.7 cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mascitti, V. R.; Maglieri, D. J. (Editor); Raney, J. P. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    NASA computer codes in the areas of preliminary sizing and enroute performance, takeoff and landing performance, aircraft noise prediction, and economics were used in a preliminary noise tradeoff study for a Mach 2.7 design supersonic cruise concept. Aerodynamic configuration data were based on wind-tunnel model tests and related analyses. Aircraft structural characteristics and weight were based on advanced structural design methodologies, assuming conventional titanium technology. The most advanced noise prediction techniques available were used, and aircraft operating costs were estimated using accepted industry methods. The 4-engines cycles included in the study were based on assumed 1985 technology levels. Propulsion data was provided by aircraft manufacturers. Additional empirical data is needed to define both noise reduction features and other operating characteristics of all engine cycles under study. Data on VCE design parameters, coannular nozzle inverted flow noise reduction and advanced mechanical suppressors are urgently needed to reduce the present uncertainties in studies of this type.

  3. Supersonic through-flow fan design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, James F.; Moore, Royce D.; Wood, Jerry R.; Steinke, Ronald J.

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has embarked on a program to experimentally prove the concept of a supersonic through-flow fan which is to maintain supersonic velocities throughout the compression system with only weak shock-wave flow losses. The detailed design of a supersonic through-flow fan and estimated off-design performance with the use of advanced computational codes are described. A multistage compressor facility is being modified for the newly designed supersonic through-flow fan and the major aspects of this modification are briefly described.

  4. Design features of a low-disturbance supersonic wind tunnel for transition research at low supersonic Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Laub, James A.; King, Lyndell S.; Reda, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    A unique, low-disturbance supersonic wind tunnel is being developed at NASA-Ames to support supersonic laminar flow control research at cruise Mach numbers of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). The distinctive design features of this new quiet tunnel are a low-disturbance settling chamber, laminar boundary layers along the nozzle/test section walls, and steady supersonic diffuser flow. This paper discusses these important aspects of our quiet tunnel design and the studies necessary to support this design. Experimental results from an 1/8th-scale pilot supersonic wind tunnel are presented and discussed in association with theoretical predictions. Natural laminar flow on the test section walls is demonstrated and both settling chamber and supersonic diffuser performance is examined. The full-scale wind tunnel should be commissioned by the end of 1993.

  5. 76 FR 30231 - Civil Supersonic Aircraft Panel Discussion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... the wave shape results in a softer sound that is quieter than the Concord sonic boom by a factor of 10... supersonic aircraft such as the Concorde in cruise produces a traditional jagged ``N-wave'' sonic boom pressure wave, resulting in a loud, jarring double boom on the ground as it passes by....

  6. Overview of Experimental Capabilities - Supersonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of experimental capabilities applicable to the area of supersonic research. The contents include: 1) EC Objectives; 2) SUP.11: Elements; 3) NRA; 4) Advanced Flight Simulator Flexible Aircraft Simulation Studies; 5) Advanced Flight Simulator Flying Qualities Guideline Development for Flexible Supersonic Transport Aircraft; 6) Advanced Flight Simulator Rigid/Flex Flight Control; 7) Advanced Flight Simulator Rapid Sim Model Exchange; 8) Flight Test Capabilities Advanced In-Flight Infrared (IR) Thermography; 9) Flight Test Capabilities In-Flight Schlieren; 10) Flight Test Capabilities CLIP Flow Calibration; 11) Flight Test Capabilities PFTF Flowfield Survey; 12) Ground Test Capabilities Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics (LITA); 13) Ground Test Capabilities Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV); 14) Ground Test Capabilities Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV); and 15) Ground Test Capabilities EDL Optical Measurement Capability (PIV) for Rigid/Flexible Decelerator Models.

  7. A Generalized Framework for Constrained Design Optimization of General Supersonic Configurations Using Adjoint Based Sensitivity Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karman, Steve L., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) sent out an NASA Research Announcement (NRA) for proposals soliciting research and technical development. The proposed research program was aimed at addressing the desired milestones and outcomes of ROA (ROA-2006) Subtopic A.4.1.1 Advanced Computational Methods. The second milestone, SUP.1.06.02 Robust, validated mesh adaptation and error quantification for near field Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), was addressed by the proposed research. Additional research utilizing the direct links to geometry through a CAD interface enabled by this work will allow for geometric constraints to be applied and address the final milestone, SUP2.07.06 Constrained low-drag supersonic aerodynamic design capability. The original product of the proposed research program was an integrated system of tools that can be used for the mesh mechanics required for rapid high fidelity analysis and for design of supersonic cruise vehicles. These Euler and Navier-Stokes volume grid manipulation tools were proposed to efficiently use parallel processing. The mesh adaptation provides a systematic approach for achieving demonstrated levels of accuracy in the solutions. NASA chose to fund only the mesh generation/adaptation portion of the proposal. So this report describes the completion of the proposed tasks for mesh creation, manipulation and adaptation as it pertains to sonic boom prediction of supersonic configurations.

  8. N plus 3 Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transport Aircraft Entering Service in the 2030-2035 Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welge, H. Robert; Bonet, John; Magee, Todd; Tompkins, Daniel; Britt, Terry R.; Nelson, Chet; Miller, Gregory; Stenson, Douglas; Staubach, J. Brent; Bala, Naushir; Duge, Robert; OBrien, Mark; Cedoz, Robert; Barlow, Andrew; Martins, Steve; Viars, Phil; Rasheed, Adam; Kirby, Michelle; Raczynski, Chris; Roughen, Kevin; Doyle, Steven; Alston, Katherine; Page, Juliet; Plotkin, Kenneth J.

    2011-01-01

    Boeing, with Pratt & Whitney, General Electric, Rolls-Royce, M4 Engineering, Wyle Laboratories and Georgia Institute of Technology, conducted a study of supersonic commercial aircraft concepts and enabling technologies for the year 2030-2035 timeframe. The work defined the market and environmental/regulatory conditions that could evolve by the 2030/35 time period, from which vehicle performance goals were derived. Relevant vehicle concepts and technologies are identified that are anticipated to meet these performance and environmental goals. A series of multidisciplinary analyses trade studies considering vehicle sizing, mission performance and environmental conformity determined the appropriate concepts. Combinations of enabling technologies and the required technology performance levels needed to meet the desired goals were identified. Several high priority technologies are described in detail, including roadmaps with risk assessments that outline objectives, key technology challenges, detailed tasks and schedules and demonstrations that need to be performed. A representative configuration is provided for reference purposes, along with associated performance estimates based on these key technologies.

  9. Naval threat countermeasure simulator and the IR_CRUISE_missiles models for the generation of infrared (IR) videos of maritime targets and background for input into advanced imaging IR seekers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taczak, Thomas M.; Dries, John W.; Gover, Robert E.; Snapp, Mary Ann; Williams, Elmer F.; Cahill, Colin P.

    2002-07-01

    A new hardware-in-the-loop modeling technique was developed at the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) for the evaluation of IR countermeasures against advanced IR imaging anti-ship cruise missiles. The research efforts involved the creation of tools to generate accurate IR imagery and synthesize video to inject in to real-world threat simulators. A validation study was conducted to verify the accuracy and limitations of the techniques that were developed.

  10. Effect of Maximum Cruise-power Operation at Ultra-lean Mixture and Increased Spark Advance on the Mechanical Condition of Cylinder Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Herbert B.; Duffy, Robert T.; Erwin, Robert D., Jr.

    1945-01-01

    A continuous 50-hour test was conducted to determine the effect of maximum cruise-power operation at ultra-lean fuel-air mixture and increased spark advance on the mechanical conditions of cylinder components. The test was conducted on a nine-cylinder air-cooled radial engine at the following conditions:brake horsepower, 750; engine speed, 1900 rpm; brake mean effective pressure, 172 pounds per square inch; fuel-air ratio, 0.052; spark advance, 30 deg B.T.C.; and maximum rear-spark-plug-bushing temperature, 400 F. In addition to the data on corrosion and wear, data are presented and briefly discussed on the effect of engine operation at the conditions of this test on economy, knock, preignition, and mixture distribution. Cylinder, piston, and piston-ring wear was small and all cylinder component were in good condition at the conclusion of the 50-hour test except that all exhaust-valve guides were bellmouthed beyond the Army's specified limit and one exhaust-valve face was lightly burned. It is improbable that the light burning in one spot of the valve face would have progressed further because the burn was filled with a hard deposit so that the valve face formed an unbroken seal and the mating seat showed no evidence of burning. The bellmouthing of the exhaust-valve guides is believed to have been a result of the heavy carbon and lead-oxide deposits, which were present on the head end of the guided length of the exhaust-valve stem. Engine operational the conditions of this test was shown to result In a fuel saving of 16.8 percent on a cooled-power basis as compared with operation at the conditions recommended for this engine by the Army Air Forces for the same power.

  11. Study of structural design concepts for an arrow wing supersonic transport configuration, volume 1. Tasks 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A structural design study was made, based on a 1975 level of technology, to assess the relative merits of structural concepts and materials for an advanced supersonic transport cruising at Mach 2.7. Preliminary studies were made to insure compliance of the configuration with general design criteria, to integrate the propulsion system with the airframe, to select structural concepts and materials, and to define an efficient structural arrangement. An advanced computerized structural design system was used, in conjunction with a relatively large, complex finite element model, for detailed analysis and sizing of structural members to satisfy strength and flutter criteria. A baseline aircraft design was developed for assessment of current technology and for use in future studies of aerostructural trades, and application of advanced technology. Criteria, analysis methods, and results are presented.

  12. Supersonic throughflow fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, C. L.; Moore, R. D.

    1988-01-01

    Supersonic throughflow fan research, and technology needs are reviewed. The design of a supersonic throughflow fan stage, a facility inlet, and a downstream diffuser is described. The results from the analysis codes used in executing the design are shown. An engine concept intended to permit establishing supersonic throughflow within the fan on the runway and maintaining the supersonic throughflow condition within the fan throughout the flight envelope is presented.

  13. Supersonic biplane—A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusunose, Kazuhiro; Matsushima, Kisa; Maruyama, Daigo

    2011-01-01

    wave-cancellation concept. We then designed a 2-D supersonic biplane that exhibits both wave-reduction and cancellation effects simultaneously, utilizing an inverse-design method. The designed supersonic biplane not only showed the desired aerodynamic characteristics at its design condition but also outperformed a zero-thickness flat-plate airfoil. (Zero-thickness flat-plate airfoils are known as the most efficient monoplane airfoil at supersonic speeds.) Also discussed in this paper is how to design 2-D biplanes, not only at their design Mach numbers but also at off-design conditions. Supersonic biplanes have unacceptable characteristics at their off-design conditions such as flow choking and its related hysteresis problems. Flow choking causes rapid increase of wave drag and it continues to be kept up to the Mach numbers greater the cruise (design) Mach numbers due to its hysteresis. Some wing devices such as slats and flaps, which could be used at take-off and landing conditions as high-lift devices, were utilized to overcome these off-design problems. Then supersonic-biplane airfoils were extended to 3-D wings. Because that rectangular-shaped 3-D biplane wings showed undesirable aerodynamic characteristics at their wingtips, a tapered-wing planform was chosen for the study. A 3-D biplane wing having a taper ratio and aspect ratio of 0.25 and 5.12, respectively, was designed utilizing the inverse-design method. Aerodynamic characteristics of the designed biplane wing were further improved by using winglets at its wingtips. Flow choking and its hysteresis problems, however, occurred at their off-design conditions. It was shown that these off-design problems could also be resolved by utilizing slats and flaps. Finally, a study on the aerodynamic characteristics of wing-body configurations was conducted using the tapered biplane wing. In this study a body was chosen in order to generate strong shock waves at its nose region. Preliminary parametric studies on the

  14. Characteristics of the advanced supersonic technology AST-105-1 configured for transpacific range with Pratt and Whitney aircraft variable stream control engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baber, H. T., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Credence to systems weights and assurance that the noise study AST concept can be balanced were studied. Current titanium structural technology is assumed. A duct-burning turbofan variable stream control engine (VSCE), with noise reduction potential through use of a coannular nozzle was used. With 273 passengers, range of the AST-105-1 for a cruise Mach number of 2.62 is essentially transpacific. Lift-to-drag ratio is slightly higher than for previous AST configurations. It is trimmable over a center-of-gravity range of 4.7m (15.5 ft). Inherent high positive effective dihedral, typical of arrow-wing configurations in high-lift approach, would limit AST-105-1 to operating in crosswinds of 11.6 m/sec (22.4 kt), or less, with 75 percent of available lateral control. Normal power takeoff with cutback results in noise in excess of Federal Aviation Regulation Part 36 but less than for conventional procedure takeoff. Results of advanced (noncertificated) programmed throttle takeoff and approach procedures, not yet optimized, indicate that such can be an important additional method noise reduction.

  15. Conceptual Design of a Supersonic Business Jet Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology Program (UEETP) is developing a suite of technology to enhance the performance of future aircraft propulsion systems. Areas of focus for this suite of technology include: Highly Loaded Turbomachinery, Emissions Reduction, Materials and Structures, Controls, and Propulsion-Airframe Integration. The two major goals of the UEETP are emissions reduction of both landing and take-off nitrogen oxides (LTO-NO(x)) and mission carbon dioxide (CO2) through fuel burn reductions. The specific goals include a 70 percent reduction in the current LTO-NO(x) rule and an 8 percent reduction in mission CO2 emissions. In order to gain insight into the potential applications and benefits of these technologies on future aircraft, a set of representative flight vehicles was selected for systems level conceptual studies. The Supersonic Business Jet (SBJ) is one of these vehicles. The particular SBJ considered in this study has a capacity of 6 passengers, cruise Mach Number of 2.0, and a range of 4,000 nautical miles. Without the current existence of an SBJ the study of this vehicle requires a two-phased approach. Initially, a hypothetical baseline SBJ is designed which utilizes only current state of the art technology. Finally, an advanced SBJ propulsion system is designed and optimized which incorporates the advanced technologies under development within the UEETP. System benefits are then evaluated and compared to the program and design requirements. Although the program goals are only concerned with LTO-NO(x) and CO2 emissions, it is acknowledged that additional concerns for an SBJ include take-off noise, overland supersonic flight, and cruise NO(x) emissions at high altitudes. Propulsion system trade-offs in the conceptual design phase acknowledge these issues as well as the program goals. With the inclusion of UEETP technologies a propulsion system is designed which performs at 81% below the LTO-NO(x) rule, and reduces fuel burn by 23 percent

  16. Infections on Cruise Ships.

    PubMed

    Kak, Vivek

    2015-08-01

    The modern cruise ship is a small city on the seas, with populations as large as 5,000 seen on large ships. The growth of the cruise ship industry has continued in the twenty-first century, and it was estimated that nearly 21.3 million passengers traveled on cruise ships in 2013, with the majority of these sailing from North America. The presence of large numbers of individuals in close proximity to each other facilitates transmission of infectious diseases, often through person-to-person spread or via contaminated food or water. An infectious agent introduced into the environment of a cruise ship has the potential to be distributed widely across the ship and to cause significant morbidity. The median cruise ship passenger is over 45 years old and often has chronic medical problems, so it is important that, to have a safe cruise ship experience, any potential for the introduction of an infecting agent as well as its transmission be minimized. The majority of cruise ship infections involve respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. This article discusses infectious outbreaks on cruise ships and suggests preventative measures for passengers who plan to travel on cruise ships. PMID:26350312

  17. Infections on Cruise Ships.

    PubMed

    Kak, Vivek

    2015-08-01

    The modern cruise ship is a small city on the seas, with populations as large as 5,000 seen on large ships. The growth of the cruise ship industry has continued in the twenty-first century, and it was estimated that nearly 21.3 million passengers traveled on cruise ships in 2013, with the majority of these sailing from North America. The presence of large numbers of individuals in close proximity to each other facilitates transmission of infectious diseases, often through person-to-person spread or via contaminated food or water. An infectious agent introduced into the environment of a cruise ship has the potential to be distributed widely across the ship and to cause significant morbidity. The median cruise ship passenger is over 45 years old and often has chronic medical problems, so it is important that, to have a safe cruise ship experience, any potential for the introduction of an infecting agent as well as its transmission be minimized. The majority of cruise ship infections involve respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. This article discusses infectious outbreaks on cruise ships and suggests preventative measures for passengers who plan to travel on cruise ships.

  18. Supersonic biplane—A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusunose, Kazuhiro; Matsushima, Kisa; Maruyama, Daigo

    2011-01-01

    wave-cancellation concept. We then designed a 2-D supersonic biplane that exhibits both wave-reduction and cancellation effects simultaneously, utilizing an inverse-design method. The designed supersonic biplane not only showed the desired aerodynamic characteristics at its design condition but also outperformed a zero-thickness flat-plate airfoil. (Zero-thickness flat-plate airfoils are known as the most efficient monoplane airfoil at supersonic speeds.) Also discussed in this paper is how to design 2-D biplanes, not only at their design Mach numbers but also at off-design conditions. Supersonic biplanes have unacceptable characteristics at their off-design conditions such as flow choking and its related hysteresis problems. Flow choking causes rapid increase of wave drag and it continues to be kept up to the Mach numbers greater the cruise (design) Mach numbers due to its hysteresis. Some wing devices such as slats and flaps, which could be used at take-off and landing conditions as high-lift devices, were utilized to overcome these off-design problems. Then supersonic-biplane airfoils were extended to 3-D wings. Because that rectangular-shaped 3-D biplane wings showed undesirable aerodynamic characteristics at their wingtips, a tapered-wing planform was chosen for the study. A 3-D biplane wing having a taper ratio and aspect ratio of 0.25 and 5.12, respectively, was designed utilizing the inverse-design method. Aerodynamic characteristics of the designed biplane wing were further improved by using winglets at its wingtips. Flow choking and its hysteresis problems, however, occurred at their off-design conditions. It was shown that these off-design problems could also be resolved by utilizing slats and flaps. Finally, a study on the aerodynamic characteristics of wing-body configurations was conducted using the tapered biplane wing. In this study a body was chosen in order to generate strong shock waves at its nose region. Preliminary parametric studies on the

  19. Effects of varying podded nacelle-nozzle installations on transonic aeropropulsive characteristics of a supersonic fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F. J.; Reubush, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    The aeropropulsive characteristics of an advanced twin engine fighter designed for supersonic cruise was investigated in the 16 foot Transonic Tunnel. The performance characteristics of advanced nonaxisymmetric nozzles installed in various nacelle locations, the effects of thrust induced forces on overall aircraft aerodynamics, the trim characteristics, and the thrust reverser performance were evaluated. The major model variables included nozzle power setting; nozzle duct aspect ratio; forward, mid, and aft nacelle axial locations; inboard and outboard underwing nacelle locations; and underwing and overwing nacelle locations. Thrust vectoring exhaust nozzle configurations included a wedge nozzle, a two dimensional convergent divergent nozzle, and a single expansion ramp nozzle, each with deflection angles up to 30 deg. In addition to the nonaxisymmetric nozzles, an axisymmetric nozzle installation was also tested. The use of a canard for trim was also assessed.

  20. Supersonic laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    A development status evaluation is presented for the theoretical understanding and design conceptualization of boundary layer control (BLC) systems applicable to supersonic transports, such as the currently envisioned NASA High Speed Civil Transport. By reducing fuel burned, supersonic BLC techniques could expand ranges to Pacific-crossing scales, while lowering sonic boom effects and upper-atmosphere pollution and even reducing skin friction temperature. The critical consideration for supersonic BLC is the presence of wave effects.

  1. Supersonic combustor modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggins, David W.; Drummond, J. Philip; Carpenter, Mark H.

    1990-01-01

    The physical phenomena involved when a supersonic flow undergoes chemical reaction are discussed. Detailed physical models of convective and diffusive mixing, and finite rate chemical reaction in supersonic flow are presented. Numerical algorithms used to solve the equations governing these processes are introduced. Computer programs using these algorithms are used to analyze the structure of the reacting mixing layer. It is concluded that, as in subsonic flow, exothermic heat release in unconfined supersonic flows retards fuel/air mixing. Non mixing is shown to be a potential problem in reducing the efficiency of supersonic as well as subsonic combustion. Techniques for enhancing fuel/air mixing and combustion are described.

  2. Fluid Mechanics, Drag Reduction and Advanced Configuration Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses Advanced Aircraft configurational approaches across the speed range, which are either enabled, or greatly enhanced, by clever Flow Control. Configurations considered include Channel Wings with circulation control for VTOL (but non-hovering) operation with high cruise speed, strut-braced CTOL transports with wingtip engines and extensive ('natural') laminar flow control, a midwing double fuselage CTOL approach utilizing several synergistic methods for drag-due-to-lift reduction, a supersonic strut-braced configuration with order of twice the L/D of current approaches and a very advanced, highly engine flow-path-integrated hypersonic cruise machine. This paper indicates both the promise of synergistic flow control approaches as enablers for 'Revolutions' in aircraft performance and fluid mechanic 'areas of ignorance' which impede their realization and provide 'target-rich' opportunities for Fluids Research.

  3. The US Cruise Ship Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Willis H.

    1985-01-01

    The cruise ship industry relates directly to many features of the natural and cultural environments. The U.S. cruise ship industry is analyzed. Discusses the size of the industry, precruise passenger liners, current cruise ships, cruise regions and routes, ports of call, major ports, passengers, and future prospects. (RM)

  4. Considerations of high altitude emissions. [from supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broderick, A. J.; Krull, N. P.

    1976-01-01

    The status of the Federal Aviation Administration's High Altitude Pollution Program is described which was instituted to develop the detailed quantitative information needed to judge whether or not regulatory action to limit such exhaust emissions would be necessary. The complexities of this question and the nature and magnitude of uncertainties still present in our scientific understanding of the potential interactions between aircraft exhaust emissions and stratospheric ozone and climate are reviewed. The direction and scope of future Federal and international activities are described.

  5. Toward a second generation fuel efficient supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, F. D.

    1976-01-01

    Design changes that lead to improved aerodynamic and structural efficiency are presented. Practical design constraints and approaches for a blended wing-fuselage are discussed, as well as the integration of the configuration that leads to aerodynamic and structural efficiency. Highlighted are new approaches used to provide for structural efficiency, airline/passenger acceptance, passenger evacuation, and subsystem integration. Results of full-scale passenger cabin mock-up evaluations are presented showing the feasibility of the concept.

  6. Pilot Workload Measurement and Experience on Supersonic Cruise Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rezek, T. W.

    1978-01-01

    Aircraft parameters and physiological parameters most indicative of crew workload were investigated. Recommendations were used to form the basis for a continuing study in which variations of the interval between heart beats are used as a measure of nonphysical workload. Preliminary results are presented and current efforts in further defining this physiological measure are outlined.

  7. Supersonic jet plume interaction with a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, John M.; Manning, James C.; Jansen, Bernard

    1988-01-01

    Supersonic jet plume interaction with a flat plate was studied using a model scaled test apparatus designed to simulate plume/aircraft structure interaction for the cruise configuration. The generic configuration consisted of a rectangular supersonic nozzle of aspect ratio 7, and a large flat plate located beneath the nozzle at various nozzle plate distances; the plate was instrumented to measure surface dynamic pressure and mean wall temperature, with provisions for measurements of acceleration and strain on coupon size panels that could be inserted in the plate. Phase-averaged schlieren measurements revealed the presence of high-intensity acoustic emission from the supersonic plume above the plate, directed upstream; this radiation could be associated with the shock noise generation. Narrow band spectra of surface dynamic pressure show spectral peaks with amplitude levels reaching 1 psi, related to the screech tones. Temperature measurements indicated elevated surface temperatures in regions of high turbulence intensity.

  8. Computational Analysis of a Low-Boom Supersonic Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.

    2011-01-01

    A low-boom supersonic inlet was designed for use on a conceptual small supersonic aircraft that would cruise with an over-wing Mach number of 1.7. The inlet was designed to minimize external overpressures, and used a novel bypass duct to divert the highest shock losses around the engine. The Wind-US CFD code was used to predict the effects of capture ratio, struts, bypass design, and angles of attack on inlet performance. The inlet was tested in the 8-ft by 6-ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center. Test results showed that the inlet had excellent performance, with capture ratios near one, a peak core total pressure recovery of 96 percent, and a stable operating range much larger than that of an engine. Predictions generally compared very well with the experimental data, and were used to help interpret some of the experimental results.

  9. Supersonic Elliptical Ramp Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, Eric E. (Inventor); Fink, Lawrence E. (Inventor); Fugal, Spencer R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A supersonic inlet includes a supersonic section including a cowl which is at least partially elliptical, a ramp disposed within the cowl, and a flow inlet disposed between the cowl and the ramp. The ramp may also be at least partially elliptical.

  10. A corporate supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Randall; Seebass, Richard

    1996-01-01

    This talk address the market and technology for a corporate supersonic transport. It describes a candidate configuration. There seems to be a sufficient market for such an aircraft, even if restricted to supersonic operation over water. The candidate configuration's sonic boom overpressure may be small enough to allow overland operation as well.

  11. Spectroscopy with Supersonic Jets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Anne R.; Chandler, Dean W.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses a new technique that enables spectroscopists to study gas phase molecules at temperatures below 1 K, without traditional cryogenic apparatus. This technique uses supersonic jets as samples for gas molecular spectroscopy. Highlighted are points in the theory of supersonic flow which are important for applications in molecular…

  12. Flow analysis for the nacelle of an advanced ducted propeller at high angle-of-attack and at cruise with boundary layer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, D. P.; Boldman, D. R.; Hughes, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    An axisymmetric panel code and a three dimensional Navier-Stokes code (used as an inviscid Euler code) were verified for low speed, high angle of attack flow conditions. A three dimensional Navier-Stokes code (used as an inviscid code), and an axisymmetric Navier-Stokes code (used as both viscous and inviscid code) were also assessed for high Mach number cruise conditions. The boundary layer calculations were made by using the results from the panel code or Euler calculation. The panel method can predict the internal surface pressure distributions very well if no shock exists. However, only Euler and Navier-Stokes calculations can provide a good prediction of the surface static pressure distribution including the pressure rise across the shock. Because of the high CPU time required for a three dimensional Navier-Stokes calculation, only the axisymmetric Navier-Stokes calculation was considered at cruise conditions. The use of suction and tangential blowing boundary layer control to eliminate the flow separation on the internal surface was demonstrated for low free stream Mach number and high angle of attack cases. The calculation also shows that transition from laminar flow to turbulent flow on the external cowl surface can be delayed by using suction boundary layer control at cruise flow conditions. The results were compared with experimental data where possible.

  13. Feasibility of Supersonic Aircraft Concepts for Low-Boom and Flight Trim Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu

    2015-01-01

    This paper documents a process for analyzing whether a particular supersonic aircraft configuration layout and a given cruise condition are feasible to achieve a trimmed low-boom design. This process was motivated by the need to know whether a particular configuration at a given cruise condition could be reshaped to satisfy both low-boom and flight trim constraints. Without such a process, much effort could be wasted on shaping a configuration layout at a cruise condition that could never satisfy both low-boom and flight trim constraints simultaneously. The process helps to exclude infeasible configuration layouts with minimum effort and allows a designer to develop trimmed low-boom concepts more effectively. A notional low-boom supersonic demonstrator concept is used to illustrate the analysis/design process.

  14. Supersonic unstalled flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Goldstein, M. E.; Hartmann, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Recently two flutter analyses have been developed at NASA Lewis Research Center to predict the onset of supersonic unstalled flutter of a cascade of two-dimensional airfoils. The first of these analyzes the onset of supersonic flutter at low levels of aerodynamic loading (i.e., backpressure), while the second examines the occurrence of supersonic flutter at moderate levels of aerodynamic loading. Both of these analyses are based on the linearized unsteady inviscid equations of gas dynamics to model the flow field surrounding the cascade. The details of the development of the solution to each of these models have been published. The objective of the present paper is to utilize these analyses in a parametric study to show the effects of cascade geometry, inlet Mach number, and backpressure on the onset of single and multi degree of freedom unstalled supersonic flutter. Several of the results from this study are correlated against experimental qualitative observation to validate the models.

  15. Supersonic throughflow fans for high-speed aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, Calvin L.

    1987-01-01

    Increased need for more efficient long-range supersonic flight has revived interest in the supersonic throughflow fan as a possible component for advanced high-speed propulsion systems. A fan that can operate with supersonic inlet axial Mach numbers would reduce the inlet losses incurred in diffusing the flow from supersonic Mach numbers to a subsonic one at the fan face. In addition, the size and weight of an all-supersonic inlet will be substantially lower than those of a conventional inlet. However, the data base for components of this type is practically nonexistent. Therefore, in order to furnish the required information for assessing the potential for this type of fan, the NASA Lewis Research Center has begun a program to design, analyze, build, and test a fan stage that is capable of operating with supersonic axial velocities from inlet to exit. The objectives are to demonstrate the feasibility and potential of supersonic throughflow fans, to gain a fundamental understanding of the flow physics associated with such systems, and to develop an experimental data base for design and analysis code validation. A brief overview of past supersonic throughflow fan activities are provided; the technology needs discussed; the design of a supersonic throughflow fan stage, a facility inlet, and a downstream diffuser described; and the results from the analysis codes used in executing the design are presented. Also presented is an engine concept intended to permit establishing supersonic throughflow within the fan on the runway and maintaining the supersonic throughflow condition within the fan throughout the flight envelope.

  16. Low-speed wind-tunnel tests of a one-tenth-scale model of a blended-arrow advanced supersonic transport. [conducted in Langley full-scale tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemore, H. C.; Parett, L. P.

    1975-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Langley full scale tunnel to determine the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 1/10 scale model of a blended-arrow advanced supersonic transport. Tests were made for the clean configuration and a high-lift configuration with several combinations of leading- and trailing-edge flaps deflected for providing improved lift and longitudinal stability in the landing and takeoff modes. The tests were conducted for a range of angles of attack from about -6 deg to 30 deg, sideslip angles from -5 deg to 10 deg, and for Reynolds numbers from 6.78 x 1,000,000 to 13.85 x 1,000,000 corresponding to test velocities of 41 knots to 85 knots, respectively.

  17. Supersonic MHD generator system

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, M.A.

    1983-11-29

    An improved MHD electrical power generating system of the type having a MHD topping cycle and a steam generating bottoming cycle is disclosed. The system typically includes a combustion system, a conventional MHD generator and a first diffuser radiant boiler. The improvement comprises a first supersonic MHD generator and ramjet engine configuration operatively connected in series with each other and with the conventional MHD generator. The first supersonic MHD generator and ramjet engine configuration increase the power output and improve the operating efficiency of the electrical generating system. A diffuser system is also disclosed which is in fluid communication with the supersonic MHD generator and the ramjet engine for collecting bypass plasma gas to be used for heating a second radiant boiler adapted for powering a steam turbine generator.

  18. Supersonic gas compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Lawlor, Shawn P.; Novaresi, Mark A.; Cornelius, Charles C.

    2007-11-13

    A gas compressor based on the use of a driven rotor having a compression ramp traveling at a local supersonic inlet velocity (based on the combination of inlet gas velocity and tangential speed of the ramp) which compresses inlet gas against a stationary sidewall. In using this method to compress inlet gas, the supersonic compressor efficiently achieves high compression ratios while utilizing a compact, stabilized gasdynamic flow path. Operated at supersonic speeds, the inlet stabilizes an oblique/normal shock system in the gasdyanamic flow path formed between the rim of the rotor, the strakes, and a stationary external housing. Part load efficiency is enhanced by the use of a pre-swirl compressor, and using a bypass stream to bleed a portion of the intermediate pressure gas after passing through the pre-swirl compressor back to the inlet of the pre-swirl compressor. Inlet guide vanes to the compression ramp enhance overall efficiency.

  19. Study of aerodynamic technology for single-cruise-engine V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, L.

    1982-01-01

    Conceptual designs and analyses were conducted on two V/STOL supersonic fighter/attack aircraft. These aircraft feature low footprint temperature and pressure thrust augmenting ejectors in the wings for vertical lift, combined with a low wing loading, low wave drag airframe for outstanding cruise and supersonic performance. Aerodynamic, propulsion, performance, and mass properties were determined and are presented for each aircraft. Aerodynamic and Aero/Propulsion characteristics having the most significant effect on the success of the up and away flight mode were identified, and the certainty with which they could be predicted was defined. A wind tunnel model and test program are recommended to resolve the identified uncertainties.

  20. Shocks in supersonic sand.

    PubMed

    Rericha, Erin C; Bizon, Chris; Shattuck, Mark D; Swinney, Harry L

    2002-01-01

    We measure time-averaged velocity, density, and temperature fields for steady granular flow past a wedge. We find the flow to be supersonic with a speed of granular pressure disturbances (sound speed) equal to about 10% of the flow speed, and we observe shocks nearly identical to those in a supersonic gas. Molecular dynamics simulations of Newton's laws yield fields in quantitative agreement with experiment. A numerical solution of Navier-Stokes-like equations agrees with a molecular dynamics simulation for experimental conditions excluding wall friction.

  1. Combustion in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. B.

    1985-01-01

    A workshop on combustion in supersonic flow was held in conjunction with the 21st JANNAF Combustion Meeting at Laurel, Maryland on October 3 to 4 1984. The objective of the workshop was to establish the level of current understanding of supersonic combustion. The workshop was attended by approximately fifty representatives from government laboratories, engine companies, and universities. Twenty different speakers made presentations in their area of expertise during the first day of the workshop. On the second day, the presentations were discussed, deficiencies in the current understanding defined, and a list of recommended programs generated to address these deficiencies. The agenda for the workshop is given.

  2. Study of the impact of cruise speed on scheduling and productivity of commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, E. Q.; Carroll, E. A.; Flume, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A comparison is made between airplane productivity and utilization levels derived from commercial airline type schedules which were developed for two subsonic and four supersonic cruise speed aircraft. The cruise speed component is the only difference between the schedules which are based on 1995 passenger demand forecasts. Productivity-to-speed relationships were determined for the three discrete route systems: North Atlantic, Trans-Pacific, and North-South America. Selected combinations of these route systems were also studied. Other areas affecting the productivity-to-speed relationship such as aircraft design range and scheduled turn time were examined.

  3. Advanced Jet Noise Exhaust Concepts in NASA's N+2 Supersonics Validation Study and the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project's Upcoming Hybrid Wing Body Acoustics Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Doty, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic and flow-field experiments were conducted on exhaust concepts for the next generation supersonic, commercial aircraft. The concepts were developed by Lockheed Martin (LM), Rolls-Royce Liberty Works (RRLW), and General Electric Global Research (GEGR) as part of an N+2 (next generation forward) aircraft system study initiated by the Supersonics Project in NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program. The experiments were conducted in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The exhaust concepts presented here utilized lobed-mixers and ejectors. A powered third-stream was implemented to improve ejector acoustic performance. One concept was found to produce stagnant flow within the ejector and the other produced discrete-frequency tones (due to flow separations within the model) that degraded the acoustic performance of the exhaust concept. NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project has been investigating a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft as a possible configuration for meeting N+2 system level goals for noise, emissions, and fuel burn. A recently completed NRA led by Boeing Research and Technology resulted in a full-scale aircraft design and wind tunnel model. This model will be tested acoustically in NASA Langley's 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel and will include dual jet engine simulators and broadband engine noise simulators as part of the test campaign. The objectives of the test are to characterize the system level noise, quantify the effects of shielding, and generate a valuable database for prediction method development. Further details of the test and various component preparations are described.

  4. RTJ-303: Variable geometry, oblique wing supersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antaran, Albert; Belete, Hailu; Dryzmkowski, Mark; Higgins, James; Klenk, Alan; Rienecker, Lisa

    1992-01-01

    This document is a preliminary design of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) named the RTJ-303. It is a 300 passenger, Mach 1.6 transport with a range of 5000 nautical miles. It features four mixed-flow turbofan engines, variable geometry oblique wing, with conventional tail-aft control surfaces. The preliminary cost analysis for a production of 300 aircraft shows that flyaway cost would be 183 million dollars (1992) per aircraft. The aircraft uses standard jet fuel and requires no special materials to handle aerodynamic heating in flight because the stagnation temperatures are approximately 130 degrees Fahrenheit in the supersonic cruise condition. It should be stressed that this aircraft could be built with today's technology and does not rely on vague and uncertain assumptions of technology advances. Included in this report are sections discussing the details of the preliminary design sequence including the mission to be performed, operational and performance constraints, the aircraft configuration and the tradeoffs of the final choice, wing design, a detailed fuselage design, empennage design, sizing of tail geometry, and selection of control surfaces, a discussion on propulsion system/inlet choice and their position on the aircraft, landing gear design including a look at tire selection, tip-over criterion, pavement loading, and retraction kinematics, structures design including load determination, and materials selection, aircraft performance, a look at stability and handling qualities, systems layout including location of key components, operations requirements maintenance characteristics, a preliminary cost analysis, and conclusions made regarding the design, and recommendations for further study.

  5. Development of an Advanced Annular Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusnak, J. P.; Shadowen, J. H.

    1969-01-01

    The objective of the effort described in this report was to determine the structural durability of a full-scale advanced annular turbojet combustor using ASTM A-1 type fuel and operating at conditions typical of advanced supersonic aircraft. A full-scale annular combustor of the ram-induction type was fabricated and subjected to a 325-hour cyclic endurance test at conditions representative of operation in a Mach 3.0 aircraft. The combustor exhibited extensive cracking and scoop burning at the end of the test program. But these defects had no appreciable effect on combustor performance, as performance remained at a high level throughout the endurance program. Most performance goals were achieved with pressure loss values near 6% and 8%, and temperature rise variation ratio (deltaTVR) values near 1.25 and l.22 at takeoff and cruise conditions, respectively. Combustion efficiencies approached l004 and the exit radial temperature profiles were approximately as desired.

  6. Design and analysis of a supersonic penetration/maneuvering fighter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    The design of three candidate air combat fighters which would cruise effectively at freestream Mach numbers of 1.6, 2.0, and 2.5 while maintaining good transonic maneuvering capability, is considered. These fighters were designed to deliver aerodynamically controlled dogfight missiles at the design Mach numbers. Studies performed by Rockwell International in May 1974 and guidance from NASA determined the shape and size of these missiles. The principle objective of this study is the aerodynamic design of the vehicles; however, configurations are sized to have realistic structures, mass properties, and propulsion systems. The results of this study show that air combat fighters in the 15,000 to 23,000 pound class would cruise supersonically on dry power and still maintain good transonic maneuvering performance.

