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Sample records for advanced thyroid cancers

  1. Targeted therapies in advanced differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Raquel M; Carneiro, Benedito A; Agulnik, Mark; Kopp, Peter A; Giles, Francis J

    2015-09-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, and its incidence has been rising rapidly over the past 10 years. Although most patients with this disease have an excellent prognosis, a subset develops a more aggressive disease phenotype refractory to conventional therapies. Until recently, there was no effective therapy for these patients. With increasing knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of thyroid cancer, novel targeted therapies are being developed for this group of patients. Sorafenib and lenvatinib, small-molecule multikinase inhibitors, were approved for the treatment of progressive, symptomatic, radioactive iodine refractory, advanced differentiated thyroid cancer in 2013 and 2015, respectively. This represents a major innovation in the therapy of patients with advanced thyroid cancer. However, these therapies still have many limitations and further research needs to be pursued with the ultimate goal of providing safe and effective personalized therapy for patients with advanced thyroid cancer.

  2. New Treatment in Advanced Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrida, Dario; Prestifilippo, Angela; Scarfia, Alessia; Martino, Daniela; Marchisotta, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine tumor. Thyroidectomy, radioactive iodine, and TSH suppression represent the standard treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer. Since chemotherapy has been shown to be unsuccessful in case of advanced thyroid carcinomas, the research for new therapies is fundamental. In this paper, we reviewed the recent literature reports (pubmed, medline, EMBASE database, and abstracts published in meeting proceedings) on new treatments in advanced nonmedullary and medullary thyroid carcinomas. Studies of many tyrosine kinase inhibitors as well as antiangiogenic inhibitors suggest that patients with thyroid cancer could have an advantage with new target therapy. We summarized both the results obtained and the toxic effects associated with these treatments reported in clinical trials. Reported data in this paper are encouraging, but further trials are necessary to obtain a more effective result in thyroid carcinoma treatment. PMID:23133451

  3. Thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a family history of thyroid cancer and chronic goiter (enlarged thyroid). There are several types of thyroid ... Read More Anaplastic thyroid cancer Breathing difficulty Cancer Goiter - simple Metastasis Radiation therapy Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma ...

  4. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research.

  5. New Insight into the Treatment of Advanced Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Arash; Vijayasekaran, Aparna; Guerrero, Marlon A.

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) are treated successfully with surgery and radioactive iodine ablation, yet the treatment of advanced cases is frustrating and largely ineffective. Systemic treatment with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy is basically ineffective in most patients with advanced DTC. However, a better understanding of the genetics and biologic basis of thyroid cancers has generated opportunities for innovative therapeutic modalities, resulting in several clinical trials. We aim to delineate the latest knowledge regarding the biologic characteristics of DTC and to describe the available data related to novel targeted therapies that have demonstrated clinical effectiveness. PMID:23326755

  6. Pharmacotherapy options for advanced thyroid cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Christian; Richter, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Poor prognosis of anaplastic thyroid cancer and advanced disease in differentiated and medullary thyroid cancer, together with absence of effective therapeutic measures, has induced recent intensified basic and clinical research in this area. The aim of this article is to assess the effects of new drug treatment for advanced thyroid cancer. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE until the end of September 2011 for relevant data. Further sources were reference lists of original publications and review articles. We included prospective studies that investigated drug interventions for advanced thyroid cancer published in any language. We did not include trials solely communicated as abstracts. For inclusion, studies had to report overall survival, progression-free survival or similar, or response outcomes. Data were extracted by one author and checked by the other. All tables are part of this publication. Because only non-comparative studies were included, we had to focus on descriptive analysis. Twenty-four studies with 715 patients were included; 18 studies investigated kinase inhibitors, the remainder various drugs. All studies reported response (only one complete response was observed; proportions of partial response were up to 49%). Median progression-free survival was about 12 months, ranging from 3.7 to 27.9 months. Adverse events (at least grade 3) of kinase inhibitors included hypertension, hand foot syndrome and diarrhoea (10%, 16% and 9%, respectively). Due to bias-prone data, any interpretation of newer pharmacotherapy options for advanced thyroid cancer is limited because only non-comparative studies could be included. Therefore, we strongly argue the need for adequate randomized controlled trials that should provide a better basis for therapeutic decision making in thyroid cancer.

  7. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Thyroid Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Thyroid Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Symptoms and ...

  8. Operative management of locally advanced, differentiated thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Laura Y.; Nixon, Iain J.; Patel, Snehal G.; Palmer, Frank L.; Tuttle, R. Michael; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin P.; Ganly, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of differentiated thyroid cancer tends to present with limited locoregional disease, leading to excellent long-term survival after operative treatment. Even patients with advanced local disease may survive for long periods with appropriate treatment. The aim of this study is to present our institutional experience of the management of locally advanced differentiated thyroid cancer and to analyze factors predictive of outcome. Methods We reviewed our institutional database of 3,664 previously untreated patients with differentiated thyroid cancer operated between 1986 and 2010. A total of 153 patients had tumor extension beyond the thyroid capsule that invaded the subcutaneous soft tissues, recurrent laryngeal nerve, larynx, trachea, or esophagus. Details on extent of operation and adjuvant therapy were recorded. Disease-specific survival and locoregional recurrence-free probability were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Factors predictive of outcome were determined by multivariate analysis. Results The median age of the 153 patients with tumor extension beyond the thyroid capsule was 55 years (range 11–91 years). Eighty-nine patients (58.2%) were female. Twenty-three patients (15.0%) were staged as M1 at presentation, and 122 (79.7%) had pathologically involved lymph nodes. The most common site of extrathyroidal extension was the recurrent laryngeal nerve (51.0%) followed by the trachea (46.4%) and esophagus (39.2%). Sixty-three patients (41%) required resection of the recurrent laryngeal nerve due to tumor involvement. After surgery, 20 patients (13.0%) had gross residual disease (R2), 63 (41.2%) had a positive margin of resection (R1), and 70 (45.8%) had complete resection with negative margins (R0). With a median follow-up of 63.9 months, 5-year, disease-specific survival, when stratified by R0/R1/R2 resection, was 94.4%, 87.6%, and 67.9%, respectively (P = .030). The data do not demonstrate a statistical difference in survival

  9. Cabozantinib (thyroid cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat a certain type of thyroid cancer that is getting worse and that has spread ... only gives information about cabozantinib capsules (Cometriq) for thyroid cancer. If you are using this medication for advanced ...

  10. Chemotherapy for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage Thyroid Cancer Treating Thyroid Cancer Chemotherapy for Thyroid Cancer Chemotherapy (chemo) uses anti-cancer drugs that are ... Thyroid Cancer, by Type and Stage More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  11. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body work normally. There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater ... imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose thyroid cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer you ...

  12. What Is Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer What Is Thyroid Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... cell) Medullary Anaplastic (an aggressive undifferentiated tumor) Differentiated thyroid cancers Most thyroid cancers are differentiated cancers. The cells ...

  13. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-23

    Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  14. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Stage IVB Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Stage IVC Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Carcinoma

  15. Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? Most people with thyroid cancer have ... Cancer? Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  16. Anaplastic thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000352.htm Anaplastic thyroid cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... of cancer of the thyroid gland. Causes Anaplastic thyroid cancer is an invasive type of thyroid cancer that ...

  17. Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Patient Health Information News media ... and neck issues, should be consulted. Types of thyroid cancer in children: Papillary : This form of thyroid cancer ...

  18. Advances in thyroid cancer treatment: latest evidence and clinical potential

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Gordoa, T.; Díez, J.J.; Durán, M.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced thyroid carcinoma is an infrequent tumor entity with limited treatment possibilities until recently. The extraordinary improvement in the comprehension of genetic and molecular alterations involving the RAS/RAF/mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and interacting pathways that are involved in tumor survival, proliferation, differentiation, motility and angiogenesis have been the rationale for the development of new effective targeted therapies. Data coming from phase II clinical trials have confirmed the efficacy of those targeted agents against receptors in cell membrane and cytoplasmic molecules. Moreover, four of those investigational drugs, vandetanib, cabozantinib, sorafenib and lenvatinib, have reached a phase III clinical trial with favorable results in progression-free survival and overall survival in medullary thyroid carcinoma and differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Further analysis for an optimal approach has been conducted according to mutational profile and tumor subtypes. However, consistent results are still awaited and the research for adequate prognostic and predictive biomarkers is ongoing. The following report offers a comprehensive review from the rationale to the basis of targeted agents in the treatment of thyroid carcinoma. In addition, current and future therapeutic developments by the inhibition of further molecular targets are discussed in this setting. PMID:25553081

  19. Thyroid cancer - medullary carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid - medullary carcinoma; Cancer - thyroid (medullary carcinoma); MTC; Thyroid nodule - medullary ... in children and adults. Unlike other types of thyroid cancer, MTC is less likely to be caused by ...

  20. Key Statistics for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Key Statistics for Thyroid Cancer How common is thyroid cancer? ... remains very low compared with most other cancers. Statistics on survival rates for thyroid cancer are discussed ...

  1. [Advances in thyroglobulin assays and their impact on the management of differentiated thyroid cancers].

    PubMed

    d'Herbomez, Michèle; Lion, Georges; Béron, Amandine; Wémeau, Jean-Louis; DoCao, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) is a high molecular weight glycoprotein located mainly in thyroid follicles, where thyroid hormones are synthesized and stored. In patients with differentiated thyroid cancer of follicular origin, serum Tg levels become undetectable following total thyroidectomy and iodine-131 remnant ablation. It is a key biomarker to follow-up patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, in combination with neck ultrasound monitoring. The measurement of Tg in the wash-out of the needle used for fine needle aspiration biopsy is a valuable aid to the diagnosis of lymph node metastasis. The presence of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies affects reliability of Tg results measured in serum or plasma. Systematic investigation of such antibodies is required to validate any Tg assay. Elevated or rising levels of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies can in turn be used as a surrogate tumor marker of thyroid cancer. The development of second-generation Tg assay (automated, highly sensitive) has enabled significant advances in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer: early detection of persistent or recurrent disease and follow-up care simplified in low-risk patients. Testing of serum Tg can also be useful in evaluating other clinical situations such as congenital hypothyroidism, endemic goiter and thyrotoxicosis factitia.

  2. Development of molecular targeted drugs for advanced thyroid cancer in Japan.

    PubMed

    Takami, Hiroshi; Ito, Koichi; Sugino, Kiminori

    2014-01-01

    Up until now there have been no promising drugs for the treatment of advanced thyroid cancer, but the development of novel therapeutic agents is now anticipated as a result of the advent of molecular targeted drugs that inhibit tumor growth signals or angiogenesis. Against a background in which the development of numerous molecular targeted drugs for advanced thyroid cancer is being pursued worldwide, the development of sorafenib, vandetanib, and lenvatinib is currently also under way in Japan. All three of these compounds are undergoing phase 3 trials or have been approved abroad, and because they are in the final stage of development in Japan, they are expected to be introduced in clinical settings in the near future. After they have been introduced, it will be necessary to understand the differences between these compounds and to administer them to patients appropriately.

  3. Therapy for advanced thyroid cancer: treatment of a high risk case.

    PubMed

    Ceriati, F; Cavicchioni, C; Logroscino, C; Pastore, G; Montemaggi, P; Fabiano, A; Mantovani, M; Marino, I R; Ardito, G; De Luca, G

    1987-01-01

    The treatment of a high risk case of an advanced thyroid cancer is reported. The patient had a thyroid cancer with metastatic lesions of the frontal bone, left temporal bone, left sacroiliac joint, lytic destruction of C6 and lytic lesion of C7. A pre-operative immobilization of the cervical spine was performed by a halo cast set on a corset of gypsum. After this, the patient underwent a thyroidectomy and, at the same time, a metallic plate was applied to immobilize C5-C7. A month after he underwent reoperative surgery to stabilize definitively the cervical spine. Subsequently he was treated by TCT and 131I subdivided in several cycles. The latest total body scan demonstrated a complete regression of secondary lesions.

  4. Can Thyroid Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thyroid Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Thyroid Cancer Be Found Early? Many cases of thyroid cancer ... Health Care Team About Thyroid Cancer? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  5. Sorafenib for Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared sorafenib (Nexavar®) and a placebo for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer that is no longer responding to treatment with radioactive iodine

  6. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... The coming of age of ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol ablation of selected neck nodal metastases in well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. 2011;96:2717. Caprelsa (prescribing information). Wilmington, Del.: ...

  7. Thyroid cancer in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Gorlin, J.B.; Sallan, S.E. )

    1990-09-01

    The incidence, clinical presentation, and types of thyroid cancers presenting in childhood are reviewed. The role of antecedent radiation in papillary and follicular thyroid cancers and genetics of medullary thyroid carcinoma are discussed. Unique aspects of therapy and prognosis for the pediatric patient with thyroid carcinoma are addressed as well as a diagnostic approach to the child who presents with a neck mass.59 references.

  8. Thyroid stem cells: lessons from normal development and thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Dolly; Friedman, Susan; Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing advances in stem cell research have opened new avenues for therapy for many human disorders. Until recently, however, thyroid stem cells have been relatively understudied. Here, we review what is known about thyroid stem cells and explore their utility as models of normal and malignant biological development. We also discuss the cellular origin of thyroid cancer stem cells and explore the clinical implications of cancer stem cells in the thyroid gland. Since thyroid cancer is the most common form of endocrine cancer and that thyroid hormone is needed for the growth and metabolism of each cell in the body, understanding the molecular and the cellular aspects of thyroid stem cell biology will ultimately provide insights into mechanisms underlying human disease. PMID:18310275

  9. Signs and Symptoms of Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Signs and Symptoms of Thyroid Cancer Thyroid cancer can cause any of the following ... Health Care Team About Thyroid Cancer? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  10. Thyroid cancer around Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Beral, V.

    1997-03-01

    The author`s presentation on thyroid cancer around Chernobyl will focus on four different things. First will be the time trends, or the pattern of thyroid cancer occurrence before and after the accident. It is now very well known that the increase in thyroid cancer in children in several areas has been unprecedented. Second, the author discusses thyroid cancer in general and patterns of thyroid cancer around the world before the Chernobyl accident, including differences by age and pathology. Third, the author presents relatively crude analyses of risk according to dose to the thyroid gland. And last, the author attempts to contrast the findings for thyroid cancer in relation to the internal radioiodine dose in Chernobyl studies with analyses of the effects of external dose on thyroid cancer incidence. The bottom line to be developed is similar to that presented by Elaine Ron with regard to effects of external dose on thyroid cancer. The similarities between the childhood finding from Chernobyl studies and external radiation studies appear more remarkable than the differences.

  11. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Metastatic Papillary Thyroid Cancer or Follicular Thyroid Cancer Unresponsive to Iodine I 131

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-20

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  12. Thyroid Growth and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Dillwyn

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed that most papillary thyroid cancers originate in infancy and childhood, based on the early rise in sporadic thyroid carcinoma incidence, the pattern of radiation-induced risk (highest in those exposed as infants), and the high prevalence of sporadic papillary thyroid cancers in children and adolescents (ultrasound screening after the Fukushima accident). The early origin can be linked to the growth pattern of follicular cells, with a high mitotic rate in infancy falling to very low replacement levels in adult life. The cell of origin of thyroid cancers, the differentiated follicular cell, has a limited growth potential. Unlike cancers originating in stem cells, loss of the usually tight link between differentiation and replicative senescence is required for immortalisation. It is suggested that this loss distinguishes larger clinically significant papillary thyroid cancers from micro-papillary thyroid cancers of little clinical significance. Papillary carcinogenesis can then be divided into 3 stages: (1) initiation, the first mutation in the carcinogenic cascade, for radiation-induced papillary thyroid cancers usually a RET rearrangement, (2) progression, acquisition of the additional mutations needed for low-grade malignancy, and (3) escape, further mutations giving immortality and a higher net growth rate. Most papillary thyroid cancers will not have achieved full immortality by adulthood, and remain as so-called micro-carcinomas with a very low growth rate. The use of the term ‘cancer’ to describe micro-papillary thyroid cancers in older patients encourages overtreatment and alarms patients. Invasive papillary thyroid tumours show a spectrum of malignancy, which at its lowest poses no threat to life. The treatment protocols and nomenclature for small papillary carcinomas need to be reconsidered in the light of the new evidence available, the continuing discovery of smaller lesions, and the model of thyroid carcinogenesis proposed. PMID

  13. Thyroid Nodules and Thyroid Cancer: Surgical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Orlo H.

    1980-01-01

    Patients with thyroid nodules must be treated selectively because these nodules develop far more frequently than does thyroid cancer. A thorough clinical history, family history and history of radiation, as well as an accurate physical examination, are very important in determining whether surgical treatment is indicated. Thyroid function tests, a radioactive isotope scan, a thyroid echogram and fine-needle biopsy are also useful. Although there is considerable debate concerning the amount of thyroid tissue that should be removed at operation, the minimal procedure for a “cold,” solid thyroid nodule is a total thyroid lobectomy and isthmectomy. This is the treatment of choice for patients with occult papillary thyroid carcinoma. Partial lobectomy is to be discouraged. Near total or total thyroidectomy should be considered for all other patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Many factors influence the prognosis of patients with thyroid cancer including age, sex, type of thyroid cancer, invasion, symptoms, lymph node metastasis, metastasis to distant sites, extent of the surgical procedure, and use of radioactive iodine and thyroid hormone. With adequate treatment, the prognosis for differentiated thyroid carcinoma is excellent. PMID:7222643

  14. Precision Medicine Approach to Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Advances in Targeted Drug Therapy Based on Specific Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Samimi, Hilda; Fallah, Parviz; Naderi Sohi, Alireza; Tavakoli, Rezvan; Naderi, Mahmood; Soleimani, Masoud; Larijani, Bagher; Haghpanah, Vahid

    2017-03-01

    Personalized medicine is a set of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches in which medical interventions are carried out based on individual patient characteristics. As life expectancy increases in developed and developing countries, the incidence of diseases such as cancer goes up among people in the community. Cancer is a disease that the response to treatment varies from one person to another and also it is costly for individuals, families, and society. Among thyroid cancers, anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is the most aggressive, lethal and unresponsive form of the disease. Unfortunately, current drugs are not targetable, and therefore they have restricted role in ATC treatment. Consequently, mortality of this cancer, despite advances in the field of diagnosis and treatment, is one of the most important challenges in medicine. Cellular, molecular and genetic evidences play an important role in finding more effective diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Review of these evidences confirms the application of personalized medicine in cancer treatment including ATC. A growing body of evidence has elucidated that cellular and molecular mechanisms of cancer would pave the way for defining new biomarkers for targeted therapy, taking into account individual differences. It should be noted that this approach requires further progress in the fields of basic sciences, pharmacogenetics and drug design. An overview of the most important aspects in individualized anaplastic thyroid cancer treatment will be discussed in this review.

  15. New developments in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Robert I

    2013-05-01

    Thyroid cancer is common but rarely deadly. Unfortunately, when the disease becomes refractory to radioactive iodine (RAI), few effective treatment options remain. This situation is changing, however, with the availability of multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Cabozantanib and vandetanib, both recently FDA-approved for advanced or metastatic disease, have more than doubled progression-free survival in medullary thyroid cancer. New agents in the pipeline may yield even better outcomes, as discussed by Dr. Robert I. Haddad at the NCCN 18th Annual Conference.

  16. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer Cabozantinib-S-Malate Caprelsa (Vandetanib) Cometriq (Cabozantinib-S-Malate) Doxorubicin ...

  17. Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... some noncancerous childhood conditions Radiation exposure from nuclear plant disasters Radiation given through a vein (through an IV) during medical tests and treatments does not increase the risk of developing thyroid cancer.

  18. Thyroid Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... common than normal in children who lived near Chernobyl, the site of a 1986 nuclear plant accident ... exposure was much, much lower than that around Chernobyl. A higher risk of thyroid cancer has not ...

  19. Stages of Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate, body temperature, and how quickly food is changed into energy ( metabolism ). Control the amount of calcium ... test has been developed that can find the changed gene before medullary thyroid cancer appears. The patient ...

  20. Targeting the TSH receptor in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Christopher W; Paul, Jonathan; Gedye, Craig; Tolosa, Jorge; Bendinelli, Cino; McGrath, Shaun; Smith, Roger

    2017-03-28

    Recent advances in the arena of theranostics have necessitated a re-examining of previously established fields. The existing paradigm of therapeutic thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) targeting in the post-surgical management of differentiated thyroid cancer using levothyroxine and recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is well understood. However, in an era of personalized medicine, and with an increasing awareness of the risk profile of longstanding pharmacological hyperthyroidism, it is imperative clinicians understand the molecular basis and magnitude of benefit for individual patients. Furthermore, TSHR has been recently re-conceived as a selective target for residual metastatic thyroid cancer, with pilot data demonstrating effective targeting of nanoparticles to thyroid cancers using this receptor as a target. This review examines the evidence for TSHR signaling as an oncogenic pathway, and assesses the evidence for ongoing TSHR expression in thyroid cancer metastases. Priorities for further research are highlighted.

  1. [A successful treatment of percutaneous radio frequency ablation for advanced thyroid cancer].

    PubMed

    Miyabayashi, Chiharu; Ooiwa, Ako; Katakura, Masafumi; Ando, Takayuki; Hasumoto, Yuushi; Terao, Yumiko; Tsukada, Kenichirou; Kubota, Yoshiki; Nagai, Minoru; Neishi, Masao; Hara, Masahiro; Hashizume, Kiyoshi

    2005-10-01

    The patient was a 69-year-old woman. She received chemotherapy and radiation for thyroid tumor (undifferentiated cancer) following an operation in 1998. The chemotherapy was regularly repeated for relapse. The tumor increased gradually and came to cause dysphagia. She initially rejected nutritional management that depends on intravenous hyper alimentation or gastrostomy. After receiving an informed consent, we performed percutaneous radio frequency ablation (RFA) for the tumor using a Cool-tip needle on April 2, 2003. The algorithm of RFA was 9 min: 30 --> 120 W, 12 min: 50 --> 110 W, 9 min: 50 --> 100 W. After 2 days, the covered stent was implanted in the esophagus and an oral intake was started. Although the operation for undifferentiated thyroid cancer is controversial, we performed RFA and esophageal stenting for improving of QOL. This is the first case report in Japan.

  2. Biomarkers for the diagnosis of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Kruttibas; Sarkar, Siddik; Das, Subhasis; Mohanty, Biswanarayan; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid tumor contributes 1% of the total tumor but 90% of the endocrine related tumors. Majority of the thyroid cancers are being diagnosed by Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and histology. Although histology is considered as gold standard, it has some limitations, like variants of papillary and follicular cancer creates confusion among pathologists, where the morphological features are indistinguishable. Conventional histology and FNAC fails to provide any prognostic and therapeutic information. To address this problem, several immunohistochemical markers are proposed and their efficiency in thyroid cancer diagnosis, treatment and prognosis are being evaluated. Among the discussed immunohistochemical markers, few have potential in accurate diagnosis and prognosis of thyroid carcinoma. Hector battifora mesothelial antigen-1 (HBME-1) and Galectin-3 (GAL-3) shows highest specificity and sensitivity in the diagnosis of thyroid cancer respectively. Overexpression of EGFR in thyroid cancer is in proportionate with the severity of the advanced thyroid carcinoma, which required further evaluation and validation. Surgery and radio-iodine therapy is the main treatment modality, however; combined targeted therapeutic approach against different thyroid cancer receptor and biomarkers can reduce the side effect, and improve therapeutic efficiency. This review is oriented towards the finding of the potent thyroid cancer receptor having enhanced sensitivity and specificity, with diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic efficiency.

  3. Occupation and Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Ward, Mary H.; Valle, Curt T. Della; Friesen, Melissa C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Numerous occupational and environmental exposures have been shown to disrupt thyroid hormones, but much less is known about their relationships with thyroid cancer. Here we review the epidemiology studies of occupations and occupational exposures and thyroid cancer incidence to provide insight into preventable risk factors for thyroid cancer. Methods The published literature was searched using the Web of Knowledge database for all articles through August 2013 that had in their text “occupation” “job” ”employment” or “work” and “thyroid cancer”. After excluding 10 mortality studies and 4 studies with less than 5 exposed incident cases, we summarized the findings of 30 articles that examined thyroid cancer incidence in relation to occupations or occupational exposure. The studies were grouped by exposure/occupation category, study design, and exposure assessment approach. Where available, gender stratified results are reported. Results The most studied (19 of 30 studies) and the most consistent associations were observed for radiation-exposed workers and health care occupations. Suggestive, but inconsistent, associations were observed in studies of pesticide-exposed workers and agricultural occupations. Findings for other exposures and occupation groups were largely null. The majority of studies had few exposed cases and assessed exposure based on occupation or industry category, self-report, or generic (population-based) job exposure matrices. Conclusion The suggestive, but inconsistent findings for many of the occupational exposures reviewed here indicate that more studies with larger numbers of cases and better exposure assessment are necessary, particularly for exposures known to disrupt thyroid homeostasis. PMID:24604144

  4. [Thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer: Brazilian consensus].

    PubMed

    Maia, Ana Luiza; Ward, Laura S; Carvalho, Gisah A; Graf, Hans; Maciel, Rui M B; Maciel, Léa M Zanini; Rosário, Pedro W; Vaisman, Mario

    2007-07-01

    Thyroid nodules are a common manifestation of thyroid diseases. It is estimated that approximately 10% of adults have palpable thyroid nodules with the frequency increasing throughout life. The major concern on nodule evaluation is the risk of malignancy (5-10%). Differentiated thyroid carcinoma accounts for 90% of all thyroid malignant neoplasias. Although most patients with cancer have a favorable outcome, some individuals present an aggressive form of the disease and poor prognostic despite recent advances in diagnosis and treatment. Here, a set of clinical guidelines for the evaluation and management of patients with thyroid nodules or differentiated thyroid cancer was developed through consensus by 8 member of the Department of Thyroid, Sociedade Brasileira de Endocrinologia e Metabologia. The participants are from different reference medical centers within Brazil, to reflect different practice patterns. Each committee participant was initially assigned to write a section of the document and to submit it to the chairperson, who revised and assembled the sections into a complete draft document, which was then circulated among all committee members for further revision. All committee members further revised and refined the document. The guidelines were developed based on the expert opinion of the committee participants, as well as on previously published information.

  5. What Causes Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... not yet known. Certain changes in a person’s DNA can cause thyroid cells to become cancerous. DNA is the chemical in each of our cells ... parents because they are the source of our DNA. But DNA affects more than just how we ...

  6. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Iodine-Refractory Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  7. [Advances in Diagnosis and Treatment of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Patients Showing Thyroglobulin Elevative and Iodine Scintigraphy Negative].

    PubMed

    Ma, Ningshuai; Li, Suping

    2015-06-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) and radioiodine whole body scan (WBS) have been commonly used in follow-up of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). Tg is associated with radioiodine uptake in local or distant metastases. In minority of patients, the follow-up scan shows no functioning thyroid tissue, but the serum thyroglobulin is still elevated. Therefore, we review recent developments of diagnosis and treatment of those patients with differentiated thyroid cancer and with thyroglobulin elevation but negative iodine scintigraphy.

  8. Role of External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Nonanaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Terezakis, Stephanie A. Lee, Kyungmouk S.; Ghossein, Ronald A.; Rivera, Michael; Tuttle, Robert M.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Wong, Richard J.; Patel, Snehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plays a controversial role in the management of nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. We reviewed our institution's outcomes in patients treated with EBRT for advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 1989 and April 2006, 76 patients with nonanaplastic thyroid cancer were treated with EBRT. The median follow-up for the surviving patients was 35.3 months (range, 4.2-178.4). The lesions were primarily advanced and included Stage T2 in 5 (7%), T3 in 5 (7%), and T4 in 64 (84%) patients. Stage N1 disease was present in 60 patients (79%). Distant metastases before EBRT were identified in 27 patients (36%). The median total EBRT dose delivered was 6,300 cGy. The histologic features examined included medullary in 12 patients (16%) and nonmedullary in 64 (84%). Of the 76 patients, 71 (93%) had undergone surgery before RT, and radioactive iodine treatment was used in 56 patients (74%). Results: The 2- and 4-year overall locoregional control rate for all histologic types was 86% and 72%, respectively, and the 2- and 4-year overall survival rate for all patients was 74% and 55%, respectively. No significant differences were found in locoregional control, overall survival, or distant metastases-free survival for patients with complete resection, microscopic residual disease, or gross residual disease. Grade 3 acute mucositis and dysphagia occurred in 14 (18%) and 24 (32%) patients, respectively. Late adverse toxicity was notable for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube use in 4 patients (5%). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that EBRT is effective for locoregional control of selected locally advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid malignancies, with acceptable acute toxicity.

  9. Lenvatinib: a new option for the treatment of advanced iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer?

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Loredana; Newbold, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Lenvatinib mesylate (E7080; 4-[3-chloro-4-(N'-cyclopropylureido) phenoxy] 7-methoxyquinoline-6-carboxamide mesylate) is an oral molecule that inhibits multiple tyrosine kinase receptors such as VEGF-R-1-3, FGF-R-1-4, RET, c-KIT and PDGF-R-β. Phase I studies identified the maximum tolerated dose to be 25 mg daily that, in fasting treated patients, is rapidly absorbed with maximum concentrations achieved within 3 h of administration. In these studies, lenvatinib showed activity in solid tumors. Subsequently, Phase II studies in thyroid cancer, in particular differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), confirmed good clinically significant activity and the recently published Phase III SELECT trial reported median progression-free survival was 18.3 months with lenvatinib versus 3.6 months with placebo (hazard ratio for progression or death: 0.21; 99% CI: 0.14-0.31; p < 0.001). Treatment-related adverse effects occurred in more than 40% of patients on lenvatinib. These were hypertension (in 67.8% of the patients), diarrhea (in 59.4%), fatigue or asthenia (in 59.0%), decreased appetite (in 50.2%), decreased weight (in 46.4%) and nausea (in 41.0%). Discontinuations of lenvatinib because of adverse effects occurred in 37 patients (14.2%) compared with three patients who received placebo (2.3%). Six of 20 deaths in patients on lenvatinib were considered to be drug-related. Lenvatinib has been licensed by the US FDA and EMA based on these data and provides an option for the treatment of radioiodine refractory DTC.

  10. Sorafenib treatment of radioiodine-refractory advanced thyroid cancer in daily clinical practice: a cohort study from a single center.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Marco; Michelon, Federica; Castiglione, Anna; Felicetti, Francesco; Viansone, Alessandro Adriano; Nervo, Alice; Zichi, Clizia; Ciccone, Giovannino; Piovesan, Alessandro; Arvat, Emanuela

    2015-08-01

    Treatment options for recurrent or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) refractory to radioactive iodine (RAI) are inadequate. Multitargeted kinase inhibitors have recently shown promising results in phase 2-3 studies. This retrospective study aimed to document our clinical experience on the effects of sorafenib in the setting of daily clinical practice. Retrospective study evaluating the efficacy and safety of sorafenib in a cohort of patients consecutively treated with sorafenib at a single center. Twenty patients with advanced RAI-refractory thyroid carcinoma were enrolled (March 2011-March 2014). Patients generally started with 400 mg of sorafenib twice daily, tapering the dose in case of side effects. Radiological response and toxicity were measured during follow-up, together with safety parameters. CT scans were performed by a single experienced radiologist every 3-4 months. Five patients stopped sorafenib within 90 days due to severe toxicities. Median progression-free survival was 248 days. Five patients had a partial response (PR), achieved in all cases within 3 months, whereas 5 had stable disease (SD) at 12 months. Durable response rate (PR plus SD) for at least 6 months was 50 %, among those who received sorafenib for at least 3 months. Commonest adverse events included skin toxicity, gastrointestinal and constitutional symptoms. In our cohort of patients with advanced RAI-refractory thyroid carcinoma, sorafenib confirmed antitumor activity leading to SD or PR in the majority of cases, at the expense of clinically relevant side effects. More effective and tolerable agents are still needed in the treatment of RAI-refractory DTC.

  11. Thyroid Cancer: Pathogenesis and Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liebner, David A.; Shah, Manisha H.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic options for advanced, unresectable radioiodine-resistant thyroid cancers have historically been limited. Recent progress in understanding the pathogenesis of the various subtypes of thyroid cancer has led to increased interest in the development of targeted therapies, with potential strategies including angiogenesis inhibition, inhibition of aberrant intracellular signaling in the MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways, radioimmunotherapy, and redifferentiation agents. On the basis of a recent positive phase III clinical trial, the RET, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor vandetanib has received FDA approval as of April 2011 for use in the treatment of advanced medullary thyroid cancer. Several other recent phase II clinical trials in advanced thyroid cancer have demonstrated significant activity, and multiple other promising therapeutic strategies are in earlier phases of clinical development. The recent progress in targeted therapy is already revolutionizing management paradigms for advanced thyroid cancer, and will likely continue to dramatically expand treatment options in the coming years. PMID:23148184

  12. Lenvatinib and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of radioiodine refractory, advanced, and progressive thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lorusso, Loredana; Pieruzzi, Letizia; Biagini, Agnese; Sabini, Elena; Valerio, Laura; Giani, Carlotta; Passannanti, Paolo; Pontillo-Contillo, Benedetta; Battaglia, Valentina; Mazzeo, Salvatore; Molinaro, Eleonora; Elisei, Rossella

    2016-01-01

    Lenvatinib is a small oral molecule able to inhibit three of the extracellular and intracellular molecules involved in the modulation of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis: vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1–3, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1–4, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha. Since it is also able to inhibit the REarranged during Transfection oncogene and the protooncogene c-KIT, this drug can also be used to control tumor cell proliferation. The maximum tolerated dose, as demonstrated in Phase I studies, is 25 mg daily. The drug is rapidly absorbed with maximum concentrations achieved within 3 and 5 hours after administration in fasting and nonfasting treated patients, respectively. The most common adverse events, reported in Phase I study and confirmed in the subsequent Phase II and III studies, are hypertension, proteinuria, and gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, diarrhea, and stomatitis. In Phase I studies, efficacy of lenvatinib in solid tumors was demonstrated, and these encouraging results have led to the development of a Phase II study using lenvatinib in advance radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTCs) patients. Since an overall response rate of 50% was reported, this study also confirmed the efficacy of lenvatinib in DTCs patients with an acceptable toxicity profile. Recently, a Phase III study in patients with DTCs (SELECT study) demonstrated the lenvatinib efficacy in prolonging progression-free survival with respect to the placebo (18.3 vs 3.6 months; P<0.001). Although there was no statistically significant difference in the overall survival of the entire group, this result was observed when the analysis was restricted to both the follicular histotype and the group of senior patients (>65 years). The study confirmed that the most common side effects of this drug are hypertension, diarrhea, decreased appetite, weight loss, nausea, and proteinuria. In this review, we report the results of

  13. Lenvatinib and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of radioiodine refractory, advanced, and progressive thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Loredana; Pieruzzi, Letizia; Biagini, Agnese; Sabini, Elena; Valerio, Laura; Giani, Carlotta; Passannanti, Paolo; Pontillo-Contillo, Benedetta; Battaglia, Valentina; Mazzeo, Salvatore; Molinaro, Eleonora; Elisei, Rossella

    2016-01-01

    Lenvatinib is a small oral molecule able to inhibit three of the extracellular and intracellular molecules involved in the modulation of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis: vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1-3, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1-4, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha. Since it is also able to inhibit the REarranged during Transfection oncogene and the protooncogene c-KIT, this drug can also be used to control tumor cell proliferation. The maximum tolerated dose, as demonstrated in Phase I studies, is 25 mg daily. The drug is rapidly absorbed with maximum concentrations achieved within 3 and 5 hours after administration in fasting and nonfasting treated patients, respectively. The most common adverse events, reported in Phase I study and confirmed in the subsequent Phase II and III studies, are hypertension, proteinuria, and gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, diarrhea, and stomatitis. In Phase I studies, efficacy of lenvatinib in solid tumors was demonstrated, and these encouraging results have led to the development of a Phase II study using lenvatinib in advance radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTCs) patients. Since an overall response rate of 50% was reported, this study also confirmed the efficacy of lenvatinib in DTCs patients with an acceptable toxicity profile. Recently, a Phase III study in patients with DTCs (SELECT study) demonstrated the lenvatinib efficacy in prolonging progression-free survival with respect to the placebo (18.3 vs 3.6 months; P<0.001). Although there was no statistically significant difference in the overall survival of the entire group, this result was observed when the analysis was restricted to both the follicular histotype and the group of senior patients (>65 years). The study confirmed that the most common side effects of this drug are hypertension, diarrhea, decreased appetite, weight loss, nausea, and proteinuria. In this review, we report the results of the

  14. Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Management of Patients with Radioiodine Nonresponsive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Busaidy, Naifa Lamki; Cabanillas, Maria E.

    2012-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (papillary and follicular) has a favorable prognosis with an 85% 10-year survival. The patients that recur often require surgery and further radioactive iodine to render them disease-free. Five percent of thyroid cancer patients, however, will eventually succumb to their disease. Metastatic thyroid cancer is treated with radioactive iodine if the metastases are radioiodine avid. Cytotoxic chemotherapies for advanced or metastatic noniodine avid thyroid cancers show no prolonged responses and in general have fallen out of favor. Novel targeted therapies have recently been discovered that have given rise to clinical trials for thyroid cancer. Newer aberrations in molecular pathways and oncogenic mutations in thyroid cancer together with the role of angiogenesis in tumor growth have been central to these discoveries. This paper will focus on the management and treatment of metastatic differentiated thyroid cancers that do not take up radioactive iodine. PMID:22530159

  15. NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF THYROID CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, David F.; Chen, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer exists in several forms. Differentiated thyroid cancers include papillary and follicular histologies. These tumors exist along a spectrum of differentiation, and their incidence continues to climb. A number of advances in the diagnosis and treatment of differentiated thyroid cancers now exist. These include molecular diagnostics and more advanced strategies for risk stratification. Medullary cancer arises from the parafollicular cells and not the follicular cells. Therefore, diagnosis and treatment differs from differentiated thyroid tumors. Genetic testing and newer adjuvant therapies has changed the diagnosis and treatment of medullary thyroid cancer. This review will focus on the epidemiology, diagnosis, work-up, and treatment of both differentiated and medullary thyroid cancers, focusing specifically on newer developments in the field. PMID:23797834

  16. How Is Thyroid Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Because medullary thyroid cancer cells do not absorb iodine, radioiodine scans are not used for this cancer. For this test, a small amount of radioactive iodine (called I-131 ) is swallowed (usually as a ...

  17. Efficacy and safety of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of advanced thyroid cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Yimaer, Wufuer; Abudouyimu, Aizizi; Tian, Ye; Magaoweiya, Sailike; Bagedati, Duman; Wen, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Background We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the efficacy and safety of the US Food and Drug Administration approved vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (VEGFR-TKIs) in the treatment of advanced thyroid cancer. Patients and methods We included prospective randomized controlled trials that compared VEGFR-TKIs with placebo for advanced thyroid cancer. The endpoints included safety (fatal adverse events [FAEs], treatment discontinuation, and any severe [grade 3 or 4] adverse events [AEs]) and efficacy (objective response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival). The pooled relative risk (RR) or hazard ratio (HR) was calculated by using either random-effects or fixed-effects models according to the heterogeneity of included studies. Results A total of 1,614 advanced thyroid cancer patients from five randomized controlled trials were identified for analysis. Compared with placebo alone, VEGFR-TKIs significantly increased the risk of treatment discontinuation (RR: 3.80, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.56–5.65, P<0.001) and any severe AEs (RR: 2.63, 95% CI: 1.72–4.03, P<0.001), but not of FAEs (RR: 1.24, 95% CI: 0.65–2.39, P=0.52). The use of VEGFR-TKIs in advanced thyroid cancer was associated with a significant improvement in objective response rate (RR: 8.73, 95% CI: 1.72–44.4, P=0.009) and progression-free survival (HR: 0.41, 95% CI: 0.27–0.61, P<0.001), with a tendency to improve overall survival (HR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.68–1.01, P=0.06). Conclusion The use of small-molecule VEGFR-TKIs in advanced thyroid cancer did significantly increase the risk of treatment discontinuation and any severe AEs, but not of FAEs, compared with placebo alone. It is important for physicians to weigh the risk of toxicities as well as the potential survival benefits associated with VEGFR-TKI treatment in advanced thyroid cancer patients. PMID:27022276

  18. Low risk papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Brito, Juan P; Hay, Ian D; Morris, John C

    2014-06-16

    Thyroid cancer is one of the fastest growing diagnoses; more cases of thyroid cancer are found every year than all leukemias and cancers of the liver, pancreas, and stomach. Most of these incident cases are papillary in origin and are both small and localized. Patients with these small localized papillary thyroid cancers have a 99% survival rate at 20 years. In view of the excellent prognosis of these tumors, they have been denoted as low risk. The incidence of these low risk thyroid cancers is growing, probably because of the use of imaging technologies capable of exposing a large reservoir of subclinical disease. Despite their excellent prognosis, these subclinical low risk cancers are often treated aggressively. Although surgery is traditionally viewed as the cornerstone treatment for these tumors, there is less agreement about the extent of surgery (lobectomy v near total thyroidectomy) and whether prophylactic central neck dissection for removal of lymph nodes is needed. Many of these tumors are treated with radioactive iodine ablation and thyrotropin suppressive therapy, which-although effective for more aggressive forms of thyroid cancer-have not been shown to be of benefit in the management of these lesions. This review offers an evidence based approach to managing low risk papillary thyroid cancer. It also looks at the future of promising alternative surgical techniques, non-surgical minimally localized invasive therapies (ethanol ablation and laser ablation), and active surveillance, all of which form part of a more individualized treatment approach for low risk papillary thyroid tumors.

  19. Thyroid Hormone Deiodinases and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Casula, Sabina; Bianco, Antonio C.

    2012-01-01

    Deiodinases constitute a group of thioredoxin fold-containing selenoenzymes that play an important function in thyroid hormone homeostasis and control of thyroid hormone action. There are three known deiodinases: D1 and D2 activate the pro-hormone thyroxine (T4) to T3, the most active form of thyroid hormone, while D3 inactivates thyroid hormone and terminates T3 action. A number of studies indicate that deiodinase expression is altered in several types of cancers, suggesting that (i) they may represent a useful cancer marker and/or (ii) could play a role in modulating cell proliferation – in different settings thyroid hormone modulates cell proliferation. For example, although D2 is minimally expressed in human and rodent skeletal muscle, its expression level in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS)-13 cells is threefold to fourfold higher. In basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cells, sonic hedgehog (Shh)-induced cell proliferation is accompanied by induction of D3 and inactivation of D2. Interestingly a fivefold reduction in the growth of BCC in nude mice was observed if D3 expression was knocked down. A decrease in D1 activity has been described in renal clear cell carcinoma, primary liver cancer, lung cancer, and some pituitary tumors, while in breast cancer cells and tissue there is an increase in D1 activity. Furthermore D1 mRNA and activity were found to be decreased in papillary thyroid cancer while D1 and D2 activities were significantly higher in follicular thyroid cancer tissue, in follicular adenoma, and in anaplastic thyroid cancer. It is conceivable that understanding how deiodinase dysregulation in tumor cells affect thyroid hormone signaling and possibly interfere with tumor progression could lead to new antineoplastic approaches. PMID:22675319

  20. Thyroid Cancer Statistics | Did You Know?

    Cancer.gov

    Thyroid cancer represents the 8th most common cancer in the United States. Did you know that this cancer, located at the base of the throat in the thyroid gland, is highly treatable and usually curable?

  1. What's New in Thyroid Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer What’s New in Thyroid Cancer Research and Treatment? Important research ... RAI) therapy. Doctors and researchers are looking for new ways to treat thyroid cancer that are more ...

  2. Consensus on the management of advanced radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer on behalf of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology Thyroid Cancer Working Group (GTSEEN) and Spanish Rare Cancer Working Group (GETHI).

    PubMed

    Capdevila, J; Galofré, J C; Grande, E; Zafón Llopis, C; Ramón Y Cajal Asensio, T; Navarro González, E; Jiménez-Fonseca, P; Santamaría Sandi, J; Gómez Sáez, J M; Riesco Eizaguirre, G

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid cancer is the single most prevalent endocrine malignancy; differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) accounts for more than 90 % of all malignancies and its incidence has been rising steadily. For more patients, surgical treatment, radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) suppressive therapy achieve an overall survival (OS) rate of 97.7 % at 5 years. Nevertheless, locoregional recurrence occurs in up to 20 % and distant metastases in approximately 10 % at 10 years. Two-thirds of these patients will never be cured with radioactive iodine therapy and will become RAI-refractory, with a 3-year OS rate of less than 50 %. Over the last decade, substantial progress has been made in the management of RAI-refractory DTC. Given the controversy in some areas, the Spanish Task Force for Thyroid Cancer on behalf of Spanish Society of Endocrinology Thyroid Cancer Working Group (GTSEEN) and the Spanish Rare Cancer Working Group (GETHI) have created a national joint task force to reach a consensus addressing the most challenging aspects of management in these patients. In this way, multidisciplinary management should be mandatory and nuclear medicine targeted therapy, novel molecular targeted agents, and combinations are currently changing the natural history of RAI-refractory DTC.

  3. Treatment Option Overview (Thyroid Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate, body temperature, and how quickly food is changed into energy ( metabolism ). Control the amount of calcium ... test has been developed that can find the changed gene before medullary thyroid cancer appears. The patient ...

  4. General Information about Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate, body temperature, and how quickly food is changed into energy ( metabolism ). Control the amount of calcium ... test has been developed that can find the changed gene before medullary thyroid cancer appears. The patient ...

  5. Clinical Diagnosis of Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Staunton, M. D.; Greening, W. P.

    1973-01-01

    In a survey of 293 patients with carcinoma of the thyroid, a goitre or enlarged lymph nodes in the neck were the commonest symptoms and a mass confined to one lobe the commonest sign. Hardness of the mass was an important diagnostic feature, and at least two-thirds of the tumour could be recognized before operation. It is suggested that the preoperative evaluation of thyroid swellings should be classified as benign, cancer suspected, and cancer probable. PMID:4800743

  6. Concurrent papillary thyroid cancer with pituitary ACTH-secreting tumor.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Sheng-Fong; Chen, Jeng-Yeou; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Jung, Shih-Ming; Chang, Yu-Chen; Lin, Jen-Der

    2007-04-01

    Concomitant thyroid cancer with pituitary tumor is uncommon. This study reports a case of advanced papillary thyroid carcinoma with pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting tumor. A 58-year-old male patient had thyroid cancer in 1991 and presented with headache caused by pituitary tumor with apoplexy in 1993. Due to hypopituitarism, the patient underwent radioactive iodide ((131)I) for detection and treatment of metastatic thyroid cancer after the use of recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH) in 2000. During follow-up for thyroid cancer, (201)thallium scan proved to be an effective tool for detecting metastatic thyroid cancer in the patient without pituitary TSH reserve. Pituitary ACTH-secreting tumor was confirmed in 2001 based on the high serum ACTH level and positive immunohistochemical stain for ACTH. The patient had no Cushingoid features. Moreover, serum ACTH levels were 337 and 232 pg/mL with normal serum cortisol and urine-free cortisol. Although the patient underwent three operations and a total of 370 mCi (131)I therapy for recurrent thyroid cancer, the cancer continued to progress. Finally, the patient died of pneumonia with septic shock 12 years after the diagnosis of thyroid cancer.

  7. Mouse Models of Thyroid Cancer: A 2015 Update

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Lawrence S.; Qamri, Zahida; Kari, Suresh; Ashtekar, Amruta

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine neoplasm, and its rate is rising at an alarming pace. Thus, there is a compelling need to develop in vivo models which will not only enable the confirmation of the oncogenic potential of driver genes, but also point the way towards the development of new therapeutics. Over the past 20 years, techniques for the generation of mouse models of human diseases have progressed substantially, accompanied by parallel advances in the genetics and genomics of human tumors. This convergence has enabled the development of mouse lines carrying mutations in the genes that cause thyroid cancers of all subtypes, including differentiated papillary and follicular thyroid cancers, poorly differentiated/anaplastic cancers, and medullary thyroid cancers. In this review, we will discuss the state of the art of mouse modeling of thyroid cancer, with the eventual goal of providing insight into tumor biology and treatment. PMID:26123589

  8. Aggressive thyroid cancer: targeted therapy with sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Alda; Ferrari, Silvia M; Politti, Ugo; Mazzi, Valeria; Miccoli, Mario; Materazzi, Gabriele; Antonelli, Alessandro; Ulisse, Salvatore; Fallahi, Poupak; Miccoli, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    Sorafenib (Nexavar), is a multikinase inhibitor, which has demonstrated both antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo, inhibiting the activity of targets present in the tumoral cells (c-RAF [proto-oncogene serine/threonine-protein kinase], BRAF, (V600E)BRAF, c-KIT, and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3) and in tumor vessels (c-RAF, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor [VEGFR]-2, VEGFR-3, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β). Sorafenib was initially approved for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and advanced renal cell carcinoma. Experimental studies have demonstrated that sorafenib has both antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo, against thyroid cancer cells. Furthermore, several completed (or ongoing) studies have evaluated the long-term efficacy and tolerability of sorafenib in patients with papillary, follicular and medullary aggressive thyroid cancer. The results of the different studies showed good clinical responses and stabilization of the disease and suggested that sorafenib is a promising therapeutic option in patients with advanced thyroid cancer that is not responsive to traditional therapeutic strategies (such as radioiodine). Currently, USA Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of sorafenib for metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer.

  9. U.S. Thyroid Cancer Cases Continue to Rise

    MedlinePlus

    ... life-threatening, the death rate for a particularly aggressive form of the disease -- advanced papillary thyroid cancer -- ... there needs to be a "renewed focus" on aggressive management of this disease, including surgery, radiation and/ ...

  10. Lenvatinib approved for certain thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    2015-04-01

    The FDA approved lenvatinib to treat progressive, differentiated thyroid cancer, potentially offering the most effective treatment to date for a subset of thyroid cancer patients who do not respond to standard therapy.

  11. Pharmacological and clinical profile of lenvatinib (E-7080) in the treatment of advanced, radioiodine-refractory, differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, M; Azadi, A; Jain, D; Redman, R; Perez, C A

    2015-12-01

    After the pathogenesis of thyroid carcinomas was better understood and the role of molecular alterations in RET, BRAF and RET/PTC rearrangement was revealed, several trials using multikinase inhibitors were developed during the last decade for the treatment of recurrent radioactive iodine (RAI)-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), achieving a remarkable success. Sorafenib became the first drug approved for this indication in more than two decades after a significant improvement in the progression-free survival was demonstrated. Lenvatinib (E-7080), an orally active inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases including vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) 1, 2 and 3, proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase receptor Ret and mast/stem cell growth factor receptor Kit, yielded highly promising early clinical data, even when given after progression on first-line therapy. The phase III SELECT trial recently demonstrated the impressive clinical activity of the drug in RAI-refractory thyroid cancer, leading to the drug's approval by the regulatory agencies and potentially making lenvatinib the most effective drug available to date for the treatment of the disease.

  12. Canadian survey of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, W. John; McKinney, Steven E.

    1985-01-01

    We report the results of a multicentre retrospective chart review of 2214 patients with thyroid cancer registered at 13 radiotherapy centres between 1958 and 1978. The data analysed included sex, age at the time of diagnosis, pathological diagnosis, extent of disease before treatment, types of treatment and their complications, and the rates of recurrence and survival up to 24 years after diagnosis. Although papillary cancers were most common, anaplastic and miscellaneous tumours were more frequent than expected, which reflects the type of patients referred by endocrinologists and surgeons to radiotherapy centres. There were marked differences in patterns of referral to the centres. Some patients with papillary and follicular thyroid cancers died of these cancers up to 20 years after diagnosis. The clinical manifestations, treatment and outcome of the rarer types of thyroid malignant tumours were of particular interest. The influence of age at the time of diagnosis on survival rates for patients with papillary or follicular thyroid cancer was highly significant, indicating much more aggressive behaviour of these cancers in older patients, particularly those beyond the age of 60 years. A more detailed analysis of tumour subtypes should provide new information on their natural history and lead to better management. PMID:3978516

  13. Mouse Models of Follicular and Papillary Thyroid Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Marika A.; Arciuch, Valeria G. Antico; Di Cristofano, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    A significant number of well-differentiated thyroid cancers progress or recur, becoming resistant to current therapeutic options. Mouse models recapitulating the genetic and histological features of advanced thyroid cancer have been an invaluable tool to dissect the mechanisms involved in the progression from indolent, well differentiated tumors to aggressive, poorly differentiated carcinomas, and to identify novel therapeutic targets. In this review, we focus on the lessons learned from models of epithelial cell-derived thyroid cancer showing progression from hyperplastic lesions to locally invasive and metastatic carcinomas. PMID:22654848

  14. Thyroid Cancer Metabolism: A Review.

    PubMed

    Gill, Kurren S; Tassone, Patrick; Hamilton, James; Hjelm, Nikolaus; Luginbuhl, Adam; Cognetti, David; Tuluc, Madalina; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo; Johnson, Jennifer M; Curry, Joseph M

    2016-02-01

    Metabolic dysregulation within the tumor microenvironment (TME) is critical to the process of tumorigenesis in various cancer types. Thyrocyte metabolism in papillary and anaplastic thyroid cancer, however, remains poorly characterized, and studies analyzing the role of multicompartment metabolism in thyrocyte oncogenesis are sparse. We present a review of the current knowledge on cellular metabolism in non-cancerous and cancerous thyroid tissues, focusing on the monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4, and on a transporter of the outer mitochondrial membrane TOMM20. Understanding the metabolic phenotype of tumor cells and associated stromal cells in thyroid cancer can have profound implications on the use of biomarker staining in detecting subclinical cancer, imaging as it relates to expression of various transport proteins, and therapeutic interventions that manipulate this dysregulated tumor metabolism to halt tumorigenesis and eradicate the cancer. Future studies are required to confirm the prognostic significance of these biomarkers and their correlation with existing staging schemas such as the AGES, AMES, ATA and MACIS scoring systems.

  15. Thyroid Cancer Metabolism: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Kurren S; Tassone, Patrick; Hamilton, James; Hjelm, Nikolaus; Luginbuhl, Adam; Cognetti, David; Tuluc, Madalina; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo; Johnson, Jennifer M; Curry, Joseph M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic dysregulation within the tumor microenvironment (TME) is critical to the process of tumorigenesis in various cancer types. Thyrocyte metabolism in papillary and anaplastic thyroid cancer, however, remains poorly characterized, and studies analyzing the role of multicompartment metabolism in thyrocyte oncogenesis are sparse. We present a review of the current knowledge on cellular metabolism in non-cancerous and cancerous thyroid tissues, focusing on the monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4, and on a transporter of the outer mitochondrial membrane TOMM20. Understanding the metabolic phenotype of tumor cells and associated stromal cells in thyroid cancer can have profound implications on the use of biomarker staining in detecting subclinical cancer, imaging as it relates to expression of various transport proteins, and therapeutic interventions that manipulate this dysregulated tumor metabolism to halt tumorigenesis and eradicate the cancer. Future studies are required to confirm the prognostic significance of these biomarkers and their correlation with existing staging schemas such as the AGES, AMES, ATA and MACIS scoring systems. PMID:27213120

  16. Initial surgical management of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Witt, Robert L

    2008-01-01

    The rapid increase in the rate of papillary thyroid cancer is likely caused by improved surveillance. A significant trend toward total thyroidectomy for low-risk differentiated thyroid cancer is present in the United States after a paradigm shift from treatment of macroscopic disease to the treatment of macroscopic and microscopic disease by increasingly sensitive tests. Compelling arguments for thyroid lobectomy and total thyroidectomy for low-risk thyroid cancer remain. The relatively small number of deaths from thyroid cancer, the small number of clinical thyroid cancers, and the huge number of incidental thyroid cancers are indicative of how little we understand the biology of this disease. Clinical medicine awaits biologic markers to refine treatment recommendations.

  17. Multiple primary breast and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ron, E.; Curtis, R.; Hoffman, D. A.; Flannery, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    The occurrence of breast and thyroid multiple primary cancers was evaluated using data from the Connecticut Tumor Registry. The study population consisted of 1618 women with primary thyroid cancer and 39,194 women with primary breast cancer diagnosed between 1935 and 1978. Thirty-four thyroid cancer patients subsequently developed breast cancer and 24 breast cancer patients later had thyroid cancer. A significantly elevated risk of thyroid cancer following breast cancer (SIR = 1.68) and breast cancer following thyroid cancer (SIR = 1.89) was demonstrated. The finding was even more notable when compared with the risks obtained for other sites. The elevated risk was particularly evident in women under 40 years of age at time of diagnosis of the first cancer. Analysis by histologic type revealed that the highest risk of second primary breast cancer was found among patients with follicular or mixed papillary-follicular thyroid cancer. Women under age 40 with follicular carcinoma had a 10-fold risk of developing breast cancer (4 observed, 0.4 expected). An enhanced risk of second primary tumours was evident for the entire period after treatment of the first primary, although it was highest within one year after diagnosis of the first primary. This may be due to the close medical surveillance of cancer patients which would increase early diagnosis of second tumours. Our findings suggest that breast and thyroid cancer may share common aetiologic features. PMID:6691901

  18. TERT promoter mutations in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rengyun; Xing, Mingzhao

    2016-03-01

    The 2013 discovery of Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations chr5, 1,295,228 C>T (C228T) and 1,295,250 C>T (C250T) in thyroid cancer represents an important event in the thyroid cancer field and much progress has occurred since then. This article provides a comprehensive review of this exciting new thyroid cancer field. The oncogenic role of TERT promoter mutations involves their creation of consensus binding sites for E-twenty-six transcriptional factors. TERT C228T is far more common than TERT C250T and their collective prevalence is, on average, 0, 11.3, 17.1, 43.2 and 40.1% in benign thyroid tumors, papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), follicular thyroid cancer, poorly differentiated thyroid cancer and anaplastic thyroid cancer, respectively, displaying an association with aggressive types of thyroid cancer. TERT promoter mutations are associated with aggressive thyroid tumor characteristics, tumor recurrence and patient mortality as well as BRAF V600E mutation. Coexisting BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations have a robust synergistic impact on the aggressiveness of PTC, including a sharply increased tumor recurrence and patient mortality, while either mutation alone has a modest impact. Thus, TERT with promoter mutations represents a prominent new oncogene in thyroid cancer and the mutations are promising new diagnostic and prognostic genetic markers for thyroid cancer, which, in combination with BRAF V600E mutation or other genetic markers (e.g. RAS mutations), are proving to be clinically useful for the management of thyroid cancer. Future studies will specifically define such clinical utilities, elucidate the biological mechanisms and explore the potential as therapeutic targets of TERT promoter mutations in thyroid cancer.

  19. Thyroid Hormones as Renal Cell Cancer Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Matak, Damian; Bartnik, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary; Czarnecka, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    It is known that thyroid hormone is an important regulator of cancer development and metastasis. What is more, changes across the genome, as well as alternative splicing, may affect the activity of the thyroid hormone receptors. Mechanism of action of the thyroid hormone is different in every cancer; therefore in this review thyroid hormone and its receptor are presented as a regulator of renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27034829

  20. The treatment landscape in thyroid cancer: a focus on cabozantinib

    PubMed Central

    Weitzman, Steven P; Cabanillas, Maria E

    2015-01-01

    Although patients with thyroid cancer generally fare well, there is a subset for which this is not necessarily true. Progress in understanding the molecular aberrations in thyroid cancer has led to a change in the management of these cases. Since 2011, four multikinase inhibitors (MKIs) have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for thyroid cancer – cabozantinib and vandetanib for medullary thyroid cancer and sorafenib and lenvatinib for differentiated thyroid cancer. This change in the treatment landscape has raised challenges for practitioners who may not be familiar with the use of MKIs or with the treatment and natural history of advanced thyroid cancer in general. This article reviews the epidemiology, molecular drivers, and initial treatment of patients with thyroid cancer and offers practical guidance to assist with the determination of when to appropriately start an MKI. As an example, cabozantinib and its efficacy are discussed in detail. Close monitoring is required for all patients on targeted agents to assess for adverse effects and response to therapy. An approach to managing drug-related adverse events is detailed. Since these drugs are not curative and have not yet proven to prolong overall survival, it is critical to weigh the risks and benefits of treatment at every visit. The potential value of changing to a different agent following failure of an MKI is also addressed. PMID:26316818

  1. Thyroid cancer in children and adolescents

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccarelli, C.; Pacini, F.; Lippi, F.; Elisei, R.; Arganini, M.; Miccoli, P.; Pinchera, A.

    1988-12-01

    We report on 49 patients younger than 18 years at diagnosis, of 776 patients with thyroid cancer, seen in our institution in the last 17 years. Female/male ratio was 2.2:1. Histologic type was papillary in 44, follicular in 4, and medullary in 1. Initial treatment was near-total thyroidectomy with or without neck dissection. Surgical complications (vocal cord palsy, permanent hypoparathyroidism, or both) were found in 25 patients and were usually associated with more advanced primary tumors. At surgery, node metastases were present in 73% of the patients and lung metastases, detected by chest x ray films, in 6%. Patients were treated with thyroid suppressive therapy and, except the one with medullary cancer, with radioiodine (131I) therapy. After a mean follow-up of 7.7 +/- 4.4 years (range, 1 to 17 years), one patient with lung metastases died of respiratory failure. Of 36 patients who have been followed up more than 4 years, 22 (61.1%) are now cured, and 14 have metastases (to lymph nodes, 2; to nodes and lung, 10; and to lung, 2). Since 1977 serum thyroglobulin (Tg) was used routinely as a tumor marker for differentiated thyroid cancer. After operation, Tg was elevated in all patients both not receiving (mean +/- SE, 902 +/- 380 ng/ml) and receiving (44 +/- 15 ng/ml) suppressive therapy; after 131I treatment, serum Tg dropped to 104 +/- 50 and 7.3 +/- 1.7 ng/ml, without and with suppressive therapy, respectively. Of 11 patients with lung metastases treated with 131I, respiratory function, as assessed by means of spirometry, was normal in three, mildly reduced in six, and severely impaired in two (including the one who died). In conclusion, our study indicates that thyroid cancer in young patients is rather advanced at initial examination and usually associated with node and, less frequently, lung metastases.

  2. 2015 American Thyroid Association Management Guidelines for Adult Patients with Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: The American Thyroid Association Guidelines Task Force on Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Erik K.; Bible, Keith C.; Doherty, Gerard M.; Mandel, Susan J.; Nikiforov, Yuri E.; Pacini, Furio; Randolph, Gregory W.; Sawka, Anna M.; Schlumberger, Martin; Schuff, Kathryn G.; Sherman, Steven I.; Sosa, Julie Ann; Steward, David L.; Tuttle, R. Michael; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thyroid nodules are a common clinical problem, and differentiated thyroid cancer is becoming increasingly prevalent. Since the American Thyroid Association's (ATA's) guidelines for the management of these disorders were revised in 2009, significant scientific advances have occurred in the field. The aim of these guidelines is to inform clinicians, patients, researchers, and health policy makers on published evidence relating to the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer. Methods: The specific clinical questions addressed in these guidelines were based on prior versions of the guidelines, stakeholder input, and input of task force members. Task force panel members were educated on knowledge synthesis methods, including electronic database searching, review and selection of relevant citations, and critical appraisal of selected studies. Published English language articles on adults were eligible for inclusion. The American College of Physicians Guideline Grading System was used for critical appraisal of evidence and grading strength of recommendations for therapeutic interventions. We developed a similarly formatted system to appraise the quality of such studies and resultant recommendations. The guideline panel had complete editorial independence from the ATA. Competing interests of guideline task force members were regularly updated, managed, and communicated to the ATA and task force members. Results: The revised guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules include recommendations regarding initial evaluation, clinical and ultrasound criteria for fine-needle aspiration biopsy, interpretation of fine-needle aspiration biopsy results, use of molecular markers, and management of benign thyroid nodules. Recommendations regarding the initial management of thyroid cancer include those relating to screening for thyroid cancer, staging and risk assessment, surgical management, radioiodine remnant ablation and therapy

  3. Contemporary management of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Blankenship, D Russell; Chin, Edward; Terris, David J

    2005-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a relatively common and frequently curable malignant neoplasm, accounting for nearly 2% of all new cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. The diagnostic and management options have evolved considerably in the past decade, and a current understanding of these trends in the standard of care have assumed an important consideration in the practices of head and neck surgeons and endocrinologists alike. We sought to review the epidemiology and pathology of the several types of thyroid cancer and to present our evidence-based management algorithm. Every effort was made to offer alternative treatment strategies and supporting data where available. In addition to reviewing well-established approaches to diagnosis and management, emphasis is placed on newer techniques, including minimally invasive thyroidectomy, molecular detection of disease propensity, and the use of recombinant thyrotropin prior to radioiodine ablation.

