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Sample records for advanced surface transportation

  1. Application of pneumatic lift and control surface technology to advanced transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englar, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    The application of pneumatic (blown) aerodynamic technology to both the lifting and the control surfaces of advanced transport aircraft can provide revolutionary changes in the performance and operation of these vehicles, ranging in speed regime from Advanced Subsonic Transports to the High Speed Civil Transport, and beyond. This technology, much of it based on the Circulation Control Wing blown concepts, can provide aerodynamic force augmentations of 80 to 100 (i.e., return of 80-100 pounds of force per pound of input momentum from the blowing jet). This can be achieved without use of external mechanical surfaces. Clever application of this technology can provide no-moving-part lifting surfaces (wings/tails) integrated into the control system to greatly simplify aircraft designs while improving their aerodynamic performance. Lift/drag ratio may be pneumatically tailored to fit the current phase of the flight, and takeoff/landing performance can be greatly improved by reducing ground roll distances and liftoff/touchdown speeds. Alternatively, great increases in liftoff weights and payloads are possible, as are great reductions in wing and tail planform size, resulting in optimized cruise wing designs. Furthermore, lift generation independent of angle of attack provides much promise for increased safety of flight in the severe updrafts/downdrafts of microbursts and windshears, which is further augmented by the ability to sustain flight at greatly reduced airspeeds. Load-tailored blown wings can also reduce tip vorticity during highlift operations and the resulting vortex wake hazards near terminal areas. Reduced noise may also be possible as these jets can be made to operate at low pressures. The planned presentation will support the above statements through discussions of recent experimental and numerical (CFD) research and development of these advanced blown aerodynamic surfaces, portions of which have been conducted for NASA. Also to be presented will be

  2. Mars surface transportation options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitner, Jeffrey M.; Alred, John W.

    1986-01-01

    As the number of scientific experiments for the surface of Mars grows, the need for effective surface transportation becomes critical. Because of the diversity of the experiments proposed, as well as the desire to explore Mars from the equator to the poles, the optimum surface vehicle configuration is not obvious. Five candidate vehicles are described, with an estimate of their size and performance. In order to maximize the success of a manned Mars mission, it appears that two vehicles should be designed for surface transportation: an advanced long-range rover, and a remotely-piloted airplane.

  3. Advanced space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disher, J. H.; Hethcoat, J. P.; Page, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Projected growth in space transportation capabilities beyond the initial Space Shuttle is discussed in terms of earth-to-low-orbit launch vehicles as well as transportation beyond low orbit (orbit transfer vehicles). Growth versions of the Shuttle and heavy-lift derivatives of the Shuttle are shown conceptually. More advanced launch vehicle concepts are also shown, based on rocket propulsion or combinations of rocket and air-breathing propulsion. Orbit transfer vehicle concepts for personnel transport and for cargo transport are discussed, including chemical rocket as well as electric propulsion. Finally, target levels of capability and efficiencies for later time periods are discussed and compared with the prospective vehicle concepts mentioned earlier.

  4. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Len Volk; Mark Pickell; Evren Ozbayoglu; Barkim Demirdal; Paco Vieira; Affonso Lourenco

    1999-10-15

    This report includes a review of the progress made in ACTF Flow Loop development and research during 90 days pre-award period (May 15-July 14, 1999) and the following three months after the project approval date (July15-October 15, 1999) The report presents information on the following specific subjects; (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development, (b) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Progress report on the instrumentation tasks (Tasks 11 and 12) (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with oil and service company members.

  5. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira; Lei Zhou

    2000-01-30

    This is the second quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between Oct 1, 2000 and December 31, 2000. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 2: Addition of a foam generation and breaker system), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Research on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), and Foam properties while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), (h) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members. The tasks Completed During This Quarter are Task 7 and Task 8.

  6. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Evren Ozbayoglu; Lei Zhou

    2002-04-30

    This is the third quarterly progress report for Year 3 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between Jan. 1, 2002 and Mar. 31, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 9b): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b); (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop, progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S); and (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  7. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2003-01-30

    This is the second quarterly progress report for Year-4 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between October 1, 2002 and December 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks. (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System, Task 4: Addition of a Pipe Rotation System. (b) New research project (Task 9b): ''Development of a Foam Generator/Viscometer for Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature (EPET) Conditions''. (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b). (f) New Research project (Task 13): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (g) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (h) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  8. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Lei Zhou

    2002-01-30

    This is the second quarterly progress report for Year 3 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between Oct 1, 2001 and Dec. 31, 2001. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Collection System), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), and Foam properties while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  9. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Evren Ozbayoglu; Lei Zhou

    2002-07-30

    This is the fourth quarterly progress report for Year-3 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between April 1, 2002 and June 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)''; (c) Research project (Task 9b): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions''; (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''; (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b); (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S); (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  10. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira

    2000-10-30

    This is the first quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between July 14, 2000 and September 30, 2000. This report presents information on the following specific tasks: (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development (Task 2), (b) Progress on research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress on research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress on research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress on research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Initiate research on project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Progress on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution (Tasks 11), and Foam properties (Task 12), (h) Initiate a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. Since the previous Task 1 has been completed, we will now designate this new task as: (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  11. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk, Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2002-10-30

    This is the first quarterly progress report for Year-4 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between July 1, 2002 and Sept. 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System, Task 4: Addition of a Pipe Rotation System, (b) New Research project (Task 9b): ''Development of a Foam Generator/Viscometer for Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature (EPET) Conditions'', (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings (Task 12), Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b). (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  12. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2003-07-30

    This Quarter has been divided between running experiments and the installation of the drill-pipe rotation system. In addition, valves and piping were relocated, and three viewports were installed. Detailed design work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. Design of the first prototype version of a Foam Generator has been finalized, and fabrication is underway. This will be used to determine the relationship between surface roughness and ''slip'' of foams at solid boundaries. Additional cups and rotors are being machined with different surface roughness. Some experiments on cuttings transport with aerated fluids have been conducted at EPET. Theoretical modeling of cuttings transport with aerated fluids is proceeding. The development of theoretical models to predict frictional pressure losses of flowing foam is in progress. The new board design for instrumentation to measure cuttings concentration is now functioning with an acceptable noise level. The ultrasonic sensors are stable up to 190 F. Static tests with sand in an annulus indicate that the system is able to distinguish between different sand concentrations. Viscometer tests with foam, generated by the Dynamic Test Facility (DTF), are continuing.

  13. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Miska; Troy Reed; Ergun Kuru

    2004-09-30

    The Advanced Cuttings Transport Study (ACTS) was a 5-year JIP project undertaken at the University of Tulsa (TU). The project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and JIP member companies. The objectives of the project were: (1) to develop and construct a new research facility that would allow three-phase (gas, liquid and cuttings) flow experiments under ambient and EPET (elevated pressure and temperature) conditions, and at different angle of inclinations and drill pipe rotation speeds; (2) to conduct experiments and develop a data base for the industry and academia; and (3) to develop mechanistic models for optimization of drilling hydraulics and cuttings transport. This project consisted of research studies, flow loop construction and instrumentation development. Following a one-year period for basic flow loop construction, a proposal was submitted by TU to the DOE for a five-year project that was organized in such a manner as to provide a logical progression of research experiments as well as additions to the basic flow loop. The flow loop additions and improvements included: (1) elevated temperature capability; (2) two-phase (gas and liquid, foam etc.) capability; (3) cuttings injection and removal system; (4) drill pipe rotation system; and (5) drilling section elevation system. In parallel with the flow loop construction, hydraulics and cuttings transport studies were preformed using drilling foams and aerated muds. In addition, hydraulics and rheology of synthetic drilling fluids were investigated. The studies were performed under ambient and EPET conditions. The effects of temperature and pressure on the hydraulics and cuttings transport were investigated. Mechanistic models were developed to predict frictional pressure loss and cuttings transport in horizontal and near-horizontal configurations. Model predictions were compared with the measured data. Predominantly, model predictions show satisfactory agreements with the measured data. As a

  14. Advanced space transportation technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Rishi S.

    1989-01-01

    A wide range of propulsion technologies for space transportation are discussed in the literature. It is clear from the literature review that a single propulsion technology cannot satisfy the many mission needs in space. Many of the technologies tested, proposed, or in experimental stages relate to: chemical and nuclear fuel; radiative and corpuscular external energy source; tethers; cannons; and electromagnetic acceleration. The scope and limitation of these technologies is well tabulated in the literature. Prior experience has shown that an extensive amount of fuel needs to be carried along for the return mission. This requirement puts additional constraints on the lift off rocket technology and limits the payload capacity. Consider the possibility of refueling in space. If the return fuel supply is guaranteed, it will not only be possible to lift off more payload but also to provide security and safety of the mission. Exploration to deep space where solar sails and thermal effects fade would also be possible. Refueling would also facilitate travel on the planet of exploration. This aspect of space transportation prompts the present investigation. The particle emissions from the Sun's corona will be collected under three different conditions: in space closer to the Sun, in the Van Allen Belts; and on the Moon. It is proposed to convert the particle state into gaseous, liquid, or solid state and store it for refueling space vehicles. These facilities may be called space pump stations and the fuel collected as space fuel. Preliminary estimates of fuel collection at all three sites will be made. Future work will continue towards advancing the art of collection rate and design schemes for pumping stations.

  15. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi

    2004-07-31

    We have tested the loop elevation system. We raised the mast to approximately 25 to 30 degrees from horizontal. All went well. However, while lowering the mast, it moved laterally a couple of degrees. Upon visual inspection, severe spalling of the concrete on the face of the support pillar, and deformation of the steel support structure was observed. At this time, the facility is ready for testing in the horizontal position. A new air compressor has been received and set in place for the ACTS test loop. A new laboratory has been built near the ACTS test loop Roughened cups and rotors for the viscometer (RS300) were obtained. Rheologies of aqueous foams were measured using three different cup-rotor assemblies that have different surface roughness. The relationship between surface roughness and foam rheology was investigated. Re-calibration of nuclear densitometers has been finished. The re-calibration was also performed with 1% surfactant foam. A new cuttings injection system was installed at the bottom of the injection tower. It replaced the previous injection auger. A mechanistic model for cuttings transport with aerated mud has been developed. Cuttings transport mechanisms with aerated water at various conditions were experimentally investigated. A total of 39 tests were performed. Comparisons between the model predictions and experimental measurements show a satisfactory agreement. Results from the ultrasonic monitoring system indicated that we could distinguish between different sand levels. We also have devised ways to achieve consistency of performance by securing the sensors in the caps in exactly the same manner as long as the sensors are not removed from the caps. A preliminary test was conducted on the main flow loop at 100 gpm flow rate and 20 lb/min cuttings injection rate. The measured bed thickness using the ultrasonic method showed a satisfactory agreement with nuclear densitometer readings. Thirty different data points were collected after the test

  16. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira; Neelima Godugu

    2000-07-30

    ACTS flow loop is now operational under elevated pressure and temperature. Currently, experiments with synthetic based drilling fluids under pressure and temperature are being conducted. Based on the analysis of Fann 70 data, empirical correlations defining the shear stress as a function of temperature, pressure and the shear rate have been developed for Petrobras synthetic drilling fluids. PVT equipment has been modified for testing Synthetic oil base drilling fluids. PVT tests with Petrobras Synthetic base mud have been conducted and results are being analyzed Foam flow experiments have been conducted and the analysis of the data has been carried out to characterize the rheology of the foam. Comparison of pressure loss prediction from the available foam hydraulic models and the test results has been made. Cuttings transport experiments in horizontal annulus section have been conducted using air, water and cuttings. Currently, cuttings transport tests in inclined test section are being conducted. Foam PVT analysis tests have been conducted. Foam stability experiments have also been conducted. Effects of salt and oil concentration on the foam stability have been investigated. Design of ACTS flow loop modification for foam and aerated mud flow has been completed. A flow loop operation procedure for conducting foam flow experiments under EPET conditions has been prepared Design of the lab-scale flow loop for dynamic foam characterization and cuttings monitoring instrumentation tests has been completed. The construction of the test loop is underway. As part of the technology transport efforts, Advisory Board Meeting with ACTS-JIP industry members has been organized on May 13, 2000.

  17. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mengjiao Yu; Ramadan Ahmed; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Aimee Washington; Crystal Redden

    2003-09-30

    The Quarter began with installing the new drill pipe, hooking up the new hydraulic power unit, completing the pipe rotation system (Task 4 has been completed), and making the SWACO choke operational. Detailed design and procurement work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. The prototype Foam Generator Cell has been completed by Temco and delivered. Work is currently underway to calibrate the system. Literature review and preliminary model development for cuttings transportation with polymer foam under EPET conditions are in progress. Preparations for preliminary cuttings transport experiments with polymer foam have been completed. Two nuclear densitometers were re-calibrated. Drill pipe rotation system was tested up to 250 RPM. Water flow tests were conducted while rotating the drill pipe up to 100 RPM. The accuracy of weight measurements for cuttings in the annulus was evaluated. Additional modifications of the cuttings collection system are being considered in order to obtain the desired accurate measurement of cuttings weight in the annular test section. Cutting transport experiments with aerated fluids are being conducted at EPET, and analyses of the collected data are in progress. The printed circuit board is functioning with acceptable noise level to measure cuttings concentration at static condition using ultrasonic method. We were able to conduct several tests using a standard low pass filter to eliminate high frequency noise. We tested to verify that we can distinguish between different depths of sand in a static bed of sand. We tested with water, air and a mix of the two mediums. Major modifications to the DTF have almost been completed. A stop-flow cell is being designed for the DTF, the ACTF and Foam Generator/Viscometer which will allow us to capture bubble images without the need for ultra fast shutter speeds or microsecond flash system.

  18. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2003-04-30

    Experiments on the flow loop are continuing. Improvements to the software for data acquisition are being made as additional experience with three-phase flow is gained. Modifications are being made to the Cuttings Injection System in order to improve control and the precision of cuttings injection. The design details for a drill-pipe Rotation System have been completed. A US Patent was filed on October 28, 2002 for a new design for an instrument that can generate a variety of foams under elevated pressures and temperatures and then transfer the test foam to a viscometer for measurements of viscosity. Theoretical analyses of cuttings transport phenomena based on a layered model is under development. Calibrations of two nuclear densitometers have been completed. Baseline tests have been run to determine wall roughness in the 4 different tests sections (i.e. 2-in, 3-in, 4-in pipes and 5.76-in by 3.5-in annulus) of the flow loop. Tests have also been conducted with aerated fluids at EPET conditions. Preliminary experiments on the two candidate aqueous foam formulations were conducted which included rheological tests of the base fluid and foam stability reports. These were conducted after acceptance of the proposal on the Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature Conditions. Preparation of a test matrix for cuttings-transport experiments with foam in the ACTF is also under way. A controller for instrumentation to measure cuttings concentration and distribution has been designed that can control four transceivers at a time. A prototype of the control circuit board was built and tested. Tests showed that there was a problem with radiated noise. AN improved circuit board was designed and sent to an external expert to verify the new design. The new board is being fabricated and will first be tested with static water and gravel in an annulus at elevated temperatures. A series of viscometer tests to measure foam properties have

  19. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi

    2004-01-31

    Final design of the mast was completed (Task 5). The mast is consisting of two welded plate girders, set next to each other, and spaced 14-inches apart. Fabrication of the boom will be completed in two parts solely for ease of transportation. The end pivot connection will be made through a single 2-inch diameter x 4 feet-8 inch long 316 SS bar. During installation, hard piping make-ups using Chiksan joints will connect the annular section and 4-inch return line to allow full movement of the mast from horizontal to vertical. Additionally, flexible hoses and piping will be installed to isolate both towers from piping loads and allow recycling operations respectively. Calibration of the prototype Foam Generator Cell has been completed and experiments are now being conducted. We were able to generate up to 95% quality foam. Work is currently underway to attach the Thermo-Haake RS300 viscometer and install a view port with a microscope to measure foam bubble size and bubble size distribution. Foam rheology tests (Task 13) were carried out to evaluate the rheological properties of the proposed foam formulation. After successful completion of the first foam test, two sets of rheological tests were conducted at different foam flow rates while keeping other parameters constant (100 psig, 70F, 80% quality). The results from these tests are generally in agreement with the previous foam tests done previously during Task 9. However, an unanticipated observation during these tests was that in both cases, the frictional pressure drop in 2 inch pipe was lower than that in the 3 inch and 4 inch pipes. We also conducted the first foam cuttings transport test during this quarter. Experiments on aerated fluids without cuttings have been completed in ACTF (Task 10). Gas and liquid were injected at different flow rates. Two different sets of experiments were carried out, where the only difference was the temperature. Another set of tests was performed, which covered a wide range of

  20. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Len Volk; Mark Pickell; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira; Neelima Godugu; Sri Suresh Kumar Thiroveedhula

    2000-04-30

    ACTS flow loop is now operational under elevated pressure and temperature. Currently, experiments with water under pressure and temperature are being conducted. Based on the analysis of Fann 70 data, empirical correlations defining the shear stress as a function of temperature, pressure and the shear rate have been developed for Petrobras synthetic drilling fluids. PVT equipment has been modified for testing Synthetic drilling fluids. Initial calibration tests have been conducted by using water. Currently, the base oil of the Petrobras synthetic drilling fluid is being tested. Foam flow experiments have been conducted. Currently, more experiments are being conducted while data are being analyzed to characterize the rheology of the foam. Cuttings transport experiments have been conducted using air, water and cuttings. Preliminary results have shown that it may not be possible to avoid cuttings bed deposition under any practical combination of air and water flow rates. Foam stability analyses have been conducted. Effects of salt and oil concentration on the foam stability have been investigated. A software for controlling the data sampling and data storage during cuttings monitoring process have been developed.

  1. Overview of NASA Advanced Transportation Technologies Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashford, Rose; Jacobsen, R. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A General Overview of NASA Advanced Transportation Technologies Program is presented. The contents include: 1) Center-TRACON Automation System (CTAS) which provides automation tools to assist air traffic controllers in planning and controlling air traffic arriving into major airports; 2) Surface Movement Advisor (SMA) for expediting and optimizing aircraft operations on the airport surface; and 3) Terminal Area Productivity Program (TAP), which is aimed at improving airport throughput in instrument meteorological conditions to match that attainable in clear weather.

  2. Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, John J.

    1990-01-01

    NASA-Langley's Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program employs a heavily instrumented, B 737-100 as its Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TRSV). The TRSV has been used during the demonstration trials of the Time Reference Scanning Beam Microwave Landing System (TRSB MLS), the '4D flight-management' concept, ATC data links, and airborne windshear sensors. The credibility obtainable from successful flight test experiments is often a critical factor in the granting of substantial commitments for commercial implementation by the FAA and industry. In the case of the TRSB MLS, flight test demonstrations were decisive to its selection as the standard landing system by the ICAO.

  3. Advanced Surface Flux Parameterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    within PE 0602435N are BE-35-2-18, for the Mesoscale Modeling of the Atmos- phere and Aerosols, BE-35-2-19, and for the Exploratory Data Assimilation ... Methods . Related project at NPS is N0001401WR20242 for Evaluating Surface Flux and Boundary Layer Parameterizations in Mesoscale Models Using

  4. Advanced Nanostructures for Two-Phase Fluid and Thermal Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-07

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0183 (YIP 11) Advanced Nanostructures for Two-Phase Fluid and Thermal Transport Evelyn Wang MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY...Advanced Nanostructures for Two-Phase Fluid and Thermal Transport AFOSR Grant FA9550-11-1-0059 Final Report Evelyn N. Wang Associate Professor...heated channel wall. Small fluctuations in the measured heater surface temperature (± 3-8 °C) indicated increased flow stability, and the heat transfer

  5. Surface Transportation Security Priority Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Protection Plan (NIPP) framework priorities with the Sector- Specific Agencies (SSA); surface transportation owners/operators; and State, local, tribal...and recommendations. Issue Identification To identify national interagency priorities and guide Federal efforts to secure the surface...the Nation’s critical infrastructure and key resources (CIKR). These activities encompass national and sector planning and policy, program

  6. The AC-120: The advanced commercial transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duran, David; Griffin, Ernest; Mendoza, Saul; Nguyen, Son; Pickett, Tim; Noernberg, Clemm

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of this design was to fulfill a need for a new airplane to replace the aging 100 to 150 passenger, 1500 nautical mile range aircraft such as the Douglas DC9 and Boeing 737-100 airplanes. After researching the future aircraft market, conducting extensive trade studies, and analysis on different configurations, the AC-120 Advanced Commercial Transport final design was achieved. The AC-120's main design features include the incorporation of a three lifting surface configuration which is powered by two turboprop engines. The AC-120 is an economically sensitive aircraft which meets the new FM Stage Three noise requirements, and has lower NO(x) emissions than current turbofan powered airplanes. The AC-120 also improves on its contemporaries in passenger comfort, manufacturing, and operating cost.

  7. Advanced technology for future regional transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    In connection with a request for a report coming from a U.S. Senate committee, NASA formed a Small Transport Aircraft Technology (STAT) team in 1978. STAT was to obtain information concerning the technical improvements in commuter aircraft that would likely increase their public acceptance. Another area of study was related to questions regarding the help which could be provided by NASA's aeronautical research and development program to commuter aircraft manufacturers with respect to the solution of technical problems. Attention is given to commuter airline growth, current commuter/region aircraft and new aircraft in development, prospects for advanced technology commuter/regional transports, and potential benefits of advanced technology. A list is provided of a number of particular advances appropriate to small transport aircraft, taking into account small gas turbine engine component technology, propeller technology, three-dimensional wing-design technology, airframe aerodynamics/propulsion integration, and composite structure materials.

  8. Studies of advanced transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagel, A. L.

    1978-01-01

    Concepts for possible future airplanes are studied that include all-wing distributed-load airplanes, multi-body airplanes, a long-range laminar flow control airplane, a nuclear powered airplane designed for towing conventionally powered airplanes during long range cruise, and an aerial transportation system comprised of continuously flying liner airplanes operated in conjunction with short range feeder airplanes. Results indicate that each of these concepts has the potential for important performance and economic advantages, provided certain suggested research tasks are successfully accomplished. Indicated research areas include all-wing airplane aerodynamics, aerial rendezvous, nuclear aircraft engines, air-cushion landing systems, and laminar flow control, as well as the basic research discipline areas of aerodynamics, structures, propulsion, avionics, and computer applications.

  9. Studies of advanced transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagel, A. L.

    1978-01-01

    Several concepts for possible future airplanes, including all-wing distributed-load airplanes, multibody airplanes, a long-range laminar flow control airplane, a nuclear-powered airplane designed for towing conventionally powered airplanes during long-range cruise, and an aerial transportation system comprised of continuously flying liner airplanes operated in conjunction with short-range feeder airplanes are described. Performance and economic advantages of each concept are indicated. Further research is recommended in the following areas: all-wing airplane aerodynamics, aerial rendezvous, nuclear aircraft engines, air-cushion landing systems, and laminar flow control, as well as the basic research discipline areas of aerodynamics, structures, propulsion, avionics, and computer applications.

  10. Outlook for advanced concepts in transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    Air transportation demand trends, air transportation system goals, and air transportation system trends well into the 21st century were examined in detail. The outlook is for continued growth in both air passenger travel and air freight movements. The present system, with some improvements, is expected to continue to the turn of the century and to utilize technologically upgraded, derivative versions of today's aircraft, plus possibly some new aircraft for supersonic long haul, short haul, and high density commuter service. Severe constraints of the system, expected by early in the 21st century, should lead to innovations at the airport, away from the airport, and in the air. The innovations are illustrated by descriptions of three candidate systems involving advanced aircraft concepts. Advanced technologies and vehicles expected to impact the airport are illustrated by descriptions of laminar flow control aircraft, very large air freighters and cryogenically fueled transports.

  11. A review of advanced turboprop transport aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Roy H.

    The application of advanced technologies shows the potential for significant improvement in the fuel efficiency and operating costs of future transport aircraft envisioned for operation in the 1990s time period. One of the more promising advanced technologies is embodied in an advanced turboprop concept originated by Hamilton Standard and NASA and known as the propfan. The propfan concept features a highly loaded multibladed, variable pitch propeller geared to a high pressure ratio gas turbine engine. The blades have high sweepback and advanced airfoil sections to achieve 80 percent propulsive efficiency at M=0.80 cruise speed. Aircraft system studies have shown improvements in fuel efficiency of 15-20 percent for propfan advanced transport aircraft as compared to equivalent turbofan transports. Beginning with the Lockheed C-130 and Electra turboprop aircraft, this paper presents an overview of the evolution of propfan aircraft design concepts and system studies. These system studies include possible civil and military transport applications and data on the performance, community and far-field noise characteristics and operating costs of propfan aircraft design concepts. NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) program propfan projects with industry are reviewed with respect to system studies of propfan aircraft and recommended flight development programs.

  12. Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membrane for Coal Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Joseph; Porter, Jason; Patki, Neil; Kelley, Madison; Stanislowski, Josh; Tolbert, Scott; Way, J. Douglas; Makuch, David

    2015-12-23

    A pilot-scale hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) separator was built that incorporated 98 membranes that were each 24 inches long. This separator used an advanced design to minimize the impact of concentration polarization and separated over 1000 scfh of hydrogen from a hydrogen-nitrogen feed of 5000 scfh that contained 30% hydrogen. This mixture was chosen because it was representative of the hydrogen concentration expected in coal gasification. When tested with an operating gasifier, the hydrogen concentration was lower and contaminants in the syngas adversely impacted membrane performance. All 98 membranes survived the test, but flux was lower than expected. Improved ceramic substrates were produced that have small surface pores to enable membrane production and large pores in the bulk of the substrate to allow high flux. Pd-Au was chosen as the membrane alloy because of its resistance to sulfur contamination and good flux. Processes were developed to produce a large quantity of long membranes for use in the demonstration test.

  13. Advanced Space Surface Systems Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, Zachary Lynn; Mueller, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of advanced surface systems is becoming increasingly relevant in the modern age of space technology. Specifically, projects pursued by the Granular Mechanics and Regolith Operations (GMRO) Lab are unparalleled in the field of planetary resourcefulness. This internship opportunity involved projects that support properly utilizing natural resources from other celestial bodies. Beginning with the tele-robotic workstation, mechanical upgrades were necessary to consider for specific portions of the workstation consoles and successfully designed in concept. This would provide more means for innovation and creativity concerning advanced robotic operations. Project RASSOR is a regolith excavator robot whose primary objective is to mine, store, and dump regolith efficiently on other planetary surfaces. Mechanical adjustments were made to improve this robot's functionality, although there were some minor system changes left to perform before the opportunity ended. On the topic of excavator robots, the notes taken by the GMRO staff during the 2013 and 2014 Robotic Mining Competitions were effectively organized and analyzed for logistical purposes. Lessons learned from these annual competitions at Kennedy Space Center are greatly influential to the GMRO engineers and roboticists. Another project that GMRO staff support is Project Morpheus. Support for this project included successfully producing mathematical models of the eroded landing pad surface for the vertical testbed vehicle to predict a timeline for pad reparation. And finally, the last project this opportunity made contribution to was Project Neo, a project exterior to GMRO Lab projects, which focuses on rocket propulsion systems. Additions were successfully installed to the support structure of an original vertical testbed rocket engine, thus making progress towards futuristic test firings in which data will be analyzed by students affiliated with Rocket University. Each project will be explained in

  14. Manned Mars mission surface transportation elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, S. Gregg; Mulqueen, Jack

    1986-01-01

    The necessity and advantage of surface transportation was well demonstrated by the Apollo 15, 16, and 17 missions. Baseline surface transportation elements for further studies are Lunar Rover, Elastic Loop Mobility System, Mobile Laboratory, Airplane, and Rocket Powered Flying Vehicles. These types of surface transportation are discussed. Starting points for further in-depth studies are identified.

  15. Propulsion technology for an advanced subsonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, M. A.; Antl, R. J.; Povolny, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Engine design studies for future subsonic commercial transport aircraft were conducted in parallel with airframe studies. These studies surveyed a broad distribution of design variables, including aircraft configuration, payload, range, and speed, with particular emphasis on reducing noise and exhaust emissions without severe economic and performance penalties. The results indicated that an engine for an advanced transport would be similar to the currently emerging turbofan engines. Application of current technology in the areas of noise suppression and combustors imposed severe performance and economic penalties.

  16. Advanced control technology and its potential for future transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The topics covered include fly by wire, digital control, control configured vehicles, applications to advanced flight vehicles, advanced propulsion control systems, and active control technology for transport aircraft.

  17. Advanced Terrain Displays for Transport Category Aircraft.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    Map Displays, Terrain Displays, DOCUMENT IS AVAILABLE TO THE PUBLIC THROUGH Pilo t Performance, THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE , Cockp •t...DOT/FAA/RD-9214 Advanced Terran Wigays DOT-VNTSC-FAA-92-4 frTaaotCta Research and Development Servic fo rasor atgr Washington, DC 20591 Aircraft...U.S. Department of Transportation Final Report Federal Aviation Administration January 1991-Sept. 1991 Research and Development Service Washington, DC

  18. Advanced secondary power system for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, A. C.; Hansen, I. G.; Beach, R. F.; Plencner, R. M.; Dengler, R. P.; Jefferies, K. S.; Frye, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A concept for an advanced aircraft power system was identified that uses 20-kHz, 440-V, sin-wave power distribution. This system was integrated with an electrically powered flight control system and with other aircraft systems requiring secondary power. The resulting all-electric secondary power configuration reduced the empty weight of a modern 200-passenger, twin-engine transport by 10 percent and the mission fuel by 9 percent.

  19. Green Propulsion Technologies for Advanced Air Transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Del Rosario, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Air transportation is critical to U.S. and Global economic vitality. However, energy and climate issues challenge aviations ability to be sustainable in the long term. Aviation must dramatically reduce fuel use and related emissions. Energy costs to U.S. airlines nearly tripled between 1995 and 2011, and continue to be the highest percentage of operating costs. The NASA Advanced Air Transports Technology Project addresses the comprehensive challenge of enabling revolutionary energy efficiency improvements in subsonic transport aircraft combined with dramatic reductions in harmful emissions and perceived noise to facilitate sustained growth of the air transportation system. Advanced technologies and the development of unconventional aircraft systems offer the potential to achieve these improvements. The presentation will highlight the NASA vision of revolutionary systems and propulsion technologies needed to achieve these challenging goals. Specifically, the primary focus is on the N+3 generation; that is, vehicles that are three generations beyond the current state of the art, requiring mature technology solutions in the 2025-30 timeframe, which are envisioned as being powered by Hybrid Electric Propulsion Systems.

  20. Green Propulsion Technologies for Advanced Air Transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Del Rosario, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Air transportation is critical to U.S. and Global economic vitality. However, energy and climate issues challenge aviation's ability to be sustainable in the long term. Aviation must dramatically reduce fuel use and related emissions. Energy costs to U.S. airlines nearly tripled between 1995 and 2011, and continue to be the highest percentage of operating costs. The NASA Advanced Air Transports Technology Project addresses the comprehensive challenge of enabling revolutionary energy efficiency improvements in subsonic transport aircraft combined with dramatic reductions in harmful emissions and perceived noise to facilitate sustained growth of the air transportation system. Advanced technologies and the development of unconventional aircraft systems offer the potential to achieve these improvements. The presentation will highlight the NASA vision of revolutionary systems and propulsion technologies needed to achieve these challenging goals. Specifically, the primary focus is on the N+3 generation; that is, vehicles that are three generations beyond the current state of the art, requiring mature technology solutions in the 2025-30 timeframe.

  1. Applications of advanced transport aircraft in developing countries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gobetz, F. W.; Assarabowski, R. J.; Leshane, A. A.

    1978-01-01

    Four representative market scenarios were studied to evaluate the relative performance of air-and surface-based transportation systems in meeting the needs of two developing contries, Brazil and Indonesia, which were selected for detailed case studies. The market scenarios were: remote mining, low-density transport, tropical forestry, and large cargo aircraft serving processing centers in resource-rich, remote areas. The long-term potential of various aircraft types, together with fleet requirements and necessary technology advances, is determined for each application.

  2. Methodological advances in imaging intravital axonal transport

    PubMed Central

    Sleigh, James N.; Vagnoni, Alessio; Twelvetrees, Alison E.; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2017-01-01

    Axonal transport is the active process whereby neurons transport cargoes such as organelles and proteins anterogradely from the cell body to the axon terminal and retrogradely in the opposite direction. Bi-directional transport in axons is absolutely essential for the functioning and survival of neurons and appears to be negatively impacted by both aging and diseases of the nervous system, such as Alzheimer’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The movement of individual cargoes along axons has been studied in vitro in live neurons and tissue explants for a number of years; however, it is currently unclear as to whether these systems faithfully and consistently replicate the in vivo situation. A number of intravital techniques originally developed for studying diverse biological events have recently been adapted to monitor axonal transport in real-time in a range of live organisms and are providing novel insight into this dynamic process. Here, we highlight these methodological advances in intravital imaging of axonal transport, outlining key strengths and limitations while discussing findings, possible improvements, and outstanding questions. PMID:28344778

  3. Methodological advances in imaging intravital axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Sleigh, James N; Vagnoni, Alessio; Twelvetrees, Alison E; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2017-01-01

    Axonal transport is the active process whereby neurons transport cargoes such as organelles and proteins anterogradely from the cell body to the axon terminal and retrogradely in the opposite direction. Bi-directional transport in axons is absolutely essential for the functioning and survival of neurons and appears to be negatively impacted by both aging and diseases of the nervous system, such as Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The movement of individual cargoes along axons has been studied in vitro in live neurons and tissue explants for a number of years; however, it is currently unclear as to whether these systems faithfully and consistently replicate the in vivo situation. A number of intravital techniques originally developed for studying diverse biological events have recently been adapted to monitor axonal transport in real-time in a range of live organisms and are providing novel insight into this dynamic process. Here, we highlight these methodological advances in intravital imaging of axonal transport, outlining key strengths and limitations while discussing findings, possible improvements, and outstanding questions.

  4. NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Hypersonic Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe; McClinton, Charles; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's has established long term goals for access-to-space. NASA's third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operational in approximately 25 years. The goals for third generation launch systems are to reduce cost by a factor of 100 and improve safety by a factor of 10,000 over current conditions. The Advanced Space Transportation Program Office (ASTP) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL has the agency lead to develop third generation space transportation technologies. The Hypersonics Investment Area, part of ASTP, is developing the third generation launch vehicle technologies in two main areas, propulsion and airframes. The program's major investment is in hypersonic airbreathing propulsion since it offers the greatest potential for meeting the third generation launch vehicles. The program will mature the technologies in three key propulsion areas, scramjets, rocket-based combined cycle and turbine-based combination cycle. Ground and flight propulsion tests are being planned for the propulsion technologies. Airframe technologies will be matured primarily through ground testing. This paper describes NASA's activities in hypersonics. Current programs, accomplishments, future plans and technologies that are being pursued by the Hypersonics Investment Area under the Advanced Space Transportation Program Office will be discussed.

  5. Vacancy Transport and Interactions on Metal Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-06

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2013-0317 VACANCY TRANSPORT AND INTERACTIONS ON METAL SURFACES Gert Ehrlich UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS CHAMPAIGN Final Report 03/06/2014...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Vacancy Transport and Interactions on Metal Surfaces Final Report Grant FA9550-09-1-248 April 15, 2009 – November...30, 2012 Gert Ehrlich, PI Abstract This proposal is a study of vacancy transport and vacancy interaction on metal surfaces. Adatom self

  6. Advanced Civil Transport Simulator Cockpit View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Civil Transport Simulator (ACTS) is a futuristic aircraft cockpit simulator designed to provide full-mission capabilities for researching issues that will affect future transport aircraft flight stations and crews. The objective is to heighten the pilots situation awareness through improved information availability and ease of interpretation in order to reduce the possibility of misinterpreted data. The simulators five 13-inch Cathode Ray Tubes are designed to display flight information in a logical easy-to-see format. Two color flat panel Control Display Units with touch sensitive screens provide monitoring and modification of aircraft parameters, flight plans, flight computers, and aircraft position. Three collimated visual display units have been installed to provide out-the-window scenes via the Computer Generated Image system. The major research objectives are to examine needs for transfer of information to and from the flight crew; study the use of advanced controls and displays for all-weather flying; explore ideas for using computers to help the crew in decision making; study visual scanning and reach behavior under different conditions with various levels of automation and flight deck-arrangements.

  7. Advanced Air Transportation Technologies Project, Final Document Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogford, Richard H.; Wold, Sheryl (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    This CD ROM contains a compilation of the final documents of the Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AAIT) project, which was an eight-year (1996 to 2004), $400M project managed by the Airspace Systems Program office, which was part of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters. AAIT focused on developing advanced automation tools and air traffic management concepts that would help improve the efficiency of the National Airspace System, while maintaining or enhancing safety. The documents contained in the CD are final reports on AAIT tasks that serve to document the project's accomplishments over its eight-year term. Documents include information on: Advanced Air Transportation Technologies, Autonomous Operations Planner, Collaborative Arrival Planner, Distributed Air/Ground Traffic Management Concept Elements 5, 6, & 11, Direct-To, Direct-To Technology Transfer, Expedite Departure Path, En Route Data Exchange, Final Approach Spacing Tool - (Active and Passive), Multi-Center Traffic Management Advisor, Multi Center Traffic Management Advisor Technology Transfer, Surface Movement Advisor, Surface Management System, Surface Management System Technology Transfer and Traffic Flow Management Research & Development.

  8. NASA's advanced space transportation system launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branscome, Darrell R.

    1991-01-01

    Some insight is provided into the advanced transportation planning and systems that will evolve to support long term mission requirements. The general requirements include: launch and lift capacity to low earth orbit (LEO); space based transfer systems for orbital operations between LEO and geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO), the Moon, and Mars; and Transfer vehicle systems for long duration deep space probes. These mission requirements are incorporated in the NASA Civil Needs Data Base. To accomplish these mission goals, adequate lift capacity to LEO must be available: to support science and application missions; to provide for construction of the Space Station Freedom; and to support resupply of personnel and supplies for its operations. Growth in lift capacity must be time phased to support an expanding mission model that includes Freedom Station, the Mission to Planet Earth, and an expanded robotic planetary program. The near term increase in cargo lift capacity associated with development of the Shuttle-C is addressed. The joint DOD/NASA Advanced Launch System studies are focused on a longer term new cargo capability that will significantly reduce costs of placing payloads in space.

  9. How Water Advances on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellenberger, Frank; Encinas, Noemí; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Superliquid repellency can be achieved by nano- and microstructuring surfaces in such a way that protrusions entrap air underneath the liquid. It is still not known how the three-phase contact line advances on such structured surfaces. In contrast to a smooth surface, where the contact line can advance continuously, on a superliquid-repellent surface, the contact line has to overcome an air gap between protrusions. Here, we apply laser scanning confocal microscopy to get the first microscopic videos of water drops advancing on a superhydrophobic array of micropillars. In contrast to common belief, the liquid surface gradually bends down until it touches the top face of the next micropillars. The apparent advancing contact angle is 180°. On the receding side, pinning to the top faces of the micropillars determines the apparent receding contact angle. Based on these observations, we propose that the apparent receding contact angle should be used for characterizing superliquid-repellent surfaces rather than the apparent advancing contact angle and hysteresis.

  10. Advanced space transportation systems, BARGOUZIN booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prampolini, Marco; Louaas, Eric; Prel, Yves; Kostromin, Sergey; Panichkin, Nickolay; Sumin, Yuriy; Osin, Mikhail; Iranzo-Greus, David; Rigault, Michel; Beaurain, André; Couteau, Jean-Noël

    2008-07-01

    In the framework of Advanced Space Transportation Systems Studies sponsored by CNES in 2006, a study called "BARGOUZIN" was performed by a joint team led by ASTRIUM ST and TSNIIMASH. Beyond these leaders, the team comprised MOLNIYA, DASSAULT AVIATION and SNECMA as subcontractors. The "BARGOUZIN" concept is a liquid fuelled fly-back booster (LFBB), mounted on the ARIANE 5 central core stage in place of the current solid rocket booster. The main originality of the concept lies in the fact that the "BARGOUZIN" features a cluster of VULCAIN II engines, similar to the one mounted on the central core stage of ARIANE 5. An astute permutation strategy, between the booster engines and central core engine is expected to lead to significant cost reductions. The following aspects were addressed during the preliminary system study: engine number per booster trade-off/abort scenario analysis, aerodynamic consolidation, engine reliability, ascent controllability, ground interfaces separation sequence analysis, programmatics. These topics will be briefly presented and synthesized in this paper, giving an overview of the credibility of the concept.

  11. Terminal area considerations for an advanced CTOL transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sussman, M. B.

    1975-01-01

    Projected future conditions at large urban airports were used to identify design objectives for a long-haul, advanced transport airplane introduced for operation in the mid-1980s. Operating constraints associated with airport congestion and aircraft noise and emissions were of central interest. In addition, some of the interaction of these constraints with aircraft fuel usage were identified. The study allowed for advanced aircraft design features consistent with the future operating period. A baseline 200 passenger airplane design was modified to comply with design requirements imposed by terminal area constraints. Specific design changes included: (1) modification of engine arrangement; wing planform; (2) drag and spoiler surfaces; (3) secondary power systems; (4) brake and landing gear characteristics; and (5) the aircraft avionics. These changes, based on exploratory design estimates and allowing for technology advance, were judged to enable the airplane to: reduce wake turbulence; handle steeper descent paths with fewer limitation due to engine characteristics; reduce runway occupancy times; improve community noise contours; and reduce the total engine emittants deposited in the terminal area. The penalties to airplane performance and operating cost associated with improving the terminal area characteristics of the airplane were assessed. Finally, key research problems requiring solution in order to validate the assumed advanced airplane technology were identified.

  12. The Transporter Classification Database (TCDB): recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.; Reddy, Vamsee S.; Tsu, Brian V.; Ahmed, Muhammad Saad; Li, Chun; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The Transporter Classification Database (TCDB; http://www.tcdb.org) is a freely accessible reference database for transport protein research, which provides structural, functional, mechanistic, evolutionary and disease/medical information about transporters from organisms of all types. TCDB is the only transport protein classification database adopted by the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (IUBMB). It consists of more than 10 000 non-redundant transport systems with more than 11 000 reference citations, classified into over 1000 transporter families. Transporters in TCDB can be single or multi-component systems, categorized in a functional/phylogenetic hierarchical system of classes, subclasses, families, subfamilies and transport systems. TCDB also includes updated software designed to analyze the distinctive features of transport proteins, extending its usefulness. Here we present a comprehensive update of the database contents and features and summarize recent discoveries recorded in TCDB. PMID:26546518

  13. Application of advanced technologies to future military transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Rodney L.; Lange, Roy H.; Wagner, Richard D.

    1990-01-01

    Long range military transport technologies are addressed with emphasis of defining the potential benefits of the hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) concept currently being flight tested. Results of a 1990's global range transport study are presented showing the expected payoff from application of advanced technologies. Technology forecast for military transports is also presented.

  14. Surface transport vehicles and supporting technology requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matijevic, J. R.; Dias, W. C.; Levin, R. R.; Lindemann, R. A.; Smith, J. H.; Venkataraman, S. T.

    1992-01-01

    Requirements have been identified for surface transport vehicles which allow remote scientific exploration on the moon, as well as lunar resource recovery and emplacement of a permanent base on the lunar surface. Attention is given to the results of a design study which developed configurational concepts for lunar surface transport vehicles and inferred technology-development requirements, with a view to a phased program of implementation. Distinct benefits are noted for the design of simple vehicle platforms with high commonality, in order to reduce logistical-support requirements and maximize functional flexibility. Two generic vehicle classed are defined.

  15. Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot Excavator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Ebert, Thomas; Cox, Rachel; Rahmatian, Laila; Wood, James; Schuler, Jason; Nick, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR) excavator robot is a teleoperated mobility platform with a space regolith excavation capability. This more compact, lightweight design (<50 kg) has counterrotating bucket drums, which results in a net-zero reaction horizontal force due to the self-cancellation of the symmetrical, equal but opposing, digging forces.

  16. Advanced propulsion for LEO-Moon transport. 3: Transportation model. M.S. Thesis - California Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henley, Mark W.

    1992-01-01

    A simplified computational model of low Earth orbit-Moon transportation system has been developed to provide insight into the benefits of new transportation technologies. A reference transportation infrastructure, based upon near-term technology developments, is used as a departure point for assessing other, more advanced alternatives. Comparison of the benefits of technology application, measured in terms of a mass payback ratio, suggests that several of the advanced technology alternatives could substantially improve the efficiency of low Earth orbit-Moon transportation.

  17. Recent advances in understanding hepatic drug transport

    PubMed Central

    Stieger, Bruno; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Cells need to strictly control their internal milieu, a function which is performed by the plasma membrane. Selective passage of molecules across the plasma membrane is controlled by transport proteins. As the liver is the central organ for drug metabolism, hepatocytes are equipped with numerous drug transporters expressed at the plasma membrane. Drug disposition includes absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination of a drug and hence multiple passages of drugs and their metabolites across membranes. Consequently, understanding the exact mechanisms of drug transporters is essential both in drug development and in drug therapy. While many drug transporters are expressed in hepatocytes, and some of them are well characterized, several transporters have only recently been identified as new drug transporters. Novel powerful tools to deorphanize (drug) transporters are being applied and show promising results. Although a large set of tools are available for studying transport in vitro and in isolated cells, tools for studying transport in living organisms, including humans, are evolving now and rely predominantly on imaging techniques, e.g. positron emission tomography. Imaging is an area which, certainly in the near future, will provide important insights into "transporters at work" in vivo. PMID:27781095

  18. Dust Charging and Transport on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Robertson, S.; Horanyi, M.

    2011-11-29

    In this paper, we review laboratory studies of dust transport on surfaces in plasmas, performed for a number of different mechanisms: 1) Dust particles were levitated in plasma sheaths by electrostatic forces balancing the gravitational force. 2) Dust was observed to spread over and lift off a surface that repels electrons in a plasma. 3) Dust was transported on surfaces having different secondary electron yields in plasma with an electron beam as a consequence of differential charging. 4) We also report a mechanism of dust transport by electric fields occurring at electron beam impact/shadow boundaries. These processes are candidates to explain the formation of dust ponds that were recently observed in craters on the asteroid Eros by the NEAR Shoemaker spacecraft.

  19. Surface state transport suppression in topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijnders, Anjan A.; Tian, Y.; Pohl, G.; Kivlichan, I. D.; Zhao, S. Y. Frank; Kim, Y.-J.; Jia, S.; Cava, R. J.; Kwok, D. C.; Lee, N.; Cheong, S. W.; Burch, Kenneth S.

    2013-03-01

    An unresolved question in experimental research on topological insulators (TI) is the suppression mechanism of a TI's surface state transport. While room temperature ARPES studies reveal clear evidence of surface states, their observation in transport measurements is limited to low temperatures. A better understanding of this suppression is of fundamental interest, and crucial for pushing the boundary of device applications towards room-temperature operation. In this talk, we report the temperature dependent optical properties of the topological insulator Bi2Te2Se (BTS), obtained by infrared spectroscopy and ellipsometry, probing surface and bulk states simultaneously. We see clear evidence of coherent surface state transport at low temperature and find that electron-phonon coupling causes the gradual suppression of surface state transport as temperature rises to 43K. In the bulk, electron-phonon coupling enables the emergence of an indirect band gap transition, which peaks at 43K, and is limited by thermal ionization of the bulk valance band above 43K. For comparison with other resistive TIs, we also discuss the optical properties to BiSbSe2Te. Financially supported by NSERC CRSNG, Ontario Research Fund, Canadian Foundation for Innovation, Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds, NSF

  20. Advanced oxidation process sanitization of eggshell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gottselig, Steven M; Dunn-Horrocks, Sadie L; Woodring, Kristy S; Coufal, Craig D; Duong, Tri

    2016-06-01

    The microbial quality of eggs entering the hatchery represents an important critical control point for biosecurity and pathogen reduction programs in integrated poultry production. The development of safe and effective interventions to reduce microbial contamination on the surface of eggs will be important to improve the overall productivity and microbial food safety of poultry and poultry products. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ultraviolet (UV) light advanced oxidation process is a potentially important alternative to traditional sanitizers and disinfectants for egg sanitation. The H2O2/UV advanced oxidation process was demonstrated previously to be effective in reducing surface microbial contamination on eggs. In this study, we evaluated treatment conditions affecting the efficacy of H2O2/UV advanced oxidation in order to identify operational parameters for the practical application of this technology in egg sanitation. The effect of the number of application cycles, UV intensity, duration of UV exposure, and egg rotation on the recovery of total aerobic bacteria from the surface of eggs was evaluated. Of the conditions evaluated, we determined that reduction of total aerobic bacteria from naturally contaminated eggs was optimized when eggs were sanitized using 2 repeated application cycles with 5 s exposure to 14 mW cm(-2) UV light, and that rotation of the eggs between application cycles was unnecessary. Additionally, using these optimized conditions, the H2O2/UV process reduced Salmonella by greater than 5 log10 cfu egg(-1) on the surface of experimentally contaminated eggs. This study demonstrates the potential for practical application of the H2O2/UV advanced oxidation process in egg sanitation and its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella on eggshell surfaces.

  1. Advanced Materials for Neural Surface Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Schendel, Amelia A.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Williams, Justin C.

    2015-01-01

    Designing electrodes for neural interfacing applications requires deep consideration of a multitude of materials factors. These factors include, but are not limited to, the stiffness, biocompatibility, biostability, dielectric, and conductivity properties of the materials involved. The combination of materials properties chosen not only determines the ability of the device to perform its intended function, but also the extent to which the body reacts to the presence of the device after implantation. Advances in the field of materials science continue to yield new and improved materials with properties well-suited for neural applications. Although many of these materials have been well-established for non-biological applications, their use in medical devices is still relatively novel. The intention of this review is to outline new material advances for neural electrode arrays, in particular those that interface with the surface of the nervous tissue, as well as to propose future directions for neural surface electrode development. PMID:26392802

  2. Advanced Materials for Neural Surface Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Schendel, Amelia A; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Williams, Justin C

    2014-12-01

    Designing electrodes for neural interfacing applications requires deep consideration of a multitude of materials factors. These factors include, but are not limited to, the stiffness, biocompatibility, biostability, dielectric, and conductivity properties of the materials involved. The combination of materials properties chosen not only determines the ability of the device to perform its intended function, but also the extent to which the body reacts to the presence of the device after implantation. Advances in the field of materials science continue to yield new and improved materials with properties well-suited for neural applications. Although many of these materials have been well-established for non-biological applications, their use in medical devices is still relatively novel. The intention of this review is to outline new material advances for neural electrode arrays, in particular those that interface with the surface of the nervous tissue, as well as to propose future directions for neural surface electrode development.

  3. [Advances in plant anthocyanin transport mechanism].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Dai, Silan; Jin, Xuehua; Huang, He; Hong, Yan

    2014-06-01

    Anthocyanin biosynthesis is one of the thoroughly studied enzymatic pathways in biology, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of its final stage: the transport of the anthocyanins into the vacuole. A clear picture of the dynamic trafficking of flavonoids is only now beginning to emerge. So far four different models have been proposed to explain the transport of anthocyanins from biosynthetic sites to the central vacuole, and four types of transporters have been found associated with the transport of anthocyanins: glutathione S-transferase, multidrug resistance-associated protein, multidrug and toxic compound extrusion, bilitranslocase-homologue. The functions of these proteins and related genes have also been studied. Although different models have been proposed, cellular and subcellular information is still lacking for reconciliation of different lines of evidence in various anthocyanin sequestration studies. According to the information available, through sequence analysis, gene expression analysis, subcellular positioning and complementation experiments, the function and location of these transporters can be explored, and the anthocyanin transport mechanism can be better understood.

  4. Advancing Sustainable Surface Engineering: Challenges & Future Opportunities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    2013 Noblis , Inc. Advancing Sustainable Surface Engineering: Challenges & Future Opportunities Dr. Jeffrey Marqusee Chief Scientist...NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Noblis Inc,3150 Fairview Park Drive,Falls Church,VA...unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 © 2013 Noblis , Inc

  5. Advanced methods of structural and trajectory analysis for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, Mark D.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the efforts in two areas: (1) development of advanced methods of structural weight estimation, and (2) development of advanced methods of trajectory optimization. The majority of the effort was spent in the structural weight area. A draft of 'Analytical Fuselage and Wing Weight Estimation of Transport Aircraft', resulting from this research, is included as an appendix.

  6. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

    2009-01-20

    Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

  7. Advanced space transportation system support contract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The general focus is on a phase 2 lunar base, or a lunar base during the period after the first return of a crew to the Moon, but before permanent occupancy. The software effort produced a series of trajectory programs covering low earth orbit (LEO) to various node locations, the node locations to the lunar surface, and then back to LEO. The surface operations study took a lunar scenario in the civil needs data base (CNDB) and attempted to estimate the amount of space-suit work or extravehicular activity (EVA) required to set up the base. The maintenance and supply options study was a first look at the problems of supplying and maintaining the base. A lunar surface launch and landing facility was conceptually designed. The lunar storm shelter study examined the problems of radiation protection. The lunar surface construction and equipment assembly study defined twenty surface construction and assembly tasks in detail.

  8. The impact of emerging technologies on an advanced supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, C.; Maglieri, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of advances in propulsion systems, structure and materials, aerodynamics, and systems on the design and development of supersonic transport aircraft are analyzed. Efficient propulsion systems with variable-cycle engines provide the basis for improved propulsion systems; the propulsion efficienies of supersonic and subsonic engines are compared. Material advances consist of long-life damage-tolerant structures, advanced material development, aeroelastic tailoring, and low-cost fabrication. Improvements in the areas of aerodynamics and systems are examined. The environmental problems caused by engine emissions, airport noise, and sonic boom are studied. The characteristics of the aircraft designed to include these technical advances are described.

  9. EarthScope's Transportable Array: Advancing Eastward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busby, R. W.; Vernon, F.; Newman, R. L.; Astiz, L.

    2006-12-01

    EarthScope's Transportable Array has installed more than 200 high-quality broadband seismic stations over the last 3 years in the western US. These stations have a nominal spacing of 70 km and are part of an eventual 400 station array that migrates from west to east at a rate of 18 stations per month. The full 400 stations will be operating by September 2007. Stations have a residence time of about 2 years before being relocated to the next site. Throughout the continental US, 1623 sites are expected to be occupied. Standardized procedures and protocols have been developed to streamline all aspects of Transportable Array operations, from siting to site construction and installation to equipment purchasing and data archiving. Earned Value Management tools keep facility installation and operation on budget and schedule. A diverse, yet efficient, infrastructure installs and maintains the Transportable Array. Sensors, dataloggers, and other equipment are received and tested by the IRIS PASSCAL Instrument Center and shipped to regional storage facilities. To engage future geoscientists in the project, students are trained to conduct field and analytical reconnaissance to identify suitable seismic station sites. Contract personnel are used for site verification; vault construction; and installation of sensors, power, and communications systems. IRIS staff manages permitting, landowner communications, and station operations and maintenance. Seismic signal quality and metadata are quality-checked at the Array Network Facility at the University of California-San Diego and simultaneously archived at the IRIS Data Management Center in Seattle. Station equipment has been specifically designed for low power, remote, unattended operation and uses diverse two-way IP communications for real-time transmission. Digital cellular services, VSAT satellite, and commercial DSL, cable or wireless transport services are employed. Automatic monitoring of status, signal quality and

  10. Advanced surface design for logistics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Tim R.; Hansen, Scott D.

    The development of anthropometric arm/hand and tool models and their manipulation in a large system model for maintenance simulation are discussed. The use of Advanced Surface Design and s-fig technology in anthropometrics, and three-dimensional graphics simulation tools, are found to achieve a good balance between model manipulation speed and model accuracy. The present second generation models are shown to be twice as fast to manipulate as the first generation b-surf models, to be easier to manipulate into various configurations, and to more closely approximate human contours.

  11. Analytical and simulator study of advanced transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.; Rickard, W. W.

    1982-01-01

    An analytic methodology, based on the optimal-control pilot model, was demonstrated for assessing longitidunal-axis handling qualities of transport aircraft in final approach. Calibration of the methodology is largely in terms of closed-loop performance requirements, rather than specific vehicle response characteristics, and is based on a combination of published criteria, pilot preferences, physical limitations, and engineering judgment. Six longitudinal-axis approach configurations were studied covering a range of handling qualities problems, including the presence of flexible aircraft modes. The analytical procedure was used to obtain predictions of Cooper-Harper ratings, a solar quadratic performance index, and rms excursions of important system variables.

  12. Systems study of transport aircraft incorporating advanced aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.

    1982-01-01

    A study was performed to quantify the potential benefits of utilizing advanced aluminum alloys in commercial transport aircraft and to define the effort necessary to develop fully the alloys to a viable commercial production capability. The comprehensive investigation (1) established realistic advanced aluminum alloy property goals to maximize aircraft systems effectiveness (2) identified performance and economic benefits of incorporating the advanced alloy in future advanced technology commercial aircraft designs (3) provided a recommended plan for development and integration of the alloys into commercial aircraft production (4) provided an indication of the timing and investigation required by the metal producing industry to support the projected market and (5) evaluate application of advanced aluminum alloys to other aerospace and transit systems as a secondary objective. The results of the investigation provided a roadmap and identified key issues requiring attention in an advanced aluminum alloy and applications technology development program.