  7. Supersonic Leading Edge Receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslov, Anatoly A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes experimental studies of leading edge boundary layer receptivity for imposed stream disturbances. Studies were conducted in the supersonic T-325 facility at ITAM and include data for both sharp and blunt leading edges. The data are in agreement with existing theory and should provide guidance for the development of more complete theories and numerical computations of this phenomena.

  8. Supersonic unstalled flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Goldstein, M. E.; Hartmann, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    A parametric study to show the effects of cascade geometry, inlet Mach number, and backpressure on the onset of single and multi degree of freedom unstalled supersonic flutter is presented. Several of the results are correlated against experimental qualitative observation to validate the models.

  9. Inlet flowfield investigation. Part 2: Computation of the flow about a supercruise forebody at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paynter, G. C.; Salemann, V.; Strom, E. E. I.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical procedure which solves the parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) equations on a body fitted mesh was used to compute the flow about the forebody of an advanced tactical supercruise fighter configuration in an effort to explore the use of a PNS method for design of supersonic cruise forebody geometries. Forebody flow fields were computed at Mach numbers of 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5, and at angles-of-attack of 0 deg, 4 deg, and 8 deg. at each Mach number. Computed results are presented at several body stations and include contour plots of Mach number, total pressure, upwash angle, sidewash angle and cross-plane velocity. The computational analysis procedure was found reliable for evaluating forebody flow fields of advanced aircraft configurations for flight conditions where the vortex shed from the wing leading edge is not a dominant flow phenomenon. Static pressure distributions and boundary layer profiles on the forebody and wing were surveyed in a wind tunnel test, and the analytical results are compared to the data. The current status of the parabolized flow flow field code is described along with desirable improvements in the code.

  10. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. Comprehensive data report. Volume 3: Graphical data book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    A graphical presentation of the aerodynamic data acquired during coannular nozzle performance wind tunnel tests is given. The graphical data consist of plots of nozzle gross thrust coefficient, fan nozzle discharge coefficient, and primary nozzle discharge coefficient. Normalized model component static pressure distributions are presented as a function of primary total pressure, fan total pressure, and ambient static pressure for selected operating conditions. In addition, the supersonic cruise configuration data include plots of nozzle efficiency and secondary-to-fan total pressure pumping characteristics. Supersonic and subsonic cruise data are given.

  11. BENCAL Cruise Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Barlow, Ray; Sessions, Heather; Silulwane, Nonkqubela; Engel, Hermann; Aiken, James; Fishwick, James; Martinez-Vicente, Victor; Morel, Andre

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the scientific activities on board the South African Fisheries Research Ship (FRS) Africana during an ocean color calibration and validation cruise in the Benguela upwelling ecosystem (BEN-CAL), 4-17 October 2002. The cruise, denoted Afncana voyage 170, was staged in the southern Benguela between Cape Town and the Orange River within the region 14-18.5 deg E,29-34 deg S, with 15 scientists participat- ing from seven different international organizations. Uniquely in October 2002, four high-precision ocean color sensors were operational, and these included the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments on the Aqua and Terra spacecraft, the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS), and the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). SeaWiFS imagery was transmitted daily to the ship to assist in choosing the vessel's course and selecting stations for bio-optical deployments. There were four primary objectives of the cruise. The first was to conduct bio-optical measurements with above- and in-water optical instruments to vicariously calibrate the satellite sensors. The second was to interrelate diverse measurements of the apparent optical properties (AOPs) at satellite sensor wavelengths with inherent optical properties (IOPs) and bio-optically active constituents of seawater such as particles, pigments, and dissolved compounds. The third was to determine the interrelationships between optical properties, phytoplankton pigment composition, photosynthetic rates, and primary production, while the fourth objective was to collect samples for a second pigment round-robin intercalibration experiment. Weather conditions were generally very favorable, and a range of hyperspectral and fixed wavelength AOP instruments were deployed during daylight hours. Various IOP instruments were used to determine the absorption, attenuation, scattering, and backscattering properties of particulate matter and dissolved substances, while

  12. Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, Konrad

    Die adaptive Fahrgeschwindigkeitsregelung (ACC, Adaptive Cruise Control) ist eine Weiterentwicklung der konventionellen Fahrgeschwindigkeitsregelung, die eine konstante Fahrgeschwindigkeit einstellt. ACC überwacht mittels eines Radarsensors den Bereich vor dem Fahrzeug und passt die Geschwindigkeit den Gegebenheiten an. ACC reagiert auf langsamer vorausfahrende oder einscherende Fahrzeuge mit einer Reduzierung der Geschwindigkeit, sodass der vorgeschriebene Mindestabstand zum vorausfahrenden Fahrzeug nicht unterschritten wird. Hierzu greift ACC in Antrieb und Bremse ein. Sobald das vorausfahrende Fahrzeug beschleunigt oder die Spur verlässt, regelt ACC die Geschwindigkeit wieder auf die vorgegebene Sollgeschwindigkeit ein (Bild 1). ACC steht somit für eine Geschwindigkeitsregelung, die sich dem vorausfahrenden Verkehr anpasst.

  13. Climate impact of supersonic air traffic: an approach to optimize a potential future supersonic fleet - results from the EU-project SCENIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewe, V.; Stenke, A.; Ponater, M.; Sausen, R.; Pitari, G.; Iachetti, D.; Rogers, H.; Dessens, O.; Pyle, J.; Isaksen, I. S. A.; Gulstad, L.; Søvde, O. A.; Marizy, C.; Pascuillo, E.

    2007-05-01

    The demand for intercontinental transportation is increasing and people are requesting short travel times, which supersonic air transportation would enable. However, besides noise and sonic boom issues, which we are not referring to in this investigation, emissions from supersonic aircraft are known to alter the atmospheric composition, in particular the ozone layer, and hence affect climate significantly more than subsonic aircraft. Here, we suggest a metric to quantitatively assess different options for supersonic transport with regard to the potential destruction of the ozone layer and climate impacts. Options for fleet size, engine technology (nitrogen oxide emission level), cruising speed, range, and cruising altitude, are analyzed, based on SCENIC emissions scenarios for 2050, which underlay the requirements to be as realistic as possible in terms of e.g. economic markets and profitable market penetration. This methodology is based on a number of atmosphere-chemistry and climate models to reduce model dependencies. The model results differ significantly in terms of the response to a replacement of subsonic aircraft by supersonic aircraft. However, model differences are smaller when comparing the different options for a supersonic fleet. The base scenario, where supersonic aircraft get in service in 2015, a first fleet fully operational in 2025 and a second in 2050, lead in our simulations to a near surface temperature increase in 2050 of around 7 mK and with constant emissions afterwards to around 21 mK in 2100. The related total radiative forcing amounts to 22 mWm²in 2050, with an uncertainty between 9 and 29 mWClimate impact of supersonic air traffic: an approach to optimize a potential future supersonic fleet - results from the EU-project SCENIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewe, V.; Stenke, A.; Ponater, M.; Sausen, R.; Pitari, G.; Iachetti, D.; Rogers, H.; Dessens, O.; Pyle, J.; Isaksen, I. S. A.; Gulstad, L.; Søvde, O. A.; Marizy, C.; Pascuillo, E.

    2007-10-01

    The demand for intercontinental transportation is increasing and people are requesting short travel times, which supersonic air transportation would enable. However, besides noise and sonic boom issues, which we are not referring to in this investigation, emissions from supersonic aircraft are known to alter the atmospheric composition, in particular the ozone layer, and hence affect climate significantly more than subsonic aircraft. Here, we suggest a metric to quantitatively assess different options for supersonic transport with regard to the potential destruction of the ozone layer and climate impacts. Options for fleet size, engine technology (nitrogen oxide emission level), cruising speed, range, and cruising altitude, are analyzed, based on SCENIC emission scenarios for 2050, which underlay the requirements to be as realistic as possible in terms of e.g., economic markets and profitable market penetration. This methodology is based on a number of atmosphere-chemistry and climate models to reduce model dependencies. The model results differ significantly in terms of the response to a replacement of subsonic aircraft by supersonic aircraft, e.g., concerning the ozone impact. However, model differences are smaller when comparing the different options for a supersonic fleet. Those uncertainties were taken into account to make sure that our findings are robust. The base case scenario, where supersonic aircraft get in service in 2015, a first fleet fully operational in 2025 and a second in 2050, leads in our simulations to a near surface temperature increase in 2050 of around 7 mK and with constant emissions afterwards to around 21 mK in 2100. The related total radiative forcing amounts to 22 mWm2 in 2050, with an uncertainty between 9 and 29

  14. High Altitude Supersonic Decelerator Test Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Brant T.; Blando, Guillermo; Kennett, Andrew; Von Der Heydt, Max; Wolff, John Luke; Yerdon, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project is tasked by NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) to advance the state of the art in Mars entry and descent technology in order to allow for larger payloads to be delivered to Mars at higher altitudes with better accuracy. The project will develop a 33.5 m Do Supersonic Ringsail (SSRS) parachute, 6m attached torus, robotic class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-R), and an 8 m attached isotensoid, exploration class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-E). The SSRS and SIAD-R should be brought to TRL-6, while the SIAD-E should be brought to TRL-5. As part of the qualification and development program, LDSD must perform a Mach-scaled Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) in order to demonstrate successful free flight dynamic deployments at Mars equivalent altitude, of all three technologies. In order to perform these tests, LDSD must design and build a test vehicle to deliver all technologies to approximately 180,000 ft and Mach 4, deploy a SIAD, free fly to approximately Mach 2, deploy the SSRS, record high-speed and high-resolution imagery of both deployments, as well as record data from an instrumentation suite capable of characterizing the technology induced vehicle dynamics. The vehicle must also be recoverable after splashdown into the ocean under a nominal flight, while guaranteeing forensic data protection in an off nominal catastrophic failure of a test article that could result in a terminal velocity, tumbling water impact.

  15. Teacher Techniques: Exploring Timber Cruising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    A timber cruise is an estimate of the timber in a stand to see what kinds of trees are growing, how many are marketable, and whether good forest management practices are followed. The objectives of timber cruising are to secure information to recommend good management practices to the land owner and to determine the commercial value of the trees.…

  16. Norovirus transmission on cruise ship.

    PubMed

    Isakbaeva, Elmira T; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Beard, R Suzanne; Bulens, Sandra N; Mullins, James; Monroe, Stephan S; Bresee, Joseph; Sassano, Patricia; Cramer, Elaine H; Glass, Roger I

    2005-01-01

    An outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis affected passengers on two consecutive cruises of ship X and continued on 4 subsequent cruises despite a 1-week sanitization. We documented transmission by food and person-to-person contact; persistence of virus despite sanitization onboard, including introductions of new strains; and seeding of an outbreak on land.

  17. Oceanographic Mower Cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, J.; Ercilla, G.; Hernández-Molina, F. J.; Casas, D.

    2015-04-01

    The MOWER Cruise has executed a geophysics and geologic expedition in the Gulf of Cádiz (sector adjacent to the Strait of Gibraltar) and west off Portugal, in the framework of the coordinate research project MOWER "Erosive features and associated sandy deposits generated by the Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) around Iberia: paleoceanographic, sedimentary & economic implications" (CTM 2012-39599-C03). The main aim of this project is to identify and study the erosional features (terraces and channels) and associated sedimentary deposits (sandy contourites) generated by the Mediterranean Water Masses around the middle continental slope of Iberia (The Mediterranean Outflow Water - MOW - in the Atlantic margins), their Pliocene and Quaternary evolution and their paleoceanographic, sedimentary and economic implications. This objective directly involves the study of alongslope (contourite) processes associated with the MOW and across-slope (turbiditic flows, debris flows, etc.) processes in the sedimentary stacking pattern and evolution of the Iberian margins. The MOWER project and cruise are related to the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 339 (Mediterranean Outflow). It is also linked and coordinated with CONDRIBER Project "Contourite drifts and associated mass-transport deposits along the SW Iberia margin - implications to slope stability and tsunami hazard assessment" (2013-2015) funded by the Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia, Portugal (PTDC/GEO-GEO/4430/2012).

  18. Unitary Plan Supersonic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    Unitary Plan Supersonic Tunnel: In this aerial photograph of construction in the early 1950s, the return air passages are shown in the rear, center. This area was later covered with walls and a roof so that upon completion of the facility, it was not visible from the exterior. Three air storage spheres and the cooling tower are at the extreme right of the building. The spheres store dry air at 150 pounds per square inch. The cooling tower dissipates heat from coolers that control the test air temperature. One of many research facilities at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel is used for experimental investigations at supersonic speeds.

  19. Supersonic laminar flow control research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the research is to understand supersonic laminar flow stability, transition, and active control. Some prediction techniques will be developed or modified to analyze laminar flow stability. The effects of supersonic laminar flow with distributed heating and cooling on active control will be studied. The primary tasks of the research applying to the NASA/Ames Proof of Concept (POC) Supersonic Wind Tunnel and Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel (LFSWT) nozzle design with laminar flow control are as follows: (1) predictions of supersonic laminar boundary layer stability and transition, (2) effects of wall heating and cooling for supersonic laminar flow control, and (3) performance evaluation of POC and LFSWT nozzles design with wall heating and cooling effects applying at different locations and various length.

  1. The aerodynamics of supersonic parachutes

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.W.

    1987-06-01

    A discussion of the aerodynamics and performance of parachutes flying at supersonic speeds is the focus of this paper. Typical performance requirements for supersonic parachute systems are presented, followed by a review of the literature on supersonic parachute configurations and their drag characteristics. Data from a recent supersonic wind tunnel test series is summarized. The value and limitations of supersonic wind tunnel data on hemisflo and 20-degree conical ribbon parachutes behind several forebody shapes and diameters are discussed. Test techniques were derived which avoided many of the opportunities to obtain erroneous supersonic parachute drag data in wind tunnels. Preliminary correlations of supersonic parachute drag with Mach number, forebody shape and diameter, canopy porosity, inflated canopy diameter and stability are presented. Supersonic parachute design considerations are discussed and applied to a M = 2 parachute system designed and tested at Sandia. It is shown that the performance of parachutes in supersonic flows is a strong function of parachute design parameters and their interactions with the payload wake.

  2. Cruise noise of the 2/9th scale model of the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller, SR-7A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Stang, David B.

    1987-01-01

    Noise data on the Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) propeller model SR-7A were taken in the NASA Lewis Research Center 8 x 6 foot Wind Tunnel. The maximum blade passing tone noise first rises with increasing helical tip Mach number to a peak level, then remains the same or decreases from its peak level when going to higher helical tip Mach numbers. This trend was observed for operation at both constant advance ratio and approximately equal thrust. This noise reduction or, leveling out at high helical tip Mach numbers, points to the use of higher propeller tip speeds as a possible method to limit airplane cabin noise while maintaining high flight speed and efficiency. Projections of the tunnel model data are made to the full scale LAP propeller mounted on the test bed aircraft and compared with predictions. The prediction method is found to be somewhat conservative in that it slightly overpredicts the projected model data at the peak.

  3. CMO: Cruise Metadata Organizer for JAMSTEC Research Cruises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, K.; Saito, H.; Hanafusa, Y.; Vanroosebeke, A.; Kitayama, T.

    2011-12-01

    JAMSTEC's Data Research Center for Marine-Earth Sciences manages and distributes a wide variety of observational data and samples obtained from JAMSTEC research vessels and deep sea submersibles. Generally, metadata are essential to identify data and samples were obtained. In JAMSTEC, cruise metadata include cruise information such as cruise ID, name of vessel, research theme, and diving information such as dive number, name of submersible and position of diving point. They are submitted by chief scientists of research cruises in the Microsoft Excel° spreadsheet format, and registered into a data management database to confirm receipt of observational data files, cruise summaries, and cruise reports. The cruise metadata are also published via "JAMSTEC Data Site for Research Cruises" within two months after end of cruise. Furthermore, these metadata are distributed with observational data, images and samples via several data and sample distribution websites after a publication moratorium period. However, there are two operational issues in the metadata publishing process. One is that duplication efforts and asynchronous metadata across multiple distribution websites due to manual metadata entry into individual websites by administrators. The other is that differential data types or representation of metadata in each website. To solve those problems, we have developed a cruise metadata organizer (CMO) which allows cruise metadata to be connected from the data management database to several distribution websites. CMO is comprised of three components: an Extensible Markup Language (XML) database, an Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) software, and a web-based interface. The XML database is used because of its flexibility for any change of metadata. Daily differential uptake of metadata from the data management database to the XML database is automatically processed via the EAI software. Some metadata are entered into the XML database using the web

  4. Preliminary design of a supersonic Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian; Borchers, Paul; Gomer, Charlie; Henderson, Dean; Jacobs, Tavis; Lawson, Todd; Peterson, Eric; Ross, Tweed, III; Bellmard, Larry

    1990-01-01

    The preliminary design study of a supersonic Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) fighter is presented. A brief historical survey of powered lift vehicles was presented, followed by a technology assessment of the latest supersonic STOVL engine cycles under consideration by industry and government in the U.S. and UK. A survey of operational fighter/attack aircraft and the modern battlefield scenario were completed to develop, respectively, the performance requirements and mission profiles for the study. Three configurations were initially investigated with the following engine cycles: a hybrid fan vectored thrust cycle, a lift+lift/cruise cycle, and a mixed flow vectored thrust cycle. The lift+lift/cruise aircraft configuration was selected for detailed design work which consisted of: (1) a material selection and structural layout, including engine removal considerations, (2) an aircraft systems layout, (3) a weapons integration model showing the internal weapons bay mechanism, (4) inlet and nozzle integration, (5) an aircraft suckdown prediction, (6) an aircraft stability and control analysis, including a takeoff, hover, and transition control analysis, (7) a performance and mission capability study, and (8) a life cycle cost analysis. A supersonic fighter aircraft with STOVL capability with the lift+lift/cruise engine cycle seems a viable option for the next generation fighter.

  5. Developmental Continuity? Crawling, Cruising, and Walking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adolph, Karen E.; Berger, Sarah E.; Leo, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    This research examined developmental continuity between "cruising" (moving sideways holding onto furniture for support) and walking. Because cruising and walking involve locomotion in an upright posture, researchers have assumed that cruising is functionally related to walking. Study 1 showed that most infants crawl and cruise concurrently prior…

  6. The aerodynamic design of the oblique flying wing supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandervelden, Alexander J. M.; Kroo, Ilan

    1990-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of a supersonic oblique flying wing is strongly influenced by the requirement that passengers must be accommodated inside the wing. It was revealed that thick oblique wings of very high sweep angle can be efficient at supersonic speeds when transonic normal Mach numbers are allowed on the upper surface of the wing. The goals were motivated by the ability to design a maximum thickness, minimum size oblique flying wing. A 2-D Navier-Stokes solver was used to design airfoils up to 16 percent thickness with specified lift, drag and pitching moment. A new method was developed to calculate the required pressure distribution on the wing based on the airfoil loading, normal Mach number distribution and theoretical knowledge of the minimum drag of oblique configurations at supersonic speeds. The wing mean surface for this pressure distribution was calculated using an inverse potential flow solver. The lift to drag ratio of this wing was significantly higher than that of a comparable delta wing for cruise speeds up to Mach 2.

  7. Staying Healthy on a Cruise

    MedlinePlus

    ... get the most out of your cruise vacation. Zika Travel Information The 2016 Olympics in Brazil, Reggae ... the summer is full of great international celebrations! Zika has been reported in many popular event destinations ...

  8. Evaluation of a ducted-fan power plant designed for high output and good cruise fuel economy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behun, M; Rom, F E; Hensley, R V

    1950-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of performance of a ducted-fan power plant designed both for high-output, high-altitude operation at low supersonic Mach numbers and for good fuel economy at lower fight speeds is presented. Performance of ducted fan is compared with performance (with and without tail-pipe burner) of two hypothetical turbojet engines. At maximum power, the ducted fan has propulsive thrust per unit of frontal area between thrusts obtained by turbojet engines with and without tail-pipe burners. At cruise, the ducted fan obtains lowest thrust specific fuel consumption. For equal maximum thrusts, the ducted fan obtains cruising flight duration and range appreciably greater than turbojet engines.

  9. Experimental and Computational Studies of Low-Speed Aerodynamic Performance and Flow Characteristics around a Supersonic Biplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuratani, Naoshi; Ozaki, Shuichi; Obayashi, Shigeru; Ogawa, Toshihiro; Matsuno, Takashi; Kawazoe, Hiromitsu

    One of the most critical technical issues with regard to supersonic commercial transportation is the sonic boom that occurs during supersonic cruising flight, which causes impulsive noise on the ground. The “supersonic biplane theory” has been proposed to reduce the sonic boom. Shock wave interaction and cancellation between the wings of a supersonic biplane can be realized at a specific design Mach number, but does not work at off-design values. Here, the low-speed aerodynamic performance, as off-design performance, of a baseline supersonic biplane was investigated and discussed using experimental and computational fluid dynamics approaches. The thin airfoil stall characteristics of a supersonic biplane were shown to be caused by the stall of both upper and lower wings at an angle of attack of 20°. Although there was leading flow separation of the upper wing at lower angles of attack, the stall of the lower wing was suppressed by interference with the upper wing. The lift of the lower wing was almost dominant to produce the lift of the supersonic biplane in the low-speed range. However, the lower wing caused greater drag than the upper wing at higher angles of attack.

  10. Design project: LONGBOW supersonic interceptor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoney, Robert; Baker, Matt; Capstaff, Joseph G.; Dishman, Robert; Fick, Gregory; Frick, Stephen N.; Kelly, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A recent white paper entitled 'From the Sea' has spotlighted the need for Naval Aviation to provide overland support to joint operations. The base for this support, the Aircraft Carrier (CVN), will frequently be unable to operate within close range of the battleground because of littoral land-based air and subsurface threats. A high speed, long range, carrier capable aircraft would allow the CVN to provide timely support to distant battleground operations. Such an aircraft, operating as a Deck-Launched Interceptor (DLI), would also be an excellent counter to Next Generation Russian Naval Aviation (NGRNA) threats consisting of supersonic bombers, such as the Backfire, equipped with the next generation of high-speed, long-range missiles. Additionally, it would serve as an excellent high speed Reconnaissance airplane, capable of providing Battle Force commanders with timely, accurate pre-mission targeting information and post-mission Bomb Damage Assessment (BDA). Recent advances in computational hypersonic airflow modeling has produced a method of defining aircraft shapes that fit a conical shock flow model to maximize the efficiency of the vehicle. This 'Waverider' concept provides one means of achieving long ranges at high speeds. A Request for Proposal (RFP) was issued by Professor Conrad Newberry that contained design requirements for an aircraft to accomplish the above stated missions, utilizing Waverider technology.

  11. A laboratory scale supersonic combustive flow system

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, E.C.; Zerkle, D.K.; Fry, H.A.; Wantuck, P.J.

    1995-02-01

    A laboratory scale supersonic flow system [Combustive Flow System (CFS)] which utilizes the gaseous products of methane-air and/or liquid fuel-air combustion has been assembled to provide a propulsion type exhaust flow field for various applications. Such applications include providing a testbed for the study of planar two-dimensional nozzle flow fields with chemistry, three-dimensional flow field mixing near the exit of rectangular nozzles, benchmarking the predictive capability of various computational fluid dynamic codes, and the development and testing of advanced diagnostic techniques. This paper will provide a detailed description of the flow system and data related to its operation.

  12. Supersonic inlet contour interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, N. E.; Latham, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    A method for designing supersonic inlet contours is described which consists in the interpolation of the contours of two known inlets designed for different Mach numbers, thereby determining the contours for a third inlet at an intermediate design Mach number. Several similar axisymmetric inlet contours were interpolated from known inlets with design Mach numbers ranging from 2.16 to 4.0 and with design Mach numbers differing by as much as 1.0. The flowfields were calculated according to Sorensen's (1965) computer program. Shockwave structure and pressure distribution characteristics are shown for the interpolated inlets. The validity of the interpolation is demonstrated by comparing the plots of the flowfield properties across the throat station of the interpolated inlet with the known inlets which were designed iteratively. It seems possible to write a computer program so that a matrix of known inlet contours can be interpolated.

  13. Supersonic-Spray Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caimi, Raoul E. B.; Lin, Feng-Nan; Thaxton, Eric A.

    1995-01-01

    Spraying system for cleaning mechanical components uses less liquid and operates at pressures significantly lower. Liquid currently used is water. Designed to replace chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvent-based cleaning and cleanliness verification methods. Consists of spray head containing supersonic converging/diverging nozzles, source of gas at regulated pressure, pressurized liquid tank, and various hoses, fittings, valves, and gauges. Parameters of nozzles set so any of large variety of liquids and gases combined in desired ratio and rate of flow. Size and number of nozzles varied so system built in configurations ranging from small hand-held spray heads to large multinozzle cleaners. Also used to verify part adequately cleaned. Runoff liquid from spray directed at part collected. Liquid analyzed for presence of contaminants, and part recleaned if necessary.

  14. Supersonic Pulsed Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; Harding, G. C.; Diskin, G. S.

    2001-01-01

    An injector has been developed to provide high-speed high-frequency (order 10 kHz) pulsed a supersonic crossflow. The injector nozzle is formed between the fixed internal surface of the nozzle and a freely rotating three- or four-sided wheel embedded within the device. Flow-induced rotation of the wheel causes the nozzle throat to open and close at a frequency proportional to the speed of sound of the injected gas. Measurements of frequency and mass flow rate as a function of supply pressure are discussed for various injector designs. Preliminary results are presented for wall-normal injection of helium into a Mach-2 ducted airflow. The data include schlieren images in the injectant plume in a plane normal to the flow, downstream of injection.

  15. Supersonics--Airport Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2007-01-01

    At this, the first year-end meeting of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program, an overview of the Airport Noise discipline of the Supersonics Project leads the presentation of technical plans and achievements in this area of the Project. The overview starts by defining the Technical Challenges targeted by Airport Noise efforts, and the Approaches planned to meet these challenges. These are fleshed out in Elements, namely Prediction, Diagnostics, and Engineering, and broken down into Tasks. The Tasks level is where individual researchers' work is defined and from whence the technical presentations to follow this presentation come. This overview also presents the Milestones accomplished to date and to be completed in the next year. Finally, the NASA Research Announcement cooperative agreement activities are covered and tied to the Tasks and Milestones.

  16. Turbulent supersonic channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Richard; Sesterhenn, Jörn; Friedrich, Rainer

    2001-01-01

    The effects of compressibility are studied in low Reynolds number turbulent supersonic channel flow via a direct numerical simulation. A pressure-velocity-entropy formulation of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations which is cast in a characteristic, non-conservative form and allows one to specify exact wall boundary conditions, consistent with the field equations, is integrated using a fifth-order compact upwind scheme for the Euler part, a fourth-order Padé scheme for the viscous terms and a third-order low-storage Runge-Kutta time integration method. Coleman et al fully developed supersonic channel flow at M?=?1.5 and Re?=?3000 is used to test the method. The nature of fluctuating variables is investigated in detail for the wall layer and the core region based on scatter plots. Fluctuations conditioned on sweeps and ejections in the wall layer are especially instructive, showing that positive temperature, entropy and total temperature fluctuations are mainly due to sweep events in this specific situation of wall cooling. The effect of compressibility on the turbulence structure is in many respects similar to that found in homogeneous shear turbulence and in mixing layers. The normal components of the Reynolds stress anisotropy tensor are increased due to compressibility, while the shear stress component is slightly reduced. Characteristic of the Reynolds stress transport is a suppression of the production of the longitudinal and the shear stress component, a suppression of all velocity-pressure-gradient correlations and most of the dissipation rates. Comparison with incompressible channel flow data reveals that compressibility effects manifest themselves in the wall layer only.

  17. Aerodynamic design and analysis of the AST-204, AST-205, and AST-206 blended wing-fuse large supersonic transport configuration concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, G. L.; Walkley, K. B.

    1980-01-01

    The aerodynamic design and analysis of three blended wing-fuselage supersonic cruise configurations providing four, five, and six abreast seating was conducted using a previously designed supersonic cruise configuration as the baseline. The five abreast configuration was optimized for wave drag at a Mach number of 2.7. The four and six abreast configurations were also optimized at Mach 2.7, but with the added constraint that the majority of their structure be common with the five abreast configuration. Analysis of the three configurations indicated an improvement of 6.0, 7.5, and 7.7 percent in cruise lift-to-drag ratio over the baseline configuration for the four, five, and six abreast configurations, respectively.

  18. Supersonic reacting internal flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. Philip

    1989-01-01

    The national program to develop a trans-atmospheric vehicle has kindled a renewed interest in the modeling of supersonic reacting flows. A supersonic combustion ramjet, or scramjet, has been proposed to provide the propulsion system for this vehicle. The development of computational techniques for modeling supersonic reacting flow fields, and the application of these techniques to an increasingly difficult set of combustion problems are studied. Since the scramjet problem has been largely responsible for motivating this computational work, a brief history is given of hypersonic vehicles and their propulsion systems. A discussion is also given of some early modeling efforts applied to high speed reacting flows. Current activities to develop accurate and efficient algorithms and improved physical models for modeling supersonic combustion is then discussed. Some new problems where computer codes based on these algorithms and models are being applied are described.

  19. Computer aided design and manufacturing of composite propfan blades for a cruise missile wind tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorp, Scott A.; Downey, Kevin M.

    1992-01-01

    One of the propulsion concepts being investigated for future cruise missiles is advanced unducted propfans. To support the evaluation of this technology applied to the cruise missile, a joint DOD and NASA test project was conducted to design and then test the characteristics of the propfans on a 0.55-scale, cruise missile model in a NASA wind tunnel. The configuration selected for study is a counterrotating rearward swept propfan. The forward blade row, having six blades, rotates in a counterclockwise direction, and the aft blade row, having six blades, rotates in a clockwise direction, as viewed from aft of the test model. Figures show the overall cruise missile and propfan blade configurations. The objective of this test was to evaluate propfan performance and suitability as a viable propulsion option for next generation of cruise missiles. This paper details the concurrent computer aided design, engineering, and manufacturing of the carbon fiber/epoxy propfan blades as the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  20. 43 CFR 5422.1 - Cruise sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cruise sales. 5422.1 Section 5422.1 Public... OF THE INTERIOR FOREST MANAGEMENT (5000) PREPARATION FOR SALE Volume Measurements § 5422.1 Cruise sales. As the general practice, the Bureau will sell timber on a tree cruise basis....

  1. 43 CFR 5422.1 - Cruise sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cruise sales. 5422.1 Section 5422.1 Public... OF THE INTERIOR FOREST MANAGEMENT (5000) PREPARATION FOR SALE Volume Measurements § 5422.1 Cruise sales. As the general practice, the Bureau will sell timber on a tree cruise basis....

  2. 43 CFR 5422.1 - Cruise sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cruise sales. 5422.1 Section 5422.1 Public... OF THE INTERIOR FOREST MANAGEMENT (5000) PREPARATION FOR SALE Volume Measurements § 5422.1 Cruise sales. As the general practice, the Bureau will sell timber on a tree cruise basis....

  3. 43 CFR 5422.1 - Cruise sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cruise sales. 5422.1 Section 5422.1 Public... OF THE INTERIOR FOREST MANAGEMENT (5000) PREPARATION FOR SALE Volume Measurements § 5422.1 Cruise sales. As the general practice, the Bureau will sell timber on a tree cruise basis....

  4. Investigations for Supersonic Transports at Transonic and Supersonic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, S. Melissa B.; Owens, Lewis R.; Wahls, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Several computational studies were conducted as part of NASA s High Speed Research Program. Results of turbulence model comparisons from two studies on supersonic transport configurations performed during the NASA High-Speed Research program are given. The effects of grid topology and the representation of the actual wind tunnel model geometry are also investigated. Results are presented for both transonic conditions at Mach 0.90 and supersonic conditions at Mach 2.48. A feature of these two studies was the availability of higher Reynolds number wind tunnel data with which to compare the computational results. The transonic wind tunnel data was obtained in the National Transonic Facility at NASA Langley, and the supersonic data was obtained in the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel. The computational data was acquired using a state of the art Navier-Stokes flow solver with a wide range of turbulence models implemented. The results show that the computed forces compare reasonably well with the experimental data, with the Baldwin-Lomax with Degani-Schiff modifications and the Baldwin-Barth models showing the best agreement for the transonic conditions and the Spalart-Allmaras model showing the best agreement for the supersonic conditions. The transonic results were more sensitive to the choice of turbulence model than were the supersonic results.

  5. Transonic wind tunnel test of a supersonic nozzle installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yetter, J. A.; Evelyn, G. B.; Mercer, C.

    1982-01-01

    The design of the propulsion system installation affects strongly the total drag and overall performance of an aircraft, and the concept, placement, and integration details of the exhaust nozzle are major considerations in the configuration definition. As part of the NASA Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) program, a wind tunnel test program has been conducted to investigate exhaust nozzle-airframe interactions at transonic speeds. First phase testing is to establish guidelines for follow-on testing. A summary is provided of the results of first phase testing, taking into account the test approach, the effect of nozzle closure on aircraft aerodynamic characteristics, nozzle installation effects and nacelle interference drag, and an analytical study of the effects of nozzle closure on the aircraft.

  6. Mixing of Supersonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, Clark W.; Landrum, D. Brian; Spetman, David

    1997-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ambient air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. A model of the Strutjet device has been built and is undergoing test to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strutjet exit plane. The modeling basis was centered on using convective Mach Number as the similarity parameter to establish correlation between subscale, cold flow tests and full scale, hot firing modes. This parameter has been used successfully to correlate supersonic shear layer growth rates. The experiment design includes hot (600 R) air as the rocket exhaust simulant and hot (760 R) carbon dioxide as the turbine exhaust gas simulant. The combination of gases and their elevated temperatures was required to achieve a convective Mach Number which matched the fall scale item design conditions. The carbon dioxide is seeded with Acetone to permit tracing of the mixing processes through Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) techniques. The experiment and its design will be discussed in detail. Both the rocket and turbine exhaust duct nozzles are of unique (square and rectangular) shape and the turbine exhaust e)dt intersects the rocket nozzle wall upstream of the exit. Cold flow testing with the individual nozzles has been conducted to ascertain their behavior in comparison to conventional flow theory. These data are presented.

  7. Tesseract supersonic business transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reshotko, Eli; Garbinski, Gary; Fellenstein, James; Botting, Mary; Hooper, Joan; Ryan, Michael; Struk, Peter; Taggart, Ben; Taillon, Maggie; Warzynski, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This year, the senior level Aerospace Design class at Case Western Reserve University developed a conceptual design of a supersonic business transport. Due to the growing trade between Asia and the United States, a transpacific range was chosen for the aircraft. A Mach number of 2.2 was chosen, too, because it provides reasonable block times and allows the use of a large range of materials without a need for active cooling. A payload of 2,500 lbs. was assumed corresponding to a complement of nine passengers and crew, plus some light cargo. With these general requirements set, the class was broken down into three groups. The aerodynamics of the aircraft were the responsibility of the first group. The second developed the propulsion system. The efforts of both the aerodynamics and propulsion groups were monitored and reviewed for weight considerations and structural feasibility by the third group. Integration of the design required considerable interaction between the groups in the final stages. The fuselage length of the final conceptual design was 107.0 ft, while the diameter of the fuselage was 7.6 ft. The delta wing design consisted of an aspect ratio of 1.9 with a wing span of 47.75 ft and mid-chord length of 61.0 ft. A SNECMA MCV 99 variable-cycle engine design was chosen for this aircraft.

  8. Tesseract: Supersonic business transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reshotko, Eli; Garbinski, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This year, the senior level Aerospace Design class at Case Western Reserve University developed a conceptual design of a supersonic business transport. Due to the growing trade between Asia and the United States, a transpacific range has been chosen for the aircraft. A Mach number of 2.2 was chosen too because it provides reasonable block times and allows the use of a large range of materials without a need for active cooling. A payload of 2500 lbs. has been assumed corresponding to a complement of nine (passengers and crew) plus some light cargo. With these general requirements set, the class was broken down into three groups. The aerodynamics of the aircraft were the responsibility of the first group. The second developed the propulsion system. The efforts of both the aerodynamics and propulsion groups were monitored and reviewed for weight considerations and structural feasibility by the third group. Integration of the design required considerable interaction between the groups in the final stages. The fuselage length of the final conceptual design was 107.0 ft. while the diameter of the fuselage was 7.6 ft. The delta wing design consisted of an aspect ratio of 1.9 with a wing span of 47.75 ft and midcord length of 61.0 ft. A SNEMCA MCV 99 variable-cycle engine design was chosen for this aircraft.

  9. Supersonic STOVL propulsion technology program: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaha, Bernard J.; Batterton, Peter G.

    1990-01-01

    Planning activities are continuing between NASA, the DoD, and two foreign governments to develop the technology and to show the design capability by the mid-1990's for advanced, supersonic, short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft. Propulsion technology is the key to achieving viable STOVL aircraft, and NASA Lewis will play a lead role in the development of these required propulsion technologies. The initial research programs are focused on technologies common to two or more of the possible STOVL propulsion system concepts. An overview is presented of the NASA Lewis role in the overall program plan and recent results of the research program. The future research program will be focused on one or possibly two of the propulsion concepts seen as most likely to be successful in the post advanced tactical fighter time frame.

  10. Advanced Vehicle Concepts and Implications for NextGen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Matt; Smith, Jim; Wright, Ken; Mediavilla Ricky; Kirby, Michelle; Pfaender, Holger; Clarke, John-Paul; Volovoi, Vitali; Dorbian, Christopher; Ashok, Akshay; Reynolds, Tom; Waitz, Ian; Hileman, James; Arunachalam, Sarav; Hedrick, Matt; Vempati, Lakshmi; Laroza, Ryan; denBraven, Wim; Henderson, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the results of a major NASA study of advanced vehicle concepts and their implications for the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). Comprising the efforts of dozens of researchers at multiple institutions, the analyses presented here cover a broad range of topics including business-case development, vehicle design, avionics, procedure design, delay, safety, environmental impacts, and metrics. The study focuses on the following five new vehicle types: Cruise-efficient short takeoff and landing (CESTOL) vehicles Large commercial tiltrotor aircraft (LCTRs) Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) Very light jets (VLJs) Supersonic transports (SST). The timeframe of the study spans the years 2025-2040, although some analyses are also presented for a 3X scenario that has roughly three times the number of flights as today. Full implementation of NextGen is assumed.

