Science.gov

Sample records for advanced surface movement

  1. Extending enhanced-vision capabilities by integration of advanced surface movement guidance and control systems (A-SMGCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker, Peter; Doehler, Hans-Ullrich; Korn, Bernd; Ludwig, T.

    2001-08-01

    DLR has set up a number of projects to increase flight safety and economics of aviation. Within these activities one field of interest is the development and validation of systems for pilot assistance in order to increase the situation awareness of the aircrew. All flight phases ('gate-to-gate') are taken into account, but as far as approaches, landing and taxiing are the most critical tasks in the field of civil aviation, special emphasis is given to these operations. As presented in previous contributions within SPIE's Enhanced and Synthetic Vision Conferences, DLR's Institute of Flight Guidance has developed an Enhanced Vision System (EVS) as a tool assisting especially approach and landing by improving the aircrew's situational awareness. The combination of forward looking imaging sensors (such as EADS's HiVision millimeter wave radar), terrain data stored in on-board databases plus information transmitted from ground or other aircraft via data link is used to help pilots handling these phases of flight especially under adverse weather conditions. A second pilot assistance module being developed at DLR is the Taxi And Ramp Management And Control - Airborne System (TARMAC-AS), which is part of an Advanced Surface Management Guidance and Control System (ASMGCS). By means of on-board terrain data bases and navigation data a map display is generated, which helps the pilot performing taxi operations. In addition to the pure map function taxi instructions and other traffic can be displayed as the aircraft is connected to TARMAC-planning and TARMAC-communication, navigation and surveillance modules on ground via data-link. Recent experiments with airline pilots have shown, that the capabilities of taxi assistance can be extended significantly by integrating EVS- and TARMAC-AS-functionalities. Especially an extended obstacle detection and warning coming from the Enhanced Vision System increases the safety of ground operations. The presented paper gives an overview

  2. Advanced InSAR and GPS measurements for the detection of surface movements along the Alto Tiberina (Italy) normal fault system: data modeling and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderlini, L.; Polcari, M.; Bignami, C.; Pepe, A.; Solaro, G.; Serpelloni, E.; Moro, M.; Albano, M.; Chiaraluce, L.; Stramondo, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Alto Tiberina fault (ATF) is a low-angle (east-dipping at 15°), 70 km long normal fault (LANF) located in the Umbria-Marche Apennines (central Italy), an area characterized by a SW-NE oriented extension occurring at rates of ~2 mm/yr. Active extension is precisely measured by a dense distribution of GPS stations belonging to several networks, thanks also to additional sites recently installed in the framework of the INGV national RING network and of the ATF observatory. Advanced Interferometry SAR (A-InSAR) techniques play today a key role in Earth Sciences thanks to their capability to detect and monitor slow surface movements over wide areas. A-InSAR techniques, along with in-situ ground measurements, can provide suitable information on the causes of interseismic (seismic, creep) movements. Large datasets of SAR images of European (ERS 1-2 and ENVISAT) and Italian (COSMO-SKyMed) satellites have been used to retrieve surface velocity maps and relevant time series from 1992 to 2014, along both ascending and descending orbits. A network of artificial Corner Reflectors has also been deployed in the proximity of some GPS sites in order to calibrate the processing results of the COSMO-SkyMed SAR data-set and to derive velocity maps. We use an elastic Block Modeling (BM) approach in order to model GPS data by considering the major fault systems as bounds of rotating blocks, while estimating geodetic fault slip-rates.,Thanks to the latest imaging of its deep structure obtained from seismic profiles, the ATF is represented as a complex rough surface with the goal of evaluating the distribution of interseismic fault coupling. The preliminary results obtained show firstly that the observed extension is partially accommodated by interseismic deformation on the ATF, highlighting the important role of this LANF inside an active tectonic contest. Secondarily, using the ATF surface "topography", we found for the resolved areas an interesting correlation between

  3. The Earth surface slide movement at Soledad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, A.

    1986-11-01

    The Earth surface slide movement at Soledad is a mountain-slide type of movement. Estimations of the thickness of the layer which is moving range between 10 and 100 m. There is no proof that the movement is water induced, but it could be influenced by the water household. The slope of the slide area is H: D = 1: 2. The height difference in the moving area studied, according to this paper, is 1 km. The actual rate of movement is about 12 cm/yr.

  4. Airport Surface Movement Technologies: Atlanta Demonstrations Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Young, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    A flight demonstration was conducted in August 1997 at the Hartsfield Atlanta (ATL) International Airport as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. This research was aimed at investigating technology to improve the safety and efficiency of aircraft movements on the surface during the operational phases of roll-out, turnoff, and taxi in any weather condition down to a runway visual range of 300 feet. The system tested at ATL was composed of airborne and ground-based components that were integrated to provide both the flight crew and controllers with supplemental information to enable safe, expedient surface operations. Experimental displays were installed on a Boeing 757-200 research aircraft in both headup and head-down formats. On the ground, an integrated system maintained surveillance of the airport surface and a controller interface provided routing and control instructions. While at ATL, the research aircraft performed a series of flight and taxi operations to show the validity of the operational concept at a major airport facility, to validate simulation findings, and to assess each of the individual technologies performance in an airport environment. The concept was demonstrated to over 100 visitors from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the aviation community. This paper gives an overview of the LVLASO system and ATL test activities.

  5. Preliminary Findings: Issues in Surface Movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Philip J.; Denning, Rebecca; Obradovich, Jodi; Billings, Charles; Woods, David

    1999-01-01

    The final report for the grant is presented. The recent goals for this project have been: (1) To identify common surface movement challenges which affect the airlines and Air Traffic Control; (2) To map out possible solutions to these challenges; (3) To start generalizing about the information we are receiving so that major, abstract categories of challenges and potential solutions will begin to emerge. In particular, there are several areas of opportunity which are beginning to emerge from the data, dealing with the need for: (1) Tools to support information exchange regarding priorities (both within an individual airline and between the ATC tower and airlines). Such priorities include both concerns affecting departure throughput as well as the ordering of departures to accommodate other airline considerations; (2) Planning tools to help ATC and airline Ramp staff deal with information about priorities; (3) Implementation of strategies to enable greater flexibility in queueing flights for departures; (4) Tools to provide better coordination and situation awareness during taxiing (within an airline as well as between airlines and between the airlines); (5) Tools to support planning and to deal with the interactions between departures and arrivals. Thus far, the initial interviews and observations at three airlines and two ATC facilities have been completed.

  6. Advanced Bayesian Method for Planetary Surface Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Center, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Autonomous Exploration, Inc., has developed an advanced Bayesian statistical inference method that leverages current computing technology to produce a highly accurate surface navigation system. The method combines dense stereo vision and high-speed optical flow to implement visual odometry (VO) to track faster rover movements. The Bayesian VO technique improves performance by using all image information rather than corner features only. The method determines what can be learned from each image pixel and weighs the information accordingly. This capability improves performance in shadowed areas that yield only low-contrast images. The error characteristics of the visual processing are complementary to those of a low-cost inertial measurement unit (IMU), so the combination of the two capabilities provides highly accurate navigation. The method increases NASA mission productivity by enabling faster rover speed and accuracy. On Earth, the technology will permit operation of robots and autonomous vehicles in areas where the Global Positioning System (GPS) is degraded or unavailable.

  7. Technological advances in the surgical treatment of movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Gross, Robert E; McDougal, Margaret E

    2013-08-01

    Technological innovations have driven the advancement of the surgical treatment of movement disorders, from the invention of the stereotactic frame to the adaptation of deep brain stimulation (DBS). Along these lines, this review will describe recent advances in inserting neuromodulation modalities, including DBS, to the target, and in the delivery of therapy at the target. Recent radiological advances are altering the way that DBS leads are targeted and inserted, by refining the ability to visualize the subcortical targets using high-field strength magnetic resonance imaging and other innovations, such as diffusion tensor imaging, and the development of novel targeting devices enabling purely anatomical implantations without the need for neurophysiological monitoring. New portable computed tomography scanners also are facilitating lead implantation without monitoring, as well as improving radiological verification of DBS lead location. Advances in neurophysiological mapping include efforts to develop automatic target verification algorithms, and probabilistic maps to guide target selection. The delivery of therapy at the target is being improved by the development of the next generation of internal pulse generators (IPGs). These include constant current devices that mitigate the variability introduced by impedance changes of the stimulated tissue and, in the near future, devices that deliver novel stimulation patterns with improved efficiency. Closed-loop adaptive IPGs are being tested, which may tailor stimulation to ongoing changes in the nervous system, reflected in biomarkers continuously recorded by the devices. Finer-grained DBS leads, in conjunction with new IPGs and advanced programming tools, may offer improved outcomes via current steering algorithms. Finally, even thermocoagulation-essentially replaced by DBS-is being advanced by new minimally-invasive approaches that may improve this therapy for selected patients in whom it may be preferred. Functional

  8. Technological advances in the surgical treatment of movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Gross, Robert E; McDougal, Margaret E

    2013-08-01

    Technological innovations have driven the advancement of the surgical treatment of movement disorders, from the invention of the stereotactic frame to the adaptation of deep brain stimulation (DBS). Along these lines, this review will describe recent advances in inserting neuromodulation modalities, including DBS, to the target, and in the delivery of therapy at the target. Recent radiological advances are altering the way that DBS leads are targeted and inserted, by refining the ability to visualize the subcortical targets using high-field strength magnetic resonance imaging and other innovations, such as diffusion tensor imaging, and the development of novel targeting devices enabling purely anatomical implantations without the need for neurophysiological monitoring. New portable computed tomography scanners also are facilitating lead implantation without monitoring, as well as improving radiological verification of DBS lead location. Advances in neurophysiological mapping include efforts to develop automatic target verification algorithms, and probabilistic maps to guide target selection. The delivery of therapy at the target is being improved by the development of the next generation of internal pulse generators (IPGs). These include constant current devices that mitigate the variability introduced by impedance changes of the stimulated tissue and, in the near future, devices that deliver novel stimulation patterns with improved efficiency. Closed-loop adaptive IPGs are being tested, which may tailor stimulation to ongoing changes in the nervous system, reflected in biomarkers continuously recorded by the devices. Finer-grained DBS leads, in conjunction with new IPGs and advanced programming tools, may offer improved outcomes via current steering algorithms. Finally, even thermocoagulation-essentially replaced by DBS-is being advanced by new minimally-invasive approaches that may improve this therapy for selected patients in whom it may be preferred. Functional

  9. Advanced Space Surface Systems Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, Zachary Lynn; Mueller, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of advanced surface systems is becoming increasingly relevant in the modern age of space technology. Specifically, projects pursued by the Granular Mechanics and Regolith Operations (GMRO) Lab are unparalleled in the field of planetary resourcefulness. This internship opportunity involved projects that support properly utilizing natural resources from other celestial bodies. Beginning with the tele-robotic workstation, mechanical upgrades were necessary to consider for specific portions of the workstation consoles and successfully designed in concept. This would provide more means for innovation and creativity concerning advanced robotic operations. Project RASSOR is a regolith excavator robot whose primary objective is to mine, store, and dump regolith efficiently on other planetary surfaces. Mechanical adjustments were made to improve this robot's functionality, although there were some minor system changes left to perform before the opportunity ended. On the topic of excavator robots, the notes taken by the GMRO staff during the 2013 and 2014 Robotic Mining Competitions were effectively organized and analyzed for logistical purposes. Lessons learned from these annual competitions at Kennedy Space Center are greatly influential to the GMRO engineers and roboticists. Another project that GMRO staff support is Project Morpheus. Support for this project included successfully producing mathematical models of the eroded landing pad surface for the vertical testbed vehicle to predict a timeline for pad reparation. And finally, the last project this opportunity made contribution to was Project Neo, a project exterior to GMRO Lab projects, which focuses on rocket propulsion systems. Additions were successfully installed to the support structure of an original vertical testbed rocket engine, thus making progress towards futuristic test firings in which data will be analyzed by students affiliated with Rocket University. Each project will be explained in

  10. Ocean surface winds drive dynamics of transoceanic aerial movements.

    PubMed

    Felicísimo, Angel M; Muñoz, Jesús; González-Solis, Jacob

    2008-08-13

    Global wind patterns influence dispersal and migration processes of aerial organisms, propagules and particles, which ultimately could determine the dynamics of colonizations, invasions or spread of pathogens. However, studying how wind-mediated movements actually happen has been hampered so far by the lack of high resolution global wind data as well as the impossibility to track aerial movements. Using concurrent data on winds and actual pathways of a tracked seabird, here we show that oceanic winds define spatiotemporal pathways and barriers for large-scale aerial movements. We obtained wind data from NASA SeaWinds scatterometer to calculate wind cost (impedance) models reflecting the resistance to the aerial movement near the ocean surface. We also tracked the movements of a model organism, the Cory's shearwater (Calonectris diomedea), a pelagic bird known to perform long distance migrations. Cost models revealed that distant areas can be connected through "wind highways" that do not match the shortest great circle routes. Bird routes closely followed the low-cost "wind-highways" linking breeding and wintering areas. In addition, we found that a potential barrier, the near surface westerlies in the Atlantic sector of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), temporally hindered meridional trans-equatorial movements. Once the westerlies vanished, birds crossed the ITCZ to their winter quarters. This study provides a novel approach to investigate wind-mediated movements in oceanic environments and shows that large-scale migration and dispersal processes over the oceans can be largely driven by spatiotemporal wind patterns.

  11. Ocean surface winds drive dynamics of transoceanic aerial movements.

    PubMed

    Felicísimo, Angel M; Muñoz, Jesús; González-Solis, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Global wind patterns influence dispersal and migration processes of aerial organisms, propagules and particles, which ultimately could determine the dynamics of colonizations, invasions or spread of pathogens. However, studying how wind-mediated movements actually happen has been hampered so far by the lack of high resolution global wind data as well as the impossibility to track aerial movements. Using concurrent data on winds and actual pathways of a tracked seabird, here we show that oceanic winds define spatiotemporal pathways and barriers for large-scale aerial movements. We obtained wind data from NASA SeaWinds scatterometer to calculate wind cost (impedance) models reflecting the resistance to the aerial movement near the ocean surface. We also tracked the movements of a model organism, the Cory's shearwater (Calonectris diomedea), a pelagic bird known to perform long distance migrations. Cost models revealed that distant areas can be connected through "wind highways" that do not match the shortest great circle routes. Bird routes closely followed the low-cost "wind-highways" linking breeding and wintering areas. In addition, we found that a potential barrier, the near surface westerlies in the Atlantic sector of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), temporally hindered meridional trans-equatorial movements. Once the westerlies vanished, birds crossed the ITCZ to their winter quarters. This study provides a novel approach to investigate wind-mediated movements in oceanic environments and shows that large-scale migration and dispersal processes over the oceans can be largely driven by spatiotemporal wind patterns. PMID:18698354

  12. Surface movement above an underground coal longwall mine after closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervoort, André

    2016-09-01

    The surface movement in an area of about 22 km2 above the underground coal mine of Houthalen was analyzed based on Interferometry with Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements. After its closure in 1992, a residual subsidence was observed over a period of several years, followed by an uplift of the surface above and around the past longwall panels, whereby the rate of movement was, in absolute terms, of the same order for the two types of movements. The processes behind these movements are different. The process of subsidence is caused by the caving of the roof above the mined-out area and is mainly a mechanical stress-deformation process, including time-dependent aspects. However, the process of uplift is most probably caused by the swelling of the clay minerals in the argillaceous rocks in the coal strata after the flooding of the underground workings. Hence, the areas in which there is the greatest risk of damage to the surface infrastructure are not the same for the hazards linked to subsidence and uplift. For example, the zone in which the maximum uplift occurs clearly is at a different location from that of the zone with the maximum residual subsidence. There is no clear sign that the amount of mining underneath affects the residual subsidence, and there is no indication that the process of uplift is linked directly to the mining characteristics. It is more likely that uplift as the result of flooding is initiated at, or close to, the vertical shafts.

  13. Measured ground-surface movements, Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Cerro Prieto geothermal area in the Mexicali Valley, 30 kilometers southeast of Mexicali, Baja California, incurred slight deformation because of the extraction of hot water and steam, and probably, active tectonism. During 1977 to 1978, the US Geological Survey established and measured two networks of horizontal control in an effort to define both types of movement. These networks consisted of: (1) a regional trilateration net brought into the mountain ranges west of the geothermal area from stations on an existing US Geological Survey crustal-strain network north of the international border; and (2) a local net tied to stations in the regional net and encompassing the present and planned geothermal production area. Electronic distance measuring instruments were used to measure the distances between stations in both networks in 1978, 1979 and 1981. Lines in the regional net averaged 25 km. in length and the standard deviation of an individual measurement is estimated to be approx. 0.3 part per million of line length. The local network was measured using different instrumentation and techniques. The average line length was about 5 km. and the standard deviation of an individual measurement approached 3 parts per million per line length. Ground-surface movements in the regional net, as measured by both the 1979 and 1981 resurveys, were small and did not exceed the noise level. The 1979 resurvey of the local net showed an apparent movement of 2 to 3 centimeters inward toward the center of the production area. This apparent movement was restricted to the general limits of the production area. The 1981 resurvey of the local net did not show increased movement attributable to fluid extraction.

  14. Numerical study of surface water waves generated by mass movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghozlani, Belgacem; Hafsia, Zouhaier; Maalel, Khlifa

    2013-10-01

    In this paper waves generated by two-dimensional mass movement are simulated using a numerical model based on the full hydrodynamic coupling between rigid-body motion and ambient fluid flow. This approach has the capability to represent the dynamics of the moving rigid body, which avoids the need to prescribe the body velocity based on the data measurements. This model is implemented in the CFX code and uses the Reynolds average Navier-Stokes equations solver coupled to the recently developed immersed solid technique. The latter technique allows us to follow implicitly the motion of the solid block based on the rigid body solver. The volume-of-fluid method is used to track the free surface locations. The accuracy of the present model is firstly examined against the simple physical case of a freely falling rigid body into water reproducing Scott Russell's solitary waves. More complex and realistic simulations of aerial and submarine mass-movement, simulated by a rigid wedge sliding into water along a 45° slope, are then performed. Simulated results of the aerial mass movement show the complex flow patterns in terms of the velocity fields and free surface profiles. Results are in good agreement with the available experimental data. In addition, the physical processes associated with the generation of water wave by two-dimensional submarine mass-movement are explored. The effects of the initial submergence and specific gravity on the slide mass kinematics and maximum wave amplitude are investigated. The terminal velocity and initial acceleration of the slide mass are well predicted when compared to experimental results. It is found that the initial submergence did not have a significant effect on the initial acceleration of the slide block centre of mass. However, it depends nonlinearly\\vadjust{\

  15. Developing and Integrating Advanced Movement Features Improves Automated Classification of Ciliate Species

    PubMed Central

    Soleymani, Ali; Pennekamp, Frank; Petchey, Owen L.; Weibel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in tracking technologies such as GPS or video tracking systems describe the movement paths of individuals in unprecedented details and are increasingly used in different fields, including ecology. However, extracting information from raw movement data requires advanced analysis techniques, for instance to infer behaviors expressed during a certain period of the recorded trajectory, or gender or species identity in case data is obtained from remote tracking. In this paper, we address how different movement features affect the ability to automatically classify the species identity, using a dataset of unicellular microbes (i.e., ciliates). Previously, morphological attributes and simple movement metrics, such as speed, were used for classifying ciliate species. Here, we demonstrate that adding advanced movement features, in particular such based on discrete wavelet transform, to morphological features can improve classification. These results may have practical applications in automated monitoring of waste water facilities as well as environmental monitoring of aquatic systems. PMID:26680591

  16. Flight Demonstration of Integrated Airport Surface Movement Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steven D.; Jones, Denise R.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes operations associated with a set of flight experiments and demonstrations using a Boeing-757-200 research aircraft as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. To support this experiment, the B-757 performed flight and taxi operations at the Atlanta Hartsfield International Airport in Atlanta, GA. The test aircraft was equipped with experimental displays that were designed to provide flight crews with sufficient information to enable safe, expedient surface operations in any weather condition down to a runway visual range of 300 feet. In addition to flight deck displays and supporting equipment onboard the B-757, there was also a ground-based component of the system that provided for ground controller inputs and surveillance of airport surface movements. Qualitative and quantitative results are discussed.

  17. Surface expression of subglacial meltwater movement, Bering Glacier, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwell, D.H. ); Fleisher, P.J. . Dept. of Earth Sciences); Bailey, P.K. )

    1993-03-01

    Longitudinal topographic profiles (1988--1992) across the thermokarst terminus of the Grindle Hills Ice-tongue and interlobate moraine of the Bering Piedmont Glacier document annual changes in crevasse patterns and fluctuations in surface elevation related to subglacial water movement. A semi-continuous record of aerial photos (1978--1990), plus field observations (1988--1992), reveal the progressive enlargement of two lateral collapse basin on both sides of the thermokarst, connected by a transverse collapse trough. Seasonally generated meltwater at depth rises within the glacier, fills the basins and other depressions and lifts the thermokarst terminus of the ice-tongue a few meters by buoyancy and hydrostatic pressure. The resulting surface tension creates a chaotic crevasse pattern unrelated to normal glacier movement. The crevasses open (2 m wide, 8--10 m deep) in response to increased water accumulation at depth and close during subsidence as the ice-tongue settles following evacuation of subglacier water. A network of open conduits (>10 m diameter), exposed by surface ablation, provides evidence for the scale of englacial passageways beneath the thermokarst and represents a form of subglacial ablation that leads to removal of support and collapse in stagnant glacier masses.

  18. Tongue-surface movement patterns during speech and swallowing.

    PubMed

    Green, Jordan R; Wang, Yu-Tsai

    2003-05-01

    The tongue has been frequently characterized as being composed of several functionally independent articulators. The question of functional regionality within the tongue was examined by quantifying the strength of coupling among four different tongue locations across a large number of consonantal contexts and participants. Tongue behavior during swallowing was also described. Vertical displacements of pellets affixed to the tongue were extracted from the x-ray microbeam database. Forty-six participants recited 20 vowel-consonant-vowel (VCV) combinations and swallowed 10 ccs of water. Tongue-surface movement patterns were quantitatively described by computing the covariance between the vertical time-histories of all possible pellet pairs. Phonemic differentiation in vertical tongue motions was observed as coupling varied predictably across pellet pairs with place of articulation. Moreover, tongue displacements for speech and swallowing clustered into distinct groups based on their coupling profiles. Functional independence of anterior tongue regions was evidenced by a wide range of movement coupling relations between anterior tongue pellets. The strengths and weaknesses of the covariance-based analysis for characterizing tongue movement are considered.

  19. How Water Advances on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellenberger, Frank; Encinas, Noemí; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Superliquid repellency can be achieved by nano- and microstructuring surfaces in such a way that protrusions entrap air underneath the liquid. It is still not known how the three-phase contact line advances on such structured surfaces. In contrast to a smooth surface, where the contact line can advance continuously, on a superliquid-repellent surface, the contact line has to overcome an air gap between protrusions. Here, we apply laser scanning confocal microscopy to get the first microscopic videos of water drops advancing on a superhydrophobic array of micropillars. In contrast to common belief, the liquid surface gradually bends down until it touches the top face of the next micropillars. The apparent advancing contact angle is 180°. On the receding side, pinning to the top faces of the micropillars determines the apparent receding contact angle. Based on these observations, we propose that the apparent receding contact angle should be used for characterizing superliquid-repellent surfaces rather than the apparent advancing contact angle and hysteresis.

  20. Integrated landslide monitoring: rainfalls, pore water pressures and surface movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berti, M.; Casula, G.; Elmi, C.; Fabris, M.; Ghirotti, M.; Loddo, F.; Mora, P.; Pesci, A.; Simoni, A.

    2003-04-01

    Rainfall-induced landslides involving clay-rich soils are widely represented in the Apennines. They cover up to 30% of the slopes forming the relief constituted by chaotic clayey units and are typically subject to repeated reactivations of the movement which are often triggered by a series of discrete failures located in the upper part (headscarp). Failures and movement can then propagate downslope and reactivate the whole landslide deposit which displays a typical elongated body, limited depth and a fan-shaped toe as a result of successive slow earth-flow like movements. An experimental monitoring programme was designed and is currently operating on the Rocca Pitigliana landslide whose characteristics well represent the above described type of movements. Its last parossistic movement date back to 1999 and, since then, remedial works were realized on behalf of local authorities. They basically consist of surficial and deep drainage works located on the landslide body. Experimental activities focus on the main headscarp whose morphology and sub-surface water circulation scheme were unaffected by the interventions. The monitoring approach includes measuring rainfalls and pore-pressure responses in both saturated and unsaturated soils. Surficial movements are continuously measured by means of GPS permanent stations and by wire extensometers which allow real time control of headscarp activity. Main aim of the monitoring activities is to provide experimental data, which can be used to test various existing hydrologic models and to identify triggering conditions. Since the ‘70s, many hydrologic models have been proposed to describe the pore water pressure distribution within the soil and its response to precipitation. The topic has recently drawn growing attention because of the recognized importance in landslide triggering but still experimental data are very much needed in order to obtain and validate capable predicting tools. This is mostly due to the multiple and

  1. Enhancing pilot situational awareness of the airport surface movement area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. R.; Young, S. D.

    1994-01-01

    Two studies are being conducted to address airport surface movement area safety and capacity issues by providing enhanced situational awareness information to pilots. One study focuses on obtaining pilot opinion of the Runway Status Light System (RSLS). This system has been designed to reduce the likelihood of runway incursions by informing pilots when a runway is occupied. The second study is a flight demonstration of an rate integrated system consisting of an electronic moving map in the cockpit and display of the aircraft identification to the controller. Taxi route and hold warning information will be sent to the aircraft data link for display on the electronic moving map. This paper describes the plans for the two studies.

  2. Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Ebert, Thomas; Cox, Rachel; Rahmatian, Laila; Wood, James; Schuler, Jason; Nick, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR) excavator robot is a teleoperated mobility platform with a space regolith excavation capability. This more compact, lightweight design (<50 kg) has counterrotating bucket drums, which results in a net-zero reaction horizontal force due to the self-cancellation of the symmetrical, equal but opposing, digging forces.

  3. Advance assessment for movement of Haz Cat 3 radioactive materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Vosburg, Susan K.

    2010-04-01

    The current packaging of most HC-3 radioactive materials at SNL/NM do not meet DOT requirements for offsite shipment. SNL/NM is transporting HC-3 quantities of radioactive materials from their storage locations in the Manzano Nuclear Facilities bunkers to facilities in TA-5 to be repackaged for offsite shipment. All transportation of HC-3 rad material by SNL/NM is onsite (performed within the confines of KAFB). Transport is performed only by the Regulated Waste/Nuclear Material Disposition Department. Part of the HC3T process is to provide the CAT with the following information at least three days prior to the move: (1) RFt-Request for transfer; (2) HC3T movement report; (3) Radiological survey; and (4) Transportation Route Map.

  4. Implicit advance knowledge effects on the interplay between arm movements and postural adjustments in catching.

    PubMed

    Tijtgat, Pieter; Vanrenterghem, Jos; Bennett, Simon J; De Clercq, Dirk; Savelsbergh, Geert J P; Lenoir, Matthieu

    2012-06-19

    This study examined if, and how, implicit advance knowledge of upcoming ball speed influences the interplay between arm movements and concomitant postural adjustments in one-handed catching. While standing, subjects were asked to catch balls that were presented with or without implicit advance knowledge of four different ball speeds. Full body kinematics and ground reaction forces were measured, which allowed the assessment of arm movements and postural adjustments through the momentum of the arm, rest of the body and whole body. Providing implicit advance knowledge induced a forward arm raising movement scaled to ball speed in the initial transport phase. However, the accompanying backward postural adjustments were unaffected, which is suggestive of a passive control mechanism. In the subsequent grasping phase, the scaling of arm raising movement exhibited in the presence of implicit advance knowledge resulted in a reduced need for postural adjustments, particularly at the highest ball speed. Together, these findings suggest that cortical involvement based on previous experience not only shapes the arm movements but also the subsequent interplaying postural responses.

  5. Advanced oxidation process sanitization of eggshell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gottselig, Steven M; Dunn-Horrocks, Sadie L; Woodring, Kristy S; Coufal, Craig D; Duong, Tri

    2016-06-01

    The microbial quality of eggs entering the hatchery represents an important critical control point for biosecurity and pathogen reduction programs in integrated poultry production. The development of safe and effective interventions to reduce microbial contamination on the surface of eggs will be important to improve the overall productivity and microbial food safety of poultry and poultry products. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ultraviolet (UV) light advanced oxidation process is a potentially important alternative to traditional sanitizers and disinfectants for egg sanitation. The H2O2/UV advanced oxidation process was demonstrated previously to be effective in reducing surface microbial contamination on eggs. In this study, we evaluated treatment conditions affecting the efficacy of H2O2/UV advanced oxidation in order to identify operational parameters for the practical application of this technology in egg sanitation. The effect of the number of application cycles, UV intensity, duration of UV exposure, and egg rotation on the recovery of total aerobic bacteria from the surface of eggs was evaluated. Of the conditions evaluated, we determined that reduction of total aerobic bacteria from naturally contaminated eggs was optimized when eggs were sanitized using 2 repeated application cycles with 5 s exposure to 14 mW cm(-2) UV light, and that rotation of the eggs between application cycles was unnecessary. Additionally, using these optimized conditions, the H2O2/UV process reduced Salmonella by greater than 5 log10 cfu egg(-1) on the surface of experimentally contaminated eggs. This study demonstrates the potential for practical application of the H2O2/UV advanced oxidation process in egg sanitation and its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella on eggshell surfaces. PMID:27030693

  6. Advanced surface design for logistics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Tim R.; Hansen, Scott D.

    The development of anthropometric arm/hand and tool models and their manipulation in a large system model for maintenance simulation are discussed. The use of Advanced Surface Design and s-fig technology in anthropometrics, and three-dimensional graphics simulation tools, are found to achieve a good balance between model manipulation speed and model accuracy. The present second generation models are shown to be twice as fast to manipulate as the first generation b-surf models, to be easier to manipulate into various configurations, and to more closely approximate human contours.

  7. Surface plasmon resonance biosensors: advances and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homola, Jirí

    2009-10-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors represent the most advanced label-free optical affinity biosensor technology. In the last decade numerous SPR sensor platforms have been developed and applied in the life sciences and bioanalytics. This contribution reviews the state of the art in the development of SPR (bio)sensor technology and presents selected results of research into SPR biosensors at the Institute of Photonics and Electronics, Prague. The developments discussed in detail include a miniature fiber optic SPR sensor for localized measurements, a compact SPR sensor for field use and a multichannel SPR sensor for high-throughput screening. Examples of applications for the detection of analytes related to medical diagnostics (biomarkers, hormones, antibodies), environmental monitoring (endocrine disrupting compounds), and food safety (pathogens and toxins) are given.

  8. Surface EMG in advanced hand prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Castellini, Claudio; van der Smagt, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    One of the major problems when dealing with highly dexterous, active hand prostheses is their control by the patient wearing them. With the advances in mechatronics, building prosthetic hands with multiple active degrees of freedom is realisable, but actively controlling the position and especially the exerted force of each finger cannot yet be done naturally. This paper deals with advanced robotic hand control via surface electromyography. Building upon recent results, we show that machine learning, together with a simple downsampling algorithm, can be effectively used to control on-line, in real time, finger position as well as finger force of a highly dexterous robotic hand. The system determines the type of grasp a human subject is willing to use, and the required amount of force involved, with a high degree of accuracy. This represents a remarkable improvement with respect to the state-of-the-art of feed-forward control of dexterous mechanical hands, and opens up a scenario in which amputees will be able to control hand prostheses in a much finer way than it has so far been possible.

  9. Advanced Potential Energy Surfaces for Molecular Simulation.

    PubMed

    Albaugh, Alex; Boateng, Henry A; Bradshaw, Richard T; Demerdash, Omar N; Dziedzic, Jacek; Mao, Yuezhi; Margul, Daniel T; Swails, Jason; Zeng, Qiao; Case, David A; Eastman, Peter; Wang, Lee-Ping; Essex, Jonathan W; Head-Gordon, Martin; Pande, Vijay S; Ponder, Jay W; Shao, Yihan; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Todorov, Ilian T; Tuckerman, Mark E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2016-09-22

    Advanced potential energy surfaces are defined as theoretical models that explicitly include many-body effects that transcend the standard fixed-charge, pairwise-additive paradigm typically used in molecular simulation. However, several factors relating to their software implementation have precluded their widespread use in condensed-phase simulations: the computational cost of the theoretical models, a paucity of approximate models and algorithmic improvements that can ameliorate their cost, underdeveloped interfaces and limited dissemination in computational code bases that are widely used in the computational chemistry community, and software implementations that have not kept pace with modern high-performance computing (HPC) architectures, such as multicore CPUs and modern graphics processing units (GPUs). In this Feature Article we review recent progress made in these areas, including well-defined polarization approximations and new multipole electrostatic formulations, novel methods for solving the mutual polarization equations and increasing the MD time step, combining linear-scaling electronic structure methods with new QM/MM methods that account for mutual polarization between the two regions, and the greatly improved software deployment of these models and methods onto GPU and CPU hardware platforms. We have now approached an era where multipole-based polarizable force fields can be routinely used to obtain computational results comparable to state-of-the-art density functional theory while reaching sampling statistics that are acceptable when compared to that obtained from simpler fixed partial charge force fields.

  10. RASSOR - Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Tracy R.; Mueller, Rob

    2015-01-01

    The Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR) is a lightweight excavator for mining in reduced gravity. RASSOR addresses the need for a lightweight (<100 kg) robot that is able to overcome excavation reaction forces while operating in reduced gravity environments such as the moon or Mars. A nominal mission would send RASSOR to the moon to operate for five years delivering regolith feedstock to a separate chemical plant, which extracts oxygen from the regolith using H2 reduction methods. RASSOR would make 35 trips of 20 kg loads every 24 hours. With four RASSORs operating at one time, the mission would achieve 10 tonnes of oxygen per year (8 t for rocket propellant and 2 t for life support). Accessing craters in space environments may be extremely hard and harsh due to volatile resources - survival is challenging. New technologies and methods are required. RASSOR is a product of KSC Swamp Works which establishes rapid, innovative and cost effective exploration mission solutions by leveraging partnerships across NASA, industry and academia.

  11. Advanced Potential Energy Surfaces for Molecular Simulation.

    PubMed

    Albaugh, Alex; Boateng, Henry A; Bradshaw, Richard T; Demerdash, Omar N; Dziedzic, Jacek; Mao, Yuezhi; Margul, Daniel T; Swails, Jason; Zeng, Qiao; Case, David A; Eastman, Peter; Wang, Lee-Ping; Essex, Jonathan W; Head-Gordon, Martin; Pande, Vijay S; Ponder, Jay W; Shao, Yihan; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Todorov, Ilian T; Tuckerman, Mark E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2016-09-22

    Advanced potential energy surfaces are defined as theoretical models that explicitly include many-body effects that transcend the standard fixed-charge, pairwise-additive paradigm typically used in molecular simulation. However, several factors relating to their software implementation have precluded their widespread use in condensed-phase simulations: the computational cost of the theoretical models, a paucity of approximate models and algorithmic improvements that can ameliorate their cost, underdeveloped interfaces and limited dissemination in computational code bases that are widely used in the computational chemistry community, and software implementations that have not kept pace with modern high-performance computing (HPC) architectures, such as multicore CPUs and modern graphics processing units (GPUs). In this Feature Article we review recent progress made in these areas, including well-defined polarization approximations and new multipole electrostatic formulations, novel methods for solving the mutual polarization equations and increasing the MD time step, combining linear-scaling electronic structure methods with new QM/MM methods that account for mutual polarization between the two regions, and the greatly improved software deployment of these models and methods onto GPU and CPU hardware platforms. We have now approached an era where multipole-based polarizable force fields can be routinely used to obtain computational results comparable to state-of-the-art density functional theory while reaching sampling statistics that are acceptable when compared to that obtained from simpler fixed partial charge force fields. PMID:27513316

  12. Surface chemical deposition of advanced electronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkevig, Cameron

    The focus of this work was to examine the direct plating of Cu on Ru diffusion barriers for use in interconnect technology and the substrate mediated growth of graphene on boron nitride for use in advanced electronic applications. The electrodeposition of Cu on Ru(0001) and polycrystalline substrates (with and without pretreatment in an iodine containing solution) has been studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV), current--time transient measurements (CTT), in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The EC-AFM data show that at potentials near the OPD/UPD threshold, Cu crystallites exhibit pronounced growth anisotropy, with lateral dimensions greatly exceeding vertical dimensions. XPS measurements confirmed the presence and stability of adsorbed I on the Ru surface following pre-treatment in a KI/H2SO4 solution and following polarization to at least -200 mV vs. Ag/AgCl. CV data of samples pre-reduced in I-containing electrolyte exhibited a narrow Cu deposition peak in the overpotential region and a UPD peak. The kinetics of the electrodeposited Cu films was investigated by CTT measurements and applied to theoretical models of nucleation. The data indicated that a protective I adlayer may be deposited on an airexposed Ru electrode as the oxide surface is electrochemically reduced, and that this layer will inhibit reformation of an oxide during the Cu electroplating process. A novel method for epitaxial graphene growth directly on a dielectric substrate of systematically variable thickness was studied. Mono/multilayers of BN(111) were grown on Ru(0001) by atomic layer deposition (ALD), exhibiting a flat (non-nanomesh) R30(✓3x✓3) structure. BN(111) was used as a template for growth of graphene by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of C2H4 at 1000 K. Characterization by LEED, Auger, STM/STS and Raman indicate the graphene is in registry with the BN substrate, and exhibits a HOPG-like 0 eV bandgap density

  13. Data Movement Dominates: Advanced Memory Technology to Address the Real Exascale Power Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, Keren

    2014-08-28

    Energy is the fundamental barrier to Exascale supercomputing and is dominated by the cost of moving data from one point to another, not computation. Similarly, performance is dominated by data movement, not computation. The solution to this problem requires three critical technologies: 3D integration, optical chip-to-chip communication, and a new communication model. The central goal of the Sandia led "Data Movement Dominates" project aimed to develop memory systems and new architectures based on these technologies that have the potential to lower the cost of local memory accesses by orders of magnitude and provide substantially more bandwidth. Only through these transformational advances can future systems reach the goals of Exascale computing with a manageable power budgets. The Sandia led team included co-PIs from Columbia University, Lawrence Berkeley Lab, and the University of Maryland. The Columbia effort of Data Movement Dominates focused on developing a physically accurate simulation environment and experimental verification for optically-connected memory (OCM) systems that can enable continued performance scaling through high-bandwidth capacity, energy-efficient bit-rate transparency, and time-of-flight latency. With OCM, memory device parallelism and total capacity can scale to match future high-performance computing requirements without sacrificing data-movement efficiency. When we consider systems with integrated photonics, links to memory can be seamlessly integrated with the interconnection network-in a sense, memory becomes a primary aspect of the interconnection network. At the core of the Columbia effort, toward expanding our understanding of OCM enabled computing we have created an integrated modeling and simulation environment that uniquely integrates the physical behavior of the optical layer. The PhoenxSim suite of design and software tools developed under this effort has enabled the co-design of and performance evaluation photonics-enabled OCM

  14. Classification of finger movements for the dexterous hand prosthesis control with surface electromyography.

    PubMed

    Al-Timemy, Ali H; Bugmann, Guido; Escudero, Javier; Outram, Nicholas

    2013-05-01

    A method for the classification of finger movements for dexterous control of prosthetic hands is proposed. Previous research was mainly devoted to identify hand movements as these actions generate strong electromyography (EMG) signals recorded from the forearm. In contrast, in this paper, we assess the use of multichannel surface electromyography (sEMG) to classify individual and combined finger movements for dexterous prosthetic control. sEMG channels were recorded from ten intact-limbed and six below-elbow amputee persons. Offline processing was used to evaluate the classification performance. The results show that high classification accuracies can be achieved with a processing chain consisting of time domain-autoregression feature extraction, orthogonal fuzzy neighborhood discriminant analysis for feature reduction, and linear discriminant analysis for classification. We show that finger and thumb movements can be decoded accurately with high accuracy with latencies as short as 200 ms. Thumb abduction was decoded successfully with high accuracy for six amputee persons for the first time. We also found that subsets of six EMG channels provide accuracy values similar to those computed with the full set of EMG channels (98% accuracy over ten intact-limbed subjects for the classification of 15 classes of different finger movements and 90% accuracy over six amputee persons for the classification of 12 classes of individual finger movements). These accuracy values are higher than previous studies, whereas we typically employed half the number of EMG channels per identified movement.

  15. Opportunities for the application of advanced remotely-sensed data in ecological studies of terrestrial animal movement.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Wiebke; Martinuzzi, Sebastian; Estes, Anna B; Pidgeon, Anna M; Dettki, Holger; Ericsson, Göran; Radeloff, Volker C

    2015-01-01

    Animal movement patterns in space and time are a central aspect of animal ecology. Remotely-sensed environmental indices can play a key role in understanding movement patterns by providing contiguous, relatively fine-scale data that link animal movements to their environment. Still, implementation of newly available remotely-sensed data is often delayed in studies of animal movement, calling for a better flow of information to researchers less familiar with remotely-sensed data applications. Here, we reviewed the application of remotely-sensed environmental indices to infer movement patterns of animals in terrestrial systems in studies published between 2002 and 2013. Next, we introduced newly available remotely-sensed products, and discussed their opportunities for animal movement studies. Studies of coarse-scale movement mostly relied on satellite data representing plant phenology or climate and weather. Studies of small-scale movement frequently used land cover data based on Landsat imagery or aerial photographs. Greater documentation of the type and resolution of remotely-sensed products in ecological movement studies would enhance their usefulness. Recent advancements in remote sensing technology improve assessments of temporal dynamics of landscapes and the three-dimensional structures of habitats, enabling near real-time environmental assessment. Online movement databases that now integrate remotely-sensed data facilitate access to remotely-sensed products for movement ecologists. We recommend that animal movement studies incorporate remotely-sensed products that provide time series of environmental response variables. This would facilitate wildlife management and conservation efforts, as well as the predictive ability of movement analyses. Closer collaboration between ecologists and remote sensing experts could considerably alleviate the implementation gap. Ecologists should not expect that indices derived from remotely-sensed data will be directly

  16. Resultant knee joint moments for lateral movement tasks on sliding and non-sliding sport surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nigg, Benno M; Stefanyshyn, Darren J; Rozitis, Antra I; Mundermann, Annegret

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare ankle and knee joint moments observed when playing on sport surfaces that slide slightly relative to the ground with the moments observed when playing on conventional sport surfaces. Three-dimensional resultant internal joint moments and kinematic characteristics of the lower extremity were quantified for 21 university basketball players when performing v-cut and side-shuffle tasks on three types of sliding surface (interlocking tiles) and on two types of conventional surface (maple wood and rolled vinyl). Translational and rotational friction between the five test surfaces and a test shoe were also quantified. The five sport surfaces moved horizontally between 0.2 and 1.6 mm during the landing phase of the two tasks. The medio-lateral ground reaction forces were lowest for the surfaces with the highest horizontal movement. Resultant ankle joint moments were lower and resultant knee moments were higher on the sliding surfaces than the conventional surfaces. Sport surfaces that allow a few millimetres of horizontal movement during ground contact may reduce joint loading at the ankle joint, but increase joint loading at the knee joint, when compared with conventional sport surfaces, and thus may influence the prevalence of knee injuries.

  17. Advances in surfaces and osseointegration in implantology. Biomimetic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Albertini, Matteo; Fernandez-Yague, Marc; Lázaro, Pedro; Herrero-Climent, Mariano; Bullon, Pedro; Gil, Francisco-Javier

    2015-01-01

    The present work is a revision of the processes occurring in osseointegration of titanium dental implants according to different types of surfaces -namely, polished surfaces, rough surfaces obtained from subtraction methods, as well as the new hydroxyapatite biomimetic surfaces obtained from thermochemical processes. Hydroxyapatite’s high plasma-projection temperatures have proven to prevent the formation of crystalline apatite on the titanium dental implant, but lead to the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate (i.e., with no crystal structure) instead. This layer produce some osseointegration yet the calcium phosphate layer will eventually dissolve and leave a gap between the bone and the dental implant, thus leading to osseointegration failure due to bacterial colonization. A new surface -recently obtained by thermochemical processes- produces, by crystallization, a layer of apatite with the same mineral content as human bone that is chemically bonded to the titanium surface. Osseointegration speed was tested by means of minipigs, showing bone formation after 3 to 4 weeks, with the security that a dental implant can be loaded. This surface can be an excellent candidate for immediate or early loading procedures. Key words:Dental implants, implants surfaces, osseointegration, biomimetics surfaces. PMID:25662555

  18. Establishing Object Correspondence across Eye Movements: Flexible Use of Spatiotemporal and Surface Feature Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Ashleigh M.; Luck, Steven J.; Hollingworth, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Visual input is frequently disrupted by eye movements, blinks, and occlusion. The visual system must be able to establish correspondence between objects visible before and after a disruption. Current theories hold that correspondence is established solely on the basis of spatiotemporal information, with no contribution from surface features. In…

  19. Surface Movement Incidents Reported to the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda J.; Hubener, Simone

    1997-01-01

    Increasing numbers of aircraft are operating on the surface of airports throughout the world. Airport operations are forecast to grow by more that 50%, by the year 2005. Airport surface movement traffic would therefore be expected to become increasingly congested. Safety of these surface operations will become a focus as airport capacity planning efforts proceed toward the future. Several past events highlight the prevailing risks experienced while moving aircraft during ground operations on runways, taxiways, and other areas at terminal, gates, and ramps. The 1994 St. Louis accident between a taxiing Cessna crossing an active runway and colliding with a landing MD-80 emphasizes the importance of a fail-safe system for airport operations. The following study explores reports of incidents occurring on an airport surface that did not escalate to an accident event. The Aviation Safety Reporting System has collected data on surface movement incidents since 1976. This study sampled the reporting data from June, 1993 through June, 1994. The coding of the data was accomplished in several categories. The categories include location of airport, phase of ground operation, weather /lighting conditions, ground conflicts, flight crew characteristics, human factor considerations, and airport environment. These comparisons and distributions of variables contributing to surface movement incidents can be invaluable to future airport planning, accident prevention efforts, and system-wide improvements.

  20. Advances in surfaces and osseointegration in implantology. Biomimetic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Matteo; Fernandez-Yague, Marc; Lázaro, Pedro; Herrero-Climent, Mariano; Rios-Santos, Jose-Vicente; Bullon, Pedro; Gil, Francisco-Javier

    2015-05-01

    The present work is a revision of the processes occurring in osseointegration of titanium dental implants according to different types of surfaces -namely, polished surfaces, rough surfaces obtained from subtraction methods, as well as the new hydroxyapatite biomimetic surfaces obtained from thermochemical processes. Hydroxyapatite's high plasma-projection temperatures have proven to prevent the formation of crystalline apatite on the titanium dental implant, but lead to the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate (i.e., with no crystal structure) instead. This layer produce some osseointegration yet the calcium phosphate layer will eventually dissolve and leave a gap between the bone and the dental implant, thus leading to osseointegration failure due to bacterial colonization. A new surface -recently obtained by thermochemical processes- produces, by crystallization, a layer of apatite with the same mineral content as human bone that is chemically bonded to the titanium surface. Osseointegration speed was tested by means of minipigs, showing bone formation after 3 to 4 weeks, with the security that a dental implant can be loaded. This surface can be an excellent candidate for immediate or early loading procedures.

  1. Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Cox, Rachel E.; Schuler, Jason M.; Ebert, Tom; Nick, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Regolith is abundant on extra-terrestrial surfaces and is the source of many resources such as oxygen, hydrogen, titanium, aluminum, iron, silica and other valuable materials, which can be used to make rocket propellant, consumables for life support, radiation protection barrier shields, landing pads, blast protection berms, roads, habitats and other structures and devices. Recent data from the Moon also indicates that there are substantial deposits of water ice in permanently shadowed crater regions and possibly under an over burden of regolith. The key to being able to use this regolith and acquire the resources, is being able to manipulate it with robotic excavation and hauling machinery that can survive and operate in these very extreme extra-terrestrial surface environments. In addition, the reduced gravity on the Moon, Mars, comets and asteroids poses a significant challenge in that the necessary reaction force for digging cannot be provided by the robot's weight as is typically done on Earth. Space transportation is expensive and limited in capacity, so small, lightweight payloads are desirable, which means large traditional excavation machines are not a viable option. A novel, compact and lightweight excavation robot prototype for manipulating, excavating, acquiring, hauling and dumping regolith on extra-terrestrial surfaces has been developed and tested. Lessons learned and test results will be presented including digging in a variety of lunar regolith simulant conditions including frozen regolith mixed with water ice.

  2. Advanced Face Gear Surface Durability Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Heath, Gregory F.

    2016-01-01

    The surface durability life of helical face gears and isotropic super-finished (ISF) face gears was investigated. Experimental fatigue tests were performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Endurance tests were performed on 10 sets of helical face gears in mesh with tapered involute helical pinions, and 10 sets of ISF-enhanced straight face gears in mesh with tapered involute spur pinions. The results were compared to previous tests on straight face gears. The life of the ISF configuration was slightly less than that of previous tests on straight face gears. The life of the ISF configuration was slightly greater than that of the helical configuration.

  3. Interactions among endoplasmic reticulum, microtubules, and retrograde movements of the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, M; Reese, T S

    1994-01-01

    Relationships among the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), microtubules, and bead movements on the cell surface were investigated in the thin peripheral region of A6 cells, a frog kidney cell line. ER tubules were often aligned with microtubules, as shown by double-labeling with DiOC6(3) and anti-tubulin in fixed cells. In living cells stained with DiOC6(3) and observed in time lapse, there were frequent extensions, but few retractions, of ER tubules. In addition, there was a steady retrograde (towards the cell center) movement of all of the ER at approximately 0.3 microns/min. Since microtubules are often aligned with the ER, microtubules must also be moving retrogradely. By simultaneous imaging, it was found that the ER moves retrogradely at the same rate as aminated latex beads on the cell surface. This indicates that the mechanisms for ER and bead movement are closely related. Cytochalasin B stopped bead and ER movement in most of the cells, providing evidence that actin is involved in both retrograde movements. The ER retracted towards the cell center in nocodazole while both ER and microtubules retracted in taxol. Time lapse observations showed that for both drugs, the retraction of the ER is the result of retrograde movement in the absence of new ER extensions. Presumably, ER extensions do not occur in nocodazole because of the absence of microtubules, and do not occur in taxol because taxol-stabilized microtubules move retrogradely and there is no polymerization of new microtubule tracks for ER elongation. PMID:7859292

  4. Movement stability analysis of surface electromyography-based elbow power assistance.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Suncheol; Kim, Yunjoo; Kim, Jung

    2014-04-01

    The use of power assistive devices that use surface electromyography (SEMG) signals may be limited by the noisy nature of SEMG signals. The aim of this study was to investigate the variation in human movement stability while the amount of SEMG-based assistive power was changed. A robotic device provided a torque that was proportional to the torque estimated by SEMG for assisting human movements, and 12 volunteers participated in the elbow flexion experiments. The maximum finite-time Lyapunov exponent (MFTLE), the average logarithmic rate of the divergence of neighboring trajectories, and the variability of the kinematic data were used to quantify the stability of the assisted elbow movements. The stability provided by the MFTLE decreased as the amount of assistive torque increased with respect to the amount of human torque. The kinematic variability increased with the increase in assistive torque. Therefore, by ensuring that the amount of SEMG-based assistive torque is less than the amount of human torque, the assistance may provide relatively natural movements. This study is the first to quantify movement stability as SEMG-based assistive power is applied. This study can provide a foundation for determining the appropriate amount of SEMG-based assistive power.

  5. Gliding movement in Peranema trichophorum is powered by flagellar surface motility.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akira; Suetomo, Yasutaka; Arikawa, Mikihiko; Omura, Gen; Khan, S M Mostafa Kamal; Kakuta, Soichiro; Suzaki, Etsuko; Kataoka, Katsuko; Suzaki, Toshinobu

    2003-08-01

    A colorless euglenoid flagellate Peranema trichophorum shows unique unidirectional gliding cell locomotion on the substratum at velocities up to 30 micro m/s by an as yet unexplained mechanism. In this study, we found that (1) treatment with NiCl(2) inhibited flagellar beating without any effect on gliding movement; (2) water currents applied to a gliding cell from opposite sides caused detachment of the cell body from the substratum. With only the anterior flagellum adhering to the substratum, gliding movement continued along the direction of the anterior flagellum; (3) gentle pipetting induced flagellar severance into various lengths. In these cells, gliding velocity was proportional to the flagellar length; and (4) Polystyrene beads were translocated along the surface of the anterior flagellum. All of these results indicate that a cell surface motility system is present on the anterior flagellum, which is responsible for cell gliding in P. trichophorum.

  6. Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of the project is to develop techniques for coal surface control prior to the advanced physical fine coal cleaning process of selective agglomeration in order to achieve 90% pyrite sulfur rejection at an energy recovery greater than 90% based on run-of-mine coal. The surface control is meant to encompass surface modification during grinding and laboratory beneficiation testing. The project includes the following tasks: Project planning, method for analysis of samples, development of standard beneficiation test, grinding studies, modification of particle surface, and exploratory R D and support. 5 refs., 22 figs., 34 tabs.

  7. On the challenge of classifying 52 hand movements from surface electromyography.

    PubMed

    Kuzborskij, Ilja; Gijsberts, Arjan; Caputo, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The level of dexterity of myoelectric hand prostheses depends to large extent on the feature representation and subsequent classification of surface electromyography signals. This work presents a comparison of various feature extraction and classification methods on a large-scale surface electromyography database containing 52 different hand movements obtained from 27 subjects. Results indicate that simple feature representations as Mean Absolute Value and Waveform Length can achieve similar performance to the computationally more demanding marginal Discrete Wavelet Transform. With respect to classifiers, the Support Vector Machine was found to be the only method that consistently achieved top performance in combination with each feature extraction method.

  8. Abnormal surface EMG during clinically normal wrist movement in cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    de Vries, P M; Leenders, K L; van der Hoeven, J H; de Jong, B M; Kuiper, A J; Maurits, N M

    2007-11-01

    We investigated whether patients with cervical dystonia (CD) have abnormal muscle activation in non-dystonic body parts. Eight healthy controls and eight CD patients performed a flexion-extension movement of the right wrist. Movement execution was recorded by surface electromyography (EMG) from forearm muscles. Although patients had no complaints concerning wrist movement and had no apparent difficulty in executing the task, they demonstrated lower mean EMG amplitude (flexor: 0.32 mV and extensor: 0.61 mV) than controls (flexor: 0.67 mV; P = 0.021 and extensor: 1.18 mV; P = 0.068; borderline significant). Mean extensor muscle contraction was prolonged in patients (1860 ms) compared with controls (1334 ms; P = 0.026). Variation in mean EMG amplitude over movements tended to be higher in patients (flexor: 43% and extensor: 35%) than controls (flexor: 34%; P = 0.072 and extensor: 26%; P = 0.073). These results suggest that CD patients also have abnormal muscle activation in non-dystonic body parts at a subclinical level. This would support the concept that in dystonia, non-dystonic limbs are in a 'pre-dystonic state'.

  9. Impact of soil vertical water movement on the energy balance of different land surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiqiu; Chen, George Tai-Jen; Hu, Yanbing

    2007-08-01

    The soil heat flux determination method proposed by Gao (Boundary-Layer Meteorol 114:165-178, 2005) is discussed for (1) dry surfaces, (2) bare soil or sparse short-grass lands, and (3) dense-grass surfaces or forest. Our analysis shows that, when neglecting the contribution of soil vertical water movement to soil heat flux, the energy components measured independently will (1) still achieve balance over dry surfaces, and (2) be significantly in imbalance over bare soil or sparse short-grass lands. The mean of bare ground evaporation modeled by SiB2 is 1.58 x 10(-5) m(3) s(-1) m(-2), and the mean of soil water flux obtained by the method of Gao is 1.22 x 10(-5) m(3) s(-1) m(-2) for the Naqu site in the summer of 1998. Comparison of the bare ground evaporation with the mean of soil water flux shows a difference, the causes of which are investigated. Physically, the bare ground evaporation is equal to the sum of soil water flux and water content change in the soil surface layer. Because the bare ground evaporation is very limited for the dense-grass surfaces or forest, our analysis implies that the energy imbalance encountered over the dense-grass or forest is not caused by the fact that previous researchers neglected soil water movements in their energy budget analyses. PMID:17429698

  10. Surface movements of emplaced lava flows measured by synthetic aperture radar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, N. F.; Wadge, G.; Williams, C. A.; Morley, J. G.; Muller, J.-P.; Murray, J. B.; Upton, M.

    2001-06-01

    Lava flows continue to move after they have been emplaced by flow mechanisms. This movement is largely vertical and can be detected using differential synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry. There are three main components to this motion: (1) movement of surface scatterers, resulting in radar phase decorrelation, (2) measurable subsidence of the flow surface due to thermal contraction and clast repacking, and (3) time-dependent depression of the flow substrate. These effects act in proportion to the thickness of the lava flow and decay with time, although there is a time lag before the third component becomes significant. We explore these effects using SAR data from the ERS satellites over the Etna volcano, Sicily. Phase decorrelation on young, thick a'a lava flows persists for a few years and probably results from surface block rotations during flow contraction. Maximum measured subsidence rates of the 1991-1993 lava flow over a period of 70 days are about 0.7 mm day-1, but are potentially greater in areas of data decorrelation. These rates fall to <2.7 × 10-2 mm day-1 after about 20 years in flows about 50 m thick, sooner for thinner flows. Comparison with measured subsidence rates on Kilauean lava lakes suggests that thermal contraction only accounts for about one third of the observed subsidence. The remaining motion is thought to come from surface clast repacking during cooling and from creep mechanisms in the flow substrate. Measurements of postemplacement surface movement provide new constraints on the thermomechanical properties of lava flows and have cautionary implications for the interpretation of interferometric SAR data of volcanoes.

  11. Advanced surface paneling method for subsonic and supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, L. L.; Johnson, F. T.; Ehlers, F. E.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical results illustrating the capabilities of an advanced aerodynamic surface paneling method are presented. The method is applicable to both subsonic and supersonic flow, as represented by linearized potential flow theory. The method is based on linearly varying sources and quadratically varying doublets which are distributed over flat or curved panels. These panels are applied to the true surface geometry of arbitrarily shaped three dimensional aerodynamic configurations.

  12. Radial Wettable Gradient of Hot Surface to Control Droplets Movement in Directions

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shile; Wang, Sijie; Tao, Yuanhao; Shang, Weifeng; Deng, Siyan; Zheng, Yongmei; Hou, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    A radial wettable gradient was fabricated on the surface of graphite plate by a simple one-step anodic oxidation process. It was found that the direction and value of the wettable gradient could be easily controlled by adjusting current and oxidation time gradient. With the increase of surface temperature, droplets on surface not only exhibited the transition of boiling mode, but also showed the controlled radial spreading, evaporation and movement behaviors. These phenomena could be attributed to the cooperation of wettability force, hysteresis force and vapor pressure (Leidenfrost effect). Especially, the controlled radial convergence or divergence of droplets with high velocity were realized on the surfaces with either inside or outside radial gradient, which would have crucial applications in the design of microfluidic devices and the exploration of the biotechnology. PMID:25975722

  13. On optimal electrode configuration to estimate hand movements from forearm surface electromyography.

    PubMed

    Paleari, Marco; Di Girolamo, Michela; Celadon, Nicoló; Favetto, Alain; Ariano, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the movement of the hand from sEMG signals acquired on the forearm is key in the development of future prosthetics of the upper limb. Despite the technical advancement on this technique, state of the art of sEMG still relies strongly on optimal electrode placement which is typically performed by a specialist by mean of a heuristic search. Involving a specialist has few major disadvantages including high costs and relatively long schedules. This work searches an optimal electrode configuration which could reduce or avoid the intervention of a specialist. More than 200 different possible electrode configurations were assessed by means of the average recognition rate over 11 different movements of the hand, wrist, and fingers. It is shown that using two rows of 8 equally spaced electrodes around the circumference of the forearm could be an optimal trade-off solution to accomplish the task of recognizing hand movement (ARR = 92%) without the need for a specialist or very complex hardware. PMID:26737680

  14. Yeast actin filaments display ATP-dependent sliding movement over surfaces coated with rabbit muscle myosin.

    PubMed Central

    Kron, S J; Drubin, D G; Botstein, D; Spudich, J A

    1992-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used to study the function of components of the actin cytoskeleton in vivo, mainly because it is easy to derive and characterize mutations affecting these proteins. In contrast, biochemical studies have generally used proteins derived from higher eukaryotes. We have devised a simple procedure to prepare, in high yield, homogeneous native actin from wild-type and act1 mutant yeast. Using intensified video fluorescence microscopy, we found that actin filaments polymerized from these preparations exhibit ATP-dependent sliding movement over surfaces coated with rabbit skeletal muscle myosin. The rates of sliding movement of the wild-type and mutant yeast actins were each about half that of rabbit skeletal muscle actin under similar conditions. We conclude that over the large evolutionary distance between yeast and mammals there has been significant conservation of actin function, specifically the ability to be moved by interaction with myosin. Images PMID:1533933

  15. UPWARD MOVEMENT OF PLUTONIUM TO SURFACE SEDIMENTS DURING AN 11-YEAR FIELD STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.; Beals, D.; Cadieux, J.; Halverson, J.