  13. Surface charge transport in Silicon (111) nanomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Weiwei; Scott, Shelley; Jacobson, Rb; Savage, Donald; Lagally, Max; The Lagally Group Team

    Using thin sheets (``nanomembranes'') of atomically flat crystalline semiconductors, we are able to investigate surface electronic properties, using back-gated van der Pauw measurement in UHV. The thinness of the sheet diminishes the bulk contribution, and the back gate tunes the conductivity until the surface dominates, enabling experimental determination of surface conductance. We have previously shown that Si(001) surface states interact with the body of the membrane altering the conductivity of the system. Here, we extended our prior measurements to Si(111) in order to probe the electronic transport properties of the Si(111) 7 ×7 reconstruction. Sharp (7 ×7) LEED images attest to the cleanliness of the Si(111) surface. Preliminary results reveal a highly conductive Si(111) 7 ×7 surface with a sheet conductance Rs of order of μS/ □, for 110nm thick membrane, and Rs is a very slowly varying function of the back gate voltage. This is in strong contrast to Si(001) nanomembranes which have a minimum conductance several orders of magnitude lower, and hints to the metallic nature of the Si(111) surface. Research supported by DOE.

  14. Advancing Transportation through Vehicle Electrification - PHEV

    SciTech Connect

    Bazzi, Abdullah; Barnhart, Steven

    2014-12-31

    FCA US LLC viewed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) as an historic opportunity to learn about and develop PHEV technologies and create the FCA US LLC engineering center for Electrified Powertrains. The ARRA funding supported FCA US LLC’s light-duty electric drive vehicle and charging infrastructure-testing activities and enabled FCA US LLC to utilize the funding on advancing Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) technologies for production on future programs. FCA US LLC intended to develop the next-generations of electric drive and energy batteries through a properly paced convergence of standards, technology, components and common modules. To support the development of a strong, commercially viable supplier base, FCA US LLC also utilized this opportunity to evaluate various designated component and sub-system suppliers. The original proposal of this project was submitted in May 2009 and selected in August 2009. The project ended in December 2014.

  15. Advanced transport design using multidisciplinary design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnum, Jennifer; Bathras, Curt; Beene, Kirk; Bush, Michael; Kaupin, Glenn; Lowe, Steve; Sobieski, Ian; Tingen, Kelly; Wells, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the first implementation of multidisciplinary design optimisation (MDO) techniques by undergraduates ina design course. The objective of the work was to design a civilian transport aircraft of the Boeing 777 class. The first half of the two semester design course consisted of application of traditional sizing methods and techniques to form a baseline aircraft. MDO techniques were then applied to this baseline design. This paper describes the evolution of the design with special emphasis on the application of MDO techniques, and presents the results of four iterations through the design space. Minimization of take-off gross weight was the goal of the optimization process. The resultant aircraft derived from the MDO procedure weighed approximately 13,382 lbs (2.57 percent) less than the baseline aircraft.

  16. Assessment of the impact of advanced air-transport technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, R. L.; Dickinson, L. V., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The long term prospects for commercial supersonic transportation appear attractive enough to keep supersonic research active and reasonably healthy. On the other hand, the uncertainties surrounding an advanced supersonic transport, (AST) specifically fuel price, fuel availability and noise, are too significant to warrant an accelerated research and development program until they are better resolved. It is estimated that an AST could capture about $50 billion (1979 dollars) of the potential $150 billion in sales up to the year 2010.

  17. Integrating advanced mobility into lunar surface exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlutz, Juergen; Messerschmid, Ernst

    2012-06-01

    With growing knowledge of the lunar surface environment from recent robotic missions, further assessment of human lunar infrastructures and operational aspects for surface exploration become possible. This is of particular interest for the integration of advanced mobility assets, where path planning, balanced energy provision and consumption as well as communication coverage grow in importance with the excursion distance. The existing modeling and simulation tools for the lunar surface environment have therefore been revisited and extended to incorporate aspects of mobile exploration. An extended analysis of the lunar topographic models from past and ongoing lunar orbital missions has resulted in the creation of a tool to calculate and visualize slope angles in selected lunar regions. This allows for the identification of traversable terrain with respect to the mobile system capabilities. In a next step, it is combined with the analysis of the solar illumination conditions throughout this terrain to inform system energy budgets in terms of electrical power availability and thermal control requirements. The combination of the traversability analysis together with a time distributed energy budget assessment then allows for a path planning and optimization for long range lunar surface mobility assets, including manned excursions as well as un-crewed relocation activities. The above mentioned tools are used for a conceptual analysis of the international lunar reference architecture, developed in the frame of the International Architecture Working Group (IAWG) of the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG). Its systems capabilities are evaluated together with the planned surface exploration range and paths in order to analyze feasibility of the architecture and to identify potential areas of optimization with respect to time-based and location-based integration of activities.

  18. 29 CFR 1926.902 - Surface transportation of explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Surface transportation of explosives. 1926.902 Section 1926... Explosives § 1926.902 Surface transportation of explosives. (a) Transportation of explosives shall meet the... Carriers. (b) Motor vehicles or conveyances transporting explosives shall only be driven by, and be in...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.902 - Surface transportation of explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Surface transportation of explosives. 1926.902 Section 1926... Explosives § 1926.902 Surface transportation of explosives. (a) Transportation of explosives shall meet the... Carriers. (b) Motor vehicles or conveyances transporting explosives shall only be driven by, and be in...

  20. Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Cox, Rachel E.; Schuler, Jason M.; Ebert, Tom; Nick, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Regolith is abundant on extra-terrestrial surfaces and is the source of many resources such as oxygen, hydrogen, titanium, aluminum, iron, silica and other valuable materials, which can be used to make rocket propellant, consumables for life support, radiation protection barrier shields, landing pads, blast protection berms, roads, habitats and other structures and devices. Recent data from the Moon also indicates that there are substantial deposits of water ice in permanently shadowed crater regions and possibly under an over burden of regolith. The key to being able to use this regolith and acquire the resources, is being able to manipulate it with robotic excavation and hauling machinery that can survive and operate in these very extreme extra-terrestrial surface environments. In addition, the reduced gravity on the Moon, Mars, comets and asteroids poses a significant challenge in that the necessary reaction force for digging cannot be provided by the robot's weight as is typically done on Earth. Space transportation is expensive and limited in capacity, so small, lightweight payloads are desirable, which means large traditional excavation machines are not a viable option. A novel, compact and lightweight excavation robot prototype for manipulating, excavating, acquiring, hauling and dumping regolith on extra-terrestrial surfaces has been developed and tested. Lessons learned and test results will be presented including digging in a variety of lunar regolith simulant conditions including frozen regolith mixed with water ice.

  1. Economic impact of applying advanced technologies to transport airplanes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carline, A. J. K.

    1972-01-01

    Various technologies have been studied which could have application to the design of future transport airplanes. These technologies include the use of supercritical aerodynamics, composite materials, and active control systems, together with advanced engine designs that provide lower noise and pollutant levels. The economic impact of each technology is shown for a typical fleet of 195-passenger, transcontinental commercial transports cruising at both 0.9M and 0.98M. Comparisons are made with conventional transports cruising at 0.82M. Effects of combining the technologies are discussed. An R & D program aimed at bringing the technologies to fruition is outlined.

  2. Risk Assessment of Carbon Fiber Composite in Surface Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, W. T.; Hergenrother, K. M.

    1980-01-01

    The vulnerability of surface transportation to airborne carbon fibers and the national risk associated with the potential use of carbon fibers in the surface transportation system were evaluated. Results show airborne carbon fibers may cause failure rates in surface transportation of less than one per year by 1995. The national risk resulting from the use of carbon fibers in the surface transportation system is discussed.

  3. Advanced Bayesian Method for Planetary Surface Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Center, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Autonomous Exploration, Inc., has developed an advanced Bayesian statistical inference method that leverages current computing technology to produce a highly accurate surface navigation system. The method combines dense stereo vision and high-speed optical flow to implement visual odometry (VO) to track faster rover movements. The Bayesian VO technique improves performance by using all image information rather than corner features only. The method determines what can be learned from each image pixel and weighs the information accordingly. This capability improves performance in shadowed areas that yield only low-contrast images. The error characteristics of the visual processing are complementary to those of a low-cost inertial measurement unit (IMU), so the combination of the two capabilities provides highly accurate navigation. The method increases NASA mission productivity by enabling faster rover speed and accuracy. On Earth, the technology will permit operation of robots and autonomous vehicles in areas where the Global Positioning System (GPS) is degraded or unavailable.

  4. Surface plasmon resonance biosensors: advances and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homola, Jirí

    2009-10-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors represent the most advanced label-free optical affinity biosensor technology. In the last decade numerous SPR sensor platforms have been developed and applied in the life sciences and bioanalytics. This contribution reviews the state of the art in the development of SPR (bio)sensor technology and presents selected results of research into SPR biosensors at the Institute of Photonics and Electronics, Prague. The developments discussed in detail include a miniature fiber optic SPR sensor for localized measurements, a compact SPR sensor for field use and a multichannel SPR sensor for high-throughput screening. Examples of applications for the detection of analytes related to medical diagnostics (biomarkers, hormones, antibodies), environmental monitoring (endocrine disrupting compounds), and food safety (pathogens and toxins) are given.

  5. Surface EMG in advanced hand prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Castellini, Claudio; van der Smagt, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    One of the major problems when dealing with highly dexterous, active hand prostheses is their control by the patient wearing them. With the advances in mechatronics, building prosthetic hands with multiple active degrees of freedom is realisable, but actively controlling the position and especially the exerted force of each finger cannot yet be done naturally. This paper deals with advanced robotic hand control via surface electromyography. Building upon recent results, we show that machine learning, together with a simple downsampling algorithm, can be effectively used to control on-line, in real time, finger position as well as finger force of a highly dexterous robotic hand. The system determines the type of grasp a human subject is willing to use, and the required amount of force involved, with a high degree of accuracy. This represents a remarkable improvement with respect to the state-of-the-art of feed-forward control of dexterous mechanical hands, and opens up a scenario in which amputees will be able to control hand prostheses in a much finer way than it has so far been possible.

  6. Moon-Based Advanced Reusable Transportation Architecture: The MARTA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, R.; Bechtel, R.; Chen, T.; Cormier, T.; Kalaver, S.; Kirtas, M.; Lewe, J.-H.; Marcus, L.; Marshall, D.; Medlin, M.; McIntire, J.; Nelson, D.; Remolina, D.; Scott, A.; Weglian, J.; Olds, J.

    2000-01-01

    The Moon-based Advanced Reusable Transportation Architecture (MARTA) Project conducted an in-depth investigation of possible Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to lunar surface transportation systems capable of sending both astronauts and large masses of cargo to the Moon and back. This investigation was conducted from the perspective of a private company operating the transportation system for a profit. The goal of this company was to provide an Internal Rate of Return (IRR) of 25% to its shareholders. The technical aspect of the study began with a wide open design space that included nuclear rockets and tether systems as possible propulsion systems. Based on technical, political, and business considerations, the architecture was quickly narrowed down to a traditional chemical rocket using liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. However, three additional technologies were identified for further investigation: aerobraking, in-situ resource utilization (ISRU), and a mass driver on the lunar surface. These three technologies were identified because they reduce the mass of propellant used. Operational costs are the largest expense with propellant cost the largest contributor. ISRU, the production of materials using resources on the Moon, was considered because an Earth to Orbit (ETO) launch cost of 1600 per kilogram made taking propellant from the Earth's surface an expensive proposition. The use of an aerobrake to circularize the orbit of a vehicle coming from the Moon towards Earth eliminated 3, 100 meters per second of velocity change (Delta V), eliminating almost 30% of the 11,200 m/s required for one complete round trip. The use of a mass driver on the lunar surface, in conjunction with an ISRU production facility, would reduce the amount of propellant required by eliminating using propellant to take additional propellant from the lunar surface to Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). However, developing and operating such a system required further study to identify if it was cost effective. The

  7. Advances in the Surface Renewal Flux Measurement Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapland, T. M.; McElrone, A.; Paw U, K. T.; Snyder, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The measurement of ecosystem-scale energy and mass fluxes between the planetary surface and the atmosphere is crucial for understanding geophysical processes. Surface renewal is a flux measurement technique based on analyzing the turbulent coherent structures that interact with the surface. It is a less expensive technique because it does not require fast-response velocity measurements, but only a fast-response scalar measurement. It is therefore also a useful tool for the study of the global cycling of trace gases. Currently, surface renewal requires calibration against another flux measurement technique, such as eddy covariance, to account for the linear bias of its measurements. We present two advances in the surface renewal theory and methodology that bring the technique closer to becoming a fully independent flux measurement method. The first advance develops the theory of turbulent coherent structure transport associated with the different scales of coherent structures. A novel method was developed for identifying the scalar change rate within structures at different scales. Our results suggest that for canopies less than one meter in height, the second smallest coherent structure scale dominates the energy and mass flux process. Using the method for resolving the scalar exchange rate of the second smallest coherent structure scale, calibration is unnecessary for surface renewal measurements over short canopies. This study forms the foundation for analysis over more complex surfaces. The second advance is a sensor frequency response correction for measuring the sensible heat flux via surface renewal. Inexpensive fine-wire thermocouples are frequently used to record high frequency temperature data in the surface renewal technique. The sensible heat flux is used in conjunction with net radiation and ground heat flux measurements to determine the latent heat flux as the energy balance residual. The robust thermocouples commonly used in field experiments

  8. Coherent transport of topological insulator surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adroguer, Pierre; Carpentier, David; Orignac, Edmond; Cayssol, Jerome

    2012-02-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are a new state of matter recently predicted theoreticallyootnotetextC. L. Kane and E. J. Mele, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 226801 (2005).^,ootnotetextX.-L. Qi, T. L. Hughes, and S.-C. Zhang, Phys. Rev. B 78,195424 (2008). and realized experimentally. In 3D they are characterized by the presence of gapless surface states which exhibit a linear dispersion, typical of Dirac fermions. Moreover, contrary to conventionnal materials, these Dirac cones occur in an odd number of Dirac fermions at the surface: ARPES experimentsootnotetextY. Xia, D. Qian, D. Hsieh, L. Wray, A. Pal, H. Lin, A. Bansil, D. Grauer, Y. S. Hor, R. J. Cava, and M. Z. Hasan, Nature Physics 5, 398 (2009).^,ootnotetextY. L. Chen, J. G. Analytis, J.-H. Chu, Z. K. Liu, S.-K. Mo, X.L.Qi,H.J.Zhang,D.H.Lu,X.Dai,Z.Fang,S.C. Zhang, I. R. Fisher, Z. Hussain, and Z.-X. Shen, Science 325, 178 (2009). have found a single Dirac cone at the surface of Bi2Se3, Bi2Te3. This work focuses on the electronic transport properties calculations in the diffusive limite of a single Dirac cone. Specificities of the TI surface states, like the hexagonal warping coupling are taken into account.

  9. Advanced Engineering Environments for Space Transportation System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, L. Dale; Smith, Charles A.; Beveridge, James

    2000-01-01

    There are significant challenges facing today's launch vehicle industry. Global competition, more complex products, geographically-distributed design teams, demands for lower cost, higher reliability and safer vehicles, and the need to incorporate the latest technologies quicker, all face the developer of a space transportation system. Within NASA, multiple technology development and demonstration projects are underway toward the objectives of safe, reliable, and affordable access to space. New information technologies offer promising opportunities to develop advanced engineering environments to meet these challenges. Significant advances in the state-of-the-art of aerospace engineering practice are envisioned in the areas of engineering design and analytical tools, cost and risk tools, collaborative engineering, and high-fidelity simulations early in the development cycle. At the Marshall Space Flight Center, work has begun on development of an advanced engineering environment specifically to support the design, modeling, and analysis of space transportation systems. This paper will give an overview of the challenges of developing space transportation systems in today's environment and subsequently discuss the advanced engineering environment and its anticipated benefits.

  10. Pumpless Transport of Low Surface Tension Liquids in Surface Tension Confined (STC) Tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megaridis, Constantine; Schutzius, Thomas; Elsharkawy, Mohamed; Tiwari, Manish

    2012-11-01

    Surfaces with patterned wettability have potential applications in microfluidics, fog capture, pool boiling, etc. With recent fabrication advancements, surfaces with adjacent superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic regions are feasible at a reasonable cost; with properly designed patterns, one can produce microfluidic paths (a.k.a. surface tension confined or STC tracks) where a liquid is confined and transported by surface tension alone. The surface tension of water is relatively high (72 mN/m), as compared with oils (~25 mN/m) and organic solvents (~20 mN/m). This makes the design of STC channels for oils and organic solvents far more difficult. In this study, open STC tracks for pumpless transport of low-surface tension liquids (acetone, ethanol, and hexadecane) on microfluidic chips are fabricated using a large-area, wet-processing technique. Wettable, wax-based, submillimeter-wide tracks are applied by a fountain-pen procedure on superoleophobic, fluoroacrylic carbon nanofiber (CNF) composite coatings. The fabricated anisotropic wetting patterns confine the low-surface tension liquids onto the flow tracks, driving them with meniscus velocities exceeding 3 cm/s. Scaling arguments and Washburn's equation provide estimates of the liquid velocities measured in these tracks, which also act as rails for directional sliding control of mm-sized water droplets. The present facile patterned wettability approach can be extended to deposit micrometer-wide tracks.

  11. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) control display unit software description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Parks, Mark A.; Debure, Kelly R.; Heaphy, William J.

    1992-01-01

    The software created for the Control Display Units (CDUs), used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project, on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) is described. Module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, a detailed description, and global references. The global reference section includes subroutines, functions, and common variables referenced by a particular module. The CDUs, one for the pilot and one for the copilot, are used for flight management purposes. Operations performed with the CDU affects the aircraft's guidance, navigation, and display software.

  12. RASSOR - Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Tracy R.; Mueller, Rob

    2015-01-01

    The Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR) is a lightweight excavator for mining in reduced gravity. RASSOR addresses the need for a lightweight (<100 kg) robot that is able to overcome excavation reaction forces while operating in reduced gravity environments such as the moon or Mars. A nominal mission would send RASSOR to the moon to operate for five years delivering regolith feedstock to a separate chemical plant, which extracts oxygen from the regolith using H2 reduction methods. RASSOR would make 35 trips of 20 kg loads every 24 hours. With four RASSORs operating at one time, the mission would achieve 10 tonnes of oxygen per year (8 t for rocket propellant and 2 t for life support). Accessing craters in space environments may be extremely hard and harsh due to volatile resources - survival is challenging. New technologies and methods are required. RASSOR is a product of KSC Swamp Works which establishes rapid, innovative and cost effective exploration mission solutions by leveraging partnerships across NASA, industry and academia.

  13. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) utility library software description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinedinst, Winston C.; Slominski, Christopher J.; Dickson, Richard W.; Wolverton, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The individual software processes used in the flight computers on-board the Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) aircraft have many common functional elements. A library of commonly used software modules was created for general uses among the processes. The library includes modules for mathematical computations, data formatting, system database interfacing, and condition handling. The modules available in the library and their associated calling requirements are described.

  14. The effect of surface transport on water desalination by porous electrodes undergoing capacitive charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shocron, Amit N.; Suss, Matthew E.

    2017-03-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) is a technology in which water is desalinated by ion electrosorption into the electric double layers (EDLs) of charging porous electrodes. In recent years significant advances have been made in modeling the charge and salt dynamics in a CDI cell, but the possible effect of surface transport within diffuse EDLs on these dynamics has not been investigated. We here present theory which includes surface transport in describing the dynamics of a charging CDI cell. Through our numerical solution to the presented models, the possible effect of surface transport on the CDI process is elucidated. While at some model conditions surface transport enhances the rate of CDI cell charging, counter-intuitively this additional transport pathway is found to slow down cell charging at other model conditions.

  15. The effect of surface transport on water desalination by porous electrodes undergoing capacitive charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shocron, Amit N.; Suss, Matthew E.

    2016-07-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) is a technology in which water is desalinated by ion electrosorption into the electric double layers (EDLs) of charging porous electrodes. In recent years significant advances have been made in modeling the charge and salt dynamics in a CDI cell, but the possible effect of surface transport within diffuse EDLs on these dynamics has not been investigated. We here present theory which includes surface transport in describing the dynamics of a charging CDI cell. Through our numerical solution to the presented models, the possible effect of surface transport on the CDI process is elucidated. While at some model conditions surface transport enhances the rate of CDI cell charging, counter-intuitively this additional transport pathway is found to slow down cell charging at other model conditions.

  16. Advanced Reactors Thermal Energy Transport for Process Industries

    SciTech Connect

    P. Sabharwall; S.J. Yoon; M.G. McKellar; C. Stoots; George Griffith

    2014-07-01

    The operation temperature of advanced nuclear reactors is generally higher than commercial light water reactors and thermal energy from advanced nuclear reactor can be used for various purposes such as liquid fuel production, district heating, desalination, hydrogen production, and other process heat applications, etc. Some of the major technology challenges that must be overcome before the advanced reactors could be licensed on the reactor side are qualification of next generation of nuclear fuel, materials that can withstand higher temperature, improvement in power cycle thermal efficiency by going to combined cycles, SCO2 cycles, successful demonstration of advanced compact heat exchangers in the prototypical conditions, and from the process side application the challenge is to transport the thermal energy from the reactor to the process plant with maximum efficiency (i.e., with minimum temperature drop). The main focus of this study is on doing a parametric study of efficient heat transport system, with different coolants (mainly, water, He, and molten salts) to determine maximum possible distance that can be achieved.

  17. Surface chemical deposition of advanced electronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkevig, Cameron

    The focus of this work was to examine the direct plating of Cu on Ru diffusion barriers for use in interconnect technology and the substrate mediated growth of graphene on boron nitride for use in advanced electronic applications. The electrodeposition of Cu on Ru(0001) and polycrystalline substrates (with and without pretreatment in an iodine containing solution) has been studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV), current--time transient measurements (CTT), in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The EC-AFM data show that at potentials near the OPD/UPD threshold, Cu crystallites exhibit pronounced growth anisotropy, with lateral dimensions greatly exceeding vertical dimensions. XPS measurements confirmed the presence and stability of adsorbed I on the Ru surface following pre-treatment in a KI/H2SO4 solution and following polarization to at least -200 mV vs. Ag/AgCl. CV data of samples pre-reduced in I-containing electrolyte exhibited a narrow Cu deposition peak in the overpotential region and a UPD peak. The kinetics of the electrodeposited Cu films was investigated by CTT measurements and applied to theoretical models of nucleation. The data indicated that a protective I adlayer may be deposited on an airexposed Ru electrode as the oxide surface is electrochemically reduced, and that this layer will inhibit reformation of an oxide during the Cu electroplating process. A novel method for epitaxial graphene growth directly on a dielectric substrate of systematically variable thickness was studied. Mono/multilayers of BN(111) were grown on Ru(0001) by atomic layer deposition (ALD), exhibiting a flat (non-nanomesh) R30(✓3x✓3) structure. BN(111) was used as a template for growth of graphene by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of C2H4 at 1000 K. Characterization by LEED, Auger, STM/STS and Raman indicate the graphene is in registry with the BN substrate, and exhibits a HOPG-like 0 eV bandgap density

  18. Advanced propulsion for LEO-Moon transport. 1: A method for evaluating advanced propulsion performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Martin O.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a study to evaluate the benefits of advanced propulsion technologies for transporting materials between low Earth orbit and the Moon. A relatively conventional reference transportation system, and several other systems, each of which includes one advanced technology component, are compared in terms of how well they perform a chosen mission objective. The evaluation method is based on a pairwise life-cycle cost comparison of each of the advanced systems with the reference system. Somewhat novel and economically important features of the procedure are the inclusion not only of mass payback ratios based on Earth launch costs, but also of repair and capital acquisition costs, and of adjustments in the latter to reflect the technological maturity of the advanced technologies. The required input information is developed by panels of experts. The overall scope and approach of the study are presented in the introduction. The bulk of the paper describes the evaluation method; the reference system and an advanced transportation system, including a spinning tether in an eccentric Earth orbit, are used to illustrate it.

  19. Advanced Technologies for Determination of Surface Cleanliness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudlacek, Jan; Chabera, Petr

    2014-12-01

    For high utility value of products is significant quality of surface treatment. Among the processes that most affect the quality of surface treatment are mainly surface pretreatment processes, namely processes of cleaning (degreasing). This article is devoted to quality control after surface pre-treatment. It mainly deals with the modern method for detecting surface contamination grease based on fluorescence methods. Impurities such as grease, oil and other have characteristic fluorescence after illumination by UV source. This principle can be used to determine the purity of the substrate surface, thereby ensuring the quality of the surface. Surface cleanliness is very important factor for the correct application of subsequent technological processes.

  20. General theory of Taylor dispersion phenomena. Part 3. Surface transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, L.H.; Brenner, H.

    1982-01-01

    An asymptotic theory of Brownian tracer particle transport phenomena within a bulk fluid, as augmented by surface transport, is presented in the context of generalized Taylor dispersion theory. The analysis expands upon prior work, which was limited to transport wholly within a continuous phase, so as to now include surface adsorption, diffusion, and convection of the tracer along a continuous surface bounding the continuous fluid phase.

  1. Fixed Wing Project: Technologies for Advanced Air Transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Del Rosario, Ruben; Koudelka, John M.; Wahls, Richard A.; Madavan, Nateri

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Fixed Wing (FW) Project addresses the comprehensive challenge of enabling revolutionary energy efficiency improvements in subsonic transport aircraft combined with dramatic reductions in harmful emissions and perceived noise to facilitate sustained growth of the air transportation system. Advanced technologies and the development of unconventional aircraft systems offer the potential to achieve these improvements. Multidisciplinary advances are required in aerodynamic efficiency to reduce drag, structural efficiency to reduce aircraft empty weight, and propulsive and thermal efficiency to reduce thrust-specific energy consumption (TSEC) for overall system benefit. Additionally, advances are required to reduce perceived noise without adversely affecting drag, weight, or TSEC, and to reduce harmful emissions without adversely affecting energy efficiency or noise.The presentation will highlight the Fixed Wing project vision of revolutionary systems and technologies needed to achieve these challenging goals. Specifically, the primary focus of the FW Project is on the N+3 generation; that is, vehicles that are three generations beyond the current state of the art, requiring mature technology solutions in the 2025-30 timeframe.

  2. NASA Noise Reduction Program for Advanced Subsonic Transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David G.; Cazier, F. W., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Aircraft noise is an important byproduct of the world's air transportation system. Because of growing public interest and sensitivity to noise, noise reduction technology is becoming increasingly important to the unconstrained growth and utilization of the air transportation system. Unless noise technology keeps pace with public demands, noise restrictions at the international, national and/or local levels may unduly constrain the growth and capacity of the system to serve the public. In recognition of the importance of noise technology to the future of air transportation as well as the viability and competitiveness of the aircraft that operate within the system, NASA, the FAA and the industry have developed noise reduction technology programs having application to virtually all classes of subsonic and supersonic aircraft envisioned to operate far into the 21st century. The purpose of this paper is to describe the scope and focus of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction program with emphasis on the advanced technologies that form the foundation of the program.

  3. NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Program: A Materials Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The realization of low-cost assess to space is one of NASA's three principal goals or "pillars" under the Office of Aero-Space Technology. In accordance with the goals of this pillar, NASA's primary space transportation technology role is to develop and demonstrate next-generation technologies to enable the commercial launch industry to develop full-scale, low cost, highly reliable space launchers. The approach involves both ground-based technology demonstrations and flight demonstrators, including the X-33, X-34, Bantam, Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), and future experimental vehicles. Next generation space transportation vehicles and propulsion systems will require the development and implementation of advanced materials and processes. This presentation will provide an overview of advanced materials efforts which are focused on the needs of next generation space transportation systems. Applications described will include ceramic matrix composite (CMC) integrally bladed turbine disk (blisk); actively cooled CMC nozzle ramp for the aerospike engine; ablative thrust chamber/nozzle; and metal matrix composite turbomachinery housings.

  4. Technology requirements for advanced earth-orbital transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haefeli, R. C.; Littler, E. G.; Hurley, J. B.; Winter, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    Areas of advanced technology that are either critical or offer significant benefits to the development of future Earth-orbit transportation systems were identified. Technology assessment was based on the application of these technologies to fully reusable, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle concepts with horizontal landing capability. Study guidelines included mission requirements similar to space shuttle, an operational capability begining in 1995, and main propulsion to be advanced hydrogen-fueled rocket engines. Also evaluated was the technical and economic feasibility of this class of SSTO concepts and the comparative features of three operational take-off modes, which were vertical boost, horizontal sled launch, and horizontal take-off with subsequent inflight fueling. Projections of both normal and accelerated technology growth were made. Figures of merit were derived to provide relative rankings of technology areas. The influence of selected accelerated areas on vehicle design and program costs was analyzed by developing near-optimum point designs.

  5. JB-300: An advanced medium size transport for 2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debrouwer, Giles; Graham, Katherine; Ison, Jim; Juarez, Vince; Moskalik, Steve; Pankonin, Jon; Weinstein, Arnold

    1993-01-01

    In the fall of 1992, the TAC Team was presented with a Request for Proposal (PFP) for a mid-size (250-350 passenger) commercial transport. The aircraft was to be extremely competitive in the areas of passenger comfort, performance, and economic aspects. Through the use of supercritical airfoils, a technologically advanced Very High By-pass Ratio (VHBR) turbofan engine, a low overall drag configuration, a comparable interior layout, and mild use of composites, the JB-300 offers an economically viable choice to the airlines. The cents per passenger mile of the JB-300 is 1.76, which is considerably lower than current aircraft in the same range. Overall, the JB-300 is a technologically advanced aircraft, which will meet the demands of the 21st century.

  6. Evaluation of undeveloped rocket engine cycle applications to advanced transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Undeveloped pump-fed, liquid propellant rocket engine cycles were assessed and evaluated for application to Next Manned Transportation System (NMTS) vehicles, which would include the evolving Space Transportation System (STS Evolution), the Personnel Launch System (PLS), and the Advanced Manned Launch System (AMLS). Undeveloped engine cycles selected for further analysis had potential for increased reliability, more maintainability, reduced cost, and improved (or possibly level) performance when compared to the existing SSME and proposed STME engines. The split expander (SX) cycle, the full flow staged combustion (FFSC) cycle, and a hybrid version of the FFSC, which has a LOX expander drive for the LOX pump, were selected for definition and analysis. Technology requirements and issues were identified and analyses of vehicle systems weight deltas using the SX and FFSC cycles in AMLS vehicles were performed. A strawman schedule and cost estimate for FFSC subsystem technology developments and integrated engine system demonstration was also provided.

  7. Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Swanson; Daniel Laudal

    2008-03-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Coal and Environmental Systems has as its mission to develop advanced gasification-based technologies for affordable, efficient, zero-emission power generation. These advanced power systems, which are expected to produce near-zero pollutants, are an integral part of DOE's Vision 21 Program. DOE has also been developing advanced gasification systems that lower the capital and operating costs of producing syngas for chemical production. A transport reactor has shown potential to be a low-cost syngas producer compared to other gasification systems since its high-throughput-per-unit cross-sectional area reduces capital costs. This work directly supports the Power Systems Development Facility utilizing the KBR transport reactor located at the Southern Company Services Wilsonville, Alabama, site. Over 2800 hours of operation on 11 different coals ranging from bituminous to lignite along with a petroleum coke has been completed to date in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). The EERC has established an extensive database on the operation of these various fuels in both air-blown and oxygen-blown modes utilizing a pilot-scale transport reactor gasifier. This database has been useful in determining the effectiveness of design changes on an advanced transport reactor gasifier and for determining the performance of various feedstocks in a transport reactor. The effects of different fuel types on both gasifier performance and the operation of the hot-gas filter system have been determined. It has been demonstrated that corrected fuel gas heating values ranging from 90 to 130 Btu/scf have been achieved in air-blown mode, while heating values up to 230 Btu/scf on a dry basis have been achieved in oxygen-blown mode. Carbon conversions up to 95% have also been obtained and are highly dependent on the oxygen-coal ratio. Higher

  8. Advanced cockpit technology for future civil transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Jack J.; Parrish, Russell V.

    1990-01-01

    A review is presented of advanced cockpit technology for future civil transport aircraft, covering the present state-of-the-art and major technologies, including flat-panel displays, graphics and pictorial displays. Pilot aiding/automation/human-centered design and imaging sensor/flight systems technology (for low-visibility operations) are also presented. NASA Langley Research Center's recent results in pictorial displays and on future developments in large-screen display technologies are discussed. Major characteristics foreseen for the future high-speed civil transport include fault-tolerant digital avionics and controls/displays with extensive human-centered automation, and unusually clean, uncluttered interface with natural crew interaction via touch, voice/tactile means.

  9. Data Compression Techniques for Advanced Space Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, William G.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced space transportation systems, including vehicle state of health systems, will produce large amounts of data which must be stored on board the vehicle and or transmitted to the ground and stored. The cost of storage or transmission of the data could be reduced if the number of bits required to represent the data is reduced by the use of data compression techniques. Most of the work done in this study was rather generic and could apply to many data compression systems, but the first application area to be considered was launch vehicle state of health telemetry systems. Both lossless and lossy compression techniques were considered in this study.

  10. Advanced composite vertical stabilizer for DC-10 transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, C. O.

    1979-01-01

    Structural design, tooling, fabrication, and test activities are reported for a program to develop an advanced composite vertical stabilizer (CVS) for the DC 10 Commercial Transport Aircraft. Structural design details are described and the status of structural and weight analyses are reported. A structural weight reduction of 21.7% is currently predicted. Test results are discussed for sine wave stiffened shear webs containing representative of the CVS spar webs and for lightning current transfer and tests on a panel representative of the CVS skins.

  11. Advances in Surface-Enhanced Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Geddes, Chris D.; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Malicka, Joanna; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Aslan, Kadir; Lukomska, Joanna; Matveeva, Evgenia; Zhang, Jian; Badugu, Ramachandram; Huang, Jun

    2009-01-01

    We report recent achievements in metal-enhanced fluorescence from our laboratory. Several fluorophore systems have been studied on metal particle-coated surfaces and in colloid suspensions. In particular, we describe a distance dependent enhancement on silver island films (SIFs), release of self-quenching of fluorescence near silver particles, and the applications of fluorescence enhancement near metalized surfaces to bioassays. We discuss a number of methods for various shaped silver particle deposition on surfaces. PMID:15617385

  12. Recent advances in designing superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Celia, Elena; Darmanin, Thierry; Taffin de Givenchy, Elisabeth; Amigoni, Sonia; Guittard, Frédéric

    2013-07-15

    The interest in superhydrophobic surfaces has grown exponentially over recent decades. Since the lotus leaf dual hierarchical structure was discovered, researchers have investigated the foundations of self-cleaning behavior. Generally, surface micro/nanostructuring combined with low surface energy of materials leads to extreme anti-wetting properties. The great number of papers on this subject attests the efforts of scientists in mimicking nature to generate superhydrophobicity. Besides the thirst for knowledge, scientists have been driven by the many possible industrial applications of superhydrophobic materials in several fields. Many methods and techniques have been developed to fabricate superhydrophobic surfaces, and the aim of this paper is to review the recent progresses in preparing manmade superhydrophobic surfaces.

  13. Continued Development and Application of Circulation Control Pneumatic Technology to Advanced Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englar, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Personnel of the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) Aerospace and Transportation Lab have completed a four-year grant program to develop and evaluate the pneumatic aerodynamic technology known as Circulation Control (CC) or Circulation Control Wing (CCW) for advanced transport aircraft. This pneumatic technology, which employs low-level blowing from tangential slots over round or near-round trailing edges of airfoils, greatly augments the circulation around a lifting or control surface and thus enhances the aerodynamic forces and moments generated by that surface. Two-dimensional force augmentations as high as 80 times the input blowing momentum coefficient have been recorded experimentally for these blown devices, thus providing returns of 8000% on the jet momentum expended. A further benefit is the absence of moving parts such as mechanical flaps, slats, spoilers, ailerons, elevators and rudders from these pneumatic surfaces, or the use of only very small, simple, blown aerodynamic surfaces on synergistic designs which integrate the lift, drag and control surfaces. The application of these devices to advanced aircraft can offer significant benefits in their performance, efficiency, simplicity, reliability, economic cost of operation, noise reduction, and safety of flight. To further develop and evaluate this potential, this research effort was conducted by GTRI under grant for the NASA Langley Research Center, Applied Aerodynamics Division, Subsonic Aerodynamics Branch, between June 14, 1993 and May 31, 1997.

  14. Surface Transportation Board Reauthorization Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Rockefeller, John D., IV [D-WV

    2009-12-16

    12/21/2010 By Senator Rockefeller from Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation filed written report. Report No. 111-380. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  15. Surface Transportation Board Reauthorization Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Rockefeller, John D., IV [D-WV

    2014-09-08

    12/12/2014 By Senator Rockefeller from Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation filed written report. Report No. 113-321. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. Surface Transportation Savings Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Perriello, Thomas S.P. [D-VA-5

    2010-06-25

    07/21/2010 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  17. Display-based communications for advanced transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Alfred T.

    1989-01-01

    The next generation of civil transport aircraft will depend increasingly upon ground-air-ground and satellite data link for information critical to safe and efficient air transportation. Previous studies which examined the concept of display-based communications in addition to, or in lieu of, conventional voice transmissions are reviewed. A full-mission flight simulation comparing voice and display-based communication modes in an advanced transport aircraft is also described. The results indicate that a display-based mode of information transfer does not result in significantly increased aircrew workload, but does result in substantially increased message acknowledgment times when compared to conventional voice transmissions. User acceptance of the display-based communication system was generally high, replicating the findings of previous studies. However, most pilots tested expressed concern over the potential loss of information available from frequency monitoring which might result from the introduction of discrete address communications. Concern was expressed by some pilots for the reduced time available to search for conflicting traffic when using the communications display system. The implications of the findings for the design of display-based communications are discussed.

  18. Advances in surfaces and osseointegration in implantology. Biomimetic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Albertini, Matteo; Fernandez-Yague, Marc; Lázaro, Pedro; Herrero-Climent, Mariano; Bullon, Pedro; Gil, Francisco-Javier

    2015-01-01

    The present work is a revision of the processes occurring in osseointegration of titanium dental implants according to different types of surfaces -namely, polished surfaces, rough surfaces obtained from subtraction methods, as well as the new hydroxyapatite biomimetic surfaces obtained from thermochemical processes. Hydroxyapatite’s high plasma-projection temperatures have proven to prevent the formation of crystalline apatite on the titanium dental implant, but lead to the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate (i.e., with no crystal structure) instead. This layer produce some osseointegration yet the calcium phosphate layer will eventually dissolve and leave a gap between the bone and the dental implant, thus leading to osseointegration failure due to bacterial colonization. A new surface -recently obtained by thermochemical processes- produces, by crystallization, a layer of apatite with the same mineral content as human bone that is chemically bonded to the titanium surface. Osseointegration speed was tested by means of minipigs, showing bone formation after 3 to 4 weeks, with the security that a dental implant can be loaded. This surface can be an excellent candidate for immediate or early loading procedures. Key words:Dental implants, implants surfaces, osseointegration, biomimetics surfaces. PMID:25662555

  19. Nonlinear Transport In Gases, Traps And Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šuvakov, M.; Marjanovic, S.

    2010-07-01

    We will present our numerical study of three different charge transport processes and we will compare properties, specially the nonlinearity, of these processes. First process is electron transport in gases in swarm regime. We used well tested Monte Carlo techique to investigate kinetic phenomena such as negative diferencial conductivity (NDC) or negative apsolute mobility (NAM). We explain these phenomena analysing the spatial profiles of the swarm and collision events. In the second part we will apply the same technique on positron transport to obtain the same level of understanding of positron transport as has been achieved for electrons. The influence of positronium formation, non-conservative process, is much larger than any comparable effects in electron transport due to attachment and/or ionisation. As a result several new phenomena have been observed, such as NDC for the bulk drift velocity. Additionaly, the same Monte Carlo technique is used for modeling and optimisation of Surko like positron traps in different geometries and field configurations. Third process we studied is the charge transport under voltage bias via single-electron tunnelings through the junctions between metallic particles on nanoparticle films. We show how the regular nanoparticle array and topologically inhomogeneous nanonetworks affect the charge transport. We find long-range correlations in the time series of charge fluctuation at individual nanoparticles and of flow along the junctions within the network. These correlations explain the occurrence of a large non-linearity in the simulated and experimentally measured current-voltage characteristics and non-Gaussian fluctuations of the current at the electrode.

  20. Oil droplet self-transportation on oleophobic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Qin, Qi Hang; Shah, Ali; Ras, Robin H. A.; Tian, Xuelin; Jokinen, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Directional liquid transportation is important for a variety of biological processes and technical applications. Although surface engineering through asymmetric chemical modification or geometrical patterning facilitates effective liquid manipulation and enables water droplet self-transportation on synthetic surfaces, self-transportation of oil droplets poses a major challenge because of their low surface tension. We report oil droplet self-transportation on oleophobic surfaces that are microtextured with radial arrays of undercut stripes. More significantly, we observe three modes of oil motion on various sample surfaces, namely, inward transportation, pinned, and outward spreading, which can be switched by the structure parameters, including stripe intersection angle and width. Accompanying theoretical modeling provides an in-depth mechanistic understanding of the structure–droplet motion relationship. Finally, we reveal how to optimize the texture parameters to maximize oil droplet self-transportation capability and demonstrate spontaneous droplet movement for liquids down to a surface tension of 22.4 mN/m. The surfaces presented here open up new avenues for power-free liquid transportation and oil contamination self-removal applications in various analytical and fluidic devices. PMID:27386574

  1. Advancing Sustainable Catalysis with Magnetite Surface ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This article surveys the recent developments in the synthesis, surface modification, and synthetic applications of magnetitenanoparticles. The emergence of iron(II,III) oxide (triiron tetraoxide or magnetite; Fe3O4, or FeO•Fe2O3) nanoparticles as a sustainable support in heterogeneous catalysis is highlighted. Use of an oxide of earth-abundant iron for various applications in catalysis and environmental remediation.

  2. Advanced Techniques for Improving Laser Optical Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-03-01

    methanol and permitting drops of the suspensions to dry on cleaned glass slides. The slides were coated with .00 angstrom aluminum films and...surface to be replicated, improper coating of it. or nonuniform re- moval of the film can cause artifacts in the replica which are difficult to interpret...difficult to coat uniformly and so act as defect sites in thin film coatings on the etched pieces. A second series of damage experiments which was

  3. Thermal blanket insulation for advanced space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusch, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of weaving Nextel ceramic and Nicalon silicon carbide yarns into integrally woven, three dimensional fluted core fabrics was demonstrated. Parallel face fabrics joined with woven fabric ribs to form triangular cross section flutes between the faces were woven into three single and one double layer configuration. High warp yarn density in the double layer configuration caused considerable yarn breakage during weaving. The flutes of all four fabrics were filled with mandrels made from Q-Fiber Felt and FRCI-20-12 to form candidate insulation panels for advanced Space Transportation Systems. Procedures for preparing and inserting the mandrels were developed. Recommendations are made on investigating alternate methods for filling the flutes with insulation, and for improving the weaving of these types of fabrics.

  4. Surface atmospheric extremes (Launch and transportation areas)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The effects of extreme values of surface and low altitude atmospheric parameters on space vehicle design, tests, and operations are discussed. Atmospheric extremes from the surface to 150 meters for geographic locations of interest to NASA are given. Thermal parameters (temperature and solar radiation), humidity, pressure, and atmospheric electricity (lighting and static) are presented. Weather charts and tables are included.

  5. Quantifying surface moisture influences on aeolian transport (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nield, J. M.; Wiggs, G. F.

    2010-12-01

    Surface moisture plays an important role in determining sediment availability and aeolian transport in beach systems but is heterogeneous both spatially and temporally. The development of rippled aeolian sand strips and protodunes are particularly influenced by surface moisture and are inherently transient and therefore difficult to quantify using traditional point based sampling methods. Furthermore, these structures are influenced by saltation cloud formation and mutual feedback associated with surface characteristics and transport dynamics. Here we utilise terrestrial laser scanning (ground-based LiDAR) to accurately decipher beach surface moisture during transport events, elucidating the switch between erosivity and erodibility as the surface dries and saltation intensity increases. This technology is particularly useful at identifying surface moisture within 0-10%, precisely the range over which the aeolian transport threshold is found. The resolution of the instrument allows millimeter accuracy of surface topography, percent accuracy of surface moisture with short (minutes) data collection periods, enabling the examination of multiple relationships at unprecedented detail. Surface roughness and saltation cloud height increase over moist areas, particularly as saltation intensity increases, whilst deposition on the wet/dry boundary is a function of feedback between the surface properties and aerodynamic attributes which ultimately contributes towards protodune formation. These observed feedback mechanisms are incorporated into a cellular automaton-based algorithm to examine sand strip development and surface moisture interaction. Simulations suggest the development of differing mobility between small-scale ripples and larger sand strip is a function of the response of the surface moisture to sediment deposition and erosion. Our findings highlight the inherent complexity of surface moisture and sediment transport interactions, and the need to incorporate their

  6. Transport Powder and Liquid Samples by Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Louyeh, Sahar

    2009-01-01

    Sample transport is an important requirement for In-situ analysis of samples in NASA planetary exploration missions. Tests have shown that powders or liquid drops on a surface can be transported by surface acoustic waves (SAW) that are generated on the surface using interdigital transducers. The phenomena were investigated experimentally and to generate SAWs interdigital electrodes were deposited on wafers of 128 deg rotated Y-cut LiNbO?. Transporting capability of the SAW device was tested using particles of various sizes and drops of various viscosities liquids. Because of different interaction mechanisms with the SAWs, the powders and the liquid drops were observed to move in opposite directions. In the preliminary tests, a speed of 180 mm/s was achieved for powder transportation. The detailed experimental setup and results are presented in this paper. The transporting mechanism can potentially be applied to miniaturize sample analysis system or " lab-on-chip" devices.

  7. Advanced Face Gear Surface Durability Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Heath, Gregory F.

    2016-01-01

    The surface durability life of helical face gears and isotropic super-finished (ISF) face gears was investigated. Experimental fatigue tests were performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Endurance tests were performed on 10 sets of helical face gears in mesh with tapered involute helical pinions, and 10 sets of ISF-enhanced straight face gears in mesh with tapered involute spur pinions. The results were compared to previous tests on straight face gears. The life of the ISF configuration was slightly less than that of previous tests on straight face gears. The life of the ISF configuration was slightly greater than that of the helical configuration.

  8. An advanced concept secondary power systems study for an advanced transport technology aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The application of advanced technology to the design of an integrated secondary power system for future near-sonic long-range transports was investigated. The study showed that the highest payoff is achieved by utilizing secondary power equipment that contributes to minimum cruise drag. This is best accomplished by the use of the dedicated auxiliary power unit concept (inflight APU) as the prime power source for an airplane with a body-mounted engine or by the use of the internal engine generator concept (electrical power extraction from the propulsion engine) for an airplane with a wing-pod-mounted engine.

  9. Advanced Single-Aisle Transport Propulsion Design Options Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Tong, Michael T.; Haller, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Future propulsion options for advanced single-aisle transports have been investigated in a number of previous studies by the authors. These studies have examined the system level characteristics of aircraft incorporating ultra-high bypass ratio (UHB) turbofans (direct drive and geared) and open rotor engines. During the course of these prior studies, a number of potential refinements and enhancements to the analysis methodology and assumptions were identified. This paper revisits a previously conducted UHB turbofan fan pressure ratio trade study using updated analysis methodology and assumptions. The changes incorporated have decreased the optimum fan pressure ratio for minimum fuel consumption and reduced the engine design trade-offs between minimizing noise and minimizing fuel consumption. Nacelle drag and engine weight are found to be key drivers in determining the optimum fan pressure ratio from a fuel efficiency perspective. The revised noise analysis results in the study aircraft being 2 to 4 EPNdB (cumulative) quieter due to a variety of reasons explained in the paper. With equal core technology assumed, the geared engine architecture is found to be as good as or better than the direct drive architecture for most parameters investigated. However, the engine ultimately selected for a future advanced single-aisle aircraft will depend on factors beyond those considered here.

  10. Engine Concept Study for an Advanced Single-Aisle Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Fisher, Kenneth L.; Haller, William J.; Tong, Michael; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    The desire for higher engine efficiency has resulted in the evolution of aircraft gas turbine engines from turbojets, to low bypass ratio, first generation turbofans, to today's high bypass ratio turbofans. Although increased bypass ratio has clear benefits in terms of propulsion system metrics such as specific fuel consumption, these benefits may not translate into aircraft system level benefits due to integration penalties. In this study, the design trade space for advanced turbofan engines applied to a single aisle transport (737/A320 class aircraft) is explored. The benefits of increased bypass ratio and associated enabling technologies such as geared fan drive are found to depend on the primary metrics of interest. For example, bypass ratios at which mission fuel consumption is minimized may not require geared fan technology. However, geared fan drive does enable higher bypass ratio designs which result in lower noise. The results of this study indicate the potential for the advanced aircraft to realize substantial improvements in fuel efficiency, emissions, and noise compared to the current vehicles in this size class.

  11. Advanced Configurations for Very Large Subsonic Transport Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMasters, John H.; Paisley, David J.; Hubert, Richard J.; Kroo, Ilan; Bofah, Kwasi K.; Sullivan, John P.; Drela, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Recent aerospace industry interest in developing a subsonic commercial transport airplane with 50 percent greater passenger capacity than the largest existing aircraft in this category (the Boeing 747-400 with approximately 400-450 seats) has generated a range of proposals based largely on the configuration paradigm established nearly 50 years ago with the Boeing B-47 bomber. While this basic configuration paradigm has come to dominate subsonic commercial airplane development since the advent of the Boeing 707/Douglas DC-8 in the mid-1950's, its extrapolation to the size required to carry more than 600-700 passengers raises several questions. To explore these and a number of related issues, a team of Boeing, university, and NASA engineers was formed under the auspices of the NASA Advanced Concepts Program. The results of a Research Analysis focused on a large, unconventional transport airplane configuration for which Boeing has applied for a patent are the subject of this report. It should be noted here that this study has been conducted independently of the Boeing New Large Airplane (NLA) program, and with the exception of some generic analysis tools which may be common to this effort and the NLA (as will be described later), no explicit Boeing NLA data other than that published in the open literature has been used in the conduct of the study reported here.

  12. Advanced fuel cells for transportation applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-10

    This Research and Development (R and D) contract was directed at developing an advanced technology compressor/expander for supplying compressed air to Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells in transportation applications. The objective of this project was to develop a low-cost high-efficiency long-life lubrication-free integrated compressor/expander utilizing scroll technology. The goal of this compressor/expander was to be capable of providing compressed air over the flow and pressure ranges required for the operation of 50 kW PEM fuel cells in transportation applications. The desired ranges of flow, pressure, and other performance parameters were outlined in a set of guidelines provided by DOE. The project consisted of the design, fabrication, and test of a prototype compressor/expander module. The scroll CEM development program summarized in this report has been very successful, demonstrating that scroll technology is a leading candidate for automotive fuel cell compressor/expanders. The objectives of the program are: develop an integrated scroll CEM; demonstrate efficiency and capacity goals; demonstrate manufacturability and cost goals; and evaluate operating envelope. In summary, while the scroll CEM program did not demonstrate a level of performance as high as the DOE guidelines in all cases, it did meet the overriding objectives of the program. A fully-integrated, low-cost CEM was developed that demonstrated high efficiency and reliable operation throughout the test program. 26 figs., 13 tabs.

  13. Consumer Views on Transportation and Advanced Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Vehicle manufacturers, U.S. Department of Energy laboratories, universities, private researchers, and organizations from countries around the globe are pursuing advanced vehicle technologies that aim to reduce gasoline and diesel consumption. This report details study findings of broad American public sentiments toward issues surrounding advanced vehicle technologies and is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technology Office (VTO) in alignment with its mission to develop and deploy these technologies to improve energy security, increase mobility flexibility, reduce transportation costs, and increase environmental sustainability. Understanding and tracking consumer sentiments can influence the prioritization of development efforts by identifying barriers to and opportunities for broad acceptance of new technologies. Predicting consumer behavior toward developing technologies and products is inherently inexact. A person's stated preference given in an interview about a hypothetical setting may not match the preference that is demonstrated in an actual situation. This difference makes tracking actual consumer actions ultimately more valuable in understanding potential behavior. However, when developing technologies are not yet available and actual behaviors cannot be tracked, stated preferences provide some insight into how consumers may react in new circumstances. In this context this report provides an additional source to validate data and a new resource when no data are available. This report covers study data captured from December 2005 through June 2015 relevant to VTO research efforts at the time of the studies. Broadly the report covers respondent sentiments about vehicle fuel economy, future vehicle technology alternatives, ethanol as a vehicle fuel, plug-in electric vehicles, and willingness to pay for vehicle efficiency. This report represents a renewed effort to publicize study findings and make consumer sentiment data available to

  14. Quantification of chemical transport processes from soil to surface runoff

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although there is a conceptual understanding on processes governing chemical transport from soil to surface runoff, there are little literature and research results actually quantifying these individual processes. We developed a laboratory flow cell and experimental procedures to quantify chemical ...

  15. Comparison of alternative concepts for lunar surface transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, Uwe

    The lunar surface transportation system is a key element in lunar development. The decision which means of conveyance should be preferred depends on a lot of influencing factors such as transportation requirements, physical boundary conditions and economics. Starting with a systematic approach to define and structure the problem, a model to compare alternative transportation systems has been built. From the pool of possible means of conveyance, chemical rockets, electric cars, maglev-trains and mass-drivers have been chosen as candidates for investigation. With these candidates five different surface transportation systems were defined. For a reference lunar development scenario the systems were compared on the basis of a cost-to-benefit ratio. Preliminary results indicate that under the assumption that LH2 could be produced on lunar surface, LOX/LH2 propulsed "Hoppers" seem very attractive up to medium transportation demands. For large amounts of bulk cargo, mass driver transportation seems to have advantages, and electric cars should be used for all transportation tasks if the transportation demand is high. Maglev-trains seem to be competitive only for very large transportation demand and long life cycles.

  16. Advances in the Application of Surface Drifters.

    PubMed

    Lumpkin, Rick; Özgökmen, Tamay; Centurioni, Luca

    2017-01-03

    Surface drifting buoys, or drifters, are used in oceanographic and climate research, oil spill tracking, weather forecasting, search and rescue operations, calibration and validation of velocities from high-frequency radar and from altimeters, iceberg tracking, and support of offshore drilling operations. In this review, we present a brief history of drifters, from the message in a bottle to the latest satellite-tracked, multisensor drifters. We discuss the different types of drifters currently used for research and operations as well as drifter designs in development. We conclude with a discussion of the various properties that can be observed with drifters, with heavy emphasis on a critical process that cannot adequately be observed by any other instrument: dispersion in the upper ocean, driven by turbulence at scales from waves through the submesoscale to the large-scale geostrophic eddies.

  17. Advances in the Application of Surface Drifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpkin, Rick; Özgökmen, Tamay; Centurioni, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Surface drifting buoys, or drifters, are used in oceanographic and climate research, oil spill tracking, weather forecasting, search and rescue operations, calibration and validation of velocities from high-frequency radar and from altimeters, iceberg tracking, and support of offshore drilling operations. In this review, we present a brief history of drifters, from the message in a bottle to the latest satellite-tracked, multisensor drifters. We discuss the different types of drifters currently used for research and operations as well as drifter designs in development. We conclude with a discussion of the various properties that can be observed with drifters, with heavy emphasis on a critical process that cannot adequately be observed by any other instrument: dispersion in the upper ocean, driven by turbulence at scales from waves through the submesoscale to the large-scale geostrophic eddies.

  18. A new approach to canal surface with parallel transport frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiṣi, Ilim; Öztürk, Günay

    In the present study, we attend to the canal surfaces with the spine curve γ according to the parallel transport frame in Euclidean 4-space 𝔼4. We give an example of these surfaces and obtain some results about curvature conditions in 𝔼4. Moreover, the visualizations of projections of canal surfaces are presented. Lastly, we give the necessary and sufficient conditions for canal surfaces to become weak superconformal.

  19. Automatic braking system modification for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) Transportation Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coogan, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Modifications were designed for the B-737-100 Research Aircraft autobrake system hardware of the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) Program at Langley Research Center. These modifications will allow the on-board flight control computer to control the aircraft deceleration after landing to a continuously variable level for the purpose of executing automatic high speed turn-offs from the runway. A bread board version of the proposed modifications was built and tested in simulated stopping conditions. Test results, for various aircraft weights, turnoff speed, winds, and runway conditions show that the turnoff speeds are achieved generally with errors less than 1 ft/sec.

