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Sample records for advanced thermochemical hydrogen

  1. Advanced Electrochemical Technologies for Hydrogen Production by Alternative Thermochemical Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Lvov, Serguei; Chung, Mike; Fedkin, Mark; Lewis, Michele; Balashov, Victor; Chalkova, Elena; Akinfiev, Nikolay; Stork, Carol; Davis, Thomas; Gadala-Maria, Francis; Stanford, Thomas; Weidner, John; Law, Victor; Prindle, John

    2011-01-06

    Hydrogen fuel is a potentially major solution to the problem of climate change, as well as addressing urban air pollution issues. But a key future challenge for hydrogen as a clean energy carrier is a sustainable, low-cost method of producing it in large capacities. Most of the world's hydrogen is currently derived from fossil fuels through some type of reforming processes. Nuclear hydrogen production is an emerging and promising alternative to the reforming processes for carbon-free hydrogen production in the future. This report presents the main results of a research program carried out by a NERI Consortium, which consisted of Penn State University (PSU) (lead), University of South Carolina (USC), Tulane University (TU), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Thermochemical water decomposition is an emerging technology for large-scale production of hydrogen. Typically using two or more intermediate compounds, a sequence of chemical and physical processes split water into hydrogen and oxygen, without releasing any pollutants externally to the atmosphere. These intermediate compounds are recycled internally within a closed loop. While previous studies have identified over 200 possible thermochemical cycles, only a few have progressed beyond theoretical calculations to working experimental demonstrations that establish scientific and practical feasibility of the thermochemical processes. The Cu-Cl cycle has a significant advantage over other cycles due to lower temperature requirements – around 530 °C and below. As a result, it can be eventually linked with the Generation IV thermal power stations. Advantages of the Cu-Cl cycle over others include lower operating temperatures, ability to utilize low-grade waste heat to improve energy efficiency, and potentially lower cost materials. Another significant advantage is a relatively low voltage required for the electrochemical step (thus low electricity input). Other advantages include common chemical agents and

  2. Thermochemical generation of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Petersen, G. R. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    The direct fluid contact heat exchange with H2SO4 at about 330 C prior to high temperature decomposition at about 830 C in the oxygen release step of several thermochemical cycles for splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen provides higher heat transfer rates, savings in energy and permits use of cast vessels rather than expensive forged alloy indirect heat exchangers. Among several candidate perfluorocarbon liquids tested, only perfluoropropylene oxide polymers having a degree of polymerization from about 10 to 60 were chemically stable, had low miscibility and vapor pressure when tested with sulfuric acid at temperatures from 300 C to 400 C.

  3. Thermochemical production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Dreyfuss, Robert M.

    1976-07-13

    A thermochemical reaction cycle for the generation of hydrogen from water comprising the following sequence of reactions wherein M represents a metal and Z represents a metalloid selected from the arsenic-antimony-bismuth and selenium-tellurium subgroups of the periodic system: 2MO + Z + SO.sub.2 .fwdarw. MZ + MSO.sub.4 (1) mz + h.sub.2 so.sub.4 .fwdarw. mso.sub.4 + h.sub.2 z (2) 2mso.sub.4 .fwdarw. 2mo + so.sub.2 + so.sub.3 + 1/20.sub.2 (3) h.sub.2 z .fwdarw. z + h.sub.2 (4) h.sub.2 o + so.sub.3 .fwdarw. h.sub.2 so.sub.4 (5) the net reaction is the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen.

  4. System for thermochemical hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Werner, R.W.; Galloway, T.R.; Krikorian, O.H.

    1981-05-22

    Method and apparatus are described for joule boosting a SO/sub 3/ decomposer using electrical instead of thermal energy to heat the reactants of the high temperature SO/sub 3/ decomposition step of a thermochemical hydrogen production process driven by a tandem mirror reactor. Joule boosting the decomposer to a sufficiently high temperature from a lower temperature heat source eliminates the need for expensive catalysts and reduces the temperature and consequent materials requirements for the reactor blanket. A particular decomposer design utilizes electrically heated silicon carbide rods, at a temperature of 1250/sup 0/K, to decompose a cross flow of SO/sub 3/ gas.

  5. Thermochemical Production of Hydrogen from Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamberger, C. E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the possible advantages of decomposing water by means of thermochemical cycles. Explains that, if energy consumption can be minimized, this method is capable of producing hydrogen more efficiently than electrolysis. (GA)

  6. Process for thermochemically producing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.; Richardson, Donald M.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen is produced by the reaction of water with chromium sesquioxide and strontium oxide. The hydrogen producing reaction is combined with other reactions to produce a closed chemical cycle for the thermal decomposition of water.

  7. Process for the thermochemical production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Norman, John H.; Russell, Jr., John L.; Porter, II, John T.; McCorkle, Kenneth H.; Roemer, Thomas S.; Sharp, Robert

    1978-01-01

    Hydrogen is thermochemically produced from water in a cycle wherein a first reaction produces hydrogen iodide and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 by the reaction of iodine, sulfur dioxide and water under conditions which cause two distinct aqueous phases to be formed, i.e., a lighter sulfuric acid-bearing phase and a heavier hydrogen iodide-bearing phase. After separation of the two phases, the heavier phase containing most of the hydrogen iodide is treated, e.g., at a high temperature, to decompose the hydrogen iodide and recover hydrogen and iodine. The H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 is pyrolyzed to recover sulfur dioxide and produce oxygen.

  8. Thermochemical property estimation of hydrogenated silicon clusters.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Andrew J; Broadbelt, Linda J

    2011-08-18

    The thermochemical properties for selected hydrogenated silicon clusters (Si(x)H(y), x = 3-13, y = 0-18) were calculated using quantum chemical calculations and statistical thermodynamics. Standard enthalpy of formation at 298 K and standard entropy and constant pressure heat capacity at various temperatures, i.e., 298-6000 K, were calculated for 162 hydrogenated silicon clusters using G3//B3LYP. The hydrogenated silicon clusters contained ten to twenty fused Si-Si bonds, i.e., bonds participating in more than one three- to six-membered ring. The hydrogenated silicon clusters in this study involved different degrees of hydrogenation, i.e., the ratio of hydrogen to silicon atoms varied widely depending on the size of the cluster and/or degree of multifunctionality. A group additivity database composed of atom-centered groups and ring corrections, as well as bond-centered groups, was created to predict thermochemical properties most accurately. For the training set molecules, the average absolute deviation (AAD) comparing the G3//B3LYP values to the values obtained from the revised group additivity database for standard enthalpy of formation and entropy at 298 K and constant pressure heat capacity at 500, 1000, and 1500 K were 3.2%, 1.9%, 0.40%, 0.43%, and 0.53%, respectively. Sensitivity analysis of the revised group additivity parameter database revealed that the group parameters were able to predict the thermochemical properties of molecules that were not used in the training set within an AAD of 3.8% for standard enthalpy of formation at 298 K. PMID:21728331

  9. Screening analysis of solar thermochemical hydrogen concepts.

    SciTech Connect

    Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Kolb, Gregory J.

    2008-03-01

    A screening analysis was performed to identify concentrating solar power (CSP) concepts that produce hydrogen with the highest efficiency. Several CSP concepts were identified that have the potential to be much more efficient than today's low-temperature electrolysis technology. They combine a central receiver or dish with either a thermochemical cycle or high-temperature electrolyzer that operate at temperatures >600 C. The solar-to-hydrogen efficiencies of the best central receiver concepts exceed 20%, significantly better than the 14% value predicted for low-temperature electrolysis.

  10. Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Research (STCH)

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Eight cycles in a coordinated set of projects for Solar Thermochemical Cycles for Hydrogen production (STCH) were self-evaluated for the DOE-EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Program at a Working Group Meeting on October 8 and 9, 2008. This document reports the initial selection process for development investment in STCH projects, the evaluation process meant to reduce the number of projects as a means to focus resources on development of a few most-likely-to-succeed efforts, the obstacles encountered in project inventory reduction and the outcomes of the evaluation process. Summary technical status of the projects under evaluation is reported and recommendations identified to improve future project planning and selection activities.

  11. Capabilities to Support Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Ginosar

    2009-05-01

    This report presents the results of a study to determine if Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has the skilled staff, instrumentation, specialized equipment, and facilities required to take on work in thermochemical research, development, and demonstration currently being performed by the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). This study outlines the beneficial collaborations between INL and other national laboratories, universities, and industries to strengthen INL's thermochemical efforts, which should be developed to achieve the goals of the NHI in the most expeditious, cost effective manner. Taking on this work supports INL's long-term strategy to maintain leadership in thermochemical cycle development. This report suggests a logical path forward to accomplish this transition.

  12. Carbonate thermochemical cycle for the production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Jack L [Knoxville, TN; Dole, Leslie R [Knoxville, TN; Ferrada, Juan J [Knoxville, TN; Forsberg, Charles W [Oak Ridge, TN; Haire, Marvin J [Oak Ridge, TN; Hunt, Rodney D [Oak Ridge, TN; Lewis, Jr, Benjamin E [Knoxville, TN; Wymer, Raymond G [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-02-23

    The present invention is directed to a thermochemical method for the production of hydrogen from water. The method includes reacting a multi-valent metal oxide, water and a carbonate to produce an alkali metal-multi-valent metal oxide compound, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen.

  13. Carbonate Thermochemical Cycle for the Production of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrada, Juan J; Collins, Jack Lee; Dole, Leslie Robert; Forsberg, Charles W; Haire, Marvin Jonathan; Hunt, Rodney Dale; Lewis Jr, Benjamin E; Wymer, Raymond; Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a thermochemical method for the production of hydrogen from water. The method includes reacting a multi-valent metal oxide, water and a carbonate to produce an alkali metal-multi-valent metal oxide compound, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen.

  14. Thermochemical water decomposition. [hydrogen separation for energy applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    At present, nearly all of the hydrogen consumed in the world is produced by reacting hydrocarbons with water. As the supply of hydrocarbons diminishes, the problem of producing hydrogen from water alone will become increasingly important. Furthermore, producing hydrogen from water is a means of energy conversion by which thermal energy from a primary source, such as solar or nuclear fusion of fission, can be changed into an easily transportable and ecologically acceptable fuel. The attraction of thermochemical processes is that they offer the potential for converting thermal energy to hydrogen more efficiently than by water electrolysis. A thermochemical hydrogen-production process is one which requires only water as material input and mainly thermal energy, or heat, as an energy input. Attention is given to a definition of process thermal efficiency, the thermodynamics of the overall process, the single-stage process, the two-stage process, multistage processes, the work of separation and a process evaluation.

  15. ALTERNATIVE FLOWSHEETS FOR THE SULFUR-IODINE THERMOCHEMICAL HYDROGEN CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,LC; LENTSCH,RD; BESENBRUCH,GE; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JE

    2003-02-01

    OAK-B135 A hydrogen economy will need significant new sources of hydrogen. Unless large-scale carbon sequestration can be economically implemented, use of hydrogen reduces greenhouse gases only if the hydrogen is produced with non-fossil energy sources. Nuclear energy is one of the limited options available. One of the promising approaches to produce large quantities of hydrogen from nuclear energy efficiently is the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) thermochemical water-splitting cycle, driven by high temperature heat from a helium Gas-Cooled Reactor. They have completed a study of nuclear-driven thermochemical water-splitting processes. The final task of this study was the development of a flowsheet for a prototype S-I production plant. An important element of this effort was the evaluation of alternative flowsheets and selection of the reference design.

  16. Initial Screening of Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles for High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.C.; Funk, J.F.; Showalter, S.K.

    1999-12-15

    OAK B188 Initial Screening of Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles for High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process, nor is such a process available for commercialization. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Fossil fuels are polluting and carbon dioxide emissions from their combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. Almost 800 literature references were located which pertain to thermochemical production of hydrogen from water and over 100 thermochemical watersplitting cycles were examined. Using defined criteria and quantifiable metrics, 25 cycles have been selected for more detailed study.

  17. Materials study supporting thermochemical hydrogen cycle sulfuric acid decomposer design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, Michael S.

    Increasing global climate change has been driven by greenhouse gases emissions originating from the combustion of fossil fuels. Clean burning hydrogen has the potential to replace much of the fossil fuels used today reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere. The sulfur iodine and hybrid sulfur thermochemical cycles coupled with high temperature heat from advanced nuclear reactors have shown promise for economical large-scale hydrogen fuel stock production. Both of these cycles employ a step to decompose sulfuric acid to sulfur dioxide. This decomposition step occurs at high temperatures in the range of 825°C to 926°C dependent on the catalysis used. Successful commercial implementation of these technologies is dependent upon the development of suitable materials for use in the highly corrosive environments created by the decomposition products. Boron treated diamond film was a potential candidate for use in decomposer process equipment based on earlier studies concluding good oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. However, little information was available relating the interactions of diamond and diamond films with sulfuric acid at temperatures greater than 350°C. A laboratory scale sulfuric acid decomposer simulator was constructed at the Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute at the University of Missouri-Columbia. The simulator was capable of producing the temperatures and corrosive environments that process equipment would be exposed to for industrialization of the sulfur iodide or hybrid sulfur thermochemical cycles. A series of boron treated synthetic diamonds were tested in the simulator to determine corrosion resistances and suitability for use in thermochemical process equipment. These studies were performed at twenty four hour durations at temperatures between 600°C to 926°C. Other materials, including natural diamond, synthetic diamond treated with titanium, silicon carbide, quartz, aluminum nitride, and Inconel

  18. Thermochemical cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. E.; Soliman, M. A.; Carty, R. H.; Conger, W. L.; Cox, K. E.; Lawson, D.

    1975-01-01

    The thermochemical production of hydrogen is described along with the HYDRGN computer program which attempts to rate the various thermochemical cycles. Specific thermochemical cycles discussed include: iron sulfur cycle; iron chloride cycle; and hybrid sulfuric acid cycle.

  19. Thermochemical method for producing hydrogen from water

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K.; Kondo, W.; Kumagai, T.

    1980-02-12

    A closed system for obtaining hydrogen from water is provided by combining a first step of obtaining hydrogen by reacting water and ferrous halide, a second step of converting triiron tetraoxide produced as a by-product in the first step to ferrous sulfate, a third step of obtaining oxygen and by-products by thermally decomposing said ferrous sulfate, and a fourth step of returning said by-products by thermally decomposing said ferrous sulfate, and a fourth step of returning said by-products obtained in the third step to any of the previous steps.

  20. Thermochemical generation of hydrogen and oxygen from water

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Paul R.; Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1982-01-01

    A thermochemical cyclic process for the production of hydrogen exploits the reaction between sodium manganate (NaMnO.sub.2) and titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) to form sodium titanate (Na.sub.2 TiO.sub.3), manganese (II) titanate (MnTiO.sub.3) and oxygen. The titanate mixture is treated with sodium hydroxide, in the presence of steam, to form sodium titanate, sodium manganate (III), water and hydrogen. The sodium titanate-manganate (III) mixture is treated with water to form sodium manganate (III), titanium dioxide and sodium hydroxide. Sodium manganate (III) and titanium dioxide are recycled following dissolution of sodium hydroxide in water.

  1. Thermochemical generation of hydrogen and oxygen from water

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Paul R.; Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1981-01-01

    A thermochemical cyclic process for the production of hydrogen exploits the reaction between sodium manganate (NaMnO.sub.2) and titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) to form sodium titanate (Na.sub.2 TiO.sub.3), manganese (II) titanate (MnTiO.sub.3) and oxygen. The titanate mixture is treated with sodium hydroxide, in the presence of steam, to form sodium titanate, sodium manganate (III), water and hydrogen. The sodium titanate-manganate (III) mixture is treated with water to form sodium manganate (III), titanium dioxide and sodium hydroxide. Sodium manganate (III) and titanium dioxide are recycled following dissolution of sodium hydroxide in water.

  2. Methane-methanol cycle for the thermochemical production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Dreyfuss, Robert M.; Hickman, Robert G.

    1976-01-01

    A thermochemical reaction cycle for the generation of hydrogen from water comprising the following sequence of reactions wherein M represents a metal: CH.sub.4 + H.sub.2 O .fwdarw. CO + 3H.sub.2 (1) co + 2h.sub.2 .fwdarw. ch.sub.3 oh (2) ch.sub.3 oh + so.sub.2 + mo .fwdarw. mso.sub.4 + ch.sub.4 (3) mso.sub.4 .fwdarw. mo + so.sub.2 + 1/2o.sub.2 (4) the net reaction is the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen.

  3. Thermochemical hydrogen production based on magnetic fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Krikorian, O.H.; Brown, L.C.

    1982-06-10

    Conceptual design studies have been carried out on an integrated fusion/chemical plant system using a Tandem Mirror Reactor fusion energy source to drive the General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Water-Splitting Cycle and produce hydrogen as a future feedstock for synthetic fuels. Blanket design studies for the Tandem Mirror Reactor show that several design alternatives are available for providing heat at sufficiently high temperatures to drive the General Atomic Cycle. The concept of a Joule-boosted decomposer is introduced in one of the systems investigated to provide heat electrically for the highest temperature step in the cycle (the SO/sub 3/ decomposition step), and thus lower blanket design requirements and costs. Flowsheeting and conceptual process designs have been developed for a complete fusion-driven hydrogen plant, and the information has been used to develop a plot plan for the plant and to estimate hydrogen production costs. Both public and private utility financing approaches have been used to obtain hydrogen production costs of $12-14/GJ based on July 1980 dollars.

  4. Thermochemical generation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Daniel D. (Inventor); England, Christopher (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Mixing of carbon in the form of high sulfur coal with sulfuric acid reduces the temperature of sulfuric acid decomposition from 830.degree. C. to between 300.degree. C. and 400.degree. C. The low temperature sulfuric acid decomposition is particularly useful in thermal chemical cycles for splitting water to produce hydrogen. Carbon dioxide is produced as a commercially desirable byproduct. Lowering of the temperature for the sulfuric acid decomposition or oxygen release step simplifies equipment requirements, lowers thermal energy input and reduces corrosion problems presented by sulfuric acid at conventional cracking temperatures. Use of high sulfur coal as the source of carbon for the sulfuric acid decomposition provides an environmentally safe and energy efficient utilization of this normally polluting fuel.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide thermochemical oscillator as driver for primordial RNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Rowena; Brindley, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents and tests a previously unrecognized mechanism for driving a replicating molecular system on the prebiotic earth. It is proposed that cell-free RNA replication in the primordial soup may have been driven by self-sustained oscillatory thermochemical reactions. To test this hypothesis, a well-characterized hydrogen peroxide oscillator was chosen as the driver and complementary RNA strands with known association and melting kinetics were used as the substrate. An open flow system model for the self-consistent, coupled evolution of the temperature and concentrations in a simple autocatalytic scheme is solved numerically, and it is shown that thermochemical cycling drives replication of the RNA strands. For the (justifiably realistic) values of parameters chosen for the simulated example system, the mean amount of replicant produced at steady state is 6.56 times the input amount, given a constant supply of substrate species. The spontaneous onset of sustained thermochemical oscillations via slowly drifting parameters is demonstrated, and a scheme is given for prebiotic production of complementary RNA strands on rock surfaces. PMID:24647902

  6. Thermochemical cycles for the production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Steinberg, M.; Dang, V.D.

    Two-step processes for the preparation of hydrogen are described: CrCl/sub 3/(g) ..-->.. CrCl/sub 2/(g) + 1/2Cl/sub 2/(g) and CrCl/sub 2/(s) + HCl(g) reversible CrCl/sub 3/(s) + 1/2H/sub 2/(g); UCl/sub 4/(g) ..-->.. UCl/sub 3/(g) + 1/2Cl/sub 2/(g) and UCl/sub 3/(s) + HCl(g) ..-->.. UCl/sub 4/(s) + 1/2H/sub 2/(g); and CaSO/sub 4/(s) ..-->.. CaO(s) + SO/sub 2/(g) + 1/2O/sub 2/(g) and CaO(s) + SO/sub 2/(g) + H/sub 2/O(l) ..-->.. CaSO/sub 4/(s) + H/sub 2/(g). The high temperature available from solar collectors, high temperature gas reactors or fusion reactors is utilized in the first step in which the reaction is endothermic. The efficiency is at least 60% and with process heat recovery, the efficiency may be increased up to 74.4%. An apparatus fr carrying out the process in conjunction with a fusion reactor, is described.

  7. Interfacing primary heat sources and cycles for thermochemical hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    Advantages cited for hydrogen production from water by coupling thermochemical cycles with primary heat include the possibility of high efficiencies. These can be realized only if the cycle approximates the criteria required to match the characteristics of the heat source. Different types of cycles may be necessary for fission reactors, for fusion reactors or for solar furnaces. Very high temperature processes based on decomposition of gaseous H/sub 2/O or CO/sub 2/ appear impractical even for projected solar technology. Cycles based on CdO decomposition are potentially quite efficient and require isothermal heat at temperatures that may be available from solar furnaces of fusion reactors. Sulfuric acid and solid sulfate cycles are potentially useful at temperatures available from each heat source. Solid sulfate cycles offer advantages for isothermal heat sources. All cycles under development include concentration and drying steps. Novel methods for improving such operations would be beneficial.

  8. Thermochemical modelling of advanced CANDU reactor fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, Emily Catherine

    2009-04-01

    With an aging fleet of nuclear generating facilities, the imperative to limit the use of non-renewal fossil fuels and the inevitable need for additional electricity to power Canada's economy, a renaissance in the use of nuclear technology in Canada is at hand. The experience and knowledge of over 40 years of CANDU research, development and operation in Ontario and elsewhere has been applied to a new generation of CANDU, the Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR). Improved fuel design allows for an extended burnup, which is a significant improvement, enhancing the safety and the economies of the ACR. The use of a Burnable Neutron Absorber (BNA) material and Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel has created a need to understand better these novel materials and fuel types. This thesis documents a work to advance the scientific and technological knowledge of the ACR fuel design with respect to thermodynamic phase stability and fuel oxidation modelling. For the BNA material, a new (BNA) model is created based on the fundamental first principles of Gibbs energy minimization applied to material phase stability. For LEU fuel, the methodology used for the BNA model is applied to the oxidation of irradiated fuel. The pertinent knowledge base for uranium, oxygen and the major fission products is reviewed, updated and integrated to create a model that is applicable to current and future CANDU fuel designs. As part of this thesis, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Coulombic Titration (CT) experiments are compared to the BNA and LEU models, respectively. From the analysis of the CT results, a number of improvements are proposed to enhance the LEU model and provide confidence in its application to ACR fuel. A number of applications for the potential use of these models are proposed and discussed. Keywords: CANDU Fuel, Gibbs Energy Mimimization, Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Fuel, Burnable Neutron Absorber (BNA) Material, Coulometric Titration, X-Ray Diffraction

  9. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur - Reaction between barium sulfide and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653-866 C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. An expression was derived for the rate of hydrogen formation.

  10. Hydrogen energy for tomorrow: Advanced hydrogen production technologies

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The future vision for hydrogen is that it will be cost-effectively produced from renewable energy sources and made available for widespread use as an energy carrier and a fuel. Hydrogen can be produced from water and when burned as a fuel, or converted to electricity, joins with oxygen to again form water. It is a clean, sustainable resource with many potential applications, including generating electricity, heating homes and offices, and fueling surface and air transportation. To achieve this vision, researchers must develop advanced technologies to produce hydrogen at costs competitive with fossil fuels, using sustainable sources. Hydrogen is now produced primarily by steam reforming of natural gas. For applications requiring extremely pure hydrogen, production is done by electrolysis. This is a relatively expensive process that uses electric current to dissociate, or split, water into its hydrogen and oxygen components. Technologies with the best potential for producing hydrogen to meet future demand fall into three general process categories: photobiological, photoelectrochemical, and thermochemical. Photobiological and photoelectrochemical processes generally use sunlight to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Thermochemical processes, including gasification and pyrolysis systems, use heat to produce hydrogen from sources such as biomass and solid waste.

  11. Commercial Alloys for Sulfuric Acid Vaporization in Thermochemical Hydrogen Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas M. Lillo; Karen M. Delezene-Briggs

    2005-10-01

    Most thermochemical cycles being considered for producing hydrogen include a processing stream in which dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated, vaporized and then decomposed over a catalyst. The sulfuric acid vaporizer is exposed to highly aggressive conditions. Liquid sulfuric acid will be present at a concentration of >96 wt% (>90 mol %) H2SO4 and temperatures exceeding 400oC [Brown, et. al, 2003]. The system will also be pressurized, 0.7-3.5 MPa, to keep the sulfuric acid in the liquid state at this temperature and acid concentration. These conditions far exceed those found in the commercial sulfuric acid generation, regeneration and handling industries. Exotic materials, e.g. ceramics, precious metals, clad materials, etc., have been proposed for this application [Wong, et. al., 2005]. However, development time, costs, reliability, safety concerns and/or certification issues plague such solutions and should be considered as relatively long-term, optimum solutions. A more cost-effective (and relatively near-term) solution would be to use commercially-available metallic alloys to demonstrate the cycle and study process variables. However, the corrosion behavior of commercial alloys in sulfuric acid is rarely characterized above the natural boiling point of concentrated sulfuric acid (~250oC at 1 atm). Therefore a screening study was undertaken to evaluate the suitability of various commercial alloys for concentration and vaporization of high-temperature sulfuric acid. Initially alloys were subjected to static corrosion tests in concentrated sulfuric acid (~95-97% H2SO4) at temperatures and exposure times up to 200oC and 480 hours, respectively. Alloys with a corrosion rate of less than 5 mm/year were then subjected to static corrosion tests at a pressure of 1.4 MPa and temperatures up to 375oC. Exposure times were shorter due to safety concerns and ranged from as short as 5 hours up to 144 hours. The materials evaluated included nickel-, iron- and cobalt

  12. An analysis of hydrogen production via closed-cycle schemes. [thermochemical processings from water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, R. E.; Cox, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    A thermodynamic analysis and state-of-the-art review of three basic schemes for production of hydrogen from water: electrolysis, thermal water-splitting, and multi-step thermochemical closed cycles is presented. Criteria for work-saving thermochemical closed-cycle processes are established, and several schemes are reviewed in light of such criteria. An economic analysis is also presented in the context of energy costs.

  13. Materials considerations for the coupling of thermochemical hydrogen cycles to tandem mirror reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Krikorian, O.H.

    1980-10-10

    Candidate materials are discussed and initial choices made for the critical elements in a liquid Li-Na Cauldron Tandem Mirror blanket and the General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Cycle for thermochemical hydrogen production. V and Ti alloys provide low neutron activation, good radiation damage resistance, and good chemical compatibility for the Cauldron design. Aluminide coated In-800H and siliconized SiC are materials choices for heat exchanger components in the thermochemical cycle interface.

  14. Cyclic thermochemical process for producing hydrogen using cerium-titanium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen employs the reaction between ceric oxide and titanium dioxide to form cerium titanate and oxygen. The titanate is treated with an alkali metal hydroxide to give hydrogen, ceric oxide, an alkali metal titanate and water. Alkali metal titanate and water are boiled to give titanium dioxide which, along with ceric oxide, is recycled.

  15. Cyclic thermochemical process for producing hydrogen using cerium-titanium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1980-01-01

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen employs the reaction between ceric oxide and titanium dioxide to form cerium titanate and oxygen. The titanate is treated with an alkali metal hydroxide to give hydrogen, ceric oxide, an alkali metal titanate and water. Alkali metal titanate and water are boiled to give titanium dioxide which, along with ceric oxide, is recycled.

  16. Thermochemical production of hydrogen via multistage water splitting processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents and reviews the fundamental thermodynamic principles underlying thermochemical water splitting processes. The overall system is considered first and the temperature limitation in process thermal efficiency is developed. The relationship to an ideal water electrolysis cell is described and the nature of efficient multistage reaction processes is discussed. The importance of the reaction entropy change and the relation of the reaction free energy change to the work of separation is described. A procedure for analyzing thermochemical water splitting processes is presented and its use to calculate individual stage efficiency is demonstrated. A number of processes are used to illustrate the concepts and procedures.

  17. Synfuels from fusion: using the tandem mirror reactor and a thermochemical cycle to produce hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, R.W.

    1982-11-01

    This study is concerned with the following area: (1) the tandem mirror reactor and its physics; (2) energy balance; (3) the lithium oxide canister blanket system; (4) high-temperature blanket; (5) energy transport system-reactor to process; (6) thermochemical hydrogen processes; (7) interfacing the GA cycle; (8) matching power and temperature demands; (9) preliminary cost estimates; (10) synfuels beyond hydrogen; and (11) thermodynamics of the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/-H/sub 2/O system. (MOW)

  18. Comparative study of thermochemical processes for hydrogen production from biomass fuels.

    PubMed

    Biagini, Enrico; Masoni, Lorenzo; Tognotti, Leonardo

    2010-08-01

    Different thermochemical configurations (gasification, combustion, electrolysis and syngas separation) are studied for producing hydrogen from biomass fuels. The aim is to provide data for the production unit and the following optimization of the "hydrogen chain" (from energy source selection to hydrogen utilization) in the frame of the Italian project "Filiera Idrogeno". The project focuses on a regional scale (Tuscany, Italy), renewable energies and automotive hydrogen. Decentred and small production plants are required to solve the logistic problems of biomass supply and meet the limited hydrogen infrastructures. Different options (gasification with air, oxygen or steam/oxygen mixtures, combustion, electrolysis) and conditions (varying the ratios of biomass and gas input) are studied by developing process models with uniform hypothesis to compare the results. Results obtained in this work concern the operating parameters, process efficiencies, material and energetic needs and are fundamental to optimize the entire hydrogen chain. PMID:20362431

  19. Thermochemical nonequilibrium in atomic hydrogen at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    A numerical study of the nonequilibrium flow of atomic hydrogen in a cascade arc was performed to obtain insight into the physics of the hydrogen cascade arc. A rigorous mathematical model of the flow problem was formulated, incorporating the important nonequilibrium transport phenomena and atomic processes which occur in atomic hydrogen. Realistic boundary conditions, including consideration of the wall electrostatic sheath phenomenon, were included in the model. The governing equations of the asymptotic region of the cascade arc were obtained by writing conservation of mass and energy equations for the electron subgas, an energy conservation equation for heavy particles and an equation of state. Finite-difference operators for variable grid spacing were applied to the governing equations and the resulting system of strongly coupled, stiff equations were solved numerically by the Newton-Raphson method.

  20. Producing thermochemical hydrogen with the tandem-mirror reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, R.W.; Hickman, R.G.

    1982-05-07

    Fusion power holds the promise to supply not only electricity but also fuels to meet the balance of our energy needs. A new integrated power and breeding blanket design is described for tandem mirror reactors. The blanket incorporates features that make it suitable for synthetic fuel production. In particular, it is matched to the thermal and electrical power requirements of the General Atomic water-splitting process for production of hydrogen. Some improvements to the high temperature chemical process steps are described. These improvements are expected to allow production of hydrogen at about $13/GJ wholesale, including financing costs, capital amortization, and profit.

  1. Thermochemical behavior of hydrogen in hafnium silicate films on Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driemeier, C.; Chambers, J. J.; Colombo, L.; Baumvol, I. J. R.

    2006-07-01

    HfSiO films on Si were sequentially annealed in vacuum, oxygen, hydrogen, or deuterium atmospheres followed by quantification of H and D by nuclear reaction analysis. The observed H(D) incorporation and desorption behaviors are discussed in terms of two H bonding states in the films. Si-H bonds are easier to break thermally and formation of these bonds can be suppressed by annealing in O2 to fully oxidize Si atoms. O-H bonds are harder to break thermally. However, hydrogen atmospheres ease desorption of H in O-H species. The results indicate possible paths to achieve low H content in HfSiO gate dielectrics.

  2. Synfuels from fusion: producing hydrogen with the tandem mirror reactor and thermochemical cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Ribe, F.L.; Werner, R.W.

    1981-01-21

    This report examines, for technical merit, the combination of a fusion reactor driver and a thermochemical plant as a means for producing synthetic fuel in the basic form of hydrogen. We studied: (1) one reactor type - the Tandem Mirror Reactor - wishing to use to advantage its simple central cell geometry and its direct electrical output; (2) two reactor blanket module types - a liquid metal cauldron design and a flowing Li/sub 2/O solid microsphere pellet design so as to compare the technology, the thermal-hydraulics, neutronics and tritium control in a high-temperature operating mode (approx. 1200 K); (3) three thermochemical cycles - processes in which water is used as a feedstock along with a high-temperature heat source to produce H/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/.

  3. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, John

    2015-09-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratories, Siemens has completed the Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development Program to develop an advanced gas turbine for incorporation into future coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. All the scheduled DOE Milestones were completed and significant technical progress was made in the development of new technologies and concepts. Advanced computer simulations and modeling, as well as subscale, full scale laboratory, rig and engine testing were utilized to evaluate and select concepts for further development. Program Requirements of: A 3 to 5 percentage point improvement in overall plant combined cycle efficiency when compared to the reference baseline plant; 20 to 30 percent reduction in overall plant capital cost when compared to the reference baseline plant; and NOx emissions of 2 PPM out of the stack. were all met. The program was completed on schedule and within the allotted budget

  4. Onboard Hydrogen Generation for a Spark Ignition Engine via Thermochemical Recuperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Isaac Alexander

    A method of exhaust heat recovery from a spark-ignition internal combustion engine was explored, utilizing a steam reforming thermochemical reactor to produce a hydrogen-rich effluent, which was then consumed in the engine. The effects of hydrogen in the combustion process have been studied extensively, and it has been shown that an extension of the lean stability limit is possible through hydrogen enrichment. The system efficiency and the extension of the operational range of an internal combustion engine were explored through the use of a methane fueled naturally aspirated single cylinder engine co-fueled with syngas produced with an on board methane steam reformer. It was demonstrated that an extension of the lean stability limit is possible using this system.

  5. An exergetic/energetic/economic analysis of three hydrogen production processes - Electrolysis, hybrid, and thermochemical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, J. E.; Eisermann, W.

    This paper presents the results of a combined first and second law analysis, along with capital and operating costs, for hydrogen production from water by means of electrolytic, hybrid, and thermochemical processes. The processes are SPE and Lurgi electrolysis with light water reactor power generation and sulfur cycle hybrid, thermochemical and SPE electrolysis with a very high temperature reactor primary energy source. Energy and Exergy (2nd law) flow diagrams for the process are shown along with the location and magnitude of the process irreversibilities. The overall process thermal (1st law) efficiencies vary from 25 to 51% and the exergetic (2nd law) efficiencies, referred to the fuel for the primary energy source, vary from 22 to 45%. Capital and operating costs, escalated to 1979 dollars, are shown for each process for both the primary energy source and the hydrogen production plant. All costs were taken from information available in the open literature and are for a plant capacity of 100 x 10 to the 6th SCF/day. Production costs vary from 10 to 18 $/GJ, based on the higher heating value of hydrogen, and are based on a 90% plant operating factor with a 21% annual charge on total capital costs.

  6. Status of the DOE /STOR/-sponsored national program on hydrogen production from water via thermochemical cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    A pure thermochemical cycle is a system of linked regenerative chemical reactions which accepts only water and heat and produces hydrogen. Thermochemical cycles are potentially a more efficient and cheaper means of producing hydrogen from water than is the generation of electricity followed by electrolysis. The Energy Storage Systems Division of the Department of Energy is currently funding a national program on thermochemical hydrogen production. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is responsible for the technical management of this program. The goal is to develop a cycle which can potentially operate with an efficiency greater than 40% using a heat source providing a maximum available temperature of 1150 K. A closed bench-scale demonstration of such a cycle would follow. This cycle would be labeled a 'reference cycle' and would serve as a baseline against which future cycles would be compared.

  7. Testing of an advanced thermochemical conversion reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This report presents the results of work conducted by MTCI to verify and confirm experimentally the ability of the MTCI gasification process to effectively generate a high-quality, medium-Btu gas from a wider variety of feedstock and waste than that attainable in air-blown, direct gasification systems. The system's overall simplicity, due to the compact nature of the pulse combustor, and the high heat transfer rates attainable within the pulsating flow resonance tubes, provide a decided and near-term potential economic advantage for the MTCI indirect gasification system. The primary objective of this project was the design, construction, and testing of a Process Design Verification System for an indirectly heated, thermochemical fluid-bed reactor and a pulse combustor an an integrated system that can process alternative renewable sources of energy such as biomass, black liquor, municipal solid waste and waste hydrocarbons, including heavy oils into a useful product gas. The test objectives for the biomass portion of this program were to establish definitive performance data on biomass feedstocks covering a wide range of feedstock qualities and characteristics. The test objectives for the black liquor portion of this program were to verify the operation of the indirect gasifier on commercial black liquor containing 65 percent solids at several temperature levels and to characterize the bed carbon content, bed solids particle size and sulfur distribution as a function of gasification conditions. 6 refs., 59 figs., 29 tabs.

  8. Testing of an advanced thermochemical conversion reactor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    This report presents the results of work conducted by MTCI to verify and confirm experimentally the ability of the MTCI gasification process to effectively generate a high-quality, medium-Btu gas from a wider variety of feedstock and waste than that attainable in air-blown, direct gasification systems. The system's overall simplicity, due to the compact nature of the pulse combustor, and the high heat transfer rates attainable within the pulsating flow resonance tubes, provide a decided and near-term potential economic advantage for the MTCI indirect gasification system. The primary objective was the design, construction, and testing of a Process Design Verification System for an indirectly heated, thermochemical fluid-bed reactor and a pulse combustor an an integrated system that can process alternative renewable sources of energy such as biomass, black liquor, municipal solid waste and waste hydrocarbons, including heavy oils into a useful product gas. The test objectives for the biomass portion of this program were to establish definitive performance data on biomass feedstocks covering a wide range of feedstock qualities and characteristics. The test objectives for the black liquor portion of this program were to verify the operation of the indirect gasifier on commercial black liquor containing 65 percent solids at several temperature levels and to characterize the bed carbon content, bed solids particle size and sulfur distribution as a function of gasification conditions.

  9. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Solar Thermochemical Splitting of Water

    SciTech Connect

    Heske, Clemens; Moujaes, Samir; Weimer, Alan; Wong, Bunsen; Siegal, Nathan; McFarland, Eric; Miller, Eric; Lewis, Michele; Bingham, Carl; Roth, Kurth; Sabacky, Bruce; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2011-09-29

    The objective of this work is to identify economically feasible concepts for the production of hydrogen from water using solar energy. The ultimate project objective was to select one or more competitive concepts for pilot-scale demonstration using concentrated solar energy. Results of pilot scale plant performance would be used as foundation for seeking public and private resources for full-scale plant development and testing. Economical success in this venture would afford the public with a renewable and limitless source of energy carrier for use in electric power load-leveling and as a carbon-free transportation fuel. The Solar Hydrogen Generation Research (SHGR) project embraces technologies relevant to hydrogen research under the Office of Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technology (HFCIT) as well as concentrated solar power under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Although the photoelectrochemical work is aligned with HFCIT, some of the technologies in this effort are also consistent with the skills and technologies found in concentrated solar power and photovoltaic technology under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Hydrogen production by thermo-chemical water-splitting is a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or a combination of heat and electrolysis instead of pure electrolysis and meets the goals for hydrogen production using only water and renewable solar energy as feed-stocks. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production also meets these goals by implementing photo-electrolysis at the surface of a semiconductor in contact with an electrolyte with bias provided by a photovoltaic source. Here, water splitting is a photo-electrolytic process in which hydrogen is produced using only solar photons and water as feed-stocks. The thermochemical hydrogen task engendered formal collaborations among two universities, three national laboratories and two private sector

  10. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    Joesph Fadok

    2008-01-01

    advanced hydrogen turbine that meets the aggressive targets set forth for the advanced hydrogen turbine, including increased rotor inlet temperature (RIT), lower total cooling and leakage air (TCLA) flow, higher pressure ratio, and higher mass flow through the turbine compared to the baseline. Maintaining efficiency with high mass flow Syngas combustion is achieved using a large high AN2 blade 4, which has been identified as a significant advancement beyond the current state-of-the-art. Preliminary results showed feasibility of a rotor system capable of increased power output and operating conditions above the baseline. In addition, several concepts were developed for casing components to address higher operating conditions. Rare earth modified bond coat for the purpose of reducing oxidation and TBC spallation demonstrated an increase in TBC spallation life of almost 40%. The results from Phase 1 identified two TBC compositions which satisfy the thermal conductivity requirements and have demonstrated phase stability up to temperatures of 1850 C. The potential to join alloys using a bonding process has been demonstrated and initial HVOF spray deposition trials were promising. The qualitative ranking of alloys and coatings in environmental conditions was also performed using isothermal tests where significant variations in alloy degradation were observed as a function of gas composition. Initial basic system configuration schematics and working system descriptions have been produced to define key boundary data and support estimation of costs. Review of existing materials in use for hydrogen transportation show benefits or tradeoffs for materials that could be used in this type of applications. Hydrogen safety will become a larger risk than when using natural gas fuel as the work done to date in other areas has shown direct implications for this type of use. Studies were conducted which showed reduced CO{sub 2} and NOx emissions with increased plant efficiency. An approach to

  11. Conceptual design study FY 1981: synfuels from fusion - using the tandem mirror reactor and a thermochemical cycle to produce hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Krikorian, O.H.

    1982-02-09

    This report represents the second year's effort of a scoping and conceptual design study being conducted for the express purpose of evaluating the engineering potential of producing hydrogen by thermochemical cycles using a tandem mirror fusion driver. The hydrogen thus produced may then be used as a feedstock to produce fuels such as methane, methanol, or gasoline. The main objective of this second year's study has been to obtain some approximate cost figures for hydrogen production through a conceptual design study.

  12. Status of the DOE (STOR)-sponsored national program on hydrogen production from water via thermochemical cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    The program structure is presented. The activities of the thermochemical cycles program are grouped according to the following categories: (1) specific cycle development, (2) support research and technology, (3) cycle evaluation. Specific objectives and status of on-going activities are discussed. Chemical reaction series for the production of hydrogen are presented. Efficiency and economic evaluations are also discussed.

  13. Configuring the thermochemical hydrogen sulfuric acid process step for the Tandem Mirror Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, T.R.

    1981-05-01

    This paper identifies the sulfuric acid step as the critical part of the thermochemical cycle in dictating the thermal demands and temperature requirements of the heat source. The General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Cycle is coupled to a Tandem Mirror. The sulfuric acid decomposition process step is focused on specifically since this step can use the high efficiency electrical power of the direct converter together with the other thermal-produced electricity to Joule-heat a non-catalytic SO/sub 3/ decomposer to approximately 1250/sup 0/K. This approach uses concepts originally suggested by Dick Werner and Oscar Krikorian. The blanket temperature can be lowered to about 900/sup 0/K, greatly alleviating materials problems, the level of technology required, safety problems, and costs. A moderate degree of heat has been integrated to keep the cycle efficiency around 48%, but the number of heat exchangers has been limited in order to keep hydrogen production costs within reasonable bounds.

  14. Advanced Hydrogen Liquefaction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Joseph; Kromer, Brian; Neu, Ben; Jankowiak, Jerome; Barrett, Philip; Drnevich, Raymond

    2011-09-28

    The project identified and quantified ways to reduce the cost of hydrogen liquefaction, and reduce the cost of hydrogen distribution. The goal was to reduce the power consumption by 20% and then to reduce the capital cost. Optimizing the process, improving process equipment, and improving ortho-para conversion significantly reduced the power consumption of liquefaction, but by less than 20%. Because the efficiency improvement was less than the target, the program was stopped before the capital cost was addressed. These efficiency improvements could provide a benefit to the public to improve the design of future hydrogen liquefiers. The project increased the understanding of hydrogen liquefaction by modeling different processes and thoroughly examining ortho-para separation and conversion. The process modeling provided a benefit to the public because the project incorporated para hydrogen into the process modeling software, so liquefaction processes can be modeled more accurately than using only normal hydrogen. Adding catalyst to the first heat exchanger, a simple method to reduce liquefaction power, was identified, analyzed, and quantified. The demonstrated performance of ortho-para separation is sufficient for at least one identified process concept to show reduced power cost when compared to hydrogen liquefaction processes using conventional ortho-para conversion. The impact of improved ortho-para conversion can be significant because ortho para conversion uses about 20-25% of the total liquefaction power, but performance improvement is necessary to realize a substantial benefit. Most of the energy used in liquefaction is for gas compression. Improvements in hydrogen compression will have a significant impact on overall liquefier efficiency. Improvements to turbines, heat exchangers, and other process equipment will have less impact.

  15. Carbon fibers: Thermochemical recovery from advanced composite materials and activation to an adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, Todd Andrew

    This research addresses an expanding waste disposal problem brought about by the increasing use of advanced composite materials, and the lack of technically and environmentally viable recycling methods for these materials. A thermochemical treatment process was developed and optimized for the recycling of advanced composite materials. Counter-current gasification was employed for the treatment of carbon fiber reinforced-epoxy resin composite wastes. These materials were treated, allowing the reclamation of the material's valuable components. As expected in gasification, the organic portion of the waste was thermochemically converted to a combustible gas with small amounts of organic compounds that were identified by GC/MS. These compounds were expected based on data in the literature. The composites contain 70% fiber reinforcement, and gasification yielded approximately 70% recovered fibers, representing nearly complete recovery of fibers from the waste. Through SEM and mechanical testing, the recovered carbon fibers were found to be structurally and mechanically intact, and amenable to re-use in a variety of applications, some of which were identified and tested. In addition, an application was developed for the carbon fiber component of the waste, as an activated carbon fiber adsorbent for the treatment of wastewaters. This novel class of adsorbent was found to have adsorption rates, for various organic molecules, up to a factor of ten times those of commercial granular activated carbon, and adsorption capacities similar to conventional activated carbons. Overall, the research addresses an existing environmental waste problem, employing a thermochemical technique to recycle and reclaim the waste. Components of the reclaimed waste material are then employed, after further modification, to address other existing and potential environmental waste problems.

  16. ENERGY EFFICIENCY LIMITS FOR A RECUPERATIVE BAYONET SULFURIC ACID DECOMPOSITION REACTOR FOR SULFUR CYCLE THERMOCHEMICAL HYDROGEN PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.; Edwards, T.

    2009-06-11

    A recuperative bayonet reactor design for the high-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition step in sulfur-based thermochemical hydrogen cycles was evaluated using pinch analysis in conjunction with statistical methods. The objective was to establish the minimum energy requirement. Taking hydrogen production via alkaline electrolysis with nuclear power as the benchmark, the acid decomposition step can consume no more than 450 kJ/mol SO{sub 2} for sulfur cycles to be competitive. The lowest value of the minimum heating target, 320.9 kJ/mol SO{sub 2}, was found at the highest pressure (90 bar) and peak process temperature (900 C) considered, and at a feed concentration of 42.5 mol% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. This should be low enough for a practical water-splitting process, even including the additional energy required to concentrate the acid feed. Lower temperatures consistently gave higher minimum heating targets. The lowest peak process temperature that could meet the 450-kJ/mol SO{sub 2} benchmark was 750 C. If the decomposition reactor were to be heated indirectly by an advanced gas-cooled reactor heat source (50 C temperature difference between primary and secondary coolants, 25 C minimum temperature difference between the secondary coolant and the process), then sulfur cycles using this concept could be competitive with alkaline electrolysis provided the primary heat source temperature is at least 825 C. The bayonet design will not be practical if the (primary heat source) reactor outlet temperature is below 825 C.

  17. Thermochemical generation of hydrogen and oxygen from water. [NaMnO/sub 2/ and TiO/sub 2/

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, P.R.; Bamberger, C.E.

    1980-02-08

    A thermochemical cyclic process for the production of hydrogen exploits the reaction between sodium manganate (NaMnO/sub 2/) and titanium dioxide (TiO/sub 2/) to form sodium titanate (Na/sub 2/TiO/sub 3/), manganese (II) titanate (MnTiO/sub 3/) and oxygen. The titanate mixture is treated with sodium hydroxide, in the presence of steam, to form sodium titanate, sodium manganate (III), water and hydrogen. The sodium titanate-manganate (III) mixture is treated with water to form sodium manganate (III), titanium dioxide and sodium hydroxide. Sodium manganate (III) and titanium dioxide are recycled following dissolution of sodium hydroxide in water.

  18. Solar Metal Sulfate-Ammonia Based Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle for Hydrogen Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Cunping (Inventor); T-Raissi, Ali (Inventor); Muradov, Nazim (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Two classes of hybrid/thermochemical water splitting processes for the production of hydrogen and oxygen have been proposed based on (1) metal sulfate-ammonia cycles (2) metal pyrosulfate-ammonia cycles. Methods and systems for a metal sulfate MSO.sub.4--NH3 cycle for producing H2 and O2 from a closed system including feeding an aqueous (NH3)(4)SO3 solution into a photoctalytic reactor to oxidize the aqueous (NH3)(4)SO3 into aqueous (NH3)(2)SO4 and reduce water to hydrogen, mixing the resulting aqueous (NH3)(2)SO4 with metal oxide (e.g. ZnO) to form a slurry, heating the slurry of aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4 and ZnO(s) in the low temperature reactor to produce a gaseous mixture of NH3 and H2O and solid ZnSO4(s), heating solid ZnSO4 at a high temperature reactor to produce a gaseous mixture of SO2 and O2 and solid product ZnO, mixing the gaseous mixture of SO2 and O2 with an NH3 and H2O stream in an absorber to form aqueous (NH4)(2)SO3 solution and separate O2 for aqueous solution, recycling the resultant solution back to the photoreactor and sending ZnO to mix with aqueous (NH4)(2)SO4 solution to close the water splitting cycle wherein gaseous H2 and O2 are the only products output from the closed ZnSO4--NH3 cycle.

  19. Synfuels from fusion: producing hydrogen with the Tandem Mirror Reactor and thermochemical cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, R.W.; Ribe, F.L.

    1981-01-21

    This volume contains the following sections: (1) the Tandem Mirror fusion driver, (2) the Cauldron blanket module, (3) the flowing microsphere, (4) coupling the reactor to the process, (5) the thermochemical cycles, and (6) chemical reactors and process units. (MOW)

  20. Present and future status of thermochemical cycles applied to fusion energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, L.A.; Cox, K.E.; Krakowski, R.A.; Pendergrass, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of current research on thermochemical hydrogen production cycles and identifies the needs for advanced cycles and materials research. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) bismuth sulfate thermochemical cycle is characterized, and fusion reactor blanket concepts for both inertial and magnetic confinement schemes are presented as thermal energy sources for process heat applications.

  1. Commercial Activated Carbon for the Catalytic Production of Hydrogen via the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Ginosar; Lucia M. Petkovic; Kyle C. Burch

    2011-07-01

    Eight activated carbon catalysts were examined for their catalytic activity to decompose hydroiodic acid (HI) to produce hydrogen; a key reaction in the sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical water splitting cycle. Activity was examined under a temperature ramp from 473 to 773 K. No statistically significant correlation was found between catalyst sample properties and catalytic activity. Four of the eight samples were examined for one week of continuous operation at 723 K. All samples appeared to be stable over the period of examination.

  2. Thermochemical and Mechanistic Studies of Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Production by Cobalt Complexes Containing Pendant Amines

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedner, Eric S.; Appel, Aaron M.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2013-12-16

    Two cobalt(tetraphosphine) complexes [Co(PnC-PPh22NPh2)(CH3CN)](BF4)2 with a tetradentate phosphine ligand (PnC-PPh22NPh2 = 1,5-diphenyl-3,7-bis((diphenylphosphino)alkyl)-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane; alkyl = (CH2)2, n = 2 (L2); (CH2)3, n = 3 (L3)) have been studied for electrocatalytic hydrogen production using 1:1 [(DMF)H]+:DMF. A turnover frequency of 980 s–1 with an overpotential of 1210 mV was measured for [CoII(L2)(CH3CN)]2+, and a turnover frequency of 980 s–1 with an overpotential of 930 mV was measured for [CoII(L3)(CH3CN)]2+. Addition of water increases the turnover frequency of [CoII(L2)(CH3CN)]2+ to 19,000 s–1. The catalytic wave for each of these complexes occurs at the reduction potential of the corresponding HCoIII complex. Comprehensive thermochemical studies of [CoII(L2)(CH3CN)]2+ and [CoII(L3)(CH3CN)]2+ and species derived from them by addition/removal of protons/electrons were carried out using values measured experimentally and calculated using DFT. Notably, HCoI(L2) and HCoI(L2) were found to be remarkably strong hydride donors, with HCoI(L2) being a better hydride donor than BH4-. Mechanistic studies of these catalysts reveal that H2 formation can occur by protonation of a HCoII intermediate, and that the pendant amines of these complexes facilitate proton delivery to the cobalt center. The rate-limiting step for catalysis is a net intramolecular isomerization of the protonated pendant amine from the non-productive exo-isomer to the productive endo isomer. We thank Dr. Shentan Chen for many helpful discussions. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Computational resources were provided at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the

  3. Neutralization and Acid Dissociation of Hydrogen Carbonate Ion: A Thermochemical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koga, Nobuyoshi; Shigedomi, Kana; Kimura, Tomoyasu; Tatsuoka, Tomoyuki; Mishima, Saki

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory inquiry into the thermochemical relationships in the reaction between aqueous solutions of NaHCO[subscript 3] and NaOH is described. The enthalpy change for this reaction, delta[subscript r]H, and that for neutralization of strong acid and NaOH(aq), delta[subscript n]H, are determined calorimetrically; the explanation for the…

  4. The life story of hydrogen peroxide II: a periodic pH and thermochemical drive for the RNA world

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Rowena; Brindley, John

    2015-01-01

    It is now accepted that primordial non-cellular RNA communities must have been subject to a periodic drive in order to replicate and prosper. We have proposed the oxidation of thiosulfate by hydrogen peroxide as this drive. This reaction system behaves as (i) a thermochemical and (ii) a pH oscillator, and in this work, we unify (i) and (ii) for the first time. We report thermally self-consistent, dynamical simulations in which the system transitions smoothly from nearly isothermal pH to fully developed thermo-pH oscillatory regimes. We use this oscillator to drive simulated replication of a 39-bp RNA species. Production of replicated duplex under thermo-pH drive was significantly enhanced compared with that under purely thermochemical drive, effectively allowing longer strands to replicate. Longer strands are fitter, with more potential to evolve enzyme activity and resist degradation. We affirm that concern over the alleged toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to life is largely misplaced in the current context, we survey its occurrence in the solar system to motivate its inclusion as a biosignature in the search for life on other worlds and highlight that pH oscillations in a spatially extended, bounded system manifest as the fundamental driving force of life: a proton gradient. PMID:26202683

  5. Reduction of hazards from copper(I) chloride in a Cu-Cl thermochemical hydrogen production plant.

    PubMed

    Ghandehariun, Samane; Wang, Zhaolin; Rosen, Marc A; Naterer, Greg F

    2012-08-30

    The copper-chlorine cycle of thermochemical water splitting, using various heat sources, is a promising technology for hydrogen production. The chemical hazards accompanying the new technology affect significantly the industrialization of the cycle, but have scarcely been examined. This paper addresses this need by examining the copper(I) chloride (CuCl) hazards that may be generated in the cycle. Regardless of the variations of Cu-Cl cycle, copper(I) chloride is always present, serving as an intermediate compound that may cause health concerns. In this paper, the CuCl hazards are quantified for each process from the generation source of the hazards along with the paths where the CuCl may be present. The processes of greatest relevance include oxygen production, heat recovery, solidification, and dissolution. The options for reducing the CuCl hazards in a Cu-Cl thermochemical hydrogen production plant are evaluated from the perspectives of variations of the Cu-Cl cycle, process integration, heat recovery, and equipment design. It is concluded that using the intake reactant Cu(2)OCl(2) for the oxygen production step to absorb CuCl vapor is the most preferable option compared with other alternatives such as absorbing CuCl vapor with water or CuCl(2), building additional structures inside the oxygen production reactor, and cooling the exiting gas at the outlet of the oxygen reactor. PMID:22749124

  6. The life story of hydrogen peroxide II: a periodic pH and thermochemical drive for the RNA world.

    PubMed

    Ball, Rowena; Brindley, John

    2015-08-01

    It is now accepted that primordial non-cellular RNA communities must have been subject to a periodic drive in order to replicate and prosper. We have proposed the oxidation of thiosulfate by hydrogen peroxide as this drive. This reaction system behaves as (i) a thermochemical and (ii) a pH oscillator, and in this work, we unify (i) and (ii) for the first time. We report thermally self-consistent, dynamical simulations in which the system transitions smoothly from nearly isothermal pH to fully developed thermo-pH oscillatory regimes. We use this oscillator to drive simulated replication of a 39-bp RNA species. Production of replicated duplex under thermo-pH drive was significantly enhanced compared with that under purely thermochemical drive, effectively allowing longer strands to replicate. Longer strands are fitter, with more potential to evolve enzyme activity and resist degradation. We affirm that concern over the alleged toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to life is largely misplaced in the current context, we survey its occurrence in the solar system to motivate its inclusion as a biosignature in the search for life on other worlds and highlight that pH oscillations in a spatially extended, bounded system manifest as the fundamental driving force of life: a proton gradient. PMID:26202683

  7. Advances in Acid Concentration Membrane Technology for the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart; Christopher J. Orme

    2006-11-01

    One of the most promising cycles for the thermochemical generation of hydrogen is the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) process, where aqueous HI is thermochemically decomposed into H2 and I2 at approximately 350 degrees Celsius. Regeneration of HI is accomplished by the Bunsen reaction (reaction of SO2, water, and iodine to generate H2SO4 and HI). Furthermore, SO2 is regenerated from the decomposition of H2SO4 at 850 degrees Celsius yielding the SO2 as well as O2. Thus, the cycle actually consists of two concurrent oxidation-reduction loops. As HI is regenerated, co-produced H2SO4 must be separated so that each may be decomposed. Current flowsheets employ a large amount (~83 mol% of the entire mixture) of elemental I2 to cause the HI and the H2SO4 to separate into two phases. To aid in the isolation of HI, which is directly decomposed into hydrogen, water and iodine must be removed. Separation of iodine is facilitated by removal of water. Sulfuric acid concentration is also required to facilitate feed recycling to the sulfuric acid decomposer. Decomposition of the sulfuric acid is an equilibrium limited process that leaves a substantial portion of the acid requiring recycle. Distillation of water from sulfuric acid involves significant corrosion issues at the liquid-vapor interface. Thus, it is desirable to concentrate the acid without boiling. Recent efforts at the INL have concentrated on applying pervaporation through Nafion-117, Nafion-112, and sulfonated poly(etheretherketone) (S-PEEK) membranes for the removal of water from HI/water and HI/Iodine/water feedstreams. In pervaporation, a feed is circulated at low pressure across the upstream side of the membrane, while a vacuum is applied downstream. Selected permeants sorb into the membrane, transport through it, and are vaporized from the backside. Thus, a concentration gradient is established, which provides the driving force for transport. In this work, membrane separations have been performed at temperatures as high as

  8. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen production from S-I thermochemical process coupled to a high temperature gas reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldi, M. R.; Francois, J. L.; Castro-Uriegas, D.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to quantify the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated to the hydrogen produced by the sulfur-iodine thermochemical process, coupled to a high temperature nuclear reactor, and to compare the results with other life cycle analysis (LCA) studies on hydrogen production technologies, both conventional and emerging. The LCA tool was used to quantify the impacts associated with climate change. The product system was defined by the following steps: (i) extraction and manufacturing of raw materials (upstream flows), (U) external energy supplied to the system, (iii) nuclear power plant, and (iv) hydrogen production plant. Particular attention was focused to those processes where there was limited information from literature about inventory data, as the TRISO fuel manufacture, and the production of iodine. The results show that the electric power, supplied to the hydrogen plant, is a sensitive parameter for GHG emissions. When the nuclear power plant supplied the electrical power, low GHG emissions were obtained. These results improve those reported by conventional hydrogen production methods, such as steam reforming. (authors)

  9. A thermochemical data bank for cycle analysis. [water decomposition for hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carty, R.; Funk, J.; Conger, W.; Soliman, M.; Cox, K.