  4. Role of surgeons in clinical trials for thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    You, Y Nancy; Wells, Samuel A

    2007-05-01

    Properly performed clinical trials provide a foundation for evidence-based medical practice. The surgeon plays a central role in the management of patients with malignant solid tumors, including thyroid cancer, because operative extirpation of the malignancy is the essential first step in effective therapy. This article discusses the role of the surgeon in the clinical research of thyroid cancer and also reviews the important clinical trials that have influenced the treatment of patients with thyroid cancer. Recent discoveries defining the genetic mutations underlying the various types of thyroid cancers have led to the development of targeted therapies. These chemical compounds, which are now being evaluated in clinical trials, hold great promise for the treatment of patients with locally advanced and distant metastatic disease. The surgical investigator also plays an important role in procuring tumor tissue from patients in clinical trials. The molecular analysis of these tissues is of critical importance in selecting specific therapies and predicting patient response and prognosis.

  5. Natural history of thyroid cancer [Review].

    PubMed

    Takano, Toru

    2017-02-02

    Thyroid cancers have long been considered to arise in middle age and, after their repeated proliferation, resulting in further damage to the genome, they progress to more aggressive and lethal cancers. However, in 2014, some studies were reported that might lead to a marked change in our understanding of the natural history of thyroid cancer. A high prevalence of papillary carcinoma in the young suggested that the first initiation of thyroid cancer is likely to occur in the infantile period. Such a conclusion was also supported by a very slow growth rate of papillary microcarcinomas (PMCs) in an observation trial. The proliferation rate of PMCs was negatively correlated with the age, and surgery to remove PMCs did not contribute to reduce mortality from thyroid cancer. These findings strongly suggested the existence of self-limiting cancers, which are truly malignant but do not progress to lethal cancers, for the first time in human history. The early detection of self-limiting cancers results in overdiagnosis. Ultrasonographic screening of the thyroid in the young should be avoided. Lethal thyroid cancers, whose origin is still unknown, appear suddenly after middle age. In the elderly, thyroid cancers are a mixture of self-limiting and lethal cancers; thus, when thyroid cancer is detected, careful follow-up with examination of its growth rate is required.

  6. Recent Advances in Management of Laryngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Laryngeal cancers account for approximately 1.5% (1~2%) of the total cancers in Korea, and 30% of all head and neck cancers, not including thyroid cancer. Early laryngeal cancer is treated by operation, including transoral laser excision or radiotherapy. Advanced laryngeal cancer has been treated with mutilating operations, such as a total laryngectomy. However, a laryngeal preserving approach, which can improve the quality of life, has recently been tried with advanced laryngeal cancer. PMID:20396561

  7. Robotic thyroidectomy and cervical neck dissection for thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Paek, Se Hyun; Kang, Kyung Ho

    2016-06-01

    A robotic approach for thyroid surgery was developed to overcome the limitations of endoscopic thyroidectomy and provide many technical advantages. This approach facilitates the surgeon's control through a magnified three-dimensional view, decreased tremor, and freedom of motion with articulated instruments. Robotic thyroidectomy is safe and technically feasible in patients with well-differentiated, low-risk thyroid cancer. Furthermore, robotic thyroidectomy may become a good surgical alternative option for patients with more advanced thyroid cancer. Our modified bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) for central and lateral cervical neck lymph node (LN) dissection has yielded excellent surgical outcomes as an open procedure. The incorporation of robotics in thyroid cancer surgery will continue to evolve, and the surgical indications for robotic thyroidectomy will continue to expand. Further analyses that include long-term outcomes and randomized comparative trials remain important.

  8. Robotic thyroidectomy and cervical neck dissection for thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paek, Se Hyun

    2016-01-01

    A robotic approach for thyroid surgery was developed to overcome the limitations of endoscopic thyroidectomy and provide many technical advantages. This approach facilitates the surgeon’s control through a magnified three-dimensional view, decreased tremor, and freedom of motion with articulated instruments. Robotic thyroidectomy is safe and technically feasible in patients with well-differentiated, low-risk thyroid cancer. Furthermore, robotic thyroidectomy may become a good surgical alternative option for patients with more advanced thyroid cancer. Our modified bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) for central and lateral cervical neck lymph node (LN) dissection has yielded excellent surgical outcomes as an open procedure. The incorporation of robotics in thyroid cancer surgery will continue to evolve, and the surgical indications for robotic thyroidectomy will continue to expand. Further analyses that include long-term outcomes and randomized comparative trials remain important. PMID:27294043

  9. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR)

    PubMed Central

    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B.; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may be entered into the registry by subjects. Information on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome is entered by the clinical personnel. The TCCR uses advanced technical and organizational practices, such as (i) metadata-driven software architecture (design); (ii) modern standards and best practices for data sharing and interoperability (standardization); (iii) Agile methodology (project management); (iv) Software as a Service (SaaS) as a software distribution model (operation); and (v) the confederation principle as a business model (governance). This allowed us to create a secure, reliable, user-friendly, and self-sustainable system for TC and TN data collection and management that is compatible with various end-user devices and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing environment. Currently, the TCCR contains data on 2,261 subjects and data on more than 28,000 biospecimens. Data and biological samples collected by the TCCR are used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against TC. PMID:27168721

  10. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR).

    PubMed

    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may be entered into the registry by subjects. Information on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome is entered by the clinical personnel. The TCCR uses advanced technical and organizational practices, such as (i) metadata-driven software architecture (design); (ii) modern standards and best practices for data sharing and interoperability (standardization); (iii) Agile methodology (project management); (iv) Software as a Service (SaaS) as a software distribution model (operation); and (v) the confederation principle as a business model (governance). This allowed us to create a secure, reliable, user-friendly, and self-sustainable system for TC and TN data collection and management that is compatible with various end-user devices and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing environment. Currently, the TCCR contains data on 2,261 subjects and data on more than 28,000 biospecimens. Data and biological samples collected by the TCCR are used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against TC.

  11. Lenvatinib: Role in thyroid cancer and other solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Cabanillas, Maria E; Habra, Mouhammed Amir

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent breakthroughs in treatment of advanced thyroid cancers, prognoses remain poor. Treatment of advanced, progressive disease remains challenging, with limited treatment options. Small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including vandetanib, cabozantinib, sorafenib, and lenvatinib, which are now FDA-approved for thyroid cancer, have shown clinical benefit in advanced thyroid cancer. Lenvatinib is approved for treatment of locally recurrent or metastatic, progressive, radioactive iodine (RAI)-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). It has been studied in phase II and III trials for treatment of advanced RAI-refractory DTC, and in a phase II trial for medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Lenvatinib targets vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1-3 (VEGFR1-3), fibroblast growth factor receptors 1-4 (FGFR-1-4), RET, c-kit, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα). Its antitumor activity may be due to antiangiogenic properties and direct antitumor effects. Lenvatinib has demonstrated antitumor activity in a variety of solid tumors, including MTC, in phase I and II clinical trials. In a phase II study in advanced RAI-refractory DTC, lenvatinib-treated patients achieved a 50% response rate (RR), with median progression-free survival (PFS) of 12.6 months. In a phase III trial in RAI-refractory DTC, median PFS in lenvatinib-treated patients was 18.3 months, with a 65% overall RR, versus 3.6 months in placebo-treated patients, with a 2% RR. Adverse events occurring in >50% of patients included hypertension, diarrhea, fatigue/asthenia, and decreased appetite. Lenvatinib is a promising new agent for treatment of patients with advanced thyroid cancer.

  12. Thyroglobulin in differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Evans, Carol; Tennant, Sarah; Perros, Petros

    2015-04-15

    Identification of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is becoming increasingly common. Patients usually have an excellent prognosis. Most undergo total thyroidectomy, radioiodine ablation and treatment with suppressive doses of levothyroxine. Patients require long term follow-up which includes measurement of serum thyroglobulin (Tg). Interpretation of serum Tg requires knowledge of the concurrent thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration, as secretion is TSH dependant, and an awareness of the limitations of the methods used to measure it. These limitations include the heterogeneity of Tg in serum, the ability of assays to recognise forms of Tg secreted by a tumour, assay biases and not least the potential for interference in immunoassays for Tg from endogenous thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAbs) in patient serum. This review considers what the clinician wants to know and how Tg results can be interpreted in light of an awareness of assay limitations.

  13. Novel Approaches in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Kun-Tai; Yu, Xiao-Min; Audhya, Anjon W.; Jaume, Juan C.; Lloyd, Ricardo V.; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Prolla, Tomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), accounting for less than 2% of all thyroid cancer, is responsible for the majority of death from all thyroid malignancies and has a median survival of 6 months. The resistance of ATC to conventional thyroid cancer therapies, including radioiodine and thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression, contributes to the very poor prognosis of this malignancy. This review will cover several cellular signaling pathways and mechanisms, including RET/PTC, RAS, BRAF, Notch, p53, and histone deacetylase, which are identified to play roles in the transformation and dedifferentiation process, and therapies that target these pathways. Lastly, novel approaches and agents involving the Notch1 pathway, nuclear factor κB, Trk-fused gene, cancer stem-like cells, mitochondrial mutation, and tumor immune microenvironment are discussed. With a better understanding of the biological process and treatment modality, the hope is to improve ATC outcome in the future. PMID:25260367

  14. Thyroid Hormone Replacement in Patients Following Thyroidectomy for Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hannoush, Zeina C.; Weiss, Roy E.

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone replacement therapy in patients following thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer, although a potentially straightforward clinical problem, can present the clinician and patient with a variety of challenges. Most often the problems are related to the dose and preparation of thyroid hormone (TH) to use. Some patients feel less well following thyroidectomy and/or radioiodine ablation than they did before their diagnosis. We present evidence that levothyroxine (L-T4) is the preparation of choice, and keeping the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) between detectable and 0.1 mU/L should be the standard of care in most cases. In unusual circumstances, when the patient remains clinically hypothyroid despite a suppressed TSH, we acknowledge there may be as yet unidentified factors influencing the body’s response to TH, and individualized therapy may be necessary in such patients. PMID:26886951

  15. [What's new in follicular thyroid cancer management in 2014?].

    PubMed

    Abeillon-du Payrat, J; Caron, P; Borson-Chazot, F

    2014-10-01

    The American Thyroid Association has presented new guidelines for the management of thyroid cancer. These guidelines tend to appreciate more accurately the individual risk of patients, to adapt accordingly the treatment and the follow up. The initial risk stratification has been completed, especially precising the risk of N1 patients, follicular thyroid cancers, and the prognostic impact of molecular markers. Indications, doses and modalities of radioiodine (RAI) have been reevaluated, restricting its utilization in order to avoid overtreatment of low risk patients. Moreover the response to initial treatment allows to restratify the risk of the patients, and to adapt the monitoring and the thyroid hormone therapy management. The risk of suppressive thyroid hormone therapy has also to be considered. Concerning advanced thyroid cancer, prognosis is mainly depending on its RAI sensitivity. The systemic treatment of progressive, threatening refractory cancers is nowadays based on targeted therapy. However none of these treatments has demonstrated an improvement in overall survival, and side effects are frequent. Fagin et al presented promising results concerning short term treatment with selective inhibitors of the MAPK pathway, able to partially restore RAI sensitivity of refractory lesions in murine models, and recently in human patients.

  16. Signaling Pathways in Thyroid Cancer and Their Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shan; Borkhuu, Oyungerel; Bao, Wuyuntu; Yang, Yun-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common malignancy of endocrine system, and has now become the fastest increasing cancer among all the malignancies. The development, progression, invasion, and metastasis are closely associated with multiple signaling pathways and the functions of related molecules, such as Src, Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, NF-κB, thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), Wnt-β-catenin and Notch signaling pathways. Each of the signaling pathways could exert its function singly or through network with other pathways. These pathways could cooperate, promote, antagonize, or interact with each other to form a complex network for the regulation. Dysfunction of this network could increase the development, progression, invasion, and metastasis of thyroid cancer. Inoperable thyroid cancer still has a poor prognosis. However, signaling pathway-related targeted therapies offer the hope of longer quality of meaningful life for this small group of patients. Signaling pathway-related targets provide unprecedented opportunities for further research and clinical development of novel treatment strategies for this cancer. In the present work, the advances in these signaling pathways and targeted treatments of thyroid cancer were reviewed. PMID:26985248

  17. The Surgical Approach to Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Iain

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer is increasing rapidly. A large percentage of new cases identified fall into a low-risk category. As the incidence has increased, clinical experience has confirmed that the majority of patients will have excellent outcomes and that those at risk of doing badly can be reliably identified. Treatment for thyroid cancer is predominantly surgical. The decision about how aggressively this disease should be managed has remained controversial due to the excellent outcomes irrespective of the nature of surgical procedure chosen. This article reviews the developments in our understanding of the biology of thyroid cancer and the evidence that supports the approach to management. PMID:26918146

  18. [Consensus statement for accreditation of multidisciplinary thyroid cancer units].

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan José; Galofré, Juan Carlos; Oleaga, Amelia; Grande, Enrique; Mitjavila, Mercedes; Moreno, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    Thyroid cancer is the leading endocrine system tumor. Great advances have recently been made in understanding of the origin of these tumors and the molecular biology that makes them grow and proliferate, which have been associated to improvements in diagnostic procedures and increased availability of effective local and systemic treatments. All of the above makes thyroid cancer a paradigm of how different specialties should work together to achieve the greatest benefit for the patients. Coordination of all the procedures and patient flows should continue throughout diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up, and is essential for further optimization of resources and time. This manuscript was prepared at the request of the Working Group on Thyroid Cancer of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition, and is aimed to provide a consensus document on the definition, composition, requirements, structure, and operation of a multidisciplinary team for the comprehensive care of patients with thyroid cancer. For this purpose, we have included contributions by several professionals from different specialties with experience in thyroid cancer treatment at centers where multidisciplinary teams have been working for years, with the aim of developing a practical consensus applicable in clinical practice.

  19. Autoimmune Thyroid Disease and Breast Cancer Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Özmen, Tolga; Güllüoğlu, Bahadır Mahmut; Yegen, Cumhur Şevket; Soran, Atilla

    2015-01-01

    Objective The association of breast cancer and thyroid autoimmunity has been suggested by many studies in the literature, but the causality still needed to be proven. With this study we aimed to search the correlation between thyroid autoimmunity and breast cancer prognostic factors. Materials and Methods To this prospective cohort study 200 consecutive breast cancer patients, who were operated in our clinic were included. Patients’ serum thyroid hormone, anti-thyroglobuline (anti-TG) and anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) levels and tumors’ prognostic parameters (tumor size, axillary involvement, histological grade, lymphovascular invasion, receptor status, Ki-67 proliferation index) were collected. The correlation between serum thyroid autoantibody levels and tumor’s prognostic factors were studied. Results The prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity (high levels of serum anti-TPO and/or anti-TG) was 18.5% (n=37). Patients with thyroid autoimmunity had a significant lower rate of axillary involvement and a lower rate of Ki-67 proliferation index (22% vs. 46% [p=0,007] and 12.73% vs. 20.72% [p=0.025], respectively) and were more commonly included to the “low-risk” group (<14%) according to their Ki-67 scores (68% vs. 46%; p=0.015). Other parameters did not differ between the two groups. Conclusion We found a favorable correlation between thyroid autoimmunity and axillary involvement and also Ki-67 proliferation index score, which are two crucial and strongly predictive parameters of breast cancer prognoses. This supports the idea of thyroid autoimmunity being a favorable prognostic parameter. Further studies are necessary to investigate the reasons of protective or predictive effect of high thyroid peroxidase levels in breast cancer patients.

  20. Thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer: update on the Brazilian consensus.

    PubMed

    Rosário, Pedro Weslley; Ward, Laura S; Carvalho, Gisah A; Graf, Hans; Maciel, Rui M B; Maciel, Léa Maria Z; Maia, Ana Luiza; Vaisman, Mário

    2013-06-01

    Thyroid nodules are frequent findings, especially when sensitive imaging methods are used. Although thyroid cancer is relatively rare, its incidence is increasing, particularly in terms of small tumors, which have an uncertain clinical relevance. Most patients with differentiated thyroid cancer exhibit satisfactory clinical outcomes when treatment is appropriate, and their mortality rate is similar to that of the overall population. However, relapse occurs in a considerable fraction of these patients, and some patients stop responding to conventional treatment and eventually die from their disease. Therefore, the challenge is how to identify the individuals who require more aggressive disease management while sparing the majority of patients from unnecessary treatments and procedures. We have updated the Brazilian Consensus that was published in 2007, emphasizing the diagnostic and therapeutic advances that the participants, representing several Brazilian university centers, consider most relevant in clinical practice. The formulation of the present guidelines was based on the participants' experience and a review of the relevant literature.

  1. Thyroid autoantibodies and thyroid function in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Syrigos, K N; Konstantoulakis, M M; Constantoulakis, M; Marafelia, P; Koutras, D; Golematis, B C

    1994-01-01

    Antibodies against thyroid antigens are commonly found in patients with chronic gastritis type B (20-30%) and pernicious anaemia (50%), two disorders that predispose to gastric cancer. In addition, thyroid disease in increased incidence has been reported in breast and in colon cancer. In order to determine a) the incidence of antithyroid antibodies (ATA) in gastric cancer, b) the thyroid function in patients with ATA and c) the correlation between ATA and the presence of chronic gastritis, we examined the sera of 32 patients with gastric cancer (GC) for the presence of antithyroglobulin and antimicrosomal antibodies. T3, T4 and TSH values were also measured. The sera of 36 patients with malignant tumours of the GI tract other than stomach (OMT) and of 40 healthy blood donors were used as controls. Three of the 32 GC patients had antithyroglobulin antibodies, 4 had antimicrosomal and one had both types. Of the eight patients with ATA (25%) only two had hypothyroidism and another two histologically diagnosed chronic gastritis. Three sera of the healthy controls and one of the OMT had also antithyroid antibodies. To conclude, a significant number of patients with GC had ATA as compared to controls (p < 0.01) but the presence of ATA did not necessarily indicate an abnormality of thyroid function. The presence of antibodies did not correlate with chronic gastritis type B.

  2. Treatment Options by Stage (Thyroid Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate, body temperature, and how quickly food is changed into energy ( metabolism ). Control the amount of calcium ... test has been developed that can find the changed gene before medullary thyroid cancer appears. The patient ...

  3. Radionuclides in the management of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Nuclear medicine imaging was born over 60 years ago with imaging of thyroid conditions. Most of our present imaging devices were developed for imaging of the thyroid and thyroid cancer. Millions of patients in over 100 countries have been diagnosed and treated for thyroid cancer using nuclear medicine techniques. It remains, however, one of the most dynamic areas of development in nuclear medicine with new roles for positron emission tomography and receptor based imaging. In addition to this is research into combinations of genetic therapy and radioisotopes and receptor based therapy using beta emitting analogues of somatostatin. Despite the use of ultrasound computed tomography and magnetic resonance, nuclear medicine techniques remain central to both imaging and therapy in thyroid disease and the field has recently become one of the most dynamic within the specialty. PMID:18083649

  4. Thyroid Adenomas After Solid Cancer in Childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Haddy, Nadia; El-Fayech, Chiraz; Guibout, Catherine; Adjadj, Elisabeth; Thomas-Teinturier, Cecile; Oberlin, Odile; Veres, Cristina; Pacquement, Helene; Jackson, Angela; Munzer, Martine; N'Guyen, Tan Dat; Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Berchery, Delphine; Laprie, Anne; Bridier, Andre; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Schlumberger, Martin; Rubino, Carole; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vathaire, Florent de

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Very few childhood cancer survivor studies have been devoted to thyroid adenomas. We assessed the role of chemotherapy and the radiation dose to the thyroid in the risk of thyroid adenoma after childhood cancer. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 3254 2-year survivors of a solid childhood cancer treated in 5 French centers before 1986 was established. The dose received by the isthmus and the 2 lobes of the thyroid gland during each course of radiation therapy was estimated after reconstruction of the actual radiation therapy conditions in which each child was treated as well as the dose received at other anatomical sites of interest. Results: After a median follow-up of 25 years, 71 patients had developed a thyroid adenoma. The risk strongly increased with the radiation dose to the thyroid up to a few Gray, plateaued, and declined for high doses. Chemotherapy slightly increased the risk when administered alone but also lowered the slope of the dose-response curve for the radiation dose to the thyroid. Overall, for doses up to a few Gray, the excess relative risk of thyroid adenoma per Gray was 2.8 (90% CI: 1.2-6.9), but it was 5.5 (90% CI: 1.9-25.9) in patients who had not received chemotherapy or who had received only 1 drug, and 1.1 (90% CI: 0.4-3.4) in the children who had received more than 1 drug (P=.06, for the difference). The excess relative risk per Gray was also higher for younger children at the time of radiation therapy than for their older counterparts and was higher before attaining 40 years of age than subsequently. Conclusions: The overall pattern of thyroid adenoma after radiation therapy for a childhood cancer appears to be similar to that observed for thyroid carcinoma.

  5. Stem cell biology in thyroid cancer: Insights for novel therapies

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Parisha; Tsumagari, Koji; Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y; Friedlander, Paul; Buell, Joseph F; Kandil, Emad

    2014-01-01

    Currently, thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine cancer in the United States. A recent involvement of sub-population of stem cells, cancer stem cells, has been proposed in different histological types of thyroid cancer. Because of their ability of self-renewal and differentiation into various specialized cells in the body, these putative cells drive tumor genesis, metastatic activity and are responsible to provide chemo- and radioresistant nature to the cancer cells in the thyroid gland. Our Review was conducted from previously published literature to provide latest apprises to investigate the role of embryonic, somatic and cancer stem cells, and discusses the hypothesis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Different methods for their identification and isolation through stemness markers using various in vivo and in vitro methods such as flow cytometry, thyrosphere formation assay, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 efflux-pump mediated Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion have been discussed. The review also outlines various setbacks that still remain to target these tumor initiating cells. Future perspectives of therapeutic strategies and their potential to treat advanced stages of thyroid cancer are also disclosed in this review. PMID:25426258

  6. Stem cell biology in thyroid cancer: Insights for novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Parisha; Tsumagari, Koji; Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y; Friedlander, Paul; Buell, Joseph F; Kandil, Emad

    2014-11-26

    Currently, thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine cancer in the United States. A recent involvement of sub-population of stem cells, cancer stem cells, has been proposed in different histological types of thyroid cancer. Because of their ability of self-renewal and differentiation into various specialized cells in the body, these putative cells drive tumor genesis, metastatic activity and are responsible to provide chemo- and radioresistant nature to the cancer cells in the thyroid gland. Our Review was conducted from previously published literature to provide latest apprises to investigate the role of embryonic, somatic and cancer stem cells, and discusses the hypothesis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Different methods for their identification and isolation through stemness markers using various in vivo and in vitro methods such as flow cytometry, thyrosphere formation assay, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 efflux-pump mediated Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion have been discussed. The review also outlines various setbacks that still remain to target these tumor initiating cells. Future perspectives of therapeutic strategies and their potential to treat advanced stages of thyroid cancer are also disclosed in this review.

  7. Thyroid cancer cell lines: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Saiselet, Manuel; Floor, Sébastien; Tarabichi, Maxime; Dom, Geneviève; Hébrant, Aline; van Staveren, Wilma C. G.; Maenhaut, Carine

    2012-01-01

    Human thyroid cancer cell lines are the most used models for thyroid cancer studies. They must be used with detailed knowledge of their characteristics. These in vitro cell lines originate from differentiated and dedifferentiated in vivo human thyroid tumors. However, it has been shown that mRNA expression profiles of these cell lines were closer to dedifferentiated in vivo thyroid tumors (anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, ATC) than to differentiated ones. Here an overview of the knowledge of these models was made. The mutational status of six human thyroid cancer cell lines (WRO, FTC133, BCPAP, TPC1, K1, and 8505C) was in line with previously reported findings for 10 genes frequently mutated in thyroid cancer. However, the presence of a BRAF mutation (T1799A: V600E) in WRO questions the use of this cell line as a model for follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC). Next, to investigate the biological meaning of the modulated mRNAs in these cells, a pathway analysis on previously obtained mRNA profiles was performed on five cell lines. In five cell lines, the MHC class II pathway was down-regulated and in four of them, ribosome biosynthesis and translation pathways were up-regulated. mRNA expression profiles of the cell lines were also compared to those of the different types of thyroid cancers. Three datasets originating from different microarray platforms and derived from distinct laboratories were used. This meta-analysis showed a significant higher correlation between the profiles of the thyroid cancer cell lines and ATC, than to differentiated thyroid tumors (i.e., PTC or FTC) specifically for DNA replication. This already observed higher correlation was obtained here with an increased number of in vivo tumors and using different platforms. In summary, this would suggest that some papillary thyroid carcinoma or follicular thyroid carcinoma (PTC or FTC) cell lines (i.e., TPC-1) might have partially lost their original DNA synthesis/replication regulation mechanisms during

  8. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won Sang

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) includes hyperthyroid Graves disease, hypothyroid autoimmune thyroiditis, and subtle subclinical thyroid dysfunctions. AITD is caused by interactions between genetic and environmental predisposing factors and results in autoimmune deterioration. Data on polymorphisms in the AITD susceptibility genes, related environmental factors, and dysregulation of autoimmune processes have accumulated over time. Over the last decade, there has been progress in the clinical field of AITD with respect to the available diagnostic and therapeutic methods as well as clinical consensus. The updated clinical guidelines allow practitioners to identify the most reasonable and current approaches for proper management. In this review, we focus on recent advances in understanding the genetic and environmental pathogenic mechanisms underlying AITD and introduce the updated set of clinical guidelines for AITD management. We also discuss other aspects of the disease such as management of subclinical thyroid dysfunction, use of levothyroxine plus levotriiodothyronine in the treatment of autoimmune hypothyroidism, risk assessment of long-standing antithyroid drug therapy in recurrent Graves' hyperthyroidism, and future research needs. PMID:27586448

  9. Thyroid cancer following exposure to radioactive iodine.

    PubMed

    Robbins, J; Schneider, A B

    2000-04-01

    The thyroid gland is one of the most sensitive organs for radiation-induced oncogenesis and the magnitude of the risk from external radiation is well understood. This is not the case for internal radiation derived from the radioiodines, a matter of practical importance because of medical use and potential accidental exposure. This article reviews current knowledge derived from the follow-up of patients receiving diagnostic or therapeutic 131I and populations exposed to radioactive fallout. The latter includes the nuclear power station accident at Chernobyl and the results of atomic bomb development and testing at Hanford, the Nevada Test Site and the Marshall Islands. The most cogent information comes from Chernobyl where an epidemic of childhood thyroid cancer has followed exposure to radioiodine that was mainly 131I. Although much has been learned from this experience about the nature of radioiodine induced thyroid cancer in young children, the reconstruction of thyroid radiation doses is too preliminary to provide accurate knowledge of the risk in comparison to that from external radiation. In the Marshall Islands, much of the exposure was from short-lived radioiodines as well as external radiation, obviating the possibility to determine the risk from 131I. Exposure to 131I in the continental United States from atomic bomb testing is expected to have caused some thyroid cancers, but only in the immediate vicinity of the Nevada Test Site has any evidence of radiation-induced thyroid neoplasms been adduced. This evidence is minimally significant statistically, and not significant for thyroid cancer per se. Medical use of radioiodine has not been observed to cause thyroid cancer but very few of the patients studied were young children, the group most sensitive to thyroid radiation. Despite these limitations, this information is sufficient to make some suggestions concerning protective measures in the case of nuclear accidents and the follow up of individuals who

  10. Lymph Node Dissection for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mizrachi, Aviram; Shaha, Ashok R.

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node metastases in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) have a wide spectrum of clinical significance. Several variables are taken under consideration when trying to decide on the optimal management of patients with DTC. Routine prophylactic central and/or lateral lymph node dissection is not advocated with exception of central neck dissection for locally advanced tumors. When regarding recurrent disease, foundations have been laid for clinicians to make accurate decisions as to when to perform surgery and when to continue maintaining the patient’s disease under observation. These complex decisions are determined based upon multiple factors, not only regarding the patient’s disease but also the patient’s comprehension of the procedure and apprehension levels. Nevertheless if the patient and/or clinician are emotionally keen to surgically remove the disease then the procedure should be considered. PMID:28117285

  11. Neoadjuvant Therapy in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Le, Valerie H.; Camille, Nadia; Miles, Brett A.; Teng, Marita S.; Genden, Eric M.; Misiukiewicz, Krzysztof J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Invasion of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) into surrounding structures can lead to morbid procedures such as laryngectomy and tracheal resection. In these patients, there is a potential role for neoadjuvant therapy. Methods. We identified three studies involving the treatment of DTC with neoadjuvant chemotherapy: two from Slovenia and one from Japan. Results. These studies demonstrate that in selected situations, neoadjuvant chemotherapy can have a good response and allow for a more complete surgical resection, the treatment of DTC. Additionally, the SELECT trial shows that the targeted therapy lenvatinib is effective in the treatment of DTC and could be useful as neoadjuvant therapy for this disease due to its short time to response. Pazopanib has also demonstrated promise in phase II data. Conclusions. Thus, chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting could possibly be useful for managing advanced DTC. Additionally, some of the new tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) hold promise for use in the neoadjuvant setting in DTC. PMID:27747102

  12. The immune network in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Varricchi, Gilda; Marone, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The immune system plays critical roles in tumor prevention, but also in its initiation and progression. Tumors are subjected to immunosurveillance, but cancer cells generate an immunosuppressive microenvironment that favors their escape from immune-mediated elimination. During chronic inflammation, immune cells can contribute to the formation and progression of tumors by producing mitogenic, prosurvival, proangiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors. Thyroid cancer is the most frequent type of endocrine neoplasia and is the most rapidly increasing cancer in the US. In this review, we discuss recent findings on how different immune cells and mediators can contribute to thyroid cancer development and progression. PMID:27471646

  13. Thyroid cancer in lingual thyroid and thyroglossal duct cyst.

    PubMed

    Sturniolo, Giacomo; Vermiglio, Francesco; Moleti, Mariacarla

    2016-11-04

    Ectopy is the most common embryogenetic defect of the thyroid gland, representing between 48 and 61% of all thyroid dysgeneses. Persistence of thyroid tissue in the context of a thyroglossal duct remnant and lingual thyroid tissue are the most common defects. Although most cases of ectopic thyroid are asymptomatic, any disease affecting the thyroid may potentially involve the ectopic tissue, including malignancies. The prevalence of differentiated thyroid carcinoma in lingual thyroid and thyroglossal duct cyst is around 1% of patients affected with the above thyroid ectopies. We here review the current literature concerning primary thyroid carcinomas originating from thyroid tissue on thyroglossal duct cysts and lingual thyroid.

  14. Propranolol sensitizes thyroid cancer cells to cytotoxic effect of vemurafenib.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei-Jun; Shen, Chen-Tian; Song, Hong-Jun; Qiu, Zhong-Ling; Luo, Quan-Yong

    2016-09-01

    Treatment options for advanced metastatic or progressive thyroid cancers are limited. Although targeted therapy specifically inhibiting intracellular kinase signaling pathways has markedly changed the therapeutic landscape, side-effects and resistance of single agent targeted therapy often leads to termination of the treatment. The objective of the present study was to identify the antitumor property of the non-selective β-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol for thyroid cancers. Human thyroid cancer cell lines 8505C, K1, BCPAP and BHP27 were used in the present study. Broad β-blocker propranolol and β2-specific antagonist ICI118551, but not β1-specific antagonist atenolol, inhibited the growth of 8505C and K1 cells. Propranolol treatment inhibited growth and induced apoptosis of 8505C cells in vitro and in vivo, which are closely associated with decreased expressions of cyclin D1 and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. Expression of hexokinase 2 (HK2) and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) also decreased following propranolol intervention. 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging of the 8505C xenografts validated shrinkage of the tumors in the propranolol-treated group when compared to the phosphate‑buffered saline treated group. Finally, we found that propranolol can amplify the cytotoxicity of vemurafenib and sensitize thyroid cancer cells to cytotoxic effect of vemurafenib. Our present results suggest that propranolol has potential activity against thyroid cancers and investigation of the combination with targeted molecular therapy for progressive thyroid cancers could be beneficial.

  15. Iodine I 131 and Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer Previously Treated With Iodine I 131 That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-04

    Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVB Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVC Papillary Thyroid Cancer

  16. Autophagy in Thyroid Cancer: Present Knowledge and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Netea-Maier, Romana T.; Klück, Viola; Plantinga, Theo S.; Smit, Johannes W. A.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. Despite having a good prognosis in the majority of cases, when the tumor is dedifferentiated it does no longer respond to conventional treatment with radioactive iodine, the prognosis worsens significantly. Treatment options for advanced, dedifferentiated disease are limited and do not cure the disease. Autophagy, a process of self-digestion in which damaged molecules or organelles are degraded and recycled, has emerged as an important player in the pathogenesis of different diseases, including cancer. The role of autophagy in thyroid cancer pathogenesis is not yet elucidated. However, the available data indicate that autophagy is involved in several steps of thyroid tumor initiation and progression as well as in therapy resistance and therefore could be exploited for therapeutic applications. The present review summarizes the most recent data on the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer and we will provide a perspective on how this process can be targeted for potential therapeutic approaches and could be further explored in the context of multimodality treatment in cancer and personalized medicine. PMID:25741318

  17. A New Aurora in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, Enke; D'Armiento, Massimino

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancers (ATC) are among the most aggressive human neoplasms with a dire prognosis and a median survival time of few months from the diagnosis. The complete absence of effective therapies for ATC renders the identification of novel therapeutic approaches sorely needed. Chromosomal instability, a feature of all human cancers, is thought to represent a major driving force in thyroid cancer progression and a number of mitotic kinases showing a deregulated expression in malignant thyroid tissues are now held responsible for thyroid tumor aneuploidy. These include the three members of the Aurora family (Aurora-A, Aurora-B, and Aurora-C), serine/threonine kinases that regulate multiple aspects of chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Over the last few years, several small molecule inhibitors targeting Aurora kinases were developed, which showed promising antitumor effects against a variety of human cancers, including ATC, in preclinical studies. Several of these molecules are now being evaluated in phase I/II clinical trials against advanced solid and hematological malignancies. In the present review we will describe the structure, expression, and mitotic functions of the Aurora kinases, their implications in human cancer progression, with particular regard to ATC, and the effects of their functional inhibition on malignant cell proliferation. PMID:25097550

  18. Potential Utility and Limitations of Thyroid Cancer Cell Lines as Models for Studying Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pilli, Tania; Prasad, Kanteti V.; Jayarama, Shankar; Pacini, Furio

    2009-01-01

    Background Tumor-derived cell lines are widely used to study the mechanisms involved in thyroid carcinogenesis but recent studies have reported redundancy among thyroid cancer cell lines and identification of some “thyroid cell lines” that are likely not of thyroid origin. Summary In this review, we have summarized the uses, the limitations, and the existing problems associated with the available follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer cell lines. There are some limitations to the use of cell lines as a model to “mimic” in vivo tumors. Based on the gene expression profiles of thyroid cell lines originating from tumors of different types it has become apparent that some of the cell lines are closely related to each other and to those of undifferentiated carcinomas. Further, many cell lines have lost the expression of thyroid-specific genes and have altered karyotypes, while they exhibit activation of several oncogenes (BRAF, v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1; RAS, rat sarcoma; and RET/PTC, rearranged in transformation/papillary thyroid carcinoma) and inactivation of tumor suppressor gene (TP53) which is known to be important for thyroid tumorigenesis. Conclusions A careful selection of thyroid cancer cell lines that reflect the major characteristics of a particular type of thyroid cancer being investigated could be used as a good model system to analyze the signaling pathways that may be important in thyroid carcinogenesis. Further, the review of literature also suggests that some of the limitations can be overcome by using multiple cell lines derived from the same type of tumor. PMID:20001716

  19. Differentiated thyroid cancer in patients with resistance to thyroid hormone syndrome. A novel case and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Vinagre, João; Borges, Fátima; Costa, António; Alvelos, Maria Inês; Mazeto, Glaúcia; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) represents a syndrome in which patients present elevated circulating thyroid hormones in the presence of non-suppressed TSH. We report a novel case where a patient with RTH presented a differentiated thyroid cancer. A19 year-old female had been referred due to thyroid disease that disclosed features characteristic of a RTH. During the follow up it was detected a follicular tumor that led to the recommendation for thyroid surgical ablation, where an incidental papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (mPTC) was found. The increase of thyroglobulin (TG) levels following thyroid removal referred the patient for radioiodine treatment. Post-treatment, it was detected jugular adenopathies and the patient was subjected to cervical lymph node drainage where metastases of the mPTC were found. RTH syndrome was confirmed by the detection of a THRB germline mutation. A BRAF mutation was also found in the mPTC but not detected in the follicular adenoma or normal adjacent tissue. The young age of the patient, the rarity of BRAF mutations in childhood and the high dissemination of the malignancy, lead us to the speculation that increased TSH stimulation in a RTH background and oncogenic activation of BRAF could have served as (co) drivers and might have triggered an advanced stage of the neoplastic disease. These findings together with a review of published cases add novel information to the management of RTH patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. PMID:25988151

  20. Involvement of Aberrant Glycosylation in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Eiji; Ito, Yasuhiro; Miyoshi, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most common posttranslational modification reactions and nearly half of all known proteins in eukaryotes are glycosylated. In fact, changes in oligosaccharides structures are associated with many physiological and pathological events, including cell growth, migration and differentiation, and tumor invasion. Therefore, functional glycomics, which is a comprehensive study of the structures and functions of glycans, is attracting the increasing attention of scientists in various fields of life science. In cases of thyroid cancer, the biological characters and prognosis are completely different in each type of histopathology, and their oligosaccharide structures as well as the expression of glycosyltransferases are also different. In this review, we summarized our previous papers on oligosaccharides and thyroid cancers and discussed a possible function of oligosaccharides in the carcinogenesis in thyroid cancer. PMID:20652009

  1. Molecular Targeted Therapies of Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Politti, Ugo; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTCs) that arise from follicular cells account >90% of thyroid cancer (TC) [papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) 90%, follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) 10%], while medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) accounts <5%. Complete total thyroidectomy is the treatment of choice for PTC, FTC, and MTC. Radioiodine is routinely recommended in high-risk patients and considered in intermediate risk DTC patients. DTC cancer cells, during tumor progression, may lose the iodide uptake ability, becoming resistant to radioiodine, with a significant worsening of the prognosis. The lack of specific and effective drugs for aggressive and metastatic DTC and MTC leads to additional efforts toward the development of new drugs. Several genetic alterations in different molecular pathways in TC have been shown in the past few decades, associated with TC development and progression. Rearranged during transfection (RET)/PTC gene rearrangements, RET mutations, BRAF mutations, RAS mutations, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 angiogenesis pathways are some of the known pathways determinant in the development of TC. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are small organic compounds inhibiting tyrosine kinases auto-phosphorylation and activation, most of them are multikinase inhibitors. TKIs act on the aforementioned molecular pathways involved in growth, angiogenesis, local, and distant spread of TC. TKIs are emerging as new therapies of aggressive TC, including DTC, MTC, and anaplastic thyroid cancer, being capable of inducing clinical responses and stabilization of disease. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of MTC, while sorafenib and lenvatinib for DTC refractory to radioiodine. These drugs prolong median progression-free survival, but until now no significant increase has been observed on overall survival; side effects are common. New efforts are made to find new more effective and safe compounds and to personalize the therapy in

  2. Thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) is a novel tumor suppressor in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    the transition from differentiated to advanced thyroid cancer. These studies underscore the potential of TXNIP as a novel therapeutic target and prognostic indicator in advanced thyroid cancer. PMID:24645981

  3. Clinical and Pathological Implications of Concurrent Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders and Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, L. L.; Ferreira, R. C.; Marcello, M. A.; Vassallo, J.; Ward, L. S.

    2011-01-01

    Cooccurrences of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT) and thyroid cancer (DTC) have been repeatedly reported. Both CLT and DTC, mainly papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), share some epidemiological and molecular features. In fact, thyroid lymphocytic inflammatory reaction has been observed in association with PTC at variable frequency, although the precise relationship between the two diseases is still debated. It also remains a matter of debate whether the association with a CLT or even an autoimmune disorder could influence the prognosis of PTC. A better understanding about clinical implications of autoimmunity in concurrent thyroid cancer could raise new insights of thyroid cancer immunotherapy. In addition, elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in autoimmune disease and concurrent cancer allowed us to identify new therapeutic strategies against thyroid cancer. The objective of this article was to review recent literature on the association of these disorders and its potential significance. PMID:21403889

  4. [Thyroid cancer. In search of individualized treatment].

    PubMed

    Pitoia, Fabián; Cavallo, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has increased exponentially around the world (mostly papillary thyroid carcinoma). This growth may reflect the combined effects of increased screening practices, together with changes in risk factors for thyroid cancer. In spite of this, disease specific mortality remained stable in the last three decades. Due to the fact that patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma often have a very good prognosis, with high survival in the long term follow-up compared with other types of carcinomas, there has been no need to change the standard treatment. The mainstays of thyroid cancer treatment are surgery (total or near-total thyroidectomy) with or without the additional administration of radioiodine (131I). These approaches are now in the center of discussion in all global forums. The current trend is to ensure the most effective and less harmful treatment and the most important issue at this point is to individualize patients according to tumor stage and risk of recurrence, to define which patients will benefit of more aggressive therapy and who could be handled with a more conservative approach.

  5. Diagnostic imaging techniques in thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Toriumi, D.M.; Mafee, M.F.

    1988-02-01

    With the refinement of fine-needle aspiration, the specific applications of thyroid imaging techniques need to be reevaluated for efficiency and cost containment. No thyroid imaging test should be routinely obtained. Radionuclide scanning is most beneficial in evaluating the functional status of thyroid nodules when fine-needle aspiration is inadequate, the findings are benign, or when there is no discrete nodule that is palpated in an enlarged gland. When fine-needle aspiration is unavailable or unreliable, radionuclide scanning becomes a first-line diagnostic tool. Ultrasonography should be used primarily for identifying a solid component of a cystic nodule, determining the size of nodules on thyroxine suppression that are not easily palpable, or for performing guided fine-needle aspiration. Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging both have a definite role in the evaluation of thyroid tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging is superior to computerized tomography for the evaluation of metastatic, retrotracheal, or mediastinal involvement of large thyroid tumors or goiters. Careful selection of the diagnostic techniques will ensure more accurate diagnosis and reduce unnecessary patient costs in the treatment of thyroid cancer.

  6. Thyroid Cancer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... List of All Topics All Thyroid Cancer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) French (français) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Arabic (العربية) ...

  7. Management of the neck in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaha, A R

    1998-10-01

    The incidence of nodal metastasis in differentiated thyroid cancer ranges between 40% to 75%. Elective neck dissection is generally not advised in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer; however, if clinically apparent nodal disease is noted in the tracheoesophageal groove during surgery, central compartment clearance is advised. If clinically apparent nodal disease is present in the lateral compartment of the neck, modified neck dissection preserving the sternomastoid, accessory nerve, and jugular vein is advised. The "berry picking procedure" is generally not recommended because of the higher incidence of regional recurrence. Due consideration should be given for parathyroidal transplantation if the blood supply to the parathyroids is damaged during central compartment clearance. The incidence of lymph node metastasis is highest in young patients, however, lymph node metastasis has no bearing on long-term survival. There seems to be a higher incidence of regional recurrence in elderly individuals. If patients present with bulky nodal disease, consideration may be given for postoperative radioactive iodine dosimetry and ablation if necessary. Differentiated thyroid cancer represents a unique disease in the human body, where lymph node metastasis has no prognostic implication. Aggressive surgical clearance is advised in patients with medullary thyroid cancer in the central compartment and the jugular chain lymph nodes.

  8. Stemness in Human Thyroid Cancers and Derived Cell Lines: The Role of Asymmetrically Dividing Cancer Stem Cells Resistant to Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Minsky, Noga; Morshed, Syed A.; Davies, Terry F.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have the ability to self-renew through symmetric and asymmetric cell division. CSCs may arise from mutations within an embryonic stem cell/progenitor cell population or via epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and recent advances in the study of thyroid stem cells have led to a growing recognition of the likely central importance of CSCs in thyroid tumorigenesis. Objective: The objectives of this study were to establish the presence of a stem cell population in human thyroid tumors and to identify, isolate, and characterize CSCs in thyroid cancer cell lines. Results: 1) Human thyroid cancers (n = 10) and thyroid cancer cell lines (n = 6) contained a stem cell population as evidenced by pluripotent stem cell gene expression. 2) Pulse-chase experiments with thyroid cancer cells identified a label-retaining cell population, a primary characteristic of CSCs, which at mitosis divided their DNA both symmetrically and asymmetrically and included a population of cells expressing the progenitor marker, stage-specific embryonic antigen 1 (SSEA-1). 3) Cells positive for SSEA-1 expressed additional stem cell markers including Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog were confirmed as CSCs by their tumor-initiating properties in vivo, their resistance to chemotherapy, and their multipotent capability. 4) SSEA-1-positive cells showed enhanced vimentin expression and decreased E-cadherin expression, indicating their likely derivation via EMT. Conclusions: Cellular diversity in thyroid cancer occurs through both symmetric and asymmetric cell division, and SSEA-1-positive cells are one form of CSCs that appear to have arisen via EMT and may be the source of malignant thyroid tumor formation. This would suggest that thyroid cancer CSCs were the result of thyroid cancer transformation rather than the source. PMID:24823711

  9. MicroRNAs in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Context: Traditionally, factors predisposing to diseases are either genetic (“nature”) or environmental, also known as lifestyle-related (“nurture”). Papillary thyroid cancer is an example of a disease where the respective roles of these factors are surprisingly unclear. Evidence Acquisition: Original articles and reviews summarizing our current understanding of the role of microRNA in thyroid tumorigenesis are reviewed and evaluated. Conclusion: The genetic predisposition to papillary thyroid cancer appears to consist of a variety of gene mutations that are mostly either of low penetrance and common or of high penetrance but rare. Moreover, they likely interact with each other and with environmental factors. The culpable genes may not be of the traditional, protein-coding type. A limited number of noncoding candidate genes have indeed been described, and we propose here that the failure to find mutations in traditional protein-coding genes is not coincidental. Instead, a more likely hypothesis is that changes in the expression of multiple regulatory RNA genes, e.g. microRNAs, may be a major mechanism. Our review of the literature strongly supports this notion in that a polymorphism in one microRNAs (miR-146a) predisposes to thyroid carcinoma, whereas numerous other microRNAs are involved in signaling (mainly PTEN/PI3K/AKT and T3/THRB) that is central to thyroid carcinogenesis. PMID:21865360

  10. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms Tumor, Liver Cancer, or Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-14

    Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

  11. Expression of YY1 in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Arribas, Jéssica; Castellví, Josep; Marcos, Ricard; Zafón, Carles; Velázquez, Antonia

    2015-05-01

    The transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) has an important regulatory role in tumorigenesis, but its implication in thyroid cancer has not been yet investigated. In the present study, we have analyzed the expression of YY1 in differentiated thyroid cancer and assessed the association of YY1 expression with clinical features. Expression of YY1 was evaluated in human thyroid cancer cell lines, a series of matched normal/tumor thyroid tissues and in a thyroid cancer tissue microarray, using real-time PCR, Western blot, and/or immunohistochemistry. YY1 was overexpressed in thyroid cancer cells, at transcription and protein levels. A significant increase of YY1 mRNA was also observed in tumor thyroid tissues. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of the thyroid cancer tissue microarray revealed that both papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) present increased YY1 protein levels (48 and 19%, respectively). After stratification by the level of YY1 protein, positive YY1 expression identifies 88% of patients with PTC. The association of YY1 expression with clinicopathological features in PTC and FTC showed that YY1 expression was related with age at diagnosis. Our data indicates for the first time overexpression of YY1 in differentiated thyroid cancer, with YY1 being more frequently overexpressed in the PTC subtype.

  12. Resistance of papillary thyroid cancer stem cells to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    GIUFFRIDA, RAFFAELLA; ADAMO, LUANA; IANNOLO, GIOACCHIN; VICARI, LUISA; GIUFFRIDA, DARIO; ERAMO, ADRIANA; GULISANO, MASSIMO; MEMEO, LORENZO; CONTICELLO, CONCETTA

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid carcinoma is the most common endocrine neoplasm, with the highest mortality rate of all the endocrine cancers. Among the endocrine malignancies, ~80% are papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs). In the initiation and progression of this tumor, genetic alterations in the mitogen-associated protein kinase pathway, including RAS point mutations, RET/PTC oncogene rearrangements and BRAF point mutations, play an important role, particularly in deciding targeted therapy. In the present study, a small population of thyroid tumor cells, known as tumor spheres, were isolated and characterized from PTC surgical samples. These spheres can be expanded indefinitely in vitro and give rise to differentiated adherent cells when cultivated in differentiative conditions. The present study showed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometric analysis that the undifferentiated PTC cells exhibited a characteristic antigen expression profile of adult progenitor/stem cells. The cells were more resistant to chemotherapeutics, including bortezomib, taxol, cisplatin, etoposide, doxorubicin and vincristine, than differentiated PTC cells and the majority possessed a quiescent status, as revealed by the various cell cycle characteristics and anti-apoptotic protein expression. Such advances in cancer thyroid stem cell biology may provide relevant information for future targeted therapies. PMID:27347201

  13. Editorial: Thyroid cancer and the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.

    1996-01-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl power station nearly 10 years ago was unprecedented in the exposure of a very large population to high levels of fallout including high levels of isotopes of iodine, predominantly {sup 131}I. An increase in incidence of childhood thyroid cancer was first observed in 1990 in Belarus and in the Ukraine, and the first reports in the Western literature were published in 1992. At a symposium in Nagasaki in June 1994, the numbers of cases that had occurred between 1990 and 1993 in Belarus, a country with a population of just over 10 million, was reported to be 233, and in the heavily contaminated northern parts of the Ukraine, with a population of about 7 million, 36 cases occurred in the same period. To put these figures into perspective, the number of childhood thyroid cancers registered in England and Wales over a 30-year period was 154, an average of 5 cases per yr in a population of 50 million people, with about 10 million children under 15 yr of age. The initial reports of such a great increase in childhood thyroid cancers in the areas exposed to fallout from Chernobyl were at first greeted in the West with some skepticism. The latent period between exposure and development of thyroid cancer was surprisingly short, based on experience with thyroid carcinomas developing after external radiation to the neck. The reliability of the figures based on the pathological diagnosis was questioned because the cases had not been confirmed by Western pathologists, and because the known high frequency of papillary microcarcinoms in adults raised the possibility that the reported incidence was resulted form increased ascertainment and not a true increase in incidence. 14 refs.

  14. Induction of thyroid cancer by ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This report assesses the potential for cancer induction in the thyroid gland after exposure of the gland to external x radiation and gamma radiation and/or some internally deposited radionuclides. Data and assumptions from existing human and animal studies are used to develop average risk estimates for populations over various ranges of radiation dose to the thyroid. The carcinogenicity of various iodine isotopes is examined. A specific model for risk estimation is developed which involves numerous modifications of an absolute risk model for factors such as age at exposure, sex, ethnic background, radiation source, exposure range, and time since exposure. Risk estimates are presented which are considered to be application to the population of the US for mean thyroidal doses in the range from 6 to 1500 rads. 146 references, 1 figures, 18 tables.

  15. Mitochondrial Metabolism as a Treatment Target in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jennifer M; Lai, Stephen Y.; Cotzia, Paolo; Cognetti, David; Luginbuhl, Adam; Pribitkin, Edmund A.; Zhan, Tingting; Mollaee, Mehri; Domingo-Vidal, Marina; Chen, Yunyun; Campling, Barbara; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Birbe, Ruth; Tuluc, Madalina; Outschoorn, Ubaldo Martinez; Curry, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Aims Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human cancers. Key signal transduction pathways that regulate mitochondrial metabolism are frequently altered in ATC. Our goal was to determine the mitochondrial metabolic phenotype of ATC by studying markers of mitochondrial metabolism, specifically Monocarboxylate Transporter 1 (MCT1) and Translocase of the Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Member 20 (TOMM20). Methods Staining patterns of MCT1 and TOMM20 in 35 human thyroid samples (15 ATC, 12 papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), and 8 non-cancerous thyroid) and 9 ATC mouse orthotopic xenografts were assessed by visual and Aperio digital scoring. Staining patterns of areas involved with cancer versus areas with no evidence of cancer were evaluated independently where available. Results MCT1 is highly expressed in human anaplastic thyroid cancer when compared to both non-cancerous thyroid tissues and papillary thyroid cancers (p<0.001 for both). TOMM20 is also highly expressed in both ATC and PTC compared to non-cancerous thyroid tissue (p<0.01 for both). High MCT1 and TOMM20 expression is also found in ATC mouse xenograft tumors compared to non-cancerous thyroid tissue (p<0.001). These xenograft tumors have high 13C- pyruvate uptake. Conclusions Anaplastic thyroid cancer has metabolic features that distinguish it from PTC and non-cancerous thyroid tissue, including high expression of MCT1 and TOMM20. PTC has low expression of MCT1 and non-cancerous thyroid tissue has low expression of both MCT1 and TOMM20. This work suggests that MCT1 blockade may specifically target ATC cells presenting an opportunity for a new drug target. PMID:26615136

  16. Multikinase inhibitors in the treatment of thyroid cancer: specific role of lenvatinib.

    PubMed

    Stjepanovic, Neda; Capdevila, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid cancers are the most frequent neoplasms of the endocrine system and in the initial stages their prognosis is excellent. However, few therapeutic options are available for advanced or metastatic disease. In the last decade, a better understanding of the molecular events involved in the tumorigenesis of thyroid cancers has led to development of new targeted agents for the management of advanced and refractory disease. Multikinase inhibitors that are able to block pathways involved in the proliferation, invasion, and neoangiogenesis of thyroid cancer have been the most widely studied. After an international effort to identify and recruit sufficient patients, four placebo-controlled studies of multikinase inhibitors have been completed. These trials have led to the approval of the first agents with activity in advanced medullary thyroid cancers, which will probably change the landscape of treatment for iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer in the near future. The purpose of this paper is to review the development of targeted agents for thyroid malignancy, with a special focus on lenvatinib, a multikinase inhibitor.

  17. Detecting and Treating Thyroid Nodules and Cancer Before, During, and After Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for thyroid nodules: age over 40 and low iodine intake. Some types of thyroid cancer have their ... family history of nodules • Those whose diet lacks iodine (which the thyroid uses to make thyroid hormones), ...

  18. Metastin receptor is overexpressed in papillary thyroid cancer and activates MAP kinase in thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ringel, Matthew D; Hardy, Elena; Bernet, Victor J; Burch, Henry B; Schuppert, Frank; Burman, Kenneth D; Saji, Motoyasu

    2002-05-01

    The development of distant metastasis is the most important predictor of death from thyroid cancer. KiSS-1 is a recently cloned human metastasis suppressor gene whose product, metastin, was recently identified as the endogenous agonist for a novel Gq/11 coupled receptor (metastin receptor). The expression and functional consequences of metastin and the metastin receptor have not been evaluated in thyroid cancer. We measured metastin and metastin receptor mRNA levels in 10 FCs and 13 papillary carcinomas (PCs), 2 benign non-functioning follicular adenomas (FAs), and 11 normal thyroid samples, and evaluated the signaling pathways activated by metastin in ARO thyroid cancer cells that express the metastin receptor endogenously. Paired normal and tumor samples were available for 4 PC and 3 PFC samples. Metastin mRNA was detected in 6/11 normal samples, and 0/2 FA, 2/10 FC, and 9/13 PC samples (p < 0.05 for PC vs. FC). Metastin receptor was not expressed in any normal thyroid or benign FA samples, and was expressed in only a minority (2/10) of FC samples. However, the receptor was expressed in the majority (10/13) of PCs (p = 0.002 for PC vs. normal tissue). Increased levels of metastin receptor were detected in all four PCs compared to adjacent normal tissue. Incubation levels of metastin receptor were detected in all four PCs compared to adjacent normal tissue. Incubation of metastin receptor expressing ARO thyroid cancer cells with metastin resulted in activation of ERK, but not Akt. Taken together, these data suggest a potential role for metastin and/or metastin receptors in modulating the biological behavior of thyroid cancers.

  19. Thyroid cancer following radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease: a case report and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Moroff, S.V.; Fuks, J.Z.

    1986-01-01

    Improved survival resulting from advances in therapy in patients with Hodgkin's disease is associated with long-term morbidity, including the potential for the development of a second solid malignancy. We report a 44-year-old man with an unusually aggressive course of thyroid carcinoma 15 years after treatment for Hodgkin's disease. In a review of the English-language literature, we found 21 cases of thyroid cancer following radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease, with latency periods ranging from 6 to 48 years. The development of secondary thyroid cancer after high-dose neck irradiation may be related to hypothyroidism, itself a complication of radiotherapy. Thyroid function should be measured at least once a year in all patients given neck irradiation, with initiation of thyroid hormone replacement if there is evidence of sustained hypothyroidism.

  20. 2012 European Thyroid Association Guidelines for Metastatic Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schlumberger, M.; Bastholt, L.; Dralle, H.; Jarzab, B.; Pacini, F.; Smit, J.W.A.

    2012-01-01

    Distant metastases are the main cause of death in patients with medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). These 21 recommendations focus on MTC patients with distant metastases and a detailed follow-up protocol of patients with biochemical or imaging evidence of disease, selection criteria for treatment, and treatment modalities, including local and systemic treatments based on the results of recent trials. Asymptomatic patients with low tumor burden and stable disease may benefit from local treatment modalities and can be followed up at regular intervals of time. Imaging is usually performed every 6–12 months, or at longer intervals of time depending on the doubling times of serum calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen levels. Patients with symptoms, large tumor burden and progression on imaging should receive systemic treatment. Indeed, major progress has recently been achieved with novel targeted therapies using kinase inhibitors directed against RET and VEGFR, but further research is needed to improve the outcome of these patients. PMID:24782992

  1. Pediatric papillary thyroid cancer: current management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Verburg, Frederik A; Van Santen, Hanneke M; Luster, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Although with a standardized incidence of 0.54 cases per 100,000 persons, differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is a rare disease in children and adolescents, it nonetheless concerns ~1.4% of all pediatric malignancies. Furthermore, its incidence is rising. Due to the rarity and long survival of pediatric DTC patients, in most areas of treatment little evidence exists. Treatment of pediatric DTC is therefore littered with controversies, many questions therefore remain open regarding the optimal management of pediatric papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), and many challenges remain unsolved. In the present review, we aim to provide an overview of these challenging areas of patient and disease management in pediatric PTC patients. Data on diagnosis, surgery, radionuclide, and endocrine therapy are discussed, and the controversies therein are highlighted. PMID:28096684

  2. Targeted Therapy Shows Benefit in Rare Type of Thyroid Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Treatment with the multitargeted agent vandetanib (Caprelsa) improved progression-free survival in patients with medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), according to findings from a randomized clinical trial.

  3. Validity of thyroid cancer incidence data following the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Jargin, Sergei V

    2011-12-01

    The only clearly demonstrated cancer incidence increase that can be attributed to radiation from the Chernobyl accident is thyroid carcinoma in patients exposed during childhood or adolescence. Significant increases in thyroid disease were observed as soon as 4 y after the accident. The solid/follicular subtype of papillary carcinoma predominated in the early period after the accident. Morphological diagnosis of cancer in such cases, if no infiltrative growth is clearly visible, depends mainly on the nuclear criteria. Outdated equipment and insufficient quality of histological specimens impeded reliable evaluation of the nuclear criteria. Access to foreign professional literature has always been limited in the former Soviet Union. The great number of advanced tumors observed shortly after the accident can be explained by the screening effect (detection of previously neglected cancers) and by the fact that many patients were brought from non-contaminated areas and registered as Chernobyl victims. It is also worth noting that exaggeration of the Chernobyl cancer statistics facilitated the writing of dissertations, financing of research, and assistance from outside the former Soviet Union. "Chernobyl hysteria" impeded nuclear energy production in some countries, thus contributing to higher prices for fossil fuel. The concluding point is that since post-Chernobyl cancers tend on average to be in a later stage of tumor progression, some published data on molecular or immunohistochemical characteristics of Chernobyl-related cancers require reevaluation.

  4. Mitochondrial Metabolism as a Treatment Target in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer M; Lai, Stephen Y; Cotzia, Paolo; Cognetti, David; Luginbuhl, Adam; Pribitkin, Edmund A; Zhan, Tingting; Mollaee, Mehri; Domingo-Vidal, Marina; Chen, Yunyun; Campling, Barbara; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Birbe, Ruth; Tuluc, Madalina; Martinez Outschoorn, Ubaldo; Curry, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human cancers. Key signal transduction pathways that regulate mitochondrial metabolism are frequently altered in ATC. Our goal was to determine the mitochondrial metabolic phenotype of ATC by studying markers of mitochondrial metabolism, specifically monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) and translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane member 20 (TOMM20). Staining patterns of MCT1 and TOMM20 in 35 human thyroid samples (15 ATC, 12 papillary thyroid cancer [PTC], and eight non-cancerous thyroid) and nine ATC mouse orthotopic xenografts were assessed by visual and Aperio digital scoring. Staining patterns of areas involved with cancer versus areas with no evidence of cancer were evaluated independently where available. MCT1 is highly expressed in human anaplastic thyroid cancer when compared to both non-cancerous thyroid tissues and papillary thyroid cancers (P<.001 for both). TOMM20 is also highly expressed in both ATC and PTC compared to non-cancerous thyroid tissue (P<.01 for both). High MCT1 and TOMM20 expression is also found in ATC mouse xenograft tumors compared to non-cancerous thyroid tissue (P<.001). These xenograft tumors have high (13)C- pyruvate uptake. ATC has metabolic features that distinguish it from PTC and non-cancerous thyroid tissue, including high expression of MCT1 and TOMM20. PTC has low expression of MCT1 and non-cancerous thyroid tissue has low expression of both MCT1 and TOMM20. This work suggests that MCT1 blockade may specifically target ATC cells presenting an opportunity for a new drug target.

  5. The association between serum TSH concentration and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Boelaert, Kristien

    2009-12-01

    There is mounting evidence that the serum concentration of TSH is an independent predictor for the diagnosis of thyroid malignancy in patients with nodular thyroid disease. Furthermore, preoperative serum TSH concentrations are higher in patients with more aggressive tumours, suggesting a potential role for TSH in the progression of differentiated thyroid cancer. Based on these observations, patients with higher serum TSH concentrations and borderline cytological results may require more aggressive investigation and treatment when compared with those with lower baseline TSH levels. The mechanisms underlying the finding of higher serum TSH in patients with thyroid cancer remain unexplained. In this issue of Endocrine-Related Cancer, Fiore et al. have analysed the relationship between serum TSH and diagnosis of papillary thyroid cancer in 10 178 patients with nodular thyroid disease who were investigated by fine-needle aspiration biopsy. They found significantly higher TSH concentrations in patients who were subsequently diagnosed with thyroid cancer compared with those with benign disease. In addition, they found that the development of autonomous thyroid function (TSH<0.4 muU/ml) was associated with a reduction in the risk of papillary thyroid carcinoma. In this commentary, the evidence regarding the association between serum TSH and thyroid cancer is discussed placing these new findings into context.