    2010-01-25

    An 11-y lysimeter study was established to monitor the movement of Pu through vadose zone sediments. Sediment Pu concentrations as a function of depth indicated that some Pu moved upward from the buried source material. Subsequent numerical modeling suggested that the upward movement was largely the result of invading grasses taking up the Pu and translocating it upward. The objective of this study was to determine if the Pu of surface sediments originated from atmosphere fallout or from the buried lysimeter source material (weapons-grade Pu), providing additional evidence that plants were involved in the upward migration of Pu. The {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu and {sup 242}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atomic fraction ratios of the lysimeter surface sediments, as determined by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (TIMS), were 0.063 and 0.00045, respectively; consistent with the signatures of the weapons-grade Pu. Our numerical simulations indicate that because plants create a large water flux, small concentrations over multiple years may result in a measurable accumulation of Pu on the ground surface. These results may have implications on the conceptual model for calculating risk associated with long-term stewardship and monitored natural attenuation management of Pu contaminated subsurface and surface sediments.

  16. Integrating movement in academic classrooms: understanding, applying and advancing the knowledge base.

    PubMed

    Webster, C A; Russ, L; Vazou, S; Goh, T L; Erwin, H

    2015-08-01

    In the context of comprehensive and coordinated approaches to school health, academic classrooms have gained attention as a promising setting for increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary time among children. The aims of this paper are to review the rationale and knowledge base related to movement integration in academic classrooms, consider the practical applications of current knowledge to interventions and teacher education, and suggest directions for future research. Specifically, this paper (i) situates movement integration amid policy and research related to children's health and the school as a health-promoting environment; (ii) highlights the benefits of movement integration; (iii) summarizes movement integration programs and interventions; (iv) examines factors associated with classroom teachers' movement integration; (v) offers strategies for translating research to practice and (vi) forwards recommendations for future inquiry related to the effectiveness and sustainability of efforts to integrate movement into classroom routines. This paper provides a comprehensive resource for developing state-of-the-art initiatives to maximize children's movement in academic classrooms as a key strategy for important goals in both education and public health.

  17. Centripetal flow of pseudopodial surface components could propel the amoeboid movement of Caenorhabditis elegans spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Roberts, T M; Ward, S

    1982-01-01

    Latex beads and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) were used to examine the movement of membrane components on amoeboid spermatozoa of Caenorhabditis elegans. The behavior of beads attached to the cell revealed continuous, directed movement from the tip of the pseudopod to its base, but no movement on the cell body. Lectin receptors are also cleared from the pseudopod (4). Blocking preexisting lectin receptors with unlabeled WGA followed by pulse-labeling wih fluorescent WGA showed that new lectin receptors are continuously inserted at the tip of the pseudopod. Like latex beads, these new lectin receptors move continuously over the pseudopod surface to the cell body-pseudopod junction where they are probably internalized. Mutants altering the rate of membrane flow, and eliminating its topographical asymmetry, have been identified. Together with the observation that fluorescent phospholipids are cleared from the pseudopod of developing spermatozoa at the same rate as lectin receptors (25), these results show that there is bulk membrane flow over the pseudopod with assembly at the tip and apparent disassembly at the base. There are no vesicles visible at either the pseudopodial tip or base, so these spermatozoa must have a novel mechanism for insertion and uptake of membrane components. This membrane flow could provide the forward propulsion of spermatozoa attached to a substrate by their pseudopods.

  18. 9 CFR 77.25 - Interstate movement from modified accredited advanced States and zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Captive Cervids § 77.25 Interstate movement from modified accredited..., and that are not known to be infected with or exposed to tuberculosis, may be moved interstate...

  19. 9 CFR 77.10 - Interstate movement from modified accredited advanced States and zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Cattle and Bison § 77.10 Interstate movement from modified accredited..., and that are not known to be infected with or exposed to tuberculosis, may be moved interstate...

  20. 9 CFR 77.25 - Interstate movement from modified accredited advanced States and zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Captive Cervids § 77.25 Interstate movement from modified accredited..., and that are not known to be infected with or exposed to tuberculosis, may be moved interstate...

  1. 9 CFR 77.25 - Interstate movement from modified accredited advanced States and zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Captive Cervids § 77.25 Interstate movement from modified accredited..., and that are not known to be infected with or exposed to tuberculosis, may be moved interstate...

  2. 9 CFR 77.10 - Interstate movement from modified accredited advanced States and zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Cattle and Bison § 77.10 Interstate movement from modified accredited..., and that are not known to be infected with or exposed to tuberculosis, may be moved interstate...

  3. 9 CFR 77.25 - Interstate movement from modified accredited advanced States and zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Captive Cervids § 77.25 Interstate movement from modified accredited..., and that are not known to be infected with or exposed to tuberculosis, may be moved interstate...

  4. 9 CFR 77.10 - Interstate movement from modified accredited advanced States and zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Cattle and Bison § 77.10 Interstate movement from modified accredited..., and that are not known to be infected with or exposed to tuberculosis, may be moved interstate...

  5. 9 CFR 77.10 - Interstate movement from modified accredited advanced States and zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Cattle and Bison § 77.10 Interstate movement from modified accredited..., and that are not known to be infected with or exposed to tuberculosis, may be moved interstate...

  6. Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gray, R.; Streeter, R.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Chiarlli, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Perez, L.; Venkatadri, R.

    1992-01-01

    This final report presents the research work carried out on the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC). The project was to support the engineering development of the selective agglomeration technology in order to reduce the sulfur content of US coals for controlling SO[sub 2] emissions (i.e., acid rain precursors). The overall effort was a part of the DOE/PETCs Acid Rain Control Initiative (ARCI). The overall objective of the project is to develop techniques for coal surface control prior to the advanced physical fine coal cleaning process of selective agglomeration in order to achieve 85% pyrite sulfur rejection at an energy recovery greater than 85% based on run-of-mine coal. The surface control is meant to encompass surface modification during grinding and laboratory beneficiation testing. The project includes the following tasks: Project planning; methods for analysis of samples; development of standard beneficiation test; grinding studies; modification of particle surface; and exploratory R D and support. The coal samples used in this project include three base coals, Upper Freeport - Indiana County, PA, Pittsburgh NO. 8 - Belmont County, OH, and Illinois No. 6 - Randolph County, IL, and three additional coals, Upper Freeport - Grant County- WV, Kentucky No. 9 Hopkins County, KY, and Wyodak - Campbell County, WY. A total of 149 drums of coal were received.

  7. Apparatus for measuring surface movement of an object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOEpatents

    Kotidis, Petros A.; Woodroffe, Jaime A.; Rostler, Peter S.

    1997-01-01

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  8. Method and apparatus for measuring surface movement of an object using a polarizing interfeometer

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Thomas J.; Kotidis, Petros A.; Woodroffe, Jaime A.; Rostler, Peter S.

    1995-01-01

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  9. Method and apparatus for measuring surface movement of an object using a polarizing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, T.J.; Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1995-05-09

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figs.

  10. Apparatus for measuring surface movement of an object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOEpatents

    Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1997-04-22

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figs.

  11. Improvement of hand function using different surfaces and identification of difficult movement post stroke in the Box and Block Test.

    PubMed

    Slota, Gregory P; Enders, Leah R; Seo, Na Jin

    2014-07-01

    This study determined the impact of changing block surfaces on hand function, as well as identified particularly time-consuming movement components post stroke, measured by the Box and Block Test (BBT). Eight chronic stroke survivors and eight age- and gender-matched control subjects participated in this study. The BBT score (number of blocks moved) and time for seven movement components were compared for three different block surfaces (wood, paper, and rubber). The rubber blocks improved BBT scores 8% (compared to all other conditions) not only for control subjects but also for the paretic and non-paretic hands of stroke survivors, by reducing movement time for finger closing and contact-to-lift. Modifying daily objects' surfaces with rubber could help stroke survivors' hand function. The paretic hand displayed notably slower movement for contact-to-lift, transport-release, reach before barrier, and reach after barrier suggesting that therapies may focus on goal directed reaching and object grasping/releasing.

  12. 9 CFR 77.25 - Interstate movement from modified accredited advanced States and zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., and that are not known to be infected with or exposed to tuberculosis, may be moved interstate only in accordance with 9 CFR part 86 and, if moved anywhere other than directly to slaughter at a recognized... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Captive Cervids § 77.25 Interstate movement from modified...

  13. 9 CFR 77.10 - Interstate movement from modified accredited advanced States and zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., and that are not known to be infected with or exposed to tuberculosis, may be moved interstate only in accordance with 9 CFR part 86 and, if moved anywhere other than directly to slaughter at a recognized... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Cattle and Bison § 77.10 Interstate movement from modified...

  14. Advances in cell surface glycoengineering reveal biological function.

    PubMed

    Nischan, Nicole; Kohler, Jennifer J

    2016-08-01

    Cell surface glycans are critical mediators of cell-cell, cell-ligand, and cell-pathogen interactions. By controlling the set of glycans displayed on the surface of a cell, it is possible to gain insight into the biological functions of glycans. Moreover, control of glycan expression can be used to direct cellular behavior. While genetic approaches to manipulate glycosyltransferase gene expression are available, their utility in glycan engineering has limitations due to the combinatorial nature of glycan biosynthesis and the functional redundancy of glycosyltransferase genes. Biochemical and chemical strategies offer valuable complements to these genetic approaches, notably by enabling introduction of unnatural functionalities, such as fluorophores, into cell surface glycans. Here, we describe some of the most recent developments in glycoengineering of cell surfaces, with an emphasis on strategies that employ novel chemical reagents. We highlight key examples of how these advances in cell surface glycan engineering enable study of cell surface glycans and their function. Exciting new technologies include synthetic lipid-glycans, new chemical reporters for metabolic oligosaccharide engineering to allow tandem and in vivo labeling of glycans, improved chemical and enzymatic methods for glycoproteomics, and metabolic glycosyltransferase inhibitors. Many chemical and biochemical reagents for glycan engineering are commercially available, facilitating their adoption by the biological community.

  15. Quantification of facial movements by optical instruments: surface laser scanning and optoelectronic three-dimensional motion analyzer.

    PubMed

    Sidequersky, Fernanda Vincia; Verzé, Laura; Mapelli, Andrea; Ramieri, Guglielmo Amedeo; Sforza, Chiarella

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy of displacements of tracing landmarks in standardized facial movements. Forty healthy persons were evaluated in 2 different groups (20 men and 20 women, aged 18-30 years) with optoelectronic motion analyzer and surface laser scanning. The displacements of tracing landmarks in brow lift and smile were calculated, and the 2 methods (optoelectronic motion analyzer and surface laser scanning) were compared in healthy persons. Side-related differences were found in the tracing landmark (superciliare) during brow lift movements between both methods (the largest movements were found on the right side, P = 0.044), whereas in smile movements the tracing landmark cheilion did not show significant differences between the 2 sides. In both movements, the differences of the tracing landmark displacements between the 2 systems and sexes were on average less than 2 mm, without statistically significant differences (P > 0.05). In conclusion, normal young adult men and women had similar standardized facial movements. The 2 analyzed movements can be measured by both optical instruments with comparable results.

  16. Advances in targeting cell surface signalling molecules for immune modulation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Sheng; Zhu, Yuwen; Chen, Lieping

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a surge in the development of immunomodulatory approaches to combat a broad range of human diseases, including cancer, viral infections, autoimmunity and inflammation as well as in the prevention of transplant rejection. Immunomodulatory approaches mostly involve the use of monoclonal antibodies or recombinant fusion proteins that target cell surface signalling molecules on immune cells to drive immune responses towards the desired direction. Advances in our understanding of the human immune system, along with valuable lessons learned from the first generation of therapeutic biologics, are aiding the design of the next generation of immunomodulatory biologics with better therapeutic efficacy, minimized adverse effects and long-lasting clinical benefit. The recent encouraging results from antibodies targeting programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1) and B7 homolog 1 (B7H1; also known as PDL1) for the treatment of various advanced human cancers show that immunomodulatory therapy has come of age. PMID:23370250

  17. A fresh look at runway incursions: onboard surface movement awareness and alerting system based on SVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernaleken, Christoph; Mihalic, Lamir; Güttler, Mathias; Klingauf, Uwe

    2006-05-01

    Increasing traffic density on the aerodrome surface due to the continuous worldwide growth in the number of flight operations does not only cause capacity and efficiency problems, but also increases the risk of serious incidents and accidents on the airport movement area. Of these, Runway Incursions are the by far most safety-critical. In fact, the worst-ever accident in civil aviation, the collision of two Boeing B747s on Tenerife in 1977 with 583 fatalities, was caused by a Runway Incursion. Therefore, various Runway Safety programs have recently been initiated around the globe, often focusing on ground-based measures such as improved surveillance. However, as a lack of flight crew situational awareness is a key causal factor in many Runway Incursion incidents and accidents, there is a strong need for an onboard solution, which should be capable of interacting cooperatively with ground-based ATM systems, such as A-SMGCS where available. This paper defines the concept of preventive and reactive Runway Incursion avoidance and describes a Surface Movement Awareness & Alerting System (SMAAS) designed to alert the flight crew if they are at risk of infringing a runway. Both the SVS flight deck displays and the corresponding alerting algorithms utilize an ED 99A/RTCA DO-272A compliant aerodrome database, as well as airport operational, traffic and clearance data received via ADS-B or other data links, respectively. The displays provide the crew with enhanced positional, operational, clearance and traffic awareness, and they are used to visualize alerts. A future enhancement of the system will provide intelligent alerting for conflicts caused by surrounding traffic.

  18. SURFACE SPECIALIZATIONS OF FUNDULUS CELLS AND THEIR RELATION TO CELL MOVEMENTS DURING GASTRULATION

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, J. P.; Lentz, Thomas L.

    1967-01-01

    Cell movements in Fundulus blastoderms during gastrulation were studied utilizing time-lapse cinemicrography and electron microscopy. Time-lapse films reveal that cells of the enveloping layer undulate and sometimes separate briefly but remain together in a cohesive layer. During epiboly, the marginal enveloping layer cells move over the periblast as it expands over the yolk sphere. Movement occurs as a result of ruffled membrane activity of the free borders of the marginal cells. Deep blastomeres become increasingly active during blastula and gastrula stages. Lobopodia project from the blastomeres in blastulae and adhere to other cells in gastrulae, giving the cells traction for movement. Contact specializations are formed by the lateral adjacent plasma membranes of enveloping layer cells. An apical junction is characterized by an intercellular gap of 60–75 A. Below this contact, the plasma membranes are separated by 120 A or more. In mid-gastrulae, cytoplasmic fibrils occur adjacent to some apical junctions, and small desmosomes appear below the apical junction. Septate desmosomes also appear at this time. A junction with an intercellular gap of 60 A occurs between marginal enveloping layer cells and periblast. Contacts between deep blastomeres become numerous in gastrulae and consist of contacts at the crests of surface undulations, short areas of contact in which the plasma membranes are 60 or 120 A apart, and long regions characterized by a 200-A intercellular gap. Lobopodia contact other blastomeres only in gastrulae. These junctions contain a 200-A intercellular space. Some deep blastomeres are in contact with the tips of periblast microvilli. The mechanism of epiboly in Fundulus is discussed and reevaluated in terms of these observations. The enveloping layer is adherent to the margin of the periblast and moves over it as a coherent cellular sheet. Periblast epiboly involves a controlled flow of cytoplasm from the thicker periblast into the thinner yolk

  19. Advanced construction management for lunar base construction - Surface operations planner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehoe, Robert P.

    1992-01-01

    The study proposes a conceptual solution and lays the framework for developing a new, sophisticated and intelligent tool for a lunar base construction crew to use. This concept integrates expert systems for critical decision making, virtual reality for training, logistics and laydown optimization, automated productivity measurements, and an advanced scheduling tool to form a unique new planning tool. The concept features extensive use of computers and expert systems software to support the actual work, while allowing the crew to control the project from the lunar surface. Consideration is given to a logistics data base, laydown area management, flexible critical progress scheduler, video simulation of assembly tasks, and assembly information and tracking documentation.

  20. Advances in surface plasmon resonance-based high throughput biochips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, San-Jun; Berguiga, Lotfi; Elezgaray, Juan; Hugo, Nicolas; Li, Wen-Xue; Roland, Thibault; Zeng, He-Ping; Argoul, Francoise

    2009-12-01

    This article reviews our recent advances in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based biochips. It includes four issues, which are the preparation and characterization of high quality gold film, the preparation and characterization of self-assembled monolayer (SAM), dynamics of DNA adsorption on SAMs, and SPR-based microscopies. Numerous topics related to SPR, such as, the modeling of SPR by transmission matrix, effective medium theory, applications of SPR in biology, and SPR-based novel microscopies, are discussed. A novel electrochemical technique, which is extremely useful for the preparation and characterization of high quality SAMs, is also discussed.

  1. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; Harris, G.H.; De, A.; Sotillo, F. ); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. ); Hu, W.; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. ); Choudhry, V.; Shea, S.; Ghosh, A.; Sehgal, R. )

    1992-03-01

    The initial goal of the research project was to develop methods of coal surface control in advanced froth flotation to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur rejection, while operating at Btu recoveries above 90% based on run-of-mine quality coal. Moreover, the technology is to concomitantly reduce the ash content significantly (to six percent or less) to provide a high-quality fuel to the boiler (ash removal also increases Btu content, which in turn decreases a coal's emission potential in terms of lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu). (VC)

  2. Topography-based surface tension gradients to facilitate water droplet movement on laser-etched copper substrates.

    PubMed

    Sommers, A D; Brest, T J; Eid, K F

    2013-09-24

    This paper describes a method for creating a topography-based gradient on a metallic surface to help mitigate problems associated with condensate retention. The gradient was designed to promote water droplet migration toward a specified region on the surface which would serve as the primary conduit for drainage using only the roughness of the surface to facilitate the movement of the droplets. In this work, parallel microchannels having a fixed land width but variable spacing were etched into copper substrates to create a surface tension gradient along the surface of the copper. The surfaces were fabricated using a 355 nm Nd:YVO4 laser system and then characterized using spray testing techniques and water droplet (2-10 μL) injection via microsyringe. The distances that individual droplets traveled on the gradient surface were also measured using a goniometer and CCD camera and were found to be between 0.5 and 1.5 mm for surfaces in a horizontal orientation. Droplet movement was spontaneous and did not require the use of chemical coatings. The theoretical design and construction of surface tension gradients were also explored in this work by calculating the minimum gradient needed for droplet movement on a horizontal surface using Wenzel's model of wetting. The results of this study suggest that microstructural patterning could be used to help reduce condensate retention on metallic fins such as those used in heat exchangers in heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC&R) applications. PMID:23971937

  3. Topography-based surface tension gradients to facilitate water droplet movement on laser-etched copper substrates.

    PubMed

    Sommers, A D; Brest, T J; Eid, K F

    2013-09-24

    This paper describes a method for creating a topography-based gradient on a metallic surface to help mitigate problems associated with condensate retention. The gradient was designed to promote water droplet migration toward a specified region on the surface which would serve as the primary conduit for drainage using only the roughness of the surface to facilitate the movement of the droplets. In this work, parallel microchannels having a fixed land width but variable spacing were etched into copper substrates to create a surface tension gradient along the surface of the copper. The surfaces were fabricated using a 355 nm Nd:YVO4 laser system and then characterized using spray testing techniques and water droplet (2-10 μL) injection via microsyringe. The distances that individual droplets traveled on the gradient surface were also measured using a goniometer and CCD camera and were found to be between 0.5 and 1.5 mm for surfaces in a horizontal orientation. Droplet movement was spontaneous and did not require the use of chemical coatings. The theoretical design and construction of surface tension gradients were also explored in this work by calculating the minimum gradient needed for droplet movement on a horizontal surface using Wenzel's model of wetting. The results of this study suggest that microstructural patterning could be used to help reduce condensate retention on metallic fins such as those used in heat exchangers in heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC&R) applications.

  4. EDITORIAL: Focus on Advances in Surface and Interface Science 2008 FOCUS ON ADVANCES IN SURFACE AND INTERFACE SCIENCE 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffler, Matthias; Schneider, Wolf-Dieter

    2008-12-01

    Basic research in surface and interface science is highly interdisciplinary, covering the fields of physics, chemistry, biophysics, geo-, atmospheric and environmental sciences, material science, chemical engineering, and more. The various phenomena are interesting by themselves, and they are most important in nearly all modern technologies, as for example electronic, magnetic, and optical devices, sensors, catalysts, lubricants, hard and thermal-barrier coatings, protection against corrosion and crack formation under harsh environments. In fact, detailed understanding of the elementary processes at surfaces is necessary to support and to advance the high technology that very much founds the prosperity and lifestyle of our society. Current state-of-the-art experimental studies of elementary processes at surfaces, of surface properties and functions employ a variety of sophisticated tools. Some are capable of revealing the location and motion of individual atoms. Others measure excitations (electronic, magnetic and vibronic), employing, for example, special light sources such as synchrotrons, high magnetic fields, or free electron lasers. The surprising variety of intriguing physical phenomena at surfaces, interfaces, and nanostructures also pose a persistent challenge for the development of theoretical descriptions, methods, and even basic physical concepts. This second focus issue on the topic of 'Advances in Surface and Interface Science' in New Journal of Physics, following on from last year's successful collection, provides an exciting synoptic view on the latest pertinent developments in the field. Focus on Advances in Surface and Interface Science 2008 Contents Organic layers at metal/electrolyte interfaces: molecular structure and reactivity of viologen monolayers Stephan Breuer, Duc T Pham, Sascha Huemann, Knud Gentz, Caroline Zoerlein, Ralf Hunger, Klaus Wandelt and Peter Broekmann Spin polarized d surface resonance state of fcc Co/Cu(001) K Miyamoto, K

  5. Water movement through blanket peat is dominated by a complicated pattern of near-surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Ed; Baird, Andy; Billett, Mike; Chapman, Pippa; Dinsmore, Kerry; Holden, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    Blanket peatland formation and functioning depend strongly on hydrology. Omitting the potential for pipe flow, the acrotelm-catotelm model is still widely held to apply to blanket peatlands. In the model, water flow through the peat profile is dominated by near-surface flow in the acrotelm, whereas water movement below the level of (near) permanent saturation (the catotelm) is characterised by very low hydraulic conductivity (K). Whilst some work has been done on characterising Kat different depths in blanket peatlands, very little is known about near-surface K, particularly with respect to how it varies between microforms and over fine spatial scales. We undertook a detailed investigation of near-surface (0 - 12 cm) and deeper (30 and 50 cm) K at a blanket peatland site in the Flow Country in Scotland (UK). Near-surface Kof peat samples taken across a range of microforms was measured vertically (Kv) and horizontally (Kh) in the laboratory using a new 'split cylinder' method (n = 48 excluding repeat tests). K30 (n = 20) andK50 (n = 20) were estimated in situ using the piezometer or seepage-tube method. To help our interpretation of the near-surface K measurements we recorded the vegetation cover from where the peat samples were taken and characterised each peat sample in terms of its plant macrofossil assemblage and dry bulk density. We found that Kvand Khwere highly variable between microforms in the near-surface samples, ranging over two orders of magnitude (0.489 - 0.003 cm s-1). Kernel density plots show that Kvwas most commonly in the region of ~0.03 cm s-1 at 0 - 6 cm, and ~0.015 cm s-1 at 6 - 12 cm, whereas Kh was ~0.05 and ~0.001 cm s-1 respectively. These data reveal a high degree of absolute variability and anisotropy in K over small scales. The deeper K30and K50 values were typically an order of magnitude or more lower than the near-surface K, and were less variable between test locations with the exception of poorly humified Sphagnum-dominated peat

  6. Eye movements reveal distinct encoding patterns for number and cumulative surface area in random dot arrays

    PubMed Central

    Odic, Darko; Halberda, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Humans can quickly and intuitively represent the number of objects in a scene using visual evidence through the Approximate Number System (ANS). But the computations that support the encoding of visual number—the transformation from the retinal input into ANS representations—remain controversial. Two types of number encoding theories have been proposed: those arguing that number is encoded through a dedicated, enumeration computation, and those arguing that visual number is inferred from nonnumber specific visual features, such as surface area, density, convex hull, etc. Here, we attempt to adjudicate between these two theories by testing participants on both a number and a cumulative area task while also tracking their eye-movements. We hypothesize that if approximate number and surface area depend on distinct encoding computations, saccadic signatures should be distinct for the two tasks, even if the visual stimuli are identical. Consistent with this hypothesis, we find that discriminating number versus cumulative area modulates both where participants look (i.e., participants spend more time looking at the more numerous set in the number task and the larger set in the cumulative area task), and how participants look (i.e., cumulative area encoding shows fewer, longer saccades, while number encoding shows many short saccades and many switches between targets). We further identify several saccadic signatures that are associated with task difficulty and correct versus incorrect trials for both dimensions. These results suggest distinct encoding algorithms for number and cumulative area extraction, and thereby distinct representations of these dimensions. PMID:26575191

  7. Growth and Movement of Spot Inoculated Rhizobium meliloti on the Root Surface of Alfalfa 1

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Wrobel-Boerner, Elizabeth; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1992-01-01

    Inoculum droplets of approximately 10 nanoliter volume and containing about 10 Rhizobium meliloti cells were placed onto the root surface of alfalfa seedlings in plastic growth pouches at either the root tip, the position of the smallest emergent root hairs, or at a site midway between these points. The droplets were initially confined to an area of about 0.2 square millimeter at the point of application. By 48 and 96 hours after inoculation, the inoculum bacteria and their progeny were distributed over several centimeters of the root between the initial site of deposition and the growing root tip, reaching densities of 103 to 104 bacteria per centimeter near the site of initial deposition and decreasing exponentially from that point toward the root tip. Graphite particles deposited on the root surface close to the growing tip were similarly distributed along the root length by 48 and 96 hours, suggesting that passive displacement by root cell elongation was primarily responsible for the spread of bacteria. A nonmotile mutant of R. meliloti colonized alfalfa roots to the same extent as the wild type and was usually distributed in the same manner, indicating that bacterial motility contributed little under these conditions to long distance spread of the bacteria. However, when applied in low numbers, R. meliloti mutants defective in motility or chemotaxis were considerably less efficient in initiating nodules near the point of inoculation than the wild type. This implies that motility and/or chemotaxis contribute significantly to local exploration for suitable infection sites. Almost all nodules on the primary root formed within a few millimeters of the spot-inoculation site, indicating that, under our experimental conditions, movement and multiplication of R. meliloti on the root surface were not sufficient to maintain an adequate population in the infectible region of the root during root growth. PMID:16668744

  8. An integrated system to monitor landslide surface movements by means of geodetic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesci, A.; Baldi, P.; Bedin, A.; Casula, G.; Cenni, N.; Fabris, M.; Loddo, F.; Mora, P.

    2003-04-01

    The application of GPS, Digital Photogrammetry and Laser Scanning to landslide represent a powerfool tool for movement monitoring including small deformation preceding the failure phase. These techniques are applied leading to an integrated system to generate Digital Elevation Models. The GPS gives the possibility of determining the relative position of points at centimetric and/or millimetric accuracy by means of fast survey operations. The application of this technique in the so-called kinematic mode, that is moving continuously one receiver with respect to a reference fixed station, allows the description of the terrain surface measuring the coordinates of points distributed on a high density irregular grid. Moreover Static and Fast Static GPS mode provide an efficient means for determining the position at millimetric level of precision of marker points distributed along the interested area. Continuous observations of landslide surface displacement may be performed by means of GPS permanent station monitored from a remote control centre, and the possibility of automating the main GPS operational steps (observation, collection, downloading and processing) make it possible to control landslide activity in real time. The Digital Photogrammetry provide the measurement of shape, position and dimension of objects on a surface from stereo photographs. Combined with surveying of control points, photogrammetric techniques can be applied to generate DEMs. Aerial and terrestrial images are automatically processed by means of correlation algorithms that work at sub-pixel level. The precision of the computation of three dimensional coordinates of points depends mainly on the scale and the resolution of the image. The Laser Scanning technique is based on determining distances measuring the round trip time of a laser wave: for each point shot by the laser beam, the telemeter provide the distances, the reflectance and the coordinates of a high number of surface points in a

  9. Surface hydrology and soil movement in an arid karst: the Nullarbor Plain, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillieson, D. S.; Cochrane, J. A.; Murray, A.

    1994-03-01

    The Nullarbor Plain is the largest karst area in Australia (220,000 km2) and one of the largest in the world. Its climate is arid (Köppen BWk and BWh), and the surface relief is less than 10m. The landscape is divided into extensive closed karstic depressions separated by low rocky ridges, and the dominant vegetation is chenopod shrubland. The extent and severity of soil degradation has been assessed using remote sensing. GPS rectified images from 1972 1973, 1979, 1983, 1988, and 1991 have been compared for two sites on the Nullarbor. Over the 19 years the total extent of bare soil has reduced significantly, but some areas around water points have degraded and there is some disturbance due to fossorial wombats. Sheet-flow processes occur during intense rainfall events, which happen two or three times per decade. Runoff only occurs after the 10- or 50- year return frequency events, and at these times turbid water ponds in depressions and enters caves. Surface soil sorptivity and hydraulic conductivity differ markedly between ridges and depressions; the ridges are clearly zones of groundwater recharge, while ponding is evident in most depressions. Sorptivity is influenced by the extent and nature of ground cover and cryptogam crusts on the soil. The landscape has been divided into classes on the basis of vegetation type and percentage of foliage cover. In each class the activities of fallout radionuclides will be determined by high resolution γ spectroscopy. Preliminary results suggest that in undisturbed sites little sediment movement has occurred over the time scale of cesium-137 (the last 35 years) but that the landscape has been well sorted over a much longer time scale. Future work will investigate disturbed sites to estimate relative soil loss during the pastoral period.

  10. Advanced Control Surface Seal Development for Future Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMange, J. J.; Dunlap, P. H., Jr.; Steinetz, B. M.

    2004-01-01

    NASA s Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been developing advanced high temperature structural seals since the late 1980's and is currently developing seals for future space vehicles as part of the Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program. This includes control surface seals that seal the edges and hinge lines of movable flaps and elevons on future reentry vehicles. In these applications, the seals must operate at temperatures above 2000 F in an oxidizing environment, limit hot gas leakage to protect underlying structures, endure high temperature scrubbing against rough surfaces, and remain flexible and resilient enough to stay in contact with sealing surfaces for multiple heating and loading cycles. For this study, three seal designs were compared against the baseline spring tube seal through a series of compression tests at room temperature and 2000 F and flow tests at room temperature. In addition, canted coil springs were tested as preloaders behind the seals at room temperature to assess their potential for improving resiliency. Addition of these preloader elements resulted in significant increases in resiliency compared to the seals by themselves and surpassed the performance of the baseline seal at room temperature. Flow tests demonstrated that the seal candidates with engineered cores had lower leakage rates than the baseline spring tube design. However, when the seals were placed on the preloader elements, the flow rates were higher as the seals were not compressed as much and therefore were not able to fill the groove as well. High temperature tests were also conducted to asses the compatibility of seal fabrics against ceramic matrix composite (CMC) panels anticipated for use in next generation launch vehicles. These evaluations demonstrated potential bonding issues between the Nextel fabrics and CMC candidates.

  11. EDITORIAL: Focus on Advances in Surface and Interface Science 2009 FOCUS ON ADVANCES IN SURFACE AND INTERFACE SCIENCE 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeschlimann, Martin; Schneider, Wolf-Dieter

    2009-12-01

    Nearly 80% of all chemical reactions in nature and in human technology take place at boundaries between phases, i.e., at surfaces or interfaces. A detailed understanding of the elementary processes at surfaces and interfaces is therefore necessary to support and to advance the high technology that very much founds the prosperity and life style of our society. One of the challenges of modern surface science is thus to expand its range of investigations to all types of surfaces and interfaces and to develop a thorough understanding of the relationships between molecular-scale surface properties and parameters relevant to potential applications and devices. Beyond these technological drivers, however, is a rich range of novel and fundamental physical and chemical properties at surfaces and interfaces down to the nanoscale whose study represents outstanding intellectual challenges. The current research focuses on atomic- and molecular-level studies of the structure (atomic and electronic), bonding, reactivity, dynamics, restructuring, and magnetism at the surfaces and interfaces of metals, oxides, semiconductors, polymers, biological molecules, and liquids. Such investigations are becoming more and more important in view of the increasing emphasis on nanometer-scale structures in almost every technological application, from heterogeneous catalysis to microcircuit fabrication to magnetic data storage. As the scale of devices continues to be reduced, the distinction between bulk and surface properties becomes blurred, and all of the properties of materials tend to become interfacial This Focus Issue includes exciting new developments in the field of surface and interface science ranging, e.g., from the properties of metal-water interfaces to single-atom contacts. Special emphasis was taken to coupling theory with experiments aimed at elucidating fundamental atomic scale phenomena. It combines a broad expert and frontiers survey of research in this field today with an up

  12. Advances in Electrostatic Dust Detection on Remote Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Voinier, C; Skinner, C H; Roquemore, A L

    2005-02-09

    The inventory of dust in next-step magnetic fusion devices will be regulated for safety reasons, however diagnostics to measure in-vessel dust are still in their infancy. Advances in dust particle detection on remote surfaces are reported. Two grids of interlocking circuit traces with spacing in the range 125 mu m to 25 mu m are biased to 30 V. Impinging dust creates a short circuit and the result current pulse is recorded. The detector response was measured with particles scraped from a carbon fiber composite tile and sorted by size category. The finest 25 mu m grid showed a sensitivity more than an order of magnitude higher than the 125 mu m grid. The response to the finest particle categories (5 30 mu m) was two orders of magnitude higher than the largest (125 250 mu m) category. Longer duration current pulses were observed from the coarser particles. The results indicate a detection threshold for fine particles below 1 mu g/cm^2.

  13. New advanced surface modification technique: titanium oxide ceramic surface implants: long-term clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Gyorgy; Kovacs, Lajos; Barabas, Jozsef; Nemeth, Zsolt; Maironna, Carlo

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the background to advanced surface modification technologies and to present a new technique, involving the formation of a titanium oxide ceramic coating, with relatively long-term results of its clinical utilization. Three general techniques are used to modify surfaces: the addition or removal of material and the change of material already present. Surface properties can also be changed without the addition or removal of material, through the laser or electron beam thermal treatment. The new technique outlined in this paper relates to the production of a corrosion-resistant 2000-2500 A thick, ceramic oxide layer with a coherent crystalline structure on the surface of titanium implants. The layer is grown electrochemically from the bulk of the metal and is modified by heat treatment. Such oxide ceramic-coated implants have a number of advantageous properties relative to implants covered with various other coatings: a higher external hardness, a greater force of adherence between the titanium and the oxide ceramic coating, a virtually perfect insulation between the organism and the metal (no possibility of metal allergy), etc. The coated implants were subjected to various physical, chemical, electronmicroscopic, etc. tests for a qualitative characterization. Finally, these implants (plates, screws for maxillofacial osteosynthesis and dental root implants) were applied in surgical practice for a period of 10 years. Tests and the experience acquired demonstrated the good properties of the titanium oxide ceramic-coated implants.

  14. Arm Orthosis/Prosthesis Movement Control Based on Surface EMG Signal Extraction.

    PubMed

    Suberbiola, Aaron; Zulueta, Ekaitz; Lopez-Guede, Jose Manuel; Etxeberria-Agiriano, Ismael; Graña, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    This paper shows experimental results on electromyography (EMG)-based system control applied to motorized orthoses. Biceps and triceps EMG signals are captured through two biometrical sensors, which are then filtered and processed by an acquisition system. Finally an output/control signal is produced and sent to the actuators, which will then perform the actual movement, using algorithms based on autoregressive (AR) models and neural networks, among others. The research goal is to predict the desired movement of the lower arm through the analysis of EMG signals, so that the movement can be reproduced by an arm orthosis, powered by two linear actuators. In this experiment, best accuracy has achieved values up to 91%, using a fourth-order AR-model and 100ms block length.

  15. Preface: Special Topic Section on Advanced Electronic Structure Methods for Solids and Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelides, Angelos; Martinez, Todd J.; Alavi, Ali; Kresse, Georg

    2015-09-14

    This Special Topic section on Advanced Electronic Structure Methods for Solids and Surfaces contains a collection of research papers that showcase recent advances in the high accuracy prediction of materials and surface properties. It provides a timely snapshot of a growing field that is of broad importance to chemistry, physics, and materials science.

  16. Design and validation of surface-marker clusters for the quantification of joint rotations in general movements in early infancy.

    PubMed

    Berthouze, Luc; Mayston, Margaret

    2011-04-01

    Lack of complexity in general movements in early infancy is an important marker of potential motor disorders of neurological origin, such as cerebral palsy. Quantitative approaches to characterising this complexity are hampered by experimental difficulties in recording from infants in their first few months of life. The aim of this study was to design and validate bespoke surface-marker clusters to facilitate data acquisition and enable full quantification of joint rotations. The clusters were validated by recording the controlled movements of a soft-body dummy doll simultaneously with an optical (Qualisys) and inertial (XSens) motion capture system. The angles estimated from the optical system were compared with those measured by the inertial system. We demonstrate that the surface-marker based approach compares well with the use of an inertial system to obtain "direct" readings of the rotations whilst alleviating the issues associated with the use of an optical motion capture system. We briefly report use of this technique in 1-5 month old infants. By enabling full quantification of joint rotation, use of the custom made markers could pave the way for early diagnosis of movement disorders. PMID:21288525

  17. Real-time 3D visualization of the thoraco-abdominal surface during breathing with body movement and deformation extraction.

    PubMed

    Povšič, K; Jezeršek, M; Možina, J

    2015-07-01

    Real-time 3D visualization of the breathing displacements can be a useful diagnostic tool in order to immediately observe the most active regions on the thoraco-abdominal surface. The developed method is capable of separating non-relevant torso movement and deformations from the deformations that are solely related to breathing. This makes it possible to visualize only the breathing displacements. The system is based on the structured laser triangulation principle, with simultaneous spatial and color data acquisition of the thoraco-abdominal region. Based on the tracking of the attached passive markers, the torso movement and deformation is compensated using rigid and non-rigid transformation models on the three-dimensional (3D) data. The total time of 3D data processing together with visualization equals 20 ms per cycle.In vitro verification of the rigid movement extraction was performed using the iterative closest point algorithm as a reference. Furthermore, a volumetric evaluation on a live subject was performed to establish the accuracy of the rigid and non-rigid model. The root mean square deviation between the measured and the reference volumes shows an error of  ±0.08 dm(3) for rigid movement extraction. Similarly, the error was calculated to be  ±0.02 dm(3) for torsional deformation extraction and  ±0.11 dm(3) for lateral bending deformation extraction. The results confirm that during the torso movement and deformation, the proposed method is sufficiently accurate to visualize only the displacements related to breathing. The method can be used, for example, during the breathing exercise on an indoor bicycle or a treadmill.

  18. Large Omnivore Movements in Response to Surface Mining and Mine Reclamation.

    PubMed

    Cristescu, Bogdan; Stenhouse, Gordon B; Boyce, Mark S

    2016-01-11

    Increasing global demands have resulted in widespread proliferation of resource extraction. Scientists are challenged to develop environmental mitigation strategies that meet societal expectations of resource supply, while achieving minimal disruption to sensitive "wilderness" species. We used GPS collar data from a 9-year study on grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) (n = 18) in Alberta, Canada to assess movements and associated space use during versus after mining. Grizzly bear home range overlap with mined areas was lower during active mining except for females with cubs, that also had shortest movements on active mines. However, both females with cubs and males made shorter steps when on/close to mines following mine closure and reclamation. Our results show differences in bear movement and space-use strategies, with individuals from a key population segment (females with cubs) appearing most adaptable to mining disturbance. Preserving patches of original habitat, reclaiming the landscape and minimizing the risk of direct human-induced mortality during and after development can help conserve bears and other wildlife on industrially modified landscapes.

  19. Large Omnivore Movements in Response to Surface Mining and Mine Reclamation

    PubMed Central

    Cristescu, Bogdan; Stenhouse, Gordon B.; Boyce, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing global demands have resulted in widespread proliferation of resource extraction. Scientists are challenged to develop environmental mitigation strategies that meet societal expectations of resource supply, while achieving minimal disruption to sensitive “wilderness” species. We used GPS collar data from a 9-year study on grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) (n = 18) in Alberta, Canada to assess movements and associated space use during versus after mining. Grizzly bear home range overlap with mined areas was lower during active mining except for females with cubs, that also had shortest movements on active mines. However, both females with cubs and males made shorter steps when on/close to mines following mine closure and reclamation. Our results show differences in bear movement and space-use strategies, with individuals from a key population segment (females with cubs) appearing most adaptable to mining disturbance. Preserving patches of original habitat, reclaiming the landscape and minimizing the risk of direct human-induced mortality during and after development can help conserve bears and other wildlife on industrially modified landscapes. PMID:26750094

  20. Large Omnivore Movements in Response to Surface Mining and Mine Reclamation.

    PubMed

    Cristescu, Bogdan; Stenhouse, Gordon B; Boyce, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Increasing global demands have resulted in widespread proliferation of resource extraction. Scientists are challenged to develop environmental mitigation strategies that meet societal expectations of resource supply, while achieving minimal disruption to sensitive "wilderness" species. We used GPS collar data from a 9-year study on grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) (n = 18) in Alberta, Canada to assess movements and associated space use during versus after mining. Grizzly bear home range overlap with mined areas was lower during active mining except for females with cubs, that also had shortest movements on active mines. However, both females with cubs and males made shorter steps when on/close to mines following mine closure and reclamation. Our results show differences in bear movement and space-use strategies, with individuals from a key population segment (females with cubs) appearing most adaptable to mining disturbance. Preserving patches of original habitat, reclaiming the landscape and minimizing the risk of direct human-induced mortality during and after development can help conserve bears and other wildlife on industrially modified landscapes. PMID:26750094

  1. Recent advances in engineering topography mediated antibacterial surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    The tendency of bacterial cells to adhere and colonize a material surface leading to biofilm formation is a fundamental challenge underlying many different applications including microbial infections associated with biomedical devices and products. Although, bacterial attachment to surfaces has been extensively studied in the past, the effect of surface topography on bacteria–material interactions has received little attention until more recently. We review the recent progress in surface topography based approaches for engineering antibacterial surfaces. Biomimicry of antibacterial surfaces in nature is a popular strategy. Whereas earlier endeavors in the field aimed at minimizing cell attachment, more recent efforts have focused on developing bactericidal surfaces. However, not all such topography mediated bactericidal surfaces are necessarily cytocompatible thus underscoring the need for continued efforts for research in this area for developing antibacterial and yet cytocompatible surfaces for use in implantable biomedical applications. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the current strategies and challenges in the emerging field of topography mediated antibacterial surfaces. PMID:26372264

  2. Recent advances in engineering topography mediated antibacterial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Jafar; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2015-10-14

    The tendency of bacterial cells to adhere and colonize a material surface leading to biofilm formation is a fundamental challenge underlying many different applications including microbial infections associated with biomedical devices and products. Although, bacterial attachment to surfaces has been extensively studied in the past, the effect of surface topography on bacteria-material interactions has received little attention until more recently. We review the recent progress in surface topography based approaches for engineering antibacterial surfaces. Biomimicry of antibacterial surfaces in nature is a popular strategy. Whereas earlier endeavors in the field aimed at minimizing cell attachment, more recent efforts have focused on developing bactericidal surfaces. However, not all such topography mediated bactericidal surfaces are necessarily cytocompatible thus underscoring the need for continued efforts for research in this area for developing antibacterial and yet cytocompatible surfaces for use in implantable biomedical applications. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the current strategies and challenges in the emerging field of topography mediated antibacterial surfaces.

  3. Recent advances in engineering topography mediated antibacterial surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Jafar; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2015-09-01

    The tendency of bacterial cells to adhere and colonize a material surface leading to biofilm formation is a fundamental challenge underlying many different applications including microbial infections associated with biomedical devices and products. Although, bacterial attachment to surfaces has been extensively studied in the past, the effect of surface topography on bacteria-material interactions has received little attention until more recently. We review the recent progress in surface topography based approaches for engineering antibacterial surfaces. Biomimicry of antibacterial surfaces in nature is a popular strategy. Whereas earlier endeavors in the field aimed at minimizing cell attachment, more recent efforts have focused on developing bactericidal surfaces. However, not all such topography mediated bactericidal surfaces are necessarily cytocompatible thus underscoring the need for continued efforts for research in this area for developing antibacterial and yet cytocompatible surfaces for use in implantable biomedical applications. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the current strategies and challenges in the emerging field of topography mediated antibacterial surfaces.

  4. Recent advances in engineering topography mediated antibacterial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Jafar; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2015-10-14

    The tendency of bacterial cells to adhere and colonize a material surface leading to biofilm formation is a fundamental challenge underlying many different applications including microbial infections associated with biomedical devices and products. Although, bacterial attachment to surfaces has been extensively studied in the past, the effect of surface topography on bacteria-material interactions has received little attention until more recently. We review the recent progress in surface topography based approaches for engineering antibacterial surfaces. Biomimicry of antibacterial surfaces in nature is a popular strategy. Whereas earlier endeavors in the field aimed at minimizing cell attachment, more recent efforts have focused on developing bactericidal surfaces. However, not all such topography mediated bactericidal surfaces are necessarily cytocompatible thus underscoring the need for continued efforts for research in this area for developing antibacterial and yet cytocompatible surfaces for use in implantable biomedical applications. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the current strategies and challenges in the emerging field of topography mediated antibacterial surfaces. PMID:26372264

  5. Foraging spots of streaked shearwaters in relation to ocean surface currents as identified using their drift movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoda, Ken; Shiomi, Kozue; Sato, Katsufumi

    2014-03-01

    Ocean currents are in continuous motion and strongly influence oceanic ecosystems. In situ observation of currents is of primary importance for understanding how marine animals respond to ocean surface currents at various scales and for realizing effective ecosystem-based management and realistic oceanographic modelling. We developed a new method for obtaining in situ current measurements by using seabirds as Lagrangian current sensors akin to drifting buoys. We deployed high-resolution global positioning system (GPS) loggers on streaked shearwaters (Calonectris leucomelas) foraging in the Oyashio-Tsugaru Warm Current confluence in Japan, which is one of the most productive oceans in the world. The seabirds repeatedly performed foraging trips, including searching for prey and resting on the sea surface, over several hundred kilometres. The seabirds spent half of their time resting on the water surface and tended to be passive drifters. We inferred that the drift movements of C. leucomelas provided a direct and detailed description of the ocean surface currents, because currents deduced from their drift movements were in good agreement with ocean surface currents derived from in situ and satellite data. In addition, we extracted details of shearwaters’ intense searching flights associated with feeding (i.e. foraging spots) from GPS tracks. C. leucomelas did not forage at the core of anticyclonic eddies; rather, they used the boundary areas between eddies and the edge of eddies where primary productivity and prey density are thought to be high. Our study demonstrated that animal-borne GPS data can provide a detailed and cost-efficient tool for observing ocean surface currents and can reveal the ways in which marine animals respond to these currents at a fine scale.

  6. Use of a Slope-Based Surface Matching Technique to Detect Landslide Movement in LiDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streutker, D. R.; Glenn, N. F.; Thackray, G. D.

    2006-12-01

    A canyon-rim landslide near Salmon Falls Creek in southern Idaho was first reported in 1999. Due to the creation of a natural dam by the slide, a monitoring campaign was initiated to assess the potential for a possible catastrophic breech and downstream flooding. This monitoring campaign included two collections of high-resolution LiDAR (light detection and ranging) data. The collections were spaced three years apart, in 2002 and 2005, in order to detect morphological changes and determine movement within the landslide complex during that interval. The two data sets are compared using an iterative, slope-based surface matching algorithm. By comparing the spatial offset with the local slope and aspect, the three-dimensional shift correction can be predicted statistically. This method can be extended to incorporate higher order polynomial warping for an improved fit between the two surfaces. Areas of known change are masked out to prevent biasing the match, and least absolute deviation methods are incorporated. Change detection is accomplished by differencing the two matched surfaces. Examination of the difference product reveals that the upper body of the slide has dropped nearly 1 m during the three-year interval, while the toe has risen approximately 50 cm. Analysis of individual features on the main body indicates horizontal movement on the order of several dozen centimeters.

  7. An overview of advanced surface engineering technologies for protection against wear

    SciTech Connect

    Seitzman, L.E.

    1995-12-31

    Advanced engineering processes used to produce wear-resistant surfaces are reviewed. These include coating techniques, such as thermal spray, sol-gel, physical vapor deposition, and plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. Surface modification treatments such as ion implantation, ion beam mixing, and centrifugal casting, are also considered. The coating techniques of evaporation, plasma-assisted deposition, and ion-beam-assisted deposition are used to examine the optimization of process complexity and control. Examples of commercial facilities and applications for advanced surface engineering are also described. Two issues affecting the expansion of commercial opportunities for surface engineering -- quality control and meaningful surface engineering properties -- are discussed. 67 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Surface chemistry: Key to control and advance myriad technologies

    PubMed Central

    Yates, John T.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2011-01-01

    This special issue on surface chemistry is introduced with a brief history of the field, a summary of the importance of surface chemistry in technological applications, a brief overview of some of the most important recent developments in this field, and a look forward to some of its most exciting future directions. This collection of invited articles is intended to provide a snapshot of current developments in the field, exemplify the state of the art in fundamental research in surface chemistry, and highlight some possibilities in the future. Here, we show how those articles fit together in the bigger picture of this field. PMID:21245359

  9. Surface Diagnostics in Tribology Technology and Advanced Coatings Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the methodologies used for surface property measurement of thin films and coatings, lubricants, and materials in the field of tribology. Surface diagnostic techniques include scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, stylus profilometry, x-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil spectroscopy, and tribology examination. Each diagnostic technique provides specific measurement results in its own unique way. In due course it should be possible to coordinate the different pieces of information provided by these diagnostic techniques into a coherent self-consistent description of the surface properties. Examples are given on the nature and character of thin diamond films.

  10. Advancing dental implant surface technology--from micron- to nanotopography.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Gustavo; Mendonça, Daniela B S; Aragão, Francisco J L; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2008-10-01

    Current trends in clinical dental implant therapy include use of endosseous dental implant surfaces embellished with nanoscale topographies. The goal of this review is to consider the role of nanoscale topographic modification of titanium substrates for the purpose of improving osseointegration. Nanotechnology offers engineers and biologists new ways of interacting with relevant biological processes. Moreover, nanotechnology has provided means of understanding and achieving cell specific functions. The various techniques that can impart nanoscale topographic features to titanium endosseous implants are described. Existing data supporting the role of nanotopography suggest that critical steps in osseointegration can be modulated by nanoscale modification of the implant surface. Important distinctions between nanoscale and micron-scale modification of the implant surface are presently considered. The advantages and disadvantages of nanoscale modification of the dental implant surface are discussed. Finally, available data concerning the current dental implant surfaces that utilize nanotopography in clinical dentistry are described. Nanoscale modification of titanium endosseous implant surfaces can alter cellular and tissue responses that may benefit osseointegration and dental implant therapy.

  11. Method and apparatus for measuring surface movement of a solid object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Thomas J.; Kotidis, Petros A.; Woodroffe, Jaime A.; Rostler, Peter S.

    1995-01-01

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  12. Method and apparatus for measuring surface movement of a solid object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, T.J.; Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1995-04-25

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figs.

  13. Supramolecular Rotor and Translator at Work: On-Surface Movement of Single Atoms.

    PubMed

    Ohmann, Robin; Meyer, Jörg; Nickel, Anja; Echeverria, Jorge; Grisolia, Maricarmen; Joachim, Christian; Moresco, Francesca; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2015-08-25

    A supramolecular nanostructure composed of four 4-acetylbiphenyl molecules and self-assembled on Au (111) was loaded with single Au adatoms and studied by scanning tunneling microscopy at low temperature. By applying voltage pulses to the supramolecular structure, the loaded Au atoms can be rotated and translated in a controlled manner. The manipulation of the gold adatoms is driven neither by mechanical interaction nor by direct electronic excitation. At the electronic resonance and driven by the tunneling current intensity, the supramolecular nanostructure performs a small amount of work of about 8 × 10(-21) J, while transporting the single Au atom from one adsorption site to the next. Using the measured average excitation time necessary to induce the movement, we determine the mechanical motive power of the device, yielding about 3 × 10(-21) W. PMID:26158314

  14. Simulation of drop movement over an inclined surface using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Das, Arup K; Das, Prasanta K

    2009-10-01

    Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is used to numerically simulate the movement of drops down an inclined plane. Diffuse interfaces have been assumed for tracking the motion of the contact line. The asymmetric shape of the three-dimensional drop and the variation of contact angle along its periphery can be calculated using the simulation. During the motion of a liquid drop down an inclined plane, an internal circulation of liquid particles is observed due to gravitational pull which causes periodic change in the drop shape. The critical angle of inclination required for the inception of drop motion is also evaluated for different fluids as a function of drop volume. The numerical predictions exhibit a good agreement with the published experimental results.

  15. Recent advances in 3D SEM surface reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tafti, Ahmad P; Kirkpatrick, Andrew B; Alavi, Zahrasadat; Owen, Heather A; Yu, Zeyun

    2015-11-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM), as one of the most commonly used instruments in biology and material sciences, employs electrons instead of light to determine the surface properties of specimens. However, the SEM micrographs still remain 2D images. To effectively measure and visualize the surface attributes, we need to restore the 3D shape model from the SEM images. 3D surface reconstruction is a longstanding topic in microscopy vision as it offers quantitative and visual information for a variety of applications consisting medicine, pharmacology, chemistry, and mechanics. In this paper, we attempt to explain the expanding body of the work in this area, including a discussion of recent techniques and algorithms. With the present work, we also enhance the reliability, accuracy, and speed of 3D SEM surface reconstruction by designing and developing an optimized multi-view framework. We then consider several real-world experiments as well as synthetic data to examine the qualitative and quantitative attributes of our proposed framework. Furthermore, we present a taxonomy of 3D SEM surface reconstruction approaches and address several challenging issues as part of our future work.

  16. Cooperative Research and Development of Primary Surface Recuperator for Advanced Microturbine Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Escola, George

    2007-01-17

    Recuperators have been identified as key components of advanced gas turbines systems that achieve a measure of improvement in operating efficiency and lead the field in achieving very low emissions. Every gas turbine manufacturer that is studying, developing, or commercializing advanced recuperated gas turbine cycles requests that recuperators operate at higher temperature without a reduction in design life and must cost less. The Solar Cooperative Research and Development of Primary Surface Recuperator for Advanced Microturbine Systems Program is directed towards meeting the future requirements of advanced gas turbine systems by the following: (1) The development of advanced alloys that will allow recuperator inlet exhaust gas temperatures to increase without significant cost increase. (2) Further characterization of the creep and oxidation (dry and humid air) properties of nickel alloy foils (less than 0.13 mm thick) to allow the economical use of these materials. (3) Increasing the use of advanced robotic systems and advanced in-process statistical measurement systems.

  17. Global scale hydrology - Advances in land surface modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, E.F. )

    1991-01-01

    Research into global scale hydrology is an expanding area that includes researchers from the meteorology, climatology, ecology and hydrology communities. This paper reviews research in this area carried out in the United States during the last IUGG quadrennial period of 1987-1990. The review covers the representation of land-surface hydrologic processes for general circulation models (GCMs), sensitivity analysis of these representations on global hydrologic fields like precipitation, regional studies of climate that have global hydrologic implications, recent field studies and experiments whose aims are the improved understanding of land surface-atmospheric interactions, and the use of remotely sensed data for the further understanding of the spatial variability of surface hydrologic processes that are important at regional and global climate scales. 76 refs.

  18. Recent advances in liposome surface modification for oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh Xuan; Huang, Lin; Gauthier, Mario; Yang, Guang; Wang, Qun

    2016-05-01

    Oral delivery via the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the dominant route for drug administration. Orally delivered liposomal carriers can enhance drug solubility and protect the encapsulated theraputic agents from the extreme conditions found in the GI tract. Liposomes, with their fluid lipid bilayer membrane and their nanoscale size, can significantly improve oral absorption. Unfortunately, the clinical applications of conventional liposomes have been hindered due to their poor stability and availability under the harsh conditions typically presented in the GI tract. To overcome this problem, the surface modification of liposomes has been investigated. Although liposome surface modification has been extensively studied for oral drug delivery, no review exists so far that adequately covers this topic. The purpose of this paper is to summarize and critically analyze emerging trends in liposome surface modification for oral drug delivery. PMID:27074098

  19. Advancing Sustainable Catalysis with Magnetite Surface Modification and Synthetic Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article surveys the recent developments in the synthesis, surface modification, and synthetic applications of magnetitenanoparticles. The emergence of iron(II,III) oxide (triiron tetraoxide or magnetite; Fe3O4, or FeO•Fe2O3) nanoparticles as a sustainable support in het...

  20. Advancing Sustainable Catalysis with Magnetite Surface Modification and Synthetic Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article surveys the recent developments in the synthesis, surface modification, and synthetic applications of magnetitenanoparticles. The emergence of iron(II,III) oxide (triiron tetraoxide or magnetite; Fe3O4, or FeO•Fe2O3) nanoparticles as a sustainable support in heteroge...

  1. Advanced thermionic reactors for surface nuclear power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Kent, Karl; Peddicord, Kenneth L.; Khan, Ehsan U.

    1991-09-01

    A preliminary feasibility study on a new concept for a highly compact space reactor power system is presented, consisting of in-core thermionic fuel elements and in-core heat pipes for passive core cooling. The reference fuel considered in this study is uranium carbide. The calculations reported include a neutronic design analysis using a 2D neutron transport model, as well as a simplified 1D thermal analysis of the reactor core, using a preliminary thermal sizing of the in-core heat pipes. Initial results indicate that the proposed core design is thermally and neutronically feasible, with a maximum steady-state fuel temperature below 2000 K. Alternate advanced fuels, such as various oxides of Am-242, result in exceedingly high fuel centerline temperatures because of the associated low thermal conductivities.

  2. Advanced spectroscopic analysis of coal surfaces during beneficiation

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, J.F.; Oh, J.S.

    1989-10-01

    Preliminary FTIR spectra are reported on coals undergoing flotation where enhanced recovery was achieved by ultrasonic or chemical treatments. The spectra of sonicated coals indicate that ultrasonic treatment (10 kHz Swen Sonic) reduces the surface oxidation of heavily oxidized coal. Spectra of chemically treated coal indicate that a higher mineral concentration is present on or near the surface of float coal suggesting that a slime might be present. Spectra are reported for coal-, mineral-, and crystal-derived pyrite which show a strong absorbance band at 420 cm{sup {minus}1}. Spectra of eight Argonne Premium Coal Library specimens have been examined in the 420 cm{sup {minus}1} spectral region and are found to have numerous overlapping bands. 4 figs.

  3. Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S-H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Venkatadri, R.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Perez, L.

    1990-01-01

    Research continued on surface control of coal. This report describes Task 7 of the program. The following topics are discussed: quantitative distribution of iron species; surface functional groups; comparison of wet and dry ground samples; study of Illinois No. 6 coal wet ground using additives; study of wet grinding using tall oil; elemental distribution of coal samples wet ground without additives; elemental distribution of coal samples wet ground with tall oil; direct determination of pyrite by x-ray diffraction; electron microprobe measurements; morphology; zeta potential measurements; pyrite size distribution; statistical analysis of grinding study data; grinding using N-pentane; cyclohexane, and N-heptane; study of the effects of the grinding method and time; study of the effects of the agglomeration time; and the pentane to coal ratio. 13 refs.

  4. (De)synchronization of advanced visual information and ball flight characteristics constrains emergent information-movement couplings during one-handed catching.

    PubMed

    Stone, J A; Maynard, I W; North, J S; Panchuk, D; Davids, K

    2015-02-01

    Advance visual information of a projection action and ball flight information is important for organizing dynamic interceptive actions like catching. However, how the central nervous system (CNS) manages the relationship between advance visual information and emerging ball flight information in regulating behavior is less well understood. Here, we sought to examine the extent that advance visual information to the CNS constrains regulation of catching actions by synchronizing and desynchronizing its relationship with ball trajectory characteristics. Novel technology was used to present video footage of an actor throwing a ball at three different speeds, integrated with information from a real ball projected by a machine set to the three speeds. The technology enabled three synchronized and six desynchronized conditions between advance visual information and subsequent ball flight trajectories. Catching performance, kinematic data from the catching hand and gaze behaviors were recorded. Findings revealed that desynchronization of video images of ball projection shaped emergent catching behaviors. Footage of slower throws, paired with faster ball projection speeds, caused catching performance decrements. Timing in early phases of action was organized by the CNS to match the advance visual information presented. In later phases, like the grasp, ball flight information constraints adapted and regulated behaviors. Gaze behaviors showed increased ball projection speed resulted in participants tracking the ball for a smaller percentage of ball flight. Findings highlighted the role of the two visual systems in perception and action, implicating the importance of coupling advanced visual information and ball flight to regulate emergent movement coordination tendencies during interceptive behaviors.

  5. Quantifying soil surface photolysis under conditions simulating water movement in the field: a new laboratory test design.