    1976-01-01

    The use of the computer program PAC-2 to produce a thermodynamic data bank for various materials used in water-splitting cycles is described. The sources of raw data and a listing of 439 materials for which data are presently available are presented. This paper also discusses the use of the data bank in conjunction with two other programs, CEC-72 and HYDRGN. The integration of these three programs implement an evaluation procedure for thermochemical water splitting cycles. CEC-72 is a program used to predict the equilibrium composition of the various chemical reactions in the cycle. HYDRGN is a program which is used to calculate changes in thermodynamic properties, work of separation, amount of recycle, internal heat regeneration, total thermal energy and process thermal efficiency for a thermochemical cycle.

  10. Chemical engineering challenges in driving thermochemical hydrogen processes with the tandem mirror reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, T.R.; Werner, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Reactor is described and compared with Tokamaks, both from a basic physics viewpoint and from the suitability of the respective reactor for synfuel production. Differences and similarities between the TMR as an electricity producer or a synfuel producer are also cited. The Thermochemical cycle chosen to link with the fusion energy source is the General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Cycle, which is a purely thermal-driven process with no electrochemical steps. There are real chemical engineering challenges of getting this high quality heat into the large thermochemical plant in an efficient manner. We illustrate with some of our approaches to providing process heat via liquid sodium to drive a 1050 K, highly-endothermic, catalytic and fluidized-bed SO/sub 3/ Decomposition Reactor. The technical, economic, and safety tradeoffs that arise are discussed.

  11. Hydrogen production by water decomposition using a combined electrolytic-thermochemical cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farbman, G. H.; Brecher, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    A proposed dual-purpose power plant generating nuclear power to provide energy for driving a water decomposition system is described. The entire system, dubbed Sulfur Cycle Water Decomposition System, works on sulfur compounds (sulfuric acid feedstock, sulfur oxides) in a hybrid electrolytic-thermochemical cycle; performance superior to either all-electrolysis systems or presently known all-thermochemical systems is claimed. The 3345 MW(th) graphite-moderated helium-cooled reactor (VHTR - Very High Temperature Reactor) generates both high-temperature heat and electric power for the process; the gas stream at core exit is heated to 1850 F. Reactor operation is described and reactor innards are illustrated. A cost assessment for on-stream performance in the 1990's is optimistic.

  12. Thermochemical and kinetics studies of the CH3SH+S (3P) hydrogen abstraction and insertion reactions.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Daniely V V; Cunha, Leonardo A; Spada, Rene F K; Ferrão, Luiz F A; Roberto-Neto, Orlando; Machado, Francisco B C

    2014-09-01

    Sulfur-containing molecules have a significant impact on atmosphere and biosphere. In this work we studied, from the point of view of electronic structure and chemical kinetics methods, the elementary reactions between a methanethiol molecule and a sulfur atom leading to hydrogen abstraction C-S bond cleavage (CH(3)SH+S; R1:→ CH(3)S+SH; R2: → CH(2)SH+SH; R3:→ CH(3)+HS(2)). The geometrical structures of the reactants, products, and saddle points for the three reaction paths were optimized using the BB1K method with the aug-cc-pV(T+d)Z basis set. The thermochemical properties were improved using single point coupled-cluster (CCSD(T)) calculations on the BB1K geometries followed by extrapolation to the complete basis set (CBS) limit. This methodology was previously applied and has given accurate values of thermochemical and kinetics properties when compared to benchmark calculations and experimental data. For each reaction, the thermal rate constants were calculated using the improved canonical variational theory (ICVT) including the zero-curvature (ICVT/ZCT) and small-curvature (ICVT/SCT) tunneling corrections. For comparison, the overall ICVT/SCT reaction rate constant at 300 K obtained with single-point CCSD(T)/CBS calculations for the CH(3)SH+S reaction is approximately 1400 times lower than the isovalent CH(3)SH+O reaction, obtained with CVT/SCT. The reaction path involving the hydrogen abstraction from the thiol group is the most important reactive path in all temperatures. PMID:25204585

  13. Corrosive Resistant Diamond Coatings for the Acid Based Thermo-Chemical Hydrogen Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Prelas

    2009-06-25

    This project was designed to test diamond, diamond-like and related materials in environments that are expected in thermochemical cycles. Our goals were to build a High Temperature Corrosion Resistance (HTCR) test stand and begin testing the corrosive properties of barious materials in a high temperature acidic environment in the first year. Overall, we planned to test 54 samples each of diamond and diamond-like films (of 1 cm x 1 cm area). In addition we use a corrosion acceleration method by treating the samples at a temperature much larger than the expected operating temperature. Half of the samples will be treated with boron using the FEDOA process.

  14. Design and construction of a cascading pressure reactor prototype for solar-thermochemical hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermanoski, Ivan; Grobbel, Johannes; Singh, Abhishek; Lapp, Justin; Brendelberger, Stefan; Roeb, Martin; Sattler, Christian; Whaley, Josh; McDaniel, Anthony; Siegel, Nathan P.

    2016-05-01

    Recent work regarding the efficiency maximization for solar thermochemical fuel production in two step cycles has led to the design of a new type of reactor—the cascading pressure reactor—in which the thermal reduction step of the cycle is completed in multiple stages, at successively lower pressures. This approach enables lower thermal reduction pressures than in single-staged reactors, and decreases required pump work, leading to increased solar to fuel efficiencies. Here we report on the design and construction of a prototype cascading pressure reactor and testing of some of the key components. We especially focus on the technical challenges particular to the design, and their solutions.

  15. Advanced hydrogen utilization technology demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, J C; Winsor, R E

    1994-06-01

    This report presents the results of a study done by Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC). DDC used a 6V-92TA engine for experiments with hydrogen fuel. The engine was first baseline tested using methanol fuel and methanol unit injectors. One cylinder of the engine was converted to operate on hydrogen fuel, and methanol fueled the remaining five cylinders. This early testing with only one hydrogen-fueled cylinder was conducted to determine the operating parameters that would later be implemented for multicylinder hydrogen operation. Researchers then operated three cylinders of the engine on hydrogen fuel to verify single-cylinder idle tests. Once it was determined that the engine would operate well at idle, the engine was modified to operate with all six cylinders fueled with hydrogen. Six-cylinder operation on hydrogen provided an opportunity to verify previous test results and to more accurately determine the performance, thermal efficiency, and emissions of the engine.

  16. Thermochemical nonequilibrium and radiative interactions in supersonic hydrogen-air combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekhar, R.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1992-01-01

    The two-dimensional, elliptic Navier-Stokes equations are used to investigate supersonic flows with nonequilibrium chemistry and thermodynamics, coupled with radiation, for hydrogen-air systems. The chemistry source term in the species equation is treated implicitly to alleviate the stiffness associated with fast reactions. The explicit, unsplit MacCormack finite-difference scheme is used to advance the governing equations in time, until convergence is achieved. The specific problem considered is the premixed, expanding flow in a supersonic nozzle. The reacting flow consists of seven species, one of which is the inert N2 molecule. The thermal state of the gas is modeled with one translational-rotational temperature and five vibrational temperatures. The harmonic oscillator model is used in the formulation for vibrational relaxation. The tangent slab approximation is used in the radiative flux formulation. A pseudo-gray model is used to represent the absorption-emission characteristics of the participating species. Results obtained for specific conditions indicate the presence of nonequilibrium in the expansion region. This reduces the radiative interactions and can have a significant influence on the flowfield.

  17. Green Energy: Advancing Bio-Hydrogen (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Alber, D.

    2007-07-01

    Developing a model of metabolism linked to H2 production in green algae. Develop tools for parameter discovery and optimization at organism level and advance knowledge of hydrogen-producting photosynthetic organisms.

  18. Development of Advanced Small Hydrogen Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Sapru, Krishna; Tan, Zhaosheng; Chao, Ben

    2010-09-30

    The main objective of the project is to develop advanced, low cost conversions of small (< 25 hp) gasoline internal combustion engines (ICEs) to run on hydrogen fuel while maintaining the same performance and durability. This final technical report summarizes the results of i) the details of the conversion of several small gasoline ICEs to run on hydrogen, ii) the durability test of a converted hydrogen engine and iii) the demonstration of a prototype bundled canister solid hydrogen storage system. Peak power of the hydrogen engine achieves 60% of the power output of the gasoline counterpart. The efforts to boost the engine power with various options including installing the over-sized turbocharger, retrofit of custom-made pistons with high compression ratio, an advanced ignition system, and various types of fuel injection systems are not realized. A converted Honda GC160 engine with ACS system to run with hydrogen fuel is successful. Total accumulative runtime is 785 hours. A prototype bundled canister solid hydrogen storage system having nominal capacity of 1.2 kg is designed, constructed and demonstrated. It is capable of supporting a wide range of output load of a hydrogen generator.

  19. Activated Carbon Catalysts for the Production of Hydrogen for the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar; Harry W. Rollins; Kyle C Burch; Cristina Deiana; Hugo S. Silva; Maria F. Sardella; Dolly Granados

    2009-05-01

    Seven activated carbon catalysts obtained from a variety of raw material sources and preparation methods were examined for their catalytic activity to decompose hydroiodic acid (HI) to produce hydrogen; a key reaction in the sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical water splitting cycle. Activity was examined under a temperature ramp from 473 to 773 K. Within the group of ligno-cellulosic steam-activated carbon catalysts, activity increased with surface area. However, both a mineral-based steam-activated carbon and a ligno-cellulosic chemically-activated carbon displayed activities lower than expected based on their higher surface areas. In general, ash content was detrimental to catalytic activity while total acid sites, as determined by Bohem’s titrations, seemed to favor higher catalytic activity within the group of steam-activated carbons. These results suggest, one more time, that activated carbon raw materials and preparation methods may have played a significant role in the development of surface characteristics that eventually dictated catalyst activity and stability as well.

  20. Development of the Hybrid Sulfur Thermochemical Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, William A.; Steimke, John L

    2005-09-23

    The production of hydrogen via the thermochemical splitting of water is being considered as a primary means for utilizing the heat from advanced nuclear reactors to provide fuel for a hydrogen economy. The Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process is one of the baseline candidates identified by the U.S. Department of Energy [1] for this purpose. The HyS Process is a two-step hybrid thermochemical cycle that only involves sulfur, oxygen and hydrogen compounds. Recent work has resulted in an improved process design with a calculated overall thermal efficiency (nuclear heat to hydrogen, higher heating value basis) approaching 50%. Economic analyses indicate that a nuclear hydrogen plant employing the HyS Process in conjunction with an advanced gas-cooled nuclear reactor system can produce hydrogen at competitive prices. Experimental work has begun on the sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer, the major developmental component in the cycle. Proof-of-concept tests have established proton-exchange-membrane cells (a state-of-the-art technology) as a viable approach for conducting this reaction. This is expected to lead to more efficient and economical cell designs than were previously available. Considerable development and scale-up issues remain to be resolved, but the development of a viable commercial-scale HyS Process should be feasible in time to meet the commercialization schedule for Generation IV gas-cooled nuclear reactors.

  1. Ultrafast Shock Interrogation of Hydrogen Peroxide/Water Mixtures: Thermochemical Predictions of Shock Condition Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaug, Joseph; Armstrong, Michael; Bastea, Sorin; Carter, Jeffrey; Kuo, I.-F. William; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Grant, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a powerful oxidizer and its concentrated aqueous solutions exhibit very high reactivity, even sustaining detonation under strong enough confinement. Due to its simple composition and basic expected decomposition kinetics hydrogen peroxide is very suitable for studying the interplay of high pressures, temperatures and reactivity and their effect on the equation of state, particularly at the boundary between detonating and non-detonating behavior. To this end we performed speed of sound and picosecond time resolved shock measurements on solutions of hydrogen peroxide of concentrations from 30 to 90 percent, and analyzed the results in terms of common assumptions of chemical equilibrium in reactive fluid mixtures. Experimental shock states were achieved up to a maximum pressure of 20 GPa with corresponding shock velocities of 6-7 km/sec.

  2. Thermochemical process for the production of hydrogen using chromium and barium compound

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.; Richardson, Donald M.

    1977-01-25

    Hydrogen is produced by a closed cyclic process involving the reduction and oxidation of chromium compounds by barium hydroxide and the hydrolytic disproportionation of Ba.sub.2 CrO.sub.4 and Ba.sub.3 (CrO.sub.4).sub.2.

  3. Advanced thermal hydrolysis: optimization of a novel thermochemical process to aid sewage sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Abelleira, Jose; Pérez-Elvira, Sara I; Portela, Juan R; Sánchez-Oneto, Jezabel; Nebot, Enrique

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this work was to study in depth the behavior and optimization of a novel process, called advanced thermal hydrolysis (ATH), to determine its utility as a pretreatment (sludge solubilization) or postreatment (organic matter removal) for anaerobic digestion (AD) in the sludge line of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). ATH is based on a thermal hydrolysis (TH) process plus hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) addition and takes advantage of a peroxidation/direct steam injection synergistic effect. On the basis of the response surface methodology (RSM) and a modified Doehlert design, an empirical second-order polynomial model was developed for the total yield of: (a) disintegration degree [DD (%)] (solubilization), (b) filtration constant [F(c) (cm(2)/min)] (dewaterability), and (c) organic matter removal (%). The variables considered were operation time (t), temperature reached after initial heating (T), and oxidant coefficient (n = oxygen(supplied)/oxygen(stoichiometric)). As the model predicts, in the case of the ATH process with high levels of oxidant, it is possible to achieve an organic matter removal of up to 92%, but the conditions required are prohibitive on an industrial scale. ATH operated at optimal conditions (oxygen amount 30% of stoichiometric, 115 °C and 24 min) gave promising results as a pretreatment, with similar solubilization and markedly better dewaterability levels in comparison to those obtained with TH at 170 °C. The empirical validation of the model was satisfactory. PMID:22463756

  4. Ultrafast Shock Interrogation of Hydrogen Peroxide/Water Mixtures: Thermochemical Predictions of Shock Condition Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaug, Joseph; Armstrong, Michael; Bastea, Sorin; Kuo, I.-F. William; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Kashgarian, Michaela

    2011-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a powerful oxidizer and its concentrated aqueous solutions exhibit very high reactivity, even sustaining detonation under strong enough confinement. Due to its simple composition and basic expected decomposition kinetics hydrogen peroxide is very suitable for studying the interplay of high pressures, temperatures and reactivity and their effect on the equation of state, particularly at the boundary between detonating and non-detonating behavior. To this end we have performed picosecond time resolved shock measurements on solutions of hydrogen peroxide of concentrations from 30 to 90 percent, and analyzed the results in terms of common assumptions of chemical equilibrium in reactive fluid mixtures. Experimental shock states were achieved up to a maximum pressure of 20 GPa with corresponding shock velocities of 6-7 km/sec. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344. We acknowledge the LLNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development office for support.

  5. Advanced Catalytic Hydrogenation Retrofit Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Reinaldo M. Machado

    2002-08-15

    Industrial hydrogenation is often performed using a slurry catalyst in large stirred-tank reactors. These systems are inherently problematic in a number of areas, including industrial hygiene, process safety, environmental contamination, waste production, process operability and productivity. This program proposed the development of a practical replacement for the slurry catalysts using a novel fixed-bed monolith catalyst reactor, which could be retrofitted onto an existing stirred-tank reactor and would mitigate many of the minitations and problems associated with slurry catalysts. The full retrofit monolith system, consisting of a recirculation pump, gas/liquid ejector and monolith catalyst, is described as a monolith loop reactor or MLR. The MLR technology can reduce waste and increase raw material efficiency, which reduces the overall energy required to produce specialty and fine chemicals.

  6. RECENT ADVANCES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE HYBRID SULFUR PROCESS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.

    2010-07-22

    Thermochemical processes are being developed to provide global-scale quantities of hydrogen. A variant on sulfur-based thermochemical cycles is the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process, which uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) to produce the hydrogen. In the HyS Process, sulfur dioxide is oxidized in the presence of water at the electrolyzer anode to produce sulfuric acid and protons. The protons are transported through a cation-exchange membrane electrolyte to the cathode and are reduced to form hydrogen. In the second stage of the process, the sulfuric acid by-product from the electrolyzer is thermally decomposed at high temperature to produce sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The two gases are separated and the sulfur dioxide recycled to the electrolyzer for oxidation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been exploring a fuel-cell design concept for the SDE using an anolyte feed comprised of concentrated sulfuric acid saturated with sulfur dioxide. The advantages of this design concept include high electrochemical efficiency and small footprint compared to a parallel-plate electrolyzer design. This paper will provide a summary of recent advances in the development of the SDE for the HyS process.

  7. Tests Of Advanced Nickel/Hydrogen Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1994-01-01

    Individual-pressure-vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen technology adanced with intention of improving cycle life and performance. One advancement to use 26 percent potassium hydroxide electrolyte to improve cycle life. Another to modify state-of-art cell design to eliminate identified failure modes.

  8. Thermochemical breakthroughs

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, G.F.

    1985-08-01

    Biomass is an important energy resource at present and offers excellent potential for increased energy impact in the future. Wood and crop residues constitute a vast majority of the biomass feedstocks available for conversion to higher valued energy products. Thermochemical processes are well suited for conversion of these materials. In this paper, research sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program to convert biomass into higher valued energy forms is discussed. Pacific Northwest Laboratory serves as the Field Management Office for the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. 20 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Estimating the uncertainty in thermochemical calculations for oxygen-hydrogen combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Joseph David

    The thermochemistry program CEA2 was combined with the statistical thermodynamics program PAC99 in a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the uncertainty in several CEA2 output variables due to uncertainty in thermodynamic reference values for the reactant and combustion species. In all, six typical performance parameters were examined, along with the required intermediate calculations (five gas properties and eight stoichiometric coefficients), for three hydrogen-oxygen combustors: a main combustor, an oxidizer preburner and a fuel preburner. The three combustors were analyzed in two different modes: design mode, where, for the first time, the uncertainty in thermodynamic reference values---taken from the literature---was considered (inputs to CEA2 were specified and so had no uncertainty); and data reduction mode, where inputs to CEA2 did have uncertainty. The inputs to CEA2 were contrived experimental measurements that were intended to represent the typical combustor testing facility. In design mode, uncertainties in the performance parameters were on the order of 0.1% for the main combustor, on the order of 0.05% for the oxidizer preburner and on the order of 0.01% for the fuel preburner. Thermodynamic reference values for H2O were the dominant sources of uncertainty, as was the assigned enthalpy for liquid oxygen. In data reduction mode, uncertainties in performance parameters increased significantly as a result of the uncertainties in experimental measurements compared to uncertainties in thermodynamic reference values. Main combustor and fuel preburner theoretical performance values had uncertainties of about 0.5%, while the oxidizer preburner had nearly 2%. Associated experimentally-determined performance values for all three combustors were 3% to 4%. The dominant sources of uncertainty in this mode were the propellant flowrates. These results only apply to hydrogen-oxygen combustors and should not be generalized to every propellant combination. Species for

  10. Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membrane for Coal Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Joseph; Porter, Jason; Patki, Neil; Kelley, Madison; Stanislowski, Josh; Tolbert, Scott; Way, J. Douglas; Makuch, David

    2015-12-23

    A pilot-scale hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) separator was built that incorporated 98 membranes that were each 24 inches long. This separator used an advanced design to minimize the impact of concentration polarization and separated over 1000 scfh of hydrogen from a hydrogen-nitrogen feed of 5000 scfh that contained 30% hydrogen. This mixture was chosen because it was representative of the hydrogen concentration expected in coal gasification. When tested with an operating gasifier, the hydrogen concentration was lower and contaminants in the syngas adversely impacted membrane performance. All 98 membranes survived the test, but flux was lower than expected. Improved ceramic substrates were produced that have small surface pores to enable membrane production and large pores in the bulk of the substrate to allow high flux. Pd-Au was chosen as the membrane alloy because of its resistance to sulfur contamination and good flux. Processes were developed to produce a large quantity of long membranes for use in the demonstration test.

  11. Systematic Discrimination of Advanced Hydrogen Production Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson

    2010-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, in concert with industry, is developing a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to demonstrate high temperature heat applications to produce hydrogen and electricity or to support other industrial applications. A key part of this program is the production of hydrogen from water that would significantly reduce carbon emissions compared to current production using natural gas. In 2009 the INL led the methodical evaluation of promising advanced hydrogen production technologies in order to focus future resources on the most viable processes. This paper describes how the evaluation process was systematically planned and executed. As a result, High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis was selected as the most viable near-term technology to deploy as a part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project.

  12. Characteristics of advanced hydrogen maser frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    In house research and development at Goddard Space Flight Center to provide advanced frequency and time standards for the most demanding applications is concentrated primarily in field operable atomic hydrogen masers. Some of the most important goals for the new maser designs have been improved long and short term stability, elimination of the need for auto tuning, increased maser oscillation level, improved hydrogen economy, increased operational life, minimization of operator control or monitoring, improvement in magnetic isolation or sensitivity, and reduction in size and weight. New design concepts which have been incorporated in these masers to achieve these goals are described. The basic maser assemblies and control systems have recently been completed; the masers are oscillating; and operational testing has begun. Data illustrating the improvements in maser performance was available and presented.

  13. Research of advanced electrolytic hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacs, H. S.; Yang, C. Y.; McBreen, J.

    1982-02-01

    Research on advanced electrolytic hydrogen production consisted of two areas. One was the development of an electrochemical method for investigation of the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) electrocatalyst interface, the other was the development of stable photoanodes for photodecomposition of water by coating low barrier n type semiconductor with a thin film of n type TiO2. By using various types of contact electrodes on SPE membranes, it was possible to use modern electrochemical techniques to investigate the SPE electrocatalyst interface under conditions simulating electrolyzer operation. Low barrier heterojunctions of thin films of n type TiO2 on n type Fe2O3 were successfully demonstrated.

  14. Hydrogen from renewable resources. Monthly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Rocheleau, R.E.

    1995-08-01

    This progress report updates two tasks. In the area of hydrogen production, photobiological production and photoelectrochemical production advances are discussed as well as thermochemical production of hydrogen from wet biomass. In the area of hydrogen storage, reversible catalytic dehydrogenation of cycloalkanes by polyhydride complexes and polyhydride systems engineering are presented.

  15. Advanced IGCC/Hydrogen Gas Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect

    York, William; Hughes, Michael; Berry, Jonathan; Russell, Tamara; Lau, Y. C.; Liu, Shan; Arnett, Michael; Peck, Arthur; Tralshawala, Nilesh; Weber, Joseph; Benjamin, Marc; Iduate, Michelle; Kittleson, Jacob; Garcia-Crespo, Andres; Delvaux, John; Casanova, Fernando; Lacy, Ben; Brzek, Brian; Wolfe, Chris; Palafox, Pepe; Ding, Ben; Badding, Bruce; McDuffie, Dwayne; Zemsky, Christine

    2015-07-30

    The objective of this program was to develop the technologies required for a fuel flexible (coal derived hydrogen or syngas) gas turbine for IGCC that met DOE turbine performance goals. The overall DOE Advanced Power System goal was to conduct the research and development (R&D) necessary to produce coal-based IGCC power systems with high efficiency, near-zero emissions, and competitive capital cost. To meet this goal, the DOE Fossil Energy Turbine Program had as an interim objective of 2 to 3 percentage points improvement in combined cycle (CC) efficiency. The final goal is 3 to 5 percentage points improvement in CC efficiency above the state of the art for CC turbines in IGCC applications at the time the program started. The efficiency goals were for NOx emissions of less than 2 ppm NOx (@15 % O2). As a result of the technologies developed under this program, the DOE goals were exceeded with a projected 8 point efficiency improvement. In addition, a new combustion technology was conceived of and developed to overcome the challenges of burning hydrogen and achieving the DOE’s NOx goal. This report also covers the developments under the ARRA-funded portion of the program that include gas turbine technology advancements for improvement in the efficiency, emissions, and cost performance of gas turbines for industrial applications with carbon capture and sequestration. Example applications could be cement plants, chemical plants, refineries, steel and aluminum plants, manufacturing facilities, etc. The DOE’s goal for more than 5 percentage point improvement in efficiency was met with cycle analyses performed for representative IGCC Steel Mill and IGCC Refinery applications. Technologies were developed in this program under the following areas: combustion, larger latter stage buckets, CMC and EBC, advanced materials and coatings, advanced configurations to reduce cooling, sealing and rotor purge flows, turbine aerodynamics, advanced sensors, advancements in first

  16. Proceedings of the DOE chemical energy storage and hydrogen energy systems contracts review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    Sessions were held on electrolysis-based hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen production, hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen storage materials, end-use applications and system studies, chemical heat pump/chemical energy storage systems, systems studies and assessment, thermochemical hydrogen production cycles, advanced production concepts, and containment materials. (LHK)

  17. NREL Advances Spillover Materials for Hydrogen Storage (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in advancing spillover materials for hydrogen storage and improving the reproducible synthesis, long-term durability, and material costs of hydrogen storage materials. Work was performed by NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center.

  18. THERMOCHEMICAL AND PHOTOCHEMICAL KINETICS IN COOLER HYDROGEN-DOMINATED EXTRASOLAR PLANETS: A METHANE-POOR GJ436b?

    SciTech Connect

    Line, Michael R.; Yung, Yuk L.; Vasisht, Gautam; Chen, Pin; Angerhausen, D. E-mail: gv@s383.jpl.nasa.gov

    2011-09-01

    We introduce a thermochemical kinetics and photochemical model. We use high-temperature bidirectional reaction rates for important H, C, O, and N reactions (most importantly for CH{sub 4} to CO interconversion), allowing us to attain thermochemical equilibrium, deep in an atmosphere, purely kinetically. This allows the chemical modeling of an entire atmosphere, from deep-atmosphere thermochemical equilibrium to the photochemically dominated regime. We use our model to explore the atmospheric chemistry of cooler (T{sub eff} < 10{sup 3} K) extrasolar giant planets. In particular, we choose to model the nearby hot-Neptune GJ436b, the only planet in this temperature regime for which spectroscopic measurements and estimates of chemical abundances now exist. Recent Spitzer measurements with retrieval have shown that methane is driven strongly out of equilibrium and is deeply depleted on the day side of GJ436b, whereas quenched carbon monoxide is abundant. This is surprising because GJ436b is cooler than many of the heavily irradiated hot Jovians and thermally favorable for CH{sub 4}, and thus requires an efficient mechanism for destroying it. We include realistic estimates of ultraviolet flux from the parent dM star GJ436, to bound the direct photolysis and photosensitized depletion of CH{sub 4}. While our models indicate fairly rich disequilibrium conditions are likely in cooler exoplanets over a range of planetary metallicities, we are unable to generate the conditions for substantial CH{sub 4} destruction. One possibility is an anomalous source of abundant H atoms between 0.01 and 1 bars (which attack CH{sub 4}), but we cannot as yet identify an efficient means to produce these hot atoms.

  19. Advanced nickel-hydrogen spacecraft battery development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, Dwaine K.; Fox, Chris L.; Standlee, D. J.; Grindstaff, B. K.

    1994-02-01

    Eagle-Picher currently has several advanced nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) cell component and battery designs under development including common pressure vessel (CPV), single pressure vessel (SPV), and dependent pressure vessel (DPV) designs. A CPV NiH2 battery, utilizing low-cost 64 mm (2.5 in.) cell diameter technology, has been designed and built for multiple smallsat programs, including the TUBSAT B spacecraft which is currently scheduled (24 Nov. 93) for launch aboard a Russian Proton rocket. An advanced 90 mm (3.5 in.) NiH2 cell design is currently being manufactured for the Space Station Freedom program. Prototype 254 mm (10 in.) diameter SPV batteries are currently under construction and initial boilerplate testing has shown excellent results. NiH2 cycle life testing is being continued at Eagle-Picher and IPV cells have currently completed more than 89,000 accelerated LEO cycles at 15% DOD, 49,000 real-time LEO cycles at 30 percent DOD, 37,800 cycles under a real-time LEO profile, 30 eclipse seasons in accelerated GEO, and 6 eclipse seasons in real-time GEO testing at 75 percent DOD maximum. Nickel-metal hydride battery development is continuing for both aerospace and electric vehicle applications. Eagle-Picher has also developed an extensive range of battery evaluation, test, and analysis (BETA) measurement and control equipment and software, based on Hewlett-Packard computerized data acquisition/control hardware.

  20. Advanced nickel-hydrogen spacecraft battery development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, Dwaine K.; Fox, Chris L.; Standlee, D. J.; Grindstaff, B. K.

    1994-01-01

    Eagle-Picher currently has several advanced nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) cell component and battery designs under development including common pressure vessel (CPV), single pressure vessel (SPV), and dependent pressure vessel (DPV) designs. A CPV NiH2 battery, utilizing low-cost 64 mm (2.5 in.) cell diameter technology, has been designed and built for multiple smallsat programs, including the TUBSAT B spacecraft which is currently scheduled (24 Nov. 93) for launch aboard a Russian Proton rocket. An advanced 90 mm (3.5 in.) NiH2 cell design is currently being manufactured for the Space Station Freedom program. Prototype 254 mm (10 in.) diameter SPV batteries are currently under construction and initial boilerplate testing has shown excellent results. NiH2 cycle life testing is being continued at Eagle-Picher and IPV cells have currently completed more than 89,000 accelerated LEO cycles at 15% DOD, 49,000 real-time LEO cycles at 30 percent DOD, 37,800 cycles under a real-time LEO profile, 30 eclipse seasons in accelerated GEO, and 6 eclipse seasons in real-time GEO testing at 75 percent DOD maximum. Nickel-metal hydride battery development is continuing for both aerospace and electric vehicle applications. Eagle-Picher has also developed an extensive range of battery evaluation, test, and analysis (BETA) measurement and control equipment and software, based on Hewlett-Packard computerized data acquisition/control hardware.

  1. Thermochemical water decomposition processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Thermochemical processes which lead to the production of hydrogen and oxygen from water without the consumption of any other material have a number of advantages when compared to other processes such as water electrolysis. It is possible to operate a sequence of chemical steps with net work requirements equal to zero at temperatures well below the temperature required for water dissociation in a single step. Various types of procedures are discussed, giving attention to halide processes, reverse Deacon processes, iron oxide and carbon oxide processes, and metal and alkali metal processes. Economical questions are also considered.

  2. Recent work in advanced hydrogen production concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    The hydrogen photoelectrolytic conversion activity investigated the practicability of semiconductor electrolytic devises that use solar energy to decompose water into hydrogen and oxygen in an apparent single step process. The photocatalytic decomposition of inorganic hydrogen compounds; i.e., hydrobromic and hydriodic acids using rhodium organic bridge complexes were also studied. The feasibility of direct high temperature thermal decompositions of water with diffusion processes for separation of the equilibrium mixture of hydrogen and oxygen into usable energy sources was examined.

  3. Effect of controlled deactivation on the thermochemical characteristics of hydrogen adsorption on skeletal nickel from sodium hydroxide-water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prozorov, D. A.; Lukin, M. V.; Ulitin, M. V.

    2013-04-01

    Differential heats of adsorption in a wide range of surface coverage and maximum amounts of adsorbed hydrogen are determined by adsorption calorimetry on partially deactivated skeletal nickel from aqueous solutions of sodium hydroxide. The effect of the composition of solutions on the values of limiting adsorption and adsorption equilibria of individual forms of hydrogen is shown.

  4. Advanced hydrogen electrode for hydrogen-bromide battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosek, Jack A.; Laconti, Anthony B.

    1987-01-01

    Binary platinum alloys are being developed as hydrogen electrocatalysts for use in a hydrogen bromide battery system. These alloys were varied in terms of alloy component mole ratio and heat treatment temperature. Electrocatalyst evaluation, performed in the absence and presence of bromide ion, includes floating half cell polarization studies, electrochemical surface area measurements, X ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy analysis and corrosion measurements. Results obtained to date indicate a platinum rich alloy has the best tolerance to bromide ion poisoning.

  5. Thermochemical Energy Storage through De/Hydrogenation of Organic Liquids: Reactions of Organic Liquids on Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Ulmer, Ulrich; Cholewa, Martin; Diemant, Thomas; Bonatto Minella, Christian; Dittmeyer, Roland; Behm, R Jürgen; Fichtner, Maximilian

    2016-06-01

    A study of the reactions of liquid acetone and toluene on transition metal hydrides, which can be used in thermal energy or hydrogen storage applications, is presented. Hydrogen is confined in TiFe, Ti0.95Zr0.05Mn1.49V0.45Fe0.06 ("Hydralloy C5"), and V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 after contact with acetone. Toluene passivates V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 completely for hydrogen desorption while TiFe is only mildly deactivated and desorption is not blocked at all in the case of Hydralloy C5. LaNi5 is inert toward both organic liquids. Gas chromatography (GC) investigations reveal that CO, propane, and propene are formed during hydrogen desorption from V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 in liquid acetone, and methylcyclohexane is formed in the case of liquid toluene. These reactions do not occur if dehydrogenated samples are used, which indicates an enhanced surface reactivity during hydrogen desorption. Significant amounts of carbon-containing species are detected at the surface and subsurface of acetone- and toluene-treated V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The modification of the surface and subsurface chemistry and the resulting blocking of catalytic sites is believed to be responsible for the containment of hydrogen in the bulk. The surface passivation reactions occur only during hydrogen desorption of the samples. PMID:27183004

  6. Innovative solar thermochemical water splitting.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Roy E. Jr.; Siegel, Nathan P.; Evans, Lindsey R.; Moss, Timothy A.; Stuecker, John Nicholas; Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Miller, James Edward; Allendorf, Mark D.; James, Darryl L.

    2008-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is evaluating the potential of an innovative approach for splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen using two-step thermochemical cycles. Thermochemical cycles are heat engines that utilize high-temperature heat to produce chemical work. Like their mechanical work-producing counterparts, their efficiency depends on operating temperature and on the irreversibility of their internal processes. With this in mind, we have invented innovative design concepts for two-step solar-driven thermochemical heat engines based on iron oxide and iron oxide mixed with other metal oxides (ferrites). The design concepts utilize two sets of moving beds of ferrite reactant material in close proximity and moving in opposite directions to overcome a major impediment to achieving high efficiency--thermal recuperation between solids in efficient counter-current arrangements. They also provide inherent separation of the product hydrogen and oxygen and are an excellent match with high-concentration solar flux. However, they also impose unique requirements on the ferrite reactants and materials of construction as well as an understanding of the chemical and cycle thermodynamics. In this report the Counter-Rotating-Ring Receiver/Reactor/Recuperator (CR5) solar thermochemical heat engine and its basic operating principals are described. Preliminary thermal efficiency estimates are presented and discussed. Our ferrite reactant material development activities, thermodynamic studies, test results, and prototype hardware development are also presented.

  7. Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Chastagner, P.

    2001-08-01

    This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.

  8. CFD studies on biomass thermochemical conversion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiqun; Yan, Lifeng

    2008-06-01

    Thermochemical conversion of biomass offers an efficient and economically process to provide gaseous, liquid and solid fuels and prepare chemicals derived from biomass. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling applications on biomass thermochemical processes help to optimize the design and operation of thermochemical reactors. Recent progression in numerical techniques and computing efficacy has advanced CFD as a widely used approach to provide efficient design solutions in industry. This paper introduces the fundamentals involved in developing a CFD solution. Mathematical equations governing the fluid flow, heat and mass transfer and chemical reactions in thermochemical systems are described and sub-models for individual processes are presented. It provides a review of various applications of CFD in the biomass thermochemical process field. PMID:19325848

  9. CFD Studies on Biomass Thermochemical Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiqun; Yan, Lifeng

    2008-01-01

    Thermochemical conversion of biomass offers an efficient and economically process to provide gaseous, liquid and solid fuels and prepare chemicals derived from biomass. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling applications on biomass thermochemical processes help to optimize the design and operation of thermochemical reactors. Recent progression in numerical techniques and computing efficacy has advanced CFD as a widely used approach to provide efficient design solutions in industry. This paper introduces the fundamentals involved in developing a CFD solution. Mathematical equations governing the fluid flow, heat and mass transfer and chemical reactions in thermochemical systems are described and sub-models for individual processes are presented. It provides a review of various applications of CFD in the biomass thermochemical process field. PMID:19325848

  10. Advancing the hydrogen safety knowledge base

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, S. C.

    2014-08-29

    The International Energy Agency's Hydrogen Implementing Agreement (IEA HIA) was established in 1977 to pursue collaborative hydrogen research and development and information exchange among its member countries. Information and knowledge dissemination is a key aspect of the work within IEA HIA tasks, and case studies, technical reports and presentations/publications often result from the collaborative efforts. The work conducted in hydrogen safety under Task 31 and its predecessor, Task 19, can positively impact the objectives of national programs even in cases for which a specific task report is not published. As a result, the interactions within Task 31 illustrate how technology information and knowledge exchange among participating hydrogen safety experts serve the objectives intended by the IEA HIA.

  11. Advancing the hydrogen safety knowledge base

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Weiner, S. C.

    2014-08-29

    The International Energy Agency's Hydrogen Implementing Agreement (IEA HIA) was established in 1977 to pursue collaborative hydrogen research and development and information exchange among its member countries. Information and knowledge dissemination is a key aspect of the work within IEA HIA tasks, and case studies, technical reports and presentations/publications often result from the collaborative efforts. The work conducted in hydrogen safety under Task 31 and its predecessor, Task 19, can positively impact the objectives of national programs even in cases for which a specific task report is not published. As a result, the interactions within Task 31 illustrate how technologymore » information and knowledge exchange among participating hydrogen safety experts serve the objectives intended by the IEA HIA.« less

  12. Enhanced hydrogen production by doping Pr into Ce0.9Hf0.1O2 for thermochemical two-step water-splitting cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qing-Long; Tamaura, Yutaka

    2014-03-01

    We synthesized (Ce0.9Hf0.1)1-xPrxO2-δ (x=0, 0.05 and 0.1) using the polymerized complex method. The synthesized samples, as well as the samples after thermochemical two-step water-splitting cycles have a fluorite structure and Pr exists in the solid solutions with both trivalent and tetravalent states, as suggested by powder X-ray Diffraction (XRD) Patterns. The reduction fraction of Ce4+ in redox cycles (oxidation step in air) and two-step water-splitting cycles (oxidation step in steam) indicates that the addition of Pr into Ce-Hf oxide solid solution cannot improve the reduction fraction of Ce4+ during the redox cycles but both the reduction fraction of Ce4+ and H2 yield are significantly enhanced during two-step water-splitting cycles. The chemical composition of 10 mol% Pr doped Ce0.9Hf0.1O2 exhibits the highest reactivity for hydrogen production in H2-generation step by yielding an average amount of 5.72 ml g-1 hydrogen gas, which is much higher than that evolved by Ce0.9Hf0.1O2 (4.50 ml g-1). The enhancement effect of doping Pr on the performance during two-step water-splitting cycles is because of the multivalent properties of Pr, which can: (1) reduce the amount of Ce3+ oxidized by contamination air (contamination air eliminated by partial oxidation of Pr3+ to Pr4+) in H2-generation step; (2) enhance the reaction rate in H2-generation step by improving the ionic conductivity (extrinsic oxygen vacancies created by the substitution of Ce4+ by Pr3+).

  13. Hydrolysis of CuCl{sub 2} in the Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production : experimental studies using a spray reactor with an ultrasonic atomizer.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrandon, M. S.; Lewis, M. A.; Alvarez, F.; Shafirovich, E.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Texas at El Paso

    2010-03-01

    The Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle is being developed as a hydrogen production method. Prior proof-of-concept experimental work has shown that the chemistry is viable while preliminary modeling has shown that the efficiency and cost of hydrogen production have the potential to meet DOE's targets. However, the mechanisms of CuCl{sub 2} hydrolysis, an important step in the Cu-Cl cycle, are not fully understood. Although the stoichiometry of the hydrolysis reaction, 2CuCl{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O {leftrightarrow} Cu{sub 2}OCl{sub 2} + 2HCl, indicates a necessary steam-to-CuCl{sub 2} molar ratio of 0.5, a ratio as high as 23 has been typically required to obtain near 100% conversion of the CuCl{sub 2} to the desired products at atmospheric pressure. It is highly desirable to conduct this reaction with less excess steam to improve the process efficiency. Per Le Chatelier's Principle and according to the available equilibrium-based model, the needed amount of steam can be decreased by conducting the hydrolysis reaction at a reduced pressure. In the present work, the experimental setup was modified to allow CuCl{sub 2} hydrolysis in the pressure range of 0.4-1 atm. Chemical and XRD analyses of the product compositions revealed the optimal steam-to-CuCl{sub 2} molar ratio to be 20-23 at 1 atm pressure. The experiments at 0.4 atm and 0.7 atm showed that it is possible to lower the steam-to-CuCl{sub 2} molar ratio to 15, while still obtaining good yields of the desired products. An important effect of running the reaction at reduced pressure is the significant decrease of CuCl concentration in the solid products, which was not predicted by prior modeling. Possible explanations based on kinetics and residence times are suggested.

  14. Hydrogen energy progress; Proceedings of the Third World Hydrogen Energy Conference, Tokyo, Japan, June 23-26, 1980. Volumes 1, 2, 3 & 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veziroglu, T. N.; Fueki, K.; Ohta, T.

    Papers are presented in the areas of electrolytic hydrogen production, thermochemical and hybrid hydrogen production, innovative hydrogen production, hydrogen storage and transmission, vehicles and hydrogen combustion, chemical and metallurgical usage of hydrogen, overall systems, environmental and materials aspects of hydrogen energy, and industrial aspects of hydrogen energy. Specific topics include advanced alkaline water electrolysis plants, polyethylene-based solid polymer electrolytes, the sulfur-iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and char production by flash coal carbonization, photoassisted water electrolysis by Si electrodes, hydrogen production by a thermophilic blue-green alga, the hydrogen storage properties of Fe(1-x)Nb(x)Ti alloys, and hydrogen-fueled compression-ignition engines. Attention is also given to ammonia as an energy vector for the hydrogen economy, a solar hydrogen energy system for an isolated island, a photovoltaic electrolysis system, and the economics of synthetic fuel and chemical production from nuclear power and coal.

  15. Hydrogen-bromine fuel cell advance component development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charleston, Joann; Reed, James

    1988-01-01

    Advanced cell component development is performed by NASA Lewis to achieve improved performance and longer life for the hydrogen-bromine fuel cells system. The state-of-the-art hydrogen-bromine system utilizes the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) technology, similar to the SPE technology developed for the hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell system. These studies are directed at exploring the potential for this system by assessing and evaluating various types of materials for cell parts and electrode materials for Bromine-hydrogen bromine environment and fabricating experimental membrane/electrode-catalysts by chemical deposition.

  16. Characteristics of advanced hydrogen maser frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements with several operational atomic hydrogen maser standards have been made which illustrate the fundamental characteristics of the maser as well as the analysability of the corrections which are made to relate the oscillation frequency to the free, unperturbed, hydrogen standard transition frequency. Sources of the most important perturbations, and the magnitude of the associated errors, are discussed. A variable volume storage bulb hydrogen maser is also illustrated which can provide on the order of 2 parts in 10 to the 14th power or better accuracy in evaluating the wall shift. Since the other basic error sources combined contribute no more than approximately 1 part in 10 to the 14th power uncertainty, the variable volume storage bulb hydrogen maser will have net intrinsic accuracy capability of the order of 2 parts in 10 to the 14th power or better. This is an order of magnitude less error than anticipated with cesium standards and is comparable to the basic limit expected for a free atom hydrogen beam resonance standard.

  17. An advanced negative hydrogen ion source.

    PubMed

    Goncharov, Alexey A; Dobrovolsky, Andrey N; Goretskii, Victor P

    2016-02-01

    The results of investigation of emission productivity of negative particles source with cesiated combined discharge are presented. A cylindrical beam of negative hydrogen ions with density about 2 A/cm(2) in low noise mode on source emission aperture is obtained. The total beam current values are up to 200 mA for negative hydrogen ions and up to 1.5 A for all negative particles with high divergence after source. The source has simple design and can produce stable discharge with low level of oscillation. PMID:26931996

  18. Solar Thermochemical Production of Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wegeng, Robert S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Mankins, John C.

    2007-06-25

    [Abstract] If cost and efficiency targets can be achieved, Solar Thermochemical Plants – occupying a few square kilometers each – can potentially generate substantial quantities of transportation fuels, therefore enabling reductions in imports of foreign petroleum and emissions of carbon dioxide. This paper describes the results of a comparative evaluation of various solar thermochemical approaches for producing chemical fuels. Common to each approach is the concentration of solar and/or other radiant energy so that high temperature heat is provided for thermochemical processes including chemical reactors, heat exchangers and separators. The study includes the evaluation of various feedstock chemicals as input to the Solar Thermochemical Plant: natural gas, biomass and zero-energy chemicals (water and carbon dioxide); the effect of combusting natural gas or concentrating beamed radiant energy from an orbiting platform (e.g., space solar power) as supplemental energy sources that support high plant capacity factors; and the production of either hydrogen or long-chain hydrocarbons (i.e., Fischer-Tropsch fuels) as the Solar Fuel product of the plant.

  19. Advanced nickel hydrogen cell configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, E.; Perez, F.

    1983-01-01

    An evaluation of the current nickel hydrogen cell design is presented. The IPV, or the Individual Pressure Vessel, is the state of the art right now. The present design, 3 1/2 inch cell, has a current limit of 50 ampere-hours. The nickel hydrogen cell design is the state of the art. Its size is 3 1/2 inches which limits it to 50 hours. The probable limits of that are probably 160 amphere IPV cell remaining in the passive cooling mode. The IPV stacks is a parallel connection of electrodes. Positive electrodes are connected with leads to the top portion of the stack and negative electrodes are connected with leads and pulled down to the bottom. So it is a combination connection of paralleling series electrostacking--parallel inside each individual stack, and series connected from one stack to the next. It offers, in the analysis, improvements in packaging, cost, energy density, and specific energy.

  20. Analysis of Hydrogen Generation through Thermochemical Gasification of Coconut Shell Using Thermodynamic Equilibrium Model Considering Char and Tar

    PubMed Central

    Rupesh, Shanmughom; Muraleedharan, Chandrasekharan; Arun, Palatel

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates the potential of coconut shell for air-steam gasification using thermodynamic equilibrium model. A thermodynamic equilibrium model considering tar and realistic char conversion was developed using MATLAB software to predict the product gas composition. After comparing it with experimental results the prediction capability of the model is enhanced by multiplying equilibrium constants with suitable coefficients. The modified model is used to study the effect of key process parameters like temperature, steam to biomass ratio, and equivalence ratio on product gas yield, composition, and heating value of syngas along with gasification efficiency. For a steam to biomass ratio of unity, the maximum mole fraction of hydrogen in the product gas is found to be 36.14% with a lower heating value of 7.49 MJ/Nm3 at a gasification temperature of 1500 K and equivalence ratio of 0.15. PMID:27433487

  1. Hydrogen production from water: Recent advances in photosynthesis research

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of the algae`s hydrogen-producing capability, which is based on the following: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the potential for research advances using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. ORNL has shown that sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen can be performed with mutants of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that lack a detectable level of the Photosystem I light reaction. This result is surprising in view of the standard two-light reaction model of photosynthesis and has interesting scientific and technological implications. This ORNL discovery also has potentially important implications for maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency of light energy into chemical energy by green plant photosynthesis. Hydrogen production performed by a single light reaction, as opposed to two, implies a doubling of the theoretically maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency from {approx}10% to {approx}20%.

  2. Advanced nickel-hydrogen cell configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, E.; Perez, F.

    1984-01-01

    Three nickel hydrogen battery designs, individual pressure vessel (IPV), common pressure vessel (CPV), and a bipolar battery module were studied. Weight, system complexity and cost were compared for a satellite operating in a 6 hour, 5600 nautical mile orbit. The required energy storage is 52 kWh. A 25% improvement in specific energy is observed by employing a bipolar battery versus a battery comprised of hundreds of IPV's. Further weight benefits are realized by the development of light weight technologies in the bipolar design.

  3. Hafnia-Based Nanostructured Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ramana, Chintalapalle; Choudhuri, Ahsan

    2013-01-31

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are critical technologies for future gas turbine engines of advanced coal based power generation systems. TBCs protect engine components and allow further increase in engine temperatures for higher efficiency. In this work, nanostructured HfO{sub 2}-based coatings, namely Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized HfO{sub 2} (YSH), Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized HfO{sub 2} (GSH) and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}-HfO{sub 2} (YSZH) were investigated for potential TBC applications in hydrogen turbines. Experimental efforts are aimed at creating a fundamental understanding of these TBC materials. Nanostructured ceramic coatings of YSH, GSH and YSZH were grown by physical vapor deposition methods. The effects of processing parameters and ceramic composition on the microstructural evolution of YSH, GSH and YSZH nanostructured coatings was studied using combined X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Electron microscopy analyses. Efforts were directed to derive a detailed understanding of crystal-structure, morphology, and stability of the coatings. In addition, thermal conductivity as a function of composition in YSH, YSZH and GSH coatings was determined. Laboratory experiments using accelerated test environments were used to investigate the relative importance of various thermo-mechanical and thermo-chemical failure modes of TBCs. Effects of thermal cycling, oxidation and their complex interactions were evaluated using a syngas combustor rig.

  4. Advanced nickel-hydrogen cell configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Long-term trends in the evolution of space power technology point toward increased payload power demand which in turn translates into both higher battery system charge storage capability and higher operating voltages. State of the art nickel-hydrogen cells of the 50 to 60 Wh size, packaged in individual pressure vessels, are capable of meeting the required cycle life for a wide range of anticipated operating conditions; however, they provided several drawbacks to battery system integrated efforts. Because of size, high voltage/high power systems require integrating hundreds of cells into the operating system. Packaging related weight and volume inefficiencies degrade the energy density and specific energy of individual cells currently at 30 Wh/cudm and 40 Wh/kg respectively. In addition, the increased parts count and associated handling significantly affect the overall battery related costs. Spacecraft battery systems designers within industry and Government realize that to reduce weight, volume, and cost requires increases in the capacity of nickel-hydrogen cells.

  5. Advanced IPV Nickel/Hydrogen Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, J. J.; Manzo, M. A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O.; Soltis, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    Expansion and contraction of electrode stack accommodated to increase cycle life. Three features of advanced designs new and not incorporated but fully compatible in either contemporary cells: use of alternate methods of oxygen recombination, serrated-edge separators, and expandable stack. Designs also consider electrolyte volume requirements over life of cells and are fully compatible with state-of-the-art designs. Cells improve performance, life, and usable energy leading to lighter storage devices for low Earthorbit applications for commercial or government applications.

  6. Hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Chirivella, J. E.; Fujita, T.; Jeffe, R. E.; Lawson, D.; Manvi, R.

    1975-01-01

    The state of hydrogen production technology is evaluated. Specific areas discussed include: hydrogen production fossil fuels; coal gasification processes; electrolysis of water; thermochemical production of hydrogen; production of hydrogen by solar energy; and biological production of hydrogen. Supply options are considered along with costs of hydrogen production.

  7. Metal hydride hydrogen compression: Recent advances and future prospects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bowman, Jr., Robert C.; Yartys, Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Mykhaylo V.; Linkov, Vladimir; Grant, David; Stuart, Alastair; Eriksen, Jon; Denys, Roman

    2016-03-17

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is one of the more important applications of the metal hydrides. The present paper reviews recent advances in the field based on the analysis of the fundamental principles of this technology. The performances when boosting hydrogen pressure, along with two- and three-step compression units are analyzed. The paper includes also a theoretical modeling of a two-stage compressor aimed at both describing the performance of the experimentally studied systems, but, also, on their optimization and design of more advanced MH compressors. Business developments in the field are reviewed for the Norwegian company HYSTORSYS AS andmore » the South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry. Finally, future prospects are outlined presenting the role of the metal hydride compression in the overall development of the hydrogen driven energy systems. Lastly, the work is based on the analysis of the development of the technology in Europe, USA and South Africa.« less

  8. Metal hydride hydrogen compression: recent advances and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yartys, Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Mykhaylo; Linkov, Vladimir; Grant, David; Stuart, Alastair; Eriksen, Jon; Denys, Roman; Bowman, Robert C.

    2016-04-01

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is one of the more important applications of the MHs. The present paper reviews recent advances in the field based on the analysis of the fundamental principles of this technology. The performances when boosting hydrogen pressure, along with two- and three-step compression units, are analyzed. The paper includes also a theoretical modelling of a two-stage compressor aimed at describing the performance of the experimentally studied systems, their optimization and design of more advanced MH compressors. Business developments in the field are reviewed for the Norwegian company HYSTORSYS AS and the South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry. Finally, future prospects are outlined presenting the role of the MH compression in the overall development of the hydrogen-driven energy systems. The work is based on the analysis of the development of the technology in Europe, USA and South Africa.

  9. ALS liquid hydrogen turbopump: Advanced Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimp, Nancy R.; Claffy, George J.

    1989-01-01

    The point of departure (POD) turbopump concept was reviewed and finalized. The basis for the POD was the configuration presented in the Aerojet proposal. After reviewing this proposal concept, several modifications were made. These modifications include the following: (1) the dual pump discharge arrangement was changed to a single discharge; (2) commonality of the turbine inlet manifold with the advanced launch system (ALS) liquid oxygen (LOX) TPA was dropped for this program; (3) the turbine housing flange arrangement was improved by relocating it away from the first stage nozzles; (4) a ten percent margin (five percent diameter increase) was built into the impeller design to ensure meeting the required discharge pressure without the need for increasing speed; (5) a ten percent turbine power margin was imposed which is to be obtained by increasing turbine inlet pressure if required; and (6) the backup concept, as an alternative to the use of cast impellers, now incorporates forged/machined shrouded impellers, rather than the unshrouded type originally planned.

  10. Advanced hydrogen/methanol utilization technology demonstration. Phase II: Hydrogen cold start of a methanol vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This is the Phase 11 Final Report on NREL Subcontract No. XR-2-11175-1 {open_quotes}Advanced Hydrogen/Methane Utilization Demonstration{close_quotes} between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Alternative Fuels Utilization Program, Golden, Colorado and Hydrogen Consultants, Inc. (HCI), Littleton, Colorado. Mr. Chris Colucci was NREL`s Technical Monitor. Colorado State University`s (CSU) Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory was HCI`s subcontractor. Some of the vehicle test work was carried out at the National Center for Vehicle Emissions Control and Safety (NCVECS) at CSU. The collaboration of the Colorado School of Mines is also gratefully acknowledged. Hydrogen is unique among alternative fuels in its ability to burn over a wide range of mixtures in air with no carbon-related combustion products. Hydrogen also has the ability to burn on a catalyst, starting from room temperature. Hydrogen can be made from a variety of renewable energy resources and is expected to become a widely used energy carrier in the sustainable energy system of the future. One way to make a start toward widespread use of hydrogen in the energy system is to use it sparingly with other alternative fuels. The Phase I work showed that strong affects could be achieved with dilute concentrations of hydrogen in methane (11). Reductions in emissions greater than the proportion of hydrogen in the fuel provide a form of leverage to stimulate the early introduction of hydrogen. Per energy unit or per dollar of hydrogen, a greater benefit is derived than simply displacing fossil-fueled vehicles with pure hydrogen vehicles.

  11. Solar thermochemical process interface study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The design and analyses of a subsystem of a hydrogen production process are described. The process is based on solar driven thermochemical reactions. The subject subsystem receives sulfuric acid of 60% concentration at 100 C, 1 atm pressure. The acid is further concentrated, vaporized, and decomposed (at a rate of 122 g moles/sec H2SO4) into SO2, O2, and water. The produce stream is cooled to 100 C. Three subsystem options, each being driven by direct solar energy, were designed and analyzed. The results are compared with a prior study case in which solar energy was provided indirectly through a helium loop.

  12. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Automotive Advanced High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovicu, Gianfranco; Bottazzi, Mauro; D'Aiuto, Fabio; De Sanctis, Massimo; Dimatteo, Antonella; Santus, Ciro; Valentini, Renzo

    2012-11-01

    Advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) have a better combination between strength and ductility than conventional HSS, and higher crash resistances are obtained in concomitance with weight reduction of car structural components. These steels have been developed in the last few decades, and their use is rapidly increasing. Notwithstanding, some of their important features have to be still understood and studied in order to completely characterize their service behavior. In particular, the high mechanical resistance of AHSS makes hydrogen-related problems a great concern for this steel grade. This article investigates the hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of four AHSS steels. The behavior of one transformation induced plasticity (TRIP), two martensitic with different strength levels, and one hot-stamping steels has been studied using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests on electrochemically hydrogenated notched samples. The embrittlement susceptibility of these AHSS steels has been correlated mainly to their strength level and to their microstructural features. Finally, the hydrogen critical concentrations for HE, established by SSRT tests, have been compared to hydrogen contents absorbed during the painting process of a body in white (BIW) structure, experimentally determined during a real cycle in an industrial plant.

  13. Integrated Refrigeration and Storage for Advanced Liquid Hydrogen Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanger, A. M.; Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Tomsik, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    NASA has used liquefied hydrogen (LH2) on a large scale since the beginning of the space program as fuel for the Centaur and Apollo upper stages, and more recently to feed the three space shuttle main engines. The LH2 systems currently in place at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch pads are aging and inefficient compared to the state-of-the-art. Therefore, the need exists to explore advanced technologies and operations that can drive commodity costs down, and provide increased capabilities. The Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen (GODU-LH2) was developed at KSC to pursue these goals by demonstrating active thermal control of the propellant state by direct removal of heat using a cryocooler. The project has multiple objectives including zero loss storage and transfer, liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen, and densification of liquid hydrogen. The key technology challenge was efficiently integrating the cryogenic refrigerator into the LH2 storage tank. A Linde LR1620 Brayton cycle refrigerator is used to produce up to 900W cooling at 20K, circulating approximately 22 g/s gaseous helium through the hydrogen via approximately 300 m of heat exchanger tubing. The GODU-LH2 system is fully operational, and is currently under test. This paper will discuss the design features of the refrigerator and storage system, as well as the current test results.