  11. Performance potential of an advanced technology Mach 3 turbojet engine installed on a conceptual high-speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Shelby J., Jr.; Geiselhart, Karl A.; Coen, Peter G.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of an advanced technology conceptual turbojet optimized for a high-speed civil aircraft is presented. This information represents an estimate of performance of a Mach 3 Brayton (gas turbine) cycle engine optimized for minimum fuel burned at supersonic cruise. This conceptual engine had no noise or environmental constraints imposed upon it. The purpose of this data is to define an upper boundary on the propulsion performance for a conceptual commercial Mach 3 transport design. A comparison is presented demonstrating the impact of the technology proposed for this conceptual engine on the weight and other characteristics of a proposed high-speed civil transport. This comparison indicates that the advanced technology turbojet described could reduce the gross weight of a hypothetical Mach 3 high-speed civil transport design from about 714,000 pounds to about 545,000 pounds. The aircraft with the baseline engine and the aircraft with the advanced technology engine are described.

  12. Development and Testing of a New Family of Supersonic Decelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ian G.; Adler, Mark; Rivellini, Tommaso P.

    2013-01-01

    The state of the art in Entry, Descent, and Landing systems for Mars applications is largely based on technologies developed in the late 1960's and early 1970's for the Viking Lander program. Although the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory has made advances in EDL technology, these are predominantly in the areas of entry (new thermal protection systems and guided hypersonic flight) and landing (the sky crane architecture). Increases in entry mass, landed mass, and landed altitude beyond MSL capabilities will require advances predominantly in the field of supersonic decelerators. With this in mind, a multi-year program has been initiated to advance three new types of supersonic decelerators that would enable future large-robotic and human-precursor class missions to Mars.

  13. Propulsion/airframe integration considerations for high altitude hypersonic cruise vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    A study has been conducted to determine the implications of top-mounted inlet nacelles on propulsion performance and cruise range. The top-mounted nacelle would be less visible from ground-based radar below and ahead of the aircraft. For this study, the nacelle is integrated with a high altitude Mach 5 turbojet/ramjet-powered airplane concept requiring a large nacelle. Results of the study suggest nacelle installation advantages and improved inlet mass flow ratio for the top-mounted nacelle, but at the expense of a higher installed drag at transonic and supersonic speeds.

  14. Summary of Lift and Lift/Cruise Fan Powered Lift Concept Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Woodrow L.

    1993-01-01

    A summary is presented of some of the lift and lift/cruise fan technology including fan performance, fan stall, ground effects, ingestion and thrust loss, design tradeoffs and integration, control effectiveness and several other areas related to vertical short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) aircraft conceptual design. The various subjects addressed, while not necessarily pertinent to specific short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) supersonic designs being considered, are of interest to the general field of lift and lift/cruise fan aircraft designs and may be of importance in the future. The various wind tunnel and static tests reviewed are: (1) the Doak VZ-4 ducted fan, (2) the 0.57 scale model of the Bell X-22 ducted fan aircraft, (3) the Avrocar, (4) the General Electric lift/cruise fan, (5) the vertical short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) lift engine configurations related to ingestion and consequent thrust loss, (6) the XV-5 and other fan-in-wing stall consideration, (7) hybrid configurations such as lift fan and lift/cruise fan or engines, and (8) the various conceptual design studies by air-frame contractors. Other design integration problems related to small and large V/STOL transport aircraft are summarized including lessons learned during more recent conceptual design studies related to a small executive V/STOL transport aircraft.

  15. Supersonic Dislocation Bursts in Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, E. N.; Zhao, S.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Dislocations are the primary agents of permanent deformation in crystalline solids. Since the theoretical prediction of supersonic dislocations over half a century ago, there is a dearth of experimental evidence supporting their existence. Here we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shocked silicon to reveal transient supersonic partial dislocation motion at approximately 15 km/s, faster than any previous in-silico observation. Homogeneous dislocation nucleation occurs near the shock front and supersonic dislocation motion lasts just fractions of picoseconds before the dislocations catch the shock front and decelerate back to the elastic wave speed. Applying a modified analytical equation for dislocation evolution we successfully predict a dislocation density of 1.5 × 1012 cm−2 within the shocked volume, in agreement with the present simulations and realistic in regards to prior and on-going recovery experiments in silicon. PMID:27264746

  16. Supersonic Dislocation Bursts in Silicon

    DOE PAGES

    Hahn, E. N.; Zhao, S.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-06-06

    Dislocations are the primary agents of permanent deformation in crystalline solids. Since the theoretical prediction of supersonic dislocations over half a century ago, there is a dearth of experimental evidence supporting their existence. Here we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shocked silicon to reveal transient supersonic partial dislocation motion at approximately 15 km/s, faster than any previous in-silico observation. Homogeneous dislocation nucleation occurs near the shock front and supersonic dislocation motion lasts just fractions of picoseconds before the dislocations catch the shock front and decelerate back to the elastic wave speed. Applying a modified analytical equation for dislocation evolutionmore » we successfully predict a dislocation density of 1.5 x 10(12) cm(-2) within the shocked volume, in agreement with the present simulations and realistic in regards to prior and on-going recovery experiments in silicon.« less

  17. Supersonic laminar flow control research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Wiberg, Clark G.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this research is to understand supersonic laminar flow stability, transition and active control. Some prediction techniques will be developed or modified to analyze laminar flow stability. The effects of distributed heating and cooling as an active boundary layer control technique will be studied. The primary tasks of the research apply to the NASA/Ames PoC and LFSWT's nozzle design with laminar flow control and are listed as follows: (1) predictions of supersonic laminar boundary layer stability and transition; (2) effects of wall heating and cooling on supersonic laminar flow control; (3) performance evaluation of the PoC and LFSWT nozzle designs with wall heating and cooling applied at different locations and various lengths; and (4) effects of a conducted -vs- pulse wall temperature distribution for the LFSWT.

  18. Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Wiberg, Clark G.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to understand supersonic laminar flow stability, transition and active control. Some prediction techniques will be developed or modified to analyze laminar flow stability. The effects of distributed heating and cooling as an active boundary layer control technique will be studied. The primary tasks of the research apply to the NASA/Ames PoC and LFSWT's nozzle design with laminar flow control and are listed as follows: Predictions of supersonic laminar boundary layer stability and transition; Effects of wall heating and cooling on supersonic laminar flow control on a flat plate; Performance evaluation of the PoC and LFSWT nozzle designs with wall heating and cooling applied at different locations and various lengths; Effects of a conducted-vs-pulse wall temperature distribution for the LFSWT; and Application of wall heating and/or cooling to laminar boundary layer and flow separation control of airfoils and investigation of related active control techniques.

  19. Jet Noise Modeling for Supersonic Business Jet Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, James R.; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Clark, Bruce J.

    2004-01-01

    This document describes the development of an improved predictive model for coannular jet noise, including noise suppression modifications applicable to small supersonic-cruise aircraft such as the Supersonic Business Jet (SBJ), for NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). For such aircraft a wide range of propulsion and integration options are under consideration. Thus there is a need for very versatile design tools, including a noise prediction model. The approach used is similar to that used with great success by the Modern Technologies Corporation (MTC) in developing a noise prediction model for two-dimensional mixer ejector (2DME) nozzles under the High Speed Research Program and in developing a more recent model for coannular nozzles over a wide range of conditions. If highly suppressed configurations are ultimately required, the 2DME model is expected to provide reasonable prediction for these smaller scales, although this has not been demonstrated. It is considered likely that more modest suppression approaches, such as dual stream nozzles featuring chevron or chute suppressors, perhaps in conjunction with inverted velocity profiles (IVP), will be sufficient for the SBJ.

  20. Supersonic coal water slurry fuel atomizer

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Frederick E.; Smolensky, Leo A.; Balsavich, John

    1991-01-01

    A supersonic coal water slurry atomizer utilizing supersonic gas velocities to atomize coal water slurry is provided wherein atomization occurs externally of the atomizer. The atomizer has a central tube defining a coal water slurry passageway surrounded by an annular sleeve defining an annular passageway for gas. A converging/diverging section is provided for accelerating gas in the annular passageway to supersonic velocities.

  1. The aeroacoustics of supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Philip J.; McLaughlin, Dennis K.

    1995-01-01

    This research project was a joint experimental/computational study of noise in supersonic jets. The experiments were performed in a low to moderate Reynolds number anechoic supersonic jet facility. Computations have focused on the modeling of the effect of an external shroud on the generation and radiation of jet noise. This report summarizes the results of the research program in the form of the Masters and Doctoral theses of those students who obtained their degrees with the assistance of this research grant. In addition, the presentations and publications made by the principal investigators and the research students is appended.

  2. Parametric Inlet Tested in Glenn's 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Davis, David O.; Solano, Paul A.

    2005-01-01

    The Parametric Inlet is an innovative concept for the inlet of a gas-turbine propulsion system for supersonic aircraft. The concept approaches the performance of past inlet concepts, but with less mechanical complexity, lower weight, and greater aerodynamic stability and safety. Potential applications include supersonic cruise aircraft and missiles. The Parametric Inlet uses tailored surfaces to turn the incoming supersonic flow inward toward an axis of symmetry. The terminal shock spans the opening of the subsonic diffuser leading to the engine. The external cowl area is smaller, which reduces cowl drag. The use of only external supersonic compression avoids inlet unstart--an unsafe shock instability present in previous inlet designs that use internal supersonic compression. This eliminates the need for complex mechanical systems to control unstart, which reduces weight. The conceptual design was conceived by TechLand Research, Inc. (North Olmsted, OH), which received funding through NASA s Small-Business Innovation Research program. The Boeing Company (Seattle, WA) also participated in the conceptual design. The NASA Glenn Research Center became involved starting with the preliminary design of a model for testing in Glenn s 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (10 10 SWT). The inlet was sized for a speed of Mach 2.35 while matching requirements of an existing cold pipe used in previous inlet tests. The parametric aspects of the model included interchangeable components for different cowl lip, throat slot, and sidewall leading-edge shapes and different vortex generator configurations. Glenn researchers used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools for three-dimensional, turbulent flow analysis to further refine the aerodynamic design.

  3. A Supersonic Business-Jet Concept Designed for Low Sonic Boom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    Ongoing human-response studies of sonic-boom noise indicated that a previous level of 1.0 psf might still be too annoying. This led to studies of a Supersonic Business Jet (SBJ), which might generate lower, more acceptable ground overpressures. To determine whether methods for designing a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) could be successfully applied, a SBJ concept was designed at the langley Research Center. It would cruise at Mach 2, carry 10 passengers for 4000 nautical miles, and generate a 0.50 psf or less on the ground under the flight path at start of cruise. Results indicated that a 10-passenger, low-boom SBJ design was just as technically demanding as a 300-passenger, low-boom HSCT design. In this report, the sources of these technical problems are identified, and ideas for addressing them are discussed.

  4. Nonlinear potential analysis techniques for supersonic aerodynamic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, V.; Szema, K. Y.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical method based on the conservation form of the full potential equation has been applied to the problem of three-dimensional supersonic flows with embedded subsonic regions. The governing equation is cast in a nonorthogonal coordinate system, and the theory of characteristics is used to accurately monitor the type-dependent flow field. A conservative switching scheme is employed to transition from the supersonic marching procedure to a subsonic relaxation algorithm and vice versa. The newly developed computer program can handle arbitrary geometries with fuselage, canard, wing, flow through nacelle, vertical tail and wake components at combined angles of attack and sideslip. Results are obtained for a variety of configurations that include a Langley advanced fighter concept with fuselage centerline nacelle, Rockwell's Advanced Tactical Fighter (ATF) with wing mounted nacelles, and the Shuttle Orbiter configuration. Comparisons with available experiments were good.

  5. Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, C. F.; Wiberg, Clark G.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to understand supersonic laminar flow stability, transition and active control. Some prediction techniques are developed or modified to analyze laminar flow stability. The effects of distributed heating and cooling as an active boundary layer control technique are studied. The primary tasks of the research apply to the NASA/Ames Proof-of-Concept (PoC) and the Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel's (LFSWT's) nozzle design with laminar flow control and are listed as follows: (1) Predictions of supersonic laminar boundary layer stability and transition; (2) Effects of wall heating and cooling on supersonic laminar flow control on a flat plate; (3) Performance evaluation of the PoC and LFSWT nozzle designs with wall heating and cooling applied at different locations and various lengths; (4) Effects of a conducted -vs- pulse wall temperature distribution for the LFSWT; and (5) Application of wall heating and/or cooling to laminar boundary layer and flow separation control of airfoils and investigation of related active control techniques.

  6. Supersonic Wave Interference Affecting Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Eugene S.

    1958-01-01

    Some of the significant interference fields that may affect stability of aircraft at supersonic speeds are briefly summarized. Illustrations and calculations are presented to indicate the importance of interference fields created by wings, bodies, wing-body combinations, jets, and nacelles.

  7. Numerical simulation of viscous supersonic flow over a generic fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaussee, D. S.; Blum, G.; Wai, J.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure is presented, as well as some results, to calculate the flow over a generic fighter configuration. A parabolized marching Navier-Stokes code is used to obtain the solution over a wing-canopy body. The flow conditions simulate supersonic cruise with a freestream Mach number of 2.169 and angles of attack of 4 and 10 deg. The body surface is considered to be an adiabatic wall and the flow is assumed to be turbulent for the given Reynolds number.

  8. Summary and recent results from the NASA advanced High Speed Propeller Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, G. A.; Mikkelson, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    Advanced high-speed propellers offer large performance improvements for aircraft that cruise in the Mach 0.7 to 0.8 speed regime. The current status of the NASA research program on high-speed propeller aerodynamics, acoustics, and aeroelastics is described. Recent wind tunnel results for five 8- to 10-blade advanced models are compared with analytical predictions. Test results show that blade sweep was important in achieving net efficiencies near 80 percent at Mach 0.8 and reducing near-field cruise noise by dB. Lifting line and lifting surface aerodynamic analysis codes are under development and some initial lifting line results are compared with propeller force and probe data. Some initial laser velocimeter measurements of the flow field velocities of an 8-bladed 45 deg swept propeller are shown. Experimental aeroelastic results indicate that cascade effects and blade sweep strongly affect propeller aeroelastic characteristics. Comparisons of propeller near-field noise data with linear acoustic theory indicate that the theory adequate predicts near-field noise for subsonic tip speeds but overpredicts the noise for supersonic tip speeds. Potential large gains in propeller efficiency of 7 to 11 percent at Mach 0.8 may be possible with advanced counter-rotation propellers.

  9. Medical aspects of supersonic travel.

    PubMed

    Preston, F S

    1975-08-01

    During the 1950s, military aircraft in France and the United Kingdom developed along almost identical lines in that supersonic fighters were developed together with delta-plan research aircraft capable of speeds twice the speed of sound (Mach 2). At the end of the decade, discussions between the British Aircraft Corp. (BAC) and Sub-Aviation of France (SUD) resulted in suggested designs for a supersonic transport (SST) aircraft. With official backing from both governments, the Anglo-French Concorde Agreement was signed in 1962. At first, the development costs were estimated to be between 150 and 170 million, the costs to be equally divided between both nations. The total costs for research and development are now expected to exceed 1065 million!

  10. Medical aspects of supersonic travel.

    PubMed

    Preston, F S

    1975-08-01

    During the 1950s, military aircraft in France and the United Kingdom developed along almost identical lines in that supersonic fighters were developed together with delta-plan research aircraft capable of speeds twice the speed of sound (Mach 2). At the end of the decade, discussions between the British Aircraft Corp. (BAC) and Sub-Aviation of France (SUD) resulted in suggested designs for a supersonic transport (SST) aircraft. With official backing from both governments, the Anglo-French Concorde Agreement was signed in 1962. At first, the development costs were estimated to be between 150 and 170 million, the costs to be equally divided between both nations. The total costs for research and development are now expected to exceed 1065 million! PMID:1164343

  11. Thermal Design and Analysis of the Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test Vehicle for the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastropietro, A. J.; Pauken, Michael; Sunada, Eric; Gray, Sandria

    2013-01-01

    The thermal design and analysis of the experimental Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) vehicle is presented. The SFDT vehicle is currently being designed as a platform to help demonstrate key technologies for NASA's Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project. The LDSD project is charged by NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) with the task of advancing the state of the art in Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems by developing and testing three new technologies required for landing heavier payloads on Mars. The enabling technologies under development consist of a large 33.5 meter diameter Supersonic Ringsail (SSRS) parachute and two different types of Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) devices - a robotic class, SIAD-R, that inflates to a 6 meter diameter torus, and an exploration class, SIAD-E, that inflates to an 8 meter diameter isotensoid. As part of the technology development effort, the various elements of the new supersonic decelerator system must be tested in a Mars-like environment. This is currently planned to be accomplished by sending a series of SFDT vehicles into Earth's stratosphere. Each SFDT vehicle will be lifted to a stable float altitude by a large helium carrier balloon. Once at altitude, the SFDT vehicles will be released from their carrier balloon and spun up via spin motors to provide trajectory stability. An onboard third stage solid rocket motor will propel each test vehicle to supersonic flight in the upper atmosphere. After main engine burnout, each vehicle will be despun and testing of the deceleration system will begin: first an inflatable decelerator will be deployed around the aeroshell to increase the drag surface area, and then the large parachute will be deployed to continue the deceleration and return the vehicle back to the Earth's surface. The SFDT vehicle thermal system must passively protect the vehicle structure and its components from cold temperatures experienced during the

  12. Cruise Ship Plume Tracking Survey Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-09-01

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing a Cruise Ship Discharge Assessment Report in response to a petition the agency received in March 2000. The petition requested that EPA assess and where necessary control discharges from cruise ships. Comments received during public hearings, in 2000, resulted in the EPA agreeing to conduct a survey to assess the discharge plumes resulting from cruise ships, operating in ocean waters off the Florida coast and to compare the results to the Alaska dispersion models. This survey report describes the daily activities of August 2001 Cruise Ship Plume Tracking Survey, and provides a synopsis of the observations from the survey. It also provides data that can be used to assess dispersion of cruise ship wastewater discharges, while in transit. A description of the survey methods is provided in Section 2. Survey results are presented in Section 3. Findings and conclusions are discussed in Section 4.

  13. Low-Disturbance Flow Characteristics of the NASA-Ames Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Laub, James A.; Davis, Sanford S. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A unique, low-disturbance (quiet) supersonic wind tunnel has been commissioned at the NASA-Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory (FML) to support Supersonic Laminar Flow Control (SLFC) research. Known as the Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel (LFSWT), this tunnel is designed to operate at potential cruise Mach numbers and unit Reynolds numbers (Re) of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). The need to better understand the receptivity of the transition phenomena on swept (HSCT) wings to attachment-line contamination and cross-flows has provided the impetus for building the LFSWT. Low-disturbance or "quiet" wind tunnels are known to be an essential part of any meaningful boundary layer transition research. In particular, the receptivity of supersonic boundary layers to wind tunnel disturbances can significantly alter the transition phenomena under investigation on a test model. Consequently, considerable effort has gone into the design of the LFSWT to provide quiet flow. The paper describes efforts to quantify the low-disturbance flows in the LFSWT operating at Mach 1.6, as a precursor to transition research on wing models. The research includes: (1) Flow measurements in both the test section and settling chamber of the LFSWT, using a full range of measurement techniques; (2) Study of the state of the test section boundary layer so far by using a single hot-wire mounted above the floor centerline, with and without boundary layer trips fitted at the test section entrance; (3) The effect of flow quality of unsteady supersonic diffuser flow, joint steps and gaps, and wall vibration.

  14. Flight Research and Validation Formerly Experimental Capabilities Supersonic Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Experimental Capabilities Supersonic project, that is being reorganized into Flight Research and Validation. The work of Experimental Capabilities Project in FY '09 is reviewed, and the specific centers that is assigned to do the work is given. The portfolio of the newly formed Flight Research and Validation (FRV) group is also reviewed. The various projects for FY '10 for the FRV are detailed. These projects include: Eagle Probe, Channeled Centerbody Inlet Experiment (CCIE), Supersonic Boundary layer Transition test (SBLT), Aero-elastic Test Wing-2 (ATW-2), G-V External Vision Systems (G5 XVS), Air-to-Air Schlieren (A2A), In Flight Background Oriented Schlieren (BOS), Dynamic Inertia Measurement Technique (DIM), and Advanced In-Flight IR Thermography (AIR-T).

  15. A higher order panel method for linearized supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, F. E.; Epton, M. A.; Johnson, F. T.; Magnus, A. E.; Rubbert, P. E.

    1979-01-01

    The basic integral equations of linearized supersonic theory for an advanced supersonic panel method are derived. Methods using only linear varying source strength over each panel or only quadratic doublet strength over each panel gave good agreement with analytic solutions over cones and zero thickness cambered wings. For three dimensional bodies and wings of general shape, combined source and doublet panels with interior boundary conditions to eliminate the internal perturbations lead to a stable method providing good agreement experiment. A panel system with all edges contiguous resulted from dividing the basic four point non-planar panel into eight triangular subpanels, and the doublet strength was made continuous at all edges by a quadratic distribution over each subpanel. Superinclined panels were developed and tested on s simple nacelle and on an airplane model having engine inlets, with excellent results.

  16. The effects on cruise drag of installing long-duct refan-engine nacelles on the McDonnell Douglas DC-8-50 and -61

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callaghan, J. T.; Donelson, J. E.; Morelli, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    A high-speed wind tunnel test was conducted to determine the effect on cruise performance of installing long-duct refan-engine nacelles on the DC-8-50 and -61 models. Drag data and wing/pylon/nacelle channel pressure data are presented. At a typical cruise condition there exists a very small interference drag penalty of less than one-percent of total cruise data for the Refan installation. Pressure data indicate that some supersonic flow is present in the inboard channel of the inboard refan nacelle installation, but it is not sufficient to cause any wave drag on boundary layer separation. One pylon modification, which takes the form of pylon bumps, was tested. It resulted in a drag penalty, because its design goal of eliminating shock-related interference drag was not required and the bump thus became a source of additional parasite drag.

  17. Development of a quiet supersonic wind tunnel with a cryogenic adaptive nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.

    1995-01-01

    Low-disturbance or 'quiet' wind tunnels are now considered an essential part of meaningful boundary layer transition research. Advances in Supersonic Laminar Flow Control (SLFC) technology for swept wings depends on a better understanding of the receptivity of the transition phenomena to attachment-line contamination and cross-flows. This need has provided the impetus for building the Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel (LFSWT) at NASA-Ames, as part of the NASA High Speed Research Program (HSRP). The LFSWT was designed to provide NASA with an unequaled capability for transition research at low supersonic Mach numbers (<2.5). The following are the objectives in support of the new Fluid Mechanic Laboratory (FML) quiet supersonic wind tunnel: (I) Develop a unique injector drive system using the existing FML indraft compressor; (2) Develop an FML instrumentation capability for quiet supersonic wind tunnel evaluation and transition studies at NASA-Ames; (3) Determine the State of the Art in quiet supersonic wind tunnel design; (4) Build and commission the LFSWT; (5) Make detailed flow quality measurements in the LFSWT; (6) Perform tests of swept wing models in the LFSWT in support of the NASA HSR program; and (7) Provide documentation of research progress.

  18. Expanding the Natural Laminar Flow Boundary for Supersonic Transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynde, Michelle N.; Campbell, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    A computational design and analysis methodology is being developed to design a vehicle that can support significant regions of natural laminar flow (NLF) at supersonic flight conditions. The methodology is built in the CDISC design module to be used in this paper with the flow solvers Cart3D and USM3D, and the transition prediction modules BLSTA3D and LASTRAC. The NLF design technique prescribes a target pressure distribution for an existing geometry based on relationships between modal instability wave growth and pressure gradients. The modal instability wave growths (both on- and off-axes crossflow and Tollmien-Schlichting) are balanced to produce a pressure distribution that will have a theoretical maximum NLF region for a given streamwise wing station. An example application is presented showing the methodology on a generic supersonic transport wingbody configuration. The configuration has been successfully redesigned to support significant regions of NLF (approximately 40% of the wing upper surface by surface area). Computational analysis predicts NLF with transition Reynolds numbers (ReT) as high as 36 million with 72 degrees of leading-edge sweep (?LE), significantly expanding the current boundary of ReT - ?LE combinations for NLF. This NLF geometry provides a total drag savings of 4.3 counts compared to the baseline wing-body configuration (approximately 5% of total drag). Off-design evaluations at near-cruise and low-speed, high-lift conditions are discussed, as well as attachment line contamination/transition concerns. This computational NLF design effort is a part of an ongoing cooperative agreement between NASA and JAXA researchers.

  19. Swirling base injection for supersonic combustion ramjets.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, L. A.; Ehlers, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental evaluation of the swirling base injection proposed by Swithenbank and Chigier (1969) for application in supersonic combustion ramjets or scramjets. This concept of accelerated mixing in supersonic streams through swirl was tested, but the results indicate that swirl does not produce any enhancement of mixing.

  20. Some effects of applying sonic boom minimization to supersonic cruise aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, R. J.; Darden, C. M.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of an aircraft shaping method to control sonic boom over-pressure levels along with the analysis of wind-tunnel data which validated the method. The results indicate that the sonic boom minimization method can guide the design team choices of aircraft planform and component arrangement toward a low-boom-level configuration while permitting sufficient freedom and flexibility to satisfy other design criteria. Further, it is shown that off-design flight conditions do not drastically change the overpressure sonic boom shape and strength.

  1. Measurement of exhaust emissions from two J-58 engines at simulated supersonic cruise flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Emissions of total oxides of nitrogen, unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide from two J-58 afterburning turbojet engines at simulated high-altitude flight conditions are reported. Test conditions included flight speeds from Mach 2 to 3 at altitudes from 16 to 23 km. For each flight condition, exhaust measurements were made for four or five power levels from maximum power without afterburning through maximum afterburning. The data show that exhaust emissions vary with flight speed, altitude, power level, and radial position across the exhaust. Oxides of nitrogen (NOX) emissions decreased with increasing altitude, and increased with increasing flight speed. NOX emission indices with afterburning were less than half the value without afterburning. Carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions increased with increasing altitude, and decreased with increasing flight speed. Emissions of these species were substantially higher with afterburning than without.

  2. Measurement of exhaust emissions from two J-58 engines at simulated supersonic cruise flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Emissions of total oxides of nitrogen, unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide from two J-58 afterburning turbojet engines at simulated high-altitude flight conditions are reported. Test conditions included flight speeds from Mach 2 to 3 at altitudes from 16 to 23 km. For each flight condition, exhaust measurements were made for four or five power levels from maximum power without afterburning through maximum afterburning. The data show that exhaust emissions vary with flight speed, altitude, power level, and radial position across the exhaust. Oxides of nitrogen emissions decreased with increasing altitude and increased with increasing flight speed. NO(x) emission indices with afterburning were less than half the value without afterburning. Carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions increased with increasing altitude and decreased with increasing flight speed. Emissions of these species were substantially higher with afterburning than without.

  3. Investigation of convergent-divergent nozzles applicable to reduced-power supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, B. L.; Re, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation was conducted of isolated convergent-divergent nozzles to determine the effect of several design parameters on nozzle performance. Tests were conducted using high pressure air for propulsion simulation at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 2.86 at an angle of attack of 0 deg and at nozzle pressure ratios from jet off to 46.0. Three power settings (dry, partial afterburning, and maximum afterburning), three nozzle lengths, and nozzle expansion ratios from 1.22 to 2.24 were investigated. In addition, the effects of nozzle throat radius and a cusp in the external boattail geometry were studied. The results of this study indicate that, for nozzles operating near design conditions, increasing nozzle length increases nozzle thrust-minus-drag performance. Nozzle throat radius and an external boattail cusp had negligible effects on nozzle drag or internal performance.

  4. Potential benefits of propulsion and flight control integration for supersonic cruise vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, D. T.; Schweikhard, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    Typical airframe/propulsion interactions such as Mach/altitude excursions and inlet unstarts are reviewed. The improvements in airplane performance and flight control that can be achieved by improving the interfaces between propulsion and flight control are estimated. A research program to determine the feasibility of integrating propulsion and flight control is described. This program includes analytical studies and YF-12 flight tests.

  5. A linearized theory method of constrained optimization for supersonic cruise wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. S.; Carlson, H. W.; Middleton, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    A linearized theory wing design and optimization procedure which allows physical realism and practical considerations to be imposed as constraints on the optimum (least drag due to lift) solution is discussed and examples of application are presented. In addition to the usual constraints on lift and pitching moment, constraints are imposed on wing surface ordinates and wing upper surface pressure levels and gradients. The design procedure also provides the capability of including directly in the optimization process the effects of other aircraft components such as a fuselage, canards, and nacelles.

  6. Evaluation of high temperature structural adhesives for extended service. [supersonic cruise aircraft research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. G.

    1981-01-01

    Eight different Ti-6Al-4V surface treatments were investigated for each of 10 candidate resins. Primers (two for each resin) were studied for appropriate cure and thickness and initial evaluation of bond joints began using various combinations of the adhesive resins and surface treatments. Surface failure areas of bonded titanium coupons were analyzed by electron microscopy and surface chemical analysis techniques. Results of surface characterization and failure analysis are described for lap shear bond joints occurring with adhesive systems consisting of: (1) LARC-13 adhesive, Pasa jell surface treatment; (2) LARC-13 adhesive, 10 volt CAA treatment; (3) PPQ adhesive, 10 volt CAA treatment; and (4) PPQ adhesive, 5 volt CAA treatment. The failure analysis concentrated on the 10,000 hr 505K (450 F) exposed specimens which exhibited adhesive failure. Environmental exposure data being generated on the PPQ-10 volt CAA and the LARC-TPI-10 volt CAA adhesive systems is included.

  7. Supersonic transport. [using canard surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, P. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An aircraft of supersonic transport configuration is described, featuring thrust vectoring in conjunction with wing apex segments used as canard surfaces during takeoff, landing, and low-speed flight. The angle of incidence of the wing apex segments, when the segments were functioning as canard surfaces, was variable with respect to the aircraft angle of attack. The wing apex segments furthermore formed a portion of the main wing panel swept leading edge when not functioning as canard surfaces. The combination of thrust vectoring and deployable wing apex segments resulted in increased aircraft range and improved low speed longitudinal stability while providing acceptable takeoff length capabilities.

  8. Multifidelity Analysis and Optimization for Supersonic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, Ilan; Willcox, Karen; March, Andrew; Haas, Alex; Rajnarayan, Dev; Kays, Cory

    2010-01-01

    Supersonic aircraft design is a computationally expensive optimization problem and multifidelity approaches over a significant opportunity to reduce design time and computational cost. This report presents tools developed to improve supersonic aircraft design capabilities including: aerodynamic tools for supersonic aircraft configurations; a systematic way to manage model uncertainty; and multifidelity model management concepts that incorporate uncertainty. The aerodynamic analysis tools developed are appropriate for use in a multifidelity optimization framework, and include four analysis routines to estimate the lift and drag of a supersonic airfoil, a multifidelity supersonic drag code that estimates the drag of aircraft configurations with three different methods: an area rule method, a panel method, and an Euler solver. In addition, five multifidelity optimization methods are developed, which include local and global methods as well as gradient-based and gradient-free techniques.

  9. Axisymmetric Calculations of a Low-Boom Inlet in a Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.; Hirt, Stefanie M.; Reger, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes axisymmetric CFD predictions made of a supersonic low-boom inlet with a facility diffuser, cold pipe, and mass flow plug within wind tunnel walls, and compares the CFD calculations with the experimental data. The inlet was designed for use on a small supersonic aircraft that would cruise at Mach 1.6, with a Mach number over the wing of 1.7. The inlet was tested in the 8-ft by 6-ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center in the fall of 2010 to demonstrate the performance and stability of a practical flight design that included a novel bypass duct. The inlet design is discussed here briefly. Prior to the test, CFD calculations were made to predict the performance of the inlet and its associated wind tunnel hardware, and to estimate flow areas needed to throttle the inlet. The calculations were done with the Wind-US CFD code and are described in detail. After the test, comparisons were made between computed and measured shock patterns, total pressure recoveries, and centerline pressures. The results showed that the dual-stream inlet had excellent performance, with capture ratios near one, a peak core total pressure recovery of 96 percent, and a large stable operating range. Predicted core recovery agreed well with the experiment but predicted bypass recovery and maximum capture ratio were high. Calculations of offdesign performance of the inlet along a flight profile agreed well with measurements and previous calculations.

  10. Velocity field measurements on high-frequency, supersonic microactuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreth, Phillip A.; Ali, Mohd Y.; Fernandez, Erik J.; Alvi, Farrukh S.

    2016-05-01

    The resonance-enhanced microjet actuator which was developed at the Advanced Aero-Propulsion Laboratory at Florida State University is a fluidic-based device that produces pulsed, supersonic microjets by utilizing a number of microscale, flow-acoustic resonance phenomena. The microactuator used in this study consists of an underexpanded source jet that flows into a cylindrical cavity with a single, 1-mm-diameter exhaust orifice through which an unsteady, supersonic jet issues at a resonant frequency of 7 kHz. The flowfields of a 1-mm underexpanded free jet and the microactuator are studied in detail using high-magnification, phase-locked flow visualizations (microschlieren) and two-component particle image velocimetry. These are the first direct measurements of the velocity fields produced by such actuators. Comparisons are made between the flow visualizations and the velocity field measurements. The results clearly show that the microactuator produces pulsed, supersonic jets with velocities exceeding 400 m/s for roughly 60 % of their cycles. With high unsteady momentum output, this type of microactuator has potential in a range of ow control applications.

  11. Studies on nonequilibrium phenomena in supersonic chemically reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Chandrasekhar, Rajnish

    1993-01-01

    This study deals with a systematic investigation of nonequilibrium processes in supersonic combustion. The two-dimensional, elliptic Navier-Stokes equations are used to investigate supersonic flows with nonequilibrium chemistry and thermodynamics, coupled with radiation, for hydrogen-air systems. The explicit, unsplit MacCormack finite-difference scheme is used to advance the governing equations in time, until convergence is achieved. For a basic understanding of the flow physics, premixed flows undergoing finite rate chemical reactions are investigated. Results obtained for specific conditions indicate that the radiative interactions vary substantially, depending on reactions involving HO2 and NO species, and that this can have a noticeable influence on the flowfield. The second part of this study deals with premixed reacting flows under thermal nonequilibrium conditions. Here, the critical problem is coupling of the vibrational relaxation process with the radiative heat transfer. The specific problem considered is a premixed expanding flow in a supersonic nozzle. Results indicate the presence of nonequilibrium conditions in the expansion region of the nozzle. This results in reduction of the radiative interactions in the flowfield. Next, the present study focuses on investigation of non-premixed flows under chemical nonequilibrium conditions. In this case, the main problem is the coupled turbulence-chemistry interaction. The resulting formulation is validated by comparison with experimental data on reacting supersonic coflowing jets. Results indicate that the effect of heat release is to lower the turbulent shear stress and the mean density. The last part of this study proposes a new theoretical formulation for the coupled turbulence-radiation interactions. Results obtained for the coflowing jets experiment indicate that the effect of turbulence is to enhance the radiative interactions.

  12. Optimization of Supersonic Transport Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, Mark D.; Windhorst, Robert; Phillips, James

    1998-01-01

    This paper develops a near-optimal guidance law for generating minimum fuel, time, or cost fixed-range trajectories for supersonic transport aircraft. The approach uses a choice of new state variables along with singular perturbation techniques to time-scale decouple the dynamic equations into multiple equations of single order (second order for the fast dynamics). Application of the maximum principle to each of the decoupled equations, as opposed to application to the original coupled equations, avoids the two point boundary value problem and transforms the problem from one of a functional optimization to one of multiple function optimizations. It is shown that such an approach produces well known aircraft performance results such as minimizing the Brequet factor for minimum fuel consumption and the energy climb path. Furthermore, the new state variables produce a consistent calculation of flight path angle along the trajectory, eliminating one of the deficiencies in the traditional energy state approximation. In addition, jumps in the energy climb path are smoothed out by integration of the original dynamic equations at constant load factor. Numerical results performed for a supersonic transport design show that a pushover dive followed by a pullout at nominal load factors are sufficient maneuvers to smooth the jump.

  13. Vortex Flows at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Allen, Jerry M.

    2003-01-01

    A review of research conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) into high-speed vortex flows during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s is presented. The data are for flat plates, cavities, bodies, missiles, wings, and aircraft with Mach numbers of 1.5 to 4.6. Data are presented to show the types of vortex structures that occur at supersonic speeds and the impact of these flow structures on vehicle performance and control. The data show the presence of both small- and large-scale vortex structures for a variety of vehicles, from missiles to transports. For cavities, the data show very complex multiple vortex structures exist at all combinations of cavity depth to length ratios and Mach number. The data for missiles show the existence of very strong interference effects between body and/or fin vortices. Data are shown that highlight the effect of leading-edge sweep, leading-edge bluntness, wing thickness, location of maximum thickness, and camber on the aerodynamics of and flow over delta wings. Finally, a discussion of a design approach for wings that use vortex flows for improved aerodynamic performance at supersonic speeds is presented.

  14. Low-Boom and Low-Drag Optimization of the Twin Engine Version of Silent Supersonic Business Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Koma; Kumano, Takayasu; Yonezawa, Masahito; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Jeong, Shinkyu; Obayashi, Shigeru

    Multi-Objective Optimization has been applied to a design problem of the twin engine concept for Silent Supersonic Business Jet (SSBJ). This problem aims to find main wing, body, tail wing and engine nacelle configurations, which can minimize both sonic boom and drag in a supersonic cruising flight. The multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA) coupled with the Kriging model has been used to globally and effectively search for optimal design candidates in the multi-objective problem. The drag and the sonic boom have been evaluated by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation and the waveform parameter method. As a result, the present optimization has successfully obtained low-boom and low-drag design candidates, which are better than the baseline design by more than 40% regarding each performance. Moreover, the structure of design space has been visualized by the self-organizing map (SOM).