  6. Redifferentiating Thyroid Cancer: Selumetinib-enhanced Radioiodine Uptake in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Steven M.; Osborne, Joseph R.; Grewal, Ravinder K.; Tuttle, R. Michael

    2017-01-01

    In a recent article, we reported a restorative therapeutic intervention that turned individual thyroid cancer lesions into more efficient tissues for taking up radioactive iodine (RAI), resulting in clinically significant and durable responses. A group of Iodine-131 refractory thyroid cancer patients were treated with the MEK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) selumetinib, and RAI uptake was restored in a subset of patients. We employed Iodine-124 positron emission tomography to measure radiation absorbed dose, on a lesion by lesion basis. The process can be thought of as a re-differentiation of the cancer toward a more nearly normal state most like the tissue from which the cancer arose. Remarkably, in its own way, a change was detected within a few weeks of treatment, restoring uptake with therapeutically effective levels of RAI and in some patients, previously completely refractory to radioiodine treatment. In this article, we summarize the basic work that led to this seminal study, and make the case for lesional dosimetry in thyroid cancer with Iodine-124 as a new optimal radiotracer for precision medicine in patients with well differentiated thyroid cancer. PMID:28117292

  7. [Genetic factors predisposing to the development of papillary thyroid cancer].

    PubMed

    Puzianowska-Kuźnicka, Monika; Pietrzak, Maciej

    2005-01-01

    protein synthesized on such hybrid template is not present in the cell membrane but in the cytoplasm, where it permanently activates transduction pathway specific for RET. NTRK1 gene encoding a member of family of neuronal growth factor receptors containing thyrosine kinase domain is also rearranged in papillary cancers. However, genes fused to its kinase domain-encoding sequence are different from the ones fused to RET. MET, a gene encoding another membrane protein with thyrosine kinase activity, which acts as a growth factor-receptor, is overexpressed in 70%-90% of papillary thyroid cancers. BRAF gene encoding another yet kinase transducing signals from RAS and RAF to the cell is mutated at position 1796 (T/A, amino acid substitution V599E) in 38-69% of papillary cancers. The presence of this activatory mutation is associated with higher degree of clinical advancement of the disease. In addition, in majority of papillary cancers tested, mutations of the genes encoding nuclear triiodothyronine receptors were found. Transgenic mice with both TRB allele replaced with dominant-negative TRB mutants develop aggressive thyroid cancers. Progression from papillary to anaplastic cancer is most possibly caused by the occurrence of additional anomalies within P53, RAS, NM23,b-catenin gene and other genes.

  8. Treating medullary thyroid cancer in the age of targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cabanillas, Maria E; Hu, Mimi I; Jimenez, Camilo; Grubbs, Elizabeth G; Cote, Gilbert J

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare neuroendocrine tumor deriving from the thyroid parafollicular cell. Thyroidectomy continues to serve as the primary initial treatment for this cancer. Because standard cytotoxic chemotherapy has proven ineffective, reoperation and external beam radiation therapy had been the only tools to treat recurrences or distant disease. The discovery that aberrant activation of RET, a receptor tyrosine kinase, is a primary driver of MTC tumorigenesis led to clinical trials using RET-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The successes of those trials led to the approval of vandetanib and cabozantinib for treating patients with progressive or symptomatic MTC. The availability of these drugs, along with additional targeted therapies in development, requires a thoughtful reconsideration of the approach to treating patients with unresectable locally advanced and/or metastatic progressive MTC. PMID:25908961

  9. [Current Advances and Future Development of Thyroid Ultrasound Examination--Steps toward State-of-the-Art Laboratory Medicine in Fukushima].

    PubMed

    Shimura, Hiroki

    2015-03-01

    Since the accidents at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant after the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, large quantities of radionuclides have leaked into the surrounding environment. Fukushima Prefecture started the Fukushima Health Management Survey Project including Thyroid Ultrasound Examination to screen for thyroid cancer in all residents aged 0 to 18 years at the time of the nuclear accident. This accident also led to increased interest in thyroid ultrasound examination in Japan. This article reviews the studies to establish ultrasound diagnostic criteria for thyroid nodules and the clinical guidelines of thyroid nodule management, both of which are fundamental to Thyroid Ultrasound Examination in Fukushima. This article also reviews a study designed to clarify the actual frequency of sonographically detected thyroid nodular lesions among Japanese children, which will become appropriate reference data to interpret the results from Thyroid Ultrasound Examination. Further advances in the screening and management of thyroid diseases are important responsibilities of clinicians and researchers in Fukushima.

  10. [Lymph node and distant metastases of thyroid gland cancer. Metastases in the thyroid glands].

    PubMed

    Schmid, K W

    2015-11-01

    The different biological features of the various major entities of thyroid cancer, e.g. papillary, follicular, poorly differentiated, anaplastic and medullary, depend to a large extent on their different metastatic spread. Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) has a propensity for cervical lymphatic spread that occurs in 20-50 % of patients whereas distant metastasis occurs in < 5 % of cases. Cervical lymphadenopathy may be the first symptom particularly of (micro) PTC. In contrast follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) has a marked propensity for vascular but not lymphatic invasion and 10-20 % of FTC develop distant metastases. At the time of diagnosis approximately one third of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) cases show lymph node metastases, in 10-15 % distant metastases and 25 % develop metastases during the course of the disease. Poorly differentiated (PDTC) and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) spread via both lymphatic and vascular invasion. Thus distant metastases are relatively uncommon in DTC and when they occur, long-term stable disease is the typical clinical course. The major sites of distant metastases are the lungs and bone. Metastases to the brain, breasts, liver, kidneys, muscle and skin are relatively rare or even rare. The thyroid gland itself can be a site of metastases from a variety of other tumors. In autopsy series of patients with disseminated cancer disease, metastases to the thyroid gland were found in up to 10 % of cases. Metastases from other primary tumors to the thyroid gland have been reported in 1.4-3 % of patients who have surgery for suspected cancer of the thyroid gland. The most common primary cancers that metastasize to the thyroid gland are renal cell (48.1 %), colorectal (10.4 %), lung (8.3 %) and breast cancer (7.8 %) and surprisingly often sarcomas (4.0 %).

  11. Thyroid cancer after external or internal ionizing irradiation.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Foteini; Efthimiou, Elias

    2009-01-01

    It has been known for 50 years that thyroid exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation in childhood and adolescence induces an appreciable cancer risk. Epidemiological studies in children treated with external radiotherapy for benign or malignant lesions in the head and neck have also shown the induction of thyroid cancer. The World Health Organization (WHO) has reported that the risk for developing thyroid cancer due to the Chernobyl accident is greatest in newborns and children below the age of 5, less in adolescents and negligible in adults. As reported, during the first 15 years after the accident, the increase in thyroid cancer cases in Belarus was 87.8 fold in children, 12.7 fold in adolescents and 4.5 fold in adults more than expected. Papillary thyroid cancer with a relative risk incidence of approximately 80% per se is typical in childhood and adolescence. We refer to the differences between adult and childhood papillary thyroid cancers. Gene mutations in thyroid tumors induced after Chernobyl accident have been studied extensively. The treatment comprises thyroid surgery, suppressive doses of thyroxine and radioiodine. It is noteworthy that the thyroid gland can be protected from the intake of radioactive iodine by oral administration of potassium iodide.

  12. Neutron therapy for salivary and thyroid gland cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribova, O. V.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Choynzonov, E. L.; Lisin, V. A.; Novikov, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the results of the combined modality treatment and radiation therapy using 6.3 MeV fast neutrons for salivary gland cancer and prognostically unfavorable thyroid gland cancer. The study group comprised 127 patients with salivary gland cancer and 46 patients with thyroid gland cancer, who received neutron therapy alone and in combination with surgery. The results obtained demonstrated that the combined modality treatment including fast neutron therapy led to encouraging local control in patients with salivary and thyroid gland cancers.

  13. Trends of Thyroid Cancer in Israel: 1980–2012

    PubMed Central

    Keinan-Boker, Lital; Silverman, Barbara G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Thyroid cancer incidence is increasing worldwide, while mortality from thyroid cancer is stable or decreasing. Consequently, survival rates are rising. We describe time trends in the incidence, mortality, and 5-year survival of thyroid cancer in Israel in 1980–2012, in light of the global trends. Methods: Israel National Cancer Registry database provided information regarding thyroid cancer incidence and vital status, which enabled computation of survival rates. The Central Bureau of Statistics database provided information on thyroid cancer mortality. Incidence and mortality rates were age-adjusted and presented by population group (Jews/Arabs) and gender. Relative 5-year survival rates which account for the general population survival in the corresponding time period were presented by population group and gender. Joinpoint analyses were used to assess incidence trends over time. Results: In 1980–2012 significant increases in the incidence of thyroid cancer were observed, with an annual percent change (APC) range of 3.98–6.93, driven almost entirely by papillary carcinoma (APCs 5.75–8.86), while rates of other types of thyroid cancer remained stable or decreased. Furthermore, higher rates of early detection were noted. In 1980–2012, a modest reduction in thyroid cancer mortality was observed in Jewish women (APC −1.07) with no substantial change in Jewish men. The 5-year relative survival after thyroid cancer diagnosis has increased to ≥90% in both population groups and both genders. Conclusions: The Israeli secular trends of thyroid cancer incidence (increasing), mortality (mostly stable), and survival (modestly increasing) closely follow reported global trends. PMID:26886958

  14. Oxidative stress: a new risk factor for thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mingzhao

    2012-02-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) is a state of excessive free radicals and reactive metabolites among which the most important class is reactive oxygen species (ROS) - radicals derived from oxygen - as represented by the superoxide anion radical (O2(·-)) and its reactive metabolites, hydroxyl radical (·OH) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). In essence, OS represents an imbalance between the production of oxidants - ROS - and their elimination by antioxidative systems in the body. Many studies have linked OS to thyroid cancer by showing its association with abnormally regulated oxidative or antioxidative molecules. The study by Wang et al. in the December 2011 issue of Endocrine-Related Cancer (18, 773-782) further supports this relationship by demonstrating a high total oxidant status and OS index in thyroid cancer patients. The origin of ROS in thyroid cancer patients has not been defined, but thyroid cancer itself can be one since inflammation, a major event in it, is a classical source of ROS. ROS may in turn enhance the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathways, forming a vicious cycle propelling thyroid tumorigenesis. Regardless of the mechanism, the clinical implication of the association of OS with thyroid cancer is severalfold: one, OS is a new risk factor for thyroid cancer; two, OS confers thyroid cancer patients an increased risk for cardiovascular diseases, degenerative neurological disorders, and other cancers that are classically associated with OS; and three, interference with OS may reduce this risk and be therapeutically beneficial to thyroid cancer itself in thyroid cancer patients. These interesting possibilities deserve further studies.

  15. Dietary Factors and the Risk of Thyroid Cancer: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Wook Jin

    2014-01-01

    In the past few decades, the incidence of thyroid cancer has rapidly increased worldwide. Thyroid cancer incidence is relatively high in regions where the population's daily iodine intake is insufficient. While low dietary iodine has been considered as a risk factor for thyroid cancer development, previous studies found controversial results across different food types. Among different ethnic groups, dietary factors are influenced by various dietary patterns, eating habits, life-styles, nutrition, and other environmental factors. This review reports the association between dietary factors and thyroid cancer risk among ethnic groups living in different geologic regions. Iodine-rich food such as fish and shellfish may provide a protective role in populations with insufficient daily iodine intake. The consumption of goitrogenic food, such as cruciferous vegetables, showed a positive association with risk. While considered to be a risk factor for other cancers, alcohol intake showed a protective role against thyroid cancer. High consumption of meat such as chicken, pork, and poultry showed a positive association with the risk, but dairy products showed no significant association. Regular use of multivitamins and dietary nitrate and nitrite also showed a positive association with thyroid cancer risk. However, the study results are inconsistent and investigations into the mechanism for how dietary factors change thyroid hormone levels and influence thyroid function are required. PMID:25136535

  16. Radioiodine and radiotherapy in the management of thyroid cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, W.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Radioiodine is an important adjuvant treatment in the management of resectable papillary and follicular thyroid cancers in all patients except those with the best prognostic features. External radiation is also an important adjuvant therapy in these patients, especially those with tumors that extend beyond the thyroid gland and invade the trachea, esophagus, nerves, and blood vessels; it is especially important in treating patients whose tumors do not concentrate radioiodine. Radioiodine may be curative in patients with microscopic distant metastases demonstrated by radioiodine scanning. Even unresectable primary papillary and follicular cancers may be eradicated by combined therapy with radioiodine and radiotherapy. Radioiodine plays no significant role in the treatment of medullary or anaplastic thyroid cancers, but external radiation may eradicate microscopic thyroid bed or nodal disease when persistent disease is indicated by elevated calcitonin levels in medullary thyroid cancer patients. Anaplastic thyroid cancers are usually unresectable and are not eradicated by conventional radiotherapy or by any of the novel radiation techniques, with or without chemotherapy. In all types of thyroid cancer, external radiotherapy may produce beneficial palliative results in patients with distant metastases, but the use of radioiodine should always be explored in papillary and follicular thyroid cancer patients. 30 references.

  17. Circulating thyroid stimulating hormone receptor messenger RNA and differentiated thyroid cancer: A diagnostic meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Chao-Yue; Li, Zhan-Ming; Wang, Li-Shun

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor messenger RNA (TSHR-mRNA) is over-expressed in thyroid cancer patients, which indicates that TSHR-mRNA is a potential biomarker of thyroid cancer. However, system evaluation for TSHR-mRNA as a diagnostic biomarker of thyroid cancer is deficient. The performance of TSHR-mRNA for thyroid cancer diagnosis was evaluated in this study. Three common international databases as well as a Chinese database were applied for literature researching. Quality assessment of the included literatures was conducted by the QUADAS-2 tool. Totally, 1027 patients from nine studies eligible for the meta-analysis were included in this study. Global sensitivity and specificity for the positivity of TSHR-mRNA in the thyroid cancer diagnosis is 72% and 82%. The value of AUC for this test performance was 0.84. Our meta-analysis suggests that TSHR-mRNA might be a potential biomarker to complete present diagnostic methods for early and precision diagnosis of thyroid cancer. Notably, this findings need validation thorough large-scale clinical studies. PMID:28036261

  18. The Treatment of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Children: Emphasis on Surgical Approach and Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mazzaferri, Ernest L.; Verburg, Frederik A.; Reiners, Christoph; Luster, Markus; Breuer, Christopher K.; Dinauer, Catherine A.; Udelsman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric thyroid cancer is a rare disease with an excellent prognosis. Compared with adults, epithelial-derived differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), which includes papillary and follicular thyroid cancer, presents at more advanced stages in children and is associated with higher rates of recurrence. Because of its uncommon occurrence, randomized trials have not been applied to test best-care options in children. Even in adults that have a 10-fold or higher incidence of thyroid cancer than children, few prospective trials have been executed to compare treatment approaches. We recognize that treatment recommendations have changed over the past few decades and will continue to do so. Respecting the aggressiveness of pediatric thyroid cancer, high recurrence rates, and the problems associated with decades of long-term follow-up, a premium should be placed on treatments that minimize risk of recurrence and the adverse effects of treatments and facilitate follow-up. We recommend that total thyroidectomy and central compartment lymph node dissection is the surgical procedure of choice for children with DTC if it can be performed by a high-volume thyroid surgeon. We recommend radioactive iodine therapy for remnant ablation or residual disease for most children with DTC. We recommend long-term follow-up because disease can recur decades after initial diagnosis and therapy. Considering the complexity of DTC management and the potential complications associated with therapy, it is essential that pediatric DTC be managed by physicians with expertise in this area. PMID:21880704

  19. Spotlight on lenvatinib in the treatment of thyroid cancer: patient selection and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ricardo; Carneiro, Benedito A; Chandra, Sunandana; Pai, Sachin G; Chae, Young Kwang; Kaplan, Jason B; Garrett, Hannah B; Agulnik, Mark; Kopp, Peter A; Giles, Francis J

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, with over 60,000 cases reported per year in the US alone. The incidence of thyroid cancer has increased in the last several years. Patients with metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) generally have a good prognosis. Metastatic DTC can often be treated in a targeted manner with radioactive iodine, but the ability to accumulate iodine is lost with decreasing differentiation. Until recently, chemotherapy was the only treatment in patients with advanced thyroid cancer, which is no longer amenable to therapy with radioactive iodine. The modest efficacy and significant toxicity of chemotherapy necessitated the need for urgent advances in the medical field. New insights in thyroid cancer biology propelled the development of targeted therapies for this disease, including the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib as salvage treatment for DTC. In 2015, the US Food and Drug Administration approved a second tyrosine kinase inhibitor, lenvatinib, for the treatment of radioiodine-refractory thyroid cancer. Although associated with a significant progression-free survival improvement as compared to placebo in a large Phase III study (median progression-free survival 18.2 vs 3.6 months; hazard ratio 0.21; 99% confidence interval 0.14-0.31; P<0.001), the benefit of lenvatinib needs to be proved in the context of associated moderate to severe toxicities that require frequent dose reduction and delays. This article reviews the evidence supporting the use of lenvatinib as salvage therapy for radioactive iodine-refractory thyroid cancer, with a focus on the toxicity profile of this new therapy.

  20. Spotlight on lenvatinib in the treatment of thyroid cancer: patient selection and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ricardo; Carneiro, Benedito A; Chandra, Sunandana; Pai, Sachin G; Chae, Young Kwang; Kaplan, Jason B; Garrett, Hannah B; Agulnik, Mark; Kopp, Peter A; Giles, Francis J

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, with over 60,000 cases reported per year in the US alone. The incidence of thyroid cancer has increased in the last several years. Patients with metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) generally have a good prognosis. Metastatic DTC can often be treated in a targeted manner with radioactive iodine, but the ability to accumulate iodine is lost with decreasing differentiation. Until recently, chemotherapy was the only treatment in patients with advanced thyroid cancer, which is no longer amenable to therapy with radioactive iodine. The modest efficacy and significant toxicity of chemotherapy necessitated the need for urgent advances in the medical field. New insights in thyroid cancer biology propelled the development of targeted therapies for this disease, including the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib as salvage treatment for DTC. In 2015, the US Food and Drug Administration approved a second tyrosine kinase inhibitor, lenvatinib, for the treatment of radioiodine-refractory thyroid cancer. Although associated with a significant progression-free survival improvement as compared to placebo in a large Phase III study (median progression-free survival 18.2 vs 3.6 months; hazard ratio 0.21; 99% confidence interval 0.14–0.31; P<0.001), the benefit of lenvatinib needs to be proved in the context of associated moderate to severe toxicities that require frequent dose reduction and delays. This article reviews the evidence supporting the use of lenvatinib as salvage therapy for radioactive iodine-refractory thyroid cancer, with a focus on the toxicity profile of this new therapy. PMID:27013865

  1. Thyroid cancer incidence in relation to volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Arnbjoernsson, E.A.; Arnbjoernsson, A.O.; Olafsson, A.

    1986-01-01

    Environmental or genetic factors are sought to explain the high incidence of thyroid cancer in Iceland. At present, it is impossible to cite any environmental factor, particularly one related to the volcanic activity in the country, which could explain the high incidence of thyroid cancer in Iceland. However, the thyroid gland in Icelanders is very small due to the high intake of iodine from seafood. It is, therefore, easier for physicians to find thyroid tumors. Furthermore, genetic factors are very likely to be of great importance in the small, isolated island of Iceland.

  2. Highly prevalent TERT promoter mutations in aggressive thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Bishop, Justin; Shan, Yuan; Pai, Sara; Liu, Dingxie; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Sun, Hui; El-Naggar, Adel K; Xing, Mingzhao

    2013-08-01

    Mutations 1 295 228 C>T and 1 295 250 C>T (termed C228T and C250T respectively), corresponding to -124 C>T and -146 C>T from the translation start site in the promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene, have recently been reported in human cancers, but not in thyroid cancers yet. We explored these mutations in thyroid cancers by genomic sequencing of a large number of primary tumor samples. We found the C228T mutation in 0 of 85 (0.0%) benign thyroid tumors, 30 of 257 (11.7%) papillary thyroid cancers (PTC), 9 of 79 (11.4%) follicular thyroid cancers (FTC), 3 of 8 (37.5%) poorly differentiated thyroid cancers (PDTC), 23 of 54 (42.6%) anaplastic thyroid cancers (ATC), and 8 of 12 (66.7%) thyroid cancer cell lines. The C250T mutation was uncommon, but mutually exclusive with the C228T mutation, and the two mutations were collectively found in 11 of 79 (13.9%) FTC, 25 of 54 (46.3%) ATC, and 11 of 12 (91.7%) thyroid cancer cell lines. Among PTC variants, the C228T mutation was found in 4 of 13 (30.8%) tall-cell PTC (TCPTC), 23 of 187 (12.3%) conventional PTC, and 2 of 56 (3.6%) follicular variant PTC samples. No TERT mutation was found in 16 medullary thyroid cancer samples. The C228T mutation was associated with the BRAF V600E mutation in PTC, being present in 19 of 104 (18.3%) BRAF mutation-positive PTC vs 11 of 153 (7.2%) the BRAF mutation-negative PTC samples (P=0.0094). Conversely, BRAF mutation was found in 19 of 30 (63.3%) C228T mutation-positive PTC vs 85 of 227 (37.4%) C228T mutation-negative PTC samples (P=0.0094). We thus for the first time, to our knowledge, demonstrate TERT promoter mutations in thyroid cancers, that are particularly prevalent in the aggressive thyroid cancers TCPTC, PDTC, ATC and BRAF mutation-positive PTC, revealing a novel genetic background for thyroid cancers.

  3. Selective use of sorafenib in the treatment of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pitoia, Fabián; Jerkovich, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Sorafenib is a multiple kinase inhibitor (MKI) approved for the treatment of primary advanced renal cell carcinoma and advanced primary liver cancer. It was recently approved by several health agencies around the world as the first available MKI treatment for radioactive iodine-refractory advanced and progressive differentiated thyroid cancer. Sorafenib targets C-RAF, B-RAF, VEGF receptor-1, -2, -3, PDGF receptor-β, RET, c-kit, and Flt-3. As a multifunctional inhibitor, sorafenib has the potential of inhibiting tumor growth, progression, metastasis, and angiogenesis and downregulating mechanisms that protect tumors from apoptosis and has shown to increase the progression-free survival in several Phase II trials. This led to the Phase III trial (DECISION) which showed that there was an improvement in progression-free survival of 5 months for patients on sorafenib when compared to those on placebo. Adverse events with this drug are common but usually manageable. The development of resistance after 1 or 2 years is almost a rule in most patients who showed partial response or stabilization of the disease while on sorafenib, which makes it necessary to think of a plan for subsequent therapies. These may include the use of another MKI, such as lenvatinib, the second approved MKI for advanced differentiated thyroid cancer, or include patients in clinical trials or the off-label use of other MKIs. Given sorafenib’s earlier approval, most centers now have access to its prescription. The goal of this review was to improve the care of these patients by describing key aspects that all prescribers will need to master in order to optimize outcomes. PMID:27042004

  4. Standardized Thyroid Cancer Mortality in Korea between 1985 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun Mi; Jang, Eun Kyung; Kwon, Hyemi; Jeon, Min Ji; Kim, Won Gu; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Won Bae

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of thyroid cancer has increased very rapidly in Korea. However, there is no published report focusing on thyroid cancer mortality in Korea. In this study, we aimed to evaluate standardized thyroid cancer mortality using data from Statistics Korea (the Statistical Office of Korea). Methods Population and mortality data from 1985 to 2010 were obtained from Statistics Korea. Age-standardized rates of thyroid cancer mortality were calculated according to the standard population of Korea, as well as World Health Organization (WHO) standard population and International Cancer Survival Standard (ICSS) population weights. Results The crude thyroid cancer mortality rate increased from 0.1 to 0.7 per 100,000 between 1985 and 2010. The pattern was the same for both sexes. The age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR) for thyroid cancer for Korean resident registration population increased from 0.19 to 0.67 between 1985 and 2000. However, it decreased slightly, from 0.67 to 0.55, between 2000 and 2010. When mortality was adjusted using the WHO standard population and ICSS population weights, the ASMR similarly increased until 2000, and then decreased between 2000 and 2010. Conclusion Thyroid cancer mortality increased until 2000 in Korea. It started to decrease from 2000. PMID:25559576

  5. Diagnostic studies of thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, I.B.

    1981-01-01

    Patient with goiter usually has benign disease. While investigation is important, clinical factors weight heavily in the diagnosis of cancer. Aside from serum calcitonin and CEA, biochemical findings are of little help. Radioisotope scanning is of fundamental importance and has an implication in history. Ultrasonography has a diminishing role although its use has led to the widespread acceptance of needle aspiration. Needle aspiration cytology is now the most important maneuver in preoperative assessment and management of the goiter patient. Its results permit refined operative selection, the institution of safe conservative management, and greater organization in surgical treatment. Persistent cooperation between clinician and pathologist can yield a high rate of the reliable preoperative cytological diagnosis obtained by needle aspiration.

  6. Medical Management of Metastatic Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Jessica E.; Sherman, Scott K.; O’Dorisio, Thomas M.; Howe, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is an aggressive form of thyroid cancer, which occurs in both heritable and sporadic forms. Discovery that mutations in the RET protooncogene predispose to familial cases of this disease has allowed for presymptomatic identification of gene carriers and prophylactic surgery to improve the prognosis of these patients. A significant number of patients with the sporadic type of MTC and even with familial disease, still present with nodal or distant metastases, making surgical cure difficult. Over the past several decades, many different types of therapy for metastatic disease have been attempted, with limited success. Improved understanding of the molecular defects and pathways involved in both familial and sporadic MTC has resulted in new hope for these patients with the development of drugs targeting the specific alterations responsible. This new era of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors represents a significant step forward from previous trials of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy. Although much progress has been made, additional agents and strategies are needed to achieve durable, long-term responses in patients with metastatic MTC. This article reviews the history and results of medical management for metastatic MTC from the early 1970s up until the present day. PMID:24942936

  7. Determinants of papillary cancer of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Wingren, G.; Hatschek, T.; Axelson, O. )

    1993-10-01

    Determinants of papillary thyroid cancer were evaluated in a questionnaire-based case-control study from southeastern Sweden. A total of 104 cases, diagnosed from 1977 to 1987, and 387 randomly selected controls were included in the analyses. Female subjects with papillary cancer reported a work history as dentists/dental assistants, telephone operators, teachers, and day nursery personnel, and an occupational contact with chemicals and video display terminals more often than did controls. The 11 male cases more often reported working as mechanics and metal workers and having occupational contact with solvents. Other factors associated with increased risk for female papillary cancer were having private well water at the birth address; leisure time exposure to combustion smoke; low intake of cruciferous vegetables and seafood; and a family history of goiter, heart disease, biliary disorder, or female genital cancer. Diagnostic radiographic examinations, especially to the head, neck, or upper back/chest area, or repeated dental examinations, were also found to be associated with this form of cancer. With regard to the possible influence from hormonal factors among women less than age 50 years at time of diagnosis, an increased risk was found for a pregnancy soon after puberty. Tendencies toward a decreasing risk with increasing age at first pregnancy as well as an increasing risk with increasing number of pregnancies were found as well. Multiparity seemed to potentiate the effect from prior radiographic examinations.

  8. Immune Response in Thyroid Cancer: Widening the Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Laura Sterian

    2014-01-01

    The association between thyroid cancer and thyroid inflammation has been repeatedly reported and highly debated in the literature. In fact, both molecular and epidemiological data suggest that these diseases are closely related and this association reinforces that the immune system is important for thyroid cancer progression. Innate immunity is the first line of defensive response. Unlike innate immune responses, adaptive responses are highly specific to the particular antigen that induced them. Both branches of the immune system may interact in antitumor immune response. Major effector cells of the immune system that directly target thyroid cancer cells include dendritic cells, macrophages, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, mast cells, and lymphocytes. A mixture of immune cells may infiltrate thyroid cancer microenvironment and the balance of protumor and antitumor activity of these cells may be associated with prognosis. Herein, we describe some evidences that immune response may be important for thyroid cancer progression and may help us identify more aggressive tumors, sparing the vast majority of patients from costly unnecessary invasive procedures. The future trend in thyroid cancer is an individualized therapy. PMID:25328756

  9. Ultrasonography survey and thyroid cancer in the Fukushima Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Peter; Kaiser, Jan Christian; Ulanovsky, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Thyroid cancer is one of the major health concerns after the accident in the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station (NPS). Currently, ultrasonography surveys are being performed for persons residing in the Fukushima Prefecture at the time of the accident with an age of up to 18 years. Here, the expected thyroid cancer prevalence in the Fukushima Prefecture is assessed based on an ultrasonography survey of Ukrainians, who were exposed at an age of up to 18 years to (131)I released during the Chernobyl NPS accident, and on differences in equipment and study protocol in the two surveys. Radiation risk of thyroid cancer incidence among survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and preliminary estimates of thyroid dose due to the Fukushima accident were used for the prediction of baseline and radiation-related thyroid cancer risks. We estimate a prevalence of thyroid cancer of 0.027 % (95 % CI 0.010 %; 0.050 %) for the first screening campaign in the Fukushima Prefecture. Compared with the incidence rate in Japan in 2007, the ultrasonography survey is predicted to increase baseline thyroid cancer incidence by a factor of 7.4 (95 % CI 0.95; 17.3). Under the condition of continued screening, thyroid cancer during the first fifty years after the accident is predicted to be detected for about 2 % of the screened population. The prediction of radiation-related thyroid cancer in the most exposed fraction (a few ten thousand persons) of the screened population of the Fukushima Prefecture has a large uncertainty with the best estimates of the average risk of 0.1-0.3 %, depending on average dose.

  10. Molecular Pathways Associated with Aggressiveness of Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Benvenga, Salvatore; Koch, Christian A

    2014-01-01

    The most common thyroid malignancy is papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Mortality rates from PTC mainly depend on its aggressiveness. Geno- and phenotyping of aggressive PTC has advanced our understanding of treatment failures and of potential future therapies. Unraveling molecular signaling pathways of PTC including its aggressive forms will hopefully pave the road to reduce mortality but also morbidity from this cancer. The mitogen-activated protein kinase and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling pathway as well as the family of RAS oncogenes and BRAF as a member of the RAF protein family and the aberrant expression of microRNAs miR-221, miR-222, and miR-146b all play major roles in tumor initiation and progression of aggressive PTC. Small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting BRAF-mediated events, vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, RET/PTC rearrangements, and other molecular targets, show promising results to improve treatment of radioiodine resistant, recurrent, and aggressive PTC. PMID:24955023

  11. Global tyrosine kinome profiling of human thyroid tumors identifies Src as a promising target for invasive cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Nancy L.; Lin, Chi-Iou; Du, Jinyan; Whang, Edward E.; Ito, Hiromichi; Moore, Francis D.; Ruan, Daniel T.

    2012-05-11

    . Conclusion: Global kinome analysis enables the discovery of novel targets for thyroid cancer therapy. Further investigation of Src targeted therapy for advanced thyroid cancer is warranted.

  12. Genetic basis and gene therapy trials for thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Al-Humadi, Hussam; Zarros, Apostolos; Al-Saigh, Rafal; Liapi, Charis

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy is regarded as one of the most promising novel therapeutic approaches for hopeless cases of thyroid cancer and those not responding to traditional treatment. In the last two decades, many studies have focused on the genetic factors behind the origin and the development of thyroid cancer, in order to investigate and shed more light on the molecular pathways implicated in different differentiated or undifferentiated types of thyroid tumors. We, herein, review the current data on the main genes that have been proven to (or thought to) be implicated in thyroid cancer etiology, and which are involved in several well-known signaling pathways (such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt pathways). Moreover, we review the results of the efforts made through multiple gene therapy trials, via several gene therapy approaches/strategies, on different thyroid carcinomas. Our review leads to the conclusion that future research efforts should seriously consider gene therapy for the treatment of thyroid cancer, and, thus, should: (a) shed more light on the molecular basis of thyroid cancer tumorigenesis, (b) focus on the development of novel gene therapy approaches that can achieve the required antitumoral efficacy with minimum normal tissue toxicity, as well as (c) perform more gene therapy clinical trials, in order to acquire more data on the efficacy of the examined approaches and to record the provoked adverse effects.

  13. Thyroid cancer after diagnostic administration of iodine-131

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, P.; Mattsson, A.; Boice, J.D. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    To provide quantitative data on the risk of thyroid cancer after exposure to {sup 131}I, 34,104 patients administered {sup 131}I for diagnostic purposes were followed for up to 40 years. The mean thyroid dose was estimated as 1.1 Gy, and 67 thyroid cancers occurred in contrast to 49.7 expected (standardized incidence ratio = 1.35; 95% confidence interval 1.05-1.71). Excess cancers were apparent only among patients referred because of a suspected thyroid tumor, and no increased risk was seen among those referred for other reasons. Further, risk was not related to radiation dose to the thyroid gland, time since exposure or age at exposure. The slight excess of thyroid cancer thus appeared to be due to the underlying thyroid condition and not radiation exposure. Among those under age 20 years when {sup 131}I was administered, a small excess risk (3 cancers compared to 1.8 expected) was about 2-10 times lower than that predicted from data for the A-bomb survivors. These data suggest that protraction of dose may result in a lower risk than an acute X-ray exposure of the same total dose. 34 refs., 5 tabs.

  14. Zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 1: its clinical significance and functional role in human thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Liu, Gang; Wu, Shihe; Jiang, Futing; Xie, Jiangping; Wang, Yuhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Transcription factor zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1), as one of the key inducers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, has been reported to be regulated by microRNA-144 and Bcl-2-associated athanogene 3, which both promote thyroid cancer cell invasion. However, the involvement of ZEB1 in thyroid cancer has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role and clinical implication of ZEB1 in this disease. Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine the subcellular localization and the expression level of ZEB1 protein in 82 self-pairs of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded cancerous and adjacent noncancerous tissues obtained from patients with thyroid cancer. The roles of ZEB1 in thyroid cancer cell migration, invasion, and proliferation were also detected by transwell and MTT analyses, respectively. Results Immunohistochemistry showed that ZEB1 was predominantly localized in the nucleus of thyroid cancer cells. Its immunoreactive score in thyroid cancer tissues was significantly higher than that in adjacent noncancerous tissues (P=0.01). In addition, ZEB1 overexpression was significantly associated with the advanced tumor node metastasis staging (P=0.008), the positive lymph node metastasis (P=0.01) and distant metastasis (P=0.02). Furthermore, ZEB1 knockdown by siRNA could efficiently inhibit the migration, invasion, and proliferation abilities of thyroid cancer cells in vitro. Conclusion These findings indicated that ZEB1 might function as an oncogene, the overexpression of which was associated with the aggressive tumor progression of human thyroid cancer. Interestingly, ZEB1 also could promote thyroid cancer cell migration, invasion, and proliferation, suggesting that the inhibition of this protein might be a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of this malignancy. PMID:27099512

  15. Thyroid gland metastasis arising from breast cancer: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Chenfang

    2013-06-01

    The thyroid gland is an uncommon site for metastasis to develop and thus metastases arising from breast cancer are rarely observed. In the present study, we describe a case of a 45-year-old female with a three-year history of breast cancer who presented with a thyroid mass that was diagnosed as metastatic breast carcinoma by histopathological analysis of the subtotal thyroidectomy specimen. To ascertain the diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer, we evaluated two types of markers; those that possessed a similar expression status in the original and metastatic lesions [ER, PR and CerbB-2 (HER2/neu)], and those that are capable of differentiating between metastatic lesions and the surrounding thyroid components (TG and TTF-1). The results showed that ER, PR and CerbB-2 demonstrated a similar expression pattern in primary breast carcinoma and thyroid lesions. Meanwhile, in the thyroid lesions, the malignant cells showed negative staining for TG and TTF-1, which confirmed that lesions were not thyroid in origin. This case may prompt clinicians that although thyroid gland are uncommon metastatic site, a diagnosis of metastatic disease should be considered when new aggregates are identified in the thyroid glands and histopathological analysis may aid the diagnosis.

  16. [Malignant tumors associated with thyroid cancer in an autopsy material].

    PubMed

    Tiszlavicz, L; Varga, Z

    1991-03-17

    In the Department of Pathology of Albert Szent-Györgyi Medical University at Szeged in Hungary 37,504 autopsies were performed in the last 30 years and double multiple primary malignant tumours were found in 385 cases (4.2%). In thyroid cancer cases the tumours of other organs were more frequent (22.7%), and these tumour-associations were observed mainly simultaneously, there were no important sex differences. In the most of cases the thyroid cancer was only a side diagnosis beside other malignancies, in the more rare metachronous cases the thyroid cancer was secondary following postoperative irradiation of the first tumour (4 cases of 5). We have seen thyroid cancers most frequently together with lung, breast and digestive system tumours.

  17. TCGA study improves understanding of thyroid cancer genetics - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    A comprehensive analysis of the genomes of nearly 500 papillary thyroid carcinomas has provided new insights into the roles of frequently mutated cancer genes and other genomic alterations that drive disease development.

  18. Radionuclide imaging and treatment of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu Juan; Li, XianFeng; Ren, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, the diagnostic methods and therapeutic tools for thyroid cancer (TC) have been greatly improved. In addition to the classical method of ingestion of radioactive iodine-131 (I131) and subsequent I123 and I124 positron emission tomography (PET) in therapy and examination, I124 PET-based 3-dimensional imaging, Ga68-labeled [1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraacetic acid]-1-NaI(3)-octreotide (DOTANOC) PET/computed tomography (CT), Tc99m tetrofosmin, pre-targeted radioimmunotherapy, and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy have all been used clinically. These novel methods are useful in diagnosis and therapy of TC, but also have unavoidable adverse effects. In this review, we will discuss the development of nuclear medicine in TC examination and treatment.

  19. Thyroid nodules and cancers in children.

    PubMed

    Josefson, Jami; Zimmerman, Donald

    2008-09-01

    The incidence of thyroid nodules in children is estimated to be 1 to 1.5% based on clinical examination. Children with thyroid nodules, compared to adults with thyroid nodules, have a fourfold greater risk of developing malignant thyroid disease. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma is the most common pediatric endocrine tumor, constituting 0.5-3% of all childhood malignancies. The thyroid is one of the most frequent sites of secondary neoplasm in children who receive radiation therapy for other malignancies. Thyroid carcinoma has been studied extensively in adults. However, the pediatric literature on this subject is much less complete, owing to the rarity of its diagnosis. This article reviews the predisposing factors, genetics, pathology, pathogenesis , clinical presentation, detailed treatment and follow-up management of children with thyroid carcinoma. Additionally, a discussion regarding the controversial aspects of radioiodine therapy in children is included.

  20. Herpes and polyoma family viruses in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    STAMATIOU, DIMITRIS P.; DERDAS, STAVROS P.; ZORAS, ODYSSEAS L.; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is considered the most common malignancy that affects the endocrine system. Generally, thyroid cancer derives from follicular epithelial cells, and thyroid cancer is divided into well-differentiated papillary (80% of cases) and follicular (15% of cases) carcinoma. Follicular thyroid cancer is further divided into the conventional and oncocytic (Hürthle cell) type, poorly differentiated carcinoma and anaplastic carcinoma. Both poorly differentiated and anaplastic carcinoma can arise either de novo, or secondarily from papillary and follicular thyroid cancer. The incidence of thyroid cancer has significantly increased for both males and females of all ages, particularly for females between 55–64 years of age, from 1999 through 2008. The increased rates refer to tumors of all stages, though they were mostly noted in localized disease. Recently, viruses have been implicated in the direct regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the development of metastases. More specifically, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) proteins may potentially lead to the development of metastasis through the regulation of the metastasis suppressor, Nm23, and the control of Twist expression. The significant enhancement of the metastatic potential, through the induction of angiogenesis and changes to the tumor microenvironment, subsequent to viral infection, has been documented, while EMT also contributes to cancer cell permissiveness to viruses. A number of viruses have been identified to be associated with carcinogenesis, and these include lymphotropic herpesviruses, namely EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus [KSHV, also known as human herpesvirus type 8 (HHV8)]; two hepatitis viruses, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV); human papillomaviruses (HPVs); human T cell lymphoma virus (HTLV); and a new polyomavirus, Merkel cell polyomavirus identified in 2008. In this review, we examined the association between thyroid cancer and two oncogenic

  1. Management Guidelines for Children with Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Waguespack, Steven G.; Bauer, Andrew J.; Angelos, Peter; Benvenga, Salvatore; Cerutti, Janete M.; Dinauer, Catherine A.; Hamilton, Jill; Hay, Ian D.; Luster, Markus; Parisi, Marguerite T.; Rachmiel, Marianna; Thompson, Geoffrey B.; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules and cancers were geared toward adults. Compared with thyroid neoplasms in adults, however, those in the pediatric population exhibit differences in pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and long-term outcomes. Furthermore, therapy that may be recommended for an adult may not be appropriate for a child who is at low risk for death but at higher risk for long-term harm from overly aggressive treatment. For these reasons, unique guidelines for children and adolescents with thyroid tumors are needed. Methods: A task force commissioned by the American Thyroid Association (ATA) developed a series of clinically relevant questions pertaining to the management of children with thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Using an extensive literature search, primarily focused on studies that included subjects ≤18 years of age, the task force identified and reviewed relevant articles through April 2014. Recommendations were made based upon scientific evidence and expert opinion and were graded using a modified schema from the United States Preventive Services Task Force. Results: These inaugural guidelines provide recommendations for the evaluation and management of thyroid nodules in children and adolescents, including the role and interpretation of ultrasound, fine-needle aspiration cytology, and the management of benign nodules. Recommendations for the evaluation, treatment, and follow-up of children and adolescents with DTC are outlined and include preoperative staging, surgical management, postoperative staging, the role of radioactive iodine therapy, and goals for thyrotropin suppression. Management algorithms are proposed and separate recommendations for papillary and follicular thyroid cancers are provided. Conclusions: In response to our charge as an independent task force appointed by the ATA, we developed recommendations based on scientific evidence and expert opinion for the

  2. Imaging characteristics and findings in thyroglossal duct cyst cancer and concurrent thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Shemen, Larry; Sherman, Craig Harvey; Yurovitsky, Alyssa

    2016-04-20

    Thyroglossal duct cyst cancer is rare, while synchronous thyroglossal duct cyst cancer with thyroid cancer is still rarer. The radiographic features of this case are instructive and crucial when evaluating a thyroglossal duct cyst.

  3. Vandetanib for the treatment of symptomatic or progressive medullary thyroid cancer in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic disease: U.S. Food and Drug Administration drug approval summary.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Katherine; Kim, Geoffrey; Maher, V Ellen; Chattopadhyay, Somesh; Tang, Shenghui; Moon, Young Jin; Song, Pengfei; Marathe, Anshu; Balakrishnan, Suchitra; Zhu, Hao; Garnett, Christine; Liu, Qi; Booth, Brian; Gehrke, Brenda; Dorsam, Robert; Verbois, Leigh; Ghosh, Debasis; Wilson, Wendy; Duan, John; Sarker, Haripada; Miksinski, Sarah Pope; Skarupa, Lisa; Ibrahim, Amna; Justice, Robert; Murgo, Anthony; Pazdur, Richard

    2012-07-15

    On April 6, 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved vandetanib (Caprelsa tablets; AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP) for the treatment of symptomatic or progressive medullary thyroid cancer in patients with unresectable, locally advanced, or metastatic disease. Vandetanib is the first drug approved for this indication, and this article focuses on the basis of approval. Approval was based on the results of a double-blind trial conducted in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma. Patients were randomized 2:1 to vandetanib, 300 mg/d orally (n = 231), or to placebo (n = 100). The primary objective was demonstration of improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) with vandetanib compared with placebo. Other endpoints included evaluation of overall survival and objective response rate. The PFS analysis showed a marked improvement for patients randomized to vandetanib (hazard ratio = 0.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.24-0.53; P < 0.0001). The objective response rate for the vandetanib arm was 44% compared with 1% for the placebo arm. The most common grade 3 and 4 toxicities (>5%) were diarrhea and/or colitis, hypertension and hypertensive crisis, fatigue, hypocalcemia, rash, and corrected QT interval (QTc) prolongation. This approval was based on a statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement in PFS. Given the toxicity profile, which includes prolongation of the QT interval and sudden death, only prescribers and pharmacies certified through the vandetanib Risk Evaluation Mitigation Strategy Program are able to prescribe and dispense vandetanib. Treatment-related risks should be taken into account when considering the use of vandetanib in patients with indolent, asymptomatic, or slowly progressing disease.

  4. Increasing Incidence of Thyroid Cancer in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Bann, Darrin V.; Goyal, Neerav; Camacho, Fabian; Goldenberg, David

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The incidence of thyroid cancer in the United States has increased rapidly and Pennsylvania is the state with the highest rate of thyroid cancer in the country, although the factors driving this increase are unknown. Moreover, it remains unclear whether the increase in thyroid cancer represents a true increase in disease or is the result of overdiagnosis. OBJECTIVE To compare the increase in thyroid cancer incidence and tumor characteristics in Pennsylvania with the rest of the United States and gain insight into the factors influencing the increased incidence of thyroid cancer. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In a population-based study, data on thyroid cancer from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results 9 (SEER-9) registry and the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry (PCR) from 1985 through 2009 were collected and reviewed for information regarding sex, race, histologic type of thyroid cancer, staging, and tumor size at diagnosis. International Classification of Diseases for Oncology, Third Edition code C739 (thyroid carcinoma) was used to identify 110 615 records in the SEER-9 registry and 29 030 records in the PCR. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Average annual percent change (AAPC) in thyroid cancer incidence across various demographic groups in Pennsylvania. RESULTS The AAPC for thyroid cancer in Pennsylvania was 7.1% per year (95% CI, 6.3%–7.9%) vs 4.2% (95% CI, 3.7%–4.7%) per year in the remainder of the United States, and trends in incidence were significantly different (P < .001). Females experienced a higher AAPC (7.6% per year; 95% CI, 6.9%–8.3%) compared with males (6.1% per year; 95% CI, 4.9%–7.2%) (P < .01), and trend analysis revealed that thyroid cancer may be increasing more rapidly among black females (8.6% per year; 95% CI, 5.4%–11.9%) than among white females (7.6% per year; 95% CI, 6.8%–8.4) (P = .60; but despite the similarity in AAPC between the 2 groups, the joinpoint models fit to the data were not parallel [P < .005

  5. New drugs for medullary thyroid cancer: new promises?

    PubMed

    Spitzweg, Christine; Morris, John C; Bible, Keith C

    2016-06-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a rare tumor arising from the calcitonin-producing parafollicular C cells of the thyroid gland, occurring either sporadically or alternatively in a hereditary form based on germline RET mutations in approximately one-third of cases. Historically, patients with advanced, metastasized MTC have had a poor prognosis, partly due to limited response to conventional chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In the past decade, however, considerable progress has been made in identifying key genetic alterations and dysregulated signaling pathways paving the way for the evaluation of a series of multitargeted kinase inhibitors that have started to meaningfully impact clinical practice. Two drugs, vandetanib and cabozantinib, are now approved in the US and EU for use in advanced, progressive MTC, with additional targeted agents also showing promise or awaiting results from clinical trials. However, the potential for toxicities with significant reduction in quality of life and lack of curative outcomes has to be carefully weighed against potential for benefit. Despite significant PFS prolongation observed in randomized clinical trials, most patients even with metastatic disease enjoy indolent courses with slow progression observed over years, wherein watchful waiting is still the preferred strategy. As advanced, progressive MTC is a rare and complex disease, a multidisciplinary approach centered in specialized centers providing interdisciplinary expertise in the individualization of available therapeutic options is preferred. In this review, we summarize current concepts of the molecular pathogenesis of advanced MTC and discuss results from clinical trials of targeted agents and also cytotoxic chemotherapy in the context of clinical implications and future perspectives.

  6. Perspectives of the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) signalling pathway in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Bruno Moulin; de Carvalho, Denise Pires

    2014-04-01

    Approximately 90% of non-medullary thyroid malignancies originate from the follicular cell and are classified as papillary or follicular (well-differentiated) thyroid carcinomas, showing an overall favourable prognosis. However, recurrence or persistence of the disease occurs in some cases associated with the presence of loco-regional or distant metastatic lesions that generally become resistant to radioiodine therapy, while glucose uptake and metabolism are increased. Recent advances in the field of tumor progression have shown that CTC (circulating tumour cells) are metabolic and genetically heterogeneous. There is now special interest in unravelling the mechanisms that allow the reminiscence of dormant tumour lesions that might be related to late disease progression and increased risk of recurrence. AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) is activated by the depletion in cellular energy levels and allows adaptive changes in cell metabolism that are fundamental for cell survival in a stressful environment; nevertheless, the activation of this kinase also decreases cell proliferation rate and induces tumour cell apoptosis. In the thyroid field, AMPK emerged as a novel important intracellular pathway, since it regulates both iodide and glucose uptakes in normal thyroid cells. Furthermore, it has recently been demonstrated that the AMPK pathway is highly activated in papillary thyroid carcinomas, although the clinical significance of these findings remains elusive. Herein we review the current knowledge about the role of AMPK activation in thyroid physiology and pathophysiology, with special focus on thyroid cancer.

  7. Perspectives of the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) signalling pathway in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Bruno Moulin; de Carvalho, Denise Pires

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 90% of non-medullary thyroid malignancies originate from the follicular cell and are classified as papillary or follicular (well-differentiated) thyroid carcinomas, showing an overall favourable prognosis. However, recurrence or persistence of the disease occurs in some cases associated with the presence of loco-regional or distant metastatic lesions that generally become resistant to radioiodine therapy, while glucose uptake and metabolism are increased. Recent advances in the field of tumor progression have shown that CTC (circulating tumour cells) are metabolic and genetically heterogeneous. There is now special interest in unravelling the mechanisms that allow the reminiscence of dormant tumour lesions that might be related to late disease progression and increased risk of recurrence. AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) is activated by the depletion in cellular energy levels and allows adaptive changes in cell metabolism that are fundamental for cell survival in a stressful environment; nevertheless, the activation of this kinase also decreases cell proliferation rate and induces tumour cell apoptosis. In the thyroid field, AMPK emerged as a novel important intracellular pathway, since it regulates both iodide and glucose uptakes in normal thyroid cells. Furthermore, it has recently been demonstrated that the AMPK pathway is highly activated in papillary thyroid carcinomas, although the clinical significance of these findings remains elusive. Herein we review the current knowledge about the role of AMPK activation in thyroid physiology and pathophysiology, with special focus on thyroid cancer. PMID:27919039

  8. Well-differentiated thyroid cancer - are you overtreating your patients?

    PubMed

    Nixon, Iain J

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 50 years there has been a move towards more aggressive therapy for well-differentiated thyroid cancer. In recent times, however, international guidelines have shown some trend back towards a more conservative approach to treating low-risk patients. This review explores how the state of the art in well-differentiated thyroid cancer research has evolved in tandem with improvements in risk-stratification. A focus on the surgical approach to the primary thyroid tumour and the regional lymphatics in addition to the interplay between surgical decision making and the use of radioactive iodine are presented to allow the reader to determine whether they are now overtreating patients with well-differentiated thyroid cancer.

  9. [Differentiated thyroid cancer: an ancient disease with new knowledge].

    PubMed

    Granados García, Martín; León Takahashi, Alberto Mitsuo; Guerrero Huerta, Francisco Javier; Taissoun Aslan, Zaki Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy and its incidence appears to be rising rapidly with a good prognosis. However, the involvement of different medical specialties has changed the focus of treatment and triggered a number of controversies. In the absence of controlled trials, the guidelines for treatment are founded on prognostic factors for survival and local control, the effects of the treatments, and comorbidities. Recently, the major advances in the field of genetics and molecular biology have been applied in the treatment of iodine refractory disease, and the use of tracers and recombinant hormones have succeeded in improving adjuvant treatment. Based on this information, we present this review with the aim of updating the knowledge of an ancient disease.

  10. Thyroid cancer following nuclear tests in French Polynesia

    PubMed Central

    de Vathaire, F; Drozdovitch, V; Brindel, P; Rachedi, F; Boissin, J-L; Sebbag, J; Shan, L; Bost-Bezeaud, F; Petitdidier, P; Paoaafaite, J; Teuri, J; Iltis, J; Bouville, A; Cardis, E; Hill, C; Doyon, F

    2010-01-01

    Background: Between 1966 and 1974, France conducted 41 atmospheric nuclear tests in Polynesia, but their potential health effects have not previously been investigated. Methods: In a case–control study, we compared the radiation exposure of almost all the French Polynesians diagnosed with differentiated thyroid carcinoma between 1981 and 2003 (n=229) to the exposure of 373 French Polynesian control individuals without cancer from the general population. Radiation exposures were estimated using measurements after the nuclear tests, age at time of each test, residential and dietary information. Results: The average thyroid dose before 15 years of age was about 1.8 mGy, and 5% of the cases and 3% of the controls received a dose above 10 mGy. Despite this low level of dose, and after adjusting for ethnic group, level of education, body surface area, family history of thyroid cancer and number of pregnancies for women, we observed an increasing risk (P=0.04) of thyroid cancer with increasing thyroid dose received before age of 15 years, which remained after excluding non-aggressive differentiated thyroid micro-carcinomas. This increase of risk per unit of thyroid radiation dose was higher (P=0.03) in women who later experienced four or more pregnancies than among other women. Conclusion: The risk estimate is low, but is based on limited exposure data. The release of information on exposure, currently classified, would greatly improve the reliability of the risk estimation. PMID:20808313

  11. Graves' Disease that Developed Shortly after Surgery for Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hea Min; Park, Soon Hyun; Lee, Jae Min; Park, Kang Seo

    2013-09-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that may present with various clinical manifestations of hyperthyroidism. Patients with Graves' disease have a greater number of thyroid nodules and a higher incidence of thyroid cancer compared with patients with normal thyroid activity. However, cases in which patients are diagnosed with recurrence of Graves' disease shortly after partial thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer are very rare. Here we report a case of hyperthyroid Graves' disease that occurred after partial thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. In this case, the patient developed hyperthyroidism 9 months after right hemithyroidectomy, and antithyroglobulin autoantibody and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor stimulating autoantibody were positive. Therefore, we diagnosed Graves' disease on the basis of the laboratory test results and thyroid ultrasonography findings. The patient was treated with and maintained on antithyroid drugs. The mechanism of the recurrence of Graves' disease in this patient is still unclear. The mechanism may have been the improper response of the immune system after partial thyroidectomy. To precisely determine the mechanisms in Graves' disease after partial thyroidectomy, further studies based on a greater number of cases are needed.

  12. Cross-talk between NO and HMGB1 in lymphocytic thyroiditis and papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Mardente, Stefania; Zicari, Alessandra; Consorti, Fabrizio; Mari, Emanuela; Di Vito, Maura; Leopizzi, Martina; Della Rocca, Carlo; Antonaci, Alfredo

    2010-12-01

    The controversy on whether or not inflammatory infiltrates in chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis predispose to cancer, has now merged into a debate over the role of the inflammatory infiltrates. The question is how and why some cells become transformed and what factors allow them to spread and in some cases become invasive. Here, we show that the amount of inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) and high mobility group Box 1 protein (HMGB1) produced in thyroiditis microenvironment increases in tumors and could be involved in the cellular transformation process. NO and HMGB1 are known to attract macrophages that would promote angiogenesis, matrix remodelling and suppression of an efficient immune response. Inflammatory infiltrates could increase the risk of papillary cancer in patients with autoimmune lymphocytic thyroiditis. Cytokines and soluble inflammatory mediators involved in cancer-related inflammation are not only a target for innovative diagnostic and therapeutic strategies but they also represent a future challenge for oncologists.

  13. The effect of low level laser on anaplastic thyroid cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Yun-Hee; Moon, Jeon-Hwan; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang

    2015-02-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a non-thermal phototherapy used in several medical applications, including wound healing, reduction of pain and amelioration of oral mucositis. Nevertheless, the effects of LLLT upon cancer or dysplastic cells have been so far poorly studied. Here we report that the effects of laser irradiation on anaplastic thyroid cancer cells leads to hyperplasia. 650nm of laser diode was performed with a different time interval (0, 15, 30, 60J/cm2 , 25mW) on anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line FRO in vivo. FRO was orthotopically injected into the thyroid gland of nude mice and the irradiation was performed with the same method described previously. After irradiation, the xenograft evaluation was followed for one month. The thyroid tissues from sacrificed mice were undergone to H&E staining and immunohistochemical staining with HIF-1α, Akt, TGF-β1. We found the aggressive proliferation of FRO on thyroid gland with dose dependent. In case of 60 J/ cm2 of energy density, the necrotic bodies were found in a center of the thyroid. The phosphorylation of HIF-1α and Akt was detected in the thyroid gland, which explained the survival signaling of anaplastic cancer cell was turned on the thyroid gland. Furthermore, TGF-β1 expression was decreased after irradiation. In this study, we demonstrated that insufficient energy density irradiation occurred the decreasing of TGF-β1 which corresponding to the phosphorylation of Akt/ HIF-1α. This aggressive proliferation resulted to the hypoxic condition of tissue for angiogenesis. We suggest that LLLT may influence to cancer aggressiveness associated with a decrease in TGF-β1 and increase in Akt/HIF-1α.

  14. Role of the Wnt Pathway in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sastre-Perona, Ana; Santisteban, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant activation of Wnt signaling is involved in the development of several epithelial tumors. Wnt signaling includes two major types of pathways: (i) the canonical or Wnt/β-catenin pathway; and (ii) the non-canonical pathways, which do not involve β-catenin stabilization. Among these pathways, the Wnt/β-catenin pathway has received most attention during the past years for its critical role in cancer. A number of publications emphasize the role of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in thyroid cancer. This pathway plays a crucial role in development and epithelial renewal, and components such as β-catenin and Axin are often mutated in thyroid cancer. Although it is accepted that altered Wnt signaling is a late event in thyroid cell transformation that affects anaplastic thyroid tumors, recent data suggest that it is also altered in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) with RET/PTC mutations. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to summarize the main relevant data of Wnt signaling in thyroid cancer, with special emphasis on the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:22645520

  15. Cold Climate Is a Risk Factor for Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lehrer, Steven; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

    2014-01-01

    Background The incidence rates of differentiated thyroid cancers of all sizes increased between 1988 and 2005 in both men and women. Exposure to ionizing radiation is the best-established environmental risk factor for thyroid cancer. Nonionizing radiation from cell phones has also been implicated. A positive correlation between all-cancer incidence rates and latitude and an inverse correlation between all-cancer incidence rates and temperature have been reported. In the present study, we examined the relationship between thyroid cancer incidence and average temperature in 50 U.S. states. Methods The age-adjusted incidence of thyroid cancer is from U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group, United States Cancer Statistics: 1999–2010, Incidence and Mortality Web-based Report (Atlanta: Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Cancer Institute; 2013, available at: www.cdc.gov/uscs). Average temperature by state is from the National Climatic Data Center, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov). Information on high-impact exposure to nuclear radiation by state is from the National Radiation Exposure Screening and Education Program, U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (http://www.hrsa.gov/gethealthcare/conditions/radiationexposure). Cell-phone subscriber data for 2007 is from the Governing State and Local Sourcebook (http://sourcebook.governing.com). Mean elevation and latitude of U.S. states is from “Elevations and Distances in the United States,” Reston, VA: U.S. Geological Survey, April 29, 2005 (http://pubs.er.usgs.gov). Results There was a significant negative correlation between average temperature by state and the age-adjusted incidence of all thyroid cancers (r2 = −0.212, P = 0.001). Because of the possible effects of ionizing radiation exposure from nuclear testing and nonionizing radiation exposure from cell phones, multiple linear regression analysis was

  16. Anaplastic carcinoma following well-differentiated thyroid cancer: etiological considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Kapp, D. S.; LiVolsi, V. A.; Sanders, M. M.

    1982-01-01

    Most cases of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma can be pathologically and often historically associated with the presence of low-grade (differentiated) cancer in the thyroid. That radiation therapy to the differentiated tumor plays an etiologic role in the transformation of a differentiated to an undifferentiated tumor has been suggested. If such therapy can be implicated, is there a difference in risk between external radiotherapy or radioactive iodine? Review of the literature discloses that more anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid develop in patients without a history of prior radiation than in individuals who have received radiation. We report our recent experience with two patients who demonstrated the sequence of well-differentiated followed by anaplastic thyroid cancer subsequent to radiation and review the question. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:7183024

  17. Novel Approaches to Thyroid Cancer Treatment and Response Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, Ravinder K.; Ho, Alan; Schöder, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has been on the rise. After total thyroidectomy of well differentiated thyroid tumors with intermediate or high-risk features on pathology, radioiodine remains one of the mainstays as the standard therapy for thyroid remnant ablation as well as treatment of metastatic disease. SPECT/CT, a relatively newer modality, has shown to play a pivotal role predominantly in the post-therapy setting by changing the risk stratification of patients with thyroid cancer. In the case of radioiodine failure, other modalities such as FDG PET/CT have been shown to provide prognostic information in terms of metabolic activity and external beam radiation therapy, thereby playing a role in disease management. The role of newer redifferentiation drugs has been evaluated with the use of I-124 PET/CT. PMID:26897715

  18. Targeted treatments of radio-iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    de la Fouchardière, C

    2015-02-01

    Radio-iodine refractory metastatic thyroid cancers are rare and their management was until recently relatively complex. New therapeutic agents, kinase inhibitors, joined since the early 2000s the fight against these cancers with very promising results. These targeted agents showed for two of them (sorafenib; lenvatinib), in randomized phase III trials, a significant improvement in response rate and progressionfree survival when compared to placebo, leading to the first approval for radio-iodine refractory metastatic thyroid cancers. In parallel, patients also benefited from the development of interventional radiology techniques and organization of cares in oncology, with multidisciplinary management strengthened by the creation of a national network (TUTHYREF).

  19. Trends in Imaging after Thyroid Cancer Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Mousumi; Muenz, Daniel G.; Worden, Francis P.; Haymart, Megan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The largest growth in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) diagnosis is in low-risk cancers. Trends in imaging after DTC diagnosis are understudied. Hypothesizing a reduction in imaging utilization due to rising low-risk disease, we evaluated post-diagnosis imaging patterns over time and patient characteristics that are associated with likelihood of imaging. Methods Using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare database, we identified patients diagnosed with localized, regional or distant DTC between 1991 and 2009. We reviewed Medicare claims for neck ultrasound, I-131 scan, or PET scan within 3 years post-diagnosis. Using regression analyses we evaluated trends of imaging utilization. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the likelihood of imaging based on patient characteristics. Results 23,669 patients were included. Patients diagnosed during 2001-2009, compared to 1991-2000, were more likely to have localized disease (p<0.001) and tumors less than 1cm (p<0.001). Use of neck ultrasound and I-131 scan increased in patients with localized disease (p=<0.001 and p=0.003, respectively), regional disease (p<0.001 and p<0.001), and distant metastasis (p=0.001 and p=0.015). Patients diagnosed after 2000 were more likely to undergo neck ultrasound (OR 2.15, 95% CI 2.02-2.28) and I-131 scan (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.35-1.54). PET scan use from 2005-2009, compared to 1996-2004, increased 32.4-fold (p=<0.001) in localized patients, 13.1-fold (p<0.001) in regional disease patients, and 33.4-fold (p<0.001) in patients with distant DTC. Conclusion Despite a rise in low-risk disease, the use of post-diagnosis imaging increased in all stages of disease. The largest growth was in use of PET scan after 2004. PMID:25565063

  20. [Thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Buffet, Camille; Groussin, Lionel

    2013-02-01

    The diagnosis of thyroiditis encompasses a broad spectrum of thyroid disorders. Analysis of signs and symptoms, biochemical changes, neck ultrasound characteristics and radioactive iodine uptake values allows an accurate diagnosis. Recent studies of the whole genome have helped to identify many susceptibility genes for autoimmune thyroiditis. However, none of these genes contribute to a significant increase in risk of developing this thyroiditis. Clinical awareness of the characteristic presentations of exceptional thyroiditis (acute suppurative thyroiditis, Riedel's thyroiditis) is an important issue. Selenium administration seems to be beneficial for reducing the incidence of thyroiditis. Finally, certain drug-induced thyroiditis remains a therapeutic challenge for the physician.