  14. NASA Lewis advanced IPV nickel-hydrogen technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Britton, Doris L.

    1993-11-01

    Individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen technology was advanced at NASA Lewis and under Lewis contracts. Some of the advancements are as follows: to use 26 percent potassium hydroxide electrolyte to improve cycle life and performance, to modify the state of the art cell design to eliminate identified failure modes and further improve cycle life, and to develop a lightweight nickel electrode to reduce battery mass, hence reduce launch and/or increase satellite payload. A breakthrough in the LEO cycle life of individual pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen battery cells was reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte was about 40,000 accelerated LEO cycles at 80 percent DOD compared to 3,500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH. Results of the boiler plate cell tests have been validated at NWSC, Crane, Indiana. Forty-eight ampere-hour flight cells containing 26 and 31 percent KOH have undergone real time LEO cycle life testing at an 80 percent DOD, 10 C. The three cells containing 26 percent KOH failed on the average at cycle 19,500. The three cells containing 31 percent KOH failed on the average at cycle 6,400. Validation testing of NASA Lewis 125 Ah advanced design IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells is also being conducted at NWSC, Crane, Indiana under a NASA Lewis contract. This consists of characterization, storage, and cycle life testing. There was no capacity degradation after 52 days of storage with the cells in the discharged state, on open circuit, 0 C, and a hydrogen pressure of 14.5 psia. The catalyzed wall wick cells have been cycled for over 22,694 cycles with no cell failures in the continuing test. All three of the non-catalyzed wall wick cells failed (cycles 9,588; 13,900; and 20,575). Cycle life test results of the Fibrex nickel electrode has demonstrated the feasibility of an improved nickel electrode giving a higher specific energy nickel-hydrogen cell. A nickel-hydrogen boiler plate cell using an 80

  15. NASA Lewis advanced IPV nickel-hydrogen technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Britton, Doris L.

    1993-01-01

    Individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen technology was advanced at NASA Lewis and under Lewis contracts. Some of the advancements are as follows: to use 26 percent potassium hydroxide electrolyte to improve cycle life and performance, to modify the state of the art cell design to eliminate identified failure modes and further improve cycle life, and to develop a lightweight nickel electrode to reduce battery mass, hence reduce launch and/or increase satellite payload. A breakthrough in the LEO cycle life of individual pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen battery cells was reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte was about 40,000 accelerated LEO cycles at 80 percent DOD compared to 3,500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH. Results of the boiler plate cell tests have been validated at NWSC, Crane, Indiana. Forty-eight ampere-hour flight cells containing 26 and 31 percent KOH have undergone real time LEO cycle life testing at an 80 percent DOD, 10 C. The three cells containing 26 percent KOH failed on the average at cycle 19,500. The three cells containing 31 percent KOH failed on the average at cycle 6,400. Validation testing of NASA Lewis 125 Ah advanced design IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells is also being conducted at NWSC, Crane, Indiana under a NASA Lewis contract. This consists of characterization, storage, and cycle life testing. There was no capacity degradation after 52 days of storage with the cells in the discharged state, on open circuit, 0 C, and a hydrogen pressure of 14.5 psia. The catalyzed wall wick cells have been cycled for over 22,694 cycles with no cell failures in the continuing test. All three of the non-catalyzed wall wick cells failed (cycles 9,588; 13,900; and 20,575). Cycle life test results of the Fibrex nickel electrode has demonstrated the feasibility of an improved nickel electrode giving a higher specific energy nickel-hydrogen cell. A nickel-hydrogen boiler plate cell using an 80

  16. Hydrogen as a transportation fuel: Costs and benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, G.D.

    1996-03-01

    Hydrogen fuel and vehicles are assessed and compared to other alternative fuels and vehicles. The cost, efficiency, and emissions of hydrogen storage, delivery, and use in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs) are estimated. Hydrogen made thermochemically from natural gas and electrolytically from a range of electricity mixes is examined. Hydrogen produced at central plants and delivered by truck is compared to hydrogen produced on-site at filling stations, fleet refueling centers, and residences. The impacts of hydrogen HEVs, fueled using these pathways, are compared to ultra-low emissions gasoline internal-combustion-engine vehicles (ICEVs), advanced battery-powered electric vehicles (BPEVs), and HEVs using gasoline or natural gas.

  17. USE OF THE MODULAR HELIUM REACTOR FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    SCHULTZ,KR

    2003-09-01

    OAK-B135 A significant ''Hydrogen Economy'' is predicted that will reduce our dependence on petroleum imports and reduce pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels, but contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels. The author has recently completed a three-year project for the US Department of Energy (DOE) whose objective was to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source''. Thermochemical water-slitting, a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen, met this objective. The goal of the first phase of this study was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen, and to select one for further detailed consideration. They selected the Sulfur-Iodine cycle. In the second phase, they reviewed all the basic reactor types for suitability to provide the high temperature heat needed by the selected thermochemical water splitting cycle and chose the helium gas-cooled reactor. In the third phase they designed the chemical flowsheet for the thermochemical process and estimated the efficiency and cost of the process and the projected cost of producing hydrogen. These results are summarized in this report.

  18. Advanced hydrogen/oxygen thrust chamber design analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The results are reported of the advanced hydrogen/oxygen thrust chamber design analysis program. The primary objectives of this program were to: (1) provide an in-depth analytical investigation to develop thrust chamber cooling and fatigue life limitations of an advanced, high pressure, high performance H2/O2 engine design of 20,000-pounds (88960.0 N) thrust; and (2) integrate the existing heat transfer analysis, thermal fatigue and stress aspects for advanced chambers into a comprehensive computer program. Thrust chamber designs and analyses were performed to evaluate various combustor materials, coolant passage configurations (tubes and channels), and cooling circuits to define the nominal 1900 psia (1.31 x 10 to the 7th power N/sq m) chamber pressure, 300-cycle life thrust chamber. The cycle life capability of the selected configuration was then determined for three duty cycles. Also the influence of cycle life and chamber pressure on thrust chamber design was investigated by varying in cycle life requirements at the nominal chamber pressure and by varying the chamber pressure at the nominal cycle life requirement.

  19. Advanced designs for IPV nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, J. J.; Manzo, M. A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1984-01-01

    Advanced designs for individual pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen cells have been concieved which should improve the cycle life at deep depths-of-discharge. Features of the designs which are new and not incorporated in either of the contemporary cells (Air Force/Hughes, Comsat) are: (1) use of alternate methods of oxygen recombination, (2) use of serrated edge separators to facilitate movement of gas within the cell while still maintaining required physical contact with the wall wick, and (3) use of an expandable stack to accommodate some of the nickel electrode expansion. The designs also consider electrolyte volume requirements over the life of the cells, and are fully compatible with the Air Force/Hughes design.

  20. Biomass for thermochemical conversion: targets and challenges.

    PubMed

    Tanger, Paul; Field, John L; Jahn, Courtney E; Defoort, Morgan W; Leach, Jan E

    2013-01-01

    Bioenergy will be one component of a suite of alternatives to fossil fuels. Effective conversion of biomass to energy will require the careful pairing of advanced conversion technologies with biomass feedstocks optimized for the purpose. Lignocellulosic biomass can be converted to useful energy products via two distinct pathways: enzymatic or thermochemical conversion. The thermochemical pathways are reviewed and potential biotechnology or breeding targets to improve feedstocks for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion are identified. Biomass traits influencing the effectiveness of the thermochemical process (cell wall composition, mineral and moisture content) differ from those important for enzymatic conversion and so properties are discussed in the language of biologists (biochemical analysis) as well as that of engineers (proximate and ultimate analysis). We discuss the genetic control, potential environmental influence, and consequences of modification of these traits. Improving feedstocks for thermochemical conversion can be accomplished by the optimization of lignin levels, and the reduction of ash and moisture content. We suggest that ultimate analysis and associated properties such as H:C, O:C, and heating value might be more amenable than traditional biochemical analysis to the high-throughput necessary for the phenotyping of large plant populations. Expanding our knowledge of these biomass traits will play a critical role in the utilization of biomass for energy production globally, and add to our understanding of how plants tailor their composition with their environment. PMID:23847629

  1. Biomass for thermochemical conversion: targets and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Tanger, Paul; Field, John L.; Jahn, Courtney E.; DeFoort, Morgan W.; Leach, Jan E.

    2013-01-01

    Bioenergy will be one component of a suite of alternatives to fossil fuels. Effective conversion of biomass to energy will require the careful pairing of advanced conversion technologies with biomass feedstocks optimized for the purpose. Lignocellulosic biomass can be converted to useful energy products via two distinct pathways: enzymatic or thermochemical conversion. The thermochemical pathways are reviewed and potential biotechnology or breeding targets to improve feedstocks for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion are identified. Biomass traits influencing the effectiveness of the thermochemical process (cell wall composition, mineral and moisture content) differ from those important for enzymatic conversion and so properties are discussed in the language of biologists (biochemical analysis) as well as that of engineers (proximate and ultimate analysis). We discuss the genetic control, potential environmental influence, and consequences of modification of these traits. Improving feedstocks for thermochemical conversion can be accomplished by the optimization of lignin levels, and the reduction of ash and moisture content. We suggest that ultimate analysis and associated properties such as H:C, O:C, and heating value might be more amenable than traditional biochemical analysis to the high-throughput necessary for the phenotyping of large plant populations. Expanding our knowledge of these biomass traits will play a critical role in the utilization of biomass for energy production globally, and add to our understanding of how plants tailor their composition with their environment. PMID:23847629

  2. Hydrogen as an energy vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing hydrogen as an energy vector is considered, with special attention given to means of hydrogen production. The state-of-the-art in thermochemical processes is reviewed, and criteria for the technical and economic feasibility of large-scale thermochemical water splitting processes are presented. The production of hydrogen from coal and from photolysis of water is discussed.

  3. Advanced research and technology program for advanced high pressure oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsik, S. J.; Morea, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    A research and technology program for advanced high pressure, oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion technology is presently being pursued by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to establish the basic discipline technologies, develop the analytical tools, and establish the data base necessary for an orderly evolution of the staged combustion reusable rocket engine. The need for the program is based on the premise that the USA will depend on the Shuttle and its derivative versions as its principal Earth-to-orbit transportation system for the next 20 to 30 yr. The program is focused in three principal areas of enhancement: (1) life extension, (2) performance, and (3) operations and diagnosis. Within the technological disciplines the efforts include: rotordynamics, structural dynamics, fluid and gas dynamics, materials fatigue/fracture/life, turbomachinery fluid mechanics, ignition/combustion processes, manufacturing/producibility/nondestructive evaluation methods and materials development/evaluation. An overview of the Advanced High Pressure Oxygen-Hydrogen Rocket Propulsion Technology Program Structure and Working Groups objectives are presented with highlights of several significant achievements.

  4. Advanced research and technology programs for advanced high-pressure oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsik, S. J.; Morea, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    A research and technology program for advanced high pressure, oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion technology is presently being pursued by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to establish the basic discipline technologies, develop the analytical tools, and establish the data base necessary for an orderly evolution of the staged combustion reusable rocket engine. The need for the program is based on the premise that the USA will depend on the Shuttle and its derivative versions as its principal Earth-to-orbit transportation system for the next 20 to 30 yr. The program is focused in three principal areas of enhancement: (1) life extension, (2) performance, and (3) operations and diagnosis. Within the technological disciplines the efforts include: rotordynamics, structural dynamics, fluid and gas dynamics, materials fatigue/fracture/life, turbomachinery fluid mechanics, ignition/combustion processes, manufacturing/producibility/nondestructive evaluation methods and materials development/evaluation. An overview of the Advanced High Pressure Oxygen-Hydrogen Rocket Propulsion Technology Program Structure and Working Groups objectives are presented with highlights of several significant achievements.

  5. Advances in materials for room temperature hydrogen sensors.

    PubMed

    Arya, Sunil K; Krishnan, Subramanian; Silva, Hayde; Jean, Sheila; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2012-06-21

    Hydrogen (H(2)), as a source of energy, continues to be a compelling choice in applications ranging from fuel cells and propulsion systems to feedstock for chemical, metallurgical and other industrial processes. H(2), being a clean, reliable, and affordable source, is finding ever increasing use in distributed electric power generation and H(2) fuelled cars. Although still under 0.1%, the distributed use of H(2) is the fastest growing area. In distributed H(2) storage, distribution, and consumption, safety continues to be a critical aspect. Affordable safety systems for distributed H(2) applications are critical for the H(2) economy to take hold. Advances in H(2) sensors are driven by specificity, reliability, repeatability, stability, cost, size, response time, recovery time, operating temperature, humidity range, and power consumption. Ambient temperature sensors for H(2) detection are increasingly being explored as they offer specificity, stability and robustness of high temperature sensors with lower operational costs and significantly longer operational lifetimes. This review summarizes and highlights recent developments in room temperature H(2) sensors. PMID:22582176

  6. Modular Advanced Oxidation Process Enabled by Cathodic Hydrogen Peroxide Production

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is frequently used in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to treat trace organic contaminants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In small-scale applications, such as wellhead and point-of-entry water treatment systems, the need to maintain a stock solution of concentrated H2O2 increases the operational cost and complicates the operation of AOPs. To avoid the need for replenishing a stock solution of H2O2, a gas diffusion electrode was used to generate low concentrations of H2O2 directly in the water prior to its exposure to UV light. Following the AOP, the solution was passed through an anodic chamber to lower the solution pH and remove the residual H2O2. The effectiveness of the technology was evaluated using a suite of trace contaminants that spanned a range of reactivity with UV light and hydroxyl radical (HO•) in three different types of source waters (i.e., simulated groundwater, simulated surface water, and municipal wastewater effluent) as well as a sodium chloride solution. Irrespective of the source water, the system produced enough H2O2 to treat up to 120 L water d–1. The extent of transformation of trace organic contaminants was affected by the current density and the concentrations of HO• scavengers in the source water. The electrical energy per order (EEO) ranged from 1 to 3 kWh m–3, with the UV lamp accounting for most of the energy consumption. The gas diffusion electrode exhibited high efficiency for H2O2 production over extended periods and did not show a diminution in performance in any of the matrices. PMID:26039560

  7. Modular advanced oxidation process enabled by cathodic hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Barazesh, James M; Hennebel, Tom; Jasper, Justin T; Sedlak, David L

    2015-06-16

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is frequently used in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to treat trace organic contaminants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In small-scale applications, such as wellhead and point-of-entry water treatment systems, the need to maintain a stock solution of concentrated H2O2 increases the operational cost and complicates the operation of AOPs. To avoid the need for replenishing a stock solution of H2O2, a gas diffusion electrode was used to generate low concentrations of H2O2 directly in the water prior to its exposure to UV light. Following the AOP, the solution was passed through an anodic chamber to lower the solution pH and remove the residual H2O2. The effectiveness of the technology was evaluated using a suite of trace contaminants that spanned a range of reactivity with UV light and hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) in three different types of source waters (i.e., simulated groundwater, simulated surface water, and municipal wastewater effluent) as well as a sodium chloride solution. Irrespective of the source water, the system produced enough H2O2 to treat up to 120 L water d(-1). The extent of transformation of trace organic contaminants was affected by the current density and the concentrations of HO(•) scavengers in the source water. The electrical energy per order (EEO) ranged from 1 to 3 kWh m(-3), with the UV lamp accounting for most of the energy consumption. The gas diffusion electrode exhibited high efficiency for H2O2 production over extended periods and did not show a diminution in performance in any of the matrices. PMID:26039560

  8. Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Harold A. Wright; Adam E. Calihman; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Chandra Ratnasamy; Mahendra Sunkara; Jyothish Thangala; Clive Brereton; Warren Wolfs; James Lockhart

    2005-10-31

    During this quarter composite layered membrane size was scaled-up and tested for permeation performance. Sintering conditions were optimized for a new cermet containing a high permeability metal and seals were developed to allow permeability testing. Theoretical calculations were performed to determine potential sulfur tolerant hydrogen dissociation catalysts. Finally, work was finalized on mechanical and process & control documentation for a hydrogen separation unit.

  9. Hydrogen as a fuel for today and tomorrow: expectations for advanced hydrogen storage materials/systems research.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Katsuhiko

    2011-01-01

    History shows that the evolution of vehicles is promoted by several environmental restraints very similar to the evolution of life. The latest environmental strain is sustainability. Transport vehicles are now facing again the need to advance to use sustainable fuels such as hydrogen. Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are being prepared for commercialization in 2015. Despite intensive research by the world's scientists and engineers and recent advances in our understanding of hydrogen behavior in materials, the only engineering phase technology which will be available for 2015 is high pressure storage. Thus industry has decided to implement the high pressure tank storage system. However the necessity of smart hydrogen storage is not decreasing but rather increasing because high market penetration of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles is expected from around 2025 onward. In order to bring more vehicles onto the market, cheaper and more compact hydrogen storage is inevitable. The year 2025 seems a long way away but considering the field tests and large scale preparation required, there is little time available for research. Finding smart materials within the next 5 years is very important to the success of fuel cells towards a low carbon sustainable world. PMID:22455059

  10. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard T. Treglio; Adam E. Calihman; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Chandra Ratnasamy; Mahendra Sunkara; Jyothish Thangla; Clive Brereton; Warren Wolfs; James Lockhart

    2005-04-30

    During this quarter long term and high pressure hydrogen separation experiments were performed on Eltron's composite layered membranes. Membranes were tested at 400 C and a 300 psig feed stream with 40% hydrogen for up to 400 continuous hours. In addition membranes were tested up to 1000 psig as demonstration of the ability for this technology to meet DOE goals. Progress was made in the development of new hydrogen separation cermets containing high permeability metals. A sulfur tolerant catalyst deposition technique was optimized and engineering work on mechanical and process & control reports was continued.

  11. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard T. Treglio; Jim Fisher; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Chandra Ratnasamy; Mahendra Sunkara; Jyothish Thangla; Clive Brereton; Warren Wolfs; James Lockhart

    2005-01-28

    During this quarter work was continued on characterizing the stability of layered composite membranes under a variety of conditions. Membrane permeation was tested up to 100 hours at constant pressure, temperature, and flow rates. In addition, design parameters were completed for a scale-up hydrogen separation demonstration unit. Evaluation of microstructure and effect of hydrogen exposure on BCY/Ni cermet mechanical properties was initiated. The fabrication of new cermets containing high permeability metals is reported and progress in the preparation of sulfur resistant catalysts is discussed. Finally, a report entitled ''Criteria for Incorporating Eltron's Hydrogen Separation Membranes into Vision 21 IGCC Systems and FutureGen Plants'' was completed.

  12. High-pressure hydrogen testing of single crystal superalloys for advanced rocket engine turbopump turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, W. S.; Parr, R. A.; Johnston, M. H.; Strizak, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    A screening program to determine the effects of high pressure hydrogen on selected candidate materials for advanced single crystal turbine blade applications is examined. The alloys chosen for the investigation are CM SX-2, CM SX-4C, Rene N-4, and PWA1480. Testing is carried out in hydrogen and helium at 34 MPa and room temperature, with both notched and unnotched single crystal specimens. Results show a significant variation in susceptibility to Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) among the four alloys and a marked difference in fracture topography between hydrogen and helium environment specimens.

  13. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUELS PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard Mackay; Stewart Schesnack; Scott Morrison; Thomas A. Zirbel; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

    2003-07-31

    Eltron Research Inc. and team members CoorsTek, Sued Chemie, and Argonne National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative, which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. Currently, this project is focusing on four basic categories of dense membranes: (1) mixed conducting ceramic/ceramic composites, (2) mixed conducting ceramic/metal (cermet) composites, (3) cermets with hydrogen permeable metals, and (4) layered composites containing hydrogen permeable alloys. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. This report presents hydrogen permeation data during long term tests and tests at high pressure in addition to progress with cermet, ceramic/ceramic, and thin film membranes.

  14. Advanced fabrication techniques for hydrogen-cooled engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchmann, O. A.; Arefian, V. V.; Warren, H. A.; Vuigner, A. A.; Pohlman, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Described is a program for development of coolant passage geometries, material systems, and joining processes that will produce long-life hydrogen-cooled structures for scramjet applications. Tests were performed to establish basic material properties, and samples constructed and evaluated to substantiate fabrication processes and inspection techniques. Results of the study show that the basic goal of increasing the life of hydrogen-cooled structures two orders of magnitude relative to that of the Hypersonic Research Engine can be reached with available means. Estimated life is 19000 cycles for the channels and 16000 cycles for pin-fin coolant passage configurations using Nickel 201. Additional research is required to establish the fatigue characteristics of dissimilar-metal coolant passages (Nickel 201/Inconel 718) and to investigate the embrittling effects of the hydrogen coolant.

  15. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard Mackay; Richard Treglio; Sara L. Rolfe; Richard Blair; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Chandra Ratnasamy; Jon P. Wagner; Clive Brereton; Warren Wolfs

    2004-07-26

    During this quarter, work was focused on testing layered composite membranes under varying feed stream flow rates at high pressure. By optimizing conditions, H{sub 2} permeation rates as high as 423 mL {center_dot} min{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup -2} at 440 C were measured. Membrane stability was investigated by comparison to composite alloy membranes. Permeation of alloyed membranes showed a strong dependence on the alloying element. Impedance analysis was used to investigate bulk and grain boundary conductivity in cermets. Thin film cermet deposition procedures were developed, hydrogen dissociation catalysts were evaluated, and hydrogen separation unit scale-up issues were addressed.

  16. Advanced supersonic technology concept study: Hydrogen fueled configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.

    1974-01-01

    Conceptual designs of hydrogen fueled supersonic transport configurations for the 1990 time period were developed and compared with equivalent technology Jet A-1 fueled vehicles to determine the economic and performance potential of liquid hydrogen as an alternate fuel. Parametric evaluations of supersonic cruise vehicles with varying design and transport mission characteristics established the basis for selecting a preferred configuration which was then studied in greater detail. An assessment was made of the general viability of the selected concept including an evaluation of costs and environmental considerations, i.e., exhaust emissions and sonic boom characteristics. Technology development requirements and suggested implementation schedules are presented.

  17. Method for thermochemical decomposition of water

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, Bernard M.; Schreiner, Felix

    1977-01-11

    Water is thermochemically decomposed to produce hydrogen by the following sequence of reactions: KI, NH.sub.3, CO.sub. 2 and water in an organic solvent such as ethyl or propyl alcohol are reacted to produce KHCO 3 and NH.sub.4 I. The KHCO.sub.3 is thermally decomposed to K.sub.2 CO.sub.3, H.sub.2 O and CO.sub.2, while the NH.sub.4 I is reacted with Hg to produce HgI.sub.2, NH.sub.3 and H.sub.2. The K.sub.2 CO.sub.3 obtained by calcining KHCO.sub.3 is then reacted with HgI.sub.2 to produce Hg, KI, CO and O.sub.2. All products of the reaction are recycled except hydrogen and oxygen.

  18. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shane E. Roark; Tony F. Sammells; Adam Calihman; Andy Girard; Pamela M. Van Calcar; Richard Mackay; Tom Barton; Sara Rolfe

    2001-01-30

    Eltron Research Inc., and team members CoorsTek, McDermott Technology, Inc., Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. The proposed technology addresses the DOE Vision 21 initiative in two ways. First, this process offers a relatively inexpensive solution for pure hydrogen separation that can be easily incorporated into Vision 21 fossil fuel plants. Second, this process could reduce the cost of hydrogen, which is a clean burning fuel under increasing demand as supporting technologies are developed for hydrogen utilization and storage. Additional motivation for this project arises from the potential of this technology for other applications. Membranes testing during this reporting period were greater than 1 mm thick and had the general perovskite composition AB{sub 1-x}B'{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where 0.05 {<=} x {<=} 0.3. These materials demonstrated hydrogen separation rates between 1 and 2 mL/min/cm{sup 2}, which represents roughly 20% of the target goal for

  19. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard Mackay; Scott R. Morrison; Sara L. Rolfe; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephen; Frank E. Anderson; Shandra Ratnasamy; Jon P. Wagner; Clive Brereton

    2004-01-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. Currently, this project is focusing on four basic categories of dense membranes: (1) mixed conducting ceramic/ceramic composites, (2) mixed conducting ceramic/metal (cermet) composites, (3) cermets with hydrogen permeable metals, and (4) layered composites with hydrogen permeable alloys. The primary technical challenge in achieving the goals of this project will be to optimize membrane composition to enable practical hydrogen separation rates and chemical stability. Other key aspects of this developing technology include catalysis, ceramic processing methods, and separation unit design operating under high pressure. To achieve these technical goals, Eltron Research Inc. has organized a consortium consisting of CoorsTek, Sued Chemie, Inc. (SCI), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and NORAM. Hydrogen permeation rates in excess of 50 mL {center_dot} min{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup 2} at {approx}440 C were routinely achieved under less than optimal experimental conditions using a range of membrane compositions. Factors that limit the maximum permeation attainable were determined to be mass transport resistance of H{sub 2} to and from the membrane surface, as well as surface contamination. Mass transport resistance was partially overcome by increasing the feed and sweep gas flow rates to greater than five liters per minute. Under these experimental conditions, H2 permeation rates in excess of 350 mL {center_dot} min{sup -1} {center_dot} cm{sup 2} at {approx}440 C were attained. These results are presented in this report, in addition to progress with cermets, thin film fabrication, catalyst development, and H{sub 2} separation unit scale up.

  20. Strategic partnerships final LDRD report : nanocomposite materials for efficient solar hydrogen production.

    SciTech Connect

    Corral, Erica L.; Miller, James Edward; Walker, Luke S.; Evans, Lindsey R.

    2012-05-01

    This 'campus executive' project sought to advance solar thermochemical technology for producing the chemical fuels. The project advanced the common interest of Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Arizona in creating a sustainable and viable alternative to fossil fuels. The focus of this effort was in developing new methods for creating unique monolithic composite structures and characterizing their performance in thermochemical production of hydrogen from water. The development and processing of the materials was undertaken in the Materials Science and Engineering Department at the University of Arizona; Sandia National Laboratories performed the thermochemical characterization. Ferrite/yttria-stabilized zirconia composite monoliths were fabricated and shown to have exceptionally high utilization of the ferrite for splitting CO{sub 2} to obtain CO (a process analogous to splitting H{sub 2}O to obtain H{sub 2}).

  1. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen-Fueled Mercedes Sprinter Van Operating Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-22

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of testing conducted over 6,864 kilometers (4,265 miles) of operation using the pure-hydrogen-fueled Mercedes Sprinter van.

  2. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Dodge Ram Wagon Van - Hydrogen/CNG Operations Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-16

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle, a Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 22,816 miles of testing for the Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operating on CNG fuel, and a blended fuel of 15% hydrogen-85% CNG.

  3. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hydrogen-Fueled Mercedes Sprinter Van -- Operating Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Karner, D.; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure- hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of testing conducted over 6,864 kilometers (4,265 miles) of operation using the pure-hydrogen-fueled Mercedes Sprinter van.

  4. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Low-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend, Ford F-150 -- Operating Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Karner, D.; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 16,942 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 30% hydrogen/70% CNG fuel.

  5. Advanced hydrogen/method utilization technology demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, F.; Fulton, J.

    1994-04-01

    The overall objective of the work was to seek homogeneous blend ratios of hydrogen:methane that provide ``leverage`` with respect to exhaust emissions or engine performance. The leverage sought was a reduction in exhaust emissions or improved efficiency in proportions greater than the percentage of hydrogen energy in the blended fuel gas mixture. The scope of the study included the range of air/fuel mixtures from the lean limit to slightly richer than stoichiometric. This encompasses two important modes of engine operation for emissions control; lean burn pre-catalyst (some natural gas engines have no catalyst) and post-catalyst; and stoichiometric with three-way catalyst. The report includes a brief discussion of each of these modes.

  6. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; George Farthing; Dan Rowley; Tim R. Armstrong; R.D. Carneim; P.F. Becher; C-H. Hsueh; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

    2002-04-30

    Eltron Research Inc., and team members CoorsTek, McDermott Technology, inc., Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur.

  7. Advances in nickel hydrogen technology at Yardney Battery Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentley, J. G.; Hall, A. M.

    1987-01-01

    The current major activites in nickel hydrogen technology being addressed at Yardney Battery Division are outlined. Five basic topics are covered: an update on life cycle testing of ManTech 50 AH NiH2 cells in the LEO regime; an overview of the Air Force/industry briefing; nickel electrode process upgrading; 4.5 inch cell development; and bipolar NiH2 battery development.

  8. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard T. Treglio; Adam E. Calihman; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Chandra Ratnasamy; Mahendra Sunkara; Jyothish Thangala; Clive Brereton; Warren Wolfs; James Lockhart

    2005-07-29

    During this quarter catalyst stability studies were performed on Eltron's composite layered membranes. In addition, permeation experiments were performed to determine the effect of crystallographic orientation on membrane performance. Sintering conditions were optimized for preparation of new cermets containing high permeability metals. Theoretical calculations were performed to determine potential sulfur tolerant catalysts. Finally, work was continued on mechanical and process & control documentation for a hydrogen separation unit.

  9. Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Shane E. Roark

    2006-03-31

    The objective of this project was to develop an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. A family of hydrogen separation membranes was developed including single phase mixed conducting ceramics, ceramic/ceramic composites, cermet membranes, cermet membranes containing a hydrogen permeable metal, and intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. Each membrane type had different operating parameters, advantages, and disadvantages that were documented over the course of the project. Research on these membranes progressed from ceramics to cermets to intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. During this progression performance was increased from 0.01 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2} up to 423 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2}. Eltron and team membranes not only developed each membrane type, but also membrane surface catalysis and impurity tolerance, creation of thin film membranes, alternative applications such as membrane promoted alkane dehydrogenation, demonstration of scale-up testing, and complete engineering documentation including process and mechanical considerations necessary for inclusion of Eltron membranes in a full scale integrated gasification combined cycle power plant. The results of this project directly led to a new $15 million program funded by the Department of Energy. This new project will focus exclusively on scale-up of this technology as part of the FutureGen initiative.

  10. Advances in the development of piezoelectric quartz-crystal oscillators, hydrogen masers, and superconducting frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suter, Joseph J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes recent research advances made in the development of radiation-hardened piezoelectric quartz oscillators, hydrogen masers, and superconducting oscillators, with emphasis placed on the principles involved in the operation of these oscillators and the factors affecting the operation. Particular attention is given to the radiation-susceptibility studies of quartz-crystal resonators, the hydrogen-maser relaxation process and noise sources, and low-phase-noise superconducting oscillators. Diagrams of these devices and performance graphs are included.

  11. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: High-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend, Ford F-150 -- Operating Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Don Karner; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents the results of 4,695 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 50% hydrogen–50% CNG fuel.

  12. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Dodge Ram Wagon Van -- Hydrogen/CNG Operations Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Don Karner; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle, a Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 22,816 miles of testing for the Dodge Ram Wagon Van, operating on CNG fuel, and a blended fuel of 15% hydrogen–85% CNG.

  13. A fuel conservation study for transport aircraft utilizing advanced technology and hydrogen fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, W.; Calleson, R.; Espil, J.; Quartero, C.; Swanson, E.

    1972-01-01

    The conservation of fossil fuels in commercial aviation was investigated. Four categories of aircraft were selected for investigation: (1) conventional, medium range, low take-off gross weight; (2) conventional, long range, high take-off gross weights; (3) large take-off gross weight aircraft that might find future applications using both conventional and advanced technology; and (4) advanced technology aircraft of the future powered with liquid hydrogen fuel. It is concluded that the hydrogen fueled aircraft can perform at reduced size and gross weight the same payload/range mission as conventionally fueled aircraft.

  14. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R. Evenson; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard T. Treglio; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Clive Brereton; Warren Wolfs; James Lockhart

    2004-10-21

    During this quarter, work was focused on characterizing the stability of layered composite membranes in a one hundred percent permeate environment. Permeation data was also collected on cermets as a function of thickness. A thin film deposition procedure was used to deposit dense thin BCY/Ni onto a tubular porous support. Thin film tubes were then tested for permeation at ambient pressure. Process flow diagrams were prepared for inclusion of hydrogen separation membranes into IGCC power plants under varying conditions. Finally, membrane promoted alkane dehydrogenation experiments were performed.

  15. Hydrogen Vent Ground Umbilical Quick Disconnect - Flight Seal Advanced Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girard, Doug; Jankowski, Fred; Minich, Mark C.; Yu, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    This project is a team effort between NASA Engineering (NE) and Team QNA Engineering personnel to provide support for the Umbilical Systems Development project which is funded by Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) and 21st Century Launch Complex. Specifically, this project seeks to develop a new interface between the PPBE baselined Legacy SSP LH2 Vent Arm QD probe and SLS vent seal.

  16. Recent advances in osmium-catalyzed hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Chelucci, Giorgio; Baldino, Salvatore; Baratta, Walter

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: A current issue in metal-catalyzed reactions is the search for highly efficient transition-metal complexes affording high productivity and selectivity in a variety of processes. Moreover, there is also a great interest in multitasking catalysts that are able to efficiently promote different organic transformations by careful switching of the reaction parameters, such as temperature, solvent, and cocatalyst. In this context, osmium complexes have shown the ability to catalyze efficiently different types of reactions involving hydrogen, proving at the same time high thermal stability and simple synthesis. In the catalytic reduction of C═X (X = O, N) bonds by both hydrogenation (HY) and transfer hydrogenation (TH) reactions, the most interest has been focused on homogeneous systems based on rhodium, iridium, and in particular ruthenium catalysts, which have proved to catalyze chemo- and stereoselective hydrogenations with remarkable efficiency. By contrast, osmium catalysts have received much less attention because they are considered less active on account of their slower ligand exchange kinetics. Thus, this area remained almost neglected until recent studies refuted these prejudices. The aim of this Account is to highlight the impressive developments achieved over the past few years by our and other groups on the design of new classes of osmium complexes and their applications in homogeneous catalytic reactions involving the hydrogenation of carbon-oxygen and carbon-nitrogen bonds by both HY and TH reactions as well as in alcohol deydrogenation (DHY) reactions. The work described in this Account demonstrates that osmium complexes are emerging as powerful catalysts for asymmetric and non-asymmetric syntheses, showing a remarkably high catalytic activity in HY and TH reactions of ketones, aldehydes, imines, and esters as well in DHY reactions of alcohols. Thus, for instance, the introduction of ligands with an NH function, possibly in combination with a

  17. Advanced acoustic cavity technology. [for hydrogen oxygen rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, W. S.; Oberg, C. L.; Kusak, L.

    1974-01-01

    A series of rocket motor firings was performed in a modified linear aerospike thrust chamber with the H2/O2 propellant combination to allow determination of the physical properties of the combustion gases in acoustic cavities located in the chamber side walls. A preliminary analytical study was first conducted to define theoretically both the appropriate cavity dimensions and the combustion gas flow field adjacent to the cavity openings. During the subsequent motor firings, cavity gas temperature profiles were measured and gas samples were withdrawn from the bottom of the cavities for compositional analysis by measurement of pressure/temperature variation and gas chromatography. Data were obtained with both radially and axially oriented cavities and with and without hydrogen bleed flow through the cavities. A simplified procedure was developed for predicting gas cavity and acoustic velocity for use in acoustic cavity design analyses.

  18. Efficiency and cost advantages of an advanced-technology nuclear electrolytic hydrogen-energy production facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donakowski, T. D.; Escher, W. J. D.; Gregory, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of an advanced-technology (viz., 1985 technology) nuclear-electrolytic water electrolysis facility was assessed for hydrogen production cost and efficiency expectations. The facility integrates (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) operating a binary work cycle, (2) direct-current (d-c) electricity generation via acyclic generators, and (3) high-current-density, high-pressure electrolyzers using a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE). All subsystems are close-coupled and optimally interfaced for hydrogen production alone (i.e., without separate production of electrical power). Pipeline-pressure hydrogen and oxygen are produced at 6900 kPa (1000 psi). We found that this advanced facility would produce hydrogen at costs that were approximately half those associated with contemporary-technology nuclear electrolysis: $5.36 versus $10.86/million Btu, respectively. The nuclear-heat-to-hydrogen-energy conversion efficiency for the advanced system was estimated as 43%, versus 25% for the contemporary system.

  19. NREL's Hydrogen-Powered Bus Serves as Showcase for Advanced Vehicle Technologies (AVT) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    Brochure describes the hydrogen-powered internal combustion engine (H2ICE) shuttle bus at NREL. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is funding the lease of the bus from Ford to demonstrate market-ready advanced technology vehicles to visitors at NREL.

  20. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; George Farthing; Dan Rowley; Tim R. Armstrong; M.K. Ferber; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

    2002-07-30

    Eltron Research Inc. and their team members are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, new cermet compositions were tested that demonstrated similar performance to previous materials. A 0.5-mm thick membrane achieved at H{sub 2} transport rate of 0.2 mL/min/cm{sup 2} at 950 C, which corresponded to an ambipolar conductivity of 3 x 10{sup -3} S/cm. Although these results were equivalent to those for other cermet compositions, this new composition might be useful if it demonstrates improved chemical or mechanical stability. Ceramic/ceramic composite membranes also were fabricated and tested; however, some reaction did occur between the proton- and electron-conducting phases, which likely compromised conductivity. This sample only achieved a H{sub 2} transport rate of {approx} 0.006 mL/min/cm{sup 2} and an ambipolar conductivity of {approx}4 x 10{sup -4} S/cm. Chemical stability tests were continued, and candidate ceramic membranes were found to react slightly with carbon monoxide under extreme testing conditions. A cermet

  1. Validation test of advanced technology for IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells: Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1992-01-01

    Individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen technology was advanced at NASA Lewis and under Lewis contracts with the intention of improving cycle life and performance. One advancement was to use 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte to improve cycle life. Another advancement was to modify the state-of-the-art cell design to eliminate identified failure modes. The modified design is referred to as the advanced design. A breakthrough in the low-earth-orbit (LEO) cycle life of IPV nickel-hydrogen cells has been previously reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte was about 40,000 LEO cycles compared to 3,500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH. The boiler plate test results are in the process of being validated using flight hardware and real time LEO testing at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NWSC), Crane, Indiana under a NASA Lewis Contract. An advanced 125 Ah IPV nickel-hydrogen cell was designed. The primary function of the advanced cell is to store and deliver energy for long-term, LEO spacecraft missions. The new features of this design are: (1) use of 26 percent rather than 31 percent KOH electrolyte; (2) use of a patented catalyzed wall wick; (3) use of serrated-edge separators to facilitate gaseous oxygen and hydrogen flow within the cell, while still maintaining physical contact with the wall wick for electrolyte management; and (4) use of a floating rather than a fixed stack (state-of-the-art) to accommodate nickel electrode expansion due to charge/discharge cycling. The significant improvements resulting from these innovations are: extended cycle life; enhanced thermal, electrolyte, and oxygen management; and accommodation of nickel electrode expansion. The advanced cell design is in the process of being validated using real time LEO cycle life testing of NWSC, Crane, Indiana. An update of validation test results confirming this technology is presented.

  2. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-06-01

    OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil

  3. Advanced Palladium Membrane Scale-up for Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Emerson, Sean; Magdefrau, Neal; She, Ying; Thibaud-Erkey, Catherine

    2012-10-31

    The main objective of this project was to construct, test, and demonstrate a Pd-Cu metallic tubular membrane micro-channel separator capable of producing 2 lb day{sup -1} H{sub 2} at 95% recovery when operating downstream of an actual coal gasifier. A key milestone for the project was to complete a pilot-scale gasifier test by 1 September 2011 and demonstrate the separation of 2 lb day{sup -1} H{sub 2} to verify progress toward the DOE's goals prior to down-selection for larger-scale (100 lb day{sup -1}) hydrogen separator development. Three different pilot-scale (1.5 ft{sup 2}) separators were evaluated downstream of coal gasifiers during four different tests and the key project milestone was achieved in August 2011, ahead of schedule. During three of those tests, all of the separators demonstrated or exceeded the targeted separation rate of 2 lb day{sup -1} H{sub 2}. The separator design was proved to be leak tight and durable in the presence of gasifier exhaust contaminants at temperatures and pressures up to 500 °C and 500 psia. The contaminants in the coal gasifier syngas for the most part had negligible impact on separator performance, with H{sub 2} partial pressure being the greatest determinant of membrane performance. Carbon monoxide and low levels of H{sub 2}S (<39 ppmv) had no effect on H{sub 2} permeability, in agreement with laboratory experiments. However, higher levels of H{sub 2}S (>100 ppmv) were shown to significantly reduce H{sub 2} separation performance. The presence of trace metals, including mercury and arsenic, appeared to have no effect based on the experimental data. Subscale Pd-Cu coupon tests further quantified the impact of H{sub 2}S on irreversible sulfide formation in the UTRC separators. Conditions that have a thermodynamic driving force to form coke were found to reduce the performance of the separators, presumably by blockage of effective separation area with carbon deposits. However, it was demonstrated that both in situ and ex

  4. Advanced chemical hydride-based hydrogen generation/storage system for fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Breault, R.W.; Rolfe, J.

    1998-08-01

    Because of the inherent advantages of high efficiency, environmental acceptability, and high modularity, fuel cells are potentially attractive power supplies. Worldwide concerns over clean environments have revitalized research efforts on developing fuel cell vehicles (FCV). As a result of intensive research efforts, most of the subsystem technology for FCV`s are currently well established. These include: high power density PEM fuel cells, control systems, thermal management technology, and secondary power sources for hybrid operation. For mobile applications, however, supply of hydrogen or fuel for fuel cell operation poses a significant logistic problem. To supply high purity hydrogen for FCV operation, Thermo Power`s Advanced Technology Group is developing an advanced hydrogen storage technology. In this approach, a metal hydride/organic slurry is used as the hydrogen carrier and storage media. At the point of use, high purity hydrogen will be produced by reacting the metal hydride/organic slurry with water. In addition, Thermo Power has conceived the paths for recovery and regeneration of the spent hydride (practically metal hydroxide). The fluid-like nature of the spent hydride/organic slurry will provide a unique opportunity for pumping, transporting, and storing these materials. The final product of the program will be a user-friendly and relatively high energy storage density hydrogen supply system for fuel cell operation. In addition, the spent hydride can relatively easily be collected at the pumping station and regenerated utilizing renewable sources, such as biomass, natural, or coal, at the central processing plants. Therefore, the entire process will be economically favorable and environmentally friendly.

  5. A preliminary systems-engineering study of an advanced nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen-production facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, W. J. D.; Donakowski, T. D.; Tison, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    An advanced nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen-production facility concept was synthesized at a conceptual level with the objective of minimizing estimated hydrogen-production costs. The concept is a closely-integrated, fully-dedicated (only hydrogen energy is produced) system whose components and subsystems are predicted on ''1985 technology.'' The principal components are: (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) operating a helium-Brayton/ammonia-Rankine binary cycle with a helium reactor-core exit temperature of 980 C, (2) acyclic d-c generators, (3) high-pressure, high-current-density electrolyzers based on solid-polymer electrolyte technology. Based on an assumed 3,000 MWt HTGR the facility is capable of producing 8.7 million std cu m/day of hydrogen at pipeline conditions, 6,900 kPa. Coproduct oxygen is also available at pipeline conditions at one-half this volume. It has further been shown that the incorporation of advanced technology provides an overall efficiency of about 43 percent, as compared with 25 percent for a contemporary nuclear-electric plant powering close-coupled contemporary industrial electrolyzers.

  6. Biomass thermochemical gasification: Experimental studies and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay

    The overall goals of this research were to study the biomass thermochemical gasification using experimental and modeling techniques, and to evaluate the cost of industrial gas production and combined heat and power generation. This dissertation includes an extensive review of progresses in biomass thermochemical gasification. Product gases from biomass gasification can be converted to biopower, biofuels and chemicals. However, for its viable commercial applications, the study summarizes the technical challenges in the gasification and downstream processing of product gas. Corn stover and dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), a non-fermentable byproduct of ethanol production, were used as the biomass feedstocks. One of the objectives was to determine selected physical and chemical properties of corn stover related to thermochemical conversion. The parameters of the reaction kinetics for weight loss were obtained. The next objective was to investigate the effects of temperature, steam to biomass ratio and equivalence ratio on gas composition and efficiencies. DDGS gasification was performed on a lab-scale fluidized-bed gasifier with steam and air as fluidizing and oxidizing agents. Increasing the temperature resulted in increases in hydrogen and methane contents and efficiencies. A model was developed to simulate the performance of a lab-scale gasifier using Aspen Plus(TM) software. Mass balance, energy balance and minimization of Gibbs free energy were applied for the gasification to determine the product gas composition. The final objective was to optimize the process by maximizing the net energy efficiency, and to estimate the cost of industrial gas, and combined heat and power (CHP) at a biomass feedrate of 2000 kg/h. The selling price of gas was estimated to be 11.49/GJ for corn stover, and 13.08/GJ for DDGS. For CHP generation, the electrical and net efficiencies were 37 and 86%, respectively for corn stover, and 34 and 78%, respectively for DDGS. For

  7. Advances in the biotechnology of hydrogen production with the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Torzillo, Giuseppe; Scoma, Alberto; Faraloni, Cecilia; Giannelli, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Biological hydrogen production is being evaluated for use as a fuel, since it is a promising substitute for carbonaceous fuels owing to its high conversion efficiency and high specific energy content. The basic advantages of biological hydrogen production over other "green" energy sources are that it does not compete for agricultural land use, and it does not pollute, as water is the only by-product of the combustion. These characteristics make hydrogen a suitable fuel for the future. Among several biotechnological approaches, photobiological hydrogen production carried out by green microalgae has been intensively investigated in recent years. A select group of photosynthetic organisms has evolved the ability to harness light energy to drive hydrogen gas production from water. Of these, the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is considered one of the most promising eukaryotic H2 producers. In this model microorganism, light energy, H2O and H2 are linked by two excellent catalysts, the photosystem 2 (PSII) and the [FeFe]-hydrogenase, in a pathway usually referred to as direct biophotolysis. This review summarizes the main advances made over the past decade as an outcome of the discovery of the sulfur-deprivation process. Both the scientific and technical barriers that need to be overcome before H2 photoproduction can be scaled up to an industrial level are examined. Actual and theoretical limits of the efficiency of the process are also discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on algal biohydrogen production outdoors, and guidelines for an optimal photobioreactor design are suggested. PMID:24754449

  8. Validation test of advanced technology for IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells - Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1992-01-01

    Individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen technology was advanced at NASA Lewis and under Lewis contracts with the intention of improving cycle life and performance. One advancement was to use 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte to improve cycle life. Another advancement was to modify the state-of-the-art cell design to eliminate identified failure modes. The modified design is referred to as the advanced design. A breakthrough in the LEO cycle life of IPV nickel-hydrogen cells has been previously reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte was about 40,000 LEO cycles compared to 3,500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH. The boiler plate test results are in the process of being validated using flight hardware and real time LEO testing. The primary function of the advanced cell is to store and deliver energy for long-term, LEO spacecraft missions. The new features of this design are: (1) use of 26 percent rather than 31 percent KOH electrolyte; (2) use of a patented catalyzed wall wick; (3) use of serrated-edge separators to facilitate gaseous oxygen and hydrogen flow within the cell, while still maintaining physical contact with the wall wick for electrolyte management; and (4) use of a floating rather than a fixed stack (state-of-the-art) to accommodate nickel electrode expansion due to charge/discharge cycling. The significant improvements resulting from these innovations are: extended cycle life; enhanced thermal, electrolyte, and oxygen management; and accommodation of nickel electrode expansion.

  9. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power for the period February 01, 2001- April 30, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L. C.

    2002-09-01

    OAK B188 High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power for the period February 01, 2001-April 30, 2002. Future nuclear reactors will operate at higher efficiencies and, therefore, at higher temperature than current reactors. High temperatures present the potential for generating hydrogen at high efficiency using a thermochemical process. Thermochemical cycles for the generation of hydrogen from water were extensively studied in the 1970s and early 1980s both in the U.S. and abroad. Since that time, thermochemical water-splitting has not been pursued in the U.S. at any significant level. In Phase 1, we reviewed and analyzed all available data to determine the process best suited to hydrogen production from the advanced nuclear reactors expected to be available in the next 20 to 30 years. The Sulfur-Iodine Cycle was selected for detailed study in Phases 2 and 3. In Phase 2, we investigated means of adapting this cycle to the heat output characteristics of an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor. In Phase 3, we are integrating the cycle and reactor into a unified hydrogen production plant. The highlight of this period was that the scheme of processing the HI/I{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O phase with phosphoric acid is being considered in addition to the reactive distillation scheme.

  10. Validation test of 125 Ah advanced design IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1993-01-01

    An update of validation test results confirming the advanced design nickel-hydrogen cell is presented. An advanced 125 Ah individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen cell was designed. The primary function of the advanced cell is to store and deliver energy for long-term, Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) spacecraft missions. The new features of this design, which are not incorporated in state-of-the-art design cells, are: (1) use of 26 percent rather than 31 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte; (2) use of a patented catalyzed wall wick; (3) use of serrated-edge separators to facilitate gaseous oxygen and hydrogen flow within the cell, while still maintaining physical contact with the wall wick for electrolyte management; and (4) use of a floating rather than a fixed stack (state-of-the-art) to accommodate nickel electrode expansion due to charge/discharge cycling. The significant improvements resulting from these innovations are extended cycle life; enhanced thermal, electrolyte, and oxygen management; and accommodation of nickel electrode expansion. Six 125 Ah flight cells based on this design were fabricated by Eagle-Picher. Three of the cells contain all of the advanced features (test cells) and three are the same as the test cells except they do not have catalyst on the wall wick (control cells). All six cells are in the process of being evaluated in a LEO cycle life test at the Naval Weapons Support Center, Crane, IN, under a NASA Lewis Research Center contract. The catalyzed wall wick cells have been cycled for over 19000 cycles with no cell failures in the continuing test. Two of the noncatalyzed wall wick cells failed (cycles 9588 and 13,900).

  11. Development of advanced compact railguns for injection of hypervelocity hydrogen pellets into magnetic fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, M.W.; Anderson, M.A.; Kim, K.; Feng, Q.; Zhang, J.; King, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    The authors have designed, fabricated, and tested a number of compact railguns utilizing a variety of gun geometries, augmentation schemes, and state-of-the-art rail and insulator materials in order to develop an injector that can accelerate pellets of hydrogen isotopes to very high velocities ({approximately}10 km/s) continuously and at high repetition rates for refueling magnetically confined fusion plasmas. These advanced guns are designed to achieve two goals: to minimize or eliminate gunwall erosion and to produce the maximum possible pellet acceleration. These closely related goals assure long gun lifetimes. Using an advanced transaugmented compact gun with an acceleration length of only 45-cm, they have recently achieved hydrogen pellet velocities as high as 2.2 km/s with a time-averaged pellet acceleration of 4.7 {times} 10{sup 6} m/s{sup 2} at a modest rail current of 10 kA. This paper includes a brief overview of the railgun control and diagnostic systems and discusses recent results of the railgun experiments using both plexiglass and cryogenic hydrogen pellets.

  12. Effect of LEO cycling on 125 Ah advanced design IPV nickel-hydrogen battery cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1990-01-01

    An advanced 125 Ah individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen cell was designed. The primary function of the advanced cell is to store and deliver energy for long-term, low earth-orbit (LEO) spacecraft missions. The new features of this design are: (1) use of 26 percent rather than 31 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte, (2) use of a patented catalyzed wall wick, (3) use of serrated-edge separators to facilitate gaseous oxygen and hydrogen flow within the cell, while still maintaining physical contact with the wall wick for electrolyte management, and (4) use of a floating rather than a fixed stack (state-of-the-art) to accommodate nickel electrode expansion. Six 125-Ah flight cells based on this design were fabricated by Eagle-Picher. Three of the cells contain all of the advanced features (test cells) and three are the same as the test cells except they don't have catalyst on the wall wick (control cells). All six cells are in the process of being evaluated in a LEO cycle life test. The cells have accumulated about 4700 LEO cycles (60 percent DOD 10 C). There have been no cell failures; the catalyzed wall wick cells, however, are performing better.

  13. Effect of LEO cycling on 125 Ah advanced design IPV nickel-hydrogen battery cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1990-01-01

    An advanced 125 Ah individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen cell was designed. The primary function of the advanced cell, is to store and deliver energy for long term, low earth-orbit (LEO) spacecraft missions. The new features of this design are: (1) use of 26 percent rather than 31 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte, (2) use of a patented catalyzed wall wick, (3) use of serrated edge separators to facilitate gaseous oxygen and hydrogen flow within the cell, while still maintaining physical contact with the wall wick for electrolyte management, and (4) use of a floating rather than a fixed stack (state-of-the-art) to accommodate nickel electrode expansion. Six 125 Ah flight cells based on this design were fabricated by Eagle-Picher. Three of the cells contain all of the advanced features (test cells) and three are the same as the test cells except they don't have catalyst on the wall wick (control cells). All six cells are in the process of being evaluated in a LEO cycle life test. The cells have accumulated about 4700 LEO cycles (60 percent DOD 10 C). There have been no cell failures, the catalyzed wall wick cells however, are performing better.

  14. Study of Advanced Railgun Hydrogen Pellet Injectors for Fusion Reactor Refueling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Tony Levone

    An advanced railgun system has been developed to assess its feasibility as a hypervelocity hydrogen pellet injector for magnetically confined plasmas. It consists of a pellet generator/gas gun assembly for freezing hydrogen pellets and injecting them into the railgun at velocities as high as 1.5 km/s. A plasma armature is formed by ionizing the low-Z propellant gas behind the pellet and firing the railgun. This fuseless operation prevents high-Z impurities from entering the reactor during pellet injection. The railgun system has several features that distinguish it from its predecessors, including: (1) a more compact, versatile pellet generator, (2) a new gas gun configuration that produces significantly higher pellet speeds, (3) a perforated coupling piece between the gas gun and railgun to prevent spurious arcing, and (4) ablation-resistant sidewalls, perforated sidewalls and transaugmentation to reduce inertial and viscous drag, the primary obstacles to achieving hypervelocity. A unique system of sophisticated controls and diagnostics has been assembled to operate the railgun system and assess its performance, including fully automated pellet freezing and gas gun operation, an automatic timing circuit that is immune to mistriggering caused by pellet fragmentation or electromagnetic interference, a streak camera, photostations, light gates, current trans formers, B-dot probes, laser interferometry and optical spectroscopy. Free-arc and hydrogen pellet experiments were conducted to evaluate various railgun designs. Transaugmented and simple railguns 1.2 and 2 m long were tested. The performances of railguns using Mullite, solid Lexan and perforated Lexan sidewalls were compared. The railgun theory of operation and anticipated losses are also examined. The theoretical predictions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The advanced railgun system has set several world records for bare hydrogen pellet velocity, including a 3.3 km/s shot on

  15. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Tasks 3 & 4 Report Economic, Energy, and Environmental Analysis of Hydrogen Production and Delivery Options in Select Alabama Markets: Preliminary Case Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Gillette, Jerry; Elgowainy, Amgad; Mintz, Marianne

    2007-12-01

    This report documents a set of case studies developed to estimate the cost of producing, storing, delivering, and dispensing hydrogen for light-duty vehicles for several scenarios involving metropolitan areas in Alabama. While the majority of the scenarios focused on centralized hydrogen production and pipeline delivery, alternative delivery modes were also examined. Although Alabama was used as the case study for this analysis, the results provide insights into the unique requirements for deploying hydrogen infrastructure in smaller urban and rural environments that lie outside the DOE’s high priority hydrogen deployment regions. Hydrogen production costs were estimated for three technologies – steam-methane reforming (SMR), coal gasification, and thermochemical water-splitting using advanced nuclear reactors. In all cases examined, SMR has the lowest production cost for the demands associated with metropolitan areas in Alabama. Although other production options may be less costly for larger hydrogen markets, these were not examined within the context of the case studies.

  16. Cesium Neonide: Molecule or Thermochemical Exercise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, P. G.; Clack, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    Thermochemical cycles are used to decide which hypothetical compounds might exist and, if not, what is the factor that condemns them to non-existence. Hypothetical compounds of rare gases provide examples of the approach with added historical interest that thermochemical considerations led to prediction and demonstration that XePtF-6 was stable.…

  17. Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program: 1986 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Wood and crop residues constitute a vast majority of the biomass feedstocks available for conversion, and thermochemical processes are well suited for conversion of these materials. Thermochemical conversion processes can generate a variety of products such as gasoline hydrocarbon fuels, natural gas substitutes, or heat energy for electric power generation. The US Department of Energy is sponsoring research on biomass conversion technologies through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been designated the Technical Field Management Office for the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program with overall responsibility for the Program. This report briefly describes the Thermochemical Conversion Program structure and summarizes the activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1986. 88 refs., 31 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Solar photochemical and thermochemical splitting of water.

    PubMed

    Rao, C N R; Lingampalli, S R; Dey, Sunita; Roy, Anand

    2016-02-28

    Artificial photosynthesis to carry out both the oxidation and the reduction of water has emerged to be an exciting area of research. It has been possible to photochemically generate oxygen by using a scheme similar to the Z-scheme, by using suitable catalysts in place of water-oxidation catalyst in the Z-scheme in natural photosynthesis. The best oxidation catalysts are found to be Co and Mn oxides with the e(1) g configuration. The more important aspects investigated pertain to the visible-light-induced generation of hydrogen by using semiconductor heterostructures of the type ZnO/Pt/Cd1-xZnxS and dye-sensitized semiconductors. In the case of heterostructures, good yields of H2 have been obtained. Modifications of the heterostructures, wherein Pt is replaced by NiO, and the oxide is substituted with different anions are discussed. MoS2 and MoSe2 in the 1T form yield high quantities of H2 when sensitized by Eosin Y. Two-step thermochemical splitting of H2O using metal oxide redox pairs provides a strategy to produce H2 and CO. Performance of the Ln0.5A0.5MnO3 (Ln = rare earth ion, A = Ca, Sr) family of perovskites is found to be promising in this context. The best results to date are found with Y0.5Sr0.5MnO3. PMID:26755752

  19. Recent advances on enzymatic glucose/oxygen and hydrogen/oxygen biofuel cells: Achievements and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosnier, Serge; J. Gross, Andrew; Le Goff, Alan; Holzinger, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The possibility of producing electrical power from chemical energy with biological catalysts has induced the development of biofuel cells as viable energy sources for powering portable and implanted electronic devices. These power sources employ biocatalysts, called enzymes, which are highly specific and catalytic towards the oxidation of a biofuel and the reduction of oxygen or hydrogen peroxide. Enzymes, on one hand, are promising candidates to replace expensive noble metal-based catalysts in fuel cell research. On the other hand, they offer the exciting prospect of a new generation of fuel cells which harvest energy from body fluids. Biofuel cells which use glucose as a fuel are particularly interesting for generating electricity to power electronic devices inside a living body. Hydrogen consuming biofuel cells represent an emerging alternative to platinum catalysts due to comparable efficiencies and the capability to operate at lower temperatures. Currently, these technologies are not competitive with existing commercialised fuel cell devices due to limitations including insufficient power outputs and lifetimes. The advantages and challenges facing glucose biofuel cells for implantation and hydrogen biofuel cells will be summarised along with recent promising advances and the future prospects of these exotic energy-harvesting devices.