  15. Development of the NASA-Ames low disturbance supersonic wind tunnel for transition research up to Mach 2.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Laub, James A.; King, Lyndell S.; Reda, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    A unique, low-disturbance supersonic wind tunnel is being developed at NASA-Ames to support supersonic laminar flow control research at cruise Mach numbers of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). The distinctive aerodynamic features of this new quiet tunnel will be a low-disturbance settling chamber, laminar boundary layers on the nozzle walls and steady supersonic diffuser flow. Furthermore, this new wind tunnel will operate continuously at uniquely low compression ratios (less than unity). This feature allows an existing non-specialist compressor to be used as a major part of the drive system. In this paper, we highlight activities associated with drive system development, the establishment of natural laminar flow on the test section walls, and instrumentation development for transition detection. Experimental results from an 1/8th-scale model of the supersonic wind tunnel are presented and discussed in association with theoretical predictions. Plans are progressing to build the full-scale wind tunnel by the end of 1993.

  16. Tone noise of three supersonic helical tip speed propellers in a wind tunnel at 0.8 Mach number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.; Blaha, B. J.; Jeracki, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Three supersonic helical tip speed propellers were tested in the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel. Noise data were obtained while these propellers were operating at a simulated cruise condition. The walls of this tunnel were not acoustically treated and therefore this was not an ideal location for taking noise data, but it was thought that the differences in noise among the three propellers would be meaningful. The straight bladed propeller which did not incorporate sweep was the noisiest with the aerodynamically swept propeller only slightly quieter. However, the acoustically swept propeller was significantly quieter than the straight propeller, thereby indicating the merit of this design technique.

  17. Application of laminar flow control to supersonic transport configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, P. G.; Nagel, A. L.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility and impact of implementing a laminar flow control system on a supersonic transport configuration were investigated. A hybrid laminar flow control scheme consisting of suction controlled and natural laminar flow was developed for a double-delta type wing planform. The required suction flow rates were determined from boundary layer stability analyses using representative wing pressure distributions. A preliminary design of structural modifications needed to accommodate suction through a perforated titanium skin was carried out together with the ducting and systems needed to collect, compress and discharge the suction air. The benefits of reduced aerodynamic drag were weighed against the weight, volume and power requirement penalties of suction system installation in a mission performance and sizing program to assess the net benefits. The study showed a feasibility of achieving significant laminarization of the wing surface by use of a hybrid scheme, leading to an 8.2 percent reduction in the cruise drag. This resulted in an 8.5 percent reduction in the maximum takeoff weight and a 12 percent reduction in the fuel burn after the inclusion of the LFC system installation penalties. Several research needs were identified for a resolution of aerodynamics, structural and systems issues before these potential benefits could be realized in a practical system.

  18. Design and Analysis Tool for External-Compression Supersonic Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.

    2012-01-01

    A computational tool named SUPIN has been developed to design and analyze external-compression supersonic inlets for aircraft at cruise speeds from Mach 1.6 to 2.0. The inlet types available include the axisymmetric outward-turning, two-dimensional single-duct, two-dimensional bifurcated-duct, and streamline-traced Busemann inlets. The aerodynamic performance is characterized by the flow rates, total pressure recovery, and drag. The inlet flowfield is divided into parts to provide a framework for the geometry and aerodynamic modeling and the parts are defined in terms of geometric factors. The low-fidelity aerodynamic analysis and design methods are based on analytic, empirical, and numerical methods which provide for quick analysis. SUPIN provides inlet geometry in the form of coordinates and surface grids useable by grid generation methods for higher-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. SUPIN is demonstrated through a series of design studies and CFD analyses were performed to verify some of the analysis results.

  19. Actuator for automatic cruising system

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.

    1989-03-07

    An actuator for an automatic cruising system is described, comprising: a casing; a control shaft provided in the casing for rotational movement; a control motor for driving the control shaft; an input shaft; an electromagnetic clutch and a reduction gear which are provided between the control motor and the control shaft; and an external linkage mechanism operatively connected to the control shaft; wherein the reduction gear is a type of Ferguson's mechanical paradox gear having a pinion mounted on the input shaft always connected to the control motor; a planetary gear meshing with the pinion so as to revolve around the pinion; a static internal gear meshing with the planetary gear and connected with the electromagnetic clutch for movement to a position restricting rotation of the static internal gear; and a rotary internal gear fixed on the control shaft and meshed with the planetary gear, the rotary internal gear having a number of teeth slightly different from a number of teeth of the static internal gear; and the electromagnetic clutch has a tubular electromagnetic coil coaxially provided around the input shaft and an engaging means for engaging and disengaging with the static internal gear in accordance with on-off operation of the electromagnetic coil.

  20. Autonomous intelligent cruise control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baret, Marc; Bomer, Thierry T.; Calesse, C.; Dudych, L.; L'Hoist, P.

    1995-01-01

    Autonomous intelligent cruise control (AICC) systems are not only controlling vehicles' speed but acting on the throttle and eventually on the brakes they could automatically maintain the relative speed and distance between two vehicles in the same lane. And more than just for comfort it appears that these new systems should improve the safety on highways. By applying a technique issued from the space research carried out by MATRA, a sensor based on a charge coupled device (CCD) was designed to acquire the reflected light on standard-mounted car reflectors of pulsed laser diodes emission. The CCD is working in a unique mode called flash during transfer (FDT) which allows identification of target patterns in severe optical environments. It provides high accuracy for distance and angular position of targets. The absence of moving mechanical parts ensures high reliability for this sensor. The large field of view and the high measurement rate give a global situation assessment and a short reaction time. Then, tracking and filtering algorithms have been developed in order to select the target, on which the equipped vehicle determines its safety distance and speed, taking into account its maneuvering and the behaviors of other vehicles.

  1. Economic benefits of supersonic overland operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metwally, Munir

    1992-01-01

    Environmental concerns are likely to impose some restrictions on the next generation of supersonic commercial transport. There is a global concern over the effects of engine emissions on the ozone layer which protects life on Earth from ultraviolet radiation. There is also some concern over community noise. The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) must meet at least the current subsonic noise certification standards to be compatible with the future subsonic fleet. Concerns over sonic boom represent another environmental and marketing challenge to the HSCT program. The most attractive feature of the supersonic transport is speed, which offers the traveling public significant time-savings on long range routes. The sonic boom issue represents a major environmental and economic challenge as well. Supersonic operation overland produces the most desirable economic results. However, unacceptable overland sonic boom raise levels may force HSCT to use subsonic speeds overland. These environmental and economic challenges are likely to impose some restrictions on supersonic operation, thus introducing major changes to existing route structures and future supersonic network composition. The current subsonic route structure may have to be altered for supersonic transports to avoid sensitive areas in the stratosphere or to minimize overland flight tracks. It is important to examine the alternative route structure and the impact of these restrictions on the economic viability of the overall supersonic operation. Future market potential for HSCT fleets must be large enough to enable engine and airframe manufacturers to build the plane at a cost that provides them with an attractive return on investment and to sell it at a price that allows the airlines to operate with a reasonable margin of profit. Subsonic overland operation of a supersonic aircraft hinders its economic viability. Ways to increase the market potential of supersonic operation are described.

  2. Design and Analysis Tools for Supersonic Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Folk, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Computational tools are being developed for the design and analysis of supersonic inlets. The objective is to update existing tools and provide design and low-order aerodynamic analysis capability for advanced inlet concepts. The Inlet Tools effort includes aspects of creating an electronic database of inlet design information, a document describing inlet design and analysis methods, a geometry model for describing the shape of inlets, and computer tools that implement the geometry model and methods. The geometry model has a set of basic inlet shapes that include pitot, two-dimensional, axisymmetric, and stream-traced inlet shapes. The inlet model divides the inlet flow field into parts that facilitate the design and analysis methods. The inlet geometry model constructs the inlet surfaces through the generation and transformation of planar entities based on key inlet design factors. Future efforts will focus on developing the inlet geometry model, the inlet design and analysis methods, a Fortran 95 code to implement the model and methods. Other computational platforms, such as Java, will also be explored.

  3. Calculation of the shape of a two-dimensional supersonic nozzle in closed form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunsolo, Dante

    1953-01-01

    The idea is advanced of making a supersonic nozzle by producing one, two, or three successive turns of the whole flow; with the result that the wall contour can be calculated exactly by means of the Prandtl-Meyer "Lost Solution."

  4. Method and apparatus for starting supersonic compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Lawlor, Shawn P.

    2012-04-10

    A supersonic gas compressor. The compressor includes aerodynamic duct(s) situated on a rotor journaled in a casing. The aerodynamic duct(s) generate a plurality of oblique shock waves for efficiently compressing a gas at supersonic conditions. The convergent inlet is adjacent to a bleed air collector, and during acceleration of the rotor, bypass gas is removed from the convergent inlet via a collector to enable supersonic shock stabilization. Once the oblique shocks are stabilized at a selected inlet relative Mach number and pressure ratio, the bleed of bypass gas from the convergent inlet via the bypass gas collectors is eliminated.

  5. Measurements of a supersonic turbulent vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metwally, O. M.; Settles, G. S.

    1988-01-01

    Mean-flow measurements of a supersonic turbulent streamwise vortex are presented. This vortex was produced by the injection of a swirling flow along the centerline of a supersonic airstream at Mach 3. Directional Mach number distributions, obtained via a five-hole flow-angularity probe, reveal vortex characteristics similar to those of the incompressible case, even though rotational Mach numbers up to 0.8 were obtained. This work is the first step of a study of the supersonic vortex breakdown phenomenon.

  6. Pdf prediction of supersonic hydrogen flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eifler, P.; Kollmann, W.

    1993-01-01

    A hybrid method for the prediction of supersonic turbulent flows with combustion is developed consisting of a second order closure for the velocity field and a multi-scalar pdf method for the local thermodynamic state. It is shown that for non-premixed flames and chemical equilibrium mixture fraction, the logarithm of the (dimensionless) density, internal energy per unit mass and the divergence of the velocity have several advantages over other sets of scalars. The closure model is applied to a supersonic non-premixed flame burning hydrogen with air supplied by a supersonic coflow and the results are compared with a limited set of experimental data.

  7. Two-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Hysteresis around Supersonic Biplane in Supersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonezawa, Masahito; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Obayashi, Shigeru; Kusunose, Kazuhiro

    The Busemann biplane is well known as the airfoil that has zero wave drag at the supersonic flight in the linear theory. It is found that this airfoil has a hysteresis in drag values from the transonic speeds through the low supersonic speeds based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis. This paper shows that this hysteresis is explained by the Kantrowitz-Donaldson Criteria that usually defines the start and unstart of the supersonic intake.

  8. Measured far-field flight noise of a counterrotation turboprop at cruise conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Loeffler, Irvin J.; Dittmar, James H.

    1989-01-01

    Modern high speed propeller (advanced turboprop) aircraft are expected to operate on 50 to 60 percent less fuel than the 1980 vintage turbofan fleet while at the same time matching the flight speed and performance of those aircraft. Counterrotation turboprop engines offer additional fuel savings by means of upstream propeller swirl recovery. This paper presents acoustic sideline results for a full-scale counterrotation turboprop engine at cruise conditions. The engine was installed on a Boeing 727 aircraft in place of the right-side turbofan engine. Acoustic data were taken from an instrumented Learjet chase plane. Sideline acoustic results are presented for 0.50 and 0.72 Mach cruise conditions. A scale model of the engine propeller was tested in a wind tunnel at 0.72 Mach cruise conditions. The model data were adjusted to flight acquisition conditions and were in general agreement with the flight results.

  9. Nonlinear stability of supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N. (Principal Investigator); Bhat, T. R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The stability calculations made for a shock-free supersonic jet using the model based on parabolized stability equations are presented. In this analysis the large scale structures, which play a dominant role in the mixing as well as the noise radiated, are modeled as instability waves. This model takes into consideration non-parallel flow effects and also nonlinear interaction of the instability waves. The stability calculations have been performed for different frequencies and mode numbers over a range of jet operating temperatures. Comparisons are made, where appropriate, with the solutions to Rayleigh's equation (linear, inviscid analysis with the assumption of parallel flow). The comparison of the solutions obtained using the two approaches show very good agreement.

  10. Nonlinear Stability of Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, T. R. S.; Seiner, J. M.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents stability calculations made for a shock-free supersonic jet using the model based on parabolized stability equations. In this analysis the large-scale structures, which play a dominant role in the mixing as well as the noise radiated, are modeled as instability waves. This model takes into consideration non-parallel flow effects and also nonlinear interaction of the instability waves. The stability calculations have been performed for different frequencies and mode numbers over a range of jet operating temperatures. Comparisons are made, where appropriate, with the solutions to Rayleigh's equation (linear, inviscid analysis with the assumption of parallel flow). The comparison of the solutions obtained using the two approaches show very good agreement.

  11. Pulsed supersonic beams with nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Sarfraz, Adnan; Rademann, Klaus; Christen, Wolfgang

    2012-10-01

    The dissolution of the primary nucleobases in supercritical fluids has been investigated using pulsed molecular beam mass spectrometry. Due to the low critical temperatures of ethylene and carbon dioxide, their adiabatic jet expansion permits transferring thermally sensitive solutes into the gas phase. This feature is particularly attractive for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. In this study, adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil have been dissolved in supercritical ethylene with a few percent of ethanol as cosolvent. At source temperatures of 313 K, these solutions have been expanded from supercritical pressures into high vacuum using a customized pulsed nozzle. A mass spectrometer was used to monitor the relative amounts of solute, solvent, and cosolvent in the supersonic beam. The results suggest a paramount influence of the cosolvent.

  12. Wake-Vortex Hazards During Cruise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; James, Kevin D.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Even though the hazard posed by lift-generated wakes of subsonic transport aircraft has been studied extensively for approach and departure at airports, only a small amount of effort has gone into the potential hazard at cruise altitude. This paper reports on a studio of the wake-vortex hazard during cruise because encounters may become more prevalent when free-flight becomes available and each aircraft, is free to choose its own route between destinations. In order to address the problem, the various fluid-dynamic stages that vortex wakes usually go through as they age will be described along with estimates of the potential hazard that each stage poses. It appears that a rolling-moment hazard can be just as severe at cruise as for approach at airports, but it only persists for several minutes. However, the hazard posed by the downwash in the wake due to the lift on the generator aircraft persists for tens of minutes in a long narrow region behind the generating aircraft. The hazard consists of severe vertical loads when an encountering aircraft crosses the wake. A technique for avoiding vortex wakes at cruise altitude will be described. To date the hazard posed by lift-generated vortex wakes and their persistence at cruise altitudes has been identified and subdivided into several tasks. Analyses of the loads to be encounter and are underway and should be completed shortly. A review of published literature on the subject has been nearly completed (see text) and photographs of vortex wakes at cruise altitudes have been taken and the various stages of decay have been identified. It remains to study and sort the photographs for those that best illustrate the various stages of decay after they are shed by subsonic transport aircraft at cruise altitudes. The present status of the analysis and the paper are described.

  13. Federated provenance of oceanographic research cruises: from metadata to data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Rob; Leadbetter, Adam; Shepherd, Adam

    2016-04-01

    The World Wide Web Consortium's Provenance Data Model and associated Semantic Web ontology (PROV-O) have created much interest in the Earth and Space Science Informatics community (Ma et al., 2014). Indeed, PROV-O has recently been posited as an upper ontology for the alignment of various data models (Cox, 2015). Similarly, PROV-O has been used as the building blocks of a data release lifecycle ontology (Leadbetter & Buck, 2015). In this presentation we show that the alignment between different local data descriptions of an oceanographic research cruise can be achieved through alignment with PROV-O and that descriptions of the funding bodies, organisations and researchers involved in a cruise and its associated data release lifecycle can be modelled within a PROV-O based environment. We show that, at a first-order, this approach is scalable by presenting results from three endpoints (the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, USA; the British Oceanographic Data Centre at the National Oceanography Centre, UK; and the Marine Institute, Ireland). Current advances in ontology engineering, provide pathways to resolving reasoning issues from varying perspectives on implementing PROV-O. This includes the use of the Information Object design pattern where such edge cases as research cruise scheduling efforts are considered. PROV-O describes only things which have happened, but the Information Object design pattern allows for the description of planned research cruises through its statement that the local data description is not the the entity itself (in this case the planned research cruise) and therefore the local data description itself can be described using the PROV-O model. In particular, we present the use of the data lifecycle ontology to show the connection between research cruise activities and their associated datasets, and the publication of those data sets online with Digital Object Identifiers and

  14. FLOW FIELDS IN SUPERSONIC INLETS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorenson, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program is designed to calculate the flow fields in two-dimensional and three-dimensional axisymmetric supersonic inlets. The method of characteristics is used to compute arrays of points in the flow field. At each point the total pressure, local Mach number, local flow angle, and static pressure are calculated. This program can be used to design and analyze supersonic inlets by determining the surface compression rates and throat flow properties. The program employs the method of characteristics for a perfect gas. The basic equation used in the program is the compatibility equation which relates the change in stream angle to the change in entropy and the change in velocity. In order to facilitate the computation, the flow field behind the bow shock wave is broken into regions bounded by shock waves. In each region successive rays are computed from a surface to a shock wave until the shock wave intersects a surface or falls outside the cowl lip. As soon as the intersection occurs a new region is started and the previous region continued only in the area in which it is needed, thus eliminating unnecessary calculations. The maximum number of regions possible in the program is ten, which allows for the simultaneous calculations of up to nine shock waves. Input to this program consists of surface contours, free-stream Mach number, and various calculation control parameters. Output consists of printed and/or plotted results. For plotted results an SC-4020 or similar plotting device is required. This program is written in FORTRAN IV to be executed in the batch mode and has been implemented on a CDC 7600 with a central memory requirement of approximately 27k (octal) of 60 bit words.

  15. Propulsion Simulations Using Advanced Turbulence Models with the Unstructured Grid CFD Tool, TetrUSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Frink, Neal T.; Deere, Karen A.; Pandya, Mohangna J.

    2004-01-01

    A computational investigation has been completed to assess the capability of TetrUSS for exhaust nozzle flows. Three configurations were chosen for this study (1) an axisymmetric supersonic jet, (2) a transonic axisymmetric boattail with solid sting operated at different Reynolds number and Mach number, and (3) an isolated non-axisymmetric nacelle with a supersonic cruise nozzle. These configurations were chosen because existing experimental data provided a means for measuring the ability of TetrUSS for simulating complex nozzle flows. The main objective of this paper is to validate the implementation of advanced two-equation turbulence models in the unstructured-grid CFD code USM3D for propulsion flow cases. USM3D is the flow solver of the TetrUSS system. Three different turbulence models, namely, Menter Shear Stress Transport (SST), basic k epsilon, and the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) are used in the present study. The results are generally in agreement with other implementations of these models in structured-grid CFD codes. Results indicate that USM3D provides accurate simulations for complex aerodynamic configurations with propulsion integration.

  16. Measurements of Supersonic Wing Tip Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Michael K.; Kalkhoran, Iraj M.; Benston, James

    1994-01-01

    An experimental survey of supersonic wing tip vortices has been conducted at Mach 2.5 using small performed 2.25 chords down-stream of a semi-span rectangular wing at angle of attack of 5 and 10 degrees. The main objective of the experiments was to determine the Mach number, flow angularity and total pressure distribution in the core region of supersonic wing tip vortices. A secondary aim was to demonstrate the feasibility of using cone probes calibrated with a numerical flow solver to measure flow characteristics at supersonic speeds. Results showed that the numerically generated calibration curves can be used for 4-hole cone probes, but were not sufficiently accurate for conventional 5-hole probes due to nose bluntness effects. Combination of 4-hole cone probe measurements with independent pitot pressure measurements indicated a significant Mach number and total pressure deficit in the core regions of supersonic wing tip vortices, combined with an asymmetric 'Burger like' swirl distribution.

  17. Streamline curvature in supersonic shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibens, V.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation in which a curved shear layer was generated between supersonic flow from a rectangular converging/diverging nozzle and the freestream in a series of open channels with varying radii of curvature are reported. The shear layers exhibit unsteady large-scale activity at supersonic pressure ratios, indicating increased mixing efficiency. This effect contrasts with supersonic flow in a straight channel, for which no large-scale vortical structure development occurs. Curvature must exceed a minimum level before it begins to affect the dynamics of the supersonic shear layer appreciably. The curved channel flows are compared with reference flows consisting of a free jet, a straight channel, and wall jets without sidewalls on a flat and a curved plate.

  18. Supersonic fan engines for military aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franciscus, L. C.

    1983-01-01

    Engine performance and mission studies were performed for turbofan engines with supersonic through-flow fans. A Mach 2.4 CTOL aircraft was used in the study. Two missions were considered: a long range penetrator mission and a long range intercept mission. The supersonic fan engine is compared with an augmented mixed flow turbofan in terms of mission radius for a fixed takeoff gross weight of 75,000 lbm. The mission radius of aircraft powered by supersonic fan engines could be 15 percent longer than aircraft powered with conventional turbofan engines at moderate thrust to gross weight ratios. The climb and acceleration performance of the supersonic fan engines is better than that of the conventional turbofan engines.

  19. Supersonic fan engines for military aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franciscus, L. C.

    1983-01-01

    Engine performance and mission studies were performed for turbofan engines with supersonic through-flow fans. A Mach 2.4 CTOL aircraft was used in the study. Two missions were considered: a long range penetrator mission and a long range intercept mission. The supersonic fan engine is compared with an augmented mixed flow turbofan in terms of mission radius for a fixed takeoff gross weight of 75,000 lbm. The mission radius of aircraft powered by supersonic fan engines could be 15 percent longer than aircraft powered with conventional turbofan engines at moderate thrust to gross weight ratios. The climb and acceleration performance of the supersonic fan engines is better than that of the conventional turbofan engines. Previously announced in STAR as N83-34947

  20. Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA recently performed a trial run on a rocket sled test fixture, powered by rockets, to replicate the forces a supersonic spacecraft would experience prior to landing. The sled tests will allow t...

  1. NASA Flight Tests Explore Supersonic Laminar Flow

    NASA Video Gallery

    In partnership with Aerion Corporation of Reno, Nevada, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center’s tested supersonic airflow over a small experimental airfoil design on its F-15B Test Bed aircraft du...

  2. Design and Testing of CO2 Compression Using Supersonic Shock Wave Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, Aaron

    2015-06-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Ramgen and subcontractors in pursuit of the design and construction of a 10 MW supersonic CO2 compressor and supporting facility. The compressor will demonstrate application of Ramgen’s supersonic compression technology at an industrial scale using CO2 in a closed-loop. The report includes details of early feasibility studies, CFD validation and comparison to experimental data, static test experimental results, compressor and facility design and analyses, and development of aerodynamic tools. A summary of Ramgen's ISC Engine program activity is also included. This program will demonstrate the adaptation of Ramgen's supersonic compression and advanced vortex combustion technology to result in a highly efficient and cost effective alternative to traditional gas turbine engines. The build out of a 1.5 MW test facility to support the engine and associated subcomponent test program is summarized.

  3. Numerical Studies of a Supersonic Fluidic Diverter Actuator for Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Culley, Dennis e.; Raghu, Surya

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of the internal flow structure and performance of a specific fluidic diverter actuator, previously studied by time-dependent numerical computations for subsonic flow, is extended to include operation with supersonic actuator exit velocities. The understanding will aid in the development of fluidic diverters with minimum pressure losses and advanced designs of flow control actuators. The self-induced oscillatory behavior of the flow is successfully predicted and the calculated oscillation frequencies with respect to flow rate have excellent agreement with our experimental measurements. The oscillation frequency increases with Mach number, but its dependence on flow rate changes from subsonic to transonic to supersonic regimes. The delay time for the initiation of oscillations depends on the flow rate and the acoustic speed in the gaseous medium for subsonic flow, but is unaffected by the flow rate for supersonic conditions

  4. Robust predictive cruise control for commercial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junell, Jaime; Tumer, Kagan

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we explore learning-based predictive cruise control and the impact of this technology on increasing fuel efficiency for commercial trucks. Traditional cruise control is wasteful when maintaining a constant velocity over rolling hills. Predictive cruise control (PCC) is able to look ahead at future road conditions and solve for a cost-effective course of action. Model- based controllers have been implemented in this field but cannot accommodate many complexities of a dynamic environment which includes changing road and vehicle conditions. In this work, we focus on incorporating a learner into an already successful model- based predictive cruise controller in order to improve its performance. We explore back propagating neural networks to predict future errors then take actions to prevent said errors from occurring. The results show that this approach improves the model based PCC by up to 60% under certain conditions. In addition, we explore the benefits of classifier ensembles to further improve the gains due to intelligent cruise control.

  5. Art concept of Magellan spacecraft in cruise configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Magellan spacecraft cruise configuration is illustrated in this artist concept. With solar panels deployed and having jettisoned the inertial upper stage (IUS), Magellan approaches the sun which it will orbit approximately 1.6 times before encountering Venus. Magellan, named after the 16th century Portuguese explorer, will orbit Venus about once every three hours, acquiring radar data for 37 minutes of each orbit when it is closest to the surface. Using an advanced instrument called a synthetic aperture radar (SAR), it will map more than 90 per cent of the surface with resolution ten times better than the best from prior spacecraft. Magellan is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); Martin Marietta Aerospace is developing the spacecraft and Hughes Aircraft Company, the advanced imaging radar. Magellan will be deployed from payload bay (PLB) of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, during the STS-30 mission.

  6. Conditions for supersonic bent Marshak waves

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Qiang Ren, Xiao-dong; Li, Jing; Dan, Jia-kun; Wang, Kun-lun; Zhou, Shao-tong

    2015-03-15

    Supersonic radiation diffusion approximation is an useful method to study the radiation transportation. Considering the 2-d Marshak theory, and an invariable source temperature, conditions for supersonic radiation diffusion are proved to be coincident with that for radiant flux domination in the early time when √(ε)x{sub f}/L≪1. However, they are even tighter than conditions for radiant flux domination in the late time when √(ε)x{sub f}/L≫1, and can be expressed as M>4(1+ε/3)/3 and τ>1. A large Mach number requires the high temperature, while the large optical depth requires the low temperature. Only when the source temperature is in a proper region the supersonic diffusion conditions can be satisfied. Assuming a power-low (in temperature and density) opacity and internal energy, for a given density, the supersonic diffusion regions are given theoretically. The 2-d Marshak theory is proved to be able to bound the supersonic diffusion conditions in both high and low temperature regions, however, the 1-d theory only bounds it in low temperature region. Taking SiO{sub 2} and the Au, for example, these supersonic regions are shown numerically.

  7. Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Parachute Decelerator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallon, John C.; Clark, Ian G.; Rivellini, Tommaso P.; Adams, Douglas S.; Witkowski, Allen

    2013-01-01

    The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Project has undertaken the task of developing and testing a large supersonic ringsail parachute. The parachute under development is intended to provide mission planners more options for parachutes larger than the Mars Science Laboratory's 21.5m parachute. During its development, this new parachute will be taken through a series of tests in order to bring the parachute to a TRL-6 readiness level and make the technology available for future Mars missions. This effort is primarily focused on two tests, a subsonic structural verification test done at sea level atmospheric conditions and a supersonic flight behind a blunt body in low-density atmospheric conditions. The preferred method of deploying a parachute behind a decelerating blunt body robotic spacecraft in a supersonic flow-field is via mortar deployment. Due to the configuration constraints in the design of the test vehicle used in the supersonic testing it is not possible to perform a mortar deployment. As a result of this limitation an alternative deployment process using a ballute as a pilot is being developed. The intent in this alternate approach is to preserve the requisite features of a mortar deployment during canopy extraction in a supersonic flow. Doing so will allow future Mars missions to either choose to mortar deploy or pilot deploy the parachute that is being developed.

  8. Cruise report RV Inland Surveyer Cruise IS-98; the bathymetry of Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada, August 2 through August 17, 1998, Lake Tahoe, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, James V.; Mayer, Larry A.; Hughes-Clarke, John

    1998-01-01

    The major objective of cruise IS-98 was to map the bathymetry of Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada (Fig. 1) to fulfill a commitment made during the Lake Tahoe Presidential Forum in 1997. The only existing bathymetry of Lake Tahoe, collected in 1923, was recently compiled by Rowe and Stone (1997), but the data density is inadequate for the level of scientific studies ongoing and anticipated in the near future for Lake Tahoe. Recent advances in marine multibeam-sonar capabilities now permit a cost-effective way, to precisely map the bathymetry of large areas of the ocean floor with 100% coverage. Cruise IS-98 applied this state-of-the-art ocean technology to Lake Tahoe. The newest of these high-resolution multibeam mapping systems also simultaneously collects backscatter (similar to sidescan sonar) imagery that results in a complimentary and co-registered data set that is related to the distribution of lake-floor materials and textures. The two types of maps that resulted from this cruise provide the multidisiplinary Lake Tahoe research community an unprecedented set of base maps upon which to build their studies. This report describes the high-resolution multibeam mapping system used at Lake Tahoe, outlines the data-processing steps used to produce the maps, and includes the daily log of the cruise.

  9. When propfans cruise, will LDN 65 fly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Fred; Dickerson, William

    1990-01-01

    The type and extent of response that may be expected from the persons exposed to the noise of propfans cruising overhead is examined. The cruise mode is of particular interest because it appears that it is in this mode that the propfan airplane noise differs substantially from the noise of present jet-powered airplanes. Early test data on propfan engines suggests that noise levels on the ground under the flight track of commercial propfan transports may approach 65 decibels. To explore the reaction of the exposed population to repeated noise levels of this magnitude, it may be helpful to review some of the pertinent literature on the effects of environmental noise.

  10. Reynolds Number Effects on Leading Edge Radius Variations of a Supersonic Transport at Transonic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, S. M. B.; Wahls, R. A.; Owens, L. R.

    2001-01-01

    A computational study focused on leading-edge radius effects and associated Reynolds number sensitivity for a High Speed Civil Transport configuration at transonic conditions was conducted as part of NASA's High Speed Research Program. The primary purposes were to assess the capabilities of computational fluid dynamics to predict Reynolds number effects for a range of leading-edge radius distributions on a second-generation supersonic transport configuration, and to evaluate the potential performance benefits of each at the transonic cruise condition. Five leading-edge radius distributions are described, and the potential performance benefit including the Reynolds number sensitivity for each is presented. Computational results for two leading-edge radius distributions are compared with experimental results acquired in the National Transonic Facility over a broad Reynolds number range.

  11. Influence of propulsion system size, shape, and location on supersonic aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, E.; Roe, M. H.; Tyson, R. M.; Mairs, R. Y.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of various propulsion system parameters on the characteristics of a supersonic transport were investigated. The effects of arbitrarily scaling engine size on wave drag, friction drag, drag-due-to-lift, wing sizing, airplane balance, and airplane weight were studied. These evaluations were made for two families of nacelle shapes, resulting from typical turbojet and turbofan installations. Also examined were effects of nacelle location, and the wing camber plane deformations required to cancel the nacelle interference pressure field at cruise Mach number (2.7 M) were determined. The most drag-sensitive parameter is found to be nacelle shape. Similarly, wing deformation requirements are found to be primarily affected by nacelle shape. Effects of engine size variations are noted primarily in airplane gross weight.

  12. Tone Noise of Three Supersonic Helical Tip Speed Propellers in a Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.; Jeracki, R. J.; Blaha, B. J.

    1979-01-01

    Three supersonic helical tip speed propellers were tested in the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-foot wind tunnel. This is a perforated-wall wind tunnel but it does not have acoustic damping material on its walls. The propellers were tested at tunnel through flow Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.7, 0.75, 0.8, and 0.85 with different rotational speeds and blade setting angles. The three propellers, which had approximately the same aerodynamic performance, incorporated different plan forms and different amounts of sweep and yielded different near field noise levels. The acoustically designed propeller had 45 deg of tip sweep and was significantly quieter at M = 0.8 cruise than the straight bladed propeller. The intermediate 30 deg tip sweep propeller, which was swept for aerodynamic purposes, exhibited noise that was between the other two propellers. Noise trends with varying helical tip Mach number and blade loading were also observed.

  13. 33 CFR 104.295 - Additional requirements-cruise ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ships. 104.295 Section 104.295 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... requirements—cruise ships. (a) At all MARSEC Levels, the owner or operator of a cruise ship must ensure the... cruise ship must ensure that security briefs to passengers about the specific threat are provided....

  14. 33 CFR 104.295 - Additional requirements-cruise ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ships. 104.295 Section 104.295 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... requirements—cruise ships. (a) At all MARSEC Levels, the owner or operator of a cruise ship must ensure the... cruise ship must ensure that security briefs to passengers about the specific threat are provided....

  15. 33 CFR 104.295 - Additional requirements-cruise ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ships. 104.295 Section 104.295 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... requirements—cruise ships. (a) At all MARSEC Levels, the owner or operator of a cruise ship must ensure the... cruise ship must ensure that security briefs to passengers about the specific threat are provided....

  16. 33 CFR 104.295 - Additional requirements-cruise ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ships. 104.295 Section 104.295 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... requirements—cruise ships. (a) At all MARSEC Levels, the owner or operator of a cruise ship must ensure the... cruise ship must ensure that security briefs to passengers about the specific threat are provided....

  17. 33 CFR 104.295 - Additional requirements-cruise ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ships. 104.295 Section 104.295 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... requirements—cruise ships. (a) At all MARSEC Levels, the owner or operator of a cruise ship must ensure the... cruise ship must ensure that security briefs to passengers about the specific threat are provided....

  18. Toward Supersonic Retropropulsion CFD Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Bil; Schauerhamer, D. Guy; Trumble, Kerry; Sozer, Emre; Barnhardt, Michael; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Edquist, Karl

    2011-01-01

    This paper begins the process of verifying and validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes for supersonic retropropulsive flows. Four CFD codes (DPLR, FUN3D, OVERFLOW, and US3D) are used to perform various numerical and physical modeling studies toward the goal of comparing predictions with a wind tunnel experiment specifically designed to support CFD validation. Numerical studies run the gamut in rigor from code-to-code comparisons to observed order-of-accuracy tests. Results indicate that this complex flowfield, involving time-dependent shocks and vortex shedding, design order of accuracy is not clearly evident. Also explored is the extent of physical modeling necessary to predict the salient flowfield features found in high-speed Schlieren images and surface pressure measurements taken during the validation experiment. Physical modeling studies include geometric items such as wind tunnel wall and sting mount interference, as well as turbulence modeling that ranges from a RANS (Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes) 2-equation model to DES (Detached Eddy Simulation) models. These studies indicate that tunnel wall interference is minimal for the cases investigated; model mounting hardware effects are confined to the aft end of the model; and sparse grid resolution and turbulence modeling can damp or entirely dissipate the unsteadiness of this self-excited flow.

  19. Calculation of Supersonic Combustion Using Implicit Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    One of the technology goals of NASA for advanced space transportation is to develop highly efficient propulsion systems to reduce the cost of payload for space missions. Developments of rockets for the second generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) in the past several years have been focused on low-cost versions of conventional engines. However, recent changes in the Integrated Space Transportation Program to build a crew transportation vehicle to extend the life of the Space Shuttle fleet might suggest that air-breathing rockets could reemerge as a possible propulsion system for the third generation RLV to replace the Space Shuttle after 2015. The weight of the oxygen tank exceeds thirty percent of the total weight of the Space Shuttle at launch while the payload is only one percent of the total weight. The air-breathing rocket propulsion systems, which consume oxygen in the air, offer clear advantages by making vehicles lighter and more efficient. Experience in the National Aerospace Plane Program in the late 1980s indicates that scramjet engines can achieve high specific impulse for low hypersonic vehicle speeds. Whether taking a form of Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) or Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC), the scramjet is an essential mode of operation for air-breathing rockets. It is well known that fuel-air mixing and rapid combustion are of crucial importance for the success of scramjet engines since the spreading rate of the supersonic mixing layer decreases as the Mach number increases. A factored form of the Gauss-Seidel relaxation method has been widely used in hypersonic flow research since its first application to non-equilibrium flows. However, difficulties in stability and convergence have been encountered when there is strong interaction between fluid motion and chemical reaction, such as multiple fuel injection problems. The present paper reports the results from investigation of the effect of modifications to the original algorithm on the

  20. Inverse Design of Low-Boom Supersonic Concepts Using Reversed Equivalent-Area Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Rallabhand, Sriam

    2011-01-01

    A promising path for developing a low-boom configuration is a multifidelity approach that (1) starts from a low-fidelity low-boom design, (2) refines the low-fidelity design with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) equivalent-area (Ae) analysis, and (3) improves the design with sonic-boom analysis by using CFD off-body pressure distributions. The focus of this paper is on the third step of this approach, in which the design is improved with sonic-boom analysis through the use of CFD calculations. A new inverse design process for off-body pressure tailoring is formulated and demonstrated with a low-boom supersonic configuration that was developed by using the mixed-fidelity design method with CFD Ae analysis. The new inverse design process uses the reverse propagation of the pressure distribution (dp/p) from a mid-field location to a near-field location, converts the near-field dp/p into an equivalent-area distribution, generates a low-boom target for the reversed equivalent area (Ae,r) of the configuration, and modifies the configuration to minimize the differences between the configuration s Ae,r and the low-boom target. The new inverse design process is used to modify a supersonic demonstrator concept for a cruise Mach number of 1.6 and a cruise weight of 30,000 lb. The modified configuration has a fully shaped ground signature that has a perceived loudness (PLdB) value of 78.5, while the original configuration has a partially shaped aft signature with a PLdB of 82.3.