  1. The IGF system in thyroid cancer: new concepts.

    PubMed

    Vella, V; Sciacca, L; Pandini, G; Mineo, R; Squatrito, S; Vigneri, R; Belfiore, A

    2001-06-01

    In recent years, the activation of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system in cancer has emerged as a key factor for tumour progression and resistance to apoptosis. Therefore, a variety of strategies have been developed to block the type I IGF receptor (IGF-I-R), which is thought to mediate the biological effects of both IGF-I and IGF-II. However, recent data suggest that the IGF signalling system is complex and that other receptors are involved. To unravel the complexity of the IGF system in thyroid cancer, IGF-I and IGF-II production, and the expression and function of their cognate receptors were studied. Both IGFs were found to be locally produced in thyroid cancer: IGF-I by stromal cells and IGF-II by malignant thyrocytes. Values were significantly higher in malignant tissue than in normal tissue. IGF-I-Rs were overexpressed in differentiated papillary carcinomas but not in poorly differentiated or undifferentiated tumours, whereas insulin receptors (IRs) were greatly overexpressed in all tumour hystotypes, with a trend for higher values in dedifferentiated tumours. As a consequence of IR overexpression, high amounts of IR/IGF-I-R hybrids (which bind IGF-I with high affinity) were present in all thyroid cancer histotypes. Because of recent evidence that isoform A of IR (IR-A) is a physiological receptor for IGF-II in fetal life, the relative abundance of IR-A in thyroid cancer was measured. Preliminary data indicate that overexpressed IRs mainly occur as IR-A in thyroid cancer. These data indicate that both IR/IGF-I-R hybrids and IR-A play an important role in the overactivation of the IGF system in thyroid cancer and in IGF-I mitogenic signalling in these tumours. J Clin PATHOL: Mol Pathol

  2. Advances in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Levin, Mark

    2003-06-01

    From May 29 to June 5, 2003, the American Society of Clinical Oncology held its 39th Annual Meeting in Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A. The meeting was devoted to the presentation of advances in clinical sciences, diagnosis, prevention and management of malignant disorders, and brings together investigators, clinicians, policy makers and other professionals interested in the science and impact of cancer worldwide. This report will be presented in two parts, the first focusing of colon cancer, and the second on breast cancer will be published in the next issue of Drug News & Perspectives.

  3. Total oxidant/antioxidant status in sera of patients with thyroid cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Feng, Jia-Fu; Zeng, Ping; Yang, Yun-Hong; Luo, Jun; Yang, Yu-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to be involved in the pathophysiology of all cancers. In order to evaluate the total oxidant/antioxidant status in patients with thyroid cancer and to investigate the relationship between oxidative stress parameters and serum thyroid profiles among thyroid cancer patients and various controls, we determined oxidative status including total antioxidant status (TAS) and total oxidant status (TOS) and calculation of oxidative stress index (OSI) in sera in 82 thyroid cancer patients, 56 benign thyroid disease patients, and 50 healthy controls. It was found that serum TAS levels were significantly lower in patients with thyroid cancer than in controls (P<0.001), while serum TOS levels and OSI values were significantly higher (both P<0.001) in the cancer patients. No significant correlations were observed between various oxidative stress markers and thyroid profiles in either the thyroid cancer patients or the controls. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated that OSI was the best indicator for distinguishing cancer patients from benign thyroid diseased or healthy controls, followed by TOS and TAS. Risk estimate statistics also indicated that TOS and/or OSI were good risk factors to discriminate patients with thyroid cancer from two controls. These findings suggested that oxidants are increased and antioxidants are decreased in patients with thyroid cancer. OSI may be a more useful oxidative stress biomarker than TAS and TOS for monitoring the clinical status of thyroid cancer patients. PMID:22002574

  4. Antitumor Activity of VB-111, a Novel Antiangiogenic Virotherapeutic, in Thyroid Cancer Xenograft Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Reddi, H. V.; Madde, P.; Cohen, Y. C.; Bangio, L.; Breitbart, E.; Harats, D.; Bible, K. C.

    2011-01-01

    VB-111 is an engineered antiangiogenic adenovirus that expresses Fas-c in angiogenic blood vessels and has previously been shown to have significant antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo in Lewis lung carcinoma, melanoma, and glioblastoma models. To evaluate the efficacy of VB-111 in thyroid cancer, we conducted in vivo xenograft nude mouse studies using multiple thyroid cancer-derived cell lines models. VB-111 treatment resulted in 26.6% (P = 0.0596), 34.4% (P = 0.0046), and 37.6% (P = 0.0249) inhibition of tumor growth in follicular, papillary and anaplastic thyroid cancer models, respectively. No toxicity was observed in any model. All tumor types showed a consistent and significant reduction of CD-31 staining (P < 0.05), reflecting a reduction of angiogenic activity in the tumors, consistent with the intended targeting of the virus. A phase 2 clinical trial of VB-111 in patients with advanced differentiated thyroid cancer is ongoing. PMID:22701765

  5. FAP Associated Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: A Peculiar Subtype of Familial Nonmedullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cetta, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Familial Nonmedullary Thyroid Carcinoma (FNMTC) makes up to 5–10% of all thyroid cancers, also including those FNMTC occurring as a minor component of familial cancer syndromes, such as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP). We give evidence that this extracolonic manifestation of FAP is determined by the same germline mutation of the APC gene responsible for colonic polyps and cancer but also shows some unusual features (F : M ratio = 80 : 1, absence of LOH for APC in the thyroid tumoral tissue, and indolent biological behaviour, despite frequent multicentricity and lymph nodal involvement), suggesting that the APC gene confers only a generic susceptibility to thyroid cancer, but perhaps other factors, namely, modifier genes, sex-related factors, or environmental factors, are also required for its phenotypic expression. This great variability is against the possibility of classifying all FNMTC as a single entity, not only with a unique or prevalent causative genetic factor, but also with a unique or common biological behavior and a commonly dismal prognosis. A new paradigm is also suggested that could be useful (1) for a proper classification of FAP associated PTC within the larger group of FNMTC and (2) for making inferences to sporadic carcinogenesis, based on the lesson from FAP. PMID:26697262

  6. Management of metastatic thyroid cancer in pregnancy: risk and uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Kirsten; Woods, Andrew; Gupta, Sandeep; Smith, Roger; Wynne, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic thyroid cancer is an uncommon condition to be present at the time of pregnancy, but presents a challenging paradigm of care. Clinicians must balance the competing interests of long-term maternal health, best achieved by iatrogenic hyperthyroidism, regular radioiodine therapy and avoidance of dietary iodine, against the priority to care for the developing foetus, with inevitable compromise. Additionally, epidemiological and cellular data support the role of oestrogen as a growth factor for benign and malignant thyrocytes, although communicating the magnitude of this risk to patients and caregivers, as well as the uncertain impact of any pregnancy on long-term prognosis, remains challenging. Evidence to support treatment decisions in this uncommon situation is presented in the context of a case of a pregnant teenager with known metastatic papillary thyroid cancer and recent radioiodine therapy. Learning points: Pregnancy is associated with the growth of thyroid nodules due to stimulation from oestrogen receptors on thyrocytes and HCG cross-stimulation of the TSH receptor. Thyroid cancer diagnosed during pregnancy has not been shown to be associated with increased rates of persistent or recurrent disease in most studies. There is little evidence to guide the management of metastatic thyroid cancer in pregnancy, where both maternal and foetal wellbeing must be carefully balanced. PMID:27994875

  7. Thyroid gland removal

    MedlinePlus

    Total thyroidectomy; Partial thyroidectomy; Thyroidectomy; Subtotal thyroidectomy; Thyroid cancer - thyroidectomy; Papillary cancer - thyroidectomy; Goiter - thyroidectomy; Thyroid nodules - thyroidectomy

  8. Thyroid scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... test is done to: Evaluate thyroid nodules or goiter Find the cause of an overactive thyroid gland ... chap 11. Read More Anaplastic thyroid cancer Cancer Goiter - simple Hyperthyroidism Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) II PET ...

  9. Thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States. Postpartum thyroiditis, which causes ... hormone levels in the blood) followed by temporary hypothyroidism, is a common cause of thyroid problems after ...

  10. Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid is used to treat the symptoms of hypothyroidism (a condition where the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone). Symptoms of hypothyroidism include lack of energy, depression, constipation, weight gain, ...

  11. Common genetic variants in pituitary-thyroid axis genes and the risk of differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Susana; Akdi, Abdelmounaim; González, Eddy R; Castell, Juan; Biarnés, Josefina; Marcos, Ricard; Velázquez, Antonia

    2012-11-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors, THRA and THRB, together with the TSH receptor, TSHR, are key regulators of thyroid function. Alterations in the genes of these receptors (THRA, THRB and TSHR) have been related to thyroid diseases, including thyroid cancer. Moreover, there is evidence suggesting that predisposition to differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is related to common genetic variants with low penetrance that interact with each other and with environmental factors. In this study, we investigated the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the THRA (one SNP), THRB (three SNPs) and TSHR (two SNPs) genes with DTC risk. A case-control association study was conducted with 398 patients with sporadic DTC and 479 healthy controls from a Spanish population. Among the polymorphisms studied, only THRA-rs939348 was found to be associated with an increased risk of DTC (recessive model, odds ratio=1.80, 95% confidence interval=1.03-3.14, P=0.037). Gene-gene interaction analysis using the genotype data of this study together with our previous genotype data on TG and TRHR indicated a combined effect of the pairwises: THRB-TG (P interaction=0.014, THRB-rs3752874 with TG-rs2076740; P interaction=0.099, THRB-rs844107 with TG-rs2076740) and THRB-TRHR (P interaction=0.0024, THRB-rs3752874 with TRHR-rs4129682) for DTC risk in a Spanish population. Our results confirm that THRA is a risk factor for DTC, and we show for the first time the combined effect of THRB and TG or TRHR on DTC susceptibility, supporting the importance of gene-gene interaction in thyroid cancer risk.

  12. Nodal metastases in thyroid cancer: prognostic implications and management.

    PubMed

    Wang, Laura Y; Ganly, Ian

    2016-04-01

    The significance of cervical lymph node metastases in differentiated thyroid cancer has been controversial and continues to evolve. Current staging systems consider nodal metastases to confer a poorer prognosis, particularly in older patients. Increasingly, the literature suggests that characteristics of the metastatic lymph nodes such as size and number are also prognostic. There is a growing trend toward less aggressive treatment of low-volume nodal disease. The aim of this review is to summarize the current literature and discuss prognostic and management implications of lymph node metastases in differentiated thyroid cancer.

  13. [Enviromental factors in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer].

    PubMed

    Gubetta, L; Costa, A

    1978-07-14

    Local factors with a possible influence on the frequency and histological type of thyroid cancer are examined in the light of cases observed at the Mauriziano Hospital in the last 10 years. The overall number of cases has been increasing and papilliferous forms have been more common than follicular forms. Iodine deficiency and thyrotropin hyper-stimulation encourage onset and account for the higher frequency of thyroid cancer in endemic areas, where, however, follicular forms are more common. Ironising radiation is a direct cause, particularly of papilliferous forms arising after exposure during youth.

  14. Lenvatinib: A Review in Refractory Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Frampton, James E

    2016-02-01

    Lenvatinib (Lenvima®) is an oral, multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors 1, 2 and 3, fibroblast growth factor receptors 1, 2, 3 and 4, platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha, and RET and KIT signalling networks, which are implicated in tumour growth and maintenance. In the EU and USA, lenvatinib is indicated for the treatment of locally recurrent or metastatic progressive, radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (RR-DTC). This approval was based on the results of the randomized, double-blind, multinational, phase 3 SELECT study, in which lenvatinib significantly improved median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall response rate compared with placebo in patients with RR-DTC. The PFS benefit with lenvatinib was seen in all pre-specified subgroups, including patients who had received either one or no prior VEGF-targeted therapy. Moreover, the PFS benefit with lenvatinib was maintained regardless of BRAF or RAS mutation status. The safety and tolerability profile of lenvatinib in SELECT was consistent with that of other VEGF/VEGF receptor-targeted therapies and was mostly manageable. Hypertension was the most common treatment-related adverse event in lenvatinib-treated patients, but only infrequently led to discontinuation of the drug. Although not collected in SELECT, information on quality of life would be useful in assessing the overall impact of therapy on the patient. This notwithstanding, the data which are available indicate that lenvatinib is an effective and generally well-tolerated treatment option for patients with RR-DTC. Lenvatinib, therefore, offers an acceptable alternative to sorafenib--currently, the only other TKI approved for this indication.

  15. Carfilzomib is an effective anticancer agent in anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Amit; Zhang, Lisa; Boufraqech, Myriem; Zhang, Yaqin; Patel, Dhaval; Shen, Min; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-06-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies. Currently, there is no standard or effective therapy for ATC. Drug repurposing for cancer treatment is an emerging approach for identifying compounds that may have antineoplastic effects. The aim of this study was to use high-throughput drug library screening to identify and subsequently validate novel therapeutic agents with anticancer effects in ATC. We performed quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) in ATC cell lines (SW-1736, 8505C, and C-643), using a compound library of 3282 drugs. qHTS identified 100 compounds that were active in all three ATC cell lines. Proteasome inhibitors were one of the most active drug categories according to enrichment analysis. Of the three proteasome inhibitors screened, a second-generation proteasome inhibitor, carfilzomib, was the most active. Treatment of ATC cells with carfilzomib significantly inhibited cellular proliferation and induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Mechanistically, carfilzomib increased expression of p27 (CDKN1B) and decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein ATF4. Pretreatment with carfilzomib reduced in vivo metastases (lung, bone, liver, and kidney) and disease progression, and decreased N-cadherin expression. Carfilzomib treatment of mice with established, widely metastatic disease significantly increased their survival, without significant toxicity. Our findings support the use or clinical study of carfilzomib as a therapeutic option in patients with advanced and metastatic ATC.

  16. Differentiated thyroid cancer-personalized therapies to prevent overtreatment.

    PubMed

    Luster, Markus; Weber, Theresia; Verburg, Frederik A

    2014-09-01

    The concept of individualized therapy is rapidly gaining recognition in the management of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). This Review provides an overview of the most important elements of this paradigm shift in DTC management and discusses the implications for clinical practice. In the majority of patients with DTC who have an inherently good prognosis, the extent of surgery, the dosage of (131)I therapy and the use of levothyroxine therapy are all aspects suitable for individualization, on the basis of both the stage of disease and the response to treatment. In individuals with advanced disease, newer imaging techniques, advances in (131)I therapy and the use of targeted molecular therapies (such as multitargeted kinase inhibitors) have provided new options for the personalized care of patients, for whom until recently no effective therapies were available. Individualized therapies could reduce adverse effects, including the sometimes debilitating hypothyroidism that used to be required before initiation of (131)I treatment, and major salivary gland damage, a common and unpleasant side effect of (131)I therapy. Highly individualized interdisciplinary treatment of patients with DTC might lead to improved outcomes with reduced severity and frequency of complications and adverse effects. However, in spite of ongoing research, personalized therapies remain in their infancy.

  17. Metastatic Mechanisms in Follicular Cell-Derived Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phay, John E.; Ringel, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence is rising annually largely related to enhanced detection and of early stage well-differentiated primary tumors. The prognosis for patients with early stage thyroid cancer is outstanding with most patients being cured with surgery. In selected cases, I-131 is administered to treat known or suspected residual or metastatic disease. Even patients with loco-regional metastases typically have an outstanding long-term prognosis, albeit with monitoring and occasional intervention for residual or recurrent disease. In contrast, individuals with distant metastases from thyroid cancer, particular older patients with larger metastatic burdens and those with poorly differentiated tumors, have a poor prognosis. Patients with metastatic anaplastic thyroid cancer have a particularly poor prognosis. Published clinical trials indicate that transient disease control and partial remissions can be achieved with kinase inhibitor therapy directed toward angiogenic targets, and that in some cases, I-131 uptake can be enhanced. However, the direct targets of activity in metastatic lesions are incompletely defined and clear evidence that these treatments increase the duration or quality of life of patients is lacking, underscoring the need for improved knowledge regarding the metastatic process to inform the development of new therapies. In this review, we will focus on current data and hypotheses regarding key regulators of metastatic dormancy, metastatic progression, and the role of putative cancer stem cells. PMID:24036131

  18. Glutathione S-transferase polymorphisms in thyroid cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Alba; Céspedes, Walkiria; Xamena, Noel; Surrallés, Jordi; Creus, Amadeu; Galofré, Pere; Marcos, Ricardo

    2003-02-10

    Glutathione S-transferases (GST) are enzymes involved in the metabolism of many carcinogens and mutagens, also acting as important free-radical scavengers. The existence of different genetic polymorphisms in human populations has proven to be a susceptibility factor for different tumours. Nevertheless, as far as we know, for thyroid cancer no study has been conducted until now linking its incidence to genetic susceptibility biomarkers. The present investigation has been conducted to detect the possible association between polymorphism at the GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 genes and thyroid cancer incidence. Thus, 134 thyroid cancer patients and 116 controls, all from the urban district of Barcelona (Spain), have been included in this study. The results indicate that, according to the calculated odds ratio, the frequencies of the different genotypes found in the group of cancer patients do not significantly differ from those values obtained in the controls. This is true for the overall data as well as for the tumour characterization as follicular and papillar types. In addition, none of the possible combinations of mutant genotypes were shown to be risk factors. Finally, when the sex of the patients, the age of tumour onset, and life-style habits were also taken into account, no influence was observed related to the different genotypes. In conclusion, the results obtained in this study clearly suggest that those susceptibility factors related to the different GST polymorphic enzymes are not a predisposing factor in thyroid cancer disease.

  19. A Comprehensive Characterization of Mitochondrial Genome in Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xingyun; Wang, Weibin; Ruan, Guodong; Liang, Min; Zheng, Jing; Chen, Ye; Wu, Huiling; Fahey, Thomas J.; Guan, Minxin; Teng, Lisong

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear genetic alterations have been widely investigated in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), however, the characteristics of the mitochondrial genome remain uncertain. We sequenced the entire mitochondrial genome of 66 PTCs, 16 normal thyroid tissues and 376 blood samples of healthy individuals. There were 2508 variations (543 sites) detected in PTCs, among which 33 variations were novel. Nearly half of the PTCs (31/66) had heteroplasmic variations. Among the 31 PTCs, 28 specimens harbored a total of 52 somatic mutations distributed in 44 sites. Thirty-three variations including seven nonsense, 11 frameshift and 15 non-synonymous variations selected by bioinformatic software were regarded as pathogenic. These 33 pathogenic mutations were associated with older age (p = 0.0176) and advanced tumor stage (p = 0.0218). In addition, they tended to be novel (p = 0.0003), heteroplasmic (p = 0.0343) and somatic (p = 0.0018). The mtDNA copy number increased in more than two-third (46/66) of PTCs, and the average content in tumors was nearly four times higher than that in adjacent normal tissues (p < 0.0001). Three sub-haplogroups of N (A4, B4a and B4g) and eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms (mtSNPs) (A16164G, C16266T, G5460A, T6680C, G9123A, A14587G, T16362C, and G709A) were associated with the occurrence of PTC. Here we report a comprehensive characterization of the mitochondrial genome and demonstrate its significance in pathogenesis and progression of PTC. This can help to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying PTC and offer potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets for future clinical practice. PMID:27735863

  20. Obesity and Risk of Thyroid Cancer: Evidence from a Meta-Analysis of 21 Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Huang, Min; Wang, Li; Ye, Wei; Tong, Yan; Wang, Hanmin

    2015-01-01

    Background Several studies have evaluated the association between obesity and thyroid cancer risk. However, the results remain uncertain. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis to assess the association between obesity and thyroid cancer risk. Material/Methods Published literature from PubMed, EMBASE, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Chinese Biology Medicine (CBM) were retrieved before 10 August 2014. We included all studies that reported adjusted risk ratios (RRs), hazard ratios (HRs) or odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of thyroid cancer risk. Results Thirty-two studies (n=12 620 676) were included in this meta-analysis. Obesity was associated with a significantly increased risk of thyroid cancer (adjusted RR=1.33; 95% CI, 1.24–1.42; I2=25%). In the subgroup analysis by study type, increased risk of thyroid cancer was found in cohort studies and case-control studies. In subgroup analysis by sex, both obese men and women were at significantly greater risk of thyroid cancer than non-obese subjects. When stratified by ethnicity, significantly elevated risk was observed in Caucasians and in Asians. In the age subgroup analysis, both young and old populations showed increased thyroid cancer risk. Subgroup analysis on smoking status showed that increased thyroid cancer risks were found in smokers and in non-smokers. In the histology subgroup analyses, increased risks of papillary thyroid cancer, follicular thyroid cancer, and anaplastic thyroid cancer were observed. However, obesity was associated with decreased risk of medullary thyroid cancer. Conclusions Our results indicate that obesity is associated with an increased thyroid cancer risk, except medullary thyroid cancer. PMID:25612155

  1. External radiotherapy prior to thyroid cancer: A case-control study

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, A.; Loefroth, P.O. ); Hardell, L. )

    1993-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study previous radiotherapy of malignant diseases as a risk factor for thyroid cancer. By using the Swedish Cancer Registry all cases of thyroid cancer with another malignant disease at least one year previously and living within the catchment area of the hospital were traced. During 1959-1989 a total of 1056 cases of thyroid cancer were identified. Of these, 37 had had another previous malignant disease and they constituted the cases in this study. As controls four persons with at least two malignant diseases, thyroid cancer excluded, were selected for each case from the same cancer registry. Ten (27.0%) of the 37 patients with thyroid cancer as a second tumor had earlier been irradiated with the treatment dose including the thyroid gland as compared with 34 (24.5%) of the 139 control patients. Eight of the ten cases with previous irradiation of the thyroid gland had papillary cancer. The median latency was 13 years. The estimated radiation dose in the thyroid varied between 3 and 40 Gy. External radiotherapy gave a crude odds ratio of 1.1 with 95% confidence interval = 0.5-2.8 for thyroid cancer. The weighted odds ratio was calculated to 2.3 with confidence interval = 0.5-8.9. This case-control study gave a nonsignificantly increased odds ratio for thyroid cancer in patients with external radiotherapy including the thyroid gland. 26 refs., 4 tabs.

  2. Heavy metals in the volcanic environment and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Vigneri, R; Malandrino, P; Gianì, F; Russo, M; Vigneri, P

    2016-10-26

    In the last two decades thyroid cancer incidence has increased worldwide more than any other cancer. Overdiagnosis of subclinical microcarcinomas has certainly contributed to this increase but many evidences indicate that a true increase, possibly due to environmental factors, has also occurred. Thyroid cancer incidence is markedly increased in volcanic areas. Thus, the volcanic environment is a good model to investigate the possible factors favoring thyroid cancer. In the volcanic area of Mt. Etna in Sicily, as well as in other volcanic areas, a non-anthropogenic pollution with heavy metals has been documented, a consequence of gas, ash and lava emission. Soil, water and atmosphere contamination, via the food chain, biocontaminate the residents as documented by high levels in the urines and the scalp hair compared to individuals living in adjacent non-volcanic areas. Trace amounts of metals are essential nutrients but, at higher concentrations, can be toxic for living cells. Metals can behave both as endocrine disruptors, perturbing the hormonal system, and as carcinogens, promoting malignant transformation. Similarly to other carcinogens, the transforming effect of heavy metals is higher in developing organisms as the fetus (contaminated via the mother) and individuals in early childhood. In the last decades environment metal pollution has greatly increased in industrialized countries. Although still within the "normal" limits for each single metal the hormesis effect (heavy metal activity at very low concentration because of biphasic, non linear cell response) and the possible potentiation effect resulting from the mixture of different metals acting synergistically can explain cell damage at very low concentrations. The effect of metals on the human thyroid is poorly studied: for some heavy metals no data are available. The scarce studies that have been performed mainly focus on metal effect as thyroid endocrine disruptors. The metal concentration in tissues has

  3. Thyroid metastases from colorectal cancer: the Institut Gustave Roussy experience.

    PubMed

    Lièvre, Astrid; Leboulleux, Sophie; Boige, Valérie; Travagli, Jean-Paul; Dromain, Clarisse; Elias, Dominique; Ducreux, Michel; Malka, David

    2006-08-01

    The prevalence of thyroid metastases in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is unknown. We retrieved the records of all patients with CRC and pathologically proved thyroid metastasis for the period 1993-2004. Among 5,862 consecutive patients with CRC, 6 (0.1%) were diagnosed with thyroid metastases, a median of 61 months after the diagnosis of primary tumour, and a median of 19 months after the last surgical resection or radiofrequency ablation of other metastases (which were present in all cases). Signs and symptoms, when present (n=3), consisted of cervical pain, cervical adenopathy, goitre, dysphagia, and/or dysphonia. In other cases, the diagnosis was made by positron emission tomography scanning. Thyroidectomy was performed in the 5 patients with isolated thyroid metastases, with cervical lymph node dissection being required in all cases. The only patient treated conservatively because of concomitant liver and lung metastases developed life-threatening dyspnoea, which required emergent tracheal stenting. Median overall survival was 77 months, 58 months, and 12 months after the diagnosis of primary CRC, initial metastases, and thyroid metastasis, respectively. It is concluded that thyroid metastases are rare and occur late in the course of CRC. Thyroidectomy (with cervical lymph node dissection) may result in prevention or improvement of life-threatening symptoms and prolonged survival.

  4. Associations between body mass index and lymph node metastases of patients with papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Changhua; Wang, Liang; Chen, Wanjun; Zou, Shujuan; Yang, Aiju

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Epidemiological studies suggest that obesity is a risk of thyroid cancer, especially papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). However, the associations of obesity and clinic–pathological features, especially the association of body mass index (BMI) and lymph node metastasis of thyroid cancer are unclear. Seven hundred ninety-six primary patients with PTC were enrolled in this retrospective cohort study. The relationships between BMI and clinic-pathological features of PTC were evaluated by logistic regression models based on the 5-point increase in BMI and BMI quartiles (underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obesity). The 5-point increase in BMI was strongly associated with extra-thyroidal invasion [odds ratio (OR) 2.201, P < 0.001], primary tumor size larger than 1 cm (OR 1.267, P = 0.027), advanced tumor node metastasis (TNM) staging (OR 1.479, P = 0.004), and multifocality (OR 1.31, P = 0.01) in multivariable-adjusted models. The relationships between BMI and lymph node metastasis of PTC were evaluated by Mann–Whitney U test. The mean number of positive central lymph nodes and lateral nodes were increased with the increase of BMI when BMI ≥18.5 kg/m2. It was not shown in underweight group. The present study found that increased BMI was associated with the lymph node metastases (LNMs) of patients with PTC, and other invasive features, including large tumor size, extra-thyroidal invasion, advanced TNM staging, and multifocality. Further studies with long-term follow-up are needed to confirm this finding. PMID:28248875

  5. Can non-thyroid illness syndrome predict mortality in lung cancer patients? A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Yasar, Zehra Asuk; Kirakli, Cenk; Yilmaz, Ufuk; Ucar, Zeynep Zeren; Talay, Fahrettin

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the incidence of non-thyroid illness syndrome (NTIS) among patients diagnosed as lung cancer and its association with the stage of the disease, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance score, nutritional parameters, and survival. We enrolled 120 patients that 71 of them with newly diagnosed and staged non-small cell lung cancer and 49 of them small-cell lung cancer. The cases were examined for thyroid function tests, ECOG performance score, and nutritional evaluation before treatment. Also, cases were evaluated for their overall survival rates. NTIS was identified in 30 (42 %) of the 71 non-small cell lung cancer patients and 22 (44 %) of the 49 small-cell lung cancer patients. NTIS was more frequent among advanced stage of cases. Serum albumin level, cholesterol level, lymphocyte level, and body mass index were detected to be significantly low and ECOG performance score was significantly high in cases with NTIS when compared to cases without NTIS. NTIS was found to be negatively correlated with body mass index, ECOG performance score, and serum albumin level, and it was positively correlated with disease stage. NTIS was detected significantly as a poor prognostic factor for lung cancer. NTIS was frequently seen in cases with non-small cell lung cancer and small-cell lung cancer. NTIS can be used as a predictor of poor prognosis for lung cancer patients.

  6. Engagement of Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-15

    End of Life; Advanced Cancer; Lung Neoplasm; Gastric Cancer; Colon Cancer; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Head and Neck Neoplasms; Rectum Cancer; Melanoma; Kidney Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Neoplasms; Liver Cancer; Cancer of Unknown Origin

  7. Systemic treatment and management approaches for medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Ernani, Vinicius; Kumar, Mukesh; Chen, Amy Y; Owonikoko, Taofeek K

    2016-11-01

    Although rare, medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) exemplifies the value that ever-expanding knowledge of molecular pathways and mechanisms brings to managing challenging cancers. Although surgery can be curative for MTC in many patients, a substantial proportion of patients present with locoregional or distant metastatic disease. Once distant disease occurs, treatment options are limited, and conventional cancer treatments such as cytotoxic chemotherapy are of minimal benefit. Biomarkers such as calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen are important correlates of disease burden as well as predictors of disease progress, including recurrence and survival. MTC is either sporadic (∼75%) or inherited (∼25%) as an autosomal dominant disease. Regardless, germline and somatic mutations, particularly in the rearranged during transfection (RET) proto-oncogene, are key factors in the neoplastic process. Gain-of-function RET mutations result in overactive proteins that lead to abnormal activation of downstream signal transduction pathways, resulting in ligand-independent growth and resistance to apoptotic stimuli. Specific RET mutation variants have been found to correlate with phenotype and natural history of MTC with some defects portending a more aggressive clinical course. Greater understanding of the consequence of the aberrant signaling pathway has fostered the development of targeted therapies. Two small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, vandetanib and cabozantinib, are currently available as approved agents for the treatment of advanced or progressive MTC and provide significant increases in progression-free survival. Since there have been no head-to-head comparisons, clinicians often select between these agents on the basis of familiarity, patient characteristics, comorbidities, and toxicity profile.

  8. Thyroid Hormone Receptor-β (TRβ) Mediates Runt-Related Transcription Factor 2 (Runx2) Expression in Thyroid Cancer Cells: A Novel Signaling Pathway in Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Carr, Frances E; Tai, Phillip W L; Barnum, Michael S; Gillis, Noelle E; Evans, Katherine G; Taber, Thomas H; White, Jeffrey H; Tomczak, Jennifer A; Jaworski, Diane M; Zaidi, Sayyed K; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2016-08-01

    Dysregulation of the thyroid hormone receptor (TR)β is common in human cancers. Restoration of functional TRβ delays tumor progression in models of thyroid and breast cancers implicating TRβ as a tumor suppressor. Conversely, aberrant expression of the runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) is established in the progression and metastasis of thyroid, breast, and other cancers. Silencing of Runx2 diminishes tumor invasive characteristics. With TRβ as a tumor suppressor and Runx2 as a tumor promoter, a compelling question is whether there is a functional relationship between these regulatory factors in thyroid tumorigenesis. Here, we demonstrated that these proteins are reciprocally expressed in normal and malignant thyroid cells; TRβ is high in normal cells, and Runx2 is high in malignant cells. T3 induced a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in Runx2 expression. Silencing of TRβ by small interfering RNA knockdown resulted in a corresponding increase in Runx2 and Runx2-regulated genes, indicating that TRβ levels directly impact Runx2 expression and associated epithelial to mesenchymal transition molecules. TRβ specifically bound to 3 putative thyroid hormone-response element motifs within the Runx2-P1 promoter ((-)105/(+)133) as detected by EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation. TRβ suppressed Runx2 transcriptional activities, thus confirming TRβ regulation of Runx2 at functional thyroid hormone-response elements. Significantly, these findings indicate that a ratio of the tumor-suppressor TRβ and tumor-promoting Runx2 may reflect tumor aggression and serve as biomarkers in biopsy tissues. The discovery of this TRβ-Runx2 signaling supports the emerging role of TRβ as a tumor suppressor and reveals a novel pathway for intervention.

  9. Incidence of thyroid cancer in women in relation to previous exposure to radiation therapy and history of thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    McTiernan, A.M.; Weiss, N.S.; Daling, J.R.

    1984-09-01

    Female residents of 13 counties of Western Washington, in whom papillary, follicular, or mixed papillary-follicular thyroid carcinomas had been diagnosed between 1974 and 1979 were interviewed regarding their medical and reproductive histories and past exposure to radiation treatments. For comparison, a random sample of women from the same population was interviewed. Women who had received radiation treatments to the head or neck prior to 5 years before interview were 16.5 times (95% confidence interval . 8.1-33.5) more likely than unexposed women to develop cancer. The relative risk (RR) was highest for papillary cancer (19.4) but also was elevated substantially for follicular and mixed papillary-follicular tumors. Women first irradiated at age 19 years or younger had a much higher RR than did women irradiated at age 20 or older. Regardless of prior radiation exposure, women who ever had had a goiter were at increased risk of developing thyroid cancer. Women who had ever developed a goiter had 17 times the risk of developing follicular cancer and almost 7 times the risk of developing papillary cancer as compared with women who never had had a goiter. Risk of thyroid cancer was elevated even among women who had had a history of goiter many years prior to diagnosis. A history of thyroid nodules was also a risk factor for papillary and mixed thyroid cancer. Neither a history of hypothyroidism nor hyperthyroidism was found to increase the risk of thyroid cancer.

  10. Expression of glutamine metabolism-related proteins in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Min; Lee, Yu Kyung; Koo, Ja Seung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to investigate the expression of glutamine metabolism-related protein in tumor and stromal compartments among the histologic subtypes of thyroid cancer. Results GLS1 and GDH expression in tumor and stromal compartments were the highest in AC than in other subtypes. Tumoral ASCT2 expression was higher in MC but lower in FC (p < 0.001). In PTC, tumoral GLS1 and tumoral GDH expression was higher in the conventional type than in the follicular variant (p = 0.043 and 0.001, respectively), and in PTC with BRAF V600E mutation than in PTC without BRAF V600E mutation (p<0.001). Stromal GDH positivity was the independent factor associated with short overall survival (hazard ratio: 21.48, 95% confidence interval: 2.178-211.8, p = 0.009). Methods We performed tissue microarrays with 557 thyroid cancer cases (papillary thyroid carcinoma [PTC]: 344, follicular carcinoma [FC]: 112, medullary carcinoma [MC]: 70, poorly differentiated carcinoma [PDC]: 23, and anaplastic carcinoma [AC]: 8) and 152 follicular adenoma (FA) cases. We performed immunohistochemical staining of glutaminolysis-related proteins (glutaminase 1 [GLS1], glutamate dehydrogenase [GDH], and amino acid transporter-2 [ASCT-2]). Conclusion Glutamine metabolism-related protein expression differed among the histologic subtypes of thyroid cancer. PMID:27447554

  11. Genetic Alterations in Hungarian Patients with Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tobiás, Bálint; Halászlaki, Csaba; Balla, Bernadett; Kósa, János P; Árvai, Kristóf; Horváth, Péter; Takács, István; Nagy, Zsolt; Horváth, Evelin; Horányi, János; Járay, Balázs; Székely, Eszter; Székely, Tamás; Győri, Gabriella; Putz, Zsuzsanna; Dank, Magdolna; Valkusz, Zsuzsanna; Vasas, Béla; Iványi, Béla; Lakatos, Péter

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancers is increasing worldwide. Some somatic oncogene mutations (BRAF, NRAS, HRAS, KRAS) as well as gene translocations (RET/PTC, PAX8/PPAR-gamma) have been associated with the development of thyroid cancer. In our study, we analyzed these genetic alterations in 394 thyroid tissue samples (197 papillary carcinomas and 197 healthy). The somatic mutations and translocations were detected by Light Cycler melting method and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction techniques, respectively. In tumorous samples, 86 BRAF (44.2%), 5 NRAS (3.1%), 2 HRAS (1.0%) and 1 KRAS (0.5%) mutations were found, as well as 9 RET/PTC1 (4.6%) and 1 RET/PTC3 (0.5%) translocations. No genetic alteration was seen in the non tumorous control thyroid tissues. No correlation was detected between the genetic variants and the pathological subtypes of papillary cancer as well as the severity of the disease. Our results are only partly concordant with the data found in the literature.

  12. Cervical distribution of iodine 131 following total thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fratkin, M.J.; Newsome, H.H. Jr.; Sharpe, A.R. Jr.; Tatum, J.L.

    1983-07-01

    The use of postoperative radioiodine thyroid scanning has questioned whether total thyroidectomy is surgically possible. Similar to earlier studies, we have found functioning iodine 131 (/sup 131/I)-avid thyroid tissue in our patients following total thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer. Preoperative and postoperative thyroid scans were compared in 24 patients to study the cervical location of postthyroidectomy residual thyroid tissue. Thyroid scanning detected 44 distinct sites of uptake. Thirty-eight of these foci were located either at the extremes of the upper poles of the thyroid gland (24) or along the embryonic thyroid descent tract (14). We conclude that these foci of /sup 131/I uptake represent incomplete resection of normal thyroid tissue, and that surgical attention to these areas should result more frequently in extirpation of the entire thyroid gland.

  13. The evolving field of kinase inhibitors in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Marotta, V; Sciammarella, C; Vitale, M; Colao, A; Faggiano, A

    2015-01-01

    Most of the genetic events implicated in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer (TC) involve genes with kinase activity. Thus, kinase inhibitors (KIs) are very relevant in this field. KIs are considered the most suitable treatment for patients with iodine-refractory differentiated TC; these patients comprise the subgroup with the poorer prognosis. To date, only sorafenib has been approved for this indication, but promising results have been reported with several other KIs. In particular, lenvatinib has demonstrated excellent efficacy, with both progression-free survival and objective tumour response being better than with sorafenib. Despite being considered to be well tolerated, both sorafenib and lenvatinib have shown a remarkable toxicity, which has led to dose reductions in the majority of patients and to treatment discontinuation in a significant proportion of cases. The role of KIs in differentiated TC may be revolutionised by the finding that selumetinib may restore a clinical response to radioactive iodine (RAI). Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of advanced, progressive medullary TC (MTC). Nevertheless, the toxicity of both compounds suggests their selective use in those patients with strong disease progression. Treatment with the mTOR-inhibitor everolimus, alone or in combination with somatostatin analogues, should be studied in metastatic MTC patients with slow progression of disease, these representing the vast majority of patients. KIs did not significantly impact on the clinical features of anaplastic TC (ATC).

  14. Association of telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations with clinicopathological features and prognosis of thyroid cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xingyun; Jiang, Xiaoxia; Wang, Weibin; Wang, Haiyong; Xu, Xin; Lin, Aihui; Teng, Xiaodong; Wu, Huiling; Teng, Lisong

    2016-01-01

    The clinicopathological and prognostic significance of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations have been widely investigated in thyroid cancer; however, the results are still discrepant. Systematic searches were performed in PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Ovid, and the Cochran Library databases for relevant articles prior to April 2016. Mutation rates were synthesized by R statistical software. The odds ratio or standardized mean difference with 95% confidence interval was pooled by Stata. A total of 22 studies with 4,907 cases were included in this meta-analysis. TERT promoter mutations tended to present in aggressive histological types including poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (33.37%), anaplastic thyroid cancer (38.69%), and tall-cell variant papillary thyroid cancer (30.23%). These promoter mutations were likely to exist in older patients and males and were well associated with larger tumor size, extrathyroidal extension, vascular invasion, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, advanced tumor stage, disease recurrence/persistence, and mortality. In addition, TERT promoter mutations (especially C228T) tended to coexist with BRAFV600E mutation, which indicated more aggressive tumor behavior. Therefore, TERT promoter mutations may be promising biomarkers for early diagnosis, risk stratification, prognostic prediction, and management of thyroid cancer. PMID:27956840

  15. Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy and Follicular Thyroid Cancer: A Rare Paraneoplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tavarelli, Martina; Sarfati, Julie; De Gennes, Christian; Haroche, Julien; Buffet, Camille; Ghander, Cécile; Simon, Jean Marc; Ménégaux, Fabrice; Leenhardt, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) is a rare condition characterized by bone and joint pain and digital clubbing usually associated with bronchopulmonary diseases. Primary HOA is rare and the pathogenesis remains unclear. Objectives Cases of HOA as a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with thyroid carcinoma are very rare – only 2 cases have been described in the literature. Results We present the first case of a 40-year-old patient affected by HOA associated with invasive differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma operated in 2 stages. Both operations were followed by radioiodine ablation, and then a rapid unresectable local recurrence developed requiring cervical radiotherapy (70 Gy). A second treatment with 100 mCi of 131I confirmed it was a refractory thyroid cancer. Further surgery confirmed a poorly differentiated follicular cancer and 12 cycles of chemotherapy by gemcitabine and oxaliplatin followed. During the 8 years of follow-up, cervical recurrence was stable, but severe episodes of hemoptysis occurred requiring iterative embolization of the bronchial and tracheal arteries. Other lung diseases were excluded. Digital clubbing appeared, which was associated with arthritis, bone pain and inflammatory syndrome. X-rays and magnetic resonance imaging found periosteal apposition in the long bones; bone scintigraphy confirmed the HOA diagnosis. Other causes of arthritis were eliminated. She was treated with colchicine, corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but only the combination of methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine reduced the morphine requirements. Conclusion HOA is exceptionally associated with thyroid cancer and we raised the hypothesis of the secretion of a circulating factor in a patient with invasive and recurrent follicular thyroid cancer, refractory to radioiodine. PMID:26835431

  16. Thyroid cancer with tracheal invasion: a pathological estimation.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Vincenzo; La Rosa, Stefano; Imperatori, Andrea; Rotolo, Nicola; Tanda, Maria Laura; Sessa, Andrea; Dominioni, Lorenzo; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo

    2016-10-01

    We review the clinical and pathologic features of seven cases of papillary carcinoma of the thyroid that invaded the trachea and were treated by thyroidectomy, airway resection with reconstructive surgery over an interval of 15 years. We depicted the peculiarity of invasion of well differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) cells is perpendicularly oriented to the tracheal lumen, in between cartilaginous rings, along blood vessels and collagen fibers. Tracheal rings appear non-infiltrated in all histological sections of well differentiated PTC infiltrating the trachea. Similar description of inter-cartilage PTC infiltration into the trachea was first provided by Shin et al. in 1993. Interestingly, our pathological revision support the estimation by Shin et al., though that cartilage rings infiltration did occur in poorly differentiated thyroid cancers with exiguous prognosis.

  17. Thyroid cancer with tracheal invasion: a pathological estimation

    PubMed Central

    Pappalardo, Vincenzo; La Rosa, Stefano; Imperatori, Andrea; Rotolo, Nicola; Tanda, Maria Laura; Sessa, Andrea; Dominioni, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    We review the clinical and pathologic features of seven cases of papillary carcinoma of the thyroid that invaded the trachea and were treated by thyroidectomy, airway resection with reconstructive surgery over an interval of 15 years. We depicted the peculiarity of invasion of well differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) cells is perpendicularly oriented to the tracheal lumen, in between cartilaginous rings, along blood vessels and collagen fibers. Tracheal rings appear non-infiltrated in all histological sections of well differentiated PTC infiltrating the trachea. Similar description of inter-cartilage PTC infiltration into the trachea was first provided by Shin et al. in 1993. Interestingly, our pathological revision support the estimation by Shin et al., though that cartilage rings infiltration did occur in poorly differentiated thyroid cancers with exiguous prognosis. PMID:27867870

  18. [Advance of researches on thyroid tissues autotransplantation and embryonic stem cell transplantation in therapy of hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Ma, Quanfu; Kuang, Anren

    2008-10-01

    Patients with irreversible hypothyroidism require lifelong levo-thyroxin ( L-T4) replacement therapy, which makes them feel discomfortable. With the development of the thyroid tissues autotransplantation and embryonic stem cell (ESC), this would be a more physiological approach to the treatment of irreversible hypothyroidism. The animal experiments and human clinical trials on thyroid tissues autotransplantation have shown that the autograft can survive and function. The advanced researches have demonstrated that ESC can differentiate into thyroid follicular cells.

  19. Thyroid nodularity and cancer among Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia

    SciTech Connect

    Inskip, P.D.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Tekkel, M.

    1997-02-01

    Thyroid examinations, including palpation, ultrasound and, selectively, fine-needle aspiration biopsy, were conducted on nearly 2,000 Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia to evaluate the occurrence of thyroid cancer and nodular thyroid disease among men with protracted exposure to ionizing radiation. The examinations were conducted in four cities in Estonia during March-April 1995, 9 years after the reactor accident. The study population was selected from a predefined cohort of 4,833 cleanup workers from Estonia under surveillance for cancer incidence. These men had been sent to Chernobyl between 1986 and 1991 to entomb the damaged reactor, remove radioactive debris and perform related cleanup activities. A total of 2,997 men were invited for thyroid screening and 1,984 (66%) were examined. Estimates of radiation dose from external sources were obtained from military or other institutional records, and details about service dates and types of work performed while at Chernobyl were obtained from a self-administered questionnaire. Blood samples were collected for assay of chromosomal translocations in circulating lymphocytes and loss of expression of the glycophorin A (GPA) gene in erythrocytes. The primary outcome measure was the presence or absence of thyroid nodules as determined by the ultrasound examination. Of the screened workers, 1,247 (63%) were sent to Chernobyl in 1986, including 603 (30%) sent in April or May, soon after the accident. Workers served at Chernobyl for an average of 3 months. The average age was 32 years at the time of arrival at Chernobyl and 40 years at the time of thyroid examination. The mean documented radiation dose from external sources was 10.8 cGy. Biological indicators of exposure showed low correlations with documented dose, but did not indicate that the mean dose for the population was higher than the average documented dose. 47 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

  20. The Breast-Thyroid Cancer Link: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Sarah M.; White, Michael G.; Hong, Susan; Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Kaplan, Edwin L.; Angelos, Peter; Kulkarni, Swati A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Grogan, Raymon H.

    2015-01-01

    Rates of thyroid cancer in women with a history of breast cancer are higher than expected. Similarly, rates of breast cancer in those with a history of thyroid cancer are increased. Explanations for these associations include detection bias, shared hormonal risk factors, treatment effect, and genetic susceptibility. With increasing numbers of breast and thyroid cancer survivors clinicians should be particularly cognizant of this association. Here we perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature utilizing PubMed and Scopus search engines to identify all publications studying the incidence of breast cancer as a secondary malignancy following a diagnosis of thyroid cancer or thyroid cancer following a diagnosis of breast cancer. This demonstrated an increased risk of thyroid cancer as a secondary malignancy following breast cancer (OR=1.55, 95% CI [1.44,1.67]) and an increased risk of breast cancer as a secondary malignancy following thyroid cancer (OR= 1.32, 95% CI [1.23,1.42]). There is a clear increase in the odds of developing either thyroid or breast cancer as a secondary malignancy after diagnosis with the other. Here we review this association and current hypothesis as to the cause of this correlation. PMID:26908594

  1. Engineering Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Therapeutic Bionanofluids to Selectively Target Papillary Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paliouras, Miltiadis; Mitmaker, Elliot J.; Trifiro, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has risen steadily over the past few decades as well as the recurrence rates. It has been proposed that targeted ablative physical therapy could be a therapeutic modality in thyroid cancer. Targeted bio-affinity functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BioNanofluid) act locally, to efficiently convert external light energy to heat thereby specifically killing cancer cells. This may represent a promising new cancer therapeutic modality, advancing beyond conventional laser ablation and other nanoparticle approaches. Methods Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR) was selected as a target for PTC cells, due to its wide expression. Either TSHR antibodies or Thyrogen or purified TSH (Thyrotropin) were chemically conjugated to our functionalized Bionanofluid. A diode laser system (532 nm) was used to illuminate a PTC cell line for set exposure times. Cell death was assessed using Trypan Blue staining. Results TSHR-targeted BioNanofluids were capable of selectively ablating BCPAP, a TSHR-positive PTC cell line, while not TSHR-null NSC-34 cells. We determined that a 2:1 BCPAP cell:α-TSHR-BioNanofluid conjugate ratio and a 30 second laser exposure killed approximately 60% of the BCPAP cells, while 65% and >70% of cells were ablated using Thyrotropin- and Thyrogen-BioNanofluid conjugates, respectively. Furthermore, minimal non-targeted killing was observed using selective controls. Conclusion A BioNanofluid platform offering a potential therapeutic path for papillary thyroid cancer has been investigated, with our in vitro results suggesting the development of a potent and rapid method of selective cancer cell killing. Therefore, BioNanofluid treatment emphasizes the need for new technology to treat patients with local recurrence and metastatic disease who are currently undergoing either re-operative neck explorations, repeated administration of radioactive iodine and as a last resort external beam

  2. Bridging hypoxia, inflammation and estrogen receptors in thyroid cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Tafani, Marco; De Santis, Elena; Coppola, Luigi; Perrone, Giulietta A; Carnevale, Ilaria; Russo, Andrea; Pucci, Bruna; Carpi, Angelo; Bizzarri, Mariano; Russo, Matteo A

    2014-02-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine-related cancer with a higher incidence in women than in men. Thyroid tumors are classified on the basis of their histopathology as papillary, follicular, medullary, and undifferentiated or anaplastic. Epidemiological and in vitro or in vivo studies have suggested a correlation between incidence of thyroid malignancies and hormones. In particular, growing evidence indicates a role of estrogens and estrogen receptors (ERs) in thyroid tumorigenesis, reprogramming and progression. In this scenario, estrogens are hypothesized to contribute to the observed female predominance of thyroid cancer in reproductive years. However, the precise contribution of estrogens in thyroid proliferative disease initiation and progression is not well understood. HIF-1α and NF-κB are two transcription factors very frequently activated in tumors and involved in tumor growth, progression and resistance to chemotherapy. In fact, HIF-1α and NF-κB together regulate transcription of over a thousand genes that, in turn, control vital cellular processes such as adaptation to the hypoxia, metabolic and differentiation reprogramming, inflammatory-reparative response, extracellular matrix digestion, migration and invasion, adhesion, etc. Because of this wide involvement, they could control in an integrated manner the origin of the malignant phenotype. Interestingly, hypoxia and inflammation have been sequentially bridged in tumors by the discovery that alarmin receptors genes such as RAGE, P2X7 and some TLRs are activated by HIF-1α; and that, in turn, alarmin receptors strongly activate NF-κB and proinflammatory gene expression, evidencing all the hallmarks of the malignant phenotype. Recently, a large number of drugs have been identified that inhibit one or both transcription factors with promising results in terms of controlling tumor progression. In addition, many of these inhibitors are natural compounds or off-label drugs already used to cure other

  3. Thyroid Cancer Risk Is Not Increased in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated thyroid cancer risk with regards to diabetes status and diabetes duration, and with the use of anti-diabetic drugs including sulfonylurea, metformin, insulin, acarbose, pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, by using a population-based reimbursement database in Taiwan. Methods A random sample of 1,000,000 subjects covered by the National Health Insurance was recruited. After excluding patients with type 1 diabetes, 999730 subjects (495673 men and 504057 women) were recruited into the analyses. Logistic regression estimated the odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) for independent variables including age, sex, diabetes status/duration, anti-diabetic drugs, other medications, comorbidities, living regions, occupation and examinations that might potentially lead to the diagnosis of thyroid cancer in various models. Results The diabetic patients had a significantly higher probability of receiving potential detection examinations (6.38% vs. 5.83%, P<0.0001). After multivariable-adjustment, the OR (95% CI) for diabetes status was 0.816 (0.652–1.021); and for diabetes duration <1 year, 1–3 years, 3–5 years and ≥5 years vs. non-diabetes was 0.071 (0.010–0.507), 0.450 (0.250–0.813), 0.374 (0.203–0.689) and 1.159 (0.914–1.470), respectively. Among the anti-diabetic agents, only sulfonylurea was significantly associated with thyroid cancer, OR (95% CI): 1.882 (1.202–2.947). The OR (95% CI) for insulin, metformin, acarbose, pioglitazone and rosiglitazone was 1.701 (0.860–3.364), 0.696 (0.419–1.155), 0.581 (0.202–1.674), 0.522 (0.069–3.926) and 0.669 (0.230–1.948), respectively. Furthermore, patients with benign thyroid disease or other cancer, living in Kao-Ping/Eastern regions, or receiving potential detection examinations might have a significantly higher risk; and male sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, vascular complications or use of statin, aspirin or non

  4. Incidental thyroid 99mTc-MDP uptake in a patient affected by differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Albano, Domenico; Magri, Gian Carlo; Treglia, Giorgio; Bertagna, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of incidental uptake of 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate in the thyroid in a 62-year-old female with a history of breast cancer treated with quadrantectomy, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, who underwent total-body-bone scintigraphy during follow up. Planar scintigraphy was followed by neck SPECT-CT that demonstrated an area of increased tracer uptake in the neck at the left lobe of the thyroid. Neck ultrasonography showed a nodule corresponding to SPECT-CT finding and the ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration documented the presence of papillary carcinoma. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy and ipsilateral lymphadenectomy; histological examination confirmed the presence of a papillary carcinoma and the patient underwent ablation therapy with iodine-131.

  5. Thyroid and Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meetings ATA Publications ATA Professional Guidelines Research Grants Thyroid Cancer Trainees Corner ATA Career Link Continuing Medical Education THYROID Calculators Thyroid Cancer Staging (CEA) Doubling Time Calculator Change In Thyroid ...

  6. Risk Factors for Thyroid Cancer: A Hospital-Based Case-Control Study in Korean Adults

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Seung-Kwon; Lee, Chan Wha; Lee, Jeonghee; Kim, Jeongseon; Kim, Hyeon Suk

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Although the incidence of thyroid cancer in Korea has rapidly increased over the past decade, few studies have investigated its risk factors. This study examined the risk factors for thyroid cancer in Korean adults. Materials and Methods The study design was a hospital-based case-control study. Between August 2002 and December 2011, a total of 802 thyroid cancer cases out of 34,211 patients screened from the Cancer Screenee. Cohort of the National Cancer Center in South Korea were included in the analysis. A total of 802 control cases were selected from the same cohort, and matched individually (1:1) by age (±2 years) and area of residence for control group 1 and additionally by sex for control group 2. Results Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis using the control group 1 showed that females and those with a family history of thyroid cancer had an increased risk of thyroid cancer, whereas ever-smokers and those with a higher monthly household income had a decreased risk of thyroid cancer. On the other hand, the analysis using control group 2 showed that a family history of cancer and alcohol consumption were associated with a decreased risk of thyroid cancer, whereas higher body mass index (BMI) and family history of thyroid cancer were associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer. Conclusion These findings suggest that females, those with a family history of thyroid cancer, those with a higher BMI, non-smokers, non-drinkers, and those with a lower monthly household income have an increased risk of developing thyroid cancer. PMID:27338034

  7. Lymphocytic profiling in thyroid cancer provides clues for failure of tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Imam, Shahnawaz; Paparodis, Rodis; Sharma, Deepak; Jaume, Juan Carlos

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid cancers are usually surrounded by a significant number of immune-reactive cells. Tumor-associated lymphocytes as well as background lymphocytic thyroiditis are frequently mentioned in pathology reports of patients who have undergone surgery for thyroid cancer. The nature of this lymphocytic reaction is not well understood. The fact that cancer can survive in this adverse microenvironment is indicative of immune regulation. We characterized the lymphocytic infiltration that accompanies thyroid cancer and compared it with that present in thyroid autoimmunity. We found that double-negative (DN) T cells were significantly more abundant in thyroid cancer than in thyroid autoimmunity. Although FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells were also present, DN T cells were the dominant cell type, associated with thyroid cancer. Furthermore, upon stimulation, the DN T cells associated with cancer remained unchanged, while the few (<5%) DN T cells associated with thyroid autoimmunity increased in numbers (>20%). CD25 expression on DN T cells remained unchanged after stimulation, which indicates that the increase in the absolute number of DN T cells in thyroid autoimmunity was at the expense of inactivation of single-positive T cells. We concluded that in the setting of thyroid cancer, DN T cells appear to suppress tumor immunity. In contrast, in thyroid autoimmunity, DN T cells were barely present and only increased at the expense of inactivated, single-positive T cells upon induction. Together, these findings indicate that thyroid cancer-associated DN T cells might regulate proliferation and effector function of T cells and thereby contribute to tumor tolerance and active avoidance of tumor immunity.

  8. Timing of multikinase inhibitor initiation in differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Brose, Marcia S; Smit, Jan Wa; Lin, Chia-Chi; Pitoia, Fabian; Fellous, Marc; DeSanctis, Yoriko; Schlumberger, Martin; Tori, Masayuki; Sugitani, Iwao

    2017-03-07

    There are limited treatment options for patients with radioactive iodine-refractory, progressive differentiated thyroid cancer. Although there is consensus that multikinase inhibitor therapy should be considered in patients with progressive disease with considerable tumor load or symptomatic disease, uncertainty exists on the optimal timing to treat with a multikinase inhibitor, especially for asymptomatic patients. RIFTOS MKI is an international, prospective, open-label, multicenter, noninterventional study with the primary objective to compare the time to symptomatic progression from study entry in asymptomatic patients with radioactive iodine -refractory, progressive differentiated thyroid cancer for whom there is a decision to initiate multikinase inhibitors at study entry (cohort 1) with those for whom there is a decision to not initiate multikinase inhibitors at study entry (cohort 2). Secondary endpoints are overall survival and progression-free survival, which will be compared between cohorts 1 and 2. Additional secondary endpoints are postprogression survival from time of symptomatic progression, duration of and response to each systemic treatment regimen, and dosing of sorafenib throughout the treatment period. Asymptomatic, multikinase inhibitor-naive patients aged ≥18 years with histologically/cytologically documented differentiated thyroid cancer that is radioactive iodine-refractory are eligible. Patients may receive any therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer, including sorafenib or other multikinase inhibitors if indicated and decided on by the treating physician. In total, 700 patients are estimated to be enrolled from >20 countries. Final analysis will be performed once the last enrolled patient has been followed up with for 24 months. (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02303444).

  9. High-throughput drug library screening identifies colchicine as a thyroid cancer inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Le; Yang, Zhaoying; Granieri, Letizia; Pasculescu, Adrian; Datti, Alessandro; Asa, Sylvia L.; Xu, Zheli; Ezzat, Shereen

    2016-01-01

    We employed a high-throughput drug library screening platform to identify novel agents affecting thyroid cancer cells. We used human thyroid cancer cell lines to screen a collection of approximately 5200 small molecules with biological and/or pharmacologial properties. Parallel primary screens yielded a number of hits differentially active between thyroid and melanoma cells. Amongst compounds specifically targeting thyroid cancer cells, colchicine emerged as an effective candidate. Colchicine inhibited cell growth which correlated with G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These effects were hampered through inhibition of MEK1/2 and JNK. In contrast, inhibition of p38-MAPK had little effect, and AKT had no impact on colchicine action. Systemic colchicine inhibited thyroid cancer progression in xenografted mice. These findings demonstrate that our screening platform is an effective vehicle for drug reposition and show that colchicine warrants further attention in well-defined clinical niches such as thyroid cancer. PMID:26942566

  10. High-throughput drug library screening identifies colchicine as a thyroid cancer inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Yang, Zhaoying; Granieri, Letizia; Pasculescu, Adrian; Datti, Alessandro; Asa, Sylvia L; Xu, Zheli; Ezzat, Shereen

    2016-04-12

    We employed a high-throughput drug library screening platform to identify novel agents affecting thyroid cancer cells. We used human thyroid cancer cell lines to screen a collection of approximately 5200 small molecules with biological and/or pharmacologial properties. Parallel primary screens yielded a number of hits differentially active between thyroid and melanoma cells. Amongst compounds specifically targeting thyroid cancer cells, colchicine emerged as an effective candidate. Colchicine inhibited cell growth which correlated with G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These effects were hampered through inhibition of MEK1/2 and JNK. In contrast, inhibition of p38-MAPK had little effect, and AKT had no impact on colchicine action. Systemic colchicine inhibited thyroid cancer progression in xenografted mice. These findings demonstrate that our screening platform is an effective vehicle for drug reposition and show that colchicine warrants further attention in well-defined clinical niches such as thyroid cancer.

  11. The Chernobyl thyroid cancer experience: pathology.

    PubMed

    LiVolsi, V A; Abrosimov, A A; Bogdanova, T; Fadda, G; Hunt, J L; Ito, M; Rosai, J; Thomas, G A; Williams, E D

    2011-05-01

    The Chernobyl accident was followed by a large increase in the incidence of thyroid carcinoma in the areas exposed to high levels of fallout. The Chernobyl Tumor Bank was set up in 1998 to make tumours available for study internationally, and a pathology panel reviewed all the tumours and established an agreed diagnosis. The thyroid tumours that were discovered after the Chernobyl nuclear accident were virtually all (95%) of the papillary carcinoma type. Rare examples of other tumour types were identified. Within the papillary group, several subtypes were noted, including classical or usual type, follicular variant, solid variant and mixed patterns Diffuse sclerosis variant, cribriform/morular type and Warthin-like variant were rare. No tall cell or columnar cell variants were identified. The tumours examined by the Pathology Panel of the Chernobyl Tumor Bank constitute a large representative sample (estimated at about 50%) of the tumours that developed in this population. This overview describes the method adopted by the panel and the different diagnostic categories adopted; illustrates the pathology of these neoplasms; compares the pathological characteristics of the early lesions with those identified after long latency periods and the institution of screening programmes and outlines the possible associated causes for the various morphological patterns seen.

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Modigliani, E; Franc, B; Niccoli-sire, P

    2000-12-01

    Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MTC) is a rare tumour derived from thyroid C cells with serum calcitonin as a specific and sensitive marker. MTC is inherited in 25% of cases, with an autosomal dominant transmission, age-related penetrance and variable expressivity. MTC is an obligatory component of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2), which comprises three well defined syndromes: MEN2A, which may be associated with pheochromocytoma and/or hyperparathyroidism; the much rarer MEN2B, which occurs early and is accompanied by developmental abnormalities; while in contrast, familial MTC (FMTC) is not associated with any endocrinopathy. The RET proto-oncogene is the causative gene of the MEN2 syndromes and mutations in this gene are found in >90% of inherited cases, allowing easier and more reliable family screening than pentagastrin stimulation tests. Nevertheless, the correlation between the genotype and the different clinical phenotypes is not perfect. The prognosis of MTC depends on its staging at presentation, and the early appearance of cervical lymph node metastases emphasizes the need for extensive surgery, although many patients still do not normalize calcitonin levels post-operatively, and they remain a challenge for the further management.

  13. Association between thyroid cancer and epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in female with nonsmall cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seo Yun; Kim, Hye-Ryoun; Kim, Cheol Hyeon; Koh, Jae Soo; Baek, Hee Jong; Choi, Chang-Min; Song, Joon Seon; Lee, Jae Cheol; Na, Im II

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation and thyroid cancer in female patients with nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS: In a retrospective study, we examined 835 female patients who were diagnosed with NSCLC and underwent an EGFR mutation test between June 2003 and August 2013. The associations of EGFR mutation with thyroid cancer and a family history of thyroid cancer were evaluated using logistic regression models. RESULTS: EGFR mutation was found in 378 of 835 patients. In addition to adenocarcinoma (P < 0.001), EGFR mutations were positively associated with a personal history of thyroid cancer (5.8% versus 2.6%; P = 0.020), while showing a trend toward inverse association with a personal history of nonthyroid cancer (5.8% vs. 9.0%; P = 0.086). Likewise, the incidence of EGFR mutations was associated with a family history of thyroid cancer (2.9% vs. 0.9%; P = 0.028), while showing a trend toward inverse association with a family history of nonthyroid cancer (27.8% vs. 33.7%; P = 0.066). Multivariate logistic regression showed that the incidence of EGFR mutations was different in women with thyroid or nonthyroid cancer (P = 0.035) and in women with a family history of thyroid or nonthyroid cancer (P = 0.023). CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that thyroid cancer and a family history of thyroid cancer are associated with EGFR-mutated NSCLC in female patients. The differences in the incidence of thyroid cancer and a family history of thyroid cancer by EGFR mutational status provide new insight into pathogenesis of this genetic change. PMID:28197220

  14. Generation of Novel Thyroid Cancer Stem-Like Cell Clones: Effects of Resveratrol and Valproic Acid.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Heather; Yu, Xiao-Min; Harrison, April D; Larrain, Carolina; Zhang, Ranran; Chen, Jidong; Chen, Herbert; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2016-06-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer is an aggressive and highly lethal cancer for which conventional therapies have proved ineffective. Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) represent a small fraction of cells in the cancer that are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy and are responsible for tumor reoccurrence and metastasis. We characterized CSCs in thyroid carcinomas and generated clones of CSC lines. Our study showed that anaplastic thyroid cancers had significantly more CSCs than well-differentiated thyroid cancers. We also showed that Aldefluor-positive cells revealed significantly higher expression of stem cell markers, self-renewal properties, thyrosphere formation, and enhanced tumorigenicity. In vivo passaging of Aldefluor-positive cells resulted in the growth of larger, more aggressive tumors. We isolated and generated two clonal spheroid CSC lines derived from anaplastic thyroid cancer that were even more enriched with stem cell markers and more tumorigenic than the freshly isolated Aldefluor-positive cells. Resveratrol and valproic acid treatment of one of the CSC lines resulted in a significant decrease in stem cell markers, Aldefluor expression, proliferation, and invasiveness, with an increase in apoptosis and thyroid differentiation markers, suggesting that these cell lines may be useful for discovering new adjuvant therapies for aggressive thyroid cancers. For the first time, we have two thyroid CSC lines that will be useful tools for the study of thyroid CSC targeted therapies.