  20. Regulation of airway surface liquid volume and mucus transport by active ion transport.

    PubMed

    Tarran, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Mucus clearance is an important component of the lung's innate defense against disease, and the ability of the airways to clear mucus is strongly dependent on the volume of liquid on airway surfaces. Whether airway surface liquid (ASL) volume is maintained by passive surface forces or by active ion transport is controversial yet crucial to the understanding of how this system operates in both health and disease. In support of active ion transport being the major determinant of ASL volume, we have demonstrated that normal airway epithelia sense and autoregulate ASL height (volume) by adjusting the rates of Na+ absorption and Cl- secretion to maintain mucus transport.

  1. Surface atmospheric extremes (launch and transportation areas)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Criteria are provided on atmospheric extremes from the surface to 150 meters for geographical locations of interest to NASA. Thermal parameters (temperature and solar radiation), humidity, precipitation, pressure, and atmospheric electricity (lightning and static) are presented. Available data are also provided for the entire continental United States for use in future space programs.

  2. Models of Fate and Transport of Pollutants in Surface Waters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okome, Gloria Eloho

    2013-01-01

    There is the need to answer very crucial questions of "what happens to pollutants in surface waters?" This question must be answered to determine the factors controlling fate and transport of chemicals and their evolutionary state in surface waters. Monitoring and experimental methods are used in establishing the environmental states.…

  3. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) Flight Management/Flight Controls (FM/FC) software description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, David A.; Dickson, Richard W.; Clinedinst, Winston C.; Slominski, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    The flight software developed for the Flight Management/Flight Controls (FM/FC) MicroVAX computer used on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle for Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) research is described. The FM/FC software computes navigation position estimates, guidance commands, and those commands issued to the control surfaces to direct the aircraft in flight. Various modes of flight are provided for, ranging from computer assisted manual modes to fully automatic modes including automatic landing. A high-level system overview as well as a description of each software module comprising the system is provided. Digital systems diagrams are included for each major flight control component and selected flight management functions.

  4. Delta Advanced Reusable Transport (DART): An alternative manned spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewerenz, T.; Kosha, M.; Magazu, H.

    Although the current U.S. Space Transportation System (STS) has proven successful in many applications, the truth remains that the space shuttle is not as reliable or economical as was once hoped. In fact, the Augustine Commission on the future of the U.S. Space Program has recommended that the space shuttle only be used on missions directly requiring human capabilities on-orbit and that the shuttle program should eventually be phased out. This poses a great dilemma since the shuttle provides the only current or planned U.S. means for human access to space at the same time that NASA is building toward a permanent manned presence. As a possible solution to this dilemma, it is proposed that the U.S. begin development of an Alternative Manned Spacecraft (AMS). This spacecraft would not only provide follow-on capability for maintaining human space flight, but would also provide redundancy and enhanced capability in the near future. Design requirements for the AMS studied include: (1) capability of launching on one of the current or planned U.S. expendable launch vehicles (baseline McDonnell Douglas Delta II model 7920 expendable booster); (2) application to a wide variety of missions including autonomous operations, space station support, and access to orbits and inclinations beyond those of the space shuttle; (3) low enough costing to fly regularly in augmentation of space shuttle capabilities; (4) production surge capabilities to replace the shuttle if events require it; (5) intact abort capability in all flight regimes since the planned launch vehicles are not man-rated; (6) technology cut-off date of 1990; and (7) initial operational capability in 1995. In addition, the design of the AMS would take advantage of scientific advances made in the 20 years since the space shuttle was first conceived. These advances are in such technologies as composite materials, propulsion systems, avionics, and hypersonics.

  5. Delta Advanced Reusable Transport (DART): An alternative manned spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewerenz, T.; Kosha, M.; Magazu, H.

    1991-01-01

    Although the current U.S. Space Transportation System (STS) has proven successful in many applications, the truth remains that the space shuttle is not as reliable or economical as was once hoped. In fact, the Augustine Commission on the future of the U.S. Space Program has recommended that the space shuttle only be used on missions directly requiring human capabilities on-orbit and that the shuttle program should eventually be phased out. This poses a great dilemma since the shuttle provides the only current or planned U.S. means for human access to space at the same time that NASA is building toward a permanent manned presence. As a possible solution to this dilemma, it is proposed that the U.S. begin development of an Alternative Manned Spacecraft (AMS). This spacecraft would not only provide follow-on capability for maintaining human space flight, but would also provide redundancy and enhanced capability in the near future. Design requirements for the AMS studied include: (1) capability of launching on one of the current or planned U.S. expendable launch vehicles (baseline McDonnell Douglas Delta II model 7920 expendable booster); (2) application to a wide variety of missions including autonomous operations, space station support, and access to orbits and inclinations beyond those of the space shuttle; (3) low enough costing to fly regularly in augmentation of space shuttle capabilities; (4) production surge capabilities to replace the shuttle if events require it; (5) intact abort capability in all flight regimes since the planned launch vehicles are not man-rated; (6) technology cut-off date of 1990; and (7) initial operational capability in 1995. In addition, the design of the AMS would take advantage of scientific advances made in the 20 years since the space shuttle was first conceived. These advances are in such technologies as composite materials, propulsion systems, avionics, and hypersonics.

  6. Transport advances in disposable bioreactors for liver tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Catapano, Gerardo; Patzer, John F; Gerlach, Jörg Christian

    2009-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a devastating diagnosis with an overall survival of approximately 60%. Liver transplantation is the therapy of choice for ALF patients but is limited by the scarce availability of donor organs. The prognosis of ALF patients may improve if essential liver functions are restored during liver failure by means of auxiliary methods because liver tissue has the capability to regenerate and heal. Bioartificial liver (BAL) approaches use liver tissue or cells to provide ALF patients with liver-specific metabolism and synthesis products necessary to relieve some of the symptoms and to promote liver tissue regeneration. The most promising BAL treatments are based on the culture of tissue engineered (TE) liver constructs, with mature liver cells or cells that may differentiate into hepatocytes to perform liver-specific functions, in disposable continuous-flow bioreactors. In fact, adult hepatocytes perform all essential liver functions. Clinical evaluations of the proposed BALs show that they are safe but have not clearly proven the efficacy of treatment as compared to standard supportive treatments. Ambiguous clinical results, the time loss of cellular activity during treatment, and the presence of a necrotic core in the cell compartment of many bioreactors suggest that improvement of transport of nutrients, and metabolic wastes and products to or from the cells in the bioreactor is critical for the development of therapeutically effective BALs. In this chapter, advanced strategies that have been proposed over to improve mass transport in the bioreactors at the core of a BAL for the treatment of ALF patients are reviewed.

  7. Transport Advances in Disposable Bioreactors for Liver Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catapano, Gerardo; Patzer, John F.; Gerlach, Jörg Christian

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a devastating diagnosis with an overall survival of approximately 60%. Liver transplantation is the therapy of choice for ALF patients but is limited by the scarce availability of donor organs. The prognosis of ALF patients may improve if essential liver functions are restored during liver failure by means of auxiliary methods because liver tissue has the capability to regenerate and heal. Bioartificial liver (BAL) approaches use liver tissue or cells to provide ALF patients with liver-specific metabolism and synthesis products necessary to relieve some of the symptoms and to promote liver tissue regeneration. The most promising BAL treatments are based on the culture of tissue engineered (TE) liver constructs, with mature liver cells or cells that may differentiate into hepatocytes to perform liver-specific functions, in disposable continuous-flow bioreactors. In fact, adult hepatocytes perform all essential liver functions. Clinical evaluations of the proposed BALs show that they are safe but have not clearly proven the efficacy of treatment as compared to standard supportive treatments. Ambiguous clinical results, the time loss of cellular activity during treatment, and the presence of a necrotic core in the cell compartment of many bioreactors suggest that improvement of transport of nutrients, and metabolic wastes and products to or from the cells in the bioreactor is critical for the development of therapeutically effective BALs. In this chapter, advanced strategies that have been proposed over to improve mass transport in the bioreactors at the core of a BAL for the treatment of ALF patients are reviewed.

  8. Studying Polymer Transport on Soft and Hard Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanat

    2007-03-01

    We have employed experiments and simulations to understand the factors controlling the transport of polymers on surfaces. From an experimental viewpoint we have focused on the transport of DNA (single stranded) on lipid bilayers. We show that this behavior is slaved to the mobility of the lipids. More surprisingly, it appears that the transport of molecules adsorbed on surfaces follows the same dependence on lipid mobility as for molecules incorporated into the lipid layer. The ability to control this surface diffusion through the introduction of posts or varying the strength of adsorption (by the use of an AC field normal to the surfaces) will also be studied. Theoretically we have used molecular dynamics simulations of a polymer chain of length N dissolved in explicit solvent and adsorbed as a pancake at the solid-liquid interface to discriminate between respective influences on surface diffusion of hydrodynamics and adsorption energetics. Only for analytically-smooth surfaces do we observe a strong influence of hydrodynamics; the polymer lateral diffusion constant, D, scales as D 1/N^3/4, more weakly than for implicit solvent. For atomistic surface corrugation with uniform surface chemical makeup, D 1/N instead. This suggests that while we can understand the results for diffusion on lipid surfaces, more recent experimental observations of stronger N dependence for diffusion on hard solid surfaces originate not in hydrodynamic interactions but in spatially patchy energetic interactions.

  9. Advances in Neutral Transport Modeling with DEGAS 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karney, C. F. F.; Stotler, D. P.; Braams, B. J.; Rognlien, T. D.; Rensink, M. E.; Kanzleiter, R. J.

    1997-11-01

    With the next major release of the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code(D. Stotler and C. Karney, Contrib. Plasma Phys.) 34, 392 (1994)., the user will have access to a flexible scoring capability; a standard set of neutral and background plasma scores will be included by default. A separate set of scoring arrays will be used for time-dependent coupling to fluid plasma codes. Implicit techniques are being investigated as a way to increase the time-step relative to the explicit approach(D. Reiter, Chr. May, D. Coster, and R. Schneider, J. Nucl. Mater.) 220-222, 987 (1995).. Satisfactory execution times will be achieved by running the coupled system on massively parallel computers. Handling of high neutral density regions will be improved via a hybrid fluid-Monte Carlo model of the neutral transport. The DG grid generation and surface data input facility is being adapted for use with DEGAS 2 to provide an easy way for the user to transform equilibrium data and CAD hardware files into DEGAS 2 geometry input.

  10. Multiecho scheme advances surface NMR for aquifer characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunewald, Elliot; Walsh, David

    2013-12-01

    nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is increasingly used as a method to noninvasively characterize aquifers. This technology follows a successful history of NMR logging, applied over decades to estimate hydrocarbon reservoir properties. In contrast to logging, however, surface methods have utilized relatively simple acquisition sequences, from which pore-scale properties may not be reliably and efficiently estimated. We demonstrate for the first time the capability of sophisticated multiecho measurements to rapidly record a surface NMR response that more directly reflects aquifer characteristics. Specifically, we develop an adaptation of the multipulse Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence, widely used in logging, to measure the T2 relaxation response in a single scan. We validate this approach in a field surface NMR data set and by direct comparison with an NMR log. Adoption of the CPMG marked a landmark advancement in the history of logging NMR; we have now realized this same advancement in the surface NMR method.

  11. Application of advanced technologies to small, short-haul transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coussens, T. G.; Tullis, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    The performance and economic benefits available by incorporation of advanced technologies into the small, short haul air transport were assessed. Low cost structure and advanced composite material, advanced turboprop engines and new propellers, advanced high lift systems and active controls; and alternate aircraft configurations with aft mounted engines were investigated. Improvements in fuel consumed and aircraft economics (acquisition cost and direct operating cost) are available by incorporating selected advanced technologies into the small, short haul aircraft.

  12. Conceptual Design of a Mars Surface Transportation System (MSTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Chad; Gomez, Alex; Muniz, Rick; Musson, Dave

    1999-01-01

    We have proposed a design for a Mars Surface Transportation System. The design will support multi-range and multi-purpose scientific/exploratory activities for extended periods. Several assumptions were made before developing a desiun: 1. This system is to be deployed early in a series of piloted landings on the planet surface. 2. A Mars surface base has already been established. 3. A transport system to and from Mars already exists. 4. The capacity to transport this proposed system exists within the current transport design. 5. Facilities exist at this base for the supply of fuel and other consumables. 6. Medical facilities are a component of the main base. 7. The surface conditions of Mars are known and are.accurate. It was decided that the transportation system design should support a crew of two for up to four weeks away from the primary base. In order to support multiple mission requirements, the system is modular and m multi-configurable, The main structural aspects of the design are: 1. An inflatable habitat module. 2. Independently powered and remotely controllable wheel trucks to allow multiple configurations and ease of system assembly. 3. Parabolic space trusses for hi-h structural stability with low overall system mass. In addition to these design aspects, new and existing concepts for control systems, power, radiation protection, and crew safety have been incorporated into the transportation system design.

  13. Advanced transportation system studies. Alternate propulsion subsystem concepts: Propulsion database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levack, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Transportation System Studies alternate propulsion subsystem concepts propulsion database interim report is presented. The objective of the database development task is to produce a propulsion database which is easy to use and modify while also being comprehensive in the level of detail available. The database is to be available on the Macintosh computer system. The task is to extend across all three years of the contract. Consequently, a significant fraction of the effort in this first year of the task was devoted to the development of the database structure to ensure a robust base for the following years' efforts. Nonetheless, significant point design propulsion system descriptions and parametric models were also produced. Each of the two propulsion databases, parametric propulsion database and propulsion system database, are described. The descriptions include a user's guide to each code, write-ups for models used, and sample output. The parametric database has models for LOX/H2 and LOX/RP liquid engines, solid rocket boosters using three different propellants, a hybrid rocket booster, and a NERVA derived nuclear thermal rocket engine.

  14. Nonlinear Surface Transport in the Thin Double-Layer Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Kevin; Bazant, Martin

    2006-03-01

    At high applied electric fields, ionic transport within the double layer plays a significant role in the overall response of electrokinetic systems. It is well-known that surface transport processes, including surface electromigration, surface diffusion and surface advection, may impact the strength of electrokinetic phenomena by affecting both the zeta-potential and the magnitude of the tangential electric field. Therefore, it is important to include these effects when formulating the effective boundary conditions for the equations that govern electrokinetic flow outside of the double layer. In this talk, we discuss the application of a general formulation of ``surface conservation laws'' for diffuse boundary layers to derive effective boundary conditions that capture the physics of electrokinetic surface transport. Previous analyses (e.g. Deryagin & Dukhin 1969) are only valid for weak applied fields and are based on a linearization of the concentration and potential about a reference solution, but our results are fully nonlinear and hold at large applied fields as long as the double layer is sufficiently thin. We compare our nonlinear surface transport theory with existing linear analogues and apply it to the canonical problem of induced-charge electro-osmosis around a metal sphere or cylinder in a strong DC field.

  15. Life Prediction of Fretting Fatigue with Advanced Surface Treatments (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    surfaces and not the fretting pads. The chosen coatings included DLC, Ni-B, Molybdenum, and Nitride. These 4 coatings, their application to the titanium ...Article Preprint 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE LIFE PREDICTION OF FRETTING FATIGUE WITH ADVANCED SURFACE...TREATMENTS (PREPRINT) 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER N/A 5d. PROJECT NUMBER M02R 5e. TASK NUMBER 30 6 . AUTHOR(S) Patrick J. Golden and Michael

  16. Advanced surface paneling method for subsonic and supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, L. L.; Johnson, F. T.; Ehlers, F. E.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical results illustrating the capabilities of an advanced aerodynamic surface paneling method are presented. The method is applicable to both subsonic and supersonic flow, as represented by linearized potential flow theory. The method is based on linearly varying sources and quadratically varying doublets which are distributed over flat or curved panels. These panels are applied to the true surface geometry of arbitrarily shaped three dimensional aerodynamic configurations.

  17. Mathematical Simulation of Sediment and Radionuclide Transport in Surface Waters

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    1981-04-01

    The study objective of "The Mathematical Simulation of Sediment and Radionuclide Transport in Surface Waters" is to synthesize and test radionuclide transport models capable of realistically assessing radionuclide transport in various types of surface water bodies by including the sediment-radionuclide interactions. These interactions include radionuclide adsorption by sediment; desorption from sediment into water; and transport, deposition, and resuspension of sorbed radionuclides controlled by the sediment movements. During FY-1979, the modification of sediment and contaminant (radionuclide) transport model, FETRA, was completed to make it applicable to coastal waters. The model is an unsteady, two-dimensional (longitudinal and lateral) model that consists of three submodels (for sediment, dissolved-contaminant, and particulate-contaminant transport), coupled to include the sediment-contaminant interactions. In estuaries, flow phenomena and consequent sediment and radionuclide migration are often three-dimensional in nature mainly because of nonuniform channel cross-sections, salinity intrusion, and lateral-flow circulation. Thus, an unsteady, three-dimensional radionuclide transport model for estuaries is also being synthesized by combining and modifying a PNL unsteady hydrothermal model and FETRA. These two radionuclide transport models for coastal waters and estuaries will be applied to actual sites to examine the validity of the codes.

  18. Development of tailorable advanced blanket insulation for advanced space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calamito, Dominic P.

    1987-01-01

    Two items of Tailorable Advanced Blanket Insulation (TABI) for Advanced Space Transportation Systems were produced. The first consisted of flat panels made from integrally woven, 3-D fluted core having parallel fabric faces and connecting ribs of Nicalon silicon carbide yarns. The triangular cross section of the flutes were filled with mandrels of processed Q-Fiber Felt. Forty panels were prepared with only minimal problems, mostly resulting from the unavailability of insulation with the proper density. Rigidizing the fluted fabric prior to inserting the insulation reduced the production time. The procedures for producing the fabric, insulation mandrels, and TABI panels are described. The second item was an effort to determine the feasibility of producing contoured TABI shapes from gores cut from flat, insulated fluted core panels. Two gores of integrally woven fluted core and single ply fabric (ICAS) were insulated and joined into a large spherical shape employing a tadpole insulator at the mating edges. The fluted core segment of each ICAS consisted of an Astroquartz face fabric and Nicalon face and rib fabrics, while the single ply fabric segment was Nicalon. Further development will be required. The success of fabricating this assembly indicates that this concept may be feasible for certain types of space insulation requirements. The procedures developed for weaving the ICAS, joining the gores, and coating certain areas of the fabrics are presented.

  19. Ambipolar surface state transport in nonmetallic stoichiometric Bi2Se3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syers, Paul; Paglione, Johnpierre

    2017-01-01

    Achieving true bulk insulating behavior in Bi2Se3 , the archetypal topological insulator with a simplistic one-band electronic structure and sizable band gap, has been prohibited by a well-known self-doping effect caused by selenium vacancies, whose extra electrons shift the chemical potential into the bulk conduction band. We report a synthesis method for achieving stoichiometric Bi2Se3 crystals that exhibit nonmetallic behavior in electrical transport down to low temperatures. Hall-effect measurements indicate the presence of both electron- and holelike carriers, with the latter identified with surface state conduction and the achievement of ambipolar transport in bulk Bi2Se3 crystals without gating techniques. With carrier mobilities surpassing the highest values yet reported for topological surface states in this material, the achievement of ambipolar transport via upward band bending is found to provide a key method to advancing the potential of this material for future study and applications.

  20. Surface-Dominated Transport on a Bulk Topological Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Philip; Barreto, Lucas; Kühnemund, Lisa; Edler, Frederik; Tegenkamp, Christoph; Mi, Jianli; Bremholm, Martin; Brummerstedt Iversen, Bo; Frydendahl, Christian; Bianchi, Marco

    2014-03-01

    Topological insulators are guaranteed to support metallic surface states on an insulating bulk, and one should thus expect that the electronic transport in these materials is dominated by the surfaces states. Alas, due to the high remaining bulk conductivity, surface contributions to transport have so-far only been singled out indirectly via quantum oscillation, or for devices based on gated and doped topological insulator thin films, a situation in which the surface carrier mobility could be limited by defect and interface scattering. Here we present a direct measurement of surface-dominated conduction on an atomically clean surface of Bi2Te2Se. Using nano-scale four point setups with variable contact distance, we show that the transport at 30 K is two-dimensional rather than three-dimensional and by combining these measurements with angle-resolved photoemission results from the same crystals, we find a surface state mobility of 390(30) cm2V-1s-1 at 30 K at a carrier concentration of 8.71(7) ×1012 cm-2.

  1. Energy Conversion Advanced Heat Transport Loop and Power Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, C. H.

    2006-08-01

    The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. Many aspects of the NGNP must be researched and developed in order to make recommendations on the final design of the plant. Parameters such as working conditions, cycle components, working fluids, and power conversion unit configurations must be understood. Three configurations of the power conversion unit were demonstrated in this study. A three-shaft design with 3 turbines and 4 compressors, a combined cycle with a Brayton top cycle and a Rankine bottoming cycle, and a reheated cycle with 3 stages of reheat were investigated. An intermediate heat transport loop for transporting process heat to a High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HTSE) hydrogen production plant was used. Helium, CO2, and an 80% nitrogen, 20% helium mixture (by weight) were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms cycle efficiency and development cost. In each of these configurations the relative component size were estimated for the different working fluids. The relative size of the turbomachinery was measured by comparing the power input/output of the component. For heat exchangers the volume was computed and compared. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the three-shaft and combined cycles were performed to determine the effect of varying conditions in the cycle. This gives some insight into the sensitivity of these cycles to various

  2. Advanced transportation system study: Manned launch vehicle concepts for two way transportation system payloads to LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Advanced Transportation System Study (ATSS) task area 1 study effort is to examine manned launch vehicle booster concepts and two-way cargo transfer and return vehicle concepts to determine which of the many proposed concepts best meets NASA's needs for two-way transportation to low earth orbit. The study identified specific configurations of the normally unmanned, expendable launch vehicles (such as the National Launch System family) necessary to fly manned payloads. These launch vehicle configurations were then analyzed to determine the integrated booster/spacecraft performance, operations, reliability, and cost characteristics for the payload delivery and return mission. Design impacts to the expendable launch vehicles which would be required to perform the manned payload delivery mission were also identified. These impacts included the implications of applying NASA's man-rating requirements, as well as any mission or payload unique impacts. The booster concepts evaluated included the National Launch System (NLS) family of expendable vehicles and several variations of the NLS reference configurations to deliver larger manned payload concepts (such as the crew logistics vehicle (CLV) proposed by NASA JSC). Advanced, clean sheet concepts such as an F-1A engine derived liquid rocket booster (LRB), the single stage to orbit rocket, and a NASP-derived aerospace plane were also included in the study effort. Existing expendable launch vehicles such as the Titan 4, Ariane 5, Energia, and Proton were also examined. Although several manned payload concepts were considered in the analyses, the reference manned payload was the NASA Langley Research Center's HL-20 version of the personnel launch system (PLS). A scaled up version of the PLS for combined crew/cargo delivery capability, the HL-42 configuration, was also included in the analyses of cargo transfer and return vehicle (CTRV) booster concepts. In addition to strictly manned payloads, two-way cargo

  3. Advanced transportation system study: Manned launch vehicle concepts for two way transportation system payloads to LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, James B.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the Advanced Transportation System Study (ATSS) task area 1 study effort is to examine manned launch vehicle booster concepts and two-way cargo transfer and return vehicle concepts to determine which of the many proposed concepts best meets NASA's needs for two-way transportation to low earth orbit. The study identified specific configurations of the normally unmanned, expendable launch vehicles (such as the National Launch System family) necessary to fly manned payloads. These launch vehicle configurations were then analyzed to determine the integrated booster/spacecraft performance, operations, reliability, and cost characteristics for the payload delivery and return mission. Design impacts to the expendable launch vehicles which would be required to perform the manned payload delivery mission were also identified. These impacts included the implications of applying NASA's man-rating requirements, as well as any mission or payload unique impacts. The booster concepts evaluated included the National Launch System (NLS) family of expendable vehicles and several variations of the NLS reference configurations to deliver larger manned payload concepts (such as the crew logistics vehicle (CLV) proposed by NASA JSC). Advanced, clean sheet concepts such as an F-1A engine derived liquid rocket booster (LRB), the single stage to orbit rocket, and a NASP-derived aerospace plane were also included in the study effort. Existing expendable launch vehicles such as the Titan 4, Ariane 5, Energia, and Proton were also examined. Although several manned payload concepts were considered in the analyses, the reference manned payload was the NASA Langley Research Center's HL-20 version of the personnel launch system (PLS). A scaled up version of the PLS for combined crew/cargo delivery capability, the HL-42 configuration, was also included in the analyses of cargo transfer and return vehicle (CTRV) booster concepts. In addition to strictly manned payloads, two-way cargo

  4. Water transport mechanism through open capillaries analyzed by direct surface modifications on biological surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hirai, Yuji; Yabu, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Tsujii, Kaoru; Shimozawa, Tateo; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2013-10-01

    Some small animals only use water transport mechanisms passively driven by surface energies. However, little is known about passive water transport mechanisms because it is difficult to measure the wettability of microstructures in small areas and determine the chemistry of biological surfaces. Herein, we developed to directly analyse the structural effects of wettability of chemically modified biological surfaces by using a nanoliter volume water droplet and a hi-speed video system. The wharf roach Ligia exotica transports water only by using open capillaries in its legs containing hair- and paddle-like microstructures. The structural effects of legs chemically modified with a self-assembled monolayer were analysed, so that the wharf roach has a smart water transport system passively driven by differences of wettability between the microstructures. We anticipate that this passive water transport mechanism may inspire novel biomimetic fluid manipulations with or without a gravitational field.

  5. Water transport mechanism through open capillaries analyzed by direct surface modifications on biological surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hirai, Yuji; Yabu, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Tsujii, Kaoru; Shimozawa, Tateo; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2013-10-23

    Some small animals only use water transport mechanisms passively driven by surface energies. However, little is known about passive water transport mechanisms because it is difficult to measure the wettability of microstructures in small areas and determine the chemistry of biological surfaces. Herein, we developed to directly analyse the structural effects of wettability of chemically modified biological surfaces by using a nanoliter volume water droplet and a hi-speed video system. The wharf roach Ligia exotica transports water only by using open capillaries in its legs containing hair- and paddle-like microstructures. The structural effects of legs chemically modified with a self-assembled monolayer were analysed, so that the wharf roach has a smart water transport system passively driven by differences of wettability between the microstructures. We anticipate that this passive water transport mechanism may inspire novel biomimetic fluid manipulations with or without a gravitational field.

  6. STM tip-mediated mass transport on Cu surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. S. N.; Huang, R. Z.; Gao, T. F.; Zhang, R. J.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-02-01

    Atomic-scale simulations are performed to study atomic motion on Cu surfaces to illustrate the effect of the scanning tunneling microscopy tip on mass transport (MT) in the surfaces and on top of the Co island in heteroepitaxial Co/Cu(0 0 1) and Co/Cu(1 1 1) systems. First we investigate tip-induced atomic motion of Co atoms embedded in the Cu(0 0 1) surface at zero bias voltage. With the help of the tip, the Co atom in the surface can freely diffuse toward its nearby vacancy site. So-called vacancy mechanism is used to interpret this phenomenon. Then tip-mediated atomic motion of Co adatoms on the Co islands supported by a Cu(1 1 1) surface is studied. It is revealed that the tip has a significant effect on the diffusion of adatoms on the islands and interlayer mass transport at the island edge. Interlayer mass transport at the island edge is found to depend strongly on the tip height and the lateral distance from the tip. By calculating the diffusion barriers, it is found that the jumping diffusion barrier on the island can be zero by the tip vertical manipulation while the Ehrlich-Schwoebel diffusion barrier at the island edge can be reduced by the tip lateral manipulation. Thus, the quality of thin films can be improved by controlling MT in and/or on the surface.

  7. Directional transport of impinging capillary jet on wettability engineered surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aritra; Chatterjee, Souvick; Sinha Mahapatra, Pallab; Ganguly, Ranjan; Megaridis, Constantine

    2015-11-01

    Impingement of capillary jet on a surface is important for applications like heat transfer, or for liquid manipulation in bio-microfluidic devices. Using wettability engineered surfaces, we demonstrate pump-less and directional transport of capillary jet on a flat surface. Spatial contrast of surface energy and a wedge-shape geometry of the wettability confined track on the substrate facilitate formation of instantaneous spherical bulges upon jet impingement; these bulges are further transported along the superhydrophilic tracks due to Laplace pressure gradient. Critical condition warranted for formation of liquid bulge along the varying width of the superhydrophilic track is calculated analytically and verified experimentally. The work throws light on novel fluid phenomena of unidirectional jet impingement on wettability confined surfaces and provides a platform for innovative liquid manipulation technique for further application. By varying the geometry and wettability contrast on the surface, one can achieve volume flow rates of ~ O(100 μL/sec) and directionally guided transport of the jet liquid, pumplessly at speeds of ~ O(10cm/sec).

  8. Excess surface area in bioelectrochemical systems causes ion transport limitations

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Timothy D.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Davenport, Emily K.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    We investigated ion transport limitations on 3D graphite felt electrodes by growing Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms with advection to eliminate external mass transfer limitations. We characterized ion transport limitations by: 1) showing that serially increasing NaCl concentration up to 200 mM increased current linearly up to a total of +273% vs. 0 mM NaCl under advective conditions, 2) growing the biofilm with a starting concentration of 200 mM NaCl, which led to a maximum current increase of 400% vs. current generation without NaCl, and 3) showing that un-colonized surface area remained even after steady-state current was reached. After accounting for iR effects, we confirmed that the excess surface area existed despite a non-zero overpotential at the electrode surface. The fact that the biofilm was constrained from colonizing and producing further current under these conditions confirmed the biofilms under study here were ion transport-limited. Our work demonstrates that the use of high surface area electrodes may not increase current density when the system design allows ion transport limitations to become dominant. PMID:25421463

  9. Advanced public transportation systems deployment in the United States: Update, January 1999. Final report, July--December 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, R.F.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents work performed under FTA`s Advanced Public Transportation Systems (APTS) Program, a program structured to undertake research and development of innovative applications of advanced navigation, information, and communication technologies that most benefit public transportation.

  10. Strong Surface Orientation Dependent Thermal Transport in Si Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanguang; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectrics, which convert waste heat to electricity, offer an attractive pathway for addressing an important niche in the globally growing landscape of energy demand. Research to date has focused on reducing the thermal conductivity relative to the bulk. Si nanowires (NWs) have received exceptional attention due to their low-dimensionality, abundance of availability, and high carrier mobility. From thermal transport point of view, the thermal conductivity of Si NWs strongly depends on the detailed surface structure, such as roughness and surface orientation. Here, direct molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical models are used to investigate the thermal transport in Si NWs with diverse surface orientations. Our results show that the thermal conductivity of Si NWs with different surface orientation can differ by as large as 2.7~4.2 times, which suggests a new route to boost the thermoelectric performance. Using the full spectrum theory, we find that the surface orientation, which alters the distribution of atoms on the surface and determines the degree of phonon coupling between the core and the surface, is the dominant mechanism. Furthermore, using spectral thermal conductivity, the remarkable difference in the thermal conductivity for different surface orientation is found to only stem from the phonons in the medium frequency range, with minor contribution from low and high frequency phonons. PMID:27113556

  11. Strong Surface Orientation Dependent Thermal Transport in Si Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanguang; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-04-01

    Thermoelectrics, which convert waste heat to electricity, offer an attractive pathway for addressing an important niche in the globally growing landscape of energy demand. Research to date has focused on reducing the thermal conductivity relative to the bulk. Si nanowires (NWs) have received exceptional attention due to their low-dimensionality, abundance of availability, and high carrier mobility. From thermal transport point of view, the thermal conductivity of Si NWs strongly depends on the detailed surface structure, such as roughness and surface orientation. Here, direct molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical models are used to investigate the thermal transport in Si NWs with diverse surface orientations. Our results show that the thermal conductivity of Si NWs with different surface orientation can differ by as large as 2.7~4.2 times, which suggests a new route to boost the thermoelectric performance. Using the full spectrum theory, we find that the surface orientation, which alters the distribution of atoms on the surface and determines the degree of phonon coupling between the core and the surface, is the dominant mechanism. Furthermore, using spectral thermal conductivity, the remarkable difference in the thermal conductivity for different surface orientation is found to only stem from the phonons in the medium frequency range, with minor contribution from low and high frequency phonons.

  12. Applications of asymmetric nanotextured parylene surface using its wetting and transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekeroglu, Koray

    In this thesis, basic digital fluidics devices were introduced using polymeric nanorods (nano-PPX) inspired from nature. Natural inspiration ignited this research by observing butterfly wings, water strider legs, rye grass leaves, and their asymmetric functions. Nano-PPX rods, manufactured by an oblique angle polymerization (OAP) method, are asymmetrically aligned structures that have unidirectional wetting properties. Nano-PPX demonstrates similar functions to the directional textured surfaces of animals and plants in terms of wetting, adhesion, and transport. The water pin-release mechanism on the asymmetric nano-PPX surface with adhesion function provides a great transport property. How the asymmetry causes transport is discussed in terms of hysteresis and interface contact of water droplets. In this study, the transport property of nano-PPX rods is used to guide droplets as well as transporting cargo such as microgels. With the addition of tracks on the nano-PPX rods, the surfaces were transformed into basic digital fluidics devices. The track-assisted nano-PPX has been employed to applications (i.e. sorting, mixing, and carrying cargo particles). Thus, digital fluidics devices fabricated on nano-PPX surface is a promising pathway to assemble microgels in the field of bioengineering. The characterization of the nano textured surface was completed using methods such as Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, Contact Angle Goniometry, and Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy. These methods helped to understand the physical and chemical properties of nano-PPX. Parameters such as advancing and receding contact angles, nanorod tilt angle, and critical drop volumes were utilized to investigate the anisotropic wetting properties of nano-PPX surface. This investigation explained the directional wetting behavior of the surface as well as approaching new design parameters for adjusting surface properties. The nanorod tilt angle was a key parameter

  13. Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gray, R.; Streeter, R.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Chiarlli, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Perez, L.; Venkatadri, R.

    1992-01-01

    This final report presents the research work carried out on the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC). The project was to support the engineering development of the selective agglomeration technology in order to reduce the sulfur content of US coals for controlling SO[sub 2] emissions (i.e., acid rain precursors). The overall effort was a part of the DOE/PETCs Acid Rain Control Initiative (ARCI). The overall objective of the project is to develop techniques for coal surface control prior to the advanced physical fine coal cleaning process of selective agglomeration in order to achieve 85% pyrite sulfur rejection at an energy recovery greater than 85% based on run-of-mine coal. The surface control is meant to encompass surface modification during grinding and laboratory beneficiation testing. The project includes the following tasks: Project planning; methods for analysis of samples; development of standard beneficiation test; grinding studies; modification of particle surface; and exploratory R D and support. The coal samples used in this project include three base coals, Upper Freeport - Indiana County, PA, Pittsburgh NO. 8 - Belmont County, OH, and Illinois No. 6 - Randolph County, IL, and three additional coals, Upper Freeport - Grant County- WV, Kentucky No. 9 Hopkins County, KY, and Wyodak - Campbell County, WY. A total of 149 drums of coal were received.

  14. Human factors of advanced technology (glass cockpit) transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L.

    1989-01-01

    A three-year study of airline crews at two U.S. airlines who were flying an advanced technology aircraft, the Boeing 757 is discussed. The opinions and experiences of these pilots as they view the advanced, automated features of this aircraft, and contrast them with previous models they have flown are discussed. Training for advanced automation; (2) cockpit errors and error reduction; (3) management of cockpit workload; and (4) general attitudes toward cockpit automation are emphasized. The limitations of the air traffic control (ATC) system on the ability to utilize the advanced features of the new aircraft are discussed. In general the pilots are enthusiastic about flying an advanced technology aircraft, but they express mixed feelings about the impact of automation on workload, crew errors, and ability to manage the flight.

  15. Solute transport across the articular surface of injured cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chin, Hooi Chuan; Moeini, Mohammad; Quinn, Thomas M

    2013-07-15

    Solute transport through extracellular matrix (ECM) is important to physiology and contrast agent-based clinical imaging of articular cartilage. Mechanical injury is likely to have important effects on solute transport since it involves alteration of ECM structure. Therefore it is of interest to characterize effects of mechanical injury on solute transport in cartilage. Using cartilage explants injured by an established mechanical compression protocol, effective partition coefficients and diffusivities of solutes for transport across the articular surface were measured. A range of fluorescent solutes (fluorescein isothiocyanate, 4 and 40kDa dextrans, insulin, and chondroitin sulfate) and an X-ray contrast agent (sodium iodide) were used. Mechanical injury was associated with a significant increase in effective diffusivity versus uninjured explants for all solutes studied. On the other hand, mechanical injury had no effects on effective partition coefficients for most solutes tested, except for 40kDa dextran and chondroitin sulfate where small but significant changes in effective partition coefficient were observed in injured explants. Findings highlight enhanced diffusive transport across the articular surface of injured cartilage, which may have important implications for injury and repair situations. Results also support development of non-equilibrium methods for identification of focal cartilage lesions by contrast agent-based clinical imaging.

  16. Excess Surface Area in Bioelectrochemical Systems Causes ion Transport Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Timothy D.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Davenport, Emily K.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-05-01

    We investigated ion transport limitations on 3D graphite felt electrodes by growing Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms with advection to eliminate external mass transfer limitations. We characterized ion transport limitations by: (i) showing that serially increasing NaCl concentration up to 200mM increased current linearly up to a total of þ273% vs. 0mM NaCl under advective conditions; (ii) growing the biofilm with a starting concentration of 200mM NaCl, which led to a maximum current increase of 400% vs. current generation without NaCl, and (iii) showing that un-colonized surface area remained even after steadystate current was reached. After accounting for iR effects, we confirmed that the excess surface area existed despite a non-zero overpotential. The fact that the biofilm was constrained from colonizing and producing further current under these conditions confirmed the biofilms under study here were ion transport-limited. Our work demonstrates that the use of high surface area electrodes may not increase current density when the system design allows ion transport limitations to become dominant.

  17. Excess surface area in bioelectrochemical systems causes ion transport limitations.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Timothy D; Babauta, Jerome T; Davenport, Emily K; Renslow, Ryan S; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-05-01

    We investigated ion transport limitations on 3D graphite felt electrodes by growing Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms with advection to eliminate external mass transfer limitations. We characterized ion transport limitations by: (i) showing that serially increasing NaCl concentration up to 200 mM increased current linearly up to a total of +273% vs. 0 mM NaCl under advective conditions; (ii) growing the biofilm with a starting concentration of 200 mM NaCl, which led to a maximum current increase of 400% vs. current generation without NaCl, and (iii) showing that un-colonized surface area remained even after steady-state current was reached. After accounting for iR effects, we confirmed that the excess surface area existed despite a non-zero overpotential. The fact that the biofilm was constrained from colonizing and producing further current under these conditions confirmed the biofilms under study here were ion transport-limited. Our work demonstrates that the use of high surface area electrodes may not increase current density when the system design allows ion transport limitations to become dominant.

  18. Rhamnolipid surface thermodynamic properties and transport in agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Renfro, Tyler Dillard; Xie, Weijie; Yang, Guang; Chen, Gang

    2014-03-01

    Rhamnolipid is a biosurfactant produced by several Pseudomonas species, which can wet hydrophobic soils by lowering the cohesive and/or adhesive surface tension. Because of its biodegradability, rhamnolipid applications bring minimal adverse impact on the soil and groundwater as compared with that of chemical wetting agents. Subsequently, rhamnolipid applications have more advantages when used to improve irrigation in the agricultural soil, especially under draught conditions. In the presence of rhamnolipid, water surface tension dropped linearly with the increase of rhamnolipid concentration until the rhamnolipid critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 30 mg/L was reached. Below the CMC, rhamnolipid had linear adsorption isotherms on the soil with a partition coefficient of 0.126 L/kg. Rhamnolipid transport breakthrough curves had a broad and diffuse infiltration front, indicating retention of rhamnolipid on the soil increased with time. Rhamnolipid transport was found to be well represented by the advection-dispersion equation based on a local equilibrium assumption. When applied at concentrations above the CMC, the formed rhamnolipid micelles prevented rhamnolipid adsorption (both equilibrium adsorption and kinetic adsorption) in the soil. It was discovered in this research that rhamnolipid surface thermodynamic properties played the key role in controlling rhamnolipid transport. The attractive forces between rhamnolipid molecules contributed to micelle formation and facilitated rhamnolipid transport.

  19. Applicability of the control configured design approach to advanced earth orbital transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, A. K.; Zeck, H.; Walker, W. H.; Shafer, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    The applicability of the control configured design approach (CCV) to advanced earth orbital transportation systems was studied. The baseline system investigated was fully reusable vertical take-off/horizontal landing single-stage-to-orbit vehicle and had mission requirements similar to the space shuttle orbiter. Technical analyses were made to determine aerodynamic, flight control and subsystem design characteristics. Figures of merit were assessed on vehicle dry weight and orbital payload. The results indicated that the major parameters for CCV designs are hypersonic trim, aft center of gravity, and control surface heating. Optimized CCV designs can be controllable and provide substantial payload gains over conventional non-CCV design vertical take-off vehicles.

  20. Advanced transportation system study: Manned launch vehicle concepts for two way transportation system payloads to LEO. Program cost estimates document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, James B.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes Rockwell International's cost analysis results of manned launch vehicle concepts for two way transportation system payloads to low earth orbit during the basic and option 1 period of performance for contract NAS8-39207, advanced transportation system studies. Vehicles analyzed include the space shuttle, personnel launch system (PLS) with advanced launch system (ALS) and national launch system (NLS) boosters, foreign launch vehicles, NLS-2 derived launch vehicles, liquid rocket booster (LRB) derived launch vehicle, and cargo transfer and return vehicle (CTRV).

  1. Summary of the FY 2005 Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) research program annual review

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2005-08-01

    This document presents a summary of the evaluation and comments provided by the review panel for the FY 2005 Department of Energy (DOE) Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) program annual review.

  2. Development and Analysis of Advanced High-Temperature Technology for Nuclear Heat Transport and Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Per F. Peterson

    2010-03-01

    This project by the Thermal Hydraulics Research Laboratory at U.C. Berkeley Studied advanced high-temperature heat transport and power conversion technology, in support of the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative and Generation IV.

  3. Hazard alerting and situational awareness in advanced air transport cockpits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John; Wanke, Craig; Kuchar, James; Mykityshyn, Mark; Hahn, Edward; Midkiff, Alan

    1993-01-01

    Advances in avionics and display technology have significantly changed the cockpit environment in current 'glass cockpit' aircraft. Recent developments in display technology, on-board processing, data storage, and datalinked communications are likely to further alter the environment in second and third generation 'glass cockpit' aircraft. The interaction of advanced cockpit technology with human cognitive performance has been a major area of activity within the MIT Aeronautical Systems Laboratory. This paper presents an overview of the MIT Advanced Cockpit Simulation Facility. Several recent research projects are briefly reviewed and the most important results are summarized.

  4. Study of the application of advanced technologies to long range transport aircraft. Volume 2: Advanced technology program recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The benefits of the application of advanced technology to future transport aircraft were investigated. The noise reduction goals established by the CARD (Civil Aviation Research and Development) study for the 1981-1985 time period can be satisfied. Reduced terminal area and airway congestion can result from use of advanced on-board systems and operating procedures. The use of advanced structural design concepts can result in greatly reduced gross weight and improved operating economics. The full potential of these benefits can be realized in a 1985 airplane by implementing a research and development program that is funded to an average level of approximately $55 million per year over a ten year period.

  5. Free-surface turbulent flow and contaminants transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.S.Y.

    1994-12-31

    The requirement of maintaining the environmental quality and ecological balance of the surface water systems at the acceptable level both now and in the future has accelerated the development and refinement of a cost-effective engineering analysis and design tool--Computational Modeling. This paper presents the progress of an on-going study to develop and refine computational models to simulate the free-surface turbulent flows and contaminants transport phenomena. New developments include: the efficient Element Method, which adopts the advantages of both Finite Element and Finite Difference; the most effective up-winding and/or characteristic-path integration; the prescribed solution forcing to conduct modeling verification studies of this correctness and capabilities in prediction of nonlinear effects; among others. The newly refined computational models have been applied to simulate unsteady, three-dimensional, turbulent, free-surface flows and pollutant transport in lakes, reservoirs, streams, rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters with natural (highly-irregular) geometric configurations. They have been verified in some cases to be able to predict basic physical characteristics of the free surface flows including boundary layer separations and re-attachments, wake flow and vortex shedding, corner separation and re-circulation, etc. They are also capable of simulating the transport of solute substances, solid particles and heat energy in these waters. Results can be displayed in stationary (snapshots) color graphics and in animation (motion pictures) recorded on video cassettes.

  6. Aeolian sediment transport on a beach: Surface moisture, wind fetch, and mean transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, B. O.; Davidson-Arnott, R. G. D.; Hesp, P. A.; Namikas, S. L.; Ollerhead, J.; Walker, I. J.

    2009-04-01

    Temporal and spatial changes in wind speed, wind direction, and moisture content are ubiquitous across sandy coastal beaches. Often these factors interact in unknown ways to create complexity that confounds our ability to model sediment transport at any point across the beach as well as our capacity to predict sediment delivery into the adjacent foredunes. This study was designed to measure wind flow and sediment transport over a beach and foredune at Greenwich Dunes, Prince Edward Island National Park, with the express purpose of addressing these complex interactions. Detailed measurements are reported for one stormy day, October 11, 2004, during which meteorological conditions were highly variable. Wind speed ranged from 4 ms - 1 to over 20 ms - 1 , wind direction was highly oblique varying between 60° and 85° from shore perpendicular, and moisture content of the sand surface ranged from a minimum of about 3% (by mass) to complete saturation depending on precipitation, tidal excursion, and storm surge that progressively inundated the beach. The data indicate that short-term variations (i.e., minutes to hours) in sediment transport across this beach arise predominantly because of short-term changes in wind speed, as is expected, but also because of variations in wind direction, precipitation intensity, and tide level. Even slight increases in wind speed are capable of driving more intense saltation events, but this relationship is mediated by other factors on this characteristically narrow beach. As the angle of wind approach becomes more oblique, the fetch distance increases and allows greater opportunity for the saltation system to evolve toward an equilibrium transport state before reaching the foredunes. Whether the theoretically-predicted maximum rate of transport is ever achieved depends on the character of the sand surface (e.g., grain size, slope, roughness, vegetation, moisture content) and on various attributes of the wind field (e.g., average wind

  7. Robust surface state transport in thin bismuth nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Wei; Kong, Fengyu; Han, Yuyan; Du, Haifeng; Yang, Jiyong; Tian, Mingliang; Zhang, Yuheng

    2014-01-01

    While a two-dimensional (2D) metallic surface state in bismuth has been proposed, experimental 2D evidence of quantum transport, e.g., angular dependent Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations is still lacking. Here, we report the angular-dependent magnetoresistance measurements in single-crystal Bi nanoribbons, and found that both the low-field weak antilocalization behavior and the high-field angle-dependent SdH oscillations follow exactly the 2D character, indicative of the 2D metallic surface states which dominate the transport properties of thin Bi nanoribbons. Moreover, by controllable exposing the ribbons to ambient environment (1 atm and room temperature), the metallic surface states were found to be robust to the oxidation although the carrier density in the surface states are modified after the exposures. These results suggest that the metallic surface states in Bi nanoribbons should be topologically protected which can provide key information in understanding the surface properties of Bi in nanometer scale. PMID:25404036

  8. Summary status of advanced water electrolysis and hydrogen storage/transport R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzina, A.

    1984-04-01

    Major projects within the framework of the U.S. DOE Chemical/Hydrogen Energy Systems Program are described. Goals, accomplishments and status of investigations into advanced water electrolysis and hydrogen storage/transport are summarized. Electrolytic hydrogen production systems include: SPE electrolyzers; static feed water electrolysis; high temperature electrolysis; and other advanced concepts. Hydrogen transport studies have emphasized the characterization of hydrogen embrittlement effects on conventional natural gas pipeline steels.

  9. WAATS: A computer program for Weights Analysis of Advanced Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, C. R.

    1974-01-01

    A historical weight estimating technique for advanced transportation systems is presented. The classical approach to weight estimation is discussed and sufficient data is presented to estimate weights for a large spectrum of flight vehicles including horizontal and vertical takeoff aircraft, boosters and reentry vehicles. A computer program, WAATS (Weights Analysis for Advanced Transportation Systems) embracing the techniques discussed has been written and user instructions are presented. The program was developed for use in the ODIN (Optimal Design Integration System) system.

  10. Advances in Space Transportation Technology Toward the NASA Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyles, Garry M.

    2000-01-01

    disassembly and inspections required for the Space Shuttle's subsystems, the next generation vehicle's on-board health monitoring systems will could tell the ground crews which systems need replacement before landing. In twenty-five years, vehicles will be re-flown within one with crews numbering less than one hundred. Fully automated ground processing systems must require only a handful of personnel to launch the vehicle. Due to the increased intelligence of on-board systems, only cursory walk-around inspections would be required between flights An assessment of the progress in breakthrough technologies toward these goals by the NASA Advanced Space Transportation Program is presented. These breakthrough technologies include combined rocket and air breathing propulsion, high strength lightweight structures, high temperature materials, vehicle health management, and flight operations.

  11. How SmartWay Advances Sustainable Transportation Supply Chains

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides information on how the SmartWay program has achieved reductions in freight transportation-related greenhouse gas emissions and how it will continue to do so with its Vision 2020 strategies.

  12. Advances in cell surface glycoengineering reveal biological function.

    PubMed

    Nischan, Nicole; Kohler, Jennifer J

    2016-08-01

    Cell surface glycans are critical mediators of cell-cell, cell-ligand, and cell-pathogen interactions. By controlling the set of glycans displayed on the surface of a cell, it is possible to gain insight into the biological functions of glycans. Moreover, control of glycan expression can be used to direct cellular behavior. While genetic approaches to manipulate glycosyltransferase gene expression are available, their utility in glycan engineering has limitations due to the combinatorial nature of glycan biosynthesis and the functional redundancy of glycosyltransferase genes. Biochemical and chemical strategies offer valuable complements to these genetic approaches, notably by enabling introduction of unnatural functionalities, such as fluorophores, into cell surface glycans. Here, we describe some of the most recent developments in glycoengineering of cell surfaces, with an emphasis on strategies that employ novel chemical reagents. We highlight key examples of how these advances in cell surface glycan engineering enable study of cell surface glycans and their function. Exciting new technologies include synthetic lipid-glycans, new chemical reporters for metabolic oligosaccharide engineering to allow tandem and in vivo labeling of glycans, improved chemical and enzymatic methods for glycoproteomics, and metabolic glycosyltransferase inhibitors. Many chemical and biochemical reagents for glycan engineering are commercially available, facilitating their adoption by the biological community.

  13. Technology requirements for advanced earth orbital transportation systems. Volume 2: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, A. K.; Bangsund, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    The results of efforts to identify the technology requirements for advanced earth orbital transportation systems are reported. Topics discussed include: (1) design and definition of performance potential of vehicle systems, (2) advanced technology assessment, and (3) extended performance. It is concluded that the horizontal take-off concept is the most feasible system considered.

  14. Assessment of the application of advanced technologies to subsonic CTOL transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graef, J. D.; Sallee, G. P.; Verges, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Design studies of the application of advanced technologies to future transport aircraft were conducted. These studies were reviewed from the perspective of an air carrier. A fundamental study of the elements of airplane operating cost was performed, and the advanced technologies were ranked in order of potential profit impact. Recommendations for future study areas are given.

  15. Graphite/Polyimide Composites. [conference on Composites for Advanced Space Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. B. (Editor); Davis, J. G., Jr. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Technology developed under the Composites for Advanced Space Transportation System Project is reported. Specific topics covered include fabrication, adhesives, test methods, structural integrity, design and analysis, advanced technology developments, high temperature polymer research, and the state of the art of graphite/polyimide composites.

  16. Transport effects on the kinetics of protein-surface binding.

    PubMed Central

    Balgi, G; Leckband, D E; Nitsche, J M

    1995-01-01

    A detailed model is presented for protein binding to active surfaces, with application to the binding of avidin molecules to a biotin-functionalized fiber optic sensor in experiments reported by S. Zhao and W. M. Reichert (American Chemical Society Symposium Series 493, 1992). Kinetic data for binding in solution are used to assign an intrinsic catalytic rate coefficient k to the biotin-avidin pair, deconvoluted from transport and electrostatic factors via application of coagulation theory. This intrinsic chemical constant is built into a reaction-diffusion analysis of surface binding where activity is restricted to localized sites (representing immobilized biotin molecules). The analysis leads to an effective catalytic rate coefficient keff characterizing the active surface. Thereafter, solution of the transport problem describing absorption of avidin molecules by the macroscopic sensor surface leads to predictions of the avidin flux, which are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. The analysis suggests the following conclusions. 1) Translational diffusion limitations are negligible for avidin-biotin binding in solution owing to the small (kinetically limiting) value k = 0.00045 m/s. 2) The sparse distribution of biotin molecules and the presence of a repulsive hydration force produce an effective surface-average catalytic rate coefficient keff of order 10(-7) m/s, much smaller than k. 3) Avidin binding to the fiber optic sensor occurs in an intermediate regime where the rate is influenced by both kinetics and diffusion. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 PMID:7647232

  17. An airline study of advanced technology requirements for advanced high speed commercial transport engines. 1: Engine design study assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sallee, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    The advanced technology requirements for an advanced high speed commercial tranport engine are presented. The results of the phase 1 study effort cover the following areas: (1) statement of an airline's major objectives for future transport engines, (2) airline's method of evaluating engine proposals, (3) description of an optimum engine for a long range subsonic commercial transport including installation and critical design features, (4) discussion of engine performance problems and experience with performance degradation, (5) trends in engine and pod prices with increasing technology and objectives for the future, (6) discussion of the research objectives for composites, reversers, advanced components, engine control systems, and devices to reduce the impact of engine stall, and (7) discussion of the airline objectives for noise and pollution reduction.

  18. Surface Diffusion Effect on Gas Transport in Nanoporous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Takuma; Yoshimoto, Yuta; Takagi, Shu; Kinefuchi, Ikuya

    2016-11-01

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cells are one of the promising candidates for power sources of electric vehicles. For further improvement of their efficiency in high current density operation, a better understanding of oxygen flow inside the cells, which have micro- or nanoporous structures, is necessary. Molecular simulations such as the direct simulation of Monte Carlo (DSMC) are necessary to elucidate flow phenomena in micro- or nanostructures since the Knudsen number is close to unity. Our previous report showed that the oxygen diffusion resistance in porous structures with a characteristic pore size of 100 nm calculated by DSMC agrees well with that measured experimentally. On the other hand, when it comes to the transport in structures with much smaller pore sizes, it is expected that the surface diffusion has a significant impact on gas transport because of their higher specific surface area. Here we present the calculation of gas transport in porous structures with considering surface diffusion. The numerical porous structure models utilized in our simulations are constructed from three-dimensional imaging of materials. The effect of the distance of random walk on the total diffusion resistance in the structures is discussed. This paper is based on results obtained from a project commissioned by the New Energy and Industrial Development Organization (NEDO).

  19. Droplet-driven transports on superhydrophobic-patterned surface microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Xing, Siyuan; Harake, Ryan S; Pan, Tingrui

    2011-11-07

    Droplet-based transport phenomena driven by surface tension have been explored as an automated pumping source for a number of chemical and biological applications. In this paper, we present a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of unconventional droplet-based motions on a superhydrophobic-patterned surface microfluidic (S(2)M) platform. The S(2)M surfaces are monolithically fabricated using a facile two-step laser micromachining technique on regular polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chemistry. Unlike the traditional droplet-driven pumps built on an enclosed microfluidic network, the S(2)M network pins the liquid-solid interface of droplets to the lithographically defined wetting boundary and establishes a direct linkage between the volumetric and hydraulic measures. Moreover, diverse modes of droplet motions are theoretically determined and experimentally characterized in a bi-droplet configuration, among which several unconventional droplet-driven transport phenomena are first demonstrated. These include big-to-small droplet merging, droplet balancing, as well as bidirectional transporting, in addition to the classic small-to-big droplet transition. Furthermore, multi-stage programmable bidirectional pumping has been implemented on the S(2)M platform, according to the newly established droplet manipulation principle, to illustrate its potential use for automated biomicrofluidic and point-of-care diagnostic applications.

  20. Recent advances in arsenic bioavailability, transport, and speciation in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Peng, Bo; Tan, Changyin; Ma, Lena; Rathinasabapathi, Bala

    2015-04-01

    Widespread arsenic (As) contamination in paddy rice (Oryza sativa) from both geologic and anthropogenic origins is an increasing concern globally. Substantial efforts have been made to elucidate As transformation and uptake processes in rhizosphere and metabolism in rice plant, which provides an essential foundation for the development of mitigation strategies. However, a range of crucial mechanisms from As mobilization in rhizosphere to transport to grains remain poorly understood. To provide new insight into the underlying mechanisms of As accumulation in rice, a range of new perspectives on As bioavailability, transport pathways, and in situ speciation are reviewed here. Specifically, the prominent effects of water regime, Fe plaque, and biochar on As mobilization in rice rhizosphere are discussed critically. An updated understanding of arsenite (AsIII) and methylated As transport from root to vascular bundle and grain is integrated and discussed in detail. Special attention is given to As speciation and distribution in rice grain with potential coping strategies being provided and discussed. Future research priorities are also identified. The new insight into As bioavailability, transport and speciation in rice would lead to a better understanding of As contamination in rice. They would also provide useful strategies from agronomic measures to genetic engineering for more effective restriction of As transport and accumulation in food chain.