  1. The transition from subsonic to supersonic cracks

    PubMed Central

    Behn, Chris; Marder, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the full analytical solution for steady-state in-plane crack motion in a brittle triangular lattice. This allows quick numerical evaluation of solutions for very large systems, facilitating comparisons with continuum fracture theory. Cracks that propagate faster than the Rayleigh wave speed have been thought to be forbidden in the continuum theory, but clearly exist in lattice systems. Using our analytical methods, we examine in detail the motion of atoms around a crack tip as crack speed changes from subsonic to supersonic. Subsonic cracks feature displacement fields consistent with a stress intensity factor. For supersonic cracks, the stress intensity factor disappears. Subsonic cracks are characterized by small-amplitude, high-frequency oscillations in the vertical displacement of an atom along the crack line, while supersonic cracks have large-amplitude, low-frequency oscillations. Thus, while supersonic cracks are no less physical than subsonic cracks, the connection between microscopic and macroscopic behaviour must be made in a different way. This is one reason supersonic cracks in tension had been thought not to exist. PMID:25713443

  2. Supersonics Project - Airport Noise Tech Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2010-01-01

    The Airport Noise Tech Challenge research effort under the Supersonics Project is reviewed. While the goal of "Improved supersonic jet noise models validated on innovative nozzle concepts" remains the same, the success of the research effort has caused the thrust of the research to be modified going forward in time. The main activities from FY06-10 focused on development and validation of jet noise prediction codes. This required innovative diagnostic techniques to be developed and deployed, extensive jet noise and flow databases to be created, and computational tools to be developed and validated. Furthermore, in FY09-10 systems studies commissioned by the Supersonics Project showed that viable supersonic aircraft were within reach using variable cycle engine architectures if exhaust nozzle technology could provide 3-5dB of suppression. The Project then began to focus on integrating the technologies being developed in its Tech Challenge areas to bring about successful system designs. Consequently, the Airport Noise Tech Challenge area has shifted efforts from developing jet noise prediction codes to using them to develop low-noise nozzle concepts for integration into supersonic aircraft. The new plan of research is briefly presented by technology and timelines.

  3. Supersonic CO laser with RF excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Buelow, H.; Zeyfang, E.

    1993-07-01

    A supersonic CO laser with a maximum output power of 990 W was developed. The gas is excited in a dielectrically stabilized radio-frequency discharge before it is cooled to a temperature of 90 K by the adiabatic expansion in a supersonic nozzle. After extraction of laser power the gas is recompressed by a supersonic diffuser and a Roots-pump system. No liquid nitrogen is needed for the operation of the laser. At a pressure of 500 mbar, the RF discharge could be operated homogeneously with a specific input power of 180 W/cu cm. It could be shown that the length of the discharge region and the distance between the discharge and the supersonic nozzle should be rather short. By this, the vibrational relaxation of the carbon monoxide is reduced and more laser power can be obtained. The laser power can be increased by using a folded resonator system. If the laser is operated at a low Fresnel number by inserting an aperture inside the cavity, a nearly diffraction limited beam quality can be obtained. Using a supersonic nozzle with a low Mach number enables the operation of the diffuser with a high pressure recovery. Thereby the overall system efficiency is increased.

  4. The Supersonic Axial-Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantrowitz, Arthur

    1950-01-01

    An investigation has been made to explore the possibilities of axial-flow compressors operating with supersonic velocities into the blade rows. Preliminary calculations showed that very high pressure ratios across a stage, together with somewhat increased mass flows, were apparently possible with compressors which decelerated air through the speed of sound in their blading. The first phase of the investigation was the development of efficient supersonic diffusers to decelerate air through the speed of sound. The present report is largely a general discussion of some of the essential aerodynamics of single-stage supersonic axial-flow compressors. As an approach to the study of supersonic compressors, three possible velocity diagrams are discussed briefly. Because of the encouraging results of this study, an experimental single-stage supersonic compressor has been constructed and tested in Freon-12. In this compressor, air decelerates through the speed of sound in the rotor blading and enters the stators at subsonic speeds. A pressure ratio of about 1.8 at an efficiency of about 80 percent has been obtained.

  5. 6. VIEW NORTH, INTERIOR VIEW OF BUILDING 11, SUPERSONIC WIND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW NORTH, INTERIOR VIEW OF BUILDING 11, SUPERSONIC WIND TUNNEL - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Supersonic Wind Tunnel Building, Bounded by Clara Barton Parkway & McArthur Boulevard, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  6. Supersonic Parachute Aerodynamic Testing and Fluid Structure Interaction Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingard, J. S.; Underwood, J. C.; Darley, M. G.; Marraffa, L.; Ferracina, L.

    2014-06-01

    The ESA Supersonic Parachute program expands the knowledge of parachute inflation and flying characteristics in supersonic flows using wind tunnel testing and fluid structure interaction to develop new inflation algorithms and aerodynamic databases.

  7. Supersonic throughflow fans for high-speed aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, Calvin L.; Moore, Royce D.

    1990-01-01

    A brief overview is provided of past supersonic throughflow fan activities; technology needs are discussed; the design is described of a supersonic throughflow fan stage, a facility inlet, and a downstream diffuser; and the results are presented from the analysis codes used in executing the design. Also presented is a unique engine concept intended to permit establishing supersonic throughflow within the fan on the runway and maintaining the supersonic throughflow condition within the fan throughout the flight envelope.

  8. Transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doig, G.

    2014-08-01

    A review of recent and historical work in the field of transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics has been conducted, focussing on applied research on wings and aircraft, present and future ground transportation, projectiles, rocket sleds and other related bodies which travel in close ground proximity in the compressible regime. Methods for ground testing are described and evaluated, noting that wind tunnel testing is best performed with a symmetry model in the absence of a moving ground; sled or rail testing is ultimately preferable, though considerably more expensive. Findings are reported on shock-related ground influence on aerodynamic forces and moments in and accelerating through the transonic regime - where force reversals and the early onset of local supersonic flow is prevalent - as well as more predictable behaviours in fully supersonic to hypersonic ground effect flows.

  9. An evaluation of supersonic STOVL technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidwell, G. H., Jr.; Lampkin, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to document the status of supersonic STOVL aircraft technology. The major focus is the presentation of summaries of pertinent aspects of supersonic STOVL technology, such as justification for STOVL aircraft, current designs and their recognized areas of uncertainty, recent research programs, current activities, plans, etc. The remainder of the paper is an evaluation of the performance differential between a current supersonic STOVL design and three production (or near production) fighters, one of them the AV-8B. The results indicate that there is not a large range difference between a STOL aircraft and a STOVL aircraft, and that other aspects of performance, such as field performance or combat maneuverability, may more than make up for this decrement.

  10. Supersonic combustion engine testbed, heat lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoying, D.; Kelble, C.; Langenbahn, A.; Stahl, M.; Tincher, M.; Walsh, M.; Wisler, S.

    1990-01-01

    The design of a supersonic combustion engine testbed (SCET) aircraft is presented. The hypersonic waverider will utilize both supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRAMjet) and turbofan-ramjet engines. The waverider concept, system integration, electrical power, weight analysis, cockpit, landing skids, and configuration modeling are addressed in the configuration considerations. The subsonic, supersonic and hypersonic aerodynamics are presented along with the aerodynamic stability and landing analysis of the aircraft. The propulsion design considerations include: engine selection, turbofan ramjet inlets, SCRAMjet inlets and the SCRAMjet diffuser. The cooling requirements and system are covered along with the topics of materials and the hydrogen fuel tanks and insulation system. A cost analysis is presented and the appendices include: information about the subsonic wind tunnel test, shock expansion calculations, and an aerodynamic heat flux program.

  11. Method and apparatus for starting supersonic compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Lawlor, Shawn P

    2013-08-06

    A supersonic gas compressor with bleed gas collectors, and a method of starting the compressor. The compressor includes aerodynamic duct(s) situated for rotary movement in a casing. The aerodynamic duct(s) generate a plurality of oblique shock waves for efficiently compressing a gas at supersonic conditions. A convergent inlet is provided adjacent to a bleed gas collector, and during startup of the compressor, bypass gas is removed from the convergent inlet via the bleed gas collector, to enable supersonic shock stabilization. Once the oblique shocks are stabilized at a selected inlet relative Mach number and pressure ratio, the bleed of bypass gas from the convergent inlet via the bypass gas collectors is effectively eliminated.

  12. Assessment of the impact of advanced air-transport technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, R. L.; Dickinson, L. V., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The long term prospects for commercial supersonic transportation appear attractive enough to keep supersonic research active and reasonably healthy. On the other hand, the uncertainties surrounding an advanced supersonic transport, (AST) specifically fuel price, fuel availability and noise, are too significant to warrant an accelerated research and development program until they are better resolved. It is estimated that an AST could capture about $50 billion (1979 dollars) of the potential $150 billion in sales up to the year 2010.

  13. Study of aerodynamic technology for single-cruise-engine V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, J. R.; Bear, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    A viable, single engine, supersonic V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft concept was defined. This vectored thrust, canard wing configuration utilizes an advanced technology separated flow engine with fan stream burning. The aerodynamic characteristics of this configuration were estimated and performance evaluated. Significant aerodynamic and aerodynamic propulsion interaction uncertainties requiring additional investigation were identified. A wind tunnel model concept and test program to resolve these uncertainties and validate the aerodynamic prediction methods were defined.

  14. Numerical prediction of transition of the F-16 wing at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, Russell M.

    1993-01-01

    This work is part of the high speed research program currently underway at NASA. This project has the goal of gaining understanding of the technical requirements for supersonic-hypersonic flight. Specifically, this research is part of a continuing project to study the laminar flow over swept wings at high speeds and involves the numerical prediction of the flow about the F-16XL wing. The research uses the CNS/ARC3D codes and the resulting crossflow velocity components in order to estimate transition locations on the wing. Effects of angle of attack on the extent of laminar flows was found to be minimal. This result can be attributed to the fact that a laminar flow airfoil was used in this study, which has a continuous favorable pressure gradient over approximately the first 20 percent of the chord for angles of attacks up to 10 degrees. It should also be noted that even after 20 percent chord the pressure gradient either slowly continued to increase, but never decreased before 90 percent chord, except for the higher swept cases when separation occurs. Angles of attack greater than 10 degrees were not considered since this study assumes natural laminar flow for normal supersonic cruise flight conditions.

  15. A Computational/Experimental Study of Two Optimized Supersonic Transport Designs and the Reference H Baseline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Baker, Timothy J.; Hicks, Raymond M.; Reuther, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Two supersonic transport configurations designed by use of non-linear aerodynamic optimization methods are compared with a linearly designed baseline configuration. One optimized configuration, designated Ames 7-04, was designed at NASA Ames Research Center using an Euler flow solver, and the other, designated Boeing W27, was designed at Boeing using a full-potential method. The two optimized configurations and the baseline were tested in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Supersonic Wind Tunnel to evaluate the non-linear design optimization methodologies. In addition, the experimental results are compared with computational predictions for each of the three configurations from the Enter flow solver, AIRPLANE. The computational and experimental results both indicate moderate to substantial performance gains for the optimized configurations over the baseline configuration. The computed performance changes with and without diverters and nacelles were in excellent agreement with experiment for all three models. Comparisons of the computational and experimental cruise drag increments for the optimized configurations relative to the baseline show excellent agreement for the model designed by the Euler method, but poorer comparisons were found for the configuration designed by the full-potential code.

  16. Low Order Equivalent System Identification for the Tu-144LL Supersonic Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2000-01-01

    Low order equivalent system models were identified from flight test data for the Tu-144LL supersonic transport aircraft. Flight test maneuvers were executed by Russian and American test Pilots flying the aircraft from Zhukovsky airfield outside Moscow, Russia. Flight tests included longitudinal and lateral / directional maneuvers at supersonic cruise flight conditions. Piloted frequency sweeps and multi-step maneuvers were used to generate data for closed loop low order equivalent system modeling. Model parameters were estimated using a flexible. high accuracy Fourier transform and an equation error / output error (EE/OE) formulation in the frequency domain. Results were compared to parameter estimates obtained using spectral estimation and subsequent least squares fit to frequency response data in Bode plots. Modeling results from the two methods agreed well for both a frequency sweep and multiple concatenated multi-step maneuvers. For a single multi-step maneuvers the EE/OE method gave a better model fit with improved prediction capability. A summary of closed loop low order equivalent system identification results for the Tu-144LL, including estimated parameters, standard errors, and flying qualities level predictions, were computed and tabulated.

  17. 75 FR 8427 - Civil Supersonic Aircraft Panel Discussion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Civil Supersonic Aircraft Panel Discussion AGENCY: Federal Aviation... persons that the FAA is participating in a panel session on civil supersonic aircraft research. The... supersonic aircraft technology aimed at reducing the intensity of sonic boom. DATES: The public session...

  18. Investigation of supersonic chemically reacting and radiating channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mani, Mortaza; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1988-01-01

    The 2-D time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations are used to investigate supersonic flows undergoing finite rate chemical reaction and radiation interaction for a hydrogen-air system. The explicit multistage finite volume technique of Jameson is used to advance the governing equations in time until convergence is achieved. The chemistry source term in the species equation is treated implicitly to alleviate the stiffness associated with fast reactions. The multidimensional radiative transfer equations for a nongray model are provided for a general configuration and then reduced for a planar geometry. Both pseudo-gray and nongray models are used to represent the absorption-emission characteristics of the participating species. The supersonic inviscid and viscous, nonreacting flows are solved by employing the finite volume technique of Jameson and the unsplit finite difference scheme of MacCormack. The specified problem considered is of the flow in a channel with a 10 deg compression-expansion ramp. The calculated results are compared with those of an upwind scheme. The problem of chemically reacting and radiating flows are solved for the flow of premixed hydrogen-air through a channel with parallel boundaries, and a channel with a compression corner. Results obtained for specific conditions indicate that the radiative interaction can have a significant influence on the entire flow field.

  19. Supersonic gas shell for puff pinch experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. S., III; Doggett, W. O.; Roth, I.; Stallings, C.

    1982-09-01

    An easy-to-fabricate, conical, annular supersonic nozzle has been developed for use in high-power, puff gas z-pinch experiments. A fast responding conical pressure probe has also been developed as an accurate supersonic gas flow diagnostic for evaluating the transient gas jet formed by the nozzle. Density profile measurements show that the magnitude and radial position of the gas annulus are fairly constant with distance from the nozzle, but the gas density in the center of the annulus increases with distance from the nozzle.

  20. Laser transit anemometer experiences in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, William W., Jr.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present examples of velocity measurements obtained in supersonic flow fields with the laser transit anemometer system. Velocity measurements of a supersonic jet exhausting in a transonic flow field, a cone boundary survey in a Mach 4 flow field, and a determination of the periodic disturbance frequencies of a sonic nozzle flow field are presented. Each of the above three cases also serves to illustrate different modes of laser transit anemometer operation. A brief description of the laser transit anemometer system is also presented.

  1. Aerodynamic and performance characterization of supersonic retropropulsion for application to planetary entry and descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzun, Ashley M.

    shock layer of a blunt body in supersonic flow. Although numerous wind tunnel tests of relevance to SRP have been conducted, the scope of the work is limited in the freestream conditions and composition, retropropulsion conditions and composition, and configurations and geometries explored. The SRP aerodynamic - propulsive interaction alters the aerodynamic characteristics of the vehicle, and models must be developed that accurately represent the impact of SRP on system mass and performance. Work within this thesis has defined and advanced the state of the art for supersonic retropropulsion. This has been achieved through the application of systems analysis, computational analysis, and analytical methods. The contributions of this thesis include a detailed performance analysis and exploration of the design space specific to supersonic retropropulsion, establishment of the relationship between vehicle performance and the aerodynamic - propulsive interaction, and an assessment of the required fidelity and computational cost in simulating supersonic retropropulsion flowfields, with emphasis on the effort required to develop aerodynamic databases for conceptual design.

  2. Worry and its correlates onboard cruise ships.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Katharina; Larsen, Svein; Marnburg, Einar; Øgaard, Torvald

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined job-specific worry, as well as possible predictors of such worry, namely job-specific self-efficacy and supervisor dispositionism. 133 non-supervising crew members at different departments onboard upmarket cruise ships filled in a questionnaire during one of their journeys. Findings show that employees report moderate amounts of job-specific worry and the galley crew reports significantly greater amounts of worry than the other departments. Results also indicate that cruise ship crews worry somewhat more than workers in the land based service sector. Furthermore it was found that supervisor dispositionism, i.e. supervisors with fixed mindsets, was related to greater amounts of worry among the crew. Surprisingly, job-specific self-efficacy was unrelated to job-specific worry.

  3. Optimization on a Network-based Parallel Computer System for Supersonic Laminar Wing Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Joseph A.; Cheung, Samson; Holst, Terry L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A set of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) routines and flow transition prediction tools are integrated into a network based parallel numerical optimization routine. Through this optimization routine, the design of a 2-D airfoil and an infinitely swept wing will be studied in order to advance the design cycle capability of supersonic laminar flow wings. The goal of advancing supersonic laminar flow wing design is achieved by wisely choosing the design variables used in the optimization routine. The design variables are represented by the theory of Fourier series and potential theory. These theories, combined with the parallel CFD flow routines and flow transition prediction tools, provide a design space for a global optimal point to be searched. Finally, the parallel optimization routine enables gradient evaluations to be performed in a fast and parallel fashion.

  4. Tom Cruise is dangerous and irresponsible.

    PubMed

    Neill, Ushma S

    2005-08-01

    Yes, even the JCI can weigh in on celebrity gossip, but hopefully without becoming a tabloid. Rather, we want to shine a light on the reckless comments actor Tom Cruise has recently made that psychiatry is a "quack" field and his belief that postpartum depression cannot be treated pharmacologically. We can only hope that his influence as a celebrity does not hold back those in need of psychiatric treatment. PMID:16075033

  5. Tom Cruise is dangerous and irresponsible

    PubMed Central

    Neill, Ushma S.

    2005-01-01

    Yes, even the JCI can weigh in on celebrity gossip, but hopefully without becoming a tabloid. Rather, we want to shine a light on the reckless comments actor Tom Cruise has recently made that psychiatry is a “quack” field and his belief that postpartum depression cannot be treated pharmacologically. We can only hope that his influence as a celebrity does not hold back those in need of psychiatric treatment. PMID:16075033

  6. Mars Global Surveyor: Cruising to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Glenn E.

    1997-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft was launched on November 7, 1996, and is now cruising to Mars. While the launch was excellent, and the spacecraft and its science payload are in perfect operating condition, a broken deployment damper on one of the two solar arrays has posed some concern relative to the use of that solar array as a drag surfae during aerobraking operations at Mars.

  7. A supersonic fan equipped variable cycle engine for a Mach 2.7 supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavares, T. S.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of a variable cycle turbofan engine with an axially supersonic fan stage as powerplant for a Mach 2.7 supersonic transport was evaluated. Quantitative cycle analysis was used to assess the effects of the fan inlet and blading efficiencies on engine performance. Thrust levels predicted by cycle analysis are shown to match the thrust requirements of a representative aircraft. Fan inlet geometry is discussed and it is shown that a fixed geometry conical spike will provide sufficient airflow throughout the operating regime. The supersonic fan considered consists of a single stage comprising a rotor and stator. The concept is similar in principle to a supersonic compressor, but differs by having a stator which removes swirl from the flow without producing a net rise in static pressure. Operating conditions peculiar to the axially supersonic fan are discussed. Geometry of rotor and stator cascades are presented which utilize a supersonic vortex flow distribution. Results of a 2-D CFD flow analysis of these cascades are presented. A simple estimate of passage losses was made using empirical methods.

  8. A wing concept for supersonic maneuvering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental program in which a wing concept for supersonic maneuvering was developed and then demonstrated experimentally in a series of wind tunnel tests is described. For the typical fighter wing, the problem of obtaining efficient lift at supersonic maneuvering C sub 's occurs due to development of a strong crossflow shock, and boundary layer separation. A natural means of achieving efficient supersonic maneuvering is based on controlling the non-linear inviscid crossflow on the wing in a manner analogous to the supercritical aerodynamic methods developed for transonic speeds. The application of supercritical aerodynamics to supersonic speeds is carried out using Supercritical Conical Camber (SC3). This report provides an aerodynamic analysis of the effort, with emphasis on wing design using non-linear aerodynamics. The substantial experimental data base is described in three separate wind tunnel reports, while two of the computer programs used in the work are also described in a separate report. Based on the development program it appears that a controlled supercritical crossflow can be obtained reliably on fighter-type wing planforms, with an associated drag due to lift reduction of about 20% projected using this concept.

  9. Predicting Vortex Shedding in Supersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, M. R.; Perkins, S. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Nonlinear aerodyanmic characteristics of missile bodies computed. Program NOZVTX calculates nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics and flow fields of missile bodies at various angles-of-attack and roll in supersonic flow. Output includes geometry, centroids, and surface pressure of source panels and positions, strengths, and velocity components of shed vortexes. NOZVTX written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution.

  10. The Aeroacoustics of Supersonic Coaxial Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    1994-01-01

    Instability waves have been established as the dominant source of mixing noise radiating into the downstream arc of a supersonic jet when the waves have phase velocities that are supersonic relative to ambient conditions. Recent theories for supersonic jet noise have used the concepts of growing and decaying linear instability waves for predicting radiated noise. This analysis is extended to the prediction of noise radiation from supersonic coaxial jets. Since the analysis requires a known mean flow and the coaxial jet mean flow is not described easily in terms of analytic functions, a numerical prediction is made for its development. The Reynolds averaged, compressible, boundary layer equations are solved using a mixing length turbulence model. Empirical correlations are developed for the effects of velocity and temperature ratios and Mach number. Both normal and inverted velocity profile coaxial jets are considered. Comparisons with measurements for both single and coaxial jets show good agreement. The results from mean flow and stability calculations are used to predict the noise radiation from coaxial jets with different operating conditions. Comparisons are made between different coaxial jets and a single equivalent jet with the same total thrust, mass flow, and exit area. Results indicate that normal velocity profile jets can have noise reductions compared to the single equivalent jet. No noise reductions are found for inverted velocity profile jets operated at the minimum noise condition compared to the single equivalent jet. However, it is inferred that changes in area ratio may provide noise reduction benefits for inverted velocity profile jets.

  11. Resonant instability of supersonic shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Lele, S. K.

    1990-01-01

    A computer simulation of possible resonant instability of a supersonic shear layer is carried out. The resonance of two acoustic duct modes of the flow induced by periodic Mach waves generated by a wavy wall is sought. Results of the simulations are reported. Simulations are unable to document a resonant instability and the mixing characteristics remain unchanged. Possible weakness of the present simulations are discussed. A second set of simulations involving a mixing layer separating a supersonic and a subsonic stream were performed. A wavy wall placed adjacent to the supersonic stream to produce a set of periodic Mach waves terminating at the shear layer is modelled. The entire flow field is similar to that of an imperfectly expanded supersonic jet discharging into a subsonic coflowing stream for which enhanced mixing due to the onset of screech (feedback instability) is known to occur. The purpose of these simulations is to see if enhanced mixing and feedback instability would, indeed, take place. Some evidence of feedback oscillations is found in the simulated flow.

  12. Pulsed supersonic expansion of nonvolatile solids

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, Wolfgang; Geggier, Stephanie; Grigorenko, Svitlana; Rademann, Klaus

    2004-11-01

    A compact apparatus for transferring nonvolatile particles into the gas phase and depositing them on a solid surface has been built and tested successfully. As initial experiment, solid caffeine with a vanishingly low vapor pressure has been dissolved in supercritical carbon dioxide, expanded into vacuum using a pulsed, supersonic molecular beam, and detected using a simple residual gas analyzer.

  13. Acoustic properties of a supersonic fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, A. W.; Glaser, F. W.; Coats, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Tests of supersonic rotors designed to reduce forward propagating pressure waves and the accompanying blade passing tones and multiple pure tones showed the wave propagation and noise reduction to have been obtained at the expense of increased noise radiation rearward. Outlet guide vanes served to muffle the noise propagating rearwards, but did not affect forward propagation at all.

  14. LC-MS with electron ionization of cold molecules in supersonic molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granot, Ori; Amirav, Aviv

    2005-06-01

    A new approach is described for the combination of electron ionization and LC-MS based on sample ionization as vibrationally cold molecules in a supersonic molecular beam (Cold EI). Cold EI of sample compounds in liquid solutions (methanol, acetonitrile, water, etc.) is achieved through spray formation, followed by soft thermal vaporization of the sample particles prior to their supersonic expansion and direct electron ionization of the sample compounds while they are contained in a supersonic molecular beam (SMB). Cold EI mass spectra were demonstrated to combine an enhanced molecular ion and improved mass spectral information (in comparison with standard EI), plus all the library searchable fragments. Cold EI enables the ionization of a broad range of compounds, including the full range of non-polar samples. Four orders of magnitude linear dynamic range is demonstrated and a detection limit of 2 pg was achieved for a 774 amu compound in single ion monitoring mode at m/z = 774. The method and apparatus are under continuous development and we feel that it can excel particularly in the analysis of unknown samples, while enabling fast LC-MS analysis through automated mass spectral deconvolution of coeluting LC peaks. In addition, the same MS system can also serve as an advanced GC-MS with supersonic molecular beams.

  15. Advanced Civilian Aeronautical Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    1996-01-01

    Paper discusses alternatives to currently deployed systems which could provide revolutionary improvements in metrics applicable to civilian aeronautics. Specific missions addressed include subsonic transports, supersonic transports and personal aircraft. These alternative systems and concepts are enabled by recent and envisaged advancements in electronics, communications, computing and Designer Fluid Mechanics in conjunction with a design approach employing extensive synergistic interactions between propulsion, aerodynamics and structures.

  16. Supersonic biplane design via adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Rui

    In developing the next generation supersonic transport airplane, two major challenges must be resolved. The fuel efficiency must be significantly improved, and the sonic boom propagating to the ground must be dramatically reduced. Both of these objectives can be achieved by reducing the shockwaves formed in supersonic flight. The Busemann biplane is famous for using favorable shockwave interaction to achieve nearly shock-free supersonic flight at its design Mach number. Its performance at off-design Mach numbers, however, can be very poor. This dissertation studies the performance of supersonic biplane airfoils at design and off-design conditions. The choked flow and flow-hysteresis phenomena of these biplanes are studied. These effects are due to finite thickness of the airfoils and non-uniqueness of the solution to the Euler equations, creating over an order of magnitude more wave drag than that predicted by supersonic thin airfoil theory. As a result, the off-design performance is the major barrier to the practical use of supersonic biplanes. The main contribution of this work is to drastically improve the off-design performance of supersonic biplanes by using an adjoint based aerodynamic optimization technique. The Busemann biplane is used as the baseline design, and its shape is altered to achieve optimal wave drags in series of Mach numbers ranging from 1.1 to 1.7, during both acceleration and deceleration conditions. The optimized biplane airfoils dramatically reduces the effects of the choked flow and flow-hysteresis phenomena, while maintaining a certain degree of favorable shockwave interaction effects at the design Mach number. Compared to a diamond shaped single airfoil of the same total thickness, the wave drag of our optimized biplane is lower at almost all Mach numbers, and is significantly lower at the design Mach number. In addition, by performing a Navier-Stokes solution for the optimized airfoil, it is verified that the optimized biplane improves

  17. Preliminary Tests in the Supersonic Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John E.

    1947-01-01

    This report presents preliminary data obtained in the Langley supersonic sphere. The supersonic sphere is essentially a whirling mechanism enclosed in a steel shell which can be filled with either air or Freon gas. The test models for two-dimensional study are of propeller form having the same plan form and diameter but varying only in the airfoil shape and thickness ratio. Torque coefficients for the 16-006, 65-110, and the 15 percent thick ellipse models are presented, as well as pressure distributions on a circular-arc supersonic airfoil section having a maximum thickness of 10 percent chord at the 1/3-chord position. Torque coefficients were measured in both Freon and air on the 15 percent thick ellipse, and the data obtained in air and Freon are found to be in close agreement. The torque coefficients for the three previously mentioned models showed large differences in magnitude at tip Mach numbers above 1, the model with the thickest airfoil section having the largest torque coefficient. Pressure distribution on the previously mentioned circular-arc airfoil section are presented at Mach numbers of 0.69, 1.26, and 1.42. At Mach numbers of 1.26 and 1.42 the test section is in the mixed flow region where both subsonic and supersonic speeds occur on the airfoil. No adequate theory has been developed for this condition of mixed flow, but the experimental data have been compared with values of pressure based on Ackeret's theory. The experimental data obtained at a Mach number of 1.26 on the rear portion of the airfoil section agree fairly well with the values calculated by Ackeret's theory. At a Mach number of 1.42 a larger percentage of the airfoil is in supersonic flow, and the experimental data for the entire airfoil agree fairly well with the values obtained using Ackeret's theory.

  18. Development of Supersonic Retro-Propulsion for Future Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Dyakonov, Artem A.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Studak, Joseph W.; Tiggers, Michael A.; Kipp, Devin M.; Prakash, Ravi; Trumble, Kerry A.; Dupzyk, Ian C.; Korzun, Ashley M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have concluded that Viking-era entry system technologies are reaching their practical limits and must be succeeded by new methods capable of delivering large payloads (greater than 10 metric tons) required for human exploration of Mars. One such technology, termed Supersonic Retro-Propulsion, has been proposed as an enabling deceleration technique. However, in order to be considered for future NASA flight projects, this technology will require significant maturation beyond its current state. This paper proposes a roadmap for advancing the component technologies to a point where Supersonic Retro-Propulsion can be reliably used on future Mars missions to land much larger payloads than are currently possible using Viking-based systems. The development roadmap includes technology gates that are achieved through testing and/or analysis, culminating with subscale flight tests in Earth atmosphere that demonstrate stable and controlled flight. The component technologies requiring advancement include large engines capable of throttling, computational models for entry vehicle aerodynamic/propulsive force and moment interactions, aerothermodynamic environments modeling, entry vehicle stability and control methods, integrated systems engineering and analyses, and high-fidelity six degree-of-freedom trajectory simulations. Quantifiable metrics are also proposed as a means to gage the technical progress of Supersonic Retro-Propulsion. Finally, an aggressive schedule is proposed for advancing the technology through sub-scale flight tests at Earth by 2016.

  19. Findings from the Supersonic Qualification Program of the Mars Science Laboratory Parachute System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Anita; Steltzner, Adam; Witkowski, Allen; Candler, Graham; Pantano, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    In 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory Mission (MSL) will deploy NASA's largest extra-terrestrial parachute, a technology integral to the safe landing of its advanced robotic explorer on the surface. The supersonic parachute system is a mortar deployed 21.5 m disk-gap-band (DGB) parachute, identical in geometric scaling to the Viking era DGB parachutes of the 1970's. The MSL parachute deployment conditions are Mach 2.3 at a dynamic pressure of 750 Pa. The Viking Balloon Launched Decelerator Test (BLDT) successfully demonstrated a maximum of 700 Pa at Mach 2.2 for a 16.1 m DGB parachute in its AV4 flight. All previous Mars deployments have derived their supersonic qualification from the Viking BLDT test series, preventing the need for full scale high altitude supersonic testing. The qualification programs for Mars Pathfinder, Mars Exploration Rover, and Phoenix Scout Missions were all limited to subsonic structural qualification, with supersonic performance and survivability bounded by the BLDT qualification. The MSL parachute, at the edge of the supersonic heritage deployment space and 33% larger than the Viking parachute, accepts a certain degree of risk without addressing the supersonic environment in which it will deploy. In addition, MSL will spend up to 10 seconds above Mach 1.5, an aerodynamic regime that is associated with a known parachute instability characterized by significant canopy projected area fluctuation and dynamic drag variation. This aerodynamic instability, referred to as "area oscillations" by the parachute community has drag performance, inflation stability, and structural implications, introducing risk to mission success if not quantified for the MSL parachute system. To minimize this risk and as an alternative to a prohibitively expensive high altitude test program, a multi-phase qualification program using computation simulation validated by subscale test was developed and implemented for MSL. The first phase consisted of 2% of fullscale

  20. Tandem Fan Applications in Advanced STOVL Fighter Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zola, Charlse L.; Wilson, Samuel B., III; Eskey, Megan A.

    1984-01-01

    The series/parallel tandem fan engine is evaluated for application in advanced STOVL supersonic fighter aircraft. Options in engine cycle parameters and design of the front fan flow diverter are examined for their effects on engine weight, dimensions, and other factors in integration of the engine with the aircraft. Operation of the engine in high-bypass flow mode during cruise and loiter flight is considered as a means of minimizizng fuel consumption. Engine thrust augmentation by burning in the front fan exhaust is discussed. Achievement of very sort takeoff with vectored thrust in briefly reviewed for tandem fan engine configurations with vectorable front fan nozzles. Examples are given of two aircraft configuration planforms, a delta-canard, and a forward-swept wing, to illustrate the major features. design considerations, and potential performance of the tandem fan installation in each. Full realization of the advantages of tandem fan propulsion are found to depend on careful selection of the aircraft configuration, since integration requirements can strongly influence the engine performance.

  1. Supersonic shock wave/vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Settles, G. S.; Cattafesta, L.

    1993-01-01

    Although shock wave/vortex interaction is a basic and important fluid dynamics problem, very little research has been conducted on this topic. Therefore, a detailed experimental study of the interaction between a supersonic streamwise turbulent vortex and a shock wave was carried out at the Penn State Gas Dynamics Laboratory. A vortex is produced by replaceable swirl vanes located upstream of the throat of various converging-diverging nozzles. The supersonic vortex is then injected into either a coflowing supersonic stream or ambient air. The structure of the isolated vortex is investigated in a supersonic wind tunnel using miniature, fast-response, five-hole and total temperature probes and in a free jet using laser Doppler velocimetry. The cases tested have unit Reynolds numbers in excess of 25 million per meter, axial Mach numbers ranging from 2.5 to 4.0, and peak tangential Mach numbers from 0 (i.e., a pure jet) to about 0.7. The results show that the typical supersonic wake-like vortex consists of a non-isentropic, rotational core, where the reduced circulation distribution is self similar, and an outer isentropic, irrotational region. The vortex core is also a region of significant turbulent fluctuations. Radial profiles of turbulent kinetic energy and axial-tangential Reynolds stress are presented. The interactions between the vortex and both oblique and normal shock waves are investigated using nonintrusive optical diagnostics (i.e. schlieren, planar laser scattering, and laser Doppler velocimetry). Of the various types, two Mach 2.5 overexpanded-nozzle Mach disc interactions are examined in detail. Below a certain vortex strength, a 'weak' interaction exists in which the normal shock is perturbed locally into an unsteady 'bubble' shock near the vortex axis, but vortex breakdown (i.e., a stagnation point) does not occur. For stronger vortices, a random unsteady 'strong' interaction results that causes vortex breakdown. The vortex core reforms downstream of

  2. Turbulence Model Comparisons for Supersonic Transports at Transonic and Supersonic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, S. M. B.; Wahls, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Results of turbulence model comparisons from two studies on supersonic transport configurations performed during the NASA High-speed Research program are given. Results are presented for both transonic conditions at Mach 0.90 and supersonic conditions at Mach 2.48. A feature of these two studies was the availability of higher Reynolds number wind tunnel data with which to compare the computational results. The transonic wind tunnel data was obtained in the National Transonic Facility at NASA Langley, and the supersonic data was obtained in the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel. The computational data was acquired using a state of the art Navier-Stokes flow solver with a wide range of turbulence models implemented. The results show that the computed forces compare reasonably well with the experimental data, with the Baldwin- Lomax with Degani-Schiff modifications and the Baldwin-Barth models showing the best agreement for the transonic conditions and the Spalart-Allmaras model showing the best agreement for the supersonic conditions. The transonic results were more sensitive to the choice of turbulence model than were the supersonic results.

  3. Global mortality attributable to aircraft cruise emissions.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Steven R H; Britter, Rex E; Waitz, Ian A

    2010-10-01

    Aircraft emissions impact human health though degradation of air quality. The majority of previous analyses of air quality impacts from aviation have considered only landing and takeoff emissions. We show that aircraft cruise emissions impact human health over a hemispheric scale and provide the first estimate of premature mortalities attributable to aircraft emissions globally. We estimate ∼8000 premature mortalities per year are attributable to aircraft cruise emissions. This represents ∼80% of the total impact of aviation (where the total includes the effects of landing and takeoff emissions), and ∼1% of air quality-related premature mortalities from all sources. However, we note that the impact of landing and takeoff emissions is likely to be under-resolved. Secondary H(2)SO(4)-HNO(3)-NH(3) aerosols are found to dominate mortality impacts. Due to the altitude and region of the atmosphere at which aircraft emissions are deposited, the extent of transboundary air pollution is particularly strong. For example, we describe how strong zonal westerly winds aloft, the mean meridional circulation around 30-60°N, interaction of aircraft-attributable aerosol precursors with background ammonia, and high population densities in combination give rise to an estimated ∼3500 premature mortalities per year in China and India combined, despite their relatively small current share of aircraft emissions. Subsidence of aviation-attributable aerosol and aerosol precursors occurs predominantly around the dry subtropical ridge, which results in reduced wet removal of aviation-attributable aerosol. It is also found that aircraft NO(x) emissions serve to increase oxidation of nonaviation SO(2), thereby further increasing the air quality impacts of aviation. We recommend that cruise emissions be explicitly considered in the development of policies, technologies and operational procedures designed to mitigate the air quality impacts of air transportation.

  4. Marine Educational and Research Cruise in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Lallemand, S.; Wu, F. T.

    2009-12-01

    During April 2009, we conducted a seismic and ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) cruise as part of the Taiwan mountain building process study, called the TAIGER. The seismic is shot by the US Columbia University’s research vessel Langseth and the OBSs, including Taiwan, French and American OBSs, are carried out by a Taiwanese student training ship, called Yu-Yin (means to educate the young people) No. 2. Both ships take a big number of research scientists and technical staff (15-25 people) to conduct the seismic and OBS survey. In addition, the Yu-Yin No. 2 ship hosts a total of 25 students, both MS and PhD graduate students, from Taiwan, France and USA. The student group consists of 13 from the National Taiwan Ocean University (Taiwan), 1 from the National Central University (Taiwan), 9 from the Montpellier University (France) and 2 from the New York State University. Nearly all the French and American students are on their very first trip to Taiwan. The research activities will be reported in the T25 Tectonophysics Section. This paper only deals with the educational events. The cruise includes two parts: the first mainly to deploy the OBSs and the second to retrieve the OBSs back to the ship. In addition, the French group arranges a field geological trip onshore Taiwan to put into their hands of the actions of Taiwan mountain building processes. The marine educational courses are filled in the daily ship time at 4 hours per day. As a result, we believe that we have achieved the followings: (1) mix the students and encourage a lovely study environment, (2) mix the teachers and enhance their teaching spectrum, (3) stay in a live and work together boat, allowing more and wider culture exchange. In the future, we certainly will use every possible opportunity to promote more Marine Educational and Research Cruises.