  20. Lignin structural alterations in thermochemical pretreatments with limited delignification

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Yunqiao; Hu, Fan; Huang, Fang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-08-02

    Lignocellulosic biomass has a complex and rigid cell wall structure that makes biomass recalcitrant to biological and chemical degradation. Among the three major structural biopolymers (i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) in plant cell walls, lignin is considered the most recalcitrant component and generally plays a negative role in the biochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels. The conversion of biomass to biofuels through a biochemical platform usually requires a pretreatment stage to reduce the recalcitrance. Pretreatment renders compositional and structural changes of biomass with these changes ultimately govern the efficiency of the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Dilute acid, hot water, steam explosion, and ammonia fiber expansion pretreatments are among the leading thermochemical pretreatments with a limited delignification that can reduce biomass recalcitrance. Practical applications of these pretreatment are rapidly developing as illustrated by recent commercial scale cellulosic ethanol plants. While these thermochemical pretreatments generally lead to only a limited delignification and no significant change of lignin content in the pretreated biomass, the lignin transformations that occur during these pretreatments and the roles they play in recalcitrance reduction is an important research aspect. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of lignin alterations during these limited delignification thermochemical pretreatments, with emphasis on lignin chemical structures, molecular weights, and redistributions in the pretreated biomass.

  1. Lignin structural alterations in thermochemical pretreatments with limited delignification

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pu, Yunqiao; Hu, Fan; Huang, Fang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-08-02

    Lignocellulosic biomass has a complex and rigid cell wall structure that makes biomass recalcitrant to biological and chemical degradation. Among the three major structural biopolymers (i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) in plant cell walls, lignin is considered the most recalcitrant component and generally plays a negative role in the biochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels. The conversion of biomass to biofuels through a biochemical platform usually requires a pretreatment stage to reduce the recalcitrance. Pretreatment renders compositional and structural changes of biomass with these changes ultimately govern the efficiency of the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Dilute acid, hot water, steam explosion,more » and ammonia fiber expansion pretreatments are among the leading thermochemical pretreatments with a limited delignification that can reduce biomass recalcitrance. Practical applications of these pretreatment are rapidly developing as illustrated by recent commercial scale cellulosic ethanol plants. While these thermochemical pretreatments generally lead to only a limited delignification and no significant change of lignin content in the pretreated biomass, the lignin transformations that occur during these pretreatments and the roles they play in recalcitrance reduction is an important research aspect. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of lignin alterations during these limited delignification thermochemical pretreatments, with emphasis on lignin chemical structures, molecular weights, and redistributions in the pretreated biomass.« less

  2. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Low-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend Ford F-150 Operating Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-22

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 16,942 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 30% hydrogen/70% CNG fuel.

  3. Hydrogen Production from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    M. Patterson; C. Park

    2008-03-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor that will be capable of producing hydrogen, electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial use. The project has initiated the conceptual design phase and when completed will demonstrate the viability of hydrogen generation using nuclear produced process heat. This paper explains how industry and the U.S. Government are cooperating to advance nuclear hydrogen technology. It also describes the issues being explored and the results of recent R&D including materials development and testing, thermal-fluids research, and systems analysis. The paper also describes the hydrogen production technologies being considered (including various thermochemical processes and high-temperature electrolysis).

  4. Biomass thermochemical conversion program: 1987 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program is to generate a base of scientific data and conversion process information that will lead to establishment of cost-effective processes for conversion of biomass resources into clean fuels. To accomplish this objective, in fiscal year 1987 the Thermochemical Conversion Program sponsored research activities in the following four areas: Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology; Gasification Technology; Direct Combustion Technology; Program Support Activities. In this report an overview of the Thermochemical Conversion Program is presented. Specific research projects are then described. Major accomplishments for 1987 are summarized.

  5. Biomass thermochemical conversion program. 1985 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Wood and crop residues constitute a vast majority of the biomass feedstocks available for conversion, and thermochemical processes are well suited for conversion of these materials. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research on this conversion technology for renewable energy through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The Program is part of DOE's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division, Office of Renewable Technologies. This report briefly describes the Thermochemical Conversion Program structure and summarizes the activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1985. 32 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Validation test of 125 Ah advanced design IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1993-01-01

    An update of validation test results confirming the advanced design nickel-hydrogen cell is presented. An advanced 125 Ah individual pressure vessel Ni-H cell was designed. The primary function of the advanced cell is to store and deliver energy for long-term LEO spacecraft missions. The new features of this design are: (1) use of 26 percent rather than 31 percent KOH electrolyte; (2) use of a patented catalyzed wall wick; (3) use of serrated-edge separators to facilitate gaseous O and H flow within the cell, while maintaining physical contact with the wall wick for electrolyte management; and (4) use of a floating rather than a fixed stack to accommodate Ni electrode expansion due to charge/discharge cycling. The significant improvements resulting from these innovations are extended cycle life; enhanced thermal, electrolyte, and oxygen management; and accommodation of Ni electrode expansion. Six 125 Ah flight cells based on this design were fabricated; the catalyzed wall wick cells have been cycled for over 19,000 cycles with no cell failures in the continuing test. Two of the noncatalyzed wall wick cells failed (cycles 9588 and 13,900).

  7. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: High-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend Ford F-150 Operating Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-22

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents the results of 4,695 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 50% hydrogen-50% CNG fuel.

  8. Recent advances in SRS on hydrogen isotope separation using thermal cycling absorption process

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.; Kit Heung, L.; Sessions, H.T.

    2015-03-15

    TCAP (Thermal Cycling Absorption Process) is a gas chromatograph in principle using palladium in the column packing, but it is unique in the fact that the carrier gas, hydrogen, is being isotopically separated and the system is operated in a semi-continuous manner. TCAP units are used to purify tritium. The recent TCAP advances at Savannah River Site (SRS) include compressor-free concept for heating/cooling, push and pull separation using an active inverse column, and compact column design. The new developments allow significantly higher throughput and better reliability from 1/10 of the current production system's footprint while consuming 60% less energy. Various versions are derived in the meantime for external customers to be used in fusion energy projects.

  9. Initial performance of advanced designs for IPV nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.

    1986-01-01

    Advanced designs for individual pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen cells have been conceived which should improve the cycle life at deep depths-of-discharge and improve thermal management. Features of the designs which are new and not incorporated in either of the contemporary cells (Air Force/Hughes, Comsat) are: (1) use of alternate methods of oxygen recombination, (2) use of serrated edge separators to facilitate movement of gas within the cell while still maintaining required physical contact with the wall wick, and (3) use of an expandable stack to accommodate some of the nickel electrode expansion. The designs also consider electrolyte volume requirements over the life of the cells, and are fully compatible with the Air Force/Hughes design.

  10. Initial performance of advanced designs for IPV nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced designs for individual pressure vessel nickel hydrogen cells were conceived which should improve the life cycle at deep depths of discharge and improve thermal management. Features of the designs which are new and not incorporated in either of the contemporary cells (Air Force/Hughes, Comsat) are: (1) the use of alternate methods of oxygen recombination, (2) use of serrated edge separators to facilitate movement of gas within the cell while still maintaining required physical contact with the wall wick, and (3) use of an expandable stack to accommodate some of the nickel electrode expansion. The designs also consider electrolyte volume requirements over the life of the cells, and are fully compatible with the Air Force/Hughes design.

  11. Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Swain; Greg M.

    2009-04-13

    The original funding under this project number was awarded for a period 12/1999 until 12/2002 under the project title Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications. The project was extended until 06/2003 at which time a renewal proposal was awarded for a period 06/2003 until 06/2008 under the project title Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes. The work under DE-FG02-01ER15120 was initiated about the time the PI moved his research group from the Department of Chemistry at Utah State University to the Department of Chemistry at Michigan State University. This DOE-funded research was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder.

  12. Preparation of different carbon materials by thermochemical conversion of Lignin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas, Juana; Berenguer, Raul; Valero-Romero, Maria; Rodriguez-Mirasol, Jose; Cordero, Tomás

    2014-12-01

    Lignin valorization plays a crucial role within the modern biorefinery scheme from both the economic and environmental points of view; and the structure and composition of lignin becomes it an ideal precursor for the preparation of advanced carbon materials with high added-value. This review provides an overview of the different carbonaceous materials obtained by thermochemical conversion of lignin, such as activated carbons, carbon fibers, template carbons; high ordered carbons; giving information about the new strategies in terms of the preparation method and their possible applications.

  13. Treatment of coking wastewater by an advanced Fenton oxidation process using iron powder and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Chu, Libing; Wang, Jianlong; Dong, Jing; Liu, Haiyang; Sun, Xulin

    2012-01-01

    In this study the treatment of coking wastewater was investigated by an advanced Fenton oxidation process using iron powder and hydrogen peroxide. Particular attention was paid to the effect of initial pH, dosage of H(2)O(2) and to improvement in biodegradation. The results showed that higher COD and total phenol removal rates were achieved with a decrease in initial pH and an increase in H(2)O(2) dosage. At an initial pH of less than 6.5 and H(2)O(2) concentration of 0.3 M, COD removal reached 44-50% and approximately 95% of total phenol removal was achieved at a reaction time of 1 h. The oxygen uptake rate of the effluent measured at a reaction time of 1h increased by approximately 65% compared to that of the raw coking wastewater. This indicated that biodegradation of the coking wastewater was significantly improved. Several organic compounds, including bifuran, quinoline, resorcinol and benzofuranol were removed completely as determined by GC-MS analysis. The advanced Fenton oxidation process is an effective pretreatment method for the removal of organic pollutants from coking wastewater. This process increases biodegradation, and may be combined with a classical biological process to achieve effluent of high quality. PMID:22014660

  14. Advances in interactive supported electrocatalysts for hydrogen and oxygen electrode reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstajic, Nedeljko V.; Vracar, Ljiljana M.; Radmilovic, Velimir R.; Neophytides, Stelios G.; Labou, Miranda; Jaksic, Jelena M.; Tunold, Reidar; Falaras, Polycarpos; Jaksic, Milan M.

    2007-05-01

    Magneli phases [A. Magneli, Acta Chem. Scand. 13 (1959) 5] have been introduced as a unique electron conductive and interactive support for electrocatalysis both in hydrogen (HELR) and oxygen (OELR) electrode reactions in water electrolysis and Low Temperature PEM Fuel Cells (LT PEM FC). The Strong Metal-Support Interaction (SMSI) that imposes the former implies: (i) the hypo-hyper-d-interbonding effect and its catalytic consequences, and (ii) the interactive primary oxide (M-OH) spillover from the hypo-d-oxide support as a dynamic electrocatalytic contribution. The stronger the bonding, the more strained appear d-orbitals, thereby the less strong the intermediate adsorptive strength in the rate determining step (RDS), and consequently, the faster the facilitated catalytic electrode reaction arises. At the same time the primary oxide spillover transferred from the hypo-d-oxide support directly interferes and reacts either individually and directly to contribute to finish the oxygen reduction, or with other interactive species, like CO to contribute to the CO tolerance. In such a respect, the conditions to provide Au to act as the reversible hydrogen electrode have been proved either by its potentiodynamic surface reconstruction in a heavy water solution, or by the nanostructured SMSI Au on anatase titania with characteristic strained d-orbitals in such a hypo-hyper-d-interactive bonding (Au/TiO 2). In the same context, some spontaneous tendency towards monoatomic network dispersion of Pt upon Magneli phases makes it possible to produce an advanced interactive supported electrocatalyst for cathodic oxygen reduction (ORR). The strained hypo-hyper-d-interelectronic and inter-d-orbital metal/hypo-d-oxide support bonding relative to the strength of the latter, has been inferred to be the basis of the synergistic electrocatalytic effect both in the HELR and ORR.

  15. Development of advanced manufacturing technologies for low cost hydrogen storage vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, Mark; Lam, Patrick

    2014-12-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defined a need for low-cost gaseous hydrogen storage vessels at 700 bar to support cost goals aimed at 500,000 units per year. Existing filament winding processes produce a pressure vessel that is structurally inefficient, requiring more carbon fiber for manufacturing reasons, than would otherwise be necessary. Carbon fiber is the greatest cost driver in building a hydrogen pressure vessel. The objective of this project is to develop new methods for manufacturing Type IV pressure vessels for hydrogen storage with the purpose of lowering the overall product cost through an innovative hybrid process of optimizing composite usage by combining traditional filament winding (FW) and advanced fiber placement (AFP) techniques. A numbers of vessels were manufactured in this project. The latest vessel design passed all the critical tests on the hybrid design per European Commission (EC) 79-2009 standard except the extreme temperature cycle test. The tests passed include burst test, cycle test, accelerated stress rupture test and drop test. It was discovered the location where AFP and FW overlap for load transfer could be weakened during hydraulic cycling at 85°C. To design a vessel that passed these tests, the in-house modeling software was updated to add capability to start and stop fiber layers to simulate the AFP process. The original in-house software was developed for filament winding only. Alternative fiber was also investigated in this project, but the added mass impacted the vessel cost negatively due to the lower performance from the alternative fiber. Overall the project was a success to show the hybrid design is a viable solution to reduce fiber usage, thus driving down the cost of fuel storage vessels. Based on DOE’s baseline vessel size of 147.3L and 91kg, the 129L vessel (scaled to DOE baseline) in this project shows a 32% composite savings and 20% cost savings when comparing Vessel 15 hybrid design and the Quantum

  16. Thermochemical gasification of high-moisture biomass feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, R.S.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Elliott, D.C.

    1985-02-14

    A significant energy resource base exists in the Midwest in the form of crop residues and wastes. Estimates have been made that this resource is on the magnitude of 1.5 Quads (1 Quad = 10/sup 15/ Btu's). One obstacle to the full utilization of this resource is the high moisture content of many crop residues. A DOE-funded research program being conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory is investigating a low-temperature, mixed catalyst thermochemical system which efficiently converts high-moisture biomass to a medium Btu gas consisting of methane and hydrogen. Experimental data indicates that carbon conversions in excess of 90% may be obtained. Feedstock slurries containing up to 95% moisture have been used successfully in the batch reactor. Feedstocks used in the system include sorghum, sunflowers, napier grass, aquatic plants and food processing wastes. The ability to convert high-moisture biomass to fuels via this thermochemical process may allow greater utilization of the significant biomass resource base which exists in the Mdwest. 6 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Update of Hydrogen from Biomass -- Determination of the Delivered Cost of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Spath, P. L.; Mann, M. K.; Amos, W. A.

    2003-12-01

    Milestone report summarizing the economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass via (1) gasification/reforming of the resulting syngas and (2) fast pyrolysis/reforming of the resulting bio-oil. Hydrogen has the potential to be a clean alternative to the fossil fuels currently used in the transportation sector. This is especially true if the hydrogen is manufactured from renewable resources, primarily sunlight, wind, and biomass. Analyses have been conducted to assess the economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass via two thermochemical processes: (1) gasification followed by reforming of the syngas, and (2) fast pyrolysis followed by reforming of the carbohydrate fraction of the bio-oil. This study was conducted to update previous analyses of these processes in order to include recent experimental advances and any changes in direction from previous analyses. The systems examined were gasification in the Battelle/FERCO low pressure indirectly-heated gasifier followed by steam reforming, gasification in the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) high pressure direct-fired gasifier followed by steam reforming, and pyrolysis followed by coproduct separation and steam reforming. In each process, water-gas shift is used to convert the reformed gas into hydrogen, and pressure swing adsorption is used to purify the product. The delivered cost of hydrogen, as well as the plant gate hydrogen selling price, were determined. All analyses included Latin Hypercube sampling to obtain a detailed sensitivity analysis.

  18. Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. 1983 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1984-08-01

    Highlights of progress achieved in the program of thermochemical conversion of biomass into clean fuels during 1983 are summarized. Gasification research projects include: production of a medium-Btu gas without using purified oxygen at Battelle-Columbus Laboratories; high pressure (up to 500 psia) steam-oxygen gasification of biomass in a fluidized bed reactor at IGT; producing synthesis gas via catalytic gasification at PNL; indirect reactor heating methods at the Univ. of Missouri-Rolla and Texas Tech Univ.; improving the reliability, performance, and acceptability of small air-blown gasifiers at Univ. of Florida-Gainesville, Rocky Creek Farm Gasogens, and Cal Recovery Systems. Liquefaction projects include: determination of individual sequential pyrolysis mechanisms at SERI; research at SERI on a unique entrained, ablative fast pyrolysis reactor for supplying the heat fluxes required for fast pyrolysis; work at BNL on rapid pyrolysis of biomass in an atmosphere of methane to increase the yields of olefin and BTX products; research at the Georgia Inst. of Tech. on an entrained rapid pyrolysis reactor to produce higher yields of pyrolysis oil; research on an advanced concept to liquefy very concentrated biomass slurries in an integrated extruder/static mixer reactor at the Univ. of Arizona; and research at PNL on the characterization and upgrading of direct liquefaction oils including research to lower oxygen content and viscosity of the product. Combustion projects include: research on a directly fired wood combustor/gas turbine system at Aerospace Research Corp.; adaptation of Stirling engine external combustion systems to biomass fuels at United Stirling, Inc.; and theoretical modeling and experimental verification of biomass combustion behavior at JPL to increase biomass combustion efficiency and examine the effects of additives on combustion rates. 26 figures, 1 table.

  19. Hydrogen from renewable resources. Monthly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Rocheleau, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes activities for September 1995 for the following areas of Hydrogen Production Task: Photobiological production; Photoelectrochemical production; and, Thermochemical production of hydrogen from wet biomass. For the Hydrogen Storage Task, these areas are addressed: Reversible catalytic dehydrogenation of cycloalkanes by polyhydride complexes; and, Polyhydride systems engineering.

  20. Effect of LEO cycling on 125 Ah advanced design IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells. An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1991-01-01

    Validation testing of the NASA Lewis 125 Ah advanced design individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen flight cells was conducted. Work consisted of characterization, storage, and cycle life testing. There was no capacity degradation after 52 days of storage with the cells in the discharged state, an open circuit, 0 C, and a hydrogen pressure of 14.5 psia. The catalyzed wall wick cells were cycled for over 11,000 cycles with no cell failures in the continuing test. One of the noncatalyzed wall wick cells failed.

  1. Recent advances in the study of hydrogen embrittlement at the University of Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Ian M. ,; Liang, Y.; Teter, D. F.; Aravas, N.; Sofronis, Petros,

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent work at the University of Illinois on the fundamental mechanisms of hydrogen embrittlement. Our approach combines experimental and theoretical methods. We describe the theoretical work on hydride formation and its application to hydrogen embrittlement of Ti alloys through the stress-induced hydride formation and cleavage mechanism, the localization of shear due to solute hydrogen, and finally, we present experimental evidence that favors the decohesion mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement in a P-Ti alloy.

  2. Advanced thermal barrier coatings for operation in high hydrogen content fueled gas turbines.

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Sanjay

    2015-04-02

    The Center for Thermal Spray Research (CTSR) at Stony Brook University in partnership with its industrial Consortium for Thermal Spray Technology is investigating science and technology related to advanced metallic alloy bond coats and ceramic thermal barrier coatings for applications in the hot section of gasified coal-based high hydrogen turbine power systems. In conjunction with our OEM partners (GE and Siemens) and through strategic partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (materials degradation group and high temperature materials laboratory), a systems approach, considering all components of the TBC (multilayer ceramic top coat, metallic bond coat & superalloy substrate) is being taken during multi-layered coating design, process development and subsequent environmental testing. Recent advances in process science and advanced in situ thermal spray coating property measurement enabled within CTSR has been incorporated for full-field enhancement of coating and process reliability. The development of bond coat processing during this program explored various aspects of processing and microstructure and linked them to performance. The determination of the bond coat material was carried out during the initial stages of the program. Based on tests conducted both at Stony Brook University as well as those carried out at ORNL it was determined that the NiCoCrAlYHfSi (Amdry) bond coats had considerable benefits over NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Since the studies were also conducted at different cycling frequencies, thereby addressing an associated need for performance under different loading conditions, the Amdry bond coat was selected as the material of choice going forward in the program. With initial investigations focused on the fabrication of HVOF bond coats and the performance of TBC under furnace cycle tests , several processing strategies were developed. Two-layered HVOF bond coats were developed to render optimal balance of density and surface roughness

  3. Recent advances in the study of structural materials compatibility with hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Dadfarnia, M; Novak, P; Ahn, D C; Liu, J B; Sofronis, P; Johnson, D D; Robertson, I M

    2010-03-12

    Hydrogen is a ubiquitous element that enters materials from many different sources. It almost always has a deleterious effect on mechanical properties. In non-hydride-forming systems, research to date has identified hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity and hydrogen-induced decohesion as two viable mechanisms for embrittlement. However, a fracture prediction methodology that associates macroscopic parameters with the degradation mechanisms at the microscale has not been established, as of yet. In this article, we report recent work on modeling and simulation of hydrogen-induced crack initiation and growth. Our goal is to develop methodologies to relate characteristics of the degradation mechanisms from microscopic observations and first-principles calculations with macroscopic indices of embrittlement. The approach we use involves finite element analysis of the coupled hydrogen transport problem with hydrogen-assisted elastoplastic deformation, thermodynamic theories of decohesion, and ab initio density functional theory calculations of the hydrogen effect on grain boundaries. PMID:20217854

  4. Continuous thermochemical conversion process to produce oil from swine manure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ocfemia, K.; Zhang, Y.; Funk, T.; Christianson, L.; Chen, S.

    2004-01-01

    Thermochemical conversion (TCC) of livestock manure is a novel technology that has shown very promising results in treating waste and producing oil. A batch TCC system that was previously developed successfully converted 70% of swine manure volatile solids to oil and reduced manure chemical oxygen demand by ??? 75%. The necessary retention time to achieve an oil product was largely dependent on the operating temperature. The highest oil production efficiency was 80% of the volatile solids (or 70 wt % of the total solids). The average carbon and hydrogen contents were ??? 72 and 9%, respectively. The heating values for 80% of the oil products ranged from 32,000 to 36,700 kJ/kg. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the AWMA 97th Annual Conference and Exhibition (Indianapolis, IN 6/22-25/2004).

  5. Parametric Evaluation of Large-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Using Different Advanced Nuclear Reactor Heat Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring

    2009-09-01

    High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE), when coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 °C to 950 °C, has the potential to efficiently produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs. To evaluate the potential benefits of nuclear-driven hydrogen production, the UniSim process analysis software was used to evaluate different reactor concepts coupled to a reference HTE process design concept. The reference HTE concept included an Intermediate Heat Exchanger and intermediate helium loop to separate the reactor primary system from the HTE process loops and additional heat exchangers to transfer reactor heat from the intermediate loop to the HTE process loops. The two process loops consisted of the water/steam loop feeding the cathode side of a HTE electrolysis stack, and the sweep gas loop used to remove oxygen from the anode side. The UniSim model of the process loops included pumps to circulate the working fluids and heat exchangers to recover heat from the oxygen and hydrogen product streams to improve the overall hydrogen production efficiencies. The reference HTE process loop model was coupled to separate UniSim models developed for three different advanced reactor concepts (a high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept and two different supercritical CO2 reactor concepts). Sensitivity studies were then performed to evaluate the affect of reactor outlet temperature on the power cycle efficiency and overall hydrogen production efficiency for each of the reactor power cycles. The results of these sensitivity studies showed that overall power cycle and hydrogen production efficiencies increased with reactor outlet temperature, but the power cycles producing the highest efficiencies varied depending on the temperature range considered.

  6. Thermochemical energy storage with ammonia: Aiming for the sunshot cost target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavine, Adrienne S.; Lovegrove, Keith M.; Jordan, Joshua; Anleu, Gabriela Bran; Chen, Chen; Aryafar, Hamarz; Sepulveda, Abdon

    2016-05-01

    Thermochemical energy storage has the potential to reduce the cost of concentrating solar thermal power. This paper presents recent advances in ammonia-based thermochemical energy storage (TCES), supported by an award from the U.S. Dept. of Energy SunShot program. Advances have been made in three areas: identification of promising approaches for underground containment of the gaseous products of the dissociation reaction, demonstration that ammonia synthesis can be used to generate steam for a supercritical-steam Rankine cycle, and a preliminary design for integration of the endothermic reactors within a tower receiver. Based on these advances, ammonia-based TCES shows promise to meet the 15/kWht SunShot cost target.

  7. Safe Hydrogen Generation by Nuclear HTR

    SciTech Connect

    Sochet, Isabelle; Viossat, Anne-Laure; Rouyer, Jean-Loup

    2004-07-01

    Several concepts of new high temperature nuclear reactors are designed to generate electricity and hydrogen. Hydrogen processes envisaged here are sulfur iodine thermo-chemical process and high temperature electrolysis. Proximity of hydrogen generation is a safety challenge for nuclear reactor. This paper describes prevention and protection against hydrogen hazards as a function of inventories and type of operation of the processes. This study is important for the designers because long distance between reactor and hydrogen facility induces difficult technological equipment. (authors)

  8. Advanced Fuels Reactor using Aneutronic Rodless Ultra Low Aspect Ratio Tokamak Hydrogenic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Celso

    2015-11-01

    The use of advanced fuels for fusion reactor is conventionally envisaged for field reversed configuration (FRC) devices. It is proposed here a preliminary study about the use of these fuels but on an aneutronic Rodless Ultra Low Aspect Ratio (RULART) hydrogenic plasmas. The idea is to inject micro-size boron pellets vertically at the inboard side (HFS, where TF is very high and the tokamak electron temperature is relatively low because of profile), synchronised with a proton NBI pointed to this region. Therefore, p-B reactions should occur and alpha particles produced. These pellets will act as an edge-like disturbance only (cp. killer pellet, although the vertical HFS should make this less critical, since the unablated part should appear in the bottom of the device). The boron cloud will appear at midplance, possibly as a MARFE-look like. Scaling of the p-B reactions by varying the NBI energy should be compared with the predictions of nuclear physics. This could be an alternative to the FRC approach, without the difficulties of the optimization of the FRC low confinement time. Instead, a robust good tokamak confinement with high local HFS TF (enhanced due to the ultra low aspect ratio and low pitch angle) is used. The plasma central post makes the RULART concept attractive because of the proximity of NBI path and also because a fraction of born alphas will cross the plasma post and dragged into it in the direction of the central plasma post current, escaping vertically into a hole in the bias plate and reaching the direct electricity converter, such as in the FRC concept.

  9. An experimental test plan for the characterization of molten salt thermochemical properties in heat transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pattrick Calderoni

    2010-09-01

    Molten salts are considered within the Very High Temperature Reactor program as heat transfer media because of their intrinsically favorable thermo-physical properties at temperatures starting from 300 C and extending up to 1200 C. In this context two main applications of molten salt are considered, both involving fluoride-based materials: as primary coolants for a heterogeneous fuel reactor core and as secondary heat transport medium to a helium power cycle for electricity generation or other processing plants, such as hydrogen production. The reference design concept here considered is the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), which is a large passively safe reactor that uses solid graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel (similar to that used in gas-cooled reactors) and a molten salt primary and secondary coolant with peak temperatures between 700 and 1000 C, depending upon the application. However, the considerations included in this report apply to any high temperature system employing fluoride salts as heat transfer fluid, including intermediate heat exchangers for gas-cooled reactor concepts and homogenous molten salt concepts, and extending also to fast reactors, accelerator-driven systems and fusion energy systems. The purpose of this report is to identify the technical issues related to the thermo-physical and thermo-chemical properties of the molten salts that would require experimental characterization in order to proceed with a credible design of heat transfer systems and their subsequent safety evaluation and licensing. In particular, the report outlines an experimental R&D test plan that would have to be incorporated as part of the design and operation of an engineering scaled facility aimed at validating molten salt heat transfer components, such as Intermediate Heat Exchangers. This report builds on a previous review of thermo-physical properties and thermo-chemical characteristics of candidate molten salt coolants that was generated as part of the

  10. Intro to NREL's Thermochemical Pilot Plant

    ScienceCinema

    Magrini, Kim

    2014-06-10

    NREL's Thermochemical Pilot Plant converts biomass into higher hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals.NREL is researching biomass pyrolysis. The lab is examining how to upgrade bio-oils via stabilization. Along with this, NREL is developing the engineering system requirements for producing these fuels and chemicals at larger scales.

  11. Intro to NREL's Thermochemical Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Magrini, Kim

    2013-09-27

    NREL's Thermochemical Pilot Plant converts biomass into higher hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals.NREL is researching biomass pyrolysis. The lab is examining how to upgrade bio-oils via stabilization. Along with this, NREL is developing the engineering system requirements for producing these fuels and chemicals at larger scales.

  12. 1982 annual report: Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the Thermochemical Conversion Program's activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1982. The objective of the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program is to generate scientific data and fundamental biomass converison process information that, in the long term, could lead to establishment of cost effective processes for conversion of biomass resources into clean fuels and petrochemical substitutes. The goal of the program is to improve the data base for biomass conversion by investigating the fundamental aspects of conversion technologies and exploring those parameters which are critical to these conversion processes. To achieve this objective and goal, the Thermochemical Conversion Program is sponsoring high-risk, long-term research with high payoff potential which industry is not currently sponsoring, nor is likely to support. Thermochemical conversion processes employ elevated temperatures to convert biomass materials into energy. Process examples include: combustion to produce heat, steam, electricity, direct mechanical power; gasification to produce fuel gas or synthesis gases for the production of methanol and hydrocarbon fuels; direct liquefaction to produce heavy oils or distillates; and pyrolysis to produce a mixture of oils, fuel gases, and char. A bibliography of publications for 1982 is included.

  13. 2009 Thermochemical Conversion Platform Review Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, John

    2009-12-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Thermochemical Conversion platform review meeting, held on April 14-16, 2009, at the Sheraton Denver Downtown, Denver, Colorado.

  14. Thermochemical characteristics of chitosan-polylactide copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goruynova, P. E.; Larina, V. N.; Smirnova, N. N.; Tsverova, N. E.; Smirnova, L. A.

    2016-05-01

    The energies of combustion of chitosan and its block-copolymers with different polylactide contents are determined in a static bomb calorimeter. Standard enthalpies of combustion and formation are calculated for these substances. The dependences of the thermochemical characteristics on block-copolymer composition are determined and discussed.

  15. Thermochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-06-01

    The state-of-the-art thermochemical conversion pilot plant includes several configurable, complementary unit operations for testing and developing various reactors, filters, catalysts, and other unit operations. NREL engineers and scientists as well as clients can test new processes and feedstocks in a timely, cost-effective, and safe manner to obtain extensive performance data on processes or equipment.

  16. Advanced Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) nickel-hydrogen spacecraft cell and battery design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, Dwaine; Wright, Doug; Repplinger, Ron

    1995-01-01

    The dependent pressure vessel (DPV) nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) battery is being developed as a potential spacecraft battery design for both military and commercial satellites. Individual pressure vessel (IPV) NiH2 batteries are currently flying on more than 70 Earth orbital satellites and have accumulated more than 140,000,000 cell-hours in actual spacecraft operation. The limitations of standard NiH2 IPV flight battery technology are primarily related to the internal cell design and the battery packaging issues associated with grouping multiple cylindrical cells. The DPV cell design offers higher specific energy and reduced cost, while retaining the established IPV NiH2 technology flight heritage and database. The advanced cell design offers a more efficient mechanical, electrical and thermal cell configuration and a reduced parts count. The internal electrode stack is a prismatic flat-plate arrangement. The flat individual cell pressure vessel provides a maximum direct thermal path for removing heat from the electrode stack. The cell geometry also minimizes multiple-cell battery packaging constraints by using an established end-plateltie-rod battery design. A major design advantage is that the battery support structure is efficiently required to restrain only the force applied to a portion of the end cell. As the cells are stacked in series to achieve the desired system voltage, this increment of the total battery weight becomes small. The geometry of the DPV cell promotes compact, minimum volume packaging and places all cell terminals along the length of the battery. The resulting ability to minimize intercell wiring offers additional design simplicity and significant weight savings. The DPV battery design offers significant cost and weight savings advantages while providing minimal design risks. Cell and battery level design issues will be addressed including mechanical, electrical and thermal design aspects. A design performance analysis will be presented at both

  17. Advanced Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) nickel-hydrogen spacecraft cell and battery design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, Dwaine; Wright, Doug; Repplinger, Ron

    1995-04-01

    The dependent pressure vessel (DPV) nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) battery is being developed as a potential spacecraft battery design for both military and commercial satellites. Individual pressure vessel (IPV) NiH2 batteries are currently flying on more than 70 Earth orbital satellites and have accumulated more than 140,000,000 cell-hours in actual spacecraft operation. The limitations of standard NiH2 IPV flight battery technology are primarily related to the internal cell design and the battery packaging issues associated with grouping multiple cylindrical cells. The DPV cell design offers higher specific energy and reduced cost, while retaining the established IPV NiH2 technology flight heritage and database. The advanced cell design offers a more efficient mechanical, electrical and thermal cell configuration and a reduced parts count. The internal electrode stack is a prismatic flat-plate arrangement. The flat individual cell pressure vessel provides a maximum direct thermal path for removing heat from the electrode stack. The cell geometry also minimizes multiple-cell battery packaging constraints by using an established end-plateltie-rod battery design. A major design advantage is that the battery support structure is efficiently required to restrain only the force applied to a portion of the end cell. As the cells are stacked in series to achieve the desired system voltage, this increment of the total battery weight becomes small. The geometry of the DPV cell promotes compact, minimum volume packaging and places all cell terminals along the length of the battery. The resulting ability to minimize intercell wiring offers additional design simplicity and significant weight savings. The DPV battery design offers significant cost and weight savings advantages while providing minimal design risks. Cell and battery level design issues will be addressed including mechanical, electrical and thermal design aspects. A design performance analysis will be presented at both

  18. Thermochemical Modeling of the Uranium-Cerium-Oxygen System

    SciTech Connect

    Voit, Stewart L; Besmann, Theodore M

    2010-10-01

    The objective of the Fuel Cycle R&D Program, Advanced Fuels campaign is to provide the research and development necessary to develop low loss, high quality nuclear fuels for ultra-high burnup reactor operation. Primary work in this area will be focused on the ceramic and metallic fuel systems. The goal of the current work is to enhance the understanding of ceramic nuclear fuel thermochemistry to support fuel research and development efforts. The thermochemical behavior of oxide nuclear fuel under irradiation is dependent on the oxygen to metal ratio (O:M). In fluorite-structured fuel, the actinide metal cation is bonded with {approx}2 oxygen atoms on a crystal lattice and as the metal atoms fission, fission fragments and free oxygen are created. The resulting fission fragments will contain some oxide forming elements, however these are insufficient to bind to all the liberated oxygen and therefore, there is an average increase in O:M with fuel burnup. Some of the fission products also form species that will migrate to and react with the cladding surface in a phenomenon known as Fuel Clad Chemical Interaction (FCCI). Cladding corrosion is life-limiting so it is desirable to understand influencing factors, such as oxide thermochemistry, which can be used to guide the design and fabrication of higher burn up fuel. A phased oxide fuel thermochemical model development effort is underway within the Advanced Fuels Campaign. First models of binary oxide systems are developed. For nuclear fuel system this means U-O and transuranic systems such as Pu-O, Np-O and Am-O. Next, the binary systems will be combined to form pseudobinary systems such as U-Pu-O, etc. The model development effort requires the use of data to allow optimization based on known thermochemical parameters as a function of composition and temperature. Available data is mined from the literature and supplemented by experimental work as needed. Due to the difficulty of performing fuel fabrication development

  19. Electrochemical & Thermochemical Behavior of Cerium(IV) Oxide delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chueh, William C.

    The mixed-valent nature of nonstoichiometric ceria (CeO2-delta ) gives rise to a wide range of intriguing properties, such as mixed ionic and electronic conduction and oxygen storage. Surface and transport behavior in rare-earth (samaria) doped and undoped ceria were investigated, with particular emphasis on applications in electrochemical and thermochemical energy conversion processes such as fuel cells and solar fuel production. The electrochemical responses of bulk-processed ceria with porous Pt and Au electrodes were analyzed using 1-D and 2-D transport models to decouple surface reactions, near-surface transport and bulk transport. Combined experimental and numerical results indicate that hydrogen electro-oxidation and hydrolysis near open-circuit conditions occur preferentially over the ceria | gas interface rather than over the ceria | gas | metal interface, with the rate-limiting step likely to be either surface reaction or transport through the surface oxygen vacancy depletion layer. In addition, epitaxial thin films of ceria were grown on zirconia substrates using pulsed-laser deposition to examine electrocatalysis over well-defined microstructures. Physical models were derived to analyze the electrochemical impedance response. By varying the film thickness, interfacial and chemical capacitance were decoupled, with the latter shown to be proportional to the small polaron densities. The geometry of microfabricated metal current collectors (metal = Pt, Ni) was also systematically varied to investigate the relative activity of the ceria | gas and the ceria | metal | gas interfaces. The data suggests that the electrochemical activity of the metal-ceria composite is only weakly dependent on the metal due to the relatively high activity of the ceria | gas interface. In addition to electrochemical experiments, thermochemical reduction-oxidation studies were performed on ceria. It was shown that thermally-reduced ceria, upon exposure to H 2O and/or CO2, can be

  20. Hydrogen production from solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenstadt, M. M.; Cox, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    Three alternatives for hydrogen production from solar energy have been analyzed on both efficiency and economic grounds. The analysis shows that the alternative using solar energy followed by thermochemical decomposition of water to produce hydrogen is the optimum one. The other schemes considered were the direct conversion of solar energy to electricity by silicon cells and water electrolysis, and the use of solar energy to power a vapor cycle followed by electrical generation and electrolysis. The capital cost of hydrogen via the thermochemical alternative was estimated at $575/kW of hydrogen output or $3.15/million Btu. Although this cost appears high when compared with hydrogen from other primary energy sources or from fossil fuel, environmental and social costs which favor solar energy may prove this scheme feasible in the future.

  1. Hydrogen as an energy medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, K. E.

    1976-01-01

    Coal, though abundant in certain geographical locations of the USA poses environmental problems associated with its mining and combustion. Also, nuclear fission energy appears to have problems regarding safety and radioactive waste disposal that are as yet unresolved. The paper discusses hydrogen use and market projection along with energy sources for hydrogen production. Particular attention is given to hydrogen production technology as related to electrolysis and thermochemical water decomposition. Economics of hydrogen will ultimately be determined by the price and availability of future energy carriers such as electricity and synthetic natural gas. Thermochemical methods of hydrogen production appear to offer promise largely in the efficiency of energy conversion and in capital costs over electrolytic methods.

  2. Dehydrogenation of N2HX (X=2-4) by nitrogen atoms: thermochemical and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Spada, Rene Felipe Keidel; Ferrão, Luiz Fernando de Araujo; Roberto-Neto, Orlando; Machado, Francisco Bolivar Correto

    2013-11-21

    Thermochemical and kinetics of sequential hydrogen abstraction reactions from hydrazine by nitrogen atoms were studied. The dehydrogenation was divided in three steps, N2H4 + N, N2H3 + N, and N2H2 + N. The thermal rate constants were calculated within the framework of canonical variational theory, with zero and small curvature multidimensional tunnelling corrections. The reaction paths were computed with the BB1K/aug-cc-pVTZ method and the thermochemical properties were improved with the CCSD(T)/CBS//BB1K/aug-cc-pVTZ approach. The first dehydrogenation step presents the lowest rate constants, equal to 1.22 × 10(-20) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 298 K. PMID:24320320

  3. Ammonia synthesis for producing supercritical steam in the context of solar thermochemical energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Aryafar, Hamarz; Warrier, Gopinath; Lovegrove, Keith M.; Lavine, Adrienne S.

    2016-05-01

    In ammonia-based solar thermochemical energy storage systems, the stored energy is released when the hydrogen (H2) and nitrogen (N2) react exothermically to synthesize ammonia (NH3), providing thermal energy to a power block for electricity generation. However, ammonia synthesis has not yet been shown to reach temperatures consistent with the highest performance modern power blocks. Two similar ammonia synthesis reactors with different lengths have been used to study the ammonia synthesis reaction at high temperature and pressure and to begin the process of model improvement and validation. With the longer reactor, supercritical steam with flow rate up to 0.09 g/s has been heated from less than 350°C to ˜650°C. This result shows the technical feasibility of using ammonia-based thermochemical energy storage in a CSP plant with a supercritical steam Rankine cycle power block.

  4. Advancement of Systems Designs and Key Engineering Technologies for Materials Based Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    van Hassel, Bart A.

    2015-09-18

    UTRC lead the development of the Simulink Framework model that enables a comparison of different hydrogen storage systems on a common basis. The Simulink Framework model was disseminated on the www.HSECoE.org website that is hosted by NREL. UTRC contributed to a better understanding of the safety aspects of the proposed hydrogen storage systems. UTRC also participated in the Failure Mode and Effect Analysis of both the chemical- and the adsorbent-based hydrogen storage system during Phase 2 of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. UTRC designed a hydrogen storage system with a reversible metal hydride material in a compacted form for light-duty vehicles with a 5.6 kg H2 storage capacity, giving it a 300 miles range. It contains a heat exchanger that enables efficient cooling of the metal hydride material during hydrogen absorption in order to meet the 3.3 minute refueling time target. It has been shown through computation that the kinetics of hydrogen absorption of Ti-catalyzed NaAlH4 was ultimately limiting the rate of hydrogen absorption to 85% of the material capacity in 3.3 minutes. An inverse analysis was performed in order to determine the material property requirements in order for a metal hydride based hydrogen storage system to meet the DOE targets. Work on metal hydride storage systems was halted after the Phase 1 to Phase 2 review due to the lack of metal hydride materials with the required material properties. UTRC contributed to the design of a chemical hydrogen storage system by developing an adsorbent for removing the impurity ammonia from the hydrogen gas, by developing a system to meter the transport of Ammonia Borane (AB) powder to a thermolysis reactor, and by developing a gas-liquid-separator (GLS) for the separation of hydrogen gas from AB slurry in silicone oil. Stripping impurities from hydrogen gas is essential for a long life of the fuel cell system on board of a vehicle. Work on solid transport of AB was halted after the

  5. Thermochemical properties and contribution groups for ketene dimers and related structures from theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Morales, Giovanni; Martínez, Ramiro

    2009-07-30

    This research's main goals were to analyze ketene dimers' relative stability and expand group additivity value (GAV) methodology for estimating the thermochemical properties of high-weight ketene polymers (up to tetramers). The CBS-Q multilevel procedure and statistical thermodynamics were used for calculating the thermochemical properties of 20 cyclic structures, such as diketenes, cyclobutane-1,3-diones, cyclobut-2-enones and pyran-4-ones, as well as 57 acyclic base compounds organized into five groups. According to theoretical heat of formation predictions, diketene was found to be thermodynamically favored over cyclobutane-1,3-dione and its enol-tautomeric form (3-hydroxycyclobut-2-enone). This result did not agree with old combustion experiments. 3-Hydroxycyclobut-2-enone was found to be the least stable dimer and its reported experimental detection in solution may have been due to solvent effects. Substituted diketenes had lower stability than substituted cyclobutane-1,3-diones with an increased number of methyl substituents, suggesting that cyclobutane-1,3-dione type dimers are the major products because of thermodynamic control of alkylketene dimerization. Missing GAVs for the ketene dimers and related structures were calculated through linear regression on the 57 acyclic base compounds. Corrections for non next neighbor interactions (such as gauche, eclipses, and internal hydrogen bond) were needed for obtaining a highly accurate and precise regression model. To the best of our knowledge, the hydrogen bond correction for GAV methodology is the first reported in the literature; this correction was correlated to MP2/6-31Gdagger and HF/6-31Gdagger derived geometries to facilitate its application. GAVs assessed by the linear regression model were able to reproduce acyclic compounds' theoretical thermochemical properties and experimental heat of formation for acetylacetone. Ring formation and substituent position corrections were calculated by consecutively

  6. A web service infrastructure for thermochemical data.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Christopher P; Bhattacharjee, Subrata

    2008-07-01

    W3C standardized Web Services are becoming an increasingly popular middleware technology used to facilitate the open exchange of chemical data. While several projects in existence use Web Services to wrap existing commercial and open-source tools that mine chemical structure data, no Web Service infrastructure has yet been developed to compute thermochemical properties of substances. This work presents an infrastructure of Web Services for thermochemical data retrieval. Several examples are presented to demonstrate how our Web Services can be called from Java, through JavaScript using an AJAX methodology, and within commonly used commercial applications such as Microsoft Excel and MATLAB for use in computational work. We illustrate how a JANAF table, widely used by chemists and engineers, can be quickly reproduced through our Web Service infrastructure. PMID:18543903

  7. Biological hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Benemann, J.R.

    1995-11-01

    Biological hydrogen production can be accomplished by either thermochemical (gasification) conversion of woody biomass and agricultural residues or by microbiological processes that yield hydrogen gas from organic wastes or water. Biomass gasification is a well established technology; however, the synthesis gas produced, a mixture of CO and H{sub 2}, requires a shift reaction to convert the CO to H{sub 2}. Microbiological processes can carry out this reaction more efficiently than conventional catalysts, and may be more appropriate for the relatively small-scale of biomass gasification processes. Development of a microbial shift reaction may be a near-term practical application of microbial hydrogen production.

  8. H2FIRST: A partnership to advance hydrogen fueling station technology driving an optimal consumer experience.

    SciTech Connect

    Moen, Christopher D.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Pratt, Joseph William; Balfour, Bruce; Noma, Edwin Yoichi; Somerday, Brian P.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; K. Wipke; J. Kurtz; D. Terlip; K. Harrison; S. Sprik

    2014-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Office of Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) is establishing the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) partnership, led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). FCTO is establishing this partnership and the associated capabilities in support of H2USA, the public/private partnership launched in 2013. The H2FIRST partnership provides the research and technology acceleration support to enable the widespread deployment of hydrogen infrastructure for the robust fueling of light-duty fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV). H2FIRST will focus on improving private-sector economics, safety, availability and reliability, and consumer confidence for hydrogen fueling. This whitepaper outlines the goals, scope, activities associated with the H2FIRST partnership.

  9. Advanced fabrication techniques for hydrogen-cooled engine structures. Final report, October 1975-June 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Buchmann, O.A.; Arefian, V.V.; Warren, H.A.; Vuigner, A.A.; Pohlman, M.J.

    1985-11-01

    Described is a program for development of coolant passage geometries, material systems, and joining processes that will produce long-life hydrogen-cooled structures for scramjet applications. Tests were performed to establish basic material properties, and samples constructed and evaluated to substantiate fabrication processes and inspection techniques. Results of the study show that the basic goal of increasing the life of hydrogen-cooled structures two orders of magnitude relative to that of the Hypersonic Research Engine can be reached with available means. Estimated life is 19000 cycles for the channels and 16000 cycles for pin-fin coolant passage configurations using Nickel 201. Additional research is required to establish the fatigue characteristics of dissimilar-metal coolant passages (Nickel 201/Inconel 718) and to investigate the embrittling effects of the hydrogen coolant.

  10. Recent advances in transition metal phosphide nanomaterials: synthesis and applications in hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanmei; Zhang, Bin

    2016-03-14

    The urgent need of clean and renewable energy drives the exploration of effective strategies to produce molecular hydrogen. With the assistance of highly active non-noble metal electrocatalysts, electrolysis of water is becoming a promising candidate to generate pure hydrogen with low cost and high efficiency. Very recently, transition metal phosphides (TMPs) have been proven to be high performance catalysts with high activity, high stability, and nearly ∼100% Faradic efficiency in not only strong acidic solutions, but also in strong alkaline and neutral media for electrochemical hydrogen evolution. In this tutorial review, an overview of recent development of TMP nanomaterials as catalysts for hydrogen generation with high activity and stability is presented. The effects of phosphorus (P) on HER activity, and their synthetic methods of TMPs are briefly discussed. Then we will demonstrate the specific strategies to further improve the catalytic efficiency and stability of TMPs by structural engineering. Making use of TMPs as cocatalysts and catalysts in photochemical and photoelectrochemical water splitting is also discussed. Finally, some key challenges and issues which should not be ignored during the rapid development of TMPs are pointed out. These strategies and challenges of TMPs are instructive for designing other high-performance non-noble metal catalysts. PMID:26806563

  11. V1.6 Development of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Low Cost Hydrogen Storage Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, Mark; Lam, Patrick; Nelson, Karl M.; johnson, Brice A.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Ruiz, Antonio; Adams, Jesse

    2012-10-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an innovative manufacturing process for Type IV high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels, with the intent to significantly lower manufacturing costs. Part of the development is to integrate the features of high precision AFP and commercial FW. Evaluation of an alternative fiber to replace a portion of the baseline fiber will help to reduce costs further.

  12. Recent Advances on Hydrogenic Retention in ITER's Plasma-Facing Materials: BE, C, W.

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C H; Alimov, Kh; Bekris, N; Causey, R A; Clark, R.E.H.; Coad, J P; Davis, J W; Doerner, R P; Mayer, M; Pisarev, A; Roth, J

    2008-03-29

    Management of tritium inventory remains one of the grand challenges in the development of fusion energy and the choice of plasma-facing materials is a key factor for in-vessel tritium retention. The Atomic and Molecular Data Unit of the International Atomic Energy Agency organized a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the overall topic of tritium inventory in fusion reactors during the period 2001-2006. This dealt with hydrogenic retention in ITER's plasma-facing materials, Be, C, W, and in compounds (mixed materials) of these elements as well as tritium removal techniques. The results of the CRP are summarized in this article together with recommendations for ITER. Basic parameters of diffusivity, solubility and trapping in Be, C and W are reviewed. For Be, the development of open porosity can account for transient hydrogenic pumping but long term retention will be dominated by codeposition. Codeposition is also the dominant retention mechanism for carbon and remains a serious concern for both Be and C containing layers. Hydrogenic trapping in unirradiated tungsten is low but will increase with ion and neutron damage. Mixed materials will be formed in a tokamak and these can also retain significant amounts of hydrogen isotopes. Oxidative and photon-based techniques for detritiation of plasma-facing components are described.

  13. Thermochemical processes for hydrogen production by water decomposition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, D.D.

    1980-08-01

    The principal contributions of the research are in the area of gas-solid reactions, ranging from models and data interpretation for fundamental kinetics and mixing of solids to simulations of engineering scale reactors. Models were derived for simulating the heat and mass transfer processes inside the reactor and tested by experiments. The effects of surface renewal of solids on the mass transfer phenomena were studied and related to the solid mixing. Catalysis by selected additives were studied experimentally. The separate results were combined in a simulation study of industrial-scale rotary reactor performance. A study was made of the controlled decompositions of a series of inorganic sulfates and their common hydrates, carried out in a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA), a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC), and a Differential Thermal Analyzer (DTA). Various sample sizes, heating rates, and ambient atmospheres were used to demonstrate their influence on the results. The purposes of this study were to: (i) reveal intermediate compounds, (ii) determine the stable temperature range of each compound, and (iii) measure reaction kinetics. In addition, several solid additives: carbon, metal oxides, and sodium chloride, were demonstrated to have catalytic effects to varying degrees for the different salts.

  14. CuC1 thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Qinbai; Liu, Renxuan

    2012-01-03

    An electrochemical cell for producing copper having a dense graphite anode electrode and a dense graphite cathode electrode disposed in a CuCl solution. An anion exchange membrane made of poly(ethylene vinyl alcohol) and polyethylenimine cross-linked with a cross-linking agent selected from the group consisting of acetone, formaldehyde, glyoxal, glutaraldehyde, and mixtures thereof is disposed between the two electrodes.

  15. Membranes for H2 generation from nuclear powered thermochemical cycles.

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, Tina Maria; Ambrosini, Andrea; Garino, Terry J.; Gelbard, Fred; Leung, Kevin; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Iyer, Ratnasabapathy G.; Axness, Marlene

    2006-11-01

    In an effort to produce hydrogen without the unwanted greenhouse gas byproducts, high-temperature thermochemical cycles driven by heat from solar energy or next-generation nuclear power plants are being explored. The process being developed is the thermochemical production of Hydrogen. The Sulfur-Iodide (SI) cycle was deemed to be one of the most promising cycles to explore. The first step of the SI cycle involves the decomposition of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} into O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O at temperatures around 850 C. In-situ removal of O{sub 2} from this reaction pushes the equilibrium towards dissociation, thus increasing the overall efficiency of the decomposition reaction. A membrane is required for this oxygen separation step that is capable of withstanding the high temperatures and corrosive conditions inherent in this process. Mixed ionic-electronic perovskites and perovskite-related structures are potential materials for oxygen separation membranes owing to their robustness, ability to form dense ceramics, capacity to stabilize oxygen nonstoichiometry, and mixed ionic/electronic conductivity. Two oxide families with promising results were studied: the double-substituted perovskite A{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}Co{sub 1-y}B{sub y}O{sub 3-{delta}} (A=La, Y; B=Cr-Ni), in particular the family La{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}Co{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCM), and doped La{sub 2}Ni{sub 1-x}M{sub x}O{sub 4} (M = Cu, Zn). Materials and membranes were synthesized by solid state methods and characterized by X-ray and neutron diffraction, SEM, thermal analyses, calorimetry and conductivity. Furthermore, we were able to leverage our program with a DOE/NE sponsored H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} decomposition reactor study (at Sandia), in which our membranes were tested in the actual H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} decomposition step.

  16. Spontaneous combustion of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nusselt, Wilhelm; Pothmann, PH

    1923-01-01

    It is shown by the author's experiments that hydrogen which escapes to the atmosphere through openings in the system may burn spontaneously if it contains dust. Purely thermal reasoning can not account for the combustion. It seems to be rather an electrical ignition. In order to determine whether the cause of the spontaneous ignition was thermo-chemical, thermo-mechanical, or thermo-electrical, the experiments in this paper were performed.

  17. Thermochemical Process Development Unit: Researching Fuels from Biomass, Bioenergy Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-01-01

    The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique facility dedicated to researching thermochemical processes to produce fuels from biomass.

  18. Active Thermochemical Tables: Sequential Bond Dissociation Enthalpies of Methane, Ethane, and Methanol and the Related Thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Ruscic, Branko

    2015-07-16

    Active Thermochemical Tables (ATcT) thermochemistry for the sequential bond dissociations of methane, ethane, and methanol systems were obtained by analyzing and solving a very large thermochemical network (TN). Values for all possible C-H, C-C, C-O, and O-H bond dissociation enthalpies at 298.15 K (BDE298) and bond dissociation energies at 0 K (D0) are presented. The corresponding ATcT standard gas-phase enthalpies of formation of the resulting CHn, n = 4-0 species (methane, methyl, methylene, methylidyne, and carbon atom), C2Hn, n = 6-0 species (ethane, ethyl, ethylene, ethylidene, vinyl, ethylidyne, acetylene, vinylidene, ethynyl, and ethynylene), and COHn, n = 4-0 species (methanol, hydroxymethyl, methoxy, formaldehyde, hydroxymethylene, formyl, isoformyl, and carbon monoxide) are also presented. The ATcT thermochemistry of carbon dioxide, water, hydroxyl, and carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen atoms is also included, together with the sequential BDEs of CO2 and H2O. The provenances of the ATcT enthalpies of formation, which are quite distributed and involve a large number of relevant determinations, are analyzed by variance decomposition and discussed in terms of principal contributions. The underlying reasons for periodic appearances of remarkably low and/or unusually high BDEs, alternating along the dissociation sequences, are analyzed and quantitatively rationalized. The present ATcT results are the most accurate thermochemical values currently available for these species. PMID:25760799

  19. Application of Thermochemical Modeling to Assessment/Evaluation of Nuclear Fuel Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, Theodore M; McMurray, Jake W; Simunovic, Srdjan

    2016-01-01

    The combination of new fuel compositions and higher burn-ups envisioned for the future means that representing fuel properties will be much more important, and yet more complex. Behavior within the oxide fuel rods will be difficult to model owing to the high temperatures, and the large number of elements generated and their significant concentrations that are a result of fuels taken to high burn-up. This unprecedented complexity offers an enormous challenge to the thermochemical understanding of these systems and opportunities to advance solid solution models to describe these materials. This paper attempts to model and simulate that behavior using an oxide fuels thermochemical description to compute the equilibrium phase state and oxygen potential of LWR fuel under irradiation.

  20. A review of recent advances of numerical simulations of microscale fuel processors for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Wang, Yong

    2015-05-01

    Microscale (<5W) reformers for hydrogen production have been investigated for over a decade. These devices are intended to provide hydrogen for small fuel cells. Due to the reformer’s small size, numerical simulations are critical to understand heat and mass transfer phenomena occurring in the systems. This paper reviews the development of the numerical codes and details the reaction equations used. The majority of the devices utilized methanol as the fuel due to methanol’s low reforming temperature and high conversion, although, there are several methane fueled systems. As computational power has decreased in cost and increased in availability, the codes increased in complexity and accuracy. Initial models focused on the reformer, while more recently, the simulations began including other unit operations such as vaporizers, inlet manifolds, and combustors. These codes are critical for developing the next generation systems. The systems reviewed included, plate reactors, microchannel reactors, annulus reactors, wash-coated, packed bed systems.

  1. A review of recent advances in numerical simulations of microscale fuel processor for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holladay, J. D.; Wang, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Microscale (<5 W) reformers for hydrogen production have been investigated for over a decade. These devices are intended to provide hydrogen for small fuel cells. Due to the reformer's small size, numerical simulations are critical to understand heat and mass transfer phenomena occurring in the systems and help guide the further improvements. This paper reviews the development of the numerical codes and details the reaction equations used. The majority of the devices utilized methanol as the fuel due to methanol's low reforming temperature and high conversion, although, there are several methane fueled systems. The increased computational power and more complex codes have led to improved accuracy of numerical simulations. Initial models focused on the reformer, while more recently, the simulations began including other unit operations such as vaporizers, inlet manifolds, and combustors. These codes are critical for developing the next generation systems. The systems reviewed included plate reactors, microchannel reactors, and annulus reactors for both wash-coated and packed bed systems.

  2. Recent Advances in Hydrogen Peroxide Propulsion Test Capability at NASA's Stennis Space Center E-Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacks, Thomas E.; Beisler, Michele

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, the rocket propulsion test capability at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center's (SSC) E-Complex has been enhanced to include facilitization for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based ground testing. In particular, the E-3 test stand has conducted numerous test projects that have been reported in the open literature. These include combustion devices as simple as small-scale catalyst beds, and larger devices such as ablative thrust chambers and a flight-type engine (AR2-3). Consequently, the NASA SSC test engineering and operations knowledge base and infrastructure have grown considerably in order to conduct safe H2O2 test operations with a variety of test articles at the component and engine level. Currently, the E-Complex has a test requirement for a hydrogen peroxide based stage test. This new development, with its unique set of requirements, has motivated the facilitization for hydrogen peroxide propellant use at the E-2 Cell 2 test position in addition to E-3. Since the E-2 Cell 2 test position was not originally designed as a hydrogen peroxide test stand, a facility modernization-improvement project was planned and implemented in FY 2002-03 to enable this vertical engine test stand to accomodate H2O2. This paper discusses the ongoing enhancement of E-Complex ground test capability, specifically at the E-3 stand (Cell 1 and Cell 2) and E-2 Cell 2 stand, that enable current and future customers considerable test flexibility and operability in conducting their peroxide based rocket R&D efforts.