  1. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; Harris, G.H.; De, A.; Sotillo, F. ); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. ); Hu, W.; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. ); Choudhry, V.; Shea, S.; Ghosh, A.; Sehgal, R. )

    1992-03-01

    The initial goal of the research project was to develop methods of coal surface control in advanced froth flotation to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur rejection, while operating at Btu recoveries above 90% based on run-of-mine quality coal. Moreover, the technology is to concomitantly reduce the ash content significantly (to six percent or less) to provide a high-quality fuel to the boiler (ash removal also increases Btu content, which in turn decreases a coal's emission potential in terms of lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu). (VC)

  2. Advanced construction management for lunar base construction - Surface operations planner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehoe, Robert P.

    1992-01-01

    The study proposes a conceptual solution and lays the framework for developing a new, sophisticated and intelligent tool for a lunar base construction crew to use. This concept integrates expert systems for critical decision making, virtual reality for training, logistics and laydown optimization, automated productivity measurements, and an advanced scheduling tool to form a unique new planning tool. The concept features extensive use of computers and expert systems software to support the actual work, while allowing the crew to control the project from the lunar surface. Consideration is given to a logistics data base, laydown area management, flexible critical progress scheduler, video simulation of assembly tasks, and assembly information and tracking documentation.

  3. Advancing the understanding of plasma transport in mid-size stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Carlos; Talmadge, Joseph; Ramisch, Mirko; TJ-II, the; HXS; TJ-K Teams

    2017-01-01

    The tokamak and the stellarator are the two main candidate concepts for magnetically confining fusion plasmas. The flexibility of the mid-size stellarator devices together with their unique diagnostic capabilities make them ideally suited to study the relation between magnetic topology, electric fields and transport. This paper addresses advances in the understanding of plasma transport in mid-size stellarators with an emphasis on the physics of flows, transport control, impurity and particle transport and fast particles. The results described here emphasize an improved physics understanding of phenomena in stellarators that complements the empirical approach. Experiments in mid-size stellarators support the development of advanced plasma scenarios in Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) and, in concert with better physics understanding in tokamaks, may ultimately lead to an advance in the prediction of burning plasma behaviour.

  4. Slippery Liquid-Infused Porous Surfaces and Droplet Transportation by Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J. T.; Geraldi, N. R.; Guan, J. H.; McHale, G.; Wells, G. G.; Fu, Y. Q.

    2017-01-01

    On a solid surface, a droplet of liquid will stick due to the capillary adhesion, and this causes low droplet mobility. To reduce contact line pinning, surface chemistry can be coupled to micro- and/or nanostructures to create superhydrophobic surfaces on which a droplet balls up into an almost spherical shape, thus, minimizing the contact area. Recent progress in soft matter has now led to alternative lubricant-impregnated surfaces capable of almost zero contact line pinning and high droplet mobility without causing droplets to ball up and minimize the contact area. Here we report an approach to surface-acoustic-wave- (SAW) actuated droplet transportation enabled using such a surface. These surfaces maintain the contact area required for efficient energy and momentum transfer of the wave energy into the droplet while achieving high droplet mobility and a large footprint, therefore, reducing the threshold power required to induce droplet motion. In our approach, we use a slippery layer of lubricating oil infused into a self-assembled porous hydrophobic layer, which is significantly thinner than the SAW wavelength, and avoid damping of the wave. We find a significant reduction (up to 85%) in the threshold power for droplet transportation compared to that using a conventional surface-treatment method. Moreover, unlike droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces, where interaction with the SAW induces a transition from a Cassie-Baxter state to a Wenzel state, the droplets on our liquid-impregnated surfaces remain in a mobile state after interaction with the SAW.

  5. EDITORIAL: Focus on Advances in Surface and Interface Science 2008 FOCUS ON ADVANCES IN SURFACE AND INTERFACE SCIENCE 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffler, Matthias; Schneider, Wolf-Dieter

    2008-12-01

    Basic research in surface and interface science is highly interdisciplinary, covering the fields of physics, chemistry, biophysics, geo-, atmospheric and environmental sciences, material science, chemical engineering, and more. The various phenomena are interesting by themselves, and they are most important in nearly all modern technologies, as for example electronic, magnetic, and optical devices, sensors, catalysts, lubricants, hard and thermal-barrier coatings, protection against corrosion and crack formation under harsh environments. In fact, detailed understanding of the elementary processes at surfaces is necessary to support and to advance the high technology that very much founds the prosperity and lifestyle of our society. Current state-of-the-art experimental studies of elementary processes at surfaces, of surface properties and functions employ a variety of sophisticated tools. Some are capable of revealing the location and motion of individual atoms. Others measure excitations (electronic, magnetic and vibronic), employing, for example, special light sources such as synchrotrons, high magnetic fields, or free electron lasers. The surprising variety of intriguing physical phenomena at surfaces, interfaces, and nanostructures also pose a persistent challenge for the development of theoretical descriptions, methods, and even basic physical concepts. This second focus issue on the topic of 'Advances in Surface and Interface Science' in New Journal of Physics, following on from last year's successful collection, provides an exciting synoptic view on the latest pertinent developments in the field. Focus on Advances in Surface and Interface Science 2008 Contents Organic layers at metal/electrolyte interfaces: molecular structure and reactivity of viologen monolayers Stephan Breuer, Duc T Pham, Sascha Huemann, Knud Gentz, Caroline Zoerlein, Ralf Hunger, Klaus Wandelt and Peter Broekmann Spin polarized d surface resonance state of fcc Co/Cu(001) K Miyamoto, K

  6. Transport of solar wind plasma onto the lunar nightside surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorburger, A.; Wurz, P.; Barabash, S.; Futaana, Y.; Wieser, M.; Bhardwaj, A.; Dhanya, M. B.; Asamura, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present first measurements of energetic neutral atoms that originate from solar wind plasma having interacted with the lunar nightside surface. We observe two distinct energetic neutral atom (ENA) distributions parallel to the terminator, the spectral shape, and the intensity of both of which indicate that the particles originate from the bulk solar wind flow. The first distribution modifies the dayside ENA flux to reach ˜6° into the nightside and is well explained by the kinetic temperature of the solar wind protons. The second distribution, which was not predicted, reaches from the terminator to up to 30° beyond the terminator, with a maximum at ˜102° in solar zenith angle. As most likely wake transport processes for this second distribution we identify acceleration by the ambipolar electric field and by the negatively charged lunar nightside surface. In addition, our data provide the first observation indicative of a global solar zenith angle dependence of positive dayside surface potentials.

  7. Self-oscillating surface of gel for autonomous mass transport.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ryo; Murase, Yoko

    2012-11-01

    As a novel biomimetic gels deffering from conventonal stimuli-responsive polymer gels, we have developed a "self-oscillating" gel that swells and deswells periodically under constant condition without on-off switching of external stimuli. The gel is composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) to which the catalyst of the oscillating chemical reaction, called Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, is covalently immobilized. The chemical oscillation is converted to the mechanical oscillation of the gel through the change in hydrophilicity of polymer chains with the redox changes of the immobilized catalyst. By utilizing the self-oscillating gel, several kinds of functional material systems such as biomimetic actuators, etc. are expected. Here we review a potential application to functional surface to realize autonomous mass-transport by utilizing the peristaltic motion of the gel. With the propagation of the chemical wave, the loaded cargo is autonomously transported on the surface. In order to fabricate the self-driven gel conveyer for a wider use including biomedical applications, the interactions between the self-oscillating gel and the loaded gel cargo were investigated and their influence on the transport phenomena were evaluated.

  8. Modifying Thermal Transport in Colloidal Nanocrystal Solids with Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minglu; Ma, Yuanyu; Wang, Robert Y

    2015-12-22

    We present a systematic study on the effect of surface chemistry on thermal transport in colloidal nanocrystal (NC) solids. Using PbS NCs as a model system, we vary ligand binding group (thiol, amine, and atomic halides), ligand length (ethanedithiol, butanedithiol, hexanedithiol, and octanedithiol), and NC diameter (3.3-8.2 nm). Our experiments reveal several findings: (i) The ligand choice can vary the NC solid thermal conductivity by up to a factor of 2.5. (ii) The ligand binding strength to the NC core does not significantly impact thermal conductivity. (iii) Reducing the ligand length can decrease the interparticle distance, which increases thermal conductivity. (iv) Increasing the NC diameter increases thermal conductivity. (v) The effect of surface chemistry can exceed the effect of NC diameter and becomes more pronounced as NC diameter decreases. By combining these trends, we demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of NC solids can be varied by an overall factor of 4, from ∼0.1-0.4 W/m-K. We complement these findings with effective medium approximation modeling and identify thermal transport in the ligand matrix as the rate-limiter for thermal transport. By combining these modeling results with our experimental observations, we conclude that future efforts to increase thermal conductivity in NC solids should focus on the ligand-ligand interface between neighboring NCs.

  9. Hazard alerting and situational awareness in advanced air transport cockpits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. J.; Wanke, Craig; Kuchar, James; Mykityshyn, Mark; Hahn, Edward; Midkiff, Alan

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the Advanced Cockpit Simulation Facility at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is presented. Though detailed results depend on the specific application, graphical presentation of flight control and alert information has generally been found to be effective for situational awareness and subjectively selected by flight crews. Graphical display is most effective when it is consistent with the pilots cognitive map of the process being displayed or of the situation.

  10. Design of a pool boiler heat transport system for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Noble, J.; Kesseli, J.

    1991-01-01

    The overall operating temperature and efficiency of solar-powered Stirling engines can be improved by adding a heat transport system to more uniformly supply heat to the heater head tubes. One heat transport system with favorable characteristics is an alkali metal pool boiler. An alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system was designed for a 25-kW advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS). Solar energy concentrated on the absorber dome boils a eutectic mixture of sodium and potassium. The alkali metal vapors condense on the heater head tubes, supplying the Stirling engine with a uniform heat flux at a constant temperature. Boiling stability is achieved with the use of an enhanced boiling surface and noncondensible gas.

  11. Formation and transport of deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine in surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Meyer, M.T.; Mills, M.S.; Zimmerman, L.R.; Perry, C.A.; Goolsby, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    Field disappearance studies and a regional study of nine rivers in the Midwest Corn Belt show that deethylatrazine (DEA; 2-amino-4-chloro-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) and deisopropylatrazine (DIA; 2-amino-4-chloro-6-ethylaminos-triazine) occur frequently in surface water that has received runoff from two parent triazine herbicides, atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) and cyanazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-methylpropionitrileamino-s-triazine). The concentration of DEA and DIA in surface water varies with the hydrologic conditions of the basin and the timing of runoff, with maximum concentrations reaching 5 ??g/L (DEA + DIA). Early rainfall followed by a dry summer will result in an early peak concentration of metabolites in surface water. A wet summer will delay the maximum concentrations of metabolites and increase their runoff into surface water, occasionally resulting in a slight separation of the parent atrazine maximum concentrations from the metabolite maximum concentrations, giving a "second flush?? of triazine metabolites to surface water. Replicated field dissipation studies of atrazine and cyanazine indicate that DIA/DEA ratios will vary from 0.4 ?? 0.1 when atrazine is the major triazine present to 0.6 ?? 0.1 when significant amounts of cyanazine are present. A comparison of transport time of DEA and DIA from field plots to their appearance in surface water indicates that storage and dilution are occurring in the alluvial aquifers of the basin.

  12. Structural design of integral tankage for advanced space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macconochie, I. O.; Davis, R. B.; Lemessurier, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    Fully reusable launch vehicle concepts being studied for post-Shuttle era transports present major challenges for the structural design of large propellant tankage. The dominant structural elements are internal tankage for both cryogenic and non-cryogenic propellants which must operate in a broad range of thermal environments while meeting requirements for low weight and reusability. Several approaches to integral tank design are discussed and an analysis of a hot structure honeycomb sandwich tank for a circular body vehicle is presented.

  13. Manganese: Recent advances in understanding its transport and neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Aschner, Michael . E-mail: Michael.Aschner@vanderbilt.edu; Guilarte, Tomas R.; Schneider, Jay S.; Zheng Wei

    2007-06-01

    The present review is based on presentations from the meeting of the Society of Toxicology in San Diego, CA (March 2006). It addresses recent developments in the understanding of the transport of manganese (Mn) into the central nervous system (CNS), as well as brain imaging and neurocognitive studies in non-human primates aimed at improving our understanding of the mechanisms of Mn neurotoxicity. Finally, we discuss potential therapeutic modalities for treating Mn intoxication in humans.

  14. An airline study of advanced technology requirements for advanced high speed commercial transport engines. 2: Engine preliminary design assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sallee, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    The advanced technology requirements for an advanced high speed commercial transport engine are presented. The results of the phase 2 study effort cover the following areas: (1) general review of preliminary engine designs suggested for a future aircraft, (2) presentation of a long range view of airline propulsion system objectives and the research programs in noise, pollution, and design which must be undertaken to achieve the goals presented, (3) review of the impact of propulsion system unreliability and unscheduled maintenance on cost of operation, (4) discussion of the reliability and maintainability requirements and guarantees for future engines.

  15. Transport of inertial anisotropic particles under surface gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dibenedetto, Michelle; Koseff, Jeffrey; Ouellette, Nicholas

    2016-11-01

    The motion of neutrally and almost-neutrally buoyant particles under surface gravity waves is relevant to the transport of microplastic debris and other small particulates in the ocean. Consequently, a number of studies have looked at the transport of spherical particles or mobile plankton in these conditions. However, the effects of particle-shape anisotropy on the trajectories and behavior of irregularly shaped particles in this type of oscillatory flow are still relatively unknown. To better understand these issues, we created an idealized numerical model which simulates the three-dimensional behavior of anisotropic spheroids in flow described by Airy wave theory. The particle's response is calculated using a simplified Maxey-Riley equation coupled with Jeffery's equation for particle rotation. We show that the particle dynamics are strongly dependent on their initial conditions and shape, with some some additional dependence on Stokes number.

  16. 76 FR 50312 - Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program (STEP)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research...-LU) established the Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program... research on issues related to planning, environment, and realty will be included in future...

  17. 77 FR 38709 - Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program (STEP)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research...-LU) established the Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program... research on issues related to planning, environment, and realty will be included in future...

  18. 41 CFR 302-7.105 - May an advance of funds be authorized for transporting HHG and temporary storage?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May an advance of funds be authorized for transporting HHG and temporary storage? 302-7.105 Section 302-7.105 Public... transporting HHG and temporary storage? An advance of funds may be authorized when the transportation of...

  19. Degree-1 Surface Mass Transport and Geocenter Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.

    2015-12-01

    The longest-wavelength and hemisphere asymmetric surface mass transport is characterized by three degree-one spherical harmonic components. Such mass transport modes cause geocenter motion between the center-of-mass of the total Earth system (CM) and the center-of-figure of the solid Earth surface (CF), and deforms the solid Earth. GRACE's K-band ranging data system is not sensitive to these three variation modes. For a complete spherical harmonic spectral coverage of mass transport, degree-1 surface mass changes estimated through geocenter motion or degree-1 mass/deformation signatures from other space geodetic techniques should be combined with GRACE's time-variable gravity data. The degree-1 coefficients are critically important for mass variation assessments over large regions. For example, 1 mm error in geocenter motion can result in an error of 190 gigatons of global oceanic water mass change or, equivalently, an error of 0.5 mm of global mean sea level change when the geocenter motion is converted to degree-1 mass and combined with GRACE data. Yet, several different methods of geocenter motion estimation differ in results by more than 1 mm in annual amplitude. These differences have to be resolved after 13 years of successful GRACE operation. Recently, the difference between results from direct satellite laser ranging (SLR) determination and from a global inversion of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) deformation measurements, GRACE, and an ocean bottom pressure (OBP) model has been largely reconciled as due to SLR's sparse station distribution. This result and our current efforts to examine possible systematic errors in GNSS data and the OBP model will be discussed along with a future perspective.

  20. Acoustic charge transport technology investigation for advanced development transponder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayalar, S.

    1993-01-01

    Acoustic charge transport (ACT) technology has provided a basis for a new family of analog signal processors, including a programmable transversal filter (PTF). Through monolithic integration of ACT delay lines with GaAs metal semiconductor field effect transistor (MESFET) digital memory and controllers, these devices significantly extend the performance of PTF's. This article introduces the basic operation of these devices and summarizes their present and future specifications. The production and testing of these devices indicate that this new technology is a promising one for future space applications.

  1. SBIR Advanced Technologies in Aviation and Air Transportation System 2016

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.; Kaszeta, Richard W.; Gold, Calman; Corke, Thomas C.; McGowan, Ryan; Matlis, Eric; Eichenlaub, Jesse; Davis, Joshua T.; Shah, Parthiv N.

    2017-01-01

    This report is intended to provide a broad knowledge of various topics associated with NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), with particular interest on the NASA SBIR contracts awarded from 2011-2012 executed by small companies. The content of this report focuses on the high-quality, cutting-edge research that will lead to revolutionary concepts, technologies, and capabilities that enable radical change to both the airspace system and the aircraft that fly within it, facilitating a safer, more environmentally friendly, and more efficient air transportation system.

  2. Advanced transportation concept for round-trip space travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Chen-Wan L.

    1988-01-01

    A departure from the conventional concept of round-trip space travel is introduced. It is shown that a substantial reduction in the initial load required of the Shuttle or other launch vehicle can be achieved by staging the ascent orbit and leaving fuel for the return trip at each stage of the orbit. Examples of round trips from a low-inclination LEO to a high-inclination LEO and from an LEO to a GEO are used to show the merits of the new concept. Potential problem areas and research needed for the development of an efficient space transportation network are discussed.

  3. Solar energy conversion using surface plasmons for broadband energy transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M.

    1982-01-01

    A new strategy for efficient solar energy conversion based on parallel processing with surface plasmons is introduced. The approach is unique in identifying: (1) a broadband carrier with suitable range for energy transport, and (2) a technique to extract more energy from the more energetic photons, without sequential losses or unique materials for each frequency band. The aim is to overcome the fundamental losses associated with the broad solar spectrum and to achieve a higher level of spectrum splitting than has been possible in semiconductor systems.

  4. Advanced Hall Electric Propulsion for Future In-space Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.; Sankovic, John M.

    2001-01-01

    The Hall thruster is an electric propulsion device used for multiple in-space applications including orbit raising, on-orbit maneuvers, and de-orbit functions. These in-space propulsion functions are currently performed by toxic hydrazine monopropellant or hydrazine derivative/nitrogen tetroxide bi-propellant thrusters. The Hall thruster operates nominally in the 1500 sec specific impulse regime. It provides greater thrust to power than conventional gridded ion engines, thus reducing trip times and operational life when compared to that technology in Earth orbit applications. The technology in the far term, by adding a second acceleration stage, has shown promise of providing over 4000s Isp, the regime of the gridded ion engine and necessary for deep space applications. The Hall thruster system consists of three parts, the thruster, the power processor, and the propellant system. The technology is operational and commercially available at the 1.5 kW power level and 5 kW application is underway. NASA is looking toward 10 kW and eventually 50 kW-class engines for ambitious space transportation applications. The former allows launch vehicle step-down for GEO missions and demanding planetary missions such as Europa Lander, while the latter allows quick all-electric propulsion LEO to GEO transfers and non-nuclear transportation human Mars missions.

  5. ADVANCES IN COMPREHENSIVE GYROKINETIC SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT IN TOKAMAKS

    SciTech Connect

    WALTZ,R.E; CANDY,J; HINTON,F.L; ESTRADA-MILA,C; KINSEY,J.E

    2004-10-01

    A continuum global gyrokinetic code GYRO has been developed to comprehensively simulate core turbulent transport in actual experimental profiles and enable direct quantitative comparisons to the experimental transport flows. GYRO not only treats the now standard ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence, but also treats trapped and passing electrons with collisions and finite {beta}, equilibrium ExB shear stabilization, and all in real tokamak geometry. Most importantly the code operates at finite relative gyroradius ({rho}{sub *}) so as to treat the profile shear stabilization and nonlocal effects which can break gyroBohm scaling. The code operates in either a cyclic flux-tube limit (which allows only gyroBohm scaling) or globally with physical profile variation. Bohm scaling of DIII-D L-mode has been simulated with power flows matching experiment within error bars on the ion temperature gradient. Mechanisms for broken gyroBohm scaling, neoclassical ion flows embedded in turbulence, turbulent dynamos and profile corrugations, are illustrated.

  6. ADVANCES IN COMPREHENSIVE GYROKINETIC SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT IN TOKAMAKS

    SciTech Connect

    WALTZ RE; CANDY J; HINTON FL; ESTRADA-MILA C; KINSEY JE

    2004-10-01

    A continuum global gyrokinetic code GYRO has been developed to comprehensively simulate core turbulent transport in actual experimental profiles and enable direct quantitative comparisons to the experimental transport flows. GYRO not only treats the now standard ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence, but also treats trapped and passing electrons with collisions and finite {beta}, equilibrium ExB shear stabilization, and all in real tokamak geometry. Most importantly the code operates at finite relative gyroradius ({rho}{sub *}) so as to treat the profile shear stabilization and nonlocal effects which can break gyroBohm scaling. The code operates in either a cyclic flux-tube limit (which allows only gyroBohm scaling) or a globally with physical profile variation. Rohm scaling of DIII-D L-mode has been simulated with power flows matching experiment within error bars on the ion temperature gradient. Mechanisms for broken gyroBohm scaling, neoclassical ion flows embedded in turbulence, turbulent dynamos and profile corrugations, plasma pinches and impurity flow, and simulations at fixed flow rather than fixed gradient are illustrated and discussed.

  7. Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson

    2006-01-31

    During this quarter of the no cost extension a cermet composition referred to as EC101 containing a high permeability metal and a ceramic phase was prepared for sealing and permeability testing. Several different types of seals were developed and tested. In addition membrane surface stability was characterized.

  8. Electrostatic dust transport on the surfaces of airless bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Schwan, J.; Hsu, H. W.; Horanyi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The surfaces of airless bodies are charged due to the exposure to solar wind plasma and UV radiation. Dust particles on the regolith of these surfaces can become charged, and may move and even get lofted due to electrostatic force. Electrostatic dust transport has been a long-standing problem that may be related to many observed phenomena on the surfaces of airless planetary bodies, including the lunar horizon glow, the dust ponds on asteroid Eros, the spokes in Saturn's rings, and more recently, the collection of dust particles ejected off Comet 67P, observed by Rosetta. In order to resolve these puzzles, a handful of laboratory experiments have been performed in the past and demonstrated that dust indeed moves and lifts from surfaces exposed to plasma. However, the exact mechanisms for the mobilization of dust particles still remain a mystery. Current charging models, including the so-called "shared charge model" and the charge fluctuation theory, will be discussed. It is found that neither of these models can explain the results from either laboratory experiments or in-situ observations. Recently, single dust trajectories were captured with our new dust experiments, enabling novel micro-scale investigations. The particles' initial launch speeds and size distributions are analyzed, and a new so-called "patched charge model" is proposed to explain our findings. We identify the role of plasma micro-cavities that are formed in-between neighboring dust particles. The emitted secondary or photo- electrons are proposed to be absorbed inside the micro-cavities, resulting in significant charge accumulation on the exposed patches of the surfaces of neighboring particles. The resulting enhanced Coulomb force (repulsion) between particles is likely the dominant force to mobilize and lift them off the surface. The role of other properties, including surface morphology, cohesion and photoelectron charging, will also be discussed.

  9. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Sastry, K.V.S.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; De, A.; Sotillo, F.; Harris, G. ); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. ); Hu, Weibai; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. ); Choudhry, V.; Sehgal, R.; Ghosh, A. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United

    1991-07-30

    The primary objective in the scope of this research project is to develop advanced flotation methods for coal cleaning in order to achieve near total pyritic-sulfur removal at 90% Btu recovery, using coal samples procured from three major US coal seams. Concomitantly, the ash content of these coals is to be reduced to 6% or less. Investigation of mechanisms for the control of coal and pyrite surfaces prior to fine coal flotation is the main aspect of the project objectives. The results of this research are to be made available to ICF Kaiser Engineers who are currently working on the Engineering Development of Advanced Flotation under a separate contract with DOE under the Acid Rain Control Initiative program. A second major objective is to investigate factors involved in the progressive weathering and oxidation of coal that had been exposed to varying degrees of weathering, namely, open to the atmosphere, covered and in an argon-inerted'' atmosphere, over a period of twelve months. After regular intervals of weathering, samples of the three base coals (Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh No. 8 and Upper Freeport PA) were collected and shipped to both the University of Pittsburgh and the University of California at Berkeley for characterization studies of the weathered material. 29 figs., 29 tabs.

  10. Advanced composite aileron for L-1011 transport aircraft: Aileron manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, E. G.; Cobbs, W. L.; Legg, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The fabrication activities of the Advanced Composite Aileron (ACA) program are discussed. These activities included detail fabrication, manufacturing development, assembly, repair and quality assurance. Five ship sets of ailerons were manufactured. The detail fabrication effort of ribs, spar and covers was accomplished on male tools to a common cure cycle. Graphite epoxy tape and fabric and syntactic epoxy materials were utilized in the fabrication. The ribs and spar were net cured and required no post cure trim. Material inconsistencies resulted in manufacturing development of the front spar during the production effort. The assembly effort was accomplished in subassembly and assembly fixtures. The manual drilling system utilized a dagger type drill in a hydraulic feed control hand drill. Coupon testing for each detail was done.

  11. Advanced dosimetry systems for the space transport and space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wailly, L. F.; Schneider, M. F.; Clark, B. C.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced dosimetry system concepts are described that will provide automated and instantaneous measurement of dose and particle spectra. Systems are proposed for measuring dose rate from cosmic radiation background to greater than 3600 rads/hr. Charged particle spectrometers, both internal and external to the spacecraft, are described for determining mixed field energy spectra and particle fluxes for both real time onboard and ground-based computer evaluation of the radiation hazard. Automated passive dosimetry systems consisting of thermoluminescent dosimeters and activation techniques are proposed for recording the dose levels for twelve or more crew members. This system will allow automatic onboard readout and data storage of the accumulated dose and can be transmitted to ground after readout or data records recovered with each crew rotation.

  12. Advanced composite aileron for L-1011 transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Design and evaluation of alternate concepts for the major subcomponents of the advanced composite aileron (ACA) was completed. From this array of subcomponents, aileron assemblies were formulated and evaluated. Based on these analyses a multirib assembly with graphite tape/syntactic core covers, a graphite tape front spar, and a graphite fabric rib was selected for development. A weight savings of 29.1 percent (40.8 pounds per aileron) is predicted. Engineering cost analyses indicate that the production cost of the ACA will be 7.3 percent less than the current aluminum aileron. Fabrication, machining, and testing of the material evaluation specimens for the resin screening program was completed. The test results lead to the selection of Narmco 5208 resin for the ACA. Other activities completed include: the detailed design of the ACA, construction of a three dimensional finite element model for structural analysis, and formulation of detail plans for material verification and process development.

  13. Multiple Application Propfan Study (MAPS): Advanced tactical transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, F. C.; Liebeck, R. H.; Mitchell, G. H.; Mooiweer, A.; Platte, M. M.; Toogood, T. L.; Wright, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    This study was conducted to ascertain potential benefits of a propfan propulsion system application to a blended wing/body military tactical transport. Based on a design cruise Mach no. of 0.75 for the design mission, the results indicate a significant advantage in various figures of merit for the propfan over those of a comparable technology turbofan. Although the propfan has a 1.6 percent greater takeoff gross weight, its life cycle cost is 5.3 percent smaller, partly because of a 27 percent smaller specific fuel consumption. When employed on alternate missions, the propfan configuration offers significantly improved flexibility and capability: an increase in sea level penetration distance of more than 100 percent, or in time-on-station of 24 percent, or in deployment payload of 38 percent.

  14. Advances in NASA radiation transport research: 3DHZETRN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2014-07-01

    The computationally efficient HZETRN code has been used in recent trade studies for lunar and Martian exploration and is currently being used in the engineering development of the next generation of space vehicles, habitats, and extra vehicular activity equipment. Code development has been based on a progression of approximations first assuming all particles are produced in the initiator direction of incidence (straight-ahead) later improved by treating neutrons produced in the backward hemisphere as moving straight-back (bi-directional). A new version (3DHZETRN) capable of transporting High charge (Z) and Energy (HZE) and light ions (including neutrons) under space-like boundary conditions with enhanced neutron and light ion propagation in transverse directions is developed. Herein, new algorithms for light ion and neutron propagation with well defined convergence criteria in 3D objects is developed and tested against Monte Carlo simulations of 3D effects.

  15. Advances in the Understanding of Mammalian Copper Transporters12

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanfang; Hodgkinson, Victoria; Zhu, Sha; Weisman, Gary A.; Petris, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient. Its ability to exist in 2 oxidation states (Cu1+ and Cu2+) allows it to function as an enzymatic cofactor in hydrolytic, electron transfer, and oxygen utilization reactions. Cu transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B play key roles in ensuring that adequate Cu is available for Cu-requiring processes and the prevention of excess Cu accumulation within cells. Two diseases of Cu metabolism, Menkes disease and Wilson disease, which are caused by mutations in ATP7A and ATP7B, respectively, exemplify the critical importance of regulating Cu balance in humans. Herein, we review recent studies of the biochemical and cell biological characteristics of CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B, as well as emerging roles for Cu in new areas of physiology. PMID:22332042

  16. Economic study of multipurpose advanced high-speed transport configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A nondimensional economic examination of a parametrically-derived set of supersonic transport aircraft was conducted. The measure of economic value was surcharged relative to subsonic airplane tourist-class yield. Ten airplanes were defined according to size, payload, and speed. The price, range capability, fuel burned, and block time were determined for each configuration, then operating costs and surcharges were calculated. The parameter with the most noticeable influence on nominal surcharge was found to be real (constant dollars) fuel price increase. A change in SST design Mach number from 2.4 to Mach 2.7 showed a very small surcharge advantage (on the order of 1 percent for the faster aircraft). Configuration design compromises required for an airplane to operate overland at supersonic speeds without causing sonic boom annoyance result in severe performance penalties and require high (more than 100 percent) surcharges.

  17. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Peter; van Sebille, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics floating on the ocean surface from 2015 to 2025, with the goal to assess the optimal marine microplastic removal locations for two scenarios: removing the most surface microplastic and reducing the impact on ecosystems, using plankton growth as a proxy. The simulations show that the optimal removal locations are primarily located off the coast of China and in the Indonesian Archipelago for both scenarios. Our estimates show that 31% of the modeled microplastic mass can be removed by 2025 using 29 plastic collectors operating at a 45% capture efficiency from these locations, compared to only 17% when the 29 plastic collectors are moored in the North Pacific garbage patch, between Hawaii and California. The overlap of ocean surface microplastics and phytoplankton growth can be reduced by 46% at our proposed locations, while sinks in the North Pacific can only reduce the overlap by 14%. These results are an indication that oceanic plastic removal might be more effective in removing a greater microplastic mass and in reducing potential harm to marine life when closer to shore than inside the plastic accumulation zones in the centers of the gyres.

  18. Aluminum in acidic surface waters: chemistry, transport, and effects.

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, C T

    1985-01-01

    Ecologically significant concentrations of Al have been reported in surface waters draining "acid-sensitive" watersheds that are receiving elevated inputs of acidic deposition. It has been hypothesized that mineral acids from atmospheric deposition have remobilized Al previously precipitated within the soil during soil development. This Al is then thought to be transported to adjacent surface waters. Dissolved mononuclear Al occurs as aquo Al, as well as OH-, F-, SO4(2-), and organic complexes. Although past investigations have often ignored non-hydroxide complexes of Al, it appears that organic and F complexes are the predominant forms of Al in dilute (low ionic strength) acidic surface waters. The concentration of inorganic forms of Al increases exponentially with decreases in solution pH. This response is similar to the theoretical pH dependent solubility of Al mineral phases. The concentration of organic forms of Al, however, is strongly correlated with variations in organic carbon concentration of surface waters rather than pH. Elevated concentrations of Al in dilute acidic waters are of interest because: Al is an important pH buffer; Al may influence the cycling of important elements like P, organic carbon, and trace metals; and Al is potentially toxic to aquatic organisms. An understanding of the aqueous speciation of Al is essential for an evaluation of these processes. PMID:3935428

  19. Advanced subsonic long-haul transport terminal area compatibility study. Volume 1: Compatibility assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An analysis was made to identify airplane research and technology necessary to ensure advanced transport aircraft the capability of accommodating forecast traffic without adverse impact on airport communities. Projections were made of the delay, noise, and emissions impact of future aircraft fleets on typical large urban airport. Design requirements, based on these projections, were developed for an advanced technology, long-haul, subsonic transport. A baseline aircraft was modified to fulfill the design requirements for terminal area compatibility. Technical and economic comparisons were made between these and other aircraft configured to support the study.

  20. NREL - Advanced Vehicles and Fuels Basics - Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems 2010

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    We can improve the fuel economy of our cars, trucks, and buses by designing them to use the energy in fuels more efficiently. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are helping the nation achieve these goals by developing transportation technologies like: advanced vehicle systems and components; alternative fuels; as well as fuel cells, hybrid electric, and plug-in hybrid vehicles. For a text version of this video visit http://www.nrel.gov/learning/advanced_vehicles_fuels.html

  1. NREL - Advanced Vehicles and Fuels Basics - Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems 2010

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    We can improve the fuel economy of our cars, trucks, and buses by designing them to use the energy in fuels more efficiently. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are helping the nation achieve these goals by developing transportation technologies like: advanced vehicle systems and components; alternative fuels; as well as fuel cells, hybrid electric, and plug-in hybrid vehicles. For a text version of this video visit http://www.nrel.gov/learning/advanced_vehicles_fuels.html

  2. Advanced public transportation systems: State of the art update `98. Final report, July-December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, R.F.; Labell, L.N.; LoVecchio, J.A.; Ow, R.S.; Royal, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    This report is the latest in a series of State-of-the-Art reports, the last of which was published in January 1996. It contains the results of an investigation of the extent of adoption of advanced technology in the provision of public transportation service in North America. It focused on some of the most innovative or comprehensive implementations, categorized under four types of service/technologies: Fleet Management, Traveler Information, Electronic Fare Payment, and Transportation Demand Management.

  3. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Sastry, K.V.S.; Hanson, J.S.; Harris, G.; Sotillo, F.; Diao, J. ); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. ); Hu, Weibai; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. ); Choudhry, V.; Sehgal, R.; Ghosh, A. )

    1990-08-15

    The primary objective of this research project is to develop advanced flotation methods for coal cleaning in order to achieve near total pyritic-sulfur removal at 90% Btu recovery, using coal samples procured from six major US coal seams. Concomitantly, the ash content of these coals is to be reduced to 6% or less. Work this quarter concentrated on the following: washability studies, which included particle size distribution of the washability samples, and chemical analysis of washability test samples; characterization studies of induction time measurements, correlation between yield, combustible-material recovery (CMR), and heating-value recovery (HVR), and QA/QC for standard flotation tests and coal analyses; surface modification and control including testing of surface-modifying reagents, restoration of hydrophobicity to lab-oxidized coals, pH effects on coal flotation, and depression of pyritic sulfur in which pyrite depression with calcium cyanide and pyrite depression with xanthated reagents was investigated; flotation optimization and circuitry included staged reagent addition, cleaning and scavenging, and scavenging and middling recycling. Weathering studies are also discussed. 19 figs., 28 tabs.

  4. ATF (Advanced Toroidal Facility) flux surfaces and related plasma effects

    SciTech Connect

    Colchin, R.J.; England, A.C.; Harris, J.H.; Hillis, D.L.; Jernigan, T.C.; Murakami, M.; Neilson, G.H.; Rome, J.A.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Anderson, F.S.B.

    1989-01-01

    Flux surfaces in the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) were mapped using an electron beam which was incident on a fluorescent screen. Islands were found at r/a greater than or equal to 0.6, indicating the existence of field errors. Failure of the island size to scale with magnetic field indicated that the islands were intrinsic to the coils. The source of the field errors was found to be uncompensated dipoles in the helical coil feeds. The electron temperature was observed to be very low in the vicinity of the islands. Modifications were made to the helical field buswork to eliminate the field errors, and the flux surfaces were again checked using an electron beam. Islands at r/a greater than or equal to 0.6 were found to be greatly reduced in size, with the residual island at /tau/ = 1/2 scaling to 1 cm at B = 1 T. Initial experiments indicate that the plasma operating space has been extended since the buswork modifications. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Recovery Act - Sustainable Transportation: Advanced Electric Drive Vehicle Education Program

    SciTech Connect

    Caille, Gary

    2013-12-13

    The collective goals of this effort include: 1) reach all facets of this society with education regarding electric vehicles (EV) and plug–in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), 2) prepare a workforce to service these advanced vehicles, 3) create web–based learning at an unparalleled level, 4) educate secondary school students to prepare for their future and 5) train the next generation of professional engineers regarding electric vehicles. The Team provided an integrated approach combining secondary schools, community colleges, four–year colleges and community outreach to provide a consistent message (Figure 1). Colorado State University Ventures (CSUV), as the prime contractor, plays a key program management and co–ordination role. CSUV is an affiliate of Colorado State University (CSU) and is a separate 501(c)(3) company. The Team consists of CSUV acting as the prime contractor subcontracted to Arapahoe Community College (ACC), CSU, Motion Reality Inc. (MRI), Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) and Ricardo. Collaborators are Douglas County Educational Foundation/School District and Gooru (www.goorulearning.org), a nonprofit web–based learning resource and Google spin–off.

  6. 41 CFR 302-7.105 - May an advance of funds be authorized for transporting HHG and temporary storage?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... STORAGE OF PROPERTY 7-TRANSPORTATION AND TEMPORARY STORAGE OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS AND PROFESSIONAL BOOKS... transporting HHG and temporary storage? An advance of funds may be authorized when the transportation of HHG... be authorized for transporting HHG and temporary storage? 302-7.105 Section 302-7.105...

  7. 41 CFR 302-7.105 - May an advance of funds be authorized for transporting HHG and temporary storage?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... STORAGE OF PROPERTY 7-TRANSPORTATION AND TEMPORARY STORAGE OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS AND PROFESSIONAL BOOKS... transporting HHG and temporary storage? An advance of funds may be authorized when the transportation of HHG... be authorized for transporting HHG and temporary storage? 302-7.105 Section 302-7.105...

  8. 41 CFR 302-7.105 - May an advance of funds be authorized for transporting HHG and temporary storage?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... STORAGE OF PROPERTY 7-TRANSPORTATION AND TEMPORARY STORAGE OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS AND PROFESSIONAL BOOKS... transporting HHG and temporary storage? An advance of funds may be authorized when the transportation of HHG... be authorized for transporting HHG and temporary storage? 302-7.105 Section 302-7.105...

  9. Advanced Control Surface Seal Development for Future Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMange, J. J.; Dunlap, P. H., Jr.; Steinetz, B. M.

    2004-01-01

    NASA s Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been developing advanced high temperature structural seals since the late 1980's and is currently developing seals for future space vehicles as part of the Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program. This includes control surface seals that seal the edges and hinge lines of movable flaps and elevons on future reentry vehicles. In these applications, the seals must operate at temperatures above 2000 F in an oxidizing environment, limit hot gas leakage to protect underlying structures, endure high temperature scrubbing against rough surfaces, and remain flexible and resilient enough to stay in contact with sealing surfaces for multiple heating and loading cycles. For this study, three seal designs were compared against the baseline spring tube seal through a series of compression tests at room temperature and 2000 F and flow tests at room temperature. In addition, canted coil springs were tested as preloaders behind the seals at room temperature to assess their potential for improving resiliency. Addition of these preloader elements resulted in significant increases in resiliency compared to the seals by themselves and surpassed the performance of the baseline seal at room temperature. Flow tests demonstrated that the seal candidates with engineered cores had lower leakage rates than the baseline spring tube design. However, when the seals were placed on the preloader elements, the flow rates were higher as the seals were not compressed as much and therefore were not able to fill the groove as well. High temperature tests were also conducted to asses the compatibility of seal fabrics against ceramic matrix composite (CMC) panels anticipated for use in next generation launch vehicles. These evaluations demonstrated potential bonding issues between the Nextel fabrics and CMC candidates.

  10. Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Swanson

    2005-08-30

    The transport reactor development unit (TRDU) was modified to accommodate oxygen-blown operation in support of a Vision 21-type energy plex that could produce power, chemicals, and fuel. These modifications consisted of changing the loop seal design from a J-leg to an L-valve configuration, thereby increasing the mixing zone length and residence time. In addition, the standpipe, dipleg, and L-valve diameters were increased to reduce slugging caused by bubble formation in the lightly fluidized sections of the solid return legs. A seal pot was added to the bottom of the dipleg so that the level of solids in the standpipe could be operated independently of the dipleg return leg. A separate coal feed nozzle was added that could inject the coal upward into the outlet of the mixing zone, thereby precluding any chance of the fresh coal feed back-mixing into the oxidizing zone of the mixing zone; however, difficulties with this coal feed configuration led to a switch back to the original downward configuration. Instrumentation to measure and control the flow of oxygen and steam to the burner and mix zone ports was added to allow the TRDU to be operated under full oxygen-blown conditions. In total, ten test campaigns have been conducted under enriched-air or full oxygen-blown conditions. During these tests, 1515 hours of coal feed with 660 hours of air-blown gasification and 720 hours of enriched-air or oxygen-blown coal gasification were completed under this particular contract. During these tests, approximately 366 hours of operation with Wyodak, 123 hours with Navajo sub-bituminous coal, 143 hours with Illinois No. 6, 106 hours with SUFCo, 110 hours with Prater Creek, 48 hours with Calumet, and 134 hours with a Pittsburgh No. 8 bituminous coal were completed. In addition, 331 hours of operation on low-rank coals such as North Dakota lignite, Australian brown coal, and a 90:10 wt% mixture of lignite and wood waste were completed. Also included in these test campaigns was

  11. Fabrication of self-supporting porous silicon membranes and tuning transport properties by surface functionalization.

    PubMed

    Velleman, Leonora; Shearer, Cameron James; Ellis, Amanda Vera; Losic, Dusan; Voelcker, Nicolas Hans; Shapter, Joseph George

    2010-09-01

    This study presents a simple approach to perform selective mass transport through freestanding porous silicon (pSi) membranes. pSi membranes were fabricated by the electrochemical etching of silicon to produce membranes with controlled structure and pore sizes close to molecular dimensions (approximately 12 nm in diameter). While these membranes are capable of size-exclusion based separations, chemically specific filtration remains a great challenge especially in the biomedical field. Herein, we investigate the transport properties of chemically functionalized pSi membranes. The membranes were functionalized using silanes (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrodecyl)dimethylchlorosilane (PFDS) and N-(triethoxysilylpropyl)-o-polyethylene oxide urethane (PEGS) to give membranes hydrophobic (PFDS) and hydrophilic (PEGS) properties. The transport of probe dyes tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(ii) hexahydrate (Rubpy) and Rose Bengal (RB) through these functionalized membranes was examined to determine the effect surface functionalization has on the selectivity and separation ability of pSi membranes. This study provides the basis for further investigation into more sophisticated surface functionalization and coupled with the biocompatibility of pSi will lead to new advances in membrane based bio-separations.

  12. EDITORIAL: Focus on Advances in Surface and Interface Science 2009 FOCUS ON ADVANCES IN SURFACE AND INTERFACE SCIENCE 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeschlimann, Martin; Schneider, Wolf-Dieter

    2009-12-01

    Nearly 80% of all chemical reactions in nature and in human technology take place at boundaries between phases, i.e., at surfaces or interfaces. A detailed understanding of the elementary processes at surfaces and interfaces is therefore necessary to support and to advance the high technology that very much founds the prosperity and life style of our society. One of the challenges of modern surface science is thus to expand its range of investigations to all types of surfaces and interfaces and to develop a thorough understanding of the relationships between molecular-scale surface properties and parameters relevant to potential applications and devices. Beyond these technological drivers, however, is a rich range of novel and fundamental physical and chemical properties at surfaces and interfaces down to the nanoscale whose study represents outstanding intellectual challenges. The current research focuses on atomic- and molecular-level studies of the structure (atomic and electronic), bonding, reactivity, dynamics, restructuring, and magnetism at the surfaces and interfaces of metals, oxides, semiconductors, polymers, biological molecules, and liquids. Such investigations are becoming more and more important in view of the increasing emphasis on nanometer-scale structures in almost every technological application, from heterogeneous catalysis to microcircuit fabrication to magnetic data storage. As the scale of devices continues to be reduced, the distinction between bulk and surface properties becomes blurred, and all of the properties of materials tend to become interfacial This Focus Issue includes exciting new developments in the field of surface and interface science ranging, e.g., from the properties of metal-water interfaces to single-atom contacts. Special emphasis was taken to coupling theory with experiments aimed at elucidating fundamental atomic scale phenomena. It combines a broad expert and frontiers survey of research in this field today with an up

  13. Transport through quantum wells and superlattices on topological insulator surfaces.

    PubMed

    Song, J-T; Li, Y-X; Sun, Q-F

    2014-05-07

    We investigate electron transmission coefficients through quantum wells and quantum superlattices on topological insulator surfaces. The quantum well or superlattice is not constituted by general electronic potential barriers but by Fermi velocity barriers which originate in the different topological insulator surfaces. It is found that electron resonant modes can be renormalized by quantum wells and more clearly by quantum superlattices. The depth and width of a quantum well and superlattice, the incident angle of an electron, and the Fermi energy can be used to effectively tune the electron resonant modes. In particular, the number N of periodic structures that constitute a superlattice can further strengthen these regulating effects. These results suggest that a device could be developed to select and regulate electron propagation modes on topological insulator surfaces. Finally, we also study the conductance and the Fano factor through quantum wells and quantum superlattices. In contrast to what has been reported before, the suppression factors of 0.4 in the conductance and 0.85 in the Fano factor are observed in a quantum well, while the transport for a quantum superlattice shows strong oscillating behavior at low energy and reaches the same saturated values as in the case of a quantum well at sufficiently large energies.

  14. Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Shane E. Roark

    2006-03-31

    The objective of this project was to develop an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. A family of hydrogen separation membranes was developed including single phase mixed conducting ceramics, ceramic/ceramic composites, cermet membranes, cermet membranes containing a hydrogen permeable metal, and intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. Each membrane type had different operating parameters, advantages, and disadvantages that were documented over the course of the project. Research on these membranes progressed from ceramics to cermets to intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. During this progression performance was increased from 0.01 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2} up to 423 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2}. Eltron and team membranes not only developed each membrane type, but also membrane surface catalysis and impurity tolerance, creation of thin film membranes, alternative applications such as membrane promoted alkane dehydrogenation, demonstration of scale-up testing, and complete engineering documentation including process and mechanical considerations necessary for inclusion of Eltron membranes in a full scale integrated gasification combined cycle power plant. The results of this project directly led to a new $15 million program funded by the Department of Energy. This new project will focus exclusively on scale-up of this technology as part of the FutureGen initiative.

  15. Formal representation of the requirements for an Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT) flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frincke, Deborah; Wolber, Dave; Fisher, Gene; Cohen, Gerald C.; Mclees, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    A partial requirement specification for an Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT) Flight Control System is described. The example was adopted from requirements given in a NASA Contractor report. The language used to describe the requirements, Requirements Specification Language (RSL), is described in a companion document.

  16. 78 FR 35746 - Advance Notification to Native American Tribes of Transportation of Certain Shipments of Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... licensees will be required to provide advance notifications for certain shipments of radioactive material at... for certain shipments of radioactive material at the time the applicable Agreement State implements... B packaging; (2) the licensed material is being transported within or across the boundary of...

  17. Mass transport of deposited particles by surface-to-surface contact.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, A; Sextro, R G; Byrne, M A

    2012-08-15

    The spread of particle-borne contamination by surface-to-surface contact and its implications for exposures within the indoor environment have been observed - largely qualitatively. The present study was conducted with the aim of quantifying the mass transfer efficiency (TE) of deposited aerosol particles when selected soft and hard surfaces come in contact. The surfaces used were 100% cotton, synthetic fleece, plastic laminate and brass. Contact transfer efficiencies ranging from 2 to 45% were observed; these are very significant numbers in terms of hazardous aerosol transport in the environment. Other observations include an increase in the mass transferred with increased surface roughness. An increase in the applied pressure between the two surfaces in contact leads to a step change in transfer efficiency, so that two pressure regimes can be identified, with a transition pressure between them that depends on surface type. Time of contact appears to have little to no effect on the mass transfer efficiency for the surfaces studied, while contaminant loading has some effect that is not systematic.

  18. Asphalt pavement surfaces and asphalt mixtures. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The papers in this volume, which deal with asphalt pavement surfaces and asphalt mixtures, should be of interest to state and local construction, design, materials, and research engineers as well as contractors and material producers. The papers in Part 1 include discussions of pavement smoothness specifications and skidding characteristics. The first four papers in Part 2 were submitted in response to a call for papers for a session at the 75th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board on low-temperature properties of hot-mix asphalt. The next eight are on the influence of volumetric and strength properties on the performance of hot-mix asphalt. In the following three papers, the topics covered are the complex modulus of asphalt concrete, cold in-place asphalt recycling, and polymer modification of asphalt pavements in Ontario. The last two papers were presented in a session on relationship of materials characterization to accelerated pavement performance testing.

  19. The role of advanced reactive surface area characterization in improving predictions of mineral reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckingham, L. E.; Zhang, S.; Mitnick, E.; Cole, D. R.; Yang, L.; Anovitz, L. M.; Sheets, J.; Swift, A.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Landrot, G.; Mito, S.; Xue, Z.; Steefel, C. I.; DePaolo, D. J.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2 in deep sedimentary formations is a promising means of mitigating carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants but the long-term fate of injected CO2 is challenging to predict. Reactive transport models are used to gain insight over long times but rely on laboratory determined mineral reaction rates that have been difficult to extrapolate to field systems. This, in part, is due to a lack of understanding of mineral reactive surface area. Many models use an arbitrary approximation of reactive surface area, applying orders of magnitude scaling factors to measured BET or geometric surface areas. Recently, a few more sophisticated approaches have used 2D and 3D image analyses to determine mineral-specific reactive surface areas that account for the accessibility of minerals. However, the ability of these advanced surface area estimates to improve predictions of mineral reaction rates has yet to be determined. In this study, we fuse X-ray microCT, SEM QEMSCAN, XRD, SANS, and SEM-FIB analysis to determine mineral-specific accessible reactive surface areas for a core sample from the Nagaoka pilot CO2 injection site (Japan). This sample is primarily quartz, plagioclase, smectite, K-feldspar, and pyroxene. SEM imaging shows abundant smectite cement and grain coatings that decrease the fluid accessibility of other minerals. However, analysis of FIB-SEM images reveals that smectite nano-pores are well connected such that access to underlying minerals is not occluded by smectite coatings. Mineral-specific accessible surfaces are determined, accounting for the connectivity of the pore space with and without connected smectite nano-pores. The large-scale impact of variations in accessibility and dissolution rates are then determined through continuum scale modeling using grid-cell specific information on accessible surface areas. This approach will be compared with a traditional continuum scale model using mineral abundances and common surface area

  20. Predicting the sun's polar magnetic fields with a surface flux transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Upton, Lisa; Hathaway, David H. E-mail: lar0009@uah.edu

    2014-01-01

    The Sun's polar magnetic fields are directly related to solar cycle variability. The strength of the polar fields at the start (minimum) of a cycle determine the subsequent amplitude of that cycle. In addition, the polar field reversals at cycle maximum alter the propagation of galactic cosmic rays throughout the heliosphere in fundamental ways. We describe a surface magnetic flux transport model that advects the magnetic flux emerging in active regions (sunspots) using detailed observations of the near-surface flows that transport the magnetic elements. These flows include the axisymmetric differential rotation and meridional flow and the non-axisymmetric cellular convective flows (supergranules), all of which vary in time in the model as indicated by direct observations. We use this model with data assimilated from full-disk magnetograms to produce full surface maps of the Sun's magnetic field at 15 minute intervals from 1996 May to 2013 July (all of sunspot cycle 23 and the rise to maximum of cycle 24). We tested the predictability of this model using these maps as initial conditions, but with daily sunspot area data used to give the sources of new magnetic flux. We find that the strength of the polar fields at cycle minimum and the polar field reversals at cycle maximum can be reliably predicted up to 3 yr in advance. We include a prediction for the cycle 24 polar field reversal.

  1. Advances in Electrostatic Dust Detection on Remote Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Voinier, C; Skinner, C H; Roquemore, A L

    2005-02-09

    The inventory of dust in next-step magnetic fusion devices will be regulated for safety reasons, however diagnostics to measure in-vessel dust are still in their infancy. Advances in dust particle detection on remote surfaces are reported. Two grids of interlocking circuit traces with spacing in the range 125 mu m to 25 mu m are biased to 30 V. Impinging dust creates a short circuit and the result current pulse is recorded. The detector response was measured with particles scraped from a carbon fiber composite tile and sorted by size category. The finest 25 mu m grid showed a sensitivity more than an order of magnitude higher than the 125 mu m grid. The response to the finest particle categories (5 30 mu m) was two orders of magnitude higher than the largest (125 250 mu m) category. Longer duration current pulses were observed from the coarser particles. The results indicate a detection threshold for fine particles below 1 mu g/cm^2.

  2. Recent Advances in Biosensing With Photonic Crystal Surfaces: A Review.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, B T; Zhang, M; Zhuo, Y; Kwon, L; Race, C

    2016-05-15

    Photonic crystal surfaces that are designed to function as wavelength-selective optical resonators have become a widely adopted platform for label-free biosensing, and for enhancement of the output of photon-emitting tags used throughout life science research and in vitro diagnostics. While some applications, such as analysis of drug-protein interactions, require extremely high resolution and the ability to accurately correct for measurement artifacts, others require sensitivity that is high enough for detection of disease biomarkers in serum with concentrations less than 1 pg/ml. As the analysis of cells becomes increasingly important for studying the behavior of stem cells, cancer cells, and biofilms under a variety of conditions, approaches that enable high resolution imaging of live cells without cytotoxic stains or photobleachable fluorescent dyes are providing new tools to biologists who seek to observe individual cells over extended time periods. This paper will review several recent advances in photonic crystal biosensor detection instrumentation and device structures that are being applied towards direct detection of small molecules in the context of high throughput drug screening, photonic crystal fluorescence enhancement as utilized for high sensitivity multiplexed cancer biomarker detection, and label-free high resolution imaging of cells and individual nanoparticles as a new tool for life science research and single-molecule diagnostics.

  3. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Sastry, K.V.S.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; De, A.; Sotillo, F.; Harris, G. ); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. ); Hu, W.; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. ); Choudhry, V.; Sehgal, R.; Ghosh, A. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United Stat

    1991-05-15

    The primary objective in the scope of this research project is to develop advanced flotation methods for coal cleaning in order to achieve near total pyritic-sulfur removal at 90% Btu recovery, using coal samples procured from three major US coal seams. Concomitantly, the ash content of these coals is to be reduced to 6% or less. Investigation of mechanisms for the control of coal and pyrite surfaces prior to fine coal flotation is the main aspect of the project objectives. Research topics covered during this quarter include the characterization of the base coals, various flotation studies on optimization and pyrite rejection, and a detailed flotation kinetic study. The effect of hexanol, butanol, dodecane, and polyethylene glycol on flotation is described. A second major objective is to investigate factors involved in the progressive weathering and oxidation of coal that had been exposed to varying weathered degrees, namely, open, covered and in an argon-inerted'' atmosphere, over a period of twelve months. After regular intervals if weathering, samples of the three base coals (Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh No. 8 and Upper Freeport PA) were collected and shipped to both the University of Pittsburgh and the University of California at Berkeley for characterization studies of the weathered material. 35 figs., 17 tabs.

  4. Advances in direct and diffraction methods for surface structural determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, S. Y.

    1999-08-01

    I describe recent advances in low-energy electron diffraction holography and photoelectron diffraction holography. These are direct methods for determining the surface structure. I show that for LEED and PD spectra taken in an energy and angular mesh, the relative phase between the reference wave and the scattered wave has a known geometric form if the spectra are always taken from within a small angular cone in the near backscattering direction. By using data in the backscattering small cone at each direction of interest, a simple algorithm is developed to invert the spectra and extract object atomic positions with no input of calculated dynamic factors. I also describe the use of a convergent iterative method of PD and LEED. The computation time of this method scales as N2, where N is the dimension of the propagator matrix, rather than N3 as in conventional Gaussian substitutional methods. Both the Rehr-Albers separable-propagator cluster approach and the slab-type non-separable approach can be cast in the new iterative form. With substantial savings in computational time and no loss in numerical accuracy, this method is very useful in applications of multiple scattering theory, particularly for systems involving either very large unit cells (>300 atoms) or where no long-range order is present.