  5. Supersonic flow development in slotted wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaswamy, M. A.; Cornette, E. S.

    1980-01-01

    The development of test section slot shapes for achieving smooth supersonic Mach number distribution without overexpansion or waviness has, in the past, been largely an experimentally iterative or 'cutand try' procedure for each wind tunnel. To overcome the obvious disadvantages of time and expense involved in such an experimental approach, a simple analytical method has been developed to predict the supersonic flow development in a two-dimensional slotted tunnel given only the variation of open area ratio with downstream distance and the Mach number corresponding to the plenum static pressure. The well known method of characteristics is used with the constraint that it be compatible with the quadratic cross-flow pressure drop boundary condition at the slotted wall. The predicted results from this method agree remarkably well with the experimental calibration data available for some of the existing facilities. The flow mechanism responsible for causing overexpansion in the centerline Mach number distribution with some slot shapes has been brought to light.

  6. Study of active cooling for supersonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The potential benefits of using the fuel heat sink of hydrogen fueled supersonic transports for cooling large portions of the aircraft wing and fuselage are examined. The heat transfer would be accomplished by using an intermediate fluid such as an ethylene glycol-water solution. Some of the advantages of the system are: (1) reduced costs by using aluminum in place of titanium, (2) reduced cabin heat loads, and (3) more favorable environmental conditions for the aircraft systems. A liquid hydrogen fueled, Mach 2.7 supersonic transport aircraft design was used for the reference uncooled vehicle. The cooled aircraft designs were analyzed to determine their heat sink capability, the extent and location of feasible cooled surfaces, and the coolant passage size and spacing.

  7. Supersonic burning in separated flow regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumwalt, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    The trough vortex phenomena is used for combustion of hydrogen in a supersonic air stream. This was done in small sizes suitable for igniters in supersonic combustion ramjets so long as the boundary layer displacement thickness is less than 25% of the trough step height. A simple electric spark, properly positioned, ignites the hydrogen in the trough corner. The resulting flame is self sustaining and reignitable. Hydrogen can be injected at the base wall or immediately upstream of the trough. The hydrogen is introduced at low velocity to permit it to be drawn into the corner vortex system and thus experience a long residence time in the combustion region. The igniters can be placed on a skewed back step for angles at least up to 30 deg. without affecting the igniter performance significantly. Certain metals (platinum, copper) act catalytically to improve ignition.

  8. Nonequilibrium combustion effects in supersonic streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, R. M.; Bryce, C. A.; Reese, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    This research program is a theoretical and experimental investigation of the effect of nonequilibrium conditions upon the performance of combustors employing supersonic flows. Calculations and experiments are made regarding the effects on the ignition of hydrogen of the nonequilibrium species (free radicals, atoms, water vapor, etc.) obtained using vitiated air. Results of this investigation show that the nonequilibrium free-radical content from a supersonic vitiated air source will cause early ignition of the hydrogen. An analysis of heated air expended from a high temperature source to test section conditions also indicates that there is sufficient free radical content in the incoming flow to cause early ignition. Water vapor, an inherent contaminant in the generation of vitiated air, was found to reduce the ignition delay period under the experimental conditions considered.

  9. An asymptotic theory of supersonic propeller noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    1992-01-01

    A theory for predicting the noise field of supersonic propellers with realistic blade geometries is presented. The theory, which utilizes a large-blade-count approximation, provides an efficient formula for predicting the radiation of sound from all three sources of propeller noise. Comparisons with a full numerical integration indicate that the levels predicted by this formula are quite accurate. Calculations also show that, for high speed propellers, the noise radiated by the Lighthill quadrupole source is rather substantial when compared with the noise radiated by the blade thickness and loading sources. Results from a preliminary application of the theory indicate that the peak noise level generated by a supersonic propeller initially increases with increasing tip helical Mach number, but is eventually reaches a plateau and does not increase further. The predicted trend shows qualitative agreement with the experimental observations.

  10. Mars Science Laboratory Cruise Propulsion Maneuvering Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Raymond S.; Mizukami, Masahi; Barber, Todd J.

    2013-01-01

    Mars Science Laboratory "Curiosity" is NASA's most recent mission to Mars, launched in November 2011, and landed in August 2012. It is a subcompact car-sized nuclear powered rover designed for a long duration mission, with an extensive suite of science instruments. Entry, descent and landing used a unique "skycrane" concept. This report describes the propulsive maneuvering operations during cruise from Earth to Mars, to control attitudes and to target the vehicle for entry. The propulsion subsystem, mission operations, and flight performance are discussed. All trajectory control maneuvers were well within accuracy requirements, and all turns and spin corrections were nominal.

  11. An autonomous rendezvous and docking system using cruise missile technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ruel Edwin

    1991-01-01

    In November 1990 the Autonomous Rendezvous & Docking (AR&D) system was first demonstrated for members of NASA's Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group. This simulation utilized prototype hardware from the Cruise Missile and Advanced Centaur Avionics systems. The object was to show that all the accuracy, reliability and operational requirements established for a space craft to dock with Space Station Freedom could be met by the proposed system. The rapid prototyping capabilities of the Advanced Avionics Systems Development Laboratory were used to evaluate the proposed system in a real time, hardware in the loop simulation of the rendezvous and docking reference mission. The simulation permits manual, supervised automatic and fully autonomous operations to be evaluated. It is also being upgraded to be able to test an Autonomous Approach and Landing (AA&L) system. The AA&L and AR&D systems are very similar. Both use inertial guidance and control systems supplemented by GPS. Both use an Image Processing System (IPS), for target recognition and tracking. The IPS includes a general purpose multiprocessor computer and a selected suite of sensors that will provide the required relative position and orientation data. Graphic displays can also be generated by the computer, providing the astronaut / operator with real-time guidance and navigation data with enhanced video or sensor imagery.

  12. Supersonic and subsonic measurements of mesospheric ionization.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, L. C.; Nickell, L. C.; Kennedy, B.; Powell, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    An Arcas rocket-parachute system was used at night to compare supersonic and subsonic ionization measurements below 75 km. A hemispherical nose-tip probe was used on ascent and a parachute-borne blunt probe on descent to measure polar conductivities, which were due entirely to positive and negative ions. The velocity of the supersonic probe was Mach 2.5 at 50 km and 1.75 at 70 km; the blunt probe was subsonic below 71 km. Between 65 and 75 km the ratio of negative to positive conductivities (and thus of mobilities) determined by the blunt probe was about 1.2, and it approached 1 below this altitude range. The ratio obtained by the nose-tip probe varied from 1.5 at 75 km to .6 at 65 km, thus indicating a rapid variation of the effects of the shock wave on the sampled ions. The absolute values of positive conductivity measured subsonically and supersonically were essentially identical from 60 to 75 km, indicating that the sampled ions were unchanged by the shock. However, below 60 km the shock apparently 'broke up' the positive ions, as indicated by higher measured conductivities.

  13. Supersonic Gas-Liquid Cleaning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, Frank

    1996-01-01

    The Supersonic Gas-Liquid Cleaning System Research Project consisted mainly of a feasibility study, including theoretical and engineering analysis, of a proof-of-concept prototype of this particular cleaning system developed by NASA-KSC. The cleaning system utilizes gas-liquid supersonic nozzles to generate high impingement velocities at the surface of the device to be cleaned. The cleaning fluid being accelerated to these high velocities may consist of any solvent or liquid, including water. Compressed air or any inert gas is used to provide the conveying medium for the liquid, as well as substantially reduce the total amount of liquid needed to perform adequate surface cleaning and cleanliness verification. This type of aqueous cleaning system is considered to be an excellent way of conducting cleaning and cleanliness verification operations as replacements for the use of CFC 113 which must be discontinued by 1995. To utilize this particular cleaning system in various cleaning applications for both the Space Program and the commercial market, it is essential that the cleaning system, especially the supersonic nozzle, be characterized for such applications. This characterization consisted of performing theoretical and engineering analysis, identifying desirable modifications/extensions to the basic concept, evaluating effects of variations in operating parameters, and optimizing hardware design for specific applications.

  14. Experimental Supersonic Combustion Research at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, R. Clayton; Capriotti, Diego P.; Guy, R. Wayne

    1998-01-01

    Experimental supersonic combustion research related to hypersonic airbreathing propulsion has been actively underway at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) since the mid-1960's. This research involved experimental investigations of fuel injection, mixing, and combustion in supersonic flows and numerous tests of scramjet engine flowpaths in LaRC test facilities simulating flight from Mach 4 to 8. Out of this research effort has come scramjet combustor design methodologies, ground test techniques, and data analysis procedures. These technologies have progressed steadily in support of the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program and the current Hyper-X flight demonstration program. During NASP nearly 2500 tests of 15 scramjet engine models were conducted in LaRC facilities. In addition, research supporting the engine flowpath design investigated ways to enhance mixing, improve and apply nonintrusive diagnostics, and address facility operation. Tests of scramjet combustor operation at conditions simulating hypersonic flight at Mach numbers up to 17 also have been performed in an expansion tube pulse facility. This paper presents a review of the LaRC experimental supersonic combustion research efforts since the late 1980's, during the NASP program, and into the Hyper-X Program.

  15. Conditions for one-dimensional supersonic flow of quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovanazzi, S.; Farrell, C.; Kiss, T.; Leonhardt, U.

    2004-12-01

    One can use transsonic Bose-Einstein condensates of alkali atoms to establish the laboratory analog of the event horizon and to measure the acoustic version of Hawking radiation. We determine the conditions for supersonic flow and the Hawking temperature for realistic condensates on waveguides where an external potential plays the role of a supersonic nozzle. The transition to supersonic speed occurs at the potential maximum and the Hawking temperature is entirely determined by the curvature of the potential.

  16. Freely Localized Microwave Discharge in a Supersonic Gas Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Shibkov, V.M.; Aleksandrov, A.F.; Ershov, A.P.; Timofeev, I.B.; Chernikov, V.A.; Shibkova, L.V.

    2005-09-15

    A discharge produced by a focused microwave beam in a supersonic gas flow has been investigated experimentally. It is shown that the degree of ionization and the gas temperature in the discharge are fairly high and that the main properties of the discharge plasma are only slightly affected by the supersonic air flow. Discharges produced by focused microwave beams can find application in supersonic plasma aerodynamics.

  17. Chemically reacting supersonic flow calculation using an assumed PDF model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farshchi, M.

    1990-01-01

    This work is motivated by the need to develop accurate models for chemically reacting compressible turbulent flow fields that are present in a typical supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRAMJET) engine. In this paper the development of a new assumed probability density function (PDF) reaction model for supersonic turbulent diffusion flames and its implementation into an efficient Navier-Stokes solver are discussed. The application of this model to a supersonic hydrogen-air flame will be considered.

  18. Supersonic variable-cycle engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, E. A.; Welliver, A. D.

    1976-01-01

    The evolution and current status of selected recent variable cycle engine (VCE) studies are reviewed, and how the results were influenced by airplane requirements is described. Promising VCE concepts are described, their designs are simplified and the potential benefits in terms of aircraft performance are identified. This includes range, noise, emissions, and the time and effort it may require to ensure technical readiness of sufficient depth to satisfy reasonable economic, performance, and environmental constraints. A brief overview of closely related, ongoing technology programs in acoustics and exhaust emissions is also presented. Realistic technology advancements in critical areas combined with well matched aircraft and selected VCE concepts can lead to significantly improved economic and environmental performance relative to first generation SST predictions.

  19. Supersonic Decelerator on 'Right Track' for Future Mars Missions

    NASA Video Gallery

    Project Manager, Mark Adler, and Principal Investigator, Ian Clark describe the innovative testing being conducted by the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project. Combining very large sup...

  20. Feasibility of supersonic diode pumped alkali lasers: Model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2013-04-08

    The feasibility of supersonic operation of diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) is studied for Cs and K atoms applying model calculations, based on a semi-analytical model previously used for studying static and subsonic flow DPALs. The operation of supersonic lasers is compared with that measured and modeled in subsonic lasers. The maximum power of supersonic Cs and K lasers is found to be higher than that of subsonic lasers with the same resonator and alkali density at the laser inlet by 25% and 70%, respectively. These results indicate that for scaling-up the power of DPALs, supersonic expansion should be considered.

  1. Supersonic Retropropulsion Technology Development in NASA's Entry, Descent, and Landing Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Berry, Scott A.; Rhode, Matthew N.; Kelb, Bil; Korzun, Ashley; Dyakonov, Artem A.; Zarchi, Kerry A.; Schauerhamer, Daniel G.; Post, Ethan A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) space technology roadmap calls for new technologies to achieve human exploration of Mars in the coming decades [1]. One of those technologies, termed Supersonic Retropropulsion (SRP), involves initiation of propulsive deceleration at supersonic Mach numbers. The potential benefits afforded by SRP to improve payload mass and landing precision make the technology attractive for future EDL missions. NASA's EDL project spent two years advancing the technological maturity of SRP for Mars exploration [2-15]. This paper summarizes the technical accomplishments from the project and highlights challenges and recommendations for future SRP technology development programs. These challenges include: developing sufficiently large SRP engines for use on human-scale entry systems; testing and computationally modelling complex and unsteady SRP fluid dynamics; understanding the effects of SRP on entry vehicle stability and controllability; and demonstrating sub-scale SRP entry systems in Earth's atmosphere.

  2. Cruise missiles should not stop START

    SciTech Connect

    Tsipis, K.

    1988-11-01

    A method for verifying a cruise-missile agreement that would be acceptable to the military, industrial, and intelligence communities in both nations must be as unintrusive as possible, while remaining immune to cheating of any significance. This is the goal of the technical solutions outlined here. The elements of a verification regime described do not require routine, intrusive, on-site visits to naval vessels, aircraft, air bases, or weapons magazines where missiles may be stored. They do not interfere with the operational readiness of the missiles, and they protect legitimate military secrets of the inspected nation. If supported by competent national technical means of verification such as those both sides already employ, with a small number of on-site challenge inspections, a combination of technical solutions and procedures such as these could be effective. They would adequately safeguard the national security and sovereignty of the participating nations while providing policymakers with the option of a treaty that limits the number of long-range nuclear cruise missiles or eliminates them completely. As discussed, there are problems that remain to be addressed, but they should not be allowed to block a U.S.-Soviet agreement significantly reducing strategic nuclear arsenals.

  3. Wind tunnel performance results of swirl recovery vanes as tested with an advanced high speed propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazzaniga, John A.; Rose, Gayle E.

    1992-01-01

    Tests of swirl recovery vanes designed for use in conjunction with advanced high speed propellers were carried out at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The eight bladed 62.23 cm vanes were tested with a 62.23 cm SR = 7A high speed propeller in the NASA Lewis 2.44 x 1.83 m Supersonic Wind Tunnel for a Mach number range of 0.60 to 0.80. At the design operating condition for cruise of Mach 0.80 at an advance ratio of 3.26, the vane contribution to the total efficiency approached 2 percent. At lower off-design Mach numbers, the vane efficiency is even higher, approaching 4.5 percent for the Mach 0.60 condition. Use of the swirl recovery vanes essentially shifts the peak of the high speed propeller efficiency to a higher operating speed. This allows a greater degree of freedom in the selection of rpm over a wider operating range. Another unique result of the swirl recovery vane configuration is their essentially constant torque split between the propeller and the swirl vanes over a wide range of operating conditions for the design vane angle.

  4. Near-Field Acoustic Power Level Analysis of F31/A31 Open Rotor Model at Simulated Cruise Conditions, Technical Report II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Near-field acoustic power level analysis of F31A31 open rotor model has been performed to determine its noise characteristics at simulated cruise flight conditions. The non-proprietary parts of the test data obtained from experiments in the 8x6 supersonic wind tunnel were provided by NASA-Glenn Research Center. The tone and broadband components of total noise have been separated from raw test data by using a new data analysis tool. Results in terms of sound pressure levels, acoustic power levels, and their variations with rotor speed, freestream Mach number, and input shaft power, with different blade-pitch setting angles at simulated cruise flight conditions, are presented and discussed. Empirical equations relating models acoustic power level and input shaft power have been developed. The near-field acoustic efficiency of the model at simulated cruise conditions is also determined. It is hoped that the results presented in this work will serve as a database for comparison and improvement of other open rotor blade designs and also for validating open rotor noise prediction codes.

  5. Advanced IR System For Supersonic Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.

    2008-01-01

    Infrared thermography is a preferred method investigating transition in flight: a) Global and non-intrusive; b) Can also be used to visualize and characterize other fluid mechanic phenomena such as shock impingement, separation etc. F-15 based system was updated with new camera and digital video recorder to support high Reynolds number transition tests. Digital Recording improves image quality and analysis capability and allows for accurate quantitative (temperature) measurements and greater enhancement through image processing allows analysis of smaller scale phenomena.

  6. Experimental Study of an Axisymmetric Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle for Supersonic Aircraft Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Deere, Karen A.; Mason, Mary L.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Johnson, Stuart K.

    2007-01-01

    An axisymmetric version of the Dual Throat Nozzle concept with a variable expansion ratio has been studied to determine the impacts on thrust vectoring and nozzle performance. The nozzle design, applicable to a supersonic aircraft, was guided using the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics code, PAB3D. The axisymmetric Dual Throat Nozzle concept was tested statically in the Jet Exit Test Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The nozzle geometric design variables included circumferential span of injection, cavity length, cavity convergence angle, and nozzle expansion ratio for conditions corresponding to take-off and landing, mid climb and cruise. Internal nozzle performance and thrust vectoring performance was determined for nozzle pressure ratios up to 10 with secondary injection rates up to 10 percent of the primary flow rate. The 60 degree span of injection generally performed better than the 90 degree span of injection using an equivalent injection area and number of holes, in agreement with computational results. For injection rates less than 7 percent, thrust vector angle for the 60 degree span of injection was 1.5 to 2 degrees higher than the 90 degree span of injection. Decreasing cavity length improved thrust ratio and discharge coefficient, but decreased thrust vector angle and thrust vectoring efficiency. Increasing cavity convergence angle from 20 to 30 degrees increased thrust vector angle by 1 degree over the range of injection rates tested, but adversely affected system thrust ratio and discharge coefficient. The dual throat nozzle concept generated the best thrust vectoring performance with an expansion ratio of 1.0 (a cavity in between two equal minimum areas). The variable expansion ratio geometry did not provide the expected improvements in discharge coefficient and system thrust ratio throughout the flight envelope of typical a supersonic aircraft. At mid-climb and cruise conditions, the variable geometry

  7. Coupled Analysis of an Inlet and Fan for a Quiet Supersonic Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.; Conners, Timothy R.; Wayman, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    A computational analysis of a Gulfstream isentropic external compression supersonic inlet coupled to a Rolls-Royce fan has been completed. The inlet was designed for a small, low sonic boom supersonic vehicle with a design cruise condition of M = 1.6 at 45,000 ft. The inlet design included an annular bypass duct that routed flow subsonically around an engine-mounted gearbox and diverted flow with high shock losses away from the fan tip. Two Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes codes were used for the analysis: an axisymmetric code called AVCS for the inlet and a three dimensional (3-D) code called SWIFT for the fan. The codes were coupled at a mixing plane boundary using a separate code for data exchange. The codes were used to determine the performance of the inlet/fan system at the design point and to predict the performance and operability of the system over the flight profile. At the design point the core inlet had a recovery of 96 percent, and the fan operated near its peak efficiency and pressure ratio. A large hub radial distortion generated in the inlet was not eliminated by the fan and could pose a challenge for subsequent booster stages. The system operated stably at all points along the flight profile. Reduced stall margin was seen at low altitude and Mach number where flow separated on the interior lips of the cowl and bypass ducts. The coupled analysis gave consistent solutions at all points on the flight profile that would be difficult or impossible to predict by analysis of isolated components.

  8. Coupled Analysis of an Inlet and Fan for a Quiet Supersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.; Conners, Timothy R.; Wayman, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    A computational analysis of a Gulfstream isentropic external compression supersonic inlet coupled to a Rolls-Royce fan was completed. The inlet was designed for a small, low sonic boom supersonic vehicle with a design cruise condition of M = 1.6 at 45,000 feet. The inlet design included an annular bypass duct that routed flow subsonically around an engine-mounted gearbox and diverted flow with high shock losses away from the fan tip. Two Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes codes were used for the analysis: an axisymmetric code called AVCS for the inlet and a 3-D code called SWIFT for the fan. The codes were coupled at a mixing plane boundary using a separate code for data exchange. The codes were used to determine the performance of the inlet/fan system at the design point and to predict the performance and operability of the system over the flight profile. At the design point the core inlet had a recovery of 96 percent, and the fan operated near its peak efficiency and pressure ratio. A large hub radial distortion generated in the inlet was not eliminated by the fan and could pose a challenge for subsequent booster stages. The system operated stably at all points along the flight profile. Reduced stall margin was seen at low altitude and Mach number where flow separated on the interior lips of the cowl and bypass ducts. The coupled analysis gave consistent solutions at all points on the flight profile that would be difficult or impossible to predict by analysis of isolated components.

  9. Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) Plume Induced Environment Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mobley, B. L.; Smith, S. D.; Van Norman, J. W.; Muppidi, S.; Clark, I

    2016-01-01

    Provide plume induced heating (radiation & convection) predictions in support of the LDSD thermal design (pre-flight SFDT-1) Predict plume induced aerodynamics in support of flight dynamics, to achieve targeted freestream conditions to test supersonic deceleration technologies (post-flight SFDT-1, pre-flight SFDT-2)

  10. Aerodynamic Models for the Low Density Supersonic Declerator (LDSD) Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Norman, John W.; Dyakonov, Artem; Schoenenberger, Mark; Davis, Jody; Muppidi, Suman; Tang, Chun; Bose, Deepak; Mobley, Brandon; Clark, Ian

    2015-01-01

    An overview of pre-flight aerodynamic models for the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test (SFDT) campaign is presented, with comparisons to reconstructed flight data and discussion of model updates. The SFDT campaign objective is to test Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) and large supersonic parachute technologies at high altitude Earth conditions relevant to entry, descent, and landing (EDL) at Mars. Nominal SIAD test conditions are attained by lifting a test vehicle (TV) to 36 km altitude with a large helium balloon, then accelerating the TV to Mach 4 and and 53 km altitude with a solid rocket motor. The first flight test (SFDT-1) delivered a 6 meter diameter robotic mission class decelerator (SIAD-R) to several seconds of flight on June 28, 2014, and was successful in demonstrating the SFDT flight system concept and SIAD-R. The trajectory was off-nominal, however, lofting to over 8 km higher than predicted in flight simulations. Comparisons between reconstructed flight data and aerodynamic models show that SIAD-R aerodynamic performance was in good agreement with pre-flight predictions. Similar comparisons of powered ascent phase aerodynamics show that the pre-flight model overpredicted TV pitch stability, leading to underprediction of trajectory peak altitude. Comparisons between pre-flight aerodynamic models and reconstructed flight data are shown, and changes to aerodynamic models using improved fidelity and knowledge gained from SFDT-1 are discussed.

  11. Wind-Tunnel Results of Advanced High-Speed Propellers at Takeoff, Climb, and Landing Mach Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefko, George L.; Jeracki, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    Low-speed wind-tunnel performance tests of two advanced propellers have been completed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as part of the NASA Advanced Turboprop Program. The 62.2 cm (24.5 in.) diameter adjustable-pitch models were tested at Mach numbers typical of takeoff, initial climbout, and landing speeds (i.e., from Mach 0.10 to 0.34) at zero angle of attack in the NASA Lewis 10 by 10 Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. Both models had eight blades and a cruise-design-point operating condition of Mach 0.80, and 10.668 km (35,000 ft) I.S.A. altitude, a 243.8 m/s (800 ft/sec) tip speed, and a high power loading of 301 kW/sq m (37.5 shp/sq ft). Each model had its own integrally designed area-ruled spinner, but used the same specially contoured nacelle. These features reduced blade-section Mach numbers and relieved blade-root choking at the cruise condition. No adverse or unusual low-speed operating conditions were found during the test with either the straight blade SR-2 or the 45 deg swept SR-3 propeller. Typical efficiencies of the straight and 45 deg swept propellers were 50.2 and 54.9 percent, respectively, at a takeoff condition of Mach 0.20 and 53.7 and 59.1 percent, respectively, at a climb condition of Mach 0.34.

  12. Supersonic transport vis-a-vis energy savings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormery, G.

    1979-01-01

    The energy and economic saving modifications in supersonic transportation are studied. Modifications in the propulsion systems and in the aerodynamic configurations of the Concorde aircraft to reduce noise generation and increase fuel efficiency are discussed. The conversion of supersonic aircraft from fuel oils to synthetic fuels is examined.

  13. General purpose computer program for interacting supersonic configurations: Programmer's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crill, W.; Dale, B.

    1977-01-01

    The program ISCON (Interacting Supersonic Configuration) is described. The program is in support of the problem to generate a numerical procedure for determining the unsteady dynamic forces on interacting wings and tails in supersonic flow. Subroutines are presented along with the complete FORTRAN source listing.

  14. Simple method of supersonic flow visualization using smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. S.; Irani, E.

    1992-01-01

    A modified smoke wire visualization method for application in high-speed and supersonic flows has been developed which produces a large number of fine smoke filaments that do not dissipate. This new technique is easily implemented in an open-inlet induction-type supersonic wind tunnel. Shock waves and expansion regions are clearly identified by the smoke filament behavior.

  15. Theory and Experiments on Supersonic Air-to-Air Ejectors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabri, J; Paulon, J

    1958-01-01

    A comparison of experiment with theory is made for air ejectors having cylindrical mixing sections and operating under conditions of supersonic primary flow and either mixed or supersonic regimes of mixing. The effect on ejector performance of such parameters as mixer length and cross section, terminating diffuser, primary Mach number, and primary nozzle position is presented in terms of mass flow and pressure ratio.

  16. 14 CFR 91.821 - Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits... Noise Limits § 91.821 Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits. Except for Concorde airplanes having... airplane that does not comply with Stage 2 noise limits of part 36 in effect on October 13, 1977,...

  17. 14 CFR 91.821 - Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits... Noise Limits § 91.821 Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits. Except for Concorde airplanes having... airplane that does not comply with Stage 2 noise limits of part 36 in effect on October 13, 1977,...

  18. 14 CFR 91.821 - Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits... Noise Limits § 91.821 Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits. Except for Concorde airplanes having... airplane that does not comply with Stage 2 noise limits of part 36 in effect on October 13, 1977,...

  19. Hepatitis E Outbreak on Cruise Ship

    PubMed Central

    Ijaz, Samreen; Kafatos, George; Booth, Linda; Thomas, H. Lucy; Walsh, Amanda; Ramsay, Mary; Morgan, Dilys

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, acute hepatitis E infection was confirmed in 4 passengers returning to the United Kingdom after a world cruise. Epidemiologic investigation showed that of 789 persons who provided blood samples, 195 (25%) were seropositive, 33 (4%) had immunoglobulin [Ig] M levels consistent with recent acute infection (11 of these persons were symptomatic), and 162 (21%) had IgG only, consistent with past infection. Passenger mean age was 68 years. Most (426/789, 54%) passengers were female, yet most with acute infection (25/33, 76%) were male. Sequencing of RNA from 3 case-patients identified hepatitis E virus genotype 3, closely homologous to genotype 3 viruses from Europe. Significant association with acute infection was found for being male, drinking alcohol, and consuming shellfish while on board (odds ratio 4.27, 95% confidence interval 1.23–26.94, p = 0.019). This was probably a common-source foodborne outbreak. PMID:19891860

  20. Turbofan Volume Dynamics Model for Investigations of Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic Effects in a Supersonic Commercial Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Kopasakis, George; Lemon, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    A turbofan simulation has been developed for use in aero-propulso-servo-elastic coupling studies, on supersonic vehicles. A one-dimensional lumped volume approach is used whereby each component (fan, high-pressure compressor, combustor, etc.) is represented as a single volume using characteristic performance maps and conservation equations for continuity, momentum and energy. The simulation is developed in the MATLAB/SIMULINK (The MathWorks, Inc.) environment in order to facilitate controls development, and ease of integration with a future aero-servo-elastic vehicle model being developed at NASA Langley. The complete simulation demonstrated steady state results that closely match a proposed engine suitable for a supersonic business jet at the cruise condition. Preliminary investigation of the transient simulation revealed expected trends for fuel flow disturbances as well as upstream pressure disturbances. A framework for system identification enables development of linear models for controller design. Utilizing this framework, a transfer function modeling an upstream pressure disturbance s impacts on the engine speed is developed as an illustrative case of the system identification. This work will eventually enable an overall vehicle aero-propulso-servo-elastic model

  1. Coherent Raman spectroscopy for supersonic flow measurments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.

    1986-01-01

    In collaboration with NASA/Langley Research Center, a truly nonintrusive and nonseeding method for measuring supersonic molecular flow parameters was proposed and developed at Colorado State University. The feasibility of this Raman Doppler Velocimetry (RDV), currently operated in a scanning mode, was demonstrated not only in a laboratory environment at Colorado State University, but also in a major wind tunnel at NASA/Langley Research Center. The research progress of the RDV development is summarized. In addition, methods of coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin spectroscopy and single-pulse coherent Raman spectroscopy are investigated, respectively, for measurements of high-pressure and turbulent flows.

  2. Algorithmic comparisons of decaying, isothermal, supersonic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsionas, S.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R. S.; Schmidt, W.; Price, D. J.; Dursi, L. J.; Gritschneder, M.; Walch, S.; Piontek, R.; Kim, J.; Jappsen, A.-K.; Ciecielag, P.; Mac Low, M.-M.

    2009-12-01

    Context: Simulations of astrophysical turbulence have reached such a level of sophistication that quantitative results are now starting to emerge. However, contradicting results have been reported in the literature with respect to the performance of the numerical techniques employed for its study and their relevance to the physical systems modelled. Aims: We aim at characterising the performance of a variety of hydrodynamics codes including different particle-based and grid-based techniques on the modelling of decaying supersonic turbulence. This is the first such large-scale comparison ever conducted. Methods: We modelled driven, compressible, supersonic, isothermal turbulence with an rms Mach number of M_rms ˜ 4, and then let it decay in the absence of gravity, using runs performed with four different grid codes (ENZO, FLASH, TVD, ZEUS) and three different SPH codes (GADGET, PHANTOM, VINE). We additionally analysed two calculations denoted as PHANTOM A and PHANTOM B using two different implementations of artificial viscosity in PHANTOM. We analysed the results of our numerical experiments using volume-averaged quantities like the rms Mach number, volume- and density-weighted velocity Fourier spectrum functions, and probability distribution functions of density, velocity, and velocity derivatives. Results: Our analysis indicates that grid codes tend to be less dissipative than SPH codes, though details of the techniques used can make large differences in both cases. For example, the Morris & Monaghan viscosity implementation for SPH results in less dissipation (PHANTOM B and VINE versus GADGET and PHANTOM A). For grid codes, using a smaller diffusion parameter leads to less dissipation, but results in a larger bottleneck effect (our ENZO versus FLASH runs). As a general result, we find that by using a similar number of resolution elements N for each spatial direction means that all codes (both grid-based and particle-based) show encouraging similarity of all

  3. IPCS implications for future supersonic transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billig, L. O.; Kniat, J.; Schmidt, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    The Integrated Propulsion Control System (IPCS) demonstrates control of an entire supersonic propulsion module - inlet, engine afterburner, and nozzle - with an HDC 601 digital computer. The program encompasses the design, build, qualification, and flight testing of control modes, software, and hardware. The flight test vehicle is an F-111E airplane. The L.H. inlet and engine will be operated under control of a digital computer mounted in the weapons bay. A general description and the current status of the IPCS program are given.

  4. Selected Examples of NACA/NASA Supersonic Flight Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltzman, Edwin J.; Ayers, Theodore G.

    1995-01-01

    The present Dryden Flight Research Center, a part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, has a flight research history that extends back to the mid-1940's. The parent organization was a part of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and was formed in 1946 as the Muroc Flight Test Unit. This document describes 13 selected examples of important supersonic flight research conducted from the Mojave Desert location of the Dryden Flight Research Center over a 4 decade period beginning in 1946. The research described herein was either obtained at supersonic speeds or enabled subsequent aircraft to penetrate or traverse the supersonic region. In some instances there accrued from these research efforts benefits which are also applicable at lower or higher speed regions. A major consideration in the selection of the various research topics was the lasting impact they have had, or will have, on subsequent supersonic flight vehicle design, efficiency, safety, and performance or upon improved supersonic research techniques.

  5. Line-vortex theory for calculation of supersonic downwash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirels, Harold; Haefeli, Rudolph C

    1950-01-01

    The perturbation field induced by a line vortex in a supersonic stream and the downwash behind a supersonic lifting surface are examined to establish approximate methods for determining the downwash behind supersonic wings. Lifting-lines methods are presented for calculating supersonic downwash. A bent lifting-line method is proposed for computing the downwash field behind swept wings. When applied to triangular wings with subsonic leading edges, this method gives results that, in general, are in good agreement with the exact linearized solution. An unbent lifting-line method (horseshoe-vortex system) is proposed for unswept wings. This method is applied to determine downwash behind rectangular wings with aspect ratios of 2 and 4. Excellent agreement with exact linearized theory is obtained for both aspect ratios by placing the lifting line at the 1/2-chord point. The use of lifting-lines therefore appears promising for obtaining estimates of the downwash behind supersonic wings.

  6. Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) program publications for fiscal year 1977 through fiscal year 1979: Preliminary bibliography. [bibliographies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, S.

    1979-01-01

    Approximately 512 bibliographies are presented for the time period from FY 77 to FY 79. Several non-SCR publications and a few papers not included in the last publication are included. Topics include propulsion, stratospheric emissions impact, materials and structure, aerodynamic performance, and stability and control.

  7. Experimental aerodynamic characteristics at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 2.70 of two supersonic cruise fighter configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollyhigh, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    Two 0.085-scale full span wind-tunnel models of a Mach 1.60 design supercruiser configuration were tested at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 2.70. One model incorporated a varying dihedral (swept-up) wing to obtain the desired lateral-directional characteristics; the other incorporated more conventional twin vertical tails. The data from the wind-tunnel tests are presented without analysis.

  8. Characteristics of Control Laws Tested on the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) Wind-Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christhilf, David M.; Moulin, Boris; Ritz, Erich; Chen, P. C.; Roughen, Kevin M.; Perry, Boyd

    2012-01-01

    The Semi-Span Supersonic Transport (S4T) is an aeroelastically scaled wind-tunnel model built to test active controls concepts for large flexible supersonic aircraft in the transonic flight regime. It is one of several models constructed in the 1990's as part of the High Speed Research (HSR) Program. Control laws were developed for the S4T by M4 Engineering, Inc. and by Zona Technologies, Inc. under NASA Research Announcement (NRA) contracts. The model was tested in the NASA-Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) four times from 2007 to 2010. The first two tests were primarily for plant identification. The third entry was used for testing control laws for Ride Quality Enhancement, Gust Load Alleviation, and Flutter Suppression. Whereas the third entry only tested FS subcritically, the fourth test demonstrated closed-loop operation above the open-loop flutter boundary. The results of the third entry are reported elsewhere. This paper reports on flutter suppression results from the fourth wind-tunnel test. Flutter suppression is seen as a way to provide stability margins while flying at transonic flight conditions without penalizing the primary supersonic cruise design condition. An account is given for how Controller Performance Evaluation (CPE) singular value plots were interpreted with regard to progressing open- or closed-loop to higher dynamic pressures during testing.

  9. An extended supersonic combustion model for the dynamic analysis of hypersonic vehicles. Interim Task Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bossard, J.A.; Peck, R.E.; Schmidt, D.K.

    1993-03-01

    The development of an advanced dynamic model for aeroelastic hypersonic vehicles powered by air breathing engines requires an adequate engine model. This report provides a discussion of some of the more important features of supersonic combustion and their relevance to the analysis and design of supersonic ramjet engines. Of particular interest are those aspects of combustion that impact the control of the process. Furthermore, the report summarizes efforts to enhance the aeropropulsive/aeroelastic dynamic model developed at the Aerospace Research Center of Arizona State University by focusing on combustion and improved modeling of this flow. The expanded supersonic combustor model described here has the capability to model the effects of friction, area change, and mass addition, in addition to the heat addition process. A comparison is made of the results from four cases: (1) heat addition only; (2) heat addition plus friction; (3) heat addition, friction, and area reduction, and (4) heat addition, friction, area reduction, and mass addition. The relative impact of these effects on the Mach number, static temperature, and static pressure distributions within the combustor are then shown. Finally, the effects of frozen versus equilibrium flow conditions within the exhaust plume is discussed.

  10. On the Origin of Fanaroff-Riley Classification of Radio Galaxies: Deceleration of Supersonic Radio Lobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatu, Nozomu; Kino, Motoki; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2009-06-01

    We argue that the origin of "FRI/FRII dichotomy"—the division between Fanaroff-Riley class I (FRI) with subsonic lobes and class II (FRII) radio sources with supersonic lobes is sharp in the radio-optical luminosity plane (Owen-White diagram)—can be explained by the deceleration of advancing radio lobes. The deceleration is caused by the growth of the effective cross-sectional area of radio lobes. We derive the condition in which an initially supersonic lobe turns into a subsonic lobe, combining the ram pressure equilibrium between the hot spots and the ambient medium with the relation between "the hot spot radius" and "the linear size of radio sources" obtained from the radio observations. We find that the dividing line between the supersonic lobes and subsonic ones is determined by the ratio of the jet power L j to the number density of the ambient matter at the core radius of the host galaxy \\bar{n}_a. It is also found that the maximal ratio of (L_j/\\bar{n}_a) exists and its value resides in (L_j/\\bar{n}_a)_max≈ 10^{44-47} erg s^{-1} cm^{3}, taking into account considerable uncertainties. This suggests that the maximal value (L_j/\\bar{n}_a)_max separates between FRIs and FRIIs.

  11. Overview of Supersonic Aerodynamics Measurement Techniques in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    An overview is given of selected measurement techniques used in the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of aerospace vehicles operating at supersonic speeds. A broad definition of a measurement technique is adopted in this paper and is any qualitative or quantitative experimental approach that provides information leading to the improved understanding of the supersonic aerodynamic characteristics. On-surface and off-surface measurement techniques used to obtain discrete (point) and global (field) measurements and planar and global flow visualizations are described, and examples of all methods are included. The discussion is limited to recent experiences in the UPWT and is, therefore, not an exhaustive review of existing experimental techniques. The diversity and high quality of the measurement techniques and the resultant data illustrate the capabilities of a ground-based experimental facility and the key role that it plays in the advancement of our understanding, prediction, and control of supersonic aerodynamics.