  15. Recent Advances in Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Arthur-Quan; Gehrig, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy in the United States, with yearly rates continuing to increase. Most women present with early stage disease; however, advanced disease carries a grave prognosis. As a result, novel therapies are currently under investigation for the treatment of endometrial cancer. These advances include a better understanding of the genetic basis surrounding the development of endometrial cancer, novel surgical therapies, and new molecular targets for the treatment of this disease. This review explores the literature regarding these advancements in endometrial cancer. PMID:28184290

  16. Management of thyroid cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, A L; Gandhi, A; Scott-Coombes, D; Perros, P

    2016-05-01

    This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. This paper provides recommendations on the management of thyroid cancer in adults and is based on the 2014 British Thyroid Association guidelines. Recommendations • Ultrasound scanning (USS) of the nodule or goitre is a crucial investigation in guiding the need for fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). (R) • FNAC should be considered for all nodules with suspicious ultrasound features (U3-U5). If a nodule is smaller than 10 mm in diameter, USS guided FNAC is not recommended unless clinically suspicious lymph nodes on USS are also present. (R) • Cytological analysis and categorisation should be reported according to the current British Thyroid Association Guidance. (R) • Ultrasound scanning assessment of cervical nodes should be done in FNAC-proven cancer. (R) • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) should be done in suspected cases of retrosternal extension, fixed tumours (local invasion with or without vocal cord paralysis) or when haemoptysis is reported. When CT with contrast is used pre-operatively, there should be a two-month delay between the use of iodinated contrast media and subsequent radioactive iodine (I131) therapy. (R) • Fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography imaging is not recommended for routine evaluation. (G) • In patients with thyroid cancer, assessment of extrathyroidal extension and lymph node disease in the central and lateral neck compartments should be undertaken pre-operatively by USS and cross-sectional imaging (CT or MRI) if indicated. (R) • For patients with Thy 3f or Thy 4 FNAC a diagnostic hemithyroidectomy is recommended. (R) • Total thyroidectomy is recommended for patients with tumours greater than 4 cm in diameter or tumours of any size in association with any of the following characteristics: multifocal disease, bilateral disease, extrathyroidal

  17. Diagnostic and Prognostic Markers in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Sáez, José M

    2011-01-01

    The MAPK/ERK (mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal- regulated kinase signaling pathway) and PI3K/Akt (lipid kinase phoshoinositide-3-kinase signaling pathway) play an important role in transmission of cell signals through transduction systems as ligands, transmembrane receptors and cytoplasmic secondary messengers to cell nucleus, where they influence the expression of genes that regulate important cellular processes: cell growth, proliferation and apoptosis. The genes, coding the signaling cascade proteins (RET, RAS, BRAF, PI3K, PTEN, AKT), are mutated or aberrantly expressed in thyroid cancer derived from follicular thyroid cell. Genetic and epigenetic alternations, concerning MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways, contribute to their activation and interaction in consequence of malignant follicular cell transformation. Moreover, it is additionally pointed out that genetic, as well as epigenetic DNA changing via aberrant methylation of several tumor suppressor and thyroid-specific genes is associated with tumor aggressiveness, being a jointly responsible mechanism for thyroid tumorigenesis. In the present manuscript the currently developed diagnostic and prognostic genetic/epigenetic markers are presented; the understanding of this molecular mechanism provides access to novel molecular therapeutic strategies. PMID:22654559

  18. Cribiform variant of papillary thyroid cancer and familial adenomatous polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Perea del Pozo, E.; Ramirez Plaza, C.; Padillo Ruiz, J.; Martos Martínez, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome characterised by the progressive development of multiple colorectal adenomatous polyps and an increased incidence of colorectal carcinoma. It is often accompanied by other benign or malignant extracolonic manifestations, including gastric and duodenal tumours, osteomas, desmoid tumours, retinal pigmentation, and thyroid and adrenocortical tumours Methods and results We report the case of a 42-year-old white female with FAP who was referred to our Endocrine Surgery Unit for surgery because of a palpable mass in the left side of the neck. An ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy showed a cribriform-morular variant (CMV) of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The incidence, clinical presentation, histology and treatment options for this rare histological subtype are discussed. Conclusions The diagnosis of CMV of PTC is very strongly related to the FAP syndrome and must be suspected when a thyroid node appears in FAP patients. Likewise, any patient without known FAP who presents this histology in a surgically biopsied or resected thyroid node should undergo total colonoscopy for screening of colonic polyposis and genetic study of the APC gene sequence. PMID:26521198

  19. Neck dissection with cervical sensory preservation in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shuai; Wang, Peisong; Chen, Guang

    2013-11-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. Recently, controversy has focused on the management of lymph node metastases, which represent approximately 90% of disease recurrences and may require considerable time, effort, and resources to diagnose and treat. Neck dissections play an essential role in the management of head and neck cancer. A modified radical neck dissection (MND) refers to resection of the lymph nodes in levels II through V and often including the central nodes in level VI. When performing modified neck dissection, we recommend to protect more reserved cervical plexus. The purpose is to better protect patient's neck skin feeling.

  20. Risk Stratification in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: An Ongoing Process.

    PubMed

    Omry-Orbach, Gal

    2016-01-28

    Thyroid cancer is an increasingly common malignancy, with a rapidly rising prevalence worldwide. The social and economic ramifications of the increase in thyroid cancer are multiple. Though mortality from thyroid cancer is low, and most patients will do well, the risk of recurrence is not insignificant, up to 30%. Therefore, it is important to accurately identify those patients who are more or less likely to be burdened by their disease over years and tailor their treatment plan accordingly. The goal of risk stratification is to do just that. The risk stratification process generally starts postoperatively with histopathologic staging, based on the AJCC/UICC staging system as well as others designed to predict mortality. These do not, however, accurately assess the risk of recurrence/persistence. Patients initially considered to be at high risk may ultimately do very well yet be burdened by frequent unnecessary monitoring. Conversely, patients initially thought to be low risk, may not respond to their initial treatment as expected and, if left unmonitored, may have higher morbidity. The concept of risk-adaptive management has been adopted, with an understanding that risk stratification for differentiated thyroid cancer is dynamic and ongoing. A multitude of variables not included in AJCC/UICC staging are used initially to classify patients as low, intermediate, or high risk for recurrence. Over the course of time, a response-to-therapy variable is incorporated, and patients essentially undergo continuous risk stratification. Additional tools such as biochemical markers, genetic mutations, and molecular markers have been added to this complex risk stratification process such that this is essentially a continuum of risk. In recent years, additional considerations have been discussed with a suggestion of pre-operative risk stratification based on certain clinical and/or biologic characteristics. With the increasing prevalence of thyroid cancer but stable mortality

  1. Thyroid functional parameters and correlative autoantibodies as prognostic factors for differentiated thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Yu, Wenbin; Fan, Jinchuan; Li, Guojun; Tao, Xiaofeng; Feng, Yun; Sun, Ronghao

    To evaluate the effect of preoperative thyroid functional parameters and thyroid autoantibodies on aggressive clinicopathologic features and lymph node metastasis (LNM) of differentiated thyroid cancer patients. Four hundred twenty consecutive patients with initial surgery were enrolled from July 2010 to July 2015. The associations between aggressive clinicopathologic and LNM factors and thyroid functional & autoantibodies parameters were analyzed. Higher levels of TSH, TGAb or TMAb were found in patients with tumor size≥1 cm (all P<0.05), especially when TSH≥2.5 ulU/ml (P=0.03) and TGAb≥1 (P=0.01). Higher levels of TSH and TGAb and lower levels of T3 and T4 were found in patients with capsular invasion (all P<0.05), particularly when TSH≥2.5ulU/ml (P=0.03) and TGAb≥1 (P=0.005). The patients with multifocality had higher TAbs level (TAbs>1). Higher level of TSH was also found in patients with central LNM (P=0.001) and lateral LNM (P=0.002), especially with TSH≥2.5ulU/ml (P=0.003 and P=0.03). TGAb level was also found higher in patients with central LNM (P=0.02) and lateral LNM (P=0.01), especially with TGAb≥1 (P<0.05 and P=0.01). Higher level of TMAb was found in patients with lateral LNM (P<0.05). Moreover, multivariable analysis revealed that only TGAb was an independently predictive factor for primary tumor size≥1cm (P=0.01); and TSH level (P=0.01) and TGAb≥1 (P<0.05) were associated independently with central LNM. Thus, TSH level and TGAb≥1 were significantly independent predictors for central LNM, and might help make the decision of central neck dissection.

  2. Is there loss or qualitative changes in the expression of thyroid peroxidase protein in thyroid epithelial cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Czarnocka, B; Pastuszko, D; Janota-Bzowski, M; Weetman, A P; Watson, P F; Kemp, E H; McIntosh, R S; Asghar, M S; Jarzab, B; Gubala, E; Wloch, J; Lange, D

    2001-01-01

    There is disagreement concerning the expression of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) in thyroid cancer, some studies finding qualitative as well as quantitative differences compared to normal tissue. To investigate TPO protein expression and its antigenic properties, TPO was captured from a solubilizate of thyroid microsomes by a panel of murine anti-TPO monoclonal antibodies and detected with a panel of anti-human TPO IgGκ Fab. TPO protein expression in 30 samples of malignant thyroid tissue was compared with TPO from adjacent normal tissues. Virtual absence of TPO expression was observed in 8 cases. In the remaining 22 malignant thyroid tumours the TPO protein level varied considerably from normal to nearly absent when compared to normal thyroid tissue or tissues from patients with Graves' disease (range less than 0.5 to more than 12.5 μg mg−1 of protein). When expressed TPO displayed similar epitopes, to that of TPO from Graves' disease tissue. The results obtained by the TPO capturing method were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis with both microsomes and their solubilizates. The present results show that in about two-thirds of differentiated thyroid carcinomas, TPO protein is expressed, albeit to a more variable extent than normal; when present, TPO in malignant tissues is immunologically normal. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaignhttp://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11556840

  3. Current Management of Low Risk Differentiated Thyroid Cancer and Papillary Microcarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tarasova, V D; Tuttle, R M

    2017-01-10

    Each year, the proportion of thyroid cancer patients presenting with low risk disease is increasing. Moreover, the definition of low risk thyroid cancer is expanding and several histological subtypes beyond papillary microcarcinomas are now classified as low risk disease. This shift in the landscape of thyroid cancer presentation is forcing clinicians to critically re-evaluate whether or not traditional management paradigms that were effective in treating intermediate and high risk disease are applicable to these low risk patients. Here we review the definition of low risk disease, examine the various histological subtypes that are considered low risk in the 2015 American Thyroid Association guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer, and review our current approach to the management of these low risk tumours.

  4. The relationship of thyroid cancer with radiation exposure from nuclear weapon testing in the Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tatsuya; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Trott, Klaus R; Simon, Steven L; Fujimori, Keisei; Nakashima, Noriaki; Fukao, Akira; Saito, Hiroshi

    2003-03-01

    The US nuclear weapons testing program in the Pacific conducted between 1946 and 1958 resulted in radiation exposure in the Marshall Islands. The potentially widespread radiation exposure from radio-iodines of fallout has raised concerns about the risk of thyroid cancer in the Marshallese population. The most serious exposures and its health hazards resulted from the hydrogen-thermonuclear bomb test, the Castle BRAVO, on March 1, 1954. Between 1993 and 1997, we screened 3,709 Marshallese for thyroid disease who were born before the BRAVO test. It was 60% of the entire population at risk and who were still alive at the time of our examinations. We diagnosed 30 thyroid cancers and found 27 other study participants who had been operated for thyroid cancer before our screening in this group. Fifty-seven Marshallese born before 1954 (1.5%) had thyroid cancer or had been operated for thyroid cancer. Nearly all (92%) of these cancers were papillary carcinoma. We derived estimates of individual thyroid dose proxy from the BRAVO test in 1954 on the basis of published age-specific doses estimated on Utirik atoll and 137Cs deposition levels on the atolls where the participants came from. There was suggestive evidence that the prevalence of thyroid cancer increased with category of estimated dose to the thyroid.

  5. Anaplastic thyroid cancer: molecular pathogenesis and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Smallridge, Robert C; Marlow, Laura A; Copland, John A

    2010-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is a rare malignancy. While external beam radiation therapy has improved locoregional control, the median survival of ∼ 4 months has not changed in more than half a century due to uncontrolled systemic metastases. The objective of this study was to review the literature in order to identify potential new strategies for treating this highly lethal cancer. PubMed searches were the principal source of articles reviewed. The molecular pathogenesis of ATC includes mutations in BRAF, RAS, catenin (cadherin-associated protein), beta 1, PIK3CA, TP53, AXIN1, PTEN, and APC genes, and chromosomal abnormalities are common. Several microarray studies have identified genes and pathways preferentially affected, and dysregulated microRNA profiles differ from differentiated thyroid cancers. Numerous proteins involving transcription factors, signaling pathways, mitosis, proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, adhesion, migration, epigenetics, and protein degradation are affected. A variety of agents have been successful in controlling ATC cell growth both in vitro and in nude mice xenografts. While many of these new compounds are in cancer clinical trials, there are few studies being conducted in ATC. With the recent increased knowledge of the many critical genes and proteins affected in ATC, and the extensive array of targeted therapies being developed for cancer patients, there are new opportunities to design clinical trials based upon tumor molecular profiling and preclinical studies of potentially synergistic combinatorial novel therapies. PMID:18987168

  6. Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Expression in Papillary Thyroid Cancer Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells Modulates Cancer Cell Growth and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Parascandolo, Alessia; Rappa, Francesca; Cappello, Francesco; Kim, Jaehyup; Cantu, David A.; Chen, Herbert; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Hematti, Peiman; Castellone, Maria Domenica; Salvatore, Marco; Laukkanen, Mikko O.

    2017-01-01

    Tumor stroma-secreted growth factors, cytokines, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) influence tumor development from early stages to the metastasis phase. Previous studies have demonstrated downregulation of ROS-producing extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) in thyroid cancer cell lines although according to recent data, the expression of SOD3 at physiological levels stimulates normal and cancer cell proliferation. Therefore, to analyze the expression of SOD3 in tumor stroma, we characterized stromal cells from the thyroid. We report mutually exclusive desmoplasia and inflammation in papillary and follicular thyroid cancers and the presence of multipotent mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) in non-carcinogenic thyroids and papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). The phenotypic and differentiation characteristics of Thyroid MSCs and PTC MSCs were comparable with bone marrow MSCs. A molecular level analysis showed increased FIBROBLAST ACTIVATING PROTEIN, COLLAGEN 1 TYPE A1, TENASCIN, and SOD3 expression in PTC MSCs compared to Thyroid MSCs, suggesting the presence of MSCs with a fibrotic fingerprint in papillary thyroid cancer tumors and the autocrine-paracrine conversion of SOD3 expression, which was enhanced by cancer cells. Stromal SOD3 had a stimulatory effect on cancer cell growth and an inhibitory effect on cancer cell migration, thus indicating that SOD3 might be a novel player in thyroid tumor stroma. PMID:28216675

  7. Thyroid cancer incidence attributable to overdiagnosis in the United States 1981-2011.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Thomas J; Gates, Margaret A; Boscoe, Francis P

    2015-12-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer incidence has increased in the United States from 1978 through 2011 for both men and women of all ages and races. Overdiagnosis is partially responsible for this trend, although its magnitude is uncertain. This study examines papillary thyroid cancer incidence according to stage at diagnosis and estimates the proportion of newly diagnosed tumors that are attributable to overdiagnosis. We analyzed stage specific trends in papillary thyroid cancer incidence, 1981-2011, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results national cancer registries. Yearly changes in early and late-stage thyroid cancer incidence were calculated. We estimate that the proportion of incident papillary thyroid cancers attributable to overdiagnosis in 2011 was 5.5 and 45.5% in men ages 20-49 and 50+ and 41.1 and 60.1% in women ages 20-49 and 50+, respectively. Overdiagnosis has resulted in an additional 82,000 incident papillary thyroid cancers that likely would never have caused any clinical symptoms. The detection of early-stage papillary thyroid cancer outpaced that of late-stage disease from 1981 through 2011, in part due to overdiagnosis. Further studies into the prevention, risk stratification and optimal treatment of papillary thyroid cancer are warranted in response to these trends.

  8. Thyroid cancer in dogs: an update based on 638 cases (1995-2005).

    PubMed

    Wucherer, Katja L; Wilke, Vicki

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to update the descriptive statistics of thyroid cancer by using data from multiple institutions collected through the Veterinary Medical Database (VMDB). Information was collected and reported from cases of canine thyroid cancer submitted to the VMDB between January 1, 1995 and December 31, 2005. Odds ratio (OR) analysis was performed on breeds that had > or =3% of the total number of dogs with thyroid cancer; ORs for each age category were also determined. Thyroid cancer represented 1.1% of all neoplasms during the time period of interest. Golden retrievers, beagles, and Siberian huskies all had significantly increased ORs for developing thyroid cancer. No sex predisposition was evident, but dogs between 10 and 15 years of age had a significantly increased chance of developing thyroid disease. Carcinomas and adenocarcinomas represented 90% of thyroid cancers, while adenomas represented 9.3%. Thyroid carcinoma and adenocarcinoma continue to be uncommon in our canine population. Older dogs are still more commonly affected, and this study is in agreement with previous studies that golden retrievers and beagles are overrepresented. A new finding is that Siberian huskies are also overrepresented. Carcinomas represent a much higher proportion of thyroid cancers than previously reported, and adenomas are likely incidental findings on necropsy. Thyroid cancer should be high on the list of differentials for a neck mass in older, large-breed dogs, as they make up 1.1% of the cancer cases reported. The overwhelming majority of thyroid cancers are carcinomas, and they are most common in golden retrievers, beagles, and Siberian huskies.

  9. Family History of Cancer and Risk of Sporadic Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Li, Guojun; Wei, Qingyi; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Sturgis, Erich M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Thyroid cancer incidence in the United States, particularly in women, has increased dramatically since 1980s. While the causes of thyroid cancer in most patients remain largely unknown, evidence suggests the existence of an inherited predisposition to development of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Therefore, we explored the association between sporadic DTC and family history of cancer. METHODS In a retrospective hospital-based case-control study of prospectively recruited subjects who completed the study questionnaire upon enrollment, unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) as estimates of the DTC risk associated with first-degree family history of cancer. RESULTS The study included 288 patients with sporadic DTC and 591 cancer-free controls. Family history of thyroid cancer in first-degree relatives was associated with increased DTC risk (adjusted OR = 4.1, 95% CI: 1.7–9.9). All DTC cases in patients with a first-degree family history of thyroid cancer were cases of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) (adjusted OR = 4.6, 95 CI%: 1.9–11.1). Notably, the risk of PTC was highest in subjects with a family history of thyroid cancer in siblings (OR = 7.4, 95% CI: 1.8–30.4). In addition, multifocal primary tumor was more common among PTC patients with first-degree family history of thyroid cancer than among PTC patients with no first-degree family history of thyroid cancer (68.8% vs. 35.5%, p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Our study suggests that family history of thyroid cancer in first-degree relatives, particularly in siblings, is associated with an increased risk of sporadic PTC. PMID:21800288

  10. Lenvatinib in Advanced, Radioactive Iodine-Refractory, Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Kay T; Cohen, Ezra E W

    2015-12-15

    Management options are limited for patients with radioactive iodine refractory, locally advanced, or metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Prior to 2015, sorafenib, a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was the only approved treatment and was associated with a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 11 months and overall response rate (ORR) of 12% in a phase III trial. Lenvatinib, a multikinase inhibitor with high potency against VEGFR and FGFR demonstrated encouraging results in phase II trials. Recently, the pivotal SELECT trial provided the basis for the FDA approval of lenvatinib as a second targeted therapy for these patients. Median PFS of 18.3 months in the lenvatinib group was significantly improved from 3.6 months in the placebo group, with an HR of 0.21 (95% confidence interval, 0.4-0.31; P < 0.0001). ORR was also significantly increased in the lenvatinib arm (64.7%) compared with placebo (1.5%). In this article, we will review the molecular mechanisms of lenvatinib, the data from preclinical studies to the recent phase III clinical trial, and the biomarkers being studied to further guide patient selection and predict treatment response.

  11. Aurora kinase A induces papillary thyroid cancer lymph node metastasis by promoting cofilin-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Maimaiti, Yusufu; Jie, Tan; Jing, Zhou; Changwen, Wang; Pan, Yu; Chen, Chen; Tao, Huang

    2016-04-22

    Aurora-A (Aur-A), a member of the serine/threonine Aurora kinase family, plays an important role in ensuring genetic stability during cell division. Previous studies indicated that Aur-A possesses oncogenic activity and may be a valuable therapeutic target in cancer therapy. However, the role of Aur-A in the most common thyroid cancer, papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), remains largely unknown. In patients with PTC, cancer cell migration and invasion account for most of the metastasis, recurrence, and cancer-related deaths. Cofilin-1 (CFL-1) is the most important effector of actin polymerization and depolymerization, determining the direction of cell migration. Here, we assessed the correlation between Aur-A and CFL-1 in PTC with lymph node metastasis. Tissue microarray data showed that simultaneous overexpression of Aur-A and CFL-1 correlated with lymph node metastasis in thyroid cancer tissue. Inhibition of Aur-A suppressed thyroid cancer cell migration in vitro and decreased lymph node metastasis in nude mice. Importantly, Aur-A increased the non-phosphorylated, active form of CFL-1 in TPC-1 cells, thus promoting cancer cell migration and thyroid cancer lymph node metastasis. Our findings indicate that the combination of Aur-A and CFL-1 may be useful as a molecular prediction model for lymph node metastasis in thyroid cancer and raise the possibility of targeting Aur-A and CFL-1 for more effective treatment of thyroid cancer.

  12. REC8 is a novel tumor suppressor gene epigenetically robustly targeted by the PI3K pathway in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dingxie; Shen, Xiaopei; Zhu, Guangwu; Xing, Mingzhao

    2015-11-17

    The role of the PI3K pathway in human cancer has been well established, but much of its molecular mechanism, particularly the epigenetic aspect, remains to be defined. We hypothesized that aberrant methylation and hence altered expression of certain unknown important genes induced by the genetically activated PI3K pathway signaling is a major epigenetic mechanism in human tumorigenesis. Through a genome-wide search for such genes that were epigenetically controlled by the PI3K pathway in thyroid cancer cells, we found a wide range of genes with broad functions epigenetically targeted by the PI3K pathway. The most prominent among these genes was REC8, classically known as a meiotic-specific gene, which we found to be robustly down-regulated by the PI3K pathway through hypermethylation. REC8 hypermethylation was strongly associated with genetic alterations and activities of the PI3K pathway in thyroid cancer cell lines, thyroid cancer tumors, and some other human cancers; it was also associated with poor clinicopathological outcomes of thyroid cancer, including advanced disease stages and patient mortality. Demethylating the hypermethylated REC8 gene restored its expression in thyroid cancer cells in which the PI3K pathway was genetically over-activated and induced expression of REC8 protein inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of these cells. These findings are consistent with REC8 being a novel major bona fide tumor suppressor gene and a robust epigenetic target of the PI3K pathway. Aberrant inactivation of REC8 through hypermethylation by the PI3K pathway may represent an important mechanism mediating the oncogenic functions of the PI3K pathway.

  13. Investigation of excess thyroid cancer incidence in Los Alamos County

    SciTech Connect

    Athas, W.F.

    1996-04-01

    Los Alamos County (LAC) is home to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear research and design facility. In 1991, the DOE funded the New Mexico Department of Health to conduct a review of cancer incidence rates in LAC in response to citizen concerns over what was perceived as a large excess of brain tumors and a possible relationship to radiological contaminants from the Laboratory. The study found no unusual or alarming pattern in the incidence of brain cancer, however, a fourfold excess of thyroid cancer was observed during the late-1980`s. A rapid review of the medical records for cases diagnosed between 1986 and 1990 failed to demonstrate that the thyroid cancer excess had resulted from enhanced detection. Surveillance activities subsequently undertaken to monitor the trend revealed that the excess persisted into 1993. A feasibility assessment of further studies was made, and ultimately, an investigation was conducted to document the epidemiologic characteristics of the excess in detail and to explore possible causes through a case-series records review. Findings from the investigation are the subject of this report.

  14. Diffuse thyroid metastases and bilateral internal jugular vein tumor thrombus from renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Jha, Priyanka; Shekhar, Mallika; Wan, Jennifer; Mari-Aparici, Carina

    2016-12-01

    Renal cell cancer rarely metastasizes to the thyroid gland, and it has been reported to present as a solitary mass. We present a case of diffuse thyroid cancer metastases from renal cell cancer. Bilateral internal jugular vein tumor thrombi were also present. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of diffuse thyroid metastases from renal cell cancer in the English literature. Renal cell cancer metastases should be considered in the differential of thyroid imaging abnormalities arising in the setting of known renal cell carcinoma, particularly late in the course of disease. This is frequently associated with internal jugular vein thrombi, which should be evaluated with an abnormal thyroid. Thyroglobulin levels are usually normal in such patients.

  15. Occupation and thyroid cancer: a population-based case-control study in Connecticut

    PubMed Central

    Ba, Yue; Huang, Huang; Lerro, Catherine C.; Li, Shuzhen; Zhao, Nan; Li, Anqi; Ma, Shuangge; Udelsman, Robert; Zhang, Yawei

    2016-01-01

    Objective The study aims to explore the associations between various occupations and thyroid cancer risk. Methods A population-based case-control study involving 462 histologically confirmed incident cases and 498 controls was conducted in Connecticut in 2010–2011. Results A significantly increased risk of thyroid cancer, particularly papillary microcarcinoma, was observed for those working as the healthcare practitioners and technical workers, health diagnosing and treating practitioners and registered nurses. Those working in building and grounds cleaning, maintenance occupations, pest control, retail sales, and customer service also had increased risk for papillary thyroid cancer. Subjects who worked as cooks, janitors, cleaners, and customer service representatives were at an increased risk of papillary thyroid cancer with tumor size >1 cm. Conclusions Certain occupations were associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer, with some tumor size and subtype specificity. PMID:26949881

  16. A loss-of-function genetic screening identifies novel mediators of thyroid cancer cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Cantisani, Maria Carmela; Parascandolo, Alessia; Perälä, Merja; Allocca, Chiara; Fey, Vidal; Sahlberg, Niko; Merolla, Francesco; Basolo, Fulvio; Laukkanen, Mikko O.; Kallioniemi, Olli Pekka; Santoro, Massimo; Castellone, Maria Domenica

    2016-01-01

    RET, BRAF and other protein kinases have been identified as major molecular players in thyroid cancer. To identify novel kinases required for the viability of thyroid carcinoma cells, we performed a RNA interference screening in the RET/PTC1(CCDC6-RET)-positive papillary thyroid cancer cell line TPC1 using a library of synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the human kinome and related proteins. We identified 14 hits whose silencing was able to significantly reduce the viability and the proliferation of TPC1 cells; most of them were active also in BRAF-mutant BCPAP (papillary thyroid cancer) and 8505C (anaplastic thyroid cancer) and in RAS-mutant CAL62 (anaplastic thyroid cancer) cells. These included members of EPH receptor tyrosine kinase family as well as SRC and MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinases) families. Importantly, silencing of the identified hits did not affect significantly the viability of Nthy-ori 3-1 (hereafter referred to as NTHY) cells derived from normal thyroid tissue, suggesting cancer cell specificity. The identified proteins are worth exploring as potential novel druggable thyroid cancer targets. PMID:27058903

  17. Sustained ERK inhibition maximizes responses of BrafV600E thyroid cancers to radioiodine

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajah, James; Le, Mina; Montero-Conde, Cristina; Pillarsetty, Nagavarakishore; Bolaender, Alexander; Irwin, Christopher; Krishnamoorthy, Gnana Prakasam; Larson, Steven M.; Ho, Alan L.; Seshan, Venkatraman; Ishii, Nobuya; Carrasco, Nancy; Rosen, Neal; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Fagin, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Radioiodide (RAI) therapy of thyroid cancer exploits the relatively selective ability of thyroid cells to transport and accumulate iodide. Iodide uptake requires expression of critical genes that are involved in various steps of thyroid hormone biosynthesis. ERK signaling, which is markedly increased in thyroid cancer cells driven by oncogenic BRAF, represses the genetic program that enables iodide transport. Here, we determined that a critical threshold for inhibition of MAPK signaling is required to optimally restore expression of thyroid differentiation genes in thyroid cells and in mice with BrafV600E-induced thyroid cancer. Although the MEK inhibitor selumetinib transiently inhibited ERK signaling, which subsequently rebounded, the MEK inhibitor CKI suppressed ERK signaling in a sustained manner by preventing RAF reactivation. A small increase in ERK inhibition markedly increased the expression of thyroid differentiation genes, increased iodide accumulation in cancer cells, and thereby improved responses to RAI therapy. Only a short exposure to the drug was necessary to obtain a maximal response to RAI. These data suggest that potent inhibition of ERK signaling is required to adequately induce iodide uptake and indicate that this is a promising strategy for the treatment of BRAF-mutant thyroid cancer. PMID:27669459

  18. Do Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) Increase the Risk of Thyroid Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yawei; Guo, Grace L.; Han, Xuesong; Zhu, Cairong; Kilfoy, Briseis A.; Zhu, Yong; Boyle, Peter; Zheng, Tongzhang

    2008-01-01

    An increased incidence of thyroid cancer has been reported in many parts of the world including the United States during the past several decades. Recently emerging evidence has demonstrated that polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs), particularly polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), alter thyroid hormone homeostasis and cause thyroid dysfunction. However, few studies have been conducted to test whether exposure to PBDEs and other PHAHs increases the risk of thyroid cancer. Here, we hypothesize that elevated exposure to PHAHs, particularly PBDEs, increases the risk of thyroid cancer and may explain part of the increase in incidence of thyroid cancer during the past several decades. In addition, genetic and epigenetic variations in metabolic pathway genes may alter the expression and function of metabolic enzymes which are involved in the metabolism of endogenous thyroid hormones and the detoxification of PBDEs and other PHAHs. Such variation may result in different individual susceptibilities to PBDEs and other PHAHs and the subsequent development of thyroid cancer. The investigation of this hypothesis will lead to an improved understanding of the role of PBDEs and other PHAHs in thyroid tumorigenesis and may provide a real means to prevent this deadly disease. PMID:19122824

  19. Metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma to the nose: report and review of cutaneous metastases of papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma typically appears in local lymph nodes. Skin metastases are rare. Purpose: A man with progressive metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma who developed a cutaneous metastasis on his nose is described. The clinical manifestations of metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma to skin are reviewed. Methods: PubMed was used to search the following terms, separately and in combination: basal, cancer, carcinoma, cell, cutaneous, kinase, inhibitor, metastases, nose, papillary, rearranged during transfection, receptor, RET, thyroid, tyrosine, vandetanib. Results: Pathologic changes observed on the biopsy of the man’s nose lesion were similar to those of his original cancer. Genomic evaluation of the tumor revealed an aberration involving the rearranged during transfection (RET) receptor tyrosine kinase. The residual tumor was excised. Treatment with vandetanib, a RET inhibitor was initiated; his metastatic disease has been stable, without symptoms or recurrent cutaneous metastasis, for 2 years following the discovery of his metastatic nose tumor. Conclusions: Papillary thyroid carcinoma with skin metastases is rare. Nodules usually appear on the scalp or neck; the thyroidectomy scar is also a common site. Metastatic tumor, albeit infrequently, can present as a nose lesion. The prognosis for patients with cutaneous metastases from papillary thyroid carcinoma is poor. However, with the ability to test the tumor for genomic aberrations, molecular targeted therapies—such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors—may provide extended survival in these individuals. PMID:26693082

  20. Thyroid Cancer in Saudi Arabia: A Histopathological and Outcome Study

    PubMed Central

    Alomar, Haneen; Alzahrani, Nada

    2017-01-01

    Most data on differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) came from the Western world. We describe its salient characteristics and outcome from a Middle Eastern country. Patients and Methods. We studied all cases of TC seen during a 2-year period (2004-2005) seen at our institution. Results. A total of 600 consecutive cases of DTC with a median age at diagnosis of 39 years (5–85) and the female : male ratio of 459 : 141 (76.5% : 23.5%). The cases included classical papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) in 77%, follicular variant PTC in 13.3%, follicular thyroid cancer in 3.2%, and other rare subtypes 6.5%. Total or near-total thyroidectomy was performed in 93%, central and/or lateral neck dissection in 64.5% of cases, and radioactive iodine ablation in 82% of cases. Additional therapies were administered to 154 patients (25.7%). At a median follow-up period of 7.63 years (0.22–13.1), 318 patients (53.3%) were in excellent response, 147 (24.5%) having an indeterminate response, 55 (9.2%) biochemically incomplete, 33 (5.5%) structurally incomplete, and 27 (4.5%) unclassifiable. Twenty cases died secondary to DTC (disease-specific mortality 3.3%). Conclusions. In Saudi Arabia, DTC is common and occurs at young age and predominantly in females. Although remission is common, persistent disease is also common but disease-specific mortality is low. PMID:28348588

  1. The incidence of thyroid cancer is affected by the characteristics of a healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Jin; Kim, Sun; Cho, Hong-Jun; Lee, Jae-Ho

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between the incidence of thyroid cancer and the characteristics of healthcare systems in OECD countries and to demonstrate that the increasing incidence of thyroid cancer is mainly due to overdiagnosis. We used a random effects panel model to regress the incidence of thyroid cancer on the characteristics of healthcare systems (i.e., share of public expenditure on health, mode of health financing, existence of referral system to secondary care, mode of payment to primary care physicians), controlling for macro context variables (i.e., GDP per capita, educational level) on a country level. Data were derived from 34 OECD countries for 2002 and 2008. The share of public expenditure on health was negatively associated with the incidence of thyroid cancer. However, it had no statistically significant effect on the mortality of thyroid cancer and on the incidence of stomach and lung cancer. In the case of colorectal cancer, it had a positive effect on the incidence rate. The upward trend of the incidence of thyroid cancer is closely related to the healthcare system that permits overdiagnosis. Increases in the proportion of public financing may help reduce the overdiagnosis of thyroid cancer.

  2. IMRT versus 3D-CRT for thyroid cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizynska, Marta K.; Zawadzka, Anna

    2008-01-01

    A 3D-CRT involving a 4-field (5-field, 6-field, etc.) technique (photon and electron beams) and an alternative IMRT 7-field technique with 6 MV photon fields for thyroid cancer were compared. The IMRT allows reduction in the dose to the spinal cord of about 12 Gy and permits better coverage of the target volume with smaller standard deviation (average 4.65% for 3D-CRT as compared with 1.81% for IMRT). The time needed to prepare therapy (TPS, dosimetry, preparing boluses and electron aperture) and the session time are about the same for both techniques.

  3. Current Concepts and Future Directions in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Donald SA

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an overview on the biology, monitoring and management of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), with particular attention to issues of relevance to clinical chemistry. The incidence of DTC appears to be increasing and management strategies are evolving as we learn more about its natural history and response to therapy. Clinical chemistry techniques play a central role in these protocols. Technical limitations inherent in current monitoring tools can hamper follow-up, although progress is being made. The molecular basis of DTC is being delineated with the potential to develop new strategies for diagnosis, monitoring and management of this condition. PMID:20179793

  4. Thyroid dysfunction and neoplasia in children receiving neck irradiation for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, I.D.; Black, T.L.; Thompson, E.I.; Pratt, C.; Rao, B.; Hustu, O.

    1985-03-15

    The reported relationship of radiation exposure and thyroid carcinoma stimulated this retrospective study of 298 patients treated at St. Jude Children's Hospital with radiation therapy to the neck for childhood cancer to identify patients who developed subsequent thyroid abnormalities. This series includes 153 patients with Hodgkin's disease, 95 with acute lymphocytic leukemia, 28 with lymphoepithelioma, and 22 with miscellaneous tumors. Inclusion in the study required 5 years of disease-free survival following therapy for their original tumor, which included thyroid irradiation. Follow-up has been 100%. Most patients also received chemotherapy. Seventeen patients were found to have decreased thyroid reserve with normal levels of free triiodothyroxine (T3) or free thyroxin, (T4) and an elevated level of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). In nine patients hypothyroidism developed, with decreased T3 or T4 levels and an elevated level of TSH. One hyperthyroid patient was identified. Two patients had thyroiditis, and seven had thyroid neoplasms: (carcinoma in two, adenoma in two, colloid nodule in one, and undiagnosed nodules in two). This survey has demonstrated an increased incidence of thyroid dysfunction and thyroid neoplasia when compared to the general population. The importance of long-term follow-up for thyroid disease is emphasized in patients who have received thyroid irradiation. The possible role of subclinical hypothyroidism with TSH elevation coupled with radiation damage to the thyroid gland as a model for the development of neoplastic disease is discussed.

  5. A Genomic Alternative to Identify Medullary Thyroid Cancer Preoperatively in Thyroid Nodules with Indeterminate Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Robert J.; Traweek, S. Thomas; Lanman, Richard B.; Kennedy, Giulia C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of calcitonin screening for the rare medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is controversial due to questions of efficacy, accuracy, and cost-effectiveness. This study reports the results of a large prospective validation using a machine-trained algorithm (MTC Classifier) to preoperatively identify MTC in fine-needle aspiration biopsies in lieu of calcitonin measurements. Methods: Cytology analysis on a prospective consecutive series of 50,430 thyroid nodule biopsies yielded a total of 7815 indeterminate (Bethesda categories III/IV) cases, which were tested with the MTC classifier. A prospective, consecutively submitted series of 2673 Bethesda III–VI cases with cytology determined locally was also evaluated. RNA was isolated and tested for the MTC Classifier using microarrays. Results: Forty-three cases were positive by the MTC Classifier among 10,488 tested nodules (0.4%), consistent with the low prevalence of MTC. Of these, all but one was histologically or biochemically confirmed as MTC, yielding a positive predictive value (PPV) of 98%. Of the positive cases, only 19 (44%) had been specifically suspected of MTC by cytology, highlighting the limitations of light microscopy to detect this disease. Three surgically confirmed MTC cases that were detected by the MTC Classifier had low basal serum calcitonin values, indicating these would have been missed by traditional calcitonin screening methods. A pooled analysis of three independent validation sets demonstrates high test sensitivity (97.9%), specificity (99.8%), PPV (97.9%), and negative predictive value (99.8%). Conclusions: A clinical paradigm is proposed, whereby cytologically indeterminate thyroid nodules being tested for common malignancies using gene expression can be simultaneously tested for MTC using the same genomic assay at no added cost. PMID:26992356

  6. Temperature-sensitive polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles as a potential drug delivery system for targeted therapy of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Koppolu, Bhanuprasanth; Bhavsar, Zarna; Wadajkar, Aniket S; Nattama, Sivaniarvindpriya; Rahimi, Maham; Nwariaku, Fiemu; Nguyen, Kytai T

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this work was to develop and investigate temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-acrylamide-allylamine)-coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (TPMNPs) as possible targeted drug carriers for treatments of advanced thyroid cancer (ATC). These nanoparticles were prepared by free radical polymerization of monomers on the surface of silane-coupled iron oxide nanoparticles. In vitro studies demonstrated that TPMNPs were cytocompatible and effectively taken up by cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. An external magnetic field significantly increased nanoparticle uptake, especially when cells were exposed to physiological flow conditions. Drug loading and release studies using doxorubicin confirmed the temperature-responsive release of drugs from nanoparticles. In addition, doxorubicin-loaded nanoparticles significantly killed ATC cells when compared to free doxorubicin. The in vitro results indicate that TPMNPs have potential as targeted and controlled drug carriers for thyroid cancer treatment.

  7. Lymphocytes and thyroid cancer: more to it than meets the eye?

    PubMed

    Weber, Frank

    2014-06-01

    Immune responses by innate and adaptive immune cells are crucial for the suppression of carcinogenesis and tumor spread. Effector T cells such as, cytotoxic CD8(+) T (CTL), natural killer (NK), and NK T cells (NKT cells) prevent tumor growth by their ability to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. To circumvent anti-tumor immunity, tumors commonly attract regulatory T cells (Treg), which suppress the function of CTL and NKT cells in a contact- and cytokine-dependent manner. Recent findings in patients with thyroid cancer have suggested that an imbalance between immune suppressive and anti-tumor cells occurs during thyroid carcinogenesis. However, the composition and regulation of immune responses in thyroid cancer are still elusive and a comprehensive immune profile of thyroid cancer is missing. In this issue of Endocrine-Related Cancer, Imam et al. compare immune profiles between patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma and autoimmune thyroiditis. Their data suggest that an imbalance between immunosuppressive Treg cells and effector T cells occurs during papillary thyroid carcinogenesis. Their study identified double-negative T cells as a novel key factor involved in this process. Future research is required to recapitulate these findings, to elucidate the mechanisms by which the immune response is regulated and to evaluate if this process might be used for the therapeutical management of thyroid cancer.

  8. Thyroglossal duct cyst cancer most likely arises from a thyroid gland remnant.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Esther D; Martini, Maurizio; Straccia, Patrizia; Cocomazzi, Alessandra; Pennacchia, Ilaria; Revelli, Luca; Rossi, Armando; Lombardi, Celestino Pio; Larocca, Luigi M; Fadda, Guido

    2014-07-01

    Thyroglossal duct cancer is a rare entity, occurring in 1.5 % of all thyroglossal duct cysts (TDC). A definitive consensus about its neoplastic origin has not been established as two contrasting theories exist, one proposing an origin in extra-thyroid remnants and the other a metastatic localization of a primary thyroid cancer. We compare morphological and molecular characteristics of both thyroglossal and thyroid carcinomas in a case series from our institute. We evaluated histology of 80 TDC. In 12 cases, prior cytological evaluation had been performed by liquid-based cytology (LBC). The BRAF gene was examined for mutations, and the histology of both thyroglossal duct and synchronous thyroid carcinoma was reevaluated. In 9 out of 80 (11 %) TDC cases, a papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) was diagnosed. In five out of nine (56 %) thyroglossal carcinomas, a synchronous thyroid cancer was diagnosed: 3 PTC and 2 follicular variant PTC (FVPC). In five thyroglossal carcinomas, mutated BRAF (V600E) was found, three in PTC and in thyroglossal as well as in the synchronous tumor in the thyroid. All the patients are in a disease-free status and still alive. Our results suggest that the majority of thyroglossal carcinomas most likely develop as a primary malignancy from a thyroid remnant. Neither the presence of V600E BRAF mutations nor that of a well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma changed the outcome or disease-free survival. We suggest that a diagnosis of thyroglossal carcinoma should be followed by a detailed evaluation of the thyroid gland. In the absence of clinical and radiological thyroid alterations, follow-up as for thyroid cancer is the correct management.

  9. Cancer Screening Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Camelia S.; Panageas, Katherine S.; Schrag, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Context Cancer screening has been integrated into routine primary care but does not benefit patients with limited life expectancy. Objective To evaluate the extent to which patients with advanced cancer continue to be screened for new cancers. Design, Setting, and Participants Utilization of cancer screening procedures (mammography, Papanicolaou test, prostate-specific antigen [PSA], and lower gastrointestinal [GI] endoscopy) was assessed in 87 736 fee-for-service Medicare enrollees aged 65 years or older diagnosed with advanced lung, colorectal, pancreatic, gastroesophageal, or breast cancer between 1998 and 2005, and reported to one of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) tumor registries. Participants were followed up until death or December 31, 2007, whichever came first. A group of 87 307 Medicare enrollees without cancer were individually matched by age, sex, race, and SEER registry to patients with cancer and observed over the same period to evaluate screening rates in context. Demographic and clinical characteristics associated with screening were also investigated. Main Outcome Measure For each cancer screening test, utilization rates were defined as the percentage of patients who were screened following the diagnosis of an incurable cancer. Results Among women following advanced cancer diagnosis compared with controls, at least 1 screening mammogram was received by 8.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.6%-9.1%) vs 22.0% (95% CI, 21.7%-22.5%); Papanicolaou test screening was received by 5.8% (95% CI, 5.6%-6.1%) vs 12.5% (95% CI, 12.2%-12.8%). Among men following advanced cancer diagnosis compared with controls, PSA test was received by 15.0% (95% CI, 14.7%-15.3%) vs 27.2% (95% CI, 26.8%-27.6%). For all patients following advanced diagnosis compared with controls, lower GI endoscopy was received by 1.7% (95% CI, 1.6%-1.8%) vs 4.7% (95% CI, 4.6%-4.9%). Screening was more frequent among patients with a recent history of screening (16.2% [95

  10. International patterns and trends in thyroid cancer incidence, 1973–2002

    PubMed Central

    Kilfoy, Briseis A.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Holford, Theodore R.; Han, Xuesong; Ward, Mary H.; Sjodin, Andreas; Zhang, Yaqun; Bai, Yana; Zhu, Cairong; Guo, Grace L.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zhang, Yawei

    2009-01-01

    During the past several decades, an increasing incidence of thyroid cancer has been reported in many parts of the world. To date, no study has compared trends in thyroid cancer incidence across continents. We examined incidence data from Cancer Incidence in Five Continents (CI5) over the 30-year period 1973–2002 from 19 populations in the Americas, Asia, Europe and Oceania. Thyroid cancer rates have increased from 1973–1977 to 1998–2002 for most of the populations except for Sweden, in which the incidence rates decreased about 18% for both males and females. The average increase was 48.0% among males and 66.7% among females. More recently, the age-adjusted international thyroid cancer incidence rates from 1998–2002 varied 5-fold by geographic region for males and nearly 10-fold for females by geographic region. Considerable variation in thyroid cancer incidence was present for every continent but Africa, in which the incidence rates were generally low. Our analysis of published CI5 data suggests that thyroid cancer rates increased between 1973 and 2002 in most populations worldwide and that the increase does not appear to be restricted to a particular region of the world or by the underlying rates of thyroid cancer. PMID:19016336

  11. Dietary patterns, goitrogenic food, and thyroid cancer: a case-control study in French Polynesia.

    PubMed

    Cléro, Énora; Doyon, Françoise; Chungue, Vaïana; Rachédi, Frédérique; Boissin, Jean-Louis; Sebbag, Joseph; Shan, Larrys; Rubino, Carole; de Vathaire, Florent

    2012-01-01

    French Polynesia has one of the world's highest thyroid cancer incidence rates. A case-control study among native residents of French Polynesia included 229 cases of differentiated thyroid cancer diagnosed between 1979 and 2004, and 371 population controls. Dietary patterns and goitrogenic food consumption (cabbage, cassava) were analyzed. We used a factor analysis to identify dietary patterns and a conditional logistic regression analysis to investigate the association between dietary patterns or food items and thyroid cancer risk. Two distinct dietary patterns were identified: traditional Polynesian and Western. A nonsignificant inverse association was observed between the traditional Polynesian dietary pattern and thyroid cancer risk. The Western pattern was not associated with thyroid cancer risk. Cassava consumption was significantly associated with a decreased risk of thyroid cancer. In conclusion, a traditional Polynesian dietary pattern led to a weak reduced risk of thyroid cancer in French Polynesia. The protective effect of cassava on this cancer does not seem to be substantially different from that of cabbage, which was the main goitrogenic food studied to date.

  12. A prospective study of medical diagnostic radiography and risk of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Neta, Gila; Rajaraman, Preetha; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Doody, Michele M; Alexander, Bruce H; Preston, Dale; Simon, Steven L; Melo, Dunstana; Miller, Jeremy; Freedman, D Michal; Linet, Martha S; Sigurdson, Alice J

    2013-04-15

    Although diagnostic x-ray procedures provide important medical benefits, cancer risks associated with their exposure are also possible, but not well characterized. The US Radiologic Technologists Study (1983-2006) is a nationwide, prospective cohort study with extensive questionnaire data on history of personal diagnostic imaging procedures collected prior to cancer diagnosis. We used Cox proportional hazard regressions to estimate thyroid cancer risks related to the number and type of selected procedures. We assessed potential modifying effects of age and calendar year of the first x-ray procedure in each category of procedures. Incident thyroid cancers (n = 251) were diagnosed among 75,494 technologists (1.3 million person-years; mean follow-up = 17 years). Overall, there was no clear evidence of thyroid cancer risk associated with diagnostic x-rays except for dental x-rays. We observed a 13% increase in thyroid cancer risk for every 10 reported dental radiographs (hazard ratio = 1.13, 95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.26), which was driven by dental x-rays first received before 1970, but we found no evidence that the relationship between dental x-rays and thyroid cancer was associated with childhood or adolescent exposures as would have been anticipated. The lack of association of thyroid cancer with x-ray procedures that expose the thyroid to higher radiation doses than do dental x-rays underscores the need to conduct a detailed radiation exposure assessment to enable quantitative evaluation of risk.

  13. The changing face of thyroid cancer in a population-based cohort.

    PubMed

    Pathak, K Alok; Leslie, William D; Klonisch, Thomas C; Nason, Richard W

    2013-08-01

    In North America, the incidence of thyroid cancer is increasing by over 6% per year. We studied the trends and factors influencing thyroid cancer incidence, its clinical presentation, and treatment outcome during 1970-2010 in a population-based cohort of 2306 consecutive thyroid cancers in Canada, that was followed up for a median period of 10.5 years. Disease-specific survival (DSS) and disease-free survival were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and the independent influence of various prognostic factors was evaluated by Cox proportional hazard models. Cumulative incidence of deaths resulting from thyroid cancer was calculated by competing risk analysis. A P-value <0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. The age standardized incidence of thyroid cancer by direct method increased from 2.52/100,000 (1970) to 9.37/100,000 (2010). Age at diagnosis, gender distribution, tumor size, and initial tumor stage did not change significantly during this period. The proportion of papillary thyroid cancers increased significantly (P < 0.001) from 58% (1970-1980) to 85.9% (2000-2010) while that of anaplastic cancer fell from 5.7% to 2.1% (P < 0.001). Ten-year DSS improved from 85.4% to 95.6%, and was adversely influenced by anaplastic histology (hazard ratio [HR] = 8.7; P < 0.001), male gender (HR = 1.8; P = 0.001), TNM stage IV (HR = 8.4; P = 0.001), incomplete surgical resection (HR = 2.4; P = 0.002), and age at diagnosis (HR = 1.05 per year; P < 0.001). There was a 373% increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer in Manitoba with a marked improvement in the thyroid cancer-specific survival that was independent of changes in patient demographics, tumor stage, or treatment practices, and is largely attributed to the declining proportion of anaplastic thyroid cancers.

  14. Effects of the Chernobyl Disaster on Thyroid Cancer Incidence in Turkey after 22 Years

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Hasan; Çakabay, Bahri; Bayrak, Ferit; Evrenkaya, Tülay

    2011-01-01

    Background. Separate studies involving people who survived atomic bombs have shown that the risk for cancer remains high after 40 years, compared with the risk in the general population. An elevated risk may also remain in regions of Turkey near the Chernobyl disaster. Patients and Methods. A multidisciplinary study conducted in 2008, 22 years after the Chernobyl disaster, examined the thyroid cancer incidence in Rize, a province of Turkey located on the shore of the middle Black Sea. Approximately 100,000 people were screened, and a fine-needle aspiration biopsy was performed in 89 patients. Results. Based on postoperative histopathological examinations, thyroid cancer was diagnosed in six of the 100,000 people screened. Conclusion. Given a thyroid cancer frequency of approximately 8 in 100,000 in the Turkish population, according to the Turkish Cancer Research Association, the rate in Rize reflects no increase in the thyroid cancer incidence 22 years after the Chernobyl disaster. PMID:22229102

  15. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    Cancer Treatment Affecting the Central Nervous System (HLMCC 0707) • Melatonin and sleep hygiene for the treatment of insomnia following cancer...Determinants of Diabetes in the Young. (PI: Jeffrey Krischer, Ph.D.) Moffitt Community Clinical Oncology Program Research Base (PI: Jeffrey Krischer

  16. Worldwide Increasing Incidence of Thyroid Cancer: Update on Epidemiology and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Francesco; Regalbuto, Concetto; Squatrito, Sebastiano; Vigneri, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    Background. In the last decades, thyroid cancer incidence has continuously and sharply increased all over the world. This review analyzes the possible reasons of this increase. Summary. Many experts believe that the increased incidence of thyroid cancer is apparent, because of the increased detection of small cancers in the preclinical stage. However, a true increase is also possible, as suggested by the observation that large tumors have also increased and gender differences and birth cohort effects are present. Moreover, thyroid cancer mortality, in spite of earlier diagnosis and better treatment, has not decreased but is rather increasing. Therefore, some environmental carcinogens in the industrialized lifestyle may have specifically affected the thyroid. Among potential carcinogens, the increased exposure to medical radiations is the most likely risk factor. Other factors specific for the thyroid like increased iodine intake and increased prevalence of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis cannot be excluded, while other factors like the increasing prevalence of obesity are not specific for the thyroid. Conclusions. The increased incidence of thyroid cancer is most likely due to a combination of an apparent increase due to more sensitive diagnostic procedures and of a true increase, a possible consequence of increased population exposure to radiation and to other still unrecognized carcinogens. PMID:23737785

  17. Municipal mortality due to thyroid cancer in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Lope, Virginia; Pollán, Marina; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Aragonés, Nuria; Ramis, Rebeca; Gómez-Barroso, Diana; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2006-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer is a tumor with a low but growing incidence in Spain. This study sought to depict its spatial municipal mortality pattern, using the classic model proposed by Besag, York and Mollié. Methods It was possible to compile and ascertain the posterior distribution of relative risk on the basis of a single Bayesian spatial model covering all of Spain's 8077 municipal areas. Maps were plotted depicting standardized mortality ratios, smoothed relative risk (RR) estimates, and the posterior probability that RR > 1. Results From 1989 to 1998 a total of 2,538 thyroid cancer deaths were registered in 1,041 municipalities. The highest relative risks were mostly situated in the Canary Islands, the province of Lugo, the east of La Coruña (Corunna) and western areas of Asturias and Orense. Conclusion The observed mortality pattern coincides with areas in Spain where goiter has been declared endemic. The higher frequency in these same areas of undifferentiated, more aggressive carcinomas could be reflected in the mortality figures. Other unknown genetic or environmental factors could also play a role in the etiology of this tumor. PMID:17173668

  18. Serum thyroglobulin in the management of patients with thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Barsano, C.P.; Skosey, C.; DeGroot, L.J.; Refetoff, S.

    1982-04-01

    We have reviewed our experience with the management of patients with thyroid cancer to assess the potential benefits of employing the serum thyroglobulin assay in patient management programs and to determine the optimal conditions for this application. Serum thyroglobulin levels were found to be more reliable when obtained from hypothyroid patients. Levels of thyroglobulin greater than 10 ng/mL appeared to be abnormally elevated in both thyroidectomized patients prior to radioactive iodine therapy (group 1) and in thyroidectomized patients after radioactive iodine therapy (group 2). Elevated thyroglobulin levels were found to be useful indicators of the presence of metastatic disease, whereas normal thyroglobulin levels were reliable indicators of the absence of metastases. In group 1 patients, elevated thyroglobulin levels reliably predicted the presence of important total body scan uptake. In group 2 patients, normal thyroglobulin levels reliably predicted the absence of total body scan uptake. The serum thyroglobulin assay can substantially reduce the need for repetitive total body scanning in the follow-up of group 2 patients with thyroid cancer.

  19. Estrogen activity as a preventive and therapeutic target in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Rajoria, Shilpi; Suriano, Robert; George, Andrea L; Shanmugam, Arulkumaran; Jussim, Casey; Shin, Edward J; Moscatello, Augustine L; Geliebter, Jan; Carpi, Angelo; Tiwari, Raj K

    2012-03-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine-related cancer with increasing incidences during the last five years. Interestingly, according to the American Thyroid Association, the incidences of thyroid proliferative diseases occur four to five times more in women than in men with the risk of developing thyroid disorders being one in every eight females. Several epidemiological studies have suggested a possible correlation between incidences of thyroid malignancies and hormones but the precise contribution of estrogen in thyroid proliferative disease initiation, and progression is not well understood. This review is an attempt to define the phenotypic and genotypic modulatory effects of estrogen on thyroid proliferative diseases. The significance and relevance of expression of estrogen receptors, α and β, in normal and malignant thyroid tissues and their effects on different molecular pathways involved in growth and function of the thyroid gland are discussed. These novel findings open up areas of developing alternative therapeutic treatments and preventive approaches which employ the use of antiestrogen to treat thyroid malignancies.

  20. A Concise Atlas of Thyroid Cancer Next-Generation Sequencing Panel ThyroSeq v.2

    PubMed Central

    Alsina, Jorge; Alsina, Raul; Gulec, Seza

    2017-01-01

    The next-generation sequencing technology allows high out-put genomic analysis. An innovative assay in thyroid cancer, ThyroSeq® was developed for targeted mutation detection by next generation sequencing technology in fine needle aspiration and tissue samples. ThyroSeq v.2 next generation sequencing panel offers simultaneous sequencing and detection in >1000 hotspots of 14 thyroid cancer-related genes and for 42 types of gene fusions known to occur in thyroid cancer. ThyroSeq is being increasingly used to further narrow the indeterminate category defined by cytology for thyroid nodules. From a surgical perspective, genomic profiling also provides prognostic and predictive information and closely relates to determination of surgical strategy. Both the genomic analysis technology and the informatics for the cancer genome data base are rapidly developing. In this paper, we have gathered existing information on the thyroid cancer-related genes involved in the initiation and progression of thyroid cancer. Our goal is to assemble a glossary for the current ThyroSeq genomic panel that can help elucidate the role genomics play in thyroid cancer oncogenesis. PMID:28117295

  1. Metformin inhibits thyroid cancer cell growth, migration, and EMT through the mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Baiyu; Cui, Hanzhi; Kang, Lei; Zhang, Xuelin; Jin, Zhitao; Lu, Lanmin; Fan, Zhongyi

    2015-08-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways have been shown to be activated in thyroid cancer. Recent evidences have demonstrated that the antidiabetic agent metformin, an activator of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase, can impair the proliferation and migration of cancer cells via inhibition of mTOR. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we show that metformin can inhibit mTOR pathway to impair growth and migration of the thyroid cancer cell lines. Cyclin D1 and c-Myc are important regulators of cancer cell growth, and we observed that treatment of thyroid cancer cells with metformin reduced c-Myc and cyclin D1 expression through suppression of mTOR and subsequent inhibition of P70S6K1 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation. Metformin reduced epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in thyroid carcinoma cells. Moreover, metformin regulated expression of the EMT-related markers E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and Snail. Additionally, knockdown of TSC2, the upstream regulatory molecule of mTOR pathway, or treatment of rapamycin, the mTOR inhibitor, could abolish the effects of metformin to regulate thyroid cancer cell proliferation, migration, EMT, and mTOR pathway molecules. These results indicate that metformin can suppress the proliferation, migration, and EMT of thyroid cancer cell lines by inhibiting mTOR signaling. These findings suggest that metformin and its molecular targets may be useful in thyroid carcinoma therapy.

  2. Electric Blanket Use and Risk of Thyroid Cancer in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Cohort.

    PubMed

    Kato, Ikuko; Young, Alicia; Liu, Jingmin; Abrams, Judith; Bock, Cathryn; Simon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer disproportionally affects more women than men. The aim of this study was to assess whether exposure to extremely low frequency electric magnetic fields from electric blankets (EBs) was associated with the development of thyroid cancer. Data were analyzed from 89,527 women who participated in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study and who responded to questions concerning prior use of EBs. During a mean follow-up of 12.2 years, 190 incident cases of thyroid cancer were identified. We estimated the hazard ratio (HR) and 95 percent confidence interval (CI) of incident thyroid cancer associated with EB use by Cox's proportional hazard model, adjusted for selected covariates. A majority, 57 percent, of the women in the cohort reported the use of EBs while sleeping and/or for warming the bed before sleep. No association was found between use of EBs and subsequent risk of thyroid cancer (HR = 0.98, 95 percent CI 0.72-1.32). Duration of EB use measured in years, months, or hours had no effect on risk. These results did not change when the cases were limited to papillary thyroid cancer, the most frequently occurring histologic type. The results of this study do not support possible health hazards of EBs in regards to thyroid cancer risk.

  3. The changing face of thyroid cancer in a population-based cohort

    PubMed Central

    Alok Pathak, K; Leslie, William D; Klonisch, Thomas C; Nason, Richard W

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In North America, the incidence of thyroid cancer is increasing by over 6% per year. We studied the trends and factors influencing thyroid cancer incidence, its clinical presentation, and treatment outcome during 1970–2010 in a population-based cohort of 2306 consecutive thyroid cancers in Canada, that was followed up for a median period of 10.5 years. Disease-specific survival (DSS) and disease-free survival were estimated by the Kaplan–Meier method and the independent influence of various prognostic factors was evaluated by Cox proportional hazard models. Cumulative incidence of deaths resulting from thyroid cancer was calculated by competing risk analysis. A P-value <0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. The age standardized incidence of thyroid cancer by direct method increased from 2.52/100,000 (1970) to 9.37/100,000 (2010). Age at diagnosis, gender distribution, tumor size, and initial tumor stage did not change significantly during this period. The proportion of papillary thyroid cancers increased significantly (P < 0.001) from 58% (1970–1980) to 85.9% (2000–2010) while that of anaplastic cancer fell from 5.7% to 2.1% (P < 0.001). Ten-year DSS improved from 85.4% to 95.6%, and was adversely influenced by anaplastic histology (hazard ratio [HR] = 8.7; P < 0.001), male gender (HR = 1.8; P = 0.001), TNM stage IV (HR = 8.4; P = 0.001), incomplete surgical resection (HR = 2.4; P = 0.002), and age at diagnosis (HR = 1.05 per year; P < 0.001). There was a 373% increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer in Manitoba with a marked improvement in the thyroid cancer-specific survival that was independent of changes in patient demographics, tumor stage, or treatment practices, and is largely attributed to the declining proportion of anaplastic thyroid cancers. This article shows there is an increase in the incidence of thyroid cancers of all sizes in a population cohort in Canada. The improvement in thyroid

  4. Cancer risk estimation in Belarussian children due to thyroid irradiation as a consequence of the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    SciTech Connect

    Buglova, E.; Kenigsberg, J.E.; Sergeeva, N.V.

    1996-07-01

    The thyroid doses received by the juvenile population of Belarus following the Chernobyl accident ranged up to about 10 Gy. The thyroid cancer risk estimate recommended in NCRP Report No. 80 was used to predict the number of thyroid cancer cases among children during 1990-1992 in selected Belarussian regions and cities. The results obtained using this risk estimate show an excess of thyroid cancer cases being registered vs. the predicted cases. Thyroid cancer incidence rate among boys under investigation is higher than among girls in the postaccident period. The excess of the observed over the expected incidence in the general juvenile population is caused by the high thyroid cancer incidence rate among boys. These results, which can be considered part of the first stage of a thorough thyroid cancer risk estimation after the Chernobyl accident, demonstrate the critical need to complete these studies in depth. 6 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Risk Factors for Decreased Quality of Life in Thyroid Cancer Survivors: Initial Findings from the North American Thyroid Cancer Survivorship Study

    PubMed Central

    James, Benjamin; Nagar, Sapna; Kaplan, Sharone; Seng, Vanessa; Ahsan, Habibul; Angelos, Peter; Kaplan, Edwin L.; Guerrero, Marlon A.; Kuo, Jennifer H.; Lee, James A.; Mitmaker, Elliot J.; Moalem, Jacob; Ruan, Daniel T.; Shen, Wen T.; Grogan, Raymon H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of thyroid cancer survivors is rising rapidly due to the combination of an increasing incidence, high survival rates, and a young age at diagnosis. The physical and psychosocial morbidity of thyroid cancer has not been adequately described, and this study therefore sought to improve the understanding of the impact of thyroid cancer on quality of life (QoL) by conducting a large-scale survivorship study. Methods: Thyroid cancer survivors were recruited from a multicenter collaborative network of clinics, national survivorship groups, and social media. Study participants completed a validated QoL assessment tool that measures four morbidity domains: physical, psychological, social, and spiritual effects. Data were also collected on participant demographics, medical comorbidities, tumor characteristics, and treatment modalities. Results: A total of 1174 participants with thyroid cancer were recruited. Of these, 89.9% were female, with an average age of 48 years, and a mean time from diagnosis of five years. The mean overall QoL was 5.56/10, with 0 being the worst. Scores for each of the sub-domains were 5.83 for physical, 5.03 for psychological, 6.48 for social, and 5.16 for spiritual well-being. QoL scores begin to improve five years after diagnosis. Female sex, young age at diagnosis, and lower educational attainment were highly predictive of decreased QoL. Conclusion: Thyroid cancer diagnosis and treatment can result in a decreased QoL. The present findings indicate that better tools to measure and improve thyroid cancer survivor QoL are needed. The authors plan to follow-up on these findings in the near future, as enrollment and data collection are ongoing. PMID:26431811

  6. Advanced Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... if it has spread to: • Bones • Lungs • Liver • Brain • Lymph nodes outside the pelvis • Other organs You may be diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer when you are first diagnosed, after having completed ...