    PubMed

    Hand, Laurence H; Nichols, Carol; Kuet, Sui F; Oliver, Robin G; Harbourt, Christopher M; El-Naggar, Essam M

    2015-10-01

    Soil surface photolysis can be a significant dissipation pathway for agrochemicals under field conditions, although it is assumed that such degradation ceases once the agrochemical is transported away from the surface following rainfall or irrigation and subsequent drainage of soil porewater. However, as both downward and upward water movements occur under field conditions, relatively mobile compounds may return to the surface, prolonging exposure to ultraviolet light and increasing the potential for degradation by photolysis. To test this hypothesis, a novel experimental system was used to quantify the contribution of photolysis to the overall dissipation of a new herbicide, bicyclopyrone, under conditions that mimicked field studies more closely than the standard laboratory test guidance. Soil cores were taken from 3 US field study sites, and the surfaces were treated with [(14) C]-bicyclopyrone. The radioactivity was redistributed throughout the cores using a simulated rainfall event, following which the cores were incubated under a xenon-arc lamp with continuous provision of moisture from below and a wind simulator to induce evaporation. After only 2 d, most of the test compound had returned to the soil surface. Significantly more degradation was observed in the irradiated samples than in a parallel dark control sample. Degradation rates were very similar to those observed in both the thin layer photolysis study and the field dissipation studies and significantly faster than in the soil metabolism studies conducted in the dark. Thus, for highly soluble, mobile agrochemicals, such as bicyclopyrone, photolysis is not terminated permanently by rainfall or irrigation but can resume following transport to the surface in evaporating water. PMID:26010776

  6. Quantifying soil surface photolysis under conditions simulating water movement in the field: a new laboratory test design.

    PubMed

    Hand, Laurence H; Nichols, Carol; Kuet, Sui F; Oliver, Robin G; Harbourt, Christopher M; El-Naggar, Essam M

    2015-10-01

    Soil surface photolysis can be a significant dissipation pathway for agrochemicals under field conditions, although it is assumed that such degradation ceases once the agrochemical is transported away from the surface following rainfall or irrigation and subsequent drainage of soil porewater. However, as both downward and upward water movements occur under field conditions, relatively mobile compounds may return to the surface, prolonging exposure to ultraviolet light and increasing the potential for degradation by photolysis. To test this hypothesis, a novel experimental system was used to quantify the contribution of photolysis to the overall dissipation of a new herbicide, bicyclopyrone, under conditions that mimicked field studies more closely than the standard laboratory test guidance. Soil cores were taken from 3 US field study sites, and the surfaces were treated with [(14) C]-bicyclopyrone. The radioactivity was redistributed throughout the cores using a simulated rainfall event, following which the cores were incubated under a xenon-arc lamp with continuous provision of moisture from below and a wind simulator to induce evaporation. After only 2 d, most of the test compound had returned to the soil surface. Significantly more degradation was observed in the irradiated samples than in a parallel dark control sample. Degradation rates were very similar to those observed in both the thin layer photolysis study and the field dissipation studies and significantly faster than in the soil metabolism studies conducted in the dark. Thus, for highly soluble, mobile agrochemicals, such as bicyclopyrone, photolysis is not terminated permanently by rainfall or irrigation but can resume following transport to the surface in evaporating water.

  7. Ultrastructural changes on the root surface in "pressure zone" after experimental movement of teeth in young rats fed a low calcium and vitamin D-deficient diet.

    PubMed

    Bielaczyc, A; Gołebiewska, M

    1997-01-01

    Dietary calcium and vitamin D-deficiency, as a potential biological factor in etiopathogenesis of root resorption occurring during orthodontic tooth movement, still remains controversial. The aim of the present investigation was to assess the ultrastructural changes on the surface of the root in "pressure zone" after orthodontic tooth movement in rats fed a low calcium and vitamin D-deficient diet. The studies were carried out on 20 young Wistar rats. The results from the scanning electron microscopic showed the increased root resorption in "pressure zone" after orthodontic tooth movement in rats fed a low calcium and vitamin D-deficient diet.

  8. Applications of advanced upper surface blowing propulsive-lift technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochrane, J. A.; Riddle, D. W.; Youth, S.

    1982-01-01

    The success of the Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft led to studies of this technology for a business jet and a Short-Haul Transport. The studies showed that the Short-Haul Transport could operate from a 762.0-m runway with 95 passengers at low noise levels. Design range was 500 n. mi. but with maximum fuel load the runway length is only increased to 883.9 m while the range is increased to more than 1000 n. mi. Two business jet designs were studied; one design was based on a 457.2-m field length and the other was designed for a 760.0-m field length. The business jet designed for a 457.2-m field length can also be loaded to maximum fuel capacity. In this case the range increases from 500 n. mi. to 1400 n. mi. while the runway length increases from 457.2 m to 632.5 m. The business jet studies showed that the application of advanced propulsive-lift technology to this class aircraft can result in payload-range-speed performance comparable to current aircraft with about one-half the runway length requirement.

  9. An algorithm for the estimation of the signal-to-noise ratio in surface myoelectric signals generated during cyclic movements.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Valentina; Knaflitz, Marco

    2012-01-01

    In many applications requiring the study of the surface myoelectric signal (SMES) acquired in dynamic conditions, it is essential to have a quantitative evaluation of the quality of the collected signals. When the activation pattern of a muscle has to be obtained by means of single- or double-threshold statistical detectors, the background noise level e (noise) of the signal is a necessary input parameter. Moreover, the detection strategy of double-threshold detectors may be properly tuned when the SNR and the duty cycle (DC) of the signal are known. The aim of this paper is to present an algorithm for the estimation of e (noise), SNR, and DC of an SMES collected during cyclic movements. The algorithm is validated on synthetic signals with statistical properties similar to those of SMES, as well as on more than 100 real signals.

  10. Novel algorithm for real-time onset detection of surface electromyography in step-tracking wrist movements.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yoshihiro; Nisky, Ilana; Uranishi, Yuki; Imura, Masataka; Okamura, Allison M; Oshiro, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm for real-time detection of the onset of surface electromyography signal in step-tracking wrist movements. The method identifies abrupt increase of the quasi-tension signal calculated from sEMG resulting from the step-by-step recruitment of activated motor units. We assessed the performance of our proposed algorithm using both simulated and real sEMG signals, and compared with two existing detection methods. Evaluation with simulated sEMG showed that the detection accuracy of our method is robust to different signal-to-noise ratios, and that it outperforms the existing methods in terms of bias when the noise is large (low SNR). Evaluation with real sEMG analysis also indicated better detection performance compared to existing methods. PMID:24110123

  11. Rapid movement of wastewater from on-site disposal systems into surface waters in the lower Florida Keys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paul, John H.; McLaughlin, Molly R.; Griffin, Dale W.; Lipp, Erin K.; Stokes, Rodger; Rose, Joan B.

    2000-01-01

    Viral tracer studies have been used previously to study the potential for wastewater contamination of surface marine waters in the Upper and Middle Florida Keys. Two bacteriophages, the marine bacteriophage φHSIC and the Salmonella phage PRD1, were used as tracers in injection well and septic tank studies in Saddlebunch Keys of the Lower Florida Keys and in septic tank studies in Boot Key Harbor, Marathon, of the Middle Keys. In Boot Key Harbor, both phages were detected in a canal adjacent to the seeded septic tank within 3 h 15 min of the end of the seed period. The tracer was then detected at all sampling sites in Boot Key Harbor, including one on the opposite side of U. S. Highway 1 in Florida Bay, and at an Atlantic Ocean beach outside Boot Key Harbor. Rates of migration based on first appearance of the phage ranged from 1.7 to 57.5 m h-1. In Saddlebunch Keys, φHSIC and PRD1 were used to seed a residential septic tank and a commercial injection well. The septic tank tracer was not found in any surface water samples. The injection well tracer was first detected at a site most distant from the seed site, a channel that connected Sugarloaf Sound with the Atlantic Ocean. The rate of tracer migration from the injection well to this channel ranged from 66.8 to 141 m h-1. Both tracer studies showed a rapid movement of wastewater from on-site sewage treatment and disposal systems in a southeasterly direction toward the reef tract and Atlantic Ocean, with preferential movement through tidal channels. These studies indicate that wastewater disposal systems currently in widespread use in the Florida Keys can rapidly contaminate the marine environment.

  12. Transplant related ocular surface disorders: Advanced techniques for ocular surface rehabilitation after ocular complications secondary to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Erin D; Mahomed, Faheem; Hans, Amneet K; Dalal, Jignesh D

    2016-05-01

    HSCT has been linked to the development of an assortment of ocular surface complications with the potential to lead to permanent visual impairment if left untreated or if not treated early in the course of disease. Strategies for therapy include maintenance of lubrication and tear preservation, prevention of evaporation, decreasing inflammation, and providing epithelial support. The ultimate aim of treatment is to prevent permanent ocular sequelae through prompt ophthalmology consultation and the use of advanced techniques for ocular surface rehabilitation. We describe several rehabilitation options of ocular surface complications occurring secondarily during the post-HSCT course.

  13. - and Syn-Eruptive Surface Movements of Azerbaijan Mud Volcanoes Detected Through Insar Analysis: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonielli, Benedetta; Monserrat, Oriol; Bonini, Marco; Righini, Gaia; Sani, Federico; Luzi, Guido; Feyzullayev, Akper; Aliyev, Chingiz

    2014-05-01

    Mud volcanism is a process that consists in the extrusion of mud, fragments or blocks of country rocks, saline waters and gases, mostly methane. This mechanism is typically linked to in-depth hydrocarbon traps, and it builds up a variety of conical edifices with dimension and morphology similar to those of magmatic volcanoes. Interferometry by Satellite Aperture Radar (InSAR) techniques have been commonly used to monitor and investigate the ground deformation connected to the eruptive phases of magmatic volcanoes. InSAR techniques have also been employed to explore the ground deformation associated with the LUSI mud volcano in Java (Indonesia). We aim to carry out a study on the paroxysmal activities of the Azerbaijan mud volcanoes, among the largest on Earth, using similar techniques. In particular the deformations of the mud volcanic systems were analyzed through the technique of satellite differential interferometry (DInSAR), thanks to the acquisition of 16 descending and 4 ascending Envisat images, spanning about 4 years (October 2003-November 2007); these data were provided by the European Space Agency. The preliminary analysis of a set of 77 interferograms and the unwrapping process elaboration of some of them selected according to the best coherence values, allowed the detection of significant deformations in correspondence of Ayaz-Akhtarma and Khara Zira Island mud volcanoes. This analysis has allowed to identify relevant ground deformations of the volcanic systems in connection with the main eruptive events in 2005 and in 2006 respectively, that are recorded by the catalogue of Azerbaijan mud volcano eruptions until 2007. The preliminary analysis of the interferograms of the Ayaz-Akhtarma and the Khara Zira mud volcanoes shows that the whole volcano edifice or part of it is subject to a ground displacement before or in coincidence with the eruption. Assuming that the movement is mainly vertical, we suppose that deformation is due to bulging of the volcanic

  14. Processing of surface EMG through pattern recognition techniques aimed at classifying shoulder joint movements.

    PubMed

    Rivela, Diletta; Scannella, Alessia; Pavan, Esteban E; Frigo, Carlo A; Belluco, Paolo; Gini, Giuseppina

    2015-01-01

    Artificial arms for shoulder disarticulation need a high number of degrees of freedom to be controlled. In order to control a prosthetic shoulder joint, an intention detection system based on surface electromyography (sEMG) pattern recognition methods was proposed and experimentally investigated. Signals from eight trunk muscles that are generally preserved after shoulder disarticulation were recorded from a group of eight normal subjects in nine shoulder positions. After data segmentation, four different features were extracted (sample entropy, cepstral coefficients of the 4th order, root mean square and waveform length) and classified by means of linear discriminant analysis. The classification accuracy was 92.1% and this performance reached 97.9% after reducing the positions considered to five classes. To reduce the computational cost, the two channels with the least discriminating information were neglected yielding to a classification accuracy diminished by just 4.08%. PMID:26736704

  15. Advanced Key Technologies for Hot Control Surfaces in Space Re- Entry Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogigli, Michael; Pradier, Alain; Tumino, Giorgio

    2002-01-01

    (1)MAN Technologie AG, D- 86153 Augsburg, Germany (2,3) ESA, 2200 Noordwijk ZH, The Netherlands Current space re-entry vehicles (e.g. X-38 vehicle 201, the prototype of the International Space Station's Crew Return Vehicle (CRV)) require advanced control surfaces (so called body flaps). Such control surfaces allow the design of smaller and lighter vehicles as well as faster re-entries (compared to the US Shuttle). They are designed as light-weight structures that need no metallic parts, need no mass or volume consuming heat sinks to protect critical components (e.g. bearings) and that can be operated at temperatures of more than 1600 "C in air transferring high mechanical loads (dynamic 40 kN, static 70 kN) at the same time. Because there is a need for CRV and also for Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV) in future, the European Space Agency (ESA) felt compelled to establish a "Future European Space Transportation and Investigation Program,, (FESTIP) and a "General Support for Technology Program,, (GSTP). One of the main goals of these programs was to develop and qualify key-technologies that are able to master the above mentioned challenging requirements for advanced hot control surfaces and that can be applied for different vehicles. In 1996 MAN Technologie has started the development of hot control surfaces for small lifting bodies in the national program "Heiü Strukturen,,. One of the main results of this program was that especially the following CMC (Ceramic Matrix Composite) key technologies need to be brought up to space flight standard: Complex CMC Structures, CMC Bearings, Metal-to-CMC Joining Technologies, CMC Fasteners, Oxidation Protection Systems and Static and Dynamic Seals. MAN Technologie was contracted by ESA to continue the development and qualification of these key technologies in the frame of the FESTIP and the GSTP program. Development and qualification have successfully been carried out. The key technologies have been applied for the X-38 vehicle

  16. The mobilize center: an NIH big data to knowledge center to advance human movement research and improve mobility

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Joy P; Hicks, Jennifer L; Hastie, Trevor; Leskovec, Jure; Ré, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity helps prevent heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and other chronic diseases, yet a broad range of conditions impair mobility at great personal and societal cost. Vast amounts of data characterizing human movement are available from research labs, clinics, and millions of smartphones and wearable sensors, but integration and analysis of this large quantity of mobility data are extremely challenging. The authors have established the Mobilize Center (http://mobilize.stanford.edu) to harness these data to improve human mobility and help lay the foundation for using data science methods in biomedicine. The Center is organized around 4 data science research cores: biomechanical modeling, statistical learning, behavioral and social modeling, and integrative modeling. Important biomedical applications, such as osteoarthritis and weight management, will focus the development of new data science methods. By developing these new approaches, sharing data and validated software tools, and training thousands of researchers, the Mobilize Center will transform human movement research. PMID:26272077

  17. The jumping mechanism of cicada Cercopis vulnerata (Auchenorrhyncha, Cercopidae): skeleton-muscle organisation, frictional surfaces, and inverse-kinematic model of leg movements.

    PubMed

    Gorb, Stanislav N

    2004-07-01

    In Auchenorrhyncha, jumping is achieved by metathoracic muscles which are inserted into the trochanter of the hind leg. The synchronisation of movements of the hind legs is a difficult problem, as the leg extension that produces the jump occurs in less than 1 ms. Even slight asynchrony could potentially result in failure of a jump. Both the synchronisation of the movements of a pair of jumping legs, and their stabilisation during a jump, seem to be important problems for small jumping insects. The present study was performed in order to clarify some questions of the functional morphology of the leafhopper jumping mechanism. It is based on skeleton-muscle reconstruction, high-speed video recordings, transmission (TEM) and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) investigations of the cuticle, together with 3D inverse-kinematic modelling of angles and working zones of hind leg joints of cicada Cercopis vulnerata (Cercopidae). The complete extension of the hind leg takes less than 1 ms, which suggests that the jump is powered not only by the muscle system, but also by an elastic spring. Histological staining and fluorescence microscopy showed resilin-bearing structures, responsible for elastic energy storage, in the pleural area of the metathorax. Synchronisation of hind leg movements may be aided by microtrichia fields that are located on the medial surface of each hind coxa. In Auchenorrhyncha, hind coxae are rounded in their anterior and lateral parts, whereas medial parts are planar, and contact each other over a rather large area. The inverse-kinematic model of propulsive leg movements was used to draw the surface outlined by the medial surface of the coxa, during the jump movement. This is a cone surface, faced with its bulged-in side, medially. Surfaces outlined by the movements of both right and left coxae overlap in their anterior and posterior positions. In both extreme positions, coxae are presumably connected to each other by coupled microtrichia fields. Thus

  18. Aircraft-Based Satellite Navigation Augmentation to Enable Automated Landing and Movement on the Airport Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obeidat, Qasem Turki

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) enables a paralyzed user to interact with an external device through brain signals. A BCI measures identifies patterns within these measured signals, translating such patterns into commands. The P300 is a pattern of a scalp potentials elicited by a luminance increment of an attended target rather than a non-target character of an alphanumeric matrix. The Row-Column Paradigm (RCP) can utilize responses to series of illuminations of matrix target and non-target characters to spell out alphanumeric strings of P300-eliciting target characters, yet this popular RCP speller faces three challenges. Theadjacent problem concerns the proximity of neighboring characters, the crowding problem concerns their number. Both adjacent and crowding problems concern how these factors impede BCI performance. The fatigue problem concerns how RCP use is tiring. This dissertation addressed these challenges for both desktop and mobile platforms. A new P300 speller interface, the Zigzag Paradigm (ZP), reduced the adjacent problem by increasing the distance between adjacent characters, as well as the crowding problem, by reducing the number neighboring characters. In desktop study, the classification accuracy was significantly improved 91% with the ZP VS 80.6% with the RCP. Since the ZP is not suitable for mobile P300 spellers with a small screen size, a new P300 speller interface was developed in this study, the Edges Paradigm (EP). The EP reduced the adjacent and crowding problems by adding flashing squares located upon the outer edges of the character matrix in the EP. The classification accuracy of the EP (i.e., 93.3%) was significantly higher than the RCP (i.e., 82.1%). We further compared three speller paradigms (i.e., RCP, ZP, and EP), and the result indicated that the EP produced the highest accuracy and caused less fatigue. Later, the EP is implemented in a simulator of a Samsung galaxy smart phone on the Microsoft Surface Pro 2. The mobile EP was

  19. Advances in the surface modification techniques of bone-related implants for last 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Chen, Cen; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Lee, In-Seop

    2014-01-01

    At the time of implanting bone-related implants into human body, a variety of biological responses to the material surface occur with respect to surface chemistry and physical state. The commonly used biomaterials (e.g. titanium and its alloy, Co–Cr alloy, stainless steel, polyetheretherketone, ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene and various calcium phosphates) have many drawbacks such as lack of biocompatibility and improper mechanical properties. As surface modification is very promising technology to overcome such problems, a variety of surface modification techniques have been being investigated. This review paper covers recent advances in surface modification techniques of bone-related materials including physicochemical coating, radiation grafting, plasma surface engineering, ion beam processing and surface patterning techniques. The contents are organized with different types of techniques to applicable materials, and typical examples are also described. PMID:26816626

  20. Mesoscale Characterization of Coupled Hydromechanical Behavior of a Fractured Porous Slope in Response to Free Water-Surface Movement

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Guglielmi, Y.; Cappa, F.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C.-F.; Thoraval, A.

    2008-05-15

    the high-permeability zones. The periodicity and magnitude of free water-surface movements cause 10 to 20% variations in those local stress/strain accumulations related to the contrasting HM behavior for high and low-permeable elements of the slope. Finally, surface-tilt monitoring coupled with internal localized pressure/deformation measurements appears to be a promising method for characterizing the HM properties and behavior of a slope, and for detecting its progressive destabilization.

  1. Advanced system for 3D dental anatomy reconstruction and 3D tooth movement simulation during orthodontic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserrat, Carlos; Alcaniz-Raya, Mariano L.; Juan, M. Carmen; Grau Colomer, Vincente; Albalat, Salvador E.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes a new method for 3D orthodontics treatment simulation developed for an orthodontics planning system (MAGALLANES). We develop an original system for 3D capturing and reconstruction of dental anatomy that avoid use of dental casts in orthodontic treatments. Two original techniques are presented, one direct in which data are acquired directly form patient's mouth by mean of low cost 3D digitizers, and one mixed in which data are obtained by 3D digitizing of hydrocollids molds. FOr this purpose we have designed and manufactured an optimized optical measuring system based on laser structured light. We apply these 3D dental models to simulate 3D movement of teeth, including rotations, during orthodontic treatment. The proposed algorithms enable to quantify the effect of orthodontic appliance on tooth movement. The developed techniques has been integrated in a system named MAGALLANES. This original system present several tools for 3D simulation and planning of orthodontic treatments. The prototype system has been tested in several orthodontic clinic with very good results.

  2. A Physical Experiment to determine the Impact of Atmospheric Condensation of Water Vapour on Surface Air Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunyard, Peter

    2014-05-01

    water vapor, by 6 grams/m3during the course of the experiment, leads to differential increases in air density. The latent heat released during condensation tends to warm the air in the immediate vicinity of the coolant coils and as such would tend to counter the air clockwise air-circulation, the assumption being that the highly localized partial pressure reduction on condensation is the overriding force. The experimental data accords well with data from Costa Rica, where, for the past three years, daily meteorological data have been collected from two OTS sites, namely La Selva and Palo Verde, the former in particular displaying relatively high rates of evapotranspiration. Statistically high correlations are found between the calculated evaporative/condensation force fE, and corresponding surface wind movements. Those findings, combined with the experimental data, suggest that a high rate of condensation and the consequent partial pressure reduction at the scale of the lower trophosphere leads to horizontal surface airflows of the order of 1 m.s-1.

  3. A Physical Experiment to determine the Impact of Atmospheric Condensation of Water Vapor on Surface Air Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunyard, P. P.; Nechev, P.

    2013-12-01

    water vapor, by 6 grams/m3during the course of the experiment, leads to differential increases in air density. The latent heat released during condensation tends to warm the air in the immediate vicinity of the coolant coils and as such would tend to counter the air clockwise air-circulation, the assumption being that the highly localized partial pressure reduction on condensation is the overriding force. The experimental data accords well with data from Costa Rica, where, for the past three years, daily meteorological data have been collected from two OTS sites, namely La Selva and Palo Verde, the former in particular displaying relatively high rates of evapotranspiration. Statistically high correlations are found between the calculated evaporative/condensation force fE, and corresponding surface wind movements. Those findings, combined with the experimental data, suggest that a high rate of condensation and the consequent partial pressure reduction at the scale of the lower trophosphere leads to horizontal surface airflows of the order of 1 m.s-1.

  4. Surface Catalytic Efficiency of Advanced Carbon Carbon Candidate Thermal Protection Materials for SSTO Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic efficiency (atom recombination coefficients) for advanced ceramic thermal protection systems was calculated using arc-jet data. Coefficients for both oxygen and nitrogen atom recombination on the surfaces of these systems were obtained to temperatures of 1650 K. Optical and chemical stability of the candidate systems to the high energy hypersonic flow was also demonstrated during these tests.

  5. Binding and movement of individual Cel7A cellobiohydrolases on crystalline cellulose surfaces revealed by single-molecule fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaemyeong; Sethi, Anurag; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Han, Jason J; Jeoh, Tina; Gnanakaran, Sandrasegaram; Goodwin, Peter M

    2013-08-16

    The efficient catalytic conversion of biomass to bioenergy would meet a large portion of energy requirements in the near future. A crucial step in this process is the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose that is then converted into fuel such as ethanol by fermentation. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence imaging to directly monitor the movement of individual Cel7A cellobiohydrolases from Trichoderma reesei (TrCel7A) on the surface of insoluble cellulose fibrils to elucidate molecular level details of cellulase activity. The motion of multiple, individual TrCel7A cellobiohydrolases was simultaneously recorded with ∼15-nm spatial resolution. Time-resolved localization microscopy provides insights on the activity of TrCel7A on cellulose and informs on nonproductive binding and diffusion. We measured single-molecule residency time distributions of TrCel7A bound to cellulose both in the presence of and absence of cellobiose the major product and a potent inhibitor of Cel7A activity. Combining these results with a kinetic model of TrCel7A binding provides microscopic insight into interactions between TrCel7A and the cellulose substrate. PMID:23818525

  6. Psychogenic Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Morgante, Francesca; Edwards, Mark J.; Espay, Alberto J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review This review describes the main clinical features of psychogenic (functional) movement disorders and reports recent advances in diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment. Recent Findings The terminology and definition of patients with psychogenic movement disorders remain subjects of controversy; the term “functional” has been used more frequently in the literature in recent years regarding the neurobiological substrate underpinning these disorders. Correct diagnosis of psychogenic movement disorders should rely not on the exclusion of organic disorders or the sole presence of psychological factors but on the observation or elicitation of clinical features related to the specific movement disorder (ie, a positive or inclusionary rather than exclusionary diagnosis). Sudden onset, spontaneous remissions, and variability over time or during clinical examination are useful “red flags” suggestive of a psychogenic movement disorder. Imaging studies have demonstrated impaired connectivity between limbic and motor areas involved in movement programming and hypoactivity of a brain region that compares expected data with actual sensory data occurring during voluntary movement. Treatment of psychogenic movement disorders begins with ensuring the patient’s acceptance of the diagnosis during the initial debriefing and includes nonpharmacologic (cognitive-behavioral therapy, physiotherapy) and pharmacologic options. Summary Psychogenic movement disorders represent a challenging disorder for neurologists to diagnose and treat. Recent advances have increased understanding of the neurobiological mechanism of psychogenic movement disorders. Treatment with cognitive strategies and physical rehabilitation can benefit some patients. As short duration of disease correlates with better prognosis, early diagnosis and initiation of treatment are critical. PMID:24092294

  7. The movement of particles in liquid metals under gravity forces and the interaction of particles with advancing solid-liquid interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, F.

    1984-01-01

    The problems of shrinkage and gas porosity are discussed. Gravity forces enhance the removal of gas bubbles from a metal melt and contribute to the feeding of shrinkage porosity in castings. Experiments are reviewed which determine how large a density difference is required for metal particles to float or sink in a metal melt and to what extent do factors not considered in Stokes Law influence particle movement in a real system. As to the interaction of particles with an advancing solid-liquid interface, the results indicate that the metal particles are not rejected in a metal melt, and that concentrations of particles in a metal following solidification are due to other factors.

  8. Movement Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... want them to. If you have a movement disorder, you experience these kinds of impaired movement. Dyskinesia ... and is a common symptom of many movement disorders. Tremors are a type of dyskinesia. Nerve diseases ...

  9. Surface exposure dating of Little Ice Age ice cap advances on Disko Island, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Timothy; Jomelli, Vincent; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Brunstein, Daniel; Schimmelpfennig, Irene; Swingedouw, Didier; Favier, Vincent; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie

    2015-04-01

    Little Ice Age (LIA: 1200-1920 AD) glacier advances in Greenland often form the most extensive positions of Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) ice cap and margins since the Early Holocene. Across Greenland these advances are commonly represented by un-vegetated moraines, usually within 1-5 km of the present ice margin. However, chronological constraints on glacier advances during this period are sparse, meaning that GrIS and ice cap behavior and advance/retreat chronology remains poorly understood during this period. At present the majority of ages are based on historical accounts, ice core data, and radiocarbon ages from proglacial threshold lakes. However, developments in the accuracy and precision of surface exposure methods allow dating of LIA moraine boulders, permitting an opportunity to better understand of ice dynamics during this period. Geomorphological mapping and surface exposure dating (36Cl) were used to interpret moraine deposits from the Lyngmarksbræen on Disko Island, West Greenland. A Positive Degree Day (PDD) model was used to estimate Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) and mass balance changes for two distinct paleo-glacial extents. Three moraines (M1, M2, and M3) were mapped in the field, and sampled for 36Cl surface exposure dating. The outermost moraine (M1) was of clearly different morphology to the inner moraines, and present only in small fragments. M2 and M3 were distinct arcuate termino-lateral moraines within 50 m of one another, 1.5 km from the present ice margin. The weighted average of four 36Cl ages from M1 returned an early Holocene age of 8.4 ± 0.6 ka. M2 (four samples) returned an age of 0.57 ± 0.04 ka (1441 AD) and M3 (four samples) returned an age of 0.28 ± 0.02 ka (1732 AD). These surface exposure ages represent the first robustly dated Greenlandic ice cap moraine sequence from the LIA. The two periods of ice cap advance and marginal stabilisation are similar to recorded periods of LIA GrIS advance in west Greenland, constrained

  10. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-01

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed.

  11. Recent advances in synthesis and surface modification of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodipo, Bashiru Kayode; Aziz, Azlan Abdul

    2016-10-01

    Research on synthesis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) and its surface modification for biomedical applications is of intense interest. Due to superparamagnetic property of SPION, the nanoparticles have large magnetic susceptibility, single magnetic domain and controllable magnetic behaviour. However, owing to easy agglomeration of SPION, surface modification of the magnetic particles with biocompatible materials such as silica nanoparticle has gained much attention in the last decade. In this review, we present recent advances in synthesis of SPION and various routes of producing silica coated SPION.

  12. System safety engineering in the development of advanced surface transportation vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnzen, H. E.

    1971-01-01

    Applications of system safety engineering to the development of advanced surface transportation vehicles are described. As a pertinent example, the paper describes a safety engineering efforts tailored to the particular design and test requirements of the Tracked Air Cushion Research Vehicle (TACRV). The test results obtained from this unique research vehicle provide significant design data directly applicable to the development of future tracked air cushion vehicles that will carry passengers in comfort and safety at speeds up to 300 miles per hour.

  13. Advanced shield development for a fission surface power system for the lunar surface

    SciTech Connect

    A. E. Craft; I. J. Silver; C. M. Clark; S. D. Howe; J. C. King

    2011-02-01

    A nuclear reactor power system such as the affordable fission surface power system enables a potential outpostonthemoon.Aradiation shieldmustbe included in the reactor system to reduce the otherwise excessive dose to the astronauts and other vital system components. The radiation shield is typically the most massive component of a space reactor system, and thus must be optimized to reduce mass asmuchas possible while still providing the required protection.Various shield options for an on-lander reactor system are examined for outpost distances of 400m and 1 kmfromthe reactor. Also investigated is the resulting mass savings from the use of a high performance cermet fuel. A thermal analysis is performed to determine the thermal behaviours of radiation shields using borated water. For an outpost located 1000m from the core, a tetramethylammonium borohydride shield is the lightest (5148.4 kg), followed by a trilayer shield (boron carbide–tungsten–borated water; 5832.3 kg), and finally a borated water shield (6020.7 kg). In all of the final design cases, the temperature of the borated water remains below 400 K.

  14. A movement ecology paradigm for unifying organismal movement research

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, Ran; Getz, Wayne M.; Revilla, Eloy; Holyoak, Marcel; Kadmon, Ronen; Saltz, David; Smouse, Peter E.

    2008-01-01

    Movement of individual organisms is fundamental to life, quilting our planet in a rich tapestry of phenomena with diverse implications for ecosystems and humans. Movement research is both plentiful and insightful, and recent methodological advances facilitate obtaining a detailed view of individual movement. Yet, we lack a general unifying paradigm, derived from first principles, which can place movement studies within a common context and advance the development of a mature scientific discipline. This introductory article to the Movement Ecology Special Feature proposes a paradigm that integrates conceptual, theoretical, methodological, and empirical frameworks for studying movement of all organisms, from microbes to trees to elephants. We introduce a conceptual framework depicting the interplay among four basic mechanistic components of organismal movement: the internal state (why move?), motion (how to move?), and navigation (when and where to move?) capacities of the individual and the external factors affecting movement. We demonstrate how the proposed framework aids the study of various taxa and movement types; promotes the formulation of hypotheses about movement; and complements existing biomechanical, cognitive, random, and optimality paradigms of movement. The proposed framework integrates eclectic research on movement into a structured paradigm and aims at providing a basis for hypothesis generation and a vehicle facilitating the understanding of the causes, mechanisms, and spatiotemporal patterns of movement and their role in various ecological and evolutionary processes. ”Now we must consider in general the common reason for moving with any movement whatever.“ (Aristotle, De Motu Animalium, 4th century B.C.) PMID:19060196

  15. The Mars Microprobe Mission: Advanced Micro-Avionics for Exploration Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, Randel

    2000-01-01

    The Mars Microprobe Mission is the second spacecraft developed as part of the New Millennium Program deep space missions. The objective of the Microprobe Project is to demonstrate the applicability of key technologies for future planetary missions by developing two probes for deployment on Mars. The probes are designed with a single stage entry, descent, and landing system and impact the Martian surface at speeds of approximately 200 meters per second. The microprobes are composed of two main sections, a forebody section that penetrates to a depth below the Martian surface of 0.5 to 2 meters, and an aftbody section that remains on the surface. Each probe system consists of a number of advanced technology components developed specifically for this mission. These include a non-erosive aeroshell for entry into. the atmosphere, a set of low temperature batteries to supply probe power, an advanced microcontroller to execute the mission sequence, collect the science data, and react to possible system fault conditions, a telecommunications subsystem implemented on a set of custom integrated circuits, and instruments designed to provide science measurements from above and below the Martian surface. All of the electronic components have been designed and fabricated to withstand the severe impact shock environment and to operate correctly at predicted temperatures below -100 C.

  16. Snow cover and ground surface temperature on a talus slope affected by mass movements. Veleta cirque, Sierra Nevada, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanarro, L. M.; Palacios, D.; Gómez-Ortiz, A.; Salvador-Franch, F.

    2012-04-01

    This paper analyses the thermal ground behaviour on an alpine talus slope located at the foot of the north wall of the glacial cirque on the Pico del Veleta (3398 m, 37°03'21''N, 3°21'57''W, MAAT: -0,4°C) in Sierra Nevada, SE Spain. There are frequent mass movements on this talus slope, particularly in its central section, caused by the abundant presence of fine-grained sediment and by the water from snowmelt and/or ice degradation in the ground or permafrost (Gómez et al., 2003). To determine the snowmelt pattern and ocurrence of permafrost, a continuous ground surface temperature was kept by installing 6 mini-loggers (HOBO Pendant) along the descending profile of the central talus, which is 170 m long with altitudes ranging from 3180 m at the higher end to 3085 m at the lower end. A thermal borehole was also installed at a depth of 2 m at the base of the slope on an active rock glacier. The results obtained for the period October 2008 - September 2009 show that, in contrast to alpine talus slopes (Luetschg et. al., 2004; Lambiel and Pieracci, 2008), the upper part of the slope is characterized by mean annual ground surface temperatures (MAGST) lower than at the base of the talus, possibly due to the effect of the shadow of the cirque wall. The MAGST oscillate between 0.592°C at the station near the slope apex (S2) and 1.836°C at the station near the base (S5). In winter-spring, when the talus slope is covered with snow, the GST are stabilized at all stations between mid-October and early November. The minimum GST, which express the BTS conditions, oscillate between 0.232 and 0.01°C, depending on the month, with lowest values recorded during the month of April. Only one station (S3, mid-slope) recorded negative values (max. value : - 0.549°C in December and - 0.211 in April ). In summer, the snow disappears fairly quickly between mid- and late July on the intermediate stretch of the talus slope (S3, S4, S6), where the majority of the flows detected occur

  17. Successful Surface Treatments for Reducing Instabilities in Advanced Nickel-base Superalloys for Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locci, Ivan E.; MacKay, Rebecca A.; Garg, Anita; Ritzert, Frank J.

    2004-01-01

    An optimized carburization treatment has been developed to mitigate instabilities that form in the microstructures of advanced turbine airfoil materials. Current turbine airfoils consist of a single crystal superalloy base that provides the mechanical performance of the airfoil, a thermal barrier coating (TBC) that reduces the temperature of the base superalloy, and a bondcoat between the superalloy and the TBC, that improves the oxidation and corrosion resistance of the base superalloy and the spallation resistance of the TBC. Advanced nickel-base superalloys containing high levels of refractory metals have been observed to develop an instability called secondary reaction zone (SRZ), which can form beneath diffusion aluminide bondcoats. This instability between the superalloy and the bondcoat has the potential of reducing the mechanical properties of thin-wall turbine airfoils. Controlled gas carburization treatments combined with a prior stress relief heat treatment and adequate surface preparation have been utilized effectively to minimize the formation of SRZ. These additional processing steps are employed before the aluminide bondcoat is deposited and are believed to change the local chemistry and local stresses of the surface of the superalloy. This paper presents the detailed processing steps used to reduce SRZ between platinum aluminide bondcoats and advanced single crystal superalloys.

  18. A surface electromyography based objective method to identify patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain, presenting a flexion related movement control impairment.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Benedicte; Stevens, Veerle; Perneel, Christiaan; Van Tiggelen, Damien; Neyens, Ellen; Duvigneaud, Nathalie; Moerman, Luc; Danneels, Lieven

    2014-12-01

    Movement control impairments (MCI) are often present in patients with non-specific chronic low back pain (NS-CLBP). Therefore, movement control exercises are widely used to rehabilitate patients. However, the objective assessment remains difficult. The purpose of this study was to develop a statistical model, based on logistic regression analysis, to differentiate patients with NS-CLBP presenting a flexion-related MCI from healthy subjects. This model is based on trunk muscle activation patterns measured by surface electromyography (sEMG), during movement control exercises. Sixty-three healthy male subjects and 36 male patients with a flexion-related MCI participated in this study. Muscle activity of the internal obliques, the external obliques, the lumbar multifidus and the thoracic part of the iliocostalis was registered. Ratios of deep stabilizing to superficial torque producing muscle activity were calculated to examine trunk muscle recruitment patterns during 6 different exercises. Logistic regression analyses were performed (1) to define the ratios and exercises that were most discriminating between patients and non-patients, (2) to make a predictive model. K-Fold cross-validation was used to assess the performance of the predictive model. This study demonstrated that sEMG trunk muscle recruitment patterns during movement control tests, allows differentiating NSCLBP patients with a flexion-related MCI from healthy subjects.

  19. Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.H.; Leonard, J.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Jiang, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    This is the 9th quarterly technical progress report for the project entitled Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies'', DE-FG22-90PC90295. The work presented in this report was performed from September 1, 1992 to November 31, 1992. The objective of the project is to conduct extensive fundamental studies on the surface chemistry of pyrite oxidation and flotation and to understand how the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface affects the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. During this reporting period, the surface oxidation of pyrite in various electrolytes was investigated. It has been demonstrated, for the first time, that borate, a pH buffer and electrolyte used by many previous investigators in studying sulfide mineral oxidation, actively participates in the surface oxidation of pyrite. In borate solutions, the surface oxidation of pyrite is tronly enhanced. The anodic oxidation potential of pyrite is lowered by more than 0.4 volts. The initial reaction of the borate enhanced pyrite oxidation can be described by:FeS[sub 2] + B(OH)[sub 4][sup =] ------> [S[sub 2]Fe-B(OH)[sub 4

  20. Recent advances in lanthanide-doped upconversion nanomaterials: synthesis, nanostructures and surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Peiyu; Zhou, Na; Chen, Hengyu; Zhang, Chunlei; Gao, Guo; Cui, Daxiang

    2013-11-01

    Owing to their unique photo-physical properties, rare-earth ions-doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have attracted extensive attention in recent years. UCNPs have many special merits, such as a long luminescence lifetime, narrow emission band widths, high quantum yields and low toxicity, which allows their potential applications in bio-medical field, biological luminescent labels and drug delivery carriers. Compared with traditional fluorescence labels exited by UV (ultraviolet), such as organic dyes and quantum dots, UCNPs can transfer near-infrared (NIR) light into visible light, which is commonly called upconversion luminescence (UCL). This paper reviews the recent advances of several typical synthesis methods of UCNPs in detail as well as the fabrication and optimization of the particle morphology, and the latest advances of UCNPs for multimode imaging, surface passivation and functionalization are also described.

  1. Movement of Movements: Culture Moves in the Long Civil Rights Struggle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaac, Larry

    2008-01-01

    In what way do movements move? What do we mean by the movement of movements? While still a rather unconventional stance, I advance the argument that social movements are, at root, culture production agents. Regardless of whatever else they may accomplish, movements produce new cultural forms in the course of struggle; they often change and augment…

  2. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation. Final report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; Harris, G.H.; De, A.; Sotillo, F.; Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C.; Hu, W.; Zou, Y.; Chen, W.; Choudhry, V.; Shea, S.; Ghosh, A.; Sehgal, R.

    1992-03-01

    The initial goal of the research project was to develop methods of coal surface control in advanced froth flotation to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur rejection, while operating at Btu recoveries above 90% based on run-of-mine quality coal. Moreover, the technology is to concomitantly reduce the ash content significantly (to six percent or less) to provide a high-quality fuel to the boiler (ash removal also increases Btu content, which in turn decreases a coal`s emission potential in terms of lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu). (VC)

  3. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-01

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed. PMID:27119268

  4. Bowel Movement

    MedlinePlus

    A bowel movement is the last stop in the movement of food through your digestive tract. Your stool passes out ... rectum and anus. Another name for stool is feces. It is made of what is left after ...

  5. A Neuro-Fuzzy System for Characterization of Arm Movements

    PubMed Central

    Balbinot, Alexandre; Favieiro, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    The myoelectric signal reflects the electrical activity of skeletal muscles and contains information about the structure and function of the muscles which make different parts of the body move. Advances in engineering have extended electromyography beyond the traditional diagnostic applications to also include applications in diverse areas such as rehabilitation, movement analysis and myoelectric control of prosthesis. This paper aims to study and develop a system that uses myoelectric signals, acquired by surface electrodes, to characterize certain movements of the human arm. To recognize certain hand-arm segment movements, was developed an algorithm for pattern recognition technique based on neuro-fuzzy, representing the core of this research. This algorithm has as input the preprocessed myoelectric signal, to disclosed specific characteristics of the signal, and as output the performed movement. The average accuracy obtained was 86% to 7 distinct movements in tests of long duration (about three hours). PMID:23429579

  6. Advanced image analysis of the surface pattern emerging in Ni3Al intermetallic alloys on anodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Marco; Stępniowski, Wojciech; Cieślak, Grzegorz; Norek, Małgorzata; Michalska-Domańska, Marta; Karczewski, Krzysztof; Chilimoniuk, Paulina; Polkowski, Wojciech; Jóźwik, Paweł; Bojar, Zbigniew

    2016-07-01

    Anodization of Ni3Al alloy is of interest in the field of industrial manufacturing, thanks to the formation of protective oxide layer on the materials working in corrosive environments and high temperatures. However, homogeneous surface treatment is paramount for technological applications of this material. The anodization conditions have to be set outside the ranges of corrosion and “burning”, which is the electric field enhanced anodic dissolution of the metal. In order to check against occurrence of these events, proper quantitative means for assessing the surface quality have to be developed and established. We approached this task by advanced analysis of scanning electron microscope images of anodized Ni3Al plates. The anodization was carried out in 0.3 M citric acid at two temperatures of 0 and 30°C and at voltages in the range of 2 12 V. Different figures can be used to characterize the quality of the surface, in terms of uniformity. Here, the concept of regularity ratio spread is used for the first time on surfaces of technological interest. Additionally, the Minkowski parameters have been calculated and their meaning is discussed.

  7. Tailoring surface topographies of polymers by using ion beam: Recent advances and the potential applications in biomedical and tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasebe, Terumitsu; Nagashima, So; Yoshimoto, Yukihiro; Hotta, Atsushi; Suzuki, Tetsuya

    2012-07-01

    Ion beam technique has recently been actively employed to create various patterns on the surface of polymers. In this paper, we highlight some of the recent advances in tailoring surface topographies of polymers by using ion beam and present a brief discussion on the potential applications in biomedical and tissue engineering.

  8. Advances in the homogenization of monthly and daily climate surface data in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllemann, C.; Begert, M.; Z'graggen, L.; Croci-Maspoli, M.

    2009-04-01

    Homogenization of surface climate data is essential for the accurate monitoring of climate variability, climate extremes and climate change. The intention of MeteoSwiss by providing long term series of surface climate data in Switzerland is to a) systematically preserve historical climate data in respect to national and international guidelines and b) to homogenize these data on monthly and daily time scales. The former aspect has been considered by the definition of the Swiss National Basic Climatological Network (Swiss NBCN). This network defines the most valuable climatological surface stations in Switzerland and provides a basis to ensure a long-term perspective of their operation. For the latter aspect well established monthly homogenization methods are applied to the Swiss surface climate data. In addition, a spline method is used to derive daily adjustment values from monthly adjustments for temperature and precipitation. In line with the COST Action "Advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME)" which dedicates a main focus on the comparison and development of daily homogenization methods we present first results of the comparison of the spline method with a labour intensive semi-objective homogenization procedure using long-term temperature series. The semi-objective method is based upon physical dependences of the inhomogenities on radiation and wind conditions and is believed to produce the most accurate daily adjustments. In this presentation results will be presented of the comparison of homogenization techniques for daily mean and extreme values of the temperature during the period 1901 until 2003 for 6 Swiss surface stations.

  9. Advancing the frontiers in nanocatalysis, biointerfaces, and renewable energy conversion by innovations of surface techniques.

    PubMed

    Somorjai, Gabor A; Frei, Heinz; Park, Jeong Y

    2009-11-25

    The challenge of chemistry in the 21st century is to achieve 100% selectivity of the desired product molecule in multipath reactions ("green chemistry") and develop renewable energy based processes. Surface chemistry and catalysis play key roles in this enterprise. Development of in situ surface techniques such as high-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, time-resolved Fourier transform infrared methods, and ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy enabled the rapid advancement of three fields: nanocatalysts, biointerfaces, and renewable energy conversion chemistry. In materials nanoscience, synthetic methods have been developed to produce monodisperse metal and oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in the 0.8-10 nm range with controlled shape, oxidation states, and composition; these NPs can be used as selective catalysts since chemical selectivity appears to be dependent on all of these experimental parameters. New spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed that operate under reaction conditions and reveal the dynamic change of molecular structure of catalysts and adsorbed molecules as the reactions proceed with changes in reaction intermediates, catalyst composition, and oxidation states. SFG vibrational spectroscopy detects amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces and monitors the change of surface structure and interactions with coadsorbed water. Exothermic reactions and photons generate hot electrons in metal NPs that may be utilized in chemical energy conversion. The photosplitting of water and carbon dioxide, an important research direction in renewable energy conversion, is discussed.

  10. Nanoscale surface analysis on second generation advanced high strength steel after hot dip galvanizing.

    PubMed

    Arndt, M; Duchoslav, J; Preis, K; Samek, L; Stifter, D

    2013-09-01

    Second generation advanced high strength steel is one promising material of choice for modern automotive structural parts because of its outstanding maximal elongation and tensile strength. Nonetheless there is still a lack of corrosion protection for this material due to the fact that cost efficient hot dip galvanizing cannot be applied. The reason for the insufficient coatability with zinc is found in the segregation of manganese to the surface during annealing and the formation of manganese oxides prior coating. This work analyses the structure and chemical composition of the surface oxides on so called nano-TWIP (twinning induced plasticity) steel on the nanoscopic scale after hot dip galvanizing in a simulator with employed analytical methods comprising scanning Auger electron spectroscopy (SAES), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and focused ion beam (FIB) for cross section preparation. By the combination of these methods, it was possible to obtain detailed chemical images serving a better understanding which processes exactly occur on the surface of this novel kind of steel and how to promote in the future for this material system galvanic protection.

  11. Nanoscale surface analysis on second generation advanced high strength steel after hot dip galvanizing.

    PubMed

    Arndt, M; Duchoslav, J; Preis, K; Samek, L; Stifter, D

    2013-09-01

    Second generation advanced high strength steel is one promising material of choice for modern automotive structural parts because of its outstanding maximal elongation and tensile strength. Nonetheless there is still a lack of corrosion protection for this material due to the fact that cost efficient hot dip galvanizing cannot be applied. The reason for the insufficient coatability with zinc is found in the segregation of manganese to the surface during annealing and the formation of manganese oxides prior coating. This work analyses the structure and chemical composition of the surface oxides on so called nano-TWIP (twinning induced plasticity) steel on the nanoscopic scale after hot dip galvanizing in a simulator with employed analytical methods comprising scanning Auger electron spectroscopy (SAES), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and focused ion beam (FIB) for cross section preparation. By the combination of these methods, it was possible to obtain detailed chemical images serving a better understanding which processes exactly occur on the surface of this novel kind of steel and how to promote in the future for this material system galvanic protection. PMID:23404132

  12. Advancing the Frontiers in Nanocatalysis, Biointerfaces, and Renewable Energy Conversion by Innovations of Surface Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, G.A.; Frei, H.; Park, J.Y.

    2009-07-23

    The challenge of chemistry in the 21st century is to achieve 100% selectivity of the desired product molecule in multipath reactions ('green chemistry') and develop renewable energy based processes. Surface chemistry and catalysis play key roles in this enterprise. Development of in situ surface techniques such as high-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, time-resolved Fourier transform infrared methods, and ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy enabled the rapid advancement of three fields: nanocatalysts, biointerfaces, and renewable energy conversion chemistry. In materials nanoscience, synthetic methods have been developed to produce monodisperse metal and oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in the 0.8-10 nm range with controlled shape, oxidation states, and composition; these NPs can be used as selective catalysts since chemical selectivity appears to be dependent on all of these experimental parameters. New spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed that operate under reaction conditions and reveal the dynamic change of molecular structure of catalysts and adsorbed molecules as the reactions proceed with changes in reaction intermediates, catalyst composition, and oxidation states. SFG vibrational spectroscopy detects amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces and monitors the change of surface structure and interactions with coadsorbed water. Exothermic reactions and photons generate hot electrons in metal NPs that may be utilized in chemical energy conversion. The photosplitting of water and carbon dioxide, an important research direction in renewable energy conversion, is discussed.

  13. Advance Complex Liquid Nitriding of Stainless Steel AISI 321 Surface at 430 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuanhua; Wang, Jun; Zeng, Dezhi; Huang, Runbo; Fan, Hongyuan

    2013-09-01

    Liquid nitriding of type 321 austenite stainless steel was conducted at low temperature at 430 °C, using a type of a complex chemical heat-treatment; and the properties of the nitrided surface were evaluated. Experimental results revealed that a modified layer was formed on the surface with the thickness ranging from 2 to 30 μm varying with changing treatment time. When the stainless steel subjected to the advanced liquid nitriding less than 8 h at 430 °C, the main phase of the nitrided coating layer was the S phase generally. When the treatment time prolonged up to 16 h, S phase formed and partially transformed to CrN subsequently; and then the fine secondary CrN phase precipitated. All treatments performed in the current study can effectively improve the surface hardness. The nitrided layer thickness changed intensively with the increasing nitrided time. The growth of the nitride layer took place mainly by nitrogen diffusion according to the expected parabolic rate law. The highest hardness value obtained in this experiment was about 1400 Hv0.25. Low-temperature nitriding can improve the corrosion resistance of the 321 stainless steel against diluted vitriolic acid. The immerse test results revealed that the sample nitrided for 16 h had the best corrosion resistance than the others. SEM examinations indicated that after nitriding, the corrosion mechanisms of the steel had changed from serious general corrosion of untreated sample to selectivity corrosion of nitrided samples in the diluted vitriolic acid.

  14. Prediction of Unsteady Blade Surface Pressures on an Advanced Propeller at an Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The numerical solution of the unsteady, three-dimensional, Euler equations is considered in order to obtain the blade surface pressures of an advanced propeller at an angle of attack. The specific configuration considered is the SR7L propeller at cruise conditions with a 4.6 deg inflow angle corresponding to the plus 2 deg nacelle tilt of the Propeller Test Assessment (PTA) flight test condition. The results indicate nearly sinusoidal response of the blade loading, with angle of attack. For the first time, detailed variations of the chordwise loading as a function of azimuthal angle are presented. It is observed that the blade is lightly loaded for part of the revolution and shocks appear from hub to about 80 percent radial station for the highly loaded portion of the revolution.

  15. Unsteady blade surface pressures on a large-scale advanced propeller - Prediction and data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    An unsteady three dimensional Euler analysis technique is employed to compute the flowfield of an advanced propeller operating at an angle of attack. The predicted blade pressure waveforms are compared with wind tunnel data at two Mach numbers, 0.5 and 0.2. The inflow angle is three degrees. For an inflow Mach number of 0.5, the predicted pressure response is in fair agreement with data: the predicted phases of the waveforms are in close agreement with data while the magnitudes are underpredicted. At the low Mach number of 0.2 (take-off) the numerical solution shows the formation of a leading edge vortex which is in qualitative agreement with measurements. However, the highly nonlinear pressure response measured on the blade suction surface is not captured in the present inviscid analysis.

  16. Unsteady blade-surface pressures on a large-scale advanced propeller: Prediction and data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    An unsteady 3-D Euler analysis technique is employed to compute the flow field of an advanced propeller operating at an angle of attack. The predicted blade pressure waveforms are compared with wind tunnel data at two Mach numbers, 0.5 and 0.2. The inflow angle is three degrees. For an inflow Mach number of 0.5, the predicted pressure response is in fair agreement with data: the predicted phases of the waveforms are in close agreement with data while the magnitudes are underpredicted. At the low Mach number of 0.2 (takeoff), the numerical solution shows the formation of a leading edge vortex which is in qualitative agreement with measurements. However, the highly nonlinear pressure response measured on the blade suction surface is not captured in the present inviscid analysis.

  17. Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR) Phase 2 and Smart Autonomous Sand-Swimming Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandy, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR) Phase 2 is an excavation robot for mining regolith on a planet like Mars. The robot is programmed using the Robotic Operating System (ROS) and it also uses a physical simulation program called Gazebo. This internship focused on various functions of the program in order to make it a more professional and efficient robot. During the internship another project called the Smart Autonomous Sand-Swimming Excavator was worked on. This is a robot that is designed to dig through sand and extract sample material. The intern worked on programming the Sand-Swimming robot, and designing the electrical system to power and control the robot.

  18. Seasonal cues of Arctic grayling movement in a small Arctic stream: the importance of surface water connectivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heim, Kurt C.; Wipfli, Mark S.; Whitman, Matthew S.; Arp, Christopher D.; Adams, Jeff; Falke, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    In Arctic ecosystems, freshwater fish migrate seasonally between productive shallow water habitats that freeze in winter and deep overwinter refuge in rivers and lakes. How these movements relate to seasonal hydrology is not well understood. We used passive integrated transponder tags and stream wide antennae to track 1035 Arctic grayling in Crea Creek, a seasonally flowing beaded stream on the Arctic Coastal Plain, Alaska. Migration of juvenile and adult fish into Crea Creek peaked in June immediately after ice break-up in the stream. Fish that entered the stream during periods of high flow and cold stream temperature traveled farther upstream than those entering during periods of lower flow and warmer temperature. We used generalized linear models to relate migration of adult and juvenile fish out of Crea Creek to hydrology. Most adults migrated in late June – early July, and there was best support (Akaike weight = 0.46; w i ) for a model indicating that the rate of migration increased with decreasing discharge. Juvenile migration occurred in two peaks; the early peak consisted of larger juveniles and coincided with adult migration, while the later peak occurred shortly before freeze-up in September and included smaller juveniles. A model that included discharge, minimum stream temperature, year, season, and mean size of potential migrants was most strongly supported (w i  = 0.86). Juvenile migration rate increased sharply as daily minimum stream temperature decreased, suggesting fish respond to impending freeze-up. We found fish movements to be intimately tied to the strong seasonality of discharge and temperature, and demonstrate the importance of small stream connectivity for migratory Arctic grayling during the entire open-water period. The ongoing and anticipated effects of climate change and petroleum development on Arctic hydrology (e.g. reduced stream connectivity, earlier peak flows, increased evapotranspiration) have important implications

  19. Movement - uncontrolled or slow

    MedlinePlus

    Dystonia; Involuntary slow and twisting movements; Choreoathetosis; Leg and arm movements - uncontrollable; Arm and leg movements - uncontrollable; Slow involuntary movements of large muscle groups; Athetoid movements

  20. [Stereotypic movements].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Alvarez, E

    2003-02-01

    Stereotypic movements are repetitive patterns of movement with certain peculiar features that make them especially interesting. Their physiopathology and their relationship with the neurobehavioural disorders they are frequently associated with are unknown. In this paper our aim is to offer a simple analysis of their dominant characteristics, their differentiation from other processes and a hypothesis of the properties of stereotypic movements, which could all set the foundations for research work into their physiopathology.

  1. Advances in Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging enable quantitative measurement of laterally heterogeneous coatings of nanoscale thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raegen, Adam; Reiter, Kyle; Clarke, Anthony; Lipkowski, Jacek; Dutcher, John

    2013-03-01

    The Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) phenomenon is routinely exploited to qualitatively probe changes to the optical properties of nanoscale coatings on thin metallic surfaces, for use in probes and sensors. Unfortunately, extracting truly quantitative information is usually limited to a select few cases - uniform absorption/desorption of small biomolecules and films, in which a continuous ``slab'' model is a good approximation. We present advancements in the SPR technique that expand the number of cases for which the technique can provide meaningful results. Use of a custom, angle-scanning SPR imaging system, together with a refined data analysis method, allow for quantitative kinetic measurements of laterally heterogeneous systems. We first demonstrate the directionally heterogeneous nature of the SPR phenomenon using a directionally ordered sample, then show how this allows for the calculation of the average coverage of a heterogeneous sample. Finally, the degradation of cellulose microfibrils and bundles of microfibrils due to the action of cellulolytic enzymes will be presented as an excellent example of the capabilities of the SPR imaging system.

  2. The Screw-Like Movement of a Gliding Bacterium Is Powered by Spiral Motion of Cell-Surface Adhesins.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Abhishek; Roland, Thibault; Berg, Howard C

    2016-09-01

    Flavobacterium johnsoniae, a rod-shaped bacterium, glides over surfaces at speeds of ∼2 μm/s. The propulsion of a cell-surface adhesin, SprB, is known to enable gliding. We used cephalexin to generate elongated cells with irregular shapes and followed their displacement in three dimensions. These cells rolled about their long axes as they moved forward, following a right-handed trajectory. We coated gold nanoparticles with an SprB antibody and tracked them in three dimensions in an evanescent field where the nanoparticles appeared brighter when they were closer to the glass. The nanoparticles followed a right-handed spiral trajectory on the surface of the cell. Thus, if SprB were to adhere to the glass rather than to a nanoparticle, the cell would move forward along a right-handed trajectory, as observed, but in a direction opposite to that of the nanoparticle. PMID:27602728

  3. Development of Advanced Wear and Corrosion Resistant Systems Through Laser Surface Alloying and Materials Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Martukanitz and S. Babu

    2007-05-03

    Laser surfacing in the form of cladding, alloying, and modifications are gaining widespread use because of its ability to provide high deposition rates, low thermal distortion, and refined microstructure due to high solidification rates. Because of these advantages, laser surface alloying is considered a prime candidate for producing ultra-hard coatings through the establishment or in situ formation of composite structures. Therefore, a program was conducted by the Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop the scientific and engineering basis for performing laser-based surface modifications involving the addition of hard particles, such as carbides, borides, and nitrides, within a metallic matrix for improved wear, fatigue, creep, and corrosion resistance. This has involved the development of advanced laser processing and simulation techniques, along with the refinement and application of these techniques for predicting and selecting materials and processing parameters for the creation of new surfaces having improved properties over current coating technologies. This program has also resulted in the formulation of process and material simulation tools capable of examining the potential for the formation and retention of composite coatings and deposits produced using laser processing techniques, as well as positive laboratory demonstrations in producing these coatings. In conjunction with the process simulation techniques, the application of computational thermodynamic and kinetic models to design laser surface alloying materials was demonstrated and resulted in a vast improvement in the formulation of materials used for producing composite coatings. The methodology was used to identify materials and to selectively modify microstructures for increasing hardness of deposits produced by the laser surface alloying process. Computational thermodynamic calculations indicated that it was possible to induce the

  4. Land Surface Microwave Emissivities Derived from AMSR-E and MODIS Measurements with Advanced Quality Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moncet, Jean-Luc; Liang, Pan; Galantowicz, John F.; Lipton, Alan E.; Uymin, Gennady; Prigent, Catherine; Grassotti, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A microwave emissivity database has been developed with data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) and with ancillary land surface temperature (LST) data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the same Aqua spacecraft. The primary intended application of the database is to provide surface emissivity constraints in atmospheric and surface property retrieval or assimilation. An additional application is to serve as a dynamic indicator of land surface properties relevant to climate change monitoring. The precision of the emissivity data is estimated to be significantly better than in prior databases from other sensors due to the precise collocation with high-quality MODIS LST data and due to the quality control features of our data analysis system. The accuracy of the emissivities in deserts and semi-arid regions is enhanced by applying, in those regions, a version of the emissivity retrieval algorithm that accounts for the penetration of microwave radiation through dry soil with diurnally varying vertical temperature gradients. These results suggest that this penetration effect is more widespread and more significant to interpretation of passive microwave measurements than had been previously established. Emissivity coverage in areas where persistent cloudiness interferes with the availability of MODIS LST data is achieved using a classification-based method to spread emissivity data from less-cloudy areas that have similar microwave surface properties. Evaluations and analyses of the emissivity products over homogeneous snow-free areas are presented, including application to retrieval of soil temperature profiles. Spatial inhomogeneities are the largest in the vicinity of large water bodies due to the large water/land emissivity contrast and give rise to large apparent temporal variability in the retrieved emissivities when satellite footprint locations vary over time. This issue will be dealt with in the future by

  5. Estimation of surface energy balance from radiant surface temperature and NOAA AVHRR sensor reflectances over agricultural and native vegetation. [AVHRR (advanced very high resolution radiometer)

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xinmei; Lyons, T.J. ); Smith, R.C.G. ); Hacker, J.M.; Schwerdtfeger, P. )

    1993-08-01

    A model is developed to evaluate surface heat flux densities using the radiant surface temperature and red and near-infrared reflectances from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer sensor. Net radiation is calculated from an empirical formulation and albedo estimated from satellite observations. Infrared surface temperature is corrected to aerodynamic surface temperature in estimating the sensible heat flux and the latent flux is evaluated as the residual of the surface energy balance. When applied to relatively homogeneous agricultural and native vegetation, the model yields realistic estimates of sensible and latent heat flux density in the surface layer for cases where either the sensible or latent flux dominates. 29 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Subsurface temperatures and surface heat flow in the Michigan Basin and their relationships to regional subsurface fluid movement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vugrinovich, R.