  12. An extended supersonic combustion model for the dynamic analysis of hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossard, J. A.; Peck, R. E.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1993-01-01

    The development of an advanced dynamic model for aeroelastic hypersonic vehicles powered by air breathing engines requires an adequate engine model. This report provides a discussion of some of the more important features of supersonic combustion and their relevance to the analysis and design of supersonic ramjet engines. Of particular interest are those aspects of combustion that impact the control of the process. Furthermore, the report summarizes efforts to enhance the aeropropulsive/aeroelastic dynamic model developed at the Aerospace Research Center of Arizona State University by focusing on combustion and improved modeling of this flow. The expanded supersonic combustor model described here has the capability to model the effects of friction, area change, and mass addition, in addition to the heat addition process. A comparison is made of the results from four cases: (1) heat addition only; (2) heat addition plus friction; (3) heat addition, friction, and area reduction, and (4) heat addition, friction, area reduction, and mass addition. The relative impact of these effects on the Mach number, static temperature, and static pressure distributions within the combustor are then shown. Finally, the effects of frozen versus equilibrium flow conditions within the exhaust plume is discussed.

  13. Design philosophy of long range LFC transports with advanced supercritical LFC airfoils. [laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfenninger, Werner; Vemuru, Chandra S.

    1988-01-01

    The achievement of 70 percent laminar flow using modest boundary layer suction on the wings, empennage, nacelles, and struts of long-range LFC transports, combined with larger wing spans and lower span loadings, could make possible an unrefuelled range halfway around the world up to near sonic cruise speeds with large payloads. It is shown that supercritical LFC airfoils with undercut front and rear lower surfaces, an upper surface static pressure coefficient distribution with an extensive low supersonic flat rooftop, a far upstream supersonic pressure minimum, and a steep subsonic rear pressure rise with suction or a slotted cruise flap could alleviate sweep-induced crossflow and attachment-line boundary-layer instability. Wing-mounted superfans can reduce fuel consumption and engine tone noise.

  14. Economy of flight at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    Prandtl's theory is used to determine the airflow over bodies and wings adapted to supersonic flight. By making use of these results, and by incorporating in them an allowance for the probable skin friction, some estimates of expected lift-drag ratios are made for various flight speeds with the best configuration. At each speed a slender body and wings having the best angle of sweepback are considered. For the range of supersonic speeds shown an airplane of normal density and loading would be required to operate at an altitude of the order of 60,000 feet. The limiting value of 1-1/2 times the speed of sound corresponds to a flight speed of 1000 miles per hour. At this speed about 1.5 miles per gallon of fuel are expected. It is interesting to note that this value corresponds to a value of more than 15 miles per gallon when the weight is reduced to correspond to that of an ordinary automobile.

  15. The Aeroacoustics of Slowly Diverging Supersonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Leib, S. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with utilizing the acoustic analogy approach to predict the sound from unheated supersonic jets. Previous attempts have been unsuccessful at making such predictions over the Mach number range of practical interest. The present paper, therefore, focuses on implementing the necessary refinements needed to accomplish this objective. The important effects influencing peak supersonic noise turn out to be source convection, mean flow refraction, mean flow amplification, and source non-compactness. It appears that the last two effects have not been adequately dealt with in the literature. The first of these because the usual parallel flow models produce most of the amplification in the so called critical layer where the solution becomes singular and, therefore, causes the predicted sound field to become infinite as well. We deal with this by introducing a new weakly non parallel flow analysis that eliminates the critical layer singularity. This has a strong effect on the shape of the peak noise spectrum. The last effect places severe demands on the source models at the higher Mach numbers because the retarded time variations significantly increase the sensitivity of the radiated sound to the source structure in this case. A highly refined (non-separable) source model is, therefore, introduced in this paper.

  16. Pressure Modulated Sonic Jet in Supersonic Crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossmann, Tobias

    2014-11-01

    Sonic transverse jets in supersonic crossflow are modulated using high-amplitude variations in jet stagnation pressure to enhance jet penetration and mixing. An injection/modulation apparatus combining a powered resonance tube and acoustic resonator is used to create low momentum ratio jets (J = 1 , 2) in a supersonic cross-stream (M = 3 . 5). The injector has the capability to modulate the jet supply pressure at sufficiently high frequency (> 15 kHz) and amplitude (up to 190 dB) to access relevant Strouhal numbers (St = 0 - 0 . 3) and amplitudes (up to 10% of the jet stagnation pressure) related to mixing enhancement. Planar laser Mie scattering in both side and end views allows for instantaneous imaging of the jet fluid to quantify jet trajectory, spread, and mixing behavior. For modulated J = 2 transverse jets, the recirculation zone directly downstream of the injection location is eliminated and significantly faster centerline signal decay rates are seen. For the J = 1 modulated jets, substantial increases in centerline penetration, jet spread, and centerline signal decay rate are shown. Additionally, PDF analysis of the instantaneous jet fluid signal values is performed to compare local mixing efficiencies between the modulated and un-modulated cases.

  17. Analysis of Buzz in a Supersonic Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.

    2012-01-01

    A dual-stream, low-boom supersonic inlet designed for use on a small, Mach 1.6 aircraft was tested experimentally in the 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The tests showed that the inlet had good recovery and stable operation over large mass flow range. The inlet went into buzz at mass flows well below that needed for engine operation, and the experiments generated a wealth of data during buzz. High frequency response pressure measurements and high-speed schlieren videos were recorded for many buzz events. The objective of the present work was to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to predict some of the experimental data taken during buzz, compare those predictions to the experimental data, and to use both datasets to explain the physics of the buzz cycle. The calculations were done with the Wind-US CFD code using a second-order time-accurate differencing scheme and the SST turbulence model. Computed Mach number contours were compared with schlieren images, and ensemble-averaged unsteady pressures were compared to data. The results showed that the buzz cycle consisted partly of spike buzz, an unsteady oscillation of the main shock at the spike tip while the inlet pressure dropped, and partly of choked flow while the inlet repressurized. Most of the results could be explained by theory proposed by Dailey in 1954, but did not support commonly used acoustic resonance explanations.

  18. Calibration of transonic and supersonic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, T. D.; Pope, T. C.; Cooksey, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    State-of-the art instrumentation and procedures for calibrating transonic (0.6 less than M less than 1.4) and supersonic (M less than or equal to 3.5) wind tunnels were reviewed and evaluated. Major emphasis was given to transonic tunnels. Continuous, blowdown and intermittent tunnels were considered. The required measurements of pressure, temperature, flow angularity, noise and humidity were discussed, and the effects of measurement uncertainties were summarized. A comprehensive review of instrumentation currently used to calibrate empty tunnel flow conditions was included. The recent results of relevant research are noted and recommendations for achieving improved data accuracy are made where appropriate. It is concluded, for general testing purposes, that satisfactory calibration measurements can be achieved in both transonic and supersonic tunnels. The goal of calibrating transonic tunnels to within 0.001 in centerline Mach number appears to be feasible with existing instrumentation, provided correct calibration procedures are carefully followed. A comparable accuracy can be achieved off-centerline with carefully designed, conventional probes, except near Mach 1. In the range 0.95 less than M less than 1.05, the laser Doppler velocimeter appears to offer the most promise for improved calibration accuracy off-centerline.

  19. Supersonic gas-liquid cleaning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caimi, Raoul E. B.; Thaxton, Eric A.

    1994-01-01

    A system to perform cleaning and cleanliness verification is being developed to replace solvent flush methods using CFC 113 for fluid system components. The system is designed for two purposes: internal and external cleaning and verification. External cleaning is performed with the nozzle mounted at the end of a wand similar to a conventional pressure washer. Internal cleaning is performed with a variety of fixtures designed for specific applications. Internal cleaning includes tubes, pipes, flex hoses, and active fluid components such as valves and regulators. The system uses gas-liquid supersonic nozzles to generate high impingement velocities at the surface of the object to be cleaned. Compressed air or any inert gas may be used to provide the conveying medium for the liquid. The converging-diverging nozzles accelerate the gas-liquid mixture to supersonic velocities. The liquid being accelerated may be any solvent including water. This system may be used commercially to replace CFC and other solvent cleaning methods widely used to remove dust, dirt, flux, and lubricants. In addition, cleanliness verification can be performed without the solvents which are typically involved. This paper will present the technical details of the system, the results achieved during testing at KSC, and future applications for this system.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Gap Flow

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xu; Haiming, Huang; Guo, Huang; Song, Mo

    2015-01-01

    Various gaps in the surface of the supersonic aircraft have a significant effect on airflows. In order to predict the effects of attack angle, Mach number and width-to-depth ratio of gap on the local aerodynamic heating environment of supersonic flow, two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the finite volume method, where convective flux of space term adopts the Roe format, and discretization of time term is achieved by 5-step Runge-Kutta algorithm. The numerical results reveal that the heat flux ratio is U-shaped distribution on the gap wall and maximum at the windward corner of the gap. The heat flux ratio decreases as the gap depth and Mach number increase, however, it increases as the attack angle increases. In addition, it is important to find that chamfer in the windward corner can effectively reduce gap effect coefficient. The study will be helpful for the design of the thermal protection system in reentry vehicles. PMID:25635395

  1. Dynamic characteristics of pulsed supersonic fuel sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pianthong, K.; Matthujak, A.; Takayama, K.; Milton, B. E.; Behnia, M.

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes the dynamic characteristics of pulsed, supersonic liquid fuel sprays or jets injected into ambient air. Simple, single hole nozzles were employed with the nozzle sac geometries being varied. Different fuel types, diesel fuel, bio-diesel, kerosene, and gasoline were used to determine the effects of fuel properties on the spray characteristics. A vertical two-stage light gas gun was employed as a projectile launcher to provide a high velocity impact to produce the liquid jet. The injection pressure was around 0.88-1.24 GPa in all cases. The pulsed, supersonic fuel sprays were visualized by using a high-speed video camera and shadowgraph method. The spray tip penetration and velocity attenuation and other characteristics were examined and are described here. An instantaneous spray tip velocity of 1,542 m/s (Mach number 4.52) was obtained. However, this spray tip velocity can be sustained for only a very short period (a few microseconds). It then attenuates very quickly. The phenomenon of multiple high frequency spray pulses generated by a single shot impact and the changed in the angle of the shock structure during the spray flight, which had already been observed in previous studies, is again noted. Multiple shock waves from the conical nozzle spray were also clearly captured.

  2. An outbreak of Cyclospora infection on a cruise ship.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, R A; Nanyonjo, R; Pingault, N M; Combs, B G; Mazzucchelli, T; Armstrong, P; Tarling, G; Dowse, G K

    2013-03-01

    In 2010, an outbreak of cyclosporiasis affected passengers and crew on two successive voyages of a cruise ship that departed from and returned to Fremantle, Australia. There were 73 laboratory-confirmed and 241 suspected cases of Cyclospora infection reported in passengers and crew from the combined cruises. A case-control study performed in crew members found that illness was associated with eating items of fresh produce served onboard the ship, but the study was unable conclusively to identify the responsible food(s). It is likely that one or more of the fresh produce items taken onboard at a south-east Asian port during the first cruise was contaminated. If fresh produce supplied to cruise ships is sourced from countries or regions where Cyclospora is endemic, robust standards of food production and hygiene should be applied to the supply chain. PMID:22687637

  3. Galileo post-Gaspra cruise and Earth-2 encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyer, P. E.; Andrews, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    This article documents DSN support for the Galileo cruise after the Oct. 1991 encounter with the asteroid Gaspra. This article also details the Earth-2 encounter and the special non-DSN support provided during the Earth-2 closest approach.

  4. An outbreak of Cyclospora infection on a cruise ship.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, R A; Nanyonjo, R; Pingault, N M; Combs, B G; Mazzucchelli, T; Armstrong, P; Tarling, G; Dowse, G K

    2013-03-01

    In 2010, an outbreak of cyclosporiasis affected passengers and crew on two successive voyages of a cruise ship that departed from and returned to Fremantle, Australia. There were 73 laboratory-confirmed and 241 suspected cases of Cyclospora infection reported in passengers and crew from the combined cruises. A case-control study performed in crew members found that illness was associated with eating items of fresh produce served onboard the ship, but the study was unable conclusively to identify the responsible food(s). It is likely that one or more of the fresh produce items taken onboard at a south-east Asian port during the first cruise was contaminated. If fresh produce supplied to cruise ships is sourced from countries or regions where Cyclospora is endemic, robust standards of food production and hygiene should be applied to the supply chain.

  5. Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test: Trajectory, Atmosphere, and Aerodynamics Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutty, Prasad; Karlgaard, Christopher D.; Blood, Eric M.; O'Farrell, Clara; Ginn, Jason M.; Shoenenberger, Mark; Dutta, Soumyo

    2015-01-01

    The Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test is a full-scale flight test of a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator, which is part of the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator technology development project. The purpose of the project is to develop and mature aerodynamic decelerator technologies for landing large mass payloads on the surface of Mars. The technologies include a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator and Supersonic Parachutes. The first Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test occurred on June 28th, 2014 at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. This test was used to validate the test architecture for future missions. The flight was a success and, in addition, was able to acquire data on the aerodynamic performance of the supersonic inflatable decelerator. This paper describes the instrumentation, analysis techniques, and acquired flight test data utilized to reconstruct the vehicle trajectory, atmosphere, and aerodynamics. The results of the reconstruction show significantly higher lofting of the trajectory, which can partially be explained by off-nominal booster motor performance. The reconstructed vehicle force and moment coefficients fall well within pre-flight predictions. A parameter identification analysis indicates that the vehicle displayed greater aerodynamic static stability than seen in pre-flight computational predictions and ballistic range tests.

  6. SPF/DB primary structure for supersonic aircraft (T-38 horizontal stabilizer)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delmundo, A. R.; Mcquilkin, F. T.; Rivas, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    The structural integrity and potential cost savings of superplastic forming/diffusion bonding (SPF/DB) titanium structure for future Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) and military aircraft primary structure applications was demonstrated. Using the horizontal stabilizer of the T-38 aircraft as a baseline, the structure was redesigned to the existing criteria and loads, using SPF/DB titanium technology. The general concept of using a full-depth sandwich structure which is attached to a steel spindle, was retained. Trade studies demonstrated that the optimum design should employ double-truss, sinewave core in the deepest section of the surface, making a transition to single-truss core in the thinner areas at the leading and trailing edges and at the tip. At the extreme thin edges of the surface, the single-truss core was changed to dot core to provide for gas passages during the SPF/DB process. The selected SPF/DB horizontal stabilizer design consisted of a one-piece SPF/DB sinewave truss core panel, a trunnion fitting, and reinforcing straps. The fitting and the straps were mechanically fastened to the SPF/DB panel.

  7. Design of Supersonic Transport Flap Systems for Thrust Recovery at Subsonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, Michael J.; Carlson, Harry W.; Domack, Christopher S.

    1999-01-01

    A study of the subsonic aerodynamics of hinged flap systems for supersonic cruise commercial aircraft has been conducted using linear attached-flow theory that has been modified to include an estimate of attainable leading edge thrust and an approximate representation of vortex forces. Comparisons of theoretical predictions with experimental results show that the theory gives a reasonably good and generally conservative estimate of the performance of an efficient flap system and provides a good estimate of the leading and trailing-edge deflection angles necessary for optimum performance. A substantial reduction in the area of the inboard region of the leading edge flap has only a minor effect on the performance and the optimum deflection angles. Changes in the size of the outboard leading-edge flap show that performance is greatest when this flap has a chord equal to approximately 30 percent of the wing chord. A study was also made of the performance of various combinations of individual leading and trailing-edge flaps, and the results show that aerodynamic efficiencies as high as 85 percent of full suction are predicted.

  8. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of a Dual-Stream Supersonic Plug Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Christopher M.; Gray, Justin S.; Park, Michael A.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2015-01-01

    Aerodynamic shape optimization was performed on an isolated axisymmetric plug nozzle sized for a supersonic business jet. The dual-stream concept was tailored to attenuate nearfield pressure disturbances without compromising nozzle performance. Adjoint-based anisotropic mesh refinement was applied to resolve nearfield compression and expansion features in the baseline viscous grid. Deformed versions of the adapted grid were used for subsequent adjoint-driven shape optimization. For design, a nonlinear gradient-based optimizer was coupled to the discrete adjoint formulation of the Reynolds-averaged Navier- Stokes equations. All nozzle surfaces were parameterized using 3rd order B-spline interpolants and perturbed axisymmetrically via free-form deformation. Geometry deformations were performed using 20 design variables shared between the outer cowl, shroud and centerbody nozzle surfaces. Interior volume grid deformation during design was accomplished using linear elastic mesh morphing. The nozzle optimization was performed at a design cruise speed of Mach 1.6, assuming core and bypass pressure ratios of 6.19 and 3.24, respectively. Ambient flight conditions at design were commensurate with 45,000-ft standard day atmosphere.

  9. Cruise ship's doctors - company employees or independent contractors?

    PubMed

    Dahl, Eilif

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, cruise companies have stated that they are in the transport business but not in the business of providing medical services to passengers. They have claimed not to be able to supervise or control the ship's medical personnel and cruise ship's doctors have therefore mostly been signed on as independent contractors, not employees. A United States court decision from 1988, Barbetta versus S/S Bermuda Star, supported this view and ruled that a ship's owner cannot be held vicariously liable for the negligence of the ship's doctor directed at the ship's passengers. Some years ago a cruise passenger fell and hit his head while boarding a trolley ashore. Hours later he was seen aboard by the ship's doctor, who sent him to a local hospital. He died 1 week later, and his daughter filed a complaint alleging the cruise company was vicariously liable for the purported negligence of the ship's doctor and nurse, under actual or apparent agency theories. A United States district court initially dismissed the case, but in November 2014 the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit disagreed and reversed. From then on independently contracted ship's doctors may be considered de facto employees of the cruise line. The author discusses the employment status of physicians working on cruise ships and reviews arguments for and against the Appellate Court's decision. PMID:27681214

  10. Cruise ship's doctors - company employees or independent contractors?

    PubMed

    Dahl, Eilif

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, cruise companies have stated that they are in the transport business but not in the business of providing medical services to passengers. They have claimed not to be able to supervise or control the ship's medical personnel and cruise ship's doctors have therefore mostly been signed on as independent contractors, not employees. A United States court decision from 1988, Barbetta versus S/S Bermuda Star, supported this view and ruled that a ship's owner cannot be held vicariously liable for the negligence of the ship's doctor directed at the ship's passengers. Some years ago a cruise passenger fell and hit his head while boarding a trolley ashore. Hours later he was seen aboard by the ship's doctor, who sent him to a local hospital. He died 1 week later, and his daughter filed a complaint alleging the cruise company was vicariously liable for the purported negligence of the ship's doctor and nurse, under actual or apparent agency theories. A United States district court initially dismissed the case, but in November 2014 the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit disagreed and reversed. From then on independently contracted ship's doctors may be considered de facto employees of the cruise line. The author discusses the employment status of physicians working on cruise ships and reviews arguments for and against the Appellate Court's decision.

  11. Supersonic Retropropulsion Experimental Results from the NASA Ames 9- x 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Rhode, Matthew N.; Edquist, Karl T.

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic retropropulsion was experimentally examined in the Ames Research Center 9x7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel at Mach 1.8 and 2.4. The experimental model, previously designed for and tested in the Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach 2.4, 3.5 and 4.6, was a 5-in diameter 70-deg sphere-cone forebody with a 9.55-in long cylindrical aftbody. The forebody was designed to accommodate up to four 4:1 area ratio nozzles, one on the model centerline and the other three on the half radius spaced 120-deg apart. Surface pressure and flow visualization were the primary measurements, including high-speed data to investigate the dynamics of the interactions between the bow and nozzle shocks. Three blowing configurations were tested with thrust coefficients up to 10 and angles of attack up to 20-deg. Preliminary results and observations from the test are provided

  12. Radiative interactions in chemically reacting supersonic internal flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Chandrasekhar, R.

    1991-01-01

    The two-dimensional, elliptic Navier-Stokes equations are used to investigate supersonic flows with finite-rate chemistry and radiation for hydrogen-air systems. The chemistry source terms in the species equation is treated implicitly to alleviate the stiffness associated with fast reactions. The explicit, unsplit MacCormack finite-difference scheme is used to advance the governing equations in time, until convergence is achieved. The specific problem considered is the premixed flow in a channel with a ten-degree compression ramp. Three different chemistry models are used, accounting for increasing number of reactions and participating species. Two chemistry models assure nitrogen as inert, while the third model accounts for nitrogen reactions and NO(x) formation. The tangent slab approximation is used in the radiative flux formulation. A pseudo-gray model is used to represent the absorption-emission characteristics of the participating species. Results obtained for specific conditions indicate that the radiative interactions vary substantially, depending on reactions involving HO2 and NO species and that this can have a significant influence on the flowfield.

  13. Screech Noise Generation From Supersonic Underexpanded Jets Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta; Seasholtz, Richard G.

    2000-01-01

    Many supersonic military aircraft and some of the modern civilian aircraft (such as the Boeing 777) produce shock-associated noise. This noise is generated from the jet engine plume when the engine nozzle is operated beyond the subsonic operation limit to gain additional thrust. At these underexpanded conditions, a series of shock waves appear in the plume. The turbulent vortices present in the jet interact with the shock waves and produce the additional shock-associated noise. Screech belongs to this noise category, where sound is generated in single or multiple pure tones. The high dynamic load associated with screech can damage the tailplane. One purpose of this study at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field was to provide an accurate data base for validating various computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. These codes will be used to predict the frequency and amplitude of screech tones. A second purpose was to advance the fundamental physical understanding of how shock-turbulence interactions generate sound. Previously, experiments on shock-turbulence interaction were impossible to perform because no suitable technique was available. As one part of this program, an optical Rayleigh-scattering measurement technique was devised to overcome this difficulty.

  14. Supersonic flow computations for an ASTOVL aircraft configuration, phase 2, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramakrishnan, Sekaripuram V.; Chakravarthy, Sukumar R.; Szema, Kuo-Yen

    1990-01-01

    A unified space/time marching method was used to solve the Euler and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for supersonic flow past an Advanced Short Take-off and Vertical Landing (ASTOVL) aircraft configuration. Lift and drag values obtained from the computations compare well with wind tunnel measurements. The entire calculation procedure is described starting from the geometry to final postprocessing for lift and drag. The intermediate steps include conversion from IGES to the patch specification needed for the CFD code, grid generation, and solution procedure. The calculations demonstrate the capability of the method used to accurately predict design parameters such as lift and drag for very complex aircraft configurations.

  15. The resonance of twin supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Philip J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the resonant interaction between twin supersonic jets. An instability wave model is used to describe the large scale coherent structures in the jet mixing layers. A linearized shock cell model is also given for the jets when operating off design. The problem's geometry admits four types of normal modes associated with each azimuthal mode number in the single jet. The stability of these modes is examined for both a vortex sheet model of the jet and a jet flow represented by realistic profiles. The growth rates of each mode number and type are found to vary with jet separation and mixing layer thickness and Strouhal number. Contours of equal pressure level are obtained for each mode. The region close to the symmetry axis is found to have the greatest pressure fluctuation amplitude.

  16. The gaseous jet in supersonic crossflow

    SciTech Connect

    Heister, S.D.; Karagozian, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical/numerical model for the deflection and mixing of a single gaseous jet in a supersonic crossflow is presented. The jet cross-section is described in terms of the compressible vortex pair resulting from viscous and impulsive forces acting at the jet periphery, and the vortex pair data are combined with data for the mass and momentum balance along the jet axis in order to model the trajectory and mixing of the injected fluid. A numerical technique is employed to solve for the inviscid outer flow and the position of the bow shock which envelopes the jet. The model is shown to be capable of predicting overall jet penetration (for perfectly or slightly underexpanded jets) to within 10 percent of experimental findings, while requiring only a few seconds of computer time. 24 refs.

  17. Design of supersonic Coanda jet nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevilaqua, Paul M.; Lee, John D.

    1987-01-01

    The thrust vectoring of supersonic Coanda jets was improved by designing a nozzle to skew the initial jet velocity profile. A new nozzle design procedure, based on the method of characteristics, was developed to design a nozzle which produces a specified exit velocity profile. The thrust vectoring of a simple convergent nozzle, a convergent-divergent nozzle, and a nozzle which produces a skewed velocity profile matched to the curvature of the Coanda surface were expermentially compared over a range of pressure ratios from 1.5 to 3.5. Elimination of the expansion shocks with the C-D nozzle is shown to greatly improve the thrust vectoring; elimination of turning shocks with the skewed profile nozzle further improves the vectoring.

  18. The noise from supersonic elliptic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Philip J.; Bhat, Thonse R. S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents calculations of the noise radiated by a supersonic elliptic jet. The large scale structures in the jet, that are the predominant source of noise in the downstream direction, are modeled as instability waves. The evolution of the instability waves is determined by a local, linear, inviscid analysis. An expression is derived for the acoustic field outside the jet and the far field directivity associated with each instability wave. Calculations are performed for a Mach 1.5 elliptic jet with aspect ratio 2:1 and a Mach 2.0 elliptic jet with aspect ratio 2:1 and a Mach 2.0 elliptic jet with aspect ratio 3:1. The mean flow development is taken from experimental results. Comparisons are made with far field acoustic measurements.

  19. Gas turbine engine with supersonic compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, II, William Byron; Lawlor, Shawn P.

    2015-10-20

    A gas turbine engine having a compressor section using blades on a rotor to deliver a gas at supersonic conditions to a stator. The stator includes one or more of aerodynamic ducts that have converging and diverging portions for deceleration of the gas to subsonic conditions and to deliver a high pressure gas to combustors. The aerodynamic ducts include structures for changing the effective contraction ratio to enable starting even when designed for high pressure ratios, and structures for boundary layer control. In an embodiment, aerodynamic ducts are provided having an aspect ratio of two to one (2:1) or more, when viewed in cross-section orthogonal to flow direction at an entrance to the aerodynamic duct.

  20. SUPERSONIC DOWNFLOWS IN A SUNSPOT LIGHT BRIDGE

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, Rohan E.; Mathew, Shibu K.; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Bellot Rubio, Luis R.

    2009-10-10

    We report the discovery of supersonic downflows in a sunspot light bridge using measurements taken with the spectropolarimeter onboard the Hinode satellite. The downflows occur in small patches close to regions where the vector magnetic field changes orientation rapidly, and are associated with anomalous circular polarization profiles. An inversion of the observed Stokes spectra reveals velocities of up to 10 km s{sup -1}, making them the strongest photospheric flows ever measured in light bridges. Some (but not all) of the downflowing patches are cospatial and cotemporal with brightness enhancements in chromospheric Ca II H filtergrams. We suggest that these flows are due to magnetic reconnection in the upper photosphere/lower chromosphere, although other mechanisms cannot be ruled out.

  1. Axisymmetric supersonic flow in rotating impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Arthur W

    1952-01-01

    General equations are developed for isentropic, frictionless, axisymmetric flow in rotating impellers with blade thickness taken into account and with blade forces eliminated in favor of the blade-surface function. It is shown that the total energy of the gas relative to the rotating coordinate system is dependent on the stream function only, and that if the flow upstream of the impeller is vortex-free, a velocity potential exists which is a function of only the radial and axial distances in the impeller. The characteristic equations for supersonic flow are developed and used to investigate flows in several configurations in order to ascertain the effect of variations of the boundary conditions on the internal flow and the work input. Conditions varied are prerotation of the gas, blade turning rate, gas velocity at the blade tips, blade thickness, and sweep of the leading edge.

  2. Turbulent supersonic convection in three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malagoli, Andrea; Cattaneo, Fausto; Brummell, Nicholas H.

    1990-01-01

    Previous numerical calculations of two-dimensional, compressible convection are extended to three dimensions, using a higher order Godunov scheme. The results show that the flow readily becomes supersonic in the upper boundary layer, where shock structures form intermittently in the vicinity of the strong downflow lanes. The convection as a whole is strongly time-dependent and evolves on a time scale comparable to the sound crossing time. The motions in the upper layers are characterized by the rapid expansion of the upward-moving fluid elements. In the interior, most of the heat is carried by a small fraction of the fluid residing in strong, highly coherent downflows. The remaining fluid is dominated by small-scale, disorganized turbulent motions.

  3. Supersonic projectile models for asynchronous shooter localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozick, Richard J.; Whipps, Gene T.; Ash, Joshua N.

    2011-06-01

    In this work we consider the localization of a gunshot using a distributed sensor network measuring time differences of arrival between a firearm's muzzle blast and the shockwave induced by a supersonic bullet. This so-called MB-SW approach is desirable because time synchronization is not required between the sensors, however it suffers from increased computational complexity and requires knowledge of the bullet's velocity at all points along its trajectory. While the actual velocity profile of a particular gunshot is unknown, one may use a parameterized model for the velocity profile and simultaneously fit the model and localize the shooter. In this paper we study efficient solutions for the localization problem and identify deceleration models that trade off localization accuracy and computational complexity. We also develop a statistical analysis that includes bias due to mismatch between the true and actual deceleration models and covariance due to additive noise.

  4. An asymptotic theory of supersonic propeller noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    1992-01-01

    A theory for predicting the noise field of a propeller with a realistic blade geometry is presented. The theory, which utilizes a large blade count approximation, provides an efficient formula for predicting the radiation of sound from all three sources of propeller noise. Comparisons with full numerical integration indicate that the noise levels predicted by this formula are quite accurate. Calculations based on this method also show that the radiation from the Lighthill quadrupole source is rather substantial when compared with thickness and loading noise for high speed propellers. A preliminary application of the theory to the problem of the sensitivity of the peak noise levels generated by a supersonic propeller to the variations in its tip helical Mach number has produced a trend that is in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations.

  5. Historical development of worldwide supersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    Some major milestones in the progression of airplane speeds from subsonic to supersonic are traced. Historical background is included on work done prior to the Twentieth Century, but the major emphasis is on the Twentieth Century developments after the man carrying airplane became a practical reality. The techniques of increasing airplane speed revolve around means of increasing the propulsive force and means of reducing the airframe resistance (drag). With the changes in speed, the attendant changes in flow patterns due to the compressibility of air introduce some aerodynamic problems. In addition, geometric changes introduced to combat the effects of compressibility also promote aerodynamic problems. Some of the solutions to these problems are illustrated, and many design features that evolved are discussed.

  6. NASA's F-15B Research Testbed aircraft flies in the supersonic shock wave of a U.S. Navy F-5E as par

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's F-15B Research Testbed aircraft recently flew in the supersonic shock wave of a U.S. Navy F-5E in support of the F-5 Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration (SSBD) project, part of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Quiet Supersonic Platform (QSP) program. The flights originated from the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California. Four flights were flown in order to measure the F-5E's near-field (close-up) sonic boom signature at Mach 1.4, during which more than 50 shockwave patterns were measured at distances as close as 100 feet below the F-5E.

  7. Supersonic Wing Optimization Using SpaRibs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locatelli, David; Mulani, Sameer B.; Liu, Qiang; Tamijani, Ali Y.; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2014-01-01

    This research investigates the advantages of using curvilinear spars and ribs, termed SpaRibs, to design a supersonic aircraft wing-box in comparison to the use of classic design concepts that employ straight spars and ribs. The objective is to achieve a more efficient load-bearing mechanism and to passively control the deformation of the structure under the flight loads. Moreover, the use of SpaRibs broadens the design space and allows for natural frequencies and natural mode shape tailoring. The SpaRibs concept is implemented in a new optimization MATLAB-based framework referred to as EBF3SSWingOpt. This optimization scheme performs both the sizing and the shaping of the internal structural elements, connecting the optimizer with the analysis software. The shape of the SpaRibs is parametrically defined using the so called Linked Shape method. Each set of SpaRibs is placed in a one by one square domain of the natural space. The set of curves is subsequently transformed in the physical space for creating the wing structure geometry layout. The shape of each curve of each set is unique; however, mathematical relations link the curvature in an effort to reduce the number of design variables. The internal structure of a High Speed Commercial Transport aircraft concept developed by Boeing is optimized subjected to stress, subsonic flutter and supersonic flutter constraints. The results show that the use of the SpaRibs allows for the reduction of the aircraft's primary structure weight without violating the constraints. A weight reduction of about 15 percent is observed.

  8. 4. VIEW NORTHWEST OF SUPERSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING TO TRANSONIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTHWEST OF SUPERSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING TO TRANSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Bounded by Clara Barton Parkway & McArthur Boulevard, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  9. 2. VIEW SOUTH OF TRANSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING AND SUPERSONIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTH OF TRANSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING AND SUPERSONIC WIND TUNNEL BUILDING - Naval Surface Warfare Center, Bounded by Clara Barton Parkway & McArthur Boulevard, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  10. F-16XL Supersonic Laminar Flow Test Flight

    NASA Video Gallery

    An F-16XL aircraft was used by the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in a NASA-wide program to improve laminar airflow on aircraft flying at sustained supersonic speeds. It was th...

  11. Assessment of the Thermal Advantages of Biased Supersonic Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carkin, Michael J.

    The following work investigates an alternative supersonic film cooling method for hydrogen-fueled, gas-generator cycle rocket engines. The research is intended to serve as an initial proof-of-concept for a biased supersonic film cooling method envisioned for nozzle extension thermal management. The proposed method utilizes a dual-stream injection process that leverages the high heat capacity of the fuel-rich gas-generator gases. By comparing the proposed cooling strategy to the conventional mixed injection process, the research numerically validates the biased supersonic film cooling scheme for low supersonic slot Mach numbers. The average film cooling effectiveness was improved 5%-8% with increases as high as 12%. The average reduction in wall temperature ranged from 9%-15% with maximum reductions as high as 36% over the conventional method.

  12. Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel primary air injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brooke Edward

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the requirements, design, and prototype testing of the flex-section and hinge seals for the Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel Primary Injector. The supersonic atmospheric primary injector operates between Mach 1.8 and Mach 2.2 with mass-flow rates of 62 to 128 lbm/s providing the necessary pressure reduction to operate the tunnel in the desired Reynolds number (Re) range.

  13. Performance Predictions of Supersonic Intakes with Isentropic-Compression Forebody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, K.; Saito, Tsutomu

    Intake is an important component of next generation air-breathing engines such as Ram/Scram jet engines, as well as conventional jet-propulsion systems. The supersonic intake decelerates compresses the air inflow by shocks or compression waves to appropriate flow conditions for a specific engine system. The performance of supersonic intakes is evaluated mainly by the mass flow rate and the total pressure recovery rate.

  14. Affordable/Acceptable Supersonic Flight: Is It Near?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, Christine M.

    2003-01-01

    The author takes a historical look at supersonic flight and humankind's first encounter with the sonic boom. A review is given from the 1950s to the present of the quest to understand the sonic boom, quantify its disturbance on humans and structures, and minimize its effect through aircraft design and operation. Finally, the author reminds readers that sonic boom is only one factor, though critical, in enabling an economically viable commercial supersonic aircraft.

  15. Wide range operation of advanced low NOx aircraft gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, P. B.; Fiorito, R. J.; Butze, H. F.

    1978-01-01

    The paper summarizes the results of an experimental test rig program designed to define and demonstrates techniques which would allow the jet-induced circulation and vortex air blast combustors to operate stably with acceptable emissions at simulated engine idle without compromise to the low NOx emissions under the high-altitude supersonic cruise condition. The discussion focuses on the test results of the key combustor modifications for both the simulated engine idle and cruise conditions. Several range-augmentation techniques are demonstrated that allow the lean-reaction premixed aircraft gas turbine combustor to operate with low NOx emissons at engine cruise and acceptable CO and UHC levels at engine idle. These techniques involve several combinations, including variable geometry and fuel switching designs.

  16. Referring cruise ship patients to specialists in Norway--a welfare state with a national health care system.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Eilif

    2015-01-01

    Northern Europe is a popular cruise destination, but many non-Scandinavian cruise ship's doctors who are used to enthusiastic service from specialists ashore, get frustrated when referring passengers or crew to out-patient medical evaluation. Norway's national health care system is described and used as an example of medical conditions in a welfare state with a relatively well-functioning national health care system: Emergency cases are usually promptly admitted. Out-patient specialist consultations are available in public polyclinics, but waiting time can be considerable, also for patients from ships. Private specialists are fully booked weeks in advance and do not work from Friday to Monday and during holidays. Public and private medical service capacity is significantly reduced during the summer months. Hence, most specialists ashore are not eager to see demanding ship patients. Ship's doctors should limit referral to conditions that require specific procedures that are not available on the vessel but are necessary for the patient to be able to continue cruising or working aboard. Crewmembers who are unfit for work aboard, should instead be signed off and repatriated for diagnostic work-up and follow-up at home. In cases of hospitalisation or necessary referral ashore, the ship's doctor should always confer in advance with the company's ship's port agents and make necessary shore-side arrangements through them. PMID:26119674

  17. Referring cruise ship patients to specialists in Norway--a welfare state with a national health care system.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Eilif

    2015-01-01

    Northern Europe is a popular cruise destination, but many non-Scandinavian cruise ship's doctors who are used to enthusiastic service from specialists ashore, get frustrated when referring passengers or crew to out-patient medical evaluation. Norway's national health care system is described and used as an example of medical conditions in a welfare state with a relatively well-functioning national health care system: Emergency cases are usually promptly admitted. Out-patient specialist consultations are available in public polyclinics, but waiting time can be considerable, also for patients from ships. Private specialists are fully booked weeks in advance and do not work from Friday to Monday and during holidays. Public and private medical service capacity is significantly reduced during the summer months. Hence, most specialists ashore are not eager to see demanding ship patients. Ship's doctors should limit referral to conditions that require specific procedures that are not available on the vessel but are necessary for the patient to be able to continue cruising or working aboard. Crewmembers who are unfit for work aboard, should instead be signed off and repatriated for diagnostic work-up and follow-up at home. In cases of hospitalisation or necessary referral ashore, the ship's doctor should always confer in advance with the company's ship's port agents and make necessary shore-side arrangements through them.