  7. Coping with Advanced Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  8. Clinical guidelines for management of thyroid nodule and cancer during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Galofré, Juan Carlos; Riesco-Eizaguirre, Garcilaso; Alvarez-Escolá, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Special considerations are warranted in management of thyroid nodule and thyroid cancer during pregnancy. The diagnostic and therapeutic approach of thyroid nodules follows the standard practice in non-pregnant women. On the other hand, differentiated thyroid cancer management during pregnancy poses a number of challenges for the mother and fetus. The available data show that pregnancy is not a risk factor for thyroid cancer development or recurrence, although flare-ups cannot be completely ruled out in women with active disease. If surgery is needed, it should be performed during the second term or, preferably, after delivery. A majority of pregnant patients with low-risk disease only need adjustment in levothyroxine therapy. However, women with increased serum thyroglobulin levels before pregnancy or structural disease require regular thyroglobulin measurements and neck ultrasound throughout pregnancy. Pregnancy is an absolute contraindication for radioactive iodine administration.

  9. Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy sparing the thyroid gland for early-stage glottic cancer: A dosimetrical analysis

    PubMed Central

    KIM, EUN SEOK; YEO, SEUNG-GU

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies on advanced radiotherapy (RT) techniques for early stage glottic cancer have focused on sparing the carotid artery. However, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the dosimetric advantages of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in terms of sparing the thyroid gland in early-stage glottic cancer patients. In total, 15 cT1N0M0 glottic cancer patients treated with definitive RT using VMAT were selected, and for dosimetric comparison, a conventional RT plan comprising opposed-lateral wedged fields was generated for each patient. The carotid artery, thyroid gland and spinal cord were considered organs at risk. The prescription dose was 63 Gy at 2.25 Gy per fraction. For the thyroid gland and carotid artery, all compared parameters were significantly lower with VMAT compared with conventional RT. For the thyroid gland, the median reduction rates of the mean dose (Dmean), the volume receiving ≥30% of the prescription dose (V30) and the V50 were 32.6, 40.9 and 46.0%, respectively. The Dmean was 14.7±2.6 Gy when using VMAT compared with 22.2±3.9 Gy when using conventional RT. The differences between the techniques in terms of planning target volume coverage and dose homogeneity were not significant. When considering a recent normal tissue complication probability model, which indicated the mean thyroid gland dose as the most significant predictor of radiation-induced hypothyroidism, the dosimetric advantage shown in this study may be valuable in reducing hypothyroidism following RT for early stage glottic cancer patients. PMID:24932276

  10. Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy sparing the thyroid gland for early-stage glottic cancer: A dosimetrical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Seok; Yeo, Seung-Gu

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies on advanced radiotherapy (RT) techniques for early stage glottic cancer have focused on sparing the carotid artery. However, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the dosimetric advantages of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in terms of sparing the thyroid gland in early-stage glottic cancer patients. In total, 15 cT1N0M0 glottic cancer patients treated with definitive RT using VMAT were selected, and for dosimetric comparison, a conventional RT plan comprising opposed-lateral wedged fields was generated for each patient. The carotid artery, thyroid gland and spinal cord were considered organs at risk. The prescription dose was 63 Gy at 2.25 Gy per fraction. For the thyroid gland and carotid artery, all compared parameters were significantly lower with VMAT compared with conventional RT. For the thyroid gland, the median reduction rates of the mean dose (Dmean), the volume receiving ≥30% of the prescription dose (V30) and the V50 were 32.6, 40.9 and 46.0%, respectively. The Dmean was 14.7±2.6 Gy when using VMAT compared with 22.2±3.9 Gy when using conventional RT. The differences between the techniques in terms of planning target volume coverage and dose homogeneity were not significant. When considering a recent normal tissue complication probability model, which indicated the mean thyroid gland dose as the most significant predictor of radiation-induced hypothyroidism, the dosimetric advantage shown in this study may be valuable in reducing hypothyroidism following RT for early stage glottic cancer patients.

  11. Measurement of Thyroid Dose by TLD arising from Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer Patients from Supraclavicular Field

    PubMed Central

    Farhood, B.; Bahreyni Toossi, M.T.; Vosoughi, H.; Khademi, S.; Knaup, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading global cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Radiotherapy plays a significant role in treatment of breast cancer and reduces locoregional recurrence and eventually improves survival. The treatment fields applied for breast cancer treatment include: tangential, axillary, supraclavicular and internal mammary fields. Objective: In the present study, due to the presence of sensitive organ such as thyroid inside the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose and its effective factors were investigated. Materials and Methods: Thyroid dose of 31 female patients of breast cancer with involved supraclavicular lymph nodes which had undergone radiotherapy were measured. For each patient, three TLD-100 chips were placed on their thyroid gland surface, and thyroid doses of patients were measured. The variables of the study include shield shape, the time of patient’s setup, the technologists’ experience and qualification. Finally, the results were analyzed by ANOVA test using SPSS 11.5 software. Results: The average age of the patients was 46±10 years. The average of thyroid dose of the patients was 140±45 mGy (ranged 288.2 and 80.8) in single fraction. There was a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and shield shape. There was also a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and the patient’s setup time. Conclusion: Beside organ at risk such as thyroid which is in the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose possibility should be reduced. For solving this problem, an appropriate shield shape, the appropriate time of the patient’s setup, etc. could be considered. PMID:27853722

  12. Thyroid cancer susceptibility and THRA1 and BAT-40 repeats polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Baida, Aida; Farrington, Susan M; Galofré, Pere; Marcos, Ricard; Velázquez, Antonia

    2005-03-01

    Although genetic and environmental factors have been identified in the etiology of thyroid cancer, the specific genetic implications in sporadic thyroid tumors are poorly understood but, as in other common cancers, low-penetrance susceptibility genes are believed to be crucial in the tumorigenesis processes. Here, we have carried out a case-control study to investigate whether there is an association between THRA1 CA repeat or BAT-40 A repeat polymorphisms and thyroid cancer risk. The THRA1 repeat resides in the thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 gene, which is associated with thyroid cancer and whose expression depends on the THRA1 repeat size. We also analyzed the BAT-40 repeat that maps to chromosome 1, a region known to be involved in thyroid cancer. This repeat is located in the 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase gene that is associated with prostate cancer susceptibility. The THRA1 repeat was genotyped in 212 thyroid cancer patients and 141 controls of a Spanish population. From these individuals, 207 patients and 138 controls were also analyzed for the BAT-40 marker. No significant difference in the THRA1 allele distribution between patients and controls was found, although short alleles (<128 bp) might have some protective effect on thyroid cancer risk of carriers (odds ratio, 0.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.22-1.13; P = 0.094). By contrast, the BAT-40 allele distribution in patients was significantly different with respect to control (P = 0.035). Essentially, the difference were found in the genotypes involving the 111- to 115-bp allele range, which seem to be associated with a protective effect on thyroid cancer susceptibility in the studied population (odds ratio, 0.18; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.57; P = 0.02). Therefore, our results indicate that the BAT-40 containing region and to a less extend the thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 gene are related to thyroid cancer susceptibility. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the

  13. Characterization of thyroid cancer in mouse models using high-frequency quantitative ultrasound techniques.

    PubMed

    Lavarello, Roberto J; Ridgway, William R; Sarwate, Sandhya S; Oelze, Michael L

    2013-12-01

    Currently, the evaluation of thyroid cancer relies on the use of fine-needle aspiration biopsy, as non-invasive imaging methods do not provide sufficient levels of accuracy for the diagnosis of this disease. In this study, the potential of quantitative ultrasound methods for characterization of thyroid tissues was studied using a rodent model ex vivo. A high-frequency ultrasonic scanning system (40 MHz) was used to scan thyroids extracted from mice that had spontaneously developed thyroid lesions (cancerous or benign). Three sets of mice were acquired having different predispositions to developing three thyroid anomalies: C-cell adenoma, papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and follicular variant papillary thyroid carcinoma (FV-PTC). A fourth set of mice that did not develop thyroid anomalies (normal mice) were used as controls. The backscatter coefficient was estimated from excised thyroid lobes the different mice. From the backscatter coefficient versus frequency (25-45 MHz), the effective scatterer diameter (ESD) and effective acoustic concentration (EAC) were estimated. From the envelope of the backscattered signal, the homodyned K distribution was used to estimate the k parameter (ratio of coherent to incoherent signal energy) and the μ parameter (number of scatterers per resolution cell). Statistically significant differences were observed between cancerous thyroids and normal thyroids based on the ESD, EAC and μ parameters. The mean ESD values were 18.0 ± 0.92, 15.9 ± 0.81 and 21.5 ± 1.80 μm for the PTC, FV-PTC and normal thyroids, respectively. The mean EAC values were 59.4 ± 1.74, 62.7 ± 1.61 and 52.9 ± 3.42 dB (mm(-3)) for the PTC, FV-PTC and normal thyroids, respectively. The mean μ values were 2.55 ± 0.37, 2.59 ± 0.43 and 1.56 ± 0.99 for the PTC, FV-PTC and normal thyroids, respectively. Statistically significant differences were observed between cancerous thyroids and C-cell adenomas based on the ESD and EAC parameters, with an estimated ESD

  14. Quality of life aspects in the management of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Duan, H; Gamper, E; Becherer, A; Hoffmann, M

    2015-06-01

    While there is agreement that quality of life (QoL) is a central aim of medical treatment, the methods of its evaluation as well as its role in the patient's overall treatment experience are under continuous scrutiny. Different perspectives on patients' QoL have emerged; from the treating physician, from the psychologist, and naturally from the patient him/herself. This article provides insights into each of these views within the context of thyroid cancer where, as a consequence of increasing incidence and decreasing mortality rates, QoL aspects deserve close attention. Physicians often find themselves in situations where they perform a balancing act between what they know is best from a somatic point of view and learning about what is best for the individual patient. For psychologists in the field of oncology, a main area of interest is the incorporation of the patient's perspective into research by using patient-reported outcomes (PROs) which include QoL assessment. PROs can also be used in clinical practice as a way to start a conversation about symptoms and QoL aspects that perhaps patients might not volunteer, and this allows physicians to address QoL issues more directly. Patients usually appreciate being asked about all aspects of QoL, and need sound information about how their QoL might be affected by the disease and its treatment. By examining and understanding the different perspectives on QoL, and how QoL differs in patients with thyroid cancer compared with other cancers, it is hoped that the QoL can be enhanced in this particular patient group.

  15. Thyroid ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid ultrasonography has established itself as a popular and useful tool in the evaluation and management of thyroid disorders. Advanced ultrasound techniques in thyroid imaging have not only fascinated the radiologists but also attracted the surgeons and endocrinologists who are using these techniques in their daily clinical and operative practice. This review provides an overview of indications for ultrasound in various thyroid diseases, describes characteristic ultrasound findings in these diseases, and illustrates major diagnostic pitfalls of thyroid ultrasound. PMID:23776892

  16. BRAF-activated LncRNA functions as a tumor suppressor in papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Kai; Ma, Ben; Cao, Yi-Ming; Xiang, Jun; Lu, Zhong-Wu; Zhu, Yong-Xue; Li, Duan-Shu; Ji, Qing-Hai

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) participate in cancer cell tumorigenesis, cell cycle control, migration, proliferation, apoptosis, metastasis and drug resistance. The BRAF-activated non-coding RNA (BANCR) functions as both an oncogene and a tumor suppressor. Here, we investigated BANCR's role in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) by assessing BANCR levels in PTC and matched normal thyroid epithelial tissues from 92 patients using qRT-PCR. We also used lentiviral vectors to establish PTC cell lines to investigate the effects of BANCR overexpression on cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion. Our results indicate BANCR levels are lower in PTC tumor tissues than control tissues. Decreased BANCR levels correlate with tumor size, the presence of multifocal lesions and advanced PTC stage. BANCR overexpression reduced PTC cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis, which inhibited metastasis. It also inactivated ERK1/2 and p38, and this effect was enhanced by treatment with the MEK inhibitor U0126. Finally, BANCR overexpression dramatically inhibited tumor growth from PTC cells in xenograft mouse models. These results suggest BANCR inhibits tumorigenesis in PTC and that BANCR levels may be used as a novel prognostic marker. PMID:27462868

  17. Thyroid cancer incidence among people living in areas contaminated by radiation from the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Ron, Elaine

    2007-11-01

    As a result of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident, massive amounts of radioactive materials were released into the environment and large numbers of individuals living in Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine were exposed to radioactive iodines, primarily 131I. Iodine-131 concentrated in the thyroid gland of residents of the contaminated areas, with children and adolescents being particularly affected. In the decade after the accident, a substantial increase in thyroid cancer incidence was observed among exposed children in the three affected countries, and compelling evidence of an association between pediatric thyroid cancer incidence and radiation exposure to the thyroid gland accumulated. The data currently available suggest that both the magnitude and patterns of thyroid cancer risk are generally consistent with those reported following external exposure. Based on data from case-control studies, iodine deficiency appeared to enhance the risk of developing thyroid cancer following exposure from Chernobyl. Results from a recent large cohort study, however, did not support these findings. Data on adult exposure are limited and not entirely consistent. Similarly, information on thyroid cancer risks associated with in utero exposure is insufficient to draw conclusions. The lack of information on these two population groups indicates an important gap that needs to be filled. Twenty years after the accident, excess thyroid cancers are still occurring among persons exposed as children or adolescents, and, if external radiation can be used as a guide, we can expect an excess of radiation-associated thyroid cancers for several more decades. Since considerable uncertainties about the long-term health effects from Chernobyl remain, continued follow-up of the exposed populations should provide valuable information.

  18. Nuclear Molecular and Theranostic Imaging for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Arif; Polack, Berna; Rodriguez, Yvette; Kuker, Russ

    2017-01-01

    Traditional nuclear medicine is rapidly being transformed by the evolving concepts in molecular imaging and theranostics. The utility of new approaches in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) diagnostics and therapy has not been fully appreciated. The clinical information, relevant to disease management and patient care, obtained by scintigraphy is still being underestimated. There has been a trend towards moving away from the use of radioactive iodine (RAI) imaging in the management of the disease. This paradigm shift is supported by the 2015 American Thyroid Association Guidelines (1). A more systematic and comprehensive understanding of disease pathophysiology and imaging methodologies is needed for optimal utilization of different imaging modalities in the management of DTC. There have been significant developments in radiotracer and imaging technology, clinically proven to contribute to the understanding of tumor biology and the clinical assessment of patients with DTC. The research and development in the field continues to evolve, with expected emergence of many novel diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. The role for nuclear imaging applications will continue to evolve and be reconfigured in the changing paradigm. This article aims to review the clinical uses and controversies surrounding the use of scintigraphy, and the information it can provide in assisting in the management and treatment of DTC. PMID:28117289

  19. DNA damage among thyroid cancer and multiple cancer cases, controls, and long-lived individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Sigurdson, A J; Hauptmann, M; Alexander, B J; Doody, M M; Thomas, C B; Struewing, J P; Jones, I M

    2004-08-24

    Variation in the detection, signaling, and repair of DNA damage contributes to human cancer risk. To assess capacity to modulate endogenous DNA damage among radiologic technologists who had been diagnosed with breast cancer and another malignancy (breast-other; n=42), early-onset breast cancer (early-onset, age {<=} 35; n=38), thyroid cancer (n=68), long-lived cancer-free individuals (hyper-normals; n=20) and cancer-free controls (n=49) we quantified DNA damage (single strand breaks and abasic sites) in untreated lymphoblastoid cell lines using the alkaline comet assay. Komet{trademark} software provided comet tail length, % DNA in tail (tail DNA), comet distributed moment (CDM), and Olive tail moment (OTM) summarized as the geometric mean of 100 cells. Category cut-points (median and 75th percentile) were determined from the distribution among controls. Tail length (for {>=} 75% vs. below the median, age adjusted) was most consistently associated with the highest odds ratios in the breast-other, early-onset, and thyroid cancer groups (with risk increased 10-, 5- or 19-fold, respectively, with wide confidence intervals) and decreased risk among the hyper-normal group. For the other three Comet measures, risk of breast-other was elevated approximately three-fold. Risk of early-onset breast cancer was mixed and risk of thyroid cancer ranged from null to a two-fold increase. The hyper-normal group showed decreased odds ratios for tail DNA and OTM, but not CDM. DNA damage, as estimated by all Comet measures, was relatively unaffected by survival time, reproductive factors, and prior radiation treatment. We detected a continuum of endogenous DNA damage that was highest among cancer cases, less in controls, and suggestively lowest in hyper-normal individuals. Measuring this DNA damage phenotype may contribute to the identification of susceptible sub-groups. Our observations require replication in a prospective study with a large number of pre-diagnostic samples.

  20. A case report of thyroid gland metastasis associated with lung metastasis from colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Nozawa, Keijiro; Aoyagi, Yoshiko; Ishihara, Soichiro; Matsuda, Keiji; Fukushima, Junichi; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid gland metastasis of malignant tumors is observed in 1.9% to 9.5% of histologically examined autopsy cases. Thyroid metastasis from colon cancer is extremely rare and the prognosis is poor. Here we report a case of lung metastasis and thyroid gland metastasis following sigmoid colon cancer surgery. In 2000, a 58-year-old woman underwent a sigmoid colectomy for sigmoid colon cancer. In 2005, a metastatic lung tumor was detected by chest CT. The patient underwent a partial thoracoscopic resection of the left lung in April 2005. On a CT scan taken 3 years and 4 months after the lung resection, a tumor mass was observed in the left lung and a low-absorption region with an unclear border was seen in the left lobe of the thyroid gland. Thyroid aspiration cytology showed adenocarcinoma, and a diagnosis of thyroid gland metastasis from sigmoid colon cancer was made. In April 2008 a subtotal thyroidectomy was performed. Following surgery, the patient underwent chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 and bevacizumab. Nevertheless a number of lung metastases and expressions of lung metastasis were subsequently observed. Histopathological examination revealed a number of metastases of differentiated papillary adenocarcinoma in the thyroid gland from colon cancer.

  1. Cancer risks after diagnostic doses of 131I with special reference to thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, L.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Between 1951 and 1969 a total of 35,074 patients less than 75 years of age (mean = 44 years) were examined with diagnostic doses of 131I. The mean administered activity of 131I was 52 microCi and the radiation dose to the thyroid gland was on the average of 0.5 Gy. The cohort was matched with the Swedish Cancer Register for the years 1958-1984. During this period, 3746 cancers occurred more than 5 years after the 131I examination, and the resulting standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.98 to 1.04). SIR for thyroid cancer was 1.18 (95% CI = 0.88 to 1.56). The risks for both cancer of all sites and for thyroid cancer were highest 5 to 9 years after examination (SIR = 1.07 and 2.06, respectively) and did not differ from unity thereafter. With greater than or equal to 10 years of follow-up, risk was not statistically associated with the dose of 131I.

  2. Advances in cancer immunology and cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Voena, Claudia; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    After decades of setbacks, cancer immunology is living its Golden Age. Recent advances in cancer immunology have provided new therapeutic approaches to treat cancer. The objective clinical response observed in patients treated with antibodies that block the immune checkpoints, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell-death protein 1 (PD-1)/programmed cell-death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathways, has led to their FDA approval for the treatment of melanoma in 2011 and in 2014, respectively. The anti-PD-1 antibody nivolumab has received the FDA-approval in March 2015 for squamous lung cancer treatment. In addition, antibodies targeting PD-1 or PD-L1 have demonstrated their efficacy and safety in additional tumors, including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), renal cell carcinoma (RCC), bladder cancer, and Hodgkin's lymphoma. Almost at the same time, the field of adoptive cell transfer has exploded. The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T technology has provided strong evidence of efficacy in the treatment of B cell malignancies, and different T cell based treatments are currently under investigation for different types of tumors. In this review we will discuss the latest advances in cancer immunology and immunotherapy as well as new treatments now under development in the clinic and potential strategies that have shown promising results in preclinical models.

  3. [Therapeutic advances in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, B C

    2006-04-01

    The treatment of breast cancer has made significant improvements during the past ten years. For early breast cancer with a clinically negative axilla sentinel node biopsy has become the preferred approach. For endocrine therapy of postmenopausal patients the selective aromatase inhibitors have become standard in metastatic as well as in early breast cancer. Trastuzumab (Herceptin) plays an important role in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer in the metastatic and since 2005 also in the adjuvant setting. When chemotherapy is used to treat metastatic breast cancer drug combinations are superior to monotherapy only in terms of response rates. By contrast, in the adjuvant setting combination drug therapy is the standard. New methods of tissue analysis including expression patterns of mRNA and proteins are promising research strategies to further advance the field.

  4. What Should You Ask Your Health Care Team About Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis, and Staging What Should You Ask Your Health Care Team About Thyroid Cancer? As you deal with ... only ones who can give you information. Other health care professionals, such as nurses and social workers, may ...

  5. RET/PTC Rearrangements Are Associated with Elevated Postoperative TSH Levels and Multifocal Lesions in Papillary Thyroid Cancer without Concomitant Thyroid Benign Disease.

    PubMed

    Su, Xuan; He, Caiyun; Ma, Jiangjun; Tang, Tao; Zhang, Xiao; Ye, Zulu; Long, Yakang; Shao, Qiong; Shao, Jianyong; Yang, Ankui

    2016-01-01

    RET/PTC rearrangements, resulting in aberrant activity of the RET protein tyrosine kinase receptor, occur exclusively in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). In this study, we examined the association between RET/PTC rearrangements and thyroid hormone homeostasis, and explored whether concomitant diseases such as nodular goiter and Hashimoto's thyroiditis influenced this association. A total of 114 patients diagnosed with PTC were enrolled in this study. Thyroid hormone levels, clinicopathological parameters and lifestyle were obtained through medical records and surgical pathology reports. RET/PTC rearrangements were detected using TaqMan RT-PCR and validated by direct sequencing. No RET/PTC rearrangements were detected in benign thyroid tissues. RET/PTC rearrangements were detected in 23.68% (27/114) of PTC tissues. No association between thyroid function, clinicopathological parameters and lifestyle was observed either in total thyroid cancer patients or the subgroup of patients with concomitant disease. In the subgroup of PTC patients without concomitant disease, RET/PTC rearrangement was associated with multifocal cancer (P = 0.018). RET/PTC rearrangement was also correlated with higher TSH levels at one month post-surgery (P = 0.037). Based on likelihood-ratio regression analysis, the RET/PTC-positive PTC cases showed an increased risk of multifocal cancers in the thyroid gland (OR = 5.57, 95% CI, 1.39-22.33). Our findings suggest that concomitant diseases such as nodular goiter and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in PTC may be a confounding factor when examining the effects of RET/PTC rearrangements. Excluding the potential effect of this confounding factor showed that RET/PTC may confer an increased risk for the development of multifocal cancers in the thyroid gland. Aberrantly increased post-operative levels of TSH were also associated with RET/PTC rearrangement. Together, our data provides useful information for the treatment of papillary thyroid cancer.

  6. RET/PTC Rearrangements Are Associated with Elevated Postoperative TSH Levels and Multifocal Lesions in Papillary Thyroid Cancer without Concomitant Thyroid Benign Disease

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xuan; He, Caiyun; Ma, Jiangjun; Tang, Tao; Zhang, Xiao; Ye, Zulu; Long, Yakang; Shao, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    RET/PTC rearrangements, resulting in aberrant activity of the RET protein tyrosine kinase receptor, occur exclusively in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). In this study, we examined the association between RET/PTC rearrangements and thyroid hormone homeostasis, and explored whether concomitant diseases such as nodular goiter and Hashimoto's thyroiditis influenced this association. A total of 114 patients diagnosed with PTC were enrolled in this study. Thyroid hormone levels, clinicopathological parameters and lifestyle were obtained through medical records and surgical pathology reports. RET/PTC rearrangements were detected using TaqMan RT-PCR and validated by direct sequencing. No RET/PTC rearrangements were detected in benign thyroid tissues. RET/PTC rearrangements were detected in 23.68% (27/114) of PTC tissues. No association between thyroid function, clinicopathological parameters and lifestyle was observed either in total thyroid cancer patients or the subgroup of patients with concomitant disease. In the subgroup of PTC patients without concomitant disease, RET/PTC rearrangement was associated with multifocal cancer (P = 0.018). RET/PTC rearrangement was also correlated with higher TSH levels at one month post-surgery (P = 0.037). Based on likelihood-ratio regression analysis, the RET/PTC-positive PTC cases showed an increased risk of multifocal cancers in the thyroid gland (OR = 5.57, 95% CI, 1.39–22.33). Our findings suggest that concomitant diseases such as nodular goiter and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in PTC may be a confounding factor when examining the effects of RET/PTC rearrangements. Excluding the potential effect of this confounding factor showed that RET/PTC may confer an increased risk for the development of multifocal cancers in the thyroid gland. Aberrantly increased post-operative levels of TSH were also associated with RET/PTC rearrangement. Together, our data provides useful information for the treatment of papillary thyroid cancer. PMID

  7. Genomic and transcriptomic hallmarks of poorly differentiated and anaplastic thyroid cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahimpasic, Tihana; Boucai, Laura; Shah, Ronak H.; Dogan, Snjezana; Ricarte-Filho, Julio C.; Krishnamoorthy, Gnana P.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Berger, Michael F.; Sander, Chris; Taylor, Barry S.; Ghossein, Ronald; Ganly, Ian; Fagin, James A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC) and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) are rare and frequently lethal tumors that so far have not been subjected to comprehensive genetic characterization. METHODS. We performed next-generation sequencing of 341 cancer genes from 117 patient-derived PDTCs and ATCs and analyzed the transcriptome of a representative subset of 37 tumors. Results were analyzed in the context of The Cancer Genome Atlas study (TCGA study) of papillary thyroid cancers (PTC). RESULTS. Compared to PDTCs, ATCs had a greater mutation burden, including a higher frequency of mutations in TP53, TERT promoter, PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway effectors, SWI/SNF subunits, and histone methyltransferases. BRAF and RAS were the predominant drivers and dictated distinct tropism for nodal versus distant metastases in PDTC. RAS and BRAF sharply distinguished between PDTCs defined by the Turin (PDTC-Turin) versus MSKCC (PDTC-MSK) criteria, respectively. Mutations of EIF1AX, a component of the translational preinitiation complex, were markedly enriched in PDTCs and ATCs and had a striking pattern of co-occurrence with RAS mutations. While TERT promoter mutations were rare and subclonal in PTCs, they were clonal and highly prevalent in advanced cancers. Application of the TCGA-derived BRAF-RAS score (a measure of MAPK transcriptional output) revealed a preserved relationship with BRAF/RAS mutation in PDTCs, whereas ATCs were BRAF-like irrespective of driver mutation. CONCLUSIONS. These data support a model of tumorigenesis whereby PDTCs and ATCs arise from well-differentiated tumors through the accumulation of key additional genetic abnormalities, many of which have prognostic and possible therapeutic relevance. The widespread genomic disruptions in ATC compared with PDTC underscore their greater virulence and higher mortality. FUNDING. This work was supported in part by NIH grants CA50706, CA72597, P50-CA72012, P30-CA008748, and 5T32-CA160001; the Lefkovsky Family

  8. Robust Thyroid Gene Expression and Radioiodine Uptake Induced by Simultaneous Suppression of BRAF V600E and Histone Deacetylase in Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Weiwei; Liu, Rengyun; Zhu, Guangwu; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Context: Use of BRAF V600E inhibitors to restore thyroid iodide-handling gene expression and radioactive iodine (RAI) avidity is an attractive therapeutic strategy for RAI-refractory thyroid cancer, but recent initial clinical responses were modest. Given histone deacetylation at the sodium/iodide symporter promoter by histone deacetylase (HDAC) as a mechanism, simultaneously targeting BRAF V600E and HDAC could be a more effective strategy. Objectives: The objective of the study was to test whether suppressing both BRAF V600E and HDAC could more effectively induce thyroid gene expression and RAI uptake in thyroid cancer cells. Research Design: We tested the BRAF V600E inhibitor PLX4032 (vemurafenib) and the HDAC inhibitor SAHA (vorinostat), two major anticancer drugs currently approved for clinical use, in inducing thyroid gene expression and RAI uptake in thyroid cancer cells. Results: PLX4032 alone induced a modest expression of thyroid genes and RAI uptake preferentially in thyroid cancer cells harboring BRAF V600E. SAHA showed an effect in a genetic-independent manner in all the cells. A robust synergistic effect on thyroid gene expression and RAI uptake was observed in BRAF V600E-positive thyroid cancer cells when the two inhibitors were simultaneously used. This was dramatically enhanced further by TSH; triple combination of PLX4032, SAHA, and TSH showed the most robust effect on thyroid gene expression and RAI uptake in cells harboring BRAF V600E. Abundant sodium/iodide symporter protein expression in thyroid cancer cells under these conditions was confirmed by immunofluorescent microscopy. Conclusions: Simultaneously suppressing BRAF V600E and HDAC, particularly when cotreated with TSH, induced a far more robust expression of thyroid genes and RAI uptake in thyroid cancer cells than suppressing BRAF V600E alone. Triple combination of PLX4032, SAHA, and TSH is a specific robust regimen to restore RAI avidity in RAI-refractory BRAF V600E-positive thyroid

  9. Completion thyroidectomy in differentiated thyroid cancer: When to perform?

    PubMed Central

    Kısaoğlu, Abdullah; Özoğul, Bünyami; Akçay, Müfide Nuran; Öztürk, Gürkan; Atamanalp, Sabri Selçuk; Aydınlı, Bülent; Kara, Salih

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Completion thyroidectomy is recommended in patients who have been diagnosed with differentiated thyroid cancer on histopathological evaluation, if their first operation was a conservative approach. The critical issue is when to do the second operation. Material and Methods: The medical records of 66 patients who underwent completion thyroidectomy for the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer in our clinic between 2006–2013 were retrospectively analyzed. All data were compared after patients were divided into two groups according to the interval between the first surgery and completion thyroidectomy. Results: Fifty-two patients (78.8%) were women and 14 patients (21.2%) were male. Completion thyroidectomy was performed 10–90 days after the initial surgery (group 1) in 26 patients, whereas it was performed later than 90 days in 40 patients (group 2). Temporary hypoparathyroidism occurred in two patients (7.7%) in group 1, and in 3 patients (7.5%) in group 2. Transient recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy was observed in 1 patient (3.9%) in group 1, and in 1 patient (2.5%) in group 2. There were no permanent morbidities in both groups. Residual tumor rate after completion thyroidectomy was 45.5%. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of complications after completion thyroidectomy. Conclusion: Although in some studies it is recommended that completion thyroidectomy should be performed either before scar tissue development or after clinical remission of scar tissue, edema and inflammation, we believe that timing of surgery has no effect on morbidity. PMID:25931885

  10. 2013 European Thyroid Association Guidelines for Cervical Ultrasound Scan and Ultrasound-Guided Techniques in the Postoperative Management of Patients with Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leenhardt, L.; Erdogan, M.F.; Hegedus, L.; Mandel, S.J.; Paschke, R.; Rago, T.; Russ, G.

    2013-01-01

    Cervical ultrasound scanning (US) is considered a key examination, by all major thyroid and endocrine specialist societies for the postoperative follow-up of thyroid cancer patients to assess the risk of recurrence. Neck US imaging is readily available, non-invasive, relatively easy to perform, cost-effective, and can guide diagnostic and therapeutic procedures with low complication rates. Its main shortcoming is its operator-dependency. Because of the pivotal role of US in the care of thyroid cancer patients, the European Thyroid Association convened a panel of international experts to review technical aspects, indications, results, and limitations of cervical US in the initial staging and follow-up of thyroid cancer patients. The main aim is to establish guidelines for both a cervical US scanning protocol and US-guided diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in patients with thyroid cancer. This report presents (1) standardization of the US scanning procedure, techniques of US-guided fine-needle aspiration, and reporting of findings; (2) definition of criteria for classification of malignancy risk based on cervical US imaging characteristics of neck masses and lymph nodes; (3) indications for US-guided fine-needle aspiration and for biological in situ assessments; (4) proposal of an algorithm for the follow-up of thyroid cancer patients based on risk stratification following histopathological and cervical US findings, and (5) discussion of the potential use of US-guided localization and ablation techniques for locoregional thyroid metastases. PMID:24847448

  11. Non-thyroid cancer in Northern Ukraine in the post-Chernobyl period: Short report.

    PubMed

    Hatch, M; Ostroumova, E; Brenner, A; Federenko, Z; Gorokh, Y; Zvinchuk, O; Shpak, V; Tereschenko, V; Tronko, M; Mabuchi, K

    2015-06-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in Ukraine in 1986 led to widespread radioactive releases into the environment - primarily of radioiodines and cesium - heavily affecting the northern portions of the country, with settlement-averaged thyroid doses estimated to range from 10 mGy to more than 10 Gy. The increased risk of thyroid cancer among exposed children and adolescents is well established but the impact of radioactive contamination on the risk of other types of cancer is much less certain. To provide data on a public health issue of major importance, we have analyzed the incidence of non-thyroid cancers during the post-Chernobyl period in a well-defined cohort of 13,203 individuals who were <18 years of age at the time of the accident. The report is based on standardized incidence ratio (SIR) analysis of 43 non-thyroid cancers identified through linkage with the National Cancer Registry of Ukraine for the period 1998 through 2009. We compared the observed and expected number of cases in three cancer groupings: all solid cancers excluding thyroid, leukemia, and lymphoma. Our analyses found no evidence of a statistically significant elevation in cancer risks in this cohort exposed at radiosensitive ages, although the cancer trends, particularly for leukemia (SIR=1.92, 95% confidence interval: 0.69; 4.13), should continue to be monitored.

  12. Anthropometric Factors and Thyroid Cancer Risk by Histological Subtype: Pooled Analysis of 22 Prospective Studies

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Marjorie L.; Franceschi, Silvia; Rinaldi, Sabina; Wolk, Alicja; Neta, Gila; Olov Adami, Hans; Anderson, Kristin; Andreotti, Gabriella; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Bernstein, Leslie; Buring, Julie E.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; De Roo, Lisa A.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giles, Graham G.; Håkansson, Niclas; Horn-Ross, Pamela L.; Kirsh, Vicki A.; Linet, Martha S.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Orsini, Nicola; Park, Yikyung; Patel, Alpa V.; Purdue, Mark P.; Riboli, Elio; Robien, Kimberly; Rohan, Thomas; Sandler, Dale P.; Schairer, Catherine; Schneider, Arthur B.; Sesso, Howard D.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Singh, Pramil N.; van den Brandt, Piet A.; Ward, Elizabeth; Weiderpass, Elisabete; White, Emily; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Hartge, Patricia; Berrington de González, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Greater height and body mass index (BMI) have been associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer, particularly papillary carcinoma, the most common and least aggressive subtype. Few studies have evaluated these associations in relation to other, more aggressive histologic types or thyroid cancer-specific mortality. Methods: This large pooled analysis of 22 prospective studies (833,176 men and 1,260,871 women) investigated thyroid cancer incidence associated with greater height, BMI at baseline and young adulthood, and adulthood BMI gain (difference between young-adult and baseline BMI), overall and separately by sex and histological subtype using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models. Associations with thyroid cancer mortality were investigated in a subset of cohorts (578,922 men and 774,373 women) that contributed cause of death information. Results: During follow-up, 2996 incident thyroid cancers and 104 thyroid cancer deaths were identified. All anthropometric factors were positively associated with thyroid cancer incidence: hazard ratios (HR) [confidence intervals (CIs)] for height (per 5 cm) = 1.07 [1.04–1.10], BMI (per 5 kg/m2) = 1.06 [1.02–1.10], waist circumference (per 5 cm) = 1.03 [1.01–1.05], young-adult BMI (per 5 kg/m2) = 1.13 [1.02–1.25], and adulthood BMI gain (per 5 kg/m2) = 1.07 [1.00–1.15]. Associations for baseline BMI and waist circumference were attenuated after mutual adjustment. Baseline BMI was more strongly associated with risk in men compared with women (p = 0.04). Positive associations were observed for papillary, follicular, and anaplastic, but not medullary, thyroid carcinomas. Similar, but stronger, associations were observed for thyroid cancer mortality. Conclusion: The results suggest that greater height and excess adiposity throughout adulthood are associated with higher incidence of most major types of thyroid cancer, including the least common but

  13. Evaluation of the Quality of Online Information for Patients with Rare Cancers: Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuenzel, Ulrike; Monga Sindeu, Tabea; Schroth, Sarah; Huebner, Jutta; Herth, Natalie

    2017-01-24

    The Internet offers an easy and quick access to a vast amount of patient information. However, several studies point to the poor quality of many websites and the resulting hazards of false information. The aim of this study was to assess quality of information on thyroid cancer. A patients' search for information about thyroid cancer on German websites was simulated using the search engine Google and the patient portal "Patienten-Information.de". The websites were assessed using a standardized instrument with formal and content aspects from the German Cancer Society. Supporting the results of prior studies that analysed patient information on the Internet, the data showed that the quality of patient information on thyroid cancer is highly heterogeneous depending on the website providers. The majority of website providers are represented by media and health providers other than health insurances, practices and professionals offering patient information of relatively poor quality. Moreover, most websites offer patient information of low-quality content. Only a few trustworthy, high-quality websites exist. Especially Google, a common search engine, focuses more on the dissemination of information than on quality aspects. In order to improve the patient information from the Internet, the visibility of high-quality websites must be improved. For that, education programs to improve patients' eHealth literacy are needed. A quick and easy evaluation tool for online information suited for patients should be implemented, and patients should be taught to integrate such a tool into their research process.

  14. Molecular profiling of thyroid cancer subtypes using large-scale text mining

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine tumor with a steady increase in incidence. It is classified into multiple histopathological subtypes with potentially distinct molecular mechanisms. Identifying the most relevant genes and biological pathways reported in the thyroid cancer literature is vital for understanding of the disease and developing targeted therapeutics. Results We developed a large-scale text mining system to generate a molecular profiling of thyroid cancer subtypes. The system first uses a subtype classification method for the thyroid cancer literature, which employs a scoring scheme to assign different subtypes to articles. We evaluated the classification method on a gold standard derived from the PubMed Supplementary Concept annotations, achieving a micro-average F1-score of 85.9% for primary subtypes. We then used the subtype classification results to extract genes and pathways associated with different thyroid cancer subtypes and successfully unveiled important genes and pathways, including some instances that are missing from current manually annotated databases or most recent review articles. Conclusions Identification of key genes and pathways plays a central role in understanding the molecular biology of thyroid cancer. An integration of subtype context can allow prioritized screening for diagnostic biomarkers and novel molecular targeted therapeutics. Source code used for this study is made freely available online at https://github.com/chengkun-wu/GenesThyCan. PMID:25521965

  15. Role of B-RafV600E in differentiated thyroid cancer and preclinical validation of compounds against B-RafV600E

    PubMed Central

    Nucera, Carmelo; Goldfarb, Melanie; Hodin, Richard; Parangi, Sareh

    2012-01-01

    Summary B-RafV600E, an oncogenic protein kinase, is the most frequent genetic alteration in papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC). PTC represents 80–90% of all thyroid cancers and over the past five years, more than 200 manuscripts have been published about the relationship between “B-RafV600E and thyroid cancer”. B-RafV600E genetically arises from a transversion point mutation (valine-to-glutamate substitution at amino acid residue-600, V600E) and leads to over activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signalling pathway. The MAPK pathway is essential for transmitting proliferation signals generated by cell surface receptors and cytoplasmic signaling elements to the nucleus. In many cancers, including thyroid cancer, B-RafV600E appears to play a crucial role in cell proliferation, survival and de-differentiation. In thyroid cancer, the V600E mutation occurs with greater frequently in aggressive subtypes of PTC, and in individuals that present at advanced stages of disease with extra-thyroidal extension and/or lymph node metastases. B-RafV600E is considered a marker of aggressive disease in both PTC (>1 cm) and micro-PTC (≤1 cm), and interestingly, is associated with both loss of I-131 avidity and PTC recurrence. Though treatment of patients with thyroid cancer is usually successful and most patients are rendered disease-free, to date there are no effective therapies for patients with invasive, non-radioiodine sensitive tumors or metastatic disease. In this article we will review the relation between B-RafV600E and PTC, as well as both non-selective and selective pharmacological agents currently under investigation for treatment of B-RafV600E positive PTC. PMID:19356676

  16. Characterization of thyroid cancer in mouse models using high-frequency quantitative ultrasound techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lavarello, R. J.; Ridgway, W. R.; Sarwate, S.; Oelze, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, the evaluation of thyroid cancer relies on the use of fine needle aspiration biopsy as non-invasive imaging methods do not provide sufficient levels of accuracy for the diagnosis of this disease. In this study, the potential of quantitative ultrasound methods for characterizing thyroid tissues was studied using a rodent model ex vivo. A high-frequency ultrasonic scanning system (40 MHz) was used to scan thyroids extracted from mice that had spontaneously developed thyroid lesions (cancerous or benign). Three sets of mice were acquired having different predispositions to developing thyroid anomalies (a C-cell adenoma, a papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), and a follicular variant papillary thyroid carcinoma (FV-PTC)). A fourth set of mice did not develop thyroid anomalies (normal mice) and were used as controls. The backscatter coefficient was estimated from excised thyroid lobes for the different mice. From the backscatter coefficient versus frequency (25 to 45 MHz), the effective scatterer diameter (ESD) and effective acoustic concentration (EAC) were estimated. From the envelope of the backscattered signal, the homodyned K distribution was used to estimate the k parameter (ratio of coherent to incoherent signal energy) and the μ parameter (number of scatterers per resolution cell). Statistically significant differences were observed between the malignant thyroids and the normal thyroids based on the ESD, EAC and μ parameters. The mean values of the ESDs were 18.0 ± 0.92, 15.9 ± 0.81, and 21.5 ± 1.80 µm for the PTC, FV-PTC and the normal thyroids, respectively. The mean values of the EACs were 59.4 ± 1.74, 62.7 ± 1.61, and 52.9 ± 3.42 dB (mm−3) for the PTC, FV-PTC and the normal thyroids, respectively. The mean values of the μ parameters were 2.55 ± 0.37, 2.59 ± 0.43, and 1.56 ± 0.99 for the PTC, FV-PTC and the normal thyroids, respectively. Statistically significant differences were observed between the malignant thyroids and the C

  17. Zn(II)-curc targets p53 in thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    GARUFI, ALESSIA; D'ORAZI, VALERIO; CRISPINI, ALESSANDRA; D'ORAZI, GABRIELLA

    2015-01-01

    TP53 mutation is a common event in many cancers, including thyroid carcinoma. Defective p53 activity promotes cancer resistance to therapies and a more malignant phenotype, acquiring oncogenic functions. Rescuing the function of mutant p53 (mutp53) protein is an attractive anticancer therapeutic strategy. Zn(II)-curc is a novel small molecule that has been shown to target mutp53 protein in several cancer cells, but its effect in thyroid cancer cells remains unclear. Here, we investigated whether Zn(II)-curc could affect p53 in thyroid cancer cells with both p53 mutation (R273H) and wild-type p53. Zn(II)-curc induced mutp53H273 downregulation and reactivation of wild-type functions, such as binding to canonical target promoters and target gene transactivation. This latter effect was similar to that induced by PRIMA-1. In addition, Zn(II)-curc triggered p53 target gene expression in wild-type p53-carrying cells. In combination treatments, Zn(II)-curc enhanced the antitumor activity of chemotherapeutic drugs, in both mutant and wild-type-carrying cancer cells. Taken together, our data indicate that Zn(II)-curc promotes the reactivation of p53 in thyroid cancer cells, providing in vitro evidence for a potential therapeutic approach in thyroid cancers. PMID:26314369

  18. Rising thyroid cancer incidence in the United States by demographic and tumor characteristics, 1980–2005

    PubMed Central

    Enewold, Lindsey; Zhu, Kangmin; Ron, Elaine; Marrogi, Aizen J.; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Peoples, George E.; Devesa, Susan S.

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence has been rising in the United States, and this trend has often been attributed to heightened medical surveillance and use of improved diagnostics. Thyroid cancer incidence varies by sex and race/ethnicity, and these factors also influence access to and utilization of healthcare. We therefore examined thyroid cancer incidence rates by demographic and tumor characteristics, based on 48,403 thyroid cancer patients diagnosed during 1980–2005 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program of the National Cancer Institute. Rates varied by histologic type, sex, and race/ethnicity. Papillary carcinoma was the only histologic type for which incidence rates rose consistently among all racial/ethnic groups. Subsequent analyses focused on the 39,706 papillary thyroid cancers diagnosed during this period. Papillary carcinoma rates increased most rapidly among females. Between 1992–1995 and 2003–2005, they rose nearly 100% among White Non-Hispanics and Black females, but only 20–50% among White Hispanics, Asian/Pacific Islanders and Black males. Increases were most rapid for localized stage and small tumors; however, rates also rose for large tumors and tumors of regional and distant stage. Since 1992–1995, half the overall increase in papillary carcinoma rates was due to rising rates of very small (≤1.0 cm) cancers, 30% to cancers 1.1–2 cm, and 20% to cancers >2 cm. Among White females, the rate of increase for cancers >5 cm almost equaled that for the smallest cancers. Medical surveillance and more sensitive diagnostic procedures cannot completely explain the observed rises in papillary thyroid cancer rates. Thus, other possible explanations should be explored. PMID:19240234

  19. Trends in Thyroid Cancer Incidence in Korean Children (1999-2012) Based on Palpation and Nonpalpation Detection Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoon Young; Jang, Hye Won; Joung, Ji Young; Park, Sun-Mi; Jeong, Dae Joon; Kim, Sun Wook; Chung, Jae Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of childhood thyroid cancer is increasing in several populations; however, contributing factors have not been adequately discussed. Objectives Our aim was to identify trends of childhood thyroid cancer based on the Korea Central Cancer Registry (KCCR) database and to elucidate changes in detection methods of cancers using a single-center database. Methods Data from the KCCR and Statistics Korea between 1999 and 2012 were used to calculate the crude incidence of thyroid cancer in children. To analyze detection methods for cancers, pediatric patients (aged 0-19 years, n = 126) who underwent thyroid surgery for thyroid cancers at our institution were identified. Subjects were divided into two groups by detection method: (1) palpation group and (2) screening group. Results The crude incidence of childhood thyroid cancer increased from 0.5 per 100,000 in 1999 to 1.7 in 2012. The proportion of thyroid cancer among total cancers also increased from 4.4% in 1999 to 10.6% in 2012. Among 126 children from our institution, 91 cases (72%) were identified as palpable neck masses, and the remainder were discovered during imaging studies. The numbers in both groups gradually increased during the study period. Conclusions The incidence of childhood thyroid cancer has steadily increased in Korea. Regarding the detection methods of cancers, most tumors are detected by palpation rather than screening, although the rate of masses identified during screening has increased. PMID:26835429

  20. Radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer in the era of risk stratification and alternative targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Pryma, Daniel A; Mandel, Susan J

    2014-09-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancers are typically iodine-avid and can be effectively treated with radioiodine. In most patients, radioiodine treatment is done for ablation of residual tissue, and in these cases the focus should be on using the minimum effective dose. Adjuvant therapy can be done to reduce the risk of recurrence, but optimal patient selection and dose are unclear. Patients with advanced disease benefit most from treatment with the maximum-tolerated dose. Recent research has focused on better patient selection and reduced radioiodine doses for remnant ablation. There are emerging targeted therapeutic approaches in patients who are appropriately shown to have iodine-refractory disease, with 1 drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Numerous trials are ongoing to assess targeted therapeutics alone or in combination with radioiodine.

  1. Cribriform variant papillary thyroid cancer: a characteristic of familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Fenton, P A; Clarke, S E; Owen, W; Hibbert, J; Hodgson, S V

    2001-02-01

    Inherited cancer syndromes may predispose to more than one type of cancer, and these characteristically develop at an earlier age than their sporadic counterparts. The occurrence in a single individual of multiple, early onset primary cancers may indicate an inherited cancer susceptibility. Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), an autosomal, dominantly inherited susceptibility to colorectal adenomas and cancer also predisposes to childhood medulloblastomas and to a specific rare histologic type (cribriform variant) of papillary thyroid cancer. We describe a patient who developed a childhood medulloblastoma of the cerebellum, and subsequently a cribriform papillary thyroid cancer. These cancers predated the diagnosis of FAP in this patient, who was later found to have several relatives with FAP. The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutation delineated in this family was in the region associated with those causing an increased risk of thyroid cancer. We submit that the diagnosis of the cribriform variant of papillary thyroid cancer in a young individual, especially after a previous cancer diagnosis, should alert the physician to the possibility of a diagnosis of FAP.

  2. Thyroid cancer with concurrent breast tubular cancer: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying-Jie; Qian, Chen; He, Jun; Cheng, Da-Qing; Jiang, Liu-Xia

    2017-03-03

    Here one concurrent case of a patient with both thyroid and breast cancers was discussed here with a comprehensive literature review. On March 21, 2016, a 42-year-old female patient was admitted into our hospital because of right neck mass and left breast mass for 1 week during a routine health examination. On March 22, the combined procedures of complete resection of right thyroid gland plus isthmus with dissection of lymph nodes in right VI region plus left breast regional lumpectomy were performed under endotracheal anesthesia. Final diagnosis: Mammary cancer (right thyroid gland), PT1aN1aM0 (stage I); ductal breast cancer (left breast), PT1NxM0 (re-operation within two weeks). For either disease, a practicing clinician should stay on a high alert for individual and familial endocrine diseases. And breast molybdenum target imaging and type B ultrasound should be performed regularly for screening. It is always prudent to catch and treat diseases as early as possible. The conclusion is as follows.

  3. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Other Thyroid Cancers: Medullary, Anaplastic, Lymphoma and So Forth

    PubMed Central

    Araz, Mine; Çayır, Derya

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is used in staging, restaging, and evaluation of therapy response in many cancers as well as differentiated thyroid carcinomas especially in non-iodine avid variants. Its potential in less frequent thyroid tumors like medullary, anaplastic thyroid cancers, thyroid lymphoma and metastatic tumors of the thyroid however, is not well established yet. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the recent applications and indications of 18F-FDG PET/CT in these tumors and to focus on the controversies in the clinical setting. PMID:28291004

  4. In Thyroidectomized Thyroid Cancer Patients, False-Positive I-131 Whole Body Scans Are Often Caused by Inflammation Rather Than Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garger, Yana Basis; Winfeld, Mathew; Friedman, Kent; Blum, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To show that I-131 false-positive results on whole-body scans (WBSs) after thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer may be a result of inflammation unassociated with the cancer. Methods. We performed a retrospective image analysis of our database of thyroid cancer patients who underwent WBS from January 2008 to January 2012 to identify and stratify false positives. Results. A total of 564 patients underwent WBS during the study period; 96 patients were referred for 99 I-131 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT/CT) scans to better interpret cryptic findings. Among them, 73 scans were shown to be falsely positive; 40/73 or 54.7% of false-positive findings were a result of inflammation. Of the findings, 17 were in the head, 1 in the neck, 4 in the chest, 3 in the abdomen, and 14 in the pelvis; 1 had a knee abscess. Conclusions. In our series, inflammation caused the majority of false-positive WBSs. I-131 SPECT/CT is powerful in the differentiation of inflammation from thyroid cancer. By excluding metastatic disease, one can properly prognosticate outcome and avoid unnecessary, potentially harmful treatment of patients with thyroid cancer. PMID:26977418

  5. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Papillary Thyroid Cancer That Did Not Respond to Radioactive Iodine

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-02

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  6. Benign breast and gynecologic conditions, reproductive and hormonal factors, and risk of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Braganza, Melissa Z; de González, Amy Berrington; Schonfeld, Sara J; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brenner, Alina V; Kitahara, Cari M

    2014-04-01

    The higher incidence of thyroid cancer in women compared with men suggests an influence of sex steroid hormones in the etiology of this malignancy. We investigated a comprehensive set of potential indicators of lifetime sex steroid hormone exposure in relation to thyroid cancer risk. Using data from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, which enrolled 70,047 women, 50 to 78 years old, we prospectively examined associations of self-reported history of benign breast and gynecologic conditions, reproductive factors, and exogenous sex hormone use with thyroid cancer risk. Multivariable-adjusted HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated in models using age as the time metric. During follow-up (median, 11 years), 127 women were diagnosed with first primary thyroid cancer. Older age at natural menopause (≥55 vs. <50 years; HR, 2.24; 95% CI, 1.20-4.18), greater estimated lifetime number of ovulatory cycles (≥490 vs. <415 cycles; HR, 2.40; 95% CI, 1.33-4.30), greater number of live births (≥5 vs. 1-2; HR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.05-2.82), and history of uterine fibroids (HR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.18-2.50) were associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer. Earlier age at menarche, greater number of reproductive years, history of a tubal ligation, and history of ovarian cysts were nonsignificantly associated with increased thyroid cancer risk. No associations were observed for oral contraceptive use, menopausal hormone therapy, or history of benign breast disease or endometriosis. In general, we found that factors reflecting a greater length of exposure to endogenous hormones, particularly during the reproductive years, were associated with risk of postmenopausal thyroid cancer.

  7. Coffee Consumption and the Risk of Thyroid Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mi Ah; Kim, Jin Hwa

    2017-01-01

    An inverse association has been reported between coffee consumption and the risk of several cancers. However, the association between coffee and thyroid cancer is controversial. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the association between coffee consumption and the risk of thyroid cancer through a systematic review and meta-analysis. Published studies were examined from PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central, and the reference lists of the retrieved articles. The summary odds ratio (OR) for the association between coffee consumption was categorized as highest versus lowest consumption, and thyroid cancer risk was calculated using a fixed effects model. Subgroup analyses by study design, geographic location, source of controls, and adjusted variables were performed. A total of 1039 thyroid cancer cases and 220,816 controls were identified from five case-control studies and two cohort studies. The summary OR for the association between coffee consumption and thyroid cancer risk was 0.88 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.71–1.07). There was no significant heterogeneity among the study results (I² = 0%, p = 0.79). However, the beneficial effect of coffee consumption on thyroid cancer was found only in hospital-based case-control studies (OR= 0.59, 95% CI= 0.37–0.93). There was no significant association between coffee consumption and thyroid cancer risk according to our meta-analysis results. These findings should be interpreted with caution because of potential biases and confounding variables. Further prospective studies with a larger number of cases are encouraged to confirm these results. PMID:28134794

  8. Serum thyroglobulin in the monitoring of differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Evans, Carol; Tennant, Sarah; Perros, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) usually have an excellent prognosis. Following surgical and radioiodine treatment to remove the cancer cells and suppressive doses of levothyroxine, long-term follow-up, including measurement of serum thyroglobulin (Tg) using a sensitive assay is required to detect recurrence. To interpret Tg results clinicians need to know the corresponding serum TSH concentration, have an appreciation of the clearance of Tg from patient serum following various interventions and the limitations of its measurement. The limitations of Tg immunoassay are well described and include potential interference from TgAb. For the majority of patients with DTC who are TgAb-negative, Tg measurement remains the most useful method of follow-up. For the TgAb-positive minority, interference and the possibility of producing erroneous results is a concern. Some assays are less badly affected than others and laboratories are advised to choose their assays carefully. Laboratories have sought to identify interferences using measurement of TgAb, lack of concordance between RIAs and immunometric assays and recovery of added Tg. More recently LC-MSMS assays to quantify Tg have been developed. They are not currently as sensitive as Tg immunoassays and it is likely these assays will, like immunoassays, be limited by Tg heterogeneity and standardization issues, although initial evaluations indicate that they may have value in the clinical setting as a second line test in antibody-positive DTC patients in whom Tg is unmeasurable by immunoassay.

  9. Breast, prostate, and thyroid cancer screening tests and overdiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Minsoo

    2016-12-20

    The purpose of this study was to examine overdiagnosis and overtreatment related to cancer screening and to review relevant reports and studies. A comprehensive search of peer-reviewed and gray literature was conducted for relevant studies published between January 2000 and December 2015 reporting breast, prostate, and thyroid cancer screening tests and overdiagnosis. This study revealed no dichotomy on where screening would lower risk or cause overdiagnosis and overtreatment. Many screening tests did both, that is, at population level, there were both benefit (decreased disease-specific mortality) and harm (overdiagnosis and overtreatment). Therefore, we need to consider a balanced argument with citations for the potential benefits of screening along with the harms associated with screening. Although the benefits and harms can only be tested through randomized trials, important data from cohort studies, diagnostic accuracy studies, and modeling work can help define the extent of benefits and harms in the population. The health care cycle that prompt patients to undergo periodic screening tests is self-reinforcing. In most developed countries, screening test recommendations encourage periodic testing. Therefore, patients are continuing their screening. It is necessary for patients to become wise consumers of screening tests and make decisions with their physicians regarding further testing and treatments.

  10. Key genes and pathways in thyroid cancer based on gene set enrichment analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Wenwu; Qi, Bin; Zhou, Qiuxi; Lu, Chuansen; Huang, Qi; Xian, Lei; Chen, Mingwu

    2013-09-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer and its associated morbidity has shown the most rapid increase among all cancers since 1982, but the mechanisms involved in thyroid cancer, particularly significant key genes induced in thyroid cancer, remain undefined. In many studies, gene probes have been used to search for key genes involved in causing and facilitating thyroid cancer. As a result, many possible virulence genes and pathways have been identified. However, these studies lack a case contrast for selecting the most possible virulence genes and pathways, as well as conclusive results with which to clarify the mechanisms of cancer development. In the present study, we used gene set enrichment and meta-analysis to select key genes and pathways. Based on gene set enrichment, we identified 5 downregulated and 4 upregulated mixed pathways in 6 tissue datasets. Based on the meta-analysis, there were 17 common pathways in the tissue datasets. One pathway, the p53 signaling pathway, which includes 13 genes, was identified by both the gene set enrichment analysis and meta-analysis. Genes are important elements that form key pathways. These pathways can induce the development of thyroid cancer later in life. The key pathways and genes identified in the present study can be used in the next stage of research, which will involve gene elimination and other methods of experimentation.

  11. Novel leptin OB3 peptide-induced signaling and progression in thyroid cancers: Comparison with leptin

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Meng-Ti; Lai, Hsuan-Yu; Ke, Chien-Chih; Crawford, Dana R.; Lee, Oscar K.; Fu, Earl; Mousa, Shaker A.; Grasso, Patricia; Liu, Leroy F.; Chang, Heng-Yu; Tang, Heng-Yuan; Lin, Hung-Yun; Davis, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity results in increased secretion of cytokines from adipose tissue and is a risk factor for various cancers. Leptin is largely produced by adipose tissue and cancer cells. It induces cell proliferation and may serve to induce various cancers. OB3-leptin peptide (OB3) is a new class of functional leptin peptide. However, its mitogenic effect has not been determined. In the present study, because of a close link between leptin and the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, OB3 was compared with leptin in different thyroid cancer cells for gene expression, proliferation and invasion. Neither agent stimulated cell proliferation. Leptin stimulated cell invasion, but reduced adhesion in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells. Activated ERK1/2 and STAT3 contributed to leptin-induced invasion. In contrast, OB3 did not affect expression of genes involved in proliferation and invasion. In vivo studies in the mouse showed that leptin, but not OB3, significantly increased circulating levels of thyrotropin (TSH), a growth factor for thyroid cancer. In summary, OB3 is a derivative of leptin that importantly lacks the mitogenic effects of leptin on thyroid cancer cells. PMID:27050378

  12. Dietary nitrate and nitrite and the risk of thyroid cancer in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.

    PubMed

    Kilfoy, Briseis A; Zhang, Yawei; Park, Yikyung; Holford, Theodore R; Schatzkin, Arthur; Hollenbeck, Albert; Ward, Mary H

    2011-07-01

    During the past several decades, an increasing incidence of thyroid cancer has been observed worldwide. Nitrate inhibits iodide uptake by the thyroid, potentially disrupting thyroid function. An increased risk of thyroid cancer associated with nitrate intake was recently reported in a cohort study of older women in Iowa. We evaluated dietary nitrate and nitrite intake and thyroid cancer risk overall and for subtypes in the National Institutes of Health-American Association of Retired Persons (NIH-AARP) Diet and Health Study, a large prospective cohort of 490,194 men and women, ages 50-71 years in 1995-1996. Dietary intakes were assessed using a 124-item food frequency questionnaire. During an average of 7 years of follow-up we identified 370 incident thyroid cancer cases (170 men, 200 women) with complete dietary information. Among men, increasing nitrate intake was positively associated with thyroid cancer risk (relative risk [RR] for the highest quintile versus lowest quintile RR = 2.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.29-4.041; p-trend <0.001); however, we observed no trend with intake among women (p-trend = 0.61). Nitrite intake was not associated with risk of thyroid cancer for either men or women. We evaluated risk for the two main types of thyroid cancer. We found positive associations for nitrate intake and both papillary (RR = 2.10; 95% CI: 1.09-4.05; p-trend = 0.05) and follicular thyroid cancer (RR = 3.42; 95% CI: 1.03-11.4; p-trend = 0.01) among men. Nitrite intake was associated with increased risk of follicular thyroid cancer (RR = 2.74; 95%CI: 0.86-8.77; p-trend = 0.04) among men. Our results support a role of nitrate in thyroid cancer risk and suggest that further studies to investigate these exposures are warranted.

  13. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Male Breast Cancer; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Intraductal Carcinoma; Paget Disease of the Breast With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unresectable Gallbladder Cancer

  14. Quantification of the increase in thyroid cancer prevalence in Fukushima after the nuclear disaster in 2011--a potential overdiagnosis?

    PubMed

    Katanoda, Kota; Kamo, Ken-Ichi; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-03-01

    A thyroid ultrasound examination programme has been conducted in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, after the nuclear disaster in 2011. Although remarkably high prevalence of thyroid cancer was observed, no relevant quantitative evaluation was conducted. We calculated the observed/expected (O/E) ratio of thyroid cancer prevalence for the residents aged ≤20 years. Observed prevalence was the number of thyroid cancer cases detected by the programme through the end of April 2015. Expected prevalence was calculated as cumulative incidence by a life-table method using the national estimates of thyroid cancer incidence rate in 2001-10 (prior to the disaster) and the population of Fukushima Prefecture. The underlying assumption was that there was neither nuclear accident nor screening intervention. The observed and estimated prevalence of thyroid cancer among residents aged ≤20 years was 160.1 and 5.2, respectively, giving an O/E ratio of 30.8 [95% confidence interval (CI): 26.2, 35.9]. When the recent increasing trend in thyroid cancer was considered, the overall O/E ratio was 22.2 (95% CI: 18.9, 25.9). The cumulative number of thyroid cancer deaths in Fukushima Prefecture, estimated with the same method (annual average in 2009-13), was 0.6 under age 40. Combined with the existing knowledge about radiation effect on thyroid cancer, our descriptive analysis suggests the possibility of overdiagnosis. Evaluation including individual-level analysis is required to further clarify the contribution of underlying factors.