  5. Strain driven transport for bone modeling at the periosteal surface.

    PubMed

    Banks-Sills, Leslie; Ståhle, Per; Svensson, Ingrid; Eliaz, Noam

    2011-03-01

    Bone modeling and remodeling has been the subject of extensive experimental studies. There have been several mathematical models proposed to explain the observed behavior, as well. A different approach is taken here in which the bone is treated from a macroscopic view point. In this investigation, a one-dimensional analytical model is used to shed light on the factors which play the greatest role in modeling or growth of cortical bone at the periosteal surface. It is presumed that bone growth is promoted when increased amounts of bone nutrients, such as nitric oxide synthase (NOS) or messenger molecules, such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), seep out to the periosteal surface of cortical bone and are absorbed by osteoblasts. The transport of the bone nutrients is assumed to be a strain controlled process. Equations for the flux of these nutrients are written for a one-dimensional model of a long bone. The obtained partial differential equation is linearized and solved analytically. Based upon the seepage of nutrients out of the bone, the effect of loading frequency, number of cycles and strain level is examined for several experiments that were found in the literature. It is seen that bone nutrient seepage is greatest on the tensile side of the bone; this location coincides with the greatest amount of bone modeling.

  6. Importance of 3D Processes Near the Ocean's Surface for Material Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgokmen, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    There are a number of practical problems that demand an accurate knowledge of ocean currents near the surface of the ocean. It is known that oceanic coherent features transport heat and carry out vertical exchange of biogeochemical tracers. Ocean currents can affect biological primary production, air-sea gas exchanges and global tracer budgets. Ocean currents are also important for the dispersion of substances that pose a danger to society, economy and human health. Examples of such events include algal blooms, the Fukushima nuclear plant incident in the Pacific Ocean in 2011, and repeated large oil spills in the Gulf of Mexico, namely the IXTOC in 1978 and the Deepwater Horizon event in 2010. Such incidents demand accurate answers to questions such as ``where will the pollutant go?", ``how fast will it get there?" and ``how much pollutant will arrive there?", and in some instances ``where did the pollutant come from?". The answers to these questions are critical to the allocation of limited response resources, and in determining the overall impact of the events. We will summarize the efforts by the Consortium for Advanced Research on Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment (CARTHE). One of the primary objectives of CARTHE is to improve predictive modeling capability for flows near the air-sea interface. In particular, two large experiments, Grand Lagrangian Deployment (GLAD) and Surf-zone and Coastal Oil Pathways Experiment (SCOPE), coordinated with real-time modeling were instructive on processes influencing near-surface material transport. Findings on submesoscale flows as well as model deficiencies to capture processes relevant to transport will be discussed. Insight into future modeling and observational plans will be provided.

  7. Nanofluidic transport through isolated carbon nanotube channels: Advances, controversies, and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Shirui; Meshot, Eric R.; Kuykendall, Tevye; Cabrini, Stefano; Fornasiero, Francesco

    2015-06-02

    Owing to their simple chemistry and structure, controllable geometry, and a plethora of unusual yet exciting transport properties, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have emerged as exceptional channels for fundamental nanofluidic studies, as well as building blocks for future fluidic devices that can outperform current technology in many applications. Leveraging the unique fluidic properties of CNTs in advanced systems requires a full understanding of their physical origin. Recent advancements in nanofabrication technology enable nanofluidic devices to be built with a single, nanometer-wide CNT as a fluidic pathway. These novel platforms with isolated CNT nanochannels offer distinct advantages for establishing quantitative structure–transport correlations in comparison with membranes containing many CNT pores. In addition, they are promising components for single-molecule sensors as well as for building nanotube-based circuits wherein fluidics and electronics can be coupled. With such advanced device architecture, molecular and ionic transport can be manipulated with vastly enhanced control for applications in sensing, separation, detection, and therapeutic delivery. Recent achievements in fabricating isolated-CNT nanofluidic platforms are highlighted, along with the most-significant findings each platform enables for water, ion, and molecular transport. Furthermore, the implications of these findings and remaining open questions on the exceptional fluidic properties of CNTs are also discussed.

  8. Nanofluidic transport through isolated carbon nanotube channels: Advances, controversies, and challenges

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Shirui; Meshot, Eric R.; Kuykendall, Tevye; ...

    2015-06-02

    Owing to their simple chemistry and structure, controllable geometry, and a plethora of unusual yet exciting transport properties, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have emerged as exceptional channels for fundamental nanofluidic studies, as well as building blocks for future fluidic devices that can outperform current technology in many applications. Leveraging the unique fluidic properties of CNTs in advanced systems requires a full understanding of their physical origin. Recent advancements in nanofabrication technology enable nanofluidic devices to be built with a single, nanometer-wide CNT as a fluidic pathway. These novel platforms with isolated CNT nanochannels offer distinct advantages for establishing quantitative structure–transport correlationsmore » in comparison with membranes containing many CNT pores. In addition, they are promising components for single-molecule sensors as well as for building nanotube-based circuits wherein fluidics and electronics can be coupled. With such advanced device architecture, molecular and ionic transport can be manipulated with vastly enhanced control for applications in sensing, separation, detection, and therapeutic delivery. Recent achievements in fabricating isolated-CNT nanofluidic platforms are highlighted, along with the most-significant findings each platform enables for water, ion, and molecular transport. Furthermore, the implications of these findings and remaining open questions on the exceptional fluidic properties of CNTs are also discussed.« less

  9. Surface transportation: Demands and needs. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning long and short-term requirements of surface transportation. Topics include traffic forecasting on highways, waterways, and rail systems; long-range transportation planning strategies; and cost considerations of future requirements. Freight transport studies in urban areas and specific regions, and energy demands for surface transportation are also considered. (Contains a minimum of 95 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. New advanced surface modification technique: titanium oxide ceramic surface implants: long-term clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Gyorgy; Kovacs, Lajos; Barabas, Jozsef; Nemeth, Zsolt; Maironna, Carlo

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the background to advanced surface modification technologies and to present a new technique, involving the formation of a titanium oxide ceramic coating, with relatively long-term results of its clinical utilization. Three general techniques are used to modify surfaces: the addition or removal of material and the change of material already present. Surface properties can also be changed without the addition or removal of material, through the laser or electron beam thermal treatment. The new technique outlined in this paper relates to the production of a corrosion-resistant 2000-2500 A thick, ceramic oxide layer with a coherent crystalline structure on the surface of titanium implants. The layer is grown electrochemically from the bulk of the metal and is modified by heat treatment. Such oxide ceramic-coated implants have a number of advantageous properties relative to implants covered with various other coatings: a higher external hardness, a greater force of adherence between the titanium and the oxide ceramic coating, a virtually perfect insulation between the organism and the metal (no possibility of metal allergy), etc. The coated implants were subjected to various physical, chemical, electronmicroscopic, etc. tests for a qualitative characterization. Finally, these implants (plates, screws for maxillofacial osteosynthesis and dental root implants) were applied in surgical practice for a period of 10 years. Tests and the experience acquired demonstrated the good properties of the titanium oxide ceramic-coated implants.

  11. Preface: Special Topic Section on Advanced Electronic Structure Methods for Solids and Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelides, Angelos; Martinez, Todd J.; Alavi, Ali; Kresse, Georg

    2015-09-14

    This Special Topic section on Advanced Electronic Structure Methods for Solids and Surfaces contains a collection of research papers that showcase recent advances in the high accuracy prediction of materials and surface properties. It provides a timely snapshot of a growing field that is of broad importance to chemistry, physics, and materials science.

  12. Surface trap mediated electronic transport in biofunctionalized silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puppo, F.; Traversa, F. L.; Di Ventra, M.; De Micheli, G.; Carrara, S.

    2016-08-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs), fabricated via a top-down approach and then functionalized with biological probes, are used for electrically-based sensing of breast tumor markers. The SiNWs, featuring memristive-like behavior in bare conditions, show, in the presence of biomarkers, modified hysteresis and, more importantly, a voltage memory component, namely a voltage gap. The voltage gap is demonstrated to be a novel and powerful parameter of detection thanks to its high-resolution dependence on charges in proximity of the wire. This unique approach of sensing has never been studied and adopted before. Here, we propose a physical model of the surface electronic transport in Schottky barrier SiNW biosensors, aiming at reproducing and understanding the voltage gap based behavior. The implemented model describes well the experimental I-V characteristics of the device. It also links the modification of the voltage gap to the changing concentration of antigens by showing the decrease of this parameter in response to increasing concentrations of the molecules that are detected with femtomolar resolution in real human samples. Both experiments and simulations highlight the predominant role of the dynamic recombination of the nanowire surface states, with the incoming external charges from bio-species, in the appearance and modification of the voltage gap. Finally, thanks to its compactness, and strict correlation with the physics of the nanodevice, this model can be used to describe and predict the I-V characteristics in other nanostructured devices, for different than antibody-based sensing as well as electronic applications.

  13. Transport on the surface of a topological insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Vargiamidis, V.; Vasilopoulos, P.

    2014-08-14

    We study theoretically dc and ac transport on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator when its time-reversal symmetry is broken. Starting with a Kubo formula, we derive an explicit expression for the dc Hall conductivity, valid for finite temperatures. At zero temperature this expression gives the dc half-quantum Hall conductivity, provided the Fermi level lies in the gap. Corrections when the Fermi level is outside the gap and scattering by impurities are quantified. The longitudinal conductivity is also examined. At finite frequencies, we find a modified Drude term in σ{sub xx}(ω) and logarithmic, frequency-dependent corrections in σ{sub yx}(ω). The ac Hall conductivity exhibits a robust logarithmic singularity for excitation energies equal to the gapwidth. For these energies, we also find that the power spectrum, which is pertinent to optical experiments, exhibits drastic increase. The Hall conductivity remains almost unaffected for temperatures up to approximately 300 K.

  14. Advanced subsonic transport approach noise: The relative contribution of airframe noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, William L., Jr.; Garber, Donald P.

    1992-01-01

    With current engine technology, airframe noise is a contributing source for large commercial aircraft on approach, but not the major contributor. With the promise of much quieter jet engines with the planned new generation of high-by-pass turbofan engines, airframe noise has become a topic of interest in the advanced subsonic transport research program. The objective of this paper is to assess the contribution of airframe noise relative to the other aircraft noise sources on approach. The assessment will be made for a current technology large commercial transport aircraft and for an envisioned advanced technology aircraft. NASA's Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) will be used to make total aircraft noise predictions for these two aircraft types. Predicted noise levels and areas of noise contours will be used to determine the relative importance of the contributing approach noise sources. The actual set-up decks used to make the ANOPP runs for the two aircraft types are included in appendixes.

  15. Workshop on Critical Issues in Microgravity Fluids, Transport, and Reaction Processes in Advanced Human Support Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Joshi, Jitendra A.

    2004-01-01

    This workshop was designed to bring the experts from the Advanced Human Support Technologies communities together to identify the most pressing and fruitful areas of research where success hinges on collaborative research between the two communities. Thus an effort was made to bring together experts in both advanced human support technologies and microgravity fluids, transport and reaction processes. Expertise was drawn from academia, national laboratories, and the federal government. The intent was to bring about a thorough exchange of ideas and develop recommendations to address the significant open design and operation issues for human support systems that are affected by fluid physics, transport and reaction processes. This report provides a summary of key discussions, findings, and recommendations.

  16. Benefits assessment of Advanced Public Transportation Systems (APTS). Final report, October 1995-July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Goeddel, D.

    1996-07-30

    This report documents work performed under FTA`s Advanced Public Transportation Systems (APTS) Program, a program structured to undertake research and development of innovative applications of advanced navigation, information, and communication technologies that most benefit public transportation. This report presents the results of an analysis conducted by the Volpe Center, for the FTA, to provide an `order-of-magnitude` estimate of the expected benefits to the transit industry with the application of APTS technologies. Specifically, the study identified and quantified the major benefits derived from current applications of APTS technologies within the transit industry and projected current APTS benefits to a national level based on forecasts and reasonable assumptions on the potential future applications of such technologies within the transit industry.

  17. Advanced public transportation systems deployment in the United States. Final report, July 1995-January 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, R.F.; Labell, L.N.

    1996-08-01

    This report documents work performed under FTA`s Advanced Public Transportation Systems (APTS) Program, a program structured to undertake research and development of innovative applications of advanced navigation, information, and communication technologies that most benefit public transportation. This report is a compilation of existing and planned deployments of APTS technologies and services. The information was collected during the Fall of 1995 and was obtained through contacts with one or more persons at each agency. The objective was to include information from all agencies who submitted information for the 1993 National Transit Database (NTD) Report Year, the last year for which NTD data was available at the time. A total of 464 agencies provided information for this study. Those with no existing or planned APTS systems are not included herein.

  18. Fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions impacts of alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. Q.

    1998-12-16

    At an international conference on global warming, held in Kyoto, Japan, in December 1997, the United States committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 7% over its 1990 level by the year 2012. To help achieve that goal, transportation GHG emissions need to be reduced. Using Argonne's fuel-cycle model, I estimated GHG emissions reduction potentials of various near- and long-term transportation technologies. The estimated per-mile GHG emissions results show that alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies can help significantly reduce transportation GHG emissions. Of the near-term technologies evaluated in this study, electric vehicles; hybrid electric vehicles; compression-ignition, direct-injection vehicles; and E85 flexible fuel vehicles can reduce fuel-cycle GHG emissions by more than 25%, on the fuel-cycle basis. Electric vehicles powered by electricity generated primarily from nuclear and renewable sources can reduce GHG emissions by 80%. Other alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas, offer limited, but positive, GHG emission reduction benefits. Among the long-term technologies evaluated in this study, conventional spark ignition and compression ignition engines powered by alternative fuels and gasoline- and diesel-powered advanced vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by 10% to 30%. Ethanol dedicated vehicles, electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by over 40%. Spark ignition engines and fuel-cell vehicles powered by cellulosic ethanol and solar hydrogen (for fuel-cell vehicles only) can reduce GHG emissions by over 80%. In conclusion, both near- and long-term alternative fuels and advanced transportation technologies can play a role in reducing the United States GHG emissions.

  19. An assessment of advanced displays and controls technology applicable to future space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Jack J.; Villarreal, Diana

    1990-01-01

    The topic of advanced display and control technology is addressed along with the major objectives of this technology, the current state of the art, major accomplishments, research programs and facilities, future trends, technology issues, space transportation systems applications and projected technology readiness for those applications. The holes that may exist between the technology needs of the transportation systems versus the research that is currently under way are addressed, and cultural changes that might facilitate the incorporation of these advanced technologies into future space transportation systems are recommended. Some of the objectives are to reduce life cycle costs, improve reliability and fault tolerance, use of standards for the incorporation of advancing technology, and reduction of weight, volume and power. Pilot workload can be reduced and the pilot's situational awareness can be improved, which would result in improved flight safety and operating efficiency. This could be accomplished through the use of integrated, electronic pictorial displays, consolidated controls, artificial intelligence, and human centered automation tools. The Orbiter Glass Cockpit Display is an example examined.

  20. Surface tension confined (STC) tracks for capillary-driven transport of low surface tension liquids.

    PubMed

    Schutzius, Thomas M; Elsharkawy, Mohamed; Tiwari, Manish K; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2012-12-21

    Surface tension confined (STC) open tracks for pumpless transport of low-surface tension liquids (e.g., acetone, ethanol, hexadecane) on microfluidic chips are fabricated using a large-area, wet-processing technique. Wettable, paraffin-wax, submillimeter-wide tracks are applied by a fountain-pen procedure on superoleophobic, fluoroacrylic-carbon nanofiber (CNF) composite coatings. The fabricated anisotropic wetting patterns confine the low-surface-tension liquids onto the flow tracks, driving them with meniscus velocities up to 3.1 cm s(-1). Scaling arguments and Washburn's equation provide estimates of the liquid velocities measured in the STC tracks. These tracks are also shown to act as rails for directional sliding control of mm-sized water droplets. The present facile top-down patterned wettability approach can be extended to deposit micrometer-wide tracks, which bear promise for pumpless handling of low-surface tension liquids (e.g., aqueous solutions containing alcohols or surfactants) in lab-on-a-chip type applications or in low power, high-throughput bio-microfluidics for health care applications.

  1. Noise and economic characteristics of an advanced blended supersonic transport concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molloy, J. K.; Grantham, W. D.; Neubauer, M. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Noise and economic characteristics were obtained for an advanced supersonic transport concept that utilized wing body blending, a double bypass variable cycle engine, superplastically formed and diffusion bonded titanium in both the primary and secondary structures, and an alternative interior arrangement that provides increased seating capacity. The configuration has a cruise Mach number of 2.62, provisions for 290 passengers, a mission range of 8.19 Mm (4423 n.mi.), and an average operating cruise lift drag ratio of 9.23. Advanced operating procedures, which have the potential to reduce airport community noise, were explored by using a simulator. Traded jet noise levels of 105.7 and 103.4 EPNdB were obtained by using standard and advanced takeoff operational procedures, respectively. A new method for predicting lateral attenuation was utilized in obtaining these jet noise levels.

  2. Evaluation of advanced propulsion options for the next manned transportation system: Propulsion evolution study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spears, L. T.; Kramer, R. D.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives were to examine launch vehicle applications and propulsion requirements for potential future manned space transportation systems and to support planning toward the evolution of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) engines beyond their current or initial launch vehicle applications. As a basis for examinations of potential future manned launch vehicle applications, we used three classes of manned space transportation concepts currently under study: Space Transportation System Evolution, Personal Launch System (PLS), and Advanced Manned Launch System (AMLS). Tasks included studies of launch vehicle applications and requirements for hydrogen-oxygen rocket engines; the development of suggestions for STME engine evolution beyond the mid-1990's; the development of suggestions for STME evolution beyond the Advanced Launch System (ALS) application; the study of booster propulsion options, including LOX-Hydrocarbon options; the analysis of the prospects and requirements for utilization of a single engine configuration over the full range of vehicle applications, including manned vehicles plus ALS and Shuttle C; and a brief review of on-going and planned LOX-Hydrogen propulsion technology activities.

  3. DART: Delta Advanced Reusable Transport. An alternate manned space system proposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Delta Advanced Reusable Transport (DART) craft is being developed to add, multiple, rapid, and cost effective space access to the U.S. capability and to further the efforts towards a permanent space presence. The DART craft provides an augmentative and an alternative system to the Shuttle. As a supplement launch vehicle, the DART adds low cost and easily accessible transport of crew and cargo to specific space destinations to the U.S. program. This adds significant opportunities for manned rated missions that do not require Shuttle capabilities. In its alternative role, the DART can provide emergency space access and satellite repair, the continuation of scientific research, and the furthering of U.S. manned efforts in the event of Shuttle incapabilities. In addition, the DART is being designed for Space Station Freedom compatibility, including its use as a 'lifeboat' emergency reentry craft for Freedom astronauts, as well as the transport of crew and cargo for station resupply.

  4. Recent advances in statistical methods for the estimation of sediment and nutrient transport in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, T. A.

    1995-07-01

    This paper reviews advances in methods for estimating fluvial transport of suspended sediment and nutrients. Research from the past four years, mostly dealing with estimating monthly and annual loads, is emphasized. However, because this topic has not appeared in previous IUGG reports, some research prior to 1990 is included. The motivation for studying sediment transport has shifted during the past few decades. In addition to its role in filling reservoirs and channels, sediment is increasingly recognized as an important part of fluvial ecosystems and estuarine wetlands. Many groups want information about sediment transport [Bollman, 1992]: Scientists trying to understand benthic biology and catchment hydrology; citizens and policy-makers concerned about environmental impacts (e.g. impacts of logging [Beschta, 1978] or snow-fences [Sturges, 1992]); government regulators considering the effectiveness of programs to protect in-stream habitat and downstream waterbodies; and resource managers seeking to restore wetlands.

  5. Study on utilization of advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. W.; Thomson, L. W.; Wilson, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    The potential for utilizing advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports was assessed. Six fuselage design concepts were selected and evaluated in terms of structural performance, weight, and manufacturing development and costs. Two concepts were selected that merit further consideration for composite fuselage application. These concepts are: (1) a full depth honeycomb design with no stringers, and (2) an I section stringer stiffened laminate skin design. Weight reductions due to applying composites to the fuselages of commercial and military transports were calculated. The benefits of applying composites to a fleet of military transports were determined. Significant technology issues pertinent to composite fuselage structures were identified and evaluated. Program plans for resolving the technology issues were developed.

  6. Laboratory studies of aeolian sediment transport processes on planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Keld R.; Valance, Alexandre; Merrison, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    , but not all, older or recent wind tunnel observations. Similarly some measurements performed with uniform sand samples having grain diameters of the order of 0.25-0.40 mm indicate that ripple spacing depends on friction velocity in a similar way as particle jump length. The observations are thus in agreement with a recent ripple model that link the typical jump length to ripple spacing. A possible explanation for contradictory observations in some experiments may be that long observation sequences are required in order to assure that equilibrium exists between ripple geometry and wind flow. Quantitative understanding of saltation characteristics on Mars still lacks important elements. Based upon image analysis and numerical predictions, aeolian ripples have been thought to consist of relatively large grains (diameter > 0.6 mm) and that saltation occurs at high wind speeds (> 26 m/s) involving trajectories that are significantly longer than those on Earth (by a factor of 10-100). However, this is not supported by recent observations from the surface of Mars, which shows that active ripples in their geometry and composition have characteristics compatible with those of terrestrial ripples (Sullivan et al., 2008). Also the highest average wind speeds on Mars have been measured to be < 20 m/s, with even turbulent gusts not exceeding 25 m/s. Electrification is seen as a dominant factor in the transport dynamics of dust on Mars, affecting the structure, adhesive properties and detachment/entrainment mechanisms specifically through the formation of aggregates (Merrison et al., 2012). Conversely for terrestrial conditions electric fields typically observed are not intense enough to significantly affect sand transport rates while little is known in the case of extra-terrestrial environments.

  7. Air support facilities. [interface between air and surface transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Airports are discussed in terms of the interface between the ground and air for transportation systems. The classification systems, design, facilities, administration, and operations of airports are described.

  8. 36 CFR 13.460 - Use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation traditionally employed by local rural... of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation traditionally... this chapter, the use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface...

  9. 36 CFR 13.460 - Use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation traditionally employed by local rural... of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation traditionally... this chapter, the use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface...

  10. 36 CFR 13.460 - Use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation traditionally employed by local rural... of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation traditionally... this chapter, the use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface...

  11. 36 CFR 13.460 - Use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation traditionally employed by local rural... of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation traditionally... this chapter, the use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface...

  12. 36 CFR 13.460 - Use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation traditionally employed by local rural... of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation traditionally... this chapter, the use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface...

  13. Lunar surface transportation systems conceptual design lunar base systems study Task 5.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Conceptual designs for three categories of lunar surface transportation were described. The level of understanding for the capabilities and design approach varies between the vehicles representing these categories. A summary of the vehicle categories and current state of conceptual design is provided. Finally, a brief evaluation and discussion is provided for a systematic comparison of transportation categories and effectiveness in supporting transportation objectives.

  14. Recent advances in engineering topography mediated antibacterial surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Jafar; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2015-09-01

    The tendency of bacterial cells to adhere and colonize a material surface leading to biofilm formation is a fundamental challenge underlying many different applications including microbial infections associated with biomedical devices and products. Although, bacterial attachment to surfaces has been extensively studied in the past, the effect of surface topography on bacteria-material interactions has received little attention until more recently. We review the recent progress in surface topography based approaches for engineering antibacterial surfaces. Biomimicry of antibacterial surfaces in nature is a popular strategy. Whereas earlier endeavors in the field aimed at minimizing cell attachment, more recent efforts have focused on developing bactericidal surfaces. However, not all such topography mediated bactericidal surfaces are necessarily cytocompatible thus underscoring the need for continued efforts for research in this area for developing antibacterial and yet cytocompatible surfaces for use in implantable biomedical applications. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the current strategies and challenges in the emerging field of topography mediated antibacterial surfaces.

  15. Recent advances in engineering topography mediated antibacterial surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    The tendency of bacterial cells to adhere and colonize a material surface leading to biofilm formation is a fundamental challenge underlying many different applications including microbial infections associated with biomedical devices and products. Although, bacterial attachment to surfaces has been extensively studied in the past, the effect of surface topography on bacteria–material interactions has received little attention until more recently. We review the recent progress in surface topography based approaches for engineering antibacterial surfaces. Biomimicry of antibacterial surfaces in nature is a popular strategy. Whereas earlier endeavors in the field aimed at minimizing cell attachment, more recent efforts have focused on developing bactericidal surfaces. However, not all such topography mediated bactericidal surfaces are necessarily cytocompatible thus underscoring the need for continued efforts for research in this area for developing antibacterial and yet cytocompatible surfaces for use in implantable biomedical applications. This mini-review provides a brief overview of the current strategies and challenges in the emerging field of topography mediated antibacterial surfaces. PMID:26372264

  16. 29 CFR 1926.902 - Surface transportation of explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR parts 171-179, Highways and Railways; 49 CFR part 195, Pipelines; and 49 CFR parts 390-397, Motor Carriers. (b) Motor vehicles or conveyances transporting explosives shall only be driven by, and be in the... near a motor vehicle or conveyance transporting explosives. (d) Explosives, blasting agents,...

  17. An experimental investigation on the surface water transport process over an airfoil by using a digital image projection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Wei, Tian; Hu, Hui

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, an experimental investigation was conducted to characterize the transient behavior of the surface water film and rivulet flows driven by boundary layer airflows over a NACA0012 airfoil in order to elucidate underlying physics of the important micro-physical processes pertinent to aircraft icing phenomena. A digital image projection (DIP) technique was developed to quantitatively measure the film thickness distribution of the surface water film/rivulet flows over the airfoil at different test conditions. The time-resolved DIP measurements reveal that micro-sized water droplets carried by the oncoming airflow impinged onto the airfoil surface, mainly in the region near the airfoil leading edge. After impingement, the water droplets formed thin water film that runs back over the airfoil surface, driven by the boundary layer airflow. As the water film advanced downstream, the contact line was found to bugle locally and developed into isolated water rivulets further downstream. The front lobes of the rivulets quickly advanced along the airfoil and then shed from the airfoil trailing edge, resulting in isolated water transport channels over the airfoil surface. The water channels were responsible for transporting the water mass impinging at the airfoil leading edge. Additionally, the transition location of the surface water transport process from film flows to rivulet flows was found to occur further upstream with increasing velocity of the oncoming airflow. The thickness of the water film/rivulet flows was found to increase monotonically with the increasing distance away from the airfoil leading edge. The runback velocity of the water rivulets was found to increase rapidly with the increasing airflow velocity, while the rivulet width and the gap between the neighboring rivulets decreased as the airflow velocity increased.

  18. The Synergism Between Heat and Mass Transfer Additive and Advanced Surfaces in Aqueous LiBr Horizontal Tube Absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.A.

    1999-03-24

    Experiments were conducted in a laboratory to investigate the absorption of water vapor into a falling-film of aqueous lithium bromide (LiBr). A mini-absorber test stand was used to test smooth tubes and a variety of advanced tube surfaces placed horizontally in a single-row bundle. The bundle had six copper tubes; each tube had an outside diameter of 15.9-mm and a length of 0.32-m. A unique feature of the stand is its ability to operate continuously and support testing of LiBr brine at mass fractions {ge} 0.62. The test stand can also support testing to study the effect of the failing film mass flow rate, the coolant mass flow rate, the coolant temperature, the absorber pressure and the tube spacing. Manufacturers of absorption chillers add small quantities of a heat and mass transfer additive to improve the performance of the absorbers. The additive causes surface stirring which enhances the transport of absorbate into the bulk of the film. Absorption may also be enhanced with advanced tube surfaces that mechanically induce secondary flows in the falling film without increasing the thickness of the film. Several tube geometry's were identified and tested with the intent of mixing the film and renewing the interface with fresh solution from the tube wall. Testing was completed on a smooth tube and several different externally enhanced tube surfaces. Experiments were conducted over the operating conditions of 6.5 mm Hg absorber pressure, coolant temperatures ranging from 20 to 35 C and LiBr mass fractions ranging from 0.60 through 0.62. Initially the effect of tube spacing was investigated for the smooth tube surface, tested with no heat and mass transfer additive. Test results showed the absorber load and the mass absorbed increased as the tube spacing increased because of the improved wetting of the tube bundle. However, tube spacing was not a critical factor if heat and mass transfer additive was active in the mini-absorber. The additive dramatically affected

  19. Advances in Studies of Electrode Kinetics and Mass Transport in AMTEC Cells (abstract)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; Kisor, A.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1993-01-01

    Previous work reported from JPL has included characterization of electrode kinetics and alkali atom transport from electrodes including Mo, W, WRh(sub x), WPt(sub x)(Mn), in sodium AMTEC cells and vapor exposure cells, and Mo in potassium vapor exposure cells. These studies were generally performed in cells with small area electrodes (about 1 to 5 cm(sup 2)), and device geometry had little effect on transport. Alkali diffusion coefficients through these electrodes have been characterized, and approximate surface diffusion coefficients derived in cases of activated transport. A basic model of electrode kinetic at the alkali metal vapor/porous metal electrode/alkali beta'-alumina solid electrolyte three phase boundary has been proposed which accounts for electrochemical reaction rates with a collision frequency near the three phase boundary and tunneling from the porous electrode partially covered with adsorbed alkali metal atoms. The small electrode effect in AMTEC cells has been discussed in several papers, but quantitative investigations have described only the overall effect and the important contribution of electrolyte resistance. The quantitative characterization of transport losses in cells with large area electrodes has been limited to simulations of large area electrode effects, or characterization of transport losses from large area electrodes with significant longitudinal temperature gradients. This paper describes new investigations of electrochemical kinetics and transport, particularily with WPt(sub 3.5) electrodes, including the influence of electrode size on the mass transport loss in the AMTEC cell. These electrodes possess excellent sodium transport properties making verification of device limitations on transport much more readily attained.

  20. Recent advances in small molecular, non-polymeric organic hole transporting materials for solid-state DSSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Thanh-Tuan; Goubard, Fabrice

    2013-10-01

    Issue from thin-film technologies, dye-sensitized solar cells have become one of the most promising technologies in the field of renewable energies. Their success is not only due to their low weight, the possibility of making large flexible surfaces, but also to their photovoltaic efficiency which are found to be more and more significant (>12% with a liquid electrolyte, >7% with a solid organic hole conductor). This short review highlights recent advances in the characteristics and use of low-molecular-weight glass-forming organic materials as hole transporters in all solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. These materials must feature specific physical and chemical properties that will ensure both the operation of a photovoltaic cell and the easy implementation. This review is an english extended version based on our recent article published in Matériaux & Techniques 101, 102 (2013).

  1. Development of Advanced Methods of Structural and Trajectory Analysis for Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, Mark D.

    1996-01-01

    In this report the author describes: (1) development of advanced methods of structural weight estimation, and (2) development of advanced methods of flight path optimization. A method of estimating the load-bearing fuselage weight and wing weight of transport aircraft based on fundamental structural principles has been developed. This method of weight estimation represents a compromise between the rapid assessment of component weight using empirical methods based on actual weights of existing aircraft and detailed, but time-consuming, analysis using the finite element method. The method was applied to eight existing subsonic transports for validation and correlation. Integration of the resulting computer program, PDCYL, has been made into the weights-calculating module of the AirCraft SYNThesis (ACSYNT) computer program. ACSYNT bas traditionally used only empirical weight estimation methods; PDCYL adds to ACSYNT a rapid, accurate means of assessing the fuselage and wing weights of unconventional aircraft. PDCYL also allows flexibility in the choice of structural concept, as well as a direct means of determining the impact of advanced materials on structural weight.

  2. Advanced Space Transportation Concepts and Propulsion Technologies for a New Delivery Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, John W.; McCleskey, Carey M.; Rhodes, Russel E.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Henderson, Edward M.; Joyner, Claude R., III; Levack, Daniel J. H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes Advanced Space Transportation Concepts and Propulsion Technologies for a New Delivery Paradigm. It builds on the work of the previous paper "Approach to an Affordable and Productive Space Transportation System". The scope includes both flight and ground system elements, and focuses on their compatibility and capability to achieve a technical solution that is operationally productive and also affordable. A clear and revolutionary approach, including advanced propulsion systems (advanced LOX rich booster engine concept having independent LOX and fuel cooling systems, thrust augmentation with LOX rich boost and fuel rich operation at altitude), improved vehicle concepts (autogeneous pressurization, turbo alternator for electric power during ascent, hot gases to purge system and keep moisture out), and ground delivery systems, was examined. Previous papers by the authors and other members of the Space Propulsion Synergy Team (SPST) focused on space flight system engineering methods, along with operationally efficient propulsion system concepts and technologies. This paper continues the previous work by exploring the propulsion technology aspects in more depth and how they may enable the vehicle designs from the previous paper. Subsequent papers will explore the vehicle design, the ground support system, and the operations aspects of the new delivery paradigm in greater detail.

  3. Advanced transportation system studies. Technical area 2: Heavy lift launch vehicle development. Volume 2; Technical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Sections 10 to 13 of the Advanced Transportation System Studies final report are included in this volume. Section 10 contains a copy of an executive summary that was prepared by Lockheed Space Operations Company (LSOC) to document their support to the TA-2 contract during the first-year period of performance of the contract, May 1992 through May 1993. LSOC participated on the TA-2 contract as part of the concurrent engineering launch system definition team, and provided outstanding heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) ground operations requirements and concept assessments for Lockheed Missiles and Space Company (LMSC) through an intercompany work transfer as well as providing specific HLLV ground operations assessments at the direction of NASA KSC through KSC funding that was routed to the TA-2 contract. Section 11 contains a copy of a vehicle-independent, launch system health management requirements assessment. The purpose of the assessment was to define both health management requirements and the associated interfaces between a generic advanced transportation system launch vehicle and all related elements of the entire transportation system, including the ground segment. Section 12 presents the major TA-2 presentations provided to summarize the significant results and conclusions that were developed over the course of the contract. Finally, Section 13 presents the design and assessment report on the first lunar outpost heavy lift launch vehicle.

  4. Functional droplets that recognize, collect, and transport debris on surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ying; Chang, Chia-Chih; Choudhary, Umesh; Bolukbasi, Irem; Crosby, Alfred J.; Emrick, Todd

    2016-01-01

    We describe polymer-stabilized droplets capable of recognizing and picking up nanoparticles from substrates in experiments designed for transporting hydroxyapatite nanoparticles that represent the principal elemental composition of bone. Our experiments, which are inspired by cells that carry out materials transport in vivo, used oil-in-water droplets that traverse a nanoparticle-coated substrate driven by an imposed fluid flow. Nanoparticle capture is realized by interaction of the particles with chemical functionality embedded within the polymeric stabilizing layer on the droplets. Nanoparticle uptake efficiency is controlled by solution conditions and the extent of functionality available for contact with the nanoparticles. Moreover, in an elementary demonstration of nanoparticle transportation, particles retrieved initially from the substrate were later deposited “downstream,” illustrating a pickup and drop-off technique that represents a first step toward mimicking point-to-point transportation events conducted in living systems. PMID:27819054

  5. Surface Diagnostics in Tribology Technology and Advanced Coatings Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the methodologies used for surface property measurement of thin films and coatings, lubricants, and materials in the field of tribology. Surface diagnostic techniques include scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, stylus profilometry, x-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil spectroscopy, and tribology examination. Each diagnostic technique provides specific measurement results in its own unique way. In due course it should be possible to coordinate the different pieces of information provided by these diagnostic techniques into a coherent self-consistent description of the surface properties. Examples are given on the nature and character of thin diamond films.

  6. Surface chemistry: Key to control and advance myriad technologies

    PubMed Central

    Yates, John T.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2011-01-01

    This special issue on surface chemistry is introduced with a brief history of the field, a summary of the importance of surface chemistry in technological applications, a brief overview of some of the most important recent developments in this field, and a look forward to some of its most exciting future directions. This collection of invited articles is intended to provide a snapshot of current developments in the field, exemplify the state of the art in fundamental research in surface chemistry, and highlight some possibilities in the future. Here, we show how those articles fit together in the bigger picture of this field. PMID:21245359

  7. Surface chemistry: key to control and advance myriad technologies.

    PubMed

    Yates, John T; Campbell, Charles T

    2011-01-18

    This special issue on surface chemistry is introduced with a brief history of the field, a summary of the importance of surface chemistry in technological applications, a brief overview of some of the most important recent developments in this field, and a look forward to some of its most exciting future directions. This collection of invited articles is intended to provide a snapshot of current developments in the field, exemplify the state of the art in fundamental research in surface chemistry, and highlight some possibilities in the future. Here, we show how those articles fit together in the bigger picture of this field.

  8. Bioinspired Directional Surfaces for Adhesion, Wetting and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Matthew J.; Sekeroglu, Koray

    2013-01-01

    In Nature, directional surfaces on insect cuticle, animal fur, bird feathers, and plant leaves are comprised of dual micro-nanoscale features that tune roughness and surface energy. This feature article summarizes experimental and theoretical approaches for the design, synthesis and characterization of new bioinspired surfaces demonstrating unidirectional surface properties. The experimental approaches focus on bottom-up and top-down synthesis methods of unidirectional micro- and nanoscale films to explore and characterize their anomalous features. The theoretical component of the review focuses on computational tools to predict the physicochemical properties of unidirectional surfaces. PMID:23526120

  9. Propulsion/ASME Rocket-Based Combined Cycle Activities in the Advanced Space Transportation Program Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe; Turner, James

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Office Of Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology (OASTT) has establish three major coals. "The Three Pillars for Success". The Advanced Space Transportation Program Office (ASTP) at the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville,Ala. focuses on future space transportation technologies under the "Access to Space" pillar. The Advanced Reusable Technologies (ART) Project, part of ASTP, focuses on the reusable technologies beyond those being pursued by X-33. The main activity over the past two and a half years has been on advancing the rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) technologies. In June of last year, activities for reusable launch vehicle (RLV) airframe and propulsion technologies were initiated. These activities focus primarily on those technologies that support the year 2000 decision to determine the path this country will take for Space Shuttle and RLV. In February of this year, additional technology efforts in the reusable technologies were awarded. The RBCC effort that was completed early this year was the initial step leading to flight demonstrations of the technology for space launch vehicle propulsion. Aerojet, Boeing-Rocketdyne and Pratt & Whitney were selected for a two-year period to design, build and ground test their RBCC engine concepts. In addition, ASTROX, Pennsylvania State University (PSU) and University of Alabama in Huntsville also conducted supporting activities. The activity included ground testing of components (e.g., injectors, thrusters, ejectors and inlets) and integrated flowpaths. An area that has caused a large amount of difficulty in the testing efforts is the means of initiating the rocket combustion process. All three of the prime contractors above were using silane (SiH4) for ignition of the thrusters. This follows from the successful use of silane in the NASP program for scramjet ignition. However, difficulties were immediately encountered when silane (an 80/20 mixture of hydrogen/silane) was used for rocket

  10. The development and evaluation of advanced technology laminar-flow-control subsonic transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturgeon, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of applying laminar flow control (LFC) to the wings and empennage of long-range subsonic transport aircraft for initial operation in 1985. For a design mission range of 5500 n mi, advanced technology LFC and turbulent-flow aircraft were developed for a 200-passenger payload, and compared on the basis of production costs, direct operating costs, and fuel efficiency. Parametric analyses were conducted to establish optimum geometry, advanced system concepts were evaluated, and configuration variations maximizing the effectiveness of LFC were developed. The final comparisons include consideation of maintenance costs and procedures, manufacturing costs and procedures, and operational considerations peculiar to LFC aircraft.

  11. A Distributed Simulation Facility to Support Human Factors Research in Advanced Air Transportation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amonlirdviman, Keith; Farley, Todd C.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Ladik, John F.; Sherer, Dana Z.

    1998-01-01

    A distributed real-time simulation of the civil air traffic environment developed to support human factors research in advanced air transportation technology is presented. The distributed environment is based on a custom simulation architecture designed for simplicity and flexibility in human experiments. Standard Internet protocols are used to create the distributed environment, linking all advanced cockpit simulator, all Air Traffic Control simulator, and a pseudo-aircraft control and simulation management station. The pseudo-aircraft control station also functions as a scenario design tool for coordinating human factors experiments. This station incorporates a pseudo-pilot interface designed to reduce workload for human operators piloting multiple aircraft simultaneously in real time. The application of this distributed simulation facility to support a study of the effect of shared information (via air-ground datalink) on pilot/controller shared situation awareness and re-route negotiation is also presented.

  12. Cooperative Research and Development of Primary Surface Recuperator for Advanced Microturbine Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Escola, George

    2007-01-17

    Recuperators have been identified as key components of advanced gas turbines systems that achieve a measure of improvement in operating efficiency and lead the field in achieving very low emissions. Every gas turbine manufacturer that is studying, developing, or commercializing advanced recuperated gas turbine cycles requests that recuperators operate at higher temperature without a reduction in design life and must cost less. The Solar Cooperative Research and Development of Primary Surface Recuperator for Advanced Microturbine Systems Program is directed towards meeting the future requirements of advanced gas turbine systems by the following: (1) The development of advanced alloys that will allow recuperator inlet exhaust gas temperatures to increase without significant cost increase. (2) Further characterization of the creep and oxidation (dry and humid air) properties of nickel alloy foils (less than 0.13 mm thick) to allow the economical use of these materials. (3) Increasing the use of advanced robotic systems and advanced in-process statistical measurement systems.

  13. Inward particle transport at high collisionality in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G. Q.; Ma, J.; Weiland, J.; Zang, Q.

    2013-10-15

    We have made the first drift wave study of particle transport in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (Wan et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104011 (2009)). The results reveal that collisions make the particle flux more inward in the high collisionality regime. This can be traced back to effects that are quadratic in the collision frequency. The particle pinch is due to electron trapping which is not very efficient in the high collisionality regime so the approach to equilibrium is slow. We have included also the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode to give the right electron temperature gradient, since the Trapped Electron Mode (TE mode) is weak in this regime. However, at the ETG mode number ions are Boltzmann distributed so the ETG mode does not give particle transport.

  14. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) color displays software description microprocessor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Plyler, Valerie E.; Dickson, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the software created for the Sperry Microprocessor Color Display System used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV). The software delivery known as the 'baseline display system', is the one described in this document. Throughout this publication, module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, detailed description, and global references. The global reference section includes procedures and common variables referenced by a particular module. The system described supports the Research Flight Deck (RFD) of the TSRV. The RFD contains eight cathode ray tubes (CRTs) which depict a Primary Flight Display, Navigation Display, System Warning Display, Takeoff Performance Monitoring System Display, and Engine Display.

  15. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) color displays software description: MicroVAX system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Plyler, Valerie E.; Dickson, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the software created for the Display MicroVAX computer used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV). The software delivery of February 27, 1991, known as the 'baseline display system', is the one described in this document. Throughout this publication, module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, detailed description, and global references. The global references section includes subroutines, functions, and common variables referenced by a particular module. The system described supports the Research Flight Deck (RFD) of the TSRV. The RFD contains eight Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) which depict a Primary Flight Display, Navigation Display, System Warning Display, Takeoff Performance Monitoring System Display, and Engine Display.

  16. Technology requirements for advanced earth-orbital transportation systems, dual-mode propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haefeli, R. C.; Littler, E. G.; Hurley, J. B.; Winter, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    The application of dual-mode propulsion concepts to fully reusable single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicles is discussed. Dual-mode propulsion uses main rocket engines that consume hydrocarbon fuels as well as liquid hydrogen fuel. Liquid oxygen is used as the oxidizer. These engine concepts were integrated into transportation vehicle designs capable of vertical takeoff, delivering a payload to earth orbit, and return to earth with a horizontal landing. Benefits of these vehicles were assessed and compared with vehicles using single-mode propulsion (liquid hydrogen and oxygen engines). Technology requirements for such advanced transportation systems were identified. Figures of merit, including life-cycle cost savings and research costs, were derived for dual-mode technology programs, and were used for assessments of potential benefits of proposed technology activities. Dual-mode propulsion concepts display potential for significant cost and performance benefits when applied to SSTO vehicles.

  17. Propulsion system studies for an advanced high subsonic, long range jet commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Propulsion system characteristics for a long range, high subsonic (Mach 0.90 - 0.98), jet commercial transport aircraft are studied to identify the most desirable cycle and engine configuration and to assess the payoff of advanced engine technologies applicable to the time frame of the late 1970s to the mid 1980s. An engine parametric study phase examines major cycle trends on the basis of aircraft economics. This is followed by the preliminary design of two advanced mixed exhaust turbofan engines pointed at two different technology levels (1970 and 1985 commercial certification for engines No. 1 and No. 2, respectively). The economic penalties of environmental constraints - noise and exhaust emissions - are assessed. The highest specific thrust engine (lowest bypass ratio for a given core technology) achievable with a single-stage fan yields the best economics for a Mach 0.95 - 0.98 aircraft and can meet the noise objectives specified, but with significant economic penalties. Advanced technologies which would allow high temperature and cycle pressure ratios to be used effectively are shown to provide significant improvement in mission performance which can partially offset the economic penalties incurred to meet lower noise goals. Advanced technology needs are identified; and, in particular, the initiation of an integrated fan and inlet aero/acoustic program is recommended.

  18. Application of Advanced Technologies to Small, Short-haul Air Transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adcock, C.; Coverston, C.; Knapton, B.

    1980-01-01

    A study was conducted of the application of advanced technologies to small, short-haul transport aircraft. A three abreast, 30 passenger design for flights of approximately 100 nautical miles was evaluated. Higher wing loading, active flight control, and a gust alleviation system results in improved ride quality. Substantial savings in fuel and direct operating cost are forecast. An aircraft of this configuration also has significant benefits in forms of reliability and operability which should enable it to sell a total of 450 units through 1990, of which 80% are for airline use.

  19. Characterization of an Integral Thermal Protection and Cryogenic Insulation Material for Advanced Space Transportation Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; White, S. M.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's planned advanced space transportation vehicles will benefit from the use of integral/conformal cryogenic propellant tanks which will reduce the launch weight and lower the earth-to-orbit costs considerably. To implement the novel concept of integral/conformal tanks requires developing an equally novel concept in thermal protection materials. Providing insulation against reentry heating and preserving propellant mass can no longer be considered separate problems to be handled by separate materials. A new family of materials, Superthermal Insulation (STI), has been conceiving and investigated by NASA's Ames Research Center to simultaneously provide both thermal protection and cryogenic insulation in a single, integral material.

  20. Key Metrics and Goals for NASA's Advanced Air Transportation Technologies Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Bruce; Lee, David

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AATT) program is developing a set of decision support tools to aid air traffic service providers, pilots, and airline operations centers in improving operations of the National Airspace System (NAS). NASA needs a set of unifying metrics to tie these efforts together, which it can use to track the progress of the AATT program and communicate program objectives and status within NASA and to stakeholders in the NAS. This report documents the results of our efforts and the four unifying metrics we recommend for the AATT program. They are: airport peak capacity, on-route sector capacity, block time and fuel, and free flight-enabling.

  1. An example of requirements for Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT) flight control system using structured techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclees, Robert E.; Cohen, Gerald C.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements are presented for an Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT) flight control system generated using structured techniques. The requirements definition starts from initially performing a mission analysis to identify the high level control system requirements and functions necessary to satisfy the mission flight. The result of the study is an example set of control system requirements partially represented using a derivative of Yourdon's structured techniques. Also provided is a research focus for studying structured design methodologies and in particular design-for-validation philosophies.

  2. Ultraclean Fuels Production and Utilization for the Twenty-First Century: Advances toward Sustainable Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Elise B.; Liu, Zhong-Wen; Liu, Zhao-Tie

    2013-11-21

    Ultraclean fuels production has become increasingly important as a method to help decrease emissions and allow the introduction of alternative feed stocks for transportation fuels. Established methods, such as Fischer-Tropsch, have seen a resurgence of interest as natural gas prices drop and existing petroleum resources require more intensive clean-up and purification to meet stringent environmental standards. This review covers some of the advances in deep desulfurization, synthesis gas conversion into fuels and feed stocks that were presented at the 245th American Chemical Society Spring Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA in the Division of Energy and Fuels symposium on "Ultraclean Fuels Production and Utilization".

  3. Transportation of transplantable cell sheets fabricated with temperature-responsive culture surfaces for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Takayuki; Yamato, Masayuki; Inuma, Toshiaki; Nishida, Kohji; Okano, Teruo

    2008-06-01

    Here we report transportation of cell sheets fabricated on temperature-responsive culture surfaces for regenerative medicine. On the surfaces cells adhere, spread and proliferate at 37 degrees C, but upon temperature reduction below 32 degrees C all the cells are spontaneously detached. When cells on the surfaces are challenged by long distance transportation, maintaining the temperature is critical. Therefore, we developed a portable homothermal container to keep the inner temperature at 36 degrees C for > 30 h without any need for batteries or energy supply. We transported and compared fibroblast sheets cultured on temperature-responsive surfaces in the container, at room temperature in a car, or on ice. After 8 h transportation by car, all cells at room temperature and on ice were detached from the surfaces and some were folded and broken into tiny pieces. On the other hand, fibroblast sheets transported in the container retained their adhesion to the dish surfaces and intact cell sheets were successfully harvested by temperature reduction. During the transportation, cell viability and histology were not impaired. This unique transportation device would be useful for cell sheet-based regenerative medicine utilizing temperature-responsive culture surfaces.

  4. Advanced transport operating system software upgrade: Flight management/flight controls software description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinedinst, Winston C.; Debure, Kelly R.; Dickson, Richard W.; Heaphy, William J.; Parks, Mark A.; Slominski, Christopher J.; Wolverton, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The Flight Management/Flight Controls (FM/FC) software for the Norden 2 (PDP-11/70M) computer installed on the NASA 737 aircraft is described. The software computes the navigation position estimates, guidance commands, those commands to be issued to the control surfaces to direct the aircraft in flight based on the modes selected on the Advanced Guidance Control System (AGSC) mode panel, and the flight path selected via the Navigation Control/Display Unit (NCDU).

  5. Recent advances in liposome surface modification for oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh Xuan; Huang, Lin; Gauthier, Mario; Yang, Guang; Wang, Qun

    2016-05-01

    Oral delivery via the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the dominant route for drug administration. Orally delivered liposomal carriers can enhance drug solubility and protect the encapsulated theraputic agents from the extreme conditions found in the GI tract. Liposomes, with their fluid lipid bilayer membrane and their nanoscale size, can significantly improve oral absorption. Unfortunately, the clinical applications of conventional liposomes have been hindered due to their poor stability and availability under the harsh conditions typically presented in the GI tract. To overcome this problem, the surface modification of liposomes has been investigated. Although liposome surface modification has been extensively studied for oral drug delivery, no review exists so far that adequately covers this topic. The purpose of this paper is to summarize and critically analyze emerging trends in liposome surface modification for oral drug delivery.

  6. Global scale hydrology - Advances in land surface modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, E.F. )

    1991-01-01

    Research into global scale hydrology is an expanding area that includes researchers from the meteorology, climatology, ecology and hydrology communities. This paper reviews research in this area carried out in the United States during the last IUGG quadrennial period of 1987-1990. The review covers the representation of land-surface hydrologic processes for general circulation models (GCMs), sensitivity analysis of these representations on global hydrologic fields like precipitation, regional studies of climate that have global hydrologic implications, recent field studies and experiments whose aims are the improved understanding of land surface-atmospheric interactions, and the use of remotely sensed data for the further understanding of the spatial variability of surface hydrologic processes that are important at regional and global climate scales. 76 refs.

  7. Advanced Control Surface Seal Development for Future Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2004-01-01

    High temperature control surface seals have been identified as a critical technology in the development of future space vehicles. These seals must withstand temperatures of up to 2600 F and protect underlying temperature-sensitive structures (such as actuators and sealing capability by remaining resilient during flight conditions. The current baseline seal, used on the Shuttle orbiters and the X-38 vehicle, consists of a Nextel 312 sheath, an internal Inconel X-750 knitted spring tube, and hand-stuffed Saffil batting. Unfortunately at high temperatures (> 1500 F), the seal resiliency significantly degrades due to yielding and creep of the spring tube element. The permanent set in the seals can result in flow passing over the seals and subsequent damage to temperature sensitive components downstream of the seals. Another shortcoming of the baseline seal is that instances have been reported on Shuttle flights where some of the hand-stuffed Saffil batting insulation has been extracted, thus potentially compromising the seal. In vehicles where the thermal protection systems are delicate (such as with Shuttle tiles), the control surface seals must also limit the amount of force applied to the opposing surfaces. Additionally, in many applications the seals are subjected to scrubbing as control surfaces are actuated. The seals must be able to withstand any damage resulting from this high temperature scrubbing and retain their heat/flow blocking abilities.

  8. Advancing Sustainable Catalysis with Magnetite Surface Modification and Synthetic Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article surveys the recent developments in the synthesis, surface modification, and synthetic applications of magnetitenanoparticles. The emergence of iron(II,III) oxide (triiron tetraoxide or magnetite; Fe3O4, or FeO•Fe2O3) nanoparticles as a sustainable support in heteroge...

  9. Characterizing Surface Transport Barriers in the South China Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    location of submesoscale fronts in the South China Sea (SCS). OBJECTIVES The scientific objective is to test and develop novel methods, with a focus...transport prooperties of unsteady flows. Applications range from improved fundamental understanding of the relationship between submesoscale fronts

  10. 29 CFR 1926.902 - Surface transportation of explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provisions of Department of Transportation regulations contained in 46 CFR parts 146-149, Water Carriers; 49... red letters, not less than 4 inches in height, on white background. In addition to such marking or... from all directions, a red flag 18 inches by 30 inches, with the word “Explosives” painted, stamped,...

  11. 29 CFR 1926.902 - Surface transportation of explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... provisions of Department of Transportation regulations contained in 46 CFR parts 146-149, Water Carriers; 49... red letters, not less than 4 inches in height, on white background. In addition to such marking or... from all directions, a red flag 18 inches by 30 inches, with the word “Explosives” painted, stamped,...

  12. Vertical-tube aqueous LiBr falling film absorption using advanced surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.A.; Perez-Blanco, H.

    1993-10-01

    A heat and mass transfer test stand was fabricated and used to investigate nonisothermal falling film absorption of water vapor into a solution of aqueous lithium bromide. The absorber was made of borosilicate glass for visual inspection of the failing film. Experiments were conducted on internally cooled tubes of about 0.019 m outside diameter and of 1.53 m length. Testing evaluated a single absorber tube`s performance at varying operating conditions, namely different cooling-water flow rates, solution flow rates, pressures, temperatures, and concentrations. Advanced surfaces were identified that enhanced absorber load and the mass of absorbed vapor. A pin-fin tube with 6.4mm pitch absorbed about 225% more mass than did a smooth tube. A grooved tube was the d best performer with 175% enhancement over the smooth tube. Increasing the cooling water flow rate to 1.893 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} m{sup 3}/s caused about a 300% increase in the mass absorbed for the grooved tube compared with the smooth tube. Results showed that the pin-fin tube with 6.4-mm pitch and the grooved tubes may enhance absorption to levels comparable to chemical enhancement in horizontal smooth tube absorbers. Absorber load, the transport coefficients, and pertinent absorption data are presented as functions of dimensionless numbers. These experimental data will prove useful in formulating analytical tools to predict vertical-tube absorber performance.