    1989-01-01

    Linear regression of 405 bottomhole temperature (BHT) measurements vs. associated depths from Michigan's Lower Peninsula results in the following equation relating BHT and depth: BHT(??C) = 14.5 + 0.0192 ?? depth(m) Temperature residuals, defined as (BHT measured)-(BHT calculated), were determined for each of the 405 BHT's. Areas of positive temperature residuals correspond to areas of regional groundwater discharge (determined from maps of equipotential surface) while areas of negative temperature residuals correspond to areas of regional groundwater recharge. These relationships are observed in the principal aquifers in rocks of Devonian and Ordovician age and in a portion of the principal aquifer in rocks of Silurian age. There is a similar correspondence between high surface heat flow (determined using the silica geothermometer) and regional groundwater discharge areas and low surface heat flow and regional groundwater recharge areas. Post-Jurassic depositional and tectonic histories suggest that the observed coupling of subsurface temperature and groundwater flow systems may have persisted since Jurassic time. Thus the higher subsurface palaeotemperatures (and palaeogeothermal gradients) indicated by recent studies most likely pre-date the Jurassic. ?? 1989.

  7. Macrophage recognition of toxic advanced glycosylation end products through the macrophage surface-receptor nucleolin.

    PubMed

    Miki, Yuichi; Dambara, Hikaru; Tachibana, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Kazuya; Konishi, Mio; Beppu, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycosylation end-products (AGEs) are non-enzymatically glycosylated proteins that play an important role in several diseases and aging processes, including angiopathy, renal failure, diabetic complications, and some neurodegenerative diseases. In particular, glyceraldehyde (GCA)- and glycolaldehyde (GOA)-derived AGEs are deemed toxic AGEs, due to their cytotoxicity. Recently, the shuttling-protein nucleolin has been shown to possess scavenger receptor-activity. Here, we investigated whether or not macrophages recognize toxic AGEs through nucleolin receptors expressed on their surface. Free amino acid groups and arginine residues found in bovine serum albumin (BSA) were time-dependently modified by incubation with GCA and GOA. In addition, average molecular size was increased by incubation with GCA and GOA. While GCA-treated BSA (GCA-BSA) and GOA-treated BSA (GOA-BSA) were recognized by thioglycollate-elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages in proportion to their respective aldehyde-modification ratios, aldehyde-untreated control-BSA was not. Surface plasmon-resonance analysis revealed that nucleolin strongly associated with GCA-BSA and GOA-BSA, but not with control-BSA. Further, pretreating macrophages with anti-nucleolin antibody, but not control-Immunoglobulin G, inhibited recognition of GCA-BSA and GOA-BSA by macrophages. Additionally, AGRO, a nucleolin-specific oligonucleotide aptamer, inhibited recognition of GCA-BSA and GOA-BSA. Moreover, nucleolin-transfected HEK293 cells recognized more GCA-BSA and GOA-BSA than control HEK cells did. Binding of nucleolin and GCA-BSA/GOA-BSA was also blocked by anti-nucleolin antibody at molecular level. These results indicate that nucleolin is a receptor that allows macrophages to recognize toxic AGEs.

  8. Advances in the homogenization of daily climate surface data in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllemann, C.; Begert, M.; Croci-Maspoli, M.

    2010-09-01

    It is often the extremes of weather and climate which have the greatest impact on society. In this respect temporal high-resolution and long-term climate data series are a unique source for e.g. variability and trend analyses, extreme value analysis or analyses of extreme climate indices. Consequentially that these analyses require high demands on the data quality for accurate conclusions on climate change. This can be achieved by homogenization of the corresponding data. It is the intention of MeteoSwiss to fulfill these requirements for their available long-term climate surface data in Switzerland by i) systematically preserve historical climate data in respect to national and international guidelines, ii) ensure efficient and extensive quality control and iii) homogenize long-term data series of the most important climate variables on monthly and daily time scales. In the framework of the COST Action ES0601 "Advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME)", which dedicates a main focus on the comparison and development of daily homogenization methods, we present results of the comparison from different daily homogenization procedures using long-term series. Currently only a few statistical methods exist to help homogenize daily climate data. We will focus on three different daily homogenization methods and will present results of extreme temperature values during the period 1864 until 2009 for several Swiss surface stations. One aspect will be the exposure of the three methods to different weather conditions such as sunny calm days or days influenced by the foehn in spring. It is important to see how the methods deal with physical impacts (radiation, wind).

  9. Lateral diffusion and retrograde movements of individual cell surface components on single motile cells observed with Nanovid microscopy

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    A recently introduced extension of video-enhanced light microscopy, called Nanovid microscopy, documents the dynamic reorganization of individual cell surface components on living cells. 40-microns colloidal gold probes coupled to different types of poly-L-lysine label negative cell surface components of PTK2 cells. Evidence is provided that they bind to negative sialic acid residues of glycoproteins, probably through nonspecific electrostatic interactions. The gold probes, coupled to short poly-L-lysine molecules (4 kD) displayed Brownian motion, with a diffusion coefficient in the range 0.1-0.2 micron2/s. A diffusion coefficient in the 0.1 micron2/s range was also observed with 40-nm gold probes coupled to an antibody against the lipid-linked Thy-1 antigen on 3T3 fibroblasts. Diffusion of these probes is largely confined to apparent microdomains of 1-2 microns in size. On the other hand, the gold probes, coupled to long poly-L-lysine molecules (240 kD) molecules and bound to the leading lamella, were driven rearward, toward the boundary between lamelloplasm and perinuclear cytoplasm at a velocity of 0.5-1 micron/min by a directed ATP-dependent mechanism. This uniform motion was inhibited by cytochalasin, suggesting actin microfilament involvement. A similar behavior on MO cells was observed when the antibody-labeled gold served as a marker for the PGP-1 (GP-80) antigen. These results show that Nanovid microscopy, offering the possibility to observe the motion of individual specific cell surface components, provides a new and powerful tool to study the dynamic reorganization of the cell membrane during locomotion and in other biological contexts as well. PMID:1670778

  10. Motions caused by the growth of Bacillus subtilis macrofibres in fluid medium result in new forms of movement of the multicellular structures over solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, N H; Sarlls, J E; Thwaites, J J

    2001-04-01

    Bacillus subtilis macrofibres, highly ordered multicellular structures, undergo twisting and writhing motions when they grow in fluid medium as a result of forces generated by the elongation of individual cells. Macrofibres are denser than the fluid medium in which they are cultured, consequently they settle to the bottom of the growth chamber and grow in contact with it. The ramifications of growth on plastic and glass surfaces were examined. Macrofibres were observed to rotate about a vertical axis near the centre of their length in a chiral-specific direction. Right-handed fibres rotated clockwise on plastic surfaces at approximately 4 degrees min(-1), left-handed structures of lower twist rotate anti-clockwise at about half that rate. Very large ball structures produced late in macrofibre formation perched on many small protruding fibres but rotated only when driven by large fibres attached to their periphery. Closer examination showed that fibres made contact with surfaces at only a few points along their length (between 1 and 6 on glass). The regions in contact with the surface changed periodically as a result of rotation of the fibre shaft caused by growth. Every time the weight of a fibre transferred from one contact point to another, each section of the fibre took a small step approximately proportional to its distance from the fibre mid-point. The net result was a rolling of each section over the surface so that the fibre rotation about a vertical axis was produced. Macrofibres also took large steps when part of the structure rose off the floor, swept through an arc in the fluid and then returned to the floor at a new location. The rate of movement during a large step, measured as the change of angle between the moving and stationary portions of the fibre, was 5 degrees s(-1). These observations reveal that the forces derived from helical growth that lead to macrofibre formation also cause characteristic macrofibre motion that differs from classical

  11. Response surface methodology for ozonation of trifluralin using advanced oxidation processes in an airlift photoreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behin, J.; Farhadian, N.

    2016-06-01

    Degradation of trifluralin, as a wide used pesticide, was investigated by advance oxidation process comprising O3/UV/H2O2 in a concentric tube airlift photoreactor. Main and interactive effects of three independent factors including pH (5-9), superficial gas velocity (0.05-0.15 cm/s) and time (20-60 min) on the removal efficiency were assessed using central composite face-centered design and response surface method (RSM). The RSM allows to solve multivariable equations and to estimate simultaneously the relative importance of several contributing parameters even in the presence of complex interaction. Airlift photoreactor imposed a synergistic effect combining good mixing intensity merit with high ozone transfer rate. Mixing in the airlift photoreactor enhanced the UV light usage efficiency and its availability. Complete degradation of trifluralin was achieved under optimum conditions of pH 9 and superficial gas velocity 0.15 cm/s after 60 min of reaction time. Under these conditions, degradation of trifluralin was performed in a bubble column photoreactor of similar volume and a lower efficiency was observed.

  12. Vertical-tube aqueous LiBr falling film absorption using advanced surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.A.; Perez-Blanco, H.

    1993-10-01

    A heat and mass transfer test stand was fabricated and used to investigate nonisothermal falling film absorption of water vapor into a solution of aqueous lithium bromide. The absorber was made of borosilicate glass for visual inspection of the failing film. Experiments were conducted on internally cooled tubes of about 0.019 m outside diameter and of 1.53 m length. Testing evaluated a single absorber tube`s performance at varying operating conditions, namely different cooling-water flow rates, solution flow rates, pressures, temperatures, and concentrations. Advanced surfaces were identified that enhanced absorber load and the mass of absorbed vapor. A pin-fin tube with 6.4mm pitch absorbed about 225% more mass than did a smooth tube. A grooved tube was the d best performer with 175% enhancement over the smooth tube. Increasing the cooling water flow rate to 1.893 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} m{sup 3}/s caused about a 300% increase in the mass absorbed for the grooved tube compared with the smooth tube. Results showed that the pin-fin tube with 6.4-mm pitch and the grooved tubes may enhance absorption to levels comparable to chemical enhancement in horizontal smooth tube absorbers. Absorber load, the transport coefficients, and pertinent absorption data are presented as functions of dimensionless numbers. These experimental data will prove useful in formulating analytical tools to predict vertical-tube absorber performance.

  13. Movement - uncoordinated

    MedlinePlus

    Lack of coordination; Loss of coordination; Coordination impairment; Ataxia; Clumsiness; Uncoordinated movement ... are passed through families (such as congenital cerebellar ataxia, Friedreich ataxia , ataxia - telangiectasia , or Wilson disease ) Multiple ...

  14. Psychogenic Movement

    MedlinePlus

    ... also look for marked improvement in symptoms following psychotherapy, use of a placebo (a medicine with no ... multi-therapy approach to treating psychogenic movement includes psychotherapy, placebo, or suggestion; antidepressants for symptoms related to ...

  15. Recent advances in electronic structure theory and their influence on the accuracy of ab initio potential energy surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in electronic structure theory and the availability of high speed vector processors have substantially increased the accuracy of ab initio potential energy surfaces. The recently developed atomic natural orbital approach for basis set contraction has reduced both the basis set incompleteness and superposition errors in molecular calculations. Furthermore, full CI calculations can often be used to calibrate a CASSCF/MRCI approach that quantitatively accounts for the valence correlation energy. These computational advances also provide a vehicle for systematically improving the calculations and for estimating the residual error in the calculations. Calculations on selected diatomic and triatomic systems will be used to illustrate the accuracy that currently can be achieved for molecular systems. In particular, the F + H2 yields HF + H potential energy hypersurface is used to illustrate the impact of these computational advances on the calculation of potential energy surfaces.

  16. Recent advances in electronic structure theory and their influence on the accuracy of ab initio potential energy surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    Recent advances in electronic structure theory and the availability of high speed vector processors have substantially increased the accuracy of ab initio potential energy surfaces. The recently developed atomic natural orbital approach for basis set contraction has reduced both the basis set incompleteness and superposition errors in molecular calculations. Furthermore, full CI calculations can often be used to calibrate a CASSCF/MRCI approach that quantitatively accounts for the valence correlation energy. These computational advances also provide a vehicle for systematically improving the calculations and for estimating the residual error in the calculations. Calculations on selected diatomic and triatomic systems will be used to illustrate the accuracy that currently can be achieved for molecular systems. In particular, the F+H2 yields HF+H potential energy hypersurface is used to illustrate the impact of these computational advances on the calculation of potential energy surfaces.

  17. The Washington aerial spray drift study: assessment of off-target organophosphorus insecticide atmospheric movement by plant surface volatilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaprasad, Jaya; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Elgethun, Kai; Hebert, Vincent R.; Felsot, Allan; Yost, Michael G.; Fenske, Richard A.

    2004-10-01

    Post-application pesticide emissions from wetted leaf surfaces and soil may present a significant pathway of exposure to humans in nearby residential communities. In this study, high volume air sampling was performed to measure airborne concentrations of the pesticide methamidophos in a residential community in close proximity to aerial spraying. Sampling occurred before, during and 24 h post-application. To evaluate whether predictive models could reliably estimate residential exposure to methamidophos, an emission factor was used for estimating fluxes of volatilized material over the sprayed area for a 1-day post-application period. These flux estimates were then incorporated into a fugitive dust gaussian dispersion model (FDM) for assessing distribution of mass around the sprayed area. The predictive model output was compared with the field air sampler measurements. In our comparison, 1-day flux estimates from the model were found to be associated to observed field measurement data, with an r2=0.63 the day of the spray and r2=0.67 the day after the spray. The volatilization model however appears to underestimate surface emission flux immediately after the spray and overestimate the emission the next day.

  18. Recent Advances in Modeling of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Land Surface in the Coupled WRF-CMAQ Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances in the land surface model (LSM) and planetary boundary layer (PBL) components of the WRF-CMAQ coupled meteorology and air quality modeling system are described. The aim of these modifications was primarily to improve the modeling of ground level concentrations of trace c...

  19. Time-dependent movement and distribution of chlorpyrifos and its metabolism in bamboo forest under soil surface mulching.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yihua; Shen, Danyu; Zhong, Donglian; Mo, Runhong; Ni, Zhanglin; Tang, Fubin

    2014-07-16

    The dissipation and distribution of chlorpyrifos (CHP) granule formulation in bamboo forest under soil surface mulching conditions (CP) and noncovered cultivation conditions (NCP) from soil to product were investigated. In the CP treatment, the CHP granule with slow-release effect leached from the topsoil to the subsoil. Conversely, the CHP was fixed in the topsoil (0-5 cm layer) in the NCP treatment, and no obvious leaching effect could be observed. The residue of CHP could be found in bamboo shoots from CP treatment, mainly at the bottom part (5 cm length). CHP could be degraded into 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) in the soil and bamboo shoots. In addition, the straw used as the mulching material with higher OM and pH had some regulatory role in changing the pH and OM characteristics of the soil. Thus the straw could indirectly affect the adsorption and degradation behavior of CHP and TCP in the soil.

  20. The Synergism Between Heat and Mass Transfer Additive and Advanced Surfaces in Aqueous LiBr Horizontal Tube Absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.A.

    1999-03-24

    Experiments were conducted in a laboratory to investigate the absorption of water vapor into a falling-film of aqueous lithium bromide (LiBr). A mini-absorber test stand was used to test smooth tubes and a variety of advanced tube surfaces placed horizontally in a single-row bundle. The bundle had six copper tubes; each tube had an outside diameter of 15.9-mm and a length of 0.32-m. A unique feature of the stand is its ability to operate continuously and support testing of LiBr brine at mass fractions {ge} 0.62. The test stand can also support testing to study the effect of the failing film mass flow rate, the coolant mass flow rate, the coolant temperature, the absorber pressure and the tube spacing. Manufacturers of absorption chillers add small quantities of a heat and mass transfer additive to improve the performance of the absorbers. The additive causes surface stirring which enhances the transport of absorbate into the bulk of the film. Absorption may also be enhanced with advanced tube surfaces that mechanically induce secondary flows in the falling film without increasing the thickness of the film. Several tube geometry's were identified and tested with the intent of mixing the film and renewing the interface with fresh solution from the tube wall. Testing was completed on a smooth tube and several different externally enhanced tube surfaces. Experiments were conducted over the operating conditions of 6.5 mm Hg absorber pressure, coolant temperatures ranging from 20 to 35 C and LiBr mass fractions ranging from 0.60 through 0.62. Initially the effect of tube spacing was investigated for the smooth tube surface, tested with no heat and mass transfer additive. Test results showed the absorber load and the mass absorbed increased as the tube spacing increased because of the improved wetting of the tube bundle. However, tube spacing was not a critical factor if heat and mass transfer additive was active in the mini-absorber. The additive dramatically affected

  1. Kinetics of pulse photothermal surface deformation as a method of studying the phase interface movement in a first-order phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vintzentz, S. V.; Kiselev, V. F.; Levshin, N. L.; Sandomirskii, V. B.

    1991-01-01

    The photothermal surface deformation (PTSD) method is used for characterization of the first-order phase transition (PT) for the first time. The advantages of the method are demonstrated experimentally for the well known metal-to-semiconductor PT in VO 2. It is found that near the PT temperature the PTSD pulse in a VO 2 film has a sign opposite to that of the thermoelastic response. The conclusion is drawn that this phenomenon is determined primarily by the contribution of the decrease in the specific volume (Δ V/ V) of the substance involved in the semiconductor-to-metal PT. The sign of Δ V/ V for a submicron polycrystalline VO 2 film is determined. Besides, analysis shows that in the PTSD kinetics measured as a whole we can "separate" a law for the metal-semicon- ductor interface movement (i.e. the interface moves towards the interior of the film when the latter is heated and back towards the surface when it is cooling down). The relative density change due to the PT is estimated based on this law.

  2. An advanced understanding of the specific effects of xylan and surface lignin contents on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Xiaohui; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhang, Xiao

    2013-01-17

    A deep understanding of biomass recalcitrance has been hampered by the intricate and heterogeneous nature of pretreated biomass substrates obtained from random deconstruction methods. In this study, we established a unique methodology based on chemical pulping principles to create "reference substrates" with intact cellulose fibers and controlled morphological and chemical properties that enable us to investigate the individual effect of xylan, bulk, and surface lignin content on enzymatic hydrolysis. We also developed and demonstrated an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technique for quantifying surface lignin content on biomass substrates. The results from this study show that, apart from its hindrance effect, xylan can facilitate cellulose fibril swelling and thus create more accessible surface area, which improves enzyme and substrate interactions. Surface lignin has a significant impact on enzyme adsorption kinetics and hydrolysis rate. Advanced understanding of xylan, bulk, and surface lignin effects provides critical information for an effective biomass conversion process.

  3. Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies. Final report, September 19, 1988--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gray, R.; Streeter, R.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Chiarlli, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Perez, L.; Venkatadri, R.

    1992-12-31

    This final report presents the research work carried out on the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC). The project was to support the engineering development of the selective agglomeration technology in order to reduce the sulfur content of US coals for controlling SO{sub 2} emissions (i.e., acid rain precursors). The overall effort was a part of the DOE/PETCs Acid Rain Control Initiative (ARCI). The overall objective of the project is to develop techniques for coal surface control prior to the advanced physical fine coal cleaning process of selective agglomeration in order to achieve 85% pyrite sulfur rejection at an energy recovery greater than 85% based on run-of-mine coal. The surface control is meant to encompass surface modification during grinding and laboratory beneficiation testing. The project includes the following tasks: Project planning; methods for analysis of samples; development of standard beneficiation test; grinding studies; modification of particle surface; and exploratory R&D and support. The coal samples used in this project include three base coals, Upper Freeport - Indiana County, PA, Pittsburgh NO. 8 - Belmont County, OH, and Illinois No. 6 - Randolph County, IL, and three additional coals, Upper Freeport - Grant County- WV, Kentucky No. 9 Hopkins County, KY, and Wyodak - Campbell County, WY. A total of 149 drums of coal were received.

  4. Life testing of reflowed and reworked advanced CCGA surface mount packages in harsh thermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2013-03-01

    Life testing/qualification of reflowed (1st reflow) and reworked (1st reflow, 1st removal, and then 1st rework) advanced ceramic column grid array (CCGA) surface mount interconnect electronic packaging technologies for future flight projects has been studied to enhance the mission assurance of JPL-NASA projects. The reliability of reworked/reflowed surface mount technology (SMT) packages is very important for short-duration and long-duration deep space harsh extreme thermal environmental missions. The life testing of CCGA electronic packages under extreme thermal environments (for example: -185°C to +125°C) has been performed with reference to various JPL/NASA project requirements which encompass the temperature range studied. The test boards of reflowed and reworked CCGA packages (717 Xilinx package, 624, 1152, and 1272 column Actel Packages) were selected for the study to survive three times the total number of expected temperature cycles resulting from all environmental and operational exposures occurring over the life of the flight hardware including all relevant manufacturing, ground operations, and mission phases or cycles to failure to assess the life of the hardware. Qualification/life testing was performed by subjecting test boards to the environmental harsh temperature extremes and assessing any structural failures, mechanical failures or degradation in electrical performance solder-joint failures due to either overstress or thermal cycle fatigue. The large, high density, high input/output (I/O) electronic interconnect SMT packages such as CCGA have increased usage in avionics hardware of NASA projects during the last two decades. The test boards built with CCGA packages are expensive and often require a rework to replace a reflowed, reprogrammed, failed, redesigned, etc., CCGA packages. Theoretically speaking, a good rework process should have similar temperature-time profile as that used for the original manufacturing process of solder reflow. A

  5. Advanced Response Surface Modeling of Ares I Roll Control Jet Aerodynamic Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favaregh, Noah M.

    2010-01-01

    The Ares I rocket uses roll control jets. These jets have aerodynamic implications as they impinge on the surface and protuberances of the vehicle. The jet interaction on the body can cause an amplification or a reduction of the rolling moment produced by the jet itself, either increasing the jet effectiveness or creating an adverse effect. A design of experiments test was planned and carried out using computation fluid dynamics, and a subsequent response surface analysis ensued on the available data to characterize the jet interaction across the ascent portion of the Ares I flight envelope. Four response surface schemes were compared including a single response surface covering the entire design space, separate sector responses that did not overlap, continuously overlapping surfaces, and recursive weighted response surfaces. These surfaces were evaluated on traditional statistical metrics as well as visual inspection. Validation of the recursive weighted response surface was performed using additionally available data at off-design point locations.

  6. Nanoscale surface modification of plastic substrates for advanced tissue engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkov, N.; Safonov, V.; Zykova, A.; Smolik, J.; Rogovska, R.; Goltsev, A.; Dubrava, T.; Rossokha, I.; Georgieva, V.

    2012-12-01

    Modified surface properties such as composition, nano roughness, wettability have effect on the most important processes at biomaterial interface. The research of stem cells (MSCs) adhesive potential, morphology, phenotypical characteristics on oxide coated and plastic substrate with different surface parameters was made. The oxide coatings deposition on plastic substrates shifts the surface properties at the more hydrophilic region and results in next positive cell/ biomaterial response in vitro tests. The MSCs marker number increases on the oxide nano structural surface of plastic substrates.

  7. Advanced Production Surface Preparation Technology Development for Ultra-High Pressure Diesel Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, Marion B.

    2012-04-30

    In 2007, An Ultra High Injection Pressure (UHIP) fueling method has been demonstrated by Caterpillar Fuel Systems - Product Development, demonstrating ability to deliver U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) Tier 4 Final diesel engine emission performance with greatly reduced emissions handling components on the engine, such as without NOx reduction after-treatment and with only a through-flow 50% effective diesel particulate trap (DPT). They have shown this capability using multiple multi-cylinder engine tests of an Ultra High Pressure Common Rail (UHPCR) fuel system with higher than traditional levels of CEGR and an advanced injector nozzle design. The system delivered better atomization of the fuel, for more complete burn, to greatly reduce diesel particulates, while CEGR or high efficiency NOx reduction after-treatment handles the NOx. With the reduced back pressure of a traditional DPT, and with the more complete fuel burn, the system reduced levels of fuel consumption by 2.4% for similar delivery of torque and horsepower over the best Tier 4 Interim levels of fuel consumption in the diesel power industry. The challenge is to manufacture the components in high-volume production that can withstand the required higher pressure injection. Production processes must be developed to increase the toughness of the injector steel to withstand the UHIP pulsations and generate near perfect form and finish in the sub-millimeter size geometries within the injector. This project resulted in two developments in 2011. The first development was a process and a machine specification by which a high target of compressive residual stress (CRS) can be consistently imparted to key surfaces of the fuel system to increase the toughness of the steel, and a demonstration of the feasibility of further refinement of the process for use in volume production. The second development was the demonstration of the feasibility of a process for imparting near perfect, durable geometry to

  8. Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiang-Huai.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to conduct extensive studies on the surface reactivity of pyrite by using electrochemical, surface analysis, potentiometric and calorimetric titration, and surface hydrophobicity characterization techniques and to correlate the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface with the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. The products as well as their structure, the mechanisms and the kinetics of the oxidation of coal-pyrite surfaces and their interaction with various chemical reagents will be systematically studied and compared with that of mineral-pyrite and synthetic pyrite to determine the correlation between the surface reactivity of pyrite and the bulk chemical properties of pyrite and impurities. The surface chemical studies and the studies of floatability of coal-pyrite and the effect of various parameters such as grinding media and environment, aging under different atmospheres, etc. on thereof, are directed at identifying the causes and possible solutions of the pyrite rejection problems in coal cleaning.

  9. Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiang-Huai; Leonard, J.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Raichur, A.M.; Jiang, Chengliang.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to conduct extensive studies on the surface reactivity of pyrite by using electrochemical, surface analysis, potentiometric and calorimetric titration, and surface hydrophobicity characterization techniques and to correlate the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface with the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. The products as well as their structure, the mechanisms and the kinetics of the oxidation of coal-pyrite surfaces and their interaction with various chemical reagents will be systematically studied and compared with that of mineral-pyrite and synthetic pyrite to determine the correlation between the surface reactivity of pyrite and the bulk chemical properties of pyrite and impurities. The surface chemical studies and the studies of floatability of coal-pyrite and the effect of various parameters such as grinding media and environment, aging under different atmospheres, etc. on thereof will lead to identifying the causes and possible solutions of the pyrite rejection problems in coal cleaning.

  10. Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiang-Huai.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to conduct extensive studies on the surfaces reactivity of pyrite by using electrochemical, surface analysis, potentiometric and calorimetric titration, and surface hydrophobicity characterization techniques and to correlate the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface with the efficiency of the pyrite rejection in coal flotation. The product as well as their structure, the mechanism and the kinetics of the oxidation of coal-pyrite surfaces and their interaction with various chemical reagents will be systematically studied and compared with that of mineral-pyrite and synthetic pyrite to determine the correlation between the surface reactivity of pyrite and the bulk chemical properties of pyrite and impurities. The surface chemical studies and the studies of floatability of coal-pyrite and the effect of various parameters such as grinding media and environment, aging under different atmospheres, etc., are directed at identifying the cause and possible solutions of the pyrite rejection problems in coal cleaning.

  11. Two-surface plasticity Model and Its Application to Spring-back Simulation of Automotive Advanced High Strength Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taejoon; Seok, Dong-Yoon; Lee, Chul-Hwan; Noma, Nobuyasu; Kuwabara, Toshihiko; Stoughton, Thomas B.; Chung, Kwansoo

    2011-08-01

    A two-surface isotropic-kinematic hardening law was developed based on a two-surface plasticity model previously proposed by Lee et al., (2007, Int. J. Plast. 23, 1189-1212). In order to properly represent the Bauschinger and transient behaviors as well as permanent softening during reverse loading with various pre-strains, both the inner yield surface and the outer bounding surface expand (isotropic hardening) and translate (kinematic hardening) in this two-surface model. As for the permanent softening, both the isotropic hardening and the kinematic hardening evolution of the outer bounding surface were modified by introducing softening parameters. The numerical formulation was also developed based on the incremental plasticity theory and the developed constitutive law was implemented into the commercial finite element program, ABAQUS/Explicit and ABAQUS/Standard using the user-defined material subroutines. In this work, a dual phase (DP) steel was considered as an advanced high strength steel sheet and uni-axial tension tests and uni-axial tension-compression-tension tests were performed for the characterization of the material property. For a validation purpose, the developed two-surface plasticity model was applied to the 2-D draw bending test proposed as a benchmark problem of the NUMISHEET 2011 conference and successfully validated with experiments.

  12. Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.H.; Leonard, J.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Raichur, A.M.; Jiang, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the project is to conduct extensive fundamental studies on the surface reactivity and surface hydrophobicity of coal-pyrites using various surface characterization techniques and to understand how the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface affects the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. During this reporting period, the influence of the impurity content, particularly coal/carbon content, on the electrochemical oxidation of pyrite surfaces was investigated. The studies demonstrate that the coal/carbon content in coal-pyrite has a determining effect on the surface reactivity of pyrite. The oxidation behavior of high carbon-content coal-pyrite is completely different from that of purer coal-pyrite and ore-pyrite. The effects of flotation gases on the flotation behavior of coal and the surface hydrophobicity of various coal-pyrite were investigated. It was found from the lab-scale column flotation studies that among the various gases studied (air, oxygen, argon, nitrogen and carbon dioxide), carbon dioxide produced the best results with a combustible recovery of 90% and ash-content of less than 9 percent. Finally, the surface energetic studies revealed that the surfaces of pyrites and coals produced by wet grinding is more heterogenous than that prepared by dry grinding.

  13. Spatial memory and animal movement.

    PubMed

    Fagan, William F; Lewis, Mark A; Auger-Méthé, Marie; Avgar, Tal; Benhamou, Simon; Breed, Greg; LaDage, Lara; Schlägel, Ulrike E; Tang, Wen-wu; Papastamatiou, Yannis P; Forester, James; Mueller, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Memory is critical to understanding animal movement but has proven challenging to study. Advances in animal tracking technology, theoretical movement models and cognitive sciences have facilitated research in each of these fields, but also created a need for synthetic examination of the linkages between memory and animal movement. Here, we draw together research from several disciplines to understand the relationship between animal memory and movement processes. First, we frame the problem in terms of the characteristics, costs and benefits of memory as outlined in psychology and neuroscience. Next, we provide an overview of the theories and conceptual frameworks that have emerged from behavioural ecology and animal cognition. Third, we turn to movement ecology and summarise recent, rapid developments in the types and quantities of available movement data, and in the statistical measures applicable to such data. Fourth, we discuss the advantages and interrelationships of diverse modelling approaches that have been used to explore the memory-movement interface. Finally, we outline key research challenges for the memory and movement communities, focusing on data needs and mathematical and computational challenges. We conclude with a roadmap for future work in this area, outlining axes along which focused research should yield rapid progress.

  14. Family of Crouzon Syndrome Represents the Evolution of the Frontofacial Monobloc Advancement Technique: From Immediate Movement to Monobloc Distraction to Monobloc Bipartition Distraction.

    PubMed

    Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo; Denadai, Rafael; Ghizoni, Enrico; Buzzo, Celso Luiz; Raposo-Amaral, Cesar Augusto

    2015-09-01

    Crouzon syndrome (CS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by premature fusion of cranial sutures, midface and supraorbital ridge retrusion, exorbitism, and in some clinical scenarios strabismus, parrot-beaked nose, short upper lip and hypertelorbitism. Treatment of CS is overlapped with the beginning of craniofacial surgery and is grounded on morphologic and functional objectives. The authors reported on the outcomes and complications of family members (mother and 2 siblings) with CS, who were operated on by different techniques of frontofacial advancement and have attained skeletal maturity. Operations were performed in different moments throughout the last 3 decades of craniofacial surgery history. A 10-year-old Crouzon progenitor underwent a monobloc osteotomy with acute advancement, using rigid fixation and bone grafting in the osteotomy sites. An 8-year-old Crouzon daughter underwent gradual lengthening of a monobloc segment, using an external, institutionally made distracter device. In addition, a 10-year-old Crouzon son underwent gradual lengthening of a monobloc segment associated to facial bipartition, using an internal distracter device. After 30 years, the mother presented a mild relapse on the orbit level, but her children had satisfactory stable outcomes. The family members with CS have undergone different modifications of the monobloc approach based on different chronological momentum, from acute monobloc advancement, to monobloc distraction, to monobloc facial bipartition distraction. PMID:26267562

  15. Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiang-Huai; Leonard, J.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Raichur, A.M.; Munirathinam, M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to conduct extensive studies on the surface reactivity of pyrite by using electrochemical, surface analysis, potentiometric and calorimetric titration, and surface hydrophobicity characterization techniques and to correlate the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface with the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. The products as well as their structure, the mechanisms and the kinetics of the oxidation of coal-pyrite surfaces and their interaction with various chemical reagents will be systematically studied and compared with that of mineral-pyrite and synthetic pyrite to determine the correlation between the surface reactivity of pyrite and the bulk chemical properties of pyrite and impurities. Four high quality coal pyrite samples from the Illinois No. 6, Kentucky No. 9, Pittsburgh No. 8 and Upper Freeport coal seams, and several high purity mineral pyrite samples were acquired. Synthetic single pyrite crystals (5 mm in size) and microcrystalline pyrite particles (averaging 6 {mu}m in size) were carefully obtained. Surface hydrophobicities of coal- and ore-pyrites have been studied by contact angle titration and film flotation methods. The oxidation and reduction behavior of coal-pyrites, ore-pyrites and synthetic pyrite single crystals have been studied suing electrochemical methods, including cyclic voltammetry, rotating-disc electrode technique, open-circuit potential measurements and steady-polarization measurements. 7 refs., 14 figs.

  16. Advanced flow-polishing and surface metrology of the SO56 X Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The surface finishing of X ray grazing incidence optics is a most demanding area of optical processing, both in terms of metrology and application of optical finishing techniques. An existing optical mirror was processed using a new removal technique that uses a jet of finely dispersed and extremely small particles that impact a surface, which under the correct conditions, produces an ultrasmooth surface, especially on aspheric curvatures. The surfaces of the SO56 mirror are tapered conical shapes that have a continuously changing radius with the primary mirror having a parabolic shape and the secondary mirror a hyperbolic shape. An optical ray trace that was conducted of a telescope used the measured parameters from the existing substrates to set up the prescription for the optical layout. The optimization indicated a wavefront performance of 0.10 A at 0.633 micron.

  17. Further Investigations of High Temperature Knitted Spring Tubes for Advanced Control Surface Seal Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Shawn C.; DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2006-01-01

    Knitted metallic spring tubes are the structural backbones that provide resiliency in control surface seals for use on current and future reusable space launch vehicles. Control surface seals fill the space between movable control surfaces such as body flaps, rudders and elevons, and the static body structures to which they are attached. These seals must remain in continuous contact with opposing surfaces to prevent the ingestion of damaging hot gases encountered during atmospheric re-entry. The Inconel X-750 (Special Metals Corporation) spring tube utilized in the baseline control surface seal shows significant resiliency loss when compressed at temperatures as low as 1200 F. High temperature compression testing and microstructural analysis show that creep is the dominant deformation mechanism leading to permanent set and resiliency loss in tested spring tube samples. Additional evaluation using a structured design of experiments approach shows that spring tube performance, primarily high temperature resiliency, can be enhanced through material substitution of Rene 41 (Allvac) alloy (for the baseline Inconel X-750 material) when coupled with specialized thermal processing.

  18. Recent advances in surface chemistry strategies for the fabrication of functional iron oxide based magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcheniuk, Kostiantyn; Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Kukhar, Valeriy P.; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis of superparamagnetic nanostructures, especially iron-oxide based nanoparticles (IONPs), with appropriate surface functional groups has been intensively researched for many high-technological applications, including high density data storage, biosensing and biomedicine. In medicine, IONPs are nowadays widely used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in hyperthermia therapy, but are also exploited for drug and gene delivery, detoxification of biological fluids or immunoassays, as they are relatively non-toxic. The use of magnetic particles in vivo requires IONPs to have high magnetization values, diameters below 100 nm with overall narrow size distribution and long time stability in biological fluids. Due to the high surface energies of IONPs agglomeration over time is often encountered. It is thus of prime importance to modify their surface to prevent aggregation and to limit non-specific adsorption of biomolecules onto their surface. Such chemical modifications result in IONPs being well-dispersed and biocompatible, and allow for targeted delivery and specific interactions. The chemical nature of IONPs thus determines not only the overall size of the colloid, but also plays a significant role for in vivo and in vitro applications. This review discusses the different concepts currently used for the surface functionalization and coating of iron oxide nanoparticles. The diverse strategies for the covalent linking of drugs, proteins, enzymes, antibodies, and nucleotides will be discussed and the chemically relevant steps will be explained in detail.

  19. Recent advances in yeast cell-surface display technologies for waste biorefineries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuo; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ren, Nan-Qi; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    Waste biorefinery aims to maximize the output of value-added products from various artificial/agricultural wastes by using integrated bioprocesses. To make waste biorefinery economically feasible, it is thus necessary to develop a low-cost, environment-friendly technique to perform simultaneous biodegradation and bioconversion of waste materials. Cell-surface display engineering is a novel, cost-effective technique that can auto-immobilize proteins on the cell exterior of microorganisms, and has been applied for use with waste biofinery. Through tethering different enzymes (e.g., cellulase, lipase, and protease) or metal-binding peptides on cell surfaces, various yeast strains can effectively produce biofuels and biochemicals from sugar/protein-rich waste materials, catalyze waste oils into biodiesels, or retrieve heavy metals from wastewater. This review critically summarizes recent applications of yeast cell-surface display on various types of waste biorefineries, highlighting its potential and future challenges with regard to commercializing this technology. PMID:27039354

  20. Recent advances in yeast cell-surface display technologies for waste biorefineries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuo; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ren, Nan-Qi; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    Waste biorefinery aims to maximize the output of value-added products from various artificial/agricultural wastes by using integrated bioprocesses. To make waste biorefinery economically feasible, it is thus necessary to develop a low-cost, environment-friendly technique to perform simultaneous biodegradation and bioconversion of waste materials. Cell-surface display engineering is a novel, cost-effective technique that can auto-immobilize proteins on the cell exterior of microorganisms, and has been applied for use with waste biofinery. Through tethering different enzymes (e.g., cellulase, lipase, and protease) or metal-binding peptides on cell surfaces, various yeast strains can effectively produce biofuels and biochemicals from sugar/protein-rich waste materials, catalyze waste oils into biodiesels, or retrieve heavy metals from wastewater. This review critically summarizes recent applications of yeast cell-surface display on various types of waste biorefineries, highlighting its potential and future challenges with regard to commercializing this technology.

  1. Pioneers of eye movement research.

    PubMed

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the technology affording eye movement recordings carry the risk of neglecting past achievements. Without the assistance of this modern armoury, great strides were made in describing the ways the eyes move. For Aristotle the fundamental features of eye movements were binocular, and he described the combined functions of the eyes. This was later given support using simple procedures like placing a finger over the eyelid of the closed eye and culminated in Hering's law of equal innervation. However, the overriding concern in the 19th century was with eye position rather than eye movements. Appreciating discontinuities of eye movements arose from studies of vertigo. The characteristics of nystagmus were recorded before those of saccades and fixations. Eye movements during reading were described by Hering and by Lamare in 1879; both used similar techniques of listening to sounds made during contractions of the extraocular muscles. Photographic records of eye movements during reading were made by Dodge early in the 20th century, and this stimulated research using a wider array of patterns. In the mid-20th century attention shifted to the stability of the eyes during fixation, with the emphasis on involuntary movements. The contributions of pioneers from Aristotle to Yarbus are outlined.

  2. Pioneers of eye movement research

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the technology affording eye movement recordings carry the risk of neglecting past achievements. Without the assistance of this modern armoury, great strides were made in describing the ways the eyes move. For Aristotle the fundamental features of eye movements were binocular, and he described the combined functions of the eyes. This was later given support using simple procedures like placing a finger over the eyelid of the closed eye and culminated in Hering's law of equal innervation. However, the overriding concern in the 19th century was with eye position rather than eye movements. Appreciating discontinuities of eye movements arose from studies of vertigo. The characteristics of nystagmus were recorded before those of saccades and fixations. Eye movements during reading were described by Hering and by Lamare in 1879; both used similar techniques of listening to sounds made during contractions of the extraocular muscles. Photographic records of eye movements during reading were made by Dodge early in the 20th century, and this stimulated research using a wider array of patterns. In the mid-20th century attention shifted to the stability of the eyes during fixation, with the emphasis on involuntary movements. The contributions of pioneers from Aristotle to Yarbus are outlined. PMID:23396982

  3. Recent advances in superhydrophobic surfaces and their relevance to biology and medicine.

    PubMed

    Ciasca, G; Papi, M; Businaro, L; Campi, G; Ortolani, M; Palmieri, V; Cedola, A; De Ninno, A; Gerardino, A; Maulucci, G; De Spirito, M

    2016-02-01

    By mimicking naturally occurring superhydrophobic surfaces, scientists can now realize artificial surfaces on which droplets of a few microliters of water are forced to assume an almost spherical shape and an extremely high contact angle. In recent decades, these surfaces have attracted much attention due to their technological applications for anti-wetting and self-cleaning materials. Very recently, researchers have shifted their interest to investigate whether superhydrophobic surfaces can be exploited to study biological systems. This research effort has stimulated the design and realization of new devices that allow us to actively organize, visualize and manipulate matter at both the microscale and nanoscale levels. Such precise control opens up wide applications in biomedicine, as it allows us to directly manipulate objects at the typical length scale of cells and macromolecules. This progress report focuses on recent biological and medical applications of superhydrophobicity. Particular regard is paid to those applications that involve the detection, manipulation and study of extremely small quantities of molecules, and to those that allow high throughput cell and biomaterial screening. PMID:26844980

  4. Evaluation of advanced lubricants for aircraft applications using gear surface fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.; Shimski, John

    1991-01-01

    Surface pitting fatigue life tests were conducted with five lubricants, using spur gears made from a single lot of consumable-electrode vacuum melted (CVM) AISI 9310 steel. The gears were case carbonized and hardened to a Rockwell c-60 and finish ground. The gear pitch diameter was 8.89 cm. The lot of gears was divided into five groups, each of which was tested with a different lubricant. The test lubricants can be classified as synthetic polyol-esters with various viscosities and additive packages. Test conditions included bulk gear temperature of 350 K, a maximum Hertz stress of 1.71 GPa (248 ksi) at the pitch line, and a speed of 10,000 RPM. The lubricant with a viscosity that provided a specific film thickness greater than one and with an additive package produced far greater gear surface fatigue lives than lubricants with a viscosity that provided specific film thickness less than one. A low viscosity lubricant with an additive package produced gear surface fatigue lives equivalent to a similar base stock lubricant with 30 percent higher viscosity, but without an additive package. Lubricants with the same viscosity and similar additive packages gave equivalent gear surface fatigue lives.

  5. Boundary layer drag reduction research hypotheses derived from bio-inspired surface and recent advanced applications.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuehao; Yuan, Lu; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Jianshe

    2015-12-01

    Nature has supplied the inexhaustible resources for mankind, and at the same time, it has also progressively developed into the school for scientists and engineers. Through more than four billions years of rigorous and stringent evolution, different creatures in nature gradually exhibit their own special and fascinating biological functional surfaces. For example, sharkskin has the potential drag-reducing effect in turbulence, lotus leaf possesses the self-cleaning and anti-foiling function, gecko feet have the controllable super-adhesion surfaces, the flexible skin of dolphin can accelerate its swimming velocity. Great profits of applying biological functional surfaces in daily life, industry, transportation and agriculture have been achieved so far, and much attention from all over the world has been attracted and focused on this field. In this overview, the bio-inspired drag-reducing mechanism derived from sharkskin is explained and explored comprehensively from different aspects, and then the main applications in different fluid engineering are demonstrated in brief. This overview will inevitably improve the comprehension of the drag reduction mechanism of sharkskin surface and better understand the recent applications in fluid engineering. PMID:26348428

  6. Advanced Rotating Biological Surface Operation. Training Module 2.122.4.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulson, W. L.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with operation and maintenance of a rotating biological surface (RBS) wastewater treatment system. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts, and transparency masters. This is the third level of a three module series and…

  7. Boundary layer drag reduction research hypotheses derived from bio-inspired surface and recent advanced applications.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuehao; Yuan, Lu; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Jianshe

    2015-12-01

    Nature has supplied the inexhaustible resources for mankind, and at the same time, it has also progressively developed into the school for scientists and engineers. Through more than four billions years of rigorous and stringent evolution, different creatures in nature gradually exhibit their own special and fascinating biological functional surfaces. For example, sharkskin has the potential drag-reducing effect in turbulence, lotus leaf possesses the self-cleaning and anti-foiling function, gecko feet have the controllable super-adhesion surfaces, the flexible skin of dolphin can accelerate its swimming velocity. Great profits of applying biological functional surfaces in daily life, industry, transportation and agriculture have been achieved so far, and much attention from all over the world has been attracted and focused on this field. In this overview, the bio-inspired drag-reducing mechanism derived from sharkskin is explained and explored comprehensively from different aspects, and then the main applications in different fluid engineering are demonstrated in brief. This overview will inevitably improve the comprehension of the drag reduction mechanism of sharkskin surface and better understand the recent applications in fluid engineering.

  8. Recent advances in the control of form and texture on free-form surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. D.; Beaucamp, A. T.; Doubrovski, V.; Dunn, C.; Freeman, R.; Hobbs, G.; McCavana, G.; Morton, R.; Riley, D.; Simms, J.; Wei, X.

    2005-10-01

    The recent upsurge in the demand for off-axis and complex "freeform" optical surfaces is driving the development of novel processes for their fabrication. This paper focuses on recent developments of the Precessions CNC polishing process for freeform surfaces, including off-axis as a special case. First, the surface-prescription and metrology-data, and their relation to the data-input for the polishing machines, are considered. The relevance of consistent coordinate frames is emphasised. An outline of how the process can 'polish' a ground freeform part (improve the texture), and then 'figure' the part (reduce the form errors) is given. Specific experimental case-studies are then presented, illustrating the versatility of the process on different materials and forms. Recent work is included in which the process-speed has been moderated in order to remove tens of nanometres of stock material, rather then the more usual hundreds of nanometres to tens of microns as in the standard Precessions process. The relevance of this to improving the ultimate surface-precision that should be achievable by this method is described. As a final illustration, the potential of the process to the rapid fabrication of the hundreds to thousands of 1-2 metre class mirror segments required for extremely large telescopes is considered.

  9. Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiang-Huai; Leonard, J.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Jiang, Chengliang; Raichur, A.M.

    1992-07-14

    The objective of this project is to conduct extensive studies on the surface reactivity and surface hydrophobicity of coal-pyrites using various surface characterization techniques and to correlate the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface with the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. The flotation characteristics of coal-pyrites under various conditions was studied and compared with ore-pyrite and coal to determine the causes of pyrite rejection difficulties in coal flotation. Both the native and induced floatabilities of pyrites were investigated. It was found that both coal- and ore-pyrites, ff prepared by dry-grinding, show little or no floatability in the absence of any chemical reagents. After ultrasonic pretreatment, ore-pyrite floats effectively in the acidic to neutral pH range. Kentucky No. 9 coal-pyrite (KYPY) shows significant flotation in the pH range 7--10. With ethyl xanthate as collector, ore-pyrite floats well up to pH = 10; while coal-pyrite reveals no flotation above pH = 6. For the first time, the effect of coal collector on the floatability of coal-pyrite has been studied. It was shown that in the presence of fuel oil--a widely used collector for promoting coal flotation, coal-pyrite, particularly for the fine sizes, shows good flotation below pH = 11, whereas ore-pyrite has no or little floatability. These studies demonstrate that one of the main causes of the coal-pyrite flotation in coal separation is the oil-induced floatability due to adsorption/attachment of oil droplets on the coal-pyrite surfaces, the native'' or self-induced'' floatability of pyrite is no as profound as the oil-induced flotation.

  10. Advanced Liquid Cooling for a Traction Drive Inverter Using Jet Impingement and Microfinned Enhanced Surfaces: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S. K.; Narumanchi, S.; Mihalic, M.; Moreno, G.; Bennion, K.; Jeffers, J.

    2014-08-01

    Jet impingement on plain and micro-finned enhanced surfaces was compared to a traditional channel flow configuration. The jets provide localized cooling to areas heated by the insulated-gate bipolar transistor and diode devices. Enhanced microfinned surfaces increase surface area and thermal performance. Using lighter materials and designing the fluid path to manage pressure losses increases overall performance while reducing weight, volume, and cost. Powering four diodes in the center power module of the inverter and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to characterize the baseline as well as jet-impingement-based heat exchangers. CFD modeling showed the thermal performance improvements should hold for a fully powered inverter. Increased thermal performance was observed for the jet-impingement configurations when tested at full inverter power (40 to 100 kW output power) on a dynamometer. The reliability of the jets and enhanced surfaces over time was also investigated. Experimentally, the junction-to- coolant thermal resistance was reduced by up to 12.5% for jet impingement on enhanced surfaces s compared to the baseline channel flow configuration. Base plate-to-coolant (convective) resistance was reduced by up to 37.0% for the jet-based configuration compared to the baseline, suggesting that while improvements to the cooling side reduce overall resistance, reducing the passive stack resistance may contribute to lowering overall junction-to-coolant resistance. Full inverter power testing showed reduced thermal resistance from the middle of the module baseplate to coolant of up to 16.5%. Between the improvement in thermal performance and pumping power, the coefficient of performance improved by up to 13% for the jet-based configuration.

  11. An analogue study of the influence of solidification on the advance and surface thermal signature of lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garel, F.; Kaminski, E.; Tait, S.; Limare, A.

    2014-06-01

    The prediction of lava flow advance and velocity is crucial during an effusive volcanic crisis. The effusion rate is a key control of lava dynamics, and proxies have been developed to estimate it in near real-time. The thermal proxy in predominant use links the satellite-measured thermal radiated power to the effusion rate. It lacks however a robust physical basis to allow time-dependent modeling. We investigate here through analogue experiments the coupling between the spreading of a solidifying flow and its surface thermal signal. We extract a first order behavior from experimental results obtained using polyethylene glycol (PEG) wax, that solidifies abruptly during cooling. We find that the flow advance is discontinuous, with relatively low supply rates yielding long stagnation phases and compound flows. Flows with higher supply rates are less sensitive to solidification and display a spreading behavior closer to that of purely viscous currents. The total power radiated from the upper surface also grows by stages, but the signal radiated by the hottest and liquid part of the flow reaches a quasi-steady state after some time. This plateau value scales around half of the theoretical prediction of a model developed previously for the spreading and cooling of isoviscous gravity currents. The corrected scaling yields satisfying estimates of the effusion rate from the total radiated power measured on a range of basaltic lava flows. We conclude that a gross estimate of the supply rate of solidifying flows can be retrieved from thermal remote-sensing, but the predictions of lava advance as a function of effusion rate appears a more difficult task due to chaotic emplacement of solidifying flows.

  12. Modern methods for investigating functional surfaces of advanced materials by mechanical contact testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrzhik, M. I.; Levashov, E. A.

    2007-11-01

    Modern methods for determining the hardness, Young’s modulus, elastic recovery, adhesive/cohesive strength, friction coefficient, and wear resistance of thin films, coatings, multilayer materials, and bulk materials are considered. The experimental data obtained in instrumented indentation, instrumented scratching, and tribological tests of nanostructured and quasicrystalline coatings and composite materials are analyzed. It is noted that the elastic recovery of a number of advanced materials is higher than the elastic recovery of metal alloys by a factor of 2-3. The coefficients of sliding friction of sintered samples and thin films containing Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystals are found to be relatively low. An increase in the fraction of quasicrystalline particles to 30% in composites with an aluminum matrix leads to an increase in the wear resistance.

  13. Advanced photoelectric effect experiment beamline at Elettra: A surface science laboratory coupled with Synchrotron Radiation.

    PubMed

    Panaccione, G; Vobornik, I; Fujii, J; Krizmancic, D; Annese, E; Giovanelli, L; Maccherozzi, F; Salvador, F; De Luisa, A; Benedetti, D; Gruden, A; Bertoch, P; Polack, F; Cocco, D; Sostero, G; Diviacco, B; Hochstrasser, M; Maier, U; Pescia, D; Back, C H; Greber, T; Osterwalder, J; Galaktionov, M; Sancrotti, M; Rossi, G

    2009-04-01

    We report the main characteristics of the advanced photoelectric effect experiments beamline, operational at Elettra storage ring, featuring a fully independent double branch scheme obtained by the use of chicane undulators and able to keep polarization control in both linear and circular mode. The paper describes the novel technical solutions adopted, namely, (a) the design of a quasiperiodic undulator resulting in optimized suppression of higher harmonics over a large photon energy range (10-100 eV), (b) the thermal stability of optics under high heat load via cryocoolers, and (c) the end station interconnected setup allowing full access to off-beam and on-beam facilities and, at the same time, the integration of users' specialized sample growth chambers or modules.

  14. Advanced photoelectric effect experiment beamline at Elettra: A surface science laboratory coupled with Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Panaccione, G.; Vobornik, I.; Fujii, J.; Krizmancic, D.; Annese, E.; Giovanelli, L.; Maccherozzi, F.; Salvador, F.; De Luisa, A.; Benedetti, D.; Gruden, A.; Bertoch, P.; Rossi, G.; Polack, F.; Cocco, D.; Sostero, G.; Diviacco, B.; Hochstrasser, M.; Maier, U.; Pescia, D.; and others

    2009-04-15

    We report the main characteristics of the advanced photoelectric effect experiments beamline, operational at Elettra storage ring, featuring a fully independent double branch scheme obtained by the use of chicane undulators and able to keep polarization control in both linear and circular mode. The paper describes the novel technical solutions adopted, namely, (a) the design of a quasiperiodic undulator resulting in optimized suppression of higher harmonics over a large photon energy range (10-100 eV), (b) the thermal stability of optics under high heat load via cryocoolers, and (c) the end station interconnected setup allowing full access to off-beam and on-beam facilities and, at the same time, the integration of users' specialized sample growth chambers or modules.

  15. Advances in the theory and application of BSF cells. [Back Surface Field solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandelkorn, J.; Lamneck, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    A study to determine the influence of fabrication processes and bulk material properties on the behavior of back surface field (BSF) cells is reported. It is concluded that a photovoltage is generated at the p(+), p back junction of the cell. The concept of majority carrier collection is proposed as a possible mechanism for this generation. Advantages accruing to the advent of BSF cells are outlined.

  16. Atomic step-and-terrace surface of polyimide sheet for advanced polymer substrate engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, G.; Shimada, K.; Nozawa, Y.; Kaneko, S.; Urakami, T.; Koyama, K.; Komura, M.; Matsuda, A.; Yoshimoto, M.

    2016-07-01

    Typical thermostable and flexible polyimide polymers exhibit many excellent properties such as strong mechanical and chemical resistance. However, in contrast to single-crystal substrates like silicon or sapphire, polymers mostly display disordered and rough surfaces, which may result in instability and degradation of the interfaces between thin films and polymer substrates. As a step toward the development of next-generation polymer substrates, we here report single-atom-layer imprinting onto the polyimide sheets, resulting in an ultrasmooth 0.3 nm high atomic step-and-terrace surface on the polyimides. The ultrasmooth polymer substrates are expected to be applied to the fabrication of nanostructures such as superlattices, nanowires, or quantum dots in nanoscale-controlled electronic devices. We fabricate smooth and atomically stepped indium tin oxide transparent conducting oxide thin films on the imprinted polyimide sheets for future use in organic-based optoelectronic devices processed with nanoscale precision. Furthermore, toward 2D polymer substrate nanoengineering, we demonstrate nanoscale letter writing on the atomic step-and-terrace polyimide surface via atomic force microscopy probe scratching.

  17. Active optical system for advanced 3D surface structuring by laser remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütsch, O.; Temmler, A.; Stollenwerk, J.; Willenborg, E.; Loosen, P.

    2015-03-01

    Structuring by laser remelting enables completely new possibilities for designing surfaces since material is redistributed but not wasted. In addition to technological advantages, cost and time benefits yield from shortened process times, the avoidance of harmful chemicals and the elimination of subsequent finishing steps such as cleaning and polishing. The functional principle requires a completely new optical machine technology that maintains the spatial and temporal superposition and manipulation of three different laser beams emitted from two laser sources of different wavelength. The optical system has already been developed and demonstrated for the processing of flat samples of hot and cold working steel. However, since particularly the structuring of 3D-injection molds represents an application example of high innovation potential, the optical system has to take into account the elliptical beam geometry that occurs when the laser beams irradiate a curved surface. To take full advantage of structuring by remelting for the processing of 3D surfaces, additional optical functionality, called EPS (elliptical pre-shaping) has to be integrated into the existing set-up. The development of the beam shaping devices not only requires the analysis of the mechanisms of the beam projection but also a suitable optical design. Both aspects are discussed in this paper.

  18. Recent advances on surface engineering of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and their biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ajay Kumar; Naregalkar, Rohan R; Vaidya, Vikas Deep; Gupta, Mona

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles with appropriate surface coatings are increasingly being used clinically for various biomedical applications, such as magnetic resonance imaging, hyperthermia, drug delivery, tissue repair, cell and tissue targeting and transfection. This is because of the nontoxicity and biocompatibility demand that mainly iron oxide-based materials are predominantly used, despite some attempts to develop 'more magnetic nanomaterials' based on cobalt, nickel, gadolinium and other compounds. For all these applications, the material used for surface coating of the magnetic particles must not only be nontoxic and biocompatible but also allow a targetable delivery with particle localization in a specific area. Magnetic nanoparticles can bind to drugs and an external magnetic field can be applied to trap them in the target site. By attaching the targeting molecules, such as proteins or antibodies, at particles surfaces, the latter may be directed to any cell, tissue or tumor in the body. In this review, different polymers/molecules that can be used for nanoparticle coating to stabilize the suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles under in vitro and in vivo situations are discussed. Some selected proteins/targeting ligands that could be used for derivatizing magnetic nanoparticles are also explored. We have reviewed the various biomedical applications with some of the most recent uses of magnetic nanoparticles for early detection of cancer, diabetes and atherosclerosis.

  19. Atomic step-and-terrace surface of polyimide sheet for advanced polymer substrate engineering.

    PubMed

    Tan, G; Shimada, K; Nozawa, Y; Kaneko, S; Urakami, T; Koyama, K; Komura, M; Matsuda, A; Yoshimoto, M

    2016-07-22

    Typical thermostable and flexible polyimide polymers exhibit many excellent properties such as strong mechanical and chemical resistance. However, in contrast to single-crystal substrates like silicon or sapphire, polymers mostly display disordered and rough surfaces, which may result in instability and degradation of the interfaces between thin films and polymer substrates. As a step toward the development of next-generation polymer substrates, we here report single-atom-layer imprinting onto the polyimide sheets, resulting in an ultrasmooth 0.3 nm high atomic step-and-terrace surface on the polyimides. The ultrasmooth polymer substrates are expected to be applied to the fabrication of nanostructures such as superlattices, nanowires, or quantum dots in nanoscale-controlled electronic devices. We fabricate smooth and atomically stepped indium tin oxide transparent conducting oxide thin films on the imprinted polyimide sheets for future use in organic-based optoelectronic devices processed with nanoscale precision. Furthermore, toward 2D polymer substrate nanoengineering, we demonstrate nanoscale letter writing on the atomic step-and-terrace polyimide surface via atomic force microscopy probe scratching. PMID:27284690

  20. Advanced Surface and Microstructural Characterization of Natural Graphite Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gallego, Nidia C; Contescu, Cristian I; Meyer III, Harry M; Howe, Jane Y; Meisner, Roberta Ann; Payzant, E Andrew; Lance, Michael J; Yoon, Steve; Denlinger, Matthew; Wood III, David L

    2014-01-01

    Natural graphite powders were subjected to a series of thermal treatments in order to improve the anode irreversible capacity loss (ICL) and capacity retention during long-term cycling of lithium ion batteries. A baseline thermal treatment in inert Ar or N2 atmosphere was compared to cases with a proprietary additive to the furnace gas environment. This additive substantially altered the surface chemistry of the natural graphite powders and resulted in significantly improved long-term cycling performance of the lithium ion batteries over the commercial natural graphite baseline. Different heat-treatment temperatures were investigated ranging from 950-2900 C with the intent of achieving the desired long-term cycling performance with as low of a maximum temperature and thermal budget as possible. A detailed summary of the characterization data is also presented, which includes X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and temperature-programed desorption mass spectroscopy (TPD-MS). This characterization data was correlated to the observed capacity fade improvements over the course of long-term cycling at high charge-discharge rates in full lithium-ion coin cells. It is believed that the long-term performance improvements are a result of forming a more stable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer on the anode graphite surfaces, which is directly related to the surface chemistry modifications imparted by the proprietary gas environment during thermal treatment.