  15. Relationship of hemoxygenase-1 and prolidase enzyme activity with oxidative stress in papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Terzioglu, D; Teksoz, S; Arikan, AE; Uslu, E; Yılmaz, E; Eren, B

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Recent studies associate thyroid cancer with oxidative stress. We aim to clarify the relation between papillary thyroid cancer, oxidative stress, hemoxygenase-1, prolidase enzymes and investigate the availability of these enzymes as markers for diagnosis, success of treatment, and follow-up. Methods: Thirty-one patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma and 25 healthy control subjects were included in this study. Hemoxygenase-1, prolidase (oxidant stress indicator), malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, and superoxide dismutase (an indicator of antioxidant defense system) were measured pre-operatively and 30 days after thyroidectomy. Results: There was a significant decrease in serum levels of malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase (p <0.001 for both) after thyroidectomy in papillary thyroid carcinoma group. In addition, there was a significant difference in the postoperative serum levels of prolidase, malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, and superoxide dismutase between papillary thyroid carcinoma and control groups (p =0.024, p <0.001, p =0.002, and p =0.016, respectively) beside significant difference of malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, hemoxygenase-1, and superoxide dismutase pre-operative serum levels (p <0.001, p =0.003, p =0.006, and p =0.025, respectively). Conclusion: When the unquestionable role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of cancer is considered, in the future it is expected to associate parametric changes in the serum of patients caused by oxidative stress to papillary thyroid cancer. Hippokratia 2016, 20(1): 55-59 PMID:27895444

  16. Prospective study of seaweed consumption and thyroid cancer incidence in women: the Japan collaborative cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaochen; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Li, Yuanying; Ota, Atsuhiko; Tamakoshi, Koji; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Mikami, Haruo; Iso, Hiroyasu; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2016-05-01

    Excess intake of iodine is a suspected risk factor for thyroid cancer. Previous epidemiological research from Japan reported that daily intake of seaweed was associated with a four-fold higher risk in postmenopausal women, whereas others reported a null association. A major source of iodine intake in Japan is from edible seaweeds, and it is reported to be among the highest in the world. We examined the association between seaweed intake frequency and the risk of thyroid cancer in women in the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study followed from 1988 to 2009. Seaweed intake, together with other lifestyle-related information was collected using a self-administered questionnaire at baseline. Seaweed intake frequency was categorized as follows: 1-2 times/week or less, 3-4 times/week, and almost daily. Hazard ratios and the 95% confidence intervals of thyroid cancer incidence according to seaweed intake frequency were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression. During 447 876 person-years of follow-up (n=35 687), 94 new cases of thyroid cancer were identified. The crude incidence rate was 20.9 per 100 000 person-years. The hazard ratio of thyroid cancer in women who consumed seaweed daily compared with women who ate it 1-2 times/week or less was 1.15 (95% confidence interval: 0.69-1.90, P for trend=0.59). Further analyses did not indicate any association between seaweed intake and the risk of thyroid cancer on statistically adjusting for potential confounding variables as well as on stratification by menopausal status. The present study did not find an association between seaweed intake and thyroid cancer incidence in premenopausal or in postmenopausal women.

  17. A cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, dinaciclib in preclinical treatment models of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu-Fu; Lin, Jen-Der; Hsueh, Chuen; Chou, Ting-Chao; Wong, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    Background We explored the therapeutic effects of dinaciclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor, in the treatment of thyroid cancer. Materials and methods Seven cell lines originating from three pathologic types of thyroid cancer (papillary, follicular and anaplastic) were studied. The cytotoxicity of dinaciclib was measured using a lactate dehydrogenase assay. The expression of proteins associated with cell cycle and apoptosis was assessed using Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. Cell cycle distribution was measured by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. Apoptosis and caspase-3 activity were measured by flow cytometry and fluorometric assay. Mice bearing flank anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) were treated with intraperitoneal injections of dinaciclib. Results Dinaciclib inhibited thyroid cancer cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Dinaciclib had a low median-effect dose (≤ 16.0 nM) to inhibit cell proliferation in seven thyroid cancer cell lines. Dinaciclib decreased CDK1, cyclin B1, and Aurora A expression, induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, and induced accumulation of prophase mitotic cells. Dinaciclib decreased Mcl-1, Bcl-xL and survivin expression, activated caspase-3 and induced apoptosis. In vivo, the growth of ATC xenograft tumors was retarded in a dose-dependent fashion with daily dinaciclib treatment. Higher-dose dinaciclib (50 mg/kg) caused slight, but significant weight loss, which was absent with lower-dose dinaciclib (40 mg/kg) treatment. Conclusions Dinaciclib inhibited thyroid cancer proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. These findings support dinaciclib as a potential drug for further studies in clinical trials for the treatment of patients with refractory thyroid cancer. PMID:28207834

  18. Strong association of chromosome 1p12 loci with thyroid cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Baida, Aida; Akdi, Mounaim; González-Flores, Eddy; Galofré, Pere; Marcos, Ricard; Velázquez, Antonia

    2008-06-01

    Several genes directly related to thyroid cancer development have been described; nevertheless, the genetic pathways of this tumorigenesis process are unknown. Together with environmental factors, susceptibility genes could have an important role in thyroid cancer. Our previous studies suggest that the chromosome 1p12-13 is related to thyroid cancer incidence. Here, we extend the analysis with a case-control association study in a Spanish population. Thus, six single-nucleotide polymorphisms were genotyped, covering 2.4 Mb of the 1p12-13 region. A statistically significant association between thyroid cancer incidence and the rs2145418 and rs4658973 polymorphisms was found (P < 0.0001). No association was detected for the other four polymorphisms studied. The rs2145418 marker showed a significant odds ratio of 5.0 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 2.85-8.83] and 9.2 (95% CI, 4.50-21.6) for heterozygous and homozygous G-variant alleles, respectively. For rs4658973, the odds ratios were 0.40 (95% CI, 0.26-0.62) and 0.07 (95% CI, 0.03-0.18) for heterozygous and homozygous G-variant alleles, respectively. These markers map into the 1p12 region, and no linkage disequilibrium was found between them, indicating an independent relation of these polymorphisms with thyroid cancer susceptibility. Our data provide evidence of a strong association of the chromosome 1p12 with thyroid cancer risk, and it is the first study describing susceptibility loci for thyroid cancer in this region.

  19. Recombinant human TSH increases uptake and effective half-life of radioiodine in thyroid hormone secreting metastases of follicular thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Schneider, C; Dietlein, M; Eschner, W; Schmidt, M; Kahraman, D; Kobe, C

    2012-03-01

    Follicular thyroid cancer with thyroid hormone secreting metastases is an extremely rare condition, with only a few cases reported world-wide. We here present the case of a 64-year-old female patient affected by follicular thyroid cancer with extensive thyroid hormone secreting metastases leading to TSH-suppression. We have also summarized the relevant diagnostic and therapeutic approaches and describe, for the first time, the effects of rhTSH-application in this rare tumor entity. In this patient, we found that rhTSH increased ¹³¹I-uptake into the thyroid hormone secreting metastases and prolonged the effective half-life of ¹³¹I. These effects of rhTSH should be considered when fixed activities of ¹³¹I are prescribed.

  20. Targeting Thyroid Hormone Receptor Beta in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Guowei; Gelsomino, Luca; Covington, Kyle R.; Beyer, Amanda R.; Wang, John; Rechoum, Yassine; Huffman, Kenneth; Carstens, Ryan; Ando, Sebastiano; Fuqua, Suzanne A.W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Discover novel nuclear receptor targets in triple negative breast cancer Methods Expression microarray, western blot, qRT-PCR, MTT growth assay, soft agar anchorage-independent growth assay, TRE reporter transactivation assay, statistical analysis. Results We performed microarray analysis using 227 triple negative breast tumors, and clustered the tumors into five groups according to their nuclear receptor expression. Thyroid hormone receptor beta (TRβ) was one of the most differentially expressed nuclear receptors in group 5 compared to other groups. TRβ low expressing patients were associated with poor outcome. We evaluated the role of TRβ in triple negative breast cancer cell lines representing group 5 tumors. Knockdown of TRβ increased soft agar colony and reduced sensitivity to docetaxel and doxorubicin treatment. Docetaxel or doxorubicin long-term cultured cell lines also expressed decreased TRβ protein. Microarray analysis revealed cAMP/PKA signaling was the only KEGG pathways upregulated in TRβ knockdown cells. Inhibitors of cAMP or PKA, in combination with doxorubicin further enhanced cell apoptosis and restored sensitivity to chemotherapy. TRβ-specific agonists enhanced TRβ expression, and further sensitized cells to both docetaxel and doxorubicin. Sensitization was mediated by increased apoptosis with elevated cleaved PARP and caspase 3. Conclusions TRβ represents a novel nuclear receptor target in triple negative breast cancer; low TRβ levels were associated with enhanced resistance to both docetaxel and doxorubicin treatment. TRβ-specific agonists enhance chemosensitivity to these two agents. Mechanistically enhanced cAMP/PKA signaling was associated with TRβ’s effects on response to chemotherapy. PMID:25820519

  1. The EORTC module for quality of life in patients with thyroid cancer: phase III.

    PubMed

    Singer, Susanne; Jordan, Susan; Locati, Laura D; Pinto, Monica; Tomaszewska, Iwona M; Araujo, Claudia; Hammerlid, Eva; Vidhubala, E; Husson, Olga; Kiyota, Naomi; Brannan, Christine; Salem, Dina; Gamper, Eva; Arraras, Juan Ignacio; Ioannidis, Georgios; Andry, Guy; Inhestern, Johanna; Gregoire, Vincent; Licitra, Lisa

    2017-02-21

    We pilot-tested a questionnaire measuring health related quality of life (QoL) in thyroid cancer patients to be used with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) core questionnaire EORTC QLQ-C30. A provisional questionnaire with 47 items was administered to patients treated for thyroid cancer within the last 2 years. Patients were interviewed about time and help needed to complete the questionnaire and whether they found the items understandable, confusing, or annoying. Items were kept in the questionnaire if they fulfilled pre-defined criteria: relevant to the patients, easy to understand, not confusing, few missing values, neither floor nor ceiling effects, and high variance. A total of 182 thyroid cancer patients in 15 countries participated (n=115 with papillary, n=31 with follicular, n=22 with medullary, n=6 with anaplastic, and n=8 with other types of thyroid cancer). Sixty-six percent of the patients needed 15 minutes or less to complete the questionnaire. Of the 47 items, 31 fulfilled the predefined criteria and were kept unchanged, 14 were removed, 2 were changed. Shoulder dysfunction was mentioned by 5 patients as missing and an item covering this issue was added. We conclude that the EORTC quality of life module for thyroid cancer (EORTC QLQ-THY34) is ready for the final validation phase IV.

  2. Aberrant expression of posterior HOX genes in well differentiated histotypes of thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Cantile, Monica; Scognamiglio, Giosuè; La Sala, Lucia; La Mantia, Elvira; Scaramuzza, Veronica; Valentino, Elena; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Losito, Simona; Pezzullo, Luciano; Chiofalo, Maria Grazia; Fulciniti, Franco; Franco, Renato; Botti, Gerardo

    2013-11-01

    Molecular etiology of thyroid cancers has been widely studied, and several molecular alterations have been identified mainly associated with follicular and papillary histotypes. However, the molecular bases of the complex pathogenesis of thyroid carcinomas remain poorly understood. HOX genes regulate normal embryonic development, cell differentiation and other critical processes in eukaryotic cell life. Several studies have shown that HOX genes play a role in neoplastic transformation of several human tissues. In particular, the genes belonging to HOX paralogous group 13 seem to hold a relevant role in both tumor development and progression. We have identified a significant prognostic role of HOX D13 in pancreatic cancer and we have recently showed the strong and progressive over-expression of HOX C13 in melanoma metastases and deregulation of HOX B13 expression in bladder cancers. In this study we have investigated, by immunohistochemisty and quantitative Real Time PCR, the HOX paralogous group 13 genes/proteins expression in thyroid cancer evolution and progression, also evaluating its ability to discriminate between main histotypes. Our results showed an aberrant expression, both at gene and protein level, of all members belonging to paralogous group 13 (HOX A13, HOX B13, HOX C13 and HOX D13) in adenoma, papillary and follicular thyroid cancers samples. The data suggest a potential role of HOX paralogous group 13 genes in pathogenesis and differential diagnosis of thyroid cancers.

  3. Severe hyponatremia in association with I(131) therapy in a patient with metastatic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Nozu, Tsukasa; Yoshida, Yuri; Ohira, Masumi; Okumura, Toshikatsu

    2011-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a common clinical problem that results from various causes. Hypothyroidism is known to be one of the causes of this disorder. We report a case of metastatic thyroid cancer presenting with severe hyponatremia in association with hypothyroidism induced by pretreatment of I(131) therapy, such as a low-iodine diet and withdrawal of thyroid hormone. Serum arginine vasopressin (AVP) was elevated and urine osmolality was higher than that of serum. Saline infusion and thyroid hormone replacement normalized serum sodium and AVP. Inappropriate secretion of AVP in hypothyroid state was thought to be one of the causes of this hyponatremia.

  4. BRAF Inhibitors: Experience in Thyroid Cancer and General Review of Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Cabanillas, M.E.; Patel, A.; Danysh, B. P.; Dadu, R.; Kopetz, S.; Falchook, G.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved BRAF inhibitors, vemurafenib and dabrafenib, have demonstrated superior efficacy in patients with BRAF-mutant melanomas but have limited efficacy in BRAF-mutant colorectal cancer. Little is known at this time regarding BRAF inhibitors in thyroid cancer. Initial reports in patients with progressive, radioactive iodine–refractory BRAF-mutant papillary thyroid cancer suggest response rates of approximately 30–40%. In this review, we discuss BRAF inhibitors in the context of thyroid cancer, the toxicities associated with BRAF inhibitors, and the suggested management of those toxicities. The management of vemurafenib and dabrafenib toxicities is applicable across all tumor types and may serve as a practical guide to their use. PMID:25467940

  5. Studies for the application of boron neutron capture therapy to the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Dagrosa, A; Carpano, M; Perona, M; Thomasz, L; Nievas, S; Cabrini, R; Juvenal, G; Pisarev, M

    2011-12-01

    The aim of these studies was to evaluate the possibility of treating differentiated thyroid cancer by BNCT. These carcinomas are well controlled with surgery followed by therapy with (131)I; however, some patients do not respond to this treatment. BPA uptake was analyzed both in vitro and in nude mice implanted with cell lines of differentiated thyroid carcinoma. The boron intracellular concentration in the different cell lines and the biodistribution studies showed the selectivity of the BPA uptake by this kind of tumor.

  6. Failure of pentagastrin-stimulated calcitonin testing in early manifestation of familial medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Pirich, Christian; Rendl, Gundula; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Häusler, Ingrid

    2012-10-01

    This case report describes three generations of a family with familial medullary thyroid cancer (RET gene mutation L790F). One of the three siblings-all of them carrier of the respective mutation-exhibited the absence of pathological basal and pentagastrin-stimulated calcitonin levels in spite of multifocal medullary thyroid microcancer. This case illustrates the challenge to consider the biological diversity of RET gene mutations in the clinical management of affected gene carriers.

  7. Current status of PET imaging of differentiated thyroid cancer with second generation radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Lauri, C; Di Traglia, S; Galli, F; Pizzichini, P; Signore, A

    2015-03-01

    Although the prognosis of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is favorable, some histotypes show worst clinical outcome and higher risk of recurrence. Serum thyroglobulin (Tg) levels and 131I-whole-body-scan (WBS), together with neck ultrasound (US), represent the golden standard for DTC follow-up. Nevertheless, the relatively high frequency of patients with high Tg levels and negative WBS requires further investigations by using new imaging modalities. The availability of whole body positron emission tomography (PET) methods, in parallel with the advances in radiochemistry, offer a wide substrate for many solutions. To this day ¹⁸F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (¹⁸F-FDG) PET/CT still represents the imaging of choice in follow-up of patients with high serum Tg and negative ¹³¹I-WBS but in the last decades the research has focused on finding "second generation" radiopharmaceuticals for PET imaging, with both diagnostic and prognostic purposes, aiming to change the way to image thyroid cancer. Moreover, the use of various PET radiopharmaceuticals, that offer the possibility to explore different pathways involved in thyroid cancer, could find important applications in the near future for clinical decision making in order to program tailored treatments and follow-up. It would be desirable to use the same radiopharmaceutical for both imaging and dosimetric purpose to achieve a tailored therapy. Many efforts are focused in this direction and ¹²⁴I-PET/CT is now emerging as a valid tool in restaging and therapy management of DTC with promising results. Although the preliminary data available in literature require a confirmation in larger studies with longer follow-up, we think that in next future ¹²⁴I-PET/CT could gain an important role for management of DTC. The aim of this review was to perform a systematic analysis of literature describing the state of art of "second generation" PET-radiopharmaceuticals for imaging DTC. Discussion is focused on the utility of

  8. Thyroid cancer incidence in New Jersey: time trend, birth cohort and socioeconomic status analysis (1979-2006).

    PubMed

    Roche, Lisa M; Niu, Xiaoling; Pawlish, Karen S; Henry, Kevin A

    2011-01-01

    The study's purpose was to investigate thyroid cancer incidence time trends, birth cohort effects, and association with socioeconomic status (SES) in New Jersey (NJ), a high incidence state, using NJ State Cancer Registry data. Thyroid cancer incidence rates in each sex, nearly all age groups, two major histologies and all stages significantly increased between 1979 and 2006. For each sex, age-specific incidence rates began greatly increasing in the 1924 birth cohort and, generally, the highest thyroid cancer incidence rate for each five-year age group occurred in the latest birth cohort and diagnosis period. Thyroid cancer incidence rates were significantly higher in NJ Census tracts with higher SES and in counties with a higher percentage of insured residents. These results support further investigation into the relationship between rising thyroid cancer incidence and increasing population exposure to medical (including diagnostic) radiation, as well as widespread use of more sensitive diagnostic techniques.

  9. Thyroid Cancer Incidence in New Jersey: Time Trend, Birth Cohort and Socioeconomic Status Analysis (1979–2006)

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Lisa M.; Niu, Xiaoling; Pawlish, Karen S.; Henry, Kevin A.

    2011-01-01

    The study's purpose was to investigate thyroid cancer incidence time trends, birth cohort effects, and association with socioeconomic status (SES) in New Jersey (NJ), a high incidence state, using NJ State Cancer Registry data. Thyroid cancer incidence rates in each sex, nearly all age groups, two major histologies and all stages significantly increased between 1979 and 2006. For each sex, age-specific incidence rates began greatly increasing in the 1924 birth cohort and, generally, the highest thyroid cancer incidence rate for each five-year age group occurred in the latest birth cohort and diagnosis period. Thyroid cancer incidence rates were significantly higher in NJ Census tracts with higher SES and in counties with a higher percentage of insured residents. These results support further investigation into the relationship between rising thyroid cancer incidence and increasing population exposure to medical (including diagnostic) radiation, as well as widespread use of more sensitive diagnostic techniques. PMID:22187575

  10. Carfilzomib potentiates CUDC-101-induced apoptosis in anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lisa; Boufraqech, Myriem; Lake, Ross; Kebebew, Electron

    2016-03-29

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, with no effective treatment currently available. Previously, we identified agents active against ATC cells, both in vitro and in vivo, using quantitative high-throughput screening of 3282 clinically approved drugs and small molecules. Here, we report that combining two of these active agents, carfilzomib, a second-generation proteasome inhibitor, and CUDC-101, a histone deacetylase and multi-kinase inhibitor, results in increased, synergistic activity in ATC cells. The combination of carfilzomib and CUDC-101 synergistically inhibited cellular proliferation and caused cell death in multiple ATC cell lines harboring various driver mutations observed in human ATC tumors. This increased anti-ATC effect was associated with a synergistically enhanced G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased caspase 3/7 activity induced by the drug combination. Mechanistically, treatment with carfilzomib and CUDC-101 increased p21 expression and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase protein cleavage. Our results suggest that combining carfilzomib and CUDC-101 would offer an effective therapeutic strategy to treat ATC.

  11. A meta-analysis of alcohol consumption and thyroid cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofei; Cheng, Wenli; Li, Jingdong; Zhu, Jingqiang

    2016-01-01

    Background It is still inconclusive whether alcohol consumption affects the risk of thyroid cancer. We conducted a meta-analysis of available epidemiological data to address this issue. Results Compared with nondrinkers, the pooled relative risks (RRs) and corresponding 95% confidential intervals (CIs) of thyroid cancer were 0.80 (95% CI 0.71-0.90) for any drinkers, 0.81 (95% CI 0.70-0.93) for light and 0.71 (95% CI 0.63-0.79) for moderate drinkers. The dose–response analysis suggested that there is no evidence of a dose-risk relationship between alcohol intaking and thyroid cancer risk (P = 0.112). Methods Eligible studies were identified by searching PubMed and EMbase databases. A total of 24 studies, included 9,990 cases with thyroid cancer, were included in this meta-analysis. We defined light alcohol intake as ≤ one drink/day and moderate as >one drink/day. The summary risk estimates were calculated by the random effects model. A dose-response analysis was also conducted for modeling the dose-risk relation. Conclusion This meta-analysis confirmed an inverse association between alcohol consumption and thyroid cancer risk. Further studies are needed to better understand the potential mechanisms underlying this association. PMID:27385005

  12. Targeted near infrared hyperthermia combined with immune stimulation for optimized therapeutic efficacy in thyroid cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Le; Zhang, Mengchao; Fu, Qingfeng; Li, Jingting; Sun, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of thyroid cancer has incurred much focus because of its high prevalency. As a new strategy treating thyroid cancer, hyperthermia takes several advantages compared with surgery or chemotherapy, including minimal invasion, low systematic toxicity and the ability to enhance the immunogenicity of cancer cells with the expression Hsp70 which serves as Toll-like receptors-4 (TLR-4 agonist). However, Hsp70 as a molecular chaperone can protect cells from heat induced apoptosis and therefore compromise the tumor killing effect of hyperthermia. In this study, to solve this problem, a combined hyperthermia therapy was employed to treat thyroid cancer. We prepared a probe with the tumor targeting agent AG to monitor thyroid tumor issue and generate heat to kill tumor cells in vivo. At the same time Quercetin (inhibitor of HSP70) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (agonist of TLR-4) were used for the combined hyperthermia therapy. The results showed that compared with free IR820, AG modification facilitated much enhanced cellular uptake and greatly pronounced tumor targeting ability. The combined therapy exhibited the most remarkable tumor inhibition compared with the single treatments both in vitro and in vivo. These findings verified that the new therapeutic combination could significantly improve the effect of hyperthermia and shed light on a novel clinical strategy in thyroid cancer treatment. PMID:26769848

  13. Solitary thyroid metastasis from colon cancer: a rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Nicosia, L; Alessi, S; Proh, M; Grosso, E; Ansarin, M; Vingiani, A; Pisa, E; De Fiori, E

    2016-01-01

    Malignant metastases to the thyroid are rare and are even rarer from a colorectal primary. As these metastases are often asymptomatic, they are usually discovered incidentally on imaging performed as follow-up for the primary tumour. In this report, we present a case of metastatic sigmoid adenocarcinoma to the thyroid diagnosed and treated at our institution. PMID:28101139

  14. Trametinib in Increasing Tumoral Iodine Incorporation in Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    BRAF Gene Mutation; Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  15. Advances in paediatric cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Saletta, Federica; Seng, Michaela S; Lau, Loretta M S

    2014-04-01

    Four out of five children diagnosed with cancer can be cured with contemporary cancer therapy. This represents a dramatic improvement since 50 years ago when the cure rate of childhood cancer was <25% in the pre-chemotherapy era. Over the past ten years, while improvement in overall survival (OS) has been marginal, progress in pediatric oncology lies with adopting risk-adapted therapeutic approach. This has been made possible through identifying clinical and biologic prognostic factors with rigorous research and stratifying patients using these risk factors, and subsequently modifying therapy according to risk group assignment. This review provides a perspective for eight distinct pediatric malignancies, in which significant advances in treatment were made in the last decade and are leading to changes in standard of care. This includes four hematologic malignancies [acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL)] and four solid tumors [medulloblastoma (MB), low grade glioma (LGG), neuroblastoma (NB) and Ewing sarcoma (ES)]. Together, they comprise 60% of childhood cancer. Improved patient outcome is not limited to better survival, but encompasses reducing both short and long-term treatment-related complications which is as important as cure, given the majority of childhood cancer patients will become long-term survivors. Risk-adapted approach allows treatment intensification in the high-risk cohort while therapy can be de-escalated in the low-risk to minimize toxicity and late sequelae without compromising survival. Advances in medical research technology have also led to a rapid increase in the understanding of the genetics of childhood cancer in the last decade, facilitating identification of molecular targets that can potentially be exploited for therapeutic benefits. As we move into the era of targeted therapeutics, searching for novel agents that target specific genetic lesions becomes a

  16. A Screening Study of Thyroid Cancer and Other Thyroid Diseases among Individuals Exposed in Utero to Iodine-131 from Chernobyl Fallout

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, M.; Brenner, A.; Bogdanova, T.; Derevyanko, A.; Kuptsova, N.; Likhtarev, I.; Bouville, A.; Tereshchenko, V.; Kovgan, L.; Shpak, V.; Ostroumova, E.; Greenebaum, E.; Zablotska, L.; Ron, E.; Tronko, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Like stable iodine, radioiodines concentrate in the thyroid gland, increasing thyroid cancer risk in exposed children. Data on exposure to the embryonic/fetal thyroid are rare, raising questions about use of iodine 131 (I-131) in pregnant women. We present here estimated risks of thyroid disease from exposure in utero to I-131 fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional thyroid screening study (palpation, ultrasound, thyroid hormones, and, if indicated, fine needle aspiration) from 2003 to 2006. Participants were 2582 mother-child pairs from Ukraine in which the mother had been pregnant at the time of the accident on April 26, 1986, or 2 months after the time during which I-131 fallout was still present (1494 from contaminated areas, 1088 in the comparison group). Individual cumulative in utero thyroid dose estimates were derived from estimated I-131 activity in the mother’s thyroid (mean 72 mGy; range 0–3230 mGy). Results: There were seven cases of thyroid carcinoma and one case of Hurthle cell neoplasm identified as a result of the screening. Whereas the estimated excess odds ratio per gray for thyroid carcinoma was elevated (excess odds ratio per gray 11.66), it was not statistically significant (P = 0.12). No radiation risks were identified for other thyroid diseases. Conclusion: Our results suggest that in utero exposure to radioiodines may have increased the risk of thyroid carcinoma approximately 20 yr after the Chernobyl accident, supporting a conservative approach to medical uses of I-131 during pregnancy. PMID:19106267

  17. Long-term trend of thyroid cancer risk among Japanese atomic-bomb survivors: 60 years after exposure.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kyoji; Preston, Dale; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Yonehara, Shuji; Ito, Masahiro; Tokuoka, Shoji; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Soda, Midori; Ozasa, Kotaro; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2013-03-01

    Thyroid cancer risk following exposure to ionizing radiation in childhood and adolescence is a topic of public concern. To characterize the long-term temporal trend and age-at-exposure variation in the radiation-induced risk of thyroid cancer, we analyzed thyroid cancer incidence data for the period from 1958 through 2005 among 105,401 members of the Life Span Study cohort of Japanese atomic-bomb survivors. During the follow-up period, 371 thyroid cancer cases (excluding those with microcarcinoma with a diameter <10 mm) were identified as a first primary among the eligible subjects. Using a linear dose-response model, the excess relative risk of thyroid cancer at 1 Gy of radiation exposure was estimated as 1.28 (95% confidence interval: 0.59-2.70) at age 60 after acute exposure at age 10. The risk decreased sharply with increasing age-at-exposure and there was little evidence of increased thyroid cancer rates for those exposed after age 20. About 36% of the thyroid cancer cases among those exposed before age 20 were estimated to be attributable to radiation exposure. While the magnitude of the excess risk has decreased with increasing attained age or time since exposure, the excess thyroid cancer risk associated with childhood exposure has persisted for >50 years after exposure.

  18. Long-term trend of thyroid cancer risk among Japanese atomic-bomb survivors: 60 years after exposure

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Kyoji; Preston, Dale; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Yonehara, Shuji; Ito, Masahiro; Tokuoka, Shoji; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Soda, Midori; Ozasa, Kotaro; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid cancer risk following exposure to ionizing radiation in childhood and adolescence is a topic of public concern. To characterize the long-term temporal trend and age-at-exposure variation in the radiation-induced risk of thyroid cancer, we analyzed thyroid cancer incidence data for the period from 1958 through 2005 among 105,401 members of the Life Span Study cohort of Japanese atomic-bomb survivors. During the follow-up period, 371 thyroid cancer cases (excluding those with microcarcinoma with a diameter <10 mm) were identified as a first primary among the eligible subjects. Using a linear dose–response model, the excess relative risk of thyroid cancer at 1 Gy of radiation exposure was estimated as 1.28 (95% confidence interval: 0.59–2.70) at age 60 after acute exposure at age 10. The risk decreased sharply with increasing age-at-exposure and there was little evidence of increased thyroid cancer rates for those exposed after age 20. About 36% of the thyroid cancer cases among those exposed before age 20 were estimated to be attributable to radiation exposure. While the magnitude of the excess risk has decreased with increasing attained age or time since exposure, the excess thyroid cancer risk associated with childhood exposure has persisted for >50 years after exposure PMID:22847218

  19. CD97 amplifies LPA receptor signaling and promotes thyroid cancer progression in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ward, Y; Lake, R; Martin, P L; Killian, K; Salerno, P; Wang, T; Meltzer, P; Merino, M; Cheng, S-y; Santoro, M; Garcia-Rostan, G; Kelly, K

    2013-05-30

    CD97, a member of the adhesion family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), complexes with and potentiates lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor signaling to the downstream effector RHOA. We show here that CD97 was expressed in a majority of thyroid cancers but not normal thyroid epithelium and that the level of CD97 expression was further elevated with progression to poorly differentiated and undifferentiated carcinoma. Intratumoral progression also showed that CD97 expression correlates with invasiveness and dedifferentiation. To determine the functional role of CD97, we produced a transgenic model of thyroglobulin promoter-driven CD97 expression. Transgenic CD97 in combination with Thrb(PV), an established mouse model of thyroid follicular cell carcinogenesis, significantly increased the occurrence of vascular invasion and lung metastasis. Expression of transgenic CD97 in thyroid epithelium led to elevated ERK phosphorylation and increased numbers of Ki67+ cells in developing tumors. In addition, tumor cell cultures derived from CD97 transgenic as compared with non-transgenic mice demonstrated enhanced, constitutive and LPA-stimulated ERK activation. In human thyroid cancer cell lines, CD97 depletion reduced RHO-GTP and decreased LPA-stimulated invasion but not EGF-stimulated invasion, further suggesting that CD97 influences an LPA-associated mechanism of progression. Consistent with the above, CD97 expression in human thyroid cancers correlated with LPA receptor and markers of aggressiveness including Ki67 and pAKT. This study shows an autonomous effect of CD97 on thyroid cancer progression and supports the investigation of this GPCR as a therapeutic target for these cancers.

  20. Regional Variation across Canadian Centers in Radioiodine Administration for Thyroid Remnant Ablation in Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Diagnosed in 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Rachinsky, I.; Rajaraman, M.; Zahedi, A.; Jefford, C.; McGibbon, A.; Young, J. E. M.; Pathak, K. A.; Badreddine, M.; De Brabandere, S.; Fong, H.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Use of radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation has been reported to vary significantly between studies. We explored variation in RAI ablation care patterns between seven thyroid cancer treatment centers in Canada. Methods. The Canadian Collaborative Network for Cancer of the Thyroid (CANNECT) is a collaborative registry to describe and analyze patterns of care for thyroid cancer. We analyzed data from seven participating centers on RAI ablation in patients diagnosed with well-differentiated (papillary and follicular) thyroid cancer between 2000 and 2010. We compared RAI ablation protocols including indications (based on TNM staging), preparation protocols, and administered dose. We excluded patients with known distant metastases at time of RAI ablation. Results. We included 3072 patients. There were no significant differences in TNM stage over time. RAI use increased in earlier years and then declined. The fraction of patients receiving RAI varied significantly between centers, ranging between 20–85% for T1, 44–100% for T2, 58–100% for T3, and 59–100% for T4. There were significant differences in the RAI doses between centers. Finally, there was major variation in the use of thyroid hormone withdrawal or rhTSH for preparation of RAI ablation. Conclusion. Our study identified significant variation in use of RAI for ablation in patients with well-differentiated thyroid cancer both between Canadian centers and over time. PMID:28025634

  1. Evaluating Positron Emission Tomography Use in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Esfandiari, Nazanene H.; Papaleontiou, Maria; Worden, Francis P.; Haymart, Megan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results—Medicare database, a substantial increase was found in the use of positron emission tomography (PET) scans after 2004 in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients. The reason for the increased utilization of the PET scan was not clear based on available the data. Therefore, the indications for and outcomes of PET scans performed at an academic institution were evaluated. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed of DTC patients who underwent surgery at the University of Michigan Health System from 2006 to 2011. After identifying patients who underwent a PET scan, indications, rate of positive PET scans, and impact on management were evaluated. For positive scans, the location of disease was characterized, and presence of disease on other imaging was determined. Results: Of the 585 patients in the cohort, 111 (19%) patients had 200 PET scans performed for evaluation of DTC. Indications for PET scan included: elevated thyroglobulin and negative radioiodine scan in 52 scans (26.0%), thyroglobulin antibodies in 13 scans (6.5%), rising thyroglobulin in 18 scans (9.0%), evaluation of abnormality on other imaging in 22 scans (11.0%), evaluation of extent of disease in 33 scans (16.5%), follow-up of previous scan in 57 scans (28.5%), other indications in two scans (1.0%), and unclear indications in three scans (1.5%). The PET scan was positive in 124 studies (62.0%); positivity was identified in the thyroid bed on 25 scans, cervical or mediastinal lymph nodes on 105 scans, lung on 28 scans, bone on four scans, and other areas on 14 scans. Therapy following PET scan was surgery in 66 cases (33.0%), chemotherapy or radiation in 23 cases (11.5%), observation in 110 cases (55.0%), and palliative care in one case (0.5%). Disease was identifiable on other imaging in 66% of cases. PET scan results changed management in 59 cases (29.5%). Conclusions: In this academic medical center, the PET scan was

  2. The Adverse Effect of Hypertension in the Treatment of Thyroid Cancer with Multi-Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ancker, Ole Vincent; Wehland, Markus; Bauer, Johann; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of thyroid cancer has promising prospects, mostly through the use of surgical or radioactive iodine therapy. However, some thyroid cancers, such as progressive radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid carcinoma, are not remediable with conventional types of treatment. In these cases, a treatment regimen with multi-kinase inhibitors is advisable. Unfortunately, clinical trials have shown a large number of patients, treated with multi-kinase inhibitors, being adversely affected by hypertension. This means that treatment of thyroid cancer with multi-kinase inhibitors prolongs progression-free and overall survival of patients, but a large number of patients experience hypertension as an adverse effect of the treatment. Whether the prolonged lifetime is sufficient to develop sequelae from hypertension is unclear, but late-stage cancer patients often have additional diseases, which can be complicated by the presence of hypertension. Since the exact mechanisms of the rise of hypertension in these patients are still unknown, the only available strategy is treating the symptoms. More studies determining the pathogenesis of hypertension as a side effect to cancer treatment as well as outcomes of dose management of cancer drugs are necessary to improve future therapy options for hypertension as an adverse effect to cancer therapy with multi-kinase inhibitors. PMID:28335429

  3. Genetically Engineered Immunotherapy for Advanced Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, doctors will collect T lymphocytes from patients with advanced mesothelin-expressing cancer and genetically engineer them to recognize mesothelin. The gene-engineered cells will be multiplied and infused into the patient to fight the cancer

  4. Fibronectin 1 promotes migration and invasion of papillary thyroid cancer and predicts papillary thyroid cancer lymph node metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Shujun; Wang, Chuandong; Postma, Emily Louise; Yang, Yanhua; Ni, Xiaofeng; Zhan, Weiwei

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node metastasis (LNM) is common in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), and is an indicator of recurrence. The detailed molecular mechanism of LNM in PTC has not been well described. This study aimed to investigate the role of fibronectin 1 in PTC LNM and its clinical relevance. The expression of fibronectin 1 was confirmed in PTC tissues and cell lines. A correlation analysis was conducted and a receiver-operating characteristic curve obtained. The effect of fibronectin 1 on the proliferation of PTC cell lines was performed using a colony-formation assay and Cell Counting Kit 8. Cell-cycle analysis was performed with a flow-cytometry assay. Migration and invasion ability were evaluated by transwell and wound-healing assays. Fibronectin 1 was overexpressed in metastasized PTC. Overexpressed fibronectin 1 was positively correlated with PTC LNM. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis showed that the diagnostic accuracy of fibronectin 1 was 81.1%, with sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 82%. Overexpression of fibronectin 1 promoted proliferation, migration, and invasion in PTC. Fibronectin 1 plays a critical role in PTC metastasis by modulating the proliferation, migration, and invasion ability of PTC cells, and it is a valuable diagnostic biomarker for predicting PTC LNM. PMID:28367057

  5. Check Your Neck for Thyroid Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thyroid Awareness Month. "The number of cases of thyroid cancer is rising, and while in most cases the ... the American Thyroid Association. "While in most patients thyroid cancer develops without signs or symptoms, patients who have ...

  6. Loss of c-KIT expression in thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Sara; Lessi, Francesca; Panebianco, Federica; Tantillo, Elena; La Ferla, Marco; Menicagli, Michele; Aretini, Paolo; Apollo, Alessandro; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Marchetti, Ivo; Mazzanti, Chiara Maria

    2017-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma is the most frequent histologic type of thyroid tumor. Few studies investigated the role of c-KIT expression in thyroid tumors, suggesting a role for this receptor and its ligand in differentiation and growth control of thyroid epithelium and a receptor loss following malignant transformation. We investigated and correlated c-KIT expression levels and two known markers of thyrocytes differentiation, PAX8 and TTF-1, in malignant and benign cytological thyroid samples. Moreover, we performed functional studies on human papillary thyroid carcinoma cell line to associated c-KIT expression to thyrocytes differentiation and tumor proliferation. c-KIT and PAX8 expression resulted higher in benign samples compared to the malignant ones, and the expression levels of these two genes were significantly correlated to each other. We also observed that c-KIT overexpression led to an increase of PAX8 expression level together with a decrease of proliferation. Furthermore, c-KIT overexpressing cells showed a regression of typical morphological features of malignancy. Taken together these results suggest that c-KIT could be involved in the differentiation of thyroid cells and in tumor progression.

  7. Loss of c-KIT expression in thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Panebianco, Federica; Tantillo, Elena; La Ferla, Marco; Menicagli, Michele; Aretini, Paolo; Apollo, Alessandro; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Marchetti, Ivo; Mazzanti, Chiara Maria

    2017-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma is the most frequent histologic type of thyroid tumor. Few studies investigated the role of c-KIT expression in thyroid tumors, suggesting a role for this receptor and its ligand in differentiation and growth control of thyroid epithelium and a receptor loss following malignant transformation. We investigated and correlated c-KIT expression levels and two known markers of thyrocytes differentiation, PAX8 and TTF-1, in malignant and benign cytological thyroid samples. Moreover, we performed functional studies on human papillary thyroid carcinoma cell line to associated c-KIT expression to thyrocytes differentiation and tumor proliferation. c-KIT and PAX8 expression resulted higher in benign samples compared to the malignant ones, and the expression levels of these two genes were significantly correlated to each other. We also observed that c-KIT overexpression led to an increase of PAX8 expression level together with a decrease of proliferation. Furthermore, c-KIT overexpressing cells showed a regression of typical morphological features of malignancy. Taken together these results suggest that c-KIT could be involved in the differentiation of thyroid cells and in tumor progression. PMID:28301608

  8. A novel mechanism of sodium iodide symporter repression in differentiated thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Vicki E.; Read, Martin L.; Turnell, Andrew S.; Watkins, Rachel J.; Watkinson, John C.; Lewy, Greg D.; Fong, Jim C. W.; James, Sally R.; Eggo, Margaret C.; Boelaert, Kristien; Franklyn, Jayne A.; McCabe, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Differentiated thyroid cancers and their metastases frequently exhibit reduced iodide uptake, impacting on the efficacy of radioiodine ablation therapy. PTTG binding factor (PBF) is a proto-oncogene implicated in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer. We recently reported that PBF inhibits iodide uptake, and have now elucidated a mechanism by which PBF directly modulates sodium iodide symporter (NIS) activity in vitro. In subcellular localisation studies, PBF overexpression resulted in the redistribution of NIS from the plasma membrane into intracellular vesicles, where it colocalised with the tetraspanin CD63. Cell-surface biotinylation assays confirmed a reduction in plasma membrane NIS expression following PBF transfection compared with vector-only treatment. Coimmunoprecipitation and GST-pull-down experiments demonstrated a direct interaction between NIS and PBF, the functional consequence of which was assessed using iodide-uptake studies in rat thyroid FRTL-5 cells. PBF repressed iodide uptake, whereas three deletion mutants, which did not localise within intracellular vesicles, lost the ability to inhibit NIS activity. In summary, we present an entirely novel mechanism by which the proto-oncogene PBF binds NIS and alters its subcellular localisation, thereby regulating its ability to uptake iodide. Given that PBF is overexpressed in thyroid cancer, these findings have profound implications for thyroid cancer ablation using radioiodine. PMID:19706688

  9. A novel mechanism of sodium iodide symporter repression in differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Vicki E; Read, Martin L; Turnell, Andrew S; Watkins, Rachel J; Watkinson, John C; Lewy, Greg D; Fong, Jim C W; James, Sally R; Eggo, Margaret C; Boelaert, Kristien; Franklyn, Jayne A; McCabe, Christopher J

    2009-09-15

    Differentiated thyroid cancers and their metastases frequently exhibit reduced iodide uptake, impacting on the efficacy of radioiodine ablation therapy. PTTG binding factor (PBF) is a proto-oncogene implicated in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer. We recently reported that PBF inhibits iodide uptake, and have now elucidated a mechanism by which PBF directly modulates sodium iodide symporter (NIS) activity in vitro. In subcellular localisation studies, PBF overexpression resulted in the redistribution of NIS from the plasma membrane into intracellular vesicles, where it colocalised with the tetraspanin CD63. Cell-surface biotinylation assays confirmed a reduction in plasma membrane NIS expression following PBF transfection compared with vector-only treatment. Coimmunoprecipitation and GST-pull-down experiments demonstrated a direct interaction between NIS and PBF, the functional consequence of which was assessed using iodide-uptake studies in rat thyroid FRTL-5 cells. PBF repressed iodide uptake, whereas three deletion mutants, which did not localise within intracellular vesicles, lost the ability to inhibit NIS activity. In summary, we present an entirely novel mechanism by which the proto-oncogene PBF binds NIS and alters its subcellular localisation, thereby regulating its ability to uptake iodide. Given that PBF is overexpressed in thyroid cancer, these findings have profound implications for thyroid cancer ablation using radioiodine.

  10. Mechanisms of apoptosis in irradiated and sunitinib-treated follicular thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Jirka; Warnke, Elisabeth; Wehland, Markus; Pietsch, Jessica; Pohl, Fabian; Wise, Petra; Magnusson, Nils E; Eilles, Christoph; Grimm, Daniela

    2014-03-01

    The multikinase inhibitor sunitinib (S) seems to have promising potential in the treatment of thyroid cancer. We focused on the impact of S and/or irradiation (R) on mechanisms of apoptosis in follicular thyroid cancer cells. The effects of R, S and their combination were evaluated 2 and 4 days after treatment, using the human thyroid cancer cell line CGTH W-1. The transcription of genes involved in the regulation of apoptosis was investigated using quantitative real-time PCR. Western blot analyses of caspases and survivin were also performed. S elevated BAX (day 4), CASP9, CASP3, BIRC5 (day 4) and PRKACA (day 4) gene expression, whereas the mRNAs of BCL2, CASP8, PRKCA, ERK1, and ERK2 were not significantly changed. S, R and R+S clearly induced caspase-9 protein and elevated caspase-3 activity. Survivin was down-regulated at day 4 in control cells and the expression was blunted by S treatment. R+S induced survivin expression at day 2 followed by a reduction at day 4 of treatment. Sunitinib and the combined application with radiation induced apoptosis in follicular thyroid cancer cells via the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. In addition, sunitinib might induce apoptosis via decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein survivin. These findings suggest the potential use of sunitinib for the treatment of poorly differentiated follicular thyroid carcinomas.

  11. Sorafenib in radioactive iodine-refractory well-differentiated metastatic thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Daniel C; Misiukiewicz, Krzysztof J

    2014-01-01

    Recent Phase III data presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2013 annual conference by Brose et al led to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of sorafenib for the treatment of well-differentiated radioactive iodine-resistant metastatic thyroid cancer. This is the second drug in 40 years to be FDA approved for this indication. Recent reviews and a meta-analysis reveal a modest ability to induce a partial remission but substantial ability to halt disease progression. Given the significant activating mutations present in thyroid cancer, many of which are inhibited by sorafenib, the next logical approach may be to combine targeted rational therapies if permitted by collective toxicity profiles. This systematic review aims to summarize the recent Phase II/III data leading to the FDA approval of sorafenib for radioactive iodine therapy differentiated thyroid cancer and highlights recent novel combination therapy trials. PMID:25053887

  12. Isolated Liver Metastasis in Hürthle Cell Thyroid Cancer Treated with Microwave Ablation.

    PubMed

    Segkos, Konstantinos; Schmidt, Carl; Nabhan, Fadi

    2017-01-01

    Hürthle cell thyroid cancer (HCTC) is a less common form of differentiated thyroid cancer. It rarely metastasizes to the liver, and when it does, the metastasis is almost never isolated. Here we report a 62-year-old male with widely invasive Hürthle cell thyroid cancer, who underwent total thyroidectomy and received adjuvant treatment with I-131 with posttreatment scan showing no evidence of metastatic disease. His thyroglobulin however continued to rise after that and eventually an isolated liver metastasis was identified. He underwent laparoscopic microwave ablation of the liver metastasis, with dramatic decline in thyroglobulin and no structural disease identified to date. This case highlights the rare occurrence of isolated liver metastasis from HCTC and also illustrates the utility of thermoablation as an alternative to surgical resection in the treatment of small isolated liver metastases from HCTC.

  13. Isolated Liver Metastasis in Hürthle Cell Thyroid Cancer Treated with Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Hürthle cell thyroid cancer (HCTC) is a less common form of differentiated thyroid cancer. It rarely metastasizes to the liver, and when it does, the metastasis is almost never isolated. Here we report a 62-year-old male with widely invasive Hürthle cell thyroid cancer, who underwent total thyroidectomy and received adjuvant treatment with I-131 with posttreatment scan showing no evidence of metastatic disease. His thyroglobulin however continued to rise after that and eventually an isolated liver metastasis was identified. He underwent laparoscopic microwave ablation of the liver metastasis, with dramatic decline in thyroglobulin and no structural disease identified to date. This case highlights the rare occurrence of isolated liver metastasis from HCTC and also illustrates the utility of thermoablation as an alternative to surgical resection in the treatment of small isolated liver metastases from HCTC. PMID:28163939

  14. Living near nuclear power plants and thyroid cancer risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaeyoung; Bang, Yejin; Lee, Won Jin

    2016-02-01

    There has been public concern regarding the safety of residing near nuclear power plants, and the extent of risk for thyroid cancer among adults living near nuclear power plants has not been fully explored. In the present study, a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies was conducted to investigate the association between living near nuclear power plants and the risk of thyroid cancer. A comprehensive literature search was performed on studies published up to March 2015 on the association between nuclear power plants and thyroid cancer risk. The summary standardized incidence ratio (SIR), standardized mortality ratio (SMR), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effect model of meta-analysis. Sensitivity analyses were performed by study quality. Thirteen studies were included in the meta-analysis, covering 36 nuclear power stations in 10 countries. Overall, summary estimates showed no significant increased thyroid cancer incidence or mortality among residents living near nuclear power plants (summary SIR=0.98; 95% CI 0.87-1.11, summary SMR=0.80; 95% CI 0.62-1.04). The pooled estimates did not reveal different patterns of risk by gender, exposure definition, or reference population. However, sensitivity analysis by exposure definition showed that living less than 20 km from nuclear power plants was associated with a significant increase in the risk of thyroid cancer in well-designed studies (summary OR=1.75; 95% CI 1.17-2.64). Our study does not support an association between living near nuclear power plants and risk of thyroid cancer but does support a need for well-designed future studies.

  15. Recent incidences and differential trends of thyroid cancer in the USA.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yushan; Xing, Mingzhao

    2016-04-01

    The incidence rate of thyroid cancer has been rising rapidly in recent decades; however, its trend remains unclear. To investigate this, we analyzed the database of the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) 13, 1992-2012 in the USA, particularly focusing on conventional papillary thyroid cancer (CPTC) and follicular variant of PTC (FVPTC). Of the 75,992 thyroid cancers, 61.3% were CPTC and 25.7% were FVPTC, and their incidence rates (IRs) were significantly increased from 1992 to 2012 (P all < 0.001), with CPTC being 2.4 times of FVPTC (P < 0.001) and the overall average annual percent change (AAPC) of incidence being 6.3% in the former and 5.3% in the latter. IRs were increased in all thyroid cancers, albeit most dramatically in PTC, in virtually all ethnic/demographic groups in recent two decades; however, the incidence trends varied among different thyroid cancers, particularly differentiable between CPTC and FVPTC. For example, Joinpoint analyses revealed that the APC of CPTC before 1996 was 1.5% (P > 0.05), which jumped to 6.8% (P < 0.05) after 1996, whereas the APC of FVPTC before 2000 was 6.6% (P < 0.05), which dropped to 4.8% (P < 0.05) after 2000. IRs and incidence trends of PTC were uneven among different ethnic/demographic groups, as exemplified by the lower IRs of both PTC variants in the Black females than in non-Hispanic White females but higher AAPCs of incidence in the former than in the latter. Interestingly, the data also suggest that the rise in the IRs of PTC is becoming plateaued in the most recent 2 years. These novel observations are helpful in understanding the incidence and incidence trends of thyroid cancer.

  16. Estrogen and thyroid cancer is a stem affair: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Zane, Mariangela; Parello, Carmelo; Pennelli, Gianmaria; Townsend, Danyelle M.; Merigliano, Stefano; Boscaro, Marco; Toniato, Antonio; Baggio, Giovannella; Pelizzo, Maria Rosa; Rubello, Domenico; Boschin, Isabella Merante

    2016-01-01

    Gender influences Papillary Thyroid Cancer (PTC) with an incidence of 3:1 when comparing women to men with different aggressiveness. This gender discrepancy suggests some role of sex hormones in favoring the malignant progression of thyroid tissue to cancer. Estrogens are known to promote Stem Cell self-renewal and, therefore, may be involved in tumor initiation. The goals of these studies are to investigate the underlying causes of gender differences in PTC by studying the specific role of estrogens on tumor cells and their involvement within the Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) compartment. Exposure to 1 nmol l−1 Estradiol for 24 h promotes growth and maintenance of PTC Stem Cells, while inducing dose-dependent cellular proliferation and differentiation following Estradiol administration. Whereas mimicking a condition of hormonal imbalance led to an opposite phenotype compared to a continuous treatment. In vivo we find that Estradiol promotes motility and tumorigenicity of CSCs. Estradiol-treated mice inoculated with Thyroid Cancer Stem Cell-enriched cells developed larger tumor masses than control mice. Furthermore, Estradiol-pretreated Cancer Stem cells migrated to distant organs, while untreated cells remained circumscribed. We also find that the biological response elicited by estrogens on Papillary Thyroid Cancer in women differed from men in pathways mediated. This could explain the gender imbalance in tumor incidence and development and could be useful to develop gender specific treatment of (PTC). PMID:27899250

  17. Potential Antitumor Effect of Harmine in the Treatment of Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in endocrine system. In latest studies, harmine has been proved to inhibit the growth of several cancers in vitro and in vivo. In the current study, we evaluated the in vitro and in vivo anticancer efficiency of harmine against thyroid cancer cell line TPC-1. The in vitro cytotoxicity of harmine evaluated by XTT assay indicated that harmine suppressed the proliferation of TPC-1 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, harmine dose-dependently induced apoptosis of TPC-1 cells through regulating the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax. The colony forming ability of TPC-1 cells was also time-dependently inhibited by harmine. The inhibitory effects of harmine on migration and invasion of TPC-1 cells were studied by wound scratching and Transwell assays. In vivo evaluation showed that harmine effectively inhibited the growth of thyroid cancer in a dose-dependent manner in nude mice. Therefore, harmine might be a promising herbal medicine in the therapy of thyroid cancer and further efforts are needed to explore this therapeutic strategy. PMID:28270853

  18. Common symptoms in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Lagman, Ruth L; Davis, Mellar P; LeGrand, Susan B; Walsh, Declan

    2005-04-01

    The key points of this article are anorexia and cachexia are: A major cause of cancer deaths. Several drugs are available to treat anorexia and cachexia. Dyspnea in cancer usually is caused by several factors. Treatment consists of reversing underlying causes, empiric bronchodilators, cortico-steroids--and in the terminally ill patients-opioids, benzodiazepines,and chlorpromazine. Delirium is associated with advanced cancer. Empiric treatment with neuroleptics while evaluating for reversible causes is a reasonable approach to management. Nausea and vomiting are caused by extra-abdominal factors (drugs,electrolyte abnormalities, central nervous system metastases) or intra-abdominal factors (gastroparesis, ileus, gastric outlet obstruction, bowel obstruction). The pattern of nausea and vomiting differs depending upon whether the cause is extra- or intra-abdominal. Reversible causes should be sought and empiric metoclopramide or haloperidol should be initiated. Fatigue may be caused by anemia, depression, endocrine abnormalities,or electrolyte disturbances that should be treated before using empiric methylphenidate. Constipation should be treated with laxatives and stool softeners. Both should start with the first opioid dose.

  19. A review on ultrasound-based thyroid cancer tissue characterization and automated classification.

    PubMed

    Acharya, U R; Swapna, G; Sree, S V; Molinari, F; Gupta, S; Bardales, R H; Witkowska, A; Suri, J S

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we review the different studies that developed Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) for automated classification of thyroid cancer into benign and malignant types. Specifically, we discuss the different types of features that are used to study and analyze the differences between benign and malignant thyroid nodules. These features can be broadly categorized into (a) the sonographic features from the ultrasound images, and (b) the non-clinical features extracted from the ultrasound images using statistical and data mining techniques. We also present a brief description of the commonly used classifiers in ultrasound based CAD systems. We then review the studies that used features based on the ultrasound images for thyroid nodule classification and highlight the limitations of such studies. We also discuss and review the techniques used in studies that used the non-clinical features for thyroid nodule classification and report the classification accuracies obtained in these studies.

  20. Effects of thyroid hormone withdrawal on metabolic and cardiovascular parameters during radioactive iodine therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    An, Jee Hyun; Song, Kee-Ho; Kim, Dong-Lim; Kim, Suk Kyeong

    2017-02-01

    Objective To investigate the cardiometabolic effects of a severe hypothyroid state induced by withdrawal of thyroid hormone replacement before radioactive iodine therapy. Methods Patients with thyroid cancer who were scheduled to receive radioactive iodine ablation were enrolled. Cardiometabolic parameters were measured using blood samples taken immediately before levothyroxine withdrawal, 4 weeks following withdrawal (on radiotherapy day), and 4 weeks following reinstitution of levothyroxine. Results Out of 48 patients (age 49.4 ± 10.5 years; 77.1% [37/48] female), the severe hypothyroid state induced by levothyroxine withdrawal significantly aggravated the majority of lipid parameters, particularly in patients with a greater number of metabolic syndrome components. Fasting plasma glucose levels and homeostatic model assessment values for insulin resistance and β-cell function significantly decreased following levothyroxine withdrawal. Serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, fibrinogen and cystatin C levels significantly decreased, and homocysteine levels increased during the severe hypothyroid state. All of these changes were reversed by levothyroxine reinstitution. Conclusions Severe hypothyroid state induced pronounced changes in cardiometabolic parameters. Further studies should identify the long-term effects of changes in these parameters on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in relation to thyroid disease.

  1. Familial nontoxic multinodular thyroid goiter locus maps to chromosome 14q but does not account for familial nonmedullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Bignell, G R; Canzian, F; Shayeghi, M; Stark, M; Shugart, Y Y; Biggs, P; Mangion, J; Hamoudi, R; Rosenblatt, J; Buu, P; Sun, S; Stoffer, S S; Goldgar, D E; Romeo, G; Houlston, R S; Narod, S A; Stratton, M R; Foulkes, W D

    1997-01-01

    Thyroid goiter is a common condition that is often associated with iodine deficiency. Familial forms of goiter in areas not known to feature iodine deficiency are much less common. We have performed a genomic search on a single large Canadian family with 18 cases of nontoxic multinodular goiter in which 2 individuals also had papillary lesions highly suggestive of papillary carcinoma. A locus on chromosome 14q (MNG1 [multinodular goiter 1]) has been identified, with a maximal two-point LOD score of 3.8 at D14S1030 and a multipoint LOD score of 4.88 at the same marker, defined by D14S1062 (upper boundary) and D14S267 (lower boundary). The gene encoding thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), which is located on chromosome 14q, is outside the linked region. To determine the role of this gene in familial nonmedullary thyroid cancer (NMTC), we studied 37 smaller pedigrees each containing at least two cases of NMTC. Analysis by both parametric and nonparametric methods indicates that only a very small proportion of familial NMTC (point estimate 0.001, support intervals 0-.6 under a dominant model) is attributable to MNG1. PMID:9345104

  2. Geospatial and Temporal Analysis of Thyroid Cancer Incidence in a Rural Population

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, John P.; Jackson, Erin; Morrissey, Leslie A.; Rizzo, Donna M.; Sprague, Brian L.; Sarkar, Indra Neil

    2015-01-01

    Background: The increasing incidence of thyroid cancer has resulted in the rate tripling over the past 30 years. Reasons for this increase have not been established. Geostatistics and geographic information system (GIS) tools have emerged as powerful geospatial technologies to identify disease clusters, map patterns and trends, and assess the impact of ecological and socioeconomic factors (SES) on the spatial distribution of diseases. In this study, these tools were used to analyze thyroid cancer incidence in a rural population. Methods: Thyroid cancer incidence and socio-demographic factors in Vermont (VT), United States, between 1994 and 2007 were analyzed by logistic regression and geospatial and temporal analyses. Results: The thyroid cancer age-adjusted incidence in Vermont (8.0 per 100,000) was comparable to the national level (8.4 per 100,000), as were the ratio of the incidence of females to males (3.1:1) and the mortality rate (0.5 per 100,000). However, the estimated annual percentage change was higher (8.3 VT; 5.7 U.S.). Incidence among females peaked at 30–59 years of age, reflecting a significant rise from 1994 to 2007, while incidence trends for males did not vary significantly by age. For both females and males, the distribution of tumors by size did not vary over time; ≤1.0 cm, 1.1–2.0 cm, and >2.0 cm represented 38%, 22%, and 40%, respectively. In females, papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) accounted for 89% of cases, follicular (FTC) 8%, medullary (MTC) 2%, and anaplastic (ATC) 0.6%, while in males PTC accounted for 77% of cases, FTC 15%, MTC 1%, and ATC 3%. Geospatial analysis revealed locations and spatial patterns that, when combined with multivariate incidence analyses, indicated that factors other than increased surveillance and access to healthcare (physician density or insurance) contributed to the increased thyroid cancer incidence. Nine thyroid cancer incidence hot spots, areas with very high normalized incidence, were identified

  3. [Incidence of anaplastic tumor in structure of other histologic forms of the thyroid gland cancer].

    PubMed

    Vinnik, Iu A; Gorbenko, V N; Vas'ko, A R; Kikhtenko, E V; Gargin, V V

    2014-01-01

    The degrees of invasiveness, proliferative activity, morphofunctional activity of nuclei in the thyroidal gland tumors were studied, while analyzing material, obtained in 1343 patients, suffering thyroidal gland cancer (THGC) and operated on in 2000-2013 yrs. Morphological point quantity of malignancy (as a criterion of the tumor progression grade) and mitotic activity in cellular population were determined in various kinds of THGC. Undifferentiated (anaplastic carcinoma) type of THGC is the most malignant one. There were determined a spindle-like, giant-cell and squamous-cell forms of undifferentiated THGC. The presence of sites of differentiated cancer in 33% of histological preparations witnesses the interrelationship with the earlier existed pathological process.

  4. Lenvatinib - A multikinase inhibitor for radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Hewett, Yvonne; Ghimire, Subash; Farooqi, Bilal; Shah, Binay K

    2016-11-17

    Lenvatinib, an oral multikinase inhibitor, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in February 2015. In a pivotal phase III study of 392 patients with progressive radioiodine-refractory thyroid cancer, the overall response rate of patients receiving lenvatinib was 64.8%, with complete response in four patients. The median progression-free survival was 18.3 months in the lenvatinib arm versus 3.6 months in patients receiving placebo. Median overall survival was not reached in either arm. Lenvatinib is a promising new treatment for patients with radioiodine (iodine-131)-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer.

  5. Dendritic cells in autoimmune disorders and cancer of the thyroid.

    PubMed

    Lewinski, Andrzej; Sliwka, Przemyslaw Wiktor; Stasiolek, Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), considered as one of the crucial immune regulatory populations, are implicated in the immune pathology of various disorders. Also in the thyroid gland, DCs were shown to be involved in early and chronic phases of various types of autoimmunity - including Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease. In thyroid malignant processes, DCs are suggested as an important element of both tumour defence and tumour immune evasion mechanisms. Recent findings emphasize a crucial role of interactions between particular DC subsets and other regulatory cell populations (e.g. FoxP3+ regulatory T cells) in thyroid pathology. Additionally, an increasing attention has been paid to the control of DC function by thyrometabolic conditions.

  6. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Patients With Refractory Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Tall Cell Variant Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Oncocytic Follicular Carcinoma

  7. Immunogenetic mechanisms leading to thyroid autoimmunity: recent advances in identifying susceptibility genes and regions.

    PubMed

    Brand, Oliver J; Gough, Stephen C L

    2011-12-01

    The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) include Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), which are characterised by a breakdown in immune tolerance to thyroid antigens. Unravelling the genetic architecture of AITD is vital to better understanding of AITD pathogenesis, required to advance therapeutic options in both disease management and prevention. The early whole-genome linkage and candidate gene association studies provided the first evidence that the HLA region and CTLA-4 represented AITD risk loci. Recent improvements in; high throughput genotyping technologies, collection of larger disease cohorts and cataloguing of genome-scale variation have facilitated genome-wide association studies and more thorough screening of candidate gene regions. This has allowed identification of many novel AITD risk genes and more detailed association mapping. The growing number of confirmed AITD susceptibility loci, implicates a number of putative disease mechanisms most of which are tightly linked with aspects of immune system function. The unprecedented advances in genetic study will allow future studies to identify further novel disease risk genes and to identify aetiological variants within specific gene regions, which will undoubtedly lead to a better understanding of AITD patho-physiology.

  8. On the cells of origin of radiogenic thyroid cancer: New studies based on an old idea

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.; Domann, F.E.; Groch, K.M.

    1990-12-31

    We have presented evidence that the functional thyroid follicles (follicular units, FU) which are formed in grafts of monodispersed rat thyroid cells, and hence the thyroid tumors which later develop in such grafts, are clonal in origin. Recent studies have been designed to investigate: whether cell number-dependent inhibition of promotion-progression is mediated by remote hormonal feed-back, local cell-cell interactions, or both; the cell population kinetics of the clonogen subpopulation during goitrogenesis and goiter involution; and the effect of prolonged exposure to high levels of TSH (thyrotropin) on the capacity of the clonogens to give rise to functional FU. The results indicate that local cell-cell interactions play an important role in the cell number-dependent suppression of neoplastic promotion-progression. They also show that if sufficient thyroid cells are grafted, the thyroid-pituitary axis can be reestablished in thyroidectomized rats fed normal diets. In such animals given iodine deficient diets, the FU that develop in the thyroid grafts shift their secretory pattern to increase the ratio of T3 (triiodothyronine) to T4 (thyroxine), and thus conserve the available iodine. Finally, the clonogenic subpopulation is conserved during both goitrogenesis and goiter involution. When they are transplanted to thyroidectomized recipients, clonogens from two types of goiters form FU that are morphologically indistinguishable from those that develop in grafts of normal thyroid clonogens. Furthermore, the secretion of T3 and T4 by such grafts is dependent on the grafted clonogen number, and hence FU formation, and not on the total number of thyroid cells transplanted. We conclude that the thyroid clonogens, the presumptive cancer progenitor cells, have many of the characteristics of stem cells.