  13. Advanced modelling of the transport phenomena across horizontal clothing microclimates with natural convection.

    PubMed

    Mayor, T S; Couto, S; Psikuta, A; Rossi, R M

    2015-12-01

    The ability of clothing to provide protection against external environments is critical for wearer's safety and thermal comfort. It is a function of several factors, such as external environmental conditions, clothing properties and activity level. These factors determine the characteristics of the different microclimates existing inside the clothing which, ultimately, have a key role in the transport processes occurring across clothing. As an effort to understand the effect of transport phenomena in clothing microclimates on the overall heat transport across clothing structures, a numerical approach was used to study the buoyancy-driven heat transfer across horizontal air layers trapped inside air impermeable clothing. The study included both the internal flow occurring inside the microclimate and the external flow occurring outside the clothing layer, in order to analyze the interdependency of these flows in the way heat is transported to/from the body. Two-dimensional simulations were conducted considering different values of microclimate thickness (8, 25 and 52 mm), external air temperature (10, 20 and 30 °C), external air velocity (0.5, 1 and 3 m s(-1)) and emissivity of the clothing inner surface (0.05 and 0.95), which implied Rayleigh numbers in the microclimate spanning 4 orders of magnitude (9 × 10(2)-3 × 10(5)). The convective heat transfer coefficients obtained along the clothing were found to strongly depend on the transport phenomena in the microclimate, in particular when natural convection is the most important transport mechanism. In such scenario, convective coefficients were found to vary in wavy-like manner, depending on the position of the flow vortices in the microclimate. These observations clearly differ from data in the literature for the case of air flow over flat-heated surfaces with constant temperature (which shows monotonic variations of the convective heat transfer coefficients, along the length of the surface). The flow

  14. Advanced modelling of the transport phenomena across horizontal clothing microclimates with natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, T. S.; Couto, S.; Psikuta, A.; Rossi, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The ability of clothing to provide protection against external environments is critical for wearer's safety and thermal comfort. It is a function of several factors, such as external environmental conditions, clothing properties and activity level. These factors determine the characteristics of the different microclimates existing inside the clothing which, ultimately, have a key role in the transport processes occurring across clothing. As an effort to understand the effect of transport phenomena in clothing microclimates on the overall heat transport across clothing structures, a numerical approach was used to study the buoyancy-driven heat transfer across horizontal air layers trapped inside air impermeable clothing. The study included both the internal flow occurring inside the microclimate and the external flow occurring outside the clothing layer, in order to analyze the interdependency of these flows in the way heat is transported to/from the body. Two-dimensional simulations were conducted considering different values of microclimate thickness (8, 25 and 52 mm), external air temperature (10, 20 and 30 °C), external air velocity (0.5, 1 and 3 m s-1) and emissivity of the clothing inner surface (0.05 and 0.95), which implied Rayleigh numbers in the microclimate spanning 4 orders of magnitude (9 × 102-3 × 105). The convective heat transfer coefficients obtained along the clothing were found to strongly depend on the transport phenomena in the microclimate, in particular when natural convection is the most important transport mechanism. In such scenario, convective coefficients were found to vary in wavy-like manner, depending on the position of the flow vortices in the microclimate. These observations clearly differ from data in the literature for the case of air flow over flat-heated surfaces with constant temperature (which shows monotonic variations of the convective heat transfer coefficients, along the length of the surface). The flow patterns and

  15. Study of utilization of advanced composites in fuselage structures of large transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. C.; Campion, M. C.; Pei, G.

    1984-01-01

    The effort required by the transport aircraft manufacturers to support the introduction of advanced composite materials into the fuselage structure of future commercial and military transport aircraft is investigated. Technology issues, potential benefits to military life cycle costs and commercial operating costs, and development plans are examined. The most urgent technology issues defined are impact dynamics, acoustic transmission, pressure containment and damage tolerance, post-buckling, cutouts, and joints and splices. A technology demonstration program is defined and a rough cost and schedule identified. The fabrication and test of a full-scale fuselage barrel section is presented. Commercial and military benefits are identified. Fuselage structure weight savings from use of advanced composites are 16.4 percent for the commercial and 21.8 percent for the military. For the all-composite airplanes the savings are 26 percent and 29 percent, respectively. Commercial/operating costs are reduced by 5 percent for the all-composite airplane and military life cycle costs by 10 percent.

  16. Vehicle Emission Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Provision in the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document is a memorandum regarding Vehicle Emission Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) Provision in Fixing America's Surface Transportation (FAST) Act, which provides long-term funding certainty for surface transportation infrastructure planning

  17. Study of the application of advanced technologies to long-range transport aircraft. Volume 2: Research and development requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, R. H.; Sturgeon, R. F.; Adams, W. E.; Bradley, E. S.; Cahill, J. F.; Eudaily, R. R.; Hancock, J. P.; Moore, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Investigations were conducted to evaluate the relative benefits attainable through the exploitation of advanced technologies and to identify future research and development efforts required to permit the application of selected technologies to transport aircraft entering commercial operation in 1985. Results show that technology advances, particularly in the areas of composite materials, supercritical aerodynamics, and active control systems, will permit the development of long-range, high-payload commercial transports operating at high-subsonic speeds with direct operating costs lower than those of current aircraft. These advanced transports also achieve lower noise levels and lower engine pollutant emissions than current transports. Research and development efforts, including analytical investigations, laboratory test programs, and flight test programs, are required in essentially all technology areas to achieve the potential technology benefits.

  18. New advances in the pathophysiology of intestinal ion transport and barrier function in diarrhea and the impact on therapy.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Kazi Mirajul; Chakraborty, Subhra; Sheikh, Irshad Ali; Woodward, Owen M

    2012-06-01

    Diarrhea remains a continuous threat to human health worldwide. Scaling up the best practices for diarrhea prevention requires improved therapies. Diarrhea results from dysregulation of normal intestinal ion transport functions. Host-microbe contact is a key determinant of this response. Underlying mechanisms in the disease state are regulated by intracellular signals that modulate the activity of individual transport proteins responsible for ion transport and barrier function. Similarly, virulence factors of pathogens and their complex interaction with the host has shed light on the mechanism of enteric infection. Great advances in our understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of epithelial transport, and host-microbe interaction have been made in recent years. Application of these new advances may represent strategies to decrease pathogen attachment, enhance intestinal cation absorption, decrease anion secretion and repair barrier function. This review highlights the new advances and better understanding in the pathophysiology of diarrheal diseases and their impact on therapy.

  19. Advanced public transportation systems: The state of the art, update `96. Final report, July 1995-December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, R.F.; Labell, L.N.; Holmstrom, R.; LoVecchio, J.A.; Schweiger, C.L.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents work performed under FTA`s Advanced Public Transportation Systems (APTS) Program, a program structured to undertake research and development of innovative applications of advanced navigation, information, and communication technologies that most benefit public transportation. This report is the latest in a series of State-of-the-Art reports, the last of which was published in January 1994. It contains the results of an investigation of the extent of adoption of advanced technology in the provision of public transportation service in North America. It focused on some of the most innovative or comprehensive implementations, categorized under four types of services/technologies: Fleet Management, Traveler Information, Electronic Fare Payment, and Transportation Demand Management.

  20. Advances in Dynamic Transport of Organic Contaminants in Karst Groundwater Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, I. Y.; Vesper, D.; Alshawabkeh, A.; Hellweger, F.

    2011-12-01

    Karst groundwater systems develop in soluble rocks such as limestone, and are characterized by high permeability and well-developed conduit porosity. These systems provide important freshwater resources for human consumption and ecological integrity of streams, wetlands, and coastal zones. The same characteristics that make karst aquifers highly productive make them highly vulnerable to contamination. As a result, karst aquifers serve as an important route for contaminants exposure to humans and wildlife. Transport of organic contaminants in karst ground-water occurs in complex pathways influenced by the flow mechanism predominating in the aquifer: conduit-flow dominated systems tend to convey solutes rapidly through the system to a discharge point without much attenuation; diffuse-flow systems, on the other hand, can cause significant solute retardation and slow movement. These two mechanisms represent end members of a wide spectrum of conditions found in karst areas, and often a combination of conduit- and diffuse-flow mechanisms is encountered, where both flow mechanisms can control the fate and transport of contaminants. This is the case in the carbonate aquifers of northern Puerto Rico. This work addresses advances made on the characterization of fate and transport processes in karst ground-water systems characterized by variable conduit and/or diffusion dominated flow under high- and low-flow conditions. It involves laboratory-scale physical modeling and field-scale sampling and historical analysis of contaminant distribution. Statistical analysis of solute transport in Geo-Hydrobed physical models shows the heterogeneous character of transport dynamics in karstic units, and its variability under different flow regimes. Field-work analysis of chlorinated volatile organic compounds and phthalates indicates a large capacity of the karst systems to store and transmit contaminants. This work is part of the program "Puerto Rico Testsite for Exploring Contamination

  1. Surface transport properties of reticulopodia: do intracellular and extracellular motility share a common mechanism?

    PubMed

    Bowser, S S; Israel, H A; McGee-Russell, S M; Rieder, C L

    1984-12-01

    The reticulopodial networks of the foraminiferan protozoans Allogromia sp., strain NF, and A. laticollaris display rapid (up to 11 microns/second) and bidirectional saltatory transport of membrane surface markers (polystyrene microspheres). Electron microscopy shows that microspheres adhere directly to the reticulopodial surface glycocalyx. A videomicroscopic analysis of this phenomenon reveals that microsphere movement is typically independent of pseudopod extension/withdrawal and that particles of different sizes and surface properties display similar motile characteristics. The motile properties of surface-associated microspheres appear identical to those of saltating intracellular organelles. Indeed, in some instances the surface-attached microspheres appear transiently linked in motion to these underlying organelles. Our observations suggest that, in reticulopodia, surface transport of microspheres and intracellular transport of organelles are driven by a common mechanism.

  2. SURFACE CHEMICAL EFFECTS ON COLLOID STABILITY AND TRANSPORT THROUGH NATURAL POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface chemical effects on colloidal stability and transport through porous media were investigated using laboratory column techniques. Approximately 100 nm diameter, spherical, iron oxide particles were synthesized as the mobile colloidal phase. The column packing material was ...

  3. Phosphorus transport by surface and subsurface flow pathways in an upland agricultural watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improved understanding of phosphorus transport by surface and subsurface flow pathways is critical to protecting water quality in agricultural watersheds. While considerable attention has been devoted to understanding phosphorus losses in overland flow, comparatively limited research has examined ph...

  4. 75 FR 75532 - Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit... semiannual audits during each of the first 2 years of State participation. This notice announces and solicits comments on the fifth audit report for the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans)....

  5. 76 FR 5237 - Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit... compliance by each State participating in the Pilot Program, 23 U.S.C. 327(g) mandates semiannual audits... fifth FHWA audit of the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) under the pilot program....

  6. 75 FR 9638 - Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit... compliance by each State participating in the Pilot Program, 23 U.S.C. 327(g) mandates semiannual audits... fourth FHWA audit of the California ] Department of Transportation (Caltrans) under the pilot...

  7. 77 FR 26355 - Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    ... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit... compliance by each State participating in the Pilot Program, 23 U.S.C. 327(g) mandates semiannual audits... sixth FHWA audit of the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) under the pilot...

  8. 77 FR 27273 - Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit... compliance by each State participating in the Pilot Program, 23 U.S.C. 327(g) mandates semiannual audits... sixth FHWA audit of the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) under the pilot program....

  9. Fate and transport of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid in surface waters of agricultural basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregoire, Caroline; Capel, Paul D.; Coupe, Richard H.; Kalkhoff, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Glyphosate use in a watershed results in some occurrence in surface water; however, the watersheds most at risk for the offsite transport of glyphosate are those with high application rates, rainfall that results in overland runoff and a flow route that does not include transport through the soil.

  10. E. coli transport through surface-connected biopores identified from smoke injection tests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macropores are the primary mechanism by which fecal bacteria from surface-applied manure can be transported into subsurface drains or shallow groundwater bypassing the soil matrix. Limited research has been performed investigating fecal bacteria transport through specific macropores identified in th...

  11. Ripple transport in Helical-Axis Advanced Stellarators: A comparison with classical stellarator/torsatrons

    SciTech Connect

    Beidler, C.D.; Hitchon, W.N.G.

    1995-07-01

    Calculations of the neoclassical transport rates due to particles trapped in the helical ripples of a stellarator`s magnetic field are carried out, based on solutions of the bounceaveraged kinetic equation. These calculations employ a model for the magnetic field strength, B, which is an accurate approximation to the actual B for a wide variety of stellarator-type devices, among which are Helical-Axis Advanced Stellarators (Helias) as well as conventional stellarators and torsatrons. Comparisons are carried out in which it is shown that the Helias concept leads to significant reductions in neoclassical transport rates throughout the entire long-mean-free-path regime, with the reduction being particularly dramatic in the {nu}{sup {minus}1} regime. These findings are confirmed by numerical simulations. Further, it is shown that the behavior of deeply trapped particles in Helias can be fundamentally different from that in classical stellarator/torsatrons; as a consequence, the beneficial effects of a radial electric field on the transport make themselves felt at lower collision frequency than is usual.

  12. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Program review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology to an Advanced Subsonic Transport Project, established as one element of the NASA/Boeing Energy Efficient Transport Technology Program. The performance assessment showed that incorporating ACT into an airplane designed to fly approximately 200 passengers approximately 2,000 nmi could yield block fuel savings from 6 to 10 percent at the design range. The principal risks associated with incorporating these active control functions into a commercial airplane are those involved with the ACT system implementation. The Test and Evaluation phase of the IAAC Project focused on the design, fabrication, and test of a system that implemented pitch axis fly-by-wire, pitch axis augmentation, and wing load alleviation. The system was built to be flight worthy, and was planned to be experimentally flown on the 757. The system was installed in the Boeing Digital Avionics Flight Controls Laboratory (DAFCL), where open loop hardware and software tests, and a brief examination of a direct drive valve (DDV) actuation concept were accomplished. The IAAC Project has shown that ACT can be beneficially incorporated into a commercial transport airplane. Based on the results achieved during the testing phase, there appears to be no fundamental reason(s) that would preclude the commercial application of ACT, assuming an appropriate development effort is included.

  13. Spatio-Temporal Modelling of Dust Transport over Surface Mining Areas and Neighbouring Residential Zones.

    PubMed

    Matejicek, Lubos; Janour, Zbynek; Benes, Ludek; Bodnar, Tomas; Gulikova, Eva

    2008-06-06

    Projects focusing on spatio-temporal modelling of the living environment need to manage a wide range of terrain measurements, existing spatial data, time series, results of spatial analysis and inputs/outputs from numerical simulations. Thus, GISs are often used to manage data from remote sensors, to provide advanced spatial analysis and to integrate numerical models. In order to demonstrate the integration of spatial data, time series and methods in the framework of the GIS, we present a case study focused on the modelling of dust transport over a surface coal mining area, exploring spatial data from 3D laser scanners, GPS measurements, aerial images, time series of meteorological observations, inputs/outputs form numerical models and existing geographic resources. To achieve this, digital terrain models, layers including GPS thematic mapping, and scenes with simulation of wind flows are created to visualize and interpret coal dust transport over the mine area and a neighbouring residential zone. A temporary coal storage and sorting site, located near the residential zone, is one of the dominant sources of emissions. Using numerical simulations, the possible effects of wind flows are observed over the surface, modified by natural objects and man-made obstacles. The coal dust drifts with the wind in the direction of the residential zone and is partially deposited in this area. The simultaneous display of the digital map layers together with the location of the dominant emission source, wind flows and protected areas enables a risk assessment of the dust deposition in the area of interest to be performed. In order to obtain a more accurate simulation of wind flows over the temporary storage and sorting site, 3D laser scanning and GPS thematic mapping are used to create a more detailed digital terrain model. Thus, visualization of wind flows over the area of interest combined with 3D map layers enables the exploration of the processes of coal dust deposition at a

  14. Advances on aluminum first-surface solar reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almanza, Rafael; Chen, Jiefeng; Mazari, Marcos

    1992-11-01

    Aluminum first surface mirrors have some advantages over second surface mirrors as has been discussed. At this stage of development some advantages are obtained: the first advantage was using two electron guns, one for aluminum evaporation permitting us to eliminate or to minimize the pinholes and the other to allow the evaporation of SiO without any mirror contamination as it was before due to the air when the chamber was opened to introduce the SiO, despite having only one e-gun in the laboratory. The second advantage was a better adherence between the aluminum film and the Si2O3, this last substance obtained with an oxidation of SiO with some oxygen inside the evaporation chamber (10-4 Torr). This improvement was due to the use of two e-guns that permit us not to open the chamber. These mirrors are actually under test in the environmental chamber for accelerated weather evaluations. One important aspect is the cleaning of the glass substrate. The chromic mixture cleaning is one of the most effective.

  15. Pool boiler heat transport system for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Saaski, E. L.; Noble, J.; Tower, L.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments to determine alkali metal/enhanced surface combinations that have stable boiling at the temperatures and heat fluxes that occur in the Stirling engine are reported. Two enhanced surfaces and two alkali metal working fluids were evaluated. The enhanced surfaces were an EDM hole covered surface and a sintered-powder-metal porous layer surface. The working fluids tested were potassium and eutectic sodium-potasium alloy (NaK), both with and without undissolved noncondensible gas. Noncondensible gas (He and Xe) was added to the system to provide gas in the nucleation sites, preventing quenching of the sites. The experiments demonstrated the potential of an alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system for use in a solar-powered Stirling engine. The most favorable fluid/surface combination tested was NaK boiling on a -100 +140 mesh 304L stainless steel sintered porous layer with no undissolved noncondensible gas. This combination provided stable, high-performance boiling at the operating temperature of 700 C. Heat fluxes into the system ranged from 10 to 50 W/sq cm. The transition from free convection to nucleate boiling occurred at temperatures near 540 C. Based on these experiments, a pool boiler was designed for a full-scale 25-kWe Stirling system.

  16. Surface transport in the Ria de Vigo - Transport barriers in a tidal estuary with a complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, F.; von Kameke, A.; Montero, P.; Allen-Perkins, S.; Venancio, A.; Pérez-Muñuzuri, V.

    2012-04-01

    We study the submesoscale surface transport in the Ria de Vigo, NW Spain, an estuary with tidal and wind-driven circulation, analyzing the output of the coastal model MOHID with state-of-the-art Lagrangian methods, and comparing the results to drifter experiments. We extract Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) as ridges in fields of the Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) that can be identified with transport barriers. The LCS reveal the fundamental structure of the modelled circulation in the estaury that is a superposition of the tidal inflow and outflow, the wind-driven currents and the long-term drift on the shelf. In the Ria de Vigo, LCS are attached to prominent coastal boundaries, as islands or capes, indicating that the geometry of the flow patterns is dominated by bathymetry. Although the vertical flow which is not represented in the horizontal surface flow can be important at the coast, the found transport patterns can be seen as the surface footprint of the 3D circulation in the estaury. Comparing the trajectories of real surface drifters from four deployments to the computed transport barriers in different typical meteorological sitiations, we find that the drifter trajectories are in agreement with the different coherent water masses predicted by the model. The knowledge of the global transport patterns of water masses in this highly populated coastal region is indispensable for the assessment of the fate of contaminations, like possible oil spills or released waste water, but also for biological studies that deal with the drift of eggs and larvae of fish and other marine species, or investigate plankton blooms.

  17. 41 CFR 302-10.300 - May I receive an advance of funds when a commercial carrier transports the mobile home?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May I receive an advance of funds when a commercial carrier transports the mobile home? 302-10.300 Section 302-10.300 Public... Advance of Funds § 302-10.300 May I receive an advance of funds when a commercial carrier transports...

  18. Simulating the fate and transport of nanomaterials in surface waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    The unique properties of nanomaterials have resulted in their increased production. However, it is unclear how nanomaterials will move and react once released to the environment One approach for addressing possible exposure of nanomaterials in surface waters is by using numerical...

  19. Affordable In-Space Transportation. Phase 2; An Advanced Concepts Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Affordable In-Space Transportation (AIST) program was established by the NASA Office of Space Access to improve transportation and lower the costs from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) and beyond (to Lunar orbit, Mars orbit, inner solar system missions, and return to LEO). A goal was established to identify and develop radically innovative concepts for new upper stages for Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV) and Highly Reusable Space Transportation (HRST) systems. New architectures and technologies are being identified which have the potential to meet a cost goal of $1,000 to $2,000 per pound for transportation to GEO and beyond for overall mission cost (including the cost to LEO). A Technical Interchange Meeting (ITM) was held on October 16 and 17, 1996 in Huntsville, Alabama to review previous studies, present advanced concepts and review technologies that could be used to meet the stated goals. The TIM was managed by NASA-Mar-shaU Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Concepts Office with Mr. Alan Adams providing TIM coordination. Mr. John C. Manidns of NASA Headquarters provided overall sponsorship. The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) Propulsion Research Center hosted the TM at the UAH Research Center. Dr. Clark Hawk, Center Director, was the principal investigator. Technical support was provided by Christensen Associates. Approximately 70 attendees were present at the meeting. This Executive Summary provides a record of the key discussions and results of the TIM in a summary format. It incorporates the response to the following basic issues of the TPA, which addressed the following questions: 1. What are the cost drivers and how can they be reduced? 2. What are the operational issues and their impact on cost? What is the current Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and what will it take to reach TRL 6? 4. What are the key enabling technologies and sequence for their accomplishment? 5. What is the proposed implementation time frame

  20. Affordable In-Space Transportation Phase 2: An Advanced Concepts Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Affordable In-Space Transportation (AIST) program was established by the NASA Office of Space Access to improve transportation and lower the costs from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) and beyond (to Lunar orbit, Mars orbit, inner solar system missions, and return to LEO). A goal was established to identify and develop radically innovative concepts for new upper stages for Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV) and Highly Reusable Space Transportation (HRST) systems. New architectures and technologies are being identified which have the potential to meet a cost goal of $1,000 to $2,000 per pound for transportation to GEO and beyond for overall mission cost (including the cost to LEO). A Technical Interchange Meeting (TTM) was held on October 16 and 17, 1996 in Huntsville, Alabama to review previous studies, present advanced concepts and review technologies that could be used to meet the stated goals. The TIN4 was managed by NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Concepts Office with Mr. Alan Adams providing TIM coordination. Mr. John C. Mankins of NASA Headquarters provided overall sponsorship. The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) Propulsion Research Center hosted the TIM at the UAH Research Center. Dr. Clark Hawk, Center Director, was the principal investigator. Technical support was provided by Christensen Associates. Approximately 70 attendees were present at the meeting. This Executive Summary provides a record of the key discussions and results of the TIN4 in a summary for-mat. It incorporates the response to the following basic issues of the TDVL which addressed the following questions: 1. What are the cost drivers and how can they be reduced? 2. What are the operational issues and their impact on cost? 3. What is the current technology readiness level (TRL) and what will it take to reach TRL 6? 4. What are the key enabling technologies and sequence for their accomplishment? 5 . What is the proposed implementation time

  1. Advances in Understanding Sorption and Transport Processes Affecting the Fate of Environmental Pollutants in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karapanagioti, H. K.; Werner, D.; Werth, C.

    2012-04-01

    The results of a call for a special issue that is now in press by the Journal of Contaminant Hydrology will be presented. This special issue is edited by the authors and is entitled "Sorption and Transport Processes Affecting the Fate of Environmental Pollutants in the Subsurface". A short abstract of each paper will be presented along with the most interesting results. Nine papers were accepted. Pollutants studied include: biocolloids, metals (arsenic, chromium, nickel), organic compounds such as hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, micropollutants (PAHs, PCBs), pesticides (glyphosate, 2,4-D). Findings presented in the papers include a modified batch reactor system to study equilibrium-reactive transport problems of metals. Column studies along with theoretical approximations evaluate the combined effects of grain size and pore water velocity on the transport in water saturated porous media of three biocolloids. A polluted sediment remediation method is evaluated considering site-specific conditions through monitoring results and modelling. A field study points to glogging and also sorption as mechanisms affecting the effectiveness of sub-surface flow constructed wetlands. A new isotherm model combining modified traditionally used isotherms is proposed that can be used to simulate pH-dependent metal adsorption. Linear free energy relationships (LFERs) demonstrate ability to predict slight isotope shifts into the groundwater due to sorption. Possible modifications that improve the reliability of kinetic models and parameter values during the evaluation of experiments that assess the sorption of pesticides on soils are tested. Challenges in selecting groundwater pollutant fate and transport models that account for the effect of grain-scale sorption rate limitations are evaluated based on experimental results and are discussed based on the Damköhler number. Finally, a thorough review paper presents the impact of mineral micropores on the transport and fate of

  2. Surface chemical effects on colloid stability and transport through natural porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puls, Robert W.; Paul, Cynthia J.; Clark, Donald A.

    1993-01-01

    Surface chemical effects on colloidal stability and transport through porous media were investigated using laboratory column techniques. Approximately 100 nm diameter, spherical, iron oxide particles were synthesized as the mobile colloidal phase. The column packing material was retrieved from a sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, MA. Previous studies have indicated enhanced stability and transport of iron oxide particles due to specific adsorption of some inorganic anions on the iron oxide surface. This phenomenon was further evaluated with an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate. Surfactants constitute a significant mass of the contaminant loading at the Cape Cod site and their presence may contribute to colloidal transport as a significant transport mechanism at the site. Other studies at the site have previously demonstrated the occurrence of this transport mechanism for iron phosphate particles. Photon correlation spectroscopy, micro-electrophoretic mobility, and scanning electron microscopy were used to evaluate particle stability, mobility and size. Adsorption of negatively charged organic and inorganic species onto the surface of the iron oxide particles was shown to significantly enhance particle stability and transport through alterations of the electrokinetic properties of the particle surface. Particle breakthrough generally occurred simultaneously with tritiated water, a conservative tracer. The extent of particle breakthrough was primarily dependent upon colloidal stability and surface charge.

  3. A Psychoacoustic Evaluation of Noise Signatures from Advanced Civil Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Christian, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation project has been successful in developing and demonstrating technologies for integrated aircraft systems that can simultaneously meet aggressive goals for fuel burn, noise and emissions. Some of the resulting systems substantially differ from the familiar tube and wing designs constituting the current civil transport fleet. This study attempts to explore whether or not the effective perceived noise level metric used in the NASA noise goal accurately reflects human subject response across the range of vehicles considered. Further, it seeks to determine, in a quantitative manner, if the sounds associated with the advanced aircraft are more or less preferable to the reference vehicles beyond any differences revealed by the metric. These explorations are made through psychoacoustic tests in a controlled laboratory environment using simulated stimuli developed from auralizations of selected vehicles based on systems noise assessments.

  4. Design and fabrication of brazed Rene 41 honeycomb sandwich structural panels for advanced space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepler, A. K.; Swegle, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    The design and fabrication of two large brazed Rene 41 honeycomb panels, the establishment of a test plan, the design and fabrication of a test fixture to subject the panels to cyclic thermal gradients and mechanical loads equivalent to those imposed on an advanced space transportation vehicle during its boost and entry trajectories are discussed. The panels will be supported at four points, creating three spans. The outer spans are 45.7 cm (18 in.) and the center span 76.2 cm (30 in). Specimen width is 30.5 cm (12 in.). The panels were primarily designed by boost conditions simulated by subjecting the panels to liquid nitrogen, 77K (-320 F) on one side and 455K (360 F) on the other side and by mechanically imposing loads representing vehicle fuel pressure loads. Entry conditions were simulated by radiant heating to 1034K (1400 F). The test program subjected the panels to 500 boost thermal conditions. Results are presented.

  5. Ejector nozzle test results at simulated flight conditions for an advanced supersonic transport propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.; Bresnahan, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented of wind tunnel tests conducted to verify the performance improvements of a refined ejector nozzle design for advanced supersonic transport propulsion systems. The analysis of results obtained at simulated engine operating conditions is emphasized. Tests were conducted with models of approximately 1/10th scale which were configured to simulate nozzle operation at takeoff, subsonic cruise, transonic cruise, and supersonic cruise. Transonic cruise operation was not a consideration during the nozzle design phase, although an evaluation at this condition was later conducted. Test results, characterized by thrust and flow coefficients, are given for a range of nozzle pressure ratios, emphasizing the thrust performance at the engine operating conditions predicted for each flight Mach number. The results indicate that nozzle performance goals were met or closely approximated at takeoff and supersonic cruise, while subsonic cruise performance was within 2.3 percent of the goal with further improvement possible.

  6. Plant chromium uptake and transport, physiological effects and recent advances in molecular investigations.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Maria Angélica da Conceição; Hauser-Davis, Rachel Ann; Suzuki, Marina Satika; Vitória, Angela Pierre

    2017-06-01

    Increasingly, anthropogenic perturbations of the biosphere manifest in a broad array of global phenomena, causing widespread contamination of most ecosystems, with high dispersion rates of many contaminants throughout different environmental compartments, including metals. Chromium (Cr) contamination in particular, is, increasingly, posing a serious threat to the environment, emerging as a major health hazard to the biota. However, although the molecular and physiological mechanisms of plant responses to many heavy metals, especially lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd), have been focused upon in recent years, chromium has attracted significantly less attention. In this context, this review discusses aspects of Cr uptake and transport, some physiological and biochemical effects of Cr exposure in plants, and molecular defense mechanisms against this metal. Recent advances in determining these responses, in fields of knowledge such as genomics, proteomics and metallomics, are discussed herein.

  7. Analysis and Preliminary Design of an Advanced Technology Transport Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazzini, R.; Vaughn, D.

    1975-01-01

    The analysis and preliminary design of an advanced technology transport aircraft flight control system using avionics and flight control concepts appropriate to the 1980-1985 time period are discussed. Specifically, the techniques and requirements of the flight control system were established, a number of candidate configurations were defined, and an evaluation of these configurations was performed to establish a recommended approach. Candidate configurations based on redundant integration of various sensor types, computational methods, servo actuator arrangements and data-transfer techniques were defined to the functional module and piece-part level. Life-cycle costs, for the flight control configurations, as determined in an operational environment model for 200 aircraft over a 15-year service life, were the basis of the optimum configuration selection tradeoff. The recommended system concept is a quad digital computer configuration utilizing a small microprocessor for input/output control, a hexad skewed set of conventional sensors for body rate and body acceleration, and triple integrated actuators.

  8. Space Shuttle 2 Advanced Space Transportation System. Volume 1: Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adinaro, James N.; Benefield, Philip A.; Johnson, Shelby D.; Knight, Lisa K.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation into the feasibility of establishing a second generation space transportation system is summarized. Incorporating successful systems from the Space Shuttle and technological advances made since its conception, the second generation shuttle was designed to be a lower-cost, reliable system which would guarantee access to space well into the next century. A fully reusable, all-liquid propellant booster/orbiter combination using parallel burn was selected as the base configuration. Vehicle characteristics were determined from NASA ground rules and optimization evaluations. The launch profile was constructed from particulars of the vehicle design and known orbital requirements. A stability and control analysis was performed for the landing phase of the orbiter's flight. Finally, a preliminary safety analysis was performed to indicate possible failure modes and consequences.

  9. Modeling Fate and Transport of Rotavirus in Surface Flow by Integrating WEPP and a Pathogen Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, R.; Kalita, P. K.; Davidson, P. C.; Kuhlenschmidt, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    More than 3.5 million people die each year from a water related diseases in this world. Every 20 seconds, a child dies from a water-related illness. Even in a developed country like the United States, there have been at least 1870 outbreaks associated with drinking water during the period of 1920 to 2002, causing 883,806 illnesses. Most of these outbreaks are resulted due to the presence of microbial pathogens in drinking water. Rotavirus infection has been recognized as the most common cause of diarrhea in young children throughout the world. Laboratory experiments conducted at the University of Illinois have demonstrated that recovery of rotavirus has been significantly affected by climatic and soil-surface conditions like slope, soil types, and ground cover. The objective of this study is to simulate the fate and transport of Rotavirus in overland and near-surface flow using a process-based model. In order to capture the dynamics of sediment-bound pathogens, the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) is coupled with the pathogen transport model. Transport of pathogens in overland flow can be simulated mathematically by including terms for the concentration of the pathogens in the liquid phase (in suspension or free-floating) and the solid phase (adsorbed to the fine solid particles like clay and silt). Advection, adsorption, and decay processes are considered. The mass balance equations are solved using numerical technique to predict spatial and temporal changes in pathogen concentrations in two phases. Outputs from WEPP simulations (flow velocity, depth, saturated conductivity and the soil particle fraction exiting in flow) are transferred as input for the pathogen transport model. Three soil types and three different surface cover conditions have been used in the experimental investigations. Results from these conditions have been used in calibrating and validating the simulation results. Bare surface conditions have produced very good agreement between

  10. Performance potential of an advanced technology Mach 3 turbojet engine installed on a conceptual high-speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Shelby J., Jr.; Geiselhart, Karl A.; Coen, Peter G.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of an advanced technology conceptual turbojet optimized for a high-speed civil aircraft is presented. This information represents an estimate of performance of a Mach 3 Brayton (gas turbine) cycle engine optimized for minimum fuel burned at supersonic cruise. This conceptual engine had no noise or environmental constraints imposed upon it. The purpose of this data is to define an upper boundary on the propulsion performance for a conceptual commercial Mach 3 transport design. A comparison is presented demonstrating the impact of the technology proposed for this conceptual engine on the weight and other characteristics of a proposed high-speed civil transport. This comparison indicates that the advanced technology turbojet described could reduce the gross weight of a hypothetical Mach 3 high-speed civil transport design from about 714,000 pounds to about 545,000 pounds. The aircraft with the baseline engine and the aircraft with the advanced technology engine are described.

  11. Spatial Transport of Magnetic Flux Surfaces in Strongly Anisotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Servidio, S.; Wan, M.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Rappazzo, A. F.; Oughton, S.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic flux surfaces afford familiar descriptions of spatial structure, dynamics, and connectivity of magnetic fields, with particular relevance in contexts such as solar coronal flux tubes, magnetic field connectivity in the interplanetary and interstellar medium, as well as in laboratory plasmas and dynamo problems [1-4]. Typical models assume that field-lines are orderly, and flux tubes remain identifiable over macroscopic distances; however, a previous study has shown that flux tubes shred in the presence of fluctuations, typically losing identity after several correlation scales [5]. Here, the structure of magnetic flux surfaces is numerically investigated in a reduced magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) model of homogeneous turbulence. Short and long-wavelength behavior is studied statistically by propagating magnetic surfaces along the mean field. At small scales magnetic surfaces become complex, experiencing an exponential thinning. At large scales, instead, the magnetic flux undergoes a diffusive behavior. The link between the diffusion of the coarse-grained flux and field-line random walk is established by means of a multiple scale analysis. Both large and small scales limits are controlled by the Kubo number. These results have consequences for understanding and interpreting processes such as magnetic reconnection and field-line diffusion in plasmas [6]. [1] E. N. Parker, Cosmical Magnetic Fields (Oxford Univ. Press, New York, 1979). [2] J. R. Jokipii and E. N. Parker, Phys. Rev. Lett. 21, 44 (1968). [3] R. Bruno et al., Planet. Space Sci. 49, 1201 (2001). [4] M. N. Rosenbluth et al., Nuclear Fusion 6, 297 (1966). [5] W. H. Matthaeus et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 2136 (1995). [6] S. Servidio et al., submitted (2013).

  12. Comparison of subsurface and surface runoff phosphorus transport rates in alluvial floodplains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus (P) loading to streams can occur by both surface runoff and subsurface transport. Although surface runoff is often considered the dominant pathway, groundwater P concentrations in alluvial aquifers can be significant, especially in preferential flow paths (PFPs). The objectives of this re...

  13. Design philosophy of long range LFC transports with advanced supercritical LFC airfoils. [laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfenninger, Werner; Vemuru, Chandra S.

    1988-01-01

    The achievement of 70 percent laminar flow using modest boundary layer suction on the wings, empennage, nacelles, and struts of long-range LFC transports, combined with larger wing spans and lower span loadings, could make possible an unrefuelled range halfway around the world up to near sonic cruise speeds with large payloads. It is shown that supercritical LFC airfoils with undercut front and rear lower surfaces, an upper surface static pressure coefficient distribution with an extensive low supersonic flat rooftop, a far upstream supersonic pressure minimum, and a steep subsonic rear pressure rise with suction or a slotted cruise flap could alleviate sweep-induced crossflow and attachment-line boundary-layer instability. Wing-mounted superfans can reduce fuel consumption and engine tone noise.

  14. Interplay between hydrophilicity and surface barriers on water transport in zeolite membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasano, Matteo; Humplik, Thomas; Bevilacqua, Alessio; Tsapatsis, Michael; Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Wang, Evelyn N.; Asinari, Pietro

    2016-10-01

    A comprehensive understanding of molecular transport within nanoporous materials remains elusive in a broad variety of engineering and biomedical applications. Here, experiments and atomistic simulations are synergically used to elucidate the non-trivial interplay between nanopore hydrophilicity and surface barriers on the overall water transport through zeolite crystals. At these nanometre-length scales, these results highlight the dominating effect of surface imperfections with reduced permeability on the overall water transport. A simple diffusion resistance model is shown to be sufficient to capture the effects of both intracrystalline and surface diffusion resistances, thus properly linking simulation to experimental evidence. This work suggests that future experimental work should focus on eliminating/overcoming these surface imperfections, which promise an order of magnitude improvement in permeability.

  15. Effect of surface functionalization on the electronic transport properties of Ti3C2 MXene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdiyorov, G. R.

    2015-09-01

    The effects of surface functionalization on the electronic transport properties of the MXene compound Ti3C2 are studied using density-functional theory in combination with the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. Fluorinated, oxidized and hydroxylated surfaces are considered and the obtained results are compared with the ones for the pristine MXene. It is found that the surface termination has a considerable impact on the electronic transport in MXene. For example, the fluorinated sample shows the largest transmission, whereas surface oxidation results in a considerable reduction of the electronic transmission. The current in the former sample can be up to 4 times larger for a given bias voltage as compared to the case of bare MXene. The increased transmission originates from the extended electronic states and smaller variations of the electrostatic potential profile. Our findings can be useful in designing MXene-based anode materials for energy storage applications, where enhanced electronic transport will be an asset.

  16. Analysis of Turbofan Design Options for an Advanced Single-Aisle Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Fisher, Kenneth L.; Haller, William J.; Tong, Michael T.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    The desire for higher engine efficiency has resulted in the evolution of aircraft gas turbine engines from turbojets, to low bypass ratio, first generation turbofans, to today's high bypass ratio turbofans. It is possible that future designs will continue this trend, leading to very-high or ultra-high bypass ratio (UHB) engines. Although increased bypass ratio has clear benefits in terms of propulsion system metrics such as specific fuel consumption, these benefits may not translate into aircraft system level benefits due to integration penalties. In this study, the design trade space for advanced turbofan engines applied to a single-aisle transport (737/A320 class aircraft) is explored. The benefits of increased bypass ratio and associated enabling technologies such as geared fan drive are found to depend on the primary metrics of interest. For example, bypass ratios at which fuel consumption is minimized may not require geared fan technology. However, geared fan drive does enable higher bypass ratio designs which result in lower noise. Regardless of the engine architecture chosen, the results of this study indicate the potential for the advanced aircraft to realize substantial improvements in fuel efficiency, emissions, and noise compared to the current vehicles in this size class.

  17. Refined Exploration of Turbofan Design Options for an Advanced Single-Aisle Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Fisher, Kenneth L.; Haller, William J.; Tong, Michael T.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive exploration of the turbofan engine design space for an advanced technology single-aisle transport (737/A320 class aircraft) was conducted previously by the authors and is documented in a prior report. Through the course of that study and in a subsequent evaluation of the approach and results, a number of enhancements to the engine design ground rules and assumptions were identified. A follow-on effort was initiated to investigate the impacts of these changes on the original study results. The fundamental conclusions of the prior study were found to still be valid with the revised engine designs. The most significant impact of the design changes was a reduction in the aircraft weight and block fuel penalties incurred with low fan pressure ratio, ultra-high bypass ratio designs. This enables lower noise levels to be pursued (through lower fan pressure ratio) with minor negative impacts on aircraft weight and fuel efficiency. Regardless of the engine design selected, the results of this study indicate the potential for the advanced aircraft to realize substantial improvements in fuel efficiency, emissions, and noise compared to the current vehicles in this size class.

  18. Proceedings of the Advanced Seminar on one-dimensional, open-channel Flow and transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranek, Raymond W.

    1989-01-01

    In view of the increased use of mathematical/numerical simulation models, of the diversity of both model investigations and informational project objectives, and of the technical demands of complex model applications by U.S. Geological Survey personnel, an advanced seminar on one-dimensional open-channel flow and transport modeling was organized and held on June 15-18, 1987, at the National Space Technology Laboratory, Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. Principal emphasis in the Seminar was on one-dimensional flow and transport model-implementation techniques, operational practices, and application considerations. The purposes of the Seminar were to provide a forum for the exchange of information, knowledge, and experience among model users, as well as to identify immediate and future needs with respect to model development and enhancement, user support, training requirements, and technology transfer. The Seminar program consisted of a mix of topical and project presentations by Geological Survey personnel. This report is a compilation of short papers that summarize the presentations made at the Seminar.

  19. Electrochemical and mechanical processes at surfaces and interfaces of advanced materials for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Feifei

    Energy storage is a rapidly emerging field. In almost all energy storage applications, surfaces and interfaces are playing dominant roles. Examples are fuel cell electrodes, where electro-catalytic reactions occur, Li-ion battery (LIB) electrodes, where electrolyte decomposition and passivation commence simultaneously, and failure (fracture) of battery electrodes, where surface crack initiation greatly affects battery endurance. The most fundamental chemical, electrochemical, and mechanical problems in energy storage applications originate from surfaces and interfaces. This thesis investigates the electrochemical and mechanical processes at surfaces and interfaces of advanced materials for energy applications. The thesis includes the following five main research topics. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  20. Advanced Key Technologies for Hot Control Surfaces in Space Re- Entry Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogigli, Michael; Pradier, Alain; Tumino, Giorgio

    2002-01-01

    (1)MAN Technologie AG, D- 86153 Augsburg, Germany (2,3) ESA, 2200 Noordwijk ZH, The Netherlands Current space re-entry vehicles (e.g. X-38 vehicle 201, the prototype of the International Space Station's Crew Return Vehicle (CRV)) require advanced control surfaces (so called body flaps). Such control surfaces allow the design of smaller and lighter vehicles as well as faster re-entries (compared to the US Shuttle). They are designed as light-weight structures that need no metallic parts, need no mass or volume consuming heat sinks to protect critical components (e.g. bearings) and that can be operated at temperatures of more than 1600 "C in air transferring high mechanical loads (dynamic 40 kN, static 70 kN) at the same time. Because there is a need for CRV and also for Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV) in future, the European Space Agency (ESA) felt compelled to establish a "Future European Space Transportation and Investigation Program,, (FESTIP) and a "General Support for Technology Program,, (GSTP). One of the main goals of these programs was to develop and qualify key-technologies that are able to master the above mentioned challenging requirements for advanced hot control surfaces and that can be applied for different vehicles. In 1996 MAN Technologie has started the development of hot control surfaces for small lifting bodies in the national program "Heiü Strukturen,,. One of the main results of this program was that especially the following CMC (Ceramic Matrix Composite) key technologies need to be brought up to space flight standard: Complex CMC Structures, CMC Bearings, Metal-to-CMC Joining Technologies, CMC Fasteners, Oxidation Protection Systems and Static and Dynamic Seals. MAN Technologie was contracted by ESA to continue the development and qualification of these key technologies in the frame of the FESTIP and the GSTP program. Development and qualification have successfully been carried out. The key technologies have been applied for the X-38 vehicle

  1. Surface charge-specific interactions between polymer nanoparticles and ABC transporters in Caco-2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sourav; van Opstal, Edward J.; Alink, Gerrit M.; Marcelis, Antonius T. M.; Zuilhof, Han; Rietjens, Ivonne M. C. M.

    2013-06-01

    The surface charge-dependent transport of polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs) across Caco-2 monolayers grown on transwell culture systems as an in vitro model for intestinal transport was tested. The transport of well-characterized, monodisperse, and fluorescent tri-block copolymer nanoparticles (TCNPs/size 45 nm) and polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs/size 50 nm), with different surface charges (positive and negative), was quantified. The positive PNPs showed a higher intracellular uptake and flux across the Caco-2 monolayers than the negative PNPs. Multidrug resistance/P-glycoprotein (MDR1/P-gp), a specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, was found to play a major role in the cellular efflux of positive PNPs, whereas the multidrug resistance protein 1 took part in the efflux of negative PNPs from Caco-2 cells. The positive PNPs also caused an increased cellular uptake and apical to basolateral transport of the carcinogen PhIP across the Caco-2 monolayer. The flavonoid quercetin, which is known to interact with ABC transporters, promoted the intracellular uptake of different PNPs and interfered with the normal distribution patterns of PNPs in the transwell system. These results indicate that PNPs display surface charge-specific interactions with ABC transporters and can even affect the bioavailability of toxic food-borne compounds (like pro-carcinogens).

  2. Advanced boundary condition method in quantum transport and its application in nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu

    Modern semiconductor devices have reached critical dimensions in the sub-20nm range. During the last decade, quantum transport methods have become the standard approaches to model nanoscale devices. In quantum transport methods, Schrodinger equations are solved in the critical device channel with the contacts served as the open boundary conditions. Proper and efficient treatments of these boundary conditions are essential to provide accurate prediction of device performance. The open boundary conditions, which represent charge injection and extraction effects, are described by contact self-energies. All existing contact self-energy methods assume periodic and semiinfinite contacts, which are in stark contrast to realistic devices where the contacts often have complicated geometries or imperfections. On the other hand, confined structures such as quantum dots, nanowires, and ultra-thin bodies play an important role in nanodevice designs. In the tight binding models of these confined structures, the surfaces require appropriate boundary treatments to remove the dangling bonds. The existing boundary treatments fall into two categories. One is to explicitly include the passivation atoms in the device. This is limited to passivation with atoms and small molecules due to the increasing rank of the Hamiltonian. The other is to implicitly incorporate passivation by altering the orbital energies of the dangling bonds with a passivation potential. This method only works for certain crystal structures and symmetries, and fails to distinguish different passivation scenarios, such as hydrogen and oxygen passivation. In this work, an efficient self-energy method applicable for arbitrary contact structures is developed. This method is based on an iterative algorithm which considers the explicit contact segments. The method is demonstrated on a graphene nanoribbon structure with trumpet shape contacts and a Si0.5Ge0.5 nanowire transistor with alloy disorder contacts. Furthermore

  3. Advances in the surface modification techniques of bone-related implants for last 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Chen, Cen; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Lee, In-Seop

    2014-01-01

    At the time of implanting bone-related implants into human body, a variety of biological responses to the material surface occur with respect to surface chemistry and physical state. The commonly used biomaterials (e.g. titanium and its alloy, Co–Cr alloy, stainless steel, polyetheretherketone, ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene and various calcium phosphates) have many drawbacks such as lack of biocompatibility and improper mechanical properties. As surface modification is very promising technology to overcome such problems, a variety of surface modification techniques have been being investigated. This review paper covers recent advances in surface modification techniques of bone-related materials including physicochemical coating, radiation grafting, plasma surface engineering, ion beam processing and surface patterning techniques. The contents are organized with different types of techniques to applicable materials, and typical examples are also described. PMID:26816626

  4. Stability and Transport of Graphene Oxide Nanoparticles in Groundwater and Surface Water

    PubMed Central

    Lanphere, Jacob D.; Rogers, Brandon; Luth, Corey; Bolster, Carl H.; Walker, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The effects of groundwater and surface water constituents (i.e., natural organic matter [NOM] and the presence of a complex assortment of ions) on graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONPs) were investigated to provide additional insight into the factors contributing to fate and the mechanisms involved in their transport in soil, groundwater, and surface water environments. The stability and transport of GONPs was investigated using dynamic light scattering, electrokinetic characterization, and packed bed column experiments. Stability results showed that the hydrodynamic diameter of the GONPs at a similar ionic strength (2.1±1.1 mM) was 10 times greater in groundwater environments compared with surface water and NaCl and MgCl2 suspensions. Transport results confirmed that in groundwater, GONPs are less stable and are more likely to be removed during transport in porous media. In surface water and MgCl2 and NaCl suspensions, the relative recovery was 94%±3% indicating that GONPs will be very mobile in surface waters. Additional experiments were carried out in monovalent (KCl) and divalent (CaCl2) salts across an environmentally relevant concentration range (0.1–10 mg/L) of NOM using Suwannee River humic acid. Overall, the transport and stability of GONPs was increased in the presence of NOM. This study confirms that planar “carbonaceous-oxide” materials follow traditional theory for stability and transport, both due to their response to ionic strength, valence, and NOM presence and is the first to look at GONP transport across a wide range of representative conditions found in surface and groundwater environments. PMID:25053876

  5. Stability and Transport of Graphene Oxide Nanoparticles in Groundwater and Surface Water.

    PubMed

    Lanphere, Jacob D; Rogers, Brandon; Luth, Corey; Bolster, Carl H; Walker, Sharon L

    2014-07-01

    The effects of groundwater and surface water constituents (i.e., natural organic matter [NOM] and the presence of a complex assortment of ions) on graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONPs) were investigated to provide additional insight into the factors contributing to fate and the mechanisms involved in their transport in soil, groundwater, and surface water environments. The stability and transport of GONPs was investigated using dynamic light scattering, electrokinetic characterization, and packed bed column experiments. Stability results showed that the hydrodynamic diameter of the GONPs at a similar ionic strength (2.1±1.1 mM) was 10 times greater in groundwater environments compared with surface water and NaCl and MgCl2 suspensions. Transport results confirmed that in groundwater, GONPs are less stable and are more likely to be removed during transport in porous media. In surface water and MgCl2 and NaCl suspensions, the relative recovery was 94%±3% indicating that GONPs will be very mobile in surface waters. Additional experiments were carried out in monovalent (KCl) and divalent (CaCl2) salts across an environmentally relevant concentration range (0.1-10 mg/L) of NOM using Suwannee River humic acid. Overall, the transport and stability of GONPs was increased in the presence of NOM. This study confirms that planar "carbonaceous-oxide" materials follow traditional theory for stability and transport, both due to their response to ionic strength, valence, and NOM presence and is the first to look at GONP transport across a wide range of representative conditions found in surface and groundwater environments.

  6. The transport characteristics of passing fast ions produced by nonlocal overlapping of drift island surfaces and magnetic island surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jinjia; Gong, Xueyu; Xiang, Dong; Huang, Qianhong; Yu, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The structure of the drift-island surface of passing fast ions (PFIs) is investigated in the presence of the resonant interaction with a magnetic island. Two overlapping regions of the drift-island surface and the magnetic island surface are found, one corresponding to local overlapping region and the other to non-local one. Here, the word "nonlocal" denotes that the resonances in the core plasma can have effects on the PFIs near the plasma boundary, while the "local" represents that the PFIs just near the resonant location are influenced. The nonlocal overlapping constructs a transport path along which the PFIs can become losses. There are three kinds of drift-island surfaces to join in forming the transport paths. A pitch angle region, which is called pitch angle gap, is found near the plasma boundary, where the drift-island surface cannot be formed and few PFIs are lost. The pitch-angle selective features of PFI losses are obtained by analyzing the three kinds of drift-island surfaces. The coupling between the crowd drift island surfaces and the collision can induce the prompt losses of PFIs and rapidly slowing down of PFI energy. The time of the prompt losses and the slowing down rate are calculated. Qualitatively, the theoretical results are in well agreement with the experimental observations in ASDEX Upgrade [M. García-Muñoz et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, L10 (2007)].

  7. Reactive solute transport in streams: A surface complexation approach for trace metal sorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.; Kimball, B.A.; McKnight, Diane M.; Bencala, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    A model for trace metals that considers in-stream transport, metal oxide precipitation-dissolution, and pH-dependent sorption is presented. Linkage between a surface complexation submodel and the stream transport equations provides a framework for modeling sorption onto static and/or dynamic surfaces. A static surface (e.g., an iron-oxide-coated streambed) is defined as a surface with a temporally constant solid concentration. Limited contact between solutes in the water column and the static surface is considered using a pseudokinetic approach. A dynamic surface (e.g., freshly precipitated metal oxides) has a temporally variable solid concentration and is in equilibrium with the water column. Transport and deposition of solute mass sorbed to the dynamic surface is represented in the stream transport equations that include precipitate settling. The model is applied to a pH-modification experiment in an acid mine drainage stream. Dissolved copper concentrations were depressed for a 3 hour period in response to the experimentally elevated pH. After passage of the pH front, copper was desorbed, and dissolved concentrations returned to ambient levels. Copper sorption is modeled by considering sorption to aged hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) on the streambed (static surface) and freshly precipitated HFO in the water column (dynamic surface). Comparison of parameter estimates with reported values suggests that naturally formed iron oxides may be more effective in removing trace metals than synthetic oxides used in laboratory studies. The model's ability to simulate pH, metal oxide precipitation-dissolution, and pH-dependent sorption provides a means of evaluating the complex interactions between trace metal chemistry and hydrologic transport at the field scale.

  8. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Current and Advanced Technology ACT control system definition tasks of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program are summarized. The systems mechanize six active control functions: (1) pitch augmented stability; (2) angle of attack limiting; (3) lateral/directional augmented stability; (4) gust load alleviation; (5) maneuver load control; and (6) flutter mode control. The redundant digital control systems meet all function requirements with required reliability and declining weight and cost as advanced technology is introduced.

  9. The Advanced Re-Entry Vehicle (ARV) a Development Step from ATV Toward Manned Transportation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottacini, M.; Berthe, P.; Vo, X.; Pietsch, K.

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced Re-entry Vehicle (ARV) programme has been undertaken by Europe with the objective to contribute to the preparation of a future European crew transportation system, while providing a valuable logistic support to the ISS through an operational cargo return system. This development would allow: - the early acquisition of critical technologies; - the design, development and testing of elements suitable for the follow up human rated transportation system. These vehicles should also serve future LEO infrastructures and exploration missions. With the aim to satisfy the above objectives a team composed by major European industries and led by EADS Astrium Space Transportation is currently conducting the phase A of the programme under contract with the European Space Agency (ESA). Two vehicle versions are being investigated: a Cargo version, transporting cargo only to/from the ISS, and a Crew version, which will allow the transfer of both crew and cargo to/from the ISS. The ARV Cargo version, in its present configuration, is composed of three modules. The Versatile Service Module (VSM) provides to the system the propulsion/GNC for orbital manoeuvres and attitude control and the orbital power generation. Its propulsion system and GNC shall be robust enough to allow its use for different launch stacks and different LEO missions in the future. The Un-pressurised Cargo Module (UCM) provides the accommodation for about 3000 kg of un-pressurised cargo and is to be sufficiently flexible to ensure the transportation of: - orbital infrastructure components (ORU's); - scientific / technological experiments; - propellant for re-fuelling, re-boost (and deorbiting) of the ISS. The Re-entry Module (RM) provides a pressurized volume to accommodate active/passive cargo (2000 kg upload/1500 kg download). It is conceived as an expendable conical capsule with spherical heat- hield, interfacing with the new docking standard of the ISS, i.e. it carries the IBDM docking system, on a

  10. The Advanced Re-Entry Vehicle (ARV) A Development Step From ATV Toward Manned Transportation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottacini, Massimiliano; Berthe, Philippe; Vo, Xavier; Pietsch, Klaus

    2011-05-01

    The Advanced Re-entry Vehicle (ARV) programme has been undertaken by Europe with the objective to contribute to the preparation of a future European crew transportation system, while providing a valuable logistic support to the ISS through an operational cargo return system. This development would allow: - the early acquisition of critical technologies; - the design, development and testing of elements suitable for the follow up human rated transportation system. These vehicles should also serve future LEO infrastructures and exploration missions. With the aim to satisfy the above objectives a team composed by major European industries and led by EADS Astrium Space Transportation is currently conducting the phase A of the programme under contract with the European Space Agency (ESA). Two vehicle versions are being investigated: a Cargo version, transporting cargo only to/from the ISS, and a Crew version, which will allow the transfer of both crew and cargo to/from the ISS. The ARV Cargo version, in its present configuration, is composed of three modules. The Versatile Service Module (VSM) provides to the system the propulsion/GNC for orbital manoeuvres and attitude control and the orbital power generation. Its propulsion system and GNC shall be robust enough to allow its use for different launch stacks and different LEO missions in the future. The Un-pressurised Cargo Module (UCM) provides the accommodation for about 3000 kg of unpressurised cargo and is to be sufficiently flexible to ensure the transportation of: - orbital infrastructure components (ORU’s); - scientific / technological experiments; - propellant for re-fuelling, re-boost (and de-orbiting) of the ISS. The Re-entry Module (RM) provides a pressurized volume to accommodate active/passive cargo (2000 kg upload/1500 kg download). It is conceived as an expendable conical capsule with spherical heat-shield, interfacing with the new docking standard of the ISS, i.e. it carries the IBDM docking system, on

  11. High-Purity Aluminum Magnet Technology for Advanced Space Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, R. G.; Pullam, B.; Rickle, D.; Litchford, R. J.; Robertson, G. A.; Schmidt, D. D.; Cole, John (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Basic research on advanced plasma-based propulsion systems is routinely focused on plasmadynamics, performance, and efficiency aspects while relegating the development of critical enabling technologies, such as flight-weight magnets, to follow-on development work. Unfortunately, the low technology readiness levels (TRLs) associated with critical enabling technologies tend to be perceived as an indicator of high technical risk, and this, in turn, hampers the acceptance of advanced system architectures for flight development. Consequently, there is growing recognition that applied research on the critical enabling technologies needs to be conducted hand in hand with basic research activities. The development of flight-weight magnet technology, for example, is one area of applied research having broad crosscutting applications to a number of advanced propulsion system architectures. Therefore, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Louisiana State University (LSU), and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) have initiated an applied research project aimed at advancing the TRL of flight-weight magnets. This Technical Publication reports on the group's initial effort to demonstrate the feasibility of cryogenic high-purity aluminum magnet technology and describes the design, construction, and testing of a 6-in-diameter by 12-in-long aluminum solenoid magnet. The coil was constructed in the machine shop of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at LSU and testing was conducted in NHMFL facilities at Florida State University and at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The solenoid magnet was first wound, reinforced, potted in high thermal conductivity epoxy, and bench tested in the LSU laboratories. A cryogenic container for operation at 77 K was also constructed and mated to the solenoid. The coil was then taken to NHMFL facilities in Tallahassee, FL. where its magnetoresistance was measured in a 77 K environment under steady magnetic fields as high as 10 T. In

  12. DIRECT COMPARISON OF KINETIC AND LOCAL EQUILIBRIUM FORMULATIONS FOR SOLUTE TRANSPORT AFFECTED BY SURFACE REACTIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahr, Jean M.; Rubin, Jacob

    1987-01-01

    Modeling transport of reacting solutes in porous media often requires a choice between models based on the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) and models involving reaction kinetics. Direct comparison of the mathematical formulations for these two types of transport models can aid in this choice. For cases of transport affected by surface reaction, such a comparison is made possible by a new derivation procedure. This procedure yields a kinetics-based formulation that is the sum of the LEA formulation and one or more kinetically influenced terms. The dimensionless form of the new kinetics-based formulation facilitates identification of critical parameter groupings which control the approach to transport behavior consistent with LEA model predictions. Results of numerical experiments demonstrate that criteria for LEA applicability can be expressed conveniently in terms of these parameter groupings. The derivation procedure is demonstrated for examples of surface reactions including first-order reversible sorption, Langmuir-type kinetics and binary, homovalent ion exchange.