  3. Energy recovery during advanced wastewater treatment: simultaneous estrogenic activity removal and hydrogen production through solar photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenlong; Li, Yi; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Wang, Qing

    2013-03-01

    Simultaneous estrogenic activity removal and hydrogen production from secondary effluent were successfully achieved using TiO(2) microspheres modified with both platinum nanoparticles and phosphates (P-TiO(2)/Pt) for the first time. The coexistence of platinum and phosphate on the surface of TiO(2) microspheres was confirmed by transmission electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. P-TiO(2)/Pt microspheres showed a significantly higher photocatalytic activity than TiO(2) microspheres and TiO(2) powders (P25) for the removal of estrogenic activity from secondary effluent with the removal ratio of 100%, 58.2% and 48.5% in 200 min, respectively. Moreover, the marked production of hydrogen (photonic efficiency: 3.23 × 10(-3)) was accompanied by the removal of estrogenic activity only with P-TiO(2)/Pt as photocatalysts. The hydrogen production rate was increasing with decreased DO concentration in secondary effluent. Results of reactive oxygen species (ROS) evaluation during P-TiO(2)/Pt photocatalytic process showed that O(2)(-)and OH were dominant ROS in aerobic phase, while OH was the most abundant ROS in anoxic phase. Changes of effluent organic matter (EfOM) during photocatalysis revealed that aromatic, hydrophobic, and high molecular weight fractions of EfOM were preferentially transformed into non-humic, hydrophilic, and low MW fractions (e.g. aldehydes and carboxylic acids), which were continuously utilized as electron donors in hydrogen production process. PMID:23269320

  4. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August, 2000 - July 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.C.

    2002-11-01

    OAK B188 High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August 2000 - July 2001. Currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process is available for commercialization nor has such a process been identified. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. The benefits of this work will include the generation of a low-polluting transportable energy feedstock in an efficient method that has little or no implication for greenhouse gas emissions from a primary energy source whose availability and sources are domestically controlled. This will help to ensure energy for a future transportation/energy infrastructure that is not influenced/controlled by foreign governments. This report describes work accomplished during the second year (Phase 2) of a three year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first year (Phase 1) was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water, in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most, three) for further detailed consideration. Phase 1 met its goals and did select one process, the sulfur-iodine process, for investigation in Phases 2 and 3. The combined goals of Phases 2 and 3 were to select the advanced nuclear reactor best suited to driving the

  5. Thermochemical energy storage for a lunar base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Mckissock, Barbara I.; Difilippo, Frank

    1992-01-01

    A thermochemical solar energy storage concept involving the reversible reaction CaO + H2O yields Ca(OH)2 is proposed as a power system element for a lunar base. The operation and components of such a system are described. The CaO/H2O system is capable of generating electric power during both the day and night. Mass of the required amount of CaO is neglected since it is obtained from lunar soil. Potential technical problems, such as reactor design and lunar soil processing, are reviewed.

  6. Experimental Demonstration of Advanced Palladium Membrane Separators for Central High Purity Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Sean Emerson; Neal Magdefrau; Susanne Opalka; Ying She; Catherine Thibaud-Erkey; Thoman Vanderspurt; Rhonda Willigan

    2010-06-30

    The overall objectives for this project were to: (1) confirm the high stability and resistance of a PdCu trimetallic alloy to carbon and carbide formation and, in addition, resistance to sulfur, halides, and ammonia; (2) develop a sulfur, halide, and ammonia resistant alloy membrane with a projected hydrogen permeance of 25 m{sup 3}m{sup -2}atm{sup -0.5}h{sup -1} at 400 C and capable of operating at pressures of 12.1 MPa ({approx}120 atm, 1750 psia); and (3) construct and experimentally validate the performance of 0.1 kg/day H{sup 2} PdCu trimetallic alloy membrane separators at feed pressures of 2 MPa (290 psia) in the presence of H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, and HCl. This project successfully increased the technology readiness level of palladium-based metallic membranes for hydrogen separation from coal-biomass gasifier exhaust or similar hydrogen-containing gas streams. The reversible tolerance of palladium-copper (PdCu) alloys was demonstrated for H{sub 2}S concentrations varying from 20 ppmv up to 487 ppmv and NH{sub 3} concentrations up to 9 ppmv. In addition, atomistic modeling validated the resistance of PdCu alloys to carbon formation, irreversible sulfur corrosion, and chlorine attack. The experimental program highlighted two key issues which must be addressed as part of future experimental programs: (1) tube defects and (2) non-membrane materials of construction. Four out of five FCC PdCu separators developed leaks during the course of the experimental program because {approx}10% of the alloy tubes contained a single defect that resulted in a thin, weak point in the tube walls. These defects limited operation of the existing tubes to less than 220 psig. For commercial applications of a PdCu alloy hydrogen separator under high sulfur concentrations, it was determined that stainless steel 316 is not suitable for housing or supporting the device. Testing with sulfur concentrations of 487 {+-} 4 ppmv resulted in severe corrosion of the stainless steel components of

  7. TEA: A Code Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature–pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows & Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows & Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  8. CHEETAH: A next generation thermochemical code

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L.; Souers, P.

    1994-11-01

    CHEETAH is an effort to bring the TIGER thermochemical code into the 1990s. A wide variety of improvements have been made in Version 1.0. We have improved the robustness and ease of use of TIGER. All of TIGER`s solvers have been replaced by new algorithms. We find that CHEETAH solves a wider variety of problems with no user intervention (e.g. no guesses for the C-J state) than TIGER did. CHEETAH has been made simpler to use than TIGER; typical use of the code occurs with the new standard run command. CHEETAH will make the use of thermochemical codes more attractive to practical explosive formulators. We have also made an extensive effort to improve over the results of TIGER. CHEETAH`s version of the BKW equation of state (BKWC) is able to accurately reproduce energies from cylinder tests; something that other BKW parameter sets have been unable to do. Calculations performed with BKWC execute very quickly; typical run times are under 10 seconds on a workstation. In the future we plan to improve the underlying science in CHEETAH. More accurate equations of state will be used in the gas and the condensed phase. A kinetics capability will be added to the code that will predict reaction zone thickness. Further ease of use features will eventually be added; an automatic formulator that adjusts concentrations to match desired properties is planned.

  9. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER FINAL RECHNICAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 1, 1999 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2002 REV. 1

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH, RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-12-01

    OAK-B135 Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy [1-1,1-2]. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties [1-3,1-4]. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon

  10. High Temperature Oxidation of Silicon Carbide and Advanced Iron-Based Alloys in Steam-Hydrogen Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A; Keiser, James R; Brady, Michael P; Cheng, Ting; Silva, G W Chinthaka M; Pint, Bruce A; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2012-01-01

    A side by side comparison of the oxidation behavior of zirconium alloys with SiC materials and advanced iron-based alloys is provided. Oxidation tests were conducted in steam and steam-hydrogen environments at 800-1350 C and 0.34-2MPa for durations up to 48 hours. Monolithic SiC specimens as well as SiC/SiC composites were examined during the study where the material recession mechanism appeared to be governed by silica layer volatilization at the surface for CVD SiC. A wide set of austenitic and ferritic steels were also examined where a critical Cr content (>20 wt.%) was shown to be necessary to achieve oxidation resistance at high temperatures. SiC materials and alumina-forming ferritic steels exhibited slowest oxidation kinetics; roughly two orders of magnitude lower than zirconium alloys.

  11. Advances in Hydrogen, Carbon Dioxide, and Hydrocarbon Gas Sensor Technology Using GaN and ZnO-Based Devices

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Travis; Ren, Fan; Pearton, Stephen; Kang, Byoung Sam; Wang, Hung-Ta; Chang, Chih-Yang; Lin, Jenshan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we review our recent results in developing gas sensors for hydrogen using various device structures, including ZnO nanowires and GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs). ZnO nanowires are particularly interesting because they have a large surface area to volume ratio, which will improve sensitivity, and because they operate at low current levels, will have low power requirements in a sensor module. GaN-based devices offer the advantage of the HEMT structure, high temperature operation, and simple integration with existing fabrication technology and sensing systems. Improvements in sensitivity, recoverability, and reliability are presented. Also reported are demonstrations of detection of other gases, including CO2 and C2H4 using functionalized GaN HEMTs. This is critical for the development of lab-on-a-chip type systems and can provide a significant advance towards a market-ready sensor application. PMID:22408548

  12. An Analysis of Methanol and Hydrogen Production via High-Temperature Electrolysis Using the Sodium Cooled Advanced Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Richard D. Boardman; Robert S. Cherry; Wesley R. Deason; Michael G. McKellar

    2014-03-01

    Integration of an advanced, sodium-cooled fast spectrum reactor into nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) architectures is the focus of the present study. A techno-economic evaluation of several conceptual system designs was performed for the integration of a sodium-cooled Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR) with the electric grid in conjunction with wind-generated electricity. Cases in which excess thermal and electrical energy would be reapportioned within an integrated energy system to a chemical plant are presented. The process applications evaluated include hydrogen production via high temperature steam electrolysis and methanol production via steam methane reforming to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen which feed a methanol synthesis reactor. Three power cycles were considered for integration with the AFR, including subcritical and supercritical Rankine cycles and a modified supercritical carbon dioxide modified Brayton cycle. The thermal efficiencies of all of the modeled power conversions units were greater than 40%. A thermal efficiency of 42% was adopted in economic studies because two of the cycles either performed at that level or could potentially do so (subcritical Rankine and S-CO2 Brayton). Each of the evaluated hybrid architectures would be technically feasible but would demonstrate a different internal rate of return (IRR) as a function of multiple parameters; all evaluated configurations showed a positive IRR. As expected, integration of an AFR with a chemical plant increases the IRR when “must-take” wind-generated electricity is added to the energy system. Additional dynamic system analyses are recommended to draw detailed conclusions on the feasibility and economic benefits associated with AFR-hybrid energy system operation.

  13. SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE USING A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR IN ADVANCED FOSSIL ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2005-02-03

    Inorganic membrane reactors offer the possibility of combining reaction and separation in a single operation at high temperatures to overcome the equilibrium limitations experienced in conventional reactor configurations. Such attractive features can be advantageously utilized in a number of potential commercial opportunities, which include dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, oxidative dehydrogenation, oxidation and catalytic decomposition reactions. However, to be cost effective, significant technological advances and improvements will be required to solve several key issues which include: (a) permselective thin solid film, (b) thermal, chemical and mechanical stability of the film at high temperatures, and (c) reactor engineering and module development in relation to the development of effective seals at high temperature and high pressure. In this project, we are working on the development and application of palladium and palladium-silver alloy thin-film composite membranes in membrane reactor-separator configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at high temperature. From our research on Pd-composite membrane, we have demonstrated that the new membrane has significantly higher hydrogen flux with very high perm-selectivity than any of the membranes commercially available. The steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift in Pd-composite membrane reactor is being studied to demonstrate the potential application of this new development. A two-dimensional, pseudo-homogeneous membrane-reactor model was developed to investigate the steam-methane reforming (SMR) reactions in a Pd-based membrane reactor. Radial diffusion was taken into consideration to account for the concentration gradient in the radial direction due to hydrogen permeation through the membrane. With appropriate reaction rate expressions, a set of partial differential equations was derived using the continuity equation for the reaction system. The equations were

  14. Investigation of advanced nanostructured multijunction photoanodes for enhanced solar hydrogen generation via water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Hidetaka

    As the worldwide demand for fossil-based fuel increases every day and the fossil reserve continues to be depleted, the need for alternative/renewable energy sources has gained momentum. Electric, hybrid, and hydrogen cars have been at the center of discussion lately among consumers, automobile manufacturers, and politicians, alike. The development of a fuel-cell based engine using hydrogen has been an ambitious research area over the last few decades-ever since Fujishima showed that hydrogen can be generated via the solar-energy driven photo-electrolytic splitting of water. Such solar cells are known as Photo-Electro-Chemical (PEC) solar cells. In order to commercialize this technology, various challenges associated with photo-conversion efficiency, chemical corrosion resistance, and longevity need to be overcome. In general, metal oxide semiconductors such as titanium dioxide (TiO 2, titania) are excellent candidates for PEC solar cells. Titania nanotubes have several advantages, including biocompatibility and higher chemical stability. Nevertheless, they can absorb only 5-7% of the solar spectrum which makes it difficult to achieve the higher photo-conversion efficiency required for successful commercial applications. A two-prong approach was employed to enhance photo-conversion efficiency: 1) surface modification of titania nanotubes using plasma treatment and 2) nano-capping of the titania nanotubes using titanium disilicide. The plasma surface treatment with N2 was found to improve the photo-current efficiency of titania nanotubes by 55%. Similarly, a facile, novel approach of nano-capping titania nanotubes to enhance their photocurrent response was also investigated. Electrochemically anodized titania nanotubes were capped by coating a 25 nm layer of titanium disilicide using RF magnetron sputtering technique. The optical properties of titania nanotubes were not found to change due to the capping; however, a considerable increase (40%) in the photocurrent

  15. Analysis of quasi-hybrid solid rocket booster concepts for advanced earth-to-orbit vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurawski, Robert L.; Rapp, Douglas C.

    1987-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the feasibility of quasi-hybrid solid rocket boosters for advanced Earth-to-orbit vehicles. Thermochemical calculations were conducted to determine the effect of liquid hydrogen addition, solids composition change plus liquid hydrogen addition, and the addition of an aluminum/liquid hydrogen slurry on the theoretical performance of a PBAN solid propellant rocket. The space shuttle solid rocket booster was used as a reference point. All three quasi-hybrid systems theoretically offer higher specific impulse when compared with the space shuttle solid rocket boosters. However, based on operational and safety considerations, the quasi-hybrid rocket is not a practical choice for near-term Earth-to-orbit booster applications. Safety and technology issues pertinent to quasi-hybrid rocket systems are discussed.

  16. Ni-Si Alloys for the S-I Reactor-Hydrogen Production Process Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph W. Newkirk; Richard K. Brow

    2010-01-21

    The overall goal of this project was to develop Ni-Si alloys for use in vessels to contain hot, pressurized sulfuric acid. The application was to be in the decomposition loop of the thermochemical cycle for production of hydrogen.

  17. Recent Advances in SRS on Hydrogen Isotope Separation Using Thermal Cycling Absorption Process

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiao, Xin; Sessions, Henry T.; Heung, L. Kit

    2015-02-01

    The recent Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) advances at Savannah River Site (SRS) include compressor-free concept for heating/cooling, push and pull separation using an active inverse column, and compact column design. The new developments allow significantly higher throughput and better reliability from 1/10th of the current production system’s footprint while consuming 60% less energy. Various versions are derived in the meantime for external customers to be used in fusion energy projects and medical isotope production.

  18. SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE USING A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR IN ADVANCED FOSSIL ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2004-02-17

    Inorganic membrane reactors offer the possibility of combining reaction and separation in a single operation at high temperatures to overcome the equilibrium limitations experienced in conventional reactor configurations. Such attractive features can be advantageously utilized in a number of potential commercial opportunities, which include dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, oxidative dehydrogenation, oxidation and catalytic decomposition reactions. However, to be cost effective, significant technological advances and improvements will be required to solve several key issues which include: (a) permselective thin solid film, (b) thermal, chemical and mechanical stability of the film at high temperatures, and (c) reactor engineering and module development in relation to the development of effective seals at high temperature and high pressure. In this project, we are working on the development and application of palladium and palladium-silver alloy thin-film composite membranes in membrane reactor-separator configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at high temperature. From our research on Pd-composite membrane, we have demonstrated that the new membrane has significantly higher hydrogen flux with very high perm-selectivity than any of the membranes commercially available. The steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift in Pd-composite membrane reactor is being studied to demonstrate the potential application of this new development. A two-dimensional, pseudo-homogeneous membrane-reactor model was developed to investigate the steam-methane reforming (SMR) reactions in a Pd-based membrane reactor. Radial diffusion was taken into consideration to account for the concentration gradient in the radial direction due to hydrogen permeation through the membrane. With appropriate reaction rate expressions, a set of partial differential equations was derived using the continuity equation for the reaction system. The equations were

  19. Advanced Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) Nickel-Hydrogen Spacecraft Cell and Battery Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, Dwaine K.; Wright, R. Doug; Repplinger, Ron S.

    1996-01-01

    The dependent pressure vessel (DPV) nickel-hydrogen (Ni-H2) battery is being developed as a potential spacecraft battery design for both military and commercial satellites. Individual pressure vessel (IPV) Ni-H2 batteries are currently flying on more than 70 Earth-orbiting satellites and have accumulated more that 140,000,000 cell-hours in actual spacecraft operation. The limitations of standard Ni-H2 IPV flight battery technology are primarily related to the internal cell design and the battery packaging issues associated with grouping multiple cylindrical cells. The DPV cell design offers higher specific energy and reduced cost, while retaining the established IPV Ni-H2 technology flight heritage and database. A design performance analysis is presented at both the cell and battery level. The DPV is capable of delivering up to 76 Watthours per kilogram (Wh/kg) at the cell level and 70 Wh/kg at the full battery level. This represents a 40 percent increase in specific energy at the cell level and a 60 percent increase in specific energy at the battery level compared to current IPV Ni-H2 technology.

  20. Advanced electrolysis development for hydrogen-cycle peak shaving for electric utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, R.A.; Nuttall, L.J.

    1982-09-01

    Meeting peak power demands can impose limiting conditions on generation, transmission, and distribution equipment in the electric utility network--especially around urban areas. Utilization of a cost-effective energy storage system capable of being located near the load centers could improve load factors and maximize utilization of installed capital equipment. A hydrogen-cycle peak-shaving system (HCPS) can be sited in populated areas, imposing no environmental concerns, and providing considerable flexibility not only in meeting peak load demands, but also in helping to meet varying system load-growth patterns. Several possible configurations for an HCPS are described, together with a summary of the features and benefits. An alternate ''dispersed'' HCPS system is also described for use by a combined electric and gas utility. One of the key elements in an HCPS system is an efficient, cost-effective water electrolysis unit. The General Electric Company has been working with the Niagara Mohawk Power Company, and others, since 1976 on the development of a unique solid-polymer electrolyte (SPE) electrolysis system which offers considerably higher efficiencies and potentially lower capital cost as compared with conventional commercial alkaline electrolyzers. The current status of this development program is discussed.

  1. Studies of thermochemical water-splitting cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remick, R. J.; Foh, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    Higher temperatures and more isothermal heat profiles of solar heat sources are developed. The metal oxide metal sulfate class of cycles were suited for solar heat sources. Electrochemical oxidation of SO2 and thermochemical reactions are presented. Electrolytic oxidation of sulfur dioxide in dilute sulfuric acid solutions were appropriate for metal oxide metal sulfate cycles. The cell voltage at workable current densities required for the oxidation of SO2 was critical to the efficient operation of any metal oxide metal sulfate cycle. A sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolysis cell for the splitting of water via optimization of the anode reaction is discussed. Sulfuric acid concentrations of 30 to 35 weight percent are preferred. Platinized platinum or smooth platinum gave the best anode kinetics at a given potential of the five materials examined.

  2. Plasmadynamic effects in thermochemical nonequilibrium aerobrake flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.; Shebalin, J. V.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses modifications to the governing equations of thermochemical nonequilibrium flow to include plasmadynamic effects. The magnetic field about a 1.1-m nose-radius aerobrake entering the earth's atmosphere at 80-km altitude and traveling 12 km/s is computed. The result of coupling the additional terms into the Langley Aerothermodynamics Upwind Relaxation Algorithm indicate that plasmadynamic effects are negligible for this two-temperature Mars-return aerobraking simulation. By examining the magnitude of the ohmic heating and observing a decrease in this heating when coupling terms are included in the two-temperature solution, it is argued that a three-temperature solution should not produce any different conclusions for aerobraking into the earth's atmosphere.

  3. Integrated solar reforming for thermochemical energy transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenman, T.

    1987-12-01

    This report presents a design study of two reforming processes as applied to the concept of solar thermochemical energy transport. Conceptual designs were carried out for steam-methane and CO2-methane reforming plants. A solar central receiver reformer was designed as an integrated reactor with the chemical reaction tubes placed inside the receiver cavity. The two plant designs were compared for their energy efficiency and capital cost. The CO2 reforming plant design results in higher energy efficiency but requires a catalyst which is still in an experimental stage of development. A third design was performed as a modification of the steam reforming plant utilizing a Direct Contact system, in which the process steam is generated by utilizing the heat of condensation. This system resulted in the highest energy efficiency. A comparison of the capital cost of these three plant designs shows them to be equivalent within the estimation accuracy of 25 percent.

  4. CHEETAH: A fast thermochemical code for detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L.E.

    1993-11-01

    For more than 20 years, TIGER has been the benchmark thermochemical code in the energetic materials community. TIGER has been widely used because it gives good detonation parameters in a very short period of time. Despite its success, TIGER is beginning to show its age. The program`s chemical equilibrium solver frequently crashes, especially when dealing with many chemical species. It often fails to find the C-J point. Finally, there are many inconveniences for the user stemming from the programs roots in pre-modern FORTRAN. These inconveniences often lead to mistakes in preparing input files and thus erroneous results. We are producing a modern version of TIGER, which combines the best features of the old program with new capabilities, better computational algorithms, and improved packaging. The new code, which will evolve out of TIGER in the next few years, will be called ``CHEETAH.`` Many of the capabilities that will be put into CHEETAH are inspired by the thermochemical code CHEQ. The new capabilities of CHEETAH are: calculate trace levels of chemical compounds for environmental analysis; kinetics capability: CHEETAH will predict chemical compositions as a function of time given individual chemical reaction rates. Initial application: carbon condensation; CHEETAH will incorporate partial reactions; CHEETAH will be based on computer-optimized JCZ3 and BKW parameters. These parameters will be fit to over 20 years of data collected at LLNL. We will run CHEETAH thousands of times to determine the best possible parameter sets; CHEETAH will fit C-J data to JWL`s,and also predict full-wall and half-wall cylinder velocities.

  5. Dehydrogenation of N{sub 2}H{sub X} (X = 2 − 4) by nitrogen atoms: Thermochemical and kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Spada, Rene Felipe Keidel; Araujo Ferrão, Luiz Fernando de; Roberto-Neto, Orlando; Machado, Francisco Bolivar Correto

    2013-11-21

    Thermochemical and kinetics of sequential hydrogen abstraction reactions from hydrazine by nitrogen atoms were studied. The dehydrogenation was divided in three steps, N{sub 2}H{sub 4} + N, N{sub 2}H{sub 3} + N, and N{sub 2}H{sub 2} + N. The thermal rate constants were calculated within the framework of canonical variational theory, with zero and small curvature multidimensional tunnelling corrections. The reaction paths were computed with the BB1K/aug-cc-pVTZ method and the thermochemical properties were improved with the CCSD(T)/CBS//BB1K/aug-cc-pVTZ approach. The first dehydrogenation step presents the lowest rate constants, equal to 1.22 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup −1} s{sup −1} at 298 K.

  6. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review. Thermochemical Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Grabowski, Paul E.

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Thermochemical Conversion Platform Review meeting.

  7. Maximizing Efficiency in Two-step Solar-thermochemical Fuel Production

    SciTech Connect

    Ermanoski, I.

    2015-05-01

    Widespread solar fuel production depends on its economic viability, largely driven by the solar-to-fuel conversion efficiency. Herein, the material and energy requirements in two-step solar-thermochemical cyclesare considered.The need for advanced redox active materials is demonstrated, by considering the oxide mass flow requirements at a large scale. Two approaches are also identified for maximizing the efficiency: optimizing reaction temperatures, and minimizing the pressure in the thermal reduction step by staged thermal reduction. The results show that each approach individually, and especially the two in conjunction, result in significant efficiency gains.

  8. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research.

    PubMed

    Lampert, M; Anda, G; Czopf, A; Erdei, G; Guszejnov, D; Kovácsik, Á; Pokol, G I; Réfy, D; Nam, Y U; Zoletnik, S

    2015-07-01

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera's measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties. PMID:26233377

  9. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, M.; Anda, G.; Réfy, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Czopf, A.; Erdei, G.; Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I.; Nam, Y. U.

    2015-07-15

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera’s measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  10. A novel sputtered Pd mesh architecture as an advanced electrocatalyst for highly efficient hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lucas-Consuegra, Antonio; de la Osa, Ana R.; Calcerrada, Ana B.; Linares, José J.; Horwat, David

    2016-07-01

    This study reports the preparation, characterization and testing of a sputtered Pd mesh-like anode as an advanced electrocatalyst for H2 production from alkaline ethanol solutions in an Alkaline Membrane Electrolyzer (AEM). Pd anodic catalyst is prepared by magnetron sputtering technique onto a microfiber carbon paper support. Scanning Electron Microscopy images reveal that the used preparation technique enables to cover the surface of the carbon microfibers exposed to the Pd target, leading to a continuous network that also maintains part of the original carbon paper macroporosity. Such novel anodic architecture (organic binder free) presents an excellent electro-chemical performance, with a maximum current density of 700 mA cm-2 at 1.3 V, and, concomitantly, a large H2 production rate with low energy requirement compared to water electrolysis. Potassium hydroxide emerges as the best electrolyte, whereas temperature exerts the expected promotional effect up to 90 °C. On the other hand, a 1 mol L-1 ethanol solution is enough to guarantee an efficient fuel supply without any mass transfer limitation. The proposed system also demonstrates to remain stable over 150 h of operation along five consecutives cycles, producing highly pure H2 (99.999%) at the cathode and potassium acetate as the main anodic product.

  11. Thermochemical seasonal energy storage for solar thermal power

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhart, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    During the many years that thermochemical energy storage has been under investigation, the concept has been plagued with two persistent problems: high capital cost and poor efficiency. Literally hundreds of chemical reactions have also been carried out. For short-term storage, thermochemical systems suffer in comparison with highly efficient sensible storage media such as molten salts. Long-term storage, on the other hand, is not cost-competitive with systems employing fossil backup power. Thermochemical storage will play a significant role in solar thermal electric conversion only under highly select circumstances. The portion of electric demand served by solar plants must be sufficiently high that the balance of the grid cannot fully supplant seasonal storage. High fossil fuel costs must preclude the use of gas turbines for backup power. Significant breakthroughs in the development of one or more chemical reaction systems must occur. Ingeniously integrated systems must be employed to enhance the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of thermochemical storage. A promising integration scheme discussed herein consists of using sensible storage for diurnal cycling in parallel with thermochemical seasonal storage. Under the most favorable circumstances, thermochemical storage can be expected to play a small but perhaps vital role in supplying baseload energy from solar thermal electric conversion plants.

  12. Advanced age protects microvascular endothelium from aberrant Ca2+ influx and cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Socha, Matthew J; Boerman, Erika M; Behringer, Erik J; Shaw, Rebecca L; Domeier, Timothy L; Segal, Steven S

    2015-01-01

    Young (∼4 months) and Old (∼24 months) male C57BL/6 mice. Under resting conditions, with no difference in intracellular calcium levels, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) availability was ∼1/3 greater in endothelium of Old mice while vascular catalase activity was reduced by nearly half. Compared to Old, imposing oxidative stress (200 μm H2O2) for 20 min increased intracellular calcium to 4-fold greater levels in endothelium of Young in conjunction with twice the calcium influx. Prolonged (60 min) exposure to H2O2 induced 7-fold greater cell death in endothelium of Young. Microvascular adaptation to advanced age may protect endothelial cells during elevated oxidative stress to preserve functional viability of the intima. PMID:25689097

  13. Experimental characterization of the Advanced Liquid Hydrogen Cold Neutron Source spectrum of the NBSR reactor at the NIST Center for Neutron Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, J. C.; Barker, J. G.; Rowe, J. M.; Williams, R. E.; Gagnon, C.; Lindstrom, R. M.; Ibberson, R. M.; Neumann, D. A.

    2015-08-01

    The recent expansion of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research facility has offered a rare opportunity to perform an accurate measurement of the cold neutron spectrum at the exit of a newly-installed neutron guide. Using a combination of a neutron time-of-flight measurement, a gold foil activation measurement, and Monte Carlo simulation of the neutron guide transmission, we obtain the most reliable experimental characterization of the Advanced Liquid Hydrogen Cold Neutron Source brightness to date. Time-of-flight measurements were performed at three distinct fuel burnup intervals, including one immediately following reactor startup. Prior to the latter measurement, the hydrogen was maintained in a liquefied state for an extended period in an attempt to observe an initial radiation-induced increase of the ortho (o)-hydrogen fraction. Since para (p)-hydrogen has a small scattering cross-section for neutron energies below 15 meV (neutron wavelengths greater than about 2.3 Å), changes in the o- p hydrogen ratio and in the void distribution in the boiling hydrogen influence the spectral distribution. The nature of such changes is simulated with a continuous-energy, Monte Carlo radiation-transport code using 20 K o and p hydrogen scattering kernels and an estimated hydrogen density distribution derived from an analysis of localized heat loads. A comparison of the transport calculations with the mean brightness function resulting from the three measurements suggests an overall o- p ratio of about 17.5(±1) % o- 82.5% p for neutron energies<15 meV, a significantly lower ortho concentration than previously assumed.

  14. Active thermochemical tables - thermochemistry for the 21st century.

    SciTech Connect

    Ruscic, B.; Chemistry

    2005-01-01

    Active Thermochemical Tables (ATcT) are a good example of a significant breakthrough in chemical science that is directly enabled by the US DOE SciDAC initiative. ATcT is a new paradigm of how to obtain accurate, reliable, and internally consistent thermochemistry and overcome the limitations that are intrinsic to the traditional sequential approach to thermochemistry. The availability of high-quality consistent thermochemical values is critical in many areas of chemistry, including the development of realistic predictive models of complex chemical environments such as combustion or the atmosphere, or development and improvement of sophisticated high-fidelity electronic structure computational treatments. As opposed to the traditional sequential evolution of thermochemical values for the chemical species of interest, ATcT utilizes the Thermochemical Network (TN) approach. This approach explicitly exposes the maze of inherent interdependencies normally ignored by the conventional treatment, and allows, inter alia, a statistical analysis of the individual measurements that define the TN. The end result is the extraction of the best possible thermochemistry, based on optimal use of all the currently available knowledge, hence making conventional tabulations of thermochemical values obsolete. Moreover, ATcT offer a number of additional features that are neither present nor possible in the traditional approach. With ATcT, new knowledge can be painlessly propagated through all affected thermochemical values. ATcT also allows hypothesis testing and evaluation, as well as discovery of weak links in the TN. The latter provides pointers to new experimental or theoretical determinations that can most efficiently improve the underlying thermochemical body of knowledge.

  15. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS). Final report. Volume 2. Commercial fusion synfuels plant

    SciTech Connect

    Donohue, M.L.; Price, M.E.

    1984-07-01

    Volume 2 contains the following chapters: (1) synfuels; (2) physics base and parameters for TMR; (3) high-temperature two-temperature-zone blanket system for synfuel application; (4) thermochemical hydrogen processes; (5) interfacing the sulfur-iodine cycle; (6) interfacing the reactor with the thermochemical process; (7) tritium control in the blanket system; (8) the sulfur trioxide fluidized-bed composer; (9) preliminary cost estimates; and (10) fuels beyond hydrogen. (MOW)

  16. Low-temperature thermochemical conversion of high-moisture biomass feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, R.S.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Elliott, D.C.

    1985-11-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is carrying out a research project to investigate the thermochemical conversion of high-moisture biomass feedstocks to methane, hydrogen, and liquids. Experimental results obtained in FY 1985 indicate that good yields of methane-rich gas (exceeding 40% methane) can be produced. The reaction system utilizes low tempreatures (400 to 450/sup 0/C), high pressures, and a nickel/alkali carbonate catalyst mixture to effect the gasification of biomass slurries containing up to 95% water. Carbon conversions after 15 minutes have exceeded 90%. Methane yields in excess of 6 scf/dry ash-free pound of biomass have been obtained. Most of the feedstocks selected for investigation are not conventionally used in thermochemical conversion. Feedstocks which have been used to data include napier grass, sorghum stover, sunflower stalks, water hyacinths, and macrocystis kelp. Waste biomass from the food and beverage industries has also been used, as has the unconverted residue from an anaerobic digestor. In addition to gasification performance data obtained for each of these feedstocks, elemental analyses, ash contents, and moisture contents of the raw feedstocks were determined. 5 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Statistically advanced, self-similar, radial probability density functions of atmospheric and under-expanded hydrogen jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Adam J.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents improved statistical insight regarding the self-similar scalar mixing process of atmospheric hydrogen jets and the downstream region of under-expanded hydrogen jets. Quantitative planar laser Rayleigh scattering imaging is used to probe both jets. The self-similarity of statistical moments up to the sixth order (beyond the literature established second order) is documented in both cases. This is achieved using a novel self-similar normalization method that facilitated a degree of statistical convergence that is typically limited to continuous, point-based measurements. This demonstrates that image-based measurements of a limited number of samples can be used for self-similar scalar mixing studies. Both jets exhibit the same radial trends of these moments demonstrating that advanced atmospheric self-similarity can be applied in the analysis of under-expanded jets. Self-similar histograms away from the centerline are shown to be the combination of two distributions. The first is attributed to turbulent mixing. The second, a symmetric Poisson-type distribution centered on zero mass fraction, progressively becomes the dominant and eventually sole distribution at the edge of the jet. This distribution is attributed to shot noise-affected pure air measurements, rather than a diffusive superlayer at the jet boundary. This conclusion is reached after a rigorous measurement uncertainty analysis and inspection of pure air data collected with each hydrogen data set. A threshold based upon the measurement noise analysis is used to separate the turbulent and pure air data, and thusly estimate intermittency. Beta-distributions (four parameters) are used to accurately represent the turbulent distribution moments. This combination of measured intermittency and four-parameter beta-distributions constitutes a new, simple approach to model scalar mixing. Comparisons between global moments from the data and moments calculated using the proposed model show excellent

  18. Performance demonstration of hydrogen advanced loop heat pipe for 20-30K cryocooling of far infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Triem T.; O'Connell, Tamara A.; Ku, Jentung; Butler, C. D.; Swanson, Theodore D.

    2005-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) program have identified the need for cryogenic cooling transport devices that (i) provide robust/reliable thermal management for Infrared (IR) sensors/detectors in the temperature range of 20-30K, (ii) minimize vibration effects of mechanical cryocoolers on the instruments, (iii) reduce spatial temperature gradients in cryogenic components, and (iv) afford long continuous service life of the telescope. Passive two-phase capillary cooling technologies such as heat pipes, Loop Heat Pipes (LHPs), and Capillary pumped Loops (CPLs) have proven themselves capable of performing necessary thermal control functions for room temperature applications. They have no mechanical moving part to wear out or to introduce unwanted vibration to the instruments and, hence, are reliable and maintenancefree. However, utilizing these capillary devices for cryogenic cooling still remains a challenge because of difficulties involving the system start-up and operation in a warm environment. An advanced concept of LHP using Hydrogen as the working fluid was recently developed to demonstrate the cryocooling transport capabilities in the temperature range of 20-30K. A full-size demonstration test loop - appropriately called H2-ALHP_2 - was constructed and performance tested extensively in a thermal vacuum chamber. It was designed specifically to manage "heat parasitics" from a warm surrounding, enabling it to start up from an initially supercritical state and operate without requiring a rigid heat shield. Like room temperature LHPs, the H2-ALHP transport lines were made of small-diameter stainless steel tubing that are flexible enough to isolate the cryocooler-induced vibration from the IR instruments. In addition, focus of the H2-ALHP research and development effort was also placed on the system weight saving for space-based applications.

  19. Studies of the use of heat from high temperature nuclear sources for hydrogen production processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farbman, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    Future uses of hydrogen and hydrogen production processes that can meet the demand for hydrogen in the coming decades were considered. To do this, a projection was made of the market for hydrogen through the year 2000. Four hydrogen production processes were selected, from among water electrolysis, fossil based and thermochemical water decomposition systems, and evaluated, using a consistent set of ground rules, in terms of relative performance, economics, resource requirements, and technology status.

  20. Thermochemical Conversion: Using Heat and Catalysts to Make Biofuels and Bioproducts

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-29

    This fact sheet discusses the Bioenergy Technologies Office's thermochemical conversion critical technology goal. And, how through the application of heat, robust thermochemical processes can efficiently convert a broad range of biomass.

  1. Syngas Production By Thermochemical Conversion Of H2o And Co2 Mixtures Using A Novel Reactor Design

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlman, Howard; Chen, Chien-Hua

    2014-08-27

    The Department of Energy awarded Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) an SBIR Phase II contract (#DE-SC0004729) to develop a high-temperature solar thermochemical reactor for syngas production using water and/or carbon dioxide as feedstocks. The technology aims to provide a renewable and sustainable alternative to fossil fuels, promote energy independence and mitigate adverse issues associated with climate change by essentially recycling carbon from carbon dioxide emitted by the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. To commercialize the technology and drive down the cost of solar fuels, new advances are needed in materials development and reactor design, both of which are integral elements in this program.

  2. MTCI/Thermochem stream reforming process for biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, M.N.; Durai-Swamy, K.; Voelker, G.

    1995-11-01

    Manufacturing and Technology Conversion International, Inc. (MTCI) has developed a novel technology to convert solid fuels including biomass, coal, municipal solid waste (MSW) and wastewater sludges into usable syngas by steam reforming in an indirectly heated, fluid-bed reactor. MTCI has licensed and patented the technology to ThermoChem, Inc. Both MTCI and ThermoChem have built two modular commercial-scale demonstration units: one for recycle paper mill rejects (similar to refuse-derived fuel [RDF]), and another for chemical recovery of black liquor. ThermoChem has entered into an agreement with Ajinkyatara Cooperative Sugar Factory, India, for building a 10 MW combined cycle power generation facility based on bagasse & agro-residue gasification.

  3. Thermochemical cyclic system for splitting water and/or carbon dioxide by means of cerium compounds and reactions useful therein

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.; Robinson, P.R.

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen from water comprises reacting ceric oxide with monobasic or dibasic alkali metal phosphate to yield a solid reaction product, oxygen and water. The solid reaction product, alkali metal carbonate or bicarbonate, and water, are reacted to yield hydrogen, ceric oxide, carbon dioxide and trialkali metal phosphate. Ceric oxide is recycled. Trialkali metal phosphate, carbon dioxide and water are reacted to yield monobasic or dibasic alkali metal phosphate and alkali metal bicarbonate, which are recycled. The cyclic process can be modified for producing carbon monoxide from carbon dioxide by reacting the alkali metal cerous phosphate and alkali metal carbonate or bicarbonate in the absence of water to produce carbon monoxide, ceric oxide, carbon dioxide and trialkali metal phosphate. Carbon monoxide can be converted to hydrogen by the water gas shift reaction.

  4. Thermochemical cyclic system for splitting water and/or carbon dioxide by means of cerium compounds and reactions useful therein

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1980-01-01

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen from water comprises reacting ceric oxide with monobasic or dibasic alkali metal phosphate to yield a solid reaction product, oxygen and water. The solid reaction product, alkali metal carbonate or bicarbonate, and water, are reacted to yield hydrogen, ceric oxide, carbon dioxide and trialkali metal phosphate. Ceric oxide is recycled. Trialkali metal phosphate, carbon dioxide and water are reacted to yield monobasic or dibasic alkali metal phosphate and alkali metal bicarbonate, which are recycled. The cylic process can be modified for producing carbon monoxide from carbon dioxide by reacting the alkali metal cerous phosphate and alkali metal carbonate or bicarbonate in the absence of water to produce carbon monoxide, ceric oxide, carbon dioxide and trialkali metal phosphate. Carbon monoxide can be converted to hydrogen by the water gas shift reaction.

  5. The evaluation of alternative thermochemical cycles-Part II the down selection process.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M. A.; Masin, J. G.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2009-01-01

    The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy Science and Technology is supporting an effort to reevaluate thermochemical cycles reported in the literature as having both promising efficiencies and proof-of-concept results. Nine cycles were identified. A group of universities was tasked with the evaluation of these cycles using the NHI consistent methodology for calculating efficiency and for recommending and conducting critical research needed to help in the down-selection process. Argonne National Laboratory coordinated these activities. This paper provides an overview of the program and summarizes the results of the down-selection process. Individual papers that contain the details of the research are provided by the universities.

  6. Evaluation of wastewater treatment requirements for thermochemical biomass liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, D C

    1992-04-01

    Biomass can provide a substantial energy source. Liquids are preferred for use as transportation fuels because of their high energy density and handling ease and safety. Liquid fuel production from biomass can be accomplished by any of several different processes including hydrolysis and fermentation of the carbohydrates to alcohol fuels, thermal gasification and synthesis of alcohol or hydrocarbon fuels, direct extraction of biologically produced hydrocarbons such as seed oils or algae lipids, or direct thermochemical conversion of the biomass to liquids and catalytic upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels. This report discusses direct thermochemical conversion to achieve biomass liquefaction and the requirements for wastewater treatment inherent in such processing. 21 refs.

  7. Evidence of magnetic isotope effects during thermochemical sulfate reduction

    PubMed Central

    Oduro, Harry; Harms, Brian; Sintim, Herman O.; Kaufman, Alan J.; Cody, George; Farquhar, James

    2011-01-01

    Thermochemical sulfate reduction experiments with simple amino acid and dilute concentrations of sulfate reveal significant degrees of mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionation. Enrichments of up to 13‰ for 33S are attributed to a magnetic isotope effect (MIE) associated with the formation of thiol-disulfide, ion-radical pairs. Observed 36S depletions in products are explained here by classical (mass-dependent) isotope effects and mixing processes. The experimental data contrasts strongly with multiple sulfur isotope trends in Archean samples, which exhibit significant 36S anomalies. These results support an origin other than thermochemical sulfate reduction for the mass-independent signals observed for early Earth samples. PMID:21997216

  8. Critical Evaluation of Thermochemical Properties of C1-C4 Species: Updated Group-Contributions to Estimate Thermochemical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, S. M.; Simmie, J. M.; Curran, H. J.

    2015-03-01

    A review of literature on enthalpies of formation and molar entropies for alkanes, alkenes, alcohols, hydroperoxides, and their associated radicals has been compiled and critically evaluated. By comparing literature values, the overall uncertainty in thermochemical properties of small hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons can be highlighted. In general, there is good agreement between heat of formation values in the literature for stable species; however, there is greater uncertainty in the values for radical species and for molar entropy values. Updated values for a group-additivity method for the estimation of thermochemical properties based on the evaluated literature data are proposed. The new values can be used to estimate thermochemical data for larger, combustion-relevant species for which no calculations or measurements currently exist, with increased confidence.

  9. Central-station solar hydrogen power plant.

    SciTech Connect

    Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Kolb, Gregory J.

    2005-04-01

    Solar power towers can be used to make hydrogen on a large scale. Electrolyzers could be used to convert solar electricity produced by the power tower to hydrogen, but this process is relatively inefficient. Rather, efficiency can be much improved if solar heat is directly converted to hydrogen via a thermochemical process. In the research summarized here, the marriage of a high-temperature ({approx}1000 C) power tower with a sulfuric acid/hybrid thermochemical cycle was studied. The concept combines a solar power tower, a solid-particle receiver, a particle thermal energy storage system, and a hybrid-sulfuric-acid cycle. The cycle is 'hybrid' because it produces hydrogen with a combination of thermal input and an electrolyzer. This solar thermochemical plant is predicted to produce hydrogen at a much lower cost than a solar-electrolyzer plant of similar size. To date, only small lab-scale tests have been conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of a few of the subsystems and a key immediate issue is demonstration of flow stability within the solid-particle receiver. The paper describes the systems analysis that led to the favorable economic conclusions and discusses the future development path.

  10. SUNgas: Thermochemical Approaches to Solar Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Jane

    2013-04-01

    Solar energy offers an intelligent solution to reduce anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and to meet an expanding global demand for energy. A transformative change from fossil to solar energy requires collection, storage, and transport of the earth's most abundant but diffuse and intermittent source of energy. One intriguing approach for harvest and storage of solar energy is production of clean fuels via high temperature thermochemical processes. Concentrated solar energy is the heat source and biomass or water and carbon dioxide are the feedstocks. Two routes to produce fuels using concentrated solar energy and a renewable feed stock will be discussed: gasification of biomass or other carbonaceous materials and metal oxide cycles to produce synthesis gas. The first and most near term route to solar fuels is to gasify biomass. With conventional gasification, air or oxygen is supplied at fuel-rich levels to combust some of the feedstock and in this manner generate the energy required for conversion to H2 and CO. The partial-combustion consumes up to 40% of the energetic value of the feedstock. With air combustion, the product gas is diluted by high levels of CO2 and N2. Using oxygen reduces the product dilution, but at the expense of adding an oxygen plant. Supplying the required heat with concentrated solar radiation eliminates the need for partial combustion of the biomass feedstock. As a result, the product gas has an energetic value greater than that of the feedstock and it is not contaminated by the byproducts of combustion. The second promising route to solar fuels splits water and carbon dioxide. Two-step metal-oxide redox cycles hold out great potential because they the temperature required to achieve a reasonable degree of dissociation is lower than direct thermal dissociation and O2 and the fuel are produced in separate steps. The 1^st step is the endothermic thermal dissociation of the metal oxide to the metal or lower-valence metal oxide. The 2

  11. Hydrogenated TiO2 Branches Coated Mn3O4 Nanorods as an Advanced Anode Material for Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nana; Yue, Jie; Chen, Liang; Qian, Yitai; Yang, Jian

    2015-05-20

    Rational design and delicate control on the component, structure, and surface of electrodes in lithium ion batteries are highly important to their performances in practical applications. Compared with various components and structures for electrodes, the choices for their surface are quite limited. The most widespread surface for numerous electrodes, a carbon shell, has its own issues, which stimulates the desire to find another alternative surface. Here, hydrogenated TiO2 is exemplified as an appealing surface for advanced anodes by the growth of ultrathin hydrogenated TiO2 branches on Mn3O4 nanorods. High theoretical capacity of Mn3O4 is well matched with low volume variation (∼4%), enhanced electrical conductivity, good cycling stability, and rate capability of hydrogenated TiO2, as demonstrated in their electrochemical performances. The proof-of-concept reveals the promising potential of hydrogenated TiO2 as a next-generation material for the surface in high-performance hybrid electrodes. PMID:25928277

  12. Hydrogen from biomass: state of the art and research challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Milne, Thomas A; Elam, Carolyn C; Evans, Robert J

    2002-02-01

    The report was prepared for the International Energy Agency (IEA) Agreement on the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen, Task 16, Hydrogen from Carbon-Containing Materials. Hydrogen's share in the energy market is increasing with the implementation of fuel cell systems and the growing demand for zero-emission fuels. Hydrogen production will need to keep pace with this growing market. In the near term, increased production will likely be met by conventional technologies, such as natural gas reforming. In these processes, the carbon is converted to CO2 and released to the atmosphere. However, with the growing concern about global climate change, alternatives to the atmospheric release of CO2 are being investigated. Sequestration of the CO2 is an option that could provide a viable near-term solution. Reducing the demand on fossil resources remains a significant concern for many nations. Renewable-based processes like solar- or wind-driven electrolysis and photobiological water splitting hold great promise for clean hydrogen production; however, advances must still be made before these technologies can be economically competitive. For the near-and mid-term, generating hydrogen from biomass may be the more practical and viable, renewable and potentially carbon-neutral (or even carbon-negative in conjunction with sequestration) option. Recently, the IEA Hydrogen Agreement launched a new task to bring together international experts to investigate some of these near- and mid-term options for producing hydrogen with reduced environmental impacts. This review of the state of the art of hydrogen production from biomass was prepared to facilitate in the planning of work that should be done to achieve the goal of near-term hydrogen energy systems. The relevant technologies that convert biomass to hydrogen, with emphasis on thermochemical routes are described. In evaluating the viability of the conversion routes, each must be put in the context of the availability of

  13. Effect of LEO cycling on 125 Ah advanced design IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells - An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1991-01-01

    An update of validation test results confirming the breakthrough in LEO cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells containing 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte is presented. A breakthrough in the LEO cycle life of individual pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen cells is reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte was about 40,000 LEO cycles compared to 3500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH.

  14. Thermochemical characteristics of cellulose acetates with different degrees of acetylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larina, V. N.; Ur'yash, V. F.; Kushch, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    The standard enthalpies of combustion and formation of cellulose acetates with different degrees of acetylation are determined. It is established that there is a proportional dependence of these thermochemical characteristics vs. the degree of acetylation, weight fraction of bonded acetic acid, and molar mass of the repeating unit of cellulose acetates.

  15. Biomass Program 2007 Program Peer Review - Thermochemical Conversion Platform Summary

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-10-27

    This document discloses the comments provided by a review panel at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Program Peer Review held on November 15-16, 2007 in Baltimore, MD and the Biomass Program Peer Review for the Thermochemical Platform, held on July 9th and 10th in Golden, Colorado.

  16. STATTHERM: a statistical thermodynamics program for calculating thermochemical information

    SciTech Connect

    Marinov, N.M.

    1997-03-01

    A statistical thermodynamics program is presented which computes the thermochemical properties of a polyatomic molecule using statistical thermodynamic formulas. Thermodynamic data for substances involving C, H,O,N, and Cl elements are fitted into NASA polynomial form for use in combustion research or research where thermodynamical information is important.

  17. Intermolecular bonding of metals or alloys by thermochemical decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R.

    1970-01-01

    Various metals and alloys are bonded at temperatures below their recrystallization temperature with a Ni-Fe-C alloy grown by thermochemical vapor deposition from organometallic plating compounds. Process time is short, the joints are strong, and microthrowing power is good.

  18. Thermochemical Conversion of Livestock Wastes: Carbonization of Swine Solids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure represents a significant portion of the total sustainable U.S. renewable energy sources that can serve as a bioenergy feedstock in thermochemical conversion processes. The process of slow pyrolysis or carbonization promotes the conversion of animal manure like swine manure into charcoa...

  19. Advanced sludge treatment affects extracellular polymeric substances to improve activated sludge dewatering.

    PubMed

    Neyens, Elisabeth; Baeyens, Jan; Dewil, Raf; De heyder, Bart

    2004-01-30

    The management of wastewater sludge, now often referred to as biosolids, accounts for a major portion of the cost of the wastewater treatment process and represents significant technical challenges. In many wastewater treatment facilities, the bottleneck of the sludge handling system is the dewatering operation. Advanced sludge treatment (AST) processes have been developed in order to improve sludge dewatering and to facilitate handling and ultimate disposal. The authors have extensively reported lab-scale, semi-pilot and pilot investigations on either thermal and thermochemical processes, or chemical oxidation using hydrogen peroxide. To understand the action of these advanced sludge technologies, the essential role played by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) needs to be understood. EPS form a highly hydrated biofilm matrix, in which the micro-organisms are embedded. Hence they are of considerable importance in the removal of pollutants from wastewater, in bioflocculation, in settling and in dewatering of activated sludge. The present paper reviews the characteristics of EPS and the influence of thermochemical and oxidation mechanisms on degradation and flocculation of EPS. Experimental investigations on waste activated sludge are conducted by the authors to evaluate the various literature findings. From the experiments, it is concluded that AST methods enhance cake dewaterability in two ways: (i) they degrade EPS proteins and polysaccharides reducing the EPS water retention properties; and (ii) they promote flocculation which reduces the amount of fine flocs. PMID:15177096

  20. Thermochemically Driven Gas-Dynamic Fracturing (TDGF)

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Goodwin

    2008-12-31

    This report concerns efforts to increase oil well productivity and efficiency via a method of heating the oil-bearing rock of the well, a technique known as Thermochemical Gas-Dynamic Fracturing (TGDF). The technique uses either a chemical reaction or a combustion event to raise the temperature of the rock of the well, thereby increasing oil velocity, and oil pumping rate. Such technology has shown promise for future application to both older wellheads and also new sites. The need for such technologies in the oil extraction field, along with the merits of the TGDF technology is examined in Chapter 1. The theoretical basis underpinning applications of TGDF is explained in Chapter 2. It is shown that productivity of depleted well can be increased by one order of magnitude after heating a reservoir region of radius 15-20 m around the well by 100 degrees 1-2 times per year. Two variants of thermal stimulation are considered: uniform heating and optimal temperature distribution in the formation region around the perforation zone. It is demonstrated that the well productivity attained by using equal amounts of thermal energy is higher by a factor of 3 to 4 in the case of optimal temperature distribution as compared to uniform distribution. Following this theoretical basis, two practical approaches to applying TDGF are considered. Chapter 3 looks at the use of chemical intiators to raise the rock temperature in the well via an exothermic chemical reaction. The requirements for such a delivery device are discussed, and several novel fuel-oxidizing mixtures (FOM) are investigated in conditions simulating those at oil-extracting depths. Such FOM mixtures, particularly ones containing nitric acid and a chemical initiator, are shown to dramatically increase the temperature of the oil-bearing rock, and thus the productivity of the well. Such tests are substantiated by preliminary fieldwork in Russian oil fields. A second, more cost effective approach to TGDF is considered in

  1. Discovery of Novel Perovskites for Solar Thermochemical Water Splitting from High-Throughput First-Principles Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, Antoine; Wolverton, Chris

    Among the several possible routes of hydrogen synthesis, thermochemical water splitting (TWS) cycles is a promising method for large scale production of hydrogen. The choice of metal oxide used in a TWS cycle is critical since it governs the rate and efficiency of the gas splitting process. In this work, we present a high-throughput density functional theory (HT-DFT) study of ABO3 perovskite compounds to screen for thermodynamically favorable two-step thermochemical water splitting materials. We demonstrate the use of two screens, based on thermodynamic stability and oxygen vacancy formation energy, on 5,329 different compositions to predict 139 stable potential candidate materials for water splitting applications. Several of these compounds have not been experimentally explored yet and present promising avenues for further research. Additionally, the large dataset of compounds and stability in our possession allowed us to revisit the structural maps for perovskites. This study shows the benefit of using first-principles calculations to efficiently screen an exhaustively large number of compounds at once. It provides a baseline for further studies involving more detailed exploration of a restricted number of those compounds.

  2. Renewable energy from corn residues by thermochemical conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fei

    Declining fossil oil reserve, skyrocket price, unsecured supplies, and environment pollution are among the many energy problems we are facing today. It is our conviction that renewable energy is a solution to these problems. The long term goal of the proposed research is to develop commercially practical technologies to produce energy from renewable resources. The overall objective of my research is to study and develop thermochemical processes for converting bulky and low-energy-density biomass materials into bio-fuels and value-added bio-products. The rationale for the proposed research is that, once such processes are developed, processing facility can be set up on or near biomass product sites, reducing the costs associated with transport of bulky biomass which is a key technical barrier to biomass conversion. In my preliminary research, several conversion technologies including atmospheric pressure liquefaction, high pressure liquefaction, and microwave pyrolysis have been evaluated. Our data indicated that microwave pyrolysis had the potential to become a simple and economically viable biomass conversion technology. Microwave pyrolysis is an innovative process that provides efficient and uniform heating, and are robust to type, size and uniformity of feedstock and therefore suitable for almost any waste materials without needing to reduce the particle size. The proposed thesis focused on in-depth investigations of microwave pyrolysis of corn residues. My first specific aim was to examine the effects of processing parameters on product yields. The second specific research aim was to characterize the products (gases, bio-oils, and solid residues), which was critical to process optimization and product developments. Other research tasks included conducting kinetic modeling and preliminary mass and energy balance. This study demonstrated that microwave pyrolysis could be optimized to produce high value syngas, liquid fuels and pyrolytic carbons, and had a great

  3. Ceria based inverse opals for thermochemical fuel production: Quantification and prediction of high temperature behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casillas, Danielle Courtney

    Solar energy has the potential to supply more than enough energy to meet humanity's energy demands. Here, a method for thermochemical solar energy storage through fuel production is presented. A porous non-stoichiometric oxide, ceria, undergoes partial thermal reduction and oxidation with concentrated solar energy as a heat source, and water as an oxidant. The resulting yields for hydrogen fuel and oxygen are produced in two discrete steps, while the starting material maintains its original phase. Ordered porosity has been shown superior to random porosity for thermochemical fuel production applications, but stability limits for these structures are currently undefined. Ceria-based inverse opals are currently being investigated to assess the architectural influence on thermochemical hydrogen production. Low tortuosity and continuous interconnected pore network allow for facile gas transport and improved reaction kinetics. Ceria-based ordered materials have recently been shown to increase maximum hydrogen production over non-ordered porous ceria. Thermal stability of ordered porosity was quantified using quantitative image analysis. Fourier analysis was applied to SEM images of the material. The algorithm results in an order parameter gamma that describes the degree of long range order maintained by these structures, where gamma>4 signifies ordered porosity. According to this metric, a minimum zirconium content of 20 atomic percent (at%) is necessary for these architectures to survive aggressive annealing up to 1000°C. Zirconium substituted ceria (ZSC) with Zr loadings in excess of 20at% developed undesired tetragonal phases. Through gamma, we were able to find a balance between the benefit of zirconium additions on structural stability and its negative impact on phase. This work demonstrates the stability of seemingly delicate architectures, and the operational limit for ceria based inverse opals to be 1000°C for 1microm pore size. Inverse opals having sub

  4. Hydrogen energy - An inexhaustible abundant clean energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayar, M. G.

    1981-04-01

    A review is presented of various hydrogen production processes from possible primary energy resources. The processes covered are nuclear coal gasification, thermochemical hydrogen production, and hydrogen production by electrolysis, which includes solid polymer electrolyte-based electrolyzers, high-temperature electrolyzers, and photoelectrochemical decomposition of water. Attention is given to hydrogen transport and storage (in metal hydride systems) and to its application as an automotive fuel. Hydrogen as a secondary energy source is also discussed, and its uses as an off-peak power storage medium and as an energy transmission medium are described. Costs, flow diagrams and chemical formulas are analyzed in detail.

  5. Assessment of relative flammability and thermochemical properties of some thermoplastic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The thermochemical and flammability characteristics of some typical thermoplastic materials currently in use and others being considered for use in aircraft interiors are described. The properties studied included (1) thermal mechanical properties such as glass transition and melt temperature, (2) changes in polymer enthalpy by differential scanning calorimetry, (3) thermogravimetric analysis in an anaerobic and oxidative environment, (4) oxygen index, (5) smoke evolution, (6) relative toxicity of the volatile products of pyrolysis, and (7) selected physical properties. The generic polymers which were evaluated included: acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene, bisphenol A polycarbonate, bisphenol fluorenone carbonatedimethylsiloxane block polymer, phenolphthalein-bisphenol A polycarbonate, phenolphthalein polycarbonate, polyether sulfone, polyphenylene oxide, polyphenylene sulfide, polyaryl sulfone, chlorinated polyvinyl chloride homopolymer, polyvinyl fluoride, and polyvinylidene fluoride. Processing parameters including molding characteristics of some of the advanced polymers are described. Test results and relative rankings of some of the flammability, smoke and toxicity properties are presented.

  6. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, Hydrogen/CNG Blended Fuels Performance Testing in a Ford F-150

    SciTech Connect

    James E. Francfort

    2003-11-01

    Federal regulation requires energy companies and government entities to utilize alternative fuels in their vehicle fleets. To meet this need, several automobile manufacturers are producing compressed natural gas (CNG)-fueled vehicles. In addition, several converters are modifying gasoline-fueled vehicles to operate on both gasoline and CNG (Bifuel). Because of the availability of CNG vehicles, many energy company and government fleets have adopted CNG as their principle alternative fuel for transportation. Meanwhile, recent research has shown that blending hydrogen with CNG (HCNG) can reduce emissions from CNG vehicles. However, blending hydrogen with CNG (and performing no other vehicle modifications) reduces engine power output, due to the lower volumetric energy density of hydrogen in relation to CNG. Arizona Public Service (APS) and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (DOE AVTA) identified the need to determine the magnitude of these effects and their impact on the viability of using HCNG in existing CNG vehicles. To quantify the effects of using various blended fuels, a work plan was designed to test the acceleration, range, and exhaust emissions of a Ford F-150 pickup truck operating on 100% CNG and blends of 15 and 30% HCNG. This report presents the results of this testing conducted during May and June 2003 by Electric Transportation Applications (Task 4.10, DOE AVTA Cooperative Agreement DEFC36- 00ID-13859).