  1. Advanced oxidation technology with photohydroionization as a surface treatment for controlling Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel surfaces and ready-to-eat cheese and turkey.

    PubMed

    Saini, Jasdeep K; Marsden, James L; Getty, Kelly J K; Fung, Daniel Y C

    2014-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is difficult to control in food and processing environments due to its widespread nature and ability to survive in a range of adverse conditions, including low temperatures, pH, and high salt concentrations. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Photohydroionization™ (PHI; RGF Environmental Group, Inc., Riviera, Beach, FL), a novel advanced oxidation technology, as a surface treatment to control L. monocytogenes on food-contact surfaces, sliced American cheese, and ready-to-eat (RTE) turkey. A five-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes was used to inoculate sample surfaces. Food-contact surfaces were exposed to ultraviolet and other oxidative gases produced by the PHI system for 10, 20, 30, 45, 60, and 120 s and 5, 10, and 15 min; cheese and turkey samples were treated for 30, 60, and 120 s and 5 min. For each matrix at each time point, seven samples were treated and enumerated by plating appropriate dilutions onto modified oxford medium and thin-agar-layer modified oxford medium. Results showed reductions (p<0.05) in L. monocytogenes: 4.37 log colony-forming units (CFU)/coupon on stainless steel after 15-min treatment. A 1.39 and 1.63 log CFU/sample after 120 s and 2.16 and 2.52 log CFU/sample after 5 min were seen on American cheese and ready-to-eat turkey, respectively. Lipid oxidation analyses performed on cheese and turkey samples indicated that PHI treatment did not affect (p>0.05) thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances values. This study demonstrates the efficacy of PHI treatment to reduce L. monocytogenes on stainless steel and RTE foods and may serve as a processing intervention to ensure safe production of food.

  2. Simulating carbon exchange using a regional atmospheric model coupled to an advanced land-surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter Maat, H. W.; Hutjes, R. W. A.; Miglietta, F.; Gioli, B.; Bosveld, F. C.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Fritsch, H.

    2010-08-01

    This paper is a case study to investigate what the main controlling factors are that determine atmospheric carbon dioxide content for a region in the centre of The Netherlands. We use the Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS), coupled with a land surface scheme simulating carbon, heat and momentum fluxes (SWAPS-C), and including also submodels for urban and marine fluxes, which in principle should include the dominant mechanisms and should be able to capture the relevant dynamics of the system. To validate the model, observations are used that were taken during an intensive observational campaign in central Netherlands in summer 2002. These include flux-tower observations and aircraft observations of vertical profiles and spatial fluxes of various variables. The simulations performed with the coupled regional model (RAMS-SWAPS-C) are in good qualitative agreement with the observations. The station validation of the model demonstrates that the incoming shortwave radiation and surface fluxes of water and CO2 are well simulated. The comparison against aircraft data shows that the regional meteorology (i.e. wind, temperature) is captured well by the model. Comparing spatially explicitly simulated fluxes with aircraft observed fluxes we conclude that in general latent heat fluxes are underestimated by the model compared to the observations but that the latter exhibit large variability within all flights. Sensitivity experiments demonstrate the relevance of the urban emissions of carbon dioxide for the carbon balance in this particular region. The same tests also show the relation between uncertainties in surface fluxes and those in atmospheric concentrations.

  3. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-06-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology–based society.

  4. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-06-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology-based society.

  5. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology.

    PubMed

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J

    2016-06-28

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology-based society. PMID:27317740

  6. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology.

    PubMed

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J

    2016-06-28

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology-based society.

  7. Surface renewal: an advanced micrometeorological method for measuring and processing field-scale energy flux density data.

    PubMed

    McElrone, Andrew J; Shapland, Thomas M; Calderon, Arturo; Fitzmaurice, Li; Paw U, Kyaw Tha; Snyder, Richard L

    2013-12-12

    Advanced micrometeorological methods have become increasingly important in soil, crop, and environmental sciences. For many scientists without formal training in atmospheric science, these techniques are relatively inaccessible. Surface renewal and other flux measurement methods require an understanding of boundary layer meteorology and extensive training in instrumentation and multiple data management programs. To improve accessibility of these techniques, we describe the underlying theory of surface renewal measurements, demonstrate how to set up a field station for surface renewal with eddy covariance calibration, and utilize our open-source turnkey data logger program to perform flux data acquisition and processing. The new turnkey program returns to the user a simple data table with the corrected fluxes and quality control parameters, and eliminates the need for researchers to shuttle between multiple processing programs to obtain the final flux data. An example of data generated from these measurements demonstrates how crop water use is measured with this technique. The output information is useful to growers for making irrigation decisions in a variety of agricultural ecosystems. These stations are currently deployed in numerous field experiments by researchers in our group and the California Department of Water Resources in the following crops: rice, wine and raisin grape vineyards, alfalfa, almond, walnut, peach, lemon, avocado, and corn.

  8. Surface renewal: an advanced micrometeorological method for measuring and processing field-scale energy flux density data.

    PubMed

    McElrone, Andrew J; Shapland, Thomas M; Calderon, Arturo; Fitzmaurice, Li; Paw U, Kyaw Tha; Snyder, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    Advanced micrometeorological methods have become increasingly important in soil, crop, and environmental sciences. For many scientists without formal training in atmospheric science, these techniques are relatively inaccessible. Surface renewal and other flux measurement methods require an understanding of boundary layer meteorology and extensive training in instrumentation and multiple data management programs. To improve accessibility of these techniques, we describe the underlying theory of surface renewal measurements, demonstrate how to set up a field station for surface renewal with eddy covariance calibration, and utilize our open-source turnkey data logger program to perform flux data acquisition and processing. The new turnkey program returns to the user a simple data table with the corrected fluxes and quality control parameters, and eliminates the need for researchers to shuttle between multiple processing programs to obtain the final flux data. An example of data generated from these measurements demonstrates how crop water use is measured with this technique. The output information is useful to growers for making irrigation decisions in a variety of agricultural ecosystems. These stations are currently deployed in numerous field experiments by researchers in our group and the California Department of Water Resources in the following crops: rice, wine and raisin grape vineyards, alfalfa, almond, walnut, peach, lemon, avocado, and corn. PMID:24378712

  9. Surface Renewal: An Advanced Micrometeorological Method for Measuring and Processing Field-Scale Energy Flux Density Data

    PubMed Central

    McElrone, Andrew J.; Shapland, Thomas M.; Calderon, Arturo; Fitzmaurice, Li; Paw U, Kyaw Tha; Snyder, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced micrometeorological methods have become increasingly important in soil, crop, and environmental sciences. For many scientists without formal training in atmospheric science, these techniques are relatively inaccessible. Surface renewal and other flux measurement methods require an understanding of boundary layer meteorology and extensive training in instrumentation and multiple data management programs. To improve accessibility of these techniques, we describe the underlying theory of surface renewal measurements, demonstrate how to set up a field station for surface renewal with eddy covariance calibration, and utilize our open-source turnkey data logger program to perform flux data acquisition and processing. The new turnkey program returns to the user a simple data table with the corrected fluxes and quality control parameters, and eliminates the need for researchers to shuttle between multiple processing programs to obtain the final flux data. An example of data generated from these measurements demonstrates how crop water use is measured with this technique. The output information is useful to growers for making irrigation decisions in a variety of agricultural ecosystems. These stations are currently deployed in numerous field experiments by researchers in our group and the California Department of Water Resources in the following crops: rice, wine and raisin grape vineyards, alfalfa, almond, walnut, peach, lemon, avocado, and corn. PMID:24378712

  10. Femtosecond And Picosecond Laser Ablation Of Intraocular Lenses: An Advanced Technique For Their Surface Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, A. A.; Makropoulou, M.; Spyratou, E.; Bacharis, C.; Barberoglou, M.; Englezis, A.; Kalpouzos, C.; Loukakos, P.; Pouli, P.

    2011-09-01

    Ophthalmology is entering a very interesting period with new diffractive multifocals, improved refractive multifocals, and accommodative lenses, all coming out at the same time. A new diffractive-refractive design for providing intermediated vision is apodization. In an apodized pattern, physical diffractive step heights are reduced in height, in an almost continuously varying manner. This study is aimed to investigate the use of ultrashort laser pulses to ablate the surface of intraocular lenses, and thus provide an alternative to conventional techniques. Ablation experiments were performed on hydrophilic and hydrophobic intraocular lenses (IOLs). The samples were irradiated with a Ti:Sapphire laser at λ = 0.785 μm, pulse duration 150 fs, repetition rate 1 kHz and with a Nd:YAG 4ω laser at λ = 0.266 μm, pulse duration 155 ps, repetition rate 10 Hz. We investigated the ablation efficiency and the surface modification with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The experimental results and the theoretical assumptions on the relevant ablation mechanism are discussed.

  11. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine: Parasitic Loss Control through Surface Modification

    SciTech Connect

    Farshid Sadeghi; Chin-Pei Wang

    2008-12-31

    This report presents results of our investigation on parasitic loss control through surface modification in reciprocating engine. In order to achieve the objectives several experimental and corresponding analytical models were designed and developed to corroborate our results. Four different test rigs were designed and developed to simulate the contact between the piston ring and cylinder liner (PRCL) contact. The Reciprocating Piston Test Rig (RPTR) is a novel suspended liner test apparatus which can be used to accurately measure the friction force and side load at the piston-cylinder interface. A mixed lubrication model for the complete ring-pack and piston skirt was developed to correlate with the experimental measurements. Comparisons between the experimental and analytical results showed good agreement. The results revealed that in the reciprocating engines higher friction occur near TDC and BDC of the stroke due to the extremely low piston speed resulting in boundary lubrication. A Small Engine Dynamometer Test Rig was also designed and developed to enable testing of cylinder liner under motored and fired conditions. Results of this study provide a baseline from which to measure the effect of surface modifications. The Pin on Disk Test Rig (POD) was used in a flat-on-flat configuration to study the friction effect of CNC machining circular pockets and laser micro-dimples. The results show that large and shallow circular pockets resulted in significant friction reduction. Deep circular pockets did not provide much load support. The Reciprocating Liner Test Rig (RLTR) was designed to simplifying the contact at the PRCL interface. Accurate measurement of friction was obtained using 3-axis piezoelectric force transducer. Two fiber optic sensors were used to measure the film thickness precisely. The results show that the friction force is reduced through the use of modified surfaces. The Shear Driven Test Rig (SDTR) was designed to simulate the mechanism of the

  12. Advanced surface-enhanced Raman gene probe systems and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2001-01-01

    The subject invention is a series of methods and systems for using the Surface-Enhanced Raman (SER)-labeled Gene Probe for hybridization, detection and identification of SER-labeled hybridized target oligonucleotide material comprising the steps of immobilizing SER-labeled hybridized target oligonucleotide material on a support means, wherein the SER-labeled hybridized target oligonucleotide material comprise a SER label attached either to a target oligonucleotide of unknown sequence or to a gene probe of known sequence complementary to the target oligonucleotide sequence, the SER label is unique for the target oligonucleotide strands of a particular sequence wherein the SER-labeled oligonucleotide is hybridized to its complementary oligonucleotide strand, then the support means having the SER-labeled hybridized target oligonucleotide material adsorbed thereon is SERS activated with a SERS activating means, then the support means is analyzed.

  13. Recent Advances in Power Conversion and Heat Rejection Technology for Fission Surface Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee

    2010-01-01

    Under the Exploration Technology Development Program, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) are jointly developing Fission Surface Power (FSP) technology for possible use in human missions to the Moon and Mars. A preliminary reference concept was generated to guide FSP technology development. The concept consists of a liquid-metal-cooled reactor, Stirling power conversion, and water heat rejection, with Brayton power conversion as a backup option. The FSP project has begun risk reduction activities on some key components with the eventual goal of conducting an end-to-end, non-nuclear, integrated system test. Several power conversion and heat rejection hardware prototypes have been built and tested. These include multi-kilowatt Stirling and Brayton power conversion units, titanium-water heat pipes, and composite radiator panels.

  14. Elementary steps at the surface of ice crystals visualized by advanced optical microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sazaki, Gen; Zepeda, Salvador; Nakatsubo, Shunichi; Yokoyama, Etsuro; Furukawa, Yoshinori

    2010-01-01

    Due to the abundance of ice on earth, the phase transition of ice plays crucially important roles in various phenomena in nature. Hence, the molecular-level understanding of ice crystal surfaces holds the key to unlocking the secrets of a number of fields. In this study we demonstrate, by laser confocal microscopy combined with differential interference contrast microscopy, that elementary steps (the growing ends of ubiquitous molecular layers with the minimum height) of ice crystals and their dynamic behavior can be visualized directly at air-ice interfaces. We observed the appearance and lateral growth of two-dimensional islands on ice crystal surfaces. When the steps of neighboring two-dimensional islands coalesced, the contrast of the steps always disappeared completely. We were able to discount the occurrence of steps too small to detect directly because we never observed the associated phenomena that would indicate their presence. In addition, classical two-dimensional nucleation theory does not support the appearance of multilayered two-dimensional islands. Hence, we concluded that two-dimensional islands with elementary height (0.37 and 0.39 nm on basal and prism faces, respectively) were visualized by our optical microscopy. On basal and prism faces, we also observed the spiral growth steps generated by screw dislocations. The distance between adjacent spiral steps on a prism face was about 1/20 of that on a basal face. Hence, the step ledge energy of a prism face was 1/20 of that on a basal face, in accord with the known lower-temperature roughening transition of the prism face. PMID:20974928

  15. Maximizing the Use of Satellite Thermal Infrared Data for Advancing Land Surface Temperature Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Q.; Fu, P.; Gao, F.

    2014-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a crucial parameter in investigating environmental, ecological processes and climate change at various scales, and is also valuable in the studies of evapotranspiration, soil moisture conditions, surface energy balance, and urban heat islands. These studies require thermal infrared (TIR) images at both high temporal and spatial resolution to retrieve LST. However, currently, no single satellite sensors can deliver TIR data at both high temporal and spatial resolution. Thus, various algorithms/models have been developed to enhance the spatial or the temporal resolution of TIR data, but rare of those can enhance both spatial and temporal details. This paper presents a new data fusion algorithm for producing Landsat-like LST data by blending daily MODIS and periodic Landsat TM datasets. The original Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM) was improved and modified for predicting thermal radiance and LST data by considering annual temperature cycle (ATC) and urban thermal landscape heterogeneity. The technique of linear spectral mixture analysis was employed to relate the Landsat radiance with the MODIS one, so that the temporal changes in radiance can be incorporated in the fusion model. This paper details the theoretical basis and the implementation procedures of the proposed data fusion algorithm, Spatio-temporal Adaptive Data Fusion Algorithm for Temperature mapping (SADFAT). A case study was conducted that predicted LSTs of five dates in 2005 from July to October in Los Angeles County, California. The results indicate that the prediction accuracy for the whole study area ranged from 1.3 K to 2 K. Like existing spatio-temporal data fusion models, the SADFAT method has a limitation in predicting LST changes that were not recorded in the MODIS and/or Landsat pixels due to the model assumption.

  16. Observing Conditions at Mount Graham: Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope UBVR Sky Surface Brightness and Seeing Measurements from 1999 through 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Violet A.; Jansen, Rolf A.; Windhorst, Rogier A.

    2004-08-01

    We present measurements of sky surface brightness and seeing on Mount Graham, obtained at the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT) during 16 observing runs between 1999 April and 2003 December. We show that the sky surface brightness is significantly darker during photometric conditions and can be highly variable over the course of a single observing run, as well as from one run to the next, regardless of photometricity. In our photometric observations, we find an average low air mass (secz<1.2) sky surface brightness of 22.00, 22.53, 21.49, and 20.88 mag arcsec-2 in U, B, V, and R, respectively. The darkest run (2000 February in U and 2001 February in BVR) had an average sky surface brightness of 22.38, 22.86, 21.72, and 21.19 mag arcsec-2 in U, B, V, and R, respectively. With these results, we show that under the best conditions, Mount Graham can compete with the darkest sites in Hawaii and Chile, thanks in part to the strict dark-sky ordinances in place in Tucson and Safford. We expect the sky over Mount Graham to be even darker than our 1999-2003 results during solar minimum (2006-2007). We find a significant improvement of about 0.45" in our measured stellar FWHM after improvements to the telescope were made in summer and fall 2001. Stellar FWHM values are highly variable, with median R-band focus FWHM values in each observing run ranging from 0.97" to 2.15". Significant subarcsecond seeing was occasionally achieved, with values as low as 0.65" FWHM in R. There may still be a significant telescope contribution to the seeing at the VATT, but nearby trees as high as the dome are currently the dominant factor.

  17. Si/PEDOT:PSS Hybrid Solar Cells with Advanced Antireflection and Back Surface Field Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yiling; Yang, Zhenhai; Gao, Pingqi; He, Jian; Yang, Xi; Sheng, Jiang; Wu, Sudong; Xiang, Yong; Ye, Jichun

    2016-08-01

    Molybdenum oxide (MoO3) is one of most suitable antireflection (AR) layers for silicon/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (Si/PEDOT:PSS) hybrid solar cells due to its well-matched refractive index (2.1). A simulation model was employed to predict the optical characteristics of Si/PEDOT:PSS hybrid solar cells with the MoO3 layers as antireflection coatings (ARCs), as well as to analyze the loss in current density. By adding an optimum thickness of a 34-nm-thick ARC of MoO3 on the front side and an effective rear back surface field (BSF) of phosphorus-diffused N + layer at the rear side, the hybrid cells displayed higher light response in the visible and near infrared regions, boosting a short-circuit current density ( J sc) up to 28.7 mA/cm2. The average power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the Si/PEDOT:PSS hybrid solar cells was thus increased up to 11.90 %, greater than the value of 9.23 % for the reference devices.

  18. Recent advances in laser triangulation-based measurement of airfoil surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hageniers, Omer L.

    1995-01-01

    The measurement of aircraft jet engine turbine and compressor blades requires a high degree of accuracy. This paper will address the development and performance attributes of a noncontact electro-optical gaging system specifically designed to meet the airfoil dimensional measurement requirements inherent in turbine and compressor blade manufacture and repair. The system described consists of the following key components: a high accuracy, dual channel, laser based optical sensor, a four degree of freedom mechanical manipulator system and a computer based operator interface. Measurement modes of the system include point by point data gathering at rates up to 3 points per second and an 'on-the-fly' mode where points can be gathered at data rates up to 20 points per second at surface scanning speeds of up to 1 inch per second. Overall system accuracy is +/- 0.0005 inches in a configuration that is useable in the blade manufacturing area. The systems ability to input design data from CAD data bases and output measurement data in a CAD compatible data format is discussed.

  19. Atomic layer deposition-Sequential self-limiting surface reactions for advanced catalyst "bottom-up" synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Junling; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Stair, Peter C.

    2016-06-01

    Catalyst synthesis with precise control over the structure of catalytic active sites at the atomic level is of essential importance for the scientific understanding of reaction mechanisms and for rational design of advanced catalysts with high performance. Such precise control is achievable using atomic layer deposition (ALD). ALD is similar to chemical vapor deposition (CVD), except that the deposition is split into a sequence of two self-limiting surface reactions between gaseous precursor molecules and a substrate. The unique self-limiting feature of ALD allows conformal deposition of catalytic materials on a high surface area catalyst support at the atomic level. The deposited catalytic materials can be precisely constructed on the support by varying the number and type of ALD cycles. As an alternative to the wet-chemistry based conventional methods, ALD provides a cycle-by-cycle "bottom-up" approach for nanostructuring supported catalysts with near atomic precision. In this review, we summarize recent attempts to synthesize supported catalysts with ALD. Nucleation and growth of metals by ALD on oxides and carbon materials for precise synthesis of supported monometallic catalyst are reviewed. The capability of achieving precise control over the particle size of monometallic nanoparticles by ALD is emphasized. The resulting metal catalysts with high dispersions and uniformity often show comparable or remarkably higher activity than those prepared by conventional methods. For supported bimetallic catalyst synthesis, we summarize the strategies for controlling the deposition of the secondary metal selectively on the primary metal nanoparticle but not on the support to exclude monometallic formation. As a review of the surface chemistry and growth behavior of metal ALD on metal surfaces, we demonstrate the ways to precisely tune size, composition and structure of bimetallic metal nanoparticles. The cycle-by-cycle "bottom up" construction of bimetallic (or multiple

  20. Using Advanced Remote Sensing Data Fusion Techniques for Studying Earth Surface Processes and Hazards: A Landslide Detection Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulslander, D.

    2014-12-01

    A major problem in earth surface process and hazards research is we have little to no knowledge of precisely where and when the next significant event may occur. This makes it nearly impossible to set up adequate instrumentation and observation ahead of time. Furthermore, it is not practical to overcome this challenge by instrumenting and observing everywhere all the time. We can't be everywhere and see everything. Remote sensing helps us to fill that gap with missions such as Landsat and WorldView2 offering regular global coverage. However, remote sensing systems for global monitoring have several inherent compromises. Tradeoffs must be made between data storage, processing capacity, spatial resolution, spectral resolution, and temporal resolution. Additionally, instruments and systems must be designed in advance and from a generalized standpoint to serve as many purposes as possible, often at the expense of high performance in specific tasks. Because of these practical constraints, when using remote sensing data to study earth surface processes it is critical to maximize signal content or information obtained from all available data. Several approaches, including multi-temporal data fusion, multi-sensor data fusion, and fusion with derivative products such as band ratios or vegetation indices can help expand how much information can be extracted from remote sensing acquisitions. Fused dataset results contain more coherent information than the sum of their individual constituents. Examples using Landsat and WorldView2 data in this study show this added information makes it possible to map earth surface processes and events, such as the 2011 Cinque Terre landslides, in a more automated and repeatable fashion over larger areas than is possible with manual imagery analysis techniques and with greater chance of successful detection.

  1. PREFACE: Exploring surfaces and buried interfaces of functional materials by advanced x-ray and neutron techniques Exploring surfaces and buried interfaces of functional materials by advanced x-ray and neutron techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Kenji

    2010-12-01

    measurement. Advances in such technologies are bringing with them new opportunities in surface and buried interface science. In the not too distant future, we will publish a special issue or a book detailing such progress. Exploring surfaces and buried interfaces of functional materials by advanced x-ray and neutron techniques contents Lateral uniformity in chemical composition along a buried reaction front in polymers using off-specular reflectivity Kristopher A Lavery, Vivek M Prabhu, Sushil Satija and Wen-li Wu Orientation dependence of Pd growth on Au electrode surfaces M Takahasi, K Tamura, J Mizuki, T Kondo and K Uosaki A grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering analysis on capped Ge nanodots in layer structures Hiroshi Okuda, Masayuki Kato, Keiji Kuno, Shojiro Ochiai, Noritaka Usami, Kazuo Nakajima and Osami Sakata High resolution grazing-incidence in-plane x-ray diffraction for measuring the strain of a Si thin layer Kazuhiko Omote X-ray analysis of mesoporous silica thin films templated by Brij58 surfactant S Fall, M Kulij and A Gibaud Review of the applications of x-ray refraction and the x-ray waveguide phenomenon to estimation of film structures Kouichi Hayashi Epitaxial growth of largely mismatched crystals on H-terminated Si(111) surfaces Hidehito Asaoka Novel TiO2/ZnO multilayer mirrors at 'water-window' wavelengths fabricated by atomic layer epitaxy H Kumagai, Y Tanaka, M Murata, Y Masuda and T Shinagawa Depth-selective structural analysis of thin films using total-external-reflection x-ray diffraction Tomoaki Kawamura and Hiroo Omi Structures of Yb nanoparticle thin films grown by deposition in He and N2 gas atmospheres: AFM and x-ray reflectivity studies Martin Jerab and Kenji Sakurai Ga and As composition profiles in InP/GaInAs/InP heterostructures—x-ray CTR scattering and cross-sectional STM measurements Yoshikazu Takeda, Masao Tabuchi and Arao Nakamura Polarized neutron reflectivity study of a thermally treated MnIr/CoFe exchange bias system Naoki

  2. Simulations of groundwater-surface water interaction and particle movement due to the effect of weir construction in the sub-watershed of the river Labe in the town of Děčín.

    PubMed

    Matula, S; Mekonnen, G B; Báťková, K; Nešetřil, K

    2014-11-01

    Steady- and transient-state simulations of groundwater flow and particle movement in the sub-watershed of the river Labe in Děčín town was carried out using Visual MODFLOW software. The simulations were performed for calibration and for the scenarios that the change in the water level of the river Labe was undergoing. Steady-state simulation was carried out for the sake of calibration of model outputs. For transient simulation, two different scenarios were considered in order to investigate the response of the aquifer system to the stresses applied on surface water of the river. The simulation results have shown that the surface water and groundwater interactions, and the subsequent particle movement were affected by the stresses applied on the surface water in the river Labe. The first scenario involved the rapid recharge of surface water to the aquifer in the vicinity of the river while particles still move towards the river at the places far away from the river. At the end of the second scenario, particles still tend to move towards the river slowly and finally tend to stay within the aquifer as equilibrium of hydraulic gradient is reached between the surface and groundwater levels. The time series graphs of hydraulic heads at all observation wells show that the groundwater level in the surrounding aquifer rises significantly as a result of recharges from the river. The local water balance of the study area was calculated and expressed as the rates of water entering and leaving the system. At the end of the second scenario, the difference between the rate of flow into and out of the model area was 0.73 m(3) day(-1).

  3. Winds drive dune movement on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-01-01

    Sand dunes, a common feature on the surface of Mars, can provide a record of recent and past changes. Some dunes near Mars's polar areas have recently been observed to change due to carbon dioxide ice sublimation, but it has not been confirmed whether dunes are still active all over Mars. Winds contribute to dune movement on Earth, but wind tunnel and atmospheric computer simulations have suggested that strong winds would be rare in the current Martian atmosphere. In a new study, Silvestro et al. observe recent dune movement in Mars's tropical regions, which are not affected by seasonal changes in carbon dioxide frost. Focusing on the Arabia Terra and Meridiani regions on Mars, the researchers analyzed images from the High Resolution Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter as well as other sources of data. They measured migration rates of two groups of ripples in the sand in a dune field in Meridiani Planum and found that dunes advanced about 0.4-1 meter in a Martian year.

  4. Eye movement correlates of acquired central dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Schattka, Kerstin I; Radach, Ralph; Huber, Walter

    2010-08-01

    Based on recent progress in theory and measurement techniques, the analysis of eye movements has become one of the major methodological tools in experimental reading research. Our work uses this approach to advance the understanding of impaired information processing in acquired central dyslexia of stroke patients with aphasia. Up to now there has been no research attempting to analyze both word-based viewing time measures and local fixation patterns in dyslexic readers. The goal of the study was to find out whether specific eye movement parameters reflect pathologically preferred segmental reading in contrast to lexical reading. We compared oral reading of single words of normal controls (n=11) with six aphasic participants (two cases of deep, surface and residual dyslexia each). Participants were asked to read aloud lines of target words differing in length and frequency. Segmental reading was characterized by deviant spatial distribution of saccadic landing positions with initial fixations located mainly at the beginning of the word, while lexical readers showed the normative 'preferred landing positions' left to the center of the words. Contrary to expectation, word length did not distinguish between segmental and lexical readers, while word frequency showed the expected effect for lexical readers only. Their mean fixation duration was already prolonged during first pass reading reflecting their attempts of immediate access to lexical information. After first pass reading, re-reading time was significantly increased in all participants with acquired central dyslexia due to their exceedingly higher monitoring demands for oral reading.

  5. Teaching Creative Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exiner, Johanna; Lloyd, Phyllis

    This guide to creative movement, relevant to all age groups, opens with a discussion of historical and present trends in movement and dance. Chapters treat (a) the body--body awareness, body activities, and relationships; (b) principles of movement--space, force, time, dynamics, and fluency; (c) topics within the sphere of movement, from the world…

  6. The movement ecology of seagrasses

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Kathryn; van Dijk, Kor-jent; Ruiz-Montoya, Leonardo; Kendrick, Gary A.; Krauss, Siegfried L.; Waycott, Michelle; Verduin, Jennifer; Lowe, Ryan; Statton, John; Brown, Eloise; Duarte, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    A movement ecology framework is applied to enhance our understanding of the causes, mechanisms and consequences of movement in seagrasses: marine, clonal, flowering plants. Four life-history stages of seagrasses can move: pollen, sexual propagules, vegetative fragments and the spread of individuals through clonal growth. Movement occurs on the water surface, in the water column, on or in the sediment, via animal vectors and through spreading clones. A capacity for long-distance dispersal and demographic connectivity over multiple timeframes is the novel feature of the movement ecology of seagrasses with significant evolutionary and ecological consequences. The space–time movement footprint of different life-history stages varies. For example, the distance moved by reproductive propagules and vegetative expansion via clonal growth is similar, but the timescales range exponentially, from hours to months or centuries to millennia, respectively. Consequently, environmental factors and key traits that interact to influence movement also operate on vastly different spatial and temporal scales. Six key future research areas have been identified. PMID:25297859

  7. Movement disorders and sleep.

    PubMed

    Driver-Dunckley, Erika D; Adler, Charles H

    2012-11-01

    This article summarizes what is currently known about sleep disturbances in several movement disorders including Parkinson disease, essential tremor, parkinsonism, dystonia, Huntington disease, myoclonus, and ataxias. There is an association between movement disorders and sleep. In some cases the prevalence of sleep disorders is much higher in patients with movement disorder, such as rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson disease. In other cases, sleep difficulties worsen the involuntary movements. In many cases the medications used to treat patients with movement disorder disturb sleep or cause daytime sleepiness. The importance of discussing sleep issues in patients with movement disorders cannot be underestimated.

  8. Use of advanced earth observation tools for the analyses of recent surface changes in Kalahari pans and Namibian coastal lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behling, Robert; Milewski, Robert; Chabrillat, Sabine; Völkel, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The remote sensing analyses in the BMBF-SPACES collaborative project Geoarchives - Signals of Climate and Landscape Change preserved in Southern African Geoarchives - focuses on the use of recent and upcoming Earth Observation Tools for the study of climate and land use changes and its impact on the ecosystem. It aims at demonstrating the potential of recently available advanced optical remote sensing imagery with its extended spectral coverage and temporal resolution for the identification and mapping of sediment features associated with paleo-environmental archives as well as their recent dynamic. In this study we focus on the analyses of two ecosystems of major interest, the Kalahari salt pans as well as the lagoons at Namibia's west coast, that present high dynamic caused by combined hydrological and surface processes linked to climatic events. Multitemporal remote sensing techniques allow us to derive the recent surface dynamic of the salt pans and also provide opportunities to get a detailed understanding of the spatiotemporal development of the coastal lagoons. Furthermore spaceborne hyperspectral analysis can give insight to the current surface mineralogy of the salt pans on a physical basis and provide the intra pan distribution of evaporites. The soils and sediments of the Kalahari salt pans such as the Omongwa pan are a potentially significant storage of global carbon and also function as an important terrestrial climate archive. Thus far the surface distribution of evaporites have been only assessed mono-temporally and on a coarse regional scale, but the dynamic of the salt pans, especially the formation of evaporites, is still uncertain and poorly understood. For the salt pan analyses a change detection is applied using the Iterative-reweighted Multivariate Alteration Detection (IR-MAD) method to identify and investigate surface changes based on a Landsat time-series covering the period 1984-2015. Furthermore the current spatial distribution of

  9. Fault Model of the 1703 Genroku Kanto Earthquake Based on Newly Imaged Upper- Surface of Philippine Sea Plate, Coseismic Coastal Movements, and Tsunami Inundation Heights Along the Eastern Boso Coast, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namegaya, Y.; Shishikura, M.; Satake, K.

    2008-12-01

    We propose a fault model of the 1703 Genroku Kanto earthquake by using recently imaged shape of Philippine Sea Plate, distributions of coseismic coastal movements, and tsunami inundation heights along the eastern Boso coast. The Genroku Kanto earthquake occurred in southern Kanto, less than 100 km away from Tokyo, on December 31, 1703. Its magnitude is estimated to be 7.9-8.2 (Usami, 2003). The source is located on subducting Philippine Sea Plate. Several fault models have been proposed from distributions of the coseismic coastal vertical movements or tsunami inundated heights (e.g. Kasahara et al., 1973; Matsuda et al., 1978; Aida, 1991; Shishikura, 2003). Recently, upper-surface of the subducted Philippine Sea Plate has been imaged in detail by using deep seismic reflection profiling (e.g. Sato et al., 2005; Takeda et al., 2007; Tsumura et al., 2008). One of the features is low dip angle in the shallow region (Tsumura et al., 2008). In this study, we first compiled the above three images and estimated the shape of the plate. Next, 49 subfaults whose size is 10 km x 10 km are located on the upper surface of Philippine Sea Plate in such a way that they do not overlap with each other. Vertical movement on the coast from each subfault (Green functions) is calculated for a unit amount of slip. The slip amounts of each subfault are estimated by an inversion of measured vertical movement (Shishikura, 2000). As a result, the slip amount of more than 10 m is estimated on the plate surface in the south part of Boso peninsula and Miura peninsula, while small slip is estimated between two peninsulas. To discuss with tsunami inundation height, we next locate additional large two faults whose size is 30 km x 28 km and 50 km x 28 km off southern (S) and southeastern (SE) Boso peninsula, respectively. Tsunami inundation heights along the eastern Boso coast is calculated using the estimated slip distribution of the 49 subfaults and the additional two faults with slip amount of 7

  10. Design and Optimization of a Composite Canard Control Surface of an Advanced Fighter Aircraft under Static Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Sachin; Mohite, P. M.

    2015-01-01

    The minimization of weight and maximization of payload is an ever challenging design procedure for air vehicles. The present study has been carried out with an objective to redesign control surface of an advanced all-metallic fighter aircraft. In this study, the structure made up of high strength aluminum, titanium and ferrous alloys has been attempted to replace by carbon fiber composite (CFC) skin, ribs and stiffeners. This study presents an approach towards development of a methodology for optimization of first-ply failure index (FI) in unidirectional fibrous laminates using Genetic-Algorithms (GA) under quasi-static loading. The GAs, by the application of its operators like reproduction, cross-over, mutation and elitist strategy, optimize the ply-orientations in laminates so as to have minimum FI of Tsai-Wu first-ply failure criterion. The GA optimization procedure has been implemented in MATLAB and interfaced with commercial software ABAQUS using python scripting. FI calculations have been carried out in ABAQUS with user material subroutine (UMAT). The GA's application gave reasonably well-optimized ply-orientations combination at a faster convergence rate. However, the final optimized sequence of ply-orientations is obtained by tweaking the sequences given by GA's based on industrial practices and experience, whenever needed. The present study of conversion of an all metallic structure to partial CFC structure has led to 12% of weight reduction. Therefore, the approach proposed here motivates designer to use CFC with a confidence.

  11. Breath Analysis Based on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Sensors Distinguishes Early and Advanced Gastric Cancer Patients from Healthy Persons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunsheng; Zhang, Yixia; Pan, Fei; Liu, Jie; Wang, Kan; Zhang, Chunlei; Cheng, Shangli; Lu, Lungen; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Zheng; Zhi, Xiao; Zhang, Qian; Alfranca, Gabriel; de la Fuente, Jesús M; Chen, Di; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-09-27

    Fourteen volatile organic compound (VOC) biomarkers in the breath have been identified to distinguish early gastric cancer (EGC) and advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients from healthy persons by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with solid phase microextraction (SPME). Then, a breath analysis approach based on a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensor was developed to detect these biomarkers. Utilizing hydrazine vapor adsorbed in graphene oxide (GO) film, the clean SERS sensor is facilely prepared by in situ formation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) without any organic stabilizer. In the SERS sensor, RGO can selectively adsorb and enrich the identified biomarkers from breath as an SPME fiber, and AuNPs well dispersed on RGO endow the SERS sensor with an effective detection of adsorbed biomarkers. Fourteen Raman bands associated with the biomarkers are selected as the fingerprints of biomarker patterns to distinguish persons in different states. The approach has successfully analyzed and distinguished different simulated breath samples and 200 breath samples of clinical patients with a sensitivity of higher than 83% and a specificity of more than 92%. In conclusion, the VOC biomarkers and breath analysis approach in this study can not only diagnose gastric cancer but also distinguish EGC and AGC. This work has great potential for clinical translation in primary screening diagnosis and stage determination of stomach cancer in the near future.

  12. Redesigning of a Canard Control Surface of an Advanced Fighter Aircraft: Effect on Buckling and Aerodynamic Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Sachin; Mohite, P. M.

    2015-01-01

    A redesign of canard control-surface of an advanced all-metallic fighter aircraft was carried out by using carbon fibre composite (CFC) for ribs and panels. In this study ply-orientations of CFC structure are optimized using a Genetic-Algorithm (GA) with an objective function to have minimum failure index (FI) according to Tsai-Wu failure criterion. The redesigned CFC structure was sufficiently strong to withstand aerodynamic loads from stress and deflection points of view. Now, in the present work CFC canard structure has been studied for its buckling strength in comparison to existing metallic design. In this study, the existing metallic design was found to be weak in buckling. Upon a detailed investigation, it was revealed that there are reported failures in the vicinity of zones where initial buckling modes are excited as predicted by the finite element based buckling analysis. In view of buckling failures, the redesigned CFC structure is sufficiently reinforced with stringers at specific locations. After providing reinforcements against buckling, the twist and the camber variations of the airfoil are checked and compared with existing structure data. Finally, the modal analysis has been carried out to compare the variation in excitation frequency due to material change. The CFC structure thus redesigned is safe from buckling and aerodynamic aspects as well.

  13. Recent movements of the earth crust: Composite geodynamic test areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanzhe, Iu. D.; Lilienberg, D. A.; Setunskaia, L. E.; Enman, S. V.

    This collection of papers summarizes studies of recent crustal movements on a number of test areas in the USSR in the framework of International Research Project No. 9, dealing with crustal movements in Central and Eastern Europe and Cuba. Particular papers are presented on the interpretation of movements in the Black Sea region in the light of plate tectonics; dynamic types of morphological structures of plains and low-mountain relief in Central Asia and Kazakhstan in vertical movements; horizontal movements and tectonic zoning of the earth surface on the southern Iakutsk geodynamic test area; the manifestation of crustal movements in mining regions; and movements on geodynamic test grounds in the Tiumen region.

  14. Surface water disinfection by chlorination and advanced oxidation processes: Inactivation of an antibiotic resistant E. coli strain and cytotoxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Andreza Costa; Lepretti, Marilena; Rizzo, Luigi; Caputo, Ivana; Vaiano, Vincenzo; Sacco, Olga; Lopes, Wilton Silva; Sannino, Diana

    2016-06-01

    The release of antibiotics into the environment can result in antibiotic resistance (AR) spread, which in turn can seriously affect human health. Antibiotic resistant bacteria have been detected in different aquatic environments used as drinking water source. Water disinfection may be a possible solution to minimize AR spread but conventional processes, such as chlorination, result in the formation of dangerous disinfection by-products. In this study advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), namely H2O2/UV, TiO2/UV and N-TiO2/UV, have been compared with chlorination in the inactivation of an AR Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain in surface water. TiO2 P25 and nitrogen doped TiO2 (N-TiO2), prepared by sol-gel method at two different synthesis temperatures (0 and -20°C), were investigated in heterogeneous photocatalysis experiments. Under the investigated conditions, chlorination (1.0 mg L(-1)) was the faster process (2.5 min) to achieve total inactivation (6 Log). Among AOPs, H2O2/UV resulted in the best inactivation rate: total inactivation (6 Log) was achieved in 45 min treatment. Total inactivation was not observed (4.5 Log), also after 120 min treatment, only for N-doped TiO2 synthesized at 0°C. Moreover, H2O2/UV and chlorination processes were evaluated in terms of cytotoxicity potential by means of 3-(4,5-dime-thylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenylte-trazolium colorimetric test on a human-derived cell line and they similarly affected HepG2 cells viability.

  15. Eye Movement Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... t work properly. There are many kinds of eye movement disorders. Two common ones are Strabismus - a disorder ... of the eyes, sometimes called "dancing eyes" Some eye movement disorders are present at birth. Others develop over ...

  16. Movement - unpredictable or jerky

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy (chorea gravidarum) Stroke Systemic lupus erythematosus Tardive dyskinesia (a condition that can be caused by medicines ... uncontrolled); Hyperkinetic movements References Jankovic J, Lang AE. Movement disorders. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, Mazziotta ...

  17. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  18. Utilizing Temperature and Resistivity Data as a Way to Characterize Water and Solute Movement and Groundwater-Surface Water Interaction in Variably Saturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotch, C.; Murgulet, D.; Hay, R.

    2012-12-01

    This study utilizes a multidisciplinary approach to better analyze the extent to which groundwater and surface water interact in the Oso Creek water shed of South Texas using temperature data, electrical resistivity and numerical modeling methods. The three primary objectives of this study are to: (1) identify primary areas of streambed groundwater-surface water interaction using temperature time series and resistivity soundings; (2) improve understanding of solute flow and groundwater, surface water, and sediment interaction in a semiarid, urban coastal area; (3) improve our understanding of groundwater contribution to contaminant transport and discharge to the bays and estuaries and ultimately the Gulf of Mexico. Temperature data was acquired over a one year period, using temperature loggers, from June 11, 2009 to May 18, 2010 at 15-minute intervals from 17 monitoring sites along Oso Creek and its tributaries. Each monitoring site consisted of 4 temperature loggers equally vertically spaced from the stream surface down to a depth of one meter. Furthermore, groundwater temperatures and water levels were collected from wells adjacent to the temperature monitoring sites. In order to fulfill the objectives of this study, existing hydrogeologic, stratigraphic, and other ancillary data are being integrated into a finite difference model developed using the USGS VS2DT software for the Oso Creek Watershed. The model will be calibrated using existing temperature and water level data and a resistivity component will also be added to assure accuracy of the model and temperature data by helping to identify varying lithologies and water conductivities. Compiling a time-series of temperature data and incorporating available hydrostratigraphic, geomorphologic and water level data will enable the development of a comprehensive database. This database is necessary to develop the detailed flow model that will enable an understanding of the extent of groundwater surface water

  19. Emerging Identity through Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowen, Betty

    Movement is one of the primary ways in which the young child finds out about his world. Experiences in movement help the young child to develop a healthy sense of identity. Through movement, children: (1) learn, as infants, to distinguish themselves from the outside world; (2) find out what they can do and how they can affect their environment;…

  20. Linking Literacy and Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pica, Rae

    2010-01-01

    There are many links between literacy and movement. Movement and language are both forms of communication and self-expression. Rhythm is an essential component of both language and movement. While people may think of rhythm primarily in musical terms, there is a rhythm to words and sentences as well. Individuals develop an internal rhythm when…

  1. [The "Participatory" Movement].

    PubMed

    Rossi, M J

    2001-01-01

    This study reports the trajectory of the Participatory Movement (MP), which was created in opposition to the policies carried out by the Brazilian Association of Nursing (ABEn). This article, written by the first president elected of the "participatory" movement, presents the principles of the movement, its organization, the struggle for leadership, and the work developed in the first administration.

  2. Rhetoric in Group Action: A Theory of Social Movements from Jean-Paul Sartre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnick, Barbara

    The implications of a social movement theory advanced by Jean-Paul Sartre in his "Critique of Dialectical Reason" is examined in this paper. The paper notes that unlike sociologists and rhetoricians who have stressed the psychology of movement adherents, the reasons for movement formation, or the movement's interaction with power agents, Sartre…

  3. Insulin stimulates movement of sorting nexin 9 between cellular compartments: a putative role mediating cell surface receptor expression and insulin action.

    PubMed Central

    MaCaulay, S Lance; Stoichevska, Violet; Grusovin, Julian; Gough, Keith H; Castelli, Laura A; Ward, Colin W

    2003-01-01

    SNX9 (sorting nexin 9) is one member of a family of proteins implicated in protein trafficking. This family is characterized by a unique PX (Phox homology) domain that includes a proline-rich sequence and an upstream phospholipid binding domain. Many sorting nexins, including SNX9, also have a C-terminal coiled region. SNX9 additionally has an N-terminal SH3 (Src homology 3) domain. Here we have investigated the cellular localization of SNX9 and the potential role it plays in insulin action. SNX9 had a cytosolic and punctate distribution, consistent with endosomal and cytosolic localization, in 3T3L1 adipocytes. It was excluded from the nucleus. The SH3 domain was responsible, at least in part, for the membrane localization of SNX9, since expression of an SH3-domain-deleted GFP (green fluorescent protein)-SNX9 fusion protein in HEK293T cells rendered the protein cytosolic. Membrane localization may also be attributed in part to the PX domain, since in vitro phospholipid binding studies demonstrated SNX9 binding to polyphosphoinositides. Insulin induced movement of SNX9 to membrane fractions from the cytosol. A GST (glutathione S-transferase)-SNX9 fusion protein was associated with IGF1 (insulin-like growth factor 1) and insulin receptors in vitro. A GFP-SNX9 fusion protein, overexpressed in 3T3L1 adipocytes, co-immunoprecipitated with insulin receptors. Furthermore, overexpression of this GFP-SNX9 fusion protein in CHOT cells decreased insulin binding, consistent with a role for SNX9 in the trafficking of insulin receptors. Microinjection of 3T3L1 cells with an antibody against SNX9 inhibited stimulation by insulin of GLUT4 translocation. These results support the involvement of SNX9 in insulin action, via an influence on the processing/trafficking of insulin receptors. A secondary role in regulation of the cellular processing, transport and/or subcellular localization of GLUT4 is also suggested. PMID:12917015

  4. Paraneoplastic disorders of eye movements

    PubMed Central

    Wray, Shirley H.; Dalmau, Josep; Chen, Athena; King, Susan; Leigh, R. John

    2011-01-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes affecting the brainstem and cerebellum are reported to cause a variety of abnormalities of eye movements. Recent studies have begun to account for the mechanisms underlying several syndromes, characterized by opsoclonus, slow, or dysmetric saccades, as well as downbeat nystagmus. We provide evidence that upbeat nystagmus in a patient with pancreatic cancer reflected a cerebellar-induced imbalance of otolithic pathways: she showed marked retropulsion, and her nystagmus was dependent on head position, being absent when supine, and suppressed with convergence. In addition to anti-Hu antibodies, we demonstrated antibodies to a novel neuronal cell surface antigen. Taken with other recent studies, our findings suggest that paraneoplastic syndromes arise due to antibodies against surface neuronal antigens, including receptors and channels. Abnormal eye movements in paraneoplastic syndromes offer insights into the pathogenesis of these disorders and the opportunity to test potential therapies, such as new drugs with effects on neuronal channels. PMID:21951005

  5. Movement disorders induced by deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Baizabal-Carvallo, José Fidel; Jankovic, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation represents a major advance in the treatment of several types of movement disorders. However, during stimulation new movement disorders may emerge, thus limiting the positive effects of this therapy. These movement disorders may be induced by: 1) stimulation of the targeted nucleus, 2) stimulation of surrounding tracts and nuclei, and 3) as a result of dose adjustment of accompanying medications, such as reduction of dopaminergic drugs in patients with Parkinson's disease. Various dyskinesias, blepharospasm, and apraxia of eyelid opening have been described mainly with subthalamic nucleus stimulation, whereas hypokinesia and freezing of gait have been observed with stimulation of the globus pallidus internus. Other deep brain stimulation-related movement disorders include dyskinesias associated with stimulation of the globus pallidus externus and ataxic gait as a side effect of chronic bilateral stimulation of the ventral intermediate nucleus of thalamus. These movement disorders are generally reversible and usually resolved once the stimulation is reduced or turned off. This, however, typically leads to loss of benefit of the underlying movement disorder which can be re-gained by using different contacts, changing targets or stimulation parameters, and adjusting pharmacological therapy. New and innovative emerging technologies and stimulation techniques may help to prevent or overcome the various deep brain stimulation-induced movement disorders. In this review we aim to describe the clinical features, frequency, pathophysiology, and strategies for treatment of these iatrogenic movement disorders. PMID:26806438

  6. Measurement of tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, R J; Worms, F W; Speidel, T M

    1976-09-01

    1. Tooth movement relative to the alveolar bone can be precisely described only by superimposing on fixed points in the bone. Implants are the best known way today. Over short-term studies laminagraphy and the use of bony trabeculations are also useful. Remodeling occurs extensively on bony surfaces, making them too labile for use as stable landmarks. To project small amounts of tooth movement based on the use of such methods is so questionable as to represent little better than a guess or a clinical impression. 2. Growth can be separated into vertical and anteroposterior vectors with respect to the dentition. Since the occlusion is the concern, orientation of vertical and anteroposterior vectors to the occlusal plane is a reasonable baseline. The vertical and anteroposterior dental changes may not show a linear relationship in the anterior and posterior parts of the mouth when jaw rotations are occurring. 3. Growth can be disproportionate in either the vertical and/or the anteroposteroir plane of space. If the vertical increments of the anterior face differ from the vertical increments at the posterior face, mandibular rotations occur. This growth is accompanied by dental compensations that tend to mask the rotation. Therefore, open bite and deep bite are frequently skeletal growth problems. 4. Disproportional forward growth of the maxilla or mandible in an anteroposterior direction can lead to Class II or III relations. The growth that leads to Class II or Class III is accompanied by dental migrations that tend to mask this disproportionate growth. Orthodontic treatment of growth disproportionalities usually represents attempts to make the teeth further compensate. If surgical options are elected, the dental compensations should be removed prior to surgery in order to achieve a full surgical correction. 5. The teeth tend to move and grow in the opposite direction of the growth disproportionality. The teeth tend to mask the disproportionality. Thus, in an open

  7. Allylic ionic liquid electrolyte-assisted electrochemical surface passivation of LiCoO2 for advanced, safe lithium-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Junyoung; Yim, Taeeun; Park, Jang Hoon; Ryu, Ji Heon; Lee, Sang Young; Kim, Young Gyu; Oh, Seung M.

    2014-01-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) electrolytes have attracted much attention for use in advanced, safe lithium-ion batteries (LIB) owing to their nonvolatility, high conductivity, and great thermal stability. However, LIBs containing RTIL-electrolytes exhibit poor cyclability because electrochemical side reactions cause problematic surface failures of the cathode. Here, we demonstrate that a thin, homogeneous surface film, which is electrochemically generated on LiCoO2 from an RTIL-electrolyte containing an unsaturated substituent on the cation (1-allyl-1-methylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, AMPip-TFSI), can avert undesired side reactions. The derived surface film comprised of a high amount of organic species from the RTIL cations homogenously covered LiCoO2 with a <25 nm layer and helped suppress unfavorable thermal reactions as well as electrochemical side reactions. The superior performance of the cell containing the AMPip-TFSI electrolyte was further elucidated by surface, electrochemical, and thermal analyses. PMID:25168309

  8. Evaluation of the Advanced-Canopy-Atmosphere-Surface Algorithm (ACASA Model) Using Eddy Covariance Technique Over Sparse Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marras, S.; Spano, D.; Sirca, C.; Duce, P.; Snyder, R.; Pyles, R. D.; Paw U, K. T.

    2008-12-01

    Land surface models are usually used to quantify energy and mass fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere on micro- and regional scales. One of the most elaborate land surface models for flux modelling is the Advanced Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil Algorithm (ACASA) model, which provides micro-scale as well as regional-scale fluxes when imbedded in a meso-scale meteorological model (e.g., MM5 or WRF). The model predicts vegetation conditions and changes with time due to plant responses to environment variables. In particular, fluxes and profiles of heat, water vapor, carbon and momentum within and above canopy are estimated using third-order equations. It also estimates turbulent profiles of velocity, temperature, humidity within and above canopy, and CO2 fluxes are estimated using a combination of Ball-Berry and Farquhar equations. The ACASA model is also able to include the effects of water stress on stomata, transpiration and CO2 assimilation. ACASA model is unique because it separates canopy domain into twenty atmospheric layers (ten layers within the canopy and ten layers above the canopy), and the soil is partitioned into fifteen layers of variable thickness. The model was mainly used over dense canopies in the past, so the aim of this work was to test the ACASA model over a sparse canopy as Mediterranean maquis. Vegetation is composed by sclerophyllous species of shrubs that are always green, with leathery leaves, small height, with a moderately sparse canopy, and that are tolerant at water stress condition. Eddy Covariance (EC) technique was used to collect continuous data for more than 3 years period. Field measurements were taken in a natural maquis site located near Alghero, Sardinia, Italy and they were used to parameterize and validate the model. The input values were selected by running the model several times varying the one parameter per time. A second step in the parameterization process was the simultaneously variation of some parameters

  9. Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies. First annual report, September 1, 1990--August 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiang-Huai

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this project is to conduct extensive studies on the surface reactivity of pyrite by using electrochemical, surface analysis, potentiometric and calorimetric titration, and surface hydrophobicity characterization techniques and to correlate the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface with the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. The products as well as their structure, the mechanisms and the kinetics of the oxidation of coal-pyrite surfaces and their interaction with various chemical reagents will be systematically studied and compared with that of mineral-pyrite and synthetic pyrite to determine the correlation between the surface reactivity of pyrite and the bulk chemical properties of pyrite and impurities. The surface chemical studies and the studies of floatability of coal-pyrite and the effect of various parameters such as grinding media and environment, aging under different atmospheres, etc. on thereof, are directed at identifying the causes and possible solutions of the pyrite rejection problems in coal cleaning.

  10. Flexibility of movement organization in piano performance.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Shinichi; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2013-01-01

    Piano performance involves a large repertoire of highly skilled movements. The acquisition of these exceptional skills despite innate neural and biomechanical constraints requires a sophisticated interaction between plasticity of the neural system and organization of a redundant number of degrees of freedom (DOF) in the motor system. Neuroplasticity subserving virtuosity of pianists has been documented in neuroimaging studies investigating effects of long-term piano training on structure and function of the cortical and subcortical regions. By contrast, recent behavioral studies have advanced the understanding of neuromuscular strategies and biomechanical principles behind the movement organization that enables skilled piano performance. Here we review the motor control and biomechanics literature, introducing the importance of describing motor behaviors not only for understanding mechanisms responsible for skillful motor actions in piano playing, but also for advancing diagnosis and rehabilitation of movement disorders caused by extensive piano practice. PMID:23882199

  11. Flexibility of movement organization in piano performance

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Shinichi; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2013-01-01

    Piano performance involves a large repertoire of highly skilled movements. The acquisition of these exceptional skills despite innate neural and biomechanical constraints requires a sophisticated interaction between plasticity of the neural system and organization of a redundant number of degrees of freedom (DOF) in the motor system. Neuroplasticity subserving virtuosity of pianists has been documented in neuroimaging studies investigating effects of long-term piano training on structure and function of the cortical and subcortical regions. By contrast, recent behavioral studies have advanced the understanding of neuromuscular strategies and biomechanical principles behind the movement organization that enables skilled piano performance. Here we review the motor control and biomechanics literature, introducing the importance of describing motor behaviors not only for understanding mechanisms responsible for skillful motor actions in piano playing, but also for advancing diagnosis and rehabilitation of movement disorders caused by extensive piano practice. PMID:23882199

  12. Flexibility of movement organization in piano performance.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Shinichi; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2013-01-01

    Piano performance involves a large repertoire of highly skilled movements. The acquisition of these exceptional skills despite innate neural and biomechanical constraints requires a sophisticated interaction between plasticity of the neural system and organization of a redundant number of degrees of freedom (DOF) in the motor system. Neuroplasticity subserving virtuosity of pianists has been documented in neuroimaging studies investigating effects of long-term piano training on structure and function of the cortical and subcortical regions. By contrast, recent behavioral studies have advanced the understanding of neuromuscular strategies and biomechanical principles behind the movement organization that enables skilled piano performance. Here we review the motor control and biomechanics literature, introducing the importance of describing motor behaviors not only for understanding mechanisms responsible for skillful motor actions in piano playing, but also for advancing diagnosis and rehabilitation of movement disorders caused by extensive piano practice.

  13. [Sleep related movement disorders].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-06-01

    Sleep related movement disorders (SRMD) are characterized by simple, stereotyped movements occur during sleep, with the exception of restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS has the following essential features; an urge to move the legs usually accompanied by uncomfortable sensation in the legs, improvement of symptoms after movement (non-stereotypical movements, such as walking and stretching, to reduce symptoms), and symptoms occur or worsen during periods of rest and in the evening and night. However, RLS is closely associated with periodic limb movement, which shows typical stererotyped limb movements. In the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd edition, sleep disturbances or daytime symptoms are prerequiste for a diagnosis of SRMD. We here review diagnosis and treatment of SRMD.

  14. Congenital mirror movements.

    PubMed Central

    Schott, G D; Wyke, M A

    1981-01-01

    In this report are described seven patients assessed clinically and neuropsychologically in whom mirror movements affecting predominantly the hands occurred as a congenital disorder. These mirror movements, representing a specific type of abnormal synkinesia, may arise as a hereditary condition, in the presence of a recognisable underlying neurological abnormality, and sporadically, and the seven patients provide more or less satisfactory examples of each of these three groups. Despite the apparent uniformity of the disorder, the heterogeneity and variability may be marked, examples in some of our patients including the pronounced increase in tone that developed with arm movement, and the capacity for modulation of the associated movement by alteration of neck position and bio-feedback. Various possible mechanisms are considered; these include impaired cerebral inhibition of unwanted movements, and functioning of abnormal motor pathways. Emphasis has been placed on the putative role of the direct, crossed corticomotoneurone pathways and on the unilateral and bilateral cerebral events that precede movement. PMID:7288446

  15. [Sleep related movement disorders].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-06-01

    Sleep related movement disorders (SRMD) are characterized by simple, stereotyped movements occur during sleep, with the exception of restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS has the following essential features; an urge to move the legs usually accompanied by uncomfortable sensation in the legs, improvement of symptoms after movement (non-stereotypical movements, such as walking and stretching, to reduce symptoms), and symptoms occur or worsen during periods of rest and in the evening and night. However, RLS is closely associated with periodic limb movement, which shows typical stererotyped limb movements. In the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd edition, sleep disturbances or daytime symptoms are prerequiste for a diagnosis of SRMD. We here review diagnosis and treatment of SRMD. PMID:26065126

  16. Eye Movement Correlates of Acquired Central Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schattka, Kerstin I.; Radach, Ralph; Huber, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Based on recent progress in theory and measurement techniques, the analysis of eye movements has become one of the major methodological tools in experimental reading research. Our work uses this approach to advance the understanding of impaired information processing in acquired central dyslexia of stroke patients with aphasia. Up to now there has…

  17. Control and Functions of Fixational Eye Movements

    PubMed Central

    Rucci, Michele; Poletti, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Humans and other species explore a visual scene by rapidly shifting their gaze 2-3 times every second. Although the eyes may appear immobile in the brief intervals in between saccades, microscopic (fixational) eye movements are always present, even when attending to a single point. These movements occur during the very periods in which visual information is acquired and processed and their functions have long been debated. Recent technical advances in controlling retinal stimulation during normal oculomotor activity have shed new light on the visual contributions of fixational eye movements and their degree of control. The emerging body of evidence, reviewed in this article, indicates that fixational eye movements are important components of the strategy by which the visual system processes fine spatial details, enabling both precise positioning of the stimulus on the retina and encoding of spatial information into the joint space-time domain.

  18. Tracking surface water mass movements in the Southwest Pacific for the last 5,000 years: Perspectives from deep-sea corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komugabe, A. F.; Fallon, S.; Thresher, R.; Eggins, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Current understanding of present-day natural climate variability can be improved by obtaining a good baseline through investigating past variability during the Holocene (11,500 cal yr B.P. to the present). In particular, changes in marine reservoir radiocarbon ages through the Holocene can provide information on regional ocean circulation. In the southwest Pacific, little is known about the variability of reservoir ages during this period. This limits efforts to reconstruct Southern Hemisphere Ocean and atmospheric circulation over this period. Here we present mid- to late-Holocene reservoir ages for the southwest Pacific. Reservoir ages were calculated using coupled uranium series (MC ICPMS) and radiocarbon (AMS) measurements on deep-sea (200 - 1000m) black coral (Anthozoa, Antipatharia) collected live from the Tasman Sea. Black corals have enormous potential as environmental archives to provide valuable long-term, high-resolution records. We confirm that black corals are slow growing (typical radial growth rate is 0.005 mm/yr) and extremely long-lived (maximum age 5,823 × 41 years), making them excellent candidates for proxies to extend environmental records into the Holocene. Our results also indicate comparatively lower reservoir ages for the mid-Holocene than present day for the south Tasman Sea. The lower reservoir ages in the mid-Holocene reflect a greater influx of well-equilibrated warm water of sub-tropical origin into this region, as well as increased stratification. During the late Holocene in the north Tasman, the average reservoir age between 1790 and 1900 was ˜330 years, followed by a steep decrease over time of about 70 years to 1950 AD (our most modern value). This indicates an increase in surface ocean ventilation of water masses in this region. These results are consistent with observational and modeling studies for the last century, which show significant changes in regional circulation and suggest these changes started as early as the 17th

  19. The mathematics of movement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Review of: Quantitative Analysis of Movement: Measuring and Modeling Population Redistribution in Animals and Plants. Peter Turchin. 1998. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA. 306 pages. $38.95 (paper).