  13. Nontrivial surface state transport in Bi2Se3 topological insulator nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Haiyang; Zhang, Kang; Wei, Zhongxia; Wang, Jue; Han, Min; Song, Fengqi; Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Baigeng; Zhang, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Topological insulator nanostructures have the larger surface-to-volume ratios than the bulk materials, which enhances the surface state contribution to the electrical transport. Here, we report on the single-crystalline Bi2Se3 narrow nanoribbons synthesized by the chemical vapor deposition method. The surface state induced Aharonov-Bohm effect was observed in the parallel magnetic field. The weak antilocalization (WAL) at various temperatures can be well fitted by the 1D localization theory, and the fitting coherence length is larger than the cross section size of the nanoribbon. The amplitude of WAL after subtracting the bulk background is only dependent on the vertical component of the magnetic field at various angles, revealing the surface nature of WAL. All these signatures indicate the nontrivial surface state transport in our Bi2Se3 narrow nanoribbons.

  14. Identifying key surface parameters for optical photon transport in GEANT4/GATE simulations.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Jenny; Cuplov, Vesna; Isaksson, Mats

    2015-09-01

    For a scintillator used for spectrometry, the generation, transport and detection of optical photons have a great impact on the energy spectrum resolution. A complete Monte Carlo model of a scintillator includes a coupled ionizing particle and optical photon transport, which can be simulated with the GEANT4 code. The GEANT4 surface parameters control the physics processes an optical photon undergoes when reaching the surface of a volume. In this work the impact of each surface parameter on the optical transport was studied by looking at the optical spectrum: the number of detected optical photons per ionizing source particle from a large plastic scintillator, i.e. the output signal. All simulations were performed using GATE v6.2 (GEANT4 Application for Tomographic Emission). The surface parameter finish (polished, ground, front-painted or back-painted) showed the greatest impact on the optical spectrum whereas the surface parameter σ(α), which controls the surface roughness, had a relatively small impact. It was also shown how the surface parameters reflectivity and reflectivity types (specular spike, specular lobe, Lambertian and backscatter) changed the optical spectrum depending on the probability for reflection and the combination of reflectivity types. A change in the optical spectrum will ultimately have an impact on a simulated energy spectrum. By studying the optical spectra presented in this work, a GEANT4 user can predict the shift in an optical spectrum caused be the alteration of a specific surface parameter.

  15. Surface Catalytic Efficiency of Advanced Carbon Carbon Candidate Thermal Protection Materials for SSTO Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic efficiency (atom recombination coefficients) for advanced ceramic thermal protection systems was calculated using arc-jet data. Coefficients for both oxygen and nitrogen atom recombination on the surfaces of these systems were obtained to temperatures of 1650 K. Optical and chemical stability of the candidate systems to the high energy hypersonic flow was also demonstrated during these tests.

  16. WinSRFR: Current Advances in Software for Surface Irrigation Simulation and Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Significant advances have been made over the last decade in the development of software for surface irrigation analysis. WinSRFR is an integrated tool that combines unsteady flow simulation with tools for system evaluation/parameter estimation, system design, and for operational optimization. Ongoi...

  17. Glucose transport and cell surface GLUT-4 protein in skeletal muscle of the obese Zucker rat.

    PubMed

    Etgen, G J; Wilson, C M; Jensen, J; Cushman, S W; Ivy, J L

    1996-08-01

    The relationship between 3-O-methyl-D-glucose transport and 2-N-4-(1-azi-2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-benzoyl-1, 3-bis-(D-mannos-4-yloxy)-2-propylamine (ATB-BMPA)-labeled cell surface GLUT-4 protein was assessed in fast-twitch (epitrochlearis) and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles of lean and obese (fa/fa) Zucker rats. In the absence of insulin, glucose transport as well as cell surface GLUT-4 protein was similar in both epitrochlearis and soleus muscles of lean and obese rats. In contrast, insulin-stimulated glucose transport rates were significantly higher for lean than obese rats in both soleus (0.74 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.40 +/- 0.02 mumol.g-1.10 min-1) and epitrochlearis (0.51 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.17 +/- 0.02 mumol.g-1.10 min-1) muscles. The ability of insulin to enhance glucose transport in fast- and slow-twitch muscles from both lean and obese rats corresponded directly with changes in cell surface GLUT-4 protein. Muscle contraction elicited similar increases in glucose transport in lean and obese rats, with the effect being more pronounced in fast-twitch (0.70 +/- 0.07 and 0.77 +/- 0.04 mumol.g-1.10 min-1 for obese and lean, respectively) than in slow-twitch muscle (0.36 +/- 0.03 and 0.40 +/- 0.02 mumol.g-1.10 min-1 for obese and lean, respectively). The contraction-induced changes in glucose transport directly corresponded with the observed changes in cell surface GLUT-4 protein. Thus the reduced glucose transport response to insulin in skeletal muscle of the obese Zucker rat appears to result directly from an inability to effectively enhance cell surface GLUT-4 protein.

  18. Transatlantic transport of pollution and its effects on surface ozone in Europe and North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qinbin; Jacob, Daniel J.; Bey, Isabelle; Palmer, Paul I.; Duncan, Bryan N.; Field, Brendan D.; Martin, Randall V.; Fiore, Arlene M.; Yantosca, Robert M.; Parrish, David D.; Simmonds, Peter G.; Oltmans, Samuel J.

    2002-07-01

    We examine the transatlantic transport of anthropogenic ozone and its impact on surface ozone in Europe and North America by using a 5-year (1993-1997) simulation with the GEOS-CHEM global three-dimensional model of tropospheric chemistry. Long-term time series of ozone and CO at Mace Head (Ireland) and Sable Island (Canada) are used to evaluate transatlantic transport in the model. North American anthropogenic emissions contribute on average 5 ppbv to surface ozone at Mace Head, and up to 10-20 ppbv during transatlantic transport events, which are forerunners of broader events in Europe. These events are associated with low-level westerly flow driven by an intense Icelandic low between Iceland and the British Isles. North American influence on ozone at Mace Head is strongly correlated with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), implying that the NAO index can be used to forecast transatlantic transport of North American pollution to Europe. European anthropogenic emissions contribute on average less than 2 ppbv to surface ozone at Sable Island but up to 5-10 ppbv during transatlantic transport events. These events are associated with low-level easterly flow established by anomalous low pressure at 45°N over the North Atlantic. North American anthropogenic emissions enhance surface ozone in continental Europe by 2-4 ppbv on average in summer and by 5-10 ppbv during transatlantic transport events; transport in the boundary layer and subsidence from the free troposphere are both important mechanisms. We find in the model that 20% of the violations of the European Council ozone standard (55 ppbv, 8-hour average) in the summer of 1997 over Europe would not have occurred in the absence of anthropogenic emissions from North America. North American influence on surface ozone in Europe is particularly strong at the thresholds used for the European standards (55-65 ppbv).

  19. Effects of trans-Eurasian transport of air pollutants on surface ozone concentrations over Western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Junfeng; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Emmons, Louisa K.; Walters, Stacy; Horowitz, Larry W.; Tao, Shu

    2014-11-01

    Due to a lack of industrialization in Western China, surface air there was, until recently, believed to be relatively unpolluted. However, recent measurements and modeling studies have found high levels of ozone (O3) there. Based on the state-of-the-science global chemical transport model MOZART-4, we identify the origin, pathway, and mechanism of trans-Eurasian transport of air pollutants to Western China in 2000. MOZART-4 generally simulates well the observed surface O3 over inland areas of China. Simulations find surface ozone concentrations over Western China on average to be about 10 ppbv higher than Eastern China. Using sensitivity studies, we find that anthropogenic emissions from all Eurasian regions except China contribute 10-15 ppbv surface O3 over Western China, superimposed upon a 35-40 ppbv natural background. Transport from European anthropogenic sources to Northwestern China results in 2-6 ppbv O3 enhancements in spring and summer. Indian anthropogenic sources strongly influence O3 over the Tibetan Plateau during the summer monsoon. Transport of O3 originating from emissions in the Middle East occasionally reach Western China and increase surface ozone there by about 1-4 ppbv. These influences are of similar magnitude as trans-Pacific and transatlantic transport of O3 and its precursors, indicating the significance of trans-Eurasian ozone transport in hemispheric transport of air pollution. Our study further indicates that mitigation of anthropogenic emissions from Europe, the Indian subcontinent, and the Middle East could benefit public health and agricultural productivity in Western China.

  20. Effects of trans-Eurasian transport of anthropogenic pollutants on surface ozone concentrations over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Li, X.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Emmons, L. K.; Horowitz, L. W.; Guo, Y.; Tao, S.

    2015-12-01

    Due to a lack of industrialization in Western China, surface air there was, until recently, believed to be relatively unpolluted. However, recent measurements and modeling studies have found high levels of ozone (O3) there. Based on the state-of-the-science global chemical transport model MOZART-4, we identify the origin, pathway, and mechanism of trans-Eurasian transport of air pollutants to Western China in 2000. MOZART-4 generally simulates well the observed surface O3 over inland areas of China. Simulations find surface ozone concentrations over Western China on average to be about 10 ppbv higher than Eastern China. Using sensitivity studies as well as a fully-tagged approach, we find that anthropogenic emissions from all Eurasian regions except China contribute 10-15 ppbv surface O3 over Western China, superimposed upon a 35-40 ppbv natural background. Transport from European anthropogenic sources to Northwestern China results in 2-6 ppbv O3 enhancements in spring and summer. Indian anthropogenic sources strongly influence O3 over the Tibetan Plateau during the summer monsoon. Transport of O3 originating from emissions in the Middle East occasionally reach Western China and increase surface ozone there by about 1-4 ppbv. These influences are of similar magnitude as trans-Pacific and transatlantic transport of O3 and its precursors, indicating the significance of trans-Eurasian ozone transport in hemispheric transport of air pollution. Our study further indicates that mitigation of anthropogenic emissions from Europe, the Indian subcontinent, and the Middle East could benefit public health and agricultural productivity in Western China.

  1. Surface proton transport of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) thin films on quartz substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Yuki; Kubo, Takahiro

    2014-12-01

    Thin film structure and the proton transport property of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) (P-Asp100) have been investigated. An earlier study assessed partially protonated poly(aspartic acid), highly oriented thin film structure and enhancement of the internal proton transport. In this study of P-Asp100, IR p-polarized multiple-angle incidence resolution (P-MAIR) spectra were measured to investigate the thin film structure. The obtained thin films, with thicknesses of 120-670 nm, had no oriented structure. Relative humidity dependence of the resistance, proton conductivity, and normalized resistance were examined to ascertain the proton transport property of P-Asp100 thin films. The obtained data showed that the proton transport of P-Asp100 thin films might occur on the surface, not inside of the thin film. This phenomenon might be related with the proton transport of the biological system.

  2. In situ Magnetotransport Measurements in Ultrathin Bi Films: Evidence for Surface-Bulk Coherent Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitani, Masaki; Hirahara, Toru; Ichinokura, Satoru; Hanaduka, Masahiro; Shin, Dongyoon; Hasegawa, Shuji

    2014-11-01

    We performed in situ magnetotransport measurements on ultrathin Bi(111) films [4-30 bilayers (BLs), 16-120 Å thick] to elucidate the role of bulk or surface states in the transport phenomena. We found that the temperature dependence of the film conductivity shows no thickness dependence for the 6-16 BL films and is affected by the electron-electron scattering, suggesting surface-state dominant contribution. In contrast, the weak antilocalization effect observed by applying a magnetic field shows clear thickness dependence, indicating bulk transport. This apparent inconsistency is explained by a coherent bulk-surface coupling that produces a single channel transport. For the films thicker than 20 BLs, the behavior changes drastically which can likely be interpreted as a bulk dominant conduction.

  3. Light-Driven Transport of a Liquid Marble with and against Surface Flows.

    PubMed

    Kavokine, Nikita; Anyfantakis, Manos; Morel, Mathieu; Rudiuk, Sergii; Bickel, Thomas; Baigl, Damien

    2016-09-05

    Liquid marbles, that is, liquid drops coated by a hydrophobic powder, do not wet any solid or liquid substrate, making their transport and manipulation both highly desirable and challenging. Herein, we describe the light-driven transport of floating liquid marbles and emphasize a surprising motion behavior. Liquid marbles are deposited on a water solution containing photosensitive surfactants. Irradiation of the solution generates photoreversible Marangoni flows that transport the liquid marbles toward UV light and away from blue light when the thickness of the liquid substrate is large enough (Marangoni regime). Below a critical thickness, the liquid marbles move in the opposite direction to that of the surface flow at a speed increasing with decreasing liquid thickness (anti-Marangoni). We demonstrate that the anti-Marangoni motion is driven by the free surface deformation, which propels the non-wetting marble against the surface flow. We call this behavior "slide effect".

  4. Optimized Model Surfaces for Advanced Atomic Force Microscopy Studies of Surface Nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Song, Bo; Zhou, Yi; Schönherr, Holger

    2016-11-01

    The formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of binary mixtures of 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHDA) and 1-octadecanethiol (ODT) on ultraflat template-stripped gold (TSG) surfaces was systematically investigated to clarify the assembly behavior, composition, and degree of possible phase segregation in light of atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of surface nanobubbles on these substrates. The data for SAMs on TSG were compared to those obtained by adsorption on rough evaporated gold, as reported in a previous study. Quartz crystal microbalance and surface plasmon resonance data acquired in situ on TSG indicate that similar to SAM formation on conventional evaporated gold substrates ODT and MHDA form monolayers and bilayers, respectively. The second layer on MHDA, whose formation is attributed to hydrogen bonding, can be easily removed by adequate rinsing with water. The favorable agreement of the grazing incidence reflection Fourier transform infrared (GIR FTIR) spectroscopy and contact angle data analyzed with the Israelachvili-Gee model suggests that the binary SAMs do not segregate laterally. This conclusion is fully validated by high-resolution friction force AFM observations down to a length scale of 8-10 nm, which is much smaller than the typical observed surface nanobubble radii. Finally, correspondingly functionalized TSG substrates are shown to be valuable supports for studying surface nanobubbles by AFM in water and for addressing the relation between surface functionality and nanobubble formation and properties.

  5. Continuous directional water transport on the peristome surface of Nepenthes alata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Liwen; Liu, Hongliang; Jiang, Ying; Zhang, Deyuan; Han, Zhiwu; Jiang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Numerous natural systems contain surfaces or threads that enable directional water transport. This behaviour is usually ascribed to hierarchical structural features at the microscale and nanoscale, with gradients in surface energy and gradients in Laplace pressure thought to be the main driving forces. Here we study the prey-trapping pitcher organs of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata. We find that continuous, directional water transport occurs on the surface of the ‘peristome’—the rim of the pitcher—because of its multiscale structure, which optimizes and enhances capillary rise in the transport direction, and prevents backflow by pinning in place any water front that is moving in the reverse direction. This results not only in unidirectional flow despite the absence of any surface-energy gradient, but also in a transport speed that is much higher than previously thought. We anticipate that the basic ‘design’ principles underlying this behaviour could be used to develop artificial fluid-transport systems with practical applications.

  6. Automatic droplet transportation on a plastic microfluidic device having wettability gradient surface.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Y; Nakanishi, Y; Yasuda, T

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic device that can automatically transport a droplet on a plastic plate. This device consists of a Cyclo Olefin Polymer (COP) plate and a SiO2 membrane and has wettability gradient surface. Lithographic patterns of hydrophilic SiO2 permitted wettability modification of a hydrophobic COP surface. A series of alternate hydrophobic and hydrophilic wedge-shaped patterns generated a required gradient in wettability. When we dropped a droplet on the wettability gradient surface, it moved along the wettability gradient due to an imbalance between surface tension forces acting on the opposite sides of the droplet edge. The droplet transportation test was carried out using water of 5 μl. As a result, we succeeded in automatically transporting the droplet on the SiO2/COP wettability gradient pattern. We also carried out droplet transportation in an enclosed microchannel for preventing droplet evaporation using DI (Deionized) water of 5 μl. In this case, the droplet was automatically transported by forming the wettability gradient pattern at the top and bottom in an enclosed microchannel without evaporation.

  7. Automatic droplet transportation on a plastic microfluidic device having wettability gradient surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Y.; Nakanishi, Y.; Yasuda, T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic device that can automatically transport a droplet on a plastic plate. This device consists of a Cyclo Olefin Polymer (COP) plate and a SiO2 membrane and has wettability gradient surface. Lithographic patterns of hydrophilic SiO2 permitted wettability modification of a hydrophobic COP surface. A series of alternate hydrophobic and hydrophilic wedge-shaped patterns generated a required gradient in wettability. When we dropped a droplet on the wettability gradient surface, it moved along the wettability gradient due to an imbalance between surface tension forces acting on the opposite sides of the droplet edge. The droplet transportation test was carried out using water of 5 μl. As a result, we succeeded in automatically transporting the droplet on the SiO2/COP wettability gradient pattern. We also carried out droplet transportation in an enclosed microchannel for preventing droplet evaporation using DI (Deionized) water of 5 μl. In this case, the droplet was automatically transported by forming the wettability gradient pattern at the top and bottom in an enclosed microchannel without evaporation.

  8. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, G. W.; Shomber, H. A.; Dethman, H. A.; Gratzer, L. B.; Maeshiro, A.; Gangsaas, D.; Blight, J. D.; Buchan, S. M.; Crumb, C. B.; Dorwart, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The current status of the Active Controls Technology (ACT) for the advanced subsonic transport project is investigated through analysis of the systems technical data. Control systems technologies under examination include computerized reliability analysis, pitch axis fly by wire actuator, flaperon actuation system design trade study, control law synthesis and analysis, flutter mode control and gust load alleviation analysis, and implementation of alternative ACT systems. Extensive analysis of the computer techniques involved in each system is included.

  9. Tunable Surface Hydrophobicity and Fluid Transport through Nanoporous Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, Joseph H. J.

    There are more than three billion people across the globe that struggle to obtain clean drinkable water. One of the most promising avenues for generating potable water is through reverse osmosis and nanofiltration. Both solutions require a semipermeable membrane that prohibits passage of unwanted solute particles but allows passage of the solvent. Atomically thin two-dimensional membranes based on porous graphene show great promise as semipermeable materials, but modeling fluid flow on length scales between the microscopic (nanometer and smaller) and macroscopic (micron and larger) regimes presents formidable challenges. This thesis explores both equilibrium and nonequilibrium aspects of this problem and develops new methodology for simulating systems away from thermal equilibrium. First, we hypothesize that there is a wetting penalty for water as it tries to breach a sheet of graphene that should be naturally hydrophobic. By using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the hydrophobicity depends sensitively on the degree of electrical doping, offering an opportunity to tune the hydrophobic effect of graphene using small amounts of doping. The wetting contact angle, a measure of hydrophobicity, changes dramatically with the voltage applied to single layer graphene. We find that the sensitivity of the hydrophobic effect to voltage depends not on hydrogen bonding motifs at the interface between graphene and water, but instead on a phenomenon known as electrowetting. The theory of electrowetting predicts that the difference in surface tensions that defines the contact angle is quartic in the voltage, rather than quadratic, as it would be in bilayer graphene or in a two-dimensional metal. To explore the nonequilibrium aspects of fluid passage through atomically thin membranes, we developed a molecular dynamics methodology for simulating fluid flow at constant flux based on Gauss's principle of least constraint. This method develops microscopic

  10. A Status of the Advanced Space Transportation Program from Planning to Action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyles, Garry; Griner, Carolyn

    1998-01-01

    A Technology Plan for Enabling Commercial Space Business was presented at the 48th International Astronautical Congress in Turin, Italy. This paper presents a status of the program's accomplishments. Technology demonstrations have progressed in each of the four elements of the program; (1) Low Cost Technology, (2) Advanced Reusable Technology, (3) Space Transfer Technology and (4) Space Transportation Research. The Low Cost Technology program element is primarily focused at reducing development and acquisition costs of aerospace hardware using a "design to cost" philosophy with robust margins, adapting commercial manufacturing processes and commercial off-the-shelf hardware. The attributes of this philosophy for small payload launch are being demonstrated at the component, sub-system, and system level. The X-34 "Fastrac" engine has progressed through major component and subsystem demonstrations. A propulsion system test bed has been implemented for system-level demonstration of component and subsystem technologies; including propellant tankage and feedlines, controls, pressurization, and engine systems. Low cost turbopump designs, commercial valves and a controller are demonstrating the potential for a ten-fold reduction in engine and propulsion system costs. The Advanced Reusable Technology program element is focused on increasing life through high strength-to-weight structures and propulsion components, highly integrated propellant tanks, automated checkout and health management and increased propulsion system performance. The validation of rocket based combined cycle (RBCC) propulsion is pro,-,ressing through component and subsystem testing. RBCC propulsion has the potential to provide performance margin over an all rocket system that could result in lower gross liftoff weight, a lower propellant mass fraction or a higher payload mass fraction. The Space Transfer Technology element of the program is pursuing technology that can improve performance and

  11. Influence of surface reconstruction on dopant incorporation and transport properties of GaAs(Bi) alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R. L.; Occena, J.; Jen, T.; Del Gaudio, D.; Yarlagadda, B.; Kurdak, C.; Goldman, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the influence of surface reconstruction on silicon dopant incorporation and transport properties during molecular-beam epitaxy of GaAs(Bi) alloys. GaAs(Bi) growth with an (n × 3) reconstruction leads to n-type conductivity, while growth with a (2 × 1) reconstruction leads to p-type conductivity. We hypothesize that the presence or absence of surface arsenic dimers prevents or enables dopant incorporation into arsenic lattice sites. We consider the influence of bismuth anions on arsenic-dimer mediated dopant incorporation and the resulting electronic transport properties, demonstrating the applicability of this mechanism to mixed anion semiconductor alloys.

  12. Quantum Electronic Transport of Topological Surface States in β-Ag2Se Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihwan; Hwang, Ahreum; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Sunghun; Park, Yun Chang; Kim, Si-In; Kim, Hong-Seok; Doh, Yong-Joo; Kim, Jinhee; Kim, Bongsoo

    2016-04-26

    Single-crystalline β-Ag2Se nanostructures, a new class of 3D topological insulators (TIs), were synthesized using the chemical vapor transport method. The topological surface states were verified by measuring electronic transport properties including the weak antilocalization effect, Aharonov-Bohm oscillations, and Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. First-principles band calculations revealed that the band inversion in β-Ag2Se is caused by strong spin-orbit coupling and Ag-Se bonding hybridization. These investigations provide evidence of nontrivial surface state about β-Ag2Se TIs that have anisotropic Dirac cones.

  13. A simulation study of crew performance in operating an advanced transport aircraft in an automated terminal area environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A simulation study assessing crew performance operating an advanced transport aircraft in an automated terminal area environment is described. The linking together of the Langley Advanced Transport Operating Systems Aft Flight Deck Simulator with the Terminal Area Air Traffic Model Simulation was required. The realism of an air traffic control (ATC) environment with audio controller instructions for the flight crews and the capability of inserting a live aircraft into the terminal area model to interact with computer generated aircraft was provided. Crew performance using the advanced displays and two separate control systems (automatic and manual) in flying area navigation routes in the automated ATC environment was assessed. Although the crews did not perform as well using the manual control system, their performances were within acceptable operational limits with little increase in workload. The crews favored using the manual control system and felt they were more alert and aware of their environment when using it.

  14. A simple approach to fabricate the rose petal-like hierarchical surfaces for droplet transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chao; Huang, Mengyu; Yu, Xingjian; Ma, Yupu; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-11-01

    Precise transportation of liquid microdroplets is a great challenge in the microfluidic field. A sticky superhydrophobic surface with a high static contact angle (CA) and a large contact angle hysteresis (CAH) is recognized as the favorable tool to deal with the challenging job. Some approaches have been proposed to fabricate such surface, such as mimicing the dual-scale hierarchical structure of a natural material, like rose petal. However, the available approaches normally require multiple processing steps or are carried out with great expense. In this study, we report a straightforward and inexpensive method for fabricating the sticky superhydrophobic surfaces. The fabrication relies on electroless galvanic deposition to coat the copper substrates with a textured layer of silver. The whole fabrication process is carried out under ambient conditions by using conventional laboratory materials and equipments, and generally take less than 15 min. Despite the simplicity of this fabrication method, the rose petal-like hierarchical structures and the corresponding sticky superhydrophobic wetting properties were well achieved on the artificial surfaces. For instance, the surface with a deposition time of 10 s exhibits the superhydrophobity with a CA of 151.5°, and the effective stickiness with a CAH of 56.5°. The prepared sticky superhydrophobic surfaces are finally shown in the application of droplet transportation, in which the surface acts as a mechanical hand to grasp and transport the water droplet.

  15. Advanced transportation system study: Manned launch vehicle concepts for two way transportation system payloads to LEO. Work breakdown structure and work breakdown structure dictionary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, James B.

    1992-01-01

    The report describes the work breakdown structure (WBS) and its associated WBS dictionary for task area 1 of contract NAS8-39207, advanced transportation system studies (ATSS). This WBS format is consistent with the preliminary design level of detail employed by both task area 1 and task area 4 in the ATSS study and is intended to provide an estimating structure for parametric cost estimates.

  16. Surface transport of nutrients from surface broadcast and subsurface-banded broiler litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Broiler chicken litter is commonly used as a fertilizer on pastures and cropland in major broiler-producing states. However, phosphorus (P) loss from fields fertilized with broiler litter contributes to eutrophication and growth of toxic algae in surface waters. Recently, to reduce surface transpo...

  17. Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    He, Qinggang; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Lucas, Ivan T.; Clark, Kyle; Weber, Adam Z.; Kostecki, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this effort was to correlate the local surface ionic conductance of a Nafion? 212 proton-exchange membrane with its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a function of water content. Both macroscopic and microscopic proton conductivities were investigated at different relative humidity levels, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CSAFM). We were able to identify small ion-conducting domains that grew with humidity at the surface of the membrane. Numerical analysis of the surface ionic conductance images recorded at various relative humidity levels helped determine the fractional area of ion-conducting active sites. A simple square-root relationship between the fractional conducting area and observed interfacial mass-transport resistance was established. Furthermore, the relationship between the bulk ionic conductivity and surface ionic conductance pattern of the Nafion? membrane was examined.

  18. Propulsion technology needs for advanced space transportation systems. [orbit maneuvering engine (space shuttle), space shuttle boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Plans are formulated for chemical propulsion technology programs to meet the needs of advanced space transportation systems from 1980 to the year 2000. The many possible vehicle applications are reviewed and cataloged to isolate the common threads of primary propulsion technology that satisfies near term requirements in the first decade and at the same time establish the technology groundwork for various potential far term applications in the second decade. Thrust classes of primary propulsion engines that are apparent include: (1) 5,000 to 30,000 pounds thrust for upper stages and space maneuvering; and (2) large booster engines of over 250,000 pounds thrust. Major classes of propulsion systems and the important subdivisions of each class are identified. The relative importance of each class is discussed in terms of the number of potential applications, the likelihood of that application materializing, and the criticality of the technology needed. Specific technology programs are described and scheduled to fulfill the anticipated primary propulsion technology requirements.

  19. Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transports Entering Service in the 2018 to 2020 Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgenstern, John; Norstrud, Nicole; Sokhey, Jack; Martens, Steve; Alonso, Juan J.

    2013-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company (LM), working in conjunction with General Electric Global Research (GE GR), Rolls-Royce Liberty Works (RRLW), and Stanford University, herein presents results from the "N+2 Supersonic Validations" contract s initial 22 month phase, addressing the NASA solicitation "Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transports Entering Service in the 2018 to 2020 Period." This report version adds documentation of an additional three month low boom test task. The key technical objective of this effort was to validate integrated airframe and propulsion technologies and design methodologies. These capabilities aspired to produce a viable supersonic vehicle design with environmental and performance characteristics. Supersonic testing of both airframe and propulsion technologies (including LM3: 97-023 low boom testing and April-June nozzle acoustic testing) verified LM s supersonic low-boom design methodologies and both GE and RRLW's nozzle technologies for future implementation. The N+2 program is aligned with NASA s Supersonic Project and is focused on providing system-level solutions capable of overcoming the environmental and performance/efficiency barriers to practical supersonic flight. NASA proposed "Initial Environmental Targets and Performance Goals for Future Supersonic Civil Aircraft". The LM N+2 studies are built upon LM s prior N+3 100 passenger design studies. The LM N+2 program addresses low boom design and methodology validations with wind tunnel testing, performance and efficiency goals with system level analysis, and low noise validations with two nozzle (GE and RRLW) acoustic tests.

  20. Multi-Objective Optimization of a Turbofan for an Advanced, Single-Aisle Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable interest surrounds the design of the next generation of single-aisle commercial transports in the Boeing 737 and Airbus A320 class. Aircraft designers will depend on advanced, next-generation turbofan engines to power these airplanes. The focus of this study is to apply single- and multi-objective optimization algorithms to the conceptual design of ultrahigh bypass turbofan engines for this class of aircraft, using NASA s Subsonic Fixed Wing Project metrics as multidisciplinary objectives for optimization. The independent design variables investigated include three continuous variables: sea level static thrust, wing reference area, and aerodynamic design point fan pressure ratio, and four discrete variables: overall pressure ratio, fan drive system architecture (i.e., direct- or gear-driven), bypass nozzle architecture (i.e., fixed- or variable geometry), and the high- and low-pressure compressor work split. Ramp weight, fuel burn, noise, and emissions are the parameters treated as dependent objective functions. These optimized solutions provide insight to the ultrahigh bypass engine design process and provide information to NASA program management to help guide its technology development efforts.

  1. Composite transport wing technology development: Design development tests and advanced structural concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Charles F.; Harvill, William E.

    1988-01-01

    Numerous design concepts, materials, and manufacturing methods were investigated for the covers and spars of a transport box wing. Cover panels and spar segments were fabricated and tested to verify the structural integrity of design concepts and fabrication techniques. Compression tests on stiffened panels demonstrated the ability of graphite/epoxy wing upper cover designs to achieve a 35 percent weight savings compared to the aluminum baseline. The impact damage tolerance of the designs and materials used for these panels limits the allowable compression strain and therefore the maximum achievable weight savings. Bending and shear tests on various spar designs verified an average weight savings of 37 percent compared to the aluminum baseline. Impact damage to spar webs did not significantly degrade structural performance. Predictions of spar web shear instability correlated well with measured performance. The structural integrity of spars manufactured by filament winding equalled or exceeded those fabricated by hand lay-up. The information obtained will be applied to the design, fabrication, and test of a full-scale section of a wing box. When completed, the tests on the technology integration box beam will demonstrate the structural integrity of an advanced composite wing design which is 25 percent lighter than the metal baseline.

  2. The FM-007: An advanced jet commuter for HUB to spoke transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blouke, Peter Scott; Engel, George Bryan; Fordham, Kari Suzanne; Layne, Steven James; Moore, Joel David; Shaver, Frederick Martin; Thornton, Douglas Hershal, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Due to the increasing need for new commuter aircraft, the FM-007 is proposed, a technologically advanced jet propelled short takeoff and landing (STOL) airplane. The proposed commuter is designed for hub to spoke air travel. In order to reduce drag, natural laminar flow technology is integrated into the design using the natural laminar flow airfoil section for the wing. A three lifting surface configuration provides for more efficient cruise flight. This unique design includes a small forward wing (canard), a rear mounted high aspect ratio main wing, and a small horizontal stabilizer high atop the vertical tail. These three surfaces act together to reduce drag by minimizing the downward force the horizontal stabilizer has to account for due to the nose down pitching moment. Commuter aircraft must also incorporate passenger comfort. This is achieved by providing a spacious pressurized cabin with a large galley and reduced cabin noise due to incorporation of noise reduction gear. A basic oval design is adopted, as opposed to a circular design in order to allow for the seating of five passengers abreast. To get STOL capability, an over the wing blown flap is used using a Rolls Royce Tay series engine.

  3. PTV measurements of Lagrangian particle transport by surface gravity wave groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bremer, Ton; Whittaker, Colin; Raby, Alison; Taylor, Paul

    2015-11-01

    We present detailed PTV (particle tracking velocimetry) measurements of the Lagrangian transport and trajectories of neutrally buoyant particles underneath two-dimensional surface gravity wave groups in a laboratory flume. By focussing our attention on wave groups of moderate steepness, we confirm the predictions of standard second-order multi-chromatic wave theory, in which the body of fluid satisfies the potential flow equations. Particles near the surface are transported forwards and their motion is dominated by Stokes drift. Particles at sufficient depth are transported backwards by the Eulerian return current that was first described by Longuet-Higgins & Stewart (1962) and forms an inseparable counterpart of Stokes drift for surface wave groups ensuring the (irrotational) mass balance holds. Finally, we provide experimental validation of a simple scaling relationship, derived based under the assumption of separation of scales, for the transition depth: the depth above which Lagrangian particles are transported forwards by the Stokes drift and below which such particles are transported backwards by the return current. We present results for a range of effective water depths.

  4. Relationship between cell surface properties and transport of bacteria through soil

    SciTech Connect

    Gannon, J.T.; Manilal, V.B.; Alexander, M. )

    1991-01-01

    One means of bringing about the remediation of underground sites containing polluting chemicals is to inoculate the sites with bacteria able to metabolize those compounds. However, successful bioremediation of such sites requires the movement of the biodegradative bacteria through soil, aquifer solids, or groundwater. A study was conducted to relate the properties of Enterobacter, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Achromobacter, Flavobacterium, and Arthrobacter strains to their transport with water moving through soil. The bacteria differed markedly in their extent of transport; their hydrophobicity, as measured by adherence to n-octane and by hydrophobic-interaction chromatography; and their net surface electrostatic charge, as determined by electrostatic interaction chromatography and by measurements of the zeta potential. Transport of the 19 strains through Kendaia loam or their retention by this soil was not correlated with hydrophobicities or net surface charges of the cells or the presence of capsules. Among 10 strains tested, the presence of flagella was also not correlated with transport. Retention was statistically related to cell size, with bacteria shorter than 1.0 {mu}m usually showing higher percentages of cells being transported through the soil. We suggest that more than one characteristic of bacterial cells determines whether the organisms are transported through soil with moving water.

  5. Patterned gradient surface for spontaneous droplet transportation and water collection: simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xianhua; Zhu, Yiying; Shi, Tielin; Tang, Zirong; Liao, Guanglan

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate spontaneous droplet transportation and water collection on wedge-shaped gradient surfaces consisting of alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. Droplets on the surfaces are modeled and simulated to analyze the Gibbs free energy and free energy gradient distributions. Big half-apex angle and great wettability difference result in considerable free energy gradient, corresponding to large driving force for spontaneous droplet transportation, thus causing the droplets to move towards the open end of the wedge-shaped hydrophilic regions, where the Gibbs free energy is low. Gradient surfaces are then fabricated and tested. Filmwise condensation begins on the hydrophilic regions, forming wedge-shaped tracks for water collection. Dropwise condensation occurs on the hydrophobic regions, where the droplet size distribution and departure diameters are controlled by the width of the regions. Condensate water from both the hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions are collected directionally to the open end of the wedge-shaped hydrophilic regions, agreeing with the simulations. Directional droplet transport and controllable departure diameters make the branched gradient surfaces more efficient than smooth surfaces for water collection, which proves that gradient surfaces are potential in water collection, microfluidic devices, anti-fogging and self-cleaning.

  6. Mass transport in a thin layer of power-law mud under surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Bai, Yuchuan; Xu, Dong

    2017-02-01

    The mass transport velocity in a two-layer system is studied theoretically. The wave motion is driven by a periodic pressure load on the free water surface, and mud in the lower layer is described by a power-law rheological model. Perturbation analysis is performed to the second order to find the mean Eulerian velocity. A numerical iteration method is employed to solve the non-linear governing equation at the leading order. The influence of rheological properties on fluid motion characteristics including the flow field, the surface displacement, the mass transport velocity, and the net discharge rates are investigated based on theoretical results. Theoretical analysis shows that under the action of interfacial shearing, a recirculation structure may appear near the interface in the upper water layer. A higher mass transport velocity at the interface does not necessarily mean a higher discharge rate for a pseudo-plastic fluid mud.

  7. Aircraft surface coatings study: Energy efficient transport program. [sprayed and adhesive bonded coatings for drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Surface coating materials for application on transport type aircraft to reduce drag, were investigated. The investigation included two basic types of materials: spray on coatings and adhesively bonded films. A cost/benefits analysis was performed, and recommendations were made for future work toward the application of this technology.

  8. Fate and surface transport of urea in a coastal plain soil: a rainfall simulation study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface transport of urea has rarely been studied since it is assumed to undergo rapid hydrolysis to ammonia. However, studies have shown urea to exist in estuarine and coastal waters. Urea in small amounts can trigger the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia spp. to produce the toxin domoic acid, which is o...

  9. Conceptual Model for the Transport of Energetic Residues from Surface Soil to Groundwater by Range Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    ER D C/ CR R EL T R -0 6 - 1 8 Conceptual Model for the Transport of Energetic Residues from Surface Soil to Groundwater by Range...compounds potentially migrating to groundwater. The goals of the report are to 1 ) review and summarize previous work; 2) identify data gaps; 3) provide...Nomenclature.......................................................................................................................................viii 1

  10. Acoustic charge transport induced by the surface acoustic wave in chemical doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shijun; Zhang, Hao; Feng, Zhihong; Yu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Rui; Sun, Chongling; Liu, Jing; Duan, Xuexin; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Daihua

    2016-10-01

    A graphene/LiNbO3 hybrid device is used to investigate the acoustic induced charge transport in chemical doped graphene. The chemical doping of graphene via its physisorption of gas molecules affects the surface acoustic wave (SAW) charge carrier transport in a manner different from electric field drift. That transport induces doping dependent macroscopic acoustoelectric current. The chemical doping can manipulate majority carriers and induces unique acoustoelectric features. The observation is explained by a classical relaxation model. Eventually the device based on acoustoelectric current is proved to outperform the common chemiresistor for chemicals. Our finding provides insight into acoustic charge carrier transport during chemical doping. The doping affects interaction of carriers with SAW phonon and facilitates the understanding of nanoscale acoustoelectric effect. The exploration inspires potential acoustoelectric application for chemical detection involving emerging 2D nanomaterials.

  11. Quantum transport and two-parameter scaling at the surface of a weak topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Mong, Roger S K; Bardarson, Jens H; Moore, Joel E

    2012-02-17

    Weak topological insulators have an even number of Dirac cones in their surface spectrum and are thought to be unstable to disorder, which leads to an insulating surface. Here we argue that the presence of disorder alone will not localize the surface states; rather, the presence of a time-reversal symmetric mass term is required for localization. Through numerical simulations, we show that in the absence of the mass term the surface always flow to a stable metallic phase and the conductivity obeys a one-parameter scaling relation, just as in the case of a strong topological insulator surface. With the inclusion of the mass, the transport properties of the surface of a weak topological insulator follow a two-parameter scaling form.

  12. Study of the application of advanced technologies to laminar flow control systems for subsonic transports. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturgeon, R. F.; Bennett, J. A.; Etchberger, F. R.; Ferrill, R. S.; Meade, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of applying laminar flow control to the wings and empennage of long-range subsonic transport aircraft compatible with initial operation in 1985. For a design mission range of 10,186 km (5500 n mi), advanced technology laminar-flow-control (LFC) and turbulent-flow (TF) aircraft were developed for both 200 and 400-passenger payloads, and compared on the basis of production costs, direct operating costs, and fuel efficiency. Parametric analyses were conducted to establish the optimum geometry for LFC and TF aircraft, advanced LFC system concepts and arrangements were evaluated, and configuration variations maximizing the effectiveness of LFC were developed. For the final LFC aircraft, analyses were conducted to define maintenance costs and procedures, manufacturing costs and procedures, and operational considerations peculiar to LFC aircraft. Compared to the corresponding advanced technology TF transports, the 200- and 400-passenger LFC aircraft realized reductions in fuel consumption up to 28.2%, reductions in direct operating costs up to 8.4%, and improvements in fuel efficiency, in ssm/lb of fuel, up to 39.4%. Compared to current commercial transports at the design range, the LFC study aircraft demonstrate improvements in fuel efficiency up to 131%. Research and technology requirements requisite to the development of LFC transport aircraft were identified.

  13. Surface exposure dating of Little Ice Age ice cap advances on Disko Island, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Timothy; Jomelli, Vincent; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Brunstein, Daniel; Schimmelpfennig, Irene; Swingedouw, Didier; Favier, Vincent; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie

    2015-04-01

    Little Ice Age (LIA: 1200-1920 AD) glacier advances in Greenland often form the most extensive positions of Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) ice cap and margins since the Early Holocene. Across Greenland these advances are commonly represented by un-vegetated moraines, usually within 1-5 km of the present ice margin. However, chronological constraints on glacier advances during this period are sparse, meaning that GrIS and ice cap behavior and advance/retreat chronology remains poorly understood during this period. At present the majority of ages are based on historical accounts, ice core data, and radiocarbon ages from proglacial threshold lakes. However, developments in the accuracy and precision of surface exposure methods allow dating of LIA moraine boulders, permitting an opportunity to better understand of ice dynamics during this period. Geomorphological mapping and surface exposure dating (36Cl) were used to interpret moraine deposits from the Lyngmarksbræen on Disko Island, West Greenland. A Positive Degree Day (PDD) model was used to estimate Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) and mass balance changes for two distinct paleo-glacial extents. Three moraines (M1, M2, and M3) were mapped in the field, and sampled for 36Cl surface exposure dating. The outermost moraine (M1) was of clearly different morphology to the inner moraines, and present only in small fragments. M2 and M3 were distinct arcuate termino-lateral moraines within 50 m of one another, 1.5 km from the present ice margin. The weighted average of four 36Cl ages from M1 returned an early Holocene age of 8.4 ± 0.6 ka. M2 (four samples) returned an age of 0.57 ± 0.04 ka (1441 AD) and M3 (four samples) returned an age of 0.28 ± 0.02 ka (1732 AD). These surface exposure ages represent the first robustly dated Greenlandic ice cap moraine sequence from the LIA. The two periods of ice cap advance and marginal stabilisation are similar to recorded periods of LIA GrIS advance in west Greenland, constrained

  14. Quantum transport in the surface states of epitaxial Bi(111) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Kai; Wu, Lin; Gong, Xinxin; Xiao, Shunhao; Jin, Xiaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Although bulk Bi is a prototypical semimetal with a topologically trivial electronic band structure, we show by various quantum transport measurements that epitaxial Bi(111) thin films have unexpected and nontrivial properties. Not only the top and the bottom but also the side surfaces of epitaxial Bi(111) thin films are always robustly metallic while the interior has already become insulating. We identify the coupling between the top and the bottom surface states that drives the two originally independent surface conducting channels into a single connected one. The properties of Bi(111) thin films realized could lead to promising applications in spintronics.

  15. A stochastic model updating strategy-based improved response surface model and advanced Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xue; Fei, Cheng-Wei; Choy, Yat-Sze; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2017-01-01

    To improve the accuracy and efficiency of computation model for complex structures, the stochastic model updating (SMU) strategy was proposed by combining the improved response surface model (IRSM) and the advanced Monte Carlo (MC) method based on experimental static test, prior information and uncertainties. Firstly, the IRSM and its mathematical model were developed with the emphasis on moving least-square method, and the advanced MC simulation method is studied based on Latin hypercube sampling method as well. And then the SMU procedure was presented with experimental static test for complex structure. The SMUs of simply-supported beam and aeroengine stator system (casings) were implemented to validate the proposed IRSM and advanced MC simulation method. The results show that (1) the SMU strategy hold high computational precision and efficiency for the SMUs of complex structural system; (2) the IRSM is demonstrated to be an effective model due to its SMU time is far less than that of traditional response surface method, which is promising to improve the computational speed and accuracy of SMU; (3) the advanced MC method observably decrease the samples from finite element simulations and the elapsed time of SMU. The efforts of this paper provide a promising SMU strategy for complex structure and enrich the theory of model updating.

  16. Volume-surface hardening of railroad transport parts by a high-speed water stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedin, V. M.

    1996-09-01

    Large production volumes of rolling stock and track structure require the introduction of effective strengthening methods at a minimum expenditure. This stimulates a search for ways of increasing the service life of parts of railroad transport. Volume-surface hardening is an efficient method of thermal strengthening. The method consists in through or deep furnace or induction heating of parts before hardening and subsequent intense cooling. The hardenability of the steel used is consistent with the thickness of the strengthened layer, which creates a hardness gradient over the thickness of the parts, i.e., a high surface hardness and a ductile core. In turn, this creates a favorable distribution of internal stresses and provides a high cyclic endurance of the parts in operation. The possibility of using volume-surface hardening to strength railroad transport parts is considered with allowance for the special features of their production and operation.

  17. Rapid transport from the surface to wells in fractured rock: a unique infiltration tracer experiment.

    PubMed

    Levison, Jana K; Novakowski, Kent S

    2012-04-01

    A unique infiltration tracer experiment was performed whereby a fluorescent dye was applied to the land surface in an agricultural field, near Perth, Ontario, Canada, to simulate the transport of solutes to two pumped monitoring wells drilled into the granitic gneiss aquifer. This experiment, interpreted using the discrete-fracture capability of the numerical model HydroGeoSphere, showed that solute transport from the surface through thin soil (less than 2m) to wells in fractured bedrock can be extremely rapid (on the order of hours). Also, it was demonstrated that maximum concentrations of contaminants originating from the ground surface will not necessarily be the highest in the shallow aquifer horizon. These are important considerations for both private and government-owned drinking water systems that draw water from shallow fractured bedrock aquifers. This research illustrates the extreme importance of protecting drinking water at the source.

  18. Transport and distribution of TNT and DNT in the presence of surface vegetation with Fimbristylis cymosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sangchul; Padilla, Ingrid; Feliciano, Irimar; Falcon, Juan

    2009-05-01

    A small-scale field column experiment was set up to assess the impact of a native tropical grass (Fimbrystilis Cymosa) on the transport and distribution of high explosives (TNT and DNT). Explosives powders in a membrane were embedded as a point source below 2 inches from the column surface. Three different surfaces were layered on top of the explosives layer: one column with sand, two columns with Fimbrystilis Cymosa, and one column with a mixture of (sand+clay) soil. Hydraulic differences due to surface vegetation which would affect explosives transport were monitored by measuring the amount of infiltrated rain water. For the biogeochemical parameters, explosives concentrations in the infiltrated water were quantified. At the end of the experiment, each column was sacrificed by multiple layers and distribution of explosives concentrations, soil pH, and soil dehydrogenase concentration was quantified from the layers. Plants were also analyzed for explosives concentrations in their leaves and roots.

  19. Transport numbers in the surface layers of asymmetric membranes from initial time measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Compan, V.; Lopez, M.L. ); Sorensen, T.S. ); Garrido, J. )

    1994-09-08

    The initial time asymmetry potentials of two ultra filtration membranes (cellulose acetate and polysulfone membranes) were measured in electrochemical cells using Ag/AgCl electrodes and NaCl solutions. The concentration in the two electrode chambers differed slightly by a fixed concentration difference. Either the membranes were brought to equilibrium with the left-hand solution and subsequently exposed to the right-hand solution at the right-hand face, or the procedure was reversed. From such measurements it is possible to evaluate the transport numbers corresponding to each of the two surface layers of the membrane under conditions such that the effects of autoprotolysis of water and of foreign ions may be neglected. These measurements permit a description of each of the surface layers of the membranes and make possible an electrochemical characterization of the asymmetry of ultrafiltration membranes. The asymmetry is given by the difference between surface layer transport numbers. 31 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Recent advances in synthesis and surface modification of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodipo, Bashiru Kayode; Aziz, Azlan Abdul

    2016-10-01

    Research on synthesis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) and its surface modification for biomedical applications is of intense interest. Due to superparamagnetic property of SPION, the nanoparticles have large magnetic susceptibility, single magnetic domain and controllable magnetic behaviour. However, owing to easy agglomeration of SPION, surface modification of the magnetic particles with biocompatible materials such as silica nanoparticle has gained much attention in the last decade. In this review, we present recent advances in synthesis of SPION and various routes of producing silica coated SPION.

  1. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-03

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed.

  2. The Effect of Surface Roughness on Fluid Configuration and Solute Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibbey, T. C.

    2013-12-01

    When describing the configuration of water in unsaturated media, a distinction is often made between water that is held by capillary forces between grains (capillary water), and water associated with adsorbed films on solid surfaces (film water). The objective of this work was to better understand the nature of the water associated with solid surfaces, with emphasis on understanding the configuration of water on rough natural surfaces. Stereoscopic SEM was used to determine elevation maps on a range of different natural solid surfaces. A computational technique was then developed to calculate the configuration of water on the surfaces as a function of capillary pressure. Calculations of fluid configurations show that, except at extremely high capillary pressures, fluid configuration is dominated by bridging of surface roughness features, even for extremely smooth surfaces. Results suggest that true adsorbed films are likely extremely rare in the environment except under near-dry, ultra-high capillary pressure conditions. This result has significant implications for understanding fate and transport within the unsaturated zone. Preliminary simulations exploring the impact on transport will be discussed.

  3. Thermal transport across a substrate-thin-film interface: effects of film thickness and surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhi; Sasikumar, Kiran; Keblinski, Pawel

    2014-08-08

    Using molecular dynamics simulations and a model AlN-GaN interface, we demonstrate that the interfacial thermal resistance R(K) (Kapitza resistance) between a substrate and thin film depends on the thickness of the film and the film surface roughness when the phonon mean free path is larger than film thickness. In particular, when the film (external) surface is atomistically smooth, phonons transmitted from the substrate can travel ballistically in the thin film, be scattered specularly at the surface, and return to the substrate without energy transfer. If the external surface scatters phonons diffusely, which is characteristic of rough surfaces, R(K) is independent of film thickness and is the same as R(K) that characterizes smooth surfaces in the limit of large film thickness. At interfaces where phonon transmission coefficients are low, the thickness dependence is greatly diminished regardless of the nature of surface scattering. The film thickness dependence of R(K) is analogous to the well-known fact of lateral thermal conductivity thickness dependence in thin films. The difference is that phonon-boundary scattering lowers the in-plane thermal transport in thin films, but it facilitates thermal transport from the substrate to the thin film.

  4. 41 CFR 302-9.11 - May I receive an advance of funds for transportation and emergency storage of my POV?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of funds for transportation and emergency storage of my POV? 302-9.11 Section 302-9.11 Public... STORAGE OF PROPERTY 9-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION AND EMERGENCY STORAGE OF A PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE General Rules § 302-9.11 May I receive an advance of funds for transportation and emergency storage of...

  5. Surface modification of PTMSP membranes by plasma treatment: Asymmetry of transport in organic solvent nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Volkov, A V; Tsarkov, S E; Gilman, A B; Khotimsky, V S; Roldughin, V I; Volkov, V V

    2015-08-01

    For the first time, the effect of asymmetry of the membrane transport was studied for organic solvents and solutes upon their nanofiltration through the plasma-modified membranes based on poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) (PTMSP). Plasma treatment is shown to provide a marked hydrophilization of the hydrophobic PTMSP surface (the contact angle of water decreases from 88 down to 20°) and leads to the development of a negative charge of -5.2 nC/cm(2). The XPS measurements prove the formation of the oxygen-containing groups (Si-O and C-O) due to the surface modification. The AFM images show that the small-scale surface roughness of the plasma-treated PTMSP sample is reduced but the large-scale surface heterogeneities become more pronounced. The modified membranes retain their hydrophilic surface properties even after the nanofiltration tests and 30-day storage under ambient conditions. The results of the filtration tests show that when the membrane is oriented so that its modified layer contacts the feed solution, the membrane permeability for linear alcohols (methanol-propanol) and acetone decreases nearly two times. When the modified membrane surface faces the permeate, the membrane is seen to regain its transport characteristics: the flux becomes equal to that of the unmodified PTMSP. The well-pronounced effect of the transport asymmetry is observed for the solution of the neutral dye Solvent Blue 35 in methanol, ethanol, and acetone. For example, the initial membrane shows the negative retention for the Solvent Blue 35 dye (-16%) upon its filtration from the ethanol solution whereas, for the modified PTMSP membrane, the retention increases up to 17%. Various effects contributing to the asymmetry of the membrane transport characteristics are discussed.

  6. A Complex-Geometry Validation Experiment for Advanced Neutron Transport Codes

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; Anthony W. LaPorta; Joseph W. Nielsen; James Parry; Mark D. DeHart; Samuel E. Bays; William F. Skerjanc

    2013-11-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has initiated a focused effort to upgrade legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols used for support of core fuel management and experiment management in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and its companion critical facility (ATRC) at the INL.. This will be accomplished through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate new Verification and Validation (V&V) protocols, over the next 12-18 months. Stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and nuclear data packages that support this effort include MCNP5[1], SCALE/KENO6[2], HELIOS[3], SCALE/NEWT[2], and ATTILA[4]. Furthermore, a capability for sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI[5] system has also been implemented. Finally, we are also evaluating the Serpent[6] and MC21[7] codes, as additional verification tools in the near term as well as for possible applications to full three-dimensional Monte Carlo based fuel management modeling in the longer term. On the experimental side, several new benchmark-quality code validation measurements based on neutron activation spectrometry have been conducted using the ATRC. Results for the first four experiments, focused on neutron spectrum measurements within the Northwest Large In-Pile Tube (NW LIPT) and in the core fuel elements surrounding the NW LIPT and the diametrically opposite Southeast IPT have been reported [8,9]. A fifth, very recent, experiment focused on detailed measurements of the element-to-element core power distribution is summarized here and examples of the use of the measured data for validation of corresponding MCNP5, HELIOS, NEWT, and Serpent computational models using modern least-square adjustment methods are provided.

  7. Potential impacts of advanced aerodynamic technology on air transportation system productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Summaries of a workshop held at NASA Langley Research Center in 1993 to explore the application of advanced aerodynamics to airport productivity improvement are discussed. Sessions included discussions of terminal area productivity problems and advanced aerodynamic technologies for enhanced high lift and reduced noise, emissions, and wake vortex hazard with emphasis upon advanced aircraft configurations and multidisciplinary solution options.

  8. Influence of enterococcal surface protein (esp) on the transport of Enterococcus faecium within saturated quartz sands.

    PubMed

    Johanson, Jennifer J; Feriancikova, Lucia; Xu, Shangping

    2012-02-07

    Enterococcus was selected by US EPA as a Gram-positive indicator microorganism for groundwater fecal contamination. It was recently reported that enterococcal surface protein (esp) was more prevalent in Enterococcus from human sources than in Enterococcus from nonhuman sources and esp could potentially be used as a source tracking tool for fecal contamination (Scott et al., 2005). In this research, we performed laboratory column transport experiments to investigate the transport of Enterococcus faecium within saturated quartz sands. Particularly, we used a wild type strain (E1162) and a mutant (E1162Δesp) to examine the influence of esp on the transport behavior of E. faecium. Our results showed that esp could significantly enhance the attachment of E. faecium cells onto the surface of silica sands and thus lower the mobility of E. faecium within sand packs. Cell surface properties (e.g., zeta potential) were determined and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) theory was applied to explain the effects of esp on the retention of E. faecium. Overall, our results suggested that E. faecium strains with esp could display lower mobility within saturated sand packs than E. faecium strains without esp. The disparity in the transport behavior of E. faecium with and without esp could limit the effectiveness of esp as a source tracking tool within the groundwater system.

  9. Technology and human purpose: the problem of solids transport on the Earth's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haff, P. K.