  7. Thermochemical Processing of Radioactive Waste Using Powder Metal Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ojovan, M. I.; Sobolev, I. A.; Dmitriev, S. A.; Panteleev, V. I.; Karlina, O. K.; Klimov. V. L.

    2003-02-25

    Problematic radioactive wastes were generated during various activities of both industrial facilities and research institutions usually in relative small amounts. These can be spent ion exchange resins, inorganic absorbents, wastes from research nuclear reactors, irradiated graphite, mixed, organic or chlorine-containing radioactive waste, contaminated soils, un-burnable heavily surface-contaminated materials, etc. Conventional treatment methods encounter serious problems concerning processing efficiency of such waste, e.g. complete destruction of organic molecules and avoiding of possible emissions of radionuclides, heavy metals and chemically hazardous species. Some contaminations cannot be removed from surface using common decontamination methods. Conditioning of ash residues obtained after treatment of solid radioactive waste including ashes received from treating problematic wastes also is a complicated task. Moreover due to relative small volume of specific type radioactive waste the development of target treatment procedures and facilities to conduct technological processes and their deployment could be economically unexpedient and ecologically no justified. Thermochemical processing technologies are used for treating and conditioning problematic radioactive wastes. The thermochemical processing uses powdered metal fuels (PMF) that are specifically formulated for the waste composition and react chemically with the waste components. The composition of the PMF is designed in such a way as to minimize the release of hazardous components and radionuclides in the off gas and to confine the contaminants in the ash residue. The thermochemical procedures allow decomposition of organic matter and capturing hazardous radionuclides and chemical species simultaneously. A significant advantage of thermochemical processing is its autonomy. Thermochemical treatment technologies use the energy of exothermic reactions in the mixture of radioactive or hazardous waste with PMF

  8. Thermochemical differentiation and intermittent convection of the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotelkin, Vycheslav; Lobkovsky, Leopold

    2010-05-01

    The numerical experiments are based on the thermochemical model of mantle convection. The model includes the description of the endothermic phase transition at the upper/lower mantle boundary. The aim of this work is the influence of thermochemical processes on mantle convection. As regards the thermochemical differentiation takes place near the mantle boundaries. The differentiation in the D" layer is due to melting with the rise in temperature and the descent of molten iron-bearing components of mantle material into the core. This process generates the lighter fraction, particularly produces the lower mantle plums. It takes place only if the current temperature exceeds the melting temperature. The differentiation near the outer mantle boundary is due to extracting the lighter mantle components into the crust. These thermochemical processes take place when the hot substance is lifting and the pressure falls. The growth of the continental crust on the outer surface is modeling. The oceanic crust returns into mantle throw the subducting zones. The modeling includes the "gabbro-eclogite" transition of oceanic crust. As regards the generation of heavy eclogitic material is located at the depths 80-100 km. Seismic tomography of deep mantle layers showed that the mantle really contains large inclusions of heavy, supposedly eclogitic material. The numerical experiments give a strong nonlinear interaction (either accelerating or slowing down) between the thermochemical processes and mantle convection. It leads to an impulsive character of geodynamics and promotes the formation of different cycles in the evolutionary process. Periods of gradual evolution are interrupted by the geodynamic activity outbursts. These peaks of geodynamic activity play a key role in the geological history of the Earth. Analogous oscillations of geodynamic process produce interaction heavy and light density inhomogeneities with the endothermic phase transition. When convection is layered then the

  9. THERMOCHEMICAL HEAT STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATED SOLAR POWER

    SciTech Connect

    PROJECT STAFF

    2011-10-31

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is an integral part of a concentrated solar power (CSP) system. It enables plant operators to generate electricity beyond on sun hours and supply power to the grid to meet peak demand. Current CSP sensible heat storage systems employ molten salts as both the heat transfer fluid and the heat storage media. These systems have an upper operating temperature limit of around 400 C. Future TES systems are expected to operate at temperatures between 600 C to 1000 C for higher thermal efficiencies which should result in lower electricity cost. To meet future operating temperature and electricity cost requirements, a TES concept utilizing thermochemical cycles (TCs) based on multivalent solid oxides was proposed. The system employs a pair of reduction and oxidation (REDOX) reactions to store and release heat. In the storage step, hot air from the solar receiver is used to reduce the oxidation state of an oxide cation, e.g. Fe3+ to Fe2+. Heat energy is thus stored as chemical bonds and the oxide is charged. To discharge the stored energy, the reduced oxide is re-oxidized in air and heat is released. Air is used as both the heat transfer fluid and reactant and no storage of fluid is needed. This project investigated the engineering and economic feasibility of this proposed TES concept. The DOE storage cost and LCOE targets are $15/kWh and $0.09/kWh respectively. Sixteen pure oxide cycles were identified through thermodynamic calculations and literature information. Data showed the kinetics of re-oxidation of the various oxides to be a key barrier to implementing the proposed concept. A down selection was carried out based on operating temperature, materials costs and preliminary laboratory measurements. Cobalt oxide, manganese oxide and barium oxide were selected for developmental studies to improve their REDOX reaction kinetics. A novel approach utilizing mixed oxides to improve the REDOX kinetics of the selected oxides was proposed. It partially

  10. Quantitative Thermochemical Measurements in High-Pressure Gaseous Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Jun J.; Fischer, David G.

    2012-01-01

    We present our strategic experiment and thermochemical analyses on combustion flow using a subframe burst gating (SBG) Raman spectroscopy. This unconventional laser diagnostic technique has promising ability to enhance accuracy of the quantitative scalar measurements in a point-wise single-shot fashion. In the presentation, we briefly describe an experimental methodology that generates transferable calibration standard for the routine implementation of the diagnostics in hydrocarbon flames. The diagnostic technology was applied to simultaneous measurements of temperature and chemical species in a swirl-stabilized turbulent flame with gaseous methane fuel at elevated pressure (17 atm). Statistical analyses of the space-/time-resolved thermochemical data provide insights into the nature of the mixing process and it impact on the subsequent combustion process in the model combustor.

  11. Thermochemical conversion of microalgal biomass into biofuels: a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hsin; Lin, Bo-Jhih; Huang, Ming-Yueh; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-05-01

    Following first-generation and second-generation biofuels produced from food and non-food crops, respectively, algal biomass has become an important feedstock for the production of third-generation biofuels. Microalgal biomass is characterized by rapid growth and high carbon fixing efficiency when they grow. On account of potential of mass production and greenhouse gas uptake, microalgae are promising feedstocks for biofuels development. Thermochemical conversion is an effective process for biofuel production from biomass. The technology mainly includes torrefaction, liquefaction, pyrolysis, and gasification. Through these conversion technologies, solid, liquid, and gaseous biofuels are produced from microalgae for heat and power generation. The liquid bio-oils can further be upgraded for chemicals, while the synthesis gas can be synthesized into liquid fuels. This paper aims to provide a state-of-the-art review of the thermochemical conversion technologies of microalgal biomass into fuels. Detailed conversion processes and their outcome are also addressed. PMID:25479688

  12. THERMOCHEMICAL MODELING OF REFRACTORY CORROSION IN SLAGGING COAL GASIFIERS

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, Theodore M

    2008-01-01

    Slagging coal gasifiers suffer corrosive attack on the refractory liner and these interactions were thermochemically simulated. The slag is observed to penetrate the refractory, which complicates modeling the phase behavior of the slag-penetrated interior of the refractory. A simple strategy was adopted such that step-wise changes in composition with decreasing slag content were assumed to account for the compositional changes as slag penetrates the refractory. The thermochemical equilibrium calculations following this strategy typically yielded three solution phases as well as the stoichiometric crystalline phases AlPO4 and Ca3(PO4)2 depending on composition/penetration. Under some conditions a slag liquid miscibility gap exists such that two slag liquids co-exist.

  13. Experimental and theoretical study of a solar thermochemical receiver module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Y. S.; Voecks, G. E.; McCrary, J. H.

    1984-07-01

    A few years ago, a prototype test module of a solar thermochemical receiver using an SO2/SO3 reaction system was designed, built, and tested to establish a technical data base for future subsystem design efforts. Emphasis was placed on experimental verification of the computer simulation to establish a reliable design tool to predict the thermochemical performance of the receiver with a reasonable degree of confidence. The computational results were compared with experimental results obtained from the module tested at New Mexico State University. Reasonable agreement was found over a range of test conditions. It was concluded that the present design offers satisfactory conversion performance and operational flexibility for the construction of a complete reactor/receiver unit for use in a 10- to 15-kW dish collector system.

  14. Structure and thermochemical kinetic studies of coal pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dodoo, J.N.D.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objectives of this project is an intensive effort on the application of laser to the microscopic structure and thermochemical kinetic studies of coal particles pyrolysis, char combustion and ash transformation at combustion level heat fluxes in a laser beam. Research emphasis in FY91 is placed on setup and calibration of the laser pyrolysis system, preparation and mass loss studies of Beulah lignite and subbituminous coals. The task is therefore divided into three subtasks.

  15. Instructions and Changes to the NEWPEP Thermochemical Code

    SciTech Connect

    DOBBS,JENNIFER L.; GRUBELICH,MARK C.

    2001-04-01

    The NEWPEP thermochemical code is a computer program that has been developed to help predict the performance of a user generated propellant system. Sandia has used the program to model the use of different oxidizer/fuel combinations. The program has been adapted to fit Sandia's need by expanding the programs combustion species database and the ingredient list. This paper provides the user with a thorough set of operating instructions.

  16. Thermochemical data for CVD modeling from ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, P.; Melius, C.F.

    1993-12-31

    Ab initio electronic-structure calculations are combined with empirical bond-additivity corrections to yield thermochemical properties of gas-phase molecules. A self-consistent set of heats of formation for molecules in the Si-H, Si-H-Cl, Si-H-F, Si-N-H and Si-N-H-F systems is presented, along with preliminary values for some Si-O-C-H species.

  17. Observations of Circumstellar Thermochemical Equilibrium: The Case of Phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    We will present observations of phosphorus-bearing species in circumstellar envelopes, including carbon- and oxygen-rich shells 1. New models of thermochemical equilibrium chemistry have been developed to interpret, and constrained by these data. These calculations will also be presented and compared to the numerous P-bearing species already observed in evolved stars. Predictions for other viable species will be made for observations with Herschel and ALMA.

  18. Thermochemical gasification of high-moisture biomass feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Elliott, D.C.

    1984-05-01

    A new project was initiated at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in January 1984 which has the potential for significant advantages over conventional thermochemical and biological conversion technologies. The objective of this project is to investigate the feasibility of using a low-temperature (250 to 450/sup 0/C), high pressure (up to 5000 psi) slurry reactor system for converting high-moisture biomass to gaseous (methane and synthesis gas) and liquid fuels. Emphasis will be placed on conditions favoring gasification and methane formation. However, some conditions being studied may favor liquid production and are required to develop a full understanding of the process chemistry. Catalysts and reactants to be employed singularly or in combination in the investigations include sodium carbonate, nickel or other metals, and CO. Feedstocks selected for investigation are those not previously attractive for thermochemical conversion and would require dewatering before they could be converted in ore typical thermochemical conversion systems. Several candidate feedstocks have been identified and two feedstocks (water-hyacinths and potato processing waste) have been obtained and characterized. Procurement of additional samples is in progress. Installation of the 1.0 liter autoclave and experimental system began in April. Feedstock screening tests are scheduled for June 1984. 3 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  19. Thermochemical Properties ( D° 0and IP) of the Lanthanide Monohalides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaledin, Leonid A.; Heaven, Michael C.; Field, Robert W.

    1999-02-01

    Thermochemical data for the lanthanide monohalides have been combined with recent ligand field theory calculations (A. L. Kaledin, M. C. Heaven, R. W. Field, and L. A. Kaledin (1996).J. Mol. Spectrosc.179, 310) to estimate the dissociation energies and ionization potentials for allLnX(whereLn∈ Ba through Lu, andX∈ F, Cl, Br, or I) molecules and the dissociation energies for theLnX+ions. Owing to the negligible involvement of the core-like 4felectrons in bonding, the dissociation energies and ionization potentials of allLnXmolecules, whereLn∈ Ba through Lu, andX∈ O, S, F, Cl, Br, or I, should vary withLnatom in a simple linear manner, provided that corrections are made for differences inf-orbital occupancy between theLnXmolecule and the freeLnatom or between theLnXmolecule and theLnX+molecular ion. We provide such a model here and, in so doing, correct several inconsistencies in the thermochemical data. Based on thermochemical data (A. A. Kitaev, I. S. Gotkis, P. G. Val'kov, and K. C. Krasnov (1996).Russ. Chem. Phys.7, 1685) and recent spectroscopic observations (M. C. McCarthy, J. C. Bloch, R. W. Field, and L. A. Kaledin (1996)J. Mol. Spectrosc.179, 251), a revised value for the ionization potential of DyF, IP(DyF) = 5.85 ± 0.06 eV, is proposed.

  20. Quantum Chemical Study of the Thermochemical Properties of Organophosphorous Compounds.

    PubMed

    Khalfa, A; Ferrari, M; Fournet, R; Sirjean, B; Verdier, L; Glaude, P A

    2015-10-22

    Organophosphorous compounds are involved in many toxic compounds such as fungicides, pesticides, or chemical warfare nerve agents. The understanding of the decomposition chemistry of these compounds in the environment is largely limited by the scarcity of thermochemical data. Because of the high toxicity of many of these molecules, experimental determination of their thermochemical properties is very difficult. In this work, standard gas-phase thermodynamic data, i.e., enthalpies of formation (ΔfH298°), standard entropies (S298°), and heat capacities (Cp°(T)), were determined using quantum chemical calculations and more specifically the CBS-QB3 composite method, which was found to be the best compromise between precision and calculation time among high accuracy composite methods. A large number of molecules was theoretically investigated, involving trivalent and pentavalent phosphorus atoms, and C, H, O, N, S, and F atoms. These data were used to propose 83 original groups, used in the semiempirical group contribution method proposed by Benson. Thanks to these latter group values, thermochemical properties of several nerve agents, common pesticides and herbicides have been evaluated. Bond dissociations energies (BDE), useful for the analysis the thermal stability of the compounds, were also determined in several molecules of interest. PMID:26434606

  1. Thermochemical cycle analysis using linked CECS72 and HYDRGN computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donovan, L. F.

    1977-01-01

    A combined thermochemical cycle analysis computer program was designed. Input to the combined program is the same as input to the thermochemical cycle analysis program except that the extent of the reactions need not be specified. The combined program is designed to be run interactively from a computer time-sharing terminal. This mode of operation allows correction or modification of the cycle to take place during cycle analysis. A group of 13 thermochemical cycles was used to test the combined program.

  2. System and process for producing fuel with a methane thermochemical cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Diver, Richard B.

    2015-12-15

    A thermochemical process and system for producing fuel are provided. The thermochemical process includes reducing an oxygenated-hydrocarbon to form an alkane and using the alkane in a reforming reaction as a reducing agent for water, a reducing agent for carbon dioxide, or a combination thereof. Another thermochemical process includes reducing a metal oxide to form a reduced metal oxide, reducing an oxygenated-hydrocarbon with the reduced metal oxide to form an alkane, and using the alkane in a reforming reaction as a reducing agent for water, a reducing agent for carbon dioxide, or a combination thereof. The system includes a reformer configured to perform a thermochemical process.

  3. A vertical-oriented WS2 nanosheet sensitized by graphene: an advanced electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shifa, Tofik Ahmed; Wang, Fengmei; Cheng, Zhongzhou; Zhan, Xueying; Wang, Zhenxing; Liu, Kaili; Safdar, Muhammad; Sun, Lianfeng; He, Jun

    2015-08-01

    Electrocatalytic hydrogen production at low overpotential is a promising route towards a clean and sustainable energy. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (LTMDs) have attracted copious attention for their outstanding activities in hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). However, the horizontally laid nanosheets suffer from a paucity of active edge sites. Herein, we report the successful synthesis of vertical-oriented WS2 nanosheets through a hydrothermal method followed by a facile sulfurization process. Furthermore, the surface of synthesized WS2 nanosheets was decorated by ultrathin reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanoplates. This is achieved for the first time by bringing the rGO on the surface of vertical-oriented WS2 nanosheets, which is conducive to rapid electron transport during the HER process. Significantly, the as-synthesized rGO/WS2 nanosheets exhibit improved HER activity as compared to the undecorated ones. It needs a low overpotential of only 229 mV vs. RHE to afford a current density of 10 mA cm-2. We believe that this hybrid structure demonstrated remarkable HER activity brought about by a compatible synergism between rGO and WS2.Electrocatalytic hydrogen production at low overpotential is a promising route towards a clean and sustainable energy. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (LTMDs) have attracted copious attention for their outstanding activities in hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). However, the horizontally laid nanosheets suffer from a paucity of active edge sites. Herein, we report the successful synthesis of vertical-oriented WS2 nanosheets through a hydrothermal method followed by a facile sulfurization process. Furthermore, the surface of synthesized WS2 nanosheets was decorated by ultrathin reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanoplates. This is achieved for the first time by bringing the rGO on the surface of vertical-oriented WS2 nanosheets, which is conducive to rapid electron transport during the HER process. Significantly, the as

  4. A vertical-oriented WS2 nanosheet sensitized by graphene: an advanced electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Shifa, Tofik Ahmed; Wang, Fengmei; Cheng, Zhongzhou; Zhan, Xueying; Wang, Zhenxing; Liu, Kaili; Safdar, Muhammad; Sun, Lianfeng; He, Jun

    2015-09-21

    Electrocatalytic hydrogen production at low overpotential is a promising route towards a clean and sustainable energy. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (LTMDs) have attracted copious attention for their outstanding activities in hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). However, the horizontally laid nanosheets suffer from a paucity of active edge sites. Herein, we report the successful synthesis of vertical-oriented WS2 nanosheets through a hydrothermal method followed by a facile sulfurization process. Furthermore, the surface of synthesized WS2 nanosheets was decorated by ultrathin reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanoplates. This is achieved for the first time by bringing the rGO on the surface of vertical-oriented WS2 nanosheets, which is conducive to rapid electron transport during the HER process. Significantly, the as-synthesized rGO/WS2 nanosheets exhibit improved HER activity as compared to the undecorated ones. It needs a low overpotential of only 229 mV vs. RHE to afford a current density of 10 mA cm(-2). We believe that this hybrid structure demonstrated remarkable HER activity brought about by a compatible synergism between rGO and WS2. PMID:26287333

  5. Large-Scale Liquid Hydrogen Tank Rapid Chill and Fill Testing for the Advanced Shuttle Upper Stage Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachbart, R. H.; Hedayat, A.; Holt, K. A.; Sims, J.; Johnson, E. F.; Hastings, L. J.; Lak, T.

    2013-01-01

    Cryogenic upper stages in the Space Shuttle program were prohibited primarily due to a safety risk of a 'return to launch site' abort. An upper stage concept addressed this concern by proposing that the stage be launched empty and filled using shuttle external tank residuals after the atmospheric pressure could no longer sustain an explosion. However, only about 5 minutes was allowed for tank fill. Liquid hydrogen testing was conducted within a near-ambient environment using the multipurpose hydrogen test bed 638.5 ft3 (18m3) cylindrical tank with a spray bar mounted longitudinally inside. Although the tank was filled within 5 minutes, chilldown of the tank structure was incomplete, and excessive tank pressures occurred upon vent valve closure. Elevated tank wall temperatures below the liquid level were clearly characteristic of film boiling. The test results have substantial implications for on-orbit cryogen transfer since the formation of a vapor film would be much less inhibited due to the reduced gravity. However, the heavy tank walls could become an asset in normal gravity testing for on-orbit transfer, i.e., if film boiling in a nonflight weight tank can be inhibited in normal gravity, then analytical modeling anchored with the data could be applied to reduced gravity environments with increased confidence.

  6. Review and analysis of the 1980-1989 biomass thermochemical conversion program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, D. J.

    1994-09-01

    In the period between 1980 and 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored research and development projects through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion (BTC) Program. Thermochemical conversion technologies use elevated temperatures to convert biomass into more useful forms of energy such as fuel gases or transportation fuels. The BTC Program included a wide range of biomass conversion projects in the areas of gasification, pyrolysis, liquefaction, and combustion. This work formed the basis of the present DOE research and development efforts on advanced liquid fuel and power generation systems. At the beginning of Fiscal Year 1989, the management of the BTC Program was transferred from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL, formerly Solar Energy Research Institute). This document presents a summary of the research which was performed under the BTC Program during the 1981-1989 time frame. The document consists of an analysis of the research projects which were funded by the BTC Program and a bibliography of published documents. This work will help ensure that information from PNL's BTC Program is available to those interested in biomass conversion technologies. The background of the BTC Program is discussed in the first chapter of this report. In addition, a brief summary of other related biomass research and development programs funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and others is presented with references where additional information can be found. The remaining chapters of the report present a detailed summary of the research projects which were funded by the BTC Program. The progress which was made on each project is summarized, the overall impact on biomass conversion is discussed, and selected references are provided.

  7. Review and analysis of the 1980-1989 biomass thermochemical conversion program

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D.J.

    1994-09-01

    In the period between 1980 and 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored research and development projects through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion (BTC) Program. Thermochemical conversion technologies use elevated temperatures to convert biomass into more useful forms of energy such as fuel gases or transportation fuels. The BTC Program included a wide range of biomass conversion projects in the areas of gasification, pyrolysis, liquefaction, and combustion. This work formed the basis of the present DOE research and development efforts on advanced liquid fuel and power generation systems. At the beginning of Fiscal Year 1989, the management of the BTC Program was transferred from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL, formerly Solar Energy Research Institute). This document presents a summary of the research which was performed under the BTC Program during the 1981-1989 time frame. The document consists of an analysis of the research projects which were funded by the BTC Program and a bibliography of published documents. This work will help ensure that information from PNL`s BTC Program is available to those interested in biomass conversion technologies. The background of the BTC Program is discussed in the first chapter of this report. In addition, a brief summary of other related biomass research and development programs funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and others is presented with references where additional information can be found. The remaining chapters of the report present a detailed summary of the research projects which were funded by the BTC Program. The progress which was made on each project is summarized, the overall impact on biomass conversion is discussed, and selected references are provided.

  8. Hydrogen fuel - Universal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, A. G.; Burg, J. A.

    The technology for the production, storage, transmission, and consumption of hydrogen as a fuel is surveyed, with the physical and chemical properties of hydrogen examined as they affect its use as a fuel. Sources of hydrogen production are described including synthesis from coal or natural gas, biomass conversion, thermochemical decomposition of water, and electrolysis of water, of these only electrolysis is considered economicially and technologically feasible in the near future. Methods of production of the large quantities of electricity required for the electrolysis of sea water are explored: fossil fuels, hydroelectric plants, nuclear fission, solar energy, wind power, geothermal energy, tidal power, wave motion, electrochemical concentration cells, and finally ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). The wind power and OTEC are considered in detail as the most feasible approaches. Techniques for transmission (by railcar or pipeline), storage (as liquid in underwater or underground tanks, as granular metal hydride, or as cryogenic liquid), and consumption (in fuel cells in conventional power plants, for home usage, for industrial furnaces, and for cars and aircraft) are analyzed. The safety problems of hydrogen as a universal fuel are discussed, noting that they are no greater than those for conventional fuels.

  9. Advanced nanoporous TiO2 photocatalysts by hydrogen plasma for efficient solar-light photocatalytic application

    PubMed Central

    An, Ha-Rim; Park, So Young; Kim, Hyeran; Lee, Che Yoon; Choi, Saehae; Lee, Soon Chang; Seo, Soonjoo; Park, Edmond Changkyun; Oh, You-Kwan; Song, Chan-Geun; Won, Jonghan; Kim, Youn Jung; Lee, Jouhahn; Lee, Hyun Uk; Lee, Young-Chul

    2016-01-01

    We report an effect involving hydrogen (H2)-plasma-treated nanoporous TiO2(H-TiO2) photocatalysts that improve photocatalytic performance under solar-light illumination. H-TiO2 photocatalysts were prepared by application of hydrogen plasma of assynthesized TiO2(a-TiO2) without annealing process. Compared with the a-TiO2, the H-TiO2 exhibited high anatase/brookite bicrystallinity and a porous structure. Our study demonstrated that H2 plasma is a simple strategy to fabricate H-TiO2 covering a large surface area that offers many active sites for the extension of the adsorption spectra from ultraviolet (UV) to visible range. Notably, the H-TiO2 showed strong ·OH free-radical generation on the TiO2 surface under both UV- and visible-light irradiation with a large responsive surface area, which enhanced photocatalytic efficiency. Under solar-light irradiation, the optimized H-TiO2 120(H2-plasma treatment time: 120 min) photocatalysts showed unprecedentedly excellent removal capability for phenol (Ph), reactive black 5(RB 5), rhodamine B (Rho B) and methylene blue (MB) — approximately four-times higher than those of the other photocatalysts (a-TiO2 and P25) — resulting in complete purification of the water. Such well-purified water (>90%) can utilize culturing of cervical cancer cells (HeLa), breast cancer cells (MCF-7), and keratinocyte cells (HaCaT) while showing minimal cytotoxicity. Significantly, H-TiO2 photocatalysts can be mass-produced and easily processed at room temperature. We believe this novel method can find important environmental and biomedical applications. PMID:27406992

  10. Advanced nanoporous TiO2 photocatalysts by hydrogen plasma for efficient solar-light photocatalytic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ha-Rim; Park, So Young; Kim, Hyeran; Lee, Che Yoon; Choi, Saehae; Lee, Soon Chang; Seo, Soonjoo; Park, Edmond Changkyun; Oh, You-Kwan; Song, Chan-Geun; Won, Jonghan; Kim, Youn Jung; Lee, Jouhahn; Lee, Hyun Uk; Lee, Young-Chul

    2016-07-01

    We report an effect involving hydrogen (H2)-plasma-treated nanoporous TiO2(H-TiO2) photocatalysts that improve photocatalytic performance under solar-light illumination. H-TiO2 photocatalysts were prepared by application of hydrogen plasma of assynthesized TiO2(a-TiO2) without annealing process. Compared with the a-TiO2, the H-TiO2 exhibited high anatase/brookite bicrystallinity and a porous structure. Our study demonstrated that H2 plasma is a simple strategy to fabricate H-TiO2 covering a large surface area that offers many active sites for the extension of the adsorption spectra from ultraviolet (UV) to visible range. Notably, the H-TiO2 showed strong ·OH free-radical generation on the TiO2 surface under both UV- and visible-light irradiation with a large responsive surface area, which enhanced photocatalytic efficiency. Under solar-light irradiation, the optimized H-TiO2 120(H2-plasma treatment time: 120 min) photocatalysts showed unprecedentedly excellent removal capability for phenol (Ph), reactive black 5(RB 5), rhodamine B (Rho B) and methylene blue (MB) — approximately four-times higher than those of the other photocatalysts (a-TiO2 and P25) — resulting in complete purification of the water. Such well-purified water (>90%) can utilize culturing of cervical cancer cells (HeLa), breast cancer cells (MCF-7), and keratinocyte cells (HaCaT) while showing minimal cytotoxicity. Significantly, H-TiO2 photocatalysts can be mass-produced and easily processed at room temperature. We believe this novel method can find important environmental and biomedical applications.

  11. Advanced nanoporous TiO2 photocatalysts by hydrogen plasma for efficient solar-light photocatalytic application.

    PubMed

    An, Ha-Rim; Park, So Young; Kim, Hyeran; Lee, Che Yoon; Choi, Saehae; Lee, Soon Chang; Seo, Soonjoo; Park, Edmond Changkyun; Oh, You-Kwan; Song, Chan-Geun; Won, Jonghan; Kim, Youn Jung; Lee, Jouhahn; Lee, Hyun Uk; Lee, Young-Chul

    2016-01-01

    We report an effect involving hydrogen (H2)-plasma-treated nanoporous TiO2(H-TiO2) photocatalysts that improve photocatalytic performance under solar-light illumination. H-TiO2 photocatalysts were prepared by application of hydrogen plasma of assynthesized TiO2(a-TiO2) without annealing process. Compared with the a-TiO2, the H-TiO2 exhibited high anatase/brookite bicrystallinity and a porous structure. Our study demonstrated that H2 plasma is a simple strategy to fabricate H-TiO2 covering a large surface area that offers many active sites for the extension of the adsorption spectra from ultraviolet (UV) to visible range. Notably, the H-TiO2 showed strong ·OH free-radical generation on the TiO2 surface under both UV- and visible-light irradiation with a large responsive surface area, which enhanced photocatalytic efficiency. Under solar-light irradiation, the optimized H-TiO2 120(H2-plasma treatment time: 120 min) photocatalysts showed unprecedentedly excellent removal capability for phenol (Ph), reactive black 5(RB 5), rhodamine B (Rho B) and methylene blue (MB) - approximately four-times higher than those of the other photocatalysts (a-TiO2 and P25) - resulting in complete purification of the water. Such well-purified water (>90%) can utilize culturing of cervical cancer cells (HeLa), breast cancer cells (MCF-7), and keratinocyte cells (HaCaT) while showing minimal cytotoxicity. Significantly, H-TiO2 photocatalysts can be mass-produced and easily processed at room temperature. We believe this novel method can find important environmental and biomedical applications. PMID:27406992

  12. Development of Efficient Flowsheet and Transient Modeling for Nuclear Heat Coupled Sulfur Iodine Cyclefor Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Shripad T. Revankar; Nicholas R. Brown; Cheikhou Kane; Seungmin Oh

    2010-05-01

    The realization of the hydrogen as an energy carrier for future power sources relies on a practical method of producing hydrogen in large scale with no emission of green house gases. Hydrogen is an energy carrier which can be produced by a thermochemical water splitting process. The Sulfur-Iodine (SI) process is an example of a water splitting method using iodine and sulfur as recycling agents.

  13. Survey of hydrogen production and utilization methods. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, D. P.; Pangborn, J. B.; Gillis, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The use of hydrogen as a synthetic fuel is considered. Processes for the production of hydrogen are described along with the present and future industrial uses of hydrogen as a fuel and as a chemical feedstock. Novel and unconventional hydrogen-production techniques are evaluated, with emphasis placed on thermochemical and electrolytic processes. Potential uses for hydrogen as a fuel in industrial and residential applications are identified and reviewed in the context of anticipated U.S. energy supplies and demands. A detailed plan for the period from 1975 to 1980 prepared for research on and development of hydrogen as an energy carrier is included.

  14. Suspension Hydrogen Reduction of Iron Oxide Concentrates

    SciTech Connect

    H.Y. Sohn

    2008-03-31

    The objective of the project is to develop a new ironmaking technology based on hydrogen and fine iron oxide concentrates in a suspension reduction process. The ultimate objective of the new technology is to replace the blast furnace and to drastically reduce CO2 emissions in the steel industry. The goals of this phase of development are; the performance of detailed material and energy balances, thermochemical and equilibrium calculations for sulfur and phosphorus impurities, the determination of the complete kinetics of hydrogen reduction and bench-scale testing of the suspension reduction process using a large laboratory flash reactor.

  15. Hierarchical sulfur-impregnated hydrogenated TiO2 mesoporous spheres comprising anatase nanosheets with highly exposed (001) facets for advanced Li-S batteries.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Changzhou; Zhu, Siqi; Cao, Hui; Hou, Linrui; Lin, Jingdong

    2016-01-29

    In this contribution, we purposefully designed hierarchical hydrogenated TiO2 spheres (HTSs) constructed from ultrathin anatase nanosheets with highly exposed (001) facets, and further utilized them as an efficient encapsulated host of sulfur species for advanced Li-S batteries (LSBs). Strikingly, the as-fabricated hybrid S/HTSs cathode exhibited high Coulombic efficiency (>94%), exceptional long cycling performance (capacity decay of ∼0.399% per cycle at 0.5 C), and large reversible discharge capacity (∼579 mAh g(-1) at 2.0 C) at high C rates, benefiting from better electronic conductivity, smaller charge transfer resistance and strong chemical bonding between [Formula: see text] and the reduced (001) facets of HTSs, according to experimental measurements and systematical theoretical calculations. More significantly, our in-depth insights into the mechanism involved in the hybrid S/HTSs could efficiently guide future design, optimization and synthesis of other metal oxide-based matrixes with specific exposed crystal facets for next-generation advanced LSBs. PMID:26657762

  16. Hierarchical sulfur-impregnated hydrogenated TiO2 mesoporous spheres comprising anatase nanosheets with highly exposed (001) facets for advanced Li-S batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Changzhou; Zhu, Siqi; Cao, Hui; Hou, Linrui; Lin, Jingdong

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution, we purposefully designed hierarchical hydrogenated TiO2 spheres (HTSs) constructed from ultrathin anatase nanosheets with highly exposed (001) facets, and further utilized them as an efficient encapsulated host of sulfur species for advanced Li-S batteries (LSBs). Strikingly, the as-fabricated hybrid S/HTSs cathode exhibited high Coulombic efficiency (>94%), exceptional long cycling performance (capacity decay of ˜0.399% per cycle at 0.5 C), and large reversible discharge capacity (˜579 mAh g-1 at 2.0 C) at high C rates, benefiting from better electronic conductivity, smaller charge transfer resistance and strong chemical bonding between {{{{S}}}n}2- and the reduced (001) facets of HTSs, according to experimental measurements and systematical theoretical calculations. More significantly, our in-depth insights into the mechanism involved in the hybrid S/HTSs could efficiently guide future design, optimization and synthesis of other metal oxide-based matrixes with specific exposed crystal facets for next-generation advanced LSBs.

  17. Technical Analysis of Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Ali T-Raissi

    2005-01-14

    The aim of this work was to assess issues of cost, and performance associated with the production and storage of hydrogen via following three feedstocks: sub-quality natural gas (SQNG), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and water. Three technology areas were considered: (1) Hydrogen production utilizing SQNG resources, (2) Hydrogen storage in ammonia and amine-borane complexes for fuel cell applications, and (3) Hydrogen from solar thermochemical cycles for splitting water. This report summarizes our findings with the following objectives: Technoeconomic analysis of the feasibility of the technology areas 1-3; Evaluation of the hydrogen production cost by technology areas 1; and Feasibility of ammonia and/or amine-borane complexes (technology areas 2) as a means of hydrogen storage on-board fuel cell powered vehicles. For each technology area, we reviewed the open literature with respect to the following criteria: process efficiency, cost, safety, and ease of implementation and impact of the latest materials innovations, if any. We employed various process analysis platforms including FactSage chemical equilibrium software and Aspen Technologies AspenPlus and HYSYS chemical process simulation programs for determining the performance of the prospective hydrogen production processes.

  18. Nuclear driven water decomposition plant for hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, G. H.; Brecher, L. E.; Farbman, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    The conceptual design of a hydrogen production plant using a very-high-temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR) to energize a hybrid electrolytic-thermochemical system for water decomposition has been prepared. A graphite-moderated helium-cooled VHTR is used to produce 1850 F gas for electric power generation and 1600 F process heat for the water-decomposition process which uses sulfur compounds and promises performance superior to normal water electrolysis or other published thermochemical processes. The combined cycle operates at an overall thermal efficiency in excess of 45%, and the overall economics of hydrogen production by this plant have been evaluated predicated on a consistent set of economic ground rules. The conceptual design and evaluation efforts have indicated that development of this type of nuclear-driven water-decomposition plant will permit large-scale economic generation of hydrogen in the 1990s.

  19. ASSESSMENT OF NEPHELINE PRECIPITATION IN NUCLEAR WASTE GLASS VIA THERMOCHEMICAL MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A thermochemical representation of the Na-Al-Si-B-O system relevant for nuclear waste glass has been developed based on the associate species approach for the glass solution phase. Thermochemical data were assessed and associate species data determined for binary and ternary sub...

  20. Fabrication of Pd/Pd-Alloy Films by Surfactant Induced Electroless Plating for Hydrogen Separation from Advanced Coal Gasification Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ilias, Shamsuddin; Kumar, Dhananjay

    2012-07-31

    performance and thermal cycling (573 - 723 - 573 K) at 15 psi pressure drop for 1200 hours. Pd membranes showed excellent hydrogen permeability and thermal stability during the operational period. Under thermal cycling (573 K - 873 K - 573 K), Pd-Cu-MPSS membrane was stable and retained hydrogen permeation characteristics for over three months of operation. From this limited study, we conclude that SIEP is viable method for fabrication of defect-free, robust Pd-alloy membranes for high-temperature H{sub 2}-separation applications.

  1. The thermochemical analysis of the effectiveness of various gasification technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, P. P.; Kovbasyuk, V. I.; Medvedev, Yu. V.

    2013-05-01

    The authors studied the process of gasification of solid fuels and wastes by means of modified model accounting the absence of equilibrium in the Boudouard reaction. A comparison was made between auto- and allothermal gasification, and it was demonstrated that the former method is more advantageous with respect to (as an indicator) thermochemical efficiency. The feasibility of producing highly calorific synthesis gas using an oxygen blast is discussed. A thermodynamic model of the facility for producing such synthesis gas has been developed that involves the gas turbine used for driving an oxygen plant of the adsorption type.

  2. Vehicular fuels and oxychemicals from biomass thermochemical tars

    SciTech Connect

    Soltes, E.J.; Lin, S.C.K.

    1983-01-01

    Catalytic hydroprocessing (hydrotreating and hydrocracking) of biomass thermochemical tars can yield mixtures of liquid hydrocarbons and alkyl aromatics of chemical compositions similar to those presently used in diesel and gasoline engine fuels. Phenolics can be coproduced. Compositions of hydroprocessed tars are similar regardless of biomass feedstock used, suggesting that the two-stage process of pyrolysis and hydroprocessing may afford a somewhat universal route to the generation of useful hydrocarbons and oxychemicals from a variety of agricultural and forestry residues. 26 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  3. Estimating Equivalency of Explosives Through A Thermochemical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Maienschein, J L

    2002-07-08

    The Cheetah thermochemical computer code provides an accurate method for estimating the TNT equivalency of any explosive, evaluated either with respect to peak pressure or the quasi-static pressure at long time in a confined volume. Cheetah calculates the detonation energy and heat of combustion for virtually any explosive (pure or formulation). Comparing the detonation energy for an explosive with that of TNT allows estimation of the TNT equivalency with respect to peak pressure, while comparison of the heat of combustion allows estimation of TNT equivalency with respect to quasi-static pressure. We discuss the methodology, present results for many explosives, and show comparisons with equivalency data from other sources.

  4. Three-dimensional Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Supported Molybdenum Disulfide Nanoparticles as an Advanced Catalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Haifeng; Liu, Conghui; Ye, Haitao; Hu, Linping; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Dai, Wenhao; Cao, Yu; Qi, Xueqiang; Lu, Huiting; Zhang, Xueji

    2015-01-01

    An efficient three-dimensional (3D) hybrid material of nitrogen-doped graphene sheets (N-RGO) supporting molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoparticles with high-performance electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is fabricated by using a facile hydrothermal route. Comprehensive microscopic and spectroscopic characterizations confirm the resulting hybrid material possesses a 3D crumpled few-layered graphene network structure decorated with MoS2 nanoparticles. Electrochemical characterization analysis reveals that the resulting hybrid material exhibits efficient electrocatalytic activity toward HER under acidic conditions with a low onset potential of 112 mV and a small Tafel slope of 44 mV per decade. The enhanced mechanism of electrocatalytic activity has been investigated in detail by controlling the elemental composition, electrical conductance and surface morphology of the 3D hybrid as well as Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. This demonstrates that the abundance of exposed active sulfur edge sites in the MoS2 and nitrogen active functional moieties in N-RGO are synergistically responsible for the catalytic activity, whilst the distinguished and coherent interface in MoS2/N-RGO facilitates the electron transfer during electrocatalysis. Our study gives insights into the physical/chemical mechanism of enhanced HER performance in MoS2/N-RGO hybrids and illustrates how to design and construct a 3D hybrid to maximize the catalytic efficiency. PMID:26639026

  5. Three-dimensional Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Supported Molybdenum Disulfide Nanoparticles as an Advanced Catalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Haifeng; Liu, Conghui; Ye, Haitao; Hu, Linping; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Dai, Wenhao; Cao, Yu; Qi, Xueqiang; Lu, Huiting; Zhang, Xueji

    2015-12-01

    An efficient three-dimensional (3D) hybrid material of nitrogen-doped graphene sheets (N-RGO) supporting molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoparticles with high-performance electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is fabricated by using a facile hydrothermal route. Comprehensive microscopic and spectroscopic characterizations confirm the resulting hybrid material possesses a 3D crumpled few-layered graphene network structure decorated with MoS2 nanoparticles. Electrochemical characterization analysis reveals that the resulting hybrid material exhibits efficient electrocatalytic activity toward HER under acidic conditions with a low onset potential of 112 mV and a small Tafel slope of 44 mV per decade. The enhanced mechanism of electrocatalytic activity has been investigated in detail by controlling the elemental composition, electrical conductance and surface morphology of the 3D hybrid as well as Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. This demonstrates that the abundance of exposed active sulfur edge sites in the MoS2 and nitrogen active functional moieties in N-RGO are synergistically responsible for the catalytic activity, whilst the distinguished and coherent interface in MoS2/N-RGO facilitates the electron transfer during electrocatalysis. Our study gives insights into the physical/chemical mechanism of enhanced HER performance in MoS2/N-RGO hybrids and illustrates how to design and construct a 3D hybrid to maximize the catalytic efficiency.

  6. Evaluation of the Cell Voltage of Electrolytic HI Concentration for Thermochemical Water-Splitting Iodine-Sulfur Process

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Mitsunori; Okuda, Hiroyuki; Sato, Hiroyuki; Kubo, Shinji; Onuki, Kaoru

    2007-07-01

    Breakdown of the cell voltage in the electro-dialysis process for concentrating HIx solution (HI-H{sub 2}O-I{sub 2} mixture) was preliminarily examined in an effort to clarify the optimal operation condition as well as to optimize the cell design for the application to the thermochemical water-splitting IS process for large-scale hydrogen production. Basic data such as electric resistance of HIx solution, overvoltage of the iodine-iodide ion redox reaction at graphite electrode, and the membrane voltage drop, were measured using HIx solution with composition of interest. Also, a methodology for estimating the cell voltage was discussed. The calculated cell voltage agreed well with the experimental one indicating the validity of the procedure adopted. (authors)

  7. Thermochemical characterization of some thermoplastic materials. [flammability and toxicity properties for aircraft interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.; Hilado, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    The thermochemical and flammability characteristics of some typical thermoplastic materials currently in use or being considered for use in aircraft interiors are described. The properties studied included thermomechanical properties such as glass-transition and melt temperature, changes in polymer enthalpy, thermogravimetric analysis in anerobic and oxidative environments, oxygen index, smoke evolution, relative toxicity of the volatile products of pyrolysis, and selected physical properties. The generic polymers evaluated included acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, bisphenol A polycarbonate, 9,9 bis (4-hydroxyphenyl) fluorene polycarbonate-poly (dimethylsiloxane) block polymer, phenolphthalein-bisphenol A polycarbonate, phenolphthalein polycarbonate, polyether sulfone, polyphenylene oxide, polyphenylene sulfide, polyaryl sulfone, chlorinated polyvinyl chloride homopolymer, polyvinyl fluoride, and polyvinylidene fluoride. Processing parameters, including molding characteristics of some of the advanced polymers, are described. Test results and relative rankings of some of the flammability, smoke, and toxicity properties are presented. Under these test conditions, some of the advanced polymers evaluated were significantly less flammable and toxic than or equivalent to polymers in current use.

  8. Thermochemical cycles for energy storage: Thermal decomposition of ZnCO sub 4 systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wentworth, W.E. )

    1992-04-01

    The overall objective of our research has been to develop thermochemical cycles that can be used for energy storage. A specific cycle involving ammonium hydrogen sulfate (NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4}) has been proposed. Each reaction in the proposed cycle has been examined experimentally. Emphasis has been placed on the basic chemistry of these reactions. In the concluding phase of this research, reported herein, we have shown that when NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4} is mixed with ZnO and decomposed, the resulting products can be released stepwise (H{sub 2}A{sub (g)} at {approximately}163{degrees}C, NH{sub 3(g)} at 365--418{degrees}C, and a mixture of SO{sub 2(g)} and SO{sub 3(g)} at {approximately}900{degrees}C) and separated by controlling the reaction temperature. Side reactions do not appear to be significant and the respective yields are high as would be required for the successful use of this energy storage reaction in the proposed cycle. Thermodynamic, kinetic, and other reaction parameters have been measured for the various steps of the reaction. Finally we have completed a detailed investigation of one particular reaction: the thermal decomposition of zinc sulfate (ZnSO{sub 4}). We have demonstrated that this reaction can be accelerated and the temperature required reduced by the addition of excess ZnO, V{sub 2}A{sub 5} and possibly other metal oxides.

  9. An Analysis of the Impact of Selected Fuel Thermochemical Properties on Internal Combustion Engine Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Szybist, James P; Chakravathy, Kalyana; Daw, C Stuart

    2012-01-01

    In this study we model the effects of 23 different fuels on First and Second Law thermodynamic efficiency of an adiabatic internal combustion engine. First Law efficiency is calculated using lower heating value (LHV) while Second Law efficiency is calculated with exergy, which represents the inherent chemical energy available to produce propulsion. We find that First Law efficiency can deviate by as much as nine percentage points between fuels while Second Law efficiency exhibits a much smaller degree of variability. We also find that First and Second Law efficiency can be nearly the same for some fuels (methane and ethane) but differ substantially for other fuels (hydrogen and ethanol). The differences in First and Second Law efficiency are due to differences in LHV and exergy for a given fuel. In order to explain First Law efficiency differences between fuels as well as the differences between LHV and exergy, we introduce a new term: the molar expansion ratio (MER), defined as the ratio of product moles to reactant moles for complete stoichiometric combustion. We find that the MER is a useful expression for providing a physical explanation for fuel-specific efficiency differences as well as differences between First and Second Law efficiency. First and Second Law efficiency are affected by a number of other fuel-specific thermochemical properties, such as the ratio of specific heat and dissociation of combustion products.

  10. Possible thermochemical disequilibrium in the atmosphere of the exoplanet GJ 436b.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Kevin B; Harrington, Joseph; Nymeyer, Sarah; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Seager, Sara; Bowman, William C; Hardy, Ryan A; Deming, Drake; Rauscher, Emily; Lust, Nate B

    2010-04-22

    The nearby extrasolar planet GJ 436b-which has been labelled as a 'hot Neptune'-reveals itself by the dimming of light as it crosses in front of and behind its parent star as seen from Earth. Respectively known as the primary transit and secondary eclipse, the former constrains the planet's radius and mass, and the latter constrains the planet's temperature and, with measurements at multiple wavelengths, its atmospheric composition. Previous work using transmission spectroscopy failed to detect the 1.4-mum water vapour band, leaving the planet's atmospheric composition poorly constrained. Here we report the detection of planetary thermal emission from the dayside of GJ 436b at multiple infrared wavelengths during the secondary eclipse. The best-fit compositional models contain a high CO abundance and a substantial methane (CH(4)) deficiency relative to thermochemical equilibrium models for the predicted hydrogen-dominated atmosphere. Moreover, we report the presence of some H(2)O and traces of CO(2). Because CH(4) is expected to be the dominant carbon-bearing species, disequilibrium processes such as vertical mixing and polymerization of methane into substances such as ethylene may be required to explain the hot Neptune's small CH(4)-to-CO ratio, which is at least 10(5) times smaller than predicted. PMID:20414304

  11. Evaluation of wastewater treatment requirements for thermochemical biomass liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, D.C.

    1992-05-01

    The broad range of processing conditions involved in direct biomass liquefaction lead to a variety of product properties. The aqueous byproduct streams have received limited analyses because priority has been placed on analysis of the complex organic liquid product. The range of organic contaminants carried in the aqueous byproducts directly correlates with the quantity and quality of contaminants in the liquid oil product. The data in the literature gives a general indication of the types and amounts of components expected in biomass liquefaction wastewater; however, the data is insufficient to prepare a general model that predicts the wastewater composition from any given liquefaction process. Such a model would be useful in predicting the amount of water that would be soluble in a given oil and the level of dissolved water at which a second aqueous-rich phase would separate from the oil. Both biological and thermochemical processes have proposed for wastewater treatment, but no treatment process has been tested. Aerobic and anaerobic biological systems as well as oxidative and catalytic reforming thermochemical systems should be considered.

  12. Hydrogen from the solar photolysis of water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryason, P. R.

    1978-01-01

    Developments related to the study of photosynthesis are examined and aspects of photosensitization by solids are considered. It is pointed out that solids photosensitization for solar photochemical fuel formation is now an extremely active research area as a consequence of the promising results obtained with semiconductor photoelectrodes. The investigation of water decomposition schemes involving heterogeneous reactions is likely to be a productive area. As is the case for photosynthesis, the known examples of water decomposition by solids photosensitization involve charge separation processes immediately following light absorption. Homogeneous photoredox reactions are also discussed, taking into account thermochemical and photochemical cycles leading to the formation of a photooxidized ion, hydrogen quantum yields in the photo-oxidation aqueous ions, and thermochemical and photochemical cycles leading to the formation of a photoreduced ion.

  13. Experimental and computational thermochemical study and solid-phase structure of 5,5-dimethylbarbituric acid.

    PubMed

    Roux, María Victoria; Notario, Rafael; Foces-Foces, Concepción; Temprado, Manuel; Ros, Francisco; Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N; Verevkin, Sergey P

    2010-03-18

    This paper reports an experimental and computational thermochemical study on 5,5-dimethylbarbituric acid and the solid-phase structure of the compound. The value of the standard (p(o) = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpy of formation in the gas phase at T = 298.15 K has been determined. The energy of combustion was measured by static bomb combustion calorimetry, and from the result obtained, the standard molar enthalpy of formation in the crystalline state at T = 298.15 K was calculated as -(706.4 +/- 2.2) kJ x mol(-1). The enthalpy of sublimation was determined using a transference (transpiration) method in a saturated NB(2) stream, and a value of the enthalpy of sublimation at T = 298.15 K was derived as (115.8 +/- 0.5) kJ x mol(-1). From these results a value of -(590.6 +/- 2.3) kJ x mol(-1) for the gas-phase enthalpy of formation at T = 298.15 K was determined. Theoretical calculations at the G3 level were performed, and a study on molecular and electronic structure of the compound has been carried out. Calculated enthalpies of formation are in reasonable agreement with the experimental value. 5,5-Dimethylbarbituric acid was characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In the crystal structure, N-H...O=C hydrogen bonds lead to the formation of ribbons connected further by weak C-H...O=C hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional network. The molecular and supramolecular structures observed in the solid state were also investigated in the gas phase by DFT calculations. PMID:20180529

  14. Hydrogen powered bus

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-11-22

    Take a ride on a new type of bus, fueled by hydrogen. These hydrogen taxis are part of a Department of Energy-funded deployment of hydrogen powered vehicles and fueling infrastructure at nine federal facilities across the country to demonstrate this market-ready advanced technology. Produced and leased by Ford Motor Company , they consist of one 12- passenger bus and one nine-passenger bus. More information at: http://go.usa.gov/Tgr

  15. Influence of metal surfaces on coking in a reforming/methanation thermochemical transport distributed receiver solar energy system

    SciTech Connect

    Weirick, L.J.; Greenholt, C.J.

    1986-09-01

    A number of thermochemical cycles have been proposed for energy transport. The one under investigation at Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque involves converting a carbon dioxide/methane mixture to carbon monoxide and hydrogen during the endothermic reforming reaction, and then back again to carbon dioxide and methane during the exothermic methanation reaction. Carbon formation and deposition in either the reformer or the methanator is a serious concern. We performed simultaneous thermogravimetric and gas spectrometric analyses to measure carbon deposition rate and changing gas composition in the presence of material candidates for use in the reforming/methanation loop. We found that nickel-base superalloys such as Inconel 625 are good candidates for the high temperature endothermic reforming reactor, and stainless steels such as 316L will suffice for the low temperature exothermic methanation reactor. We also found that adding carbon dioxide to the carbon monoxide/hydrogen gas mix in an attempt to reduce carbon formation was not effective, particularly at lower temperatures for iron-base alloys. More important to the propensity to form carbon is the ratio of carbon monoxide to hydrogen. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Constraining mantle viscosity structure for a thermochemical mantle using the geoid observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xi; Zhong, Shijie

    2016-03-01

    Long-wavelength geoid anomalies provide important constraints on mantle dynamics and viscosity structure. Previous studies have successfully reproduced the observed geoid using seismically inferred buoyancy in whole-mantle convection models. However, it has been suggested that large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) underneath Pacific and Africa in the lower mantle are chemically distinct and are likely denser than the ambient mantle. We formulate instantaneous flow models based on seismic tomographic models to compute the geoid and constrain mantle viscosity by assuming both thermochemical and whole-mantle convection. Geoid modeling for the thermochemical model is performed by considering the compensation effect of dense thermochemical piles and removing buoyancy structure of the compensation layer in the lower mantle. Thermochemical models well reproduce the observed geoid, thus reconciling the geoid with the interpretation of LLSVPs as dense thermochemical piles. The viscosity structure inverted for thermochemical models is nearly identical to that of whole-mantle models. In the preferred model, the lower mantle viscosity is ˜10 times higher than the upper mantle viscosity that is ˜10 times higher than the transition zone viscosity. The weak transition zone is consistent with the proposed high water content there. The geoid in thermochemical mantle models is sensitive to seismic structure at midmantle depths, suggesting a need to improve seismic imaging resolution there. The geoid modeling constrains the vertical extent of dense and stable chemical piles to be within ˜500 km above CMB. Our results have implications for mineral physics, seismic tomographic studies, and mantle convection modeling.

  17. Local hybrid functionals: An assessment for thermochemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kaupp, Martin; Bahmann, Hilke; Arbuznikov, Alexei V.

    2007-11-21

    Local hybrid functionals with position-dependent exact-exchange admixture are a new class of exchange-correlation functionals in density functional theory that promise to advance the available accuracy in many areas of application. Local hybrids with different local mixing functions (LMFs) governing the position dependence are validated for the heats of formation of the extended G3/99 set, and for two sets of barriers of hydrogen-transfer and heavy-atom transfer reactions (HTBH38 and NHTBH38 databases). A simple local hybrid Lh-SVWN with only Slater and exact exchange plus local correlation and a one-parameter LMF, g(r)=b({tau}{sub W}(r)/{tau}(r)), performs best and provides overall mean absolute errors for thermochemistry and kinetics that are a significant improvement over standard state-of-the-art global hybrid functionals. In particular, this local hybrid functional does not suffer from the systematic deterioration that standard functionals exhibit for larger molecules. In contrast, local hybrids based on generalized gradient approximation exchange tend to give rise to nonintuitive LMFs, and no improved functionals have been obtained along this route. The LMF is a real-space function and thus can be analyzed in detail. We use, in particular, graphical analyses to rationalize the performance of different local hybrids for thermochemistry and reaction barriers.

  18. Production cost comparisons of hydrogen from fossil and nuclear fuel and water decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekman, K. R.

    1981-01-01

    The comparative costs entailed in producing hydrogen by major technologies that rely on petroleum, natural gas, coal, thermochemical cycles, and electrolysis are examined. Techniques were developed for comparing these processes by formulating the process data and economic assessments on a uniform and consistent basis. These data were normalized to permit a meaningful comparative analysis of product costs of these processes.

  19. Thermo-Chemical Convection in Europa's Icy Shell with Salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, L.; Showman, A. P.

    2005-01-01

    Europa's icy surface displays numerous pits, uplifts, and chaos terrains that have been suggested to result from solid-state thermal convection in the ice shell, perhaps aided by partial melting. However, numerical simulations of thermal convection show that plumes have insufficient buoyancy to produce surface deformation. Here we present numerical simulations of thermochemical convection to test the hypothesis that convection with salinity can produce Europa's pits and domes. Our simulations show that domes (200-300 m) and pits (300-400 m) comparable to the observations can be produced in an ice shell of 15 km thick with 5-10% compositional density variation if the maximum viscosity is less than 10(exp 18) Pa sec. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  20. Assessment of the Thermochemical Properties of Actinides in Molten Chlorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masset, Patrick I.; Apostolidis, Christos; Malmbeck, Rikard; Rebizant, Jean; Serp, Jérôme; Glatz, Jean-Paul

    2008-02-01

    The electrochemical properties of the chlorides of the actinides U, Pu, Np and Am (AnCl3) were investigated by transient electrochemical techniques in the LiCl-KCl eutectic at 400 - 550 °C. The diffusion coefficients of the cations and the apparent standard potentials of the redox systems on an inert W electrode were measured. The Gibbs energy of dilute solutions of AnCl3 as well as the activity coefficients were derived from electrochemical measurements. In addition, the electrochemical behaviour of the actinides on an Al electrode was investigated. They formed AnAl4 alloys, the formation potentials of which allowed a quantitative recovery of the actinides and their separation from fission products and especially from lanthanides. In addition, the thermochemical properties of the AnAl4 alloys were determined by electrochemical measurements.

  1. Thermochemical properties and group values for nitrogen-containing molecules.

    PubMed

    Ashcraft, Robert W; Green, William H

    2008-09-25

    Gas-phase thermochemical group additivity values were derived from CBS-QB3 computational chemistry calculations for 105 noncyclic C/H/O/N molecules. The molecules contain nitrile, nitro, nitroso, nitrite, nitrate, amine, imino, and azo functional groups. The enthalpy of formation, entropy, and heat capacity values for 49 atom-centered groups were derived. The effect of hindered internal rotations was included via rotor potential energy scans and solution of the one-dimensional Schrodinger equation. The average 95% confidence intervals across all derived groups are 1.4 kcal mol(-1) for the enthalpy, 1.3 cal mol(-1) K(-1) for the entropy, and 1.0 cal/mol K for the heat capacity. The presented group values will be useful when employing automatic reaction mechanism generation tools to examine the role of fuel-bound or molecular nitrogen in energy-related or atmospheric processes. PMID:18754603

  2. Modelling ironmaking blast furnace: Solid flow and thermochemical behaviours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yansong; Guo, Baoyu; Yu, Aibing; Chew, Sheng; Austin, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Ironmaking blast furnace is a counter-, co-, cross-current moving bed reactor, where solid particles are charged at the furnace top forming a downward moving bed while gas are introduced at the lower part of furnace and travels upward through the solid bed of varying porosity, reducing solid ore to liquid iron at the cohesive zone. These three phases interact intensely. In this paper, a three-dimensional mathematical model is developed. The model describes the motion of solid and gas, based on continuum approach, and implements the so-called force balance model for the liquid flow. The model is applied to a blast furnace, where raceway cavity is considered explicitly. The results demonstrate and characterize the key multiphase flow patterns of solid-gas-liquid at different regions inside the blast furnace, in particular solid flow and associated thermochemical behaviours of solid particles. This model offers a costeffective tool to understand and optimize blast furnace operation.