  9. On the cells of origin of radiogenic thyroid cancer: New studies based on an old idea

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, K.H.; Domann, F.E.; Groch, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    We have presented evidence that the functional thyroid follicles (follicular units, FU) which are formed in grafts of monodispersed rat thyroid cells, and hence the thyroid tumors which later develop in such grafts, are clonal in origin. Recent studies have been designed to investigate: whether cell number-dependent inhibition of promotion-progression is mediated by remote hormonal feed-back, local cell-cell interactions, or both; the cell population kinetics of the clonogen subpopulation during goitrogenesis and goiter involution; and the effect of prolonged exposure to high levels of TSH (thyrotropin) on the capacity of the clonogens to give rise to functional FU. The results indicate that local cell-cell interactions play an important role in the cell number-dependent suppression of neoplastic promotion-progression. They also show that if sufficient thyroid cells are grafted, the thyroid-pituitary axis can be reestablished in thyroidectomized rats fed normal diets. In such animals given iodine deficient diets, the FU that develop in the thyroid grafts shift their secretory pattern to increase the ratio of T3 (triiodothyronine) to T4 (thyroxine), and thus conserve the available iodine. Finally, the clonogenic subpopulation is conserved during both goitrogenesis and goiter involution. When they are transplanted to thyroidectomized recipients, clonogens from two types of goiters form FU that are morphologically indistinguishable from those that develop in grafts of normal thyroid clonogens. Furthermore, the secretion of T3 and T4 by such grafts is dependent on the grafted clonogen number, and hence FU formation, and not on the total number of thyroid cells transplanted. We conclude that the thyroid clonogens, the presumptive cancer progenitor cells, have many of the characteristics of stem cells.

  10. Mitochondrial Dynamics Protein Drp1 Is Overexpressed in Oncocytic Thyroid Tumors and Regulates Cancer Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-da-Silva, André; Valacca, Cristina; Rios, Elisabete; Pópulo, Helena; Soares, Paula; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Scorrano, Luca; Máximo, Valdemar; Campello, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Oncocytic cell tumors are characterized by the accumulation of morphologically abnormal mitochondria in their cells, suggesting a role for abnormal mitochondrial biogenesis in oncocytic cell transformation. Little is known about the reason for the dysmorphology of accumulated mitochondria. The proteins regulating the morphology of mitochondria, the "mitochondria-shaping" proteins, can modulate their size and number; however, nothing is known hitherto about a possible involvement of mitochondrial dynamics in oncocytic cell transformation in tumors. Our aim was to assess the status of the mitochondria morphology and its role in oncocytic cell transformation. We therefore evaluated the expression pattern of the main mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in a series of thyroid cell tumor samples, as well as in thyroid tumor cell lines, with and without oncocytic cell features. The expression of mitochondrial fusion (Opa1, Mfn1 and Mfn2) and fission (Drp1 and Fis1) proteins were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in a series of 88 human thyroid tumors. In vitro studies, for comparative purposes and to deepen the study, were performed using TPC1 - a papillary thyroid carcinoma derived cell line—and XTC.UC1, an oncocytic follicular thyroid carcinoma-derived cell line. Both IHC and in vitro protein analyses showed an overall increase in the levels of "mitochondrial-shaping" proteins in oncocytic thyroid tumors. Furthermore, overexpression of the pro-fission protein Drp1 was found to be associated with malignant oncocytic thyroid tumors. Interestingly, genetic and pharmacological blockage of Drp1 activity was able to influence thyroid cancer cells’ migration/invasion ability, a feature of tumor malignancy. In this study we show that unbalanced mitochondrial dynamics characterize the malignant features of thyroid oncocytic cell tumors, and participate in the acquisition of the migrating phenotype. PMID:25822260

  11. Racial and Socioeconomic Disparities in Presentation and Outcomes of Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Yeh, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    (P < .04). Conclusion: Black patients and those with low SES have worse outcomes for thyroid cancer. API and Hispanic patients may have a protective effect on survival despite presenting with more advanced disease. PMID:24243631

  12. Thyroid cancer risk and dietary nitrate and nitrite intake in the Shanghai women's health study.

    PubMed

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Ji, Bu-Tian; Yang, Gong; Li, Hong Lan; Rothman, Nathaniel; Chow, Wong-Ho; Zheng, Wei; Ward, Mary H

    2013-02-15

    Nitrate and nitrite are precursors in the endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds and nitrate can disrupt thyroid homeostasis by inhibiting iodide uptake. We evaluated nitrate and nitrite intake and risk of thyroid cancer in the Shanghai Women's Health Study that included 73,317 women, aged 40-70 years enrolled in 1996-2000. Dietary intake was assessed at baseline using a food frequency questionnaire. During approximately 11 years of follow-up, 164 incident thyroid cancer cases with complete dietary information were identified. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate relative risks (RRs). We determined the nitrate and nitrite contents of foods using values from the published literature and focusing on regional values for Chinese foods. Nitrate intake was not associated with thyroid cancer risk [RR(Q4) = 0.93; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.42-2.07; p for trend = 0.40]. Compared to the lowest quartile, women with the highest dietary nitrite intake had about a twofold risk of thyroid cancer (RR(Q4) = 2.05; 95%CI: 1.20-3.51), but there was not a monotonic trend with increasing intake (p for trend = 0.36). The trend with increasing nitrite intake from animal sources was significant (p for trend = 0.02) and was stronger for nitrite from processed meats (RR(Q4) = 1.96; 95%CI: 1.28-2.99; p for trend < 0.01). Although we did not observe an association for nitrate as hypothesized, our results suggest that women consuming higher levels of nitrite from animal sources, particularly from processed meat, may have an increased risk of thyroid cancer.

  13. Meta-analysis in the association between obesity and risk of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Bai, Xiyong; Ge, Huai’e; Cui, Haibin; Wei, Zhijiang; Han, Guoda

    2014-01-01

    Although many epidemiologic studies have investigated obesity and thyroid cancer risk, definite conclusions cannot be drawn. To clarify the effects of obesity on the risk of thyroid cancer, a meta-analysis was performed. Related studies were identified from PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Chinese Biology Medicine (CBM) till 16 Aug 2014. Pooled RRs and 95% CIs were used to assess the strength of the associations. A total of 16 studies including 12616154 subjects were involved in this meta-analysis. A significantly elevated thyroid cancer risk was found in overall analysis (RR = 1.29, 95% CI 1.20-1.37, P < 0.00001). In the gender subgroup analyses, a statistically significant association was found in male patients (RR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.16-1.58, P = 0.0001) and in female patients (RR = 1.29, 95% CI 1.19-1.40, P < 0.00001). When we limited the meta-analysis to studies that controlled for age (RR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.24-1.44, P < 0.00001), smoke (RR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.22-1.52, P < 0.00001), alcohol use (RR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.15-1.71, P = 0.0009), and history of benign thyroid disease (RR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.24-1.83, P < 0.0001), a significant association between obesity and thyroid cancer risk remained. This meta-analysis provides the evidence that obesity may contribute to the thyroid cancer development. PMID:25664030

  14. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers and thyroid cancer risk in the Prostate, Colorectal, Lung, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial cohort.

    PubMed

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; DellaValle, Curt T; Purdue, Mark; Kim, Christopher; Zhang, Yawei; Sjodin, Andreas; Ward, Mary H

    2015-06-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) alter thyroid hormone homeostasis, but their relationship with thyroid cancer is unknown. To investigate whether serum concentrations of PBDE were associated with thyroid cancer, we conducted a nested, case-control study in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, a large multicenter clinical trial in the United States. Cases with thyroid cancer (n = 104) were recruited from 1992 to 2001 and diagnosed through 2009, and controls (n = 208) were individually matched (2:1) to cases by race, sex, birth date (within 1 year), center, and blood collection date (within 15 days). We used gas chromatography isotope dilution high-resolution mass spectrometry to measure 10 tri- to heptabrominated diphenyl eithers in serum samples. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using conditional logistic regression for lipid-adjusted PBDE levels detected in more than 50% of controls and for the sum of these BDEs (∑PBDEs). We observed no significant differences between cases and controls in lipid-adjusted concentrations of ∑PBDEs (for cases, median = 12.8 ng/g lipid (interquartile range, 6.2-42.1); for controls, median = 19.4 ng/g lipid (interquartile range, 7.6-50.2)) or for individual congeners. Increasing quartiles of ∑PBDEs and 4 BDE congeners were not associated with risk of thyroid cancer (for the fourth vs. first quartile of ∑PBDEs, adjusted odd ratio = 0.62, 95% confidence interval: 0.29, 1.30; P for trend = 0.56). Our study does not support an association between exposure to PBDEs and thyroid cancer.

  15. Anthropometric Risk Factors for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Young Men and Women From Eastern France: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Xhaard, Constance; de Vathaire, Florent; Cléro, Enora; Maillard, Stéphane; Ren, Yan; Borson-Chazot, Françoise; Sassolas, Geneviève; Schvartz, Claire; Colonna, Marc; Lacour, Brigitte; Danzon, Arlette; Velten, Michel; Marrer, Emilie; Bailly, Laurent; Barjoan, Eugènia Mariné; Schlumberger, Martin; Orgiazzi, Jacques; Adjadj, Elisabeth; Rubino, Carole

    2015-08-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has risen over the past decade, along with a rise in obesity. We studied the role of anthropometric risk factors for differentiated thyroid cancer at the time of diagnosis and at age 20 years in a case-control study conducted in eastern France between 2005 and 2010. The study included 761 adults diagnosed with differentiated thyroid cancer before 35 years of age between 2002 and 2006. They were matched with 825 controls from the general population. Odds ratios were calculated using conditional logistic regression models and were reported for all participants, those with papillary cancer only, and women only. The risk of thyroid cancer was higher for participants with a high body surface area (BSA), great height, or excess weight and for women with a high body fat percentage. Conversely, no significant association was found between body mass index and the risk of thyroid cancer. In the present study, we provide further evidence of the role of BSA and excess weight in the risk of thyroid cancer. These epidemiologic observations should be confirmed by further exploration of the biological mechanisms responsible for the associations of obesity and BSA with thyroid cancer.

  16. Interleukin 10 expression is related to aggressiveness and poor prognosis of patients with thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Lucas Leite; Morari, Elaine Cristina; Nonogaki, Sueli; Marcello, Marjory Alana; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Vassallo, José; Ward, Laura Sterian

    2017-02-01

    Most patients with thyroid cancer will evolve very well with current therapies. However, 10-30% of these patients will present recurrent disease and some of them will eventually die. IL-10 is an anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive cytokine that can contribute to the immune escape of neoplastic cells. We aimed to investigate IL-10 as a molecular marker to improve the clinical management of patients with thyroid cancer. We retrospectively studied 162 patients with follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer who attended to our institution, including 63 classic papillary thyroid carcinomas, 46 follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinomas, 11 poorly differentiated thyroid carcinomas and 42 follicular thyroid carcinomas. Patients were treated according to current guidelines and followed-up for 1-150 months. Additionally, we studied 96 samples of non-malignant tissues. We investigated the expression of IL-10 in tumor cells by semiquantitative and quantitative methods. Malignant tissues presented higher positivity (0.773 ± 0.140) than non-malignant samples (0.623 ± 0.190; p < 0.001). Tumors with extrathyroidal invasion at diagnosis presented higher levels of positivity for IL-10 (0.802 ± 0.125) than tumors without extrathyroidal invasion (0.731 ± 0.147; p = 0.004). We observed a positive correlation between tumor size and IL-10 positivity (correlation coefficient = 0.407; p < 0.001). Patients with IL-10 positivity above the median presented lower relapse-free survival rate compared to those patients whose tumors presented IL-10 positivity below the median. We suggest that a simple IL-10 IHC analysis could help selecting patients who would benefit from a more intensive approach.

  17. Robotic versus Open Thyroidectomy for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shirley Yuk Wah; Ng, Enders Kwok Wai

    2016-01-01

    While open thyroidectomy (OT) is advocated as the gold standard treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer, the contemporary use of robotic thyroidectomy (RT) is often controversial. Although RT combines the unique benefits of the surgical robot and remote access thyroidectomy, its applicability on cancer patients is challenged by the questionable oncological benefits and safety. This review aims to analyze the current literature evidence in comparing RT to OT on thyroid cancers for their perioperative and oncological outcomes. To date, no randomized controlled trial is available in comparing RT to OT. All published studies are nonrandomized or retrospective comparisons. Current data suggests that RT compares less favorably than OT for longer operative time, higher cost, and possibly inferior oncological control with lower number of central lymph nodes retrieved. In terms of morbidity, quality of life outcomes, and short-term recurrence rates, RT and OT are comparable. While conventional OT continues to be appropriate for most thyroid cancers, RT should better be continued by expert surgeons on selected patients who have low-risk thyroid cancers and have high expectations on cosmetic outcomes. Future research should embark on prospective randomized studies for unbiased comparisons. Long-term follow-up studies are also needed to evaluate outcomes on recurrence and survival. PMID:27069476

  18. [Chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Bazaeva, I Ia; Gorbunova, V A; Kravets, O A; Khokhlova, S V; Limareva, S V; Panov, V O; Strel'tsova, O N; Tarachkova, E V

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer takes second place in morbidity and third place in mortality from gynecological cancer. Advanced stages among newly diagnosed cases is still large. The "gold standard" of treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer is chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin that results in a lower risk of death. Improvement of radiotherapy methods allowed to bring optimal dose to the primary tumor with the inclusion of regional metastasis areas with less risk of damage to surrounding healthy tissue and organs. The search for alternative combinations of cytostatics, modes of drug administration, adjuvant chemotherapy after chemoradiotherapy showed an increase in survival of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer.

  19. US-guided biopsy of neck masses in postoperative management of patients with thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Sutton, R T; Reading, C C; Charboneau, J W; James, E M; Grant, C S; Hay, I D

    1988-09-01

    High-frequency (10-MHz) sonography demonstrated a cervical mass or lymphadenopathy, or both, during postoperative follow-up of 52 patients who had undergone surgery for thyroid cancer. Percutaneous biopsy with ultrasonographic (US) guidance was performed in all 52 masses, 44 of which were nonpalpable. Malignant cells were obtained in 29 biopsies, and the results of 20 biopsies were negative, yielding benign lymphocytes only. Results in three biopsies were nondiagnostic due to hypocellular specimens. Therefore, 94% of biopsy results (49) of 52) were confidently assigned as either positive (56%) or negative (38%) for malignancy. There were no complications. High-frequency sonography can demonstrate clinically occult thyroid bed tumor recurrence and lymph node metastases. US-guided biopsy is an accurate and safe technique to confirm or exclude malignancy in patients at high risk of recurrence of thyroid cancer.

  20. [Reinnervation of larynx in surgical treatment of invasive thyroidal gland cancer].

    PubMed

    Palamarchuk, V A

    2013-10-01

    The possibilities and efficacy of performance of simultant operations for invasive thyroid gland cancer in initial neuropathic laryngeal stenosis and dysphonic syndrome, aimed at minimization of the residual volume of thyroid gland tissue and surgical laryngeal reinnervation, were studied. The results of laryngeal surgical reinnervation, in accordance to data of videolaryngoscopy, aerodynamical and spectral analysis of the voice, self estimation of the vocal disorders impact on the patients quality of life were analyzed. Postoperatively in all the patients the improvement of phonation and quality of life was noted. Primary neurorhaphia of recurrent laryngeal nerve secures restoration of normal or nearly normal talkative voice due to restoration of the tone and volume of m. cricoarytenoideus lateralis and m. thyroarytenoideus on the side of affection and may be effectively applied for correction of consequences of laryngeal neuropathic paralysis in surgical treatment of the thyroid gland cancer.

  1. Cediranib Maleate With or Without Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-17

    Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage I Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage II Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IV Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  2. Feeding Artery of Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancers: Role of the Superior Thyroid Artery in Superselective Intraarterial Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Terayama, Noboru Sanada, Junichiro; Matsui, Osamu; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Kawashima, Hiroko; Yamashiro, Masashi; Takanaka, Tsuyoshi; Kumano, Tomoyasu; Yoshizaki, Tomokazu; Furukawa, Mitsuru

    2006-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of the superior thyroid artery in intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. Thirty-nine patients with laryngeal cancer and 29 patients with hypopharyngeal cancer underwent intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy. We performed a retrospective analysis of the feeding arteries confirmed by computed tomography during selective arteriography and compared the results with the extent of the tumors. In 14 of 39 laryngeal and 15 of 29 hypopharyngeal cancers, the tumor did not cross the midline (group 1). In the remaining 25 and 14 cancers, respectively, the tumor crossed the midline or located in the center (group 2). For 13 of 14 laryngeal and 7 of 15 hypopharyngeal cancers in group 1 and for 6 of 25 laryngeal cancers in group 2, the entire tumor was contrast enhanced by the ipsilateral superior thyroid and/or superior laryngeal artery. For 12 of 25 laryngeal and 1 of 14 hypopharyngeal cancers in group 2, the entire tumor was contrast enhanced by the bilateral superior thyroid artery. For the other patients, infusion via the other arterial branches such as the inferior thyroid and the lingual arteries were needed to achieve contrast enhancement of the entire tumor. Superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy for laryngeal cancer from the superior thyroid artery is appropriate, whereas that for hypopharyngeal cancer is less sufficient. To accomplish contrast enhancement of the entire tumor, additional intra-arterial infusion from other arteries such as the inferior thyroid artery is often necessary.

  3. Aminoglutethimide in advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ceci, G; Passalacqua, R; Bisagni, G; Bella, M; Cocconi, G

    1985-10-31

    From July 1980 to June 1983, 61 postmenopausal women with progressive metastatic breast cancer were treated with aminoglutethimide, 250 mg 4 times daily, plus cortisone acetate, 25 mg twice daily. Of 51 evaluable patients, an objective remission was observed in 22 (43%) (partial remission in 19, complete in 3), stable disease in 14 (27%), and progressive disease in 15 (30%). The median duration of response was 60 weeks (range 12+; 94+). The response rate was higher when the dominant disease site was soft tissue (50%) or bone (56%) rather than viscera (29%). Side effects were common but usually slight and transient. Somnolence (69%), dizziness (41%), nausea (35%) and skin rash (27%) were the most frequent. Serum levels of gamma-GT, alkaline phosphatase and total cholesterol rose during aminoglutethimide treatment, whereas levels of uric acid and indirect bilirubin decreased. Aminoglutethimide plus cortisone acetate appears to be an active and relatively safe treatment in advanced breast cancer and may be recommended as second-line endocrine treatment.

  4. Thyroid cancer epidemiology in England and Wales: time trends and geographical distribution.

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Silva, I.; Swerdlow, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence has been increasing in many countries, whereas mortality has been falling due to better survival. Radiation is the best-established risk factor and there has been concern that recent rises in incidence might be related to fallout radiation from atmospheric nuclear weapon tests. We examined thyroid cancer time trends and geographical distribution in England and Wales and possible interpretations of these. During 1962-84, there were significant increases in incidence (P < 0.001) in each sex at ages under 45. Cohort analysis by single year of birth showed an overall increase in incidence risks in women aged 0-44 born since 1920, with a sudden rise in risk for the birth years 1952-55 followed by a lower risk for the more recent cohorts. In men, there was an overall increase in risk at ages 0-44 in successive birth cohorts, but the pattern was irregular. In each sex, the risk in persons aged 45 and over decreased slightly in successive generations. Geographically, highest incidence risks were in countries in North and Mid Wales, in which the risk was almost twice that in the rest of the country. This pattern was present only at ages 45 and over and was most clear in rural areas. The peak of thyroid cancer risk in women born in 1952-55 is consistent with a carcinogenic effect of fallout radiation, since these women were children in the late 1950s and early 1960s when fallout radiation was greatest in England and Wales. The focus of high thyroid cancer risks in Wales was in areas with high levels of fallout radiation. However, thyroid cancer risks in Wales were not high for more recent cohorts (the ones who were exposed to fallout early in life), and a focus on high risk of benign thyroid diseases was present in Wales well before nuclear weapons existed. The distributions of these benign thyroid diseases, or of factors causing them, seem more likely than fallout to explain the high risk areas for thyroid cancer in the country. PMID:8431362

  5. RAF kinase inhibitor-independent constitutive activation of Yes-associated protein 1 promotes tumor progression in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S E; Lee, J U; Lee, M H; Ryu, M J; Kim, S J; Kim, Y K; Choi, M J; Kim, K S; Kim, J M; Kim, J W; Koh, Y W; Lim, D-S; Jo, Y S; Shong, M

    2013-01-01

    The transcription coactivator Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) is regulated by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. However, the role of YAP1 in thyroid cancer, which is frequently associated with the BRAFV600E mutation, remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the role of YAP1 in thyroid cancer. YAP1 was overexpressed in papillary (PTC) and anaplastic thyroid cancer, and nuclear YAP1 was more frequently detected in BRAFV600E (+) PTC. In the thyroid cancer cell lines TPC-1 and HTH7, which do not have the BRAFV600E mutation, YAP1 was cytosolic and inactive at high cell densities. In contrast, YAP1 was retained in the nucleus and its target genes were expressed in the thyroid cancer cells 8505C and K1, which harbor the BRAFV600E mutation, regardless of cell density. Furthermore, the nuclear activation of YAP1 in 8505C was not inhibited by RAF or MEK inhibitor. In vitro experiments, YAP1 silencing or overexpression affected migratory capacities of 8505C and TPC-1 cells. YAP1 knockdown resulted in marked decrease of tumor volume, invasion and distant metastasis in orthotopic tumor xenograft mouse models using the 8505C thyroid cancer cell line. Taken together, YAP1 is involved in the tumor progression of thyroid cancer and YAP1-mediated effects might not be affected by the currently used RAF kinase inhibitors. PMID:23857250

  6. Multifunctional Nanotherapeutic System for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    therapy for drug resistant prostate cancer cells. In addition the findings from this study can be extended to the combinatorial therapy involving...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0571 TITLE: “Multifunctional Nanotherapeutic System for Advanced Prostate Cancer ...29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Multifunctional Nanotherapeutic System for Advanced Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0571 5b

  7. 8q24 rs6983267G variant is associated with increased thyroid cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Sahasrabudhe, Ruta; Estrada, Ana; Lott, Paul; Martin, Lynn; Echeverry, Guadalupe Polanco; Velez, Alejandro; Neta, Gila; Takahasi, Meiko; Saenko, Vladimir; Mitsutake, Norisato; Jaeguer, Emma; Duque, Carlos Simon; Rios, Alejandro; Bohorquez, Mabel; Prieto, Rodrigo; Criollo, Angel; Echeverry, Magdalena; Tomlinson, Ian; Carvajal Carmona, Luis G.

    2015-01-01

    The G allele of the rs6983267 single nucleotide polymorphism, located on chromosome 8q24, has been associated with increased risk of several cancer types. The association between rs6983267G and thyroid cancer has been tested in different populations, mostly of European ancestry, and has led to inconclusive results. While significant associations have been reported in the British and Polish populations, no association has been detected in populations from Spain, Italy and the USA. To further investigate the role of rs6983267G in thyroid cancer susceptibility, we evaluated rs6983267 genotypes in three populations of different continental ancestry (British Isles, Colombia and Japan), providing a total of 3,067 cases and 8,575 controls. We detected significant associations between rs6983267G and thyroid cancer in the British Isles (Odds Ratio, OR= 1.19, 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.11–1.27, P= 4.03 × 10−7), Japan (OR= 1.20, 95% CI: 1.03–1.41, P= 0.022) and a borderline significant association of similar effect direction and size in Colombia (OR= 1.19, 95% CI: 0.99–1.44, P= 0.069). A meta-analysis of our multi-ethnic study and previously published non-overlapping datasets, which included a total of 5,484 cases and 12,594 controls, confirmed the association between rs6983267G and thyroid cancer (P= 1.23 × 10−7, OR= 1.13, 95% CI: 1.07–1.18). Our results therefore support the notion that rs6983267G is a bona fide thyroid cancer risk variant that increases the risk of disease by ~13%. PMID:26290501

  8. Reassessing the NTCTCS Staging Systems for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer, Including Age at Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Donald S.A.; Jonklaas, Jacqueline; Brierley, James D.; Ain, Kenneth B.; Cooper, David S.; Fein, Henry G.; Haugen, Bryan R.; Ladenson, Paul W.; Magner, James; Ross, Douglas S.; Skarulis, Monica C.; Steward, David L.; Xing, Mingzhao; Litofsky, Danielle R.; Maxon, Harry R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thyroid cancer is unique for having age as a staging variable. Recently, the commonly used age cut-point of 45 years has been questioned. Objective: This study assessed alternate staging systems on the outcome of overall survival, and compared these with current National Thyroid Cancer Treatment Cooperative Study (NTCTCS) staging systems for papillary and follicular thyroid cancer. Methods: A total of 4721 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer were assessed. Five potential alternate staging systems were generated at age cut-points in five-year increments from 35 to 70 years, and tested for model discrimination (Harrell's C-statistic) and calibration (R2). The best five models for papillary and follicular cancer were further tested with bootstrap resampling and significance testing for discrimination. Results: The best five alternate papillary cancer systems had age cut-points of 45–50 years, with the highest scoring model using 50 years. No significant difference in C-statistic was found between the best alternate and current NTCTCS systems (p = 0.200). The best five alternate follicular cancer systems had age cut-points of 50–55 years, with the highest scoring model using 50 years. All five best alternate staging systems performed better compared with the current system (p = 0.003–0.035). There was no significant difference in discrimination between the best alternate system (cut-point age 50 years) and the best system of cut-point age 45 years (p = 0.197). Conclusions: No alternate papillary cancer systems assessed were significantly better than the current system. New alternate staging systems for follicular cancer appear to be better than the current NTCTCS system, although they require external validation. PMID:26203804

  9. Valproic acid induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Maria G; Fortunati, Nicoletta; Pugliese, Mariateresa; Costantino, Lucia; Poli, Roberta; Bosco, Ornella; Boccuzzi, Giuseppe

    2005-03-01

    Poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma is an aggressive human cancer that is resistant to conventional therapy. Histone deacetylase inhibitors are a promising class of drugs, acting as antiproliferative agents by promoting differentiation, as well as inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Valproic acid (VPA), a class I selective histone deacetylase inhibitor widely used as an anticonvulsant, promotes differentiation in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells by inducing Na(+)/I(-) symporter and increasing iodine uptake. Here, we show that it is also highly effective at suppressing growth in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cell lines (N-PA and BHT-101). Apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest are the underlying mechanisms of VPA's effect on cell growth. It induces apoptosis by activating the intrinsic pathway; caspases 3 and 9 are activated but not caspase 8. Cell cycle is selectively arrested in G(1) and is associated with the increased expression of p21 and the reduced expression of cyclin A. Both apoptosis and cell cycle arrest are induced by treatment with 1 mm VPA, a dose that promotes cell redifferentiation and that is slightly above the serum concentration reached in patients treated for epilepsy. These multifaceted properties make VPA of clinical interest as a new approach to treating poorly differentiated thyroid cancer.

  10. rs965513 polymorphism as a common risk marker is associated with papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun; Chen, Meijun; Qiao, Hong; Zhang, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is the most common type of thyroid cancer. With the rapid development of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), many genome variants associated with susceptibility to PTC have been identified, including the single nucleotide polymorphism rs965513 (9q22.33) near FOXE1. To evaluate the association between rs965513 and PTC in different ethnicities and countries, we conducted a meta-analysis using relatively large-scale samples from 23 studies (N = 163,136; 20,736 cases and 142,400 controls) by searching the PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Significant heterogeneity caused by different populations among the selected studies was observed. The A allele of rs965513 polymorphism was shown to be highly associated with risk of thyroid cancer, with odds ratios of 1.58 (95% CI 1.32–1.90) in all populations, 1.65 (95% CI 1.31–2.07)) in Caucasian populations and 1.49 in Asian populations. Compared to the dominant and recessive models, we observed the highest odds ratio (OR = 2.80, 95% CI 2.12–3.69) in the homozygous model. These results revealed that the rs965513 polymorphism is a risk factor for thyroid cancer PMID:27191655

  11. Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Focus on Emerging Treatments for Radioactive Iodine-Refractory Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer refractory to radioactive iodine (RAI) had been hampered by few effective therapies. Recently, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have shown activity in this disease. Clinical guidance on the use of these agents in RAI-refractory thyroid cancer is warranted. Materials and Methods. Molecular mutations found in RAI-refractory thyroid cancer are summarized. Recent phase II and III clinical trial data for TKIs axitinib, lenvatinib, motesanib, pazopanib, sorafenib, sunitinib, and vandetinib are reviewed including efficacy and side effect profiles. Molecular targets and potencies of these agents are compared. Inhibitors of BRAF, mammalian target of rapamycin, and MEK are considered. Results. Routine testing for molecular alterations prior to therapy is not yet recommended. TKIs produce progression-free survival of approximately 1 year (range: 7.7–19.6 months) and partial response rates of up to 50% by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Pazopanib and lenvatinib are the most active agents. The majority of patients experienced tumor shrinkage with TKIs. Common adverse toxicities affect dermatologic, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular systems. Conclusion. Multiple TKIs have activity in RAI-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer. Selection of a targeted agent should depend on disease trajectory, side effect profile, and goals of therapy. PMID:25616432

  12. Iodine I-131 With or Without Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-15

    Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Follicular Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Papillary Carcinoma

  13. Evaluation of thyroid incidentaloma.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Scott

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid nodules are an extremely common endocrine disorder with a generally accepted prevalence of around 4% to 7%. Incidental thyroid nodules are typically nonpalpable thyroid nodules found during radiographic evaluation for a non-thyroid-related issue (eg, computed tomographic scan, positron emission tomography scan, carotid duplex). Incidental thyroid nodules are contributing to but are not the sole reason for the rising incidence of thyroid cancer in the Unites States and other developed nations.

  14. Post-thyroid FNA testing and treatment options: a synopsis of the National Cancer Institute Thyroid Fine Needle Aspiration State of the Science Conference.

    PubMed

    Layfield, Lester J; Abrams, Jacki; Cochand-Priollet, Beatrix; Evans, Doug; Gharib, Hossein; Greenspan, Frank; Henry, Michael; LiVolsi, Virginia; Merino, Maria; Michael, Claire W; Wang, Helen; Wells, Samuel A

    2008-06-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored the NCI Thyroid Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) State of the Science Conference on October 22-23, 2007 in Bethesda, MD. The 2-day meeting was accompanied by a permanent informational Web site and several on-line discussion periods between May 1 and December 15, 2007 (http://thyroidfna.cancer.gov). This document addresses follow-up procedures and therapeutic options for suggested diagnostic categories. Follow-up options for "nondiagnostic" and "benign" thyroid aspirates are given. The value of ultrasound examination in the follow-up of "nondiagnostic" and "benign" thyroid aspirates is discussed. Ultrasound findings requiring reaspiration or surgical resection are described as are the timing and length of clinical and ultrasonographic surveillance for cytologically "benign" nodules. Options for surgical intervention are given for the diagnostic categories of "atypical/borderline," "follicular neoplasm," "suspicious for malignancy" and "malignant" (http://thyroidfna.cancer.gov/pages/info/agenda/).

  15. Papillary and follicular thyroid cancer: impact of treatment in 1578 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, W.J.; Panzarella, T.; Carruthers, J.S.; Gospodarowicz, M.K.; Sutcliffe, S.B.

    1988-06-01

    We report the experience from 13 Canadian radiotherapy centers concerning the treatment and outcome for 1074 papillary and 504 follicular thyroid cancer patients followed for 4-24 years. Surgical resection was carried out in almost all patients; there was no correlation between the type of operation and recurrence or survival. Treatment with external irradiation (201 patients) radioiodine (214 patients), or both (107 patients) was used more often in poor prognosis patients than in those with good prognostic factors, and was effective in reducing local recurrences and improving survival, especially in patients with microscopic residual disease postoperatively. Treatment complications were common but rarely fatal. Thyroid cancer was the cause of death in over half of the papillary cancer deaths and in two-thirds of the follicular cancer deaths.

  16. Genomically Driven Precision Medicine to Improve Outcomes in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Krupal; Mymryk, Joe S.; Barrett, John W.; Nichols, Anthony C.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is an endocrine malignancy with an incidence rate that has been increasing steadily over the past 30 years. While well-differentiated subtypes have a favorable prognosis when treated with surgical resection and radioiodine, undifferentiated subtypes, such as anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), are far more aggressive and have a poor prognosis. Conventional therapies (surgical resection, radiation, chemotherapy, and radioiodine) have been utilized for treatment of ATC, yet these treatments have not significantly improved the overall mortality rate. As cancer is a genetic disease, genetic alterations such as mutations, fusions, activation of oncogenes, and silencing of tumor suppressors contribute to its aggressiveness. With the use of next-generation sequencing and the Cancer Genome Atlas, mutation-directed therapy is recognized as the upcoming standard of care. In this review, we highlight the known genetic landscape of ATC and the need for a comprehensive genetic characterization of this disease in order to identify additional therapeutic targets to improve patient outcomes. PMID:25276134

  17. Integrating research on thyroid cancer after Chernobyl--the Chernobyl Tissue Bank.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G A; Bethel, J A; Galpine, A; Mathieson, W; Krznaric, M; Unger, K

    2011-05-01

    The only unequivocal radiological effect of the Chernobyl accident on human health is the increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed in childhood or early adolescence. In response to the scientific interest in studying the molecular biology of thyroid cancer after Chernobyl, the Chernobyl Tissue Bank was established. The project is supported by the governments of Ukraine and Russia, and financially supported (in total around US$3 million) by the European Commission, the National Cancer Institute of the USA and the Sasakawa Memorial Health Foundation of Japan. The project began collecting a variety of biological samples from patients on 1 October 1988, and has supplied material to 21 research projects in Japan, the USA and Europe. The establishment of the Chernobyl Tissue Bank has facilitated co-operation between these research projects and the combination of clinical and research data provides a paradigm for cancer research in the molecular biological age.

  18. Laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy in treatment of recurrent nodular goiter and thyroid cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliverstov, Oleg V.; Privalov, Valeriy A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Demidov, A. K.; Faizrakhmanov, Alexey B.; Yarovoy, Nicolay N.

    2001-10-01

    Laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy was performed in 29 patients with recurrent nodular and multinodular goiter, and in 3 patients with recurrent inoperable thyroid cancer. There were used transcutaneous puncture under ultrasonic control, diode lasers with wavelength 805, 980, and 1060 nm, quartz monofibers, special computerized thermometer with microthermocouples. Disappearance or significant reduction of nodes in the most goiter cases, and regress of tumor in the cancer cases were marked during observation period (0.5 - 2.5 years).

  19. Economic Evaluation of Recombinant Human Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Stimulation vs. Thyroid Hormone Withdrawal Prior to Radioiodine Ablation for Thyroid Cancer: The Korean Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Seo Young; Jang, Hye Won; Cho, Yoon Young; Kim, Sun Wook

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rhTSH) stimulation is an acceptable alternative to thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW) when radioiodine remnant ablation is planned for thyroid cancer treatment, based on superior short-term quality of life with non-inferior remnant ablation efficacy. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of radioiodine remnant ablation using rhTSH, compared with the traditional preparation method which renders patients hypothyroid by THW, in Korean perspective. Methods This economic evaluation considered the costs and benefits to the Korean public healthcare system. Clinical experts were surveyed regarding the current practice of radioiodine ablation in Korea and their responses helped inform assumptions used in a cost effectiveness model. Markov modelling with 17 weekly cycles was used to assess the incremental costs per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) associated with rhTSH. Clinical inputs were based on a multi-center, randomized controlled trial comparing remnant ablation success after rhTSH preparation with THW. The additional costs associated with rhTSH were considered relative to the clinical benefits and cost offsets. Results The additional benefits of rhTSH (0.036 QALY) are achieved with an additional cost of Korean won ₩961,105, equating to cost per QALY of ₩26,697,361. Sensitivity analyses had only a modest impact upon cost-effectiveness, with one-way sensitivity results of approximately ₩33,000,000/QALY. Conclusion The use of rhTSH is a cost-effective alternative to endogenous hypothyroid stimulation prior to radioiodine ablation for patients who have undergone thyroidectomy in Korea. PMID:26394733

  20. Parity and thyroid cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingjing; Zhu, Xiao; Tu, Chao; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Qian, Ke-Qing; Jiang, Cheng; Feng, Tong-Bao; Li, Changwei; Liu, Guang Jian; Wu, Lang

    2016-04-01

    Although observational studies have assessed the relationship between parity and thyroid cancer risk, the findings are inconsistent. To quantitatively assess the association, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis. PubMed and Embase were searched up to January 2015. Prospective or case-control studies that evaluated the association between parity and thyroid cancer risk were included. We used the fixed-effects model to pool risk estimates. After literature search, 10 prospective studies, 12 case-control studies and 1 pooled analysis of 14 case-control studies including 8860 patients were identified. The studies had fair methodological quality. Pooled analysis suggested that there was a significant association between parity and risk of thyroid cancer (RR for parous versus nulliparous: 1.09, 95% CI 1.03-1.15; I2=33.4%). The positive association persisted in almost all strata of subgroup analyses based on study design, location, study quality, type of controls, and confounder adjustment, although in some strata statistical significance was not detected. By evaluating the number of parity, we identified that both parity number of 2 versus nulliparous and parity number of 3 versus nulliparous demonstrated significant positive associations (RR=1.11, 95% CI 1.01-1.22; I2=31.1% and RR=1.16, 95% CI 1.01-1.33; I2=19.6% respectively). The dose-response analysis suggested neither a non-linear nor linear relationship between the number of parity and thyroid cancer risk. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests a potential association between parity and risk of thyroid cancer in females. However, the lack of detection of a dose-response relationship suggests that further studies are needed to better understand the relationship.

  1. The thyroid hormone receptor gene (c-erbA alpha) is expressed in advance of thyroid gland maturation during the early embryonic development of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Banker, D E; Bigler, J; Eisenman, R N

    1991-01-01

    The c-erbA proto-oncogene encodes the thyroid hormone receptor, a ligand-dependent transcription factor which plays an important role in vertebrate growth and development. To define the role of the thyroid hormone receptor in developmental processes, we have begun studying c-erbA gene expression during the ontogeny of Xenopus laevis, an organism in which thyroid hormone has well-documented effects on morphogenesis. Using polymerase chain reactions (PCR) as a sensitive assay of specific gene expression, we found that polyadenylated erbA alpha RNA is present in Xenopus cells at early developmental stages, including the fertilized egg, blastula, gastrula, and neurula. By performing erbA alpha-specific PCR on reverse-transcribed RNAs from high-density sucrose gradient fractions prepared from early-stage embryos, we have demonstrated that these erbA transcripts are recruited to polysomes. Therefore, erbA is expressed in Xenopus development prior to the appearance of the thyroid gland anlage in tailbud-stage embryos. This implies that erbA alpha/thyroid hormone receptors may play ligand-independent roles during the early development of X. laevis. Quantitative PCR revealed a greater than 25-fold range in the steady-state levels of polyadenylated erbA alpha RNA across early stages of development, as expressed relative to equimolar amounts of total embryonic RNA. Substantial increases in the levels of erbA alpha RNA were noted at stages well after the onset of zygotic transcription at the mid-blastula transition, with accumulation of erbA alpha transcripts reaching a relative maximum in advance of metamorphosis. We also show that erbA alpha RNAs are expressed unequally across Xenopus neural tube embryos. This differential expression continues through later stages of development, including metamorphosis. This finding suggests that erbA alpha/thyroid hormone receptors may play roles in tissue-specific processes across all of Xenopus development. Images PMID:1656222

  2. Thyroid Mass: Metastasis from Nasopharyngeal Cancer - An Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Shirley C; D'cruz, Anil K; Joshi, Amit; Kumar, Rajiv; Kane, Shubhada V; Laskar, Sarbani Ghosh

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid gland is an uncommon site of metastasis, and metastasis to the gland secondary to nasopharyngeal carcinoma is seldom seen. We were only able to identify eight reported cases in the literature. A 61-year-old man, diagnosed case of nasopharyngeal cancer–second primary ( first primary-oropharynx), was found to have a thyroid nodule on routine follow-up positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan. There was no evidence of metastases at any other sites. The thyroid nodule was confirmed as metastatic carcinoma by fine needle aspiration cytology. He was treated with multimodal treatment comprising of surgery followed by reirradiation with concurrent chemotherapy. Subsequently, at the first follow-up (2 months after completion of all treatment), the patient remained asymptomatic, but the response assessment with PET-CT scan was suggestive of lung metastases with no evidence of locoregional disease. Although thyroid parenchymal metastasis is an uncommon occurrence and signifies a poor prognosis, in appropriately selected patients, aggressive therapy with reirradiation and chemotherapy may improve local control and quality of life. PMID:28216872

  3. Progress in oncolytic virotherapy for the treatment of thyroid malignant neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Guan, Mingxu; Romano, Gaetano; Coroniti, Roberta; Henderson, Earl E

    2014-11-01

    Thyroid malignant neoplasm develops from follicular or parafollicular thyroid cells. A higher proportion of anaplastic thyroid cancer has an adverse prognosis. New drugs are being used in clinical treatment. However, for advanced thyroid malignant neoplasm such as anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, the major impediment to successful control of the disease is the absence of effective therapies. Oncolytic virotherapy has significantly progressed as therapeutics in recent years. The advance is that oncolytic viruses can be designed with biological specificity to infect, replicate and lyse tumor cells. Significant advances in virotherapy have being achieved to improve the accessibility, safety and efficacy of the treatment. Therefore, it is necessary to summarize and bring together the main areas covered by these investigations for the virotherapy of thyroid malignant neoplasm. We provide an overview of the progress in virotherapy research and clinical trials, which employ virotherapy for thyroid malignant neoplasm as well as the future prospect for virotherapy of thyroid malignant neoplasms.

  4. Spurious thyroid cancer metastasis: saliva contamination artifact in high dose iodine-131 metastases survey

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.M.; Tarver, R.D.; Schauwecker, D.S.; Burt, R.

    1986-05-01

    The use of high dose /sup 131/I for workup of thyroid cancer patients increases the chance of contamination artifact which may mimic metastases. Two elderly male patients with follicular carcinoma of the thyroid had salivary contamination artifacts on metastatic survey scans. These patients received a 1 and 10 mCi dose of /sup 131/I, respectively. The artifacts were recognized only retrospectively when follow-up scans were obtained and compared. The characteristics of contamination artifacts and several methods to confirm these are discussed.

  5. Severe hyponatremia: a comorbidity with I131 therapy in a patient with papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaewput, Chalermrat; Pusuwan, Pawana

    2014-08-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte disorder in hospitalized patients, especially in elderly patients, in which morbidity varies widely in severity. A 64-year-old Thai woman with papillary thyroid cancer who developed hypothyroid state after thyroid hormone withdrawal for preparation of 1-131 treatment, had severe hyponatremia within the day of 1-131 administration. It is possible that the combination of old age, hypothyroidism, severe nausea and vomiting, and inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) may all have precipitated the severe hyponatremia in the presented case.

  6. The effect of raw vegetable and fruit intake on thyroid cancer risk among women: a case-control study in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Su Kyoung; Kim, Kirang; Tae, Kyung; Kong, Gu; Kim, Mi Kyung

    2013-01-14

    Thyroid cancer is the most common cancer among Korean women. However, there are few data on dietary factors related to thyroid cancer risk. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the association between raw vegetables and fruits intake and thyroid cancer in a case-control study. We included 111 histologically confirmed malignant thyroid cancer cases and 115 benign cases. Controls who did not have nodules in thyroid ultrasonography were matched to cases by age (± 2 years). Food and nutrient intakes were estimated using a quantitative FFQ with 121 items. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to obtain OR and corresponding 95 % CI. The intake of total vegetables was not associated with malignant thyroid cancer, but inversely associated with benign cases. High raw vegetable intake was inversely associated with thyroid cancer risk both in malignant and benign cases (P for trend = 0·01 in both malignant and benign cases). Among fruits, persimmon intake had an inverse association with thyroid cancer risk in both malignant and benign cases (P for trend = 0·06 in malignant cases; P for trend = 0·01 in benign cases) and tangerine intake had an inverse association in malignant cases (P for trend = 0·03). The frequency of consumption of raw vegetables and persimmon also had a consistent inverse association in both malignant and benign cases. These results suggest that high consumption of raw vegetables, persimmons and tangerines may decrease thyroid cancer risk and help prevent early-stage thyroid cancer.

  7. Targeting mTOR in RET mutant medullary and differentiated thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gild, Matti L; Landa, Iñigo; Ryder, Mabel; Ghossein, Ronald A; Knauf, Jeffrey A; Fagin, James A

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of RET, a tyrosine kinase receptor encoded by a gene that is frequently mutated in medullary thyroid cancer, have emerged as promising novel therapies for the disease. Rapalogs and other mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are effective agents in patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, which share lineage properties with medullary thyroid carcinomas. The objective of this study was to investigate the contribution of mTOR activity to RET-induced signaling and cell growth and to establish whether growth suppression is enhanced by co-targeting RET and mTOR kinase activities. Treatment of the RET mutant cell lines TT, TPC-1, and MZ-CRC-1 with AST487, a RET kinase inhibitor, suppressed growth and showed profound and sustained inhibition of mTOR signaling, which was recapitulated by siRNA-mediated RET knockdown. Inhibition of mTOR with INK128, a dual mTORC1 and mTORC2 kinase inhibitor, also resulted in marked growth suppression to levels similar to those seen with RET blockade. Moreover, combined treatment with AST487 and INK128 at low concentrations suppressed growth and induced apoptosis. These data establish mTOR as a key mediator of RET-mediated cell growth in thyroid cancer cells and provide a rationale for combinatorial treatments in thyroid cancers with oncogenic RET mutations. PMID:23828865

  8. Thyroid hormones in conditions of chronic malnutrition. A study with special reference to cancer cachexia.

    PubMed Central

    Persson, H; Bennegård, K; Lundberg, P A; Svaninger, G; Lundholm, K

    1985-01-01

    Circulating levels of thyroid hormones (T4, free T4, T3) and reverse tri-iodo thyronine (rT3) and thyroid-hormone binding globulin were related to the nutritional state of patients with cancer cachexia, patients with malnutrition due to other reasons and to well-nourished patients with acute illness. Hospitalized weight-stable and well-nourished patients served as controls. Malnourished patients with or without cancer and acutely ill patients had a low T3 syndrome involving both peripheral metabolism of thyroid hormones and the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid gland axis. T3 levels were correlated to altered protein metabolism and protein nutritional state. There were pronounced elevations of circulating rT3 concentrations in patients with serum albumin concentration less than 35 g/l irrespective of diagnosis. The results indicate that the low T3 syndrome in our patients is secondary to insufficient caloric intake. It seems to be maintained by the abnormal nutritional state and is related closely to protein metabolism. The authors found no differences between the low T3 syndrome in cancer patients suffering from cachexia compared with that of patients with malnutrition caused by other factors. PMID:3917657

  9. Overview and Management of Dermatologic Events Associated with Targeted Therapies for Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ciccolini, Kathryn; Kloos, Richard T.; Agulnik, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background: Treatment options for patients with advanced or metastatic medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) have, in recent years, expanded with the approval of two tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs): vandetanib and cabozantinib. Other agents, including TKIs, are under clinical investigation for MTC. Although patients treated with TKIs are at risk of developing dermatologic adverse events (AE), these untoward events may be mitigated through AE-driven algorithms. Summary: AE-driven algorithms combine effective nonpharmaceutical and pharmaceutical treatment modalities implemented by a multidisciplinary effort that incorporates nursing interventions, patient education, and referrals to pain-management specialists, podiatrists, and dermatologists, as appropriate. Effective AE prevention and management reduce the need for dose interruptions and modifications, allowing patients the opportunity to derive the maximal benefit from TKI therapy, while maintaining quality of life. Conclusions: Optimal use of targeted therapies in the treatment of MTC depends on careful patient selection, interdisciplinary communication, and patient education and encouragement to enhance compliance and safety, optimize consistent dosing, and maximize the use of effective therapies. PMID:24902006

  10. New Insights into Thyroid Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells exhibit an extraordinary ability for self-renewal. They also give rise to many specialized cells. The potential of stem cells in regenerative medicine, developmental biology, and drug discovery has been well documented. Although advances in stem cell science have raised broad ethical concerns, it is clear that stem cell technology has revolutionized our thinking in modern biology and medicine and provided the basis for understanding many of the mechanisms controlling basic biological processes and disease mechanisms. This review details the nascent field of thyroid stem cell research, exploring the current status of thyroid stem cell differentiation from the perspectives of both developmental biology and cell replacement therapy. It highlights successes to date in the generation of thyroid follicular cells from embryonic stem cells in the laboratory and the identification and characterization of adult stem cells from human thyroid glands and thyroid cancers. Finally, it outlines future challenges with a focus on potential stem cell therapy for thyroid patients. PMID:17727339

  11. Analysis of the uncertainties associated with the age-dependent thyroid doses and risk of thyroid cancer due to exposure to {sup 131}I

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, F.O.; Apostoaei, A.I.; Nair, S.K.

    1996-06-01

    Effects on the thyroid gland due to exposure to {sup 131}I are currently of interest for ongoing retrospective studies of historical releases in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Hanford, Washington. Most of the work to date has been limited to dose estimation. This work focuses on estimating both dose and risk of thyroid cancer to an exposed individual. The age-dependent thyroid dose is calculated using a standard metabolic model for iodine. Updated information on thyroid mass from measurements using modem ultrasound techniques was used. The age-dependent risk is calculated using a linear excess relative risk model. An analysis of uncertainties in dose and risk estimates was performed for an individual in a population characterized by the mass of thyroid, by the iodine metabolic parameters, by the background incidence of thyroid cancer and by the excess relative risk per Gy of absorbed dose. The uncertainty analysis was performed using Monte-Carlo simulation, by considering the age-dependent parameters as random functions. The correlation between the metabolic age-dependent parameters was considered explicitly. Special attention is given to a modifying factor that accounts for the effectiveness of {sup 131}I in inducing thyroid cancer as compared to gamma irradiation, for which most of the excess risk factors are derived. This factor is based on review of recent literature and on informal interviews with outside experts, and thus, the expressed uncertainty is subjective in nature. The paper summarizes the age-dependent dose conversion factors (Sv Bq{sup -1}) and slope factors (risk Bq{sup -1}) as well as the uncertainty associated with them. An analysis that identifies the parameters of dominant importance by their contributions to the overall uncertainty is also included.

  12. Role of MTHFR C677T and MTR A2756G polymorphisms in thyroid and breast cancer development.

    PubMed

    Zara-Lopes, T; Gimenez-Martins, A P A; Nascimento-Filho, C H V; Castanhole-Nunes, M M U; Galbiatti-Dias, A L S; Padovani-Júnior, J A; Maniglia, J V; Francisco, J L E; Pavarino, E C; Goloni-Bertollo, E M

    2016-05-09

    Folate metabolism is essential for DNA synthesis and repair. Alterations in genes that participate in folate metabolism can be associated with several types of malignant neoplasms, including thyroid and breast cancer. In the present case-control study, we examined the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T, rs1801133) and methionine synthase (MTR A2756G, rs1805087) polymorphisms and risk for thyroid and breast cancer. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length technique was used to determine the specific genotypes in the genes of interest. Statistical analysis was performed by multiple logistic regression test. We found an association between MTHFR C677T polymorphism and risks to both thyroid (OR = 2.50; 95%CI = 1.15-5.46; P = 0.02) and breast cancer (OR = 2.53; 95%CI = 1.08-5.93; P = 0.03). Tobacco consumption and high body mass index were also associated with thyroid cancer. In addition, increased age (≥50 years) and alcohol consumption were found to be associated with breast cancer. Our results indicated that MTHFR C677T is significantly associated with thyroid and breast cancer risks. Thus, these factors may be used as potential prognostic markers for thyroid and breast cancers.

  13. Radiation signatures in childhood thyroid cancers after the Chernobyl accident: possible roles of radiation in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiji; Mitsutake, Norisato; Saenko, Vladimir; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2015-02-01

    After the Tokyo Electric Power Company Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, cancer risk from low-dose radiation exposure has been deeply concerning. The linear no-threshold model is applied for the purpose of radiation protection, but it is a model based on the concept that ionizing radiation induces stochastic oncogenic alterations in the target cells. As the elucidation of the mechanism of radiation-induced carcinogenesis is indispensable to justify the concept, studies aimed at the determination of molecular changes associated with thyroid cancers among children who suffered effects from the Chernobyl nuclear accident will be overviewed. We intend to discuss whether any radiation signatures are associated with radiation-induced childhood thyroid cancers.

  14. Assessing risk of thyroid cancer using resonance-frequency based electrical impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bin; Tublin, Mitchell E.; Lederman, Dror; Klym, Amy H.; Brown, Erica D.; Gur, David

    2011-03-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has risen faster than many malignancies and has nearly doubled in the USA over the past 30 years. Palpable nodules and subclinical nodules detected by imaging are found in a large percentage of the USA population. Most of these (.>95%) are fortunately benign. This vast reservoir of nodules makes the detection and diagnosis of thyroid cancer a diagnostic dilemma. Ultrasound guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy (FNAB) is excellent for triaging patients but up to 25% of FNABs are inconclusive. As a result, definitive diagnosis is often only possible with a diagnostic lobectomy; many thousands of these are performed in the USA annually for ultimately benign disease. It would be extremely beneficial if we could develop a non-invasive procedure that could assist the diagnostician in reliably predicting the likelihood of malignancy of otherwise indeterminate thyroid nodules, thereby reducing the number of these "exploratory/diagnostic" lobectomies performed under general anesthesia. Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was considered as a possible approach to address this problem. However, the diagnostic accuracy of EIS is too low for routine clinical use to date. In our group, we developed a substantially modified technology termed Resonance-frequency Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (REIS), which yields usable information for classifying risk of having breast abnormalities. We preliminarily applied REIS to measure signals on participants having thyroid nodules aiming to assess whether we can assist in improving diagnosis of indeterminate thyroid nodules. In this study we present a new multi-probe based REIS device specifically designed for the assessment of indeterminate thyroid nodules. Our preliminary assessment presented here demonstrates the feasibility of using this proposed REIS device in a busy tertiary care center.

  15. Fine needle aspiration of the thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    Abnormal results may mean: Thyroid disease such as goiter or thyroiditis Noncancerous tumors Thyroid cancer ... Alexander EA, Hay ID. Nontoxic diffuse and nodular goiter and thyroid neoplasia. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen ...

  16. Genetic Alterations in Medullary Thyroid Cancer: Diagnostic and Prognostic Markers

    PubMed Central

    A, Taccaliti; F, Silvetti; G, Palmonella; M, Boscaro

    2011-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare calcitonin producing neuroendocrine tumour that originates from the parafollicular C-cells of the thyroid gland. The RET proto-oncogene encodes the RET receptor tyrosine kinase, with consequently essential roles in cell survival, differentiation and proliferation. Somatic or germline mutations of the RET gene play an important role in this neoplasm in development of sporadic and familial forms, respectively. Genetic diagnosis has an important role in differentiating sporadic from familiar MTC. Furthermore, depending on the location of the mutation, patients can be classified into risk classes. Therefore, genetic screening of the RET gene plays a critical role not only in diagnosis but also in assessing the prognosis and course of MTC. PMID:22654561

  17. Novel agents for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akinleye, Akintunde; Iragavarapu, Chaitanya; Furqan, Muhammad; Cang, Shundong; Liu, Delong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is relatively insensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Therefore, novel agents targeting dysregulated pathways (MAPK/ERK, EGFR, TGF-β, HEDGEHOG, NOTCH, IGF, PARP, PI3K/AKT, RAS, and Src) are being explored in clinical trials as monotherapy or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. This review summarizes the most recent advances with the targeted therapies in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26369833

  18. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Dagmara; Król, Wojciech; Szliszka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease. PMID:26593898

  19. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 is a sensitive and diagnostically useful immunohistochemical marker of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and of PTC-like nuclear alterations in Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, KE; GE, SHU-JIAN; LIN, XIAO-YAN; LV, BEI-BEI; CAO, ZHI-XIN; LI, JIA-MEI; XU, JIA-WEN; WANG, QIANG-XIU

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) is important in the progression of inflammatory responses. Recently, increased levels of ICAM-1 have been reported in a number of types of malignancy. The present study aimed to investigate ICAM-1 expression in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and in Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) with PTC-like nuclear alterations, and to assess the predictive value of ICAM-1 in thyroid lesions. ICAM-1 expression was retrospectively investigated in 132 consecutive cases of PTC, 72 cases of HT, 10 of follicular cancer, 15 of follicular adenoma, 16 of nodular goiter and 8 samples of normal thyroid tissue using immunohistochemical analyses, and in 42 PTC patients using western blotting. ICAM-1 expression was not detected in normal follicular cells, follicular lesions (adenoma and cancer) and benign nodular hyperplasia, but was frequently overexpressed in PTC cells. ICAM-1 overexpression was associated with extra-thyroidal invasion and lymph node metastasis; no association was found with age, gender, tumor size, multifocality, pathological stage, recurrence or distant metastasis. ICAM-1 expression in HT patients with PTC-like nuclear alterations was significantly higher than that in HT cases with non-PTC-like features. Compared with antibodies against cytokeratin 19, galectin-3 and Hector Battifora mesothelial-1, ICAM-1 was the most sensitive marker for the detection of PTC-like features in HT. These findings demonstrate that ICAM-1 expression is upregulated in PTC and in HT with PTC-like nuclear alterations. This feature may be an important factor in the progression of cancer of the thyroid gland. PMID:26998068

  20. Incidence of thyroid cancer in the selected areas of iodine deficiency in Poland.

    PubMed

    Szybiński, Z; Huszno, B; Zemla, B; Bandurska-Stankiewicz, E; Przybylik-Mazurek, E; Nowak, W; Cichon, S; Buziak-Bereza, M; Trofimiuk, M; Szybiński, P

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence rate (IR), trend and histotype of the differentiated thyroid cancer in the selected areas with varying iodine deficiency. The study was carried out in three areas: Krakow, (Carpathian endemic goiter area with 1.99 million mixed rural and urban population), Gliwice (Upper Silesia--moderate iodine deficiency area mostly industrial with 4.89 million inhabitants) and Olsztyn (slight iodine deficiency area, mainly rural with 0.77 million inhabitants). Between 1990 and 2001, in the study area 2691 newly diagnosed cases of malignant neoplasms of the thyroid gland were registered. In over 80% of patients it was differentiated thyroid cancer: mainly in women over 40 years, with F/M ratio 5.8. The highest percentage of papillary cancer 72.9% was observed in Olsztyn and lowest--50.0%--in Krakow and Nowy Sacz districts. In this period of time incidence rate of differentiated thyroid cancer in women increased in Kraków, Gliwice, and Olsztyn from 1.51 to 9.34 in 1998 1.27 to 5.74 in 1999 and from 2.52 to 11.35 in 2001 respectively. In the youngest (0-20 years) age group no significant increase of IR was observed. Between 1998 and 2001 the dynamics of increase of the thyroid cancer incidence markedly diminished. In conclusion it was hypothesised that an increase in IR of differentiated thyroid cancer in the study area was caused mainly by the suspension of iodine prophylaxis in 1980 and was diminished by the introduction of an obligatory model of iodine prophylaxis in 1996/1997. It was modified in terms of histotype and dynamics of increase by exposure to ionizing radiation. A very specific group at risk on the population level were women aged 20-40 years in the reproductive age exposed to iodine deficiency after suspension of iodine prophylaxis in 1980 and to radiation after the Chernobyl accident in 1986.

  1. Effect of Thyrotropin Suppression Therapy on Bone in Thyroid Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Sarah T.; Haymart, Megan R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The thyroid cancer incidence is rising. Despite current guidelines, controversy exists regarding the degree and duration of thyrotropin suppression therapy. Also, its potential skeletal effects remain a concern to physicians caring for thyroid cancer patients. We conducted a review of published data to evaluate existing studies focusing on the skeletal effects of thyrotropin suppression therapy in thyroid cancer patients. Materials and Methods. A systematic search of the PubMed, Ovid/Medline, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases was conducted. The retained studies were evaluated for methodological quality, and the study populations were categorized into premenopausal women, postmenopausal women, and men. Results. Twenty-five pertinent studies were included. Seven studies were longitudinal and 18 were cross-sectional. Of the 25 included studies, 13 were assigned an excellent methodological quality score. Three of 5 longitudinal studies and 3 of 13 cross-sectional studies reported decreased bone mineral density (BMD) in premenopausal women; 2 of 4 longitudinal studies and 5 of 13 cross-sectional studies reported decreased BMD in postmenopausal women. The remaining studies showed no effect on BMD. The only longitudinal study of men showed bone mass loss; however, cross-sectional studies of men did not demonstrate a similar effect. Conclusion. Studies to date have yielded conflicting results on the skeletal effects of thyrotropin suppression therapy and a knowledge gap remains, especially for older adults and men. Existing data should be cautiously interpreted because of the variable quality and heterogeneity. Identifying groups at risk of adverse effects from thyrotropin suppression therapy will be instrumental to providing focused and tailored thyroid cancer treatment. Implications for Practice: The standard treatment for thyroid cancer includes total thyroidectomy with or without radioactive iodine ablation, often followed by

  2. Role of dietary iodine and cruciferous vegetables in thyroid cancer: a countrywide case-control study in New Caledonia

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thérèse; Baron-Dubourdieu, Dominique; Rougier, Yannick; Guénel, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Exceptionally high incidence rates of thyroid cancer have been reported in New Caledonia, particularly in Melanesian women. To clarify the reasons of this elevated incidence, we conducted a countrywide population-based case-control study in the multiethnic population of Caledonian women. The study included 293 cases of thyroid cancer and 354 population controls. Based on a food frequency questionnaire, we investigated the role in thyroid cancer of food items rich in iodine – such as seafood – and of vegetables containing goitrogens – such as cruciferous vegetables. A measure of total daily iodine intake based on a food composition table was also used. Our findings provided little support for an association between thyroid cancer and consumption of fish and seafood. We found that high consumption of cruciferous vegetables was associated with thyroid cancer among women with low iodine intake (OR=1.86; 95% CI: 1.01–3.43 for iodine intake < 96 μg/day). The high consumption of cruciferous vegetables among Melanesian women, a group with mild iodine deficiency, may contribute to explain the exceptionally high incidence of thyroid cancer in this group. PMID:20361352

  3. Identification of the transforming STRN-ALK fusion as a potential therapeutic target in the aggressive forms of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Lindsey M.; Barila, Guillermo; Liu, Pengyuan; Evdokimova, Viktoria N.; Trivedi, Sumita; Panebianco, Federica; Gandhi, Manoj; Carty, Sally E.; Hodak, Steven P.; Luo, Jianhua; Dacic, Sanja; Yu, Yan P.; Nikiforova, Marina N.; Ferris, Robert L.; Altschuler, Daniel L.; Nikiforov, Yuri E.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine malignancy that encompasses well-differentiated as well as dedifferentiated cancer types. The latter tumors have high mortality and lack effective therapies. Using a paired-end RNA-sequencing approach, we report the discovery of rearrangements involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene in thyroid cancer. The most common of these involves a fusion between ALK and the striatin (STRN) gene, which is the result of a complex rearrangement involving the short arm of chromosome 2. STRN-ALK leads to constitutive activation of ALK kinase via dimerization mediated by the coiled-coil domain of STRN and to a kinase-dependent, thyroid-stimulating hormone–independent proliferation of thyroid cells. Moreover, expression of STRN-ALK transforms cells in vitro and induces tumor formation in nude mice. The kinase activity of STRN-ALK and the ALK-induced cell growth can be blocked by the ALK inhibitors crizotinib and TAE684. In addition to well-differentiated papillary cancer, STRN-ALK was found with a higher prevalence in poorly differentiated and anaplastic thyroid cancers, and it did not overlap with other known driver mutations in these tumors. Our data demonstrate that STRN-ALK fusion occurs in a subset of patients with highly aggressive types of thyroid cancer and provide initial evidence suggesting that it may re