  20. Does movement proficiency impact on exergaming performance?

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jess E; Thornton, Ashleigh L; Lay, Brendan S; Braham, Rebecca; Rosenberg, Michael

    2014-04-01

    There is growing interest in the use of consumer level exergames in movement skill acquisition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between movement proficiency and performance in virtual exergaming. Twenty seven children, aged 10-15years participated in an experiment completing the Movement Assessment Battery for Children 2 (MABC-2) and a series of XBOX360 Kinect Sports exergaming tasks. Significant correlations were observed between MABC-2 aiming and catching percentile and exergame javelin and target kick, where the more proficient movers tended to perform better in the exergame. Statistically significant correlations were observed between MABC-2 balance percentile and exergaming sprint and target kick performance. In this study children who scored better in real life gross motor movement tasks performed better in most related exergaming activities. This suggests current exergaming technology has advanced to a point where body movement unencumbered by a physical or remote game device tether can extract movements resembling real life tasks, translate them into game play and reward proficient movers with higher in-game performance. It is possible that benefit gained in an exergaming environment by more proficient movers was a result of either their more proficient movement, or a greater ability to adapt to the exergame. PMID:24667304

  1. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; S.D. Chittick; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2002-01-01

    In this reporting period, we extended the fault study to include more faults and developed new techniques to visualize the faults. We now have used data from the Dundee Formation to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin and are in the process of reviewing data from other horizons. These faults appear to control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review has been set for March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer.

  2. Randomness Of Amoeba Movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiguchi, S.; Khadijah, Siti; Kuwajima, T.; Ohki, M.; Tacano, M.; Sikula, J.

    2005-11-01

    Movements of amoebas were automatically traced using the difference between two successive frames of the microscopic movie. It was observed that the movements were almost random in that the directions and the magnitudes of the successive two steps are not correlated, and that the distance from the origin was proportional to the square root of the step number.

  3. The Human Potential Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamashiro, Roy T.

    The advent of the human potential movement has generated the expectation that educators unleash the intellectual, emotional, physical, and spiritual talents of students. This movement is characterized by its focus on (1) the person as a total being, (2) the needs and concerns of students, (3) phenomenology, (4) personal values and goals, and (5)…

  4. [Dance/Movement Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on dance, play, and movement therapy for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Individual articles are: "Join My Dance: The Unique Movement Style of Each Infant and Toddler Can Invite Communication, Expression and Intervention" (Suzi Tortora); "Dynamic Play Therapy: An Integrated Expressive Arts Approach to…

  5. 85 Engaging Movement Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weikart, Phyllis S.; Carlton, Elizabeth B.

    This book presents activities to keep K-6 students moving in a variety of ways as they learn. The movement experiences are planned around key curriculum concepts in movement and music as well as in academic curriculum areas. The experiences develop students' basic timing, language abilities, vocabulary, concentration, planning skills, and…

  6. National CARES Mentoring Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Martin L.

    2013-01-01

    Harsh and cruel experiences have led many of our young to believe that they are alone in the world and that no one cares. In this article, Martin L Mitchell introduces us to the "National CARES Mentoring Movement" founded by Susan L.Taylor. This movement provides young people with role models who help shape their positive development.…

  7. Measuring infant movement. Clinical and technological assessment techniques.

    PubMed

    Harris, S R; Heriza, C B

    1987-12-01

    Assessment of infant movement patterns is an important evaluation component in the early identification and management of high-risk and handicapped infants. Differences in infant movement patterns may provide early clues to the diagnosis of cerebral palsy and other developmental disabilities. The ultimate goal of early identification of movement disorders is the provision of early intervention services, such as developmental physical therapy. Qualitative analysis of infant movement differences can assist the clinician in developing treatment strategies aimed at facilitating normal movement patterns during the critical period of early central nervous system plasticity. This article presents four measurement strategies for quantifying such qualitative differences. Three clinical assessment tools--the Movement Assessment of Infants, the Bayley Motor Scale, and the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales--are described. Finally, new technological advances for kinematic analysis of infant movement are presented.

  8. Promises and pitfalls of recent advances in chemical means of preventing the spread of nosocomial infections by environmental surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Syed A

    2010-06-01

    Hard, nonporous environmental surfaces in health care settings are now receiving due recognition for their role in the spread of several types of nosocomial pathogens. The corresponding increase in the means to decontaminate such surfaces to interrupt the spread of infections is leading to the marketing of a plethora of products and procedures, including the "green" variety, with varying claims of microbicidal activity, human and environmental safety, and materials compatibility. Limitations of the existing methods to assess environmental surface disinfectants and the regulations that govern their premarket registration make objective evaluations difficult. Label claims of many such products also do not reflect the realities of field use along with a strong tendency to focus on the "bug de jour." Furthermore, whereas wiping is often an integral part of environmental surface decontamination, products meant for the purpose are rarely assessed with the physical effect of wiping incorporated. Many "green" products possess neither the spectrum of microbicidal activity nor the speed of action essential for use in health care settings. In general, "self-sanitizing" surfaces being marketed actively these days require greater scrutiny for field-relevant microbicidal activity as well as the potential to enhance microbicide resistance. The widening use of environmental surface disinfectants is also raising concerns on their human and environmental safety at many levels along with the realization that routine surface disinfection procedures in health care settings are frequently inadequate and possibly counterproductive. All this points to an urgent review of the basic procedures for assessing existing and new environmental surface disinfectants for their microbicidal activity, label claims, registration requirements, overall safety, and routine practices of environmental surface decontamination. PMID:20569854

  9. An advanced photogrammetric method to measure surface roughness: Application to volcanic terrains in the Piton de la Fournaise, Reunion Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretar, Frederic; Arab-Sedze, Melanie; Champion, Jean; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Marc; Heggy, Essam; Jacquemoud, Stephane

    2013-08-01

    We present a rapid in situ photogrammetric method to characterize surface roughness by taking overlapping photographs of a scene. The method uses a single digital camera to create a high-resolution digital terrain model (pixel size of ~ 1.32 mm) by means of a free open-source stereovision software. It is based on an auto-calibration process, which calculates the 3D geometry of the images, and an efficient multi-image correlation algorithm. The method is successfully applied to four different volcanic surfaces - namely, a'a lava flows, pahoehoe lava flows, slabby pahoehoe lava flows, and lapilli deposits. These surfaces were sampled in the Piton de la Fournaise volcano (Reunion Island) in October, 2011, and displayed various terrain roughnesses. Our in situ measurements allow deriving digital terrain models that reproduce the millimeter-scale height variations of the surfaces over about 12 m2. Five parameters characterizing surface topography are derived along unidirectional profiles: the root-mean-square height (ξ), the correlation length (Lc), the ratio Zs = ξ2/Lc, the tortuosity index (τ), and the fractal dimension (D). Anisotropy in the surface roughness has been first investigated using 1-m-long profiles circularly arranged around a central point. The results show that Lc, Zs and D effectively catch preferential directions in the structure of bare surfaces. Secondly, we studied the variation of these parameters as a function of the profile length by drawing random profiles from 1 to 12 m in length. We verified that ξ and Lc increase with the profile length and, therefore, are not appropriate to characterize surface roughness variation. We conclude that Zs and D are better suited to extract roughness information for multiple eruptive terrains with complex surface texture.

  10. Development of Advanced Surface Enhancement Technology for Decreasing Wear and Corrosion of Equipment Used for Mineral Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Tao; Craig A. Blue

    2006-07-20

    Equipment wear is a major concern in the mineral processing industry, which dramatically increases the maintenance cost and adversely affects plant operation efficiency. In this research, novel surface treatment technologies, High Density Infrared (HDI) and Laser Surface Engineering (LSE) surface coating processes were developed for the surface enhancement of selected mineral processing equipment. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the coated specimens were characterized. Laboratory-simulated wear tests were conducted to evaluate the tribological performance of the coated components. Test results indicate that the wear resistance of ASTM A36 (raw coal screen section) and can be significantly increased by applying HDI and LSE coating processes. Field testing has been performed using a LSE-treated screen panel and it showed a 2 times improvement of the service life.

  11. Development of Advanced Surface Enhancement Technology for Decreasing Wear and Corrosion of Equipment Used for Mineral Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Tao; R. Honaker; B. K. Parekh

    2007-09-20

    Equipment wear is a major concern in the mineral processing industry, which dramatically increases the maintenance cost and adversely affects plant operation efficiency. In this research, novel surface treatment technologies, High Density Infrared (HDI) and Laser Surface Engineering (LSE) surface coating processes were developed for the surface enhancement of selected mineral and coal processing equipment. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the coated specimens were characterized. Laboratory-simulated wear tests were conducted to evaluate the tribological performance of the coated components. Test results indicate that the wear resistance of ASTM A36 (raw coal screen section) and can be significantly increased by applying HDI and LSE coating processes. Field testing has been performed using a LSE-treated screen panel and it showed a significant improvement of the service life.

  12. Development of Advanced Surface Enhancement Technology for Decreasing Wear and Corrosion of Equipment Used for Mineral Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Tao; Craig A. Blue

    2005-08-01

    Equipment wear is a major concern in the mineral processing industry, which dramatically increases the maintenance cost and adversely affects plant operation efficiency. In this research, a novel surface treatment technology, laser surface engineering (LSE) surface coating process was proposed for the surface enhancement of selected mineral processing equipment. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the coated specimen were characterized. Laboratory-simulated wear tests were conducted to evaluate the tribological performance of the coated components. Test results indicate that the wear resistance of ASTM A36 (raw coal screen section) and AISI 4140 steels can be increased 10 and 25 folds, respectively by the application of LSE process. Initial field testing showed a 2 times improvement of the service life of a raw coal screen panel.

  13. Real-time studies of surface roughness development and reticulation mechanism of advanced photoresist materials during plasma processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, A. R.; Bruce, R. L.; Weilnboeck, F.; Engelmann, S.; Lin, T.; Kuo, M.-S.; Phaneuf, R.; Oehrlein, G. S.

    2009-01-01

    Surface roughness development of photoresist (PR) films during low pressure plasma etching has been studied using real-time laser light scattering from photoresist materials along with ellipsometric and atomic force microscopy (AFM) characterization. We show that evolution of the intensity of light scattered from a film surface can be used to study the development of surface roughness for a wide range of roughness starting from subnanometer to few hundred nanometers. Laser light scattering in combination with ellipsometry and AFM is also used to study the reticulation mechanism of 193 and 248 nm PRs during argon plasma processing. We employ a three-layer model (modified layer, rough layer, and bulk film) of the modified PR surface (193 and 248 nm PRs) to simulate and understand the behavior of ellipsometric Ψ-Δ trajectories. Bruggeman's effective medium approximation is employed to study the roughness that develops on the surface after reticulation. When the glass transition temperature of the organic materials is reached during Ar plasma processing, the PR films reticulate and roughness develops rapidly. Roughness development is more pronounced for 248 nm PR than for 193 nm PR. Simulation of Ψ-Δ shows that the growth of roughness is accompanied by strong expansion in the materials, which is stronger for 248 nm PR than 193 nm PR. The leading factors responsible for reticulation are found to be compressive stress that develops in the modified surface layer as it is created along with strong molecular chain motion and expansion of the material when the temperature is increased past the glass transition temperature. Reticulation leads to a significantly different surface morphology for 248 nm PR as compared to 193 nm PR and can be related to differences in molecular structure and composition leading to different responses when a modified surface layer is formed by ion bombardment accompanying plasma etching.

  14. Adaptive Movement Compensation for In Vivo Imaging of Fast Cellular Dynamics within a Moving Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Hugues; De Koninck, Paul; De Koninck, Yves; Côté, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In vivo non-linear optical microscopy has been essential to advance our knowledge of how intact biological systems work. It has been particularly enabling to decipher fast spatiotemporal cellular dynamics in neural networks. The power of the technique stems from its optical sectioning capability that in turn also limits its application to essentially immobile tissue. Only tissue not affected by movement or in which movement can be physically constrained can be imaged fast enough to conduct functional studies at high temporal resolution. Here, we show dynamic two-photon Ca2+ imaging in the spinal cord of a living rat at millisecond time scale, free of motion artifacts using an optical stabilization system. We describe a fast, non-contact adaptive movement compensation approach, applicable to rough and weakly reflective surfaces, allowing real-time functional imaging from intrinsically moving tissue in live animals. The strategy involves enslaving the position of the microscope objective to that of the tissue surface in real-time through optical monitoring and a closed feedback loop. The performance of the system allows for efficient image locking even in conditions of random or irregular movements. PMID:21629702

  15. Auxin and chloroplast movements.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Aleksandra; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Waligórski, Piotr; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-03-01

    Auxin is involved in a wide spectrum of physiological processes in plants, including responses controlled by the blue light photoreceptors phototropins: phototropic bending and stomatal movement. However, the role of auxin in phototropin-mediated chloroplast movements has never been studied. To address this question we searched for potential interactions between auxin and the chloroplast movement signaling pathway using different experimental approaches and two model plants, Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. We observed that the disturbance of auxin homeostasis by shoot decapitation caused a decrease in chloroplast movement parameters, which could be rescued by exogenous auxin application. In several cases, the impairment of polar auxin transport, by chemical inhibitors or in auxin carrier mutants, had a similar negative effect on chloroplast movements. This inhibition was not correlated with changes in auxin levels. Chloroplast relocations were also affected by the antiauxin p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid and mutations in genes encoding some of the elements of the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA auxin receptor complex. The observed changes in chloroplast movement parameters are not prominent, which points to a modulatory role of auxin in this process. Taken together, the obtained results suggest that auxin acts indirectly to regulate chloroplast movements, presumably by regulating gene expression via the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA-ARF pathway. Auxin does not seem to be involved in controlling the expression of phototropins.

  16. Key Questions in Marine Megafauna Movement Ecology.

    PubMed

    Hays, Graeme C; Ferreira, Luciana C; Sequeira, Ana M M; Meekan, Mark G; Duarte, Carlos M; Bailey, Helen; Bailleul, Fred; Bowen, W Don; Caley, M Julian; Costa, Daniel P; Eguíluz, Victor M; Fossette, Sabrina; Friedlaender, Ari S; Gales, Nick; Gleiss, Adrian C; Gunn, John; Harcourt, Rob; Hazen, Elliott L; Heithaus, Michael R; Heupel, Michelle; Holland, Kim; Horning, Markus; Jonsen, Ian; Kooyman, Gerald L; Lowe, Christopher G; Madsen, Peter T; Marsh, Helene; Phillips, Richard A; Righton, David; Ropert-Coudert, Yan; Sato, Katsufumi; Shaffer, Scott A; Simpfendorfer, Colin A; Sims, David W; Skomal, Gregory; Takahashi, Akinori; Trathan, Philip N; Wikelski, Martin; Womble, Jamie N; Thums, Michele

    2016-06-01

    It is a golden age for animal movement studies and so an opportune time to assess priorities for future work. We assembled 40 experts to identify key questions in this field, focussing on marine megafauna, which include a broad range of birds, mammals, reptiles, and fish. Research on these taxa has both underpinned many of the recent technical developments and led to fundamental discoveries in the field. We show that the questions have broad applicability to other taxa, including terrestrial animals, flying insects, and swimming invertebrates, and, as such, this exercise provides a useful roadmap for targeted deployments and data syntheses that should advance the field of movement ecology.

  17. Key Questions in Marine Megafauna Movement Ecology.

    PubMed

    Hays, Graeme C; Ferreira, Luciana C; Sequeira, Ana M M; Meekan, Mark G; Duarte, Carlos M; Bailey, Helen; Bailleul, Fred; Bowen, W Don; Caley, M Julian; Costa, Daniel P; Eguíluz, Victor M; Fossette, Sabrina; Friedlaender, Ari S; Gales, Nick; Gleiss, Adrian C; Gunn, John; Harcourt, Rob; Hazen, Elliott L; Heithaus, Michael R; Heupel, Michelle; Holland, Kim; Horning, Markus; Jonsen, Ian; Kooyman, Gerald L; Lowe, Christopher G; Madsen, Peter T; Marsh, Helene; Phillips, Richard A; Righton, David; Ropert-Coudert, Yan; Sato, Katsufumi; Shaffer, Scott A; Simpfendorfer, Colin A; Sims, David W; Skomal, Gregory; Takahashi, Akinori; Trathan, Philip N; Wikelski, Martin; Womble, Jamie N; Thums, Michele

    2016-06-01

    It is a golden age for animal movement studies and so an opportune time to assess priorities for future work. We assembled 40 experts to identify key questions in this field, focussing on marine megafauna, which include a broad range of birds, mammals, reptiles, and fish. Research on these taxa has both underpinned many of the recent technical developments and led to fundamental discoveries in the field. We show that the questions have broad applicability to other taxa, including terrestrial animals, flying insects, and swimming invertebrates, and, as such, this exercise provides a useful roadmap for targeted deployments and data syntheses that should advance the field of movement ecology. PMID:26979550

  18. Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies. Ninth quarterly technical progress report, September 1, 1992-- December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.H.; Leonard, J.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Jiang, C.L.

    1992-12-31

    This is the 9th quarterly technical progress report for the project entitled ``Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies``, DE-FG22-90PC90295. The work presented in this report was performed from September 1, 1992 to November 31, 1992. The objective of the project is to conduct extensive fundamental studies on the surface chemistry of pyrite oxidation and flotation and to understand how the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface affects the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. During this reporting period, the surface oxidation of pyrite in various electrolytes was investigated. It has been demonstrated, for the first time, that borate, a pH buffer and electrolyte used by many previous investigators in studying sulfide mineral oxidation, actively participates in the surface oxidation of pyrite. In borate solutions, the surface oxidation of pyrite is tronly enhanced. The anodic oxidation potential of pyrite is lowered by more than 0.4 volts. The initial reaction of the borate enhanced pyrite oxidation can be described by:FeS{sub 2} + B(OH){sub 4}{sup =} ------> [S{sub 2}Fe-B(OH){sub 4}]{sub surf} + e. This reaction is irreversible and is controlled by the mass-transfer of borate species from the solution to the surface. It has been shown that the above reaction inhibits the adsorption of xanthate on pyrite. Comparative studies have been made with other sulfide minerals. The solution chemistry of the iron-borate systems have been studied to understand the electrochemical results.

  19. Surface modification of nano-silica on the ligament advanced reinforcement system for accelerated bone formation: primary human osteoblasts testing in vitro and animal testing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengmeng; Wang, Shiwen; Jiang, Jia; Sun, Jiashu; Li, Yuzhuo; Huang, Deyong; Long, Yun-Ze; Zheng, Wenfu; Chen, Shiyi; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-05-01

    The Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS) has been considered as a promising graft for ligament reconstruction. To improve its biocompatibility and effectiveness on new bone formation, we modified the surface of a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) ligament with nanoscale silica using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and silica polymerization. The modified ligament is tested by both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Human osteoblast testing in vitro exhibits an ∼21% higher value in cell viability for silica-modified grafts compared with original grafts. Animal testing in vivo shows that there is new formed bone in the case of a nanoscale silica-coated ligament. These results demonstrate that our approach for nanoscale silica surface modification on LARS could be potentially applied for ligament reconstruction.

  20. Development of Advanced Surface Enhancement Technology for Decreasing Wear and Corrosion of Equipment Used for Mineral Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Tao; Craig A. Blue

    2004-08-01

    Equipment wear is a major concern in the mineral processing industry, which dramatically increases the maintenance cost and adversely affects plant operation efficiency. In this research, wear problems of mineral processing equipment including screens, sieve bends, heavy media vessel, dewatering centrifuge, etc., were identified. A novel surface treatment technology, high density infrared (HDI) surface coating process was proposed for the surface enhancement of selected mineral processing equipment. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the coated samples were characterized. Laboratory-simulated wear tests were conducted to evaluate the tribological performance of the coated components. Test results indicate that the wear resistance of AISI 4140 and ASTM A36 steels can be increased 3 and 5 folds, respectively by the application of HDI coatings.

  1. Surface modification of nano-silica on the ligament advanced reinforcement system for accelerated bone formation: primary human osteoblasts testing in vitro and animal testing in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mengmeng; Wang, Shiwen; Jiang, Jia; Sun, Jiashu; Li, Yuzhuo; Huang, Deyong; Long, Yun-Ze; Zheng, Wenfu; Chen, Shiyi; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-04-01

    The Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS) has been considered as a promising graft for ligament reconstruction. To improve its biocompatibility and effectiveness on new bone formation, we modified the surface of a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) ligament with nanoscale silica using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and silica polymerization. The modified ligament is tested by both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Human osteoblast testing in vitro exhibits an ~21% higher value in cell viability for silica-modified grafts compared with original grafts. Animal testing in vivo shows that there is new formed bone in the case of a nanoscale silica-coated ligament. These results demonstrate that our approach for nanoscale silica surface modification on LARS could be potentially applied for ligament reconstruction.The Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS) has been considered as a promising graft for ligament reconstruction. To improve its biocompatibility and effectiveness on new bone formation, we modified the surface of a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) ligament with nanoscale silica using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and silica polymerization. The modified ligament is tested by both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Human osteoblast testing in vitro exhibits an ~21% higher value in cell viability for silica-modified grafts compared with original grafts. Animal testing in vivo shows that there is new formed bone in the case of a nanoscale silica-coated ligament. These results demonstrate that our approach for nanoscale silica surface modification on LARS could be potentially applied for ligament reconstruction. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01439e

  2. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2002-04-01

    The fault study continues to find more faults and develop new techniques to visualize them. Data from the Dundee Formation has been used to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin which have now been verified using data from other horizons. These faults control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new GC laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review was held March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer. A request was made to extend the scope of the project to include the Willison Basin. A demonstration well has been suggested in Burke County, N. Dakota, following a review of 2D seismic and surface geochem. A 3D seismic survey is scheduled for the prospect.

  3. Movement Disorders Following Cerebrovascular Lesions in Cerebellar Circuits.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seong-Min

    2016-05-01

    Cerebellar circuitry is important to controlling and modifying motor activity. It conducts the coordination and correction of errors in muscle contractions during active movements. Therefore, cerebrovascular lesions of the cerebellum or its pathways can cause diverse movement disorders, such as action tremor, Holmes' tremor, palatal tremor, asterixis, and dystonia. The pathophysiology of abnormal movements after stroke remains poorly understood. However, due to the current advances in functional neuroimaging, it has recently been described as changes in functional brain networks. This review describes the clinical features and pathophysiological mechanisms in different types of movement disorders following cerebrovascular lesions in the cerebellar circuits. PMID:27240809

  4. Movement Disorders Following Cerebrovascular Lesions in Cerebellar Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar circuitry is important to controlling and modifying motor activity. It conducts the coordination and correction of errors in muscle contractions during active movements. Therefore, cerebrovascular lesions of the cerebellum or its pathways can cause diverse movement disorders, such as action tremor, Holmes’ tremor, palatal tremor, asterixis, and dystonia. The pathophysiology of abnormal movements after stroke remains poorly understood. However, due to the current advances in functional neuroimaging, it has recently been described as changes in functional brain networks. This review describes the clinical features and pathophysiological mechanisms in different types of movement disorders following cerebrovascular lesions in the cerebellar circuits. PMID:27240809

  5. Remodeling of Super-hydrophobic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Extrand, C W

    2016-08-30

    An experimental study on the underlying mechanisms of structured super-hydrophobic surfaces was recently published [ Butt, H.-J.; et al. How Water Advances on Superhydrophobic Surfaces. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2016, 116, 096101 . DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.096101 ]. After depositing small drops of water, Butt's group inclined their surfaces to initiate movement. They examined the contact between the water and structured surfaces with confocal microscopy. They observed that drops were suspended atop the protruding features and movement of water was different at the advancing and receding edges. At the advancing edge, the water interface descended downward and draped itself across the features. At the receding edge, water jumped from one feature to the next. As Butt and co-workers did not test their data against any existing model, that is done in this paper. Here, a previously proposed model that employs linear averaging at the contact line was adapted to their surfaces in an attempt to estimate their contact and sliding angles. Predictions from the model generally agreed with their experimental measurements. PMID:27541362

  6. Movement coordination during conversation.

    PubMed

    Latif, Nida; Barbosa, Adriano V; Vatikiotis-Bateson, Eric; Vatiokiotis-Bateson, Eric; Castelhano, Monica S; Munhall, K G

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral coordination and synchrony contribute to a common biological mechanism that maintains communication, cooperation and bonding within many social species, such as primates and birds. Similarly, human language and social systems may also be attuned to coordination to facilitate communication and the formation of relationships. Gross similarities in movement patterns and convergence in the acoustic properties of speech have already been demonstrated between interacting individuals. In the present studies, we investigated how coordinated movements contribute to observers' perception of affiliation (friends vs. strangers) between two conversing individuals. We used novel computational methods to quantify motor coordination and demonstrated that individuals familiar with each other coordinated their movements more frequently. Observers used coordination to judge affiliation between conversing pairs but only when the perceptual stimuli were restricted to head and face regions. These results suggest that observed movement coordination in humans might contribute to perceptual decisions based on availability of information to perceivers. PMID:25119189

  7. Movement Coordination during Conversation

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Nida; Barbosa, Adriano V.; Vatiokiotis-Bateson, Eric; Castelhano, Monica S.; Munhall, K. G.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral coordination and synchrony contribute to a common biological mechanism that maintains communication, cooperation and bonding within many social species, such as primates and birds. Similarly, human language and social systems may also be attuned to coordination to facilitate communication and the formation of relationships. Gross similarities in movement patterns and convergence in the acoustic properties of speech have already been demonstrated between interacting individuals. In the present studies, we investigated how coordinated movements contribute to observers’ perception of affiliation (friends vs. strangers) between two conversing individuals. We used novel computational methods to quantify motor coordination and demonstrated that individuals familiar with each other coordinated their movements more frequently. Observers used coordination to judge affiliation between conversing pairs but only when the perceptual stimuli were restricted to head and face regions. These results suggest that observed movement coordination in humans might contribute to perceptual decisions based on availability of information to perceivers. PMID:25119189

  8. Advances in large-scale ocean dynamics from a decade of satellite altimetric measurement of ocean surface topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. L.; Menard, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The past decade has seen the most intensive observations of the global ocean surface topography from satellite altimeters. The Joint U.S./France TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) Mission has become the longest radar mission ever flown in space, providing the most accurate measurements for the study of ocean dynamics since October 1992.

  9. Fluid movement and creativity.

    PubMed

    Slepian, Michael L; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-11-01

    Cognitive scientists describe creativity as fluid thought. Drawing from findings on gesture and embodied cognition, we hypothesized that the physical experience of fluidity, relative to nonfluidity, would lead to more fluid, creative thought. Across 3 experiments, fluid arm movement led to enhanced creativity in 3 domains: creative generation, cognitive flexibility, and remote associations. Alternative mechanisms such as enhanced mood and motivation were also examined. These results suggest that creativity can be influenced by certain types of physical movement.

  10. Calculations and surface quality measurements of high-asymmetry angle x-ray crystal monochromators for advanced x-ray imaging and metrological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zápražný, Zdenko; Korytár, Dušan; Jergel, Matej; Šiffalovič, Peter; Dobročka, Edmund; Vagovič, Patrik; Ferrari, Claudio; Mikulík, Petr; Demydenko, Maksym; Mikloška, Marek

    2015-03-01

    We present the numerical optimization and the technological development progress of x-ray optics based on asymmetric germanium crystals. We show the results of several basic calculations of diffraction properties of germanium x-ray crystal monochromators and of an analyzer-based imaging method for various asymmetry factors using an x-ray energy range from 8 to 20 keV. The important parameter of highly asymmetric monochromators as image magnifiers or compressors is the crystal surface quality. We have applied several crystal surface finishing methods, including advanced nanomachining using single-point diamond turning (SPDT), conventional mechanical lapping, chemical polishing, and chemomechanical polishing, and we have evaluated these methods by means of atomic force microscopy, diffractometry, reciprocal space mapping, and others. Our goal is to exclude the chemical etching methods as the final processing technique because it causes surface undulations. The aim is to implement very precise deterministic methods with a control of surface roughness down to 0.1 nm. The smallest roughness (˜0.3 nm), best planarity, and absence of the subsurface damage were observed for the sample which was machined using an SPDT with a feed rate of 1 mm/min and was consequently polished using a fine polishing 15-min process with a solution containing SiO2 nanoparticles (20 nm).

  11. Neural decoding of expressive human movement from scalp electroencephalography (EEG).

    PubMed

    Cruz-Garza, Jesus G; Hernandez, Zachery R; Nepaul, Sargoon; Bradley, Karen K; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L

    2014-01-01

    Although efforts to characterize human movement through electroencephalography (EEG) have revealed neural activities unique to limb control that can be used to infer movement kinematics, it is still unknown the extent to which EEG can be used to discern the expressive qualities that influence such movements. In this study we used EEG and inertial sensors to record brain activity and movement of five skilled and certified Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) dancers. Each dancer performed whole body movements of three Action types: movements devoid of expressive qualities ("Neutral"), non-expressive movements while thinking about specific expressive qualities ("Think"), and enacted expressive movements ("Do"). The expressive movement qualities that were used in the "Think" and "Do" actions consisted of a sequence of eight Laban Effort qualities as defined by LMA-a notation system and language for describing, visualizing, interpreting and documenting all varieties of human movement. We used delta band (0.2-4 Hz) EEG as input to a machine learning algorithm that computed locality-preserving Fisher's discriminant analysis (LFDA) for dimensionality reduction followed by Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) to decode the type of Action. We also trained our LFDA-GMM models to classify all the possible combinations of Action Type and Laban Effort quality (giving a total of 17 classes). Classification accuracy rates were 59.4 ± 0.6% for Action Type and 88.2 ± 0.7% for Laban Effort quality Type. Ancillary analyses of the potential relations between the EEG and movement kinematics of the dancer's body, indicated that motion-related artifacts did not significantly influence our classification results. In summary, this research demonstrates that EEG has valuable information about the expressive qualities of movement. These results may have applications for advancing the understanding of the neural basis of expressive movements and for the development of neuroprosthetics to restore

  12. Neural decoding of expressive human movement from scalp electroencephalography (EEG)

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Garza, Jesus G.; Hernandez, Zachery R.; Nepaul, Sargoon; Bradley, Karen K.; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L.

    2014-01-01

    Although efforts to characterize human movement through electroencephalography (EEG) have revealed neural activities unique to limb control that can be used to infer movement kinematics, it is still unknown the extent to which EEG can be used to discern the expressive qualities that influence such movements. In this study we used EEG and inertial sensors to record brain activity and movement of five skilled and certified Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) dancers. Each dancer performed whole body movements of three Action types: movements devoid of expressive qualities (“Neutral”), non-expressive movements while thinking about specific expressive qualities (“Think”), and enacted expressive movements (“Do”). The expressive movement qualities that were used in the “Think” and “Do” actions consisted of a sequence of eight Laban Effort qualities as defined by LMA—a notation system and language for describing, visualizing, interpreting and documenting all varieties of human movement. We used delta band (0.2–4 Hz) EEG as input to a machine learning algorithm that computed locality-preserving Fisher's discriminant analysis (LFDA) for dimensionality reduction followed by Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) to decode the type of Action. We also trained our LFDA-GMM models to classify all the possible combinations of Action Type and Laban Effort quality (giving a total of 17 classes). Classification accuracy rates were 59.4 ± 0.6% for Action Type and 88.2 ± 0.7% for Laban Effort quality Type. Ancillary analyses of the potential relations between the EEG and movement kinematics of the dancer's body, indicated that motion-related artifacts did not significantly influence our classification results. In summary, this research demonstrates that EEG has valuable information about the expressive qualities of movement. These results may have applications for advancing the understanding of the neural basis of expressive movements and for the development of

  13. Relationship between ice island movement and weather conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, M.H.

    1986-09-01

    The object of this study is to find the relationship between ice island movement and synoptic weather conditions by using daily ice island position information and surface pressure maps. Trajectory analysis of an ice island for one year shows three types of movement episodes: (1) large movement in the southwest direction; (2) medium movement in two sequentially opposite directions; and (3) small random movement. Surface pressure maps show that an off-shore geostrophic wind component is a necessary pre-condition for the large and medium movements in the southwest direction. A high pressure system located near the North Pole then causes the movement in the southwest direction, whereas a low pressure system located near the North Pole causes the movement in the northeast direction. Results show that the speed ratios between the ice island and the geostrophic wind range from 1.0% to 1.5% for the large movement and 0.1% to 1.0% for the medium movement; the average angle ranges from 20 to 26/sup 0/ counterclockwise from the geostrophic wind direction to the ice island movement direction. A force balance shows that, for an equilibrium drifting state, a residual force must be included. 60 refs., 55 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Technological advances shaping scleral lenses: the Boston ocular surface prosthesis in patients with glaucoma tubes and trabeculectomies.

    PubMed

    Tanhehco, Tasha; Jacobs, Deborah S

    2010-01-01

    The Boston Ocular Surface Prosthesis (BOS-P) (Boston Foundation for Sight, Needham, MA) is a fluid-ventilated rigid gas-permeable scleral lens that is utilized for the treatment of irregular corneal astigmatism and severe ocular surface disease. Recent reports have highlighted the utility of the BOS-P as a therapeutic device in cases of persistent epithelial defects, corneal neovascularization, ocular graft versus host disease, and exposure keratopathy. Patients with significant cornea disease might also have glaucoma, and those who have undergone glaucoma surgery, which typically disrupts the limbus, present a challenge when fitting the BOS-P. This report describes five patients with a history of both corneal disease and glaucoma surgery who were successfully fitted with the BOS-P.

  15. Advancing the retrievals of surface emissivity by modelling the spatial distribution of temperature in the thermal hyperspectral scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoni, M.; Haelterman, R.; Lodewyckx, P.

    2016-05-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Land Surface Emissivity (LSE) are commonly retrieved from thermal hyperspectral imaging. However, their retrieval is not a straightforward procedure because the mathematical problem is ill-posed. This procedure becomes more challenging in an urban area where the spatial distribution of temperature varies substantially in space and time. For assessing the influence of several spatial variances on the deviation of the temperature in the scene, a statistical model is created. The model was tested using several images from various times in the day and was validated using in-situ measurements. The results highlight the importance of the geometry of the scene and its setting relative to the position of the sun during day time. It also shows that when the position of the sun is in zenith, the main contribution to the thermal distribution in the scene is the thermal capacity of the landcover materials. In this paper we propose a new Temperature and Emissivity Separation (TES) method which integrates 3D surface and landcover information from LIDAR and VNIR hyperspectral imaging data in an attempt to improve the TES procedure for a thermal hyperspectral scene. The experimental results prove the high accuracy of the proposed method in comparison to another conventional TES model.

  16. Susceptibility genes in movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Sonja; Singleton, Andrew

    2008-05-15

    During the last years, remarkable progress in our understanding of molecular genetic mechanisms underlying movement disorders has been achieved. The successes of linkage studies, followed by positional cloning, have dominated the last decade and several genes underlying monogenic disorders have been discovered. The pathobiological understanding garnered from these mutations has laid the foundation for much of the search for genetic loci that confer risk for, rather than cause, disease. With the introduction of whole genome association studies as a novel tool to investigate genetic variation underlying common, complex diseases, a new era in neurogenomics has just begun. As the field rapidly moves forward several new challenges and critical questions in clinical care have to be addressed. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the discovery of susceptibility loci underlying major movement disorders, explain the newest methodologies and tools employed for finding and characterizing genes and discuss how insights into the molecular genetic basis of neurological disorders will impact therapeutic concepts in patient care.

  17. Movelets: A dictionary of movement

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jiawei; Goldsmith, Jeff; Caffo, Brian; Glass, Thomas A.; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent technological advances provide researchers with a way of gathering real-time information on an individual's movement through the use of wearable devices that record acceleration. In this paper, we propose a method for identifying activity types, like walking, standing, and resting, from acceleration data. Our approach decomposes movements into short components called “movelets”, and builds a reference for each activity type. Unknown activities are predicted by matching new movelets to the reference. We apply our method to data collected from a single, three-axis accelerometer and focus on activities of interest in studying physical function in elderly populations. An important technical advantage of our methods is that they allow identification of short activities, such as taking two or three steps and then stopping, as well as low frequency rare(compared with the whole time series) activities, such as sitting on a chair. Based on our results we provide simple and actionable recommendations for the design and implementation of large epidemiological studies that could collect accelerometry data for the purpose of predicting the time series of activities and connecting it to health outcomes. PMID:23293708

  18. Enlightened Publics: Popular Education Movements in Europe, Their Legacy and Promise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Popular education movements can be dated back to the religious heresies of the Middle Ages but only become well-formed movements following the eighteenth-century Enlightenment. In this article I outline the scope and nature of some of the most effective of these movements which have come to inform the concept of the "public sphere" advanced by…

  19. Advances in Raman spectroscopy for In Situ Identification of Minerals and Organics on Diverse Planetary Surfaces: from Mars to Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacksberg, J.; Alerstam, E.; Maruyama, Y.; Cochrane, C.; Rossman, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present recent developments in time-resolved Raman spectroscopy for in situ planetary surface exploration, aimed at identification of both minerals and organics. Raman is a non-destructive surface technique that requires no sample preparation. Raman spectra are highly material specific and can be used for identification of a wide range of unknown samples. In combination with micro-scale imaging and point mapping, Raman spectroscopy can be used to directly interrogate rocks and regolith materials, while placing compositional analyses within a microtextural context, essential for understanding surface evolutionary pathways. Due to these unique capabilities, Raman spectroscopy is of great interest for the exploration of all rocky and icy bodies, for example Mars, Venus, the Moon, Mars' moons, asteroids, comets, Europa, and Titan. In this work, we focus on overcoming one of the most difficult challenges faced in Raman spectroscopy: interference from background fluorescence of the very minerals and organics that we wish to characterize. To tackle this problem we use time-resolved Raman spectroscopy, which separates the Raman from background processes in the time domain. This same technique also enables operation in daylight without the need for light shielding. Two key components are essential for the success of this technique: a fast solid-state detector and a short-pulse laser. Our detector is a custom developed Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) array, capable of sub-ns time-gating. Our pulsed lasers are solid-state miniature pulsed microchip lasers. We discuss optimization of laser and detector parameters for our application. We then present Raman spectra of particularly challenging planetary analog samples to demonstrate the unique capabilities of this time-resolved Raman instrument, for example, Mars-analog clays and Titan-analog organics. The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a

  20. The classification of the Arctic Sea ice types and the determination of surface temperature using advanced very high resolution radiometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massom, Robert; Comiso, Josefino C.

    1994-01-01

    The accurate quantification of new ice and open water areas and surface temperatures within the sea ice packs is a key to the realistic parameterization of heat, moisture, and turbulence fluxes between ocean and atmosphere in the polar regions. Multispectral NOAA advanced very high resolution radiometer/2 (AVHRR/2) satellite images are analyzed to evaluate how effectively the data can be used to characterize sea ice in the Bering and Greenland seas, both in terms of surface type and physical temperature. The basis of the classification algorithm, which is developed using a late wintertime Bering Sea ice cover data, is that frequency distributions of 10.8- micrometers radiances provide four distinct peaks, represeting open water, new ice, young ice, and thick ice with a snow cover. The results are found to be spatially and temporally consistent. Possible sources of ambiguity, especially associated with wider temporal and spatial application of the technique, are discussed. An ice surface temperature algorithm is developed for the same study area by regressing thermal infrared data from 10.8- and 12.0- micrometers channels against station air temperatures, which are assumed to approximate the skin temperatures of adjacent snow and ice. The standard deviations of the results when compared with in situ data are about 0.5 K over leads and polynyas to about 0.5-1.5 K over thick ice. This study is based upon a set of in situ data limited in scope and coverage. Cloud masks are applied using a thresholding technique that utilizes 3.74- and 10.8- micrometers channel data. The temperature maps produced show coherence with surface features like new ice and leads, and consistency with corresponding surface type maps. Further studies are needed to better understand the effects of both the spatial and temporal variability in emissivity, aerosol and precipitable atmospheric ice particle distribution, and atmospheric temperature inversions.

  1. Feasibility and process scale-up low cost alumina fibers for advanced Re-usable Surface Insulation (RSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, A.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of this program was to establish feasibility of a process to produce low cost aluminum oxide fibers having sufficient strength, flexibility, and thermal stability for multiple re-use at temperatures to 1480 C in advanced RSI type heat shields for reentry vehicles. Using bench-scale processing apparatus, the Alcoa 'Saphiber' process was successfully modified to produce nominally 8 microns diameter polycrystalline alpha-alumina fiber. Thermal stability was demonstrated in vacuum reheating tests to 1371 C and in atmospheric reheating to 1483 C. Individual fiber properties of strength, modulus, and flexibility were not determined because of friability and short length of the fiber. Rigidized tile produced from fiber of nominally 8, 20 and 40 micron diameter had thermal conductivities significantly higher than those of RSI SiO2 or mullite at relatively low temperature but became comparable above about 1000 C. Tile densities were high due to short fiber length, especially in the coarser diameter fiber. No significant effect of fiber diameter on thermal properties could be determined form the data. Mechanical properties of tiles deteriorated as fiber diameter increased.

  2. [Hereditary movement disorders].

    PubMed

    Schulz, J B

    2007-12-01

    Hereditary movement disorders comprise a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by an impaired control of movements, ataxia and/or spasticity. Affected individuals are disabled, their quality of life significantly reduced and their life expectancy shortened. One or more genetic causes have been identified for many of these diseases, including Huntington's disease, Wilson's disease, spinocerebellar ataxias, recessive ataxias, hereditary spastic paraplegia and hereditary dystonias. Due to their characteristic molecular and biochemical pathogenesis, these rare diseases can often serve as models for more common disorders such as Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease. The primary tasks of the German Network of Hereditary Movement Disorders (GeNeMove), funded by the German Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF), are to co-ordinate basic scientific research and clinical research into rare hereditary movement disorders and to improve the cooperation between the German centers specializing in hereditary movement disorders. For each of the diseases in its scope, GeNeMove works at creating standardized documentation of symptoms and the disease's progressive course over time; developing rating scales for clinical examinations and guidelines for therapy; improving genetic testing; fostering genetic research; and collecting samples of DNA, tissue, CSF and blood from sufferers of the disease for biobanks.

  3. Psychostimulants and Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Asser, Andres; Taba, Pille

    2015-01-01

    Psychostimulants are a diverse group of substances with their main psychomotor effects resembling those of amphetamine, methamphetamine, cocaine, or cathinone. Due to their potential as drugs of abuse, recreational use of most of these substances is illegal since 1971 Convention on Psychotropic Substances. In recent years, new psychoactive substances have emerged mainly as synthetic cathinones with new molecules frequently complementing the list. Psychostimulant related movement disorders are a known entity often seen in emergency rooms around the world. These admissions are becoming more frequent as are fatalities associated with drug abuse. Still the legal constraints of the novel synthetic molecules are bypassed. At the same time, chronic and permanent movement disorders are much less frequently encountered. These disorders frequently manifest as a combination of movement disorders. The more common symptoms include agitation, tremor, hyperkinetic and stereotypical movements, cognitive impairment, and also hyperthermia and cardiovascular dysfunction. The pathophysiological mechanisms behind the clinical manifestations have been researched for decades. The common denominator is the monoaminergic signaling. Dopamine has received the most attention but further research has demonstrated involvement of other pathways. Common mechanisms linking psychostimulant use and several movement disorders exist. PMID:25941511

  4. Pursuit Eye Movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauzlis, Rich; Stone, Leland; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    When viewing objects, primates use a combination of saccadic and pursuit eye movements to stabilize the retinal image of the object of regard within the high-acuity region near the fovea. Although these movements involve widespread regions of the nervous system, they mix seamlessly in normal behavior. Saccades are discrete movements that quickly direct the eyes toward a visual target, thereby translating the image of the target from an eccentric retinal location to the fovea. In contrast, pursuit is a continuous movement that slowly rotates the eyes to compensate for the motion of the visual target, minimizing the blur that can compromise visual acuity. While other mammalian species can generate smooth optokinetic eye movements - which track the motion of the entire visual surround - only primates can smoothly pursue a single small element within a complex visual scene, regardless of the motion elsewhere on the retina. This ability likely reflects the greater ability of primates to segment the visual scene, to identify individual visual objects, and to select a target of interest.

  5. The help of Advanced Satellite Interferometry in assessing the effect of human-induced surface deformation in naturally subsiding areas. Methodological approach and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburini, Andrea; Giannico, Chiara; Del Conte, Sara; Teatini, Pietro

    2014-05-01

    Underground water extraction, natural gas storage either in depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs or in aquifers, and excavations for civil works (e.g. underground passageways, car parks, etc.) in flat areas are responsible for surface deformation that can damage pre-existing structures and modify drainage pathways. Deformation patterns associated to different underground show in many cases typical patterns. Their recognition can help in disentangling different processes when occurring in areas already affected by natural subsidence, such as coastal areas and inner sedimentary plains. Moreover, assessing the extent of human-induced deformation can help in identifying causes, modelling phenomena, predicting their evolution and adopting proper remedial measures. Advanced Satellite Interferometry provides a synoptic view of surface displacements over large areas and long time-spans and has become a standard in several Italian regions where underground fluid injection and withdrawal is going on. The integration of interferometric measurements with ground (leveling, GPS) and underground (borehole extensometers, piezometers, micro-seismic) monitoring networks can provide an exhaustive framework of the effect induced at surface level by underground human activities at local and regional scale. Documented case studies demonstrating the effectiveness of the above approach will be presented.

  6. Towards advanced structural analysis of iron oxide clusters on the surface of γ-Al2O3 using EXAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubnov, Alexey; Roppertz, Andreas; Kundrat, Matthew D.; Mangold, Stefan; Reznik, Boris; Jacob, Christoph R.; Kureti, Sven; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2016-11-01

    Iron oxide centres are structurally investigated in 0.1% Fe/γ-Al2O3, which is known as highly active catalyst, for instance in the oxidation of CO. The sample was characterised by using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in terms of X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These analyses evidenced high dispersion of the iron oxide entities without significant presence of bulk-like aggregates associated with the low Fe content of the catalyst. A library of structural models of Al2O3-supported surface Fe was created as input for EXAFS fitting. Additionally, several model structures of Fe substituting Al ions in bulk γ-Al2O3 were created with optimised geometry based on density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. From EXAFS refinement of the best 8 out of 24 models, it was found that the trivalent Fe ions are coordinated by 4-5 oxygen atoms and are located on octahedral lattice sites of the exposed surfaces of γ-Al2O3. These iron oxide species exist mainly as a mixture of monomeric and binuclear species and due to the low concentration represent suitable model systems as alternative to single crystal systems for structure-function relationships.

  7. Nano-design of quantum dot-based photocatalysts for hydrogen generation using advanced surface molecular chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weili; Noureldine, Dalal; Isimjan, Tayirjan; Lin, Bin; Del Gobbo, Silvano; Abulikemu, Mutalifu; Hedhili, Mohamed Nejib; Anjum, Dalaver H; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-14

    Efficient photocatalytic hydrogen generation in a suspension system requires a sophisticated nano-device that combines a photon absorber with effective redox catalysts. This study demonstrates an innovative molecular linking strategy for fabricating photocatalytic materials that allow effective charge separation of excited carriers, followed by efficient hydrogen evolution. The method for the sequential replacement of ligands with appropriate molecules developed in this study tethers both quantum dots (QDs), as photosensitizers, and metal nanoparticles, as hydrogen evolution catalysts, to TiO2 surfaces in a controlled manner at the nano-level. Combining hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions on the surface, CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs and an Au-Pt alloy were attached to TiO2 without overlapping during the synthesis. The resultant nano-photocatalysts achieved substantially high-performance visible-light-driven photocatalysis for hydrogen evolution. All syntheses were conducted at room temperature and in ambient air, providing a promising route for fabricating visible-light-responsive photocatalysts.

  8. The Occitan Movement in Southern France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Klaus

    The Occitan movement in Southern France should be studied in the light of a world-wide political reality of our days, the surfacing of ethnic minorities which are beginning to voice cultural and political demands in almost all large industrialized or developing countries. The first step for a minority group to come into existence is almost without…

  9. Higher Education Reform as a Social Movement: The Case of Affirmative Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoads, Robert A.; Saenz, Victor; Carducci, Rozana

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores affirmative action as a social movement with two goals in mind: (a) to challenge dominant notions of higher education reform, while advancing a social movement perspective; and (b) to advance understanding of the role of collective action in supporting affirmative action in college admissions. The authors highlight ways in…

  10. Movement as utopia.

    PubMed

    Couton, Philippe; López, José Julián

    2009-10-01

    Opposition to utopianism on ontological and political grounds has seemingly relegated it to a potentially dangerous form of antiquated idealism. This conclusion is based on a restrictive view of utopia as excessively ordered panoptic discursive constructions. This overlooks the fact that, from its inception, movement has been central to the utopian tradition. The power of utopianism indeed resides in its ability to instantiate the tension between movement and place that has marked social transformations in the modern era. This tension continues in contemporary discussions of movement-based social processes, particularly international migration and related identity formations, such as open borders transnationalism and cosmopolitanism. Understood as such, utopia remains an ongoing and powerful, albeit problematic instrument of social and political imagination. PMID:20027697

  11. Movement as utopia.

    PubMed

    Couton, Philippe; López, José Julián

    2009-10-01

    Opposition to utopianism on ontological and political grounds has seemingly relegated it to a potentially dangerous form of antiquated idealism. This conclusion is based on a restrictive view of utopia as excessively ordered panoptic discursive constructions. This overlooks the fact that, from its inception, movement has been central to the utopian tradition. The power of utopianism indeed resides in its ability to instantiate the tension between movement and place that has marked social transformations in the modern era. This tension continues in contemporary discussions of movement-based social processes, particularly international migration and related identity formations, such as open borders transnationalism and cosmopolitanism. Understood as such, utopia remains an ongoing and powerful, albeit problematic instrument of social and political imagination.

  12. The Black Civil Rights Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burson, George

    1986-01-01

    Presents part of the Aspen High School curriculum about the United States civil rights movement. Focuses on why Blacks were segregated and disenfranchised prior to the movement, why the movement took place, what were the results of the movement, and what is the present condition of Blacks in American society. (JDH)

  13. Correcting Slightly Less Simple Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aivar, M. P.; Brenner, E.; Smeets, J. B. J.

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have analysed how goal directed movements are corrected in response to changes in the properties of the target. However, only simple movements to single targets have been used in those studies, so little is known about movement corrections under more complex situations. Evidence from studies that ask for movements to several targets…

  14. Advancing the Remote Sensing of Land Surface-Atmosphere Interactions: Field Campaign Needs in the Next Decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, F. G.; Sellers, P. J.; Hummerich, K. F.

    2008-12-01

    Field Campaigns have played a vital role in the development of remote sensing measurement techniques and models to observe the changing nature of the Earth's vegetated land surface and to compute the exchange of carbon, water and energy from the vegetated land surface. Importantly, they have pioneered and fostered a culture of interdisciplinary research focusing and integrating the efforts of the hydrology, ecology and remote sensing communities toward the resolution of a critical question for life on the planet earth; How are the Earth's energy, water and carbon cycles changing, and what are the consequences for the Earth's climate, the sustainability of its ecosystems and biodiversity? Not only have the research results from these campaigns contributed substantially to the resolution of this critical question, the interdisciplinary data sets acquired and made easily accessible to the global scientific community, continue to contribute, remaining heavily utilized more than 20 years following the completion of the earliest campaigns. A new generation of earth science satellites is now on the drawing board; in the US to extend the 30+ year data record from the Landsat series; some to extend the data record from NOAA's AVHRR, NASA's Terra and Aqua; and a growing constellation of satellites from Europe, Japan, India and China. In addition to continuing the existing satellite data record, new satellite concepts, utilizing combined radar and lidar measurements, are being designed in the US and abroad to map the earth's vegetation, ice and solid surfaces in three dimensions. These capabilities will permit global mapping of the vertical and horizontal structure of vegetation, critical to measuring biomass and biomass change needed to understand and project future changes in the earth's carbon cycle, climate and biodiversity. New space capabilities require new field campaigns To be effective these campaigns must be formulated with a rigorous experiment design focused on

  15. Recent advances in particle and droplet manipulation for lab-on-a-chip devices based on surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuochen; Zhe, Jiang

    2011-04-01

    Manipulation of microscale particles and fluid liquid droplets is an important task for lab-on-a-chip devices for numerous biological researches and applications, such as cell detection and tissue engineering. Particle manipulation techniques based on surface acoustic waves (SAWs) appear effective for lab-on-a-chip devices because they are non-invasive, compatible with soft lithography micromachining, have high energy density, and work for nearly any type of microscale particles. Here we review the most recent research and development of the past two years in SAW based particle and liquid droplet manipulation for lab-on-a-chip devices including particle focusing and separation, particle alignment and patterning, particle directing, and liquid droplet delivery.

  16. Advancing the use of Lactobacillus acidophilus surface layer protein A for the treatment of intestinal disorders in humans.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Bikash; Ge, Yong; Colliou, Natacha; Zadeh, Mojgan; Weiner, Chelsea; Mila, Ashley; Owen, Jennifer L; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal immunity is subject to complex and fine-tuned regulation dictated by interactions of the resident microbial community and their gene products with host innate cells. Deterioration of this delicate process may result in devastating autoinflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which primarily comprises Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Efficacious interventions to regulate proinflammatory signals, which play critical roles in IBD, require further scientific investigation. We recently demonstrated that rebalancing intestinal immunity via the surface layer protein A (SlpA) from Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM potentially represents a feasible therapeutic approach to restore intestinal homeostasis. To expand on these findings, we established a new method of purifying bacterial SlpA, a new SlpA-specific monoclonal antibody, and found no SlpA-associated toxicity in mice. Thus, these data may assist in our efforts to determine the immune regulatory efficacy of SlpA in humans.

  17. Combining modules for movement.

    PubMed

    Bizzi, E; Cheung, V C K; d'Avella, A; Saltiel, P; Tresch, M

    2008-01-01

    We review experiments supporting the hypothesis that the vertebrate motor system produces movements by combining a small number of units of motor output. Using a variety of approaches such as microstimulation of the spinal cord, NMDA iontophoresis, and an examination of natural behaviors in intact and deafferented animals we have provided evidence for a modular organization of the spinal cord. A module is a functional unit in the spinal cord that generates a specific motor output by imposing a specific pattern of muscle activation. Such an organization might help to simplify the production of movements by reducing the degrees of freedom that need to be specified.

  18. Reflexive Research Ethics for Environmental Health and Justice: Academics and Movement-Building

    PubMed Central

    Cordner, Alissa; Ciplet, David; Brown, Phil; Morello-Frosch, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Community-engaged research on environmental problems has reshaped researcher-participant relationships, academic-community interaction, and the role of community partners in human subjects protection and ethical oversight. We draw on our own and others’ research collaborations with environmental health and justice social movement organizations to discuss the ethical concerns that emerge in community-engaged research. In this paper we introduce the concept of reflexive research ethics: ethical guidelines and decision-making principles that depend on continual reflexivity concerning the relationships between researchers and participants. Seeing ethics in this way can help scientists conduct research that simultaneously achieves a high level of professional conduct and protects the rights, well-being, and autonomy of both researchers and the multiple publics affected by research. We highlight our research with community-based organizations in Massachusetts, California, and Alaska, and discuss the potential impacts of the community or social movement on the research process and the potential impacts of research on community or social movement goals. We conclude by discussing ways in which the ethical concerns that surface in community-engaged research have led to advances in ethical research practices. This type of work raises ethical questions whose answers are broadly relevant for social movement, environmental, and public health scholars. PMID:22690133

  19. Simulations and surface quality testing of high asymmetry angle x-ray crystal monochromators for advanced x-ray imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zápražný, Z.; Korytár, D.; Šiffalovič, P.; Jergel, M.; Demydenko, M.; Mikulík, P.; Dobročka, E.; Ferrari, C.; Vagovič, P.; Mikloška, M.

    2014-09-01

    Advanced X-ray imaging techniques of weakly absorbing structures require an increase of the sensitivity to small refractive angles considering that they are based more on coherent X-ray phase contrast than on X-ray absorption one. Simulations of diffraction properties of germanium (Ge) X-ray crystal monochromators and of analyzer based imaging (ABI) method were performed for various asymmetry factors and several lattice plane orientations using an X-ray energy range from 8 keV to 20 keV. Using an appropriate phase/amplitude retrieval method one can recover the phase information from the ABI image, which is directly proportional to the projected electron density. We are using germanium based optics for X-ray imaging or image magnification. The use of Ge crystals offers several advantages over silicon crystals. The integrated reflectivity of Ge crystals is two to three times larger than that of Si crystals. The spatial resolution of Ge magnifiers is typically two times better than the spatial resolution of Si magnifiers. We used high asymmetry diffractions to increase effectively the propagation distance and decrease the effective pixel size of the detector, to achieve a sufficient magnification of the sample and to improve coherence and increase output intensity. The most important parameter of a highly asymmetric monochromators as image magnifiers is the crystal surface quality. We have applied several crystal surface finishing methods including conventional mechanical lapping, chemical polishing, chemo-mechanical polishing and advanced nano-machining using single point diamond turning (SPDT), and we have evaluated these methods by means of AFM, diffractometry, reciprocal space mapping and others.

  20. Advanced Nanoemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryd, Michael M.; Mason, Thomas G.

    2012-05-01

    Recent advances in the growing field of nanoemulsions are opening up new applications in many areas such as pharmaceuticals, foods, and cosmetics. Moreover, highly controlled nanoemulsions can also serve as excellent model systems for investigating basic scientific questions about soft matter. Here, we highlight some of the most recent developments in nanoemulsions, focusing on methods of formation, surface modification, material properties, and characterization. These developments provide insight into the substantial advantages that nanoemulsions can offer over their microscale emulsion counterparts.

  1. Advances in surface ion suppression from RILIS: Towards the Time-of-Flight Laser Ion Source (ToF-LIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothe, S.; Catherall, R.; Crepieux, B.; Day Goodacre, T.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Giles, T.; Marsh, B. A.; Ramos, J. P.; Rossel, R. E.

    2016-06-01

    We present results from the development towards the Time-of-Flight Laser Ion Source (ToF-LIS) aiming for the suppression of isobaric contaminants through fast beam gating. The capability to characterize high resistance ion sources has been successfully demonstrated. A ninefold selectivity gain has been achieved through suppression of surface ionized potassium, while maintaining >90% transmission for laser-ionized gallium using a thin wall graphite ionizer cavity combined with a fast beam gate. Initial results from the investigation of glassy carbon as a potential hot cavity ion source are presented. Power-cycle tests of a newly designed mount for fragile ion source cavities indicates its capability to survive the thermal stress expected during operation in an ISOLDE target unit. Finally, we introduce fast ion beam switching at a rate of 10 kHz using the ISOLDE ion beam switchyard as a new concept for ion beam distribution and conclude by highlighting the potential applications of this ion beam multiplexing technique.

  2. Surface-exposure Dating of Late Quaternary Glacial Advances in the Cordillera Blanca, Peruvian Andes (9°-10°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Zehner, S. P., Jr.; Bowen, D. R.; Rodbell, D. T.

    2013-12-01

    New 10Be surface-exposure ages from boulders on lateral moraines bordering Querococha Valley (9°44.6' S, 77°21.6' W) in the southern Cordillera Blanca, Peru, indicate that late-glacial (˜16 ka) ice extended as much as 15 km downvalley from the headwall(s). With the glacier terminus at ˜3900 masl and the headwall at ˜5200 masl, THAR reconstruction (THAR=0.45) places the late-glacial equilibrium-line altitude (ELA) at ˜4485 masl, as compared to an estimated modern ELA of ˜5100 masl. The late-glacial Querococha advance was coeval with late-glacial advances at the Nevado Jeulla Rajo (NJR) massif at the southern end of the Cordillera Blanca (10°00'S, 77°16'W; peaks ˜5600 masl), ˜35 km to the south, where we have dated multiple moraines. Surface-exposure ages (10Be) indicate that the largest lateral moraines from Jeullesh Valley at NJR are compound features deposited during both the local last glacial maximum (˜30 ka) and a late-glacial readvance (˜15 ka). Late-glacial moraines are the largest lateral moraines in neighboring Quenua Ragra and Tuco valleys. The timing of the late-glacial advances in the Cordillera Blanca suggests a link to increased precipitation associated with Heinrich Event I (˜17 ka). Additional new 10Be surface-exposure ages from boulders on a moraine crossing a side valley in the upper reaches of Jeullesh Valley are early Holocene (˜9-11 ka), suggesting retreat of 3-4 km from the late-glacial terminal position in ˜4 kyr. Using the same THAR methodology, the late-glacial ELA in Jeullesh Valley was ˜4815 masl and the early Holocene ELA was ˜4995 masl. The active, west-dipping Cordillera Blanca Normal Fault (CBNF) vertically offsets the crests of 10Be-dated moraines in six valleys where we have profiled CBNF scarps: Jeullesh, Quenua Ragra, and Tuco valleys in the NJR massif; and Llaca, Cojup, and Querococha valleys in the south-central Cordillera Blanca (9°28'-45'S, 77°28'-21'W). In Jeullesh Valley, the CBNF scarp offsets both late

  3. [Abnormal movements. Historical notes].

    PubMed

    García-Ruiz, P J

    Most of the knowledge about movement disorders comes from the last fifty years. However, the ancients made some remarkable neurological depictions. We still can find some neurological descriptions including Parkinson's disease in the Bible, and the ancient writings of Atreya and Susruta. In addition, classic tests provide us of valuable information on historical personages, including the dystonia of Alexander the Great.