  3. Enhancing methane production of Chlorella vulgaris via thermochemical pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Lara; Mahdy, Ahmed; Timmers, Rudolphus A; Ballesteros, Mercedes; González-Fernández, Cristina

    2013-12-01

    To enhance the anaerobic digestion of Chlorella vulgaris, thermochemical pretreatments were conducted. All pretreatments markedly improved solubilisation of carbohydrates. Thermal treatments and thermal treatments combined with alkali resulted in 5-fold increase of soluble carbohydrates while thermal treatment with acid addition enhanced by 7-fold. On the other hand, proteins were only solubilized with thermo-alkaline conditions applied. Likewise, all the pretreatments tested improved methane production. Highest anaerobic digestion was accomplished by thermal treatment at 120°C for 40 min without any chemical addition. As a matter of fact, hydrolysis constant rate was doubled under this condition. According to the energetic analysis, energy input was higher than the extra energy gain at the solid concentration employed. Nevertheless, higher biomass organic load pretreatment may be an option to achieve positive energetic balances. PMID:24096280

  4. Moving bed reactor for solar thermochemical fuel production

    DOEpatents

    Ermanoski, Ivan

    2013-04-16

    Reactors and methods for solar thermochemical reactions are disclosed. Embodiments of reactors include at least two distinct reactor chambers between which there is at least a pressure differential. In embodiments, reactive particles are exchanged between chambers during a reaction cycle to thermally reduce the particles at first conditions and oxidize the particles at second conditions to produce chemical work from heat. In embodiments, chambers of a reactor are coupled to a heat exchanger to pre-heat the reactive particles prior to direct exposure to thermal energy with heat transferred from reduced reactive particles as the particles are oppositely conveyed between the thermal reduction chamber and the fuel production chamber. In an embodiment, particle conveyance is in part provided by an elevator which may further function as a heat exchanger.

  5. Computational Modeling of Thermochemical Evolution of Aluminum Smelter Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qinsong; Taylor, Mark P.; Chen, John J. J.

    2015-02-01

    In an aluminum reduction cell, crushed anode cover at room temperature is added onto the exposed bulk electrolyte surface around newly positioned anodes and is heated by high heat flux from this liquid electrolyte. Liquid electrolyte penetrates inside the porous anode cover. Solid cryolite and alumina crystallize from the liquid electrolyte due to the temperature gradient in the anode cover. A solidified crust forms at the bottom part of the anode cover during the heating up period. A thermochemical model which takes into account both the liquid electrolyte penetration and phase transformations has been developed to simulate the temperature evolution, chemical composition development, and liquid front penetration and content in the anode cover. The model is tested against experimental data obtained from industrial cells and laboratory experiments in this paper.

  6. An approach to thermochemical modeling of nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Beahm, E.C.; Spear, K.E.

    1998-11-01

    This initial work is aimed at developing a basic understanding of the phase equilibria and solid solution behavior of the constituents of waste glass. Current, experimentally determined values are less than desirable since they depend on measurement of the leach rate under non-realistic conditions designed to accelerate processes that occur on a geologic time scale. The often-used assumption that the activity of a species is either unity or equal to the overall concentration of the metal can also yield misleading results. The associate species model, a recent development in thermochemical modeling, will be applied to these systems to more accurately predict chemical activities in such complex systems as waste glasses.

  7. Observations and Thermochemical Calculations for Hot-Jupiter Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver; Cubillos, Patricio; Stemm, Madison

    2015-01-01

    I present Spitzer eclipse observations for WASP-14b and WASP-43b, an open source tool for thermochemical equilibrium calculations, and components of an open source tool for atmospheric parameter retrieval from spectroscopic data. WASP-14b is a planet that receives high irradiation from its host star, yet, although theory does not predict it, the planet hosts a thermal inversion. The WASP-43b eclipses have signal-to-noise ratios of ~25, one of the largest among exoplanets. To assess these planets' atmospheric composition and thermal structure, we developed an open-source Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) code. My dissertation tasks included developing a Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code, implementing the eclipse geometry calculation in BART's radiative transfer module, and generating parameterized pressure and temperature profiles so the radiative-transfer module can be driven by the statistical module.To initialize the radiative-transfer calculation in BART, TEA calculates the equilibrium abundances of gaseous molecular species at a given temperature and pressure. It uses the Gibbs-free-energy minimization method with an iterative Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature-pressure pairs. The code is tested against the original method developed by White at al. (1958), the analytic method developed by Burrows and Sharp (1999), and the Newton-Raphson method implemented in the open-source Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA) code. TEA, written in Python, is modular, documented, and available to the community via the open-source development site GitHub.com.Support for this work was provided by NASA Headquarters under the NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, grant NNX12AL83H, by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech, and through the Science Mission Directorate's Planetary Atmospheres Program, grant

  8. Synthesis and characterization of ferrite materials for thermochemical CO2 splitting using concentrated solar energy.

    SciTech Connect

    Stechel, Ellen Beth; Ambrosini, Andrea; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Miller, James Edward; Evans, Lindsey R.; Livers, Stephanie

    2010-07-01

    The Sunshine to Petrol effort at Sandia aims to convert carbon dioxide and water to precursors for liquid hydrocarbon fuels using concentrated solar power. Significant advances have been made in the field of solar thermochemical CO{sub 2}-splitting technologies utilizing yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-supported ferrite composites. Conceptually, such materials work via the basic redox reactions: Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} {yields} 3FeO + 0.5O{sub 2} (Thermal reduction, >1350 C) and 3FeO + CO{sub 2} {yields} Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} + CO (CO{sub 2}-splitting oxidation, <1200 C). There has been limited fundamental characterization of the ferrite-based materials at the high temperatures and conditions present in these cycles. A systematic study of these composites is underway in an effort to begin to elucidate microstructure, structure-property relationships, and the role of the support on redox behavior under high-temperature reducing and oxidizing environments. In this paper the synthesis, structural characterization (including scanning electron microscopy and room temperature and in-situ x-ray diffraction), and thermogravimetric analysis of YSZ-supported ferrites will be reported.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of metal oxide materials for thermochemical CO2 splitting using concentrated solar energy.

    SciTech Connect

    Stechel, Ellen Beth; Ambrosini, Andrea; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Miller, James Edward; Evans, Lindsey R.; Livers, Stephanie

    2010-07-01

    The Sunshine to Petrol effort at Sandia aims to convert carbon dioxide and water to precursors for liquid hydrocarbon fuels using concentrated solar power. Significant advances have been made in the field of solar thermochemical CO{sub 2}-splitting technologies utilizing yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-supported ferrite composites. Conceptually, such materials work via the basic redox reactions: Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} {yields} 3FeO + 0.5O{sub 2} (Thermal reduction, >1350 C) and 3FeO + CO{sub 2} {yields} Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} + CO (CO{sub 2}-splitting oxidation, <1200 C). There has been limited fundamental characterization of the ferrite-based materials at the high temperatures and conditions present in these cycles. A systematic study of these composites is underway in an effort to begin to elucidate microstructure, structure-property relationships, and the role of the support on redox behavior under high-temperature reducing and oxidizing environments. In this paper the synthesis, structural characterization (including scanning electron microscopy and room temperature and in-situ x-ray diffraction), and thermogravimetric analysis of YSZ-supported ferrites will be reported.

  10. Mutual effect of thermochemical surface decomposition and viscous interaction during hypersonic flow past a sharp cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limanskiy, A. V.; Timoshenko, V. I.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical results on the hypersonic gas flow in viscous interaction regime past sharp circular cones with thermally destructible Teflon surface are presented. Characteristics of the mutual influence between the thermochemical decomposition of the surface and the viscous interaction are revealed.

  11. Role of thermochemical conversion in livestock waste-to-energy treatments: Obstacles and opportunities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integrating thermochemical conversion (TCC) technologies with current animal waste treatment practices can treat and reduce quantities of manure from consolidated animal feeding operations. Additionally, TCC technologies can produce value-added, renewable energy products. These products can meet hea...

  12. Solar thermal hydrogen production process: Final report, January 1978-December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    Under sponsorship by the United States Department of Energy, Westinghouse Advanced Energy-Systems Division has investigated the potential for using solar thermal energy to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. A hybrid thermochemical/electrochemical process, known as the Sulfur Cycle, has been the focus of these investigations. Process studies have indicated that, with adequate and ongoing research and development, the Sulfur Cycle can be effectively driven with solar heat. Also, economic analyses have indicated that the cycle has the potential to produce hydrogen in economic competitiveness with conventional methods (e.g. methane/steam reforming) by the turn of the century. A first generation developmental system has been defined along with its critical components, i.e. those components that need substantial engineering development. Designs for those high temperature components that concentrate, vaporize and decompose the process circulating fluid, sulfuric acid, have been prepared. Extensive experimental investigations have been conducted with regard to the selection of construction materials for these components. From these experiments, which included materials endurance tests for corrosion resistance for periods up to 6000 hours, promising materials and catalysts have been identified.

  13. Third millenium ideal gas and condensed phase thermochemical database for combustion (with update from active thermochemical tables).

    SciTech Connect

    Burcat, A.; Ruscic, B.; Chemistry; Technion - Israel Inst. of Tech.

    2005-07-29

    The thermochemical database of species involved in combustion processes is and has been available for free use for over 25 years. It was first published in print in 1984, approximately 8 years after it was first assembled, and contained 215 species at the time. This is the 7th printed edition and most likely will be the last one in print in the present format, which involves substantial manual labor. The database currently contains more than 1300 species, specifically organic molecules and radicals, but also inorganic species connected to combustion and air pollution. Since 1991 this database is freely available on the internet, at the Technion-IIT ftp server, and it is continuously expanded and corrected. The database is mirrored daily at an official mirror site, and at random at about a dozen unofficial mirror and 'finger' sites. The present edition contains numerous corrections and many recalculations of data of provisory type by the G3//B3LYP method, a high-accuracy composite ab initio calculation. About 300 species are newly calculated and are not yet published elsewhere. In anticipation of the full coupling, which is under development, the database started incorporating the available (as yet unpublished) values from Active Thermochemical Tables. The electronic version now also contains an XML file of the main database to allow transfer to other formats and ease finding specific information of interest. The database is used by scientists, educators, engineers and students at all levels, dealing primarily with combustion and air pollution, jet engines, rocket propulsion, fireworks, but also by researchers involved in upper atmosphere kinetics, astrophysics, abrasion metallurgy, etc. This introductory article contains explanations of the database and the means to use it, its sources, ways of calculation, and assessments of the accuracy of data.

  14. Thermochemical analyses of the oxidative vaporization of metals and oxides by oxygen molecules and atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, F. J.; Leisz, D. M.; Fryburg, G. C.; Stearns, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    Equilibrium thermochemical analyses are employed to describe the vaporization processes of metals and metal oxides upon exposure to molecular and atomic oxygen. Specific analytic results for the chromium-, platinum-, aluminum-, and silicon-oxygen systems are presented. Maximum rates of oxidative vaporization predicted from the thermochemical considerations are compared with experimental results for chromium and platinum. The oxidative vaporization rates of chromium and platinum are considerably enhanced by oxygen atoms.

  15. Electrical conductivity as a constraint on lower mantle thermo-chemical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, Frédéric; Khan, Amir

    2016-09-01

    Electrical conductivity of the Earth's mantle depends on both temperature and compositional parameters. Radial and lateral variations in conductivity are thus potentially a powerful means to investigate its thermo-chemical structure. Here, we use available electrical conductivity data for the major lower mantle minerals, bridgmanite and ferropericlase, to calculate 3D maps of lower mantle electrical conductivity for two possible models: a purely thermal model, and a thermo-chemical model. Both models derive from probabilistic seismic tomography, and the thermo-chemical model includes, in addition to temperature anomalies, variations in volume fraction of bridgmanite and iron content. The electrical conductivity maps predicted by these two models are clearly different. Compared to the purely thermal model, the thermo-chemical model leads to higher electrical conductivity, by about a factor 2.5, and stronger lateral anomalies. In the lowermost mantle (2000-2891 km) the thermo-chemical model results in a belt of high conductivity around the equator, whose maximum value reaches ∼120% of the laterally-averaged value and is located in the low shear-wave velocity provinces imaged in tomographic models. Based on our electrical conductivity maps, we computed electromagnetic response functions (C-responses) and found, again, strong differences between the C-responses for purely thermal and thermo-chemical models. At periods of 1 year and longer, C-responses based on thermal and thermo-chemical models are easily distinguishable. Furthermore, C-responses for thermo-chemical model vary geographically. Our results therefore show that long-period (1 year and more) variations of the magnetic field may provide key insights on the nature and structure of the deep mantle.

  16. On Nonequilibrium Radiation in Hydrogen Shock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chul

    2005-01-01

    The influence of thermochemical nonequilibrium in the shock layer over a vehicle entering the atmosphere of an outer planet is examined qualitatively. The state of understanding of the heating environment for the Galileo Probe vehicle is first reviewed. Next, the possible reasons for the high recession in the frustum region and the low recession in the stagnation region are examined. The state of understanding of the nonequilibrium in the hydrogen flow is then examined. For the entry flight in Neptune, the possible influence of nonequilibrium is predicted.

  17. World Hydrogen Energy Conference, 5th, Toronto, Canada, July 15-19, 1984, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veziroglu, T. N.; Taylor, J. B.

    Among the topics discussed are thermochemical and hybrid processes for hydrogen production, pyrite-assisted water electrolysis, a hydrogen distribution network for industrial use in Western Europe, the combustion of alternative fuels in spark-ignition engines, the use of fuel cells in locomotive propulsion, hydrogen storage by glass microencapsulation, and FeTi compounds' hydriding. Also covered are plasmachemical methods of energy carrier production, synthetic fuels' production in small scale plants, products found in the anodic oxidation of coal, hydrogen embrittlement, and the regulating step in LaNi5 hydride formation.

  18. Method of producing hydrogen. [KNO/sub 3/ and I/sub 2/

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, B.M.; Schreiner, F.

    1975-12-30

    Water is thermochemically decomposed to produce hydrogen by the following sequence of reactions. KNO/sub 3/ and I/sub 2/ are reacted to produce KI, NO and O/sub 2/, the NO and O/sub 2/ thus produced are reacted with water to form HNO/sub 3/, a hydrogen-containing iodide--NH/sub 4/I or HI--is formed from the HNO/sub 3/, and this iodide is thermally decomposed to produce hydrogen, all products of the reactions being recycled except hydrogen and oxygen. 2 claims, no drawings.

  19. Hydrogen Filling Station

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen

  20. Thermochemical evaluation of PCI failures in LWR fuel pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götzmann, Odo

    1982-06-01

    In searching for the reasons behind the PCI failures of LWR fuel pins two questions have obviously remained unanswered: (a) what is the iodine potential necessary to cause SCC of zircaloy, and (b) is this iodine potential available in a fuel pin. To answer these two questions, a consistent set of thermochemical data for the Zr-I system was created, the results of laboratory tests of iodine-induced SCC of zircaloy were evaluated, and, finally, equilibrium calculations for the fuel-fission-product system were performed to determine the temperature and oxygen potential required to produce an iodine potential high enough to cause SCC of zircaloy. The conclusion of this study is that SCC of zircaloy can be caused by an iodine potential equal to or greater than that needed to form ZrI with metallic zirconium. This iodine potential is available in an LWR fuel pin at oxygen potentials corresponding to stoichiometric fuel. The carrier of the potential, i.e. The attacking species, is CsI.

  1. Stochastic effects in a thermochemical system with Newtonian heat exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, B.; Lemarchand, A.

    2001-12-01

    We develop a mesoscopic description of stochastic effects in the Newtonian heat exchange between a diluted gas system and a thermostat. We explicitly study the homogeneous Semenov model involving a thermochemical reaction and neglecting consumption of reactants. The master equation includes a transition rate for the thermal transfer process, which is derived on the basis of the statistics for inelastic collisions between gas particles and walls of the thermostat. The main assumption is that the perturbation of the Maxwellian particle velocity distribution can be neglected. The transition function for the thermal process admits a continuous spectrum of temperature changes, and consequently, the master equation has a complicated integro-differential form. We perform Monte Carlo simulations based on this equation to study the stochastic effects in the Semenov system in the explosive regime. The dispersion of ignition times is calculated as a function of system size. For sufficiently small systems, the probability distribution of temperature displays transient bimodality during the ignition period. The results of the stochastic description are successfully compared with those of direct simulations of microscopic particle dynamics.

  2. Online residence time distribution measurement of thermochemical biomass pretreatment reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sievers, David A.; Kuhn, Erik M.; Stickel, Jonathan J.; Tucker, Melvin P.; Wolfrum, Edward J.

    2015-11-03

    Residence time is a critical parameter that strongly affects the product profile and overall yield achieved from thermochemical pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass during production of liquid transportation fuels. The residence time distribution (RTD) is one important measure of reactor performance and provides a metric to use when evaluating changes in reactor design and operating parameters. An inexpensive and rapid RTD measurement technique was developed to measure the residence time characteristics in biomass pretreatment reactors and similar equipment processing wet-granular slurries. Sodium chloride was pulsed into the feed entering a 600 kg/d pilot-scale reactor operated at various conditions, and aqueous salt concentration was measured in the discharge using specially fabricated electrical conductivity instrumentation. This online conductivity method was superior in both measurement accuracy and resource requirements compared to offline analysis. Experimentally measured mean residence time values were longer than estimated by simple calculation and screw speed and throughput rate were investigated as contributing factors. In conclusion, a semi-empirical model was developed to predict the mean residence time as a function of operating parameters and enabled improved agreement.

  3. Online residence time distribution measurement of thermochemical biomass pretreatment reactors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sievers, David A.; Kuhn, Erik M.; Stickel, Jonathan J.; Tucker, Melvin P.; Wolfrum, Edward J.

    2015-11-03

    Residence time is a critical parameter that strongly affects the product profile and overall yield achieved from thermochemical pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass during production of liquid transportation fuels. The residence time distribution (RTD) is one important measure of reactor performance and provides a metric to use when evaluating changes in reactor design and operating parameters. An inexpensive and rapid RTD measurement technique was developed to measure the residence time characteristics in biomass pretreatment reactors and similar equipment processing wet-granular slurries. Sodium chloride was pulsed into the feed entering a 600 kg/d pilot-scale reactor operated at various conditions, and aqueous saltmore » concentration was measured in the discharge using specially fabricated electrical conductivity instrumentation. This online conductivity method was superior in both measurement accuracy and resource requirements compared to offline analysis. Experimentally measured mean residence time values were longer than estimated by simple calculation and screw speed and throughput rate were investigated as contributing factors. In conclusion, a semi-empirical model was developed to predict the mean residence time as a function of operating parameters and enabled improved agreement.« less

  4. A thermochemically derived global reaction mechanism for detonation application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y.; Yang, J.; Sun, M.

    2012-07-01

    A 4-species 4-step global reaction mechanism for detonation calculations is derived from detailed chemistry through thermochemical approach. Reaction species involved in the mechanism and their corresponding molecular weight and enthalpy data are derived from the real equilibrium properties. By substituting these global species into the results of constant volume explosion and examining the evolution process of these global species under varied conditions, reaction paths and corresponding rates are summarized and formulated. The proposed mechanism is first validated to the original chemistry through calculations of the CJ detonation wave, adiabatic constant volume explosion, and the steady reaction structure after a strong shock wave. Good agreement in both reaction scales and averaged thermodynamic properties has been achieved. Two sets of reaction rates based on different detailed chemistry are then examined and applied for numerical simulations of two-dimensional cellular detonations. Preliminary results and a brief comparison between the two mechanisms are presented. The proposed global mechanism is found to be economic in computation and also competent in description of the overall characteristics of detonation wave. Though only stoichiometric acetylene-oxygen mixture is investigated in this study, the method to derive such a global reaction mechanism possesses a certain generality for premixed reactions of most lean hydrocarbon mixtures.

  5. A Thermo-Chemical Reactor for analytical atomic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.; Nagulin, K. Yu.

    2009-01-01

    A novel atomization/vaporization system for analytical atomic spectrometry is developed. It consists of two electrically and thermally separated parts that can be heated separately. Unlike conventional electrothermal atomizers in which atomization occurs immediately above the vaporization site and at the same instant of time, the proposed system allows analyte atomization via an intermediate stage of fractional condensation as a two stage process: Vaporization → Condensation → Atomization. The condensation step is selective since vaporized matrix constituents are mainly non-condensable gases and leave the system by diffusion while analyte species are trapped on the cold surface of a condenser. This kind of sample distillation keeps all the advantages of traditional electrothermal atomization and allows significant reduction of matrix interferences. Integration into one design a vaporizer, condenser and atomizer gives much more flexibility for in situ sample treatment and thus the system is called a Thermo-Chemical Reactor (TCR). Details of the design, temperature measurements, vaporization-condensation-atomization mechanisms of various elements in variety of matrices are investigated in the TCR with spectral, temporal and spatial resolution. The ability of the TCR to significantly reduce interferences and to conduct sample pyrolysis at much higher temperatures as compared to conventional electrothermal atomizers is demonstrated. The analytical potential of the system is shown when atomic absorption determination of Cd and Pb in citrus leaves and milk powder without the use of any chemical modification.

  6. Integrated solar thermochemical reaction system for steam methane reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Feng; Diver, Rich; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Cameron, Richard J.; Humble, Paul H.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Dagle, Robert A.; Wegeng, Robert S.

    2015-06-05

    Solar-aided upgrade of the energy content of fossil fuels, such as natural gas, can provide a near-term transition path towards a future solar-fuel economy and reduce carbon dioxide emission from fossil fuel consumption. Both steam and dry reforming a methane-containing fuel stream have been studied with concentrated solar power as the energy input to drive the highly endothermic reactions but the concept has not been demonstrated at a commercial scale. Under a current project with the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL is developing an integrated solar thermochemical reaction system that combines solar concentrators with micro- and meso-channel reactors and heat exchangers to accomplish more than 20% solar augment of methane higher heating value. The objective of our three-year project is to develop and prepare for commercialization such solar reforming system with a high enough efficiency to serve as the frontend of a conventional natural gas (or biogas) combined cycle power plant, producing power with a levelized cost of electricity less than 6¢/kWh, without subsidies, by the year 2020. In this paper, we present results from the first year of our project that demonstrated a solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency as high as 69% with a prototype reaction system.

  7. Integrated solar thermochemical reaction system for steam methane reforming

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zheng, Feng; Diver, Rich; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Cameron, Richard J.; Humble, Paul H.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Dagle, Robert A.; Wegeng, Robert S.

    2015-06-05

    Solar-aided upgrade of the energy content of fossil fuels, such as natural gas, can provide a near-term transition path towards a future solar-fuel economy and reduce carbon dioxide emission from fossil fuel consumption. Both steam and dry reforming a methane-containing fuel stream have been studied with concentrated solar power as the energy input to drive the highly endothermic reactions but the concept has not been demonstrated at a commercial scale. Under a current project with the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL is developing an integrated solar thermochemical reaction system that combines solar concentrators with micro- and meso-channel reactors and heatmore » exchangers to accomplish more than 20% solar augment of methane higher heating value. The objective of our three-year project is to develop and prepare for commercialization such solar reforming system with a high enough efficiency to serve as the frontend of a conventional natural gas (or biogas) combined cycle power plant, producing power with a levelized cost of electricity less than 6¢/kWh, without subsidies, by the year 2020. In this paper, we present results from the first year of our project that demonstrated a solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency as high as 69% with a prototype reaction system.« less

  8. Thermochemical scanning probe lithography of protein gradients at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Albisetti, E; Carroll, K M; Lu, X; Curtis, J E; Petti, D; Bertacco, R; Riedo, E

    2016-08-01

    Patterning nanoscale protein gradients is crucial for studying a variety of cellular processes in vitro. Despite the recent development in nano-fabrication technology, combining nanometric resolution and fine control of protein concentrations is still an open challenge. Here, we demonstrate the use of thermochemical scanning probe lithography (tc-SPL) for defining micro- and nano-sized patterns with precisely controlled protein concentration. First, tc-SPL is performed by scanning a heatable atomic force microscopy tip on a polymeric substrate, for locally exposing reactive amino groups on the surface, then the substrate is functionalized with streptavidin and laminin proteins. We show, by fluorescence microscopy on the patterned gradients, that it is possible to precisely tune the concentration of the immobilized proteins by varying the patterning parameters during tc-SPL. This paves the way to the use of tc-SPL for defining protein gradients at the nanoscale, to be used as chemical cues e.g. for studying and regulating cellular processes in vitro. PMID:27344982

  9. Thermochemical scanning probe lithography of protein gradients at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albisetti, E.; Carroll, K. M.; Lu, X.; Curtis, J. E.; Petti, D.; Bertacco, R.; Riedo, E.

    2016-08-01

    Patterning nanoscale protein gradients is crucial for studying a variety of cellular processes in vitro. Despite the recent development in nano-fabrication technology, combining nanometric resolution and fine control of protein concentrations is still an open challenge. Here, we demonstrate the use of thermochemical scanning probe lithography (tc-SPL) for defining micro- and nano-sized patterns with precisely controlled protein concentration. First, tc-SPL is performed by scanning a heatable atomic force microscopy tip on a polymeric substrate, for locally exposing reactive amino groups on the surface, then the substrate is functionalized with streptavidin and laminin proteins. We show, by fluorescence microscopy on the patterned gradients, that it is possible to precisely tune the concentration of the immobilized proteins by varying the patterning parameters during tc-SPL. This paves the way to the use of tc-SPL for defining protein gradients at the nanoscale, to be used as chemical cues e.g. for studying and regulating cellular processes in vitro.

  10. Optimization of thermo-chemical hydrolysis of kitchen wastes.

    PubMed

    Vavouraki, Aikaterini Ioannis; Angelis, Evangelos Michael; Kornaros, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Municipal Solid Wastes (MSWs) in Greece consist mainly of fermentable organic material such as food scraps (∼50%) and paper residuals (∼20%). The aim of this work was to study the thermo-chemical pretreatment of the kitchen waste (KW) fraction of MSW focusing on biotechnological exploitation of pretreated wastes for biofuel production. A representative sample of municipal food residues was derived by combining weighted amounts of each individual type of residue recognized in daily samples obtained from the University of Patras' students restaurant located at the Students Residence Hall (Greece). Chemical pretreatment experiments of the representative KW sample were performed using several types of chemical solutions (i.e. H2SO4, HCl, NaOH, H2SO3) of different solute concentration (0.7%, 1.5%, 3%) at three temperatures (50, 75, 120°C) and a range of residence times (30-120min). Optimized results proved that chemical pretreatment of KW, using either 1.12% HCl for 94min or 1.17% HCl for 86min (at 100°C), increased soluble sugars concentration by 120% compared to untreated KW. The increase of soluble sugars was mainly attributed to the mono-sugars glucose and fructose. PMID:22883686

  11. Design Principles of Perovskites for Thermochemical Oxygen Separation

    PubMed Central

    Ezbiri, Miriam; Allen, Kyle M.; Gàlvez, Maria E.; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Separation and concentration of O2 from gas mixtures is central to several sustainable energy technologies, such as solar‐driven synthesis of liquid hydrocarbon fuels from CO2, H2O, and concentrated sunlight. We introduce a rationale for designing metal oxide redox materials for oxygen separation through “thermochemical pumping” of O2 against a pO2 gradient with low‐grade process heat. Electronic structure calculations show that the activity of O vacancies in metal oxides pinpoints the ideal oxygen exchange capacity of perovskites. Thermogravimetric analysis and high‐temperature X‐ray diffraction for SrCoO3−δ, BaCoO3−δ and BaMnO3−δ perovskites and Ag2O and Cu2O references confirm the predicted performance of SrCoO3−δ, which surpasses the performance of state‐of‐the‐art Cu2O at these conditions with an oxygen exchange capacity of 44 mmol O 2 mol SrCoO 3−δ −1 exchanged at 12.1 μmol O 2 min−1 g−1 at 600–900 K. The redox trends are understood due to lattice expansion and electronic charge transfer. PMID:25925955

  12. Environmental impacts of thermochemical biomass conversion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, D.C.; Hart, T.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; McKinney, M.D.; Norton, M.V.; Abrams, C.W.

    1995-06-01

    Thermochemical conversion in this study is limited to fast pyrolysis, upgrading of fast pyrolysis oils, and gasification. Environmental impacts of all types were considered within the project, but primary emphasis was on discharges to the land, air, and water during and after the conversion processes. The project discussed here is divided into five task areas: (1) pyrolysis oil analysis; (2) hydrotreating of pyrolysis oil; (3) gas treatment systems for effluent minimization; (4) strategic analysis of regulatory requirements; and (5) support of the IEA Environmental Systems Activity. The pyrolysis oil task was aimed at understanding the oil contaminants and potential means for their removal. The hydrotreating task was undertaken to better define one potential means for both improving the quality of the oil but also removing contaminants from the oil. Within Task 3, analyses were done to evaluate the results of gasification product treatment systems. Task 4 was a review and collection of regulatory requirements which would be applicable to the subject processes. The IEA support task included input to and participation in the IEA Bioenergy activity which directly relates to the project subject. Each of these tasks is described along with the results. Conclusions and recommendations from the overall project are given.

  13. CATALYSTS NHI Thermochemical Systems FY 2009 Year-End Report

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Ginosar

    2009-09-01

    Fiscal Year 2009 work in the Catalysts project focused on advanced catalysts for the decomposition of sulfuric acid, a reaction common to both the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) cycle and the Hybrid Sulfur cycle. Prior years’ effort in this project has found that although platinum supported on titanium oxide will be an acceptable catalyst for sulfuric acid decomposition in the integrated laboratory scale (ILS) project, the material has short comings, including significant cost and high deactivation rates due to sintering and platinum evaporation. For pilot and larger scale systems, the catalyst stability needs to be improved significantly. In Fiscal Year 2008 it was found that at atmospheric pressure, deactivation rates of a 1 wt% platinum catalyst could be reduced by 300% by adding either 0.3 wt% iridium (Ir) or 0.3 wt% ruthenium (Ru) to the catalyst. In Fiscal Year 2009, work focused on examining the platinum group metal catalysts activity and stability at elevated pressures. In addition, simple and complex metal oxides are known to catalyze the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. These metal oxides could offer activities comparable to platinum but at significantly reduced cost. Thus a second focus for Fiscal Year 2009 was to explore metal oxide catalysts for the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. In Fiscal Year 2007 several commercial activated carbons had been identified for the HI decomposition reaction; a reaction specific to the S-I cycle. Those materials should be acceptable for the pilot scale project. The activated carbon catalysts have some disadvantages including low activity at the lower range of reactor operating temperature (350 to 400°C) and a propensity to generate carbon monoxide in the presence of water that could contaminate the hydrogen product, but due to limited funding, this area had low priority in Fiscal Year 2009. Fiscal Year 2009 catalyst work included five tasks: development, and testing of stabilized platinum based H2SO4 catalysts

  14. Ce K edge XAS of ceria-based redox materials under realistic conditions for the two-step solar thermochemical dissociation of water and/or CO2.

    PubMed

    Rothensteiner, Matthäus; Sala, Simone; Bonk, Alexander; Vogt, Ulrich; Emerich, Hermann; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2015-10-28

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to characterise ceria-based materials under realistic conditions present in a reactor for solar thermochemical two-step water and carbon dioxide splitting. A setup suitable for in situ measurements in transmission mode at the cerium K edge from room temperature up to 1773 K is presented. Time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) data, collected for a 10 mol% hafnium-doped ceria sample (Ce0.9Hf0.1O2-δ) during reduction at 1773 K in a flow of inert gas and during re-oxidation by CO2 at 1073 K, enables the quantitative determination of the non-stoichiometry δ of the fluorite-type structure. XANES analysis suggests the formation of the hexagonal Ce2O3 phase upon reduction in 2% hydrogen/helium at 1773 K. We discuss the experimental limitations and possibilities of high-temperature in situ XAS at edges of lower energy as well as the importance of the technique for understanding and improving the properties of ceria-based oxygen storage materials for thermochemical solar energy conversion. PMID:26412705

  15. Evaluation of the Relative Merits of Herbaceous and Woody Crops for Use in Tunable Thermochemical Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joon-Hyun; Martinalbo, Ilya

    2011-12-01

    This report summarizes the work and findings of the grant work conducted from January 2009 until September 2011 under the collaboration between Ceres, Inc. and Choren USA, LLC. This DOE-funded project involves a head-to-head comparison of two types of dedicated energy crops in the context of a commercial gasification conversion process. The main goal of the project was to gain a better understanding of the differences in feedstock composition between herbaceous and woody species, and how these differences may impact a commercial gasification process. In this work, switchgrass was employed as a model herbaceous energy crop, and willow as a model short-rotation woody crop. Both crops are species native to the U.S. with significant potential to contribute to U.S. goals for renewable liquid fuel production, as outlined in the DOE Billion Ton Update (http://www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/billion_ton_update.html, 2011). In some areas of the U.S., switching between woody and herbaceous feedstocks or blending of the two may be necessary to keep a large-scale gasifier operating near capacity year round. Based on laboratory tests and process simulations it has been successfully shown that suitable high yielding switchgrass and willow varieties exist that meet the feedstock specifications for large scale entrained flow biomass gasification. This data provides the foundation for better understanding how to use both materials in thermochemical processes. It has been shown that both switchgrass and willow varieties have comparable ranges of higher heating value, BTU content and indistinguishable hydrogen/carbon ratios. Benefits of switchgrass, and other herbaceous feedstocks, include its low moisture content, which reduce energy inputs and costs for drying feedstock. Compared to the typical feedstock currently being used in the Carbo-V® process, switchgrass has a higher ash content, combined with a lower ash melting temperature. Whether or not this may cause inefficiencies in the

  16. Low Temperature Combustion with Thermo-Chemical Recuperation to Maximize In-Use Engine Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Nigel N. Clark; Francisco Posada; Clinton Bedick; John Pratapas; Aleksandr Kozlov; Martin Linck; Dmitri Boulanov

    2009-03-30

    The key to overcome Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) load range limitations in reciprocating engines is based on proper control over the thermo-chemical properties of the in-cylinder charge. The studied alternative to achieve the required control of LTC is the use of two separate fuel streams to regulate timing and heat release at specific operational points, where the secondary fuel is a reformed product of the primary fuel in the tank. It is proposed in this report that the secondary fuel can be produced using exhaust heat and Thermo-Chemical Recuperation (TCR). TCR for reciprocating engines is a system that employs high efficiency recovery of sensible heat from engine exhaust gas and uses this energy to transform fuel composition. The recuperated sensible heat is returned to the engine as chemical energy. Chemical conversions are accomplished through catalytic and endothermic reactions in a specially designed reforming reactor. An equilibrium model developed by Gas Technology Institute (GTI) for heptane steam reforming was applied to estimate reformed fuel composition at different reforming temperatures. Laboratory results, at a steam/heptane mole ratio less than 2:1, confirm that low temperature reforming reactions, in the range of 550 K to 650 K, can produce 10-30% hydrogen (by volume, wet) in the product stream. Also, the effect of trading low mean effective pressure for displacement to achieve power output and energy efficiency has been explored by WVU. A zerodimensional model of LTC using heptane as fuel and a diesel Compression Ignition (CI) combustion model were employed to estimate pressure, temperature and total heat release as inputs for a mechanical and thermal loss model. The model results show that the total cooling burden on an LTC engine with lower power density and higher displacement was 14.3% lower than the diesel engine for the same amount of energy addition in the case of high load (43.57mg fuel/cycle). These preliminary modeling and

  17. Heavy metal removal from sewage sludge ash by thermochemical treatment with polyvinylchloride.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Christian; Exner, Robert M; Adam, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Sewage sludge ash (SSA) is a prospective phosphorus source for the future production of recycling P-fertilizers. Due to its high heavy metals contents and the relatively low P plant-availability, SSA must be treated before agricultural utilisation. In this paper SSA was thermochemically treated with PVC in a bench-scale rotary furnace in order to remove heavy metals via the chloride pathway. PVC has a high Cl-content of 52-53% and a high heating value that can be beneficially used for the thermochemical process. Large amounts of waste PVC are already recovered in recycling processes, but there are still some fractions that would be available for the proposed thermochemical process, for example, the low quality near-infrared(NIR)-fraction from waste separation facilities. Heavy metals were effectively removed at temperatures in the range of 800-950 °C via the gas phase by utilisation of PVC as Cl-donor. The resulting P plant-availability was comparable to SSA thermochemically treated with MgCl(2) as Cl-donor if MgO was used as an additive (Mg-donor). A further increase of the plant availability of phosphorus was achieved by acid post-treatment of the thermochemically treated SSA. PMID:23189972

  18. A thermochemical-biochemical hybrid processing of lignocellulosic biomass for producing fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanwen; Jarboe, Laura; Brown, Robert; Wen, Zhiyou

    2015-12-01

    Thermochemical-biological hybrid processing uses thermochemical decomposition of lignocellulosic biomass to produce a variety of intermediate compounds that can be converted into fuels and chemicals through microbial fermentation. It represents a unique opportunity for biomass conversion as it mitigates some of the deficiencies of conventional biochemical (pretreatment-hydrolysis-fermentation) and thermochemical (pyrolysis or gasification) processing. Thermochemical-biological hybrid processing includes two pathways: (i) pyrolysis/pyrolytic substrate fermentation, and (ii) gasification/syngas fermentation. This paper provides a comprehensive review of these two hybrid processing pathways, including the characteristics of fermentative substrates produced in the thermochemical stage and microbial utilization of these compounds in the fermentation stage. The current challenges of these two biomass conversion pathways include toxicity of the crude pyrolytic substrates, the inhibition of raw syngas contaminants, and the mass-transfer limitations in syngas fermentation. Possible approaches for mitigating substrate toxicities are discussed. The review also provides a summary of the current efforts to commercialize hybrid processing. PMID:26492814

  19. Hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  20. The gold-hydrogen bond, Au-H, and the hydrogen bond to gold, Au∙∙∙H-X.

    PubMed

    Schmidbaur, Hubert; Raubenheimer, Helgard G; Dobrzańska, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    In the first part of this review, the characteristics of Au-H bonds in gold hydrides are reviewed including the data of recently prepared stable organometallic complexes with gold(I) and gold(III) centers. In the second part, the reports are summarized where authors have tried to provide evidence for hydrogen bonds to gold of the type Au∙∙∙H-X. Such interactions have been proposed for gold atoms in the Au(-I), Au(0), Au(I), and Au(III) oxidation states as hydrogen bonding acceptors and H-X units with X = O, N, C as donors, based on both experimental and quantum chemistry studies. To complement these findings, the literature was screened for examples with similar molecular geometries, for which such bonding has not yet been considered. In the discussion of the results, the recently issued IUPAC definitions of hydrogen bonding and the currently accepted description of agostic interactions have been used as guidelines to rank the Au∙∙∙H-X interactions in this broad range of weak chemical bonding. From the available data it appears that all the intra- and intermolecular Au∙∙∙H-X contacts are associated with very low binding energies and non-specific directionality. To date, the energetics have not been estimated, because there are no thermochemical and very limited IR/Raman and temperature-dependent NMR data that can be used as reliable references. Where conspicuous structural or spectroscopic effects have been observed, explanations other than hydrogen bonding Au∙∙∙H-X can also be advanced in most cases. Although numerous examples of short Au∙∙∙H-X contacts exist in the literature, it seems, at this stage, that these probably make only very minor contributions to the energy of a given system and have only a marginal influence on molecular conformations which so far have most often attracted researchers to this topic. Further, more dedicated investigations will be necessary before well founded conclusions can be drawn. PMID:23999756

  1. The computation of thermo-chemical nonequilibrium hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Candler, Graham

    1989-01-01

    Several conceptual designs for vehicles that would fly in the atmosphere at hypersonic speeds have been developed recently. For the proposed flight conditions the air in the shock layer that envelops the body is at a sufficiently high temperature to cause chemical reaction, vibrational excitation, and ionization. However, these processes occur at finite rates which, when coupled with large convection speeds, cause the gas to be removed from thermo-chemical equilibrium. This non-ideal behavior affects the aerothermal loading on the vehicle and has ramifications in its design. A numerical method to solve the equations that describe these types of flows in 2-D was developed. The state of the gas is represented with seven chemical species, a separate vibrational temperature for each diatomic species, an electron translational temperature, and a mass-average translational-rotational temperature for the heavy particles. The equations for this gas model are solved numerically in a fully coupled fashion using an implicit finite volume time-marching technique. Gauss-Seidel line-relaxation is used to reduce the cost of the solution and flux-dependent differencing is employed to maintain stability. The numerical method was tested against several experiments. The calculated bow shock wave detachment on a sphere and two cones was compared to those measured in ground testing facilities. The computed peak electron number density on a sphere-cone was compared to that measured in a flight test. In each case the results from the numerical method were in excellent agreement with experiment. The technique was used to predict the aerothermal loads on an Aeroassisted Orbital Transfer Vehicle including radiative heating. These results indicate that the current physical model of high temperature air is appropriate and that the numerical algorithm is capable of treating this class of flows.

  2. Thermochemical Kinetics for Multireference Systems: Addition Reactions of Ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yan; Tishchenko, Oksana; Gour, Jeffrey R.; Li, Wei; Lutz, Jesse; Piecuch, Piotr; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2009-05-14

    The 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions of ozone to ethyne and ethene provide extreme examples of multireference singlet-state chemistry, and they are examined here to test the applicability of several approaches to thermochemical kinetics of systems with large static correlation. Four different multireference diagnostics are applied to measure the multireference characters of the reactants, products, and transition states; all diagnostics indicate significant multireference character in the reactant portion of the potential energy surfaces. We make a more complete estimation of the effect of quadruple excitations than was previously available, and we use this with CCSDT/CBS estimation of Wheeler et al. (Wheeler, S. E.; Ess, D. H.; Houk, K. N. J. Phys. Chem. A 2008, 112, 1798.) to make new best estimates of the van der Waals association energy, the barrier height, and the reaction energy to form the cycloadduct for both reactions. Comparing with these best estimates, we present comprehensive mean unsigned errors for a variety of coupled cluster, multilevel, and density functional methods. Several computational aspects of multireference reactions are considered: (i) the applicability of multilevel theory, (ii) the convergence of coupled cluster theory for reaction barrier heights, (iii) the applicability of completely renormalized coupled cluster methods to multireference systems, (iv) the treatment by density functional theory, (v) the multireference perturbation theory for multireference reactions, and (vi) the relative accuracy of scaling-type multilevel methods as compared with additive ones. It is found that scaling-type multilevel methods do not perform better than the additive-type multilevel methods. Among the 48 tested density functionals, only M05 reproduces the best estimates within their uncertainty. Multireference perturbation theory based on the complete-active-space reference wave functions constructed using a small number of reaction-specific active orbitals

  3. Photoinduced hydrogen-bonding dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chu, Tian-Shu; Xu, Jinmei

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen bonding dynamics has received extensive research attention in recent years due to the significant advances in femtolaser spectroscopy experiments and quantum chemistry calculations. Usually, photoexcitation would cause changes in the hydrogen bonding formed through the interaction between hydrogen donor and acceptor molecules on their ground electronic states, and such transient strengthening or weakening of hydrogen bonding could be crucial for the photophysical transformations and the subsequent photochemical reactions that occurred on a time scale from tens of femtosecond to a few nanoseconds. In this article, we review the combined experimental and theoretical studies focusing on the ultrafast electronic and vibrational hydrogen bonding dynamics. Through these studies, new mechanisms and proposals and common rules have been put forward to advance our understanding of the hydrogen bondings dynamics in a variety of important photoinduced phenomena like photosynthesis, dual fluorescence emission, rotational reorientation, excited-state proton transfer and charge transfer processes, chemosensor fluorescence sensing, rearrangements of the hydrogen-bond network including forming and breaking hydrogen bond in water. Graphical Abstract We review the recent advances on exploring the photoinduced hydrogen bonding dynamics in solutions through a joint approach of laser spectroscopy and theoretical calculation. The reviewed studies have put forward a new mechanism, new proposal, and new rule for a variety of photoinduced phenomena such as photosynthesis, dual fluorescence emission, rotational reorientation, excited-state proton transfer and charge transfer, chemosensor fluorescence sensing, and rearrangements of the hydrogen-bond network in water. PMID:27491849

  4. Hydrogenation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Joseph [Encino, CA; Oberg, Carl L [Canoga Park, CA; Russell, Larry H [Agoura, CA

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogenation reaction apparatus comprising a housing having walls which define a reaction zone and conduits for introducing streams of hydrogen and oxygen into the reaction zone, the oxygen being introduced into a central portion of the hydrogen stream to maintain a boundary layer of hydrogen along the walls of the reaction zone. A portion of the hydrogen and all of the oxygen react to produce a heated gas stream having a temperature within the range of from 1100.degree. to 1900.degree. C., while the boundary layer of hydrogen maintains the wall temperature at a substantially lower temperature. The heated gas stream is introduced into a hydrogenation reaction zone and provides the source of heat and hydrogen for a hydrogenation reaction. There also is provided means for quenching the products of the hydrogenation reaction. The present invention is particularly suitable for the hydrogenation of low-value solid carbonaceous materials to provide high yields of more valuable liquid and gaseous products.

  5. Effects of thermo-chemical pre-treatment on anaerobic biodegradability and hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, T V; Bos, G J Klaasse; Zeeman, G; Sanders, J P M; van Lier, J B

    2009-05-01

    The effects of different thermo-chemical pre-treatment methods were determined on the biodegradability and hydrolysis rate of lignocellulosic biomass. Three plant species, hay, straw and bracken were thermo-chemically pre-treated with calcium hydroxide, ammonium carbonate and maleic acid. After pre-treatment, the plant material was anaerobically digested in batch bottles under mesophilic conditions for 40 days. From the pre-treatment and subsequent anaerobic digestion experiments, it was concluded that when the lignin content of the plant material is high, thermo-chemical pre-treatments have a positive effect on the biodegradability of the substrate. Calcium hydroxide pre-treatment improves the biodegradability of lignocellulosic biomass, especially for high lignin content substrates, like bracken. Maleic acid generates the highest percentage of dissolved COD during pre-treatment. Ammonium pre-treatment only showed a clear effect on biodegradability for straw. PMID:19144515

  6. Comprehensive characterisation of sewage sludge for thermochemical conversion processes - Based on Singapore survey.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wei Ping; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    Recently, sludge attracted great interest as a potential feedstock in thermochemical conversion processes. However, compositions and thermal degradation behaviours of sludge were highly complex and distinctive compared to other traditional feedstock led to a need of fundamental research on sludge. Comprehensive characterisation of sludge specifically for thermochemical conversion was carried out for all existing Water Reclamation Plants in Singapore. In total, 14 sludge samples collected based on the type, plant, and batch categorisation. Existing characterisation methods for physical and chemical properties were analysed and reviewed using the collected samples. Qualitative similarities and quantitative variations of different sludge samples were identified and discussed. Oxidation of inorganic in sludge during ash forming analysis found to be causing significant deviations on proximate and ultimate analysis. Therefore, alternative parameters and comparison basis including Fixed Residues (FR), Inorganic Matters (IM) and Total Inorganics (TI) were proposed for better understanding on the thermochemical characteristics of sludge. PMID:27189138

  7. Minimum size for a nanoscale temperature discriminator based on a thermochemical system.

    PubMed

    Gorecki, J; Nowakowski, B; Gorecka, J N; Lemarchand, A

    2016-02-14

    What are the limits of size reduction for information processing devices based on chemical reactions? In this paper, we partially answer this question. We show that a thermochemical system can be used to design a discriminator of the parameters associated with oscillations of the ambient temperature. Depending on the amplitude and frequency of the oscillations, the system exhibits sharp transitions between different types of its time evolutions. This phenomenon can be used to discriminate between different parameter values describing the oscillating environment. We investigate the reliability of the thermochemical discriminator as a function of the number of molecules involved in the reactions. A stochastic model of chemical reactions and heat exchange with the neighborhood, in which the number of molecules explicitly appears, is introduced. For the selected values of the parameters, thermochemical discriminators operating with less than 10(5) molecules appear to be unreliable. PMID:26807977

  8. Evaluation of thermochemical models for particle and continuum simulations of hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Iain D.; Gokcen, Tahir

    1992-01-01

    Computations are presented for one-dimensional, strong shock waves that are typical of those that form in front of a reentering spacecraft. The fluid mechanics and thermochemistry are modeled using two different approaches. The first employs traditional continuum techniques in solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The second approach employs a particle simulation technique (the direct simulation Monte Carlo method, DSMC). The thermochemical models employed in these two techniques are quite different. The present investigation presents an evaluation of thermochemical models for nitrogen under hypersonic flow conditions. Four separate cases are considered that are dominated in turn by vibrational relaxation, weak dissociation, strong dissociation and weak ionization. In near-continuum, hypersonic flow, the nonequilibrium thermochemical models employed in continuum and particle simulations produce nearly identical solutions. Further, the two approaches are evaluated successfully against available experimental data for weakly and strongly dissociating flows.

  9. Investigation of thermochemical biorefinery sizing and environmental sustainability impacts for conventional supply system and distributed preprocessing supply system designs

    SciTech Connect

    Muth, jr., David J.; Langholtz, Matthew H.; Tan, Eric; Jacobson, Jacob; Schwab, Amy; Wu, May; Argo, Andrew; Brandt, Craig C.; Cafferty, Kara; Chiu, Yi-Wen; Dutta, Abhijit; Eaton, Laurence M.; Searcy, Erin

    2014-03-31

    The 2011 US Billion-Ton Update estimates that by 2030 there will be enough agricultural and forest resources to sustainably provide at least one billion dry tons of biomass annually, enough to displace approximately 30% of the country's current petroleum consumption. A portion of these resources are inaccessible at current cost targets with conventional feedstock supply systems because of their remoteness or low yields. Reliable analyses and projections of US biofuels production depend on assumptions about the supply system and biorefinery capacity, which, in turn, depend upon economic value, feedstock logistics, and sustainability. A cross-functional team has examined combinations of advances in feedstock supply systems and biorefinery capacities with rigorous design information, improved crop yield and agronomic practices, and improved estimates of sustainable biomass availability. A previous report on biochemical refinery capacity noted that under advanced feedstock logistic supply systems that include depots and pre-processing operations there are cost advantages that support larger biorefineries up to 10 000 DMT/day facilities compared to the smaller 2000 DMT/day facilities. This report focuses on analyzing conventional versus advanced depot biomass supply systems for a thermochemical conversion and refinery sizing based on woody biomass. The results of this analysis demonstrate that the economies of scale enabled by advanced logistics offsets much of the added logistics costs from additional depot processing and transportation, resulting in a small overall increase to the minimum ethanol selling price compared to the conventional logistic supply system. While the overall costs do increase slightly for the advanced logistic supply systems, the ability to mitigate moisture and ash in the system will improve the storage and conversion processes. In addition, being able to draw on feedstocks from further distances will decrease the risk of biomass supply to the

  10. Approximate thermochemical tables for some C-H and C-H-O species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahn, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    Approximate thermochemical tables are presented for some C-H and C-H-O species and for some ionized species, supplementing the JANAF Thermochemical Tables for application to finite-chemical-kinetics calculations. The approximate tables were prepared by interpolation and extrapolation of limited available data, especially by interpolations over chemical families of species. Original estimations have been smoothed by use of a modification for the CDC-6600 computer of the Lewis Research Center PACl Program which was originally prepared for the IBM-7094 computer Summary graphs for various families show reasonably consistent curvefit values, anchored by properties of existing species in the JANAF tables.

  11. A discrepancy between experimental and theoretical thermochemical characterization of some oxygen fluorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieninger, Martina; Segovia, Marc; Ventura, Oscar N.

    1998-05-01

    The recently recommended NIST-JANAF Thermochemical Table values for the thermochemical properties of oxygen fluorides are examined critically on the basis of high-level density functional and ab initio G2 calculations. Special attention is given to the enthalpies of formation and it is concluded that, although the proposed values for OF(g), FOO(g) and FOF(g) are reasonable and in agreement with our previously recommended values, the enthalpy of formation recommended for FOOF is too low. A value about 50% larger is proposed and it is recommended that the original 1959 experimental determination of this enthalpy of formation be repeated.

  12. Research, Development, and Field Testing of Thermochemical Recuperation for High Temperature Furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Kurek, Harry; Kozlov, Aleksandr

    2014-03-31

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) evaluated the technical and economic feasibility of utilizing a non-catalytic ThermoChemical Recuperation System (TCRS) to recover a significant amount of energy from the waste gases of natural gas fired steel reheat furnaces. The project was related to DOE-AMO’s (formerly known as ITP) one of the technical areas of interest: Technologies to improve energy efficiency and reduce the carbon footprint of equipment currently used in energy-intensive industries such as iron and steel, and reduce by at least 30% energy consumption and carbon dioxide emission compared to the conventional technologies. ThermoChemical Recuperation (TCR) is a technique that recovers sensible heat in the exhaust gas from an industrial process, furnace, engine etc., when a hydrocarbon fuel is used for combustion. TCR enables waste heat recovery by both combustion air preheat and hydrocarbon fuel (natural gas, for example) reforming into a higher calorific fuel. The reforming process uses hot flue gas components (H2O and CO2) or steam to convert the fuel into a combustible mixture of hydrogen (H2), carbon monoxide (CO), and some unreformed hydrocarbons (CnHm). Reforming of natural gas with recycled exhaust gas or steam can significantly reduce fuel consumption, CO2 emissions and cost as well as increase process thermal efficiency. The calorific content of the fuel can be increased by up to ~28% with the TCR process if the original source fuel is natural gas. In addition, the fuel is preheated during the TCR process adding sensible heat to the fuel. The Research and Development work by GTI was proposed to be carried out in three Phases (Project Objectives). • Phase I: Develop a feasibility study consisting of a benefits-derived economic evaluation of a ThermoChemical Recuperation (TCR) concept with respect to high temperature reheat furnace applications within the steel industry (and cross-cutting industries). This will establish the design parameters and

  13. Microcalorimetric Measurements of Hydrogen Peroxide Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D.; Hornung, Steven D.; Baker, Dave L.

    1999-01-01

    Recent interest in propellants with nontoxic reaction products has led to a resurgence of interest in hydrogen peroxide for various propellant applications. Because hydrogen peroxide is sensitive to contaminants and materials interactions, stability and shelf life are issues. A relatively new, ultrasensitive heat measurement technique, isothermal microcalorimetry, is being used at the White Sands Test Facility to monitor the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide at near ambient temperatures. Isothermal microcalorimetry measures the beat flow from a reaction vessel into a surrounding heat sink. In these applications, microcalorimetry is approximately 1,000 times more sensitive than accelerating rate calorimetry or differential scanning calorimetry for measuring thermal events. Experimental procedures have been developed for the microcalorimetric measurement of the ultra-small beat effects caused by incompatible interactions of hydrogen peroxide. The decomposition rates of hydrogen peroxide at the picomole/sec/gram level have been measured showing the effects of stabilizers and peroxide concentration. Typical measurements are carried out at 40 C over a 24-hour period, This paper describes a method for the conversion of the heat flow measurements to chemical reaction rates based on thermochemical considerations. The reaction rates are used in a study of the effects of stabilizer levels on the decomposition of propellant grade hydrogen peroxide.

  14. Pt/TiO2 (Rutile) Catalysts for Sulfuric Acid Decomposition in Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    L. M. Petkovic; D. M. Ginosar; H. W. Rollins; K. C. Burch; P. J. Pinhero; H. H. Farrell

    2008-04-01

    Thermochemical cycles consist of a series of chemical reactions to produce hydrogen from water at lower temperatures than by direct thermal decomposition. All the sulfur-based cycles for water splitting employ the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. This work reports the studies performed on platinum supported on titania (rutile) catalysts to investigate the causes of catalyst deactivation under sulfuric acid decomposition reaction conditions. Samples of 1 wt% Pt/TiO2 (rutile) catalysts were submitted to flowing concentrated sulfuric acid at 1123 K and atmospheric pressure for different times on stream (TOS) between 0 and 548 h. Post-operation analyses of the spent catalyst samples showed that Pt oxidation and sintering occurred under reaction conditions and some Pt was lost by volatilization. Pt loss rate was higher at initial times but total loss appeared to be independent of the gaseous environment. Catalyst activity showed an initial decrease that lasted for about 66 h, followed by a slight recovery of activity between 66 and 102 h TOS, and a period of slower deactivation after 102 h TOS. Catalyst sulfation did not seem to be detrimental to catalyst activity and the activity profile suggested that a complex dynamical situation involving platinum sintering, volatilization, and oxidation, along with TiO2 morphological changes affected catalyst activity in a non-monotonic way.

  15. Application of the BAC-MP4 method and its variations in determining thermochemical properties of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Melius, C.F.

    1996-12-31

    The Bond-Additivity-Corrected Moller-Plesset 4th order perturbation theory method (BAC-NW4) has demonstrated its ability to provide accurate thermochemical properties of small gas-phase molecules (up to eight heavy atoms plus hydrogens). Such properties include the enthalpies, entropies, free energies, etc. for both radicals and closed-shell stable species as well as for transition-state structures. This has enabled one to calculate useful reaction rates for gas-phase molecules. To improve the accuracy of the BAC method, variations have been developed, such as using the MP2 method for geometry optimizations rather than the Hartree-Fock method, and using larger basis sets for the MP4 step. In order to treat larger molecules, the NW2 method has been used for the single-point energy step (i.e., BAC-MP2). In this paper, we discuss the objectives and limitations of the BAC paradigm and its future development directions. In particular, we present means to treat larger molecules, disparate oxidation states, and heavier-Z elements.

  16. Solar Thermochemical Fuels Production: Solar Thermochemical Fuel Production via a Novel Lowe Pressure, Magnetically Stabilized, Non-volatile Iron Oxide Looping Process

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-19

    HEATS Project: The University of Florida is developing a windowless high-temperature chemical reactor that converts concentrated solar thermal energy to syngas, which can be used to produce gasoline. The overarching project goal is lowering the cost of the solar thermochemical production of syngas for clean and synthetic hydrocarbon fuels like petroleum. The team will develop processes that rely on water and recycled CO2 as the sole feed-stock, and concentrated solar radiation as the sole energy source, to power the reactor to produce fuel efficiently. Successful large-scale deployment of this solar thermochemical fuel production could substantially improve our national and economic security by replacing imported oil with domestically produced solar fuels.

  17. Hydrogen Research for Spaceport and Space-Based Applications: Hydrogen Production, Storage, and Transport. Part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Tim; Balaban, Canan

    2008-01-01

    The activities presented are a broad based approach to advancing key hydrogen related technologies in areas such as fuel cells, hydrogen production, and distributed sensors for hydrogen-leak detection, laser instrumentation for hydrogen-leak detection, and cryogenic transport and storage. Presented are the results from research projects, education and outreach activities, system and trade studies. The work will aid in advancing the state-of-the-art for several critical technologies related to the implementation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Activities conducted are relevant to a number of propulsion and power systems for terrestrial, aeronautics and aerospace applications. Hydrogen storage and in-space hydrogen transport research focused on developing and verifying design concepts for efficient, safe, lightweight liquid hydrogen cryogenic storage systems. Research into hydrogen production had a specific goal of further advancing proton conducting membrane technology in the laboratory at a larger scale. System and process trade studies evaluated the proton conducting membrane technology, specifically, scale-up issues.