    2012-11-01

    Displacement of mass of limited deformability ("solids") on the Earth's surface is opposed by friction and (the analog of) form resistance - impediments relaxed by rotational motion, self-powering of mass units, and transport infrastructure. These features of solids transport first evolved in the biosphere prior to the emergence of technology, allowing slope-independent, diffusion-like motion of discrete objects as massive as several tons, as illustrated by animal foraging and movement along game trails. However, high-energy-consumption technology powered by fossil fuels required a mechanism that could support fast advective transport of solids, i.e., long-distance, high-volume, high-speed, unidirectional, slope-independent transport across the land surface of materials like coal, containerized fluids, minerals, and economic goods. Pre-technology nature was able to sustain regional- and global-scale advection only in the limited form of piggybacking on geophysical flows of water (river sediment) and air (dust). The appearance of a mechanism for sustained advection of solids independent of fluid flows and gravity appeared only upon the emergence of human purpose. Purpose enables solids advection by, in effect, simulating a continuous potential gradient, otherwise lacking, between discrete and widely separated fossil-fuel energy sources and sinks. Invoking purpose as a mechanism in solids advection is an example of the need to import anthropic principles and concepts into the language and methodology of modern Earth system dynamics. As part of the emergence of a generalized solids advection mechanism, several additional transport requirements necessary to the function of modern large-scale technological systems were also satisfied. These include spatially accurate delivery of advected payload, targetability to essentially arbitrarily located destinations (such as cities), and independence of structure of advected payload from transport mechanism. The latter property

  10. Technology and human purpose: the problem of solids transport on the earth's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haff, P. K.

    2012-05-01

    Displacement of mass of limited deformability ("solids") on the Earth's surface is opposed by friction and (the analog of) form resistance - impediments relaxed by rotational motion, self-powering of mass units, and transport infrastructure. These features of solids transport first evolved in the biosphere prior to the emergence of technology, allowing slope-independent, diffusion-like motion of discrete objects as massive as several tons, as illustrated by animal foraging and movement along game trails. However, high-energy-consumption technology powered by fossil fuels required a mechanism that could support advective transport of solids, i.e., long-distance, high-volume, high-speed, unidirectional, slope independent transport across the land surface of materials like coal, containerized fluids, and minerals. Pre-technology nature was able to sustain large-scale, long-distance solids advection only in the limited form of piggybacking on geophysical flows of water (river sediment) and air (dust). The appearance of a generalized mechanism for advection of solids independent of fluid flows and gravity appeared only upon the emergence of human purpose. Purpose enables solids advection by, in effect, enabling a simulated continuous potential gradient, otherwise lacking, between discrete and widely separated fossil-fuel energy sources and sinks. Invoking purpose as a mechanism in solids advection is an example of the need to import anthropic principles and concepts into the language and methodology of modern Earth system dynamics. As part of the emergence of a generalized solids advection mechanism, several additional transport requirements necessary to the function of modern large-scale technological systems were also satisfied. These include spatially accurate delivery of advected payload, targetability to essentially arbitrarily located destinations (such as cities), and independence of structure of advected payload from transport mechanism. The latter property

  11. Measurements of wind friction speeds over lava surfaces and assessment of sediment transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Iversen, James D.

    1987-01-01

    Wind velocity profiles were obtained over alluvial plains, lava flows, and a cinder cone in the Mojave Desert to determine the wind shear and the potential for particle transport. It was found that aerodynamic roughness for winds increases nearly a factor of 5 as flow crosses from the alluvium to the lava surface, resulting in wind shear that is 21 percent greater. Thus, wind erosion and sand flux may be substantially enhanced over the lava field. Moreover, wind flow turbulence is enhanced in the wake of the cinder cone, which also increases erosion and sediment transportation by the wind.

  12. A controlled field pilot for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spangler, L.H.; Dobeck, L.M.; Repasky, K.; Nehrir, A.; Humphries, S.; Keith, C.; Shaw, J.; Rouse, J.; Cunningham, A.; Benson, S.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Lewicki, J.L.; Wells, A.; Diehl, R.; Strazisar, B.; Fessenden, J.; Rahn, Thomas; Amonette, J.; Barr, J.; Pickles, W.; Jacobson, J.; Silver, E.; Male, E.; Rauch, H.; Gullickson, K.; Trautz, R.; Kharaka, Y.; Birkholzer, J.; Wielopolski, L.

    2009-01-01

    A field facility has been developed to allow controlled studies of near surface CO2 transport and detection technologies. The key component of the facility is a shallow, slotted horizontal well divided into six zones. The scale and fluxes were designed to address large scale CO2 storage projects and desired retention rates for those projects. A wide variety of detection techniques were deployed by collaborators from 6 national labs, 2 universities, EPRI, and the USGS. Additionally, modeling of CO2 transport and concentrations in the saturated soil and in the vadose zone was conducted. An overview of these results will be presented. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Understanding extraction and beam transport in the ISIS H{sup -} Penning surface plasma ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Faircloth, D. C.; Letchford, A. P.; Gabor, C.; Whitehead, M. O.; Wood, T.; Jolly, S.; Pozimski, J.; Savage, P.; Woods, M.

    2008-02-15

    The ISIS H{sup -} Penning surface plasma source has been developed to produce beam currents up to 70 mA and pulse lengths up to 1.5 ms at 50 Hz. This paper details the investigation into beam extraction and beam transport in an attempt to understand the beam emittance and to try to improve the emittance. A scintillator profile measurement technique has been developed to assess the performance of different plasma electrode apertures, extraction electrode geometries, and postextraction acceleration configurations. This work shows that the present extraction, beam transport, and postacceleration system are suboptimal and further work is required to improve it.

  14. Magnetically Controlled Electronic Transport Properties of a Ferromagnetic Junction on the Surface of a Topological Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng-Qin; Wang, Rui-Qiang; Deng, Ming-Xun; Hu, Liang-Bin

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated the transport properties of the Dirac fermions through a ferromagnetic barrier junction on the surface of a strong topological insulator. The current-voltage characteristic curve and the tunneling conductance are calculated theoretically. Two interesting transport features are predicted: observable negative differential conductances and linear conductances tunable from unit to nearly zero. These features can be magnetically manipulated simply by changing the spacial orientation of the magnetization. Our results may contribute to the development of high-speed switching and functional applications or electrically controlled magnetization switching. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11174088, 11175067, 11274124

  15. Effects of magnetic drift tangential to magnetic surfaces on neoclassical transport in non-axisymmetric plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Seikichi; Satake, Shinsuke; Kanno, Ryutaro; Sugama, Hideo

    2015-07-15

    In evaluating neoclassical transport by radially local simulations, the magnetic drift tangential to a flux surface is usually ignored in order to keep the phase-space volume conservation. In this paper, effect of the tangential magnetic drift on the local neoclassical transport is investigated. To retain the effect of the tangential magnetic drift in the local treatment of neoclassical transport, a new local formulation for the drift kinetic simulation is developed. The compressibility of the phase-space volume caused by the tangential magnetic drift is regarded as a source term for the drift kinetic equation, which is solved by using a two-weight δf Monte Carlo method for non-Hamiltonian system [G. Hu and J. A. Krommes, Phys. Plasmas 1, 863 (1994)]. It is demonstrated that the effect of the drift is negligible for the neoclassical transport in tokamaks. In non-axisymmetric systems, however, the tangential magnetic drift substantially changes the dependence of the neoclassical transport on the radial electric field E{sub r}. The peaked behavior of the neoclassical radial fluxes around E{sub r }={sub  }0 observed in conventional local neoclassical transport simulations is removed by taking the tangential magnetic drift into account.

  16. Advanced shield development for a fission surface power system for the lunar surface

    SciTech Connect

    A. E. Craft; I. J. Silver; C. M. Clark; S. D. Howe; J. C. King

    2011-02-01

    A nuclear reactor power system such as the affordable fission surface power system enables a potential outpostonthemoon.Aradiation shieldmustbe included in the reactor system to reduce the otherwise excessive dose to the astronauts and other vital system components. The radiation shield is typically the most massive component of a space reactor system, and thus must be optimized to reduce mass asmuchas possible while still providing the required protection.Various shield options for an on-lander reactor system are examined for outpost distances of 400m and 1 kmfromthe reactor. Also investigated is the resulting mass savings from the use of a high performance cermet fuel. A thermal analysis is performed to determine the thermal behaviours of radiation shields using borated water. For an outpost located 1000m from the core, a tetramethylammonium borohydride shield is the lightest (5148.4 kg), followed by a trilayer shield (boron carbide–tungsten–borated water; 5832.3 kg), and finally a borated water shield (6020.7 kg). In all of the final design cases, the temperature of the borated water remains below 400 K.

  17. Research Study to Identify Technology Requirements for Advanced Earth-Orbital Transportation Systems, Dual-Mode Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The results of a study of dual mode propulsion concepts applied to advanced earth orbital transportation systems using reuseable single stage to orbit vehicle concepts were summarized. Both series burn and parallel burn modes of propulsion were analyzed for vertical takeoff, horizontal landing vehicles based on accelerated technology goals. A major study objective was to assess the merits of dual mode main propulsion concepts compared to single mode concepts for carrying payloads of Space Shuttle type to orbit.

  18. Wind tunnel tests of high-lift systems for advanced transports using high-aspect-ratio supercritical wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. B.; Oliver, W. R.; Spacht, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    The wind tunnel testing of an advanced technology high lift system for a wide body and a narrow body transport incorporating high aspect ratio supercritical wings is described. This testing has added to the very limited low speed high Reynolds number data base for this class or aircraft. The experimental results include the effects on low speed aerodynamic characteristics of various leading and trailing edge devices, nacelles and pylons, ailerons, and spoilers, and the effects of Mach and Reynolds numbers.

  19. A two stage launch vehicle for use as an advanced space transportation system for logistics support of the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the preliminary design specifications for an Advanced Space Transportation System consisting of a fully reusable flyback booster, an intermediate-orbit cargo vehicle, and a shuttle-type orbiter with an enlarged cargo bay. It provides a comprehensive overview of mission profile, aerodynamics, structural design, and cost analyses. These areas are related to the overall feasibility and usefullness of the proposed system.

  20. Safety of high speed ground transportation systems: Safety of advanced braking concepts for high speed ground transportation systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, D.P.; Ahlbeck, D.R.; Luedeke, J.F.; Cook, S.D.; Dielman, M.A.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this study is to develop qualitative and quantitative information on the various braking strategies used in high-speed ground transportation systems in support of the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). The approach employed in this study is composed of two steps: first, build a technical understanding of the various braking strategies, and second, perform a safety analysis for each system. The systems considered in this study include seven operating high-speed rail transportation systems and three existing magnetic levitation systems. The principal technique used in the system safety analysis is Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), an inductive approach to identifying system failure modes that depends on a thorough understanding of the system design and operation. Key elements derived from the system safety analysis are the fault-tolerant and fail-safe characteristics of the braking systems. The report concludes with recommended guidance on the structure of potential future regulations governing high-speed rail braking systems.

  1. Enhanced Hydrogen Transport over Palladium Ultrathin Films through Surface Nanostructure Engineering.

    PubMed

    Abate, Salvatore; Giorgianni, Gianfranco; Gentiluomo, Serena; Centi, Gabriele; Perathoner, Siglinda

    2015-11-01

    Palladium ultrathin films (around 2 μm) with different surface nanostructures are characterized by TEM, SEM, AFM, and temperature programmed reduction (TPR), and evaluated in terms of H2 permeability and H2-N2 separation. A change in the characteristics of Pd seeds by controlled oxidation-reduction treatments produces films with the same thickness, but different surface and bulk nanostructure. In particular, the films have finer and more homogeneous Pd grains, which results in lower surface roughness. Although all samples show high permeo-selectivity to H2 , the samples with finer grains exhibit enhanced permeance and lower activation energy for H2 transport. The analysis of the data suggests that grain boundaries between the Pd grains at the surface favor H2 transfer from surface to subsurface. Thus, the surface nanostructure plays a relevant role in enhancing the transport of H2 over the Pd ultrathin film, which is an important aspect to develop improved membranes that function at low temperatures and toward new integrated process architectures in H2 and syngas production with enhanced sustainability.

  2. Predicting uncertainty in sediment transport and landscape evolution - the influence of initial surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, G. R.; Coulthard, T. J.; Lowry, J. B. C.

    2016-05-01

    Numerical landscape evolution models were initially developed to examine natural catchment hydrology and geomorphology and have become a common tool to examine geomorphic behaviour over a range of time and space scales. These models all use a digital elevation model (DEM) as a representation of the landscape surface and a significant issue is the quality and resolution of this surface. Here we focus on how subtle perturbations or roughness on the DEM surface can produce alternative model results. This study is carried out by randomly varying the elevations of the DEM surface and examining the effect on sediment transport rates and geomorphology for a proposed rehabilitation design for a post-mining landscape using multiple landscape realisations with increasing magnitudes of random changes. We show that an increasing magnitude of random surface variability does not appear to have any significant effect on sediment transport over millennial time scales. However, the random surface variability greatly changes the temporal pattern or delivery of sediment output. A significant finding is that all simulations at the end of the 10,000 year modelled period are geomorphologically similar and present a geomorphological equifinality. However, the individual patterns of erosion and deposition were different for repeat simulations with a different sequence of random perturbations. The alternative positions of random perturbations strongly influence local patterns of hillslope erosion and evolution together with the pattern and behaviour of deposition. The findings demonstrate the complex feedbacks that occur even within a simple modelled system.

  3. Impact of atomization technique on the stability and transport efficiency of nebulized liposomes harboring different surface characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lehofer, Bernhard; Bloder, Florian; Jain, Pritesh P; Marsh, Leigh M; Leitinger, Gerd; Olschewski, Horst; Leber, Regina; Olschewski, Andrea; Prassl, Ruth

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of nebulization on liposomes with specific surface characteristics by applying three commercially available inhaler systems (air-jet, ultrasonic and vibrating-mesh). Conventional liposome formulations composed of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol were compared to sterically stabilized PEGylated liposomes and cationic polymer coated liposomes.Liposomes of similar size (between 140 and 165 nm in diameter with polydispersity indices <0.1) were prepared by dry lipid film rehydration followed by size extrusion. Their stability upon nebulization was determined in terms of size, polydispersity index and leakage using a fluorescence quenching system. The transport efficiencies of the nebulizer devices and the influences of both salt and liposomes on the droplet size distribution of the aerosol were investigated. While the droplet size of the aerosol decreased with increasing salt concentration the liposomes had no influence on the droplet size distribution. The output of the nebulizers in terms of liposomal transport efficiencies differed significantly among the nebulizer principles (20–100%, p < 0.05), with the vibrating-mesh nebulizers being the most effective. The integrity of the conventional liposomes was almost unaffected by the atomization process, while polymer coated and especially positively charged liposomes showed enhanced leakage. The release rates for the hydrophilic model drug system were highest for the vibrating-mesh nebulizers regardless of the surface characteristics of the liposomes (increasing from 10% to 20% and 50% for the conventional, PEGylated and positively charged formulations, respectively). In view of surface modified liposomes our data suggest that drug delivery via nebulization necessitates the finding of a compromise between nebulizer efficiency, formulation stability and drug release profile to accomplish the development of tailored formulations suitable for advanced inhalation

  4. Thermally driven transverse transports and magnetic dynamics on a topological surface capped with a ferromagnet strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ming-Xun; Zhong, Ming; Zheng, Shi-Han; Qiu, Jian-Ming; Yang, Mou; Wang, Rui-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically study thermally driven transport of the Dirac fermions on the surface of a topological insulator capped with a ferromagnet strip. The generation and manipulation of anomalous Hall and Nernst effects are analyzed, in which the in-plane magnetization of the ferromagnet film is found to take a decisive role. This scenario is distinct from that modulated by Berry phase where the in-plane magnetization is independent. We further discuss the thermal spin-transfer torque as a backaction of the thermoelectric transports on the magnetization and calculate the dynamics of the anomalous Hall and Nernst effects self-consistently. It is found that the magnitude of the long-time steady Hall and Nernst conductance is determined by competition between the magnetic anisotropy and current-induced effective anisotropy. These results open up a possibility of magnetically controlling the transverse thermoelectric transports or thermally manipulating the magnet switching.

  5. Photoluminescence Imaging of Polyfluorene Surface Structures on Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes: Implications for Thin Film Exciton Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, Nicolai F.; Pramanik, Rajib; Dowgiallo, Anne-Marie; Ihly, Rachelle; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Doorn, Stephen K.

    2016-12-27

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have potential to act as light-harvesting elements in thin film photovoltaic devices, but performance is in part limited by the efficiency of exciton diffusion processes within the films. Factors contributing to exciton transport can include film morphology encompassing nanotube orientation, connectivity, and interaction geometry. Such factors are often defined by nanotube surface structures that are not yet well understood. Here, we present the results of a combined pump-probe and photoluminescence imaging study of polyfluorene (PFO)-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs that provide additional insight into the role played by polymer structures in defining exciton transport. Pump-probe measurements suggest exciton transport occurs over larger length scales in films composed of PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, compared to those prepared from PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs. To explore the role the difference in polymer structure may play as a possible origin of differing transport behaviors, we performed a photoluminescence imaging study of individual polymer-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs. The PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs showed more uniform intensity distributions along their lengths, in contrast to the PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, which showed irregular, discontinuous intensity distributions. These differences likely originate from differences in surface coverage and suggest the PFO wrapping on (7,5) nanotubes produces a more open surface structure than is available with the PFO-bpy wrapping of (6,5) nanotubes. The open structure likely leads to improved intertube coupling that enhances exciton transport within the (7,5) films, consistent with the results of our pump-probe measurements.

  6. Photoluminescence Imaging of Polyfluorene Surface Structures on Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes: Implications for Thin Film Exciton Transport.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Nicolai F; Pramanik, Rajib; Dowgiallo, Anne-Marie; Ihly, Rachelle; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Doorn, Stephen K

    2016-12-27

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have potential to act as light-harvesting elements in thin film photovoltaic devices, but performance is in part limited by the efficiency of exciton diffusion processes within the films. Factors contributing to exciton transport can include film morphology encompassing nanotube orientation, connectivity, and interaction geometry. Such factors are often defined by nanotube surface structures that are not yet well understood. Here, we present the results of a combined pump-probe and photoluminescence imaging study of polyfluorene (PFO)-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs that provide additional insight into the role played by polymer structures in defining exciton transport. Pump-probe measurements suggest exciton transport occurs over larger length scales in films composed of PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, compared to those prepared from PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs. To explore the role the difference in polymer structure may play as a possible origin of differing transport behaviors, we performed a photoluminescence imaging study of individual polymer-wrapped (6,5) and (7,5) SWCNTs. The PFO-bpy-wrapped (6,5) SWCNTs showed more uniform intensity distributions along their lengths, in contrast to the PFO-wrapped (7,5) SWCNTs, which showed irregular, discontinuous intensity distributions. These differences likely originate from differences in surface coverage and suggest the PFO wrapping on (7,5) nanotubes produces a more open surface structure than is available with the PFO-bpy wrapping of (6,5) nanotubes. The open structure likely leads to improved intertube coupling that enhances exciton transport within the (7,5) films, consistent with the results of our pump-probe measurements.

  7. Successful Surface Treatments for Reducing Instabilities in Advanced Nickel-base Superalloys for Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locci, Ivan E.; MacKay, Rebecca A.; Garg, Anita; Ritzert, Frank J.

    2004-01-01

    An optimized carburization treatment has been developed to mitigate instabilities that form in the microstructures of advanced turbine airfoil materials. Current turbine airfoils consist of a single crystal superalloy base that provides the mechanical performance of the airfoil, a thermal barrier coating (TBC) that reduces the temperature of the base superalloy, and a bondcoat between the superalloy and the TBC, that improves the oxidation and corrosion resistance of the base superalloy and the spallation resistance of the TBC. Advanced nickel-base superalloys containing high levels of refractory metals have been observed to develop an instability called secondary reaction zone (SRZ), which can form beneath diffusion aluminide bondcoats. This instability between the superalloy and the bondcoat has the potential of reducing the mechanical properties of thin-wall turbine airfoils. Controlled gas carburization treatments combined with a prior stress relief heat treatment and adequate surface preparation have been utilized effectively to minimize the formation of SRZ. These additional processing steps are employed before the aluminide bondcoat is deposited and are believed to change the local chemistry and local stresses of the surface of the superalloy. This paper presents the detailed processing steps used to reduce SRZ between platinum aluminide bondcoats and advanced single crystal superalloys.

  8. Ultrasmall volume molecular isothermal amplification in microfluidic chip with advanced surface processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guoliang; Ma, Li; Yang, Xiaoyong; Yang, Xu

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we developed a metal micro-fluidic chip with advanced surface processing for ultra-small volume molecular isothermal amplification. This method takes advantages of the nucleic acid amplification with good stability and consistency, high sensitivity about 31 genomic DNA copies and bacteria specific gene identification. Based on the advanced surface processing, the bioreaction assays of nucleic acid amplification was dropped about 392nl in volume. A high numerical aperture confocal optical detection system was advanced to sensitively monitor the DNA amplification with low noise and high power collecting fluorescence near to the optical diffraction limit. A speedy nucleic acid isothermal amplification was performed in the ultra-small volume microfluidic chip, where the time at the inflexions of second derivative to DNA exponential amplified curves was brought forward and the sensitivity was improved about 65 folds to that of in current 25μl Ep-tube amplified reaction, which indicates a promising clinic molecular diagnostics in the droplet amplification.

  9. Surface trajectories of oil transport along the Northern Coastline of the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, J. C.; Trahan, C. J.; Howard, M. T.; Fleming, J. G.; Weaver, R. J.; Tanaka, S.; Yu, L.; Luettich, R. A.; Dawson, C. N.; Westerink, J. J.; Wells, G.; Lu, A.; Vega, K.; Kubach, A.; Dresback, K. M.; Kolar, R. L.; Kaiser, C.; Twilley, R. R.

    2012-06-01

    After the destruction of the Deepwater Horizon drilling platform during the spring of 2010, the northern Gulf of Mexico was threatened by an oil spill from the Macondo well. Emergency responders were concerned about oil transport in the nearshore, where it threatened immediately the fishing waters and coastline from Louisiana to Florida. In this region, oil movement was influenced by a continental shelf with varying width, the protruding Mississippi River delta, the marshes and bayou of southern Louisiana, and the shallow sounds and barrier islands that protect the coastline. Transport forecasts require physics-based computational models and high-resolution meshes that represent the circulation in deep water, on the continental shelf, and within the complex nearshore environment. This work applies the coupled SWAN+ADCIRC model on a high-resolution computational mesh to simulate the current velocity field on the continental shelf, nearshore and marsh areas during the time that oil was visible on the surface of the Gulf. The SWAN+ADCIRC simulations account for the influence of tides, riverine discharge, winds and wind-driven waves. A highly efficient Lagrangian particle transport model is employed to simulate the surface trajectories of the oil. The transport model accounts for dispersion and advection by wind and currents. Transport is evaluated using 2-week long sequences of satellite images. During both periods, the SWAN+ADCIRC current fields alone appeared to be more successful moving the oil than when direct wind forcing was included. In addition, hypothetical oil transport is considered during two hurricane scenarios. Had a hurricane significantly impacted the northern Gulf while the spill was active, depending on the track of the storm relative to the spill location, oil would have moved farther into the marshes of southern Louisiana or farther along the shelf toward Texas than actually occurred during the spill.

  10. Taking advantage of reduced droplet-surface interaction to optimize transport of bioanalytes in digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Freire, Sergio L S; Thorne, Nathaniel; Wutkowski, Michael; Dao, Selina

    2014-11-10

    Digital microfluidics (DMF), a technique for manipulation of droplets, is a promising alternative for the development of "lab-on-a-chip" platforms. Often, droplet motion relies on the wetting of a surface, directly associated with the application of an electric field; surface interactions, however, make motion dependent on droplet contents, limiting the breadth of applications of the technique. Some alternatives have been presented to minimize this dependence. However, they rely on the addition of extra chemical species to the droplet or its surroundings, which could potentially interact with droplet moieties. Addressing this challenge, our group recently developed Field-DW devices to allow the transport of cells and proteins in DMF, without extra additives. Here, the protocol for device fabrication and operation is provided, including the electronic interface for motion control. We also continue the studies with the devices, showing that multicellular, relatively large, model organisms can also be transported, arguably unaffected by the electric fields required for device operation.

  11. Surface-generated mesoscale eddies transport deep-sea products from hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Adams, Diane K; McGillicuddy, Dennis J; Zamudio, Luis; Thurnherr, Andreas M; Liang, Xinfeng; Rouxel, Olivier; German, Christopher R; Mullineaux, Lauren S

    2011-04-29

    Atmospheric forcing, which is known to have a strong influence on surface ocean dynamics and production, is typically not considered in studies of the deep sea. Our observations and models demonstrate an unexpected influence of surface-generated mesoscale eddies in the transport of hydrothermal vent efflux and of vent larvae away from the northern East Pacific Rise. Transport by these deep-reaching eddies provides a mechanism for spreading the hydrothermal chemical and heat flux into the deep-ocean interior and for dispersing propagules hundreds of kilometers between isolated and ephemeral communities. Because the eddies interacting with the East Pacific Rise are formed seasonally and are sensitive to phenomena such as El Niño, they have the potential to introduce seasonal to interannual atmospheric variations into the deep sea.

  12. Ozone Transport Aloft Drives Surface Ozone Maxima Across the Mojave Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanCuren, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    A persistent layer of polluted air in the lower free troposphere over the Mojave Desert (California and Nevada) drives spring and summer surface ozone maxima as deep afternoon mixing delivers ozone and ozone precursors to surface measurement sites 200 km or more downwind of the mountains that separate the deserts from the heavily populated coastal areas of California. Pollutants in this elevated layer derive from California source regions (the Los Angeles megacity region and the intensive agricultural region of the San Joaquin Valley), and from long-range transport from Asia. Recognition of this poorly studied persistent layer explains and expands the significance of previously published reports of ozone and other pollutants observed in and over the Mojave Desert, resolves an apparent paradox in the timing of ozone peaks due to transport from the upwind basins, and provides a new perspective on the long-range downwind impacts of megacity pollution plumes.

  13. Transport of surface-modified carbon nanotubes through a soil column.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Fagerlund, Fritjof

    2015-04-02

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are widely manufactured nanoparticles, which are being utilized in a number of consumer products, such as sporting goods, electronics and biomedical applications. Due to their accelerating production and use, CNTs constitute a potential environmental risk if they are released to soil and groundwater systems. It is therefore essential to improve the current understanding of environmental fate and transport of CNTs. The transport and retention of CNTs in both natural and artificial media have been reported in literature, but the findings widely vary and are thus not conclusive. There are a number of physical and chemical parameters responsible for variation in retention and transport. In this study, a complete procedure of selected multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is presented starting from their surface modification to a complete set of laboratory column experiments at critical physical and chemical scenarios. Results indicate that the stability of the commercially available MWCNTs are critical with their attached surface functional group which can also influence the transport and retention of MWCNT through the surrounding medium.

  14. Transport and Attenuation of Particles of Different Density and Surface Charge: A Karst Aquifer Field Study.

    PubMed

    Schiperski, Ferry; Zirlewagen, Johannes; Scheytt, Traugott

    2016-08-02

    Although karst aquifers are far more susceptible to contamination than porous aquifers, with the transport of particulate matter being an important factor, little is known about the attenuation of solutes within karst aquifers and even less about the attenuation of particulate matter. These in situ investigations have therefore aimed to systematically identify the processes that influence the transport and attenuation of particles within a karst aquifer through multitracer testing, using four different types of 1 μm fluorescent particles and the fluorescent dye uranine. Each of the types of particles used were detected at the observed spring, which drains the investigated aquifer. However, the transport behavior varied significantly between the various particles and the uranine dye, with the breakthrough of particles occurring slightly earlier than that of uranine. Attenuation was determined from the tracer recovery and attributed to filtration processes. These processes were affected by the hydrophobicity and surface charge of the particles. Carboxylated polystyrene particles with a density and surface charge comparable to pathogenic microorganisms were found to be mobile in groundwater over a distance of about 3 km. No attenuation was observed for plain silica particles. Particles with these characteristics thus pose a major threat to karst spring water as they might occur as contaminants themselves or facilitate the transport of other contaminants.

  15. Anisotropic surface hole-transport property of triphenylamine-derivative single crystal prepared by solution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Minoru; Katagiri, Mitsuhiko; Shironita, Sayoko; Nagayama, Norio

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports the anisotropic hole transport at the triphenylamine-derivative single crystal surface prepared by a solution method. Triphenylamine derivatives are commonly used in a hole-transport material for organic photoconductors of laser-beam printers, in which the materials are used as an amorphous form. For developing organic photovoltaics using the photoconductor's technology, preparation of a single crystal seems to be a specific way by realizing the high mobility of an organic semiconductor. In this study, a single crystal of 4-(2,2-diphenylethenyl)-N,N-bis(4-methylphenyl)-benzenamine (TPA) was prepared and its anisotropic hole-transport property measured. First, the hole-transport property of the TPA was investigated based on its chemical structure and electrochemical redox characteristics. Next, a large-scale single crystal formation at a high rate was developed by employing a solution method based on its solubility and supersolubility curves. The grown TPA was found to be a single crystal based on the polarization micrograph observation and crystallographic analysis. For the TPA single crystal, an anisotropic surface conduction was found, which was well explained by its molecular stack structure. The measured current in the long-axis direction is one order of magnitude greater than that of amorphous TPA.

  16. Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.H.; Leonard, J.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Jiang, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    This is the 9th quarterly technical progress report for the project entitled Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies'', DE-FG22-90PC90295. The work presented in this report was performed from September 1, 1992 to November 31, 1992. The objective of the project is to conduct extensive fundamental studies on the surface chemistry of pyrite oxidation and flotation and to understand how the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface affects the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. During this reporting period, the surface oxidation of pyrite in various electrolytes was investigated. It has been demonstrated, for the first time, that borate, a pH buffer and electrolyte used by many previous investigators in studying sulfide mineral oxidation, actively participates in the surface oxidation of pyrite. In borate solutions, the surface oxidation of pyrite is tronly enhanced. The anodic oxidation potential of pyrite is lowered by more than 0.4 volts. The initial reaction of the borate enhanced pyrite oxidation can be described by:FeS[sub 2] + B(OH)[sub 4][sup =] ------> [S[sub 2]Fe-B(OH)[sub 4

  17. System and Propagation Availability Analysis for NASA's Advanced Air Transportation Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ugweje, Okechukwu C.

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the research on the System and Propagation Availability Analysis for NASA's project on Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AATT). The objectives of the project were to determine the communication systems requirements and architecture, and to investigate the effect of propagation on the transmission of space information. In this report, results from the first year investigation are presented and limitations are highlighted. To study the propagation links, an understanding of the total system architecture is necessary since the links form the major component of the overall architecture. This study was conducted by way of analysis, modeling and simulation on the system communication links. The overall goals was to develop an understanding of the space communication requirements relevant to the AATT project, and then analyze the links taking into consideration system availability under adverse atmospheric weather conditions. This project began with a preliminary study of the end-to-end system architecture by modeling a representative communication system in MATLAB SIMULINK. Based on the defining concepts, the possibility of computer modeling was determined. The investigations continue with the parametric studies of the communication system architecture. These studies were also carried out with SIMULINK modeling and simulation. After a series of modifications, two end-to-end communication links were identified as the most probable models for the communication architecture. Link budget calculations were then performed in MATHCAD and MATLAB for the identified communication scenarios. A remarkable outcome of this project is the development of a graphic user interface (GUI) program for the computation of the link budget parameters in real time. Using this program, one can interactively compute the link budget requirements after supplying a few necessary parameters. It provides a framework for the eventual automation of several computations

  18. Stochastic model for photoinduced surface relief grating formation through molecular transport in polymer films.

    SciTech Connect

    Juan, M.; Plain, J.; Bachelot, R.; Royer, P.; Gray, S. K.; Wiederrecht, G. P.; Univ. de Technologie de Troyes

    2008-09-01

    We use a stochastic model to study photoinduced surface relief grating (SRG) formation due to molecular transport in azobenzene polymer films. The model is shown to reproduce the essential experimental features of SRG formation. In particular, it predicts SRG formation under both p and s polarizations, and the double peaked topographies that can occur at early times of the process. The evolving molecular positions and orientations during exposure are also followed, providing a useful mechanistic picture of SRG dynamics.

  19. Stochastic model for photoinduced surface relief grating formation through molecular transport in polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Juan, M. L.; Plain, J.; Bachelot, R.; Royer, P.; Gray, S. K.; Wiederrecht, G. P.

    2008-10-13

    We use a stochastic model to study photoinduced surface relief grating (SRG) formation due to molecular transport in azobenzene polymer films. The model is shown to reproduce the essential experimental features of SRG formation. In particular, it predicts SRG formation under both p and s polarizations, and the double peaked topographies that can occur at early times of the process. The evolving molecular positions and orientations during exposure are also followed, providing a useful mechanistic picture of SRG dynamics.

  20. Transportation-Driven Mars Surface Operations Supporting an Evolvable Mars Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toups, Larry; Brown, Kendall; Hoffman, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a study evaluating options for supporting a series of human missions to a single Mars surface destination. In this scenario the infrastructure emplaced during previous visits to this site is leveraged in following missions. The goal of this single site approach to Mars surface infrastructure is to enable "Steady State" operations by at least 4 crew for up to 500 sols at this site. These characteristics, along with the transportation system used to deliver crew and equipment to and from Mars, are collectively known as the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC). Information in this paper is presented in the sequence in which it was accomplished. First, a logical buildup sequence of surface infrastructure was developed to achieve the desired "Steady State" operations on the Mars surface. This was based on a concept of operations that met objectives of the EMC. Second, infrastructure capabilities were identified to carry out this concept of operations. Third, systems (in the form of conceptual elements) were identified to provide these capabilities. This included top-level mass, power and volume estimates for these elements. Fourth, the results were then used in analyses to evaluate three options (18t, 27t, and 40t landed mass) of Mars Lander delivery capability to the surface. Finally, Mars arrival mass estimates were generated based upon the entry, descent, and landing requirements for inclusion in separate assessments of in-space transportation capabilities for the EMC.

  1. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  2. River stage influences on uranium transport in a hydrologically dynamic groundwater-surface water transition zone: U TRANSPORT IN A GROUNDWATER-SURFACE WATER TRANSITION ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, John M.; Chen, Xingyuan; Murray, Chris; Hammond, Glenn

    2016-03-01

    A tightly spaced well-field within a groundwater uranium (U) plume in the groundwater-surface water transition zone was monitored for a three year period for groundwater elevation and dissolved solutes. The plume discharges to the Columbia River, which displays a dramatic spring stage surge resulting from mountain snowmelt. Groundwater exhibits a low hydrologic gradient and chemical differences with river water. River water intrudes the site in spring. Specific aims were to assess the impacts of river intrusion on dissolved uranium (Uaq), specific conductance (SpC), and other solutes, and to discriminate between transport, geochemical, and source term heterogeneity effects. Time series trends for Uaq and SpC were complex and displayed large temporal well-to well variability as a result of water table elevation fluctuations, river water intrusion, and changes in groundwater flow directions. The wells were clustered into subsets exhibiting common temporal behaviors resulting from the intrusion dynamics of river water and the location of source terms. Concentration hot spots were observed in groundwater that varied in location with increasing water table elevation. Heuristic reactive transport modeling with PFLOTRAN demonstrated that mobilized U was transported between wells and source terms in complex trajectories, and was diluted as river water entered and exited the groundwater system. While uranium time-series concentration trends varied significantly from year to year as a result of climate-caused differences in the spring hydrograph, common and partly predictable response patterns were observed that were driven by water table elevation, and the extent and duration of the river water intrusion event.

  3. Passive scalar transport to and from the surface of a Pocillopora coral colony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md Monir; Staples, Anne

    2016-11-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of flow through a single Pocillopora coral colony were performed to examine the interaction between the flow conditions and scalar transport near a coral colony. With corals currently undergoing a third global bleaching event, a fuller understanding of the transport of nutrients, weak temperature gradients, and other passive scalars to and from the coral polyp tissue is more important than ever. The complex geometry of a coral colony poses a significant challenge for numerical simulation. To simplify grid generation and minimize computational cost, the immersed boundary method was implemented. Large eddy simulation was chosen as the framework to capture the turbulent flow field in the range of realistic Reynolds numbers of 5,000 to 30,000 and turbulent Schmidt numbers of up to 1,000. Both uniform and oscillatory flows through the colony were investigated. Significant differences were found between the cases when the scalar originated at the edge of the flow domain and was transported into the colony, versus when the scalar originated on the surface of the colony and was transported away from the coral. The domain-to-colony transport rates were found to be orders of magnitude higher than the colony-to-domain rates.

  4. Modeling Fate and Transport of Cryptosporidium Parvum Oocysts in Overland and Near- surface Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, R.; Kalita, P.; Kuhlenschmidt, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a manure-borne protozoan parasite which is common in the environment. It has been recognized as an important microbial contaminant of water and can cause infection and diarrhea in many mammalian hosts, including humans. The laboratory experiments carried out have demonstrated that recovery of C. parvum oocysts was significantly affected by climatic and surface conditions like slope, rainfall and surface cover. The objective of this study is to develop a model for simulating transport of C. parvum oocysts in overland and near-surface flow. Modeling can help understanding oocysts transport pathways. Accordingly, best management practices (BMP) can be developed. Transport of oocysts in overland flow can be simulated mathematically by including terms for the concentration of the oocysts in the liquid phase (in suspension or free-floating) and the solid phase (adsorbed to the fine solid particles like clay). Oocysts adsorption, advection and decay processes are considered. These processes are solved using numerical technique to predict spatial and temporal changes in oocyst concentrations in solid and liquid phases. The model results are compared with experimental data to validate the model outcome. The model output reproduced observed recovery kinetics for 1.5% slope but not for higher slopes (3.0% and 4.5%).

  5. Specific spacecraft evaluation: Special report. [charged particle transport from a mercury ion thruster to spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Charged and neutral particle transport from an 8 cm mercury ion thruster to the surfaces of the P 80-1 spacecraft and to the Teal Ruby sensor and the ECOM-501 sensor of that spacecraft were investigated. Laboratory measurements and analyses were used to examine line-of-sight and nonline-of sight particle transport modes. The recirculation of Hg(+) ions in the magnetic field of the earth was analyzed for spacecraft velocity and Earth magnetic field vector configurations which are expected to occur in near Earth, circular, high inclination orbits. For these magnetic field and orbit conditions and for expected ion release distribution functions, in both angles and energies, the recirculation/re-interception of ions on spacecraft surfaces was evaluated. The refraction of weakly energetic ions in the electric fields of the thruster plasma plume and in the electric fields between this plasma plume and the material boundaries of the thruster, the thruster sputter shield, and the various spacecraft surfaces were examined. The neutral particle transport modes of interest were identified as sputtered metal atoms from the thruster beam shield. Results, conclusions, and future considerations are presented.

  6. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: biosynthesis and extraction from the inner membrane

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Brent W.; May, Janine M.; Sherman, David J.; Kahne, Daniel; Ruiz, Natividad

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface of most Gram-negative bacteria is covered with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The network of charges and sugars provided by the dense packing of LPS molecules in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane interferes with the entry of hydrophobic compounds into the cell, including many antibiotics. In addition, LPS can be recognized by the immune system and plays a crucial role in many interactions between bacteria and their animal hosts. LPS is synthesized in the inner membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, so it must be transported across their cell envelope to assemble at the cell surface. Over the past two decades, much of the research on LPS biogenesis has focused on the discovery and understanding of Lpt, a multi-protein complex that spans the cell envelope and functions to transport LPS from the inner membrane to the outer membrane. This paper focuses on the early steps of the transport of LPS by the Lpt machinery: the extraction of LPS from the inner membrane. The accompanying paper (May JM, Sherman DJ, Simpson BW, Ruiz N, Kahne D. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150027. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0027)) describes the subsequent steps as LPS travels through the periplasm and the outer membrane to its final destination at the cell surface. PMID:26370941

  7. Recent advances in lanthanide-doped upconversion nanomaterials: synthesis, nanostructures and surface modification.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Peiyu; Zhou, Na; Chen, Hengyu; Zhang, Chunlei; Gao, Guo; Cui, Daxiang

    2013-12-07

    Owing to their unique photo-physical properties, rare-earth ions-doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have attracted extensive attention in recent years. UCNPs have many special merits, such as a long luminescence lifetime, narrow emission band widths, high quantum yields and low toxicity, which allows their potential applications in bio-medical field, biological luminescent labels and drug delivery carriers. Compared with traditional fluorescence labels exited by UV (ultraviolet), such as organic dyes and quantum dots, UCNPs can transfer near-infrared (NIR) light into visible light, which is commonly called upconversion luminescence (UCL). This paper reviews the recent advances of several typical synthesis methods of UCNPs in detail as well as the fabrication and optimization of the particle morphology, and the latest advances of UCNPs for multimode imaging, surface passivation and functionalization are also described.

  8. Theory of Wetting-Induced Fluid Entrainment by Advancing Contact Lines on Dry Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledesma-Aguilar, R.; Hernández-Machado, A.; Pagonabarraga, I.

    2013-06-01

    We report on the onset of fluid entrainment when a contact line is forced to advance over a dry solid of arbitrary wettability. We show that entrainment occurs at a critical advancing speed beyond which the balance between capillary, viscous, and contact-line forces sustaining the shape of the interface is no longer satisfied. Wetting couples to the hydrodynamics by setting both the morphology of the interface at small scales and the viscous friction of the front. We find that the critical deformation that the interface can sustain is controlled by the friction at the contact line and the viscosity contrast between the displacing and displaced fluids, leading to a rich variety of wetting-entrainment regimes. We discuss the potential use of our theory to measure contact-line forces using atomic force microscopy and to study entrainment under microfluidic conditions exploiting colloid-polymer fluids of ultralow surface tension.

  9. Theory of wetting-induced fluid entrainment by advancing contact lines on dry surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Aguilar, R; Hernández-Machado, A; Pagonabarraga, I

    2013-06-28

    We report on the onset of fluid entrainment when a contact line is forced to advance over a dry solid of arbitrary wettability. We show that entrainment occurs at a critical advancing speed beyond which the balance between capillary, viscous, and contact-line forces sustaining the shape of the interface is no longer satisfied. Wetting couples to the hydrodynamics by setting both the morphology of the interface at small scales and the viscous friction of the front. We find that the critical deformation that the interface can sustain is controlled by the friction at the contact line and the viscosity contrast between the displacing and displaced fluids, leading to a rich variety of wetting-entrainment regimes. We discuss the potential use of our theory to measure contact-line forces using atomic force microscopy and to study entrainment under microfluidic conditions exploiting colloid-polymer fluids of ultralow surface tension.

  10. Application of advanced technologies to small, short-haul transport aircraft (STAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraus, E. F.; Mall, O. D.; Awker, R. W.; Scholl, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The benefits of selected advanced technologies for 19 and 30 passenger, short-haul aircraft were identified. Advanced technologies were investigated in four areas: aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, and ride quality. Configuration sensitivity studies were conducted to show design tradeoffs associated with passenger capacity, cabin comfort level, and design field length.

  11. The Australian methane budget: Interpreting surface and train-borne measurements using a chemistry transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Annemarie; Chan Miller, Christopher; Palmer, Paul I.; Deutscher, Nicholas M.; Jones, Nicholas B.; Griffith, David W. T.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the Australian methane budget from 2005-2008 using the GEOS-Chem 3D chemistry transport model, focusing on the relative contribution of emissions from different sectors and the influence of long-range transport. To evaluate the model, we use in situ surface measurements of methane, methane dry air column average (XCH4) from ground-based Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs), and train-borne surface concentration measurements from an in situ FTS along the north-south continental transect. We use gravity anomaly data from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment to describe the spatial and temporal distribution of wetland emissions and scale it to a prior emission estimate, which better describes observed atmospheric methane variability at tropical latitudes. The clean air sites of Cape Ferguson and Cape Grim are the least affected by local emissions, while Wollongong, located in the populated southeast with regional coal mining, samples the most locally polluted air masses (2.5% of the total air mass versus <1% at other sites). Averaged annually, the largest single source above background of methane at Darwin is long-range transport, mainly from Southeast Asia, accounting for ˜25% of the change in surface concentration above background. At Cape Ferguson and Cape Grim, emissions from ruminant animals are the largest source of methane above background, at approximately 20% and 30%, respectively, of the surface concentration. At Wollongong, emissions from coal mining are the largest source above background representing 60% of the surface concentration. The train data provide an effective way of observing transitions between urban, desert, and tropical landscapes.

  12. Application of slightly acidic electrolyzed water for decontamination of stainless steel surfaces in animal transport vehicles.

    PubMed

    Ni, Li; Zheng, Weichao; Zhang, Qiang; Cao, Wei; Li, Baoming

    2016-10-01

    The effectiveness of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) in reducing Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurim, Staphylococcus aureus or bacterial mixtures on stainless steel surfaces was evaluated and compared its efficacy with composite phenol solution for reducing total aerobic bacteria in animal transport vehicles. Stainless steel surfaces were inoculated with these strains individually or in a mixture, and sprayed with SAEW, composite phenol, or alkaline electrolyzed water for 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2min. The bactericidal activity of SAEW increased with increasing available chlorine concentration and spraying duration. The SAEW solution of 50mgl(-1) of available chlorine concentration showed significantly higher effectiveness than composite phenol in reducing the pathogens on stainless steel surfaces (P<0.05). Complete inactivation of pathogens on stainless steel surfaces were observed after treatment with alkaline electrolyzed water followed by SAEW at 50mgl(-1) of available chlorine concentration for 2min or alkaline electrolyzed water treatment followed by SAEW treatment at 90mgl(-1) of available chlorine concentration for 0.5min. The efficacy of SAEW in reducing total aerobic bacteria in animal transport vehicles was also determined. Vehicles in the disinfection booth were sprayed with the same SAEW, alkaline electrolyzed water and composite phenol solutions using the automatic disinfection system. Samples from vehicle surfaces were collected with sterile cotton swabs before and after each treatment. No significant differences in bactericidal efficiency were observed between SAEW and composite phenol for reducing total aerobic bacteria in the vehicles (P>0.05). SAEW was also found to be more effective when used in conjunction with alkaline electrolyzed water. Results suggest that the bactericidal efficiency of SAEW was higher than or equivalent to that of composite phenol and SAEW may be used as effective alternative for reducing microbial contamination of

  13. Advances in deployable structures and surfaces for large apertures in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago-Prowald, J.; Baier, H.

    2013-12-01

    Large apertures in space have applications for telecommunications, Earth observation and scientific missions. This paper reviews advances in mechanical architectures and technologies for large deployable apertures for space antennas and telescopes. Two complementary approaches are described to address this challenge: the deployment of structures based on quasi-rigid members and highly flexible structures. Regarding the first approach, deployable articulated structures are classified in terms of their kinematics as 3D or planar linkages in multiple variants, resulting in different architectures of radial, peripheral or modular constructions. A dedicated discussion on the number of degrees of freedom and constraints addresses the deployment reliability and thermo-elastic stability of large elastic structures in the presence of thermal gradients. This aspect has been identified as a design driver for new developments of peripheral ring and modular structures. Meanwhile, other design drivers are maintained, such as the optimization of mass and stiffness, overall accuracy and stability, and pragmatic aspects including controlled industrial development and a commitment to operators' needs. Furthermore, reflecting surface technologies and concepts are addressed with a view to the future, presenting advances in technical solutions for increasing apertures and reducing areal mass densities to affordable levels for future missions. Highly flexible materials capable of producing ultra-stable shells are described with reference to the state of the art and new developments. These concepts may enable large deployable surfaces for antennas and telescopes, as well as innovative optical concepts such as photon sieves. Shape adjustment and shape control of these surfaces are described in terms of available technologies and future needs, particularly for the reconfiguration of telecommunications antennas. In summary, the two complementary approaches described and reviewed cover the

  14. Takeoff certification considerations for large subsonic and supersonic transport airplanes using the Ames flight simulator for advanced aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, C. T.; Drinkwater, F. J., III; Fry, E. B.; Forrest, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    Data for use in development of takeoff airworthiness standards for new aircraft designs such as the supersonic transport (SST) and the large wide-body subsonic jet transport are provided. An advanced motion simulator was used to compare the performance and handling characteristics of three representative large jet transports during specific flight certification tasks. Existing regulatory constraints and methods for determining rotation speed were reviewed, and the effects on takeoff performance of variations in rotation speed, pitch attitude, and pitch attitude rate during the rotation maneuver were analyzed. A limited quantity of refused takeoff information was obtained. The aerodynamics, wing loading, and thrust-to-weight ratio of the subject SST resulted in takeoff speeds limited by climb (rather than lift-off) considerations. Take-off speeds based on U.S. subsonic transport requirements were found unacceptable because of the criticality of rotation-abuse effects on one-engine-inoperative climb performance. Adequate safety margin was provided by takeoff speeds based on proposed Anglo-French supersonic transport (TSS) criteria, with the limiting criterion being that takeoff safety speed be at least 1.15 times the one-engine-inoperative zero-rate-of-climb speed. Various observations related to SST certification are presented.

  15. The effect of surface-active solutes on water flow and contaminant transport in variably saturated porous media with capillary fringe effects.

    PubMed

    Henry, E J; Smith, J E

    2002-06-01

    Organic contaminants that decrease the surface tension of water (surfactants) can have an effect on unsaturated flow through porous media due to the dependence of capillary pressure on surface tension. We used an intermediate-scale 2D flow cell (2.44 x 1.53 x 0.108 m) packed with a fine silica sand to investigate surfactant-induced flow perturbations. Surfactant solution (7% 1-butanol and dye tracer) was applied at a constant rate at a point source located on the soil surface above an unconfined synthetic aquifer with ambient groundwater flow and a capillary fringe of approximately 55 cm. A glass plate allowed for visual flow and transport observations. Thirty instrumentation stations consist of time domain reflectometry probes and tensiometers measured in-situ moisture content and pressure head, respectively. As surfactant solution was applied at the point source, a transient flow perturbation associated with the advance of the surfactant solution was observed. Above the top of the capillary fringe the advance of the surfactant solution caused a visible drainage front that radiated from the point source. Upon reaching the capillary fringe, the drainage front caused a localized depression of the capillary fringe below the point source because the air-entry pressure decreased in proportion to the decrease in surface tension caused by the surfactant. Eventually, a new capillary fringe height was established. The height of the depressed capillary fringe was proportional to height of the initial capillary fringe multiplied by the relative surface tension of the surfactant solution. The horizontal transport of surfactant in the depressed capillary fringe, driven primarily by the ambient groundwater flow, caused the propagation of a wedge-shaped drying front in the downgradient direction. Comparison of dye transport during the surfactant experiment to dye transport in an experiment without surfactant indicated that because surfactant-induced drainage decreased the

  16. Arsenic transport between surface and groundwater in a moderately reducing zone: Geochemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaska, Mahmoud; Le Gal La Salle, Corinne; Verdoux, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Arsenic contamination represents a major risk to human health as one of the most prominent environmental causes of cancer mortality. Mining activities, particularly those involving arsenic rich ores have an impact on the environment and on human health that may persist for many decades after mine closure. The relationships between As released from alluvial aquifer in the vicinity of the sulfide-rich mine dumps was demonstrated with geochemical and isotopic tracers (major and traces elements, 87Sr/86Sr, 18O, 2H). Strontium isotopes were used to trace the transport of As downstream from a As rich tailing dam. Increasing As and Fe concentrations in surface water are explained by As release associated with alluvial groundwater discharge to the stream. This process occurs in a moderately reduced section of the stream downgradient from the sulfide-rich tailing dam. High As, total Fe and low Eh in groundwater confirm the discharge of alluvial groundwater and explain its impact on surface water. Transport of As between surface and groundwater can be described as follows: 1- Subsurface moderately reducing conditions prevail in groundwater downgradient from the tailing dams. This suggests a flux of reduced water from sulfide-rich tailing dams which is characterized by its high As and Fe content resulting from the reduction of Fe-sulfides. 2- Upon mixing with surface water, oxidizing conditions prevails and precipitate as Fe hydroxide on the stream bed. As and Sr subsequently adsorbed on the Fe -oxyhydroxide surface. This process contributes to the immobilization of As in surface water. Remaining dissolved As in surface water can be re-introduced in alluvial groundwater downstream of the reducing zone.

  17. Charge transport across high surface area metal/diamond nanostructured composites.

    PubMed

    Plana, D; Humphrey, J J L; Bradley, K A; Celorrio, V; Fermín, D J

    2013-04-24

    High surface area composites featuring metal nanostructures and diamond particles have generated a lot of interest in the fields of heterogeneous catalysis, electrocatalysis, and sensors. Diamond surfaces provide a chemically robust framework for active nanostructures in comparison with sp(2) carbon supports. The present paper investigates the charge transport properties of high surface area films of high-pressure, high-temperature diamond particles in the presence and absence of metal nanostructures, employing electrochemical field-effect transistors. Oxygen- and hydrogen-terminated surfaces were generated on 500 nm diamond powders. Homogeneously distributed metal nanostructures, with metal volume fractions between ca. 5 and 20%, were either nucleated at the diamond particles by impregnation or incorporated from colloidal solution. Electrochemical field-effect transistor measurements, employing interdigitated electrodes, allowed the determination of composite conductivity as a function of electrode potential, as well as in air. In the absence of metal nanostructures, the lateral conductivity of the diamond assemblies in air is increased by over one order of magnitude upon hydrogenation of the particle surface. This observation is consistent with studies at diamond single crystals, although the somewhat modest change in conductivity suggests that charge transport is not only determined by the intrinsic surface conductivity of individual diamond particles but also by particle-to-particle charge transfer. Interestingly, the latter contribution effectively controls the assembly conductivity in the presence of an electrolyte solution as the difference between hydrogenated and oxygenated particles vanishes. The conductivity in the presence of metal nanoparticles is mainly determined by the metal volume fraction, while diamond surface termination and the presence of electrolyte solutions exert only minor effects. The experimental trends are discussed in terms of the

  18. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation. Final report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; Harris, G.H.; De, A.; Sotillo, F.; Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C.; Hu, W.; Zou, Y.; Chen, W.; Choudhry, V.; Shea, S.; Ghosh, A.; Sehgal, R.

    1992-03-01

    The initial goal of the research project was to develop methods of coal surface control in advanced froth flotation to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur rejection, while operating at Btu recoveries above 90% based on run-of-mine quality coal. Moreover, the technology is to concomitantly reduce the ash content significantly (to six percent or less) to provide a high-quality fuel to the boiler (ash removal also increases Btu content, which in turn decreases a coal`s emission potential in terms of lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu). (VC)

  19. Surface and semantic processing of cellular transport representations by high school students with low and high prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Michelle Patrick

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of prior knowledge of cell transport processes on how students viewed and interpreted visual representations related to that topic. The participants were high school students (n=65) enrolled in Advanced Placement biology. Prior knowledge was assessed using a modified version of the Diffusion and Osmosis Diagnostic Test (Odom & Barrow, 1995). Eye movements were measured to reveal how students distribute their visual attention as they perceive and interpret graphics; in addition, interviews and questionnaires were employed to provide more interpretive data sources. The first manuscript of the study investigates the relationship between prior knowledge and students' ability to perceive salient features and interpret graphic representations of cellular transport. The results from eye tracking data, interviews, and questionnaire responses were triangulated and revealed differences in how high and low prior knowledge students attended to and interpreted various features of the graphic representations. Without adequate domain knowledge, low prior knowledge students focused on surface features of the graphics to build an understanding of the concepts represented. High prior knowledge students, with more abundant and better organized domain knowledge, were more likely to attend to thematically relevant content in the graphics and construct deeper understandings. The second manuscript of the study examines the influence of prior knowledge on how students transitioned among the macroscopic and molecular representations of selected graphics. Eye tracking and sequential analysis results indicated that high prior knowledge students transitioned more frequently between the molecular representations, where as low prior knowledge students transitioned more frequently between the macroscopic representations. In addition, low prior knowledge students transitioned more frequently between macroscopic and molecular representations

  20. A posteriori testing of the flame surface density transport equation for LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, T.; Stein, O. T.; Chakraborty, N.; Kempf, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Flame Surface Density (FSD) models for Large Eddy Simulation (LES) are implemented and tested for a canonical configuration and a practical bluff body stabilised burner, comparing common algebraic closures with a transport equation closure in the context of turbulent premixed combustion. The transported method is expected to yield advantages over algebraic closures, as the equilibrium of subgrid production and destruction of FSD is no longer enforced and resolved processes of strain, propagation and curvature are explicitly accounted for. These advantages might have the potential to improve the ability to capture large-scale unsteady flame propagation in situations with combustion instabilities or situations where the flame encounters progressive wrinkling with time. The initial study of a propagating turbulent flame in wind-tunnel turbulence shows that the Algebraic Flame Surface Density (FSDA) method can predict an excessively wrinkled flame under fine grid conditions, potentially increasing the consumption rate of reactants to artificially higher levels. In contrast, the Flame Surface Density Transport (FSDT) closure predicts a smooth flame front and avoids the formation of artificial flame cusps when the grid is refined. Five FSDA models and the FSDT approach are then applied to the LES of the Volvo Rig. The predicted mean velocities are found to be relatively insensitive to the use of the FSDT and FSDA approaches, whereas temperature predictions exhibit appreciable differences for different formulations. The FSDT approach yields very similar temperature predictions to two of the tested FSDA models, quantitatively capturing the mean temperature. Grid refinement is found to improve the FSDT predictions of the mean flame spread. Overall, the paper demonstrates that the apparently complicated FSD transport equation approach can be implemented and applied to realistic, strongly wrinkled flames with good success, and opens up the field for further work to improve