  18. Supersonic Flying Qualities Experience Using the SR-71

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Timothy H.; Jackson, Dante

    1997-01-01

    Approximately 25 years ago NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, initiated the evaluation of supersonic handling qualities issues using the XB-70 and the YF-12. Comparison of pilot comments and ratings with some of the classical handling qualities criteria for transport aircraft provided information on the usefulness of these criteria and insight into supersonic flying qualities issues. A second research study has recently been completed which again addressed supersonic flying qualities issues through evaluations of the SR-71 in flight at Mach 3. Additional insight into supersonic flying qualities issues was obtained through pilot ratings and comments. These ratings were compared with existing military specifications and proposed criteria for the High Speed Civil Transport. This paper investigates the disparity between pilot comments and the Neal/Smith criteria through a modification of the technique using vertical speed at the pilot station. The paper specifically addresses the pilot ability to control flightpath and pitch attitude in supersonic flight and pilot displays typical of supersonic maneuvering.

  19. Participation in the 1996 Arlindo Cruise to the Indonesian Seas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marra, John

    1997-01-01

    The objective of Arlindo-Productivity is to understand the factors responsible for regional differences in the response of phytoplankton and zooplankton to the SE and NW Monsoons in Indonesia. The hypothesis is that an interplay between circulation and shoaling of the nutricline, as a response to the monsoons, regulates productivity in the Indonesian Seas. My o@jective for the cruise in 1996 was to continue our collaboration with Indonesian scientists by conducting a set of hydrographic, primary production and spectral irradiance observations in the Indonesian Seas. This grant paid for shipping, travel and incidental costs associated with participation in the cruise in December, 1996. Ship costs were borne by the Indonesian Institute of Sciences as part of the collaborative effort. A plan for Arlindo in 1996 was agreed upon in March, 1996, by Indonesian scientists together with Arnold Gordon. The plan called for a 20-day physical oceanography and mooring cruise in November, 1996, followed by a 5-day bio-optical cruise. The bio-optical cruise departed from, and returned to, Ambon, and sampled in the Banda Sea. We completed a series of chlorophyll analyses, both a sampling of surface variability and depth profiles in the Banda Sea. We also completed three MER profiles for depth profiles of spectral irradiance. These data have a useful by-product in that they can be used for vicarious calibration of the OCTS sensor aboard the ADEOS satellite. As such, the data has been transmitted to NASDA in Japan for their use.

  20. Vertical Take-Off and Landing Vehicle with Increased Cruise Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredericks, William J. (Inventor); Moore, Mark D. (Inventor); Busan, Ronald C. (Inventor); Rothhaar, Paul M. (Inventor); North, David D. (Inventor); Langford, William M. (Inventor); Laws, Christopher T. (Inventor); Hodges, William T. (Inventor); Johns, Zachary R. (Inventor); Webb, Sandy R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems, methods, and devices are provided that combine an advance vehicle configuration, such as an advanced aircraft configuration, with the infusion of electric propulsion, thereby enabling a four times increase in range and endurance while maintaining a full vertical takeoff and landing ("VTOL") and hover capability for the vehicle. Embodiments may provide vehicles with both VTOL and cruise efficient capabilities without the use of ground infrastructure. An embodiment vehicle may comprise a wing configured to tilt through a range of motion, a first series of electric motors coupled to the wing and each configured to drive an associated wing propeller, a tail configured to tilt through the range of motion, a second series of electric motors coupled to the tail and each configured to drive an associated tail propeller, and an electric propulsion system connected to the first series of electric motors and the second series of electric motors.

  1. Description of an aeronautical geometry conversion package: Wave-drag to Langley Wireframe Geometry Standard (LaWGS) to Supersonic Implicit Marching Potential (SIMP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    Documented is an aeronautical geometry conversion package which translates wave-drag geometry into the Langley Wireframe Geometry Standard (LaWGS) format and then into a format which is used by the Supersonic Implicit Marching Potential (SIMP) program. The programs described were developed by Computer Sciences Corporation for the Advanced Vehicles Division/Advanced Concepts Branch at NASA Langley Research Center. Included also are the input and output from a benchmark test case.

  2. A preliminary study of the performance and characteristics of a supersonic executive aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mascitti, V. R.

    1977-01-01

    The impact of advanced supersonic technologies on the performance and characteristics of a supersonic executive aircraft was studied in four configurations with different engine locations and wing/body blending and an advanced nonafterburning turbojet or variable cycle engine. An M 2.2 design Douglas scaled arrow-wing was used with Learjet 35 accommodations. All four configurations with turbojet engines meet the performance goals of 5926 km (3200 n.mi.) range, 1981 meters (6500 feet) takeoff field length, and 77 meters per second (150 knots) approach speed. The noise levels of of turbojet configurations studied are excessive. However, a turbojet with mechanical suppressor was not studied. The variable cycle engine configuration is deficient in range by 555 km (300 n.mi) but nearly meets subsonic noise rules (FAR 36 1977 edition), if coannular noise relief is assumed. All configurations are in the 33566 to 36287 kg (74,000 to 80,000 lbm) takeoff gross weight class when incorporating current titanium manufacturing technology.

  3. A study on supersonic mixing by circular nozzle with various injection angles for air breathing engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aso, S.; Inoue, K.; Yamaguchi, K.; Tani, Y.

    2009-09-01

    -ADI factorization algorithm, AIAA Paper 86-0338, 1986] for time integration. Central difference was used for viscous terms and k-ω two-equation turbulence model [D.C. Wilcox, Reassessment of the scale determining equation for advanced turbulent models, J. AIAA 26(11) (1988) 1299-1310; D.C. Wilcox, A two-equation turbulence model for wall-bounded and free-share flows, AIAA Paper 93-2905, 1993] was also employed. In the experiments, stream line on the wall surface was revealed by the oil flow picture and the flow field was visualized by the Shlieren photograph. The wall static pressure profile along the flow was obtained by the wall pressure measurements. Also volume fraction distribution measurements were conducted. Each one of those showed good agreement with computational ones. From the thorough investigation of the flow field by experiments and computations, various characteristics of the supersonic mixing with circular nozzle have been revealed.

  4. A Numerical Comparison of Symmetric and Asymmetric Supersonic Wind Tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Kylen D.

    Supersonic wind tunnels are a vital aspect to the aerospace industry. Both the design and testing processes of different aerospace components often include and depend upon utilization of supersonic test facilities. Engine inlets, wing shapes, and body aerodynamics, to name a few, are aspects of aircraft that are frequently subjected to supersonic conditions in use, and thus often require supersonic wind tunnel testing. There is a need for reliable and repeatable supersonic test facilities in order to help create these vital components. The option of building and using asymmetric supersonic converging-diverging nozzles may be appealing due in part to lower construction costs. There is a need, however, to investigate the differences, if any, in the flow characteristics and performance of asymmetric type supersonic wind tunnels in comparison to symmetric due to the fact that asymmetric configurations of CD nozzle are not as common. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study has been conducted on an existing University of Michigan (UM) asymmetric supersonic wind tunnel geometry in order to study the effects of asymmetry on supersonic wind tunnel performance. Simulations were made on both the existing asymmetrical tunnel geometry and two axisymmetric reflections (of differing aspect ratio) of that original tunnel geometry. The Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations are solved via NASAs OVERFLOW code to model flow through these configurations. In this way, information has been gleaned on the effects of asymmetry on supersonic wind tunnel performance. Shock boundary layer interactions are paid particular attention since the test section integrity is greatly dependent upon these interactions. Boundary layer and overall flow characteristics are studied. The RANS study presented in this document shows that the UM asymmetric wind tunnel/nozzle configuration is not as well suited to producing uniform test section flow as that of a symmetric configuration, specifically one

  5. The Velocity Field Induced by a Trailing Vortex in Supersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    楠瀬, 一洋; 小高, 雄介

    In order to estimate the velocity field induced by a trailing vortex which is located along the free-stream direction in supersonic flow, we extend the Biot-Savart law, that is originally proven for subsonic flow, to supersonic flow. During the derivation we use the linearized perturbation potential equation that can be applied to both subsonic and supersonic (inviscid) flows. It is shown that our current formula reduces to the original Biot-Savart law when the flow speed reduces from supersonic to subsonic one. It is also shown in the appendix that the Kutta-Joukowski theorem is still applicable to supersonic flows within the supersonic thin-airfoil approximations.

  6. Facility Upgrade/Replacement Tasks ('planned') at the NASA Glenn Research Center 10x10 Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giriunas, Julius A.

    2012-01-01

    Facility upgrades and large maintenance tasks needed at the NASA Glenn 10x10 Supersonic Wind Tunnel requires significant planning to make sure implementation proceeds in an efficiently and cost effective manner. Advanced planning to secure the funding, complete design efforts and schedule the installation needs to be thought out years in advance to avoid interference with wind tunnel testing. This presentation describes five facility tasks planned for implementation over the next few years. The main focus of the presentation highlights the efforts on possible replacement of the diesel generator and the rationale behind the effort.

  7. Acute Gastroenteritis on Cruise Ships - United States, 2008-2014.

    PubMed

    Freeland, Amy L; Vaughan, George H; Banerjee, Shailendra N

    2016-01-15

    From 1990 to 2004, the reported rates of diarrheal disease (three or more loose stools or a greater than normal frequency in a 24-hour period) on cruise ships decreased 2.4%, from 29.2 cases per 100,000 travel days to 28.5 cases (1,2). Increased rates of acute gastroenteritis illness (diarrhea or vomiting that is associated with loose stools, bloody stools, abdominal cramps, headache, muscle aches, or fever) occurred in years that novel strains of norovirus, the most common etiologic agent in cruise ship outbreaks, emerged (3). To determine recent rates of acute gastroenteritis on cruise ships, CDC analyzed combined data for the period 2008-2014 that were submitted by cruise ships sailing in U.S. jurisdiction (defined as passenger vessels carrying ≥13 passengers and within 15 days of arriving in the United States) (4). CDC also reviewed laboratory data to ascertain the causes of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks and examined trends over time. During the study period, the rates of acute gastroenteritis per 100,000 travel days decreased among passengers from 27.2 cases in 2008 to 22.3 in 2014. Rates for crew members remained essentially unchanged (21.3 cases in 2008 and 21.6 in 2014). However, the rate of acute gastroenteritis was significantly higher in 2012 than in 2011 or 2013 for both passengers and crew members, likely related to the emergence of a novel strain of norovirus, GII.4 Sydney (5). During 2008-2014, a total of 133 cruise ship acute gastroenteritis outbreaks were reported, 95 (71%) of which had specimens available for testing. Among these, 92 (97%) were caused by norovirus, and among 80 norovirus specimens for which a genotype was identified, 59 (73.8%) were GII.4 strains. Cruise ship travelers experiencing diarrhea or vomiting should report to the ship medical center promptly so that symptoms can be assessed, proper treatment provided, and control measures implemented.

  8. Acute Gastroenteritis on Cruise Ships - United States, 2008-2014.

    PubMed

    Freeland, Amy L; Vaughan, George H; Banerjee, Shailendra N

    2016-01-01

    From 1990 to 2004, the reported rates of diarrheal disease (three or more loose stools or a greater than normal frequency in a 24-hour period) on cruise ships decreased 2.4%, from 29.2 cases per 100,000 travel days to 28.5 cases (1,2). Increased rates of acute gastroenteritis illness (diarrhea or vomiting that is associated with loose stools, bloody stools, abdominal cramps, headache, muscle aches, or fever) occurred in years that novel strains of norovirus, the most common etiologic agent in cruise ship outbreaks, emerged (3). To determine recent rates of acute gastroenteritis on cruise ships, CDC analyzed combined data for the period 2008-2014 that were submitted by cruise ships sailing in U.S. jurisdiction (defined as passenger vessels carrying ≥13 passengers and within 15 days of arriving in the United States) (4). CDC also reviewed laboratory data to ascertain the causes of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks and examined trends over time. During the study period, the rates of acute gastroenteritis per 100,000 travel days decreased among passengers from 27.2 cases in 2008 to 22.3 in 2014. Rates for crew members remained essentially unchanged (21.3 cases in 2008 and 21.6 in 2014). However, the rate of acute gastroenteritis was significantly higher in 2012 than in 2011 or 2013 for both passengers and crew members, likely related to the emergence of a novel strain of norovirus, GII.4 Sydney (5). During 2008-2014, a total of 133 cruise ship acute gastroenteritis outbreaks were reported, 95 (71%) of which had specimens available for testing. Among these, 92 (97%) were caused by norovirus, and among 80 norovirus specimens for which a genotype was identified, 59 (73.8%) were GII.4 strains. Cruise ship travelers experiencing diarrhea or vomiting should report to the ship medical center promptly so that symptoms can be assessed, proper treatment provided, and control measures implemented. PMID:26766396

  9. FRV Deleware II cruise, 30 June to 7 July 1978. Data report

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, W.; von Bock, K.

    1982-05-01

    This was the last of three companion cruises designed to provide broad-scale coverage of seasonal shelf conditions occurring between the April and October investigations undertaken aboard ATLANTIS II cruises 99 and 104.

  10. Analysis of the turbojet engine for propulsion of supersonic fighter airplanes / David S. Gabriel, Richard P. Krebs, E.Clinton Wilcox, Stanley L.Koutz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, David S; Krebs, Richard P; Wilcox, E Clinton; Koutz, Stanley L

    1953-01-01

    An analytical investigation was made of two supersonic interceptor type airplanes to determine the most desirable turbojet engine characteristics for this application The airplanes were designed differently primarily because of the amount of subsonic flight incorporated in the flight plan--one flight having none and the other, a cruise radius of 400 nautical miles. Several power plant design variables were varied independently to determine the effect of changes in each parameter on airplane performance. These parameters included compressor pressure ratio, compressor efficiency, turbine-inlet temperature, afterburner temperature, engine specific weight, and air-handling capacity. The effects of using a convergent-divergent exhaust nozzle and of changing the design flight Mach number were also investigated.

  11. Study of supersonic plasma technology jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selezneva, Svetlana; Gravelle, Denis; Boulos, Maher; van de Sanden, Richard; Schram, Dc

    2001-10-01

    Recently some new techniques using remote thermal plasma for thin film deposition and plasma chemistry processes were developed. These techniques include PECVD of diamonds, diamond-like and polymer films; a-C:H and a-Si:H films. The latter are of especial interest because of their applications for solar cell production industry. In remote plasma deposition, thermal plasma is formed by means of one of traditional plasma sources. The chamber pressure is reduced with the help of continuous pumping. In that way the flow is accelerated up to the supersonic speed. The plasma expansion is controlled using a specific torch nozzle design. To optimize the deposition process detailed knowledge about the gas dynamic structure of the jet and chemical kinetics mechanisms is required. In the paper, we show how the flow pattern and the character of the deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium differs in plasmas generated by different plasma sources, such as induction plasma torch, traditional direct current arc and cascaded arc. We study the effects of the chamber pressure, nozzle design and carrier gas on the resulting plasma properties. The analysis is performed by means of numerical modeling using commercially available FLUENT program with incorporated user-defined subroutines for two-temperature model. The results of continuum mechanics approach are compared with that of the kinetic Monte Carlo method and with the experimental data.

  12. Particle Streak Velocimetry of Supersonic Nozzle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willits, J. D.; Pourpoint, T. L.

    2016-01-01

    A novel velocimetry technique to probe the exhaust flow of a laboratory scale combustor is being developed. The technique combines the advantages of standard particle velocimetry techniques and the ultra-fast imaging capabilities of a streak camera to probe high speed flows near continuously with improved spatial and velocity resolution. This "Particle Streak Velocimetry" technique tracks laser illuminated seed particles at up to 236 picosecond temporal resolution allowing time-resolved measurement of one-dimensional flows exceeding 2000 m/s as are found in rocket nozzles and many other applications. Developmental tests with cold nitrogen have been performed to validate and troubleshoot the technique with supersonic flows of much lower velocity and without background noise due to combusting flow. Flow velocities on the order of 500 m/s have been probed with titanium dioxide particles and a continuous-wave laser diode. Single frame images containing multiple streaks are analyzed to find the average slope of all incident particles corresponding to the centerline axial flow velocity. Long term objectives for these tests are correlation of specific impulse to theoretical combustion predictions and direct comparisons between candidate green fuels and the industry standard, monomethylhydrazine, each tested under identical conditions.

  13. Supersonic jet and crossflow interaction: Computational modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ez; Boles, John; Aono, Hikaru; Davis, Douglas; Shyy, Wei

    2013-02-01

    The supersonic jet-in-crossflow problem which involves shocks, turbulent mixing, and large-scale vortical structures, requires special treatment for turbulence to obtain accurate solutions. Different turbulence modeling techniques are reviewed and compared in terms of their performance in predicting results consistent with the experimental data. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models are limited in prediction of fuel structure due to their inability to accurately capture unsteadiness in the flow. Large eddy simulation (LES) is not yet practical due to prohibitively large grid requirement near the wall. Hybrid RANS/LES can offer reasonable compromise between accuracy and efficiency. The hybrid models are based on various approaches such as explicit blending of RANS and LES, detached eddy simulation (DES), and filter-based multi-scale models. In particular, they can be used to evaluate the turbulent Schmidt number modeling techniques used in jet-in-crossflow simulations. Specifically, an adaptive approach can be devised by utilizing the information obtained from the resolved field to help assign the value of turbulent Schmidt number in the sub-filter field. The adaptive approach combined with the multi-scale model improves the results especially when highly refined grids are needed to resolve small structures involved in the mixing process.

  14. Supersonic Jet Noise Reduction Using Microjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Cuppoletti, Dan; Malla, Bhupatindra

    2013-11-01

    Fluidic injection for jet noise reduction involves injecting secondary jets into a primary jet to alter the noise characteristics of the primary jet. A major challenge has been determining what mechanisms are responsible for noise reduction due to varying injector designs, injection parameters, and primary jets. The current study provides conclusive results on the effect of injector angle and momentum ux ratio on the acoustics and shock structure of a supersonic Md = 1.56 jet. It is shown that the turbulent mixing noise scales primarily with the injector momentum flux ratio. Increasing the injector momentum flux ratio increases streamwise vorticity generation and reduces peak turbulence levels. It is found that the shock-related noise components are most affected by the interaction of the shocks from the injectors with the primary shock structure of the jet. Increasing momentum flux ratio causes shock noise reduction until a limit where shock noise increases again. It is shown that the shock noise components and mixing noise components are reduced through fundamentally different mechanisms and maximum overall noise reduction is achieved by balancing the reduction of both components.

  15. Stationary flow conditions in pulsed supersonic beams.

    PubMed

    Christen, Wolfgang

    2013-10-21

    We describe a generally applicable method for the experimental determination of stationary flow conditions in pulsed supersonic beams, utilizing time-resolved electron induced fluorescence measurements of high pressure jet expansions of helium. The detection of ultraviolet photons from electronically excited helium emitted very close to the nozzle exit images the valve opening behavior-with the decided advantage that a photon signal is not affected by beam-skimmer and beam-residual gas interactions; it thus allows to conclusively determine those operation parameters of a pulsed valve that yield complete opening. The studies reveal that a "flat-top" signal, indicating constant density and commonly considered as experimental criterion for continuous flow, is insufficient. Moreover, translational temperature and mean terminal flow velocity turn out to be significantly more sensitive in testing for the equivalent behavior of a continuous nozzle source. Based on the widely distributed Even-Lavie valve we demonstrate that, in principle, it is possible to achieve quasi-continuous flow conditions even with fast-acting valves; however, the two prerequisites are a minimum pulse duration that is much longer than standard practice and previous estimates, and a suitable tagging of the appropriate beam segment.

  16. Supersonic Flows in Micron-Sized Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayt, Robert; Breuer, Kenneth

    1998-11-01

    The results of experiments and numerical simulations of flows in micromachined converging-diverging nozzles are presented. The nozzles are fabricated using deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) and are typically 20-30 microns at the throat with expansion ratios ranging from 5 to 20. The flow channels are 300 microns deep, resulting in a 10:1 or better aspect ratio at the throat. Experimental measurements of mass flow and thrust vs. pressure ratio are presented demonstrating the presence of choked and supersonic flow in the micron-scale gemoetries. Mass flow and thrust efficiencies are also presented and compared with results from two-dimensional Navier-Stokes simulations. It is found that, while the efficiencies are reasonably large (much better than one might expect, considering the small dimension of the nozzles), the boundary layers have a considerable effect, particularly on the thrust efficiency of the device, due to the relatively large displacement thickness which reduces the effective expansion ratio. The boundary layers at the top and bottom of the nozzles also affect the performance, particularly at low Reynolds numbers. Additional experimental and numerical results are also discussed.

  17. External-Compression Supersonic Inlet Design Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.

    2011-01-01

    A computer code named SUPIN has been developed to perform aerodynamic design and analysis of external-compression, supersonic inlets. The baseline set of inlets include axisymmetric pitot, two-dimensional single-duct, axisymmetric outward-turning, and two-dimensional bifurcated-duct inlets. The aerodynamic methods are based on low-fidelity analytical and numerical procedures. The geometric methods are based on planar geometry elements. SUPIN has three modes of operation: 1) generate the inlet geometry from a explicit set of geometry information, 2) size and design the inlet geometry and analyze the aerodynamic performance, and 3) compute the aerodynamic performance of a specified inlet geometry. The aerodynamic performance quantities includes inlet flow rates, total pressure recovery, and drag. The geometry output from SUPIN includes inlet dimensions, cross-sectional areas, coordinates of planar profiles, and surface grids suitable for input to grid generators for analysis by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods. The input data file for SUPIN and the output file from SUPIN are text (ASCII) files. The surface grid files are output as formatted Plot3D or stereolithography (STL) files. SUPIN executes in batch mode and is available as a Microsoft Windows executable and Fortran95 source code with a makefile for Linux.

  18. NASA advanced propeller research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Bober, Lawrence J.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic and aerodynamic research at NASA Lewis Research Center on advanced propellers is reviewed including analytical and experimental results on both single and counterrotation. Computational tools used to calculate the detailed flow and acoustic fields are described along with wind tunnel tests to obtain data for code verification. Results from two kinds of experiments are reviewed: (1) performance and near field noise at cruise conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-foot Wind Tunnel; and (2) far field noise and performance for takeoff/approach conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Detailed measurements of steady blade surface pressures are described along with vortex flow phenomena at off-design conditions. Near field noise at cruise is shown to level out or decrease as tip relative Mach number is increased beyond 1.15. Counterrotation interaction noise is shown to be a dominant source at takeoff but a secondary source at cruise. Effects of unequal rotor diameters and rotor-to-rotor spacing on interaction noise are also illustrated. Comparisons of wind tunnel acoustic measurements to flight results are made. Finally, some future directions in advanced propeller research such as swirl recovery vanes, higher sweep, forward sweep, and ducted propellers are discussed.

  19. NASA Advanced Propeller Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Bober, Lawrence J.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic and aerodynamic research at NASA Lewis Research Center on advanced propellers is reviewed including analytical and experimental results on both single and counterrotation. Computational tools used to calculate the detailed flow and acoustic i e l d s a r e described along with wind tunnel tests to obtain data for code verification . Results from two kinds of experiments are reviewed: ( 1 ) performance and near field noise at cruise conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 8-by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel and ( 2 ) farfield noise and performance for takeoff/approach conditions as measured in the NASA Lewis 9-by 15-Font Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Detailed measurements of steady blade surface pressures are described along with vortex flow phenomena at off design conditions . Near field noise at cruise is shown to level out or decrease as tip relative Mach number is increased beyond 1.15. Counterrotation interaction noise is shown to be a dominant source at take off but a secondary source at cruise. Effects of unequal rotor diameters and rotor-to-rotor spacing on interaction noise a real so illustrated. Comparisons of wind tunnel acoustic measurements to flight results are made. Finally, some future directions in advanced propeller research such as swirl recovery vanes, higher sweep, forward sweep, and ducted propellers are discussed.

  20. Drive System Enhancement in the NASA Lewis Research Center Supersonic Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becks, Edward A.

    1998-01-01

    An overview of NASA Lewis' Aeropropulsion Wind Tunnel Productivity Improvements was presented at the 19th AIAA Advanced Measurement & Ground Testing Technology Conference. Since that time Lewis has implemented subsonic operation in their 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel as had been proven viable in the 8- by 6 and 9- by 15-Foot Wind Tunnel Complex and discussed at the aforementioned conference. In addition, two more years of data have been gathered to help quantify the true productivity increases in these facilities attributable to the drive system and operational improvements. This paper was invited for presentation at the 20th Advanced Measurement and Ground Testing Conference to discuss and quantify the productivity improvements in the 10- by 10 SWT since the implementation of less than full complement motor operation. An update on the increased productivity at the 8- by 6 and 9- by 15-Foot facility due to drive system enhancements will also be presented.

  1. Future Directions of Supersonic Combustion Research: Air Force/NASA Workshop on Supersonic Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tishkoff, Julian M.; Drummond, J. Philip; Edwards, Tim; Nejad, Abdollah S.

    1997-01-01

    The Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Air Force Wright Laboratory Aero Propulsion and Power Directorate, and the NASA Langley Research Center held a joint supersonic combustion workshop on 14-16 May 1996. The intent of this meeting was to: (1) examine the current state-of-the-art in hydrocarbon and/or hydrogen fueled scramjet research; (2) define the future direction and needs of basic research in support of scramjet technology; and (3) when appropriate, help transition basic research findings to solve the needs of developmental engineering programs in the area of supersonic combustion and fuels. A series of topical sessions were planned. Opening presentations were designed to focus and encourage group discussion and scientific exchange. The last half-day of the workshop was set aside for group discussion of the issues that were raised during the meeting for defining future research opportunities and directions. The following text attempts to summarize the discussions that took place at the workshop.

  2. 14 CFR 91.179 - IFR cruising altitude or flight level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false IFR cruising altitude or flight level. 91... Instrument Flight Rules § 91.179 IFR cruising altitude or flight level. Unless otherwise authorized by ATC... level cruising flight in controlled airspace shall maintain the altitude or flight level assigned...

  3. 14 CFR 91.179 - IFR cruising altitude or flight level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false IFR cruising altitude or flight level. 91... Instrument Flight Rules § 91.179 IFR cruising altitude or flight level. Unless otherwise authorized by ATC... level cruising flight in controlled airspace shall maintain the altitude or flight level assigned...

  4. 14 CFR 91.179 - IFR cruising altitude or flight level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false IFR cruising altitude or flight level. 91... Instrument Flight Rules § 91.179 IFR cruising altitude or flight level. Unless otherwise authorized by ATC... level cruising flight in controlled airspace shall maintain the altitude or flight level assigned...

  5. 33 CFR 165.1154 - Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San Pedro Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San... § 165.1154 Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San Pedro Bay, California. (a) Definition. “Cruise ship” as... anchored at a designated anchorage either inside the Federal breakwaters bounding San Pedro Bay or...

  6. 33 CFR 165.1154 - Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San Pedro Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San... § 165.1154 Security Zones; Cruise Ships, San Pedro Bay, California. (a) Definition. “Cruise ship” as... anchored at a designated anchorage either inside the Federal breakwaters bounding San Pedro Bay or...

  7. 33 CFR 165.1157 - Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zone; Cruise Ships... § 165.1157 Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara, California. (a) Location. The following areas are... cruise ship located within 3 nautical miles of the Santa Barbara Harbor Breakwater Light (Light...

  8. 33 CFR 165.1157 - Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Cruise Ships... § 165.1157 Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara, California. (a) Location. The following areas are... cruise ship located within 3 nautical miles of the Santa Barbara Harbor Breakwater Light (Light...

  9. Optimum Climb to Cruise Noise Trajectories for the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2003-01-01

    By entraining large quantities of ambient air into advanced ejector nozzles, the jet noise of the proposed High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) is expected to be reduced to levels acceptable for airport-vicinity noise certification. Away from the airport, however, this entrained air is shut off and the engines are powered up from their cutback levels to provide better thrust for the climb to cruise altitude. Unsuppressed jet noise levels propagating to the ground far from the airport are expected to be high. Complicating this problem is the HSCT's relative noise level with respect to the subsonic commercial fleet of 2010, which is expected to be much quieter than it is today after the retirement of older, louder, domestic stage II aircraft by the year 2000. In this study, the classic energy state approximation theory is extended to calculate trajectories that minimize the climb to cruise noise of the HSCT. The optimizer dynamically chooses the optimal altitude velocity trajectory, the engine power setting, and whether the ejector should be stowed or deployed with respect to practical aircraft climb constraints and noise limits.

  10. A Grid Sourcing and Adaptation Study Using Unstructured Grids for Supersonic Boom Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Melissa B.; Deere, Karen A.

    2008-01-01

    NASA created the Supersonics Project as part of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program to advance technology that will make a supersonic flight over land viable. Computational flow solvers have lacked the ability to accurately predict sonic boom from the near to far field. The focus of this investigation was to establish gridding and adaptation techniques to predict near-to-mid-field (<10 body lengths below the aircraft) boom signatures at supersonic speeds using the USM3D unstructured grid flow solver. The study began by examining sources along the body the aircraft, far field sourcing and far field boundaries. The study then examined several techniques for grid adaptation. During the course of the study, volume sourcing was introduced as a new way to source grids using the grid generation code VGRID. Two different methods of using the volume sources were examined. The first method, based on manual insertion of the numerous volume sources, made great improvements in the prediction capability of USM3D for boom signatures. The second method (SSGRID), which uses an a priori adaptation approach to stretch and shear the original unstructured grid to align the grid and pressure waves, showed similar results with a more automated approach. Due to SSGRID s results and ease of use, the rest of the study focused on developing a best practice using SSGRID. The best practice created by this study for boom predictions using the CFD code USM3D involved: 1) creating a small cylindrical outer boundary either 1 or 2 body lengths in diameter (depending on how far below the aircraft the boom prediction is required), 2) using a single volume source under the aircraft, and 3) using SSGRID to stretch and shear the grid to the desired length.

  11. PIV Measurements of Supersonic Internally-Mixed Dual-Stream Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    While externally mixed, or separate flow, nozzle systems are most common in high bypass-ratio aircraft, they are not as attractive for use in lower bypass-ratio systems and on aircraft that will fly supersonically. The noise of such propulsion systems is also dominated by jet noise, making the study and noise reduction of these exhaust systems very important, both for military aircraft and future civilian supersonic aircraft. This paper presents particle image velocimetry of internally mixed nozzle with different area ratios between core and bypass, and nozzles that are ideally expanded and convergent. Such configurations independently control the geometry of the internal mixing layer and of the external shock structure. These allow exploration of the impact of shocks on the turbulent mixing layers, the impact of bypass ratio on broadband shock noise and mixing noise, and the impact of temperature on the turbulent flow field. At the 2009 AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference the authors presented data and analysis from a series of tests that looked at the acoustics of supersonic jets from internally mixed nozzles. In that paper the broadband shock and mixing noise components of the jet noise were independently manipulated by holding Mach number constant while varying bypass ratio and jet temperature. Significant portions of that analysis was predicated on assumptions regarding the flow fields of these jets, both shock structure and turbulence. In this paper we add to that analysis by presenting particle image velocimetry measurements of the flow fields of many of those jets. In addition, the turbulent velocity data documented here will be very useful for validation of computational flow codes that are being developed to design advanced nozzles for future aircraft.

  12. Preliminary supersonic flight test evaluation of performance seeking control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Gilyard, Glenn B.

    1993-01-01

    Digital flight and engine control, powerful onboard computers, and sophisticated controls techniques may improve aircraft performance by maximizing fuel efficiency, maximizing thrust, and extending engine life. An adaptive performance seeking control system for optimizing the quasi-steady state performance of an F-15 aircraft was developed and flight tested. This system has three optimization modes: minimum fuel, maximum thrust, and minimum fan turbine inlet temperature. Tests of the minimum fuel and fan turbine inlet temperature modes were performed at a constant thrust. Supersonic single-engine flight tests of the three modes were conducted using varied after burning power settings. At supersonic conditions, the performance seeking control law optimizes the integrated airframe, inlet, and engine. At subsonic conditions, only the engine is optimized. Supersonic flight tests showed improvements in thrust of 9 percent, increases in fuel savings of 8 percent, and reductions of up to 85 deg R in turbine temperatures for all three modes. The supersonic performance seeking control structure is described and preliminary results of supersonic performance seeking control tests are given. These findings have implications for improving performance of civilian and military aircraft.

  13. Advancement and Refinement of HyperSoar Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, P.H.; Pines, D.J.; vonRggers Rudd, L.

    2000-02-25

    This report discusses the topic of periodic cruise trajectories for hypersonic flight. An extensive review of previous work associated with periodic cruise trajectories for subsonic, supersonic and hypersonic flight is presented to provide the background for this investigation. The primary objective of this report is to discuss why periodic cruise trajectories lead to near fuel-optimal trajectories from a heuristic, mathematical and computational perspective with air breathing propulsion. Results to date indicate that periodic achieves greater fuel savings by exchanging kinetic and potential energy more efficiently. The vehicle attempts to chatter back and forth between where the vehicle wants to fly for optimum aerodynamic and propulsive performance. Results from computational simulations are inconclusive and require further work to define appropriate interfaces for aerodynamic and propulsion data decks for input into the POST software. The notional design of a vehicle to fly periodic hypersonic cruise trajectories was improved by including concepts for engine installation, flight controls and by including considerations for off-design performance. This notional design provides a better starting point for more serious and complete vehicle design studies.

  14. Learning to Work on a Cruise Ship: Accounts from Bali

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artini, Luh Putu; Nilan, Pam

    2014-01-01

    This article looks at motivations and both formal and informal learning contexts for well-educated young Balinese from poorer areas who enrol in cruise ship training colleges. The major motivations were getting a high income and helping the family. While basic hospitality and tourism skills are acquired, trainees also named other capacities such…

  15. 16 CFR 309.22 - Determining estimated cruising range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... with the provisions of 40 CFR part 600 (other than electric vehicles), you must possess a reasonable... CFR part 600 (other than electric vehicles), you must possess a reasonable basis, consisting of... cruising range values for dedicated vehicles required to comply with the provisions of 40 CFR part 600...

  16. 16 CFR 309.22 - Determining estimated cruising range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... cruising range values for dedicated vehicles required to comply with the provisions of 40 CFR part 600 are...-1993-05-20, “Electric Vehicle Energy Consumption and Range Test Procedure.” This incorporation by reference was approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1...

  17. 16 CFR 309.22 - Determining estimated cruising range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... cruising range values for dedicated vehicles required to comply with the provisions of 40 CFR part 600 are... set forth in Society of Automotive Engineers (“SAE”) Surface Vehicle Recommended Practice SAE J1634... reference was approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1...

  18. 16 CFR 309.22 - Determining estimated cruising range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... cruising range values for dedicated vehicles required to comply with the provisions of 40 CFR part 600 are... reference was approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR... with the provisions of 40 CFR part 600 (other than electric vehicles), you must possess a...

  19. Numerical investigation of transitional supersonic axisymmetric wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Richard D.; Fasel, Hermann F.

    2006-09-01

    Transitional supersonic axisymmetric wakes are investigated by conducting various numerical experiments. The main objective is to identify hydrodynamic instability mechanisms in the flow at M {=} 2.46 for several Reynolds numbers, and to relate these to coherent structures that are found from various visualization techniques. The premise for this approach is the assumption that flow instabilities lead to the formation of coherent structures. Three high-order accurate compressible codes were developed in cylindrical coordinates for this work: a spatial Navier Stokes (N-S) code to conduct direct numerical simulations (DNS), a linearized N-S code for linear stability investigations using axisymmetric basic states, and a temporal N-S code for performing local stability analyses. The ability of numerical simulations to exclude physical effects deliberately is exploited. This includes intentionally eliminating certain azimuthal/helical modes by employing DNS for various circumferential domain sizes. With this approach, the impact of structures associated with certain modes on the global wake-behaviour can be scrutinized. Complementary spatial and temporal calculations are carried out to investigate whether instabilities are of local or global nature. Circumstantial evidence is presented that absolutely unstable global modes within the recirculation region co-exist with convectively unstable shear-layer modes. The flow is found to be absolutely unstable with respect to modes k {>} 0 for Re_D {>} 5000 and with respect to the axisymmetric mode k {=} 0 for Re_D {>} 100 000. It is concluded that azimuthal modes k {=} 2 and k {=} 4 are the dominant modes in the trailing wake, producing a ‘four-lobe’ wake pattern. Two possible mechanisms responsible for the generation of longitudinal structures within the recirculation region are suggested.

  20. Volume 35, AMT-1 Cruise Report and Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Robins, David B.; Bale, Anthony J.; Moore, Gerald F.; Rees, Nigel W.; Gallienne, Christopher P.; Westbrooke, Anthony G.; Maranon, Emilio; Spooner, William H.; Laney, Samuel R.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the scientific activities on board the Royal Research Ship (RRS) 'James Clark Ross' during the irst Atlantic Meridional Transect (AMT-1), 21 September to 24 October 1995. The ship sailed from Grimsby (England) for Montevideo (Uruguay) and then continued on to Stanley (Falkland Islands). The primary objective of the AMT program is to investigate basic biological processes in the open Atlantic Ocean over very broad spatial scales. For AMT-1, the meridional range covered was approximately 50 deg N to 50 deg S or nearly 8,000 nmi. The measurements to be taken during the AMT cruises are fundamental for the calibration, validation, and continuing understanding of remotely sensed observations of biological oceanography. They are also important for understanding plankton community structure over latitudinal scales and the role of the world ocean in global carbon cycles. During AMT-1 a variety of instruments were used to map the physical, chemical, and biological structure of the upper 200 m of the water column. Ocean color measurements were made using state-of-the-art sensors, whose calibration was traceable to the highest international standards. New advances in fluorometry were used to measure photosynthetic activity, which was then used to further interpret primary productivity. A unique set of samples and data were collected for the planktonic assemblages that vary throughout the range of the transect. These data will yield new interpretations on community composition and their role in carbon cycling. While the various provinces of the Atlantic Ocean were being crossed, the partial pressure of CO2 was related to biological productivity. This comparison revealed the areas of drawdown of atmospheric CO2 and how these areas relate to the surrounding biological productivity. These data, plus the measurements of light attenuation and phytoplankton optical properties, will be used as a primary input for basin-scale biological productivity models to help