  18. Hydrogen-rich boron-containing materials for hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Kang, Xiang-Dong

    2008-10-28

    Hydrogen-rich boron-containing compounds have received extensive attention as potential hydrogen storage media for vehicular applications. The past years have seen significant progresses in material discovery, material composition/structure tailoring, catalyst identification and regeneration chemistry, which give rise to state-of-the-art hydrogen storage materials/technologies. Lithium tetrahydroborate-related materials exhibit the hitherto highest reversible hydrogen capacity via solid-gas reactions. Catalytic hydrolysis of sodium tetrahydroborate offers an on-demand hydrogen generation system for vehicular applications. Ammonia borane-related materials exhibit a satisfactory combination of material properties that are suited for on-board hydrogen sources, coupled with significant advances in spent fuels regeneration. This Perspective discusses the current progresses of these representative reversible or irreversible material systems, aiming at providing an outline of the forefront of hydrogen storage materials/technologies for transportation applications. PMID:19082020

  19. A solar-hydrogen economy for U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockris, J. Om.; Veziroglu, T. N.

    The benefits, safety, production, distribution, storage, and uses, as well as the economics of a solar and hydrogen based U.S. energy system are described. Tropical and subtropical locations for the generation plants would provide power from photovoltaics, heliostat arrays, OTEC plants, or genetically engineered algae to produce hydrogen by electrolysis, direct thermal conversion, thermochemical reactions, photolysis, or hybrid systems. Either pipelines for gas transport or supertankers for liquefied hydrogen would distribute the fuel, with storage in underground reservoirs, aquifers, and pressurized bladders at sea. The fuel would be distributed to factories, houses, gas stations, and airports. It can be used in combustion engines, gas turbines, and jet engines, and produces water vapor as an exhaust gas. The necessary research effort to define and initiate construction of technically and economically viable solar-hydrogen plants is projected to be 3 yr, while the technical definition of fusion power plants, the other nondepletable energy system, is expected to take 25 yr.

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of alternate energy carriers, hydrogen and chemical heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, K. E.; Carty, R. H.; Conger, W. L.; Soliman, M. A.; Funk, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen and chemical heat pipes were proposed as methods of transporting energy from a primary energy source (nuclear, solar) to the user. In the chemical heat pipe system, primary energy is transformed into the energy of a reversible chemical reaction; the chemical species are then transmitted or stored until the energy is required. Analysis of thermochemical hydrogen schemes and chemical heat pipe systems on a second law efficiency or available work basis show that hydrogen is superior especially if the end use of the chemical heat pipe is electrical power.

  1. SolarSyngas: Results from a virtual institute developing materials and key components for solar thermochemical fuel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeb, Martin; Steinfeld, Aldo; Borchardt, Günter; Feldmann, Claus; Schmücker, Martin; Sattler, Christian; Pitz-Paal, Robert

    2016-05-01

    The Helmholtz Virtual Institute (VI) SolarSynGas brings together expertise from solar energy research and materials science to develop metal oxide based redox materials and to integrate them in a suitable way into related process technologies for two-step thermochemical production of hydrogen and carbon monoxide from water and CO2. One of the foci of experimental investigation was exploring the impact of doping on the feasibility of ceria-based materials - mainly by Zr-doping. The results indicate that a certain Zr-content enhances the reducibility and therefore the splitting performance. Increasing the Zr-content to x = 0.15 improved the specific CO2-splitting performance by 50% compared to pure ceria. This finding agrees with theoretical studies attributing the improvements to lattice modification caused by the introduction of Zr4+. Thermogravimetric relaxation experiments and equilibrium oxygen isotope exchange experiments with subsequent depth profiling analysis were carried out on ceria. As a result the reduction reaction of even dense samples of pure ceria with a grain size of about 20 µm is surface reaction controlled. The structure of the derived expression for the apparent activation energy suggests that the chemical surface exchange coefficient should show only a very weak dependence on temperature for ceria doped with lower valence cations. A solar receiver reactor exhibiting a foam-type reticulated porous ceramics made of ceria was tested. It could be shown that applying dual-scale porosity to those foams with mm-size pores for effective radiative heat transfer during reduction and μm-size pores within its struts for enhanced kinetics during oxidation allows enhancing the performance of the reactor significantly. Also a particle process concept applying solid-solid heat recovery from redox particles in a high temperature solar thermochemical process was analysed that uses ceramic spheres as solid heat transfer medium. This concept can be implemented

  2. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS): executive summary and overview

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Perkins, L.J.; Gordon, J.D.

    1984-07-01

    Two self-consistent MARS configurations are discussed - a 1200-MWe commercial electricity-generating plant and a synguels-generating plant that produces hydrogen with an energy equivalent to 26,000 barrels of oil per day. The MARS machine emphasizes the attractive features of the tandem mirror concept, including steady-state operation, a small-diameter high-beta plasma, a linear central cell with simple low-maintenance blankets, low first-wall heat fluxes (<10 W/cm/sup 2/), no driven plasma currents or associated disruptions, natural halo impurity diversion, and direct conversion of end-loss charged-particle power. The MARS electric plant produces 2600 MW of fusion power in a 130-m-long central cell. Advanced tandem-mirror plasma-engineering concepts, a high-efficiency liquid lithium-lead (Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/) blanket, and efficient direct electrical conversion of end loss power combine to produce a high net plant efficiency of 36%. With a total capital cost of $2.9 billion (constant 1983 dollars), the MARS electric plant produces busbar electricity at approx. 7 cents/kW-hour. The MARS synfuels plant produces 3500 MW of fusion power in a 150-m-long central cell. A helium-gas-cooled silicon carbide pebble-bed blanket provides high-temperature (1000/sup 0/C) heat to a thermochemical water-splitting cycle and the resulting hydrogen is catalytically converted to methanol for distribution. With a total capital cost of $3.6 billion (constant 1983 dollars), the synfuels plant produces methanol fuel at about $1.7/gal. The major features of the MARS reactor include sloshing-ion thermal barrier plugs for efficient plasma confinement, a high efficiency blanket, high-field (24-T) choke cells, drift pumping for trapped plasma species, quasi-optical electron-cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) systems, and a component gridless direct converter.

  3. Potential of summer legumes for thermochemical conversion to synthetic fuel in the southeast USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fallow periods during the summer in some crop rotations of the Southeast USA could potentially be used to grow feedstocks for energy production. The objective of this study was to evaluate Crotolaria juncea and cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata) as species to be used as feedstocks for thermochemical conver...

  4. Improving Students' Chemical Literacy Levels on Thermochemical and Thermodynamics Concepts through a Context-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cigdemoglu, Ceyhan; Geban, Omer

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to delve into the effect of context-based approach (CBA) over traditional instruction (TI) on students' chemical literacy level related to thermochemical and thermodynamics concepts. Four eleventh-grade classes with 118 students in total taught by two teachers from a public high school in 2012 fall semester were enrolled…

  5. Thermochemical nonequilibrium modeling of a low-power argon arcjet wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsurayama, Hiroshi; Abe, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    Non-transferred low-power arcjet wind tunnels with pure argon working gas are widely used as inexpensive laboratory plasma sources to simulate a weakly ionized supersonic flow around an atmospheric entry vehicle. Many experiments using argon arcjet wind tunnels have been conducted, but their numerical modeling is not yet complete. We develop an axisymmetric Navier-Stokes model with thermochemical nonequilibrium and arc discharge that simulates the entire flow field in a steady-operating argon arcjet wind tunnel, which consists of the inside of the arcjet and its arc plume entering a rarefied vacuum chamber. The computational method we develop makes it possible to reproduce the arc column behavior far from thermochemical equilibrium in the low-voltage discharge mode typical of argon arcjets. Furthermore, the results reveal that the plasma characteristic of being far from thermal equilibrium, which is particular to argon, causes the arcjet to operate in the low-voltage mode and its arc plume to be completely thermochemically frozen. Moreover, the arc plume has electroconductive non-uniformity with an electrically insulating boundary in the radial direction. Our computed values for the shock standoff distance in front of a blunt body and the drag exerted on it agree with measured values. As a result, the self-consistent computational model in this study is useful in investigating thermochemical nonequilibrium plasma flows in argon arcjet wind tunnels.

  6. Response of thermochemical and biochemical conversion processes to lignin concentration in alfalfa stems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The technologies currently in place to convert lignocellulosic biomass to energy are either biochemical or thermochemical, the efficiencies of which may vary depending on the composition of the feedstock. One variable that conversion technologists have wrestled with, particularly in the simultaneous...

  7. The development of the General Atomic thermochemical water-splitting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besenbruch, G. E.; Allen, C. L.; Brown, L. C.; McCorkle, K.; Rode, Y. S.; Norman, Y. H.; Trester, P.; Sharp, R.

    1981-03-01

    Thermochemical water splitting was investigated. The main advantages of the cycle are that it can be conducted as an all liquid and gas phase process and that its unit operations are simple, industry-developed processes like distillation, vaporization, and phase separation.

  8. Numerical Modeling of Deep Mantle Flow: Thermochemical Convection and Entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyukova, Elvira; Steinberger, Bernhard; Dabrowski, Marcin; Sobolev, Stephan

    2013-04-01

    ) upwelling of the ambient material in the vicinity of the dense material (mechanism of selective withdrawal (Lister, 1989)), and (iii) cold downwellings sliding along the bottom boundary, and forcing the dense material upwards. The objective of this study is to compare the efficiency of entrainment by each of these mechanisms, and its dependence on the density and viscosity anomaly of the dense material with respect to the ambient mantle. To perform this study, we have developed a two-dimensional FEM code to model thermal convection in a hollow cylinder domain with presence of chemical heterogeneities, and using a realistic viscosity profile. We present the results of the simulations that demonstrate the entrainment mechanisms described above. In addition, we perfom numerical experiments in a Cartesian box domain, where the bottom right boundary of the box is deformed to resemble the geometry of an LLSVP edge. In some of the experiments, the bottom left part of the boundary is moving towards the right boundary, simulating a slab sliding along the core-mantle boundary towards an LLSVP. These experiments allow a detailed study of the process of entrainment, and its role in the thermochemical evolution of the Earth.

  9. The role of labile sulfur compounds in thermochemical sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrani, Alon; Zhang, Tongwei; Ma, Qisheng; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Tang, Yongchun

    2008-06-01

    The reduction of sulfate to sulfide coupled with the oxidation of hydrocarbons to carbon dioxide, commonly referred to as thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), is an important abiotic alteration process that most commonly occurs in hot carbonate petroleum reservoirs. In the present study we focus on the role that organic labile sulfur compounds play in increasing the rate of TSR. A series of gold-tube hydrous pyrolysis experiments were conducted with n-octane and CaSO4 in the presence of reduced sulfur (e.g. H2S, S°, organic S) at temperatures of 330 and 356 °C under a constant confining pressure. The in-situ pH was buffered to 3.5 (∼6.3 at room temperature) with talc and silica. For comparison, three types of oil with different total S and labile S contents were reacted under similar conditions. The results show that the initial presence of organic or inorganic sulfur compounds increases the rate of TSR. However, organic sulfur compounds, such as 1-pentanethiol or diethyldisulfide, were significantly more effective in increasing the rate of TSR than H2S or elemental sulfur (on a mole S basis). The increase in rate is achieved at relatively low concentrations of 1-pentanethiol, less than 1 wt% of the total n-octane, which is comparable to the concentration of organic S that is common in many oils (∼0.3 wt%). We examined several potential reaction mechanisms to explain the observed reactivity of organic LSC. First, the release of H2S from the thermal degradation of thiols was discounted as an important mechanism due to the significantly greater reactivity of thiol compared to an equivalent amount of H2S. Second, we considered the generation of olefines in association with the elimination of H2S during thermal degradation of thiols because olefines are much more reactive than n-alkanes during TSR. In our experiments, olefines increased the rate of TSR, but were less effective than 1-pentanethiol and other organic LSC. Third, the thermal decomposition of

  10. Mercury's thermo-chemical evolution constrained by MESSENGER observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Nicola; Grott, Matthias; Breuer, Doris; Plesa, Ana-Catalina

    2013-04-01

    Low-degree coefficients of Mercury's gravity field as obtained from the MESSENGER's Radio Science experiment combined with estimates of Mercury's spin state permit to compute the normalized polar moment of inertia of the planet (C-MR2) as well as the ratio of the moment of inertia of the mantle to that of the planet (Cm-C). These two parameters provide a strong constraint on the internal mass distribution. With C-MR2 = 0.346 and Cm-C = 0.431 [1], interior structure models predict a large core radius but also a large mantle density. The latter requirement can be met with a relatively standard composition of the silicate mantle for which a core radius of ~ 2000 km is expected [2]. Alternatively, the large density of the silicate shell has been interpreted as a consequence of the presence of a solid FeS layer that could form atop the liquid core under suitable temperature conditions [3]. According to this hypothesis, the thickness of the mantle would be reduced to ~ 300 km only. Additionally, the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer measured a surface abundance of U, Th and K, which hints at a bulk mantle composition comparable to other terrestrial planets [4]. Geological evidence also suggests that volcanism was a globally extensive process even after the late heavy bombardment (LHB) and that northern plains were likely emplaced in a flood lava mode by high-temperature, low-viscosity lava. Finally, the analysis of previously unrecognized compressional tectonic features as revealed by recent MESSENGER images yielded revised estimates of the global planetary contraction, which is calculated to be as high as 4-5 km [5]. We employed the above pieces of information to constrain the thermal and magmatic history of Mercury with numerical simulations. Using 1D-parameterized thermo-chemical evolution models, we ran a large set of Monte-Carlo simulations (~ 10000) in which we varied systematically the thickness of the silicate shell, intial mantle and CMB temperatures, mantle rheology

  11. Texaco, carbide form hydrogen plant venture

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-30

    This paper reports that Texaco Inc. and Union Carbide Industrial Gases Inc. (UCIG) have formed a joint venture to develop and operate hydrogen plants. The venture, named HydroGEN Supply Co., is owned by Texaco Hydrogen Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Texaco, and UCIG Hydrogen Services Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of UCIG. Plants built by HydroGEN will combine Texaco's HyTEX technology for hydrogen production with UCIG's position in cryogenic and advanced air separation technology. Texaco the U.S. demand for hydrogen is expected to increase sharply during the next decade, while refinery hydrogen supply is expected to drop. The Clean Air Act amendments of 1990 require U.S. refiners to lower aromatics in gasoline, resulting in less hydrogen recovered by refiners from catalytic reforming units. Meanwhile, requirements to reduce sulfur in diesel fuel will require more hydrogen capacity.

  12. Hydrogen energy systems technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The paper discusses the objectives of a hydrogen energy systems technology study directed toward determining future demand for hydrogen based on current trends and anticipated new uses and identifying the critical research and technology advancements required to meet this need with allowance for raw material limitations, economics, and environmental effects. Attention is focused on historic production and use of hydrogen, scenarios used as a basis for projections, projections of energy sources and uses, supply options, and technology requirements and needs. The study found more than a billion dollar annual usage of hydrogen, dominated by chemical-industry needs, supplied mostly from natural gas and petroleum feedstocks. Evaluation of the progress in developing nuclear fusion and solar energy sources relative to hydrogen production will be necessary to direct the pace and character of research and technology work in the advanced water-splitting areas.

  13. Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  14. Magnetic liquefier for hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    This document summarizes work done at the Astronautics Technology Center of the Astronautics Corporation of America (ACA) in Phase 1 of a four phase program leading to the development of a magnetic liquefier for hydrogen. The project involves the design, fabrication, installation, and operation of a hydrogen liquefier providing significantly reduced capital and operating costs, compared to present liquefiers. To achieve this goal, magnetic refrigeration, a recently developed, highly efficient refrigeration technology, will be used for the liquefaction process. Phase 1 project tasks included liquefier conceptual design and analysis, preliminary design of promising configurations, design selection, and detailed design of the selected design. Fabrication drawings and vendor specifications for the selected design were completed during detailed design. The design of a subscale, demonstration magnetic hydrogen liquefier represents a significant advance in liquefaction technology. The cost reductions that can be realized in hydrogen liquefaction in both the subscale and, more importantly, in the full-scale device are expected to have considerable impact on the use of liquid hydrogen in transportation, chemical, and electronic industries. The benefits to the nation from this technological advance will continue to have importance well into the 21st century.

  15. Hydrogen Contractors Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzsimmons, Tim

    2006-05-16

    This volume highlights the scientific content of the 2006 Hydrogen Contractors Meeting sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering (DMS&E) on behalf of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). Hydrogen Contractors Meeting held from May 16-19, 2006 at the Crystal Gateway Marriott Hotel Arlington, Virginia. This meeting is the second in a series of research theme-based Contractors Meetings sponsored by DMS&E held in conjunction with our counterparts in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and the first with the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program. The focus of this year’s meeting is BES funded fundamental research underpinning advancement of hydrogen storage. The major goals of these research efforts are the development of a fundamental scientific base in terms of new concepts, theories and computational tools; new characterization capabilities; and new materials that could be used or mimicked in advancing capabilities for hydrogen storage.

  16. Sulfur Iodine Process Summary for the Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin Russ

    2009-05-01

    This report summarizes the sulfur-iodine (SI) thermochemical water splitting process for the purpose of supporting the process for evaluating and recommending a hydrogen production technology to deploy with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). This package provides the baseline process description as well as a comparison with the process as it was implemented in the Integrated Lab Scale (ILS) experiment conducted at General Atomics from 2006-2009.

  17. Prospects for pipeline delivery of hydrogen as a fuel and as a chemical feedstock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, D. P.; Biederman, N. P.; Darrow, K. G., Jr.; Konopka, A. J.; Wurm, J.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility of using hydrogen for storing and carrying energy obtained from nonfossil sources such as nuclear and solar energy is examined. According to the method proposed, these nonfossil raw energy sources will be used to obtain hydrogen from water by three basically distinct routes: (1) electrical generation followed by electrolysis; (2) thermochemical decomposition; and (3) direct neutron or ultraviolet irradiation of hydrogen bearing molecules. The hydrogen obtained will be transmitted in long-distance pipelines, and distributed to all energy-consuming sectors. As a fuel gas, hydrogen has many qualities similar to natural gas and with only minor modifications, it can be transmitted and distributed in the same equipment, and can be burned in the same appliances as natural gas. Hydrogen can also be used as a clean fuel (water is the only combustion product) for automobiles, fleet vehicles, and aircraft.

  18. Hydrogen Fuel Pilot Plant and Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect

    J. Francfort

    2005-03-01

    The U.S. Department Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) teamed with Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) and Arizona Public Service (APS) to develop the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant that produces and compresses hydrogen on site through an electrolysis process by operating a PEM fuel cell in reverse; natural gas is also compressed onsite. The Pilot Plant dispenses 100% hydrogen, 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG), and 100% CNG via a credit card billing system at pressures up to 5,000 psi. Thirty internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles (including Daimler Chrysler, Ford and General Motors vehicles) are operating on 100% hydrogen and 15 to 50% H/CNG blends. Since the Pilot Plant started operating in June 2002, they hydrogen and H/CNG ICE vehicels have accumulated 250,000 test miles.

  19. Hydrogenation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, J.; Oberg, C. L.; Russell, L. H.

    1981-06-23

    Hydrogenation reaction apparatus is described comprising a housing having walls which define a reaction zone and conduits for introducing streams of hydrogen and oxygen into the reaction zone, the oxygen being introduced into a central portion of the hydrogen stream to maintain a boundary layer of hydrogen along the walls of the reaction zone. A portion of the hydrogen and all of the oxygen react to produce a heated gas stream having a temperature within the range of from 1,100 to 1,900 C, while the boundary layer of hydrogen maintains the wall temperature at a substantially lower temperature. The heated gas stream is introduced into a hydrogenation reaction zone and provides the source of heat and hydrogen for a hydrogenation reaction. There also is provided means for quenching the products of the hydrogenation reaction. The present invention is particularly suitable for the hydrogenation of low-value solid carbonaceous materials to provide high yields of more valuable liquid and gaseous products. 2 figs.

  20. Designed synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes@Cu@MoS2 hybrid as advanced electrocatalyst for highly efficient hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Li, Jing; Lin, Xiaoqing; Li, Xinzhe; Fang, Yiyun; Jiao, Lixin; An, Xincai; Fu, Yan; Jin, Jun; Li, Rong

    2015-12-01

    Design and synthesis of non-precious-metal catalyst for efficient electrochemical transformation of water to molecular hydrogen in acid environments is of paramount importance in reducing energy losses during the water splitting process. Here, the hybrid material of MoS2-coated Cu loaded on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs@Cu@MoS2) was synthesized using chemical process and hydrothermal method. It was found that the participation of MWCNTs and Cu nanoparticles not only improved the electrical conductivity of the catalyst, but also further enhanced the catalytic activity by synergistic effect with edge-exposed MoS2-coating. Electrochemical experiments demonstrated that the catalyst exhibited excellent hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) activity with large cathode currents (small overpotential of 184 mV for 10 mA cm-2 current density) and a Tafel slope as small as 62 mV per decade. Furthermore, it was discovered that the current density of this composite catalyst had a little decrease after the continual 1000 cycling, which showed the catalyst had a high stability in the recycling process. These findings confirmed that this catalyst was a useful and earth-abundant material for water splitting.

  1. NREL's Hydrogen Program

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    The research and development taking place today at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is paving the way for nature's most plentiful element—hydrogen—to power the next generation. NREL researchers are working to unlock the potential of hydrogen and to advance the fuel cell technologies that will power the automobiles, equipment, and buildings of tomorrow. Hydrogen and fuel cells are a fundamental part of the broader portfolio of renewable technologies that are moving our nation toward its goals of energy independence and sustainability.

  2. Electrolytic hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramani, M. P. S.

    In the role of a secondary energy carrier complementary to electricity in a postfossil-fuel era, hydrogen produced by the elecrolytic splitting of water may be obtained by a variety of methods whose technology development status is presently assessed. Nuclear heat can be converted into hydrogen either directly, via thermal splitting of water, or by means of water electrolysis, which can be of the unipolar tank type or the bipolar filter-press type. An evaluation is made of advanced electrolytic techniques involving exotic materials, as well as solid polymer electrolyte electrolysis and high-temperature water-vapor electrolysis.

  3. Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect

    J. Francfort; D. Karner

    2006-04-01

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

  4. Turning manure into biochar through thermochemical conversion has the potential to become an exciting new way to handle waste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The livestock sector remains vigilant to address effective manure treatment that also safeguards natural resources. Livestock operations must balance business concerns, efficient energy management and environmental stewardship. Fortunately, thermochemical conversion technologies for converting lives...

  5. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberson, Luke; Captain, Janine; Williams, Martha; Smith, Trent; Tate, LaNetra; Raissi, Ali; Mohajeri, Nahid; Muradov, Nazim; Bokerman, Gary

    2009-01-01

    At NASA, hydrogen safety is a key concern for space shuttle processing. Leaks of any level must be quickly recognized and addressed due to hydrogen s lower explosion limit. Chemo - chromic devices have been developed to detect hydrogen gas in several embodiments. Because hydrogen is odorless and colorless and poses an explosion hazard, there is an emerging need for sensors to quickly and accurately detect low levels of leaking hydrogen in fuel cells and other advanced energy- generating systems in which hydrogen is used as fuel. The device incorporates a chemo - chromic pigment into a base polymer. The article can reversibly or irreversibly change color upon exposure to hydrogen. The irreversible pigment changes color from a light beige to a dark gray. The sensitivity of the pigment can be tailored to its application by altering its exposure to gas through the incorporation of one or more additives or polymer matrix. Furthermore, through the incorporation of insulating additives, the chemochromic sensor can operate at cryogenic temperatures as low as 78 K. A chemochromic detector of this type can be manufactured into any feasible polymer part including injection molded plastic parts, fiber-spun textiles, or extruded tapes. The detectors are simple, inexpensive, portable, and do not require an external power source. The chemochromic detectors were installed and removed easily at the KSC launch pad without need for special expertise. These detectors may require an external monitor such as the human eye, camera, or electronic detector; however, they could be left in place, unmonitored, and examined later for color change to determine whether there had been exposure to hydrogen. In one type of envisioned application, chemochromic detectors would be fabricated as outer layers (e.g., casings or coatings) on high-pressure hydrogen storage tanks and other components of hydrogen-handling systems to provide visible indications of hydrogen leaks caused by fatigue failures or

  6. A hydrogen energy carrier. Volume 2: Systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, R. L. (Editor); Blank, L. (Editor); Cady, T. (Editor); Cox, K. (Editor); Murray, R. (Editor); Williams, R. D. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    A systems analysis of hydrogen as an energy carrier in the United States indicated that it is feasible to use hydrogen in all energy use areas, except some types of transportation. These use areas are industrial, residential and commercial, and electric power generation. Saturation concept and conservation concept forecasts of future total energy demands were made. Projected costs of producing hydrogen from coal or from nuclear heat combined with thermochemical decomposition of water are in the range $1.00 to $1.50 per million Btu of hydrogen produced. Other methods are estimated to be more costly. The use of hydrogen as a fuel will require the development of large-scale transmission and storage systems. A pipeline system similar to the existing natural gas pipeline system appears practical, if design factors are included to avoid hydrogen environment embrittlement of pipeline metals. Conclusions from the examination of the safety, legal, environmental, economic, political and societal aspects of hydrogen fuel are that a hydrogen energy carrier system would be compatible with American values and the existing energy system.

  7. Thermochemically recuperated and steam cooled gas turbine system

    DOEpatents

    Viscovich, Paul W.; Bannister, Ronald L.

    1995-01-01

    A gas turbine system in which the expanded gas from the turbine section is used to generate the steam in a heat recovery steam generator and to heat a mixture of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel and the steam in a reformer. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide for combustion in a combustor. A portion of the steam from the heat recovery steam generator is used to cool components, such as the stationary vanes, in the turbine section, thereby superheating the steam. The superheated steam is mixed into the hydrocarbon gas upstream of the reformer, thereby eliminating the need to raise the temperature of the expanded gas discharged from the turbine section in order to achieve effective conversion of the hydrocarbon gas.

  8. Thermochemically recuperated and steam cooled gas turbine system

    DOEpatents

    Viscovich, P.W.; Bannister, R.L.

    1995-07-11

    A gas turbine system is described in which the expanded gas from the turbine section is used to generate the steam in a heat recovery steam generator and to heat a mixture of gaseous hydrocarbon fuel and the steam in a reformer. The reformer converts the hydrocarbon gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide for combustion in a combustor. A portion of the steam from the heat recovery steam generator is used to cool components, such as the stationary vanes, in the turbine section, thereby superheating the steam. The superheated steam is mixed into the hydrocarbon gas upstream of the reformer, thereby eliminating the need to raise the temperature of the expanded gas discharged from the turbine section in order to achieve effective conversion of the hydrocarbon gas. 4 figs.

  9. Dynamic Simulation and Optimization of Nuclear Hydrogen Production Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Paul I. Barton; Mujid S. Kaximi; Georgios Bollas; Patricio Ramirez Munoz

    2009-07-31

    This project is part of a research effort to design a hydrogen plant and its interface with a nuclear reactor. This project developed a dynamic modeling, simulation and optimization environment for nuclear hydrogen production systems. A hybrid discrete/continuous model captures both the continuous dynamics of the nuclear plant, the hydrogen plant, and their interface, along with discrete events such as major upsets. This hybrid model makes us of accurate thermodynamic sub-models for the description of phase and reaction equilibria in the thermochemical reactor. Use of the detailed thermodynamic models will allow researchers to examine the process in detail and have confidence in the accurary of the property package they use.

  10. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts

  11. Double layering of a thermochemical plume in the upper mantle beneath Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, Maxim D.; Ito, Garrett; Wolfe, Cecily J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2013-08-01

    According to classical plume theory, purely thermal upwellings rise through the mantle, pond in a thin layer beneath the lithosphere, and generate hotspot volcanism. Neglected by this theory, however, are the dynamical effects of compositional heterogeneity carried by mantle plumes even though this heterogeneity has been commonly identified in sources of hotspot magmas. Numerical models predict that a hot, compositionally heterogeneous mantle plume containing a denser eclogite component tends to pool at ∼300-410 km depth before rising to feed a shallower sublithospheric layer. This double-layered structure of a thermochemical plume is more consistent with seismic tomographic images at Hawaii than the classical plume model. The thermochemical structure as well as time dependence of plume material rising from the deeper into the shallower layer can further account for long-term fluctuations in volcanic activity and asymmetry in bathymetry, seismic structure, and magma chemistry across the hotspot track, as are observed.

  12. BioFacts: Fueling a stronger economy, thermochemical conversion of biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-12-01

    A primary mission of the US DOE is to stimulate the development, acceptance, and use of transportation fuels made from plants and wastes called biomass. Through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), DOE is developing and array of biomass conversion technologies that can be easily integrated into existing fuel production and distribution systems. The variety of technology options being developed should enable individual fuel producers to select and implement the most cost-effective biomass conversion process suited to their individual needs. Current DOE biofuels research focuses on the separate and tandem uses of biochemical and thermochemical conversion processes. This overview specifically addresses NREL's thermochemical conversion technologies, which are largely based on existing refining processes.

  13. BioFacts: Fueling a stronger economy, Thermochemical conversion of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    A primary mission of the US DOE is to stimulate the development, acceptance, and use of transportation fuels made from plants and wastes called biomass. Through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Doe is developing and array of biomass conversion technologies that can be easily integrated into existing fuel production and distribution systems. The variety of technology options being developed should enable individual fuel producers to select and implement the most cost-effective biomass conversion process suited to their individual needs. Current DOE biofuels research focuses on the separate and tandem uses of biochemical and thermochemical conversion processes. This overview specifically addresses NREL`s thermochemical conversion technologies, which are largely based on existing refining processes.

  14. Thermochemical pretreatments for enhancing succinic acid production from industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Ingólfur B; Kuglarz, Mariusz; Karakashev, Dimitar; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an efficient thermochemical method for treatment of industrial hemp biomass, in order to increase its bioconversion to succinic acid. Industrial hemp was subjected to various thermochemical pretreatments using 0-3% H2SO4, NaOH or H2O2 at 121-180°C prior to enzymatic hydrolysis. The influence of the different pretreatments on hydrolysis and succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes 130Z was investigated in batch mode, using anaerobic bottles and bioreactors. Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of hemp material pretreated with 3% H2O2 resulted in the highest overall sugar yield (73.5%), maximum succinic acid titer (21.9 g L(-1)), as well as the highest succinic acid yield (83%). Results obtained clearly demonstrated the impact of different pretreatments on the bioconversion efficiency of industrial hemp into succinic acid. PMID:25682224

  15. A thermochemical calculation of the pyroxene saturation surface in the system diopside-albite-anorthite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hon, R.; Henry, D. J.; Navrotsky, A.; Weill, D. F.

    1981-01-01

    The pyroxene saturation surface in the system diopside-albite-anorthite may be calculated to + or - 10 C from thermochemical data over most of its composition range. The thermochemical data used are the experimentally determined enthalpies of mixing of the ternary liquids and the enthalpy of fusion of diopside. These are combined with a mixing model for the configurational entropy in the melt and the activity of CaMgSi2O6 in the clinopyroxene, which is less than unity due to departures from CaMgSi2O6 stoichiometry. The two-lattice melt model appears to work satisfactorily throughout the pyroxene primary phase field but probably needs modification at more anorthite-rich compositions.

  16. A Feasibility Study on Low Temperature Thermochemical Treatments of Austenitic Stainless Steel in Fluidized Bed Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruman, Esa; Sun, Yong; Triwiyanto, Askar; Manurung, Yupiter H. P.; Adesta, Erry Y.

    2011-04-01

    In this work, the feasibility of using an industrial fluidized bed furnace to perform low temperature thermochemical treatments of austenitic stainless steels has been studied, with the aim to produce expanded austenite layers with combined wear and corrosion resistance, similar to those achievable by plasma and gaseous processes. Several low temperature thermochemical treatments were studied, including nitriding, carburizing, combined nitridingcarburizing (hybrid treatment), and sequential carburizing and nitriding. The results demonstrate that it is feasible to produce expanded austenite layers on the investigated austenitic stainless steel by the fluidized bed heat treatment technique, thus widening the application window for the novel low temperature processes. The results also demonstrate that the fluidized bed furnace is the most effective for performing the hybrid treatment, which involves the simultaneous incorporation of nitrogen and carbon together into the surface region of the component in nitrogen and carbon containing atmospheres. Such hybrid treatment produces a thicker and harder layer than the other three processes investigated.

  17. Evaluation energy efficiency of bioconversion knot rejects to ethanol in comparison to other thermochemically pretreated biomass.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaojiang; Qin, Menghua; Zhu, J Y; Tian, Guoyu; Li, Zongquan

    2013-02-01

    Rejects from sulfite pulp mill that otherwise would be disposed of by incineration were converted to ethanol by a combined physical-biological process that was comprised of physical refining and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). The energy efficiency was evaluated with comparison to thermochemically pretreated biomass, such as those pretreated by dilute acid (DA) and sulfite pretreatment to overcome recalcitrance of lignocelluloses (SPORL). It was observed that the structure deconstruction of rejects by physical refining was indispensable to effective bioconversion but more energy intensive than that of thermochemically pretreated biomass. Fortunately, the energy consumption was compensated by the reduced enzyme dosage and the elevated ethanol yield. Furthermore, adjustment of disk-plates gap led to reduction in energy consumption with negligible influence on ethanol yield. In this context, energy efficiency up to 717.7% was achieved for rejects, much higher than that of SPORL sample (283.7%) and DA sample (152.8%). PMID:23376154

  18. Hydrogen Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Another spinoff from spacecraft fuel cell technology is the portable hydrogen generator shown. Developed by General Electric Company, it is an aid to safer operation of systems that use hydrogen-for example, gas chromatographs, used in laboratory analysis of gases. or flame ionization detectors used as $ollution monitors. The generator eliminates the need for high-pressure hydrogen storage bottles, which can be a safety hazard, in laboratories, hospitals and industrial plants. The unit supplies high-purity hydrogen by means of an electrochemical process which separates the hydrogen and oxygen in distilled water. The oxygen is vented away and the hydrogen gas is stored within the unit for use as needed. GE's Aircraft Equipment Division is producing about 1,000 of the generators annually.

  19. Thermochemical and Kinetics of Hydrazine Dehydrogenation by an Oxygen Atom in Hydrazine-Rich Systems: A Dimer Model.

    PubMed

    Spada, Rene F K; Ferrão, Luiz F A; Roberto-Neto, Orlando; Lischka, Hans; Machado, Francisco B C

    2015-12-24

    The kinetics of the reaction of N2H4 with oxygen depends sensitively on the initial conditions used. In oxygen-rich systems, the rate constant shows a conventional positive temperature dependence, while in hydrazine-rich setups the dependence is negative in certain temperature ranges. In this study, a theoretical model is presented that adequately reproduces the experimental results trend and values for hydrazine-rich environment, consisting of the hydrogen abstraction from the hydrazine (N2H4) dimer by an oxygen atom. The thermochemical properties of the reaction were computed using two quantum chemical approaches, the coupled cluster theory with single, double, and noniterative triple excitations (CCSD(T)) and the M06-2X DFT approach with the aug-cc-pVTZ and the maug-cc-pVTZ basis sets, respectively. The kinetic data were calculated with the improved canonical variational theory (ICVT) using a dual-level methodology to build the reaction path. The tunneling effects were considered by means of the small curvature tunneling (SCT) approximation. Potential wells on both sides of the reaction ((N2H4)2 + O → N2H4···N2H3 + OH) were determined. A reaction path with a negative activation energy was found leading, in the temperature range of 250-423 K, to a negative dependence of the rate constant on the temperature, which is in good agreement with the experimental measurements. Therefore, the consideration of the hydrazine dimer model provides significantly improved agreement with the experimental data and should be included in the mechanism of the global N2H4 combustion process, as it can be particularly important in hydrazine-rich systems. PMID:26592088

  20. Thermochemical cyclic system for decomposing H/sub 2/O and/or CO/sub 2/ by means of cerium-titanium-sodium-oxygen compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1980-04-24

    A thermochemical closed cyclic process for the decomposition of water and/or carbon dioxide to hydrogen and/or carbon monoxide begins with the reaction of ceric oxide (CeO/sub 2/), titanium dioxide (TiO/sub 2/) and sodium titanate (Na/sub 2/TiO/sub 3/) to form sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi/sub 2/O/sub 6/) and oxygen. Sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi/sub 2/O/sub 6/) reacted with sodium carbonate (Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) in the presence of steam, produces hydrogen. The same reaction, in the absence of steam, produces carbon monoxide. The products, ceric oxide and sodium titanate, obtained in either case, are treated with carbon dioxide and water to produce ceric oxide, titanium dioxide, sodium titanate, and sodium bicarbonate. After dissolving sodium bicarbonate from the mixture in water, the remaining insoluble compounds are used as starting materials for a subsequent cycle. The sodium bicarbonate can be converted to sodium carbonate by heating and returned to the cycle.

  1. Thermochemical cyclic system for decomposing H2O and/or CO2 by means of cerium-titanium-sodium-oxygen compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1982-02-02

    A thermochemical closed cyclic process for the decomposition of water and/or carbon dioxide to hydrogen and/or carbon monoxide begins with the reaction of ceric oxide (CeO2), titanium dioxide (TiO2) and sodium titanate (Na2TiO3) to form sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi2O6) and oxygen. Sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi2O6) reacted with sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) in the presence of steam, produces hydrogen. The same reaction, in the absence of steam, produces carbon monoxide. The products, ceric oxide and sodium titanate, obtained in either case, are treated with carbon dioxide and water to produce ceric oxide, titanium dioxide, sodium titanate, and sodium bicarbonate. After dissolving sodium bicarbonate from the mixture in water, the remaining insoluble compounds are used as starting materials for a subsequent cycle. The sodium bicarbonate can be converted to sodium carbonate by heating and returned to the cycle.

  2. Thermochemical cyclic system for decomposing H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2 by means of cerium-titanium-sodium-oxygen compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1982-01-01

    A thermochemical closed cyclic process for the decomposition of water and/or carbon dioxide to hydrogen and/or carbon monoxide begins with the reaction of ceric oxide (CeO.sub.2), titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) and sodium titanate (Na.sub.2 TiO.sub.3) to form sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi.sub.2 O.sub.6) and oxygen. Sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi.sub.2 O.sub.6) reacted with sodium carbonate (Na.sub.2 CO.sub.3) in the presence of steam, produces hydrogen. The same reaction, in the absence of steam, produces carbon monoxide. The products, ceric oxide and sodium titanate, obtained in either case, are treated with carbon dioxide and water to produce ceric oxide, titanium dioxide, sodium titanate, and sodium bicarbonate. After dissolving sodium bicarbonate from the mixture in water, the remaining insoluble compounds are used as starting materials for a subsequent cycle. The sodium bicarbonate can be converted to sodium carbonate by heating and returned to the cycle.

  3. Kinetics of Thermochemical Reactions Important in the Venus Atmospheric Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to experimentally measure the rates of several thermochemical gas-solid reactions between sulfur gases in the Venus atmosphere and reactive minerals on the hot Venus surface. Despite the great importance of these reactions for the maintenance of significant amounts of sulfur gases (and thus for the maintenance of the global cloud cover) in the atmosphere of Venus, essentially no kinetic data are currently available for them.

  4. Development of low-temperature thermochemical conversion reactors for coal power engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhkov, A. F.; Bogatova, T. F.; Val'tsev, N. V.; Gordeev, S. I.; Khudyakova, G. I.; Osipov, P. V.; Abaimov, N. A.; Chernyavskii, N. V.; Shul'man, V. L.

    2013-12-01

    The main principles applied in developing a technology for low-temperature thermochemical conversion of brown coals to obtain fuel gas and semicoke intended for being fired in two-fuel power installations are considered on the basis of a set of experimental and calculated investigations. The obtained results are compared with the experimental data obtained using other methods and with the results of previous industrial tests.

  5. Comparative Life Cycle Assessment of Lignocellulosic Ethanol Production: Biochemical Versus Thermochemical Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Dongyan; Seager, Thomas; Rao, P. Suresh; Zhao, Fu

    2010-10-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass can be converted into ethanol through either biochemical or thermochemical conversion processes. Biochemical conversion involves hydrolysis and fermentation while thermochemical conversion involves gasification and catalytic synthesis. Even though these routes produce comparable amounts of ethanol and have similar energy efficiency at the plant level, little is known about their relative environmental performance from a life cycle perspective. Especially, the indirect impacts, i.e. emissions and resource consumption associated with the production of various process inputs, are largely neglected in previous studies. This article compiles material and energy flow data from process simulation models to develop life cycle inventory and compares the fossil fuel consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, and water consumption of both biomass-to-ethanol production processes. The results are presented in terms of contributions from feedstock, direct, indirect, and co-product credits for four representative biomass feedstocks i.e., wood chips, corn stover, waste paper, and wheat straw. To explore the potentials of the two conversion pathways, different technological scenarios are modeled, including current, 2012 and 2020 technology targets, as well as different production/co-production configurations. The modeling results suggest that biochemical conversion has slightly better performance on greenhouse gas emission and fossil fuel consumption, but that thermochemical conversion has significantly less direct, indirect, and life cycle water consumption. Also, if the thermochemical plant operates as a biorefinery with mixed alcohol co-products separated for chemicals, it has the potential to achieve better performance than biochemical pathway across all environmental impact categories considered due to higher co-product credits associated with chemicals being displaced. The results from this work serve as a starting point for developing full life cycle

  6. New developments of the CARTE thermochemical code: A two-phase equation of state for nanocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Vincent; Pineau, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    We developed a new equation of state (EOS) for nanocarbons in the thermodynamic range of high explosives detonation products (up to 50 GPa and 4000 K). This EOS was fitted to an extensive database of thermodynamic properties computed by molecular dynamics simulations of nanodiamonds and nano-onions with the LCBOPII potential. We reproduced the detonation properties of a variety of high explosives with the CARTE thermochemical code, including carbon-poor and carbon-rich explosives, with excellent accuracy.

  7. Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation of Protective Oxides and Thermal Barrier Coatings in High Hydrogen Content (HHC) - Fueled Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Mumm, Daniel

    2013-08-31

    The overarching goal of this research program has been to evaluate the potential impacts of coal-derived syngas and high-hydrogen content fuels on the degradation of turbine hot-section components through attack of protective oxides and thermal barrier coatings. The primary focus of this research program has been to explore mechanisms underpinning the observed degradation processes, and connections to the combustion environments and characteristic non-combustible constituents. Based on the mechanistic understanding of how these emerging fuel streams affect materials degradation, the ultimate goal of the program is to advance the goals of the Advanced Turbine Program by developing materials design protocols leading to turbine hot-section components with improved resistance to service lifetime degradation under advanced fuels exposures. This research program has been focused on studying how: (1) differing combustion environments – relative to traditional natural gas fired systems – affect both the growth rate of thermally grown oxide (TGO) layers and the stability of these oxides and of protective thermal barrier coatings (TBCs); and (2) how low levels of fuel impurities and characteristic non-combustibles interact with surface oxides, for instance through the development of molten deposits that lead to hot corrosion of protective TBC coatings. The overall program has been comprised of six inter-related themes, each comprising a research thrust over the program period, including: (i) evaluating the role of syngas and high hydrogen content (HHC) combustion environments in modifying component surface temperatures, heat transfer to the TBC coatings, and thermal gradients within these coatings; (ii) understanding the instability of TBC coatings in the syngas and high hydrogen environment with regards to decomposition, phase changes and sintering; (iii) characterizing ash deposition, molten phase development and infiltration, and associated corrosive

  8. 3-D Spherical modelling of the thermo-chemical evolution of Venus' mantle and crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armann, M.; Tackley, P. J.

    2008-09-01

    Background Several first-order aspects of the dynamics of Venus' mantle remain poorly understood. These include (i) how Venus' mantle loses its radiogenic heat, which is expected to be about the same as Earth's, despite the presence of stagnant lid convection. Hypotheses that have been advanced (summarised in [1]) are conduction through a thin lithosphere, episodic overturn of the lithosphere, magmatic heat transport, and concentration of almost all heat-producing elements into the crust, but there are problems with all of these taken individually. A thick lithosphere may not be consistent with admittance ratios, magmatic heat transport would require a too-large resurfacing rate, and a large concentration of heat-producing elements in the crust would cause weakness and possibly melting in the deep crust. (ii) The relatively long-wavelength distribution of surface features, which is surprising because numerical models and analogue laboratory experiments of stagnant-lid convection produce relatively short-wavelength convective cells. (iii) The inferred (from crater distributions [2]) relatively uniform surface age of 500-700 Ma. (iv) Whether the highlands are above mantle downwellings as on Earth or above mantle upwellings [3]. (v) How the mantle can have outgassing only 25% of 40Ar [4] but supposedly most of its water [5]. (vi) The cause of coronae and relationship to mantle processes [6]. Model To study some of these questions, we take advantage of advances in computational capabilities to perform integrated thermo-chemical convection models of Venus' evolution over 4.5 billion years, in 3-D spherical geometry as well as 2-D spherical annulus geometry [7]. These models include realistic ("laboratory") rheological parameters for diffusion creep and dislocation creep based on [8][9], which are also composition-dependent, and plastic yielding based on Byerlee's law, which might cause changes in tectonic regime (e.g., episodic plate tectonics). Crustal formation and

  9. Thermochemical conversion of raw and defatted algal biomass via hydrothermal liquefaction and slow pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Vardon, Derek R; Sharma, Brajendra K; Blazina, Grant V; Rajagopalan, Kishore; Strathmann, Timothy J

    2012-04-01

    Thermochemical conversion is a promising route for recovering energy from algal biomass. Two thermochemical processes, hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL: 300 °C and 10-12 MPa) and slow pyrolysis (heated to 450 °C at a rate of 50 °C/min), were used to produce bio-oils from Scenedesmus (raw and defatted) and Spirulina biomass that were compared against Illinois shale oil. Although both thermochemical conversion routes produced energy dense bio-oil (35-37 MJ/kg) that approached shale oil (41 MJ/kg), bio-oil yields (24-45%) and physico-chemical characteristics were highly influenced by conversion route and feedstock selection. Sharp differences were observed in the mean bio-oil molecular weight (pyrolysis 280-360 Da; HTL 700-1330 Da) and the percentage of low boiling compounds (bp<400 °C) (pyrolysis 62-66%; HTL 45-54%). Analysis of the energy consumption ratio (ECR) also revealed that for wet algal biomass (80% moisture content), HTL is more favorable (ECR 0.44-0.63) than pyrolysis (ECR 0.92-1.24) due to required water volatilization in the latter technique. PMID:22285293

  10. Thermochemical recovery of heat contained in flue gases by means of bioethanol conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashchenko, D. I.

    2013-06-01

    In the present paper consideration is being given to the use of bioethanol in the schemes of thermochemical recovery of heat contained in exit flue gases. Schematic diagrams illustrate the realization of thermochemical heat recovery by implementing ethanol steam conversion and conversion of ethanol by means of products of its complete combustion. The feasibility of attaining a high degree of recovery of heat contained in flue gases at the moderate temperature (up to 450°C) of combustion components is demonstrated in the example of the energy balance of the system for thermochemical heat recovery. The simplified thermodynamic analysis of the process of ethanol steam conversion was carried out in order to determine possible ranges of variation of process variables (temperature, pressure, composition) of a reaction mixture providing the efficient heat utilization. It was found that at the temperature above 600 K the degree of ethanol conversion is near unity. The equilibrium composition of products of reaction of ethanol steam conversion has been identified for different temperatures at which the process occurs at the ratio H2O/EtOH = 1 and at the pressure of 0.1 MPa. The obtained results of calculation agree well with the experimental data.

  11. Benchmarking the DFT+U method for thermochemical calculations of uranium molecular compounds and solids.

    PubMed

    Beridze, George; Kowalski, Piotr M

    2014-12-18

    Ability to perform a feasible and reliable computation of thermochemical properties of chemically complex actinide-bearing materials would be of great importance for nuclear engineering. Unfortunately, density functional theory (DFT), which on many instances is the only affordable ab initio method, often fails for actinides. Among various shortcomings, it leads to the wrong estimate of enthalpies of reactions between actinide-bearing compounds, putting the applicability of the DFT approach to the modeling of thermochemical properties of actinide-bearing materials into question. Here we test the performance of DFT+U method--a computationally affordable extension of DFT that explicitly accounts for the correlations between f-electrons - for prediction of the thermochemical properties of simple uranium-bearing molecular compounds and solids. We demonstrate that the DFT+U approach significantly improves the description of reaction enthalpies for the uranium-bearing gas-phase molecular compounds and solids and the deviations from the experimental values are comparable to those obtained with much more computationally demanding methods. Good results are obtained with the Hubbard U parameter values derived using the linear response method of Cococcioni and de Gironcoli. We found that the value of Coulomb on-site repulsion, represented by the Hubbard U parameter, strongly depends on the oxidation state of uranium atom. Last, but not least, we demonstrate that the thermochemistry data can be successfully used to estimate the value of the Hubbard U parameter needed for DFT+U calculations. PMID:25412189

  12. Reuse of microalgae grown in full-scale wastewater treatment ponds: Thermochemical pretreatment and biogas production.

    PubMed

    Passos, Fabiana; Felix, Leonardo; Rocha, Hemyle; Pereira, Jackson de Oliveira; de Aquino, Sérgio

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed thermochemical pretreatment of microalgae harvested from a full-scale wastewater treatment pond prior to its anaerobic digestion using acid and alkaline chemical doses combined with thermal pretreatment at 80°C. Results indicated that alkaline and thermal pretreatment contributed mostly to glycoprotein and pectin solubilisation; whilst acid pretreatment solubilised mostly hemicellulose, with lower effectiveness for proteins. Regarding the anaerobic biodegradability, biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests showed that final methane yield was enhanced after almost all pretreatment conditions when compared to non-pretreated microalgae, with the highest increase for thermochemical pretreatment at the lowest dose (0.5%), i.e. 82% and 86% increase for alkaline and acid, respectively. At higher doses, salt toxicity was revealed by K(+) concentrations over 5000mg/L. All BMP data from pretreated biomass was successfully described by the modified Gompertz model and optimal condition (thermochemical 0.5% HCl) showed an increase in final methane yield and the process kinetics. PMID:26990398

  13. Revisiting the BaO2/BaO redox cycle for solar thermochemical energy storage.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, A J; Sastre, D; Serrano, D P; Pizarro, P; Coronado, J M

    2016-03-21

    The barium peroxide-based redox cycle was proposed in the late 1970s as a thermochemical energy storage system. Since then, very little attention has been paid to such redox couples. In this paper, we have revisited the use of reduction-oxidation reactions of the BaO2/BaO system for thermochemical heat storage at high temperatures. Using thermogravimetric analysis, reduction and oxidation reactions were studied in order to find the main limitations associated with each process. Furthermore, the system was evaluated through several charge-discharge stages in order to analyse its possible degradation after repeated cycling. Through differential scanning calorimetry the heat stored and released were also determined. Oxidation reaction, which was found to be slower than reduction, was studied in more detail using isothermal tests. It was observed that the rate-controlling step of BaO oxidation follows zero-order kinetics, although at high temperatures a deviation from Arrhenius behaviour was observed probably due to hindrances to anionic oxygen diffusion caused by the formation of an external layer of BaO2. This redox couple was able to withstand several redox cycles without deactivation, showing reaction conversions close to 100% provided that impurities are previously eliminated through thermal pre-treatment, demonstrating the feasibility of this system for solar thermochemical heat storage. PMID:26922970

  14. Thermo-chemical process with sewage sludge by using CO2.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eilhann E; Yi, Haakrho; Kwon, Hyun-Han

    2013-10-15

    This work proposed a novel methodology for energy recovery from sewage sludge via the thermo-chemical process. The impact of CO2 co-feed on the thermo-chemical process (pyrolysis and gasification) of sewage sludge was mainly investigated to enhance thermal efficiency and to modify the end products from the pyrolysis and gasification process. The CO2 injected into the pyrolysis and gasification process enhance the generation of CO. As compared to the thermo-chemical process in an inert atmosphere (i.e., N2), the generation of CO in the presence of CO2 was enhanced approximately 200% at the temperature regime from 600 to 900 °C. The introduction of CO2 into the pyrolysis and gasification process enabled the condensable hydrocarbons (tar) to be reduced considerably by expediting thermal cracking (i.e., approximately 30-40%); thus, exploiting CO2 as chemical feedstock and/or reaction medium for the pyrolysis and gasification process leads to higher thermal efficiency, which leads to environmental benefits. This work also showed that sewage sludge could be a very strong candidate for energy recovery and a raw material for chemical feedstock. PMID:23792821

  15. Current Research on Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R. M.; Magrini-Bair, K. A.; Nimlos, M. R.; Pepiot, P.; Donohoe, B. S.; Hensley, J. E.; Phillips, S. D.

    2012-04-05

    The thermochemical research platform at the National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is primarily focused on conversion of biomass to transportation fuels using non-biological techniques. Research is conducted in three general areas relating to fuels synthesis via thermochemical conversion by gasification: (1) Biomass gasification fundamentals, chemistry and mechanisms of tar formation; (2) Catalytic tar reforming and syngas cleaning; and (3) Syngas conversion to mixed alcohols. In addition, the platform supports activities in both technoeconomic analysis (TEA) and life cycle assessment (LCA) of thermochemical conversion processes. Results from the TEA and LCA are used to inform and guide laboratory research for alternative biomass-to-fuels strategies. Detailed process models are developed using the best available material and energy balance information and unit operations models created at NREL and elsewhere. These models are used to identify cost drivers which then form the basis for research programs aimed at reducing costs and improving process efficiency while maintaining sustainability and an overall net reduction in greenhouse gases.

  16. Experimental investigation on thermochemical sulfate reduction by H2S initiation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, T.; Amrani, A.; Ellis, G.S.; Ma, Q.; Tang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to catalyze thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) by hydrocarbons (HC), but the reaction mechanism remains unclear. To understand the mechanism of this catalytic reaction, a series of isothermal gold-tube hydrous pyrolysis experiments were conducted at 330 ??C for 24 h under a constant confining pressure of 24.1 MPa. The reactants used were saturated HC (sulfur-free) and CaSO4 in the presence of variable H2S partial pressures at three different pH conditions. The experimental results showed that the in-situ pH of the aqueous solution (herein, in-situ pH refers to the calculated pH of aqueous solution under the experimental conditions) can significantly affect the rate of the TSR reaction. A substantial increase in the TSR reaction rate was recorded with a decrease in the in-situ pH value of the aqueous solution involved. A positive correlation between the rate of TSR and the initial partial pressure of H2S occurred under acidic conditions (at pH ???3-3.5). However, sulfate reduction at pH ???5.0 was undetectable even at high initial H2S concentrations. To investigate whether the reaction of H2S(aq) and HSO4- occurs at pH ???3, an additional series of isothermal hydrous pyrolysis experiments was conducted with CaSO4 and variable H2S partial pressures in the absence of HC at the same experimental temperature and pressure conditions. CaSO4 reduction was not measurable in the absence of paraffin even with high H2S pressure and acidic conditions. These experimental observations indicate that the formation of organosulfur intermediates from H2S reacting with hydrocarbons may play a significant role in sulfate reduction under our experimental conditions rather than the formation of elemental sulfur from H2S reacting with sulfate as has been suggested previously (Toland W. G. (1960) Oxidation of organic compounds with aqueous sulphate. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 82, 1911-1916). Quantification of labile organosulfur compounds (LSC), such as thiols

  17. Hydrogen and OUr Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Tidball; Stu Knoke

    2009-03-01

    In 2003, President George W. Bush announced the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative to accelerate the research and development of hydrogen, fuel cell, and infrastructure technologies that would enable hydrogen fuel cell vehicles to reach the commercial market in the 2020 timeframe. The widespread use of hydrogen can reduce our dependence on imported oil and benefit the environment by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and criteria pollutant emissions that affect our air quality. The Energy Policy Act of 2005, passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bush on August 8, 2005, reinforces Federal government support for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Title VIII, also called the 'Spark M. Matsunaga Hydrogen Act of 2005' authorizes more than $3.2 billion for hydrogen and fuel cell activities intended to enable the commercial introduction of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles by 2020, consistent with the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. Numerous other titles in the Act call for related tax and market incentives, new studies, collaboration with alternative fuels and renewable energy programs, and broadened demonstrations--clearly demonstrating the strong support among members of Congress for the development and use of hydrogen fuel cell technologies. In 2006, the President announced the Advanced Energy Initiative (AEI) to accelerate research on technologies with the potential to reduce near-term oil use in the transportation sector--batteries for hybrid vehicles and cellulosic ethanol--and advance activities under the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. The AEI also supports research to reduce the cost of electricity production technologies in the stationary sector such as clean coal, nuclear energy, solar photovoltaics, and wind energy.

  18. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    . Politano, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL This project developed a hydrogen and fuel cell technology academic program at Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Florida. Design and Development of an Advanced Hydrogen Storage System using Novel Materials ? E. Stefanakos, University of South Florida The goal of this project was to design and develop novel conducting polymeric nanomaterials for on-board hydrogen storage. The project approach was to examine synthesis of polyaniline solid state hydrogen storage materials. Advanced HiFoil ? Bipolar Plates ? J. Braun, M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The goal of this project was to provide a durable, low cost bipolar plate for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The project results produced a durable, low cost bipolar plate with very high in-plane thermal conductivity.

  19. CMB topography and electrical conductivity as additional constraints for the lowermost mantle thermo-chemical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, F.; Yin, Y.; Tackley, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of seismic observations, including tomographic models, indicate that the lowermost mantle is strongly heterogeneous. Seismic observations further support a thermo-chemical origin for the large scale heterogeneities. In particular, the large low-shear wave velocity provinces (LLSVP) observed by global tomographic images are better explained by a combination of thermal and chemical anomalies. Despite the accuracy of seismic information, uncertainties and trade-off still prevent the determination of a detailed lower mantle thermo-chemical structure. For instance, the nature of chemical heterogeneities and the exact role played by the post-perovskite phase transition are still debated. Additional constraints are needed to discriminate between the possible models of structure and dynamics of the lower mantle. Here, we consider two potential additional constraints, the electrical conductivity and the dynamic topography at the core-mantle boundary (CMB). Unlike density and seismic velocities, electrical conductivity increases with temperature. In addition, it strongly varies with the iron and silicate content. Using appropriate mineral physics data, we calculated a 3D distribution of electrical conductivity in lower mantle from the thermo-chemical structure inferred by probabilistic tomography, which maps iron and silicate excess in the LLSVP. In the lowermost mantle, we observe a belt of high conductivity, with maximum values around 20 S/m located in the LLSVP. Such a belt may trigger electric currents in the lowermost mantle and induce magnetic field variations with period of one year or more. It may thus be seen by global models of electrical conductivity. Unfortunately, such models do not sample yet regions deeper than 2000 km. A second, independent constraint we explored is the dynamic topography at the CMB. We used stagYY to calculate the dynamic topography associated with several models of thermo-chemical convection, and observe strong differences

  20. Hydrogen Bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.