  4. Fluid Movement and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slepian, Michael L.; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive scientists describe creativity as fluid thought. Drawing from findings on gesture and embodied cognition, we hypothesized that the physical experience of fluidity, relative to nonfluidity, would lead to more fluid, creative thought. Across 3 experiments, fluid arm movement led to enhanced creativity in 3 domains: creative generation,…

  5. Posture and Movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session TP3 includes short reports on: (1) Modification of Goal-Directed Arm Movements During Inflight Adaptation to Microgravity; (2) Quantitative Analysis of Motion control in Long Term Microgravity; (3) Does the Centre of Gravity Remain the Stabilised Reference during Complex Human Postural Equilibrium Tasks in Weightlessness?; and (4) Arm End-Point Trajectories Under Normal and Microgravity Environments.

  6. Measuring Facial Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekman, Paul; Friesen, Wallace V.

    1976-01-01

    The Facial Action Code (FAC) was derived from an analysis of the anatomical basis of facial movement. The development of the method is explained, contrasting it to other methods of measuring facial behavior. An example of how facial behavior is measured is provided, and ideas about research applications are discussed. (Author)

  7. [Architecture and movement].

    PubMed

    Rivallan, Armel

    2012-01-01

    Leading an architectural project means accompanying the movement which it induces within the teams. Between questioning, uncertainty and fear, the organisational changes inherent to the new facility must be subject to constructive and ongoing exchanges. Ethics, safety and training are revised and the unit projects are sometimes modified.

  8. Managing Movement as Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbrell, Sinead

    2011-01-01

    The associate director of education at Hubbard Street Dance Chicago recounts her learning and teaching through managing the Movement as Partnership program. Included are detailed descriptions of encounters with teachers and students as they create choreography reflective of their inquiry into integrating dance and literacy arts curriculum in the…

  9. Teaching the Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jamal Eric

    2012-01-01

    Every January, Charles Cobb Jr. makes the 1,100-mile trek from sunny Jacksonville, Florida, to chilly Providence, Rhode Island. For the past eight years, Cobb--a veteran of the civil rights movement who in the 1960s served as a field secretary for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in Mississippi--becomes a visiting professor of…

  10. New Insights Into the Surface / Atmosphere Exchange of Particles Based on Recent Advances in Measurement Technology (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemitz, E.; Phillips, G. J.; Thomas, R.; di Marco, C. F.; Fowler, D.

    2009-12-01

    Dry deposition velocities of particles govern the deposition and atmospheric lifetime of aerosols and their constituents and need to be parameterised in chemical transport models to predict air quality, climate change and ecosystem impacts. The same micrometeorological flux measurement approaches used to measure deposition rates can be used to quantify emissions from area sources such as urban emissions and resuspension. This paper reviews recent measurements of fluxes of particle number and, importantly, individual aerosol chemical compounds, made with wet-chemistry gradient systems and eddy-covariance using aerosol mass spectrometry. The results indicate that aerosol exchange tends to be bi-directional and is modulated by particle dynamics due to evaporation and condensation growth. Often, some aerosol components are emitted or chemically formed below the measurement height, while other components deposit or evaporate. This has important implications on the use of field measurements of number fluxes for the development of model parameterisations. For example, measurements over a range of surfaces show that ammonium nitrate volatilises during the deposition to semi-natural vegetation, forming associated gaseous precursors, which deposit faster than the aerosol species. This evaporation therefore enhances total nitrogen deposition, and models need to use enhanced effective deposition rates to account for the effect. Conversely, the effect of particle dynamics on fluxes can be used to study aerosol processing, such as the in-situ formation of inorganic and organic secondary aerosol and the volatilisation of primary combustion aerosol. Examples will be shown from agricultural, natural and urban environments. Finally, the paper will discuss future research priorities to help improve parameterisations of dry deposition velocities further.

  11. The effect of terrace geology on ground-water movement and on the interaction of ground water and surface water on a mountainside near Mirror Lake, New Hampshire, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.C.; Buso, D.C.; Shattuck, P.C.; Harte, P.T.; Vroblesky, D.A.; Goode, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    The west watershed of Mirror Lake in the White Mountains of New Hampshire contains several terraces that are at different altitudes and have different geologic compositions. The lowest terrace (FSE) has 5 m of sand overlying 9 m of till. The two next successively higher terraces (FS2 and FS1) consist entirely of sand and have maximum thicknesses of about 7 m. A fourth, and highest, terrace (FS3) lies in the north-west watershed directly adjacent to the west watershed. This highest terrace has 2 m of sand overlying 8 m of till. All terraces overlie fractured crystalline bedrock. Numerical models of hypothetical settings simulating ground-water flow in a mountainside indicated that the presence of a terrace can cause local ground-water flow cells to develop, and that the flow patterns differ based on the geologic composition of the terrace. For example, more ground water moves from the bedrock to the glacial deposits beneath terraces consisting completely of sand than beneath terraces that have sand underlain by till. Field data from Mirror Lake watersheds corroborate the numerical experiments. The geology of the terraces also affects how the stream draining the west watershed interacts with ground water. The stream turns part way down the mountainside and passes between the two sand terraces, essentially transecting the movement of ground water down the valley side. Transects of water-table wells were installed across the stream's riparian zone above, between, and below the sand terraces. Head data from these wells indicated that the stream gains ground water on both sides above and below the sand terraces. However, where it flows between the sand terraces the stream gains ground water on its uphill side and loses water on its downhill side. Biogeochemical processes in the riparian zone of the flow-through reach have resulted in anoxic ground water beneath the lower sand terrace. Results of this study indicate that it is useful to understand patterns of ground

  12. Advances in Shallow-Water, High-Resolution Seafloor Mapping: Integrating an Autonomous Surface Vessel (ASV) Into Nearshore Geophysical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, J. F.; O'Brien, T. F.; Bergeron, E.; Twichell, D.; Worley, C. R.; Danforth, W. W.; Andrews, B. A.; Irwin, B.

    2006-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been heavily involved in geological mapping of the seafloor since the 1970s. Early mapping efforts such as GLORIA provided broad-scale imagery of deep waters (depths > 400 meters) within the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). In the early 1990's, the USGS research emphasis shifted from deep- to shallow-water environments (inner continental shelf, nearshore, estuaries) to address pertinent coastal issues such as erosion, sediment availability, sediment transport, vulnerability of coastal areas to natural and anthropogenic hazards, and resource management. Geologic framework mapping in these shallow- water environments has provided valuable data used to 1) define modern sediment distribution and thickness, 2) determine underlying stratigraphic and structural controls on shoreline behavior, and 3) enable onshore-to- offshore geologic mapping within the coastal zone when coupled with subaerial techniques such as GPR and topographic LIDAR. Research in nearshore areas presents technological challenges due to the dynamics of the environment, high volume of data collected, and the geophysical limitations of operating in very shallow water. In 2004, the USGS, in collaboration with NOAA's Coastal Services Center, began a multi-year seafloor mapping effort to better define oyster habitats within Apalachicola Bay, Florida, a shallow water estuary along the northern Gulf of Mexico. The bay poses a technological challenge due to its shallow depths (< 4-m) and high turbidity that prohibits the use of bathymetric LIDAR. To address this extreme shallow water setting, the USGS incorporated an Autonomous Surface Vessel (ASV) into seafloor mapping operations, in June 2006. The ASV is configured with a chirp sub-bottom profiler (4 24 kHz), dual-frequency chirp sidescan-sonar (100/500 kHz), single-beam echosounder (235 kHz), and forward-looking digital camera, and will be used to delineate the distribution and thickness of surficial sediment, presence

  13. Repetitive Arm Movements During Sleep: A Polysomnographic Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Torabi-Nami, Mohammad; Mehrabi, Samrad; Derman, Sabri

    2016-01-01

    Sleep-related movement disorders should be differentiated from parasomnias, sleep-associated behavioral disorders, and epilepsy. Polysomnography (PSG) is the gold standard in evaluating such disorders. Periodic leg movement disorder during sleep (PLMS), hypnic jerks, bruxism, rhythmic movement disorder, restless legs syndrome, and nocturnal leg cramps have broadly been discussed in the literature. However, periodic arm movement disorder in sleep (PAMS) is a less-appreciated entity perhaps because arm surface electromyography is not an integral part of the standard polysomnography. Results from our PSG study in a case suspected for PAMS prompted us to herewith discuss this problem. PMID:27563420

  14. Repetitive Arm Movements During Sleep: A Polysomnographic Assessment.

    PubMed

    Torabi-Nami, Mohammad; Mehrabi, Samrad; Derman, Sabri

    2016-07-01

    Sleep-related movement disorders should be differentiated from parasomnias, sleep-associated behavioral disorders, and epilepsy. Polysomnography (PSG) is the gold standard in evaluating such disorders. Periodic leg movement disorder during sleep (PLMS), hypnic jerks, bruxism, rhythmic movement disorder, restless legs syndrome, and nocturnal leg cramps have broadly been discussed in the literature. However, periodic arm movement disorder in sleep (PAMS) is a less-appreciated entity perhaps because arm surface electromyography is not an integral part of the standard polysomnography. Results from our PSG study in a case suspected for PAMS prompted us to herewith discuss this problem. PMID:27563420

  15. Splitting advancement genioplasty: a new genioplasty technique.

    PubMed

    Celik, M; Tuncer, S; Büyükçayir, I

    1999-08-01

    A new genioplasty technique has been described and performed on 16 patients since 1995. The technique has been developed to avoid some undesired results of the current osseous genioplasty techniques and to achieve a more natural appearance in advancement genioplasty. According to the authors' technique, a rectangular part of the outer table of the mentum is split away from the mandible, and is advanced and fixated to the mandible. This technique can be used for advancement cases but not for reduction genioplasty. This technique was performed on 16 patients with only minor complications, including one case of wound dehiscence, one hematoma, and one case of osteomyelitis, which was managed with systemic antibiotic therapy. Aesthetic results were found to be satisfactory according to an evaluation by the authors. When the results were evaluated using pre- and postoperative photos, lip position and projection of the mentum were found to be natural in shape appearance. During the late postoperative period, the new bone formation between the advanced segment and the mandible was demonstrated radiographically. Advantages of the technique include having more contact surfaces for bony healing, a natural position of the lower lip, more natural projection of the mentum, tridimensional movement of the mentum, and improvement in the soft tissue of the neck. The disadvantages of the technique are the potential risk of infection due to dead space from the advancement, manipulation problems during surgery, and possible mental nerve injury. Splitting advancement genioplasty was found to be a useful technique for advancement genioplasty. Splitting advancement genioplasty is a more physiological osteotomy technique than most of osseous genioplasty techniques. PMID:10454320

  16. Application of response surface methodology for optimization of natural organic matter degradation by UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In this research, the removal of natural organic matter from aqueous solutions using advanced oxidation processes (UV/H2O2) was evaluated. Therefore, the response surface methodology and Box-Behnken design matrix were employed to design the experiments and to determine the optimal conditions. The effects of various parameters such as initial concentration of H2O2 (100–180 mg/L), pH (3–11), time (10–30 min) and initial total organic carbon (TOC) concentration (4–10 mg/L) were studied. Results Analysis of variance (ANOVA), revealed a good agreement between experimental data and proposed quadratic polynomial model (R2 = 0.98). Experimental results showed that with increasing H2O2 concentration, time and decreasing in initial TOC concentration, TOC removal efficiency was increased. Neutral and nearly acidic pH values also improved the TOC removal. Accordingly, the TOC removal efficiency of 78.02% in terms of the independent variables including H2O2 concentration (100 mg/L), pH (6.12), time (22.42 min) and initial TOC concentration (4 mg/L) were optimized. Further confirmation tests under optimal conditions showed a 76.50% of TOC removal and confirmed that the model is accordance with the experiments. In addition TOC removal for natural water based on response surface methodology optimum condition was 62.15%. Conclusions This study showed that response surface methodology based on Box-Behnken method is a useful tool for optimizing the operating parameters for TOC removal using UV/H2O2 process. PMID:24735555

  17. Respiratory-Related Leg Movements and Their Relationship with Periodic Leg Movements During Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Manconi, Mauro; Zavalko, Irina; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Colamartino, Elisabetta; Pons, Marco; Ferri, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To describe the time structure of leg movements (LM) in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome, in order to advance understanding of their clinical significance. Location: Sleep Research Centre, Oasi Institute (IRCCS), Troina, Italy. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Patients: Eighty-four patients (16 females, 68 males, mean age 55.1 y, range 29-74 y). Methods: Respiratory-related leg movements (RRLM) and those unrelated to respiratory events (NRLM) were examined within diagnostic polysomnograms alone and together for their distributions within the sleep period and for their periodicity. Measurements and Results: Patients with OSA and RRLM exhibited more periodic leg movements in sleep (PLMS), particularly in NREM sleep. A gradual decrease in number of NRLM across the sleep period was observed in patients with RRLM. This pattern was less clear for RRLM. Frequency histograms of intermovement intervals of all LMs in patients with RRLM showed a prominent first peak at 4 sec, and a second peak at approximately 24 sec coincident with that of PLMS occurring in the absence of OSA. A third peak of lowest amplitude was the broadest with a maximum at approximately 42 sec. In patients lacking RRLM, NRLM were evident with a single peak at 2-4 sec. A stepwise linear regression analysis showed that, after controlling for a diagnosis of restless legs syndrome and apnea-hypopnea index, PLMS remained significantly associated with RRLM. Conclusion: The time structure of leg movements occurring in conjunction with respiratory events exhibit features of periodic leg movements in sleep occurring alone, only with a different and longer period. This brings into question the validity, both biologic and clinical, of scoring conventions with their a priori exclusion from consideration as periodic leg movements in sleep. Citation: Manconi M; Zavalko I; Bassetti CL; Colamartino E; Pons M; Ferri R. Respiratory-related leg movements and their relationship with periodic leg movements

  18. Physical constraints for pathogen movement.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2015-10-01

    In this pedagogical review, we discuss the physical constraints that pathogens experience when they move in their host environment. Due to their small size, pathogens are living in a low Reynolds number world dominated by viscosity. For swimming pathogens, the so-called scallop theorem determines which kinds of shape changes can lead to productive motility. For crawling or gliding cells, the main resistance to movement comes from protein friction at the cell-environment interface. Viruses and pathogenic bacteria can also exploit intracellular host processes such as actin polymerization and motor-based transport, if they present the appropriate factors on their surfaces. Similar to cancer cells that also tend to cross various barriers, pathogens often combine several of these strategies in order to increase their motility and therefore their chances to replicate and spread.

  19. Classification of offshore mass movements

    SciTech Connect

    Mulder, T. |; Cochonat, P.

    1996-01-01

    More than 100 offshore mass-movement deposits have been studied in Holocene and Pleistocene sediments. The processes can be divided into three main types: slides/slumps, plastic flows, and turbidity currents, of which 13 main varieties have been recognized. The three types are differentiated mainly by motion, architecture, and shape of failure surface. For slides, the morphology of deposits can usually be linked to a process, but for plastic flows and turbidity currents, information about the motion is mainly provided by the sedimentary record. A static classification based on these features is given, and is related to a dynamic classification system to try to underline the morphological transformation of an offshore event from initiation to deposition.

  20. Detachment of deposited colloids by advancing and receding air-water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B

    2011-08-16

    Moving air-water interfaces can detach colloidal particles from stationary surfaces. The objective of this study was to quantify the effects of advancing and receding air-water interfaces on colloid detachment as a function of interface velocity. We deposited fluorescent, negatively charged, carboxylate-modified polystyrene colloids (diameter of 1 μm) into a cylindrical glass channel. The colloids were hydrophilic with an advancing air-water contact angle of 60° and a receding contact angle of 40°. After colloid deposition, two air bubbles were sequentially introduced into the glass channel and passed through the channel at different velocities (0.5, 7.7, 72, 982, and 10,800 cm/h). The passage of the bubbles represented a sequence of receding and advancing air-water interfaces. Colloids remaining in the glass channel after each interface passage were visualized with confocal microscopy and quantified by image analysis. The advancing air-water interface was significantly more effective in detaching colloids from the glass surface than the receding interface. Most of the colloids were detached during the first passage of the advancing air-water interface, while the subsequent interface passages did not remove significant amounts of colloids. Forces acting on the colloids calculated from theory corroborate our experimental results, and confirm that the detachment forces (surface tension forces) during the advancing air-water interface movement were stronger than during the receding movement. Theory indicates that, for hydrophilic colloids, the advancing interface movement generally exerts a stronger detachment force than the receding, except when the hysteresis of the colloid-air-water contact angle is small and that of the channel-air-water contact angle is large.

  1. Movement Coordination or Movement Interference: Visual Tracking and Spontaneous Coordination Modulate Rhythmic Movement Interference

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Veronica; Coey, Charles; Schmidt, R. C.; Richardson, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    When an actor performs a rhythmic limb movement while observing a spatially incongruent movement he or she exhibits increased movement orthogonal to the instructed motion. Known as rhythmic movement interference, this phenomenon has been interpreted as a motor contagion effect, whereby observing the incongruent movement interferes with the intended movement and results in a motor production error. Here we test the hypothesis that rhythmic movement interference is an emergent property of rhythmic coordination. Participants performed rhythmic limb movements at a self-selected tempo while observing a computer stimulus moving in a congruent or incongruent manner. The degree to which participants visually tracked the stimulus was manipulated to influence whether participants became spontaneously entrained to the stimulus or not. Consistent with the rhythmic coordination hypothesis, participants only exhibited the rhythmic movement interference effect when they became spontaneously entrained to the incongruent stimulus. PMID:23028607

  2. On quantifying insect movements

    SciTech Connect

    Wiens, J.A.; Crist, T.O. ); Milne, B.T. )

    1993-08-01

    We elaborate on methods described by Turchin, Odendaal Rausher for quantifying insect movement pathways. We note the need to scale measurement resolution to the study insects and the questions being asked, and we discuss the use of surveying instrumentation for recording sequential positions of individuals on pathways. We itemize several measures that may be used to characterize movement pathways and illustrate these by comparisons among several Eleodes beetles occurring in shortgrass steppe. The fractal dimension of pathways may provide insights not available from absolute measures of pathway configuration. Finally, we describe a renormalization procedure that may be used to remove sequential interdependence among locations of moving individuals while preserving the basic attributes of the pathway.

  3. Movement and Movement Patterns of Early Childhood. [Complete Report].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Caroline

    This study investigated the progressive development in movement and movement patterns of children ages 2-6. Data were collected over a 3-year period at six-month intervals, based on films of 57 children performing 25 motor tasks. The results are presented along two dimensions: (1) Descriptive analysis of progress of young children in movement with…

  4. The Human Potential Movement: Body/Movement/Non-Verbal Experiencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Stratton F.

    A social, humanistic movement focusing on the needs and concerns of more advantaged, affluent persons has emerged, called the "Human Potential Movement." The emphasis of the movement centers around group processes, small group experiences, and the search for personal, interpersonal, and organizational growth. The development and emergence of…

  5. Islamist Movements in Iraq

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    When the United States invaded Iraq in March 2003, one of its stated intentions was to inaugurate an era of Iraqi politics in which new kinds of democratic parties would emerge. However, one of the most dramatic effects of the U.S. invasion has been the boost it has given to the Islamist parties and movements that were banned under Saddam Hussein.…

  6. Ground movements associated with gas hydrate production

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, H.J.

    1992-10-01

    The mechanics of ground movements during hydrate production can be more closely simulated by considering similarities with ground movements associated with subsidence in permafrost regions than with gob compaction in a longwall mine. The purpose of this research work is to investigate the potential strata movements associated with hydrate production by considering similarities with ground movements in permafrost regions. The work primarily involves numerical modeling of subsidence caused by hydrate dissociation. The investigation is based on the theories of continuum mechanics , thermomechanical behavior of frozen geo-materials, and principles of rock mechanics and geomechanics. It is expected that some phases of the investigation will involve the use of finite element method, which is a powerful computer-based method which has been widely used in many areas of science and engineering. Parametric studies will be performed to predict expected strata movements and surface subsidence for different reservoir conditions and properties of geological materials. The results from this investigation will be useful in predicting the magnitude of the subsidence problem associated with gas hydrate production. The analogy of subsidence in permafrost regions may provide lower bounds for subsidence expected in hydrate reservoirs. Furthermore, it is anticipated that the results will provide insight into planning of hydrate recovery operations.

  7. Automatic emotion recognition based on body movement analysis: a survey.

    PubMed

    Zacharatos, Haris; Gatzoulis, Christos; Chrysanthou, Yiorgos L

    2014-01-01

    Humans are emotional beings, and their feelings influence how they perform and interact with computers. One of the most expressive modalities for humans is body posture and movement, which researchers have recently started exploiting for emotion recognition. This survey describes emerging techniques and modalities related to emotion recognition based on body movement, as well as recent advances in automatic emotion recognition. It also describes application areas and notation systems and explains the importance of movement segmentation. It then discusses unsolved problems and provides promising directions for future research. The Web extra (a PDF file) contains tables with additional information related to the article. PMID:25216477

  8. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on the surface of diabetic erythrocytes bind to the vessel wall via a specific receptor inducing oxidant stress in the vasculature: a link between surface-associated AGEs and diabetic complications.

    PubMed Central

    Wautier, J L; Wautier, M P; Schmidt, A M; Anderson, G M; Hori, O; Zoukourian, C; Capron, L; Chappey, O; Yan, S D; Brett, J

    1994-01-01

    Vascular complications are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes. The extent of vascular complications has been linked statistically to enhanced adherence of diabetic erythrocytes to endothelial cells (ECs) and to the accumulation of a class of glycated proteins termed advanced glycation end products (AGEs). We hypothesized that formation of AGEs on the surface of diabetic erythrocytes could mediate their interaction with ECs leading to binding and induction of vascular dysfunction. Enhanced binding of diabetic erythrocytes to ECs was blocked by preincubation of erythrocytes with anti-AGE IgG or preincubation of ECs with antibodies to the receptor for AGE (RAGE). Immunoblotting of cultured human ECs and immunostaining of normal/diabetic human tissue confirmed the presence of RAGE in the vessel wall. Binding of diabetic erythrocytes to endothelium generated an oxidant stress, as measured by production of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and activation of the transcription factor NF-kappa B, both of which were blocked by probucol or anti-RAGE IgG. Erythrocytes from diabetic rats infused into normal rats had an accelerated, early phase of clearance that was prevented, in part, by antibody to RAGE. Liver tissue from rats infused with diabetic erythrocytes showed elevated levels of TBARS, which was prevented by pretreatment with anti-RAGE IgG or probucol. Thus, erythrocyte surface AGEs can function as ligands that interact with RAGE on endothelium. The extensive contact of diabetic erythrocytes bearing surface-associated AGEs with vessel wall RAGE could be important in the development of vascular complications. Images PMID:8052654

  9. Measuring ground movement in geothermal areas of Imperial Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofgren, B. E.

    1974-01-01

    Significant ground movement may accompany the extraction of large quantities of fluids from the subsurface. In Imperial Valley, California, one of the potential hazards of geothermal development is the threat of both subsidence and horizontal movement of the land surface. Regional and local survey nets are being monitored to detect and measure possible ground movement caused by future geothermal developments. Precise measurement of surface and subsurface changes will be required to differentiate man-induced changes from natural processes in this tectonically active region.

  10. Axial movements in ideomotor apraxia

    PubMed Central

    Poeck, K; Lehmkuhl, G; Willmes, K

    1982-01-01

    Non-symbolic axial movements were examined and compared to oral and limb movements in a group of 60 aphasic patients (15 of each major subgroup) with exclusively left-sided brain damage. The contention in the literature that axial movements are preserved in patients with ideomotor limb apraxia was not confirmed. PMID:6186771

  11. Educators Assess "Open Content" Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the open-content movement in education. A small but growing movement of K-12 educators is latching on to educational resources that are "open," or free for others to use, change, and republish on web sites that promote sharing. The open-content movement is fueled partly by digital creation tools that make it easy to create…

  12. A Discovery Approach to Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hagin, Isabel B.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the effects of the discovery approach to movement-based instruction on children's level of musicality. Finds that the students with the highest musicality were girls, demonstrated reflective movements and a personal sense of style while moving, and made sense of the music by organizing, categorizing, and developing movement ideas.…

  13. Yahak Movement in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Son, Sik

    2004-01-01

    "Yahak" means "night school" in Korean and its history can be traced back to the 1920s when Korea was under Japanese colonial rule. This paper will focus on the yahak movement during the years from 1960 to the 1990s. Yahak played an important role in raising workers' consciousness during this democratic movement. Yahak started as a movement trying…

  14. Vision Based Autonomous Robotic Control for Advanced Inspection and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehner, Walter S.

    2014-01-01

    The advanced inspection system is an autonomous control and analysis system that improves the inspection and remediation operations for ground and surface systems. It uses optical imaging technology with intelligent computer vision algorithms to analyze physical features of the real-world environment to make decisions and learn from experience. The advanced inspection system plans to control a robotic manipulator arm, an unmanned ground vehicle and cameras remotely, automatically and autonomously. There are many computer vision, image processing and machine learning techniques available as open source for using vision as a sensory feedback in decision-making and autonomous robotic movement. My responsibilities for the advanced inspection system are to create a software architecture that integrates and provides a framework for all the different subsystem components; identify open-source algorithms and techniques; and integrate robot hardware.

  15. Voltammetric detection of S100B protein using His-tagged receptor domains for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) immobilized onto a gold electrode surface.

    PubMed

    Mikuła, Edyta; Wysłouch-Cieszyńska, Aleksandra; Zhukova, Liliya; Puchalska, Monika; Verwilst, Peter; Dehaen, Wim; Radecki, Jerzy; Radecka, Hanna

    2014-06-17

    In this work we report on an electrochemical biosensor for the determination of the S100B protein. The His-tagged VC1 domains of Receptors for Advanced Glycation End (RAGE) products used as analytically active molecules were covalently immobilized on a monolayer of a thiol derivative of pentetic acid (DPTA) complex with Cu(II) deposited on a gold electrode surface. The recognition processes between the RAGE VC1 domain and the S100B protein results in changes in the redox activity of the DPTA-Cu(II) centres which were measured by Osteryoung square-wave voltammetry (OSWV). In order to verify whether the observed analytical signal originates from the recognition process between the His6-RAGE VC1 domains and the S100B protein, the electrode modified with the His6-RAGE C2 and His6-RAGE VC1 deleted domains which have no ability to bind S100B peptides were applied. The proposed biosensor was quite sensitive, with a detection limit of 0.52 pM recorded in the buffer solution. The presence of diluted human plasma and 10 nM Aβ(1-40) have no influence on the biosensor performance.

  16. Voltammetric Detection of S100B Protein Using His-Tagged Receptor Domains for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Immobilized onto a Gold Electrode Surface

    PubMed Central

    Mikuła, Edyta; Wysłouch-Cieszyńska, Aleksandra; Zhukova, Liliya; Puchalska, Monika; Verwilst, Peter; Dehaen, Wim; Radecki, Jerzy; Radecka, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    In this work we report on an electrochemical biosensor for the determination of the S100B protein. The His-tagged VC1 domains of Receptors for Advanced Glycation End (RAGE) products used as analytically active molecules were covalently immobilized on a monolayer of a thiol derivative of pentetic acid (DPTA) complex with Cu(II) deposited on a gold electrode surface. The recognition processes between the RAGE VC1 domain and the S100B protein results in changes in the redox activity of the DPTA-Cu(II) centres which were measured by Osteryoung square-wave voltammetry (OSWV). In order to verify whether the observed analytical signal originates from the recognition process between the His6–RAGE VC1 domains and the S100B protein, the electrode modified with the His6–RAGE C2 and His6–RAGE VC1 deleted domains which have no ability to bind S100B peptides were applied. The proposed biosensor was quite sensitive, with a detection limit of 0.52 pM recorded in the buffer solution. The presence of diluted human plasma and 10 nM Aβ1-40 have no influence on the biosensor performance. PMID:24940866

  17. Response surface method for the optimisation of micropollutant removal in municipal wastewater treatment plant effluent with the UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Hennings, U; Pinnekamp, J

    2013-01-01

    Experiments with the ultraviolet (UV)/H2O2 advanced oxidation process (AOP) were conducted to investigate the abatement of micropollutants in wastewater treatment plant effluent. The fluence and the starting concentration of H2O2 in a bench-scale batch reactor were varied according to response surface method (RSM) to examine their influence on the treatment efficiency. It was shown that the investigated AOP is very effective for the abatement of micropollutants with conversion rates typically higher than 90%. Empirical relationships between fluence, H2O2 dosage and the resulting concentration of micropollutants were established by RSM. By this means it was shown that X-ray-contrast media had been degraded only by UV light. Nevertheless, most substances were degraded by the combination of UV irradiation and H2O2. Based on RSM an optimisation of multiple responses was conducted to find the minimal fluence and H2O2 dosage that are needed to reach an efficient abatement of micropollutants. PMID:23656952

  18. Characterization of a benchmark database for myoelectric movement classification.

    PubMed

    Atzori, Manfredo; Gijsberts, Arjan; Kuzborskij, Ilja; Elsig, Simone; Hager, Anne-Gabrielle Mittaz; Deriaz, Olivier; Castellini, Claudio; Muller, Henning; Caputo, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we characterize the Ninapro database and its use as a benchmark for hand prosthesis evaluation. The database is a publicly available resource that aims to support research on advanced myoelectric hand prostheses. The database is obtained by jointly recording surface electromyography signals from the forearm and kinematics of the hand and wrist while subjects perform a predefined set of actions and postures. Besides describing the acquisition protocol, overall features of the datasets and the processing procedures in detail, we present benchmark classification results using a variety of feature representations and classifiers. Our comparison shows that simple feature representations such as mean absolute value and waveform length can achieve similar performance to the computationally more demanding marginal discrete wavelet transform. With respect to classification methods, the nonlinear support vector machine was found to be the only method consistently achieving high performance regardless of the type of feature representation. Furthermore, statistical analysis of these results shows that classification accuracy is negatively correlated with the subject's Body Mass Index. The analysis and the results described in this paper aim to be a strong baseline for the Ninapro database. Thanks to the Ninapro database (and the characterization described in this paper), the scientific community has the opportunity to converge to a common position on hand movement recognition by surface electromyography, a field capable to strongly affect hand prosthesis capabilities. PMID:25486646

  19. Characterization of a benchmark database for myoelectric movement classification.

    PubMed

    Atzori, Manfredo; Gijsberts, Arjan; Kuzborskij, Ilja; Elsig, Simone; Hager, Anne-Gabrielle Mittaz; Deriaz, Olivier; Castellini, Claudio; Muller, Henning; Caputo, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we characterize the Ninapro database and its use as a benchmark for hand prosthesis evaluation. The database is a publicly available resource that aims to support research on advanced myoelectric hand prostheses. The database is obtained by jointly recording surface electromyography signals from the forearm and kinematics of the hand and wrist while subjects perform a predefined set of actions and postures. Besides describing the acquisition protocol, overall features of the datasets and the processing procedures in detail, we present benchmark classification results using a variety of feature representations and classifiers. Our comparison shows that simple feature representations such as mean absolute value and waveform length can achieve similar performance to the computationally more demanding marginal discrete wavelet transform. With respect to classification methods, the nonlinear support vector machine was found to be the only method consistently achieving high performance regardless of the type of feature representation. Furthermore, statistical analysis of these results shows that classification accuracy is negatively correlated with the subject's Body Mass Index. The analysis and the results described in this paper aim to be a strong baseline for the Ninapro database. Thanks to the Ninapro database (and the characterization described in this paper), the scientific community has the opportunity to converge to a common position on hand movement recognition by surface electromyography, a field capable to strongly affect hand prosthesis capabilities.

  20. Remote Sensing Observatory Validation of Surface Soil Moisture Using Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer E, Common Land Model, and Ground Based Data: Case Study in SMEX03 Little River Region, Georgia, U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimal soil moisture estimation may be characterized by inter-comparisons among remotely sensed measurements, ground-based measurements, and land surface models. In this study, we compared soil moisture from Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer E (AMSR-E), ground-based measurements, and Soil-Vege...

  1. Stereotypic movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Singer, Harvey S

    2011-01-01

    Stereotypic movements are repetitive, rhythmic, fixed, patterned in form, amplitude, and localization, but purposeless (e.g., hand shaking, waving, body rocking, head nodding). They are commonly seen in children; both in normal children (primary stereotypy) and in individuals with additional behavioral or neurological signs and symptoms (secondary stereotypy). They should be differentiated from compulsions (OCD), tics (tic disorders), trichotillomania, skin picking disorder, or the direct physiological effect of a substance. There is increasing evidence to support a neurobiological mechanism. Response to behavioral and pharmacological therapies is variable.

  2. Orofacial Movement Disorders.

    PubMed

    Clark, Glenn T; Ram, Saravanan

    2016-08-01

    Orofacial movement disorders (OMDs) include dystonia, dyskinesia, drug-induced extrapyramidal reactions, and bruxism. The definition, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical features, and management are detailed. OMDs are often disabling and affect patients' overall quality of life with pain, difficulty chewing food, speech difficulty, drooling, and social embarrassment. Management involves medications, botulinum toxin injections, and peripheral or central surgery. Botulinum toxin injections are the most effective management, often used in conjunction with medications. Surgery is the last resort for patients who fail to respond to medications or develop resistance to botulinum toxin type A. PMID:27475514

  3. Orofacial Movement Disorders.

    PubMed

    Clark, Glenn T; Ram, Saravanan

    2016-08-01

    Orofacial movement disorders (OMDs) include dystonia, dyskinesia, drug-induced extrapyramidal reactions, and bruxism. The definition, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical features, and management are detailed. OMDs are often disabling and affect patients' overall quality of life with pain, difficulty chewing food, speech difficulty, drooling, and social embarrassment. Management involves medications, botulinum toxin injections, and peripheral or central surgery. Botulinum toxin injections are the most effective management, often used in conjunction with medications. Surgery is the last resort for patients who fail to respond to medications or develop resistance to botulinum toxin type A.

  4. [Movement disorders is psychiatric diseases].

    PubMed

    Hidasi, Zoltan; Salacz, Pal; Csibri, Eva

    2014-12-01

    Movement disorders are common in psychiatry. The movement disorder can either be the symptom of a psychiatric disorder, can share a common aetiological factor with it, or can be the consequence of psychopharmacological therapy. Most common features include tic, stereotypy, compulsion, akathisia, dyskinesias, tremor, hypokinesia and disturbances of posture and gait. We discuss characteristics and clinical importance of these features. Movement disorders are frequently present in mood disorders, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, catatonia, Tourette-disorder and psychogenic movement disorder, leading to differential-diagnostic and therapeutical difficulties in everyday practice. Movement disorders due to psychopharmacotherapy can be classified as early-onset, late-onset and tardive. Frequent psychiatric comorbidity is found in primary movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, Wilson's disease, Huntington's disease, diffuse Lewy-body disorder. Complex neuropsychiatric approach is effective concerning overlapping clinical features and spectrums of disorders in terms of movement disorders and psychiatric diseases.

  5. [Movement disorders is psychiatric diseases].

    PubMed

    Hidasi, Zoltan; Salacz, Pal; Csibri, Eva

    2014-12-01

    Movement disorders are common in psychiatry. The movement disorder can either be the symptom of a psychiatric disorder, can share a common aetiological factor with it, or can be the consequence of psychopharmacological therapy. Most common features include tic, stereotypy, compulsion, akathisia, dyskinesias, tremor, hypokinesia and disturbances of posture and gait. We discuss characteristics and clinical importance of these features. Movement disorders are frequently present in mood disorders, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, catatonia, Tourette-disorder and psychogenic movement disorder, leading to differential-diagnostic and therapeutical difficulties in everyday practice. Movement disorders due to psychopharmacotherapy can be classified as early-onset, late-onset and tardive. Frequent psychiatric comorbidity is found in primary movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, Wilson's disease, Huntington's disease, diffuse Lewy-body disorder. Complex neuropsychiatric approach is effective concerning overlapping clinical features and spectrums of disorders in terms of movement disorders and psychiatric diseases. PMID:25577484

  6. [Releasing phenomenon of learned movements].

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Y; Ohno, K; Kashiwagi, T; Tanabe, H

    1998-10-01

    Involuntary movements that resembled the shooting of a basketball and piano playing were observed after brain damage in a 13-year-old female and a 74-year-old female, respectively. The movements were characterized as involuntarily triggered movements that occurred in the presence and absence of exteroceptive stimuli, movements had been practiced repeatedly just before the occurrence of the brain damage, and that could be stopped on command. According to the MRI findings, the lesions extended into the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA). The characteristics of the patients movements were different from previously reported involuntary movements such as compulsive manipulation of tools, utilization behavior, and imitation behavior. Hikosaka et al (1996) reported the role of the pre-SMA in learning new sequential procedures. We speculate that damage to the pre-SMA may be associated with the etiology of these movements.

  7. Downslope movement of material on Deimos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.

    1980-01-01

    Viking Orbiter images have shown downslope movement of loose material to be an important surface process on Deimos. Loose surface material moves downslope from prominent ridges and accumulates in topographic lows. In some areas, up to 10 m of surface material have been removed; in others, craters up to 200 m in diameter have been filled completely by material moving downslope. Brighter material associated with, and probably derived from crater rims, also moves downslope and forms tapered streamers up to 3 km in length which appear as prominent features on the satellite. The mechanism for downslope movement is uncertain, but thermal creep, micrometeroroid bombardment and impact-related seismic shaking may be involved. Certain craters show conspicuous infilling even though their prominent rims should prevent material moving downslope from reaching their interiors. Such fill must have been emplaced ballistically - the amounts of sediment suggest that over half of all ejecta produced on Deimos are retained on the satellite. Phobos appears to retain little ejecta and shows little evidence of downslope movement of debris.

  8. [Primary versus secondary stereotypic movements].

    PubMed

    Fernandez Alvarez, E

    2004-02-01

    Stereotypic movements are repetitive patterns of movements whose physiopathology and relations to other neurobehavioural disorders are still only poorly understood. In this paper our aim is to distinguish between primary stereotypic movements, which are the sole manifestation of an anomaly, while the complementary examinations, except for those involving molecular genetics, are normal; associated stereotypic movements, when they meet primary disorder criteria but there are other coexisting independent neurological signs, that is to say, they are neither the cause nor the consequence of the movement disorder; and secondary stereotypic movements, when they are the consequence of a lesion or acquired neurological dysfunction. Examples of primary stereotypic movements include episodes of parasomnia, such as head rocking, in subjects who are otherwise normal, and stereotypic movements due to emotional disorders, severe environmental deprivation or in institutionalised infants. Examples of associated stereotypic movements are those observed in Rett syndrome, in subjects with sensory defects or with mental retardation due to a variety of causes. And as instances of secondary stereotypic movements we have those that can be seen in infinite like syndrome caused by congenital cerebellar lesions. The purpose of the classification is to lay the foundations for the identification of new syndromes, which would without a doubt facilitate research into their physiopathology, their aetiology and the possible therapeutic attitude to be adopted.

  9. Anti-abortion movement.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K

    1985-01-01

    At the same time that American women celebrate the freedoms won thus far for so many Americans, American women must realize they face some of the greatest threats to liberty in recent memory. To understand this movement against American women, it is necessary to first understand the roots of the historic movement for women's rights. Reproductive freedom for many years topped the agenda of the modern women's movement. At a time and in a land where rights were being enriched and liberty prized, choice took a prominent role, specifically, the right to abortion but also generally to repdocuctive freedom and the many underlying issues involved. This is why the various efforts to criminalize abortion effect every citizen, because they pose a serious threat to the constitutional rights of each individual. This is the intellectual view, or the "head" argument. The Constitution states that: "Congress shall make no laws respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; the enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people; and no state shall make or enforce any laws which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the US." Each of these clauses expresses the philosophy on which the Constitution was founded -- individual liberty. While there has been some legitimate disagreement over what constitutes an inalienable right, the concept is clear: the government should not become involved in personal philosophical or religious matters, except to permit the freedom of personal philosophical or religious expression. The anti-abortion contignent makes its case by claiming that a fertilized egg is a cona fide person and should, therefore, be guaranteed the Constitution's full roster of protections. In its landmark Roe v. Wade opinion, the Supreme Court held what pro-choice activities have been claiming for years. Since there is no empirical test by which measure

  10. CTAS and NASA Air Traffic Management Fact Sheets for En Route Descent Advisor and Surface Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Katharine

    2004-01-01

    The Surface Management System (SMS) is a decision support tool that will help controllers, traffic managers, and NAS users manage the movements of aircraft on the surface of busy airports, improving capacity, efficiency, and flexibility. The Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AATT) Project at NASA is developing SMS in cooperation with the FAA's Free Flight Phase 2 (FFP2) pro5ram. SMS consists of three parts: a traffic management tool, a controller tool, and a National Airspace System (NAS) information tool.

  11. Cross-slope Movement Patterns in Landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petley, D.; Murphy, W.; Bulmer, M. H.; Keefer, D.

    2002-12-01

    There is growing evidence that there is a significant element of cross-slope movement in many large landslide systems. These movements may result in changing states of stress between landslide blocks that can establish complex displacement patterns. Such motions, which are not considered in traditional two-dimensional limit-equilibrium analyses, are important in the investigation of a variety of landslide types, such as those triggered by earthquakes. In addition, these movements may introduce considerable errors into the interpretation of strain patterns as derived from InSAR studies. Finally, even traditional interpretation techniques may lead to the amount of total displacement being underestimated. These observations suggest that a three dimensional form of analysis may be more appropriate for large landslide complexes. The significance of such cross-slope movements are being investigated using a detailed investigation of the Lishan landslide complex in Central Taiwan. This landslide system, which was reactivated in 1990 related to the construction of a hotel. The total recorded movements have been approximately 1.5 m over an area of sliding that is estimated to be 450 m wide and 200 m long. Extensive damage has been caused to roads and buildings within the town. Remediation work has resulted largely in the stabilization of the landslide complex. Detailed geomorphological mapping has revealed that the landslide complex is composed of two main components. The first, immediately upslope of the hotel construction site, is a relatively shallow earthflow. The second, which has formed a large headscarp upslope from the main road in the centre of the town, is a deeper translational slide. Both appear to have been reactivations of previous failures. While the displacement patterns of the earthflow indicate a relatively simple downslope movement, the vectors derived from kinematic analysis of surface features have indicated that the movement of the deeper

  12. Reports on crustal movements and deformations. [bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Peck, T.

    1983-01-01

    This Catalog of Reports on Crustal Movements and Deformation is a structured bibliography of scientific papers on the movements of the Earth crust. The catalog summarizes by various subjects papers containing data on the movement of the Earth's surface due to tectonic processes. In preparing the catalog we have included studies of tectonic plate motions, spreading and convergence, microplate rotation, regional crustal deformation strain accumulation and deformations associated with the earthquake cycle, and fault motion. We have also included several papers dealing with models of tectonic plate motion and with crustal stress. Papers which discuss tectonic and geologic history but which do not present rates of movements or deformations and papers which are primarily theoretical analyses have been excluded from the catalog. An index of authors cross-referenced to their publications also appears in the catalog. The catalog covers articles appearing in reviewed technical journals during the years 1970-1981. Although there are citations from about twenty journals most of the items come from the following publications: Journal of Geophysical Research, Tectonophysics, Geological Society of America Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Nature, Science, Geophysical Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, and Geology.

  13. The Relationship between Body Movements and Qualities of Social Interaction between a Boy with Severe Developmental Disabilities and His Caregiver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dammeyer, Jesper; Koppe, Simo

    2013-01-01

    Research in social interaction and nonverbal communication among individuals with severe developmental disabilities also includes the study of body movements. Advances in analytical technology give new possibilities for measuring body movements more accurately and reliably. One such advance is the Qualisys Motion Capture System (QMCS), which…

  14. Improving HelioClim-3 estimates of surface solar using the McClear clear-sky model and recent advances on atmosphere composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Z.; Gschwind, B.; Lefevre, M.; Wald, L.

    2014-07-01

    The HelioClim-3 database (HC3v3) provides records of surface solar irradiation every 15 min estimated by processing images from the geostationary meteorological Meteosat satellites using climatological data sets of atmospheric Linke turbidity factor. This technical note proposes a method to improve a posteriori HC3v3 by combining it with data records of the irradiation under clear sky from the new clear-sky model McClear whose inputs are the advanced global aerosol properties forecasts and physically consistent total column content in water vapour and ozone produced by the MACC projects. The method is validated by comparison with a series of ground measurements for 15 min and 1 h for 6 stations and for daily irradiation for 23 stations. The correlation coefficient is large, greater than respectively 0.92, 0.94, and 0.97, for 15 min, 1 h and daily irradiation. The bias ranges between -4 and 4% of the mean observed irradiation for most sites. The relative root mean square difference (RMSD) varies between 14 and 38% for 15 min, 12 and 33% for 1 h irradiation, and 6 and 20% for daily irradiation. As a rule of thumb, the farther from the nadir of the Meteosat satellite located at latitude 0° and longitude 0°, and the greater the occurrence of fragmented cloud cover, the greater the relative RMSD. The method improves HC3v3 in most cases and no degradation in the others. A systematic correction of HC3v3 with McClear is recommended.

  15. Improving HelioClim-3 estimates of surface solar irradiance using the McClear clear-sky model and recent advances in atmosphere composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Z.; Gschwind, B.; Lefevre, M.; Wald, L.

    2014-11-01

    The HelioClim-3 database (HC3v3) provides records of surface solar irradiation every 15 min, estimated by processing images from the geostationary meteorological Meteosat satellites using climatological data sets of the atmospheric Linke turbidity factor. This technical note proposes a method to improve a posteriori HC3v3 by combining it with data records of the irradiation under clear skies from the new McClear clear-sky model, whose inputs are the advanced global aerosol property forecasts and physically consistent total column content in water vapour and ozone produced by the MACC (Monitoring Atmosphere Composition and Climate) projects. The method is validated by comparison with a series of ground measurements for 15 min and 1 h for 6 stations and for daily irradiation for 23 stations. The correlation coefficient is large, greater than respectively 0.92, 0.94, and 0.97, for 15 min, 1 h and daily irradiation. The bias ranges from -4 to 4% of the mean observed irradiation for most sites. The relative root mean square difference (RMSD) varies between 14 and 38% for 15 min, 12 and 33% for 1 h irradiation, and 6 and 20% for daily irradiation. As a rule of thumb, the farther from the nadir of the Meteosat satellite located at latitude 0° and longitude 0°, and the greater the occurrence of fragmented cloud cover, the greater the relative RMSD. The method improves HC3v3 in most cases, and with no degradation in the others. A systematic correction of HC3v3 with McClear is recommended.

  16. Using Recent Advances in 2D Seismic Technology and Surface Geochemistry to Economically Redevelop a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir: Vernon Field, Isabella County, Class Revisit

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, James R.; Bornhorst, T.J.; Harrison, William B.; Quinlan, W.

    2002-09-24

    Continued the fault study to find more faults and develop new techniques to visualize them. Data from the Dundee Formation was used to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin which have now been verified using data from other horizons. These faults control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well.

  17. [Eye movements occurring during head rotation on artificial gravity stands].

    PubMed

    Sarkisov, I Iu; Shipov, A A

    1975-01-01

    On the basis of previously advanced theories the direction and pattern of eye movements induced by stimulation of semicircular canals onboard artificial gravity stations are predicted. The resulting data are important to describe expected disorientation illusions of vestibular origin as well as vestibular effects on the visual functions of tracking and fixation onboard artificial gravity stations.

  18. Extra patient movement during mammographic imaging: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Brettle, D; Howard, D; Kelly, J; Millington, S; Hogg, P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine if movement external to the patient occurring during mammography may be a source of image blur. Methods: Four mammography machines with eight flexible and eight fixed paddles were evaluated. In the first stage, movement at the paddle was measured mechanically using two calibrated linear potentiometers. A deformable breast phantom was used to mimic a female breast. For each paddle, the movement in millimetres and change in compression force in Newton was recorded at 0.5- and 1-s intervals, respectively, for 40 s with the phantom in an initially compressed state under a load of 80 N. In the second stage, clinical audit on 28 females was conducted on one mammography machine with the 18 × 24- and 24 × 29-cm flexible paddles. Results: Movement at the paddle followed an exponential decay with a settling period of approximately 40 s. The compression force readings for both fixed and flexible paddles decreased exponentially with time, while fixed paddles had a larger drop in compression force than did flexible paddles. There is a linear relationship between movement at the paddle and change in compression force. Conclusion: Movement measured at the paddle during an exposure can be represented by a second order system. The amount of extra patient movement during the actual exposure can be estimated using the linear relationship between movement at the paddle and the change in compression force. Advances in knowledge: This research provides a possible explanation to mammography image blurring caused by extra patient movement and proposes a theoretical model to analyse the movement. PMID:25348098

  19. Postural constraints on movement variability.

    PubMed

    Lametti, Daniel R; Ostry, David J

    2010-08-01

    Movements are inherently variable. When we move to a particular point in space, a cloud of final limb positions is observed around the target. Previously we noted that patterns of variability at the end of movement to a circular target were not circular, but instead reflected patterns of limb stiffness-in directions where limb stiffness was high, variability in end position was low, and vice versa. Here we examine the determinants of variability at movement end in more detail. To do this, we have subjects move the handle of a robotic device from different starting positions into a circular target. We use position servocontrolled displacements of the robot's handle to measure limb stiffness at the end of movement and we also record patterns of end position variability. To examine the effect of change in posture on movement variability, we use a visual motor transformation in which we change the limb configuration and also the actual movement target, while holding constant the visual display. We find that, regardless of movement direction, patterns of variability at the end of movement vary systematically with limb configuration and are also related to patterns of limb stiffness, which are likewise configuration dependent. The result suggests that postural configuration determines the base level of movement variability, on top of which control mechanisms can act to further alter variability.

  20. Eye movements during transcendental meditation.

    PubMed

    Tebēcis, A K

    1976-01-01

    Characteristic changes in eye movements occurred during meditation with closed eyes in a proportion of subjects experienced in TM. The most common changes were an increase in slow, large-amplitude, 'rolling' eye movements and a concomitant decrease in rapid, low-amplitude, 'jerky' eye movements. Much variation occurred between individuals, however, some subjects showing no differences between TM and non-meditation. Any changes that occurred were not necessarily constant for the whole recording period nor consistent between sessions. The physiological effects of TM are far more variable than previously publicized. In general, the main changes in eye movements during TM are similar to those during passive hypnosis.

  1. Discovering loose group movement patterns from animal trajectories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Yuwei; Luo, Ze; Xiong, Yan; Prosser, Diann J.; Newman, Scott H.; Takekawa, John Y.; Yan, Baoping

    2015-01-01

    The technical advances of positioning technologies enable us to track animal movements at finer spatial and temporal scales, and further help to discover a variety of complex interactive relationships. In this paper, considering the loose gathering characteristics of the real-life groups' members during the movements, we propose two kinds of loose group movement patterns and corresponding discovery algorithms. Firstly, we propose the weakly consistent group movement pattern which allows the gathering of a part of the members and individual temporary leave from the whole during the movements. To tolerate the high dispersion of the group at some moments (i.e. to adapt the discontinuity of the group's gatherings), we further scheme the weakly consistent and continuous group movement pattern. The extensive experimental analysis and comparison with the real and synthetic data shows that the group pattern discovery algorithms proposed in this paper are similar to the the real-life frequent divergences of the members during the movements, can discover more complete memberships, and have considerable performance.

  2. Guidelines for Using Movement Science to Inform Biodiversity Policy.

    PubMed

    Barton, Philip S; Lentini, Pia E; Alacs, Erika; Bau, Sana; Buckley, Yvonne M; Burns, Emma L; Driscoll, Don A; Guja, Lydia K; Kujala, Heini; Lahoz-Monfort, José J; Mortelliti, Alessio; Nathan, Ran; Rowe, Ross; Smith, Annabel L

    2015-10-01

    Substantial advances have been made in our understanding of the movement of species, including processes such as dispersal and migration. This knowledge has the potential to improve decisions about biodiversity policy and management, but it can be difficult for decision makers to readily access and integrate the growing body of movement science. This is, in part, due to a lack of synthesis of information that is sufficiently contextualized for a policy audience. Here, we identify key species movement concepts, including mechanisms, types, and moderators of movement, and review their relevance to (1) national biodiversity policies and strategies, (2) reserve planning and management, (3) threatened species protection and recovery, (4) impact and risk assessments, and (5) the prioritization of restoration actions. Based on the review, and considering recent developments in movement ecology, we provide a new framework that draws links between aspects of movement knowledge that are likely the most relevant to each biodiversity policy category. Our framework also shows that there is substantial opportunity for collaboration between researchers and government decision makers in the use of movement science to promote positive biodiversity outcomes. PMID:26099570

  3. Movement Matters: Observing the Benefits of Movement Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Melani Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Montessori's first premise is that movement and cognition are closely entwined, and movement can enhance thinking and learning (Lillard, 2005). Children must move, and practice moving, to develop strength, balance, and the stability needed to fully participate in the rigors of daily life. It is imperative for young children's motor…

  4. Factors controlling water movement in acid spoils

    SciTech Connect

    Evangelou, V.P.; Grove, J.H.; Phillips, R.E.

    1982-12-01

    The rate of water movement through toxic spoils plays a major role in reclamation. The toxic chemical constituents found in spoils need to be leached beyond the six inch depth (the usual depth of lime incorporation) since they can easily move upward during periods of high evapotranspiration. The rate of water infiltration plays a role in effective utilization of rain water, and conversely, the amount of surface runoff dictates the degree of surface erosion. Underground water quality may be affected by rates of water movement through a toxic spoil zone. Factors that control water movement through acid spoils were investigated through the use of a column one meter long and 8.0 cm in internal diameter. The maximum hydraulic conductivity was observed in the upper portion of the column where minimum salt buildup occurred. The hydraulic conductivity in this region was 0.5 cm/hr. In the middle portion of the column where a salty (14.0 mmhos/cm) solution was encountered, the hydraulic conductivity was 0.08 cm/hr. In the lower portion of the column where the maximum salt buildup took place (16.8 mmhos/cm), the hydraulic conductivity was found to be 0.03 cm/hr. Similar results were obtained with a small column experiment using calcite and dolomite as different lime sources. The hydraulic conductivity in the dolomitic small column remained relatively unchanged with time and salt depletion.

  5. Lake surface water temperatures of European Alpine lakes (1989-2013) based on the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) 1 km data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffler, M.; Lieberherr, G.; Wunderle, S.

    2015-02-01

    Lake water temperature (LWT) is an important driver of lake ecosystems and it has been identified as an indicator of climate change. Consequently, the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) lists LWT as an essential climate variable. Although for some European lakes long in situ time series of LWT do exist, many lakes are not observed or only on a non-regular basis making these observations insufficient for climate monitoring. Satellite data can provide the information needed. However, only few satellite sensors offer the possibility to analyse time series which cover 25 years or more. The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) is among these and has been flown as a heritage instrument for almost 35 years. It will be carried on for at least ten more years, offering a unique opportunity for satellite-based climate studies. Herein we present a satellite-based lake surface water temperature (LSWT) data set for European water bodies in or near the Alps based on the extensive AVHRR 1 km data record (1989-2013) of the Remote Sensing Research Group at the University of Bern. It has been compiled out of AVHRR/2 (NOAA-07, -09, -11, -14) and AVHRR/3 (NOAA-16, -17, -18, -19 and MetOp-A) data. The high accuracy needed for climate related studies requires careful pre-processing and consideration of the atmospheric state. The LSWT retrieval is based on a simulation-based scheme making use of the Radiative Transfer for TOVS (RTTOV) Version 10 together with ERA-interim reanalysis data from the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts. The resulting LSWTs were extensively compared with in situ measurements from lakes with various sizes between 14 and 580 km2 and the resulting biases and RMSEs were found to be within the range of -0.5 to 0.6 K and 1.0 to 1.6 K, respectively. The upper limits of the reported errors could be rather attributed to uncertainties in the data comparison between in situ and satellite observations than inaccuracies of the satellite

  6. EO-based lake-ice cover and surface temperature products: Advancing process understanding and modeling capabilities of lake-atmosphere interactions in cold regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguay, C. R.; Kheyrollah Pour, H.; Ochilov, S.

    2011-12-01

    Our ability to determine the energy and water budgets of lakes is critical to modeling high latitude weather and climate. In recent years, the proper representation of lake processes in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and regional climate (RCM) models has become a topic of much interest by the scientific community. With the increased resolution of the NWP models and RCMs, it has now become possible and necessary to improve the representation of lake-atmosphere interactions to better describe the energy exchange between the atmosphere and the lake surface. Among other lake properties, knowledge about lake surface temperature and ice-coverage is critical. These two parameters can either be obtained from observations or through simulations. Although much progress is being made with lake models, as implemented in NWP/RCM models, the assimilation of data on lake temperature and fractional ice coverage has been identified as highly desirable. Spatially and temporally consistent lake ice and lake surface temperature (LST) products are invaluable in this respect. These can be derived from Earth Observation (EO) systems. However, satellite-based products must be compared with existing lake models, as well as validated and further improved as needed, to generate lake ice and LST products for operational use by the modeling community. The European Space Agency (ESA) is supporting the international efforts coordinated by the Climate and Cryosphere (CliC) project of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) to exploit the use of EO technology, models and in situ data to improve the characterization of river and lake ice processes and their contribution to the Northern Hydrology system. The ESA-sponsored North Hydrology project aims to develop a portfolio of novel multi-mission geo-information products, maximizing the use of ESA satellite data, to respond to the scientific requirements of the CliC community and the operational requirements of the weather and climate

  7. Reverse engineering the euglenoid movement

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Marino; Heltai, Luca; Millán, Daniel; DeSimone, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Euglenids exhibit an unconventional motility strategy amongst unicellular eukaryotes, consisting of large-amplitude highly concerted deformations of the entire body (euglenoid movement or metaboly). A plastic cell envelope called pellicle mediates these deformations. Unlike ciliary or flagellar motility, the biophysics of this mode is not well understood, including its efficiency and molecular machinery. We quantitatively examine video recordings of four euglenids executing such motions with statistical learning methods. This analysis reveals strokes of high uniformity in shape and pace. We then interpret the observations in the light of a theory for the pellicle kinematics, providing a precise understanding of the link between local actuation by pellicle shear and shape control. We systematically understand common observations, such as the helical conformations of the pellicle, and identify previously unnoticed features of metaboly. While two of our euglenids execute their stroke at constant body volume, the other two exhibit deviations of about 20% from their average volume, challenging current models of low Reynolds number locomotion. We find that the active pellicle shear deformations causing shape changes can reach 340%, and estimate the velocity of the molecular motors. Moreover, we find that metaboly accomplishes locomotion at hydrodynamic efficiencies comparable to those of ciliates and flagellates. Our results suggest new quantitative experiments, provide insight into the evolutionary history of euglenids, and suggest that the pellicle may serve as a model for engineered active surfaces with applications in microfluidics. PMID:23047705

  8. Anti-abortion movement.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K

    1985-01-01

    At the same time that American women celebrate the freedoms won thus far for so many Americans, American women must realize they face some of the greatest threats to liberty in recent memory. To understand this movement against American women, it is necessary to first understand the roots of the historic movement for women's rights. Reproductive freedom for many years topped the agenda of the modern women's movement. At a time and in a land where rights were being enriched and liberty prized, choice took a prominent role, specifically, the right to abortion but also generally to repdocuctive freedom and the many underlying issues involved. This is why the various efforts to criminalize abortion effect every citizen, because they pose a serious threat to the constitutional rights of each individual. This is the intellectual view, or the "head" argument. The Constitution states that: "Congress shall make no laws respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; the enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people; and no state shall make or enforce any laws which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the US." Each of these clauses expresses the philosophy on which the Constitution was founded -- individual liberty. While there has been some legitimate disagreement over what constitutes an inalienable right, the concept is clear: the government should not become involved in personal philosophical or religious matters, except to permit the freedom of personal philosophical or religious expression. The anti-abortion contignent makes its case by claiming that a fertilized egg is a cona fide person and should, therefore, be guaranteed the Constitution's full roster of protections. In its landmark Roe v. Wade opinion, the Supreme Court held what pro-choice activities have been claiming for years. Since there is no empirical test by which measure

  9. Hua Loo-Keng and the Movement of Popularizing Mathematics in the People's Republic of China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Jean W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the mathematical and teaching practices of the renowned self-taught Chinese mathematician Hua Loo-keng in the movement of popularizing mathematics in the People's Republic of China. In this movement, Hua Loo-keng taught industrial workers and peasants with a low level of education how to use fairly advanced mathematical methods…

  10. Mars - Wind friction speeds for particle movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Leach, R.; White, B.; Iversen, J.; Pollack, J.

    1976-01-01

    Wind friction threshold speeds for particle movement were determined in a low pressure boundary layer wind tunnel at an atmospheric pressure of 5.3 mb. The results imply that for comparable pressures on Mars, the minimum wind friction threshold speed is about 2.5 m/sec, which would require free-stream winds of 50 to 135 m/sec, depending on the character of the surface and the atmospheric conditions. The corresponding wind speeds at the height of the Viking lander meteorology instrument would be about a factor of two less than the free-stream wind speed. The particle size most easily moved by winds on Mars is about 160 microns; particles both larger and smaller than this (at least down to about 5 microns) require stronger winds to initiate movement.

  11. Ignition angle advancer for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, T.

    1986-08-19

    This patent describes a throttle and spark advance control system for an internal combustion engine having a spark advance mechanism and a throttle valve comprising an operator controlled element, a throttle control lever supported for pivotal movement about an axis and directly connected to the operator controlled element for rotation under operator control. It also includes means for positively connecting the throttle control lever to the throttle valve for positioning the throttle valve in response to movement of the throttle control lever. A spark advance control lever supported for pivotal movement about an axis is included as well as motion transmitting means for operatively connecting the spark advance control lever to the throttle control lever for pivotal movement of the spark advance control lever about its axis in response to pivotal movement of the throttle control lever about its axis and the spark control lever to the spark advance mechanism for controlling the position of the spark advance mechanism in response to the position of the throttle control lever.

  12. Advances in functional electrical stimulation (FES).

    PubMed

    Popović, Dejan B

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the advancements that are needed to enhance the effects of electrical stimulation for restoring or assisting movement in humans with an injury/disease of the central nervous system. A complex model of the effects of electrical stimulation of peripheral systems is presented. The model indicates that both the motor and sensory systems are activated by electrical stimulation. We propose that a hierarchical hybrid controller may be suitable for functional electrical stimulation (FES) because this type of controller acts as a structural mimetic of its biological counterpart. Specific attention is given to the neural systems at the periphery with respect to the required electrodes and stimulators. Furthermore, we note that FES with surface electrodes is preferred for the therapy, although there is a definite advantage associated with implantable technology for life-long use. The last section of the review discusses the potential need to combine FES and robotic systems to provide assistance in some cases. PMID:25287528

  13. Congenital mirror movements

    PubMed Central

    Méneret, Aurélie; Depienne, Christel; Riant, Florence; Trouillard, Oriane; Bouteiller, Delphine; Cincotta, Massimo; Bitoun, Pierre; Wickert, Julia; Lagroua, Isabelle; Westenberger, Ana; Borgheresi, Alessandra; Doummar, Diane; Romano, Marcello; Rossi, Simone; Defebvre, Luc; De Meirleir, Linda; Espay, Alberto J.; Fiori, Simona; Klebe, Stephan; Quélin, Chloé; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Plessis, Ghislaine; Dale, Russell C.; Sklower Brooks, Susan; Dziezyc, Karolina; Pollak, Pierre; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Vidailhet, Marie; Brice, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We screened a large series of individuals with congenital mirror movements (CMM) for mutations in the 2 identified causative genes, DCC and RAD51. Methods: We studied 6 familial and 20 simplex CMM cases. Each patient had a standardized neurologic assessment. Analysis of DCC and RAD51 coding regions included Sanger sequencing and a quantitative method allowing detection of micro rearrangements. We then compared the frequency of rare variants predicted to be pathogenic by either the PolyPhen-2 or the SIFT algorithm in our population and in the 4,300 controls of European origin on the Exome Variant Server. Results: We found 3 novel truncating mutations of DCC that segregate with CMM in 4 of the 6 families. Among the 20 simplex cases, we found one exonic deletion of DCC, one DCC mutation leading to a frameshift, 5 missense variants in DCC, and 2 missense variants in RAD51. All 7 missense variants were predicted to be pathogenic by one or both algorithms. Statistical analysis showed that the frequency of variants predicted to be deleterious was significantly different between patients and controls (p < 0.001 for both RAD51 and DCC). Conclusion: Mutations and variants in DCC and RAD51 are strongly associated with CMM, but additional genes causing CMM remain to be discovered. PMID:24808016

  14. The Siraiki Movement in Pakistan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Tariq

    1995-01-01

    Documents the rise of the Siraiki ethnonationalist movement in economically underdeveloped Southern Pakistani Punjab. Although the Siraiki intellectuals emphasize the differences of their language from Punjabi to mobilize public opinion against the injustice of their deprivation, the Punjabi elite view the Siraiki movement as a conspiracy to…

  15. Developing Movement as Inclusive Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peter, Melanie; Walter, Ofra

    2010-01-01

    This article details the emergence of a training framework to support professional development in inclusive Movement teaching. This arose from a collaborative research project in spring 2008 (supported by the Training and Development Agency, UK), between two universities in England and Israel. Movement education is surprisingly underused globally,…

  16. Rosa Parks: The Movement Organizes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friese, Kai

    This biography for younger readers describes the life of Rosa Parks, the Alabama black woman whose refusal to give up her seat on a segregated bus helped establish the civil rights movement. The book is introduced by an overview of the movement by Andrew Young and a timeline indicating major historical events from 1954 through 1968. Highlights in…

  17. Movement Education For Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Maida L., Ed.; And Others

    This booklet explores why movement education is important for preschool children, what activities to include in a program, how and where to conduct a program, and criteria that can help to structure the program environment. The first section presents a rationale for the use of movement education for helping preschool children to develop…

  18. Antecedents of the Theory Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbertson, Jack A.

    1981-01-01

    Traces the conceptual roots of the theory movement in educational administration, highlighting the ideas of Auguste Comte and the logical positivists. Explains how core concepts that shaped the theory movement were diffused into educational administration and sets forth implications for future study. (Author/WD)

  19. Music and Movement. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Cindy; Moore, Thomas; Carlton, Elizabeth B.; Kranowitz, Carol Stock

    2000-01-01

    Four articles address music and movement in early childhood education: (1) "For the Love of Music--and Children"(Cindy Smith); (2) "Music: The Great Connector" (Thomas Moore); (3) "Learning through Music: The Support of Brain Research" (Elizabeth B. Carlton); and (4) "Music and Movement Bring Together Children of Differing Abilities" (Carol Stock…

  20. Motion transparency: depth ordering and smooth pursuit eye movements.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Alexander C

    2011-12-28

    When two overlapping, transparent surfaces move in different directions, there is ambiguity with respect to the depth ordering of the surfaces. Little is known about the surface features that are used to resolve this ambiguity. Here, we investigated the influence of different surface features on the perceived depth order and the direction of smooth pursuit eye movements. Surfaces containing more dots, moving opposite to an adapted direction, moving at a slower speed, or moving in the same direction as the eyes were more likely to be seen in the back. Smooth pursuit eye movements showed an initial preference for surfaces containing more dots, moving in a non-adapted direction, moving at a faster speed, and being composed of larger dots. After 300 to 500 ms, smooth pursuit eye movements adjusted to perception and followed the surface whose direction had to be indicated. The differences between perceived depth order and initial pursuit preferences and the slow adjustment of pursuit indicate that perceived depth order is not determined solely by the eye movements. The common effect of dot number and motion adaptation suggests that global motion strength can induce a bias to perceive the stronger motion in the back.

  1. Mass movements on Venus - Preliminary results from Magellan cycle 1 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Michael C.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of mass movements and their geomorphic characteristics as determined from visual inspection of Magellan cycle 1 synthetic aperture radar images is described. The primary data set was a catalog of over 200 ten-inch square photographic prints of full-resolution mosaic image data records. Venus exhibits unambiguous evidence of mass movements at a variety of scales. Mass movements appear mostly in the form of block and rock movements; there is little evidence of regolith and sediment movements. Unique Venusian conditions may play a role in the creation of some mass movement features. Dark (smooth) surfaces surrounding many rockslide avalanches are probably fine materials emplaced as part of the mass movement process, as airfall, surface-hugging density flows, or coarse-depleted debris flows. The size and efficiency of emplacement of landslide deposits on Venus are comparable to those seen on Mars, which in turn generally resemble terrestrial occurrences.

  2. Women in the Olympic Movement: Advancing Women's Roles through Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stier, William F.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews women's struggles for equal representation in the Olympic Games on the International Olympic Committee and the national committees, and as participants in the games. Discusses problems with the language in the Olympic Charter, governance of the games, and the role of education on all levels. (SM)

  3. Tracking the Evolution of Smartphone Sensing for Monitoring Human Movement.

    PubMed

    del Rosario, Michael B; Redmond, Stephen J; Lovell, Nigel H

    2015-07-31

    Advances in mobile technology have led to the emergence of the "smartphone", a new class of device with more advanced connectivity features that have quickly made it a constant presence in our lives. Smartphones are equipped with comparatively advanced computing capabilities, a global positioning system (GPS) receivers, and sensing capabilities (i.e., an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and more recently magnetometer and barometer) which can be found in wearable ambulatory monitors (WAMs). As a result, algorithms initially developed for WAMs that "count" steps (i.e., pedometers); gauge physical activity levels; indirectly estimate energy expenditure and monitor human movement can be utilised on the smartphone. These algorithms may enable clinicians to "close the loop" by prescribing timely interventions to improve or maintain wellbeing in populations who are at risk of falling or suffer from a chronic disease whose progression is linked to a reduction in movement and mobility. The ubiquitous nature of smartphone technology makes it the ideal platform from which human movement can be remotely monitored without the expense of purchasing, and inconvenience of using, a dedicated WAM. In this paper, an overview of the sensors that can be found in the smartphone are presented, followed by a summary of the developments in this field with an emphasis on the evolution of algorithms used to classify human movement. The limitations identified in the literature will be discussed, as well as suggestions about future research directions.

  4. Tracking the Evolution of Smartphone Sensing for Monitoring Human Movement

    PubMed Central

    del Rosario, Michael B.; Redmond, Stephen J.; Lovell, Nigel H.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in mobile technology have led to the emergence of the “smartphone”, a new class of device with more advanced connectivity features that have quickly made it a constant presence in our lives. Smartphones are equipped with comparatively advanced computing capabilities, a global positioning system (GPS) receivers, and sensing capabilities (i.e., an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and more recently magnetometer and barometer) which can be found in wearable ambulatory monitors (WAMs). As a result, algorithms initially developed for WAMs that “count” steps (i.e., pedometers); gauge physical activity levels; indirectly estimate energy expenditure and monitor human movement can be utilised on the smartphone. These algorithms may enable clinicians to “close the loop” by prescribing timely interventions to improve or maintain wellbeing in populations who are at risk of falling or suffer from a chronic disease whose progression is linked to a reduction in movement and mobility. The ubiquitous nature of smartphone technology makes it the ideal platform from which human movement can be remotely monitored without the expense of purchasing, and inconvenience of using, a dedicated WAM. In this paper, an overview of the sensors that can be found in the smartphone are presented, followed by a summary of the developments in this field with an emphasis on the evolution of algorithms used to classify human movement. The limitations identified in the literature will be discussed, as well as suggestions about future research directions. PMID:26263998

  5. Tracking the Evolution of Smartphone Sensing for Monitoring Human Movement.

    PubMed

    del Rosario, Michael B; Redmond, Stephen J; Lovell, Nigel H

    2015-01-01

    Advances in mobile technology have led to the emergence of the "smartphone", a new class of device with more advanced connectivity features that have quickly made it a constant presence in our lives. Smartphones are equipped with comparatively advanced computing capabilities, a global positioning system (GPS) receivers, and sensing capabilities (i.e., an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and more recently magnetometer and barometer) which can be found in wearable ambulatory monitors (WAMs). As a result, algorithms initially developed for WAMs that "count" steps (i.e., pedometers); gauge physical activity levels; indirectly estimate energy expenditure and monitor human movement can be utilised on the smartphone. These algorithms may enable clinicians to "close the loop" by prescribing timely interventions to improve or maintain wellbeing in populations who are at risk of falling or suffer from a chronic disease whose progression is linked to a reduction in movement and mobility. The ubiquitous nature of smartphone technology makes it the ideal platform from which human movement can be remotely monitored without the expense of purchasing, and inconvenience of using, a dedicated WAM. In this paper, an overview of the sensors that can be found in the smartphone are presented, followed by a summary of the developments in this field with an emphasis on the evolution of algorithms used to classify human movement. The limitations identified in the literature will be discussed, as well as suggestions about future research directions. PMID:26263998

  6. Signs of muscle thixotropy during human ballistic wrist joint movements.

    PubMed

    Axelson, H W

    2005-11-01

    A study was conducted on healthy subjects to determine whether voluntary ballistic wrist flexion movements are influenced by immediately preceding conditioning of the forearm muscles. Single rapid wrist flexion movements were made in response to an auditory "Go" signal. Rectified surface EMG was recorded from wrist flexors and extensors, and joint position was measured by a goniometer. The movements were preceded (2-3 s) by four different conditioning routines: 40-s rest (Rest), 10-s voluntary alternating wrist joint flexion and extension movements (Osc), and 10 s of 25 degrees weak isometric wrist extensor (Ext) or flexor contractions (Flex). When subjects made ballistic movements after Osc compared with Rest, peak velocity was higher (P = 0.02) and movement time shorter (P = 0.06), but there was no difference (P = 0.83) in motor reaction time (time between the onset of the first agonist burst and movement onset). If the movements were preceded by Ext compared with Flex, motor reaction time was longer (P = 0.01), indicating a longer electromechanical delay. There were no indications that postconditioning differences in agonist or antagonist muscle activity could explain the results. It was also demonstrated that, after Rest, peak velocity was lower (P < 0.01) for the first than for the second of a series of repetitive ballistic movements. The observations corresponded to results from passive experiments in which the median nerve was electrically stimulated. In conclusion, history-dependent (thixotropic) changes in skeletal muscle resistance seem to have implications for voluntary ballistic wrist movements. The study also provided evidence that muscle conditioning influences the central nervous reaction time preceding ballistic contractions.

  7. Control of arm movements for quick change of movement direction.

    PubMed

    Takatoku, Nozomi; Fujiwara, Motoko

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigated the control strategy for changing movement direction during arm movements by analyzing the changes in a triphasic electromyographic pattern. Subjects performed a 40° flexion (basic) and a 40° flexion-extension to return to the start position (return) under two conditions: performing a predetermined task (SF) and performing each task in response to a signal (ST). The results revealed the agonist burst for the return task under the ST condition resembled that of the basic task under the SF condition, and the antagonist burst increased after presenting the modification signal. In conclusion, the strategy for quick change of movement direction was to increase the antagonist burst by an additional command from the central nervous system without cancelling the planned movement.

  8. Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, June 1, 1991--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiang-Huai

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this project is to conduct extensive studies on the surfaces reactivity of pyrite by using electrochemical, surface analysis, potentiometric and calorimetric titration, and surface hydrophobicity characterization techniques and to correlate the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface with the efficiency of the pyrite rejection in coal flotation. The product as well as their structure, the mechanism and the kinetics of the oxidation of coal-pyrite surfaces and their interaction with various chemical reagents will be systematically studied and compared with that of mineral-pyrite and synthetic pyrite to determine the correlation between the surface reactivity of pyrite and the bulk chemical properties of pyrite and impurities. The surface chemical studies and the studies of floatability of coal-pyrite and the effect of various parameters such as grinding media and environment, aging under different atmospheres, etc., are directed at identifying the cause and possible solutions of the pyrite rejection problems in coal cleaning.

  9. Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies. Third quarterly technical progress report, March 1, 1991--May 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiang-Huai; Leonard, J.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Raichur, A.M.; Jiang, Chengliang

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this project is to conduct extensive studies on the surface reactivity of pyrite by using electrochemical, surface analysis, potentiometric and calorimetric titration, and surface hydrophobicity characterization techniques and to correlate the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface with the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. The products as well as their structure, the mechanisms and the kinetics of the oxidation of coal-pyrite surfaces and their interaction with various chemical reagents will be systematically studied and compared with that of mineral-pyrite and synthetic pyrite to determine the correlation between the surface reactivity of pyrite and the bulk chemical properties of pyrite and impurities. The surface chemical studies and the studies of floatability of coal-pyrite and the effect of various parameters such as grinding media and environment, aging under different atmospheres, etc. on thereof will lead to identifying the causes and possible solutions of the pyrite rejection problems in coal cleaning.

  10. The initiation of grain movement by wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickling, W. G.

    1986-01-01

    When air blows across the surface of dry, loose sand, a critical shear velocity must be achieved to inititate motion. Since most natural sediments consist of a range of grain sizes, fluid threshold for any sediment cannot really be defined by a finite value but should be viewed as a threshold range which is a function of the mean size, sorting, and packing of the sediment. In order to investigate the initiation of particle movement by wind, a series of wind tunnel tests were carried out on a range of screened sands and commercially available glass beads of differing sizes, sorting, and shape characteristics. In addition, individual samples of the glass beads were mixed to produce rather poorly sorted bimodal distributions. Test results suggest that when velocity is slowly increased over the sediment surface the smaller or more exposed grains are first entrained by the fluid drag of the air either in surface creep or in saltation. As velocity continues to rise, the larger more protected grains may also be moved by fluid drag. The data also indicate that predicted values based on the modified Bagnold equation fall within the range of threshold values defined by the transition section of the grain movement/shear velocity plots. Moreover, the predicted values are very similar to the threshold values derived for the point maximum inflection on the curves.

  11. The initiation of grain movement by wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickling, William G.

    1987-01-01

    When air blows across the surface of dry, loose sand, a critical shear velocity must be achieved to initiate motion. Since most natural sediments consist of a range of grain sizes, fluid threshold for any sediment cannot really be defined by a finite value but should be viewed as a threshold range which is a function of the mean size, sorting, and packing of the sediment. In order to investigate the initiation of particle movement by wind, a series of wind tunnel tests were carried out on a range of screened sands and commercially available glass beads of differing size, sorting, and shape characteristics. In addition, individual samples of the glass beads were mixed to produce rather poorly sorted bimodal distributions. Test results suggest the when velocity is slowly increased over the sediment surface the smaller or more exposed grains are first engrained by the fluid drag of the air either in surface creep or in saltation. As velocity continues to rise, the larger more protected grains may also be moved by fluid drag. The data also indicate that predicted values based on the modified Bagnold equation fall within the range of threshold values defined by the transition section of the grain movement/shear velocity plots. Moreover, the predicted values are very similar to the threshold values derived for the point maximum inflection on the curves.

  12. Biological soliton in multicellular movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwayama, Hidekazu; Ishida, Shuji

    2013-07-01

    Solitons have been observed in various physical phenomena. Here, we show that the distinct characteristics of solitons are present in the mass cell movement of non-chemotactic mutants of the cellular slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum. During starvation, D. discoideum forms multicellular structures that differentiate into spore or stalk cells and, eventually, a fruiting body. Non-chemotactic mutant cells do not form multicellular structures; however, they do undergo mass cell movement in the form of a pulsatile soliton-like structure (SLS). We also found that SLS induction is mediated by adhesive cell-cell interactions. These observations provide novel insights into the mechanisms of biological solitons in multicellular movement.

  13. Long-term decoding of movement force and direction with a wireless myoelectric implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, Pierre; Ferrea, Enrico; Taghizadeh-Sarshouri, Bahareh; Marcel Cardona Audí, Josep; Ruff, Roman; Hoffmann, Klaus-Peter; Lewis, Sören; Russold, Michael; Dietl, Hans; Abu-Saleh, Lait; Schroeder, Dietmar; Krautschneider, Wolfgang; Meiners, Thomas; Gail, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Objective. The ease of use and number of degrees of freedom of current myoelectric hand prostheses is limited by the information content and reliability of the surface electromyography (sEMG) signals used to control them. For example, cross-talk limits the capacity to pick up signals from small or deep muscles, such as the forearm muscles for distal arm amputations, or sites of targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) for proximal amputations. Here we test if signals recorded from the fully implanted, induction-powered wireless Myoplant system allow long-term decoding of continuous as well as discrete movement parameters with better reliability than equivalent sEMG recordings. The Myoplant system uses a centralized implant to transmit broadband EMG activity from four distributed bipolar epimysial electrodes. Approach. Two Rhesus macaques received implants in their backs, while electrodes were placed in their upper arm. One of the monkeys was trained to do a cursor task via a haptic robot, allowing us to control the forces exerted by the animal during arm movements. The second animal was trained to perform a center-out reaching task on a touchscreen. We compared the implanted system with concurrent sEMG recordings by evaluating our ability to decode time-varying force in one animal and discrete reach directions in the other from multiple features extracted from the raw EMG signals. Main results. In both cases, data from the implant allowed a decoder trained with data from a single day to maintain an accurate decoding performance during the following months, which was not the case for concurrent surface EMG recordings conducted simultaneously over the same muscles. Significance. These results show that a fully implantable, centralized wireless EMG system is particularly suited for long-term stable decoding of dynamic movements in demanding applications such as advanced forelimb prosthetics in a wide range of configurations (distal amputations, TMR).

  14. Electrophysiological evaluation of psychogenic movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Nitish L; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Psychogenic movement disorders (PMD) include a group of neurological symptoms which cannot be explained by any organic syndrome. The diagnosis of PMD is challenging for both neurologist and psychiatrist. Electrophysiological examination is a useful tool to evaluate and support a diagnosis PMD. It includes a set of tests which are chosen appropriate to the clinical setting that provides objective criteria for the diagnosis of PMD. The various tests available include accelerometry, surface electromyography, electroencephalography, jerk locked back averaging and pre-movement potentials, somatosensory evoked potentials, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) etc. Electrophysiologically psychogenic tremors display features of variability, entrainability, coactivation, distractibility and increase in the amplitude and frequency on mass loading. Movement related cortical potentials such as Bereitschaftspotential is seen in psychogenic myoclonus. Presence of triphasic contraction of muscles and absence of co-contraction suggests psychogenic myoclonus. Latency of C-reflex is longer in psychogenic myoclonus as compared to organic myoclonus. The role of TMS to differentiate psychogenic from organic dystonia is still not clear. In conclusion, electrophysiological tests are most useful for tremor, followed by jerks and least for dystonia. In patients with long-standing PMD or those with mixed pathology, electrophysiological tests may not be very useful. PMID:26403429

  15. The movement continues. IPPF.

    PubMed

    Inayatullah, A

    1997-06-01

    In her speech initiating the Kato Award in honor of Mme. Shidzue Kato, Dr. Attiya Inayatullah, president of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) noted that Kato is one of the great women who served as a "founding mother" of the IPPF. The Kato award also highlights the IPPF's appreciation for the sustained strategic support received from the Japanese people and government. Through the momentum of grassroots family planning associations (FPAs), the IPPF has grown from eight FPAs in 1952 to 60 in 1974 and 160 today. That the conceptual work of population planners has also grown can be seen by examining the themes of the world population conferences. In 1974, the idea that development is the best contraceptive was considered novel. By 1984, planners were discussing the interrelationship between population, economic development, and quality of life. Then the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development produced a Program of Action that shifted attention from demographic, target-driven goals to democratic, client-centered goals emphasizing women's needs. The Program of Action's chapter on gender equality, equity, and the empowerment of women is considered the strongest international statement on women's status. Another advance seen in 1994 was recognition of the need for partnerships between governments and the private sector. Inayatullah called upon the 160 IPPF FPAs to actively pursue such a partnership.

  16. Cranial functional (psychogenic) movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaski, Diego; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Edwards, Mark J; Stone, Jon

    2015-12-01

    Functional (psychogenic) neurological symptoms are frequently encountered in neurological practice. Cranial movement disorders--affecting the eyes, face, jaw, tongue, or palate--are an under-recognised feature of patients with functional symptoms. They can present in isolation or in the context of other functional symptoms; in particular, for functional eye movements, positive clinical signs such as convergence spasms can be triggered by the clinical examination. Although the specialty of functional neurological disorders has expanded, appreciation of cranial functional movement disorders is still insufficient. Identification of the positive features of cranial functional movement disorders such as convergence and unilateral platysmal spasm might lend diagnostic weight to a suspected functional neurological disorder. Understanding of the differential diagnosis, which is broad and includes many organic causes (eg, stroke), is essential to make an early and accurate diagnosis to prevent complications and initiate appropriate management. Increased understanding of these disorders is also crucial to drive clinical trials and studies of individually tailored therapies. PMID:26581970

  17. Healthy Movements: Your Body's Mechanics

    MedlinePlus

    ... devised improved treatments for movement disorders such as cerebral palsy and Parkinson’s disease. Joints are a common source ... which patients could benefit from surgery. People with cerebral palsy, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis could also benefit ...

  18. Eye movements when viewing advertisements

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Emily; Leinenger, Mallorie; Rayner, Keith

    2013-01-01

    In this selective review, we examine key findings on eye movements when viewing advertisements. We begin with a brief, general introduction to the properties and neural underpinnings of saccadic eye movements. Next, we provide an overview of eye movement behavior during reading, scene perception, and visual search, since each of these activities is, at various times, involved in viewing ads. We then review the literature on eye movements when viewing print ads and warning labels (of the kind that appear on alcohol and tobacco ads), before turning to a consideration of advertisements in dynamic media (television and the Internet). Finally, we propose topics and methodological approaches that may prove to be useful in future research. PMID:24672500

  19. 9 CFR 78.25 - Other movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Interstate Movement of Bison Because of Brucellosis § 78.25 Other movements. The Administrator may, upon request in specific cases, permit the interstate movement of bison not otherwise provided for in...

  20. 9 CFR 78.25 - Other movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Interstate Movement of Bison Because of Brucellosis § 78.25 Other movements. The Administrator may, upon request in specific cases, permit the interstate movement of bison not otherwise provided for in...

  1. 9 CFR 78.25 - Other movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Interstate Movement of Bison Because of Brucellosis § 78.25 Other movements. The Administrator may, upon request in specific cases, permit the interstate movement of bison not otherwise provided for in...

  2. 9 CFR 78.25 - Other movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Interstate Movement of Bison Because of Brucellosis § 78.25 Other movements. The Administrator may, upon request in specific cases, permit the interstate movement of bison not otherwise provided for in...

  3. 9 CFR 78.25 - Other movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Interstate Movement of Bison Because of Brucellosis § 78.25 Other movements. The Administrator may, upon request in specific cases, permit the interstate movement of bison not otherwise provided for in...

  4. 9 CFR 78.13 - Other movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.13 Other movements. The Administrator may, upon request in specific cases, permit the interstate movement of cattle not otherwise provided for in...

  5. 9 CFR 78.13 - Other movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.13 Other movements. The Administrator may, upon request in specific cases, permit the interstate movement of cattle not otherwise provided for in...

  6. 9 CFR 78.13 - Other movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.13 Other movements. The Administrator may, upon request in specific cases, permit the interstate movement of cattle not otherwise provided for in...

  7. Advanced Air Transportation Technologies Project, Final Document Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogford, Richard H.; Wold, Sheryl (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    This CD ROM contains a compilation of the final documents of the Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AAIT) project, which was an eight-year (1996 to 2004), $400M project managed by the Airspace Systems Program office, which was part of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters. AAIT focused on developing advanced automation tools and air traffic management concepts that would help improve the efficiency of the National Airspace System, while maintaining or enhancing safety. The documents contained in the CD are final reports on AAIT tasks that serve to document the project's accomplishments over its eight-year term. Documents include information on: Advanced Air Transportation Technologies, Autonomous Operations Planner, Collaborative Arrival Planner, Distributed Air/Ground Traffic Management Concept Elements 5, 6, & 11, Direct-To, Direct-To Technology Transfer, Expedite Departure Path, En Route Data Exchange, Final Approach Spacing Tool - (Active and Passive), Multi-Center Traffic Management Advisor, Multi Center Traffic Management Advisor Technology Transfer, Surface Movement Advisor, Surface Management System, Surface Management System Technology Transfer and Traffic Flow Management Research & Development.

  8. Invarient patterns in articulatory movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaventura, Patrizia

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of the reported study is to discover an effective method of characterizing movement patterns of the crucial articulator as the function of an abstract syllable magnitude and the adjacent boundary, and at the same time to investigate effects of prosodic control on utterance organization. In particular, the speed of movement when a flesh point on the tongue blade or the lower lip crosses a selected position relative to the occlusion plane is examined. The time of such crossing provides an effective measure of syllable timing and syllable duration according to previous work. In the present work, using a very limited vocabulary with only a few consonants and one vowel as the key speech materials, effects of contrastive emphasis on demisyllabic movement patterns were studied. The theoretical framework for this analysis is the C/D model of speech production in relation to the concept of an invariant part of selected articulatory movements. The results show evidence in favor of the existence of ``iceberg'' patterns, but a linear dependence of slope on the total excursion of the demisyllabic movement, instead of the approximate constancy of the threshold crossing speed as suggested in the original proposal of the iceberg, has been found. Accordingly, a revision of the original concept of iceberg, seems necessary. This refinement is consistent with the C/D model assumption on ``prominence control'' that the syllable magnitude determines the movement amplitude, accompanying directly related syllable duration change. In this assumption, the movement of a consonantal component should also be proportional to syllable magnitude. The results suggests, however, systematic outliers deviating from the linear dependence of movement speed on excursion. This deviation may be caused by the effect of the immediately following boundary, often referred to as phrase-final elongation. Thesis advisor: Osamu Fujimura Copies of this thesis written in English can be obtained from

  9. Emotional processing affects movement speed.

    PubMed

    Hälbig, Thomas D; Borod, Joan C; Frisina, Pasquale G; Tse, Winona; Voustianiouk, Andrei; Olanow, C Warren; Gracies, Jean-Michel

    2011-09-01

    Emotions can affect various aspects of human behavior. The impact of emotions on behavior is traditionally thought to occur at central, cognitive and motor preparation stages. Using EMG to measure the effects of emotion on movement, we found that emotional stimuli differing in valence and arousal elicited highly specific effects on peripheral movement time. This result has conceptual implications for the emotion-motion link and potentially practical implications for neurorehabilitation and professional environments where fast motor reactions are critical.

  10. Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies. Eighth quarterly technical progress report, June 1, 1992--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.H.; Leonard, J.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Raichur, A.M.; Jiang, C.L.

    1992-12-01

    The objective of the project is to conduct extensive fundamental studies on the surface reactivity and surface hydrophobicity of coal-pyrites using various surface characterization techniques and to understand how the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface affects the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. During this reporting period, the influence of the impurity content, particularly coal/carbon content, on the electrochemical oxidation of pyrite surfaces was investigated. The studies demonstrate that the coal/carbon content in coal-pyrite has a determining effect on the surface reactivity of pyrite. The oxidation behavior of high carbon-content coal-pyrite is completely different from that of purer coal-pyrite and ore-pyrite. The effects of flotation gases on the flotation behavior of coal and the surface hydrophobicity of various coal-pyrite were investigated. It was found from the lab-scale column flotation studies that among the various gases studied (air, oxygen, argon, nitrogen and carbon dioxide), carbon dioxide produced the best results with a combustible recovery of 90% and ash-content of less than 9 percent. Finally, the surface energetic studies revealed that the surfaces of pyrites and coals produced by wet grinding is more heterogenous than that prepared by dry grinding.

  11. Stochastic modelling of animal movement

    PubMed Central

    Smouse, Peter E.; Focardi, Stefano; Moorcroft, Paul R.; Kie, John G.; Forester, James D.; Morales, Juan M.

    2010-01-01

    Modern animal movement modelling derives from two traditions. Lagrangian models, based on random walk behaviour, are useful for multi-step trajectories of single animals. Continuous Eulerian models describe expected behaviour, averaged over stochastic realizations, and are usefully applied to ensembles of individuals. We illustrate three modern research arenas. (i) Models of home-range formation describe the process of an animal ‘settling down’, accomplished by including one or more focal points that attract the animal's movements. (ii) Memory-based models are used to predict how accumulated experience translates into biased movement choices, employing reinforced random walk behaviour, with previous visitation increasing or decreasing the probability of repetition. (iii) Lévy movement involves a step-length distribution that is over-dispersed, relative to standard probability distributions, and adaptive in exploring new environments or searching for rare targets. Each of these modelling arenas implies more detail in the movement pattern than general models of movement can accommodate, but realistic empiric evaluation of their predictions requires dense locational data, both in time and space, only available with modern GPS telemetry. PMID:20566497

  12. Eye Movements in Risky Choice

    PubMed Central

    Hermens, Frouke; Matthews, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We asked participants to make simple risky choices while we recorded their eye movements. We built a complete statistical model of the eye movements and found very little systematic variation in eye movements over the time course of a choice or across the different choices. The only exceptions were finding more (of the same) eye movements when choice options were similar, and an emerging gaze bias in which people looked more at the gamble they ultimately chose. These findings are inconsistent with prospect theory, the priority heuristic, or decision field theory. However, the eye movements made during a choice have a large relationship with the final choice, and this is mostly independent from the contribution of the actual attribute values in the choice options. That is, eye movements tell us not just about the processing of attribute values but also are independently associated with choice. The pattern is simple—people choose the gamble they look at more often, independently of the actual numbers they see—and this pattern is simpler than predicted by decision field theory, decision by sampling, and the parallel constraint satisfaction model. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27522985

  13. Motion dependence of smooth pursuit eye movements in the marmoset

    PubMed Central

    Priebe, Nicholas J.; Miller, Cory T.

    2015-01-01

    Smooth pursuit eye movements stabilize slow-moving objects on the retina by matching eye velocity with target velocity. Two critical components are required to generate smooth pursuit: first, because it is a voluntary eye movement, the subject must select a target to pursue to engage the tracking system; and second, generating smooth pursuit requires a moving stimulus. We examined whether this behavior also exists in the common marmoset, a New World primate that is increasingly attracting attention as a genetic model for mental disease and systems neuroscience. We measured smooth pursuit in two marmosets, previously trained to perform fixation tasks, using the standard Rashbass step-ramp pursuit paradigm. We first measured the aspects of visual motion that drive pursuit eye movements. Smooth eye movements were in the same direction as target motion, indicating that pursuit was driven by target movement rather than by displacement. Both the open-loop acceleration and closed-loop eye velocity exhibited a linear relationship with target velocity for slow-moving targets, but this relationship declined for higher speeds. We next examined whether marmoset pursuit eye movements depend on an active engagement of the pursuit system by measuring smooth eye movements evoked by small perturbations of motion from fixation or during pursuit. Pursuit eye movements were much larger during pursuit than from fixation, indicating that pursuit is actively gated. Several practical advantages of the marmoset brain, including the accessibility of the middle temporal (MT) area and frontal eye fields at the cortical surface, merit its utilization for studying pursuit movements. PMID:25867740

  14. Classification of mouth movements using 7 T fMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleichner, M. G.; Jansma, J. M.; Salari, E.; Freudenburg, Z. V.; Raemaekers, M.; Ramsey, N. F.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. A brain-computer interface (BCI) is an interface that uses signals from the brain to control a computer. BCIs will likely become important tools for severely paralyzed patients to restore interaction with the environment. The sensorimotor cortex is a promising target brain region for a BCI due to the detailed topography and minimal functional interference with other important brain processes. Previous studies have shown that attempted movements in paralyzed people generate neural activity that strongly resembles actual movements. Hence decodability for BCI applications can be studied in able-bodied volunteers with actual movements. Approach. In this study we tested whether mouth movements provide adequate signals in the sensorimotor cortex for a BCI. The study was executed using fMRI at 7 T to ensure relevance for BCI with cortical electrodes, as 7 T measurements have been shown to correlate well with electrocortical measurements. Twelve healthy volunteers executed four mouth movements (lip protrusion, tongue movement, teeth clenching, and the production of a larynx activating sound) while in the scanner. Subjects performed a training and a test run. Single trials were classified based on the Pearson correlation values between the activation patterns per trial type in the training run and single trials in the test run in a ‘winner-takes-all’ design. Main results. Single trial mouth movements could be classified with 90% accuracy. The classification was based on an area with a volume of about 0.5 cc, located on the sensorimotor cortex. If voxels were limited to the surface, which is accessible for electrode grids, classification accuracy was still very high (82%). Voxels located on the precentral cortex performed better (87%) than the postcentral cortex (72%). Significance. The high reliability of decoding mouth movements suggests that attempted mouth movements are a promising candidate for BCI in paralyzed people.

  15. Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies. Tenth quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.H.; Leonard, J.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Jiang, C.L.

    1993-08-01

    The objective of the project is to conduct extensive fundamental studies on the surface chemistry of pyrite oxidation and flotation and to understand how the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface affects the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. This report summarizes the studies in the following three aspects: (1) the effects of borate, used as pH buffer or electrolyte, on the pyrite surface oxidation and flotation; (2) the quantification of pyrite surface oxidation kinetics under different oxidation potentials; and (3) finding new coal-pyrite depressants. It has been demonstrated, for the first time, that borate, a pH buffer and electrolyte used by many previous investigators in studying pyrite oxidation, actively participates in the surface oxidation of pyrite. In high borate concentration solutions, the surface oxidation of pyrite is strongly enhanced. The anodic oxidation potential of pyrite is lowered by more than 0.4 volts. At low borate concentration, borate is chemisorbed on pyrite surfaces. In the intermediate concentration range, borate dissolves surface iron compounds. Consequently, the flotation of pyrite in borate solutions (using fuel oil as collector) displays depression-flotation-depression phenomena as the borate concentration is increased. The oxidation kinetics of pyrite surfaces has been determined by AC impedance spectroscopy. At low oxidation potentials, only capacitive behavior is observed. However, at high oxidation potentials, an inductive loop appears. The charge transfer resistance decreases with increasing potential, indicating that the oxidation rate increases with increasing potential. A chemical reagent has been found to be very effective in depressing the flotation of coal-pyrites from different sources, while it has little effects on the flotation of coal. The surface chemistry involved in the selective pyrite depression by this new reagent has been investigated by electrochemical studies and contact angle measurements.

  16. Flame Movement and Pressure Development in an Engine Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, Charles F , Jr; Best, Robert D

    1932-01-01

    This investigation describes a visual method for making stroboscopic observations, through a large number of small windows, of the spread of flame throughout the combustion chamber of a gasoline engine. Data, secured by this method on a small engine burning gaseous fuels, are given to show the effects of mixture ratio, spark advance, engine speed, charge density, degree of dilution, compression ratio, and fuel composition on flame movement in the cylinder. Partial indicator diagrams showing pressure development during the combustion period are included. Although present knowledge is not sufficient to permit qualitative evaluation of the separate effects on flame movement of chemical reaction velocity, thermal expansion of burned gases, resonance, turbulence, and piston movement, the qualitative influence of certain of these factors on some of the diagrams is indicated.

  17. Eye movements and attention in reading, scene perception, and visual search.

    PubMed

    Rayner, Keith

    2009-08-01

    Eye movements are now widely used to investigate cognitive processes during reading, scene perception, and visual search. In this article, research on the following topics is reviewed with respect to reading: (a) the perceptual span (or span of effective vision), (b) preview benefit, (c) eye movement control, and (d) models of eye movements. Related issues with respect to eye movements during scene perception and visual search are also reviewed. It is argued that research on eye movements during reading has been somewhat advanced over research on eye movements in scene perception and visual search and that some of the paradigms developed to study reading should be more widely adopted in the study of scene perception and visual search. Research dealing with "real-world" tasks and research utilizing the visual-world paradigm are also briefly discussed.

  18. Psychopathology and Psychogenic Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kranick, Sarah; Ekanayake, Vindhya; Martinez, Valeria; Ameli, Rezvan; Hallett, Mark; Voon, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Psychogenic movement disorder is defined as abnormal movements unrelated to a medical cause and presumed related to underlying psychological factors. Although psychological factors are of both clinical and pathophysiological relevance, very few studies to date have systematically assessed their role in psychogenic movement disorder. We sought to assess the role of previous life stress using validated quantitative measures in patients with psychogenic movement disorder compared with age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers as well as a convenience sample of patients with focal hand dystonia. Sixty-four patients with psychogenic movement disorder (72% female; mean age, 45.2 years [standard deviation, 15.2 years]), 38 healthy volunteers (74% female; mean age, 49 years [standard deviation, 13.7 years]), and 39 patients with focal hand dystonia (37% female; mean age, 48.7 years [standard deviation, 11.7 years]) were evaluated using a standardized psychological interview as well as validated quantitative scales to assess trauma and previous stressors, depression, anxiety, and personality traits. Patients with psychogenic movement disorder reported higher rates of childhood trauma, specifically greater emotional abuse and physical neglect, greater fear associated with traumatic events, and a greater number of traumatic episodes compared with healthy volunteers and patients with focal hand dystonia controlled for depressive symptoms and sex (Bonferroni corrected P < .005). There were no differences in categorical psychiatric diagnoses or scores on childhood physical or sexual abuse subscales, personality traits, or the dissociative experience scale. Our findings highlight a biopsychosocial approach toward the pathophysiology of psychogenic movement disorder, although the association with psychological issues is much less prominent than expected compared with the nonepileptic seizure population. A careful psychological assessment is indicated to optimize therapeutic

  19. Mass movement in northeast Afghanistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shroder, John F.; Weihs, Brandon J.; Schettler, Megan Jensen

    Mass movements of nearly all types occur in Afghanistan but in the high relief, rugged Pamir and Hindu Kush mountains of northeastern Afghanistan, mass-movement threats to lives and property necessitated study to elucidate problems to development. Twenty-two different mass movements in bedrock in the Badakhshan Province of northeastern Afghanistan were studied for this paper, including large rock falls and rock slides, along with massive slope-failure complexes with many types and rates of movement. Where higher altitudes prevail in the region, ice-cemented and ice-cored rock glaciers are also common and overlie some of the other mass movements. Inasmuch as seismic energy sources in the Eastern Hindu Kush are maximal in southern Badakhshan, and relief, slope angles and precipitation all increase from west to east as well, the causes of the pervasive mass movement are plentiful enough, although direct cause and slope-failure effect are not known. Some weak sedimentary lithologies downfaulted into, or draped across crystalline rocks, also failed. Some intermixed tills also occur but are not easily differentiated, even with analysis on the ground. Using high resolution satellite imagery and digital elevation models, we assessed geomorphologic parameters to characterize spatial-organization structures related to zones of erosion, deposition and further hazard potential. Analyses indicate that many of the massive slope failures can be characterized and differentiated into various process domains and chronologic-development zones with their different impacts upon the landscape. Mass movements in Afghanistan can exhibit unique topographic signatures that can be used to better assess hazards in other mountain areas, especially where landslide-dam breakout floods threaten. Development of roads, bridges, buildings, and irrigation networks should be done with care in these regions of Afghanistan.

  20. Mindful movement and skilled attention.

    PubMed

    Clark, Dav; Schumann, Frank; Mostofsky, Stewart H

    2015-01-01

    Bodily movement has long been employed as a foundation for cultivating mental skills such as attention, self-control or mindfulness, with recent studies documenting the positive impacts of mindful movement training, such as yoga and tai chi. A parallel "mind-body connection" has also been observed in many developmental disorders. We elaborate a spectrum of mindfulness by considering ADHD, in which deficient motor control correlates with impaired (disinhibited) behavioral control contributing to defining features of excessive distractibility and impulsivity. These data provide evidence for an important axis of variation for wellbeing, in which skillful cognitive control covaries with a capacity for skillful movement. We review empirical and theoretical literature on attention, cognitive control, mind wandering, mindfulness and skill learning, endorsing a model of skilled attention in which motor plans, attention, and executive goals are seen as mutually co-defining aspects of skilled behavior that are linked by reciprocal inhibitory and excitatory connections. Thus, any movement training should engage "higher-order" inhibition and selection and develop a repertoire of rehearsed procedures that coordinate goals, attention and motor plans. However, we propose that mindful movement practice may improve the functional quality of rehearsed procedures, cultivating a transferrable skill of attention. We adopt Langer's spectrum of mindful learning that spans from "mindlessness" to engagement with the details of the present task and contrast this with the mental attitudes cultivated in standard mindfulness meditation. We particularly follow Feldenkrais' suggestion that mindful learning of skills for organizing the body in movement might transfer to other forms of mental activity. The results of mindful movement training should be observed in multiple complementary measures, and may have tremendous potential benefit for individuals with ADHD and other populations.

  1. Mindful movement and skilled attention

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Dav; Schumann, Frank; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2015-01-01

    Bodily movement has long been employed as a foundation for cultivating mental skills such as attention, self-control or mindfulness, with recent studies documenting the positive impacts of mindful movement training, such as yoga and tai chi. A parallel “mind-body connection” has also been observed in many developmental disorders. We elaborate a spectrum of mindfulness by considering ADHD, in which deficient motor control correlates with impaired (disinhibited) behavioral control contributing to defining features of excessive distractibility and impulsivity. These data provide evidence for an important axis of variation for wellbeing, in which skillful cognitive control covaries with a capacity for skillful movement. We review empirical and theoretical literature on attention, cognitive control, mind wandering, mindfulness and skill learning, endorsing a model of skilled attention in which motor plans, attention, and executive goals are seen as mutually co-defining aspects of skilled behavior that are linked by reciprocal inhibitory and excitatory connections. Thus, any movement training should engage “higher-order” inhibition and selection and develop a repertoire of rehearsed procedures that coordinate goals, attention and motor plans. However, we propose that mindful movement practice may improve the functional quality of rehearsed procedures, cultivating a transferrable skill of attention. We adopt Langer’s spectrum of mindful learning that spans from “mindlessness” to engagement with the details of the present task and contrast this with the mental attitudes cultivated in standard mindfulness meditation. We particularly follow Feldenkrais’ suggestion that mindful learning of skills for organizing the body in movement might transfer to other forms of mental activity. The results of mindful movement training should be observed in multiple complementary measures, and may have tremendous potential benefit for individuals with ADHD and other

  2. Advanced information society(7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Toshihiro

    Various threats are hiding in advanced informationalized society. As we see car accident problems in motorization society light aspects necessarily accompy shady ones. Under the changing circumstances of advanced informationalization added values of information has become much higher. It causes computer crime, hacker, computer virus to come to the surface. In addition it can be said that infringement of intellectual property and privacy are threats brought by advanced information. Against these threats legal, institutional and insurance measures have been progressed, and newly security industry has been established. However, they are not adequate individually or totally. The future vision should be clarified, and countermeasures according to the visions have to be considered.

  3. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-10-01

    The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, a new field demonstration, Springdale Prospect in Manistee County, Michigan was begun to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path. The surface geochemistry sampling at the original Bear Lake demonstration site was updated several months after the prospect was confirmed and production begun. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir.

  4. Eye movements in vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Kheradmand, A; Colpak, A I; Zee, D S

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of patients with vestibular symptoms usually begins with the question: is the lesion central or is it peripheral? The answer commonly emerges from a careful examination of eye movements, especially when the lesion is located in otherwise clinically silent areas of the brain such as the vestibular portions of the cerebellum (flocculus, paraflocculus which is called the tonsils in humans, nodulus, and uvula) and the vestibular nuclei as well as immediately adjacent areas (the perihypoglossal nuclei and the paramedian nuclei and tracts). The neural circuitry that controls vestibular eye movements is intertwined with a larger network within the brainstem and cerebellum that also controls other types of conjugate eye movements. These include saccades and pursuit as well as the mechanisms that enable steady fixation, both straight ahead and in eccentric gaze positions. Navigating through this complex network requires a thorough knowledge about all classes of eye movements to help localize lesions causing a vestibular disorder. Here we review the different classes of eye movements and how to examine them, and then describe common ocular motor findings associated with central vestibular lesions from both a topographic and functional perspective. PMID:27638066

  5. Open apex shaped charge-type explosive device having special disc means with slide surface thereon to influence movement of open apex shaped charge liner during collapse of same during detonation

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, M.J.

    1993-10-12

    An open apex shape charge explosive device is disclosed having an inner liner defining a truncated cone, an explosive charge surrounding the truncated inner liner, a primer charge, and a disc located between the inner liner and the primer charge for directing the detonation of the primer charge around the end edge of the disc means to the explosive materials surrounding the inner liner. The disc comprises a material having one or more of: a higher compressive strength, a higher hardness, and/or a higher density than the material comprising the inner liner, thereby enabling the disc to resist deformation until the liner collapses. The disc has a slide surface thereon on which the end edge of the inner liner slides inwardly toward the vertical axis of the device during detonation of the main explosive surrounding the inner liner, to thereby facilitate the inward collapse of the inner liner. In a preferred embodiment, the geometry of the slide surface is adjusted to further control the collapse or [beta] angle of the inner liner. 12 figures.

  6. Open apex shaped charge-type explosive device having special disc means with slide surface thereon to influence movement of open apex shaped charge liner during collapse of same during detonation

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    An open apex shape charge explosive device is disclosed having an inner liner defining a truncated cone, an explosive charge surrounding the truncated inner liner, a primer charge, and a disc located between the inner liner and the primer charge for directing the detonation of the primer charge around the end edge of the disc means to the explosive materials surrounding the inner liner. The disc comprises a material having one or more of: a higher compressive strength, a higher hardness, and/or a higher density than the material comprising the inner liner, thereby enabling the disc to resist deformation until the liner collapses. The disc has a slide surface thereon on which the end edge of the inner liner slides inwardly toward the vertical axis of the device during detonation of the main explosive surrounding the inner liner, to thereby facilitate the inward collapse of the inner liner. In a preferred embodiment, the geometry of the slide surface is adjusted to further control the collapse or .beta. angle of the inner liner.

  7. Mechanics, modulation and modelling: how muscles actuate and control movement

    PubMed Central

    Higham, Timothy E.; Biewener, Andrew A.; Delp, Scott L.

    2011-01-01

    Animal movement is often complex, unsteady and variable. The critical role of muscles in animal movement has captivated scientists for over 300 years. Despite this, emerging techniques and ideas are still shaping and advancing the field. For example, sonomicrometry and ultrasound techniques have enhanced our ability to quantify muscle length changes under in vivo conditions. Robotics and musculoskeletal models have benefited from improved computational tools and have enhanced our ability to understand muscle function in relation to movement by allowing one to simulate muscle–tendon dynamics under realistic conditions. The past decade, in particular, has seen a rapid advancement in technology and shifts in paradigms related to muscle function. In addition, there has been an increased focus on muscle function in relation to the complex locomotor behaviours, rather than relatively simple (and steady) behaviours. Thus, this Theme Issue will explore integrative aspects of muscle function in relation to diverse locomotor behaviours such as swimming, jumping, hopping, running, flying, moving over obstacles and transitioning between environments. Studies of walking and running have particular relevance to clinical aspects of human movement and sport. This Theme Issue includes contributions from scientists working on diverse taxa, ranging from humans to insects. In addition to contributions addressing locomotion in various taxa, several manuscripts will focus on recent advances in neuromuscular control and modulation during complex behaviours. Finally, some of the contributions address recent advances in biomechanical modelling and powered prostheses. We hope that our comprehensive and integrative Theme Issue will form the foundation for future work in the fields of neuromuscular mechanics and locomotion. PMID:21502117

  8. LEACHING BOUNDARY MOVEMENT IN SOLIDIFIED/STABILIZED WASTE FORMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigation of the leaching of cement-based waste forms in acetic acid solutions found that acids attacked the waste form from the surface toward the center. A sharp leaching boundary was identified in every leached sample, using pH color indica- tors. The movement of the leach...

  9. Intra-Cyclic Phases of Arm-Leg Movement and Index of Coordination in Relation to Sprint Breaststroke Swimming in Young Swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Strzala, Marek; Krezalek, Piotr; Glab, Grzegorz; Kaca, Marcin; Ostrowski, Andrzej; Stanula, Arkadiusz; Tyka, Anna K.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the limitations set by FINA regulations, execution technique in breaststroke swimming is being improved thanks to more and more advanced analyses of the efficiency of the swimmer’s movements. The aim of this study was to detect the parameters of the time structure of the cycle correlated with the maximal swimming speed at the of 50 meters distance, in order to focus to specific technical aspects in the breaststroke training. In the group of 23 participants, between the age of 15.0 ± 1.17, the breaststroke cycle movement of the arms and legs was divided into two phases: propulsive or non-propulsive. In addition, indices characterizing the temporal coordination of movements of the upper limbs in relation to the lower limbs were distinguished: 1) Arm-Leg Lag - determines the interval between the phases of propulsion generated by upper and lower limbs; 2) Glide or Overlap - the inter-cyclic glide or overlap of the propulsive movement of the upper on lower limbs. Significant dependence was noted between the swim speed (V50surface breast) and the percentage of time of the arm propulsive in-sweep phase 0.64, p < 0.01. A significant correlation was observed between the V50surface breast with the percentage of partially surfaced hand phase of arm recovery 0.54, p < 0.01. Correlation between total leg propulsion and non-propulsion phases with V50surface breast was 0.49 and -0.49 respectively, both p < 0.01. The Glide or Overlap index was significantly related to the swimming speed V50surface breast 0.48, p < 0.05. This type of analysis suggests how to refine the swimming technique, with the goal to improve the current speed capabilities; furthermore the results also indicate the direction of its development in the future swimmers of the group studied. Key Points This study investigated the influence of the inter- and intra-cyclic time structure of the movements in sprint breaststroke swimming. The distinction of the operations phases of the upper limbs in the

  10. Movement Pattern Variability in Stone Knapping: Implications for the Development of Percussive Traditions

    PubMed Central

    Rein, Robert; Nonaka, Tetsushi; Bril, Blandine

    2014-01-01

    The earliest direct evidence for tool-use by our ancestors are 2.6 million year old stone tools from Africa. These earliest artifacts show that, already, early hominins had developed the required advanced movement skills and cognitive capacities to manufacture stone tools. Currently, it is not well understood, however, which specific movement skills are required for successful stone knapping and accordingly it is unknown how these skills emerged during early hominin evolution. In particular, it is not clear which striking movements are indicative of skilled performance, how striking movement patterns vary with task and environmental constraints, and how movement patterns are passed on within social groups. The present study addresses these questions by investigating striking movement patterns and striking variability in 18 modern stone knappers (nine experienced and nine novices). The results suggest that no single movement pattern characterizes successful stone knapping. Participants showed large inter-individual movement variability of the elementary knapping action irrespective of knapping experience and knapping performance. Changes in task- and environmental constraints led knappers to adapt their elementary striking actions using a combination of individual and common strategies. Investigation of striking pattern similarities within social groups showed only partial overlap of striking patterns across related individuals. The results therefore suggest that striking movement patterns in modern stone knappers are largely specific to the individual and movement variability is not indicative of knapping performance. The implications of these results for the development of percussive traditions are discussed. PMID:25426630

  11. Advanced stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, Arnulf

    1983-03-01

    Toroidal confinement of a plasma by an external magnetic field is not compatible with axisymmetry, in contrast to confinement by the pinch effect of induced electric currents as in a tokomak or by the reversed field pinch configuration. The existence of magnetic surfaces throughout the region in which grad p ≠ 0 is therefore not guaranteed in such configurations, though it is necessary for MHD-equilibrium when the lines of force possess a finite twist (or "rotational transform"). These twisted equilibria are called stellarators. The other type of external confinement requires all lines of force to be closed upon themselves and p to be function of the well defined quantity Q = φ d l/ B only. The resulting "bumpy" tori are sometimes also referred to as being M + S like. By discussing specific examples it is shown that stellarator configurations exist which retain as much as possible the properties of M + S like configurations, combine these with the magnetic well, and with an approximation to the isodynamic requirement of D. Palumbo. These so-called Advanced Stellarators shown an improvement in predicted particle confinement and beta-limit compared to the classical stellarators. They can also be viewed as forming a system of linked stabilized mirrors of small mirror ratio. These fields can be produced by modular coils. A prototype of such a configuration is being designed by the stellarator division of IPP under the name of Wendelstein VII-AS. Expected physical data and technical details of W VII-AS are given.

  12. Nonlinear dynamics of the movement of the venus flytrap.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfeng; Lenaghan, Scott C; Zhang, Mingjun

    2012-10-01

    The Venus flytrap has long been regarded as one of the most amazing examples of movement in the plant kingdom. The trapping ability of the flytrap consists of three unique features. First, trap closure represents one of the fastest movements in the plant kingdom. Second, a decision-making stage allows the plant to "decide" whether to completely close or open the trap, based on stimuli provided from the trapped object. Finally, the Venus flytrap contains a "memory function" that requires two mechanical stimuli within about 30 seconds to initiate trap closure. The movement involved in trap closure consists of nonlinear dynamics that have not been well understood. By understanding the movement, through nonlinear dynamics analysis, it will be possible to better understand this biological process. A mathematical model describing the movement of the Venus flytrap was first proposed by the authors in Yang et al., Plant Signal. Behav. 5(8), 968-978 (2010). In the current work, the earlier research has been advanced and an in-depth nonlinear and control analysis of the dynamic process has been provided.

  13. Movements of Yellowstone grizzly bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchard, Bonnie M.; Knight, Richard R.

    1991-01-01

    Ninety-seven grizzly bears Ursus arctos horribilis were radio-located 6299 times during 1975–1987. Annual range sizes differed by sex, age, reproductive status and amount of precipitation. Females exhibited greater fidelity to seasonal and annual ranges than males. Weaned female offspring generally remained in the vicinity of the maternal range, while weaned males often made substantial movements to unexplored country. Average total home range size was 884 km2 for females and 3757 km2 for males. Males consistently exhibited greater indices of movement and range sizes than females. All cohorts had larger mean ranges during this study than during the period 1959–1969 when the population had access to open garbage dumps. Movements and elevational distribution of all cohorts were related to availability of whitebark pine Pinus albicaulis seeds. We hypothesized that females with cubs-of-the-year and yearlings were displaced from most productive habitats during seasons and years of limited food availability.

  14. The Cycle of Movement. Spotlight: Physical Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol S.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the important role of movement in Montessori early childhood education. Focuses on the cycle of movement: (1) free exploration; (2) concentration; (3) coordination; and (4) independence. Discusses the contributions of movement to abstract thought and presents information on current theories regarding the connection between movement and…

  15. A Theatre Movement Bibliography, 1978 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Lynne

    Reference materials that deal with various aspects of theater movement are grouped in this partially annotated bibliography under the following headings: anatomy, kinesiology, and physiology; combat and martial arts; integrated approaches to movement; mime; miscellaneous acting and movement approaches; movement notations systems; movement…

  16. Wireless communication devices and movement monitoring methods

    DOEpatents

    Skorpik, James R.

    2006-10-31

    Wireless communication devices and movement monitoring methods are described. In one aspect, a wireless communication device includes a housing, wireless communication circuitry coupled with the housing and configured to communicate wireless signals, movement circuitry coupled with the housing and configured to provide movement data regarding movement sensed by the movement circuitry, and event processing circuitry coupled with the housing and the movement circuitry, wherein the event processing circuitry is configured to process the movement data, and wherein at least a portion of the event processing circuitry is configured to operate in a first operational state having a different power consumption rate compared with a second operational state.

  17. Movement Perception and Movement Production in Asperger's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Kelly J.; Shiffrar, Maggie; Kerns, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether motor difficulties documented in Asperger's Syndrome (AS) are related to compromised visual abilities, this study examined perception and movement in response to dynamic visual environments. Fourteen males with AS and 16 controls aged 7-23 completed measures of motor skills, postural response to optic flow, and visual…

  18. Proprioceptive Control of Human Movement. The Human Movement Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, John

    Various research studies concerned with the feedback from proprioceptors which accompany movement and the way in which this information is relevant to the control of activity are brought together in this volume. It is intended for the use of those who have some basic knowledge of human anatomy and physiology as well as an acquaintance with…

  19. Alterations of eye movement control in neurodegenerative movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Gorges, Martin; Pinkhardt, Elmar H; Kassubek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of the fovea centralis, the most central part of the retina and the area of the highest visual accuracy, requires humans to shift their gaze rapidly (saccades) to bring some object of interest within the visual field onto the fovea. In addition, humans are equipped with the ability to rotate the eye ball continuously in a highly predicting manner (smooth pursuit) to hold a moving target steadily upon the retina. The functional deficits in neurodegenerative movement disorders (e.g., Parkinsonian syndromes) involve the basal ganglia that are critical in all aspects of movement control. Moreover, neocortical structures, the cerebellum, and the midbrain may become affected by the pathological process. A broad spectrum of eye movement alterations may result, comprising smooth pursuit disturbance (e.g., interrupting saccades), saccadic dysfunction (e.g., hypometric saccades), and abnormal attempted fixation (e.g., pathological nystagmus and square wave jerks). On clinical grounds, videooculography is a sensitive noninvasive in vivo technique to classify oculomotion function alterations. Eye movements are a valuable window into the integrity of central nervous system structures and their changes in defined neurodegenerative conditions, that is, the oculomotor nuclei in the brainstem together with their directly activating supranuclear centers and the basal ganglia as well as cortical areas of higher cognitive control of attention. PMID:24955249

  20. Post-stroke movement disorders: report of 56 patients

    PubMed Central

    Alarcon, F; Zijlmans, J; Duenas, G; Cevallos, N

    2004-01-01

    Background: Although movement disorders that occur following a stroke have long been recognised in short series of patients, their frequency and clinical and imaging features have not been reported in large series of patients with stroke. Methods: We reviewed consecutive patients with involuntary abnormal movements (IAMs) following a stroke who were included in the Eugenio Espejo Hospital Stroke Registry and they were followed up for at least one year after the onset of the IAM. We determined the clinical features, topographical correlations, and pathophysiological implications of the IAMs. Results: Of 1500 patients with stroke 56 developed movement disorders up to one year after the stroke. Patients with chorea were older and the patients with dystonia were younger than the patients with other IAMs. In patients with isolated vascular lesions without IAMs, surface lesions prevailed but patients with deep vascular lesions showed a higher probability of developing abnormal movements. One year after onset of the IAMs, 12 patients (21.4%) completely improved their abnormal movements, 38 patients (67.8%) partially improved, four did not improve (7.1%), and two patients with chorea died. In the nested case–control analysis, the patients with IAMs displayed a higher frequency of deep lesions (63% v 33%; OR 3.38, 95% CI 1.64 to 6.99, p<0.001). Patients with deep haemorrhagic lesions showed a higher probability of developing IAMs (OR 4.8, 95% CI 0.8 to 36.6). Conclusions: Chorea is the commonest movement disorder following stroke and appears in older patients. Involuntary movements tend to persist despite the functional recovery of motor deficit. Deep vascular lesions are more frequent in patients with movement disorders. PMID